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Sample records for austenitic alloys vliyanie

  1. Tough and corrosion resistant austenitic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T.E.

    1977-01-01

    The invention concerns austenitic alloys of high corrosion resistance, which can be deformed hot and tempered, so that they can be forged, rolled, and drawn into tubes and other shapes. The alloys have a basis of nickel, chromium and iron. The silicon content is between 2 and 4% by weight, and the molybdenum content is between 0 and 2% by weight. The alloys can be hardened by ageing and contain up to 0.1% by weight of boron. The other alloying materials are 1 to 3.5% by weight of manganese, 4 to 7.5% by weight of cobalt, 2.5 to 8% by weight of copper and 0.05 to 0.25% by weight of carbon. (IHOE) [de

  2. Resistance Element Welding of Magnesium Alloy/austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manladan, S. M.; Yusof, F.; Ramesh, S.; Zhang, Y.; Luo, Z.; Ling, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Multi-material design is increasingly applied in the automotive and aerospace industries to reduce weight, improve crash-worthiness, and reduce environmental pollution. In the present study, a novel variant of resistance spot welding technique, known as resistance element welding was used to join AZ31 Mg alloy to 316 L austenitic stainless steel. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints were evaluated. It was found that the nugget consisted of two zones, including a peripheral fusion zone on the stainless steel side and the main fusion zone. The tensile shear properties of the joints are superior to those obtained by traditional resistance spot welding.

  3. Influence of phosphorus on point defects in an austenitic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulanger, L.

    1988-06-01

    The influence of phosphorus on points defects clusters has been studied in an austenitic alloy (Fe/19% at. Cr/13% at. Ni). Clusters are observed by transmission electron microscopy. After quenching and annealing, five types of clusters produced by vacancies or phosphorus-vacancies complexes are observed whose presence depends on cooling-speed. Vacancy concentration (with 3.6 10 -3 at. P) in clusters is about 10 -5 and apparent vacancy migration is 2 ± 0.1 eV. These observations suggest the formation of metastable small clusters during cooling which dissociate during annealing and migrate to create the observed clusters. With phosphorus, the unfrequent formation of vacancy loops has been observed during electron irradiation. Ions irradiations show that phosphorus does not favour nucleation of interstitial loops but slowers their growth. It reduces swelling by decreasing voids diameter. Phosphorus forms vacancy complexes whose role is to increase the recombination rate and to slow vacancy migration [fr

  4. Precipitation hardening in Fe--Ni base austenitic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, K.M.

    1979-05-01

    The precipitation of metastable Ni/sub 3/X phases in the austenitic Fe--Ni-base alloys has been investigated by using various combinations of hardening elements, including Ti, Ta, Al, and Nb. The theoretical background on the formation of transition precipitates has been summarized based on: atomic size, compressibility, and electron/atom ratio. A model is proposed from an analysis of static concentration waves ordering the fcc lattice. Ordered structure of metastable precipitates will change from the triangularly ordered ..gamma..', to the rectangularly ordered ..gamma..'', as the atomic ratio (Ti + Al)/(Ta + Nb) decreases. The concurrent precipitation of ..gamma..' and ..gamma..'' occurs at 750/sup 0/C when the ratio is between 1.5 and 1.9. Aging behavior was studied over the temperature range of 500/sup 0/C to 900/sup 0/C. Typical hardness curves show a substantial hardening effect due to precipitation. A combination of strength and fracture toughness can be developed by employing double aging techniques. The growth of these coherent intermediate precipitates follows the power law with the aging time t : t/sup 1/3/ for the spherical ..gamma..' particles; and t/sup 1/2/ for the disc-shaped ..gamma..''. The equilibrium ..beta.. phase is observed to be able to nucleate on the surface of imbedded carbides. The addition of 5 wt % Cr to the age-hardened alloys provides a non-magnetic austenite which is stable against the formation of mechanically induced martensite.Cr addition retards aging kinetics of the precipitation reactions, and suppresses intergranular embrittlement caused by the high temperature solution anneal. The aging kinetics are also found to be influenced by solution annealing treatments.

  5. Internal Friction of Austenitic Fe-Mn-C-Al Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Kook; Jeong, Sohee; Kang, Jee-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Min

    2017-12-01

    The internal friction (IF) spectra of Fe-Mn-C-Al alloys with a face-centered-cubic (fcc) austenitic phase were measured at a wide range of temperature and frequency ( f) to understand the mechanisms of anelastic relaxations occurring particularly in Fe-Mn-C twinning-induced plasticity steels. Four IF peaks were observed at 346 K (73 °C) (P1), 389 K (116 °C) (P2), 511 K (238 °C) (P3), and 634 K (361 °C) (P4) when f was 0.1 Hz. However, when f increased to 100 Hz, whereas P1, P2, and P4 disappeared, only P3 remained without the change in peak height, but with the increased peak temperature. P3 matches well with the IF peak of Fe-high Mn-C alloys reported in the literature. The effects of chemical composition and vacancy (v) on the four IF peaks were also investigated using various alloys with different concentrations of C, Mn, Al, and vacancy. As a result, the defect pair responsible for each IF peak was found as follows: a v-v pair for P1, a C-v pair for P2, a C-C pair for P3, and a C-C-v complex (major effect) + a Mn-C pair (minor effect) for P4. These results showed that the IF peaks of Fe-Mn-C-Al alloys reported previously were caused by the reorientation of C in C-C pairs, not by the reorientation of C in Mn-C pairs.

  6. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Atzmon, M.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to determine the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC) in austenitic stainless steel. High-energy protons have been used to produce grain boundary segregation and microstructural damage in samples of controlled impurity content. The densities of network dislocations and dislocation loops were determined by transmission electron microscopy and found to resemble those for neutron irradiation under LWR conditions. Grain boundary compositions were determined by in situ fracture and Auger spectroscopy, as well as by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Cr depletion and Ni segregation were observed in all irradiated samples, with the degree of segregation depending on the type and amount of impurities present. P, and to a lesser extent P, impurities were observed to segregate to the grain boundaries. Irradiation was found to increase the susceptibility of ultra-high-purity (UHP), and to a much lesser extent of UHP+P and UHP+S, alloys to intergranular SCC in 288 degree C water at 2 ppm O 2 and 0.5 μS/cm. No intergranular fracture was observed in arcon atmosphere, indicating the important role of corrosion in the embrittlement of irradiated samples. The absence of intergranular fracture in 288 degree C argon and room temperature tests also suggest that the embrittlement is not caused by hydrogen introduced by irradiation. Contrary to common belief, the presence of P impurities led to a significant improvement in IASCC over the ultrahigh purity alloy

  7. Effect of Heat Treatment on Conductivity of Metastable Alloys with Ferromagnetic and Paramagnetic Austenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uvarov, A. N.; Sandovskii, V. A.; Vil'danova, N. F.; Anufrieva, E. I.

    2013-11-01

    Invars N30K10T3 and N28K10T3 and nonmagnetic austenitic alloy N25Kh2T3 are studied after different kinds of treatment, i.e., quenching, mechanical phase hardening, and deformation followed by aging. The structure and the conductivity of the alloys are determined. An optimum treatment for providing high electric conductivity is suggested.

  8. Diffusion Couple Alloying of Refractory Metals in Austenitic and Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    temperature (DBTT) and lower upper shelf energy (USE) obtained via a Charpy impact test (austenitic steels , however, do not experience DBTT) as seen in...ALLOYING OF REFRACTORY METALS IN AUSTENITIC AND FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEELS by Alexander L. McGinnis March 2012 Thesis Advisor: Luke...Ferritic/Martensitic Steels 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Alexander L. McGinnis 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval

  9. Effects of alloying elements on the kinetics of austenitization from pearlite in Fe-C-M alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yuan; Enomoto, Masato; Yang, Zhigang; Li, Zhaodong; Zhang, Chi

    2013-03-01

    The effects of alloying elements on the kinetics of austenitization from pearlite structure were studied by computer simulation in Fe-C-M ternary alloys, where M is Mn, Cr, Si or Ni, assuming local equilibrium conditions at all transformation interfaces. A thin austenite film was assumed to nucleate at ferrite/cementite interfaces and grow in one dimension. The existence of a partition to no-partition transition temperature (PNTT) was rationalized. Above the PNTT, the growth rate of austenite is governed by the difference in carbon activity between austenite/cementite and ferrite/austenite interfaces; a substitutional element influences the reaction rate by affecting carbon activity. Below the PNTT, redistribution of M is necessary. The PNTT increases with the concentration of all alloy elements except Ni, which has a large segregation tendency in austenite from both ferrite and cementite, as well as repulsive interaction with carbon. The amount of overheating at PNTT from Ae1 increases in the order Si (∼Ni), Mn and Cr, essentially in agreement with a recently reported experiment.

  10. Natural composite in austenitic alloys with a structure of the complete discontinuous decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemtsova, N.D.; Anufrieva, E.I.; Uvarov, A.I.; Vasechkina, T.P.; Sandovskij, V.A.

    2002-01-01

    The papers are reviewed on heat treatment conditions resulting in a 100% degree of discontinuous precipitation in austenite on ageing metastable Fe-Ni-Ti alloys (N2KhT2, N26T3, N25T5, N24Kh2T3, N29T3, N29KhT3, N26Kh5T3). Mechanical properties and structure of the alloys are investigated after various heat and thermomechanical treatments. It is revealed that discontinuous precipitation is accomplished by way of migration of low-angle boundaries as the matrix is supersaturated essentially with alloying elements. The alloys with the structure of 100% discontinuous precipitation can be treated as natural composites consisting of alternating plates of intermetallic compound and austenite. Temperature dependences of strength and plastic properties of a composite material and a hardened alloy are compared [ru

  11. Effect of alloying elements on solidification of primary austenite in Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    A. Janus; A. Kurzawa

    2011-01-01

    Within the research, determined were direction and intensity of alloying elements influence on solidification way (directional orvolumetric) of primary austenite dendrites in hypoeutectic austenitic cast iron Ni-Mn-Cu. 50 cast shafts dia. 20 mm were analysed.Chemical composition of the alloy was as follows: 1.7 to 3.3 % C, 1.4 to 3.1 % Si, 2.8 to 9.9 % Ni, 0.4 to 7.7 % Mn, 0 to 4.6 % Cu, 0.14 to0.16 % P and 0.03 to 0.04 % S. The discriminant analysis revealed that carbon influences solidifica...

  12. Recent experimental and theoretical insights on the swelling of austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Once void nucleation subsides, the swelling rate of many austenitic alloys becomes rather insensitive to the variables that determine the duration of the transient regime of swelling. Models are presented which describe the roles of nickel, chromium and silicon in void nucleation. The relative insensitivity of steady-state swelling to temperature and composition is also discussed

  13. Effect of alloying elements on solidification of primary austenite in Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janus

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the research, determined were direction and intensity of alloying elements influence on solidification way (directional orvolumetric of primary austenite dendrites in hypoeutectic austenitic cast iron Ni-Mn-Cu. 50 cast shafts dia. 20 mm were analysed.Chemical composition of the alloy was as follows: 1.7 to 3.3 % C, 1.4 to 3.1 % Si, 2.8 to 9.9 % Ni, 0.4 to 7.7 % Mn, 0 to 4.6 % Cu, 0.14 to0.16 % P and 0.03 to 0.04 % S. The discriminant analysis revealed that carbon influences solidification of primary austenite dendrites most intensively. It clearly increases the tendency to volumetric solidification. Influence of the other elements is much weaker. This means that the solidification way of primary austenite dendrites in hypoeutectic austenitic cast iron Ni-Mn-Cu does not differ from that in an unalloyed cast iron.

  14. Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High Temperature Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbins, James [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Heuser, Brent [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Robertson, Ian [Kyushu Univ. (Japan); Sehitoglu, Huseyin [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Sofronis, Petros [Kyushu Univ. (Japan); Gewirth, Andrew [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    2015-04-22

    This “Blue Sky” project was directed at exploring the opportunities that would be gained by developing Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys based on the Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloy system. A great deal of research effort has been directed toward ferritic and ferritic/martensitic ODS alloys which has resulted in reasonable advances in alloy properties. Similar gains should be possible with austenitic alloy which would also take advantage of other superior properties of that alloy system. The research effort was aimed at the developing an in-depth understanding of the microstructural-level strengthening effects of ODS particles in austentic alloys. This was accomplished on a variety of alloy compositions with the main focus on 304SS and 316SS compositions. A further goal was to develop an understanding other the role of ODS particles on crack propagation and creep performance. Since these later two properties require bulk alloy material which was not available, this work was carried out on promising austentic alloy systems which could later be enhanced with ODS strengthening. The research relied on a large variety of micro-analytical techniques, many of which were available through various scientific user facilities. Access to these facilities throughout the course of this work was instrumental in gathering complimentary data from various analysis techniques to form a well-rounded picture of the processes which control austenitic ODS alloy performance. Micromechanical testing of the austenitic ODS alloys confirmed their highly superior mechanical properties at elevated temperature from the enhanced strengthening effects. The study analyzed the microstructural mechanisms that provide this enhanced high temperature performance. The findings confirm that the smallest size ODS particles provide the most potent strengthening component. Larger particles and other thermally- driven precipitate structures were less effective contributors and, in some cases, limited

  15. Hydrogen solubility in austenite of Fe-Ni-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhirnova, V.V.; Mogutnov, B.M.; Tomilin, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen solubility in Fe-Ni-Cr alloys at 600-1000 deg C is determined. Hydrogen solubility in ternary alloys can not be predicted on the basis of the data on its solubility in binary Fe-Ni, Fe-Cr alloys. Chromium and nickel effect on hydrogen solubility in iron is insignificant in comparison with the effect of these elements on carbon or nitrogen solubility [ru

  16. Evaluation of High Temperature Corrosion Resistance of Finned Tubes Made of Austenitic Steel And Nickel Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turowska A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper was to evaluate the resistance to high temperature corrosion of laser welded joints of finned tubes made of austenitic steel (304,304H and nickel alloys (Inconel 600, Inconel 625. The scope of the paper covered the performance of corrosion resistance tests in the atmosphere of simulated exhaust gases of the following chemical composition: 0.2% HCl, 0.08% SO2, 9.0% O2 and N2 in the temperature of 800°C for 1000 hours. One found out that both tubes made of austenitic steel and those made of nickel alloy displayed good resistance to corrosion and could be applied in the energy industry.

  17. Machining and Phase Transformation Response of Room-Temperature Austenitic NiTi Shape Memory Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaynak, Yusuf

    2014-09-01

    This experimental work reports the results of a study addressing tool wear, surface topography, and x-ray diffraction analysis for the finish cutting process of room-temperature austenitic NiTi alloy. Turning operation of NiTi alloy was conducted under dry, minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) and cryogenic cooling conditions at various cutting speeds. Findings revealed that cryogenic machining substantially reduced tool wear and improved surface topography and quality of the finished parts in comparison with the other two approaches. Phase transformation on the surface of work material was not observed after dry and MQL machining, but B19' martensite phase was found on the surface of cryogenically machined samples.

  18. Radiation induced phosphorus segregation in austenitic and ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brimhall, J.L.; Baer, D.R.; Jones, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation induced surface segregation (RIS) of phosphorus in stainless steel attained a maximum at a dose of 0.8 dpa then decreased continually with dose. This decrease in the surface segregation of phosphorus at high dose levels has been attributed to removal of the phosphorus layer by ion sputtering. Phosphorus is not replenished since essentially all of the phosphorus within the irradiation zone has been segregated to the surface. Sputter removal can explain the previously reported absence of phosphorus segregation in ferritic alloys irradiated at high dosessup(1,2) (>1 dpa) since irradiation of ferritic alloys to low doses has shown measurable RIS. This sputtering phenomenon places an inherent limitation to the heavy ion irradiation technique for the study of surface segregation of impurity elements. The magnitude of the segregation in ferritics is still much less than in stainless steel which can be related to the low damage accumulation in these alloys. (orig.)

  19. The microstructural, mechanical, and fracture properties of austenitic stainless steel alloyed with gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolman, D. G.; Bingert, J. F.; Field, R. D.

    2004-11-01

    The mechanical and fracture properties of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) alloyed with gallium require assessment in order to determine the likelihood of premature storage-container failure following Ga uptake. AISI 304 L SS was cast with 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 wt pct Ga. Increased Ga concentration promoted duplex microstructure formation with the ferritic phase having a nearly identical composition to the austenitic phase. Room-temperature tests indicated that small additions of Ga (less than 3 wt pct) were beneficial to the mechanical behavior of 304 L SS but that 12 wt pct Ga resulted in a 95 pct loss in ductility. Small additions of Ga are beneficial to the cracking resistance of stainless steel. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis indicated that 3 wt pct Ga alloys showed the greatest resistance to crack initiation and propagation as measured by fatigue crack growth rate, fracture toughness, and tearing modulus. The 12 wt pct Ga alloys were least resistant to crack initiation and propagation and these alloys primarily failed by transgranular cleavage. It is hypothesized that Ga metal embrittlement is partially responsible for increased embrittlement.

  20. Development of a high strength, hydrogen-resistant austenitic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, K.M.; Klahn, D.H.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    Research toward high-strength, high toughness nonmagnetic steels for use in the retaining rings of large electrical generators led to the development of a Ta-modified iron-based superalloy (Fe-36 Ni-3 Ti-3 Ta-0.5 Al-1.3 Mo-0.3 V-0.01 B) which combines high strength with good toughness after suitable aging. The alloy did, however, show some degradation in fatigue resistance in gaseous hydrogen. This sensitivity was associated with a deformation-induced martensitic transformation near the fracture surface. The addition of a small amount of chromium to the alloy suppressed the martensite transformation and led to a marked improvement in hydrogen resistance

  1. Carburization of austenitic alloys by gaseous impurities in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, G.Y.; Johnson, W.R.

    1980-03-01

    The carburization behavior of Alloy 800H, Inconel Alloy 617 and Hastelloy Alloy X in helium containing various amounts of H 2 , CO, CH 4 , H 2 O and CO 2 was studied. Corrosion tests were conducted in a temperature range from 649 to 1000 0 C (1200 to 1832 0 F) for exposure time up to 10,000 h. Four different helium environments, identified as A, B, C, and D, were investigated. Concentrations of gaseous impurities were 1500 μatm H 2 , 450 μatm CO, 50 μatm CH 4 and 50 μatm H 2 O for Environment A; 200 μatm H 2 , 100 μatm CO, 20 μatm CH 4 , 50 μatm H 2 O and 5 μatm CO 2 for Environment B; 500 μatm H 2 , 50 μatm CO, 50 μatm CH 4 and 2 O for Environment C; and 500 μatm H 2 , 50 μatm CO, 50 μatm CH 4 and 1.5 μatm H 2 O for Environment D. Environments A and B were characteristic of high-oxygen potential, while C and D were characteristic of low-oxygen potential. The results showed that the carburization kinetics in low-oxygen potential environments (C and D) were significantly higher, approximately an order of magnitude higher at high temperatures, than those in high-oxygen potential environments (A and B) for all three alloys. Thermodynamic analyses indicated no significant differences in the thermodynamic carburization potential between low- and high-oxygen potential environments. It is thus believed that the enhanced carburization kinetics observed in the low-oxygen potential environments were related to kinetic effects. A qualitatively mechanistic model was proposed to explain the enhanced kinetics. The present results further suggest that controlling the oxygen potential of the service environment can be an effective means of reducing carburization of alloys

  2. Effect of austenitizing conditions on the impact properties of an alloyed austempered ductile iron of initially ferritic matrix structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delia, M.; Alaalam, M.; Grech, M. [Univ. of Malta (Malta). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials

    1998-04-01

    The effect of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure and impact properties of an austempered ductile iron (ADI) containing 1.6% Cu and 1.6% Ni as the main alloying elements was investigated. Impact tests were carried out on samples of initially ferritic matrix structure and which had been first austenitized at 850, 900, 950, and 1,000 C for 15 to 360 min and austempered at 360 C for 180 min. Results showed that the austenitizing temperature, T{sub {gamma}}, and time, t{sub {gamma}} have a significant effect on the impact properties of the alloy. This has been attributed to the influence of these variables on the carbon kinetics. Microstructures of samples austenitized at 950 and 1,000 C contain no pro-eutectoid ferrite. The impact properties of the former structures are independent of t{sub {gamma}}, while those solution treated at 1,000 C are generally low and show wide variation over the range of soaking time investigated. For fully ausferritic structures, impact properties fall with an increase in T{sub {gamma}}. This is particularly evident at 1,000 C. As the T{sub {gamma}} increases, the amount of carbon dissolved in the original austenite increases. This slows down the rate of austenite transformation and results in coarser structures with lower mechanical properties. Optimum impact properties are obtained following austenitizing between 900 and 950 C for 120 to 180 min.

  3. Improving of wear resistance of alloys with metastable austenite structure in abrasion wearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, V.S.; Brykov, N.N.; Pugachev, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of grain composition of abrasive masses upon the wear resistance of alloys having a metastable austenitic structure is studied. The investigations have been carried out on Kh12F1 steel, using diffraction and hardness measurements and the metallographic analysis. Experimental data indicate that the specific wear of the stable alloys increases substantially with the size of abrasive particles. As regards the metastable alloys, the increase in the size of the abrasive grains has little effect upon the specific wear, as the increasing abradability of the grains is compensated for by the strengthening of the rubbing surfaces, this resulting from the ability of the metal surface layer to underao structure transformations in the course of wear

  4. Perspective on present and future alloy development efforts on austenitic stainless steels for fusion application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address important questions concerning how to effect further alloy development of austenitic stainless steels for resistance, and to what extent the behavior of other properties under irradiation, such as strength/embrittlement, fatigue/irradiation creep, corrosion (under irradiation), and radiation-induced activation must be influenced. To summarize current understanding, helium has been found to have major effects on swelling and embrittlement, but several metallurgical avenues are available for significant improvement relative to type 316 stainless steel. Studies on fatigue and irradiation creep, particularly including helium effects, are preliminary but have yet to reveal engineering problems requiring additional alloy development remedies. The effects of irradiation on corrosion behavior are unknown, but higher alloy nickel contents make thermal corrosion in lithium worse. 67 refs. (JDB)

  5. Perspective on present and future alloy development efforts on austenitic stainless steels for fusion application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address important questions concerning how to effect further alloy development of austenitic stainless steels for resistance, and to what extent the behavior of other properties under irradiation, such as strength/embrittlement, fatigue/irradiation creep, corrosion (under irradiation), and radiation-induced activation must be influenced. To summarize current understanding, helium has been found to have major effects on swelling and embrittlement, but several metallurgical avenues are available for significant improvement relative to type 316 stainless steel. Studies on fatigue and irradiation creep, particularly including helium effects, are preliminary but have yet to reveal engineering problems requiring additional alloy development remedies. The effects of irradiation on corrosion behavior are unknown, but higher alloy nickel contents make thermal corrosion in lithium worse. 67 refs

  6. Irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking in austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Andresen, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC) in austentic alloys is a complicated phenomenon that poses a difficult problem for designers and operators of nuclear plants. Because IASCC accelerates the deterioration of various reactor components, it is imperative that it be understood and modeled to maintain reactor safety. Unfortunately, the costs and dangers of gathering data on radiation effects are high, and the phenomenon itself is so complex that it is difficult to enumerate all of the causes. This article reviews current knowledge of IASCC and describes the goals of ongoing work

  7. Influence of Hold Time on Creep-Fatigue Behavior of an Advanced Austenitic Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, Mark; Carroll, Laura

    2011-01-01

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high temperature-ultrafine precipitate strengthened), is a candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS provides improved creep resistance through a composition based on 316 stainless steel (SS) with additions of Ti and Nb to form nano-scale MC precipitates in the austenitic matrix. The low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of a HT-UPS alloy has been investigated at 650 C, 1.0% total strain, and an R ratio of -1 with hold times as long as 9000 sec at peak tensile strain. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is compared to that of 316 SS. The cycles to failure are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and the deformed microstructures. Cracking in both alloys is transgranular (initiation and propagation) in the case of continuous cycle fatigue, while the primary cracks also propagate transgranularly during creep-fatigue cycling. Internal grain boundary damage as a result of the tensile hold is present in the form of fine cracks for hold times of 3600 sec and longer and substantially more internal cracks are visible in 316 SS than HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material are different. An equiaxed cellular structure is observed in 316 SS, whereas tangles of dislocations are present at the nanoscale MC precipitates in HT-UPS and no cellular substructure is observed.

  8. Hydrogen-plasticity in the austenitic alloys; Interactions hydrogene-plasticite dans les alliages austenitiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De lafosse, D. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, Lab. PECM-UMR CNRS 5146, 42 - Saint-Etienne (France)

    2007-07-01

    This presentation deals with the hydrogen effects under stresses corrosion, in austenitic alloys. The objective is to validate and characterize experimentally the potential and the limits of an approach based on an elastic theory of crystal defects. The first part is devoted to the macroscopic characterization of dynamic hydrogen-dislocations interactions by aging tests. then the hydrogen influence on the plasticity is evaluated, using analytical classic models of the elastic theory of dislocations. The hydrogen influence on the flow stress of bcc materials is analyzed experimentally with model materials. (A.L.B.)

  9. Interim fatigue design curves for carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    Both temperature and oxygen affect fatigue life; at the very low dissolved-oxygen levels in PWRs and BWRs with hydrogen water chemistry, environmental effects on fatigue life are modest at all temperatures (T) and strain rates. Between 0.1 and 0.2 ppM, the effect of dissolved-oxygen increases rapidly. In oxygenated environments, fatigue life depends strongly on strain rate and T. A fracture mechanics model is developed for predicting fatigue lives, and interim environmentally assisted cracking (EAC)-adjusted fatigue curves are proposed for carbon steels, low-alloy steels, and austenitic stainless steels

  10. Progress with alloy 33 (UNS R20033), a new corrosion resistant chromium-based austenitic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, M.; Heubner, U.; Eichenhofer, K.W.; Renner, M.

    1996-01-01

    Alloy 33 (UNS R20033), a new chromium-based corrosion resistant austenitic material with nominally (wt. %) 33 Cr, 32 Fe, 31 Ni, 1.6 Mo, 0.6 Cu, 0.4 N has been introduced to the market in 1995. This paper provides new data on this alloy with respect to mechanical properties, formability, weldability, sensitization characteristics and corrosion behavior. Mechanical properties of weldments including ductility have been established, and match well with those of wrought plate material, without any degradation of ISO V-notch impact toughness in the heat affected zone. When aged up to 8 hours between 600 C and 1,000 C the alloy is not sensitized when tested in boiling azeotropic nitric acid (Huey test). Under field test conditions alloy 33 shows excellent resistance to corrosion in flowing 96--98.5% H 2 SO 4 at 135 C--140 C and flowing 99.1% H 2 SO 4 at 150 C. Alloy 33 has also been tested with some success in 96% H 2 SO 4 with nitrosyl additions at 240 C. In nitric acid alloy 33 is corrosion resistant up to 85% HNO 3 and 75 C or even more. Alloy 33 is also corrosion resistant in 1 mol. HCl at 40 C and in NaOH/NaOCl-solutions. In artificial seawater the pitting potential remains unchanged up to 75 C and is still well above the seawater's redox potential at 95 C. Alloy 33 can be easily manufactured into all product forms required. The new data provided support the multipurpose character of alloy 33 to cope successfully with many requirements of the Chemical Process Industry, the Oil and Gas Industry and the Refinery Industry

  11. Growth of creep life of type-347H austenitic stainless steel by micro-alloying elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → B, Ce and N can improve the creep life significantly at high temperature. → The precipitate of B element at the grain boundaries can improve the creep life. → The removing O through Ce provided the steel with longer creep life. → N increased the creep life by stabilizing austenite and solid solution strengthening. - Abstract: The creep life of type-347H austenitic stainless steel modified with B, Ce and N was measured, and microstructures were analyzed by optical microscope, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results indicate that B, Ce and N can improve the creep life significantly at high temperature. The growth of creep life was mainly due to the precipitate of B in the elemental form at the grain boundaries and the removing O through Ce. N addition made for solid solution strengthening and effectively suppressed the precipitate of δ-ferrite at high temperature. The micro-alloying elements have a beneficial effect on creep life of type-347H austenitic stainless steel at high temperature.

  12. Study of the microstructure and of microhardness variation of a Ni-Fe-Cr austenitic alloy by niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho e Camargo, M.U. de; Lucki, G.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanisms of hardening and corrosion resistance increase in Ni-Fe-Cr austenitic stainless steels by Nb additions are of interest to nuclear technology Niobium additions to a 321 type stainless steel were made in order to study the microhardness, electrical resistivity and metallography. Experimental measurements results are shown. The effect of Nb additions as a micro-alloying element and the thermal and mechanical processes (cold working in particular) in the microstructure and microhardness properties of the 11% Ni - 70%Fe - 17% Cr austenitic alloys were studied. (Author) [pt

  13. Influence of Short Austenitization Treatments on the Mechanical Properties of Low-Alloy Steels for Hot Forming Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzweissig, Martin Joachim; Lackmann, Jan; Konrad, Stefan; Schaper, Mirko; Niendorf, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The current work elucidates an improvement of the mechanical properties of tool-quenched low-alloy steel by employing extremely short austenitization durations utilizing a press heating arrangement. Specifically, the influence of different austenitization treatments—involving austenitization durations ranging from three to 15 seconds—on the mechanical properties of low-alloy steel in comparison to an industrial standard furnace process was examined. A thorough set of experiments was conducted to investigate the role of different austenitization durations and temperatures on the resulting mechanical properties such as hardness, bending angle, tensile strength, and strain at fracture. The most important finding is that the hardness, the bending angle as well as the tensile strength increase with shortened austenitization durations. Furthermore, the ductility of the steels exhibits almost no difference following the short austenitization durations and the standard furnace process. The enhancement of the mechanical properties imposed by the short heat treatments investigated, is related to a refinement of microstructural features as compared to the standard furnace process.

  14. Fundamental flow and fracture analysis of prime candidate alloy (PCA) for path a (austenitics)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, G.E.; Jayakumar, M.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1982-01-01

    Room temperature microhardness tests have been performed on samples of Prime Candidate Alloy (PCA) for the austenitics (Path A) subjected to various thermomechanical treatments (TMT). The TMTs have effected various microstructures, which have been well characterized by optical metallography and TEM. For comparison, microhardness tests have been performed on samples of N-lot, DO heat and MFE 316 stainless steel with similar TMTs. The results indicate that the TMTs investigated can significantly alter the microhardness of the PCA in a manner which is consistent with microstructural changes. Moreover, while PCA had the lowest microhardness of the four alloys types after cold working, its microhardness increased while the others decreased to comparable values after aging for 2 h at 750 0 C

  15. Influence of Ti(C,N precipitates on austenite growth of micro-alloyed steel during continuous casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Austenite grain size is an important influence factor for ductility of steel at high temperatures during continuous casting. Thermodynamic and kinetics calculations were performed to analyze the characteristics of Ti(C,N precipitates formed during the continuous casting of micro-alloyed steel. Based on Andersen-Grong equation, a coupling model of second phase precipitation and austenite grain growth has been established, and the influence of second precipitates on austenite grain growth under different cooling rates is discussed. Calculations show that the final sizes of austenite grains are 2.155, 1.244, 0.965, 0.847 and 0.686 mm, respectively, under the cooling rate of 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 ℃·s-1, when ignoring the pinning effect of precipitation on austenite growth. Whereas, if taking the pinning effect into consideration, the grain growth remains stable from 1,350 ℃, the calculated final sizes of austenite grains are 1.46, 1.02, 0.80, 0.67 and 0.57 mm, respectively. The sizes of final Ti(C,N precipitates are 137, 79, 61, 51 and 43 nm, respectively, with the increase of cooling rate from 1 to 10 ℃·s-1. Model validation shows that the austenite size under different cooling rates coincided with the calculation results. Finally, the corresponding measures to strengthen cooling intensity at elevated temperature are proposed to improve the ductility and transverse crack of slab.

  16. High corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel alloyed with nitrogen in an acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metikos-Hukovic, M., E-mail: mmetik@fkit.h [Department of Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb, Savska 16, P.O. Box 177, 100000 Zagreb (Croatia); Babic, R. [Department of Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb, Savska 16, P.O. Box 177, 100000 Zagreb (Croatia); Grubac, Z. [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry and Technology, University of Split, 21000 Split (Croatia); Petrovic, Z. [Department of Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb, Savska 16, P.O. Box 177, 100000 Zagreb (Croatia); Lajci, N. [Faculty of Mine and Metallurgy, University of Prishtina, 10000 Prishtina, Kosovo (Country Unknown)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} ASS alloyed with nitrogen treated at 1150 {sup o}C exhibits microstructure homogeneity. {yields} Passivation peak of ASS corresponds to oxidation of metal and absorbed hydrogen. {yields} Transfer phenomena and conductivity depend on the film formation potential. {yields} Electronic structure of the passive film and its corrosion resistance correlate well. {yields} Passive film on ASS with nitrogen is low disordered and high corrosion resistant. - Abstract: Passivity of austenitic stainless steel containing nitrogen (ASS N25) was investigated in comparison with AISI 316L in deareated acid solution, pH 0.4. A peculiar nature of the passivation peak in a potentiodynamic curve and the kinetic parameters of formation and growth of the oxide film have been discussed. The electronic-semiconducting properties of the passive films have been correlated with their corrosion resistance. Alloying austenitic stainless steel with nitrogen increases its microstructure homogeneity and decreases the concentration of charge carriers, which beneficially affects the protecting and electronic properties of the passive oxide film.

  17. Assessing SCC and IASCC of austenitic alloys for application to the SCWR concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teysseyre, S.; Was, G.S.

    2008-01-01

    From the standpoint of environmental degradation of material, the selection of alloys for use as structural material in a supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) must include assessment of the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the alloys in supercritical water. Moreover, as experience in current reactors showed that irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a. major concern, a comprehensive study must include the assessment of the effect of irradiation on SCC in supercritical water. Therefore, such selection faces multiple obstacles. The first is the lack of data on the corrosion and SCC susceptibility of the candidate alloys in this environment. There is a need to produce basic data using complementary experimental techniques. The second is the difficulty to obtain material irradiated in conditions relevant for SCWR. Availability of such material is needed to determine the influence of irradiation and its influence on SCC. Techniques such as proton irradiation are appealing surrogates for neutron irradiation in assessing its effect of stress corrosion cracking initiation, and can be used for screening of various material and environmental conditions. However, neutron irradiation is required to confirm the role of in-core irradiation on crack growth and in performing final verification of the effect of alternative irradiation on candidate alloys. Another obstacle would be the lack of facilities for testing materials in the unirradiated and irradiated state in supercritical water. The University of Michigan has developed a comprehensive programme to assess the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of austenitic alloys in supercritical water in unirradiated, proton-irradiated and neutron-irradiated state. The cracking susceptibility of unirradiated alloys has been evaluated by a set of constant extension rate tensile, CERT, experiments and by determination of the crack propagation rate by DCPD technique under constant K

  18. Gas bubbles evolution peculiarities in ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels and alloys under helium-ion irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chernov, [No Value; Kalashnikov, AN; Kahn, BA; Binyukova, SY

    2003-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to investigate the gas bubble evolution in model alloys of the Fe C system, ferritic-martensitic steels of 13Cr type, nickel and austenitic steels under 40-keV helium-ion it. radiation up to a fluence of 5 x 10(20) m(-2) at the temperature of 920 K. It

  19. Sub-zero austenite to martensite transformation in a Fe-Ni-0.6wt.%C alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Pantleon, Karen; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Martensitic transformation in a model Fe-Ni-0.6wt%C alloy was investigated at sub-zero Celsius temperature. The influence of the thermal path in determining the conditions leading to the formation of martensite was studied. In the investigation, samples were austenitized and quenched, whereafter...

  20. The influence of combined addition of phosphorus and titanium on void swelling of austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys at 646-700 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, H.; Muroga, T.; Yoshida, N.

    1994-01-01

    The influence of combined addition of phosphorus and titanium on void swelling of model Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloys at 646 to 700 K under fast neutron irradiation has been investigated, in comparison with that of a complex austenitic alloy (JPCA-2). In the model alloys, void swelling decreased with increasing phosphorus content. Void average size and density of JPCA-2 were comparable to those of the 0.024P alloy. The fact that these two alloys have the same phosphorus level suggests the void swelling of the model alloys would be strongly suppressed by increasing the phosphorus concentration and/or coaddition of phosphorus and titanium. The present study demonstrated that the phosphorus level is the strongest determinant of void swelling of both model and complex austenitic alloys. ((orig.))

  1. Manufacturing and characterization of Ni-free N-containing ODS austenitic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, A.; Mamiya, H.; Ohnuma, M.; Ilavsky, J.; Ohishi, K.; Woźniak, Jarosław; Olszyna, A.; Watanabe, N.; Suzuki, J.; Kitazawa, H.; Lewandowska, M.

    2018-04-01

    Ni-free N-containing oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) austenitic alloys were manufactured by mechanical alloying (MA) followed by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The phase evolutions during milling under a nitrogen atmosphere and after sintering were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Transmission electron microcopy (TEM) and alloy contrast variation analysis (ACV), including small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS), revealed the existence of nanoparticles with a diameter of 3-51 nm for the samples sintered at 950 °C. Sintering at 1000 °C for 5 and 15 min caused slight growth and a significant coarsening of the nanoparticles, up to 70 nm and 128 nm, respectively. The ACV analysis indicated the existence of two populations of Y2O3, ε-martensite and MnO. The dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) confirmed two kinds of nanoparticles, Y2O3 and MnO. The material was characterized by superior micro-hardness, of above 500 HV0.1.

  2. Induced effects in Fe-Ni-Cr austenitic alloys by electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguenin, D.

    1989-01-01

    Materials behaviour under high energetic particles exposure has to be know for technological aspects, but also for microscopic material state physics. Large macroscopic investigations have been developed but reliability with theoretical calculations or fundamental physics measurements is not clear. We present four experimental procedures in order to characterize austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr synthetic alloys in the atomic scale. First, results obtained about vacancy and interstitial, after electrical resistivity measurements and monoenergetical or classical positron annihilation process, are discussed. Then, defects clustering and microstructural evolution is investigated using positron lifetime measurements and high resolution electronic microscopy. In this study, special care has been taken to understand the composition effect as a function of the irradiation conditions [fr

  3. The role of nitrogen in improving pitting corrosion resistance of high-alloy austenitic and duplex stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilpas, M.; Haenninen, H.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of nitrogen alloyed shielding gas on weld nitrogen content and pitting corrosion resistance of super austenitic (6%Mo) and super duplex stainless steels have been studied with special emphasis on microsegregation behaviour of Cr, Mo and N. The measurements performed with the 6%Mo steel indicate that all these elements segregate interdendritically in the fully austenitic weld metal. With nitrogen addition to the shielding gas the enrichment of nitrogen to the interdendritic regions is more pronounced than to the dendrite cores due to which the pitting corrosion resistance of the dendrite cores increases only marginally. In the super duplex steel welds nitrogen enriches in austenite increasing its pitting corrosion resistance more effectively. In these welds the pitting corrosion resistance of the ferrite phase remains lower. (orig.)

  4. Elastic properties of paramagnetic austenitic steel at finite temperature: Longitudinal spin fluctuations in multicomponent alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhihua; Schönecker, Stephan; Chen, Dengfu; Li, Wei; Long, Mujun; Vitos, Levente

    2017-11-01

    We propose a first-principles framework for longitudinal spin fluctuations (LSFs) in disordered paramagnetic (PM) multicomponent alloy systems and apply it to investigate the influence of LSFs on the temperature dependence of two elastic constants of PM austenitic stainless steel Fe15Cr15Ni. The magnetic model considers individual fluctuating moments in a static PM medium with first-principles-derived LSF energetics in conjunction with describing chemical disorder and randomness of the transverse magnetic component in the single-site alloy formalism and disordered local moment (DLM) picture. A temperature-sensitive mean magnetic moment is adopted to accurately represent the LSF state in the elastic-constant calculations. We make evident that magnetic interactions between an LSF impurity and the PM medium are weak in the present steel alloy. This allows gaining accurate LSF energetics and mean magnetic moments already through a perturbation from the static DLM moments instead of a tedious self-consistent procedure. We find that LSFs systematically lower the cubic shear elastic constants c' and c44 by ˜6 GPa in the temperature interval 300-1600 K, whereas the predominant mechanism for the softening of both elastic constants with temperature is the magneto-volume coupling due to thermal lattice expansion. We find that non-negligible local magnetic moments of Cr and Ni are thermally induced by LSFs, but they exert only a small influence on the elastic properties. The proposed framework exhibits high flexibility in accurately accounting for finite-temperature magnetism and its impact on the mechanical properties of PM multicomponent alloys.

  5. Swelling of austenitic iron-nickelchromium ternary alloys during fast neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    Swelling data are now available for 15 iron-nickel-chromium ternary alloys irradiated to exposures as high as 110 displacements per atom (dpa) in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) between 400 and 650 0 C. These data confirm trends observed at lower exposure levels and extend the generality of earlier conclusions to cover a broader range of composition and temperature. It appears that all austenitic iron-nickel-chromium ternary alloys eventually approach an intrinsic swelling rate of about1%/dpa over a range of temperature even wider than studied in this experiment. The duration of the transient regime that precedes the attainment of this rate is quite sensitive to nickel and chromium content, however. At nickel and chromium levels typical of 300 series steels, swelling does not saturate at engineering-relevant levels. However, there appears to be a tendency toward saturation that increases with declining temperature, increasing nickel and decreasing chromium levels. Comparisons of these results are made with those of similar studies conducted with charged particles. Conclusions are then drawn concerning the validity of charged particle simulation studies to determine the compositional and temperature dependence of swelling

  6. Effect of composition on corrosion resistance of high-alloy austenitic stainless steel weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, P.I.; Gooch, T.G.

    1993-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel weld metal in the ranges of 17 to 28% chromium (Cr), 6 to 60% nickel (Ni), 0 to 9% molybdenum (Mo), and 0.0 to 0.37% nitrogen (N) was examined. Critical pitting temperatures were determined in ferric chloride (FeCl 3 ). Passive film breakdown potentials were assessed from potentiodynamic scans in 3% sodium chloride (NaCl) at 50 C. Potentiodynamic and potentiostatic tests were carried out in 30% sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) ar 25 C, which was representative of chloride-free acid media of low redox potential. Metallographic examination and microanalysis were conducted on the test welds. Because of segregation of alloying elements, weld metal pitting resistance always was lower than that of matching composition base steel. The difference increased with higher Cr, Mo, and N contents. Segregation also reduced resistance to general corrosion in H 2 SO 4 , but the effect relative to the base steel was less marked than with chloride pitting. Segregation of Cr, Mo, and N in fully austenitic deposits decreased as the Ni' eq- Cr' eq ratio increased. Over the compositional range studied, weld metal pitting resistance was dependent mainly on Mo content and segregation. N had less effect than in wrought alloys. Both Mo and N enhanced weld metal corrosion resistance in H 2 SO 4

  7. Effect of alloying elements on branching of primary austenite dendrites in Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janus

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the research, determined were direction and intensity of influence of individual alloying elements on branching degree of primary austenite dendrites in austenitic cast iron Ni-Mn-Cu. 30 cast shafts dia. 20 mm were analysed. Chemical composition of the alloywas as follows: 2.0 to 3.3 % C, 1.4 to 3.1 % Si, 2.8 to 9.5 % Ni, 0.4 to 7.7 % Mn, 0 to 4.6 % Cu, 0.14 to 0.16 % P and 0.03 to 0.04 % S.Analysis was performed separately for the dendrites solidifying in directional and volumetric way. The average distance "x" between the2nd order arms was accepted as the criterion of branching degree. It was found that influence of C, Si, Ni, Mn and Cu on the parameter "x"is statistically significant. Intensity of carbon influence is decidedly higher than that of other elements, and the influence is more intensive in the directionally solidifying dendrites. However, in the case of the alloyed cast iron Ni-Mn-Cu, combined influence of the alloying elements on solidification course of primary austenite can be significant.

  8. The conflicting roles of boron on the radiation response of precipitate-forming austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okita, T.; Sekimura, N.; Garner, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Boron is often a deliberately added solute to improve the radiation resistance of austenitic structural alloys, with boron exerting its greatest influence on carbide precipitation. However, boron also a source of helium via transmutation and therefore tends to accelerate the onset of void nucleation. These conflicting contributions of boron with respect to radiation resistance are not easily separated, but are sometimes utilized to mimic fusion-relevant gas generation rates when testing in surrogate fission spectra. In an earlier study the authors demonstrated that in simple model ternary alloys that boron additions tended to homogenize swelling somewhat via increased helium generation but not to exert any significant influence on the total swelling. In these easily swelling alloys void nucleation was not significantly influenced by additional helium or by boron's chemical effect, with boron remaining primarily in solution. In the current study, Fe-15Cr-16Ni-0.25 Ti-0.05C alloys with four levels of natural boron addition (0, 100, 500, 2500 appm) were irradiated side-by-side at ∼400 deg. C in the Fast Flux Test Facility under active temperature control in the Materials Open Test Assembly. Although three sets of irradiation conditions were explored, the boron variation was the only variable operating in each data set. The bulk swelling was measured using an immersion density technique and electron microscopy was employed to determine the details of void, dislocation and precipitate microstructure. It was found that by 100 appm B the strongest and most immediate effect of boron was to reduce swelling at all irradiation conditions explored, but the boron-induced increases in overall helium content were rather small over the 0-100 appm B range. This indicates that boron's primary effect was chemical in nature, expressed via its effect on precipitation. As the boron level was progressively increased, however, there was a reversal in

  9. The influence of nitrogen, phosphorus, sulphur and nickel on the stress corrosion cracking of austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cihal, V.

    1985-01-01

    From the results of the stress corrosion cracking tests it is evident that austenitic alloys with a phosphorus content 0.01% causes a strong increase in stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of alloys with a nickel content in the range 33 to 38%. With a nickel content of approx. 35%, an increase of nitrogen concentration to approx. 0.15% also produces a significant effect on stress corrosion cracking susceptibility. A sulphur content up to 0.033% does not produce a significant effect on stress corrosion cracking. (author)

  10. Precipitation sensitivity to alloy composition in Fe-Cr-Mn austenitic steels developed for reduced activation for fusion application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Klueh, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Special austenitic steels are being designed in which alloying elements like Mo, Nb, and Ni are replaced with Mn, W, V, Ti, and/or Ta to reduce the long-term radioactivity induced by fusion reactor irradiation. However, the new steels still need to have properties otherwise similar to commercial steels like type 316. Precipitation strongly affects strength and radiation-resistance in austenitic steels during irradiation at 400--600/degree/C, and precipitation is also usually quite sensitive to alloy composition. The initial stage of development was to define a base Fe-Cr-Mn-C composition that formed stable austenite after annealing and cold-working, and resisted recovery or excessive formation of coarse carbide and intermetallic phases during elevated temperature annealing. These studies produced a Fe-12Cr-20Mn-0.25C base alloy. The next stage was to add the minor alloying elements W, Ti, V, P, and B for more strength and radiation-resistance. One of the goals was to produce fine MC precipitation behavior similar to the Ti-modified Fe-Cr-Ni prime candidate alloy (PCA). Additions of Ti+V+P+B produced fine MC precipitation along network dislocations and recovery/recrystallization resistance in 20% cold worked material aged at 800/degree/C for 166h, whereas W, Ti, W+Ti, or Ti+P+B additions did not. Addition of W+Ti+V+P+B also produced fine MC, but caused some σ phase formation and more recrystallization as well. 29 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs

  11. Hydrogen-Induced Delayed Cracking in TRIP-Aided Lean-Alloyed Ferritic-Austenitic Stainless Steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papula, Suvi; Sarikka, Teemu; Anttila, Severi; Talonen, Juho; Virkkunen, Iikka; Hänninen, Hannu

    2017-06-03

    Susceptibility of three lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels to hydrogen-induced delayed cracking was examined, concentrating on internal hydrogen contained in the materials after production operations. The aim was to study the role of strain-induced austenite to martensite transformation in the delayed cracking susceptibility. According to the conducted deep drawing tests and constant load tensile testing, the studied materials seem not to be particularly susceptible to delayed cracking. Delayed cracks were only occasionally initiated in two of the materials at high local stress levels. However, if a delayed crack initiated in a highly stressed location, strain-induced martensite transformation decreased the crack arrest tendency of the austenite phase in a duplex microstructure. According to electron microscopy examination and electron backscattering diffraction analysis, the fracture mode was predominantly cleavage, and cracks propagated along the body-centered cubic (BCC) phases ferrite and α'-martensite. The BCC crystal structure enables fast diffusion of hydrogen to the crack tip area. No delayed cracking was observed in the stainless steel that had high austenite stability. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence of α'-martensite increases the hydrogen-induced cracking susceptibility.

  12. Hydrogen-Induced Delayed Cracking in TRIP-Aided Lean-Alloyed Ferritic-Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Papula

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility of three lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels to hydrogen-induced delayed cracking was examined, concentrating on internal hydrogen contained in the materials after production operations. The aim was to study the role of strain-induced austenite to martensite transformation in the delayed cracking susceptibility. According to the conducted deep drawing tests and constant load tensile testing, the studied materials seem not to be particularly susceptible to delayed cracking. Delayed cracks were only occasionally initiated in two of the materials at high local stress levels. However, if a delayed crack initiated in a highly stressed location, strain-induced martensite transformation decreased the crack arrest tendency of the austenite phase in a duplex microstructure. According to electron microscopy examination and electron backscattering diffraction analysis, the fracture mode was predominantly cleavage, and cracks propagated along the body-centered cubic (BCC phases ferrite and α’-martensite. The BCC crystal structure enables fast diffusion of hydrogen to the crack tip area. No delayed cracking was observed in the stainless steel that had high austenite stability. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence of α’-martensite increases the hydrogen-induced cracking susceptibility.

  13. Evaluation of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys in Microturbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, M.P.; Matthews, W.J. (Capstone Turbine Corp.)

    2010-09-15

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Capstone Turbine Corporation (CTC) participated in an in-kind cost share cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) effort under the auspices of the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Technology Maturation Program to explore the feasibility for use of developmental ORNL alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels as a material of construction for microturbine recuperator components. ORNL delivered test coupons of three different AFA compositions to CTC. The coupons were exposed in steady-state elevated turbine exit temperature (TET) engine testing, with coupons removed for analysis after accumulating ~1,500, 3,000, 4,500, and 6,000 hours of operation. Companion test coupons were also exposed in oxidation testing at ORNL at 700-800°C in air with 10% H2O. Post test assessment of the coupons was performed at ORNL by light microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. The higher Al and Nb containing AFA alloys exhibited excellent resistance to oxidation/corrosion, and thus show good promise for recuperator applications.

  14. The Primary Origin of Dose Rate Effects on Microstructural Evolution of Austenitic Alloys During Neutron Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okita, Taira; Sato, Toshihiko; Sekimura, Naoto; Garner, Francis A.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of dose rate on neutron-induced microstructural evolution was experimentally estimated. Solution-annealed austenitic model alloys were irradiated at approximately 400 degrees C with fast neutrons at seven different dose rates that vary more than two orders difference in magnitude, and two different doses were achieved at each dose rate. Both cavity nucleation and growth were found to be enhanced at lower dose rate. The net vacancy flux is calculated from the growth rate of cavities that had already nucleated during the first cycle of irradiation and grown during the second cycle. The net vacancy flux was found to be proportional to (dpa/sec) exp (1/2) up to 28.8 dpa and 8.4 x 10 exp (-7) dpa/sec. This implies that mutual recombination dominates point defect annihilation, in this experiment even though point defect sinks such as cavities and dislocations were well developed. Thus, mutual recombination is thought to be the primary origin of the effect of dose rate on microstructural evolution

  15. Diffusive Phenomena and the Austenite/Martensite Relative Stability in Cu-Based Shape-Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegrina, J. L.; Yawny, A.; Sade, M.

    2018-02-01

    The main characteristic of martensitic phase transitions is the coordinate movement of the atoms which takes place athermally, without the contribution of diffusion during its occurrence. However, the impacts of diffusive phenomena on the relative stability between the phases involved and, consequently, on the associated transformation temperatures and functional properties can be significant. This is particularly evident in the case of Cu-based shape-memory alloys where atomic diffusion in both austenite and martensite metastable phases might occur even at room-temperature levels, giving rise to a variety of intensively studied phenomena. In the present study, the progresses made in the understanding of three selected diffusion-related effects of importance in Cu-Zn-Al and Cu-Al-Be alloys are reviewed. They are the after-quench retained disorder in the austenitic structure and its subsequent reordering, the stabilization of the martensite, and the effect of applied stress on the austenitic order. It is shown how the experimental results obtained from tests performed on single crystal material can be rationalized under the shed of a model developed to evaluate the variation of the relative stability between the phases in terms of atom pairs interchanges.

  16. Ab initio investigation of the surface properties of austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr alloys in aqueous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rák, Zs., E-mail: zrak@ncsu.edu; Brenner, D.W.

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • The trend in the surface energies of austenitic stainless steels is: (111) < (100) < (110). • On the (111) orientation Ni segregates to the surface and Cr segregates into the bulk. • The surface stability of the alloys in contact with water decrease with temperature and pH. - Abstract: The surface energetics of two austenitic stainless steel alloys (Type 304 and 316) and three Ni-based alloys (Alloy 600, 690, and 800) are investigated using theoretical methods within the density functional theory. The relative stability of the low index surfaces display the same trend for all alloys; the most closely packed orientation and the most stable is the (111), followed by the (100) and the (110) surfaces. Calculations on the (111) surfaces using various surface chemical and magnetic configurations reveal that Ni has the tendency to segregate toward the surface and Cr has the tendency to segregate toward the bulk. The magnetic frustration present on the (111) surfaces plays an important role in the observed segregation tendencies of Ni and Cr. The stability of the (111) surfaces in contact with aqueous solution are evaluated as a function of temperature, pH, and concentration of aqueous species. The results indicate that the surface stability of the alloys decrease with temperature and pH, and increase slightly with concentration. Under conditions characteristic to an operating pressurized water reactor, the Ni-based alloy series appears to be of better quality than the stainless steel series with respect to corrosion resistance and release of aqueous species when in contact with aqueous solutions.

  17. Corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel, nickel-base alloy and its weldments in aqueous LiBr solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasco-Tamarit, E.; Igual-Munoz, A.; Garcia Anton, J.; Garcia-Garcia, D. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. E.T.S.I.Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, P.O. Box 22012 E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    With the advances in materials production new alloys have been developed, such as High- Alloy Austenitic Stainless Steels and Nickel-base alloys, with high corrosion resistance. These new alloys are finding applications in Lithium Bromide absorption refrigeration systems, because LiBr is a corrosive medium which can cause serious corrosion problems, in spite of its favourable properties as absorbent. The objective of the present work was to study the corrosion resistance of a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031) used as base metal, a Nickel-base alloy (UNS N06059) used as its corresponding filler metal, and the weld metal obtained by the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) procedure. The materials have been tested in different LiBr solutions (400 g/l, 700 g/l, 850 g/l and a commercial 850 g/l LiBr heavy brine containing Lithium Chromate as corrosion inhibitor), at 25 deg. C. Open Circuit Potential tests and potentiodynamic anodic polarization curves have been carried out to obtain information about the general electrochemical behaviour of the materials. The polarization curves of all the alloys tested were typical of passivable materials. Pitting corrosion susceptibility has been evaluated by means of cyclic potentiodynamic curves, which provide parameters to analyse re-passivation properties. The galvanic corrosion generated by the electrical contact between the welded and the base material has been estimated from the polarization diagrams according to the Mixed Potential Method. Samples have been etched to study the microstructure by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrate that the pitting resistance of all these materials increases as the LiBr concentration decreases. In general, the presence of chromate tended to shift the pitting potential to more positive values than those obtained in the 850 g/l LiBr solution. (authors)

  18. Development of Cast Alumina-forming Austenitic Stainless Steel Alloys for use in High Temperature Process Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Pankiw, Roman [Duraloy Technologies Inc; Voke, Don [Duraloy Technologies Inc

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in the development of alumina-forming, creep resistant alloys for use in various industrial process environments. It is expected that these alloys can be fabricated into components for use in these environments through centrifugal casting and welding. Based on the successful earlier studies on the development of wrought versions of Alumina-Forming Austenitic (AFA) alloys, new alloy compositions have been developed for cast products. These alloys achieve good high-temperature oxidation resistance due to the formation of protective Al2O3 scales while multiple second-phase precipitation strengthening contributes to excellent creep resistance. This work will summarize the results on the development and properties of a centrifugally cast AFA alloy. This paper highlights the strength, oxidation resistance in air and water vapor containing environments, and creep properties in the as-cast condition over the temperature range of 750°C to 900°C in a centrifugally cast heat. Preliminary results for a laboratory cast AFA composition with good oxidation resistance at 1100°C are also presented.

  19. A preliminary investigation of the initiation of pitting corrosion in austenitic stainless steels and nickel-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higginson, A.

    1984-01-01

    Pitting corrosion in a number of austenitic stainless steels and nickel-based alloys that differ widely in their resistance to corrosion was studed by electrochemical and electron-optical techniques. The effect of contamination of the sulphuric acid electrolyte by chloride ions was also investigated. Preliminary results for the surface analysis of samples of 316 stainless steel by Auger electron spectroscopy are presented, and suggestions are included for further application of this technique to the examination of pitting corrosion. A comprehensive review of the literature concerning the initiation of pitting corrosion is included

  20. Subgrain and dislocation structure changes in hot-deformed high-temperature Fe-Ni austenitic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducki, K.J.; Rodak, K.; Hetmanczyk, M.; Kuc, D

    2003-08-28

    The influence of plastic deformation on the substructure of a high-temperature austenitic Fe-Ni alloy has been presented. Hot-torsion tests were executed at constant strain rates of 0.1 and 1.0 s{sup -1}, at testing temperatures in the range 900-1150 deg. C. The examination of the microstructure was carried out, using transmission electron microscopy. Direct measurements on the micrographs allowed the calculation of structural parameters: the average subgrain area, and the mean dislocation density. A detailed investigation has shown that the microstructure is inhomogeneous, consisting of dense dislocation walls, subgrains and recrystallized regions.

  1. Subgrain and dislocation structure changes in hot-deformed high-temperature Fe-Ni austenitic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducki, K.J.; Rodak, K.; Hetmanczyk, M.; Kuc, D.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of plastic deformation on the substructure of a high-temperature austenitic Fe-Ni alloy has been presented. Hot-torsion tests were executed at constant strain rates of 0.1 and 1.0 s -1 , at testing temperatures in the range 900-1150 deg. C. The examination of the microstructure was carried out, using transmission electron microscopy. Direct measurements on the micrographs allowed the calculation of structural parameters: the average subgrain area, and the mean dislocation density. A detailed investigation has shown that the microstructure is inhomogeneous, consisting of dense dislocation walls, subgrains and recrystallized regions

  2. Analysis Of The Austenite Grain Growth In Low-Alloy Boron Steel With High Resistance To Abrasive Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Białobrzeska B.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Today low-alloy steels with boron achieve high resistance to abrasive wear and high strength. These features are obtained by using advanced technology of manufacturing. This makes boron steels increasingly popular and their application more diverse. Application of these steels can extend the lifetime of very expensive machine construction in many industries such as mining, the automotive, and agriculture industries. An interesting subgroup of these materials is steel with boron intended for heat treatment. These steels are supplied by the manufacturer after cold or hot rolling so that it is possible for them to be heat treated in a suitable manner by the purchaser for its specific application. Very important factor that determines the mechanical properties of final product is austenite grain growth occurring during hot working process such us quenching or hot rolling. Investigation of the effect of heating temperature and holding time on the austenite grain size is necessary to understand the growth behavior under different conditions. This article presents the result of investigation of austenite grain growth in selected low-allow boron steel with high resistance to abrasive wear and attempts to describe the influence of chemical composition on this process.

  3. Hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen induced stress corrosion cracking of high alloyed austenitic materials; Wasserstoffversproedung und wasserstoffinduzierte Spannungsrisskorrosion hochlegierter austenitischer Werkstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mummert, K.; Uhlemann, M.; Engelmann, H.J. [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany)

    1998-11-01

    The susceptiblity of high alloyed austenitic steels and nickel base alloys to hydrogen-induced cracking is particularly determined by 1. the distribution of hydrogen in the material, and 2. the microstructural deformation behaviour, which last process is determined by the effects of hydrogen with respect to the formation of dislocations and the stacking fault energy. The hydrogen has an influence on the process of slip localization in slip bands, which in turn affects the microstructural deformation behaviour. Slip localization increases with growing Ni contents of the alloys and clearly reduces the ductility of the Ni-base alloy. Although there is a local hydrogen source involved in stress corrosion cracking, emanating from the corrosion process at the cathode, crack growth is observed only in those cases when the hydrogen concentration in a small zone ahead of the crack tip reaches a critical value with respect to the stress conditions. Probability of onset of this process gets lower with growing Ni content of the alloy, due to increasing diffusion velocity of the hydrogen in the austenitic lattice. This is why particularly austenitic steels with low Ni contents are susceptible to transcrystalline stress corrosion cracking. In this case, the microstructural deformation process at the crack tip is also influenced by analogous processes, as could be observed in hydrogen-loaded specimens. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Die Empfindlichkeit von hochlegierten austentischen Staehlen und Nickelbasislegierungen gegen wasserstoffinduziertes Risswachstum wird im wesentlichen bestimmt durch 1. die Verteilung von Wasserstoff im Werkstoff und 2. das mikrostrukturelle Verformungsverhalten. Das mikrostrukturelle Deformationsverhalten ist wiederum durch den Einfluss von Wasserstoff auf die Versetzungsbildung und die Stapelfehlerenergie charakterisiert. Das mikrostrukturelle Verformungsverhalten wird durch wasserstoffbeeinflusste Gleitlokalisierung in Gleitbaendern bestimmt. Diese nimmt mit

  4. Dissolution and oxidation behaviour of various austenitic steels and Ni rich alloys in lead-bismuth eutectic at 520 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Marion, E-mail: marion.roy@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d’Etude de la Corrosion Non Aqueuse, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Martinelli, Laure, E-mail: laure.martinelli@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d’Etude de la Corrosion Non Aqueuse, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ginestar, Kevin, E-mail: kevin.ginestar@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC, SCCME, Laboratoire d’Etude de la Corrosion Non Aqueuse, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Favergeon, Jérôme, E-mail: jerome.favergeon@utc.fr [Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 7337, Université de Technologie de Compiègne, Centre de Recherche de Royallieu, CS 60319, 60203 Compiègne Cedex (France); Moulin, Gérard [Laboratoire Roberval, UMR 7337, Université de Technologie de Compiègne, Centre de Recherche de Royallieu, CS 60319, 60203 Compiègne Cedex (France)

    2016-01-15

    Ten austenitic steels and Ni rich alloys were tested in static lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) at 520 °C in order to obtain a selection of austenitic steels having promising corrosion behaviour in LBE. A test of 1850 h was carried out with a dissolved oxygen concentration between 10{sup −9} and 5 10{sup −4} g kg{sup −1}. The combination of thermodynamic of the studied system and literature results leads to the determination of an expression of the dissolved oxygen content in LBE as a function of temperature: RT(K)ln[O](wt%) = −57584/T(K) −55.876T(K) + 254546 (R is the gas constant in J mol{sup −1} K{sup −1}). This relation can be considered as a threshold of oxygen content above which only oxidation is observed on the AISI 316L and AISI 304L austenitic alloys in static LBE between 400 °C and 600 °C. The oxygen content during the test leads to both dissolution and oxidation of the samples during the first 190 h and leads to pure oxidation for the rest of the test. Results of mixed oxidation and dissolution test showed that only four types of corrosion behaviour were observed: usual austenitic steels and Ni rich alloys behaviour including the reference alloy 17Cr-12Ni-2.5Mo (AISI 316LN), the 20Cr-31Ni alloy one, the Si containing alloy one and the Al containing alloy one. According to the proposed criteria of oxidation and dissolution kinetics, silicon rich alloys and aluminum rich alloy presented a promising corrosion behaviour. - Highlights: • 10 austenitic steels and Ni rich alloys were tested in LBE at 520 °C with dissolved oxygen content between 10{sup -9} and 5 10{sup -4} wt%. • It is shown that only thermodynamics cannot explain the Ni rich alloys corrosion behaviour in LBE. • The role of oxygen on corrosion behaviour in LBE was highlighted. • An equilibrium line was defined above which only oxidation has occurred on 316L: RTln[O](wt%) = -57584/T(K)-55.876T(K)+254546. • 18Cr-15Ni-3.7Si, 21Cr-11Ni-1.6Si and 14Cr-25Ni-3.5Al

  5. A new high-strength iron base austenitic alloy with good toughness and corrosion resistance (GE-EPRI alloy-TTL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesh, S.

    1989-01-01

    A new high strength, iron based, austenitic alloy has been successfully developed by GE-EPRI to satisfy the strength and corrosion resistance requirements of large retaining rings for high capacity generators (>840Mw). This new alloy is a modified version of the EPRI alloy-T developed by the University of California, Berkeley, in an earlier EPRI program. It is age hardenable and has the nominal composition (weight %): 34.5 Ni, 5Cr, 3Ti, 1Nb, 1Ta, 1Mo, .5Al, .3V, .01B. This composition was selected based on detailed metallurgical and processing studies on modified versions of alloy-T. These studies helped establish the optimum processing conditions for the new alloy and enabled the successful scale-up production of three large (50-52 inch dia) test rings from a 5,000 lb VIM-VAR billet. The rings were metallurgically sound and exhibited yield strength capabilities in the range 145 to 220 ksi depending on the extent of hot/cold work induced. The test rings met or exceeded all the property goals. The above alloy can provide a good combination of strength, toughness and corrosion resistance and, through an suitable modification of chemistry or processing conditions, could be a viable candidate for high strength LWR internal applications. 3 figs

  6. Three-dimensional modeling for deformation of austenitic NiTi shape memory alloys under high strain rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao; Young, Marcus L.

    2018-01-01

    A three-dimensional model for phase transformation of shape memory alloys (SMAs) during high strain rate deformation is developed and is then calibrated based on experimental results from an austenitic NiTi SMA. Stress, strain, and martensitic volume fraction distribution during high strain rate deformation are simulated using finite element analysis software ABAQUS/standard. For the first time, this paper presents a theoretical study of the microscopic band structure during high strain rate compressive deformation. The microscopic transformation band is generated by the phase front and leads to minor fluctuations in sample deformation. The strain rate effect on phase transformation is studied using the model. Both the starting stress for transformation and the slope of the stress-strain curve during phase transformation increase with increasing strain rate.

  7. Intergranular corrosion in unserviced austenitic stainless steel pipes made of alloy 904L; Kornzerfall in nicht betriebsbeanspruchten rostfreien austenitischen Rohren aus Alloy 904L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neidel, Andreas; Cagliyan, Erhan; Fischer, Boromir; Giller, Madeleine; Riesenbeck, Susanne [Siemens AG, Energy Sector, Berlin (Germany). Gasturbinenwerk Berlin

    2017-09-01

    Seamless tubes of the highly corrosion resistant austenitic steel 1.4539, X1NiCrMoCu25-20-5 (Alloy 904L) were observed to exhibit signs of inter-crystalline damage to a depth of several layers of grains and in particular on their internal surface. The material had been stored and had not been put into service. A number of hypotheses had been discussed to explain the predominant cause of the damage. Using optical light and scanning electron microscopy investigation techniques, clear evidence was obtained indicating it to be inter-crystalline corrosion due to the sensitisation of the grain boundaries. The most probable cause of this was determined to be the presence of residual deposits from the rolling process, which due to poor cleaning, had not been completely removed prior to the final solution annealing treatment. This explaining why predominantly the internal surface of the tubes was affected.

  8. Effect of Microstructure on Retained Austenite Stability and Tensile Behaviour in an Aluminum-Alloyed TRIP Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Jasmine Sheree

    Transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels have excellent strength, ductility and work hardening behaviour, which can be attributed to a phenomenon known as the TRIP effect. The TRIP effect involves a metastable phase, retained austenite (RA), transforming into martensite as a result of applied stress or strain. This transformation absorbs energy and improves the work hardening rate of the steel, delaying the onset of necking. This work describes two distinct TRIP steel microstructures and focuses on how microstructure affects the RA-to-martensite transformation and the uniaxial tensile behaviour. A two-step heat treatment was applied to an aluminum-alloyed TRIP steel to obtain a microstructure consisting of equiaxed grains of ferrite surrounded by bainite, martensite and RA -- the equiaxed microstructure. The second microstructure was produced by first austenitizing and quenching the steel to produce martensite, followed by the two-step heat treatment. The resulting microstructure (labelled the lamellar microstructure) consisted of elongated grains of ferrite with bainite, martensite and RA grains. Both microstructural variants had similar initial volume fractions of RA. A series of interrupted tensile tests and ex-situ magnetic measurements were conducted to examine the RA transformation during uniform elongation. Similar tests were also conducted on an equiaxed microstructure and a lamellar microstructure with similar ultimate tensile strengths. Results show that the work hardening rate is directly related to the RA transformation rate. The slower transformation rate, or higher RA stability, that was observed in the lamellar microstructure enables sustained work hardening at high strains. In contrast, the equiaxed microstructure has a lower RA stability and thus exhibits high values of work hardening at low strains, but the effect is quickly exhausted. Several microstructural factors that affect RA stability were examined, including RA grain size, aspect

  9. Formation of an L10 superstructure in austenite upon the α → γ transformation in the invar alloy Fe-32% Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabanova, I. G.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Kataeva, N. V.

    2011-09-01

    Structure of a metastable austenitic invar alloy Fe-32% Ni preliminarily quenched for martensite and subjected to α → γ transformation using slow heating to various temperatures (430-500°C) with the formation of variously oriented nanocrystalline lamellar austenite, which was subjected to an additional annealing at 280°C (below the calculated temperature of ordering of the γ phase), has been studied electron-microscopically. An electron diffraction analysis revealed the presence of an L10 superstructure in the disperse nickel-enriched nanocrystalline γ phase both after annealing at 280°C and in the unannealed alloy immediately after α → γ transformation upon slow heating to 430°C.

  10. Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I [Greensburg, PA

    2010-07-06

    A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

  11. Solid state alloying by plasma nitriding and diffusion annealing treatment for austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinedo, C.E.; Vatavuk, J.; Oliveira, S.D. de; Tschiptschin, A.P.

    1999-01-01

    Nitrogen has been added to stainless steels to improve mechanical strength and corrosion resistance. High nitrogen steel production is limited by high gas pressure requirements and low nitrogen solubility in the melt. One way to overcome this limitation is the addition of nitrogen in solid state because of its higher solubility in austenite. However, gas and salt bath nitriding have been done at temperatures around 550 C, where nitrogen solubility in the steel is still very low. High temperature nitriding has been, thus proposed to increase nitrogen contents in the steel but the presence of oxide layers on top of the steel is a barrier to nitrogen intake. In this paper a modified plasma nitriding process is proposed. The first step of this process is a hydrogen plasma sputtering for oxide removal, exposing active steel surface improving nitrogen pickup. This is followed by a nitriding step where high nitrogen contents are introduced in the outermost layer of the steel. Diffusion annealing is then performed in order to allow nitrogen diffusion into the core. AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel was plasma nitrided and diffusion annealed at 1423K, for 6 hours, with 0.2 MPa nitrogen pressure. The nitrided steel presented ∝60 μm outermost compact layer of (Fe,Cr) 3 N and (Fe,Cr) 4 N with 11 wt.% N measured by surface depth profiling chemical analysis - GDS system. During the annealing treatment the nitride layer was dissolved and nitrogen diffused to the core of the sample leaving more even nitrogen distribution into the steel. Using this technique one-millimetre thick sample were obtained having high nitrogen content and uniform distribution through the thickness. (orig.)

  12. Effects of minor alloying additions on the strength and swelling behavior of an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gessel, G.R.

    1978-06-01

    A set of 32 alloys consisting of various additions of the elements Mo, W, Al, Ti, Nb, C and Si to an Fe-7.5 Cr-20 Ni alloy were made in order to investigate the effects of these solute additions on alloy swelling and strength. Both single and multiple additions were examined. The influence of various solute elements on the swelling behavior in the range 500 to 730 0 C was investigated using 4 MeV Ni ion bombardment to a dose 170 dpa. It was found that on an atomic percent basis, the elements may be arranged in order of decreasing effectiveness in reducing peak temperature swelling as follows: Ti, C, Nb, Si, and Mo. Small amounts of aluminum enhance swelling. Additions of Si, Ti, or Nb truncate the high temperature swelling regime of the ternary alloy. Mo, W, and C do not have a strong effect on the temperature dependence of swelling. The results may be interpreted in terms of the effect of point defect trapping on void growth rates, and it is suggested that the changes in peak temperature are the result of small changes in the free vacancy formation energy. A method for treating certain multiple additions is proposed. The effect of these alloying additions on short time high temperature strength properties was estimated using hot hardness measurements over the temperature range 22 to 850 0 C. On an atom percent basis Nb and Ti were most effective in conferring solid solution strengthening and Si the least effective. In the regime 22 to approximately 650 0 C, the hardness data was found to fit an equation of the form: H = H 0 + b/T; where H is the hardness, T is the temperature, and H 0 and b are constants for a given alloy. An empirical method was devised to estimate the hot hardness of alloys containing more than one solute addition

  13. Effect of silicon on stability of austenite during isothermal annealing of low-alloy steel with medium carbon content in the transition region between pearlitic and bainitic transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeníček, Š.; Vorel, I.; Káňa, J.; Ibrahim, K.; Kotěšovec, V.

    2017-02-01

    In a vast majority of steels, a prerequisite to successful heat treatment is the phase transformation of initial austenite to the desired type of microstructure which may consist of ferrite, pearlite, bainite, martensite or their combinations. Diffusion plays an important role in this phase transformation. Together with enthalpy and entropy, two thermodynamic quantities, diffusion represents the decisive mechanism for the formation of the particular phase. The basis of diffusion is the thermally-activated movement of ions of alloying and residual elements. It is generally known that austenite becomes more stable during isothermal treatment in the transitional region between pearlitic and bainitic transformation. This is due to thermodynamic processes which arise from the chemical composition of the steel. The transformation of austenite to pearlite or bainite is generally accompanied by formation of cementite. The latter can be suppressed by adding silicon to the steel because this element does not dissolve in cementite, and therefore prevents its formation. The strength of this effect of silicon depends mainly on the temperature of isothermal treatment. If a steel with a sufficient silicon content is annealed at a temperature, at which silicon cannot migrate by diffusion, cementite cannot form and austenite becomes stable for hours.

  14. Cracking behavior and microstructure of austenitic stainless steels and alloy 690 irradiated in BOR-60 reactor, phase I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Soppet, W. K.; Shack, W. J.; Yang, Y.; Allen, T. R.; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison

    2010-02-16

    Cracking behavior of stainless steels specimens irradiated in the BOR-60 at about 320 C is studied. The primary objective of this research is to improve the mechanistic understanding of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of core internal components under conditions relevant to pressurized water reactors. The current report covers several baseline tests in air, a comparison study in high-dissolved-oxygen environment, and TEM characterization of irradiation defect structure. Slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted in air and in high-dissolved-oxygen (DO) water with selected 5- and 10-dpa specimens. The results in high-DO water were compared with those from earlier tests with identical materials irradiated in the Halden reactor to a similar dose. The SSRT tests produced similar results among different materials irradiated in the Halden and BOR-60 reactors. However, the post-irradiation strength for the BOR-60 specimens was consistently lower than that of the corresponding Halden specimens. The elongation of the BOR-60 specimens was also greater than that of their Halden specimens. Intergranular cracking in high-DO water was consistent for most of the tested materials in the Halden and BOR-60 irradiations. Nonetheless, the BOR-60 irradiation was somewhat less effective in stimulating IG fracture among the tested materials. Microstructural characterization was also carried out using transmission electron microscopy on selected BOR-60 specimens irradiated to {approx}25 dpa. No voids were observed in irradiated austenitic stainless steels and cast stainless steels, while a few voids were found in base and grain-boundary-engineered Alloy 690. All the irradiated microstructures were dominated by a high density of Frank loops, which varied in mean size and density for different alloys.

  15. Effect of alloy grain size on the high-temperature oxidation behavior of the austenitic steel TP 347

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Braz Trindade

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Generally, oxide scales formed on high Cr steels are multi-layered and the kinetics are strongly influenced by the alloy grain boundaries. In the present study, the oxidation behaviour of an austenite steel TP347 with different grain sizes was studied to identify the role of grain-boundaries in the oxidation process. Heat treatment in an inert gas atmosphere at 1050 °C was applied to modify the grain size of the steel TP347. The mass gain during subsequent oxidation was measured using a microbalance with a resolution of 10-5 g. The scale morphology was examined using SEM in combination with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Oxidation of TP347 with a grain size of 4 µm at 750 °C in air follows a parabolic rate law. For a larger grain size (65 µm, complex kinetics is observed with a fast initial oxidation followed by several different parabolic oxidation stages. SEM examinations indicated that the scale formed on specimens with smaller grain size was predominantly Cr2O3, with some FeCr2O4 at localized sites. For specimens with larger grain size the main oxide is iron oxide. It can be concluded that protective Cr2O3 formation is promoted by a high density of fast grain-boundary diffusion paths which is the case for fine-grained materials.

  16. Topological model of austenite-martensite interfaces in Cu-Al-Ni alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ostapovets, Andriy; Zárubová, Niva; Paidar, Václav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 3 (2012), s. 493-496 ISSN 0587-4246. [International Symposium on Physics of Materials, ISPMA /12./. Praha, 04.09.2011-08.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100920 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : CuAlNi * alloy * experimental data * in-situ * topological models * transmission electron microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.531, year: 2012

  17. Magnetic properties near the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transformation in the austenite phase of Ni43Mn44X2Sn11 (X = Fe and Co) Heusler alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, W. Z.; Thanh, T. D.; You, T. S.; Piao, H. G.; Yu, S. C.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we present a detail study on the magnetic properties in the austenitic phase (A phase) Ni43Mn44X2Sn11 alloy with X = Fe and Co, which were prepared by an arc-melting method in an argon atmosphere. The M(T) curves of two samples exhibits a single magnetic phase transition at the Curie temperature of the ferromagnetic (FM) austenitic phase with TCA = 298 K and 334k for (X = Fe and Co) respectively. Based on the Landau theory and M(H) data measured at different temperatures, we found that the FM-PM phase transitions around TCA in both samples were the second-order phase transition. Under an applied field change of 30 kOe, around TCA , the magnetic entropy changes were found to be 0.66 J Kg-1 K-1 and 1.62 J Kg-1 K-1 for (X = Fe and Co) respectively.

  18. Irradiation creep and swelling of various austenitic alloys irradiated in PFR and FFTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In order to use data from surrogate neutron spectra for fusion applications, it is necessary to analyze the impact of environmental differences on property development. This is of particular importance in the study of irradiation creep and its interactions with void swelling, especially with respect to the difficulty of separation of creep strains from various non-creep strains. As part of an on-going creep data rescue and analysis effort, the current study focuses on comparative irradiations conducted on identical gas-pressurized tubes produced and constructed in the United States from austenitic steels (20% CW 316 and 20% CW D9), but irradiated in either the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) in the United Kingdom or the Fast Flux Test Facility in the United States. In PFR, Demountable Subassemblies (DMSA) serving as heat pipes were used without active temperature control. In FFTF the specimens were irradiated with active ({+-}{degrees}5C) temperature control. Whereas the FFTF irradiations involved a series of successive side-by-side irradiation, measurement and reinsertion of the same series of tubes, the PFR experiment utilized simultaneous irradiation at two axial positions in the heat pipe to achieve different fluences at different flux levels. The smaller size of the DMSA also necessitated a separation of the tubes at a given flux level into two groups (low-stress and high-stress) at slightly different axial positions, where the flux between the two groups varied {le}10%. Of particular interest in this study was the potential impact of the two types of separation on the derivation of creep coefficients.

  19. Radiation-induced evolution of austenite matrix in silicon-modified AISI 316 alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.

    1980-01-01

    The microstructures of a series of silicon-modified AISI 316 alloys irradiated to fast neutron fluences of about 2-3 and 10 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV at temperatures ranging from 400 0 C to 600 0 C have been examined. The irradiation of AISI 316 leads to an extensive repartition of several elements, particularly nickel and silicon, between the matrix and various precipitate phases. The segregation of nickel at void and grain boundary surfaces at the expense of other faster-diffusing elements is a clear indication that one of the mechanisms driving the microchemical evolution is the Inverse Kirkendall effect. There is evidence that at one sink this mechanism is in competition with the solute drag process associated with interstitial gradients

  20. Modelling of radiation induced segregation in austenitic Fe alloys at the atomistic level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piochaud, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    In pressurized water reactors, under irradiation internal structures are subject of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking which is influenced by radiation induced segregation (RIS). In this work RIS of 316 stainless steels is modelled considering a model ternary Fe-10Ni-20Cr alloy. For this purpose we have built an Fe-Ni-Cr pair interaction model to simulate RIS at the atomistic level using an atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo approach. The pair interactions have been deduced from density functional theory (DFT) data available in the pure fcc systems but also from DFT calculations we have performed in the Fe-10Ni-20Cr target alloy. Point defect formation energies were calculated and found to depend strongly on the local environment of the defect. As a consequence, a rather good estimation of these energies can be obtained from the knowledge of the number and respective positions of the Ni and Cr atoms in the vicinity of the defect. This work shows that a model based only on interaction parameters between elements positioned in perfect lattice sites (solute atoms and vacancy) cannot capture alone both the thermodynamic and the kinetic aspect of RIS. A more accurate of estimating the barriers encountered by the diffusing species is required than the one used in our model, which has to depend on the saddle point environment. This study therefore shows thus the need to estimate point defect migration energies using the DFT approach to calibrate a model that can be used in the framework of atomic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. We also found that the reproduction by our pair interaction model of DFT data for the self-interstitial atoms was found to be incompatible with the modelling of RIS under electron irradiation. (author)

  1. Factors affecting the grain growth of austenite in low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, J.D.; Storer, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of steels is linked to the metallurgical transformations which occur during manufacture. Clearly then the optimization of a fabrication procedure must be based on fundamental relationships linking specific thermal treatments with transformation behaviour. Optimized manufacture of thick-section, multipass welds is therefore particularly complex since the thermal cycles associated with fusion welding result in the formation of heterogeneous microstructures. Moreover, these transformations will take place under rapid heating and cooling conditions so that standard data based on equilibrium behaviour may not be directly relevant. The present study is part of an integrated research programme aimed at establishing the basic microstructural relationships required to optimize the manufacture and performance of weldments. Work to date demonstrates that utilization of a computer controlled Gleeble simulation system allows a wider range of heating and cooling rates to be applied than is possible with traditional heat treatment techniques. Additional advantages of this system include precise control of time at peak temperature and uniform temperatures within a defined work zone. Results presented for a CrMoV creep resistant low alloy steel indicate that grain growth behaviour in the range 955-1390 C can be related to the time at peak temperature. The effect of this transformation behaviour on weldment behaviour is discussed. (orig.)

  2. Nucleation mechanisms of dynamic recrystallization in austenitic steel alloy 800H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruenger, E.; Wang, X.; Gottstein, G. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Metallkunde und Metallphysik

    1998-05-12

    Many metals and alloys with low and intermediate stacking fault energy undergo dynamic recrystallization (DRX). Due to the growing importance of hot deformation in metal forming there is an increasing interest in the understanding and modeling of microstructure evolution during DRX and its effect on flow behavior. However, despite extensive research in this field and numerous data on a variety of materials the physical understanding of DRX still remains very qualitative. Especially the nucleation of DRX lacks a detailed physical understanding and experimental evidence, due to the difficulties of investigating the micromechanisms of dynamic processes during high temperature deformation. The improved techniques of single grain orientation measurements by using EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction) in the SEM allow to measure the local orientation arrangement and thus identify the orientations of individual nuclei. The current report focuses on the examination of the substructure evolution during dynamic recrystallization with particular attention to the role of continuous subgrain rotation or instabilities of the subgrain structure near the grain boundary with regard to nucleation during DRX.

  3. Hydrogen effects in nitrogen-alloyed austenitic steels; Wirkung von Wasserstoff in stickstofflegierten austenitischen Staehlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlemann, M.; Mummert, K. [Institut fuer Festkoerper- und Werkstofforschung Dresden e.V. (Germany); Shehata, M.F. [National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt)

    1998-12-31

    Hydrogen increases the yield strength of nitrogen-alloyed steels, but on the other hand adversely affects properties such as tensile strength and elongation to fracture. The effect is enhanced with increasing nitrogen and hydrogen contents. Under the effect of hydrogen addition, the discontinuous stress-strain characteristic and the distinct elongation limit of hydrogen-free, nitrogen containing steels is no longer observed in the material. This change of mechanical properties is attributed to an interatomic interaction of nitrogen and hydrogen in the lattice, which is shown for instance by such effects as reduction of hydrogen velocity, high solubility, and a particularly strong lattice expansion. The nature of this interaction of nitrogen and hydrogen in the fcc lattice remains to be identified. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Wasserstoff fuehrt in stickstofflegierten Staehlen zu einer Erhoehung der Streckgrenze, aber gleichzeitig zu einer Abnahme der Zugfestigkeit und Bruchdehnung. Dieser Effekt verstaerkt sich mit zunehmenden Stickstoff- und Wasserstoffgehalten. Ein diskontinuierlicher Spannungs-Dehnungsverlauf mit einer ausgepraegten Streckgrenze in wasserstofffreien hochstickstoffhaltigen Staehlen wird nach Wasserstoffeinfluss nicht mehr beobachtet. Die Aenderung der mechanischen Eigenschaften, wird auf eine interatomare Wechselwirkung von Stickstoff und Wasserstoff im Gitter zurueckgefuehrt, die sich u.a. in geringer Wasserstoffdiffusionsgeschwindigkeit, hoher Loeslichkeit und vor allem in extremer Gitteraufweitung aeussert. Insgesamt ist die Natur der Wechselwirkung zwischen Stickstoff und Wasserstoff im kfz Gitter noch nicht aufgeklaert. (orig.)

  4. A method for the calculation of retained austenite evolution during heat-treatment of low-alloy TRIP-assisted steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsamas, A.I. [Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Univ. of Thessaly, Volos (Greece)

    2006-03-15

    Despite the critical effect of heat-treatment, and in particular of the isothermal bainitic treatment stage, on the amount and stability of retained austenite in the microstructure of low-alloy TRIP-assisted steels, determination of optimum heat-treatment conditions is still largely empirical and experiment-dependent. This work proposes a method by which it is possible to calculate the vol. fraction of retained austenite in the microstructure as a function of intercritical annealing temperature and isothermal bainitic treatment temperature and holding time. The method assumes diffusionless lengthening of bainitic ferrite ({alpha}{sub B}) plates in austenite ({gamma}), and subsequent thickness-wise C rejection from the {alpha}{sub B} plates to the adjacent {gamma} layers. The relative thickness of {alpha}{sub B} plates and adjacent {gamma} layers is determined by the T{sub o} line of the transforming system at any given bainitic transformation temperature. The C-concentration profiles in {gamma} are calculated with respect to a local time-scale, referring to any random section of any random {alpha}{sub B} plate. Determination of the variation of C-concentration profiles with local time in {gamma}, together with the use of a simple austenite-retention criterion, allows the calculation of vol. fraction retained austenite ({gamma}{sub R}) as a function of transformation temperature and local time. Transition from local (calculation) time to actual heat treatment time is performed by introducing a time-scale factor, which depends on transformation temperature and initial C-content of {alpha}{sub B}. The calculated behaviour of vol. fraction {gamma}{sub R} vs. bainitic holding time conforms to the well established, experimentally observed one: vol. fraction {gamma}{sub R} initially increases with holding time, reaches a maximum and decreases at longer holding times. According to calculated results, the decrease is attributed to the gradual homogenization of C inside the

  5. Imposed potential measurement to evaluate the pitting corrosion resistance and the galvanic behaviour of a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel and its weldment in a LiBr solution at temperatures up to 150ºC

    OpenAIRE

    Blasco Tamarit, María Encarnación; García García, Dionisio Miguel; García Antón, José

    2011-01-01

    Pitting corrosion resistance and galvanic behaviour of Alloy 31, a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031), and its weldment were studied in a heavy brine LiBr solution 1080 g/l at different temperatures (75–150 °C) using electrochemical techniques. The Mixed Potential Theory was used to evaluate the galvanic corrosion between the base and welded metals. Cyclic potentiodynamic curves indicate that high temperatures make passivation and repassivation of pits difficult, because t...

  6. Austenite-to-ferrite transformation in low alloy steels during thermornechanically controlled process studied by in situ neutron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Xu, PG.; Tomota, Y.; Lukáš, Petr; Muránsky, Ondrej; Adachi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 435, č. 5 (2006), s. 46-53 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1048107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : austenite-to-ferrite tranformation * neutron diffraction * thermomechanically controlled prosess Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.490, year: 2006

  7. HIGH TEMPERATURE BRAZING ALLOY FOR JOINT Fe-Cr-Al MATERIALS AND AUSTENITIC AND FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cost, R.C.

    1958-07-15

    A new high temperature brazing alloy is described that is particularly suitable for brazing iron-chromiumaluminum alloys. It consists of approximately 20% Cr, 6% Al, 10% Si, and from 1.5 to 5% phosphorus, the balance being iron.

  8. Influence of value of the criterion of blunting on the selection of the brand of hard alloy and optimum cutting speed when turning austenitic steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipatov Andrew A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A mechanisms of wear carbide tool when turning of austenitic steel 18-8 by cutters from firm hard-alloys of various groups (WC-Co, TiC-WC-Co, TiC-TaC-WC-Co were studied. During wear resistant tests it is established, that the prevalence of one of the two mechanisms of wear (of adhesion-fatigue or dif-fusional depends on the brand of hard alloy. It is shown, that in machining by titanium-containing carbide tool the intensity of the growth of the wear platform on the back surface of the tool as wear changes. This is due to the smooth transition from the predominance of adhesion-fatigue wear to prevalence of diffusional wear. Therefore, the intensity of wear should be considered as current, depending on the value wear platform, and value of the criterion of blunting is influence on the selection of the brand of hard-alloy and optimum cutting speed.

  9. Neutron diffraction and electron microscopic investigation of decomposition and radiation-induced ageing of Cr-Ni-Ti austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alyab'yev, V.M.; Vologin, V.G.; Dubinin, S.F.; Lapin, S.S.; Parkhomenko, V.D.; Sagaradze, V.V.

    1990-01-01

    The kinetic and structural features of intermetallic ageing of Cr-Ni-Ti austenitic steels are investigated over a wide time interval with neutron diffraction and electron microscopic methods. The size and volume fraction of γ'-particles at the initial (0.25 hr) and later (up to 1000 hr) stages of ageing are determined. From superlattice reflections in neutron diffraction a γ'-phase is identified after irradiation by fast neutrons of stainless steel Kh16N15M3T1, which possesses a high resistance to radiation swelling. (author)

  10. The Influence of Austenite Grain Size on the Mechanical Properties of Low-Alloy Steel with Boron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Białobrzeska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study forms part of the current research on modern steel groups with higher resistance to abrasive wear. In order to reduce the intensity of wear processes, and also to minimize their impact, the immediate priority seems to be a search for a correlation between the chemical composition and structure of these materials and their properties. In this paper, the correlation between prior austenite grain size, martensite packets and the mechanical properties were researched. The growth of austenite grains is an important factor in the analysis of the microstructure, as the grain size has an effect on the kinetics of phase transformation. The microstructure, however, is closely related to the mechanical properties of the material such as yield strength, tensile strength, elongation and impact strength, as well as morphology of occurred fracture. During the study, the mechanical properties were tested and a tendency to brittle fracture was analysed. The studies show big differences of the analysed parameters depending on the applied heat treatment, which should provide guidance to users to specific applications of this type of steel.

  11. The electrochemical corrosion behavior of austenitic alloys, cobalt or nickel based super alloys, structurally hardened martensitic, Inconel, zircaloy, super austenitic, duplex and of Ni-Cr or NTi deposits in tritiated water. 3 volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellanger, G.

    1994-01-01

    The redox potential of 3 H 2 O, as well as the corrosion potentials in this medium are found, abnormally, in the trans-passive region. This is completely different from the behavior in the chemical industry or in the water in nuclear powers. With such behavior, there will be breakdowns of the protective oxide layers, and in the presence of chloride there will be immediate pitting. The steels that are most resistant to this behavior are the super austenitic and super Duplex. To avoid corrosion, another solution is to decompose the radiolytic products by imposing a slight reducing potential. Corrosion inhibitors, which are stable in tritiated water, can be used. (author). 69 refs., 421 figs., tabs

  12. A comparative study of the in vitro corrosion behavior and cytotoxicity of a superferritic stainless steel, a Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy, and an austenitic stainless steel in Hank's solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assis, S L; Rogero, S O; Antunes, R A; Padilha, A F; Costa, I

    2005-04-01

    In this study, the in vitro corrosion resistance of a superferritic stainless steel in naturally aerated Hank's solution at 37 degrees C has been determined to evaluate the steel for use as a biomaterial. The potentiodynamic polarization method and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to determine the corrosion resistance. The polarization results showed very low current densities at the corrosion potential and electrochemical behavior typical of passive metals. At potentials above 0.75 V (SCE), and up to that of the oxygen evolution reaction, the superferritic steel exhibited transpassive behavior followed by secondary passivation. The superferritic stainless steel exhibited high pitting resistance in Hank's solution. This steel did not reveal pits even after polarization to 3000 mV (SCE). The EIS results indicated high impedance values at low frequencies, supporting the results obtained from the polarization measurements. The results obtained for the superferritic steel have been compared with those of the Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy and an austenitic stainless steel, as Ti alloys are well known for their high corrosion resistance and biocompatibility, and the austenitic stainless steel is widely used as an implant material. The cytotoxicity tests indicated that the superferritic steel, the austenitic steel, and the Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy were not toxic. Based on corrosion resistance and cytotoxicity results, the superferritic stainless steel can be considered as a potential biomaterial. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Effects of pulsed and/or dual ion irradiation on microstructural evolution in a Ti and Si modified austenitic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishinuma, A.; Packan, N.H.; Lee, E.H.; Mansur, L.K.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of pulsed 4 MeV Ni-ion bombardment, with and without simultaneous helium injection, at 958 K and damage levels from 1 to 50 dpa has been studied in a low swelling, Ti- and Si- modified austenitic stainless steel. Compared to continuous irradiation, pulsing caused an increase in the number density of interstitial loops formed during irradiation. Helium also increased the nucleation of interstitial loops. The main precipitates formed were a large number of small TiC particles uniformly distributed in the matrix, and a small number of relatively large eta and G precipitates. These course precipitates were somewhat larger in the pulsed specimens. Pulsing appeared to produce no significant change in swelling compared to continuous irradiation. However, for one specimen irradiated to 54 dpa, pulsing concurrent with substantial temperature fluctuations caused by beam heating may have been responsible for a larger swelling compared to continuous irradiation

  14. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  15. Magneto-elastic attenuation in austenitic phase of Ni-Mn-Ga alloy investigated by ultrasonic methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seiner, Hanuš; Bicanová, Lucie; Sedlák, Petr; Landa, Michal; Heller, Luděk; Aaltio, I.

    521-522, - (2009), s. 205-208 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/06/0768 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : ultrasonics methods * Shape memory alloys * RUS * magneto elasticity Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 1.901, year: 2009 http://apps.isiknowledge.com/full_record.do?product=WOS&search_mode=GeneralSearch&qid=1&SID=S1446KoaJ84G2G4LchI&page=1&doc=1

  16. The effect of alloyed nitrogen or dissolved nitrate ions on the anodic behaviour of austenitic stainless steel in hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahrabi, T.

    2004-01-01

    The anodic behaviour of high purity stainless steels, based on a 316L composition, has been studied at room temperature in HCl solutions from 1 to 6 M. For all acid concentrations, the presence of 0.22% nitrogen has little or no effect on the active dissolution kinetics at low over-potentials. The effect on the critical current density for passivation is also small for low HCl concentrations ( 4.5 M), no passivation occurs and again nitrogen has little effect. However, for HCl concentrations around 4 M nitrogen reversibly impedes active dissolution at a few hundred mA cm -2 . The effect does not appear to be an oxide passivation, but is more likely to be due to surface enrichment of nitrogen atoms. Implications for localized corrosion are discussed. An effect similar to that of nitrogen alloying is reproduced on a nitrogen free alloy by adding 2 M NaNO 3 to a 4M HCl solution. This effect is distinct from the passivation of salt-covered surfaces and may be preferable to the latter as an explanation of the increase in pitting potential by nitrate additions to NaCl solutions. Passivation under a salt film is retained to explain the passivation of growing pits above the inhibition potential. (authors)

  17. Solidification cracking in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solidification cracking is a significant problem during the welding of austenitic stainless steels, particularly in fully austenitic and stabilized compositions. Hot cracking in stainless steel welds is caused by low-melting eutectics containing impurities such as S, P and alloy elements such as Ti, Nb. The WRC-92 diagram can be ...

  18. Probing the electronic structure of Ni–Mn–In–Si based Heusler alloys thin films using magneto-optical spectra in martensitic and austenitic phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novikov, A. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Sokolov, A., E-mail: asokol@unlserve.unl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Gan’shina, E.A. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Quetz, Abdiel; Dubenko, I.S. [Department of Physics, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States); Stadler, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Ali, N. [Department of Physics, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901 (United States); Titov, I.S.; Rodionov, I.D. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Lähderanta, E. [Lappeenranta University of Technology, 53851 (Finland); Zhukov, A. [Dpto. de Física de Materiales, Fac. Químicas, UPV/EHU, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48011 Bilbao (Spain); Granovsky, A.B. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Sabirianov, R. [Department of Physics, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE 68182 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Magneto-optical properties of NiMnIn thin films with a magnetostructural transition. • Comparative analysis of magnetic properties in martensitic and austenite phases. • DFT calculations of the MO Kerr effect and site-resolved DOS agree with experiment. • The electronic structure does not change significantly with Martensitic transition. - Abstract: Thin films of Ni{sub 52}Mn{sub 35−x}In{sub 11+x}Si{sub 2} were fabricated by magnetron sputtering on MgO (0 0 1) single crystal substrates. Magnetization as function of temperature for Ni{sub 52}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 11}Si{sub 2} exhibits features consistent with a magnetostructural transition (MST) from an austenitic phase to a martensitic phase, similar to the bulk material. We observed that the martensitic transformation is externally sensitive to small changes in chemical composition and stoichiometry. It has been found that thin films of Ni{sub 52}Mn{sub 34−x}In{sub 11+x}Si{sub 2} with x = 0 and 1 undergo a temperature-induced MST or remain in a stable austenitic phase, respectively. Comparison of magneto-optical transverse Kerr effect spectra obtained at 0.5–4.0 eV in the 35–300 K temperature interval reveal insignificant differences between the martensitic and austenite phases. We found that the field and temperature dependencies of the transverse Kerr effect are quite different from the magnetization behavior, which is attributed to magnetic inhomogeneity across the films. To elucidate the effects of magnetostructural phase transitions on the electronic properties, we performed density functional calculations of the magneto-optical Kerr effect.

  19. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of copper alloys and their HIP joints with austenitic stainless steel in unirradiated and neutron irradiated condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taehtinen, S.; Pyykkoenen, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland); Singh, B.N.; Toft, P. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark). Materials Research Dept.

    1998-03-01

    The tensile strength and ductility of unirradiated CuAl25 IG0 and CuCrZr alloys decreased continuously with increasing temperature up to 350 deg C. Fracture toughness of unirradiated CuAl25 IG0 alloy decreased continuously with increasing temperature from 20 deg C to 350 deg C whereas the fracture toughness of unirradiated CuCrZr alloy remained almost constant at temperatures up to 100 deg C, was decreased significantly at 200 deg C and slightly increased at 350 deg C. Fracture toughness of HIP joints were lower than that of corresponding copper alloy and fracture path in HIP joint specimen was always within copper alloy side of the joint. Neutron irradiation to a dose level of 0.3 dpa resulted in hardening and reduction in uniform elongation to about 2-4% at 200 deg C in both copper alloys. At higher temperatures softening was observed and uniform elongation increased to about 5% and 16% for CuAl25 IG0 and CuCrZr alloys, respectively. Fracture toughness of CuAl25 IG0 alloy reduced markedly due to neutron irradiation in the temperature range from 20 deg C to 350 deg C. The fracture toughness of the irradiated CuCrZr alloy also decreased in the range from 20 deg C to 350 deg C, although it remained almost unaffected at temperatures below 200 deg C and decreased significantly at 350 deg C when compared with that of unirradiated CuCrZr alloy. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of austenitic stainless steels for transpassive corrosion by metal purification technology. Synergistic effect of Si and P on intergranular corrosion of Fe-18Cr-14Ni alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, Masami; Ohta, Joji; Kako, Kenji; Kawakami, Eishi

    2001-01-01

    The synergistic effect of Si, Mn, C, P, and S on the transpassive corrosion of HP18Cr-14Ni alloys was studied in 13N nitric acid. The specimens were fabricated using a cold crucible method in a high-vacuum chamber to reduce contamination. The additions of Si<1% and Mn<2% had no effect on the corrosion behavior of HP18Cr-14Ni alloys, and the addition of Si<1% also had no effect on the corrosion behavior of HP18Cr-14Ni-1Mn alloys, although 1% Si induced intergranular corrosion in both the alloys. Thus, HP18Cr-14Ni-1Mn-0.5Si alloys were selected to evaluate the effects of C, P and S (100 ppm each). The addition of P, and the co-addition of C, P, and S to HP18Cr-14Ni-1Mn-0.5Si induced intergranular corrosion of the same degree in the solution annealed condition. This result suggests the synergistic effect of Si and P to induce intergranular corrosion, since the single addition of Si or P to this level did not lead to intergranular corrosion of HP18Cr-14Ni alloys. HP18Cr-14Ni-1Mn-0.5Si alloys containing C, P, and S at the 100 ppm level each showed superior corrosion resistance compared to a commercial Type 304L in 13N nitric acid. (author)

  1. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  2. The effect of cold work, heat treatment, and composition on the austenite to R-phase transformation temperature of Ni-Ti shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoma, P.E.; Angst, D.R.; Schachner, K.D.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of cold work (CW) and heat treatment (HT) on the austenite to R-Phase (A→R) transformation temperature (TT) of a near equiatomic and three other Ti rich NiTi SMA is examined. For the SMA having a near equiatomic composition, the A→R TT increases with increasing CW at low HT temperatures. For the SMA having the maximum possible Ti content, the A→R TT decreases with increasing CW at low HT temperatures. For all compositions, the A→R TT is not sensitive to CW at high HT temperatures. At a Ti content slightly below the maximum possible, the A→R TT is relatively insensitive to CW and HT temperature. For all of the SMA investigated, the A→R TT increases with increasing Ti content for a specific CW and HT temperature, and this effect is greatest at low CW and at high HT temperatures. (orig.)

  3. In-situ synchrotron diffraction and digital image correlation technique for characterizations of retained austenite stability in low-alloyed transformation induced plasticity steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauser, S.; Kromm, A.; Kannengiesser, Th.; Rethmeier, M.

    2010-01-01

    Direct measurement and quantification of phase transformation in a low-alloyed transformation induced plasticity steels depending on the tensile load as well as determination of the real true stress and true strain values were carried out in-situ using high energy synchrotron radiation. Digital image correlation technique was used to quantify more precisely the true strain values. The aim of the work was to obtain a better understanding of the phase transformation of commercial low-alloyed transformation induced plasticity steel depending on the true strain and true stress values.

  4. Evaluation of a Belt-Cast Austenitic Steel Alloy from Salzgitter Mannesmann Forschung: Effect of Hardness on the Ballistic Resistance against Two 0.30-cal. Projectile Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    manufacturing technology and requisite alloy compositions for the production of high-strength and high-ductility security steels. Security steels...company was still experiencing fabrication issues that prevent the material from being fabricated in thicker sections. Therefore, currently, only 5-mm... production , an extended period of negotiations was required to obtain representative samples of this experimental steel from Salzgitter. As a result, 5

  5. Hydrogen induced ductility losses in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, J.A.; West, A.J.

    1978-06-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the tensile behavior of austenitic stainless steel welds was studied in two AISI 300 series alloys and two nitrogen strengthened alloys. The microstructure of these welds typically contained several percent ferrite in an austenite matrix. Hydrogen was found to reduce the ductility of all welds; however, the severity of ductility loss decreased with increasing stacking fault energy, as observed in previous studies on wrought material. In the lowest stacking fault energy welds, 304L and 308L, hydrogen changed the fracture mode from simple rupture to a mixed mode of ductile and brittle fracture associated with the austenite ferrite interface. Higher stacking fault energy welds, 309S and 22-13-5, showed smaller losses in ductility. In these materials hydrogen assisted the ductile rupture process by aiding void growth and coalescence, without changing the fracture mode. Varying the amount of ferrite from approximately one to 10 percent had no significant effect on performance in hydrogen.

  6. A study on the influence of trace elements (C, S, B, Al, N) on the hot ductility of the high purity austenitic alloy Fe-Ni 36% (INVAR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonetta-Perrot, M.T.

    1994-11-01

    In order to study the damage mechanisms leading to the ductility decrease of the Invar alloy at 600 C, a high-purity Fe-Ni 36% sample has been doped with trace elements with the purpose of identifying the role of sulfur, sulfur with Al N or B N precipitates and sulfur with boron, on the ductility, the failure modes, the intergranular damage and the plastic deformation mechanisms prior to failure. A new AES segregation quantification method has been used to study the kinetics and thermodynamics of intergranular and surface segregations and determine the relation between sulfur segregation and grain joint fragility. refs., figs., tabs.

  7. Carbon Concentration of Austenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ławrynowicz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was carried out to examine the influence of temperature and times of austempering process on the maximum extend towhich the bainite reaction can proceed and the carbon content in retained austenite. It should be noted that a small percentage change in theaustenite carbon content can have a significant effect on the subsequent austempering reaction changing the volume fraction of the phasespresent and hence, the resulting mechanical properties. Specimens were prepared from an unalloyed ductile cast iron, austenitised at 950oCfor 60 minutes and austempered by the conventional single-step austempering process at four temperatures between BS and MS, eg., 250,300, 350 and 400oC. The samples were austempered at these temperatures for 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 minutes and finally quenched toambient temperature. Volume fractions of retained austenite and carbon concentration in the residual austenite have been observed byusing X-ray diffraction. Additionally, carbon concentration in the residual austenite was calculated using volume fraction data of austeniteand a model developed by Bhadeshia based on the McLellan and Dunn quasi-chemical thermodynamic model. The comparison ofexperimental data with the T0, T0' and Ae3' phase boundaries suggests the likely mechanism of bainite reaction in cast iron is displacive rather than diffusional. The carbon concentration in retained austenite demonstrates that at the end of bainite reaction the microstructure must consist of not only ausferrite but additionally precipitated carbides.

  8. Cyclic deformation behaviour of austenitic steels at ambient and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. The aim of the present investigation is to characterise cyclic deforma- tion behaviour and plasticity-induced martensite formation of metastable austenitic stainless steels at ambient and elevated temperatures, taking into account the influ- ence of the alloying elements titanium and niobium. Titanium and niobium are.

  9. Factors which determine the swelling rate of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Once void nucleation subsides, the swelling rate of many austenitic alloys becomes rather insensitive to variables that control the transient regime of swelling. Models are presented which describe the roles of nickel, chromium and silicon in void nucleation. The relative insensitivity of steady-state swelling to temperature, displacement rate and composition is also discussed

  10. Effect of austenitization conditions on kinetics of isothermal transformation of austenite of structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopleva, E.V.; Bayazitov, V.M.; Abramov, O.V.; Kozlova, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Effect of austenization of kinetics of pearlite and bainite transformations for steels with different carbon content differing by alloying character and degree has been investigated. Austenization temperature increase is shown to leads to retardation of ferrite-pearlite transformation in low- and medium-carbon alloyed steels. Step-like holding in the region of austenite stable state (850, 950 deg) after high-temperature heating (1100 deg C) increases the rate of transformation partially recovering its kinetics and decomposition velocity after low-temperature heating in steels alloyed advantageously with carbide-forming elements (08Kh2G2F, 30Kh3) and does not affect kinetics in the 35Kh, 30KhGSN2A, 45N5 steels. Increase of heating temperature and growth of an austenite grain cause considerable acceleration of bainite transformation, increase of the temperaure of bainite transformation beginning and increase of the transformation amplitude in the 08Kh2G2F, 30Kh3 steels and affect weakly kinetics in steels with mixed alloying (30KhGSN2A) or low-alloy one (35Kh). The bainite transformation rate in the 45N5 steelite does not depend on austenization. The effect of additional acceleration of bainite transformation as a result holding after high-temperature heating in those steels, where activation of transformation occurs with increase of heating temperature

  11. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  12. Modeling of the Recrystallization and Austenite Formation Overlapping in Cold-Rolled Dual-Phase Steels During Intercritical Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollat, M.; Massardier, V.; Fabregue, D.; Buscarlet, E.; Keovilay, F.; Perez, M.

    2017-10-01

    Austenite formation kinetics of a DP1000 steel was investigated from a ferrite-pearlite microstructure (either fully recrystallized or cold-rolled) during typical industrial annealing cycles by means of dilatometry and optical microscopy after interrupted heat treatments. A marked acceleration of the kinetics was found when deformed ferrite grains were present in the microstructure just before austenite formation. After having described the austenite formation kinetics without recrystallization and the recrystallization kinetics of the steel without austenite formation by simple JMAK laws, a mixture law was used to analyze the kinetics of the cold-rolled steel for which austenite formation and recrystallization may occur simultaneously. In the case where the interaction between these two phenomena is strong, three main points were highlighted: (i) the heating rate greatly influences the austenite formation kinetics, as it affects the degree of recrystallization at the austenite start temperature; (ii) recrystallization inhibition above a critical austenite fraction accelerates the austenite formation kinetics; (iii) the austenite fractions obtained after a 1 hour holding deviate from the local equilibrium fractions given by Thermo-Calc, contrary to the case of the recrystallized steel. This latter result could be due to the fact that the dislocations of the deformed ferrite matrix could promote the diffusion of the alloying elements of the steel and accelerate austenite formation.

  13. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; steel alloys is also disclosed.

  14. Abnormal growth of austenite grain of low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qingbo; Sun Ying

    2006-01-01

    Niobium is an important alloying element for the steel. To know further the effect of Nb in the steel, the contrast experiments on the austenite grain growth of the 0.015%Nb and free Nb steels were carried out using Gleeble 1500 thermomechanical simulator. The experimental results indicate that the austenite grain of 0.015%Nb steel is finer than that of Nb free steel at 1150-1230 deg. C. And when the heating temperature arrives the critical temperature 1240 deg. C, the austenite grain of Nb steel suddenly grows up, while the austenite grain of Nb free steel changes little. Finally, the austenite grain of Nb steel is obviously coarser than that of Nb free steel. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using a carbon extraction replica technique, the precipitates of Nb(C,N) were not observed in the 0.015%Nb steel. It is concluded that the grain-boundary internal adsorption of Nb atoms leads to the result

  15. Expanded austenite in nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steel grades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casteletti, L.C.; Fernandes, F.A.P.; Heck, S.C.; Gallego, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this work nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steels were analyzed through optical microscopy and X-rays diffraction analysis (XRD). It was observed that the formation of N supersaturated phase, called expanded austenite, has promoted significant increment of hardness (> 1000HV). XRD results have indicated the anomalous displacement of the diffracted peaks, in comparison with the normal austenite. This behavior, combined with peaks broadening, it was analyzed in different nitriding temperatures which results showed good agreement with the literature. (author)

  16. Corrosion And Thermal Processing In Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Deposited Austenitic Stainless Steel Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    testing (ASTM G5) of low pressure cold spray austenitic stainless steel coatings. Several different powders and heat treatments will be applied to...diffusion eliminating the local low chromium region. The low carbon type stainless steel alloys as used here are generally considered to be...maximum 200words) This thesis presents research on the corrosion properties and effects of heat treatment on austenitic stainless steel coatings

  17. Materials design of high nitrogen manganese austenitic stainless TWIP steels for strip casting

    OpenAIRE

    Mosecker, Linda

    2016-01-01

    High nitrogen manganese austenitic stainless TWIP steels achieve attractive mechanical properties and excellent strain hardening behavior. However, high nitrogen steel melting methods are generally associated with high pressures to enhance the nitrogen solubility in the melt. Thin strip casting offers an attractive option that not only shortens the process route but also allows the alloying with nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. In the present work, the materials design of austenitic Fe-Cr-Mn...

  18. Austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G. D.; Powell, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.008 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.0010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; 0.01-0.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; 0.03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, O; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P+wt. % B+wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding

  19. Non-uniformity of hot plastic strain of stainless steels with austenitic-ferritic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laricheva, L.P.; Peretyat'ko, V.N.; Rostovtsev, A.N.; Levius, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Non-uniformity of hot strain of stainless steels of various alloying was investigated. Steels with austenite and δ-ferrite structure of two classes were chosen for investigation: 08Kh18N10T steel of austenitic class and 08Kh21N5T steel of austenitic-ferritic class. Tests were conducted for samples subjected to preliminary thermal treatment: heating up to 1250 deg C, holding during 0.5 h, cooling in water. The heat treatment enabled to produce large grains of austenite and δ-ferrite (about 30 μm) in 08Kh21N5T steel, and sufficient amount of δ-ferrite (up to 50%) in 08Kh18N10T steel. It is shown that hot strain of austenitic-ferritic steels is non-uniform. δ-ferrite strain is more pronounced as compared to austenite. The ratio of mean δ-ferrite strain to the mean austenite strain grows with increase of the degree of general steel strain and temperature. The ratio of mean phase strains in 08Kh18N10T steel is higher as compared to 08Kh21N5T steel, general strain and temperature being equal. Temperature effect on the ratio of δ-ferrite and austenite strains is more pronounced for 08Kh18N10T steel. It is explaind by the value of ratios of phase strain resistance and temperature effect on them

  20. Thermodynamic stability of austenitic Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janus

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The performed research was aimed at determining thermodynamic stability of structures of Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron castings. Examined were 35 alloys. The castings were tempered at 900 °C for 2 hours. Two cooling speeds were used: furnace-cooling and water-cooling. In the alloys with the nickel equivalent value less than 20,0 %, partial transition of austenite to martensite took place. The austenite decomposition ratio and the related growth of hardness was higher for smaller nickel equivalent value and was clearly larger in annealed castings than in hardened ones. Obtaining thermodynamically stable structure of castings requires larger than 20,0 % value of the nickel equivalent.

  1. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    Progress is reported in eight sections: analysis and evaluation studies, test matrices and test methods development, Path A Alloy Development (austenitic stainless steels), Path C Alloy Development (Ti and V alloys), Path D Alloy Development (Fe alloys), Path E Alloy Development (ferritic steels), irradiation experiments and materials inventory, and materials compatibility and hydrogen permeation studies. (DLC)

  2. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-04-01

    Progress is reported in eight sections: analysis and evaluation studies, test matrices and test methods development, Path A Alloy Development (austenitic stainless steels), Path C Alloy Development (Ti and V alloys), Path D Alloy Development (Fe alloys), Path E Alloy Development (ferritic steels), irradiation experiments and materials inventory, and materials compatibility and hydrogen permeation studies

  3. Some data of second sequence non standard austenitic ingot, A2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurdin Effendi; Aziz K Jahja; Bandriana; Wisnu Ari Adi

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis of second sequence austenite stainless steel named A2 using extracted minerals from Indonesian mines has been carried out. The starting materials for austenite alloy consist of granular ferro scrap, nickel, ferro-chrome, ferro-manganese, and ferro-silicon. The second sequence composition differs from the former first sequence. This A2 sequence contained more nickel, meanwhile titanium element had not been added explicitly to it, and just been found from raw materials contents or impurities, as well as carbon content in the alloy. However before the actual alloying work started, the first important step was to carry out the determination of the fractional amount of each starting material necessary to form an austenite stainless steel alloy as specified. Once the component fraction of each base alloy-element was determined, the raw materials are weighed on the mini-balance. After the fractional quantities of each constituent have been computed, an appropriate amount of these base materials are weighed separately on the micro scale. The raw materials were then placed in the induction foundry furnace, which was operated by an electromagnetic inductive-thermal system. The foundry furnace system performs the stirring of the molten materials automatically. The homogenized molten metals were poured down into sand casting prepared in advance. Some of the austenite stainless steel were normalized at 600°C for 6 hours. The average density is 7.8 g cm -1 and the average hardness value of 'normalized' austenite stainless-steels is in the range of 460 on the Vickers scale. The microstructure observation concludes that an extensive portion of the sample's structure is dendritic and the surface turns out to be homogenous. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the material belongs to the fcc crystallographic system, which fits in with the austenite class of the alloy. The experimental fractional elemental composition data acquired by OES method turn out to

  4. Shape memory alloys – characterization techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shape memory alloys are the generic class of alloys that show both thermal and mechanical memory. The basic physics involved in the shape memory effect is the reversible thermoelastic martensitic transformation. In general, there exists two phases in shape memory alloys, viz., a hightemperature phase or austenitic ...

  5. Lightweight Multifunctional Linear Cellular Alloy Ballistic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-26

    densities of 10, 15 and 20 % with the dimensions shown in Table 1. The alloy compositions were high strength maraging steel (M200) and Super Invar ... alloys made from LCA processing3 are shown in Table 3. Super Invar in the as-reduced state is a ductile (25-30%) austenitic alloy . When cooled to...Final Report for Lightweight Multifunctional Linear Cellular Alloy Ballistic Structures from Structured Alloys , Inc. Joe K

  6. Design of Wear-Resistant Austenitic Steels for Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, J. N.; Casati, R.; Lecis, N.; Andrianopoli, C.; Varone, A.; Montanari, R.; Vedani, M.

    2018-03-01

    Type 316L stainless steel feedstock powder was modified by alloying with powders containing carbide/boride-forming elements to create improved wear-resistant austenitic alloys that can be readily processed by Selective Laser Melting. Fe-based alloys with high C, B, V, and Nb contents were thus produced, resulting in a microstructure that consisted of austenitic grains and a significant amount of hard carbides and borides. Heat treatments were performed to modify the carbide distribution and morphology. Optimal hard-phase spheroidization was achieved by annealing the proposed alloys at 1150 °C for 1 hour followed by water quenching. The total increase in hardness of samples containing 20 pct of C/B-rich alloy powder was of 82.7 pct while the wear resistance could be increased by a factor of 6.

  7. Characterization of the sodium corrosion behavior of commercial austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiels, S.A.; Bagnall, C.; Keeton, A.R.; Witkowski, R.E.; Anantatmula, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    During the course of an on-going evaluation of austenitic alloys for potential liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) fuel pin cladding application, a series of commercial alloys was selected for study. The data obtained led to the recognition of an underlying pattern of behavior and enabled the prediction of surface chemistry changes. The changes in surface topographical development from alloy to alloy are shown and the important role played by the element molybdenum in this development is indicated. The presentation also illustrates how a total damage equation was evolved to encompass all aspects of weight loss and metal/sodium interactions: wall thinning ferrite layer formation and intergranular attack. The total damage equation represents a significant departure from the classical description of sodium corrosion in which weight loss is simply translated into wall thinning

  8. Market Opportunities for Austenitic Stainless Steels in SO2 Scrubbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Harold T.

    1980-10-01

    Recent U.S. federal legislation has created new opportunities for SO2 scrubbers because all coals, even low-sulfur western coals, will probably require scrubbing to remove SO2 from gaseous combustion products. Scrubbing, the chemical absorption of SO2 by vigorous contact with a slurry—usually lime or limestone—creates an aggressive acid-chloride solution. This presents a promising market for pitting-resistant austenitic stainless steels, but there is active competition from rubber and fiberglass-lined carbon steel. Since the latter are favored on a first-cost basis, stainless steels must be justified on a cost/performance or life-cost basis. Nickel-containing austenitic alloys are favored because of superior field fabricability. Ferritic stainless steels have little utility in this application because of limitations in weldability and resulting poor corrosion resistance. Inco corrosion test spools indicate that molybdenum-containing austenitic alloys are needed. The leanest alloys for this application are 316L and 317L. Low-carbon grades of stainless steel are specified to minimize corrosion in the vicinity of welds. More highly alloyed materials may be required in critical areas. At present, 16,000 MW of scrubber capacity is operational and 17,000 MW is under construction. Another 29,000 MW is planned, bringing the total to 62,000 MW. Some 160,000 MW of scrubber capacity is expected to be placed in service over the next 10 years. This could translate into a total potential market of 80,000 tons of alloy plate for new power industry construction in the next decade. Retrofitting of existing power plants plus scrubbers for other applications such as inert gas generators for oil tankers, smelters, municipal incinerators, coke ovens, the pulp and paper industry, sulfuric acid plants, and fluoride control in phosphoric acid plants will add to this large market.

  9. Effects of Austenitizing Conditions on the Microstructure of AISI M42 High-Speed Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwa Luo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influences of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure of AISI M42 high-speed steel were investigated through thermodynamic calculation, microstructural analysis, and in-situ observation by a confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM. Results show that the network morphology of carbides could not dissolve completely and distribute equably in the case of the austenitizing temperature is 1373 K. When the austenitizing temperature reaches 1473 K, the excessive increase in temperature leads to increase in carbide dissolution, higher dissolved alloying element contents, and unwanted grain growth. Thus, 1453 K is confirmed as the best austenitizing condition on temperature for the steel. In addition, variations on the microstructure and hardness of the steel are not obvious when holding time ranges from 15 to 30 min with the austenitizing temperature of 1453 K. However, when the holding time reaches 45 min, the average size of carbides tends to increase because of Ostwald ripening. Furthermore, the value of Ms and Mf decrease with the increase of cooling rate. Hence, high cooling rate can depress the martensitic transformation and increase the content of retained austenite. As a result, the hardness of the steel is the best (65.6 HRc when the austenitizing temperature reaches 1453 K and is held for 30 min.

  10. Comparing the possibilities of austenite content determination in austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Myszka

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents various methods for assessment of the austenite volume fraction in Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI. Tests were carried out on two types of ADI, i.e. unalloyed and alloyed with the addition of 0.72%Cu and 0.27%Mo, heat treated under different conditions of isothermal transformation to obtain different austenite volume fractions. The test material was then subjected to metallographic examinations, X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, an analysis using the author's genuine programme of artificial neural networks, image analysis and magnetic measurements. The results were compared with each other indicating the possibility of a quantitative measurement of austenite and other phases present in cast iron. It was found that different methods of measurement are not fully consistent with each other but show similar results of the austenite content.

  11. Application of Moessbauer effect in the study of austenite retained in low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, A.L.T. de; Silva, E.G. da

    1979-01-01

    Moessbauer effect measurements of two samples of low carbon alloy having micro-structure of granular bainite type and martensite type have been done. The concentration of the retained austenite in both samples was determined by Moessbauer effect and x-rays there, being agreement for the higher austenite content sample. Concentration of carbon in the MA (Martensite - Austenite) constituents of bainite is also ditermined, the results being in agreement with metallographic considerations. Carbon enrichments are shown as responsible by the stabilization of the austenite in the granular bainite. Spectra of both samples present three magnetic configurations for α-iron with medium magnetic fields iqual to 335, 307 and 280 KOe. (A.R.H.) [pt

  12. Role of Austenitization and Pre-Deformation on the Kinetics of the Isothermal Bainitic Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambers, H.-G.; Tschumak, S.; Maier, H. J.; Canadinc, D.

    2009-06-01

    The role of time-temperature path on the isothermal austenite-to-bainite phase transformation of low alloy 51 CrV 4 steel was investigated and the corresponding microstructures were analyzed. The important finding is that an incomplete initial austenitization treatment leaves undissolved carbides in the matrix, such that lower carbon and chromium content in the matrix result, eventually accelerating the phase transformation. Furthermore, the residual carbides constitute additional nucleation sites for the bainite plates, speeding up the process even further. Also, both plastic pre-deformation of the supercooled austenite and application of external elastic stresses during the phase transformation lead to transformation plasticity by enhancing the stress fields, providing a driving force for the growth of bainite plates along a preferred orientation. Overall, the current results constitute the first step toward establishing a database for constructing a realistic microstructure-based model for simulating metal forming operations involving austenite-to-bainite phase transformation.

  13. Radio-induced brittleness of austenitic stainless steels at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    1969-02-01

    In a first part, the author recalls some metallurgical characteristics and properties of iron (atomic properties, crystalline structure, transformation), of iron carbon systems and steels (ferrite, austenite, cementite, martensite, bainite, phase diagrams of iron chromium alloy and iron nickel alloy), aspects regarding the influence of addition elements in the case of stainless steels (mutual interaction of carbon, chromium and nickel in their iron alloys, indication of the various stainless steels, i.e. martensitic, ferritic, austenitic, austenitic-ferritic, and non ferrous), and presents and discusses various mechanical tests (tensile tests, torsion tests, resilience tests, hardness tests, creep tests). In a second part, he discusses the effects of irradiation on austenitic stainless steels: irradiation and deformation under low temperature, irradiation at intermediate temperature, irradiation at high temperature. The third part addresses mechanisms of intergranular fracture in different temperature ranges (400-600, 700-750, and about 800 C). The author then discusses the effect of Helium on the embrittlement of austenitic steels, and finally evokes the perspective of development of a damage model

  14. The Formation of Multipoles during the High-Temperature Creep of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howell, J.; Nielsson, O.; Horsewell, Andy

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that multipole dislocation configurations can arise during power-law creep of certain austenitic stainless steels. These multipoles have been analysed in some detail for two particular steels (Alloy 800 and a modified AISI 316L) and it is suggested that they arise either during...

  15. Diagnostic experimental results on the hydrogen embrittlement of austenitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavriljuk, V.G.; Shivanyuk, V.N.; Foct, J

    2003-03-14

    Three main available hypotheses of hydrogen embrittlement are analysed in relation to austenitic steels based on the studies of the hydrogen effect on the interatomic bonds, phase transformations and microplastic behaviour. It is shown that hydrogen increases the concentration of free electrons, i.e. enhances the metallic character of atomic interactions, although such a decrease in the interatomic bonding cannot be a reason for brittleness and rather assists an increased plasticity. The hypothesis of the critical role of the hydrogen-induced {epsilon} martensite was tested in the experiment with the hydrogen-charged Si-containing austenitic steel. Both the fraction of the {epsilon} martensite and resistance to hydrogen embrittlement were increased due to Si alloying, which is at variance with the pseudo-hydride hypothesis. The hydrogen-caused early start of the microplastic deformation and an increased mobility of dislocations, which are usually not observed in the common mechanical tests, are revealed by the measurements of the strain-dependent internal friction, which is consistent with the hypothesis of the hydrogen-enhanced localised plasticity. An influence of alloying elements on the enthalpy E{sub H} of hydrogen migration in austenitic steels is studied using the temperature-dependent internal friction and a correlation is found between the values of E{sub H} and hydrogen-caused decrease in plasticity. A mechanism for the transition from the hydrogen-caused microplasticity to the apparent macrobrittle fracture is proposed based on the similarity of the fracture of hydrogenated austenitic steels to that of high nitrogen steels.

  16. Dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puli, Ramesh, E-mail: rameshpuli2000@gmail.com; Janaki Ram, G.D.

    2012-12-15

    Friction surfacing involves complex thermo-mechanical phenomena. In this study, the nature of dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L coatings was investigated using electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the alloy 316L undergoes discontinuous dynamic recrystallization under conditions of moderate Zener-Hollomon parameter during friction surfacing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L friction surfaced coatings is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfacing leads to discontinuous dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strain rates in friction surfacing exceed 400 s{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated grain size matches well with experimental observations in 316L coatings.

  17. Comparison of damaging behavior of oxide scales grown on austenitic stainless steels using tensile test and cyclic thermogravimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Fedorova, Elena N.; Braccini, Muriel; Parry, Valérie; Pascal, Celine; Mantel, Marc; Roussel-Dherbey, Francine; Oquab, Djar; Wouters, Yves; Monceau, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Two austenitic stainless steels, AISI 304L and AISI 303, were submitted to cyclic oxidation and to staticmechanical loading after isothermal oxidation at 1000◦C. Alloy 303 contains ten times more S than 304Land some Mn addition. During the steel process, it formed manganese sulfides that lead to the formationof a less resistant oxide scale. Both alloys showed similar behavior during thermal cycling but breakawayoxidation and intensive spallation occurred much sooner for alloy 303 than for all...

  18. Study of biocompatibility of medical grade high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Menghua; Yin, Tieying; Wang, Yazhou; Du, Feifei; Zou, Xingzheng; Gregersen, Hans; Wang, Guixue

    2014-10-01

    Adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the living organism have resulted in development of high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also improves steel properties. The cell cytocompatibility, blood compatibility and cell response of high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel were studied in vitro. The mechanical properties and microstructure of this stainless steel were compared to the currently used 316L stainless steel. It was shown that the new steel material had comparable basic mechanical properties to 316L stainless steel and preserved the single austenite organization. The cell toxicity test showed no significant toxic side effects for MC3T3-E1 cells compared to nitinol alloy. Cell adhesion testing showed that the number of MC3T3-E1 cells was more than that on nitinol alloy and the cells grew in good condition. The hemolysis rate was lower than the national standard of 5% without influence on platelets. The total intracellular protein content and ALP activity and quantification of mineralization showed good cell response. We conclude that the high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel is a promising new biomedical material for coronary stent development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A review on nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talha, Mohd; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2013-10-01

    The field of biomaterials has become a vital area, as these materials can enhance the quality and longevity of human life. Metallic materials are often used as biomaterials to replace structural components of the human body. Stainless steels, cobalt-chromium alloys, commercially pure titanium and its alloys are typical metallic biomaterials that are being used for implant devices. Stainless steels have been widely used as biomaterials because of their very low cost as compared to other metallic materials, good mechanical and corrosion resistant properties and adequate biocompatibility. However, the adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have promoted the development of "nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels" for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel and emphatically the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steel, as well as the development of nickel-free nitrogen containing stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength, better corrosion and wear resistance and superior biocompatibility in comparison to the currently used austenitic stainless steel (e.g. 316L), the newly developed nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventionally used medical stainless steels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The electrochemical corrosion behavior of austenitic alloys, cobalt or nickel based super alloys, structurally hardened martensitic, Inconel, zircaloy, super austenitic, duplex and of Ni-Cr or NTi deposits in tritiated water. 3 volumes; Comportement electrochimique a la corrosion d`alliages austenitiques, superalliages base cobalt ou nickel, martensitiques a durcissement structural, inconel, zircaloy, superaustenitiques et duplex, de depots Ni-Cr et NTi en eau tritiee. 3 volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellanger, G.

    1994-12-31

    The redox potential of {sup 3} H{sub 2}O, as well as the corrosion potentials in this medium are found, abnormally, in the trans-passive region. This is completely different from the behavior in the chemical industry or in the water in nuclear powers. With such behavior, there will be breakdowns of the protective oxide layers, and in the presence of chloride there will be immediate pitting. The steels that are most resistant to this behavior are the super austenitic and super Duplex. To avoid corrosion, another solution is to decompose the radiolytic products by imposing a slight reducing potential. Corrosion inhibitors, which are stable in tritiated water, can be used. (author). 69 refs., 421 figs., tabs.

  1. General and Localized corrosion of Austenitic and Borated Stainless Steels in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, D.; Estill, J.; Wong, L.; Rebak, R.

    2004-01-01

    Boron containing stainless steels are used in the nuclear industry for applications such as spent fuel storage, control rods and shielding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion resistance of three borated stainless steels with standard austenitic alloy materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Tests were conducted in three simulated concentrated ground waters at 90 C. Results show that the borated stainless were less resistant to corrosion than the witness austenitic materials. An acidic concentrated ground water was more aggressive than an alkaline concentrated ground water

  2. Deformation Induced Martensitic Transformation and Its Initial Microstructure Dependence in a High Alloyed Duplex Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Lin; Huang, Tian Lin; Wang, Yu Hui

    2017-01-01

    Deformation induced martensitic transformation (DIMT) usually occurs in metastable austenitic stainless steels. Recent studies have shown that DIMT may occur in the austenite phase of low alloyed duplex stainless steels. The present study demonstrates that DIMT can also take place in a high alloyed...... Fe–23Cr–8.5Ni duplex stainless steel, which exhibits an unexpectedly rapid transformation from γ-austenite into α′-martensite. However, an inhibited martensitic transformation has been observed by varying the initial microstructure from a coarse alternating austenite and ferrite band structure...

  3. Anelasticity in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-dependent anelastic deformation mechanisms arise in austenitic stainless steel when load is removed during a high-temperature creep test. This phenomenon is investigated by conducting creep tests, with intermittent load removal, on AISI Type 316H austenitic stainless steel at 550 and 650 °C, supported by in situ measurement of creep-induced intergranular residual strains by neutron diffraction. All the cyclic tests exhibit anelastic behaviour on unloading and develop substantially lower load-on creep strain rates, reduced ductility and longer rupture times than baseline steady-load creep tests at similar conditions. The mechanisms underlying the observed anelastic behaviour and changes in macroscopic creep properties are discussed with reference to the development of intergranular strains and dislocation behaviour.

  4. Austenitization of FerriticDuctile Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzyńska A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Austenitization is the first step of heat treatment preceding the isothermal quenching of ductile iron in austempered ductile iron (ADI manufacturing. Usually, the starting material for the ADI production is ductile iron with more convenient pearlitic matrix. In this paper we present the results of research concerning the austenitizing of ductile iron with ferritic matrix, where all carbon dissolved in austenite must come from graphite nodules. The scope of research includedcarrying out the process of austenitization at 900° Cusing a variable times ranging from 5 to 240minutes,and then observations of the microstructure of the samples after different austenitizing times. These were supplemented with micro-hardness testing. The research showed that the process of saturating austenite with carbon is limited by the rate of dissolution of carbon from nodular graphite precipitates

  5. Standard practice for X-Ray determination of retained austenite in steel with near random crystallographic orientation

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the determination of retained austenite phase in steel using integrated intensities (area under peak above background) of X-ray diffraction peaks using chromium Kα or molybdenum Kα X-radiation. 1.2 The method applies to carbon and alloy steels with near random crystallographic orientations of both ferrite and austenite phases. 1.3 This practice is valid for retained austenite contents from 1 % by volume and above. 1.4 If possible, X-ray diffraction peak interference from other crystalline phases such as carbides should be eliminated from the ferrite and austenite peak intensities. 1.5 Substantial alloy contents in steel cause some change in peak intensities which have not been considered in this method. Application of this method to steels with total alloy contents exceeding 15 weight % should be done with care. If necessary, the users can calculate the theoretical correction factors to account for changes in volume of the unit cells for austenite and ferrite resulting from vari...

  6. Shape memory alloy based motor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (Duerig et al 1990) of the alloy. Unlike conventional materials, which show only, limited effect on stress–strain behaviour (Duerig et al 1990; Mellor 1989), SMA shows marked temperature dependence, because of reversible austenite to martensite transformation. The underlying phenomenon of the shape memory effect is ...

  7. Strength of "Light" Ferritic and Austenitic Steels Based on the Fe - Mn - Al - C System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaputkina, L. M.; Svyazhin, A. G.; Smarygina, I. V.; Kindop, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The phase composition, the hardness, the mechanical properties at room temperature, and the resistance to hot (950 - 1000°C) and warm (550°C) deformation are studied for cast deformable "light" ferritic and austenitic steels of the Fe - (12 - 25)% Mn - (0 - 15)% Al - (0 - 2)% C system alloyed additionally with about 5% Ni. The high-aluminum high-manganese low-carbon and carbonless ferritic steels at a temperature of about 0.5 T melt have a specific strength close to that of the austenitic steels and may be used as weldable scale-resistant and wear-resistant materials. The high-carbon Fe - (20 - 24)% Mn - (5 - 9)% Al - 5% Ni - 1.5% C austenitic steels may be applied as light high-strength materials operating at cryogenic temperatures after a solution treatment and as scale- and heat-resistant materials in an aged condition.

  8. Enhanced Stability of Retained Austenite by Quenching and Double Partitioning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Z. R.; Zhao, X. M.

    2017-12-01

    In the present study, a novel quenching and double partitioning (Q&DP) process is proposed. The quenching and partitioning (Q&P) process was accompanied by a second partitioning process, which led to the enhanced stability of retained austenite. The chemical composition of the investigated steel was 0.24C-1.9Mn-1.85Si, without an excess addition of alloying elements. This process aims to enhance the stability of retained austenite by controlling martensitic transformation and carbon partitioning. By applying this process, the uniform and total elongation is increased, without obvious reduction in ultimate tensile strength. An optimum combination of strength and ductility (ultimate tensile strength: 1304MPa; total elongation: 23%) was achieved by quenching to 65°C and subsequent second partitioning treatment, after the first quenching to 300°C and partitioning process. The enhanced mechanical properties were attributed to the increased amount of stabilized film-like austenite.

  9. Application of Moessbauer effect to the study of austenite retained in low carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, A.L.T. de; Silva, E.G. da

    1979-01-01

    Moessbauer effect measurements were performed in two samples of low carbon, low alloy steels, one with a bainite granular microstructure and the other a martensitic one. The concentration of the retained austenite was determined in both samples by Moessbauer spectrometry and X radiation, a very good agreement for the sample with a greater austenite content having been observed. From the assumption that the carbon atoms in the f.c.c. matrix repel one another due to Coulomb interactions, giving origin to quadrupolar interactions, it was possible to determine carbon concentration in the MA (Martensite Austenite) components of bainite, the results being in good agreement with the one obtained from metallographic considerations. (I.C.R.) [pt

  10. Corrosion of ferrous alloys in eutectic lead-lithium environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-09-01

    Corrosion data have been obtained on austenitic prime candidate alloy (PCA) and Type 316 stainless steel and ferritic HT-9 and Fe-9Cr-1Mo steels in a flowing Pb-17 at. % Li environment at 727 and 700 K (454 and 427 0 C). The results indicate that the dissolution rates for both austenitic and ferritic steels in Pb-17Li are an order of magnitude greater than in flowing lithium. The influence of time, temperature, and alloy composition on the corrosion behavior in Pb-17Li is similar to that in lithium. The weight losses for the austenitic steels are an order of magnitude greater than for the ferritic steels. The rate of weight loss for the ferritic steels is constant, whereas the dissolution rates for the austenitic steels decrease with time. After exposure to Pb-17Li, the austenitic steels develop a very weak and porous ferrite layer which easily spalls from the specimen surface

  11. Evaluation of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Foil for Advanced Recuperators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Maziasz, Philip J [ORNL; Matthews, Wendy [Capstone Turbines

    2011-01-01

    A corrosion- and creep-resistant austenitic stainless steel has been developed for advanced recuperator applications. By optimizing the Al and Cr contents, the alloy is fully austenitic for creep strength while allowing the formation of a chemically stable external alumina scale at temperatures up to 900 C. An alumina scale eliminates long-term problems with the formation of volatile Cr oxy-hydroxides in the presence of water vapor in exhaust gas. As a first step in producing foil for primary surface recuperators, three commercially cast heats have been rolled to 100 m thick foil in the laboratory to evaluate performance in creep and oxidation testing. Results from initial creep testing are presented at 675 C and 750 C, showing excellent creep strength compared with other candidate foil materials. Laboratory exposures in humid air at 650 800 C have shown acceptable oxidation resistance. A similar oxidation behavior was observed for sheet specimens of these alloys exposed in a modified 65 kW microturbine for 2871 h. One composition that showed superior creep and oxidation resistance has been selected for the preparation of a commercial batch of foil. DOI: 10.1115/1.4002827

  12. Corrosion of austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, L.; Anderson, M.; Taylor, D.; Allen, T.R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Oxidation is the primary corrosion phenomenon for the steels exposed to S-CO 2 . → The austenitic steels showed significantly better corrosion resistance than the ferritic-martensitic steels. → Alloying elements (e.g., Mo and Al) showed distinct effects on oxidation behavior. - Abstract: Supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO 2 ) is a potential coolant for advanced nuclear reactors. The corrosion behavior of austenitic steels (alloys 800H and AL-6XN) and ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels (F91 and HCM12A) exposed to S-CO 2 at 650 deg. C and 20.7 MPa is presented in this work. Oxidation was identified as the primary corrosion phenomenon. Alloy 800H had oxidation resistance superior to AL-6XN. The FM steels were less corrosion resistant than the austenitic steels, which developed thick oxide scales that tended to exfoliate. Detailed microstructure characterization suggests the effect of alloying elements such as Al, Mo, Cr, and Ni on the oxidation of the steels.

  13. Improvement of the SCC resistance of FCC alloys: influence of pre-fatigue on the SCC resistance of the austenitic stainless steel-316L in a MgCl2 boiling solution at 117 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curiere, I. de

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the effect of pre-fatigue of FCC materials on their mechanical and electrochemical response to better understand and delay the SCC damage. The material/environment couple tested is the 316L polycrystalline austenitic stainless steel in boiling MgCl 2 at 30% mass. Samples are pre-strained in low cycle fatigue under plastic strain control, with a p/2 value of 0.4%, for various number of cycles (25%, 75% and at the number of cycles to reach saturation during pre-fatigue). It was found that only pre-fatigue at saturation improves the SCC resistance of the material, both on SSRT and constant load tests. A delayed crack initiation up to 10% of strain. which increases strain to failure by half. mostly accounts for this beneficial effect, during SSRT tests. Furthermore, other pre-straining only resulted in loss of strain to fracture and no delay in crack initiation. We related the crack initiation delay to the surface strain state due to pre-fatigue. It provides fine parallel slip bands. homogeneously located at the surface of the samples. This surface state induces an increasing anodic surface-cathodic surface ratio which lowers the kinetics of localised corrosion. thus that of crack initiation. We also show some experiments implying that pre-fatigue at saturation decreases the SCC crack growth velocity which can be understood through the CEP (Corrosion Enhanced Plasticity) Model. We also show that this beneficial effect is probably available on other fcc material/environment couples, such as OFHC Cu/ 1 M NaNO 2 at pH 9. (author)

  14. Dissolution mechanism of austenitic stainless steels in lead-bismuth eutectic at 500 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, M.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the future nuclear power plants studies, lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) is foreseen as a coolant in the primary or the secondary circuit in three nuclear systems. The use of this liquid alloy induces corrosion issues for structural steels. In liquid lead alloys, steels can undergo two corrosion phenomena: dissolution or oxidation depending on the temperature and the dissolved oxygen content in LBE. The goal of this study is to identify the dissolution mechanisms of austenitic steels in LBE at 500 deg. C. Four Fe-Cr-Ni model austenitic steels, the 316L steel and five other industrial steels were corroded in LBE up to, respectively, 3000, 6000 and 200 h. The dissolution mechanism is identical for all steels: it starts by a preferential dissolution of chromium and nickel. This dissolution leads to the formation of a ferritic corrosion layer penetrated by LBE and containing between 5 and 10 at% of chromium and almost no nickel. This study demonstrates that dissolutions of nickel and chromium are linked. Otherwise, the corrosion kinetics is linear whatever the tested austenitic steel. The controlling steps of the austenitic steels' corrosion rates have been identified. Natural convection in the LBE bath leads to the formation of a diffusion boundary layer at the steel surface. Chromium diffusion in this diffusion boundary layer seems to control the corrosion rates of the model and industrial austenitic steels except the 316L steel. Indeed, the corrosion rate of the 316L steel is controlled by an interfacial reaction which is either the simultaneous dissolution of nickel and chromium in Ni, Cr compounds or the nickel and chromium dissolution catalyzed by the dissolved oxygen in LBE. This study has permitted to highlight the major role of chromium on the corrosion mechanisms and the corrosion rates of austenitic steels: the corrosion rate increases when chromium activity increases. Finally, the impact of the dissolved oxygen and the minor alloying

  15. Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking behavior of austenitic stainless steel weldments containing retained ferrite. Annual progress report, June 1, 1978--March 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, W.F.; Duquette, D.J.

    1979-03-01

    Localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking experiments have been performed on single phase 304 stainless steel alloys and autogeneous weldments containing retained delta ferrite as a second phase. The results of the pitting experiments show that the pressure of delta ferrite decreases localized corrosion resistance with pits initiating preferentially at delta ferrite--gamma austenite interphase boundaries. This increased susceptibility is reversible with elevated temperature heat treatments which revert the metastable ferrite phase to the equilibrium austenite phase

  16. The kinetics of phase transformations of undercooled austenite of the 38MnCrNi6-4-4 hypoeutectoid steel

    OpenAIRE

    R. Dąbrowski; R. Dziurka; E. Rożniata

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Present work corresponds to the research on the kinetic of phase transformation of undercooled austenite of 38MnCrNi6-4-4 hypoeutctoid steel. The kinetic of phase transformation of under cooled austenite of investigated alloy was presented on CCT diagram (continuous cooling transformation). Also the methodology of a dilatometric samples preparation and the method of the critical points determination were described.Design/methodology/approach: The austenitising temperature was defined...

  17. Effect of bainite transformation and retained austenite on mechanical properties of austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Toshio; Abe, Toshihiko; Tada, Shuji [Tohoku National Industrial Research Inst., Sendai (Japan). Materials Engineering Div.

    1996-06-01

    Austempered ductile iron (ADI) has excellent mechanical properties, but its Young`s modulus is low. Austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel (AGS) has been developed in order to obtain a new material with superior mechanical properties to ADI. Its carbon content (approximately 1.0 pct) is almost one-third that of a standard ADI; thus, the volume of graphite is also less. Young`s modulus of AGS is 195 to 200 GPa and is comparable to that of steel. Austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel has an approximately 200 MPa higher tensile strength than ADI and twice the Charpy absorbed energy of ADI. The impact properties and the elongation are enhanced with increasing volume fraction of carbon-enriched retained austenite. At the austempering temperature of 650 K, the volume fraction of austenite is approximately 40 pct for 120 minutes in the 2.4 pct Si alloy, although it decreases rapidly in the 1.4 pct Si alloy. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that appropriate quantity of silicon retards the decomposition of the carbon-enriched retained austenite. For austempering at 570 K, the amount of the carbon-enriched austenite decreases and the ferrite is supersaturated with carbon, resulting in high tensile strength but low toughness.

  18. Expanded austenite; crystallography and residual stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The identity of expanded austenite as developing during low temperature nitriding and/or carburizing of austenitic stainless steel has been under debate since the very first observation of this phase. In the present article recent results obtained with i) homogeneous samples of various uniform co...

  19. Expanded austenite, crystallography and residual stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The identity of expanded austenite as developing during low temperature nitriding and/or carburising of austenitic stainless steel has been under debate since the very first observation of this phase. In the present article, recent results obtained with (a) homogeneous samples of various uniform ...

  20. Modeling of austenite to ferrite transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It should be noted that the values of the parameters in modeling procedure can be found in an earlier study (Tong et al 2004). 4. Results and discussion. In figures 1(a)–(c), the achieved results from the modeling of austenite to ferrite transformation are exhibited. In figure 1(a), the austenite grains achieved from the normal ...

  1. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  2. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands.

  3. A review of compatibility of IFR fuel and austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiser, D.D. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Interdiffusion experiments have been conducted to investigate the compatibility of various austenitic stainless steels with U-Pu-Zr alloys, which are alloys to be employed as fuel for the Integral Fast Reactor being developed by Argonne National Laboratory. These tests have also studied the compatibility of austenitic stainless steels with fission products, like the minor actinides (Np and Am) and lanthanides (Ce and Nd), that are generated during the fission process in an IFR. This paper compares the results of these investigations in the context of fuel-cladding compatibility in IFR fuel elements, specifically focusing on the relative Interdiffusion behavior of the components and the types of phases that develop based on binary phase diagrams. Results of Interdiffusion tests are assessed in the light of observations derived from post-test examinations of actual irradiated fuel elements

  4. Intermetallic Strengthened Alumina-Forming Austenitic Steels for Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Bin [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Baker, Ian [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)

    2016-03-31

    In order to achieve energy conversion efficiencies of >50 % for steam turbines/boilers in power generation systems, the materials required must be strong, corrosion-resistant at high temperatures (>700°C), and economically viable. Austenitic steels strengthened with Laves phase and L12 precipitates, and alloyed with aluminum to improve oxidation resistance, are potential candidate materials for these applications. The creep resistance of these alloys is significantly improved through intermetallic strengthening (Laves-Fe2Nb + L12-Ni3Al precipitates) without harmful effects on oxidation resistance. Microstructural and microchemical analyses of the recently developed alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) steels (Fe-14Cr-32Ni-3Nb-3Al-2Ti-based) indicated they are strengthened by Ni3Al(Ti) L12, NiAl B2, Fe2Nb Laves phase and MC carbide precipitates. Different thermomechanical treatments (TMTs) were performed on these stainless steels in an attempt to further improve their mechanical properties. The thermo-mechanical processing produced nanocrystalline grains in AFA alloys and dramatically increased their yield strength at room temperature. Unfortunately, the TMTs didn’t increase the yield strengths of AFA alloys at ≥700ºC. At these temperatures, dislocation climb is the dominant mechanism for deformation of TMT alloys according to strain rate jump tests. After the characterization of aged AFA alloys, we found that the largest strengthening effect from L12 precipitates can be obtained by aging for less than 24 h. The coarsening behavior of the L12 precipitates was not influenced by carbon and boron additions. Failure analysis and post-mortem TEM analysis were performed to study the creep failure mechanisms of these AFA steels after creep tests. Though the Laves and B2-NiAl phase precipitated along the boundaries can improve the creep properties, cracks were

  5. High nitrogen-dosed austenitic-stainless steels and duplex steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harzenmoser, M.A.E.

    1990-01-01

    The austenitic grades represent the most important group in the family of stainless steels. Nitrogen addition to austenitic stainless steels provides much higher yield strength. It was the goal of the present work to develop new high strength austenitic and duplex stainless steels and to investigate the beneficial influence of nitrogen. More than 40 small ingots up to a weight of 1.5 kg were melted in a specially developed high pressure induction furnace. In addition 20 more alloys produced by a pressurized electro slag remelting facility were included in this investigation. The nitrogen content was varied between 0.37 and 1.47 wt.%. New coefficients are proposed for the nickel equivalent in the Schaeffler diagram; these are from 0.12 to 0.24 for manganese and 18 for nitrogen. The increase in yield strength by interstitially dissolved nitrogen is due to solid solution hardening and to increased grain boundary hardening. The addition of 1% nitrogen gives a yield strength of more than 759 MPa. The toughness remains very good. At room temperature nitrogen alloyed Fe-Cr-Mn austenitic steels give the highest product of strength and toughness. Nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels show a substantial increase in strength at low temperature. From room temperature to 4K the yield strength is more than tripled. Nitrogen alloyed Fe-Cr-Mn austenitic stainless steels exhibit a ductile to brittle transition as the temperature is lowered. This is due to a planar deformation mode which could be caused by low stacking fault energy. Nickel improves the low temperature toughness and also raises the stacking fault energy. In the temperature range from 600 to 900 o C, Cr 2 N precipitate. The minimal time for precipitation is longer by a factor of 10 than in Fe-Cr-Ni grade. Nitrogen decreases the corrosion rate in austenitic and duplex stainless steels. The resistance to pitting corrosion can be described by the equation W L = %Cr + 3.3 %Mo + 30 %N. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  6. The effect of chemical composition and austenite conditioning on the transformation behavior of microalloyed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousavi Anijdan, S.H.; Rezaeian, Ahmad; Yue, Steve

    2012-01-01

    In this investigation, by using continuous cooling torsion (CCT) testing, the transformation behavior of four microalloyed steels under two circumstances of austenite conditioning and non-conditioning was studied. A full scale hot-rolling schedule containing a 13-pass deformation was employed for the conditioning of the austenite. The CCT tests were then employed till temperature of ∼ 540 °C and the flow curves obtained from this process were analyzed. The initial and final microstructures of the steels were studied by optical and electron microscopes. Results show that alloying elements would decrease the transformation temperature. This effect intensifies with the gradual increase of Mo, Nb and Cu as alloying elements added to the microalloyed steels. As well, austenite conditioning increased the transformation start temperature due mainly to the promotion of polygonal ferrite formation that resulted from a pancaked austenite. The final microstructures also show that CCT alone would decrease the amount of bainite by inducing ferrite transformation in the two phase region. In addition, after the transformation begins, the deformation might result in the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization in the ferrite region. This could lead to two different ferrite grain sizes at the end of the CCT. Moreover, the Nb bearing steels show no sign of decreasing the strength level after the transformation begins in the non-conditioned situation and their microstructure is a mix of polygonal ferrite and bainite indicating an absence of probable dynamic recrystallization in this condition. In the conditioned cases, however, these steels show a rapid decrease of the strength level and their final microstructures insinuate that ferrite could have undergone a dynamic recrystallization due to deformation. Consequently, no bainite was seen in the austenite conditioned Nb bearing steels. The pancaking of austenite in the latest cases produced fully polygonal ferrite structures

  7. Controlling radiation induced segregation in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmedabadi, Parag M.; Kain, Vivekanand

    2011-01-01

    In-core components of austenitic stainless steels in light water reactors (LWRs) are susceptible to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in high temperature and high pressure oxygenated water at temperature around 300 deg C . Though, the exact mechanism for IASCC is not fully understood, radiation-induced segregation (RIS) is considered to be a part of a complex process that leads to IASCC. Therefore, controlling RIS in austenitic stainless steels may lead to improvement in resistance to IASCC. RIS is non-equilibrium segregation/depletion of alloying elements in austenitic stainless steels at LWR operating temperatures. RIS occurs due to adsorption of point defects at grain boundaries and leads to segregation of Si and P and depletion of Cr at grain boundaries. Thus by controlling point defect flux towards grain boundaries, the extent of RIS at grain boundaries can be controlled. An extensive study was carried out to simulate and control RIS in austenitic stainless steels using proton irradiation at 300 deg C . The primary aim of this study was to reduce point defect flux towards grain boundaries. Various approaches viz. grain boundary engineering, addition of oversized alloying element, residual strain within matrix and presence of fine precipitates within the grains and at grain boundaries were employed to control RIS in austenitic stainless steels. A novel approach involving combination of electrochemical technique followed by atomic force microscopic (AFM) examination has been used to examine the nature and the extent of RIS. Type 304, 316 and 347 stainless steels were irradiated at 300 deg C (in FOTIA and PELLETRON) in the range of 0.2 to 1.0 dpa using proton beam. The results obtained so far have indicated that a small amount of pre-strain within the grains is very effective in reducing the flux of point defects towards grain boundaries and reducing the extent of RIS at grain boundaries. The presence of NbC precipitates within the grains is

  8. Effects of phosphorus, silicon and sulphur on microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steels during electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuya, K.; Nakahigashi, S.; Ozaki, S.; Shima, S.

    1991-01-01

    Fe-18Cr-9Ni-1,5Mn austenitic alloys containing phosphorus, silicon and sulphur were irradiated by 1 MeV electrons at 573-773 K. Phosphorus increased the interstitial loop nucleation and decreased the void swelling by increasing void number density and suppressing void growth. Silicon had a similar effect to phosphorus but its effect was weaker than phosphorus. Sulphur enhanced void swelling through increasing the void density. Nickel enrichment at grain boundaries was suppressed only in the alloy containing phosphorus. These phosphorus effects may be explained by a strong interaction with interstitials resulting in a high density of sinks for point defects. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of three Ni-Hard I alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, Omer N.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Rice, J. (Texaloy Foundry Co., Inc., Floresville, Texas)

    2004-09-01

    This report documents the results of an investigation which was undertaken to reveal the similarities and differences in the mechanical properties and microstructural characteristics of three Ni-Hard I alloys. One alloy (B1) is ASTM A532 class IA Ni-Hard containing 4.2 wt. pct. Ni. The second alloy (B2) is similar to B1 but higher in Cr, Si, and Mo. The third alloy (T1) also falls in the same ASTM specification, but it contains 3.3 wt. pct. Ni. The alloys were evaluated in both as-cast and stress-relieved conditions except for B2, which was evaluated in the stress-relieved condition only. While the matrix of the high Ni alloys is composed of austenite and martensite in both conditions, the matrix of the low Ni alloy consists of a considerable amount of bainite, in addition to the martensite and the retained austenite in as cast condition, and primarily bainite, with some retained austenite, in the stress relieved condition. It was found that the stress relieving treatment does not change the tensile strength of the high Ni alloy. Both the as cast and stress relieved high Ni alloys had a tensile strength of about 350 MPa. On the other hand, the tensile strength of the low Ni alloy increased from 340 MPa to 452 MPa with the stress relieving treatment. There was no significant difference in the wear resistance of these alloys in both as-cast and stressrelieved conditions.

  10. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    The ultrasonic examination of austenitic stainless steel weld metal has always been regarded as a difficult proposition because of the large and variable ultrasonic attenuations and back scattering obtained from apparently similar weld deposits. The work to be described shows how the existence of a fibre texture within each weld deposit (as a result of epitaxial growth through successive weld beads) produces a systematic variation in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the velocity of sound, depending upon the angle between the ultrasonic beam and the fibre axis. Development work has shown that it is possible to adjust the welding parameters to ensure that the crystallographic texture within each weld is compatible with improved ultrasonic transmission. The application of the results to the inspection of a specific weld in type 316 weld metal is described

  11. Surface Characteristics of Machined NiTi Shape Memory Alloy: The Effects of Cryogenic Cooling and Preheating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaynak, Y.; Huang, B.; Karaca, H. E.; Jawahir, I. S.

    2017-07-01

    This experimental study focuses on the phase state and phase transformation response of the surface and subsurface of machined NiTi alloys. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and differential scanning calorimeter techniques were utilized to measure the phase state and the transformation response of machined specimens, respectively. Specimens were machined under dry machining at ambient temperature, preheated conditions, and cryogenic cooling conditions at various cutting speeds. The findings from this research demonstrate that cryogenic machining substantially alters austenite finish temperature of martensitic NiTi alloy. Austenite finish ( A f) temperature shows more than 25 percent increase resulting from cryogenic machining compared with austenite finish temperature of as-received NiTi. Dry and preheated conditions do not substantially alter austenite finish temperature. XRD analysis shows that distinctive transformation from martensite to austenite occurs during machining process in all three conditions. Complete transformation from martensite to austenite is observed in dry cutting at all selected cutting speeds.

  12. INFLUENCE OF IMPULSE MAGNETIC FIELD ON GRAPHITE MORPHOLOGY OF HIGH-ALLOY IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Anisovich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of researches of change of microstructure of heavily alloyed austenitic cast-iron ChN1507 subjected to magnetoimpulse processing are given. It is established that microhardness rises on all section of the sample.

  13. Fracture of Fe--Cr--Mn austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Tensile tests of Tenelon (U.S. Steel), a nitrogen-strengthened iron-base alloy containing 18% chromium and 15% manganese, demonsterated that cleavage fracture can occur in some austenitic steels and is promoted by the presence of hydrogen. Tensile failure of Tenelon at 78 0 K occurred with no detectable necking at low strain levels. The fracture surface contained cleavage facets that lay along coherent twin boundaries oriented transversely to the tensile axis. Charging gaseous hydrogen at 679 MPa pressure and 650 0 K had no significant effect on the mechanical behavior or fracture mode at 78 0 K, but raised the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature from less than 200 0 K to about 250 0 K

  14. Fatigue crack growth in metastable austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, Z.; Chang, G.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The research reported here is an investigation of the influence of the mechanically induced martensitic transformation on the fatigue crack growth rate in 304-type steels. The alloys 304L and 304LN were used to test the influence of composition, the testing temperatures 298 K and 77 K were used to study the influence of test temperature, and various load ratios (R) were used to determine the influence of the load ratio. It was found that decreasing the mechanical stability of the austenite by changing composition or lowering temperature decreases the fatigue crack growth rate. The R-ratio effect is more subtle. The fatigue crack growth rate increases with increasing R-ratio, even though this change increases the martensite transformation. Transformation-induced crack closure can explain the results in the threshold regime, but cannot explain the R-ratio effect at higher cyclic stress intensities. 26 refs., 6 figs

  15. Influence of titanium on the tempering structure of austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghuezaiel, M.J.

    1985-10-01

    The microstructure of titanium-stabilized and initially deformed (approximately 20%) austenitic stainless steels used in structures of fast neutrons reactors has been studied after one hour duration annealings (500 0 C) by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, microhardness and transmission electron microscopy. The studied alloys were either of industrial type CND 17-13 (0.23 to 0.45 wt% Ti) or pure steels (18% Cr, 14% Ni, 0 or 0.3 wt% Ti). During tempering, the pure steels presented some restauration before recristallization. In the industrial steels, only recristallization occurred, and this only in the most deformed steel. Precipitation does not occur in the titanium-free pure steel. In industrial steels, many intermetallic phases are formed when recristallization starts [fr

  16. Consitutive modeling of metastable austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih

    2008-01-01

    Metastable austenitic stainless steels combine high formability and high strength, which are generally opposing properties in materials. This property is a consequence of the martensitic phase transformation that takes place during deformation. This transformation is purely mechanically induced

  17. Crack growth rates and fracture toughness of irradiated austenitic stainless steels in BWR environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-01-21

    In light water reactors, austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in reactor core internal components because of their high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods degrades the fracture properties of these steels by changing the material microstructure (e.g., radiation hardening) and microchemistry (e.g., radiation-induced segregation). Experimental data are presented on the fracture toughness and crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast austenitic SSs, including weld heat-affected-zone materials, that were irradiated to fluence levels as high as {approx} 2x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 3 dpa) in a light water reactor at 288-300 C. The results are compared with the data available in the literature. The effects of material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry on CGRs under cyclic and stress corrosion cracking conditions were determined. A superposition model was used to represent the cyclic CGRs of austenitic SSs. The effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness of these steels, as well as the effects of material and irradiation conditions and test temperature, have been evaluated. A fracture toughness trend curve that bounds the existing data has been defined. The synergistic effects of thermal and radiation embrittlement of cast austenitic SS internal components have also been evaluated.

  18. Austenitic-ferritic stainless steels: A state-of-the-art review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronenko, B. I.

    1997-10-01

    Austenitic-ferritic stainless steels, more commonly known as duplex stainless steels, or DSS for short, consist of two basic phases. One is austenite, A, and the other is ferrite, F, present in about equal amounts (but not less than 30% each). The two phases owe their corrosion resistance to the high chromium content. Compared to austenitic stainless steels, ASS, they are stronger (without sacrificing ductility), resist corrosion better, and cost less due to their relatively low nickel content. DSS can be used in an environment where standard ASS are not durable enough, such as chloride solutions (ships, petrochemical plant, etc.). Due to their low nickel content and the presence of nickel, DSS have good weldability. However, they have a limited service temperature range (from -40 to 300°) because heating may cause them to give up objectionable excess phases and lower the threshold of cold brittleness in the heat-affected zone of welded joints. State-of-the art DSS are alloyed with nitrogen to stabilize their austenite, and in this respect the nitrogen does the job of nickel. Also, nitrogen enhances the strength and resistance to pitting and improves the structure of welds.

  19. High temperature strength and aging behavior of 12%Cr-15%Mn austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Kazuya; Bae, Dong-Su; Sakai, Hidenori; Hosoi, Yuzo

    1993-01-01

    High Mn-Cr austenitic steels are still considered to be an important high temperature structural material from the point of view of reduced radio-activation. The objective of the present study is to make a fundamental research of mechanical properties and microstructure of 12%Cr-15%Mn austenitic steels. Especially the effects of alloying elements of V and Ti on the mechanical properties and microstructure evolution of high Mn-Cr steels were studied. Precipitation behaviors of carbides, nitrides and σ phase are investigated and their remarkable effects on the high temperature strength are found. The addition of V was very effective for strengthening the materials with the precipitation of fine VN. Ti was also found to be beneficial for the improvement of high temperature strength properties. The results of high temperature strengths of the 12Cr-15Mn austenitic steels were compared with those of the other candidate and/or reference materials, for example, JFMS (modified 9Cr-2Mo ferritic stainless steel) and JPCAs (modified 316 austenitic stainless steels). (author)

  20. Model Predictive Control of the Exit Part Temperature for an Austenitization Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari S. Ganesh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Quench hardening is the process of strengthening and hardening ferrous metals and alloys by heating the material to a specific temperature to form austenite (austenitization, followed by rapid cooling (quenching in water, brine or oil to introduce a hardened phase called martensite. The material is then often tempered to increase toughness, as it may decrease from the quench hardening process. The austenitization process is highly energy-intensive and many of the industrial austenitization furnaces were built and equipped prior to the advent of advanced control strategies and thus use large, sub-optimal amounts of energy. The model computes the energy usage of the furnace and the part temperature profile as a function of time and position within the furnace under temperature feedback control. In this paper, the aforementioned model is used to simulate the furnace for a batch of forty parts under heuristic temperature set points suggested by the operators of the plant. A model predictive control (MPC system is then developed and deployed to control the the part temperature at the furnace exit thereby preventing the parts from overheating. An energy efficiency gain of 5.3 % was obtained under model predictive control compared to operation under heuristic temperature set points tracked by a regulatory control layer.

  1. Structure effect on wear resistance of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepina, A.I.; Sidorova, L.I.; Tolstenko, E.V.

    1982-01-01

    The dependence of wear resistance on hardness of steels with different microstructure is studied under conditions of gas-abrasion wear of surface layers. It is found out that at the same hardness the wear resistance of α-alloys is higher than that of γ-alloys in spite of considerable surface hardening of austenitic alloys. Fracture of surface in the process of abrasive wear occurs after achievement of definite values of microhardness and the width of a diffraction line for each structural class of alloys [ru

  2. Synergistic Computational and Microstructural Design of Next- Generation High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaman, Ibrahim [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States); Arroyave, Raymundo [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-07-31

    The purpose of this project was to: 1) study deformation twinning, its evolution, thermal stability, and the contribution on mechanical response of the new advanced stainless steels, especially at elevated temperatures; 2) study alumina-scale formation on the surface, as an alternative for conventional chromium oxide, that shows better oxidation resistance, through alloy design; and 3) design new generation of high temperature stainless steels that form alumina scale and have thermally stable nano-twins. The work involved few baseline alloys for investigating the twin formation under tensile loading, thermal stability of these twins, and the role of deformation twins on the mechanical response of the alloys. These baseline alloys included Hadfield Steel (Fe-13Mn-1C), 316, 316L and 316N stainless steels. Another baseline alloy was studied for alumina-scale formation investigations. Hadfield steel showed twinning but undesired second phases formed at higher temperatures. 316N stainless steel did not show signs of deformation twinning. Conventional 316 stainless steel demonstrated extensive deformation twinning at room temperature. Investigations on this alloy, both in single crystalline and polycrystalline forms, showed that deformation twins evolve in a hierarchical manner, consisting of micron–sized bundles of nano-twins. The width of nano-twins stays almost constant as the extent of strain increases, but the width and number of the bundles increase with increasing strain. A systematic thermomechanical cycling study showed that the twins were stable at temperatures as high as 900°C, after the dislocations are annealed out. Using such cycles, volume fraction of the thermally stable deformation twins were increased up to 40% in 316 stainless steel. Using computational thermodynamics and kinetics calculations, we designed two generations of advanced austenitic stainless steels. In the first generation, Alloy 1, which had been proposed as an alumina

  3. Effect of Composition and Deformation on Coarse-Grained Austenite Transformation in Nb-Mo Microalloyed Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isasti, N.; Jorge-Badiola, D.; Taheri, M. L.; López, B.; Uranga, P.

    2011-12-01

    Thermomechanical processing of microalloyed steels containing niobium can be performed to obtain deformed austenite prior to transformation. Accelerated cooling can be employed to refine the final microstructure and, consequently, to improve both strength and toughness. This general rule is fulfilled if the transformation occurs on a quite homogeneous austenite microstructure. Nevertheless, the presence of coarse austenite grains before transformation in different industrial processes is a usual source of concern, and regarding toughness, the coarsest high-angle boundary units would determine its final value. Sets of deformation dilatometry tests were carried out using three 0.06 pct Nb microalloyed steels to evaluate the effect of Mo alloying additions (0, 0.16, and 0.31 pct Mo) on final transformation from both recrystallized and unrecrystallized coarse-grained austenite. Continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams were created, and detailed microstructural characterization was achieved through the use of optical microscopy (OM), field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM), and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The resultant microstructures ranged from polygonal ferrite (PF) and pearlite (P) at slow cooling ranges to bainitic ferrite (BF) accompanied by martensite (M) for fast cooling rates. Plastic deformation of the parent austenite accelerated both ferrite and bainite transformation, moving the CCT curves to higher temperatures and shorter times. However, an increase in the final heterogeneity was observed when BF packets were formed, creating coarse high-angle grain boundary units.

  4. Investigations on avoidance of hot cracks during laser welding of austenitic Cr-Ni steels and nickel-based alloys using temperature field tailoring. Final report; Untersuchungen zur Vermeidung von Heissrissen beim Laserstrahlschweissen von austenitischen Cr-Ni-Staehlen und Nickelbasislegierungen mittels Temperaturfeld-Tailoring. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-08

    The aim of the project was to transfer the developed method of laser beam welding of heat treated machining steels of temperature field tailoring on hot crack endangered austenitic Cr-Ni steels and nickel-based alloys. With this method, transient thermal stresses adjacent to the weld are produced by an travelling induction heating so that the hot cracking is prevented during welding. As test materials the austenitic Cr-Ni steel with sulfur additive 1.4305, the Cr-Ni steels 1.4404 and 1.4435 and the nickel-based alloy Udimet 720 were selected. As a result of the research it was shown that a hot crack-free laser welding in the investigated materials using at least three different welding and material-technical approaches is possible. [German] Das Ziel des Forschungsvorhabens bestand darin, das fuer das Laserstrahlschweissen verguetbarer Automatenstaehle entwickelte Verfahren des Temperaturfeld-Tailorings auf heissrissgefaehrdete austenitische Cr-Ni-Staehle und Nickelbasislegierungen zu uebertragen. Mit diesem Verfahren werden waehrend des Schweissens transiente thermische Spannungen neben der Schweissnaht durch eine mitlaufende induktive Erwaermung so erzeugt, dass die Heissrissbildung verhindert wird. Als Versuchswerkstoffe wurden der austenitische Cr-Ni-Stahl mit Schwefelzusatz 1.4305, die Cr-Ni-Staehle 1.4404 und 1.4435 sowie die Nickelbasislegierung Udimet 720 ausgewaehlt. Im Ergebnis des Forschungsvorhabens konnte gezeigt werden, dass ein heissrissfreies Laserstrahlschweissen bei den untersuchten Werkstoffen unter Nutzung von mindestens drei verschiedenen schweiss- und werkstofftechnischen Ansaetzen moeglich ist: Erstens koennen mit einem Temperaturfeld-Tailoring bei im Stumpfstoss zu verschweissenden Blechen aus austenitischen Staehlen bis mindestens 6 mm Dicke senkrecht zur Naht und parallel zur Blechoberflaeche wirkende transiente Druckspannungen erzeugt werden, die der Bildung von Mittelrippenrissen oder dazu parallel liegenden Heissrissen entgegenwirken

  5. Small angle neutron scattering and Moessbauer effect in nitrogen-bearing austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadutov, V.M.; Garamus, V.M.; Islamov, A.Kh.

    2002-01-01

    The phase composition and changes in the close atomic order under the effect of the low-temperature annealing of the Fe-Cr-Mn-N steel are studied with application of the neutron diffraction and the Moessbauer spectroscopy method. The small angle neutron scattering (SANS) in the high-nitrogen Fe-19% Cr-19% Mn-0.9 N and Fe-18% Cr-10% Mn-16% Ni-0.5% N austenite is studied. The measurements and analysis of the neutron diffraction and the Moessbauer spectra are carried out. The character of the SANS in the nitrogen-bearing austenite is related to the existence of the micrononuniformities, the structure whereof depends on the nickel alloying. The average size and form of the nonuniformities are evaluated [ru

  6. Dynamical recrystallization of high purity austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavard, L.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is to optimize the performance of structural materials. The elementary mechanisms (strain hardening and dynamical regeneration, germination and growth of new grains) occurring during the hot working of metals and low pile defect energy alloys have been studied for austenitic stainless steels. In particular, the influence of the main experimental parameters (temperature, deformation velocity, initial grain size, impurities amount, deformation way) on the process of discontinuous dynamical recrystallization has been studied. Alloys with composition equal to those of the industrial stainless steel-304L have been fabricated from ultra-pure iron, chromium and nickel. Tests carried out in hot compression and torsion in order to cover a wide range of deformations, deformation velocities and temperatures for two very different deformation ways have allowed to determine the rheological characteristics (sensitivity to the deformation velocity, apparent activation energy) of materials as well as to characterize their microstructural deformations by optical metallography and electron back-scattered diffraction. The influence of the initial grain size and the influence of the purity of the material on the dynamical recrystallization kinetics have been determined. An analytical model for the determination of the apparent mobility of grain boundaries, a semi-analytical model for the dynamical recrystallization and at last an analytical model for the stationary state of dynamical recrystallization are proposed as well as a new criteria for the transition between the refinement state and the state of grain growth. (O.M.)

  7. Development of a high temperature austenitic stainless steel for Stirling engine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, D.L.; Lemkey, F.D.

    1986-01-01

    An alloy, designed NASAUT 4G-A1, was developed which exhibited an excellent balance of oxidation resistance and high temperature strength while maintaining an austenitic matrix necessary for hydrogen compatibility. This alloy, having the composition 15Cr-15Mn-2Mo-1Nb-1Si-1.5C-bal. Fe in wt%, was microstructurally characterized and shown to contain a fine M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ precipitated phase. Subsequent heat treatments were shown to substantially modify this microstructure resulting in improved mechanical properties. Yield, creep and low cycle fatigue strengths were found to be superior to the best iron base alloy thus far identified as a potential heater head candidate material, XF-818

  8. Empirical relations for tensile properties of austenitic stainless steels irradiated in mixed-spectrum reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    An assessment has been made of available tensile property data relevant to the design of fusion reactors, especially near term devices expected to operate at lower temperatures than power reactors. Empirical relations have been developed for the tensile properties as a functions of irradiation temperature for neutron exposures of 10-15, 20, 30, and 50 dpa. It was found that yield strength depends little on the particular austenitic alloy and little on the helium concentration. Strength depends upon initial condition of the alloy only for exposures of less than 30 dpa. Uniform elongation was found to be more sensitive to alloy and condition. It was also more sensitive than strength to helium level. However, below 500deg C, helium only appeared to have an efect at 10-15 dpa. At higher temperatures, helium embrittlement was apparent, and its threshold temperature decreased with increasing neutron exposure level. (orig.)

  9. Characterization of the microstructure and mechanical properties of a 50.3Ni–29.7Ti–20Hf shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughlin, D.R.; Phillips, P.J.; Bigelow, G.S.; Garg, A.; Noebe, R.D.; Mills, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The alloy 50.3Ni–29.7Ti–20Hf (at.%) exhibits attractive high-temperature shape memory properties. To determine the effect of aging on the behavior of this alloy, isothermal constant strain rate compression testing was performed at temperatures above the austenite finish temperature. This revealed that the alloy strength and the temperature range for pseudoelasticity vs. austenite plasticity was strongly influenced by aging. Electron microscopy has revealed precipitates rich in hafnium with a novel ordered structure relative to the B2 austenite phase form during aging.

  10. Vanadium-base alloys for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.L.; Loomis, B.A.; Diercks, D.R.

    1984-10-01

    Vanadium-base alloys offer potentially significant advantages over other candidate alloys as a structural material for fusion reactor first wall/blanket applications. Although the data base is more limited than that for the other leading candidate structural materials, viz., austenitic and ferritic steels, vanadium-base alloys exhibit several properties that make them particularly attractive for the fusion reactor environment. This paper presents a review of the structural material requirements, a summary of the materials data base for selected vanadium-base alloys, and a comparison of projected performance characteristics compared to other candidate alloys. Also, critical research and development (R and D) needs are defined

  11. Vanadium-base alloys for fusion reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Loomis, B.A.; Diercks, D.R.

    1984-10-01

    Vanadium-base alloys offer potentially significant advantages over other candidate alloys as a structural material for fusion reactor first wall/blanket applications. Although the data base is more limited than that for the other leading candidate structural materials, viz., austenitic and ferritic steels, vanadium-base alloys exhibit several properties that make them particularly attractive for the fusion reactor environment. This paper presents a review of the structural material requirements, a summary of the materials data base for selected vanadium-base alloys, and a comparison of projected performance characteristics compared to other candidate alloys. Also, critical research and development (R and D) needs are defined.

  12. Longitudinal wave ultrasonic inspection of austenitic weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, B.S.; Hudgell, R.J.; Seed, H.

    1980-01-01

    Successful volumetric inspection of LMFBR primary circuits, and also much of the secondary circuit, is dependent on the availability of satisfactory examination procedures for austenitic welds. Application of conventional ultrasonic techniques is hampered by the anisotropic, textured structure of the weld metal and this paper describes development work on the use of longitudinal wave techniques. In addition to confirming the dominant effects of the weld structure on ultrasound propagation some results are given of studies utilising deliberately induced defects in Manual Metal Arc Welds in 50 mm plate together with preliminary work on the inspection of narrow austenitic welds fabricated by automatic processes. (author)

  13. Recycle of radiologically contaminated austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imrich, K.J.; Leader, D.R.; Iyer, N.C.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy owns large quantities of radiologically contaminated austenitic stainless steel which could by recycled for reuse if appropriate release standards were in place. Unfortunately, current policy places the formulation of a release standard for USA industry years, if not decades, away. The Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and various university and industrial partners are participating in initiative to recycle previously contaminated austenitic stainless steels into containers for the storage and disposal of radioactive wastes. This paper describes laboratory scale experiments which demonstrated the decontamination and remelt of stainless steel which had been contaminated with radionuclides

  14. Thermogalvanic corrosion of Alloy 31 in different heavy brine LiBr solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Domene, Ramón Manuel; Blasco Tamarit, María Encarnación; García García, Dionisio Miguel; García Antón, José

    2012-01-01

    Thermogalvanic corrosion generated between two electrodes of Alloy 31, a highly-alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031), has been investigated imposing different temperature gradients in three deaerated LiBr solutions, under open circuit conditions by using a zero-resistance ammeter (ZRA). Besides EIS spectra were acquired in order to explain the obtained results. On the whole, cold Alloy 31 electrodes were anodic to hot Alloy 31 electrodes, since an increase in temperature favoured t...

  15. Microstructural evolution in fast-neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    The present work has focused on the specific problem of fast-neutron-induced radiation damage to austenitic stainless steels. These steels are used as structural materials in current fast fission reactors and are proposed for use in future fusion reactors. Two primary components of the radiation damage are atomic displacements (in units of displacements per atom, or dpa) and the generation of helium by nuclear transmutation reactions. The radiation environment can be characterized by the ratio of helium to displacement production, the so-called He/dpa ratio. Radiation damage is evidenced microscopically by a complex microstructural evolution and macroscopically by density changes and altered mechanical properties. The purpose of this work was to provide additional understanding about mechanisms that determine microstructural evolution in current fast reactor environments and to identify the sensitivity of this evolution to changes in the He/dpa ratio. This latter sensitivity is of interest because the He/dpa ratio in a fusion reactor first wall will be about 30 times that in fast reactor fuel cladding. The approach followed in the present work was to use a combination of theoretical and experimental analysis. The experimental component of the work primarily involved the examination by transmission electron microscopy of specimens of a model austenitic alloy that had been irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. A major aspect of the theoretical work was the development of a comprehensive model of microstructural evolution. This included explicit models for the evolution of the major extended defects observed in neutron irradiated steels: cavities, Frank faulted loops and the dislocation network. 340 refs., 95 figs., 18 tabs.

  16. Microstructural evolution in fast-neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoller, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    The present work has focused on the specific problem of fast-neutron-induced radiation damage to austenitic stainless steels. These steels are used as structural materials in current fast fission reactors and are proposed for use in future fusion reactors. Two primary components of the radiation damage are atomic displacements (in units of displacements per atom, or dpa) and the generation of helium by nuclear transmutation reactions. The radiation environment can be characterized by the ratio of helium to displacement production, the so-called He/dpa ratio. Radiation damage is evidenced microscopically by a complex microstructural evolution and macroscopically by density changes and altered mechanical properties. The purpose of this work was to provide additional understanding about mechanisms that determine microstructural evolution in current fast reactor environments and to identify the sensitivity of this evolution to changes in the He/dpa ratio. This latter sensitivity is of interest because the He/dpa ratio in a fusion reactor first wall will be about 30 times that in fast reactor fuel cladding. The approach followed in the present work was to use a combination of theoretical and experimental analysis. The experimental component of the work primarily involved the examination by transmission electron microscopy of specimens of a model austenitic alloy that had been irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. A major aspect of the theoretical work was the development of a comprehensive model of microstructural evolution. This included explicit models for the evolution of the major extended defects observed in neutron irradiated steels: cavities, Frank faulted loops and the dislocation network. 340 refs., 95 figs., 18 tabs

  17. Structural transformations in steels containing 12% chromium and 5 or 7% nickel. Influence of the reversed austenite on the mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto-Phan Hoang, M.L.

    1987-09-01

    The production of austenite by the reverse martensitic transformation has been studied. The alloys concerned by this study are two 12% chromium low carbon steels containing respectively 5 and 7% nickel. Thermal treatments have been done in the intercritical temperature range. The kinetic of the α' → γ transformation, the volumic fraction of reversed austenite and its stability after a subsequent cooling have been investigated as a function of the intercritical temperature. The purpose of such treatments is to develop an optimal mixture of tempered martensite and reversed austenite structure, which should improve the studied alloys mechanical properties and especially their high temperature properties for use in fast breeders. Creep properties are better than for classical martensitic steels (containing typically 0.1 to 0.2 weight carbon), and comparable to those of 316 type austenitic steels. This improvement of the mechanical properties seems to be tightly related to the high dislocations density observed in the reversed austenite which - besides - is dispersed as thin islands in the matrix [fr

  18. Mass transfer behavior of a modified austenitic stainless steel in lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel that was developed to resist neutron damage was exposed to lithium in the high-temperature part of a thermal convection loop for 6700 h. Specimens of this Prime Candidate Alloy (PCA) composed of 65.0 Fe-15.9 Ni-13.0 Cr-1.9 Mo-1.9 Mn-1.7 Si-0.5 Ti-0.05 C (wt %) were exposed at 600 and 570 0 C in both solution annealed and cold worked forms. The dissolution process was found to be similar to other austenitic alloys in flowing lithium: weight losses of PCA eventually became linearly proportional to exposure time with the specimen surfaces exhibiting porous layers depleted in nickel and chromium. However, the measured weight losses and dissolution rates of these PCA specimens were higher than those of type 316 stainless steel exposed under similar conditions and can be attributed to the higher nickel concentration of the former alloy. The effect of cold work on dissolution rates was less definitive, particularly at 570 0 C. At longer exposure times, the annealed PCA specimen exposed at 600 0 C suffered greater dissolution than the cold worked material, while no effect of prior deformation was observed by analysis of the respective surfaces

  19. Effect of Chemical Composition on Susceptibility to Weld Solidification Cracking in Austenitic Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoi, Kota; Shinozaki, Kenji

    2017-12-01

    The influence of the chemical composition, especially the niobium content, chromium equivalent Creq, and nickel equivalent Nieq, on the weld solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region in the Schaeffler diagram was investigated. Specimens were fabricated using the hot-wire laser welding process with widely different compositions of Creq, Nieq, and niobium in the region. The distributions of the susceptibility, such as the crack length and brittle temperature range (BTR), in the Schaeffler diagram revealed a region with high susceptibility to solidification cracking. Addition of niobium enhanced the susceptibility and changed the distribution of the susceptibility in the diagram. The BTR distribution was in good agreement with the distribution of the temperature range of solidification (Δ T) calculated by solidification simulation based on Scheil model. Δ T increased with increasing content of alloying elements such as niobium. The distribution of Δ T was dependent on the type of alloying element owing to the change of the partitioning behavior. Thus, the solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region depends on whether the alloy contains elements. The distribution of the susceptibility in the region is controlled by the change in Δ T and the segregation behavior of niobium with the chemical composition.

  20. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K

  1. Mechanized ultrasonic inspection of austenitic pipe systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dressler, K.; Luecking, J.; Medenbach, S.

    1999-01-01

    The contribution explains the system of standard testing methods elaborated by ABB ZAQ GmbH for inspection of austenitic plant components. The inspection tasks explained in greater detail are basic materials testing (straight pipes, bends, and pipe specials), and inspection of welds and dissimilar welds. The techniques discussed in detail are those for detection and sizing of defects. (orig./CB) [de

  2. Modeling of austenite to ferrite transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this research, an algorithm based on the Q-state Potts model is presented for modeling the austenite to ferrite transformation. In the algorithm, it is possible to exactly track boundary migration of the phase formed during transformation. In the algorithm, effects of changes in chemical free energy, strain free energy ...

  3. Effect of sub-zero cooling on microstructure and mechanical properties of a low alloyed austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ardestani

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sub-zero cooling on microstructure and mechanical properties of a low alloyed austempered ductile iron has been investigated. Austempering of samples was performed at 325! and 400℃ after austenitizing at 875℃ and 950℃. The sub-zero treatments were carried out by cooling down the samples to -30℃, -70℃ and -196℃. The changes in volume fraction of austenite and mechanical properties were determined after cooling to each temperature. The austenite volume fraction of samples which were austenitized at 875℃ and austempered at 325℃ remained unchanged, whilst it reduced in samples austenitized at 950℃ and 875℃ for austempering temperature of 400℃. In these specimens, some austenite transformed to martensite after subzero cooling. Mechanical property measurements showed a slight increase in strength and hardness and decrease in elongation and toughness due to this transformation behavior.

  4. Feasibility of surface-coated friction stir welding tools to join AISI 304 grade austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Lakshminarayanan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An attempt is made to develop the tools that are capable enough to withstand the shear, impact and thermal forces that occur during friction stir welding of stainless steels. The atmospheric plasma spray and plasma transferred arc hardfacing processes are employed to deposit refractory ceramic based composite coatings on the Inconel 738 alloy. Five different combinations of self-fluxing alloy powder and 60% ceramic reinforcement particulate mixtures are used for coating. The best friction stir welding tool selected based on tool wear analysis is used to fabricate the austenitic stainless steel joints.

  5. Effects of combined silicon and molybdenum alloying on the size and evolution of microalloy precipitates in HSLA steels containing niobium and titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlina, Erik J.; Van Tyne, C.J.; Speer, J.G.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of combined silicon and molybdenum alloying additions on microalloy precipitate formation in austenite after single- and double-step deformations below the austenite no-recrystallization temperature were examined in high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steels microalloyed with titanium and niobium. The precipitation sequence in austenite was evaluated following an interrupted thermomechanical processing simulation using transmission electron microscopy. Large (~ 105 nm), cuboidal titanium-rich nitride precipitates showed no evolution in size during reheating and simulated thermomechanical processing. The average size and size distribution of these precipitates were also not affected by the combined silicon and molybdenum additions or by deformation. Relatively fine (< 20 nm), irregular-shaped niobium-rich carbonitride precipitates formed in austenite during isothermal holding at 1173 K. Based upon analysis that incorporated precipitate growth and coarsening models, the combined silicon and molybdenum additions were considered to increase the diffusivity of niobium in austenite by over 30% and result in coarser precipitates at 1173 K compared to the lower alloyed steel. Deformation decreased the size of the niobium-rich carbonitride precipitates that formed in austenite. - Highlights: • We examine combined Si and Mo additions on microalloy precipitation in austenite. • Precipitate size tends to decrease with increasing deformation steps. • Combined Si and Mo alloying additions increase the diffusivity of Nb in austenite

  6. Joining silicon carbide to austenitic stainless steel through diffusion welding; Stellingen behorende bij het proefschrift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krugers, Jan-Paul

    1993-01-19

    In this thesis, the results are presented of a study dealing with joining silicon carbide to austenitic stainless steel AIS316 by means of diffusion welding. Welding experiments were carried out without and with the use of a metallic intermediate, like copper, nickel and copper-nickel alloys at various conditions of process temperature, process time, mechanical pressure and interlayer thickness. Most experiments were carried out in high vacuum. For reasons of comparison, however, some experiments were also carried out in a gas shielded environment of 95 vol.% Ar and 5 vol.% H2.

  7. An Overview of the Cyclic Partial Austenite-Ferrite Transformation Concept and Its Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; van der Zwaag, Sybrand

    2017-06-01

    Over the past decades, the mechanism of interface migration during the austenite-ferrite transformation in steels has attracted significant attention from physical metallurgists. There are two challenging research questions in this field: (i) What is the effect of (substitutional) alloying elements on migrating interfaces? and (ii) How to accurately determine the value of interface mobility?. Recently, a cyclic partial phase transformation approach has been proposed to study interface migration, and new insights into the above two questions have been provided. An overview of the cyclic partial phase transformation concept is given, and pathways for future research are suggested.

  8. Effect of plastic deformation on the magnetic properties of selected austenitic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Oršulová

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steels are materials, that are widely used in various fields of industry, architecture and biomedicine. Their specific composition of alloying elements has got influence on their deformation behavior. The main goal of this study was evaluation of magnetic properties of selected steels, caused by plastic deformation. The samples were heat treated in different intervals of temperature before measuring. Then the magnetic properties were measured on device designed for measuring of magnetism. From tested specimens, only AISI 304 confirmed effect of plastic deformation on the magnetic properties. Magnetic properties changed with increasing temperature.

  9. Expanded austenite in nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steel grades; Analise da austenita expandida em camadas nitretadas em acos inoxidaveis austeniticos e superaustenitico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casteletti, L.C.; Fernandes, F.A.P.; Heck, S.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia de Materais, Aeronautica e Automobilistica; Oliveira, A.M. [Instituto de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Maranhao (IFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil); Gallego, J., E-mail: gallego@dem.feis.unesp.b [UNESP, Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil). Dept. Engenharia Mecanica

    2010-07-01

    In this work nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steels were analyzed through optical microscopy and X-rays diffraction analysis (XRD). It was observed that the formation of N supersaturated phase, called expanded austenite, has promoted significant increment of hardness (> 1000HV). XRD results have indicated the anomalous displacement of the diffracted peaks, in comparison with the normal austenite. This behavior, combined with peaks broadening, it was analyzed in different nitriding temperatures which results showed good agreement with the literature. (author)

  10. Adaptation of fuel code for light water reactor with austenitic steel rod cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira, E-mail: dsgomes@ipen.br, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (POLI/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise, Avaliacao e Gerenciamento de Risco

    2015-07-01

    Light water reactors were used with steel as nuclear fuel cladding from 1960 to 1980. The high performance proved that the use of low-carbon alloys could substitute the current zirconium alloys. Stainless steel is an alternative that can be used as cladding. The zirconium alloys replaced the steel. However, significant experiences in-pile occurred, in commercial units such as Haddam Neck, Indian Point, and Yankee experiences. Stainless Steel Types 347 and 348 can be used as cladding. An advantage of using Stainless Steel was evident in Fukushima when a large number of hydrogens was produced at high temperatures. The steel cladding does not eliminate the problem of accumulating free hydrogen, which can lead to a risk of explosion. In a boiling water reactor, environments easily exist for the attack of intergranular corrosion. The Stainless Steel alloys, Types 321, 347, and 348, are stabilized against attack by the addition of titanium, niobium, or tantalum. The steel Type 348 is composed of niobium, tantalum, and cobalt. Titanium preserves type 321, and niobium additions stabilize type 347. In recent years, research has increased on studying the effects of irradiation by fast neutrons. The impact of radiation includes changes in flow rate limits, deformation, and ductility. The irradiation can convert crystalline lattices into an amorphous structure. New proposals are emerging that suggest using a silicon carbide-based fuel rod cladding or iron-chromium-aluminum alloys. These materials can substitute the classic zirconium alloys. Once the steel Type 348 was chosen, the thermal and mechanical properties were coded in a library of functions. The fuel performance codes contain all features. A comparative analysis of the steel and zirconium alloys was made. The results demonstrate that the austenitic steel alloys are the viable candidates for substituting the zirconium alloys. (author)

  11. Adaptation of fuel code for light water reactor with austenitic steel rod cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira; Giovedi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Light water reactors were used with steel as nuclear fuel cladding from 1960 to 1980. The high performance proved that the use of low-carbon alloys could substitute the current zirconium alloys. Stainless steel is an alternative that can be used as cladding. The zirconium alloys replaced the steel. However, significant experiences in-pile occurred, in commercial units such as Haddam Neck, Indian Point, and Yankee experiences. Stainless Steel Types 347 and 348 can be used as cladding. An advantage of using Stainless Steel was evident in Fukushima when a large number of hydrogens was produced at high temperatures. The steel cladding does not eliminate the problem of accumulating free hydrogen, which can lead to a risk of explosion. In a boiling water reactor, environments easily exist for the attack of intergranular corrosion. The Stainless Steel alloys, Types 321, 347, and 348, are stabilized against attack by the addition of titanium, niobium, or tantalum. The steel Type 348 is composed of niobium, tantalum, and cobalt. Titanium preserves type 321, and niobium additions stabilize type 347. In recent years, research has increased on studying the effects of irradiation by fast neutrons. The impact of radiation includes changes in flow rate limits, deformation, and ductility. The irradiation can convert crystalline lattices into an amorphous structure. New proposals are emerging that suggest using a silicon carbide-based fuel rod cladding or iron-chromium-aluminum alloys. These materials can substitute the classic zirconium alloys. Once the steel Type 348 was chosen, the thermal and mechanical properties were coded in a library of functions. The fuel performance codes contain all features. A comparative analysis of the steel and zirconium alloys was made. The results demonstrate that the austenitic steel alloys are the viable candidates for substituting the zirconium alloys. (author)

  12. Investigation on Microstructure of Heat Treated High Manganese Austenitic Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzafar A.K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of manganese addition and annealing heat treatment on microstructure of austenitic cast irons with high manganese content (Mn-Ni-resist were investigated. The complex relationship between the development of the solidification microstructures and buildup of microsegregation in Mn-Ni-resist was obtained by using microstructure analysis and EDS analysis. The annealing heat treatment was applied at 700°C up to 1000°C to investigate the effect of the annealing temperature on the microstructure. This experiment describes the characterization of microsegregation in Mn-Ni-reist was made by means of point counting microanalysis along the microstructure. With this method, the differences of silicon, manganese and nickel distribution in alloys solidified in the microstructure were clearly evidenced. The results show microstructure consists of flake graphite embedded in austenitic matrix and carbides. There is segregation of elements in the Late To Freeze (LTF region after solidification from melting. Manganese positively with high concentration detected in the LTF region. As for heat treatment, higher annealing temperature on the Mn-Ni-resist was reduced carbide formation. The higher annealing temperature shows carbide transformed into a smaller size and disperses through the austenitic matrix structure. The size of carbide decreased with increasing annealing temperature as observed in the microstructure.

  13. A simplified LBB evaluation procedure for austenitic and ferritic steel piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, R.M.; Wichman, K.R.

    1997-04-01

    The NRC previously has approved application of LBB analysis as a means to demonstrate that the probability of pipe rupture was extremely low so that dynamic loads associated with postulated pipe break could be excluded from the design basis (1). The purpose of this work was to: (1) define simplified procedures that can be used by the NRC to compute allowable lengths for circumferential throughwall cracks and assess margin against pipe fracture, and (2) verify the accuracy of the simplified procedures by comparison with available experimental data for piping having circumferential throughwall flaws. The development of the procedures was performed using techniques similar to those employed to develop ASME Code flaw evaluation procedures. The procedures described in this report are applicable to pipe and pipe fittings with: (1) wrought austenitic steel (Ni-Cr-Fe alloy) having a specified minimum yield strength less than 45 ksi, and gas metal-arc, submerged arc and shielded metal-arc austentic welds, and (2) seamless or welded wrought carbon steel having a minimum yield strength not greater than 40 ksi, and associated weld materials. The procedures can be used for cast austenitic steel when adequate information is available to place the cast material toughness into one of the categories identified later in this report for austenitic wrought and weld materials.

  14. Low-temperature nitriding of austenitic steel in a vibrofluidized bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraz, V. R.; Grachev, S. V.

    1999-11-01

    The prospects for use of a vibrofluidized bed (VFB) for low-temperature nitrogen saturation of high-strength austenitic steel based on Cr-Ni-Mn (12Kh17N8G2S2MF) are considered. The positive effect of preliminary plastic deformation on the intensity of nitriding is described. The temperature and time parameters of nitriding in a VFB for strain-aging austenitic steel 12Kh17N8G2S2MF are shown to be adequate for the regimes of the final heat-treatment operation of aging. This creates the possibility of combining the operations of surface alloying and strain aging into a single cycle. This combined treatment increases substantially the resistance of the steel to cyclic loads while preserving the strength parameters. It is shown that the presented method of low-temperature nitriding in a VFB is expedient for improving the service characteristics of austenitic steel 12Kh17N8G2S2MF used for production of force springs of automobile brake systems.

  15. The Effect of Solute Nb on the Austenite-to-Ferrite Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Tao; Militzer, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    Niobium is a widely used micro-alloying element in steels that can retard the austenite-to-ferrite transformation primarily by solute drag when Nb remains in solution. It is critical to develop quantitative models to predict the effect of Nb on the transformation kinetics. In the present work, dedicated continuous cooling transformation (CCT) studies were performed for a low-carbon steel microalloyed with 0.047 wt pct Nb starting from fully recrystallized austenite states with the same grain size but different amounts of Nb in solution. The austenite-to-ferrite transformation kinetics is described from a fundamental perspective by assuming a mixed-mode reaction including solute drag of Nb. Using the solute drag model of Fazeli and Militzer, the intrinsic interface mobility, trans-interface diffusivity of Nb, and its binding energy to the interface have been determined from the CCT data. The interfacial parameters are critically analyzed and compared with independent measurements of diffusion and grain boundary segregation.

  16. Development of a robust modeling tool for radiation-induced segregation in austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Field, Kevin G [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Allen, Todd R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Busby, Jeremy T [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components has been linked to changes in grain boundary composition due to irradiation induced segregation (RIS). This work developed a robust RIS modeling tool to account for thermodynamics and kinetics of the atom and defect transportation under combined thermal and radiation conditions. The diffusion flux equations were based on the Perks model formulated through the linear theory of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Both cross and non-cross phenomenological diffusion coefficients in the flux equations were considered and correlated to tracer diffusion coefficients through Manning’s relation. The preferential atomvacancy coupling was described by the mobility model, whereas the preferential atom-interstitial coupling was described by the interstitial binding model. The composition dependence of the thermodynamic factor was modeled using the CALPHAD approach. Detailed analysis on the diffusion fluxes near and at grain boundaries of irradiated austenitic stainless steels suggested the dominant diffusion mechanism for chromium and iron is via vacancy, while that for nickel can swing from the vacancy to the interstitial dominant mechanism. The diffusion flux in the vicinity of a grain boundary was found to be greatly influenced by the composition gradient formed from the transient state, leading to the oscillatory behavior of alloy compositions in this region. This work confirms that both vacancy and interstitial diffusion, and segregation itself, have important roles in determining the microchemistry of Fe, Cr, and Ni at irradiated grain boundaries in austenitic stainless steels.

  17. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashdown, B.G. (comp.)

    1980-04-01

    Progress is reported concerning preparation of a materials handbook for fusion, creep-fatigue of first-wall structural materials, test results on miniature compact tension fracture toughness specimens, austenitic stainless steels, Fe-Ni-Cr alloys, iron-base alloys with long-range crystal structure, ferritic steels, irradiation experiments, corrosion testing, and hydrogen permeation studies. (FS)

  18. Design of Radiation-Tolerant Structural Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, T.R.; Was, G.S.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Gan, J.; Ukai, S.

    2005-12-28

    The objective of this program is to improve the radiation tolerance of both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic (F-M) alloys projected for use in Generation IV systems. The expected materials limitations of Generation IV components include: creep strength, dimensional stability, and corrosion/stress corrosion compatibility. The material design strategies to be tested fall into three main categories: (1) engineering grain boundaries; (2) alloying, by adding oversized elements to the matrix; and (3) microstructural/nanostructural design, such as adding matrix precipitates. These three design strategies were tested across both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloy classes

  19. Surface hardening of austenitic stainless steels via low-temperature colossal supersaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan

    The Swagelok Company has recently developed a low-temperature (470°C) carburization technology for austenitic stainless steels, that increases the surface hardness from 200 to 1200 HV25 without sacrificing corrosion resistance. In order to investigate the microstructural changes responsible for these outstanding properties, bulk specimens, thin foils, and powder specimens of several different low-temperature carburized 316 stainless steels have been studied. XRD studies revealed that the low-temperature carburization of 316 austenitic stainless steels lead to a colossal supersaturation of interstitial carbon in the austenite. While the equilibrium solubility of carbon is 0.03 at% at the carburization temperature of 470°C, high-precision XRD determination of the lattice parameter after carburization indicated a carbon concentration of >10at% in solid solution---a colossal supersaturation! This astonishing result was confirmed by a completely independent experimental method, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). Residual stress measurements indicated that low-temperature carburization caused an enormous compressive residual stress of 2 GPa at the surface. The enormous compressive residual stress and a high density of stacking faults caused broadening and shifting of the austenite peaks in X-ray diffraction scans. Analysis of the underlying thermodynamics and kinetics indicate that the key to colossal supersaturation is to kinetically suppress the formation of M23C6. The colossal supersaturation of carbon in the austenite is the dominant feature responsible for the unusual hardness. Only during the extended (>40h) carburization times, M5C 2 carbide (Hagg carbide), instead of M23C6, was observed to form. In addition, TEM studies indicated the presence of a small amount of a second carbide phase, M7C3. The particles of both carbides have the shape of long needles, containing a high density of planar defects normal to the long axis of the needles. The concept of "low

  20. Shape Memory Alloys (Part I: Significant Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ivanic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Shape memory alloys (SMAs belong to a group of functional materials with the unique property of “remembering” the shape they had before pseudoplastic deformation. Such an effect is based on crystallographic reversible thermo-elastic martensitic transformation. There are two crystal phases in SMAs: the austenite phase (stable at high temperature and the martensite phase (stable at low temperature. Austenite to martensite phase transformation can be obtained by mechanical (loading and thermal methods (heating and cooling. During martensitic transformation, no diffusive process is involved, only inelastic deformation of the crystal structure. When the shape memory alloy passes through the phase transformation, the alloy transforms from high ordered phase (austenite to low ordered phase (martensite. There are two types of martensite transformations. First is temperature-induced martensite, which is also called self-accommodating (twinned martensite. The second is stress-induced martensite, also called detwinned martensite. The entire austenite to martensite transformation cycle can be described with four characteristic temperatures: Ms – martensite start temperature, Mf – martensite finish temperature, As – austenite start temperature, and Af – austenite finish temperature. The main factors influencing transformation temperatures are chemical composition, heat treatment procedure, cooling speed, grain size, and number of transformation cycles. As a result of martensitic transformation in SMAs, several thermomechanical phenomena may occur: pseudoelasticity, shape memory effect (one-way and two-way SME and rubber-like behavior. Pseudoelasticity occurs when the SMA is subjected to a mechanical loading at a constant temperature above Af. The second thermomechanical behaviour that can be observed in SMA is the shape memory effect (SME, mainly one-way SME, which is the most commonly used SME. When the sample is subjected to a mechanical

  1. Interpretation of dynamic tensile behavior by austenite stability in ferrite-austenite duplex lightweight steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeyeong; Jo, Min Cheol; Jeong, Hyeok Jae; Sohn, Seok Su; Kwak, Jai-Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2017-11-16

    Phenomena occurring in duplex lightweight steels under dynamic loading are hardly investigated, although its understanding is essentially needed in applications of automotive steels. In this study, quasi-static and dynamic tensile properties of duplex lightweight steels were investigated by focusing on how TRIP and TWIP mechanisms were varied under the quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. As the annealing temperature increased, the grain size and volume fraction of austenite increased, thereby gradually decreasing austenite stability. The strain-hardening rate curves displayed a multiple-stage strain-hardening behavior, which was closely related with deformation mechanisms. Under the dynamic loading, the temperature rise due to adiabatic heating raised the austenite stability, which resulted in the reduction in the TRIP amount. Though the 950 °C-annealed specimen having the lowest austenite stability showed the very low ductility and strength under the quasi-static loading, it exhibited the tensile elongation up to 54% as well as high strain-hardening rate and tensile strength (1038 MPa) due to appropriate austenite stability under dynamic loading. Since dynamic properties of the present duplex lightweight steels show the excellent strength-ductility combination as well as continuously high strain hardening, they can be sufficiently applied to automotive steel sheets demanded for stronger vehicle bodies and safety enhancement.

  2. Niobium segregation in the austenitic grain boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, P.R.; Farah, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The segregation of niobium and carbon in the boundary of the old austenitic grain (martensitic sample) of a steel 0,4%C/0,03%Nb, homogenized in 1350 0 C for one hour, with the help of the ionic microprobe, using oxygen as primary beam, is studied. The niobium segregation in Fe /0,58Nb homogenized samples at 1300 0 C by 8 hours and cooled in water, using the electronic microprobe is also studied. (E.G.) [pt

  3. Investigation of the Effect of Tungsten Substitution on Microstructure and Abrasive Wear Performance of In Situ VC-Reinforced High-Manganese Austenitic Steel Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Emad Galin; Karimzadeh, Neda; Varahram, Naser; Davami, Parviz

    2013-08-01

    Particulate VC-reinforced high-manganese austenitic steel matrix composites with different vanadium and tungsten contents were synthesized by conventional alloying and casting route. Microstructural characterizations showed that the composites processed by in situ precipitation of the reinforcements were composed of V8C7 particulates distributed in an austenitic matrix. It was observed that addition of tungsten to austenite increases work-hardening rate of subsurface layer during pin-on disk wear test. The maximum abrasive wear resistance was achieved at tungsten content equal to 2 wt pct. However, excessive addition of tungsten promoted the formation of W3C phase and reduced the abrasive wear resistance because of decrease in distribution homogeneity and volume fraction of the reinforcing VC particles.

  4. Microstructural changes within similar coronary stents produced from two different austenitic steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Sabine; Meissner, Andreas; Fischer, Alfons

    2009-04-01

    Coronary heart disease has become the most common source for death in western industrial countries. Since 1986, a metal vessel scaffold (stent) is inserted to prevent the vessel wall from collapsing [Puel, J., Joffre, F., Rousseau, H., Guermonprez, B., Lancelin, B., Valeix, B., Imbert, G., Bounhoure, J.P, 1987. Endo-prothéses coronariennes autoexpansives dans la Préevention des resténoses apés angioplastie transluminale. Archives des Maladies du Coeur et des Vaisseaux, 1311--1312]. Most of these coronary stents are made from CrNiMo-steel (AISI 316L). Due to its austenitic structure, the material shows strength and ductility combined with corrosion resistance and a satisfactory biocompatibility. However, recent studies indicate that Nickel is under discussion as to its allergenic potential. Other typically used materials like Co-Base L605 or Tantalum alloys are relatively expensive and are not used so often. Newly developed austenitic high-nitrogen CrMnMoN-steels (AHNS) may offer an alternative. Traditional material tests revealed that strength and ductility, as well as corrosion resistance and biocompatibility, are as good as or even better than those of 316L [Vogt, J.B., Degallaix, S., Foct J., 1984. Low cycle fatigue life enhancement of 316L stainless steel by nitrogen alloying. International Journal of Fatigue 6 (4), 211-215, Menzel, J., Stein, G., 1996. High nitrogen containing Ni-free austenitic steels for medical applications. ISIJ Intern 36 (7), 893-900, Gavriljuk, V.G., Berns, H., 1999. High nitrogen steels, Springer Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg]. However, because of a strut diameter of about 100 microm, the cross section consists of about five to ten crystal grains (oligo-crystalline). Thus very few, or even just one, grain can be responsible for the success or failure of the whole stent. During implantation, the structure of coronary artery stents is subjected to distinct inhomogeneous plastic deformation due to crimping and dilation.

  5. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chopra, O. K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gruber, Eugene E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shack, William J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (≤3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC

  6. Development of advanced austenitic stainless steels resistant to void swelling under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouxel, Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of studies about Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR) of generation IV, the CEA is developing new austenitic steel grades for the fuel cladding. These steels demonstrate very good mechanical properties but their use is limited because of the void swelling under irradiation. Beyond a high irradiation dose, cavities appear in the alloys and weaken the material. The reference material in France is a 15Cr/15Ni steel, named AIM1, stabilized with titanium. This study try to understand the role played by various chemical elements and microstructural parameters on the formation of the cavities under irradiation, and contribute to the development of a new grade AIM2 more resistant to swelling. In an analytical approach, model materials were elaborated with various chemical compositions and microstructures. Ten grades were cast with chemical variations in Ti, Nb, Ni and P. Four specific microstructures for each alloy highlighted the effect of dislocations, solutes or nano-precipitates on the void swelling. These materials were characterized using TEM and SANS, before irradiation with Fe 2+ (2 MeV) ions in the order to simulate the damages caused by neutrons. Comparing the irradiated microstructures, it is demonstrated that the solutes have a dominating effect on the formation of cavities. Specifically titanium in solid solution reduces the swelling whereas niobium does not show this effect. Finally, a matrix enriched by 15% to 25% of nickel is still favorable to limit swelling in these advanced austenitic stainless steels. (author) [fr

  7. Effect of Austenite Stability on Pack Aluminizing of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Christopher; Kvryan, Armen; Kasnakjian, Shahan; Coronado, Armando; Sujittosakul, Sutine; Villalpando, Obed; Ravi, Vilupanur A.

    2015-01-01

    Aluminide coatings were applied to the surfaces of several austenitic stainless steels—UNS S30300, S30400, S30900, S31000, and S31600 (Type 303, 304, 309, 310, and 316)—by the halide activated pack cementation process. The coating compositions, microstructures, and hardness were determined for the different steels coated at 850°C for 25 h. The stability of the austenite phase for each type of steel was calculated by determining the ratio of the nickel to the chromium equivalents based on their nominal compositions. The thickness of the inner diffusion zone in the coating was shown to be inversely related to the austenite stability of the steels. Microhardness measurements were obtained across the coating thickness and into the substrate. The hardness values followed the same trends as the aluminum composition profile into the substrate.

  8. Biocompatibility studies of low temperature nitrided and collagen-I coated AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinesi, M; Stio, M; Treves, C; Borgioli, F

    2013-06-01

    The biocompatibility of austenitic stainless steels can be improved by means of surface engineering techniques. In the present research it was investigated if low temperature nitrided AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel may be a suitable substrate for bioactive protein coating consisting of collagen-I. The biocompatibility of surface modified alloy was studied using as experimental model endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) in culture. Low temperature nitriding produces modified surface layers consisting mainly of S phase, the supersaturated interstitial solid solution of nitrogen in the austenite lattice, which allows to enhance surface microhardness and corrosion resistance in PBS solution. The nitriding treatment seems to promote the coating with collagen-I, without chemical coupling agents, in respect of the untreated alloy. For biocompatibility studies, proliferation, lactate dehydrogenase levels and secretion of two metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) were determined. Experimental results suggest that the collagen protection may be favourable for endothelial cell proliferation and for the control of MMP-2 release.

  9. Mechanical property degradation and microstructural evolution of cast austenitic stainless steels under short-term thermal aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Timothy G.; Byun, Thak Sang; Leonard, Keith J.

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical testing and microstructural characterization were performed on short-term thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) to understand the severity and mechanisms of thermal-aging degradation experienced during extended operation of light water reactor (LWR) coolant systems. Four CASS materials-CF3, CF3M, CF8, and CF8M-were thermally aged for 1500 h at 290 °C, 330 °C, 360 °C, and 400 °C. All four alloys experienced insignificant change in strength and ductility properties but a significant reduction in absorbed impact energy. The primary microstructural and compositional changes during thermal aging were spinodal decomposition of the δ-ferrite into α/α‧, precipitation of G-phase in the δ-ferrite, segregation of solute to the austenite/ferrite interphase boundary, and growth of M23C6 carbides on the austenite/ferrite interphase boundary. These changes were shown to be highly dependent on chemical composition, particularly the concentration of C and Mo, and aging temperature. The low C, high Mo CF3M alloys experienced the most spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation coinciding the largest reduction in impact properties.

  10. Martensite formation in Fe-C alloys at cryogenic temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetometry was applied to quantify the fraction of austenite retained in Fe-C alloys subjected to various treatments. These treatments consisted of: (i) water quenching; (ii) water quenching followed by immersion in boiling nitrogen and again in water; (iii) as for (ii) but re-heating from 77 K...

  11. New Stainless Steel Alloys for Low Temperature Surface Hardening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present contribution showcases the possibility for developing new surface hardenable stainless steels containing strong nitride/carbide forming elements (SNCFE). Nitriding of the commercial alloys, austenitic A286, and ferritic AISI 409 illustrates the beneficial effect of having SNCFE present...

  12. Microstructural and mechanical characteristics of low alloyed Ni-Mo-Cu austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosnjak, B.

    2000-12-01

    The present study investigated the effect of austempering temperature and austempering time on the microstructure and mechanical properties of low alloyed Ni-Mo-Cu ductile iron. The effect of austempering parameters and alloying additions on the austemperability of treated ductile iron has been estimated, too. Specimens were austenitised at 900 degree C for 120 mm, then austempered for 10, 30, 60, 120, 240 and 360 mm at 300, 350 and 400 degree C respectively, and examined by light and scanning electron microscopy. The structure consisted of bainitic ferrite containing retained austenite. the amount of which increased, and the carbon content of which decreased, with increasing austempering temperature. The carbon content of austenite has been evaluated by measuring the lattice parameter by X-ray diffraction. After short periods of austempering time in iron, the carbon content of the retained austenite decreases and on subsequent cooling to room temperature it transforms to martensite. The volume fractions of retained austenite, bainitic ferrite, martensite and austenite carbon content was correlated with microstructural changes and mechanical properties. Optimum properties are obtained at intermediate austempering periods (120-240 mm) when both the amount of retained austenite and austenite carbon content are maximum. (author)

  13. On the stable eutectic solidification of iron–carbon–silicon alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, Doru M.; Alonso, Gorka; Larrañaga, Pello; Suarez, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Extensive effort was expanded to elucidate the growth and morphology of the stable eutectic grains during early solidification of continuous cooled Fe–C–Si alloys. To this purpose, quenching experiments at successive stages during solidification have been carried out on five cast irons with various magnesium and titanium levels designed to produce graphite morphologies ranging from lamellar to mixed compacted–spheroidal. The graphite shape factors were measured on the metallographic samples, and their evolution as a function of the chemical composition and the solid fraction was analyzed. Extensive scanning electron microscopy was carried on to evaluate the change in graphite shape during early solidification, to establish the fraction of solid at which the transition from spheroidal-to-compacted-to-lamellar graphite occurs, and to outline the early morphology of the eutectic grains. It was confirmed that solidification of Mg containing irons started with the development of spheroidal graphite even at Mg levels as low as 0.013 mass%. Then, as solidification proceeds, when some spheroids developed one or more tails (tadpole graphite), the spheroidal-to-compacted graphite transition occurs. The new findings were then integrated in previous knowledge to produce an understanding of the eutectic solidification of these materials. It was concluded that in hypoeutectic lamellar graphite iron austenite/graphite eutectic grains can nucleate at the austenite/liquid interface or in the bulk of the liquid, depending on the sulfur content and on the cooling rate. When graphite nucleation occurs on the primary austenite, several eutectic grains can nucleate and grow on the same dendrite. The primary austenite continues growing as eutectic austenite and therefore the two have the same crystallographic orientation. Thus, a final austenite grain may include several eutectic grains. In eutectic irons the eutectic grains nucleate and grow mostly in the liquid. The eutectic

  14. Mechanodynamical analysis of nickel-titanium alloys for orthodontics application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arruda, Carlos do Canto

    2002-01-01

    Nickel-titanium alloys may coexist in more than one crystalline structure. There is a high temperature phase, austenite, and a low temperature phase, martensite. The metallurgical basis for the superelasticity and the shape memory effect relies in the ability of these alloys to transform easily from one phase to another. There are three essential factors for the orthodontist to understand nickel-titanium alloys behaviour: stress; deflection; and temperature. These three factors are related to each other by the stress-deflection, stress-temperature and deflection-temperature diagrams. This work was undertaken with the objective to analyse commercial nickel-titanium alloys for orthodontics application, using the dynamical mechanical analyser - DMA. Four NiTi 0,017 X 0,025'' archwires were studied. The archwires were Copper NiTi 35 deg C (Ormco), Neo Sentalloy F200 (GAC), Nitinol Superelastic (Unitek) and NiTi (GAC). The different mechanodynamical properties such as elasticity and damping moduli were evaluated. Each commercial material was evaluated with and without a 1 N static force, aiming to evaluate phase transition temperature variation with stress. The austenitic to martensitic phase ratio, for the experiments without static force, was in the range of 1.59 to 1.85. For the 1 N static force tests the austenitic to martensitic phase ratio, ranged from 1.28 to 1.57 due to the higher martensite elasticity modulus. With elastic modulus variation with temperature behaviour, the orthodontist has the knowledge of the force variation applied in the tooth in relation to the oral cavity temperature change, for nickel-titanium alloys that undergo phase transformation. The damping capacity of the studied alloys depends on the materials state: martensitic phase; austenitic phase or during phase transformation. The martensitic phase shows higher dumping capacity. During phase transformation, an internal friction peak may be observed for the CuNiTi 35 deg C and Neo Sentalloy F

  15. Modelling Cr depletion under a growing Cr2O3 layer on austenitic stainless steel: the influence of grain boundary diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Anette Nørgaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2009-01-01

    The oxidation behaviour of austenitic stainless steels in the temperature range 723–1173K is strongly influenced by the grain size of the oxidizing alloy. In this work the evolution of the concentration profiles of Cr, Ni and Fe in the substrate below a growing Cr2O3 layer is simulated...... according to a parabolic rate law as a consequence of rate limiting diffusion of Cr cations through the oxide layer; the retraction of the oxide/alloy interface associated with the removal of Cr atoms from the substrate is included in the calculations. Numerically, the movement of the oxide/alloy interface...... is formulated such that the initial mesh can be used throughout the calculation. The calculated concentration profiles of the alloying elements emphasize the importance of grain boundaries in supplying Cr from the alloy to the growing oxide layer. For temperatures of 823 and 923K the simulations predict...

  16. Development of silver-containing austenite antibacterial stainless steels for biomedical applications part I: microstructure characteristics, mechanical properties and antibacterial mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chiung-Fang; Chiang, Hsi-Jen; Lan, Wen-Chien; Chou, Hsin-Hua; Ou, Keng-Liang; Yu, Chih-Hua

    2011-05-01

    The as-quenched (AQ) microstructure of the Ag-containing alloys was found to be essentially a mixture of austenite (γ) and Ag phases. The Ag phase precipitates had a face-centered-cubic structure and lattice parameter a = 4.09 Å. When the alloy contained Ag ≥0.2 wt%, the mechanical properties were slightly enhanced because of the precipitate strengthening by the Ag phase precipitates. Moreover, the Ag-containing alloys exhibited ductile fracture after tensile testing. The results of an antibacterial test revealed that the Ag phase precipitates play a key role in the antibacterial mechanism of Ag-containing alloys: Ag(+) ions released from the Ag phase precipitates can kill bacteria. It is suggested that as AISI 316L alloy has an Ag content ≥0.2 wt%, it will have excellent antibacterial properties against both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, with an antibacterial rate of nearly 100%.

  17. Microstructural studies on Alloy 693

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halder, R.; Dutta, R.S. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sengupta, P., E-mail: praneshsengupta@gmail.com [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Samajdar, I. [Dept. of Metall. Engg. and Mater. Sci., Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400 072 (India); Dey, G.K. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Superalloy 693, is a newly identified ‘high-temperature corrosion resistant alloy’. Present study focuses on microstructure and mechanical properties of the alloy prepared by double ‘vacuum melting’ route. In general, the alloy contains ordered Ni{sub 3}Al precipitates distributed within austenitic matrix. M{sub 6}C primary carbide, M{sub 23}C{sub 6} type secondary carbide and NbC particles are also found to be present. Heat treatment of the alloy at 1373 K for 30 min followed by water quenching (WQ) brings about a microstructure that is free from secondary carbides and Ni{sub 3}Al type precipitates but contains primary carbides. Tensile property of Alloy 693 materials was measured with as received and solution annealed (1323 K, 60 min, WQ) and (1373 K, 30 min, WQ) conditions. Yield strength, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and hardness of the alloy are found to drop with annealing. It is noted that in annealed condition, considerable cold working of the alloy can be performed.

  18. Microstructural evolution in deformed austenitic TWinning Induced Plasticity steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Tol, R.T.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis studies the effect of plastic deformation on the stability of the austenitic microstructure against martensitic transformation and diffusional decomposition and its role in the phenomenon of delayed fracture in austenitic manganese (Mn)-based TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steels.

  19. Reverted austenite in PH 13-8 Mo maraging steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnitzer, Ronald; Radis, Rene; Noehrer, Matthias; Schober, Michael; Hochfellner, Rainer; Zinner, Silvia; Povoden-Karadeniz, E.; Kozeschnik, Ernst; Leitner, Harald

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of maraging steels are strongly influenced by the presence of reverted austenite. In this study, the morphology and chemical composition of reverted austenite in a corrosion resistant maraging steel was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). Two types of austenite, i.e. granular and elongated, are present after aging at 575 o C, whereby the content of the latter increases during aging. The investigations revealed that the austenite phase is enriched in Ni, which prevents the transformation to martensite during cooling. Inside and next to the austenitc areas, Mo and Cr-rich carbides, which form during the aging treatment, were found. Various aging treatments were performed to obtain the activation energy for the formation of reverted austenite. Additionally, the experimental data are compared with thermodynamic and kinetic simulations. Based on these results and the chemical composition changes of the phases, a model for the formation of reverted austenite is presented. It is concluded that precipitation of B2-ordered NiAl and formation of reverted austenite take place simultaneously during aging and that dissolution of precipitates is not essential for the initial formation of reverted austenite.

  20. Examination of carbon partitioning into austenite during tempering of bainite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero, Francesca G. [CENIM-CSIC, Madrid, Spain; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Clarke, A. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Garcia-Mateo, C. [CENIM-CSIC, Madrid, Spain

    2010-01-01

    The redistribution of carbon after tempering of a novel nanocrystalline bainitic steel consisting of a mixture of supersaturated ferrite and retained austenite has been analyzed by atom probe tomography. No direct evidence supporting the additional carbon enrichment of austenite beyond that initially achieved during the bainite heat treatment was obtained during subsequent tempering of this high carbon, high silicon steel.

  1. Void Swelling and Microstructure of Austenitic Stainless Steels Irradiated in the BOR - 60 Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yang, Yong [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Huang, Yina [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Allen, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Alexandreanu, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-11-01

    As nuclear power plants age and neutron fluence increases, detrimental effects resulting from radiation damage have become an increasingly important issue for the operational safety and structural integrity of core internal components. In this study, irradiated specimens of reactor core internal components were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The specimens had been irradiated to 5.5-45 dpa in the BOR-60 reactor at a dose rate close to 10-6 dpa/s and temperature of about 320°C. No voids were observed in the austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys at all doses. Despite the possibility that fine voids below the TEM resolution limit may be present, it was clear that void swelling was insignificant in all examined alloys up to 45 dpa. Irradiated microstructures of the studied alloys were dominated by a high density of Frank loops. The mean size and density of the Frank loops varied from one material to another, but saturated with increasing dose above ~10 dpa. While no irradiation-induced precipitations were present below 24.5 dpa, fine precipitates were evident in several alloys at 45 dpa.

  2. Improved austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications. [Improved stress-rupture properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.08 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; .01-.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; .03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, 0; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P + wt. % B + wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding.

  3. Improved Accident Tolerance of Austenitic Stainless Steel Cladding through Colossal Supersaturation with Interstitial Solutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We proposed a program-supporting research project in the area of fuel-cycle R&D, specifically on the topic of advanced fuels. Our goal was to investigate whether SECIS (surface engineering by concentrated interstitial solute - carbon, nitrogen) can improve the properties of austenitic stainless steels and related structural alloys such that they can be used for nuclear fuel cladding in LWRs (light-water reactors) and significantly excel currently used alloys with regard to performance, safety, service life, and accident tolerance. We intended to demonstrate that SECIS can be adapted for post-processing of clad tubing to significantly enhance mechanical properties (hardness, wear resistance, and fatigue life), corrosion resistance, resistance to stress-corrosion cracking (hydrogen-induced embrittlement), and - potentially - radiation resistance (against electron-, neutron-, or ion-radiation damage). To test this hypothesis, we measured various relevant properties of the surface-engineered alloys and compared them with corresponding properties of the non-treated, as-received alloys. In particular, we studied the impact of heat exposure corresponding to BWR (boiling-water reactor) working and accident (loss-of-coolant) conditions and the effect of ion irradiation.

  4. Improved Accident Tolerance of Austenitic Stainless Steel Cladding through Colossal Supersaturation with Interstitial Solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Frank [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-10-13

    We proposed a program-supporting research project in the area of fuel-cycle R&D, specifically on the topic of advanced fuels. Our goal was to investigate whether SECIS (surface engineering by concentrated interstitial solute – carbon, nitrogen) can improve the properties of austenitic stainless steels and related structural alloys such that they can be used for nuclear fuel cladding in LWRs (light-water reactors) and significantly excel currently used alloys with regard to performance, safety, service life, and accident tolerance. We intended to demonstrate that SECIS can be adapted for post-processing of clad tubing to significantly enhance mechanical properties (hardness, wear resistance, and fatigue life), corrosion resistance, resistance to stress–corrosion cracking (hydrogen-induced embrittlement), and – potentially – radiation resistance (against electron-, neutron-, or ion-radiation damage). To test this hypothesis, we measured various relevant properties of the surface-engineered alloys and compared them with corresponding properties of the non–treated, as-received alloys. In particular, we studied the impact of heat exposure corresponding to BWR (boiling-water reactor) working and accident (loss-of-coolant) conditions and the effect of ion irradiation.

  5. Static strain aging in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, S.N.

    1978-07-01

    The static strain aging effects were investigated in austenitic stainless steels by measuring the yield points developed in tensile tests following the arrest of the crosshead for some period of time. The results appear to indicate that the dragging of dislocations in the interval of temperatures from 100 to 300 0 C, where the strain aging is effective, does not apparently depend on the Cottrell's atmosphere. Moreover the influence of the pre-deformation and time on the yield point intensity displayed the existence of stages. The strain aging mechanics and the reasons for the stages were discussed. (Author) [pt

  6. Tribocorrosion wear of austenitic and martensitic steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rozing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of tribocorrosion wear caused by an aggressive acidic media. Tests were conducted on samples made of stainless steel AISI 316L, 304L and 440C. Austenitic steels were tested in their nitrided state and martensitic in quenched and tempered and then induction hardened state. Electrochemical corrosion resistance testing and analysis of the microstructure and hardness in the cross section was carried out on samples of selected steels. To test the possibility of applying surface modification of selected materials in conditions of use, tests were conducted on samples/parts in a worm press for final pressing.

  7. Prediction on Austenite Grain Growth in High Carbon Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The austenite grain growth behavior of Ti-bearing and Ti-free steel was investigated using confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM and transmission electron microscope (TEM.Samples were held for 60min at 1123-1473K and then austenite grain sizes for different holding time at a series of temperatures were measured.The results show that austenite grain size of both steels increases with the increase of temperature.Besides,the austenite grain size of both steels grows with the holding time,which meets parabolic equation.The second phase particle was observed.The equation of Ostwald ripening was introduced to calculate the size of particle,and the volume fraction equation of second phase particle was applied to calculate the volume fraction of particle.Meanwhile,the modified Gladman model was adopted to predict austenite grain growth.The predicted results agree well with the measured results.

  8. Is there a relationship between the stacking fault character and the activated mode of plasticity of Fe-Mn-based austenitic steels?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idrissi, H.; Ryelandt, L.; Veron, M.; Schryvers, D.; Jacques, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    By changing the testing temperature, an austenitic Fe-Mn-Al-Si alloy presents either ε-martensite transformation or mechanical twinning during straining. In order to understand the nucleation and growth mechanisms involved in both phenomena, defects and particularly stacking faults, were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. It is observed that the character of the stacking faults also changes (from extrinsic to intrinsic) together with the temperature and the activated mode of plasticity.

  9. Low activation vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witzenburg, W. van.

    1991-01-01

    The properties and general characteristics of vanadium-base alloys are reviewed in terms of the materials requirements for fusion reactor first wall and blanket structures. In this review attention is focussed on radiation response including induced radioactivity, mechanical properties, compatibility with potential coolants, physical and thermal properties, fabricability and resources. Where possible, properties are compared to those of other leading candidate structural materials, e.g. austenitic and ferritic/martensitic steels. Vanadium alloys appear to offer advantages in the areas of long-term activation, mechanical properties at temperatures above 600 deg C, radiation resistance and thermo-hydraulic design, due to superior physical and thermal properties. They also have a potential for higher temperature operation in liquid lithium systems. Disadvantages are associated with their ability to retain high concentrations of hydrogen isotopes, higher cost, more difficult fabrication and welding. A particular concern regarding use of vanadium alloys relates their reactivity with non-metallic elements, such as oxygen and nitrogen. (author). 33 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  10. Influence of ausforming on substructures and shape memory behavior in Fe-28Mn-6Si-5Cr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.; Ji, W.; Han, M.; Jia, D.; Liu, W.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of ausforming (deformation of austenite at temperatures above Md) on shape memory effect (SME) and the substructures in Fe-28Mn-6Si-5Cr (wt.%) alloy were studied, intending to reveal the dominating factor for SME in terms of microstructural characteristics in comparison with the case of thermo-mechanical training. It was found that the SME in the studied alloy could be effectively improved by ausforming at 700 C for 9% tensile strain, in the process of which the oriented stacking faults and dislocations were evolved and regularly distributed in austenite. The improvement of SME by ausforming, as well as thermo-mechanical training, is attributed to the restored substructures in austenite; while there is no closely correspondent relation between SME and the strength of austenite matrix. (orig.)

  11. Effects of Copper and Sulfur Additions on Corrosion Resistance and Machinability of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soon Tae; Park, Yong Soo; Kim, Hyung Joon

    1999-01-01

    Effects of Cu and S on corrosion resistance and machinability of austenitic stainless steel were investigated using immersion test, metallographic examination, Auger surface analysis and tool life test with single point turning tools. Corrosion resistance of the experimental Cu containing alloys in 18.4N H 2 SO 4 at 80 ∼ 120 .deg. C and 3N HCl at 40 .deg. C decreased as S content increased. However, one of the experimental alloys (Fe- 18%Cr- 21%Ni-3.2%Mo- 1.6%W- 0.2%N- 3.1%Cu- 0.091%S) showed general and pitting corrosion resistance equivalent to that of CW12MW in highly concentrated SO 4 2- environment. The alloy also showed pitting corrosion resistance superior to super stainless steel such as 654SMO in Cl - environment. The reasons why the increase in S content deteriorated the corrosion resistance were first, that the number and size of (Mn, Cr)S sulfides having corrosion resistance lower than that of matrix increased, leading to pitting corrosion and second, that rapid dissolution of the matrix around the pits was caused by adsorbed S. However, the alloy containing 3.1 %Cu and 0.091 % S maintained high general and pitting corrosion resistance due to heavily enriched noble Cu through selective dissolution of active Fe and Ni. The tool life for 3.1 % Cu + 0.091 % S added alloy was about four times that of 0.06%Cu + 0.005% S added alloy due to high shear strain rate generated by Cu addition giving easy cross slip of dislocation, lubrication of ductile (Mn, Cr)S sulfides adhering to tool crater surface and low cutting force resulting from thin continuous sulfides formed in chips during machining

  12. Stress Corrosion Behavior of Low-temperature Liquid-Nitrided 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel in a Sour Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangfeng; Wang, Jun; Fan, Hongyuan; Yan, Jing; Duan, Lian; Gu, Tan; Xian, Guang; Sun, Lan; Wang, Danqi

    2018-01-01

    Low-temperature nitridation is a widely used surface heat treatment. Low-temperature liquid nitridation was applied to 316 austenitic stainless steel and an S-phase (expanded austenite) layer was achieved on the alloy surface. The effect of the S-phase layer on corrosion resistance and stress corrosion cracking was investigated in a sour environment. When a bending stress of 164 MPa (80 pct yield stress, YS) was applied, no macroscopic corrosion cracking and pits were observed on the nitrided samples and the S-phase layer stayed intact. Although no macroscopic corrosion cracking was observed on the non-nitrided samples under 205 MPa (100 pct YS), some pits were formed on the alloy surface. This could be attributed to the high stresses and hardness, and the excellent corrosion resistance of the S-phase layer introduced by low-temperature nitridation. Supersaturated nitrogen atoms in the S-phase layer can effectively prevent the decrease in pH of the corrosive medium and accelerate the alloy repassivation kinetics. However, when the bending stress was increased to 205 and 246 MPa (100 pct YS, 120 pct YS), macroscopic cracks were observed in the presence of both tensile stress and a corrosive medium.

  13. Effect of composition and austenite deformation on the transformation characteristics of low-carbon and ultralow-carbon microalloyed steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizek, P.; Wynne, B. P.; Davies, C. H. J.; Muddle, B. C.; Hodgson, P. D.

    2002-05-01

    Deformation dilatometry has been used to simulate controlled hot rolling followed by controlled cooling of a group of low- and ultralow-carbon microalloyed steels containing additions of boron and/or molybdenum to enhance hardenability. Each alloy was subjected to simulated recrystallization and nonrecrystallization rolling schedules, followed by controlled cooling at rates from 0.1 °C/s to about 100 °C/s, and the corresponding continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams were constructed. The resultant microstructures ranged from polygonal ferrite (PF) for combinations of slow cooling rates and low alloying element contents, through to bainitic ferrite accompanied by martensite for fast cooling rates and high concentrations of alloying elements. Combined additions of boron and molybdenum were found to be most effective in increasing steel hardenability, while boron was significantly more effective than molybdenum as a single addition, especially at the ultralow carbon content. Severe plastic deformation of the parent austenite (>0.45) markedly enhanced PF formation in those steels in which this microstructural constituent was formed, indicating a significant effective decrease in their hardenability. In contrast, in those steels in which only nonequilibrium ferrite microstructures were formed, the decreases in hardenability were relatively small, reflecting the lack of sensitivity to strain in the austenite of those microstructural constituents forming in the absence of PF.

  14. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld

  15. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eghlimi, Abbas, E-mail: a.eghlimi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, Morteza [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eskandarian, Masoomeh [Department of Materials Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zabolian, Azam [Department of Natural Resources, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Szpunar, Jerzy A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld

  16. Martensitic transformations and morphology studies of NiTi shape memory alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murari, M. S.; Pattabi, Manjunatha

    2017-05-01

    The forward transformation temperatures Martensite Start (Ms) and Martensite Finish (Mf) during cooling, reverse transformation temperatures Austenite Start (As) and Austenite Finish (Af) during heating are very sensitive to the thermal and mechanical history of the Shape Memory Alloy (SMA). Heat treatments, cold and hot roll, thermal and mechanical cycling have great influence on the transformation temperatures. Different characterizing techniques like Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC), X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD), Electrical Resistivity (ER) and Thermo Mechanical Analyzer (TMA) were employed to study the phase transformation temperatures of NiTi alloy. The microstructure of the samples was studied with Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), Optical Microscope (OM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM).

  17. Prediction of Austenite Formation Temperatures Using Artificial Neural Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, P; Schmidl, E; Grund, T; Lampke, T

    2016-01-01

    For the modeling and design of heat treatments, in consideration of the development/ transformation of the microstructure, different material data depending on the chemical composition, the respective microstructure/phases and the temperature are necessary. Material data are, e.g. the thermal conductivity, heat capacity, thermal expansion and transformation data etc. The quality of thermal simulations strongly depends on the accuracy of the material data. For many materials, the required data - in particular for different microstructures and temperatures - are rare in the literature. In addition, a different chemical composition within the permitted limits of the considered steel alloy cannot be predicted. A solution for this problem is provided by the calculation of material data using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). In the present study, the start and finish temperatures of the transformation from the bcc lattice to the fcc lattice structure of hypoeutectoid steels are calculated using an Artificial Neural Network. An appropriate database containing different transformation temperatures (austenite formation temperatures) to train the ANN is selected from the literature. In order to find a suitable feedforward network, the network topologies as well as the activation functions of the hidden layers are varied and subsequently evaluated in terms of the prediction accuracy. The transformation temperatures calculated by the ANN exhibit a very good compliance compared to the experimental data. The results show that the prediction performance is even higher compared to classical empirical equations such as Andrews or Brandis. Therefore, it can be assumed that the presented ANN is a convenient tool to distinguish between bcc and fcc phases in hypoeutectoid steels. (paper)

  18. Prediction of Austenite Formation Temperatures Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, P.; Schmidl, E.; Grund, T.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    For the modeling and design of heat treatments, in consideration of the development/ transformation of the microstructure, different material data depending on the chemical composition, the respective microstructure/phases and the temperature are necessary. Material data are, e.g. the thermal conductivity, heat capacity, thermal expansion and transformation data etc. The quality of thermal simulations strongly depends on the accuracy of the material data. For many materials, the required data - in particular for different microstructures and temperatures - are rare in the literature. In addition, a different chemical composition within the permitted limits of the considered steel alloy cannot be predicted. A solution for this problem is provided by the calculation of material data using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). In the present study, the start and finish temperatures of the transformation from the bcc lattice to the fcc lattice structure of hypoeutectoid steels are calculated using an Artificial Neural Network. An appropriate database containing different transformation temperatures (austenite formation temperatures) to train the ANN is selected from the literature. In order to find a suitable feedforward network, the network topologies as well as the activation functions of the hidden layers are varied and subsequently evaluated in terms of the prediction accuracy. The transformation temperatures calculated by the ANN exhibit a very good compliance compared to the experimental data. The results show that the prediction performance is even higher compared to classical empirical equations such as Andrews or Brandis. Therefore, it can be assumed that the presented ANN is a convenient tool to distinguish between bcc and fcc phases in hypoeutectoid steels.

  19. Low-temperature X-ray diffraction study of martensite lattice parameters in binary Ti-Ni alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokoshkin, S.D.; Korotitskiy, A.V.; Gundyrev, V.M.; Zeldovich, V.I.

    2008-01-01

    Concentration and temperature dependency of the B19'-martensite lattice parameters (MLP) in binary Ti-Ni alloys as well as the effect of the structural state of a parent austenite on these parameters were studied using low-temperature X-ray diffraction analysis. The existence of a concentration dependence of the MLP found for the hyper-equiatomic nickel concentration range is proved for cryogenic temperature range and extended, at least, up to 51.2 at.% of nickel. Temperature dependency of MLP is observed in the studied nickel concentration range, and they are approximately the same for different alloys in the temperature range of stable martensite. During heating in the temperature range of the martensite existence, all parameters of the B19'-martensite monoclinic cell change towards the values of corresponding parameters of the austenite tetragonal cell with which they have 'genetic' relations. The maximum transformation lattice strain calculated at the martensite-start temperature of each alloy, and, hence, the resource of the recoverable strain, are higher for pre-equiatomic and equiatomic alloys than that for alloys in hyper-equiatomic nickel concentration range. For Ti-50.7 at.% Ni alloy, the lattice parameters of martensite formed from the austenite containing a well-developed dislocation substructure deviate from the corresponding lattice parameters of the quenched martensite formed from a low-dislocated recrystallized austenite. This distinction is a general feature for the alloys undergoing B2 → B19' and B2 → R → B19' martensitic transformations

  20. XHM-1 alloy as a promising structural material for water-cooled fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solonin, M.I.; Alekseev, A.B.; Kazennov, Yu.I.; Khramtsov, V.F.; Kondrat'ev, V.P.; Krasina, T.A.; Rechitsky, V.N.; Stepankov, V.N.; Votinov, S.N.

    1996-01-01

    Experience gained in utilizing austenitic stainless steel components in water-cooled power reactors indicates that the main cause of their failure is the steel's propensity for corrosion cracking. In search of a material immune to this type of corrosion, different types of austenitic steels and chromium-nickel alloys were investigated and tested at VNIINM. This paper presents the results of studying physical and mechanical properties, irradiation and corrosion resistance in a water coolant at <350 C of the alloy XHM-1 as compared with austenitic stainless steels 00Cr16Ni15Mo3Nb, 00Cr20Ni25Nb and alloy 00Cr20Ni40Mo5Nb. Analysis of the results shows that, as distinct from the stainless steels studied, the XHM-1 alloy is completely immune to corrosion cracking (CC). Not a single induced damage was encountered within 50 to 350 C in water containing different amounts of chlorides and oxygen under tensile stresses up to the yield strength of the material. One more distinctive feature of the alloy compared to steels is that no change in the strength or total elongation is encountered in the alloy specimens irradiated to 32 dpa at 350 C. The XHM-1 alloy has adequate fabricability and high weldability characteristics. As far as its properties are concerned, the XHM-1 alloy is very promising as a material for water-cooled fusion reactor components. (orig.)

  1. Measurement and tailoring of residual stress in expanded austenite on austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Winther, Grethe

    2017-01-01

    Expanded austenite on stainless steel with a high interstitial nitrogen content is characterized by elasto-plastic accommodation of the large composition-induced lattice expansion leading to huge compressive residual stress. The elasto-plastic accommodation as well as the (steep) concentration...... profile has implications for the measurement strategy to determine lattice strains and associated residual stresses with X-ray diffraction. Lattice strain measurements were performed on nitrided as well as subsequently de-nitrided expanded austenite on AISI 316L stainless steel, for various grazing...... incidence angles. It is demonstrated that keeping the information depth constant by choosing appropriate combinations of grazing incidence and tilt angle leads to reliable results for the 111 reflection, while the 200 reflection should be avoided. Further, it is shown for the first time that the residual...

  2. The Prediction of Long-Term Thermal Aging in Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yang, Ying; Lach, Timothy G.

    2017-02-15

    Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) materials are extensively used for many massive primary coolant system components of light water reactors (LWRs) including coolant piping, valve bodies, pump casings, and piping elbows. Many of these components are operated in complex and persistently damaging environments of elevated temperature, high pressure, corrosive environment, and sometimes radiation for long periods of time. Since a large number of CASS components are installed in every nuclear power plant and replacing such massive components is prohibitively expensive, any significant degradation in mechanical properties that affects structural integrity, cracking resistance in particular, of CASS components will raise a serious concern on the performance of entire power plant. The CASS materials for nuclear components are highly corrosion-resistant Fe-Cr-Ni alloys with 300 series stainless steel compositions and mostly austenite (γ)–ferrite (δ) duplex structures, which result from the casting processes consisting of alloy melting and pouring or injecting liquid metal into a static or spinning mold. Although the commonly used static and centrifugal casting processes enable the fabrication of massive components with proper resistance to environmental attacks, the alloying and microstructural conditions are not highly controllable in actual fabrication, especially in the casting processes of massive components. In the corrosion-resistant Fe-Cr-Ni alloy system, the minor phase (i.e., the δ-ferrite phase) is inevitably formed during the casting process, and is in a non-equilibrium state subject to detrimental changes during exposure to elevated temperature and/or radiation. In general, relatively few critical degradation modes are expected within the current design lifetime of 40 years, given that the CASS components have been processed properly. It has been well known, however, that both the thermal aging and the neutron irradiation can cause degradation of static

  3. Carbon content of austenite in austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, L.C. [Kuang Wu Inst. of Tech. and Commerce, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1998-06-05

    The development of austempered ductile iron (ADI) is a major achievement in cast iron technology. The austempering heat treatment enables the ductile cast iron containing mainly strong bainitic ferrite and ductile carbon-enriched austenite, with some martensite transforms from austenite during cooling down to room temperature. A key factor controlling the stability of the retained austenite can be evaluated soundly using the thermodynamics principles. It is the purpose here to demonstrate that the data of ADI from numerous sources have a similar trend.

  4. Structure, mechanical, and tribotechnical properties of an austenitic nitrogen steel after frictional treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narkevich, N. A.; Shulepov, I. A.; Mironov, Yu. P.

    2017-04-01

    The features of the structure and the mechanical and tribotechnical properties of an austenitic nitrogen steel (Cr16.5, Mn18.8, C0.07, N0.53, Si0.52 wt %, and Fe for balance) after frictional treatment have been studied. It has been shown that, along with twinning, the nitrogen austenite upon frictional treatment undergoes a γ → stacking fault → ɛ transformation. The strengthening of the steel by the frictional treatment manifests in a delay of the onset of the plastic flow. In the structure of the surface layer with a thickness of 5 μm, a high concentration of stacking faults has been detected. The mechanical properties depend on the orientation of the acting stresses relative to the direction of the frictional treatment. Upon the sliding friction of a ball made of hard alloy (94%WC + 6%Co) on the strengthened surface, an anomalously low coefficient of friction of 0.13 is observed. The coefficient of friction in the presence of abrasive particles in the form of wear debris increases to 0.50; however, the wear rate is almost two times lower compared to the same characteristic for a nonstrengthened surface of the nitrogen steel tested under the same conditions.

  5. Ameliorated Austenite Carbon Content Control in Austempered Ductile Irons by Support Vector Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Yun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Austempered ductile iron has emerged as a notable material in several engineering fields, including marine applications. The initial austenite carbon content after austenization transform but before austempering process for generating bainite matrix proved critical in controlling the resulted microstructure and thus mechanical properties. In this paper, support vector regression is employed in order to establish a relationship between the initial carbon concentration in the austenite with austenization temperature and alloy contents, thereby exercising improved control in the mechanical properties of the austempered ductile irons. Particularly, the paper emphasizes a methodology tailored to deal with a limited amount of available data with intrinsically contracted and skewed distribution. The collected information from a variety of data sources presents another challenge of highly uncertain variance. The authors present a hybrid model consisting of a procedure of a histogram equalizer and a procedure of a support-vector-machine (SVM- based regression to gain a more robust relationship to respond to the challenges. The results show greatly improved accuracy of the proposed model in comparison to two former established methodologies. The sum squared error of the present model is less than one fifth of that of the two previous models.

  6. Corrosion Behavior of the Stressed Sensitized Austenitic Stainless Steels of High Nitrogen Content in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Almubarak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of high nitrogen content on corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels in seawater under severe conditions such as tensile stresses and existence of sensitization in the structure. A constant tensile stress has been applied to sensitized specimens types 304, 316L, 304LN, 304NH, and 316NH stainless steels. Microstructure investigation revealed various degrees of stress corrosion cracking. SCC was severe in type 304, moderate in types 316L and 304LN, and very slight in types 304NH and 316NH. The electrochemical polarization curves showed an obvious second current peak for the sensitized alloys which indicated the existence of second phase in the structure and the presence of intergranular stress corrosion cracking. EPR test provided a rapid and efficient nondestructive testing method for showing passivity, degree of sensitization and determining IGSCC for stainless steels in seawater. A significant conclusion was obtained that austenitic stainless steels of high nitrogen content corrode at a much slower rate increase pitting resistance and offer an excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking in seawater.

  7. Austenite grain growth and microstructure control in simulated heat affected zones of microalloyed HSLA steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei [Department of Machine Tools and Factory Management, Technical University of Berlin, Pascalstraße 8 – 9, 10587, Berlin (Germany); Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205, Berlin (Germany); Kannengiesser, Thomas [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205, Berlin (Germany); Institute of Materials and Joining Technology, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Universitetsplatz 2, 39106, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2014-09-08

    The roles of microalloying niobium, titanium and vanadium for controlling austenite grain growth, microstructure evolution and hardness were investigated at different simulated heat affected zones (HAZ) for high strength low alloy (HSLA) S690QL steel. High resolution FEG-SEM has been used to characterize fine bainitic ferrite, martensite and nanosized second phases at simulated coarse and fine grain HAZs. It was found that for Ti bearing steel (Ti/N ratio is 2) austenite grain had the slowest growth rate due to the presence of most stable TiN. The fine cuboidal particles promoted intragranular acicular ferrite (IGF) formation. Nb bearing steel exhibited relatively weaker grain growth retardation compared with titanium bearing steels and a mixed microstructure of bainite and martensite was present for all simulated HAZs. IGF existed at coarse grain HAZ of Ti+V bearing steel but it was totally replaced by bainite at fine grain HAZs. Hardness result was closely related to the morphology of bainitic ferrite, intragranular ferrite and second phases within ferrite. The microstructure and hardness results of different simulated HAZs were in good agreement with welded experimental results.

  8. Crystal structure and lattice dynamics of Fe-Cr-Mn-Ni-N austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beskrovni, A.; Jadrowski, E.; Danilkin, S.; Fuess, H.; Wieder, T.; Neova-Baeva, M.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. High nitrogen austenitic steels are of high strength, corrosion resistance and offer structural stability. The properties of these steels depend on the interstitial (N) and substitution (Cr, Ni, Mn) atom content. The present study investigates the effect of the Mn and Cr content on crystal structure and interatomic bonding. Nitrogen austenitic steels with composition Fe-19Cr-xMn-0.5N (x = 9/23 wt.%) and Fe-xCr-11Ni-0.5N (x=15/29 wt.%) were studied with X-Ray and neutron scattering methods. It was found that Mn and Cr expand FCC lattice in the both steels. However modification of the metal atom frequency spectrum, g(ε), is different. Mn additions cause the decrease of metal atom frequencies. The softening of the Me-Me interaction is an agreement with the theoretical model predictions based on volume changes. Modification of g(ε) caused by Cr atoms is more complicated. It was concluded that alloying with Cr alters the electronic states. The decrease of the width of the nitrogen localised vibrations with increasing Cr content was noted and is probably connected with stress-induced ordering. (author)

  9. Effects of metallurgical variables on swelling of modified 316 and higher Ni austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibahara, Itaru; Akasaka, Naoaki; Onose, Shoji

    1996-01-01

    The effects of solute elements and cold-work on swelling in modified 316 and higher Ni advanced austenitic stainless steels developed for FBR core material were investigated together with the posted model alloys. The Si, P, B, Ti, Nb modified and cold-worked steels exhibited an improved swelling resistance. In the temperature range between 400 and 500 C, the swelling was suppressed significantly by an addition of 0.8 wt% Si. The beneficial effect of Si appears to be reduced in the steels without Ti and Nb tending to form γ' precipitates. In the temperature range between 500 and 600 C, a needle-like phosphide precipitates played an important role in suppressing void growth. Additions of Ti and/or Nb were found to stabilize the phosphide phase and extended the swelling incubation period. In the improved austenitic steels, the synergistic effect of cold-working and P, B, Ti, Nb additions act beneficially to stabilize the dislocation structure and to form finely dispersed precipitates during irradiation

  10. Overview of microstructural evolution in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are important structural materials common to several different reactor systems, including light water and fast breeder fission, and magnetic fusion reactors (LWR, FBR, and MFR, respectively). The microstructures that develop in 300 series austenitic stainless steels during neutron irradiation at 60-700 C include combinations of dislocation loops and networks, bubbles and voids, and various kinds of precipitate phases (radiation-induced, or -enhanced or -modified thermal phases). Many property changes in these steels during neutron irradiation are directly or indirectly related to radiation-induced microstructural evolution. Even more important is the fact that radiation-resistance of such steels during either FBR or MFR irradiation is directly related to control of the evolving microstructure during such irradiation. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the large and complex body of data accumulated from various fission reactor irradiation experiments conducted over the many years of research on microstructural evolution in this family of steels. The data can be organized into several different temperature regimes which then define the nature of the dominant microstructural components and their sensitivities to irradiation parameters (dose, helium/dpa ratio, dose rate) or metallurgical variables (alloy composition, pretreatment). The emphasis in this paper will be on the underlying mechanisms driving the microstructure to evolve during irradiation or those enabling microstructural stability related to radiation resistance. (orig.)

  11. Mechanical property degradation and microstructural evolution of cast austenitic stainless steels under short-term thermal aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lach, Timothy G.; Byun, Thak Sang; Leonard, Keith J.

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical testing and microstructural characterization were performed on short-term thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) to understand the severity and mechanisms of thermal-aging degradation experienced during extended operation of light water reactor (LWR) coolant systems. Four CASS materials – CF3, CF3M, CF8, and CF8M – were thermally aged for 1500 hours at 290 °C, 330 °C, 360 °C, and 400 °C. All four alloys experienced insignificant change in strength and ductility properties but a significant reduction in absorbed impact energy. The primary microstructural and compositional changes during thermal aging were spinodal decomposition of the δ-ferrite into α/ α`, precipitation of G-phase in the δ-ferrite, segregation of solute to the austenite/ ferrite interphase boundary, and growth of M23C6 carbides on the austenite/ferrite interphase boundary. These changes were shown to be highly dependent on chemical composition, particularly the concentration of C and Mo, and aging temperature. A comprehensive model is being developed to correlate the microstructural evolution with mechanical behavior and simulation for predictive evaluations of LWR coolant system components.

  12. Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shunichi; Hida, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Michio; Ando, Tomozumi; Shirai, Tasuku.

    1982-05-01

    Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds has been considered difficult because of the high noise level and remarkable attenuation of ultrasonic waves. To improve flaw detectability in this kind of steel, various inspection techniques have been studied. A series of tests indicated: (1) The longitudinal angle beam transducers newly developed during this study can detect 4.8 mm dia. side drilled holes in dissimilar metal welds (refraction angle: 55 0 from SUS side, 45 0 from CS side) and in cast stainless steel welds (refraction angle: 45 0 , inspection frequency: 1 MHz). (2) Cracks more than 5% t in depth in the heat affected zones of fine-grain stainless steel pipe welds can be detected by the 45 0 shear wave angle beam method (inspection frequency: 2 MHz). (3) The pattern recognition method using frequency analysis technology was presumed useful for discriminating crack signals from spurious echoes. (author)

  13. Influence of the austenitic stainless steel microstructure on the void swelling under ion irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouxel Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the role of different metallurgical parameters on the void formation mechanisms, various austenitic stainless steels were elaborated and irradiated with heavy ions. Two alloys, in several metallurgical conditions (15Cr/15Ni–Ti and 15Cr/25Ni–Ti, were irradiated in the JANNUS-Saclay facility at 600 °C with 2 MeV Fe2+ ions up to 150 dpa. Resulting microstructures were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM. Different effects on void swelling are highlighted. Only the pre-aged samples, which were consequently solute and especially titanium depleted, show cavities. The nickel-enriched matrix shows more voids with a smaller size. Finally, the presence of nano-precipitates combined with a dense dislocation network decreases strongly the number of cavities.

  14. The Effect of Calcium Treatment on Pitting Corrosion of Type 316L Austenitic Stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Heon; LeeSoo Chan; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Hee San

    2001-01-01

    Pitting in chloride containing aqueous solution occurs mainly on manganese sulphide. Adding a slight amount of Ca as an alloying element prevents the MnS formation, since Ca is a stronger sulphide former than Mn. In this work, calcium treated Type 316L austenitic stainless steels have been investigated electrochemically to evaluate the effect of modified inclusions on pitting corrosion. Staircase polarization measurements were performed in 3.5% NaCl solution, where the occurrence of pits in materials caused current spikes. During staircase polarization test, steels with calcium treatment show low and discontinuous current spikes while those without calcium treatment show high and continuous current spikes. The results show that calcium treatment in Ca/S ratio of 1 ∼ 2 leads to an increase in the pitting potential of several hundred mV. A relationship between the calcium treatment and pit initiation sites was described

  15. Shallow-Land Buriable PCA-type austenitic stainless steel for fusion application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, M.

    1991-01-01

    Neutron-induced activity in the PCA (Primary Candidate Alloy) austenitic stainless steel is examined, when used for first-wall components in a DEMO fusion reactor. Some low-activity definitions, based on different waste management and disposal concepts, are introduced. Activity in the PCA is so high that any recycling of the irradiated material can be excluded. Disposal of PCA radioactive wastes in Shallow-Land Buriable (SLB) is prevented as well. Mo, Nb and some impurity elements have to be removed or limited, in order to reduce the radioactivity of the PCA. Possible low-activity versions of the PCA are introduced (PCA-la); they meet the requirements for SLB and may also be recycled under certain conditions. (author)

  16. Tool Wear Analysis due to Machining In Super Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polishetty Ashwin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents tool wear study when a machinability test was applied using milling on Super Austenitic Stainless Steel AL6XN alloy. Eight milling trials were performed under two cutting speeds, 100 m/min and 150 m/min, combined with two feed rates at 0.1mm/tooth and 0.15 mm/tooth and two depth of cuts at 2 mm and 3 mm. An Alicona 3D optical surface profilometer was used to scan cutting inserts flank and rake face areas for wear. Readings such as maximum and minimum deviations were extracted and used to analyse the outcomes. Results showed various types of wear were generated on the tool rake and flank faces. The common formed wear was the crater wear. The formation of the build-up edge was observed on the rake face of the cutting tool.

  17. Austenite Grain Size Estimtion from Chord Lengths of Logarithmic-Normal Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian H.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Linear section of grains in polyhedral material microstructure is a system of chords. The mean length of chords is the linear grain size of the microstructure. For the prior austenite grains of low alloy structural steels, the chord length is a random variable of gamma- or logarithmic-normal distribution. The statistical grain size estimation belongs to the quantitative metallographic problems. The so-called point estimation is a well known procedure. The interval estimation (grain size confidence interval for the gamma distribution was given elsewhere, but for the logarithmic-normal distribution is the subject of the present contribution. The statistical analysis is analogous to the one for the gamma distribution.

  18. Relative merits of duplex and austenitic stainless steels for applications in the oil and gas industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Elisabeth; Wegrelius, Lena; Pettersson, Rachel [Outokumpu Stainless AB, Avesta (Sweden)

    2012-07-01

    The broad range of available stainless steel grades means that these materials can fulfil a wide variety of requirements within the oil and gas industry. The duplex grades have the advantage of higher strength than standard austenitic grades, while the superaustenitic grades provide a cost-effective alternative to nickel-base alloys in a number of cases. The paper presents the results of various types of laboratory testing to rank the grades in terms of resistance to pitting, crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Results from field testing in actual or simulated service conditions are discussed and a number of application examples, including process piping flexible, heat exchangers and topside equipment are presented. (author)

  19. Numerical simulation and experimental investigation of laser dissimilar welding of carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouie Esfahani, M. R.; Coupland, J.; Marimuthu, S.

    2015-07-01

    This study reports an experimental and numerical investigation on controlling the microstructure and brittle phase formation during laser dissimilar welding of carbon steel to austenitic stainless steel. The significance of alloying composition and cooling rate were experimentally investigated. The investigation revealed that above a certain specific point energy the material within the melt pool is well mixed and the laser beam position can be used to control the mechanical properties of the joint. The heat-affected zone within the high-carbon steel has significantly higher hardness than the weld area, which severely undermines the weld quality. A sequentially coupled thermo-metallurgical model was developed to investigate various heat-treatment methodology and subsequently control the microstructure of the HAZ. Strategies to control the composition leading to dramatic changes in hardness, microstructure and service performance of the dissimilar laser welded fusion zone are discussed.

  20. Low-temperature creep of austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, R. P.; Walsh, R. P.

    2017-09-01

    Plastic deformation under constant load (creep) in austenitic stainless steels has been measured at temperatures ranging from 4 K to room temperature. Low-temperature creep data taken from past and unreported austenitic stainless steel studies are analyzed and reviewed. Creep at cryogenic temperatures of common austenitic steels, such as AISI 304, 310 316, and nitrogen-strengthened steels, such as 304HN and 3116LN, are included. Analyses suggests that logarithmic creep (creep strain dependent on the log of test time) best describe austenitic stainless steel behavior in the secondary creep stage and that the slope of creep strain versus log time is dependent on the applied stress/yield strength ratio. The role of cold work, strain-induced martensitic transformations, and stacking fault energy on low-temperature creep behavior is discussed. The engineering significance of creep on cryogenic structures is discussed in terms of the total creep strain under constant load over their operational lifetime at allowable stress levels.

  1. Nanostructured Bainite-Austenite Steel for Armours Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burian W.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured bainite-austenite steels are applied in the armours construction due to their excellent combination of strength and ductility which enables to lower the armour weight and to improve the protection efficiency. Mechanical properties of the bainite-austenite steels can be controlled in the wide range by chemical composition and heat treatment. In the paper the results of investigation comprising measuring of quasi - static mechanical properties, dynamic yield stress and firing tests of bainite-austenite steel NANOS-BA® are presented. Reported results show that the investigated bainite-austenite steel can be used for constructing add-on armour and that the armour fulfils requirements of protection level 2 of STANAG 4569. Obtained reduction in weight of the tested NANOS-BA® plates in comparison with the present solutions is about 30%.

  2. Effects of austenitizing temperature in quenched niobium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, F.B.C. de; Assuncao, F.C.R.

    1980-01-01

    Three steel compositions with varying Nb content were austenitized at different temperatures and quenched in cold water. Metallographic examination and hardness measurements provided a basis for explaining the hardening mechanism and the role of Nb on the process. (Author) [pt

  3. Chemically Induced Phase Transformation in Austenite by Focused Ion Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basa, Adina; Thaulow, Christian; Barnoush, Afrooz

    2014-03-01

    A highly stable austenite phase in a super duplex stainless steel was subjected to a combination of different gallium ion doses at different acceleration voltages. It was shown that contrary to what is expected, an austenite to ferrite phase transformation occurred within the focused ion beam (FIB) milled regions. Chemical analysis of the FIB milled region proved that the gallium implantation preceded the FIB milling. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction analysis also showed that the phase transformation was not followed by the typical shear and plastic deformation expected from the martensitic transformation. On the basis of these observations, it was concluded that the change in the chemical composition of the austenite and the local increase in gallium, which is a ferrite stabilizer, results in the local selective transformation of austenite to ferrite.

  4. Contributions of ɛ and α' TRIP Effects to the Strength and Ductility of AISI 304 (X5CrNi18-10) Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiß, Andreas; Gutte, Heiner; Mola, Javad

    2016-01-01

    The deformation-induced processes by tensile loading of X5CrNi18-10 austenitic stainless steel in the temperature range of 77 K to 413 K (-196 °C to 140 °C) were investigated. The results were presented in the form of stress-temperature-transformation (STT) and strain-temperature-transformation (DTT) diagrams. The thermodynamic stability of the austenite with respect to the ɛ- and α'-martensite transformations was reflected in the STT and DTT diagrams. Furthermore, conclusions could be drawn from the transformation diagrams about the kinetics of stress- and strain-induced martensitic transformations. The diagrams laid foundations for the development of a new method of quantitative determination of strength and elongation contributions by means of induced and often overlapping deformation processes in the austenite. In this context, the plastic strains contributed by the glide and shearing of austenite were quantified and presented in connection with the ɛ and α' TRansformation-Induced Plasticity effects. Each deformation process was shown to have made a contribution to the strength and ductility, with a magnitude proportional to its dominance. The summation of such contributions provided the tensile strength and the uniform elongation of the steel. In other words, tensile strength and uniform elongation could be derived from a rule of mixtures. The newly proposed method was capable of explaining the anomalous temperature dependence of uniform elongation in the alloy investigated.

  5. Vliyanie poverkhnostnykh protsessov na techenie gazov v nanorazmernykh kapillyarakh

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Levdansky, V.V.; Dragun, V.L.; Smolík, Jiří; Moravec, Pavel

    -, č. 2 (2009), s. 69-73 ISSN 0002-3566 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400720804; GA AV ČR IAA200760905 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : gas flow * nanoscale capillary * molecule scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  6. Reversibility in martensitic transformation and shape memory in high Mn ferrous alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomota, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The reversibility of austenite (γ : fcc) epsilon (ε : hcp) martensitic transformation and shape memory effect in high Mn ferrous alloys are discussed. A particular emphasis is put on the ε → γ reverse transformation behavior in two poly-crystalline alloys, Fe-24Mn and Fe-24Mn-6Si, where the latter exhibits excellent shape memory while the former shows poor memory although their forward γ → ε transformation behavior is quite similar. TEM in situ observations have revealed that the motion of Shockley partial dislocations during ε → γ reverse transformation is different from each other in these two alloys. The influence of alloying elements on the shape memory effect can be related to solid solution hardening of austenite, suggesting an important role of internal stress. The effect of training on enhancing the shape memory is explained by such an internal stress distribution associated with the formation of very thin, i.e., nano-scale ε/γ lamellae. (orig.)

  7. Effect of additional minor elements on accumulation behavior of point defects under electron irradiation in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekio, Yoshihiro; Yamashita, Shinichiro; Takahashi, Heishichiro; Sakaguchi, Norihito

    2014-01-01

    Addition of minor elements to a base alloy is often applied with the aim of mitigating void swelling by decreasing the vacancy diffusivity and flux which influence vacancy accumulation behavior. However, the comparative evaluations of parameters, such as the diffusivity and flux, between a base alloy and modified alloys with specific additives have not been studied in detail. In this study, type 316 austenitic stainless steel as a base alloy and type 316 austenitic stainless steels modified with vanadium (V) or zirconium (Zr) additions were used to perform evaluations from the changes of widths of the void denuded zone (VDZ) formed near a random grain boundary during electron irradiation because these widths depend on vacancy diffusivity and flux. The formations of VDZs were observed in in-situ observations during electron irradiation at 723 K and the formed VDZ widths were measured from the transmission electron microscopic images after electron irradiation. As a result, the VDZs were formed in both steels without and with V, and respective widths were ∼119 and ∼100 nm. On the other hand, the VDZ formation was not observed clearly in the steel with Zr. From the measured VDZ widths in the steels without and with V addition, the estimated ratio of the vacancy diffusivity in the steel with V to that in the steel without V was about 0.50 and the estimated ratio of the vacancy flux in the steel with V to that in the steel without V was about 0.71. This result suggests that the effect of additional minor elements on vacancy accumulation behaviors under electron irradiation could be estimated from evaluations of the VDZ width changes among steels with and without minor elements. Especially, because void swelling is closely related with the vacancy diffusion process, the VDZ width changes would also be reflected on void swelling behavior. (author)

  8. Alloy materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo (Westborough, MA); Thompson, Elliott D. (Coventry, RI); Fritzemeier, Leslie G. (Acton, MA); Cameron, Robert D. (Franklin, MA); Siegal, Edward J. (Malden, MA)

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  9. Environmentally-assisted cracking in austenitic light water reactor structural materials. Final report of the KORA-I project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.-P.; Ritter, S

    2009-03-15

    The following document is the final report of the KORA-I project, which was performed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) between 2006 and 2008 and was funded by the Swiss Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI). The three sub-projects of KORA-I covered the experimental characterisation of the effect of the reactor coolant environment on fatigue initiation and crack growth in austenitic stainless steels under boiling and pressurised water reactor conditions, the experimental evaluation of the potential and limits of the electrochemical noise measurement technique for the early detection of stress corrosion cracking initiation in austenitic stainless steels under boiling water reactor/normal water chemistry conditions, as well as the characterisation of the stress corrosion crack growth behaviour in the fusion line region of an Alloy 182-low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steel dissimilar metal weld. The main scientific results and major conclusions of the three sub-projects are discussed in three independent parts of this report. (author)

  10. Activation analyses for different fusion structural alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaya, H.; Smith, D.

    1991-01-01

    The leading candidate structural materials, viz., the vanadium alloys, the nickel or the manganese stabilized austenitic steels, and the ferritic steels, are analysed in terms of their induced activation in the TPSS fusion power reactor. The TPSS reactor has 1950 MW fusion power and inboard and outboard average neutron wall loading of 3.75 and 5.35 MW/m 2 respectively. The results shows that, after one year of continuous operation, the vanadium alloys have the least radioactivity at reactor shutdown. The maximum difference between the induced radioactivity in the vanadium alloys and in the other iron-based alloys occurs at about 10 years after reactor shutdown. At this time, the total reactor radioactivity, using the vanadium alloys, is about two orders of magnitude less than the total reactor radioactivity utilizing any other alloy. The difference is even larger in the first wall, the FW-vanadium activation is 3 orders of magnitude less than other alloys' FW activation. 2 refs., 7 figs

  11. Effect of neutron irradiation on vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys were evaluated for their susceptibility to irradiation hardening, helium embrittlement, swelling, and residual radioactivity, and the results were compared with those for the austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. The VANSTAR-7 and V-15Cr-5Ti alloys showed the greatest hardening between 400 and 600 0 C while V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti had lower values that were comparable to those of ferritic steels. The V-15Cr-5Ti and VANSTAR-7 alloys were susceptible to helium embrittlement caused by the combination of weakened grain boundaries and irradiation-hardened grain matrices. Specimen fractures were entirely intergranular in the most severe instances of embrittlement. The V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti alloys were more resistant to helium embrittlement. Except for VANSTAR-7 irradiated to 40 dpa at 520 0 C, all of the vanadium alloys exhibited low swelling that was similar to the ferritic steels. Swelling was greater in specimens that were preimplanted with helium using the tritium trick. The vanadium alloys clearly exhibit lower residual radioactivity after irradiation than the ferrous alloys

  12. Effect of neutron irradiation on vanadium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys were evaluated for their susceptibility to irradiation hardening, helium embrittlement, swelling, and residual radioactivity, and the results were compared with those for the austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. The VANSTAR-7 and V-15Cr-5Ti alloys showed the greatest hardening between 400 and 600/sup 0/C while V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti had lower values that were comparable to those of ferritic steels. The V-15Cr-5Ti and VANSTAR-7 alloys were susceptible to helium embrittlement caused by the combination of weakened grain boundaries and irradiation-hardened grain matrices. Specimen fractures were entirely intergranular in the most severe instances of embrittlement. The V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti alloys were more resistant to helium embrittlement. Except for VANSTAR-7 irradiated to 40 dpa at 520/sup 0/C, all of the vanadium alloys exhibited low swelling that was similar to the ferritic steels. Swelling was greater in specimens that were preimplanted with helium using the tritium trick. The vanadium alloys clearly exhibit lower residual radioactivity after irradiation than the ferrous alloys.

  13. Structure and radiation induced swelling of steels and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parshin, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    Regularities of vacancy void formation and radiation induced swelling of austenitic chromium-nickel steels and alloyse ferritic steels as well as titanium α-alloys under radiation by light and heavy ions and neutrons are considered. Possible methods for preparation of alloys with increased resistance to radiation swelling are described. Accounting for investigations into ferritic steels and α-alloys of titanium the basic way of weakening vacancy smelling is development of continuous homogeneous decomposition of solid solution using alloying with vividly expressed incubation period at a certain volumetric dilatation as well as decompositions of the type of ordering, K-state, lamination of solid solutions, etc. Additional alloying of solid solutions is also shown to be necessary for increasing recrystallization temperature of cold-deformed steel

  14. Effect of Cooling Rate on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties in SA508 Gr4N High Strength Low Alloy Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Minchul; Park, Sanggyu; Choi, Kwonjae; Lee, Bongsang

    2013-01-01

    The microstructure of Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel is a mixture of tempered martensite and tempered lower bainite and that of Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel is predominantly tempered upper bainite. Higher strength and toughness steels are very attractive as an eligible RPV steel, so several researchers have studied to use the Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel for the NPP application. Because of the thickness of reactor vessel, there are large differences in austenitizing cooling rates between the surface and the center locations of thickness in RPV. Because the cooling rates after austenitization determine the microstructure, it would affect the mechanical properties in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel, and it may lead to inhomogeneous characteristics when the commercial scale of RPV is fabricated. In order to apply the Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel to RPV, it is necessary to evaluate the changes of microstructure and mechanical properties with varying phase fractions in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel. In this study, the effects of martensite and bainite fractions on mechanical properties in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel were examined by controlling the cooling rate after austenitization. First of all, continuous cooling transformation(CCT) diagram was established from the dilatometric analyses. Then, the phase fractions at each cooling rate were quantitatively evaluated. Finally, the mechanical properties were correlated with the phase fraction, especially fraction of martensite in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel

  15. Influence of phosphorus grain boundary segregation on fracture behaviour of iron-base alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janovec, J.; Pokluda, J.; Lejček, Pavel

    567-568, - (2007), s. 33-38 ISSN 0255-5476 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : austenitic stainless steel * Fe-Si-P alloy * grain boundary segregation precipitation * instrumented impact test * Auger elektron spectroscopy * transmission elektron microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.399, year: 2005

  16. Phase volume fractions and strain measurements in an ultrafine-grained NiTi shape-memory alloy during tensile loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, M.L.; Wagner, M.F.-X.; Frenzel, J.; Schmahl, W.W.; Eggeler, G.

    2010-01-01

    An ultrafine-grained pseudoelastic NiTi shape-memory alloy wire with 50.9 at.% Ni was examined using synchrotron X-ray diffraction during in situ uniaxial tensile loading (up to 1 GPa) and unloading. Both macroscopic stress-strain measurements and volume-averaged lattice strains are reported and discussed. The loading behavior is described in terms of elasto-plastic deformation of austenite, emergence of R phase, stress-induced martensitic transformation, and elasto-plastic deformation, grain reorientation and detwinning of martensite. The unloading behavior is described in terms of stress relaxation and reverse plasticity of martensite, reverse transformation of martensite to austenite due to stress relaxation, and stress relaxation of austenite. Microscopically, lattice strains in various crystallographic directions in the austenitic B2, martensitic R, and martensitic B19' phases are examined during loading and unloading. It is shown that the phase transformation occurs in a localized manner along the gage length at the plateau stress. Phase volume fractions and lattice strains in various crystallographic reflections in the austenite and martensite phases are examined over two transition regions between austenite and martensite, which have a width on the order of the wire diameter. Anisotropic effects observed in various crystallographic reflections of the austenitic phase are also discussed. The results contribute to a better understanding of the tensile loading behavior, both macroscopically and microscopically, of NiTi shape-memory alloys.

  17. Study of Creep of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steel for High-Temperature Energy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonina, Natalie Petrovna

    To withstand the high temperature (>700°C) and pressure demands of steam turbines and boilers used for energy applications, metal alloys must be economically viable and have the necessary material properties, such as high-temperature creep strength, oxidation and corrosion resistance, to withstand such conditions. One promising class of alloys potentially capable of withstanding the rigors of aggressive environments, are alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels (AFAs) alloyed with aluminum to improve corrosion and oxidation resistance. The effect of aging on the microstructure, high temperature constant-stress creep behavior and mechanical properties of the AFA-type alloy Fe-20Cr-30Ni-2Nb-5Al (at.%) were investigated in this study. The alloy's microstructural evolution with increased aging time was observed prior to creep testing. As aging time increased, the alloy exhibited increasing quantities of fine Fe2Nb Laves phase dispersions, with a precipitate-free zone appearing in samples with higher aging times. The presence of the L1 2 phase gamma'-Ni3Al precipitate was detected in the alloy's matrix at 760°C. A constant-stress creep rig was designed, built and its operation validated. Constant-stress creep tests were performed at 760°C and 35MPa, and the effects of different aging conditions on creep rate were investigated. Specimens aged for 240 h exhibited the highest creep rate by a factor of 5, with the homogenized sample having the second highest rate. Samples aged for 2.4 h and 24 h exhibited similar low secondary creep rates. Creep tests conducted at 700oC exhibited a significantly lower creep rate compared to those at 760oC. Microstructural analysis was performed on crept samples to explore high temperature straining properties. The quantity and size of Fe2Nb Laves phase and NiAl particles increased in the matrix and on grain boundaries with longer aging time. High temperature tensile tests were performed and compared to room temperature results. The

  18. Ion-nitriding of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, O.; Hertz, D.; Lebrun, J.P.; Michel, H.

    1995-01-01

    Although ion-nitriding is an extensively industrialized process enabling steel surfaces to be hardened by nitrogen diffusion, with a resulting increase in wear, seizure and fatigue resistance, its direct application to stainless steels, while enhancing their mechanical properties, also causes a marked degradation in their oxidation resistance. However, by adaption of the nitriding process, it is possible to maintain the improved wear resistant properties while retaining the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel. The controlled diffusion permits the growth of a nitrogen supersaturated austenite layer on parts made of stainless steel (AISI 304L and 316L) without chromium nitride precipitation. The diffusion layer remains stable during post heat treatments up to 650 F for 5,000 hrs and maintains a hardness of 900 HV. A very low and stable friction coefficient is achieved which provides good wear resistance against stainless steels under diverse conditions. Electrochemical and chemical tests in various media confirm the preservation of the stainless steel characteristics. An example of the application of this process is the treatment of Reactor Control Rod Cluster Assemblies (RCCAs) for Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactors

  19. Modeling of Non-isothermal Austenite Formation in Spring Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Wang, Baoyu; Tang, Xuefeng; Li, Junling

    2017-12-01

    The austenitization kinetics description of spring steel 60Si2CrA plays an important role in providing guidelines for industrial production. The dilatometric curves of 60Si2CrA steel were measured using a dilatometer DIL805A at heating rates of 0.3 K to 50 K/s (0.3 °C/s to 50 °C/s). Based on the dilatometric curves, a unified kinetics model using the internal state variable (ISV) method was derived to describe the non-isothermal austenitization kinetics of 60Si2CrA, and the abovementioned model models the incubation and transition periods. The material constants in the model were determined using a genetic algorithm-based optimization technique. Additionally, good agreement between predicted and experimental volume fractions of transformed austenite was obtained, indicating that the model is effective for describing the austenitization kinetics of 60Si2CrA steel. Compared with other modeling methods of austenitization kinetics, this model, which uses the ISV method, has some advantages, such as a simple formula and explicit physics meaning, and can be probably used in engineering practice.

  20. Solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel filler metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Braski, D.N.

    1980-02-01

    Thermal analysis and interrupted solidification experiments on selected austenitic stainless steel filler metals provided an understanding of the solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel welds. The sequences of phase separations found were for type 308 stainless steel filler metal, L + L + delta + L + delta + γ → γ + delta, and for type 310 stainless steel filler metal, L → L + γ → γ. In type 308 stainless steel filler metal, ferrite at room temperature was identified as either the untransformed primary delta-ferrite formed during the initial stages of solidification or the residual ferrite after Widmanstaetten austenite precipitation. Microprobe and scanning transmission electron microscope microanalyses revealed that solute extensively redistributes during the transformation of primary delta-ferrite to austenite, leading to enrichment and stabilization of ferrite by chromium. The type 310 stainless steel filler metal investigated solidifies by the primary crystallization of austenite, with the transformation going to completion at the solidus temperature. In our samples residual ferrite resulting from solute segregation was absent at the intercellular or interdendritic regions

  1. Influence of Parameters of Quenching and Partitioning Process on Microstructure and Fraction of Retained Austenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shirali

    2015-07-01

    of partitioning temperature made the retained austenite films become thicker and its volume fraction increase. On the other hand, by increasing the quenching temperature, carbon content of retained austenite increased sharply.

  2. Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties in Dissimilar Austenitic/Super Duplex Stainless Steel Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Mehdi; Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza

    2014-10-01

    To study the effect of chemical composition on microstructural features and mechanical properties of dissimilar joints between super duplex and austenitic stainless steels, welding was attempted by gas tungsten arc welding process with a super duplex (ER2594) and an austenitic (ER309LMo) stainless steel filler metal. While the austenitic weld metal had vermicular delta ferrite within austenitic matrix, super duplex stainless steel was mainly comprised of allotriomorphic grain boundary and Widmanstätten side plate austenite morphologies in the ferrite matrix. Also the heat-affected zone of austenitic base metal comprised of large austenite grains with little amounts of ferrite, whereas a coarse-grained ferritic region was observed in the heat-affected zone of super duplex base metal. Although both welded joints showed acceptable mechanical properties, the hardness and impact strength of the weld metal produced using super duplex filler metal were found to be better than that obtained by austenitic filler metal.

  3. Soft tissue response to a new austenitic stainless steel with a negligible nickel content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschon, M; Fini, M; Giavaresi, G; Borsari, V; Lenger, H; Bernauer, J; Chiesa, R; Cigada, A; Chiusoli, L; Giardino, R

    2005-10-01

    This study evaluates the soft tissue response to a new austenitic stainless steel with a low nickel content (P558) in comparison with a conventional stainless steel (SSt)and a titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V). Previous findings showed its in vitro biocompatibility by culturing P558 with healthy and osteoporotic osteoblasts and its in vivo effectiveness as bone implant material. Regarding its use as a material in osteosynthesis,P558 biocompatibility when implanted in soft tissues, as subcutis and muscle, was assessed. Disks and rods of these metals were implanted in rat subcutis and in rabbit muscle, respectively. Four and twelve weeks post surgery implants with surrounding tissue were retrieved for histologic and histomorphometric analysis: fibrous capsule thickness and new vessel formation were measured. Around all implanted materials, light microscopy highlighted a reactive and fibrous capsule formation coupled with ongoing neoangiogenesis both in rats and in rabbits. Histomorphometric measurements revealed a stronger inflammatory response,in terms of capsule thickness,surrounding SSt implants (9.8% Ni content) both in rat subcutis and in rabbit muscle independently of shape and site of implantation. A progressive decrease in capsule thickness around P558 (implantation. However,in the light of the previous and present studies, P558 is a good material, instead of titanium alloys, in orthopedic research.

  4. A shallow land buriable low-activation austenitic stainless steel for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, M.

    1990-01-01

    First-wall components are the most activated materials in fusion reactors, but their activity can be reduced by material selection. The development of new alloys with good mechanical and physical properties and with low activation characteristics is needed. The PCA is one of the reference austenitic stainless steels for fusion structural applications in the United States. In this paper, the authors analyze the induced radioactivity in the PCA in connection with the shallow land burial (SLB) waste disposal concept. The most proper elemental substitutions is suggested for reducing the activity in the PCA. A low-activity version of the PCA is proposed. Since recycling is not possible, shallow land burial is the best achievable goal for a low-activation steel for the first wall. The PCA cannot be accepted for SLB, mainly due to the presence of molybdenum, niobium, and certain impurities. With limited elemental substitutions and impurity limitations, a new alloy (PCA-la) can be obtained. The PCA-la meets requirements for SLB. The properties of PCA-la should be comparable to those of the PCA. Fabrication and testing of specimens to check its main properties will be the next step of this work

  5. Experimental and Computational Investigation of Structural Integrity of Dissimilar Metal Weld Between Ferritic and Austenitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosh, R.; Das, G.; Kumar, S.; Singh, P. K.; Ghosh, M.

    2018-03-01

    The structural integrity of dissimilar metal welded (DMW) joint consisting of low-alloy steel and 304LN austenitic stainless steel was examined by evaluating mechanical properties and metallurgical characteristics. INCONEL 82 and 182 were used as buttering and filler materials, respectively. Experimental findings were substantiated through thermomechanical simulation of the weld. During simulation, the effect of thermal state and stress distribution was pondered based on the real-time nuclear power plant environment. The simulation results were co-related with mechanical and microstructural characteristics. Material properties were varied significantly at different fusion boundaries across the weld line and associated with complex microstructure. During in-situ deformation testing in a scanning electron microscope, failure occurred through the buttering material. This indicated that microstructure and material properties synergistically contributed to altering the strength of DMW joints. Simulation results also depicted that the stress was maximum within the buttering material and made its weakest zone across the welded joint during service exposure. Various factors for the failure of dissimilar metal weld were analyzed. It was found that the use of IN 82 alloy as the buttering material provided a significant improvement in the joint strength and became a promising material for the fabrication of DMW joint.

  6. Experimental and computational study of nitride precipitation in a CrMnN austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersson, Niklas; Frisk, Karin; Fluch, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    The austenitic CrMnN stainless steels are high-strength, tough, and non-magnetic, and are used in oil field applications. The steels have high alloying contents, and precipitation of Cr-nitrides and/or intermetallic phases can occur when cooling through the temperature region 950–700 °C. The nitride precipitates appear in the grain boundaries but can be difficult to observe in the microstructure due to their small size. However, there is an effect of precipitation on corrosion and impact strength and a modelling approach to predict precipitation is valuable for alloy and process development. In the present work precipitation simulations were applied to a CrMnN steel composition, and coupled to experimental investigations after heat treatments at 700 and 800 °C. The early stages, with short heat-treatment times, were studied. The simulations were performed using TC-PRISMA, a software for calculation of multiphase precipitation kinetics, using multicomponent nucleation and growth models. Dedicated thermodynamic and kinetic databases were used for the simulations. The main precipitate was identified by experiments and simulations to be the Cr 2 N nitride, and the precipitation during isothermal heat treatments was investigated. Isothermal precipitation diagrams are simulated, and the influence of precipitation kinetics on toughness is discussed.

  7. Influence of cooling conditions and amount of retained austenite on the fracture of austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VYACHESLAV GORYANY

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available SEM Analysis of fracture surfaces from tensile test specimens of thick-walled, austempered ductile irons (diameter 160 mm shows different fracture behavior depending on the austenite retained in the matrix. The results show ductile fractures only in areas containing retained austenite sections. In section areas without or with a very low content of retained austenite, only brittle fracture without any plastic deformation occurs. The content of retained austenite determines the amount of ductile fracture in the microstructure.

  8. Precipitation reactions in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoch, M.; Yung-Shih Chen

    1979-01-01

    The precipitation reactions for commercial austenitic stainless steels (AISI type 347, 321, 316, 316L, 304 and 304L) and Ti-modified AISI type 316 SS were studied in the temperature range of 750 0 C-1350 0 C. Specimens were held at the temperature for 15 to 25 hours to ensure that equilibrium conditions were reached and followed by a water quench to prevent further precipitation reactions during cooling process. The precipitates were extracted from bulk specimens by anodic dissolution and identified by x-ray diffraction analysis. In Ti-stabilized 321 SS, large TiN and Ti 2 S (Ti 4 C 2 S2) precipitates were present in solution treated and subsequent annealed specimens. Small TiC precipitates were present in specimens annealed below 1150 0 C. The M 23 C 6 precipitates were found to be present after annealing at 850 0 C for 25 hours. The amount of M 23 C 6 was found to increase with decreased Ti content as shown in the Ti-motified 316 SS. In Nb-stabilized 347 SS, Nb(CN) precipitates were present in solution treated as well as annealed specimens. The M 23 C 6 precipitates were detected at an annealing temperature of 1050 0 C, which is higher than the precipitation temperature detected in 321 SS. Thermodynamic calculations were carried out to obtain the temperature where precipitation starts, and the temperatures where 50, 90 and 99% of the precipitates should be formed. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the calculations. (orig.) [de

  9. High cycle fatigue of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, J.P.; Lehmann, D.; Picker

    1990-01-01

    This study concerns the evaluation of material data to be used in LMFBR design codes. High cycle fatigue properties of three austenitic stainless steels are evaluated: type AISI 316 (UKAEA tests), type AISI 316L (CEA tests) and type AISI 304 (Interatom tests). The data on these steels comprised some 550 data points from 14 casts. This data set covered a wide range of testing parameters: temperature from 20-625 0 C, frequency from 1-20 000 Hz, constant amplitude and random fatigue loading, with and without mean stress, etc. However, the testing conditions chosen by the three partners differed considerably because they had been fixed independently and not harmonized prior to the tests. This created considerable difficulties for the evaluations. Experimental procedures and statistical treatments used for the three subsets of data are described and discussed. Results are presented in tables and graphs. Although it is often difficult to single out the influence of each parameter due to the different testing conditions, several interesting conclusions can be drawn: The HCF properties of the three steels are consistent with the 0.2% proof stress, the fatigue limit being larger than the latter at temperatures above 550 0 C. The type 304 steel has lower tensile properties than the two other steels and hence also lower HCF properties. Parameters which clearly have a significant effect of HCF behaviour are mean stress or R-ratio (less in the non-endurance region than in the endurance region), temperature, cast or product. Other parameters have probably a weak or no effect but it is difficult to conclude due to insufficient data: environment, specimen orientation, frequency, specimen geometry

  10. Austenitic Reversion of Cryo-rolled Ti-Stabilized Austenitic Stainless Steel: High-Resolution EBSD Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiamiyu, A. A.; Odeshi, A. G.; Szpunar, J. A.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) was cryo-rolled and subsequently annealed at 650 and 800 °C to reverse BCC α'-martensite to FCC γ-austenite. The texture evolution associated with the reversion at the selected temperatures was investigated using high-resolution EBSD. After the reversion, TiC precipitates were observed to be more stable in 650 °C-annealed specimens than those reversed at 800 °C. {110} texture was mainly developed in specimens subjected to both annealing temperatures. However, specimens reversed at 650 °C have stronger texture than those annealed at 800 °C, even at the higher annealing time. The strong intensity of {110} texture component is attributed to the ability of AISI 321 ASS to memorize the crystallographic orientation of the deformed austenite, a phenomenon termed texture memory. The development of weaker texture in 800 °C-annealed specimens is attributed to the residual strain relief in grains, dissolution of grain boundary precipitates, and an increase in atomic migration along the grain boundaries. Based on the observed features of the reversed austenite grains and estimation from an existing model, it is suspected that the austenite reversion at 650 and 800 °C undergone diffusional and martensitic shear reversion, respectively.

  11. Nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Ren, Yibin

    2010-02-01

    The adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have prompted the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel in medical stainless steels, the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steels, and emphatically, the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength and good plasticity, better corrosion and wear resistances, and superior biocompatibility compared to the currently used 316L stainless steel, the newly developed high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventional medical stainless steels.

  12. Effect of multiple austenitizing treatments on HT-9 steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emigh, R.A.

    1985-12-01

    The effect of multiple austenitizing treatments on the toughness of an Fe-12Cr-1.0Mo-0.5W-0.3V (HT-9) steel was studied. The resulting microstructures were characterized by their mechanical properties, precipitated carbide distribution, and fracture surface appearance. It was proposed that multiple transformations would refine the martensite structure and improve toughness. Optical and scanning electron microscopic observations revealed that the martensite packet structure was somewhat refined by a second austenite transformation. Transmission electron microscopy studies of carbon extraction replicas showed that this multiple step treatment had eliminated grain boundary carbide films seen in single treated specimens on prior austenite grain boundaries. The 0.2% yield strength, tensile strength, and elongation were relatively unchanged, but the toughness measured by fatigue pre-cracked Charpy impact tests increased for the multiple step specimens

  13. Pearlitic Lamellae Spheroidisation During Austenitization and Subsequent Temperature Hold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauserova D.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Typical processing routes for bearing steels include a soft annealing stage. The purpose of this procedure is to obtain a microstructure containing globular carbides in ferritic matrix. A newly developed process called ASR (Accelerated Spheroidisation and Refinement cuts the carbide spheroidisation times several fold, producing considerably finer globular carbides than conventional soft annealing. Finer microstructure also leads to more homogeneous and finer structure after final hardening process. The present paper explores process of the accelerated spheroidisation (ASR in steel 100CrMnSi6-4 with initial pearlitic structure. Cementite lamellae morphology was observed in different stages of austenitization. The heat treatment was performed using induction heating in quenching dilatometer. There was analysed influence of austenitization temperature and austenitization time on spheroidisation. Hardness and carbide morphology was observed. Deep etching was used to reveal evolution of cementitic lamellae fragmentation. It is favourable process especially in induction treatment of small parts.

  14. On the elusive crystal structure of expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Bastian; Ståhl, Kenny; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2017-01-01

    No consistent structural description exists for expanded austenite that accurately accounts for the hkl-dependent peak shifts and broadening observed in diffraction experiments. The best available description for homogeneous samples is a face-centered cubic lattice with stacking faults. Here Debye...... simulations of stacking fault effects were compared to experimental data for macro-stress free homogeneous expanded austenite to show that a faulted structure cannot explain the observed peak displacement anomalies. Instead it is argued that the shifts are the combined result of elastic and plastic anisotropy...

  15. Failure of austenitic stainless steel tubes during steam generator operation

    OpenAIRE

    M. Głowacka; J. Łabanowski; S. Topolska

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: of this study is to analyze the causes of premature failure of steam generator coil made of austenitic stainless steel. Special attention is paid to corrosion damage processes within the welded joints.Design/methodology/approach: Examinations were conducted several segments of the coil made of seamless cold-formed pipes Ø 23x2.3 mm, of austenitic stainless steel grade X6CrNiTi18-10 according to EN 10088-1:2007. The working time of the device was 6 months. The reason for the withdrawa...

  16. Uncertainty in retained austenite measurements applied to individual crystallographic orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creuziger, A.; Gnäupel-Herold, T.

    2015-04-01

    A technique to measure the phase volume fraction of an individual orientation and the uncertainty in the measurement is demonstrated in this paper. The technique of complete pole figure averaging using neutron diffraction was used to assess the phase fraction of retained austenite in transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels and quantify the uncertainty in the phase fraction. In parallel, an ensemble of orientation distribution functions was calculated to assess crystallographic volume fractions of particular orientations and the uncertainty of these volume fractions using Monte Carlo techniques. These methods were combined to measure the retained austenite phase volume fraction of an individual orientation.

  17. Examination of carbon partitioning into austenite during tempering of bainite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, Amy J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caballero, Francisca G [CENIM-CSIC, MADRIS, SPAIN; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Garcia - Mateo, C [CENIM-CSIC, MADRID, SPAIN

    2010-01-01

    The redistribution of carbon after tempering of a novel nanocrystalline bainitic steel consisting of a mixture of supersaturated ferrite and retained austenite, has been analyzed by atom probe tomography. Direct supporting evidence of additional austenite carbon enrichment beyond that initially achieved during the bainite heat treatment was not obtained during subsequent tempering of this high carbon, high silicon steel. Evidence of competing reactions during tempering, such as the formation of carbon clusters in bainitic ferrite that signify the onset of the transitional carbides precipitation, was observed.

  18. Hysteresis behaviour of thermoelastic alloys: some shape memory alloys models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lexcellent, C.; Torra, V.; Raniecki, B.

    1993-01-01

    The hysteretic behaviour of shape memory alloys (SMA) needs a more and more thin analysis because of its importance for technological applications. The comparison between different approaches allows to explicite the specifity of every model (macroscopic approach, micro-macro level, local description, phenomenological approach) and their points of convergence. On one hand, a thermodynamic treatment with a free energy expression as a mixing rule of each phase (parent or austenite phase and martensite) by adding a coupling term: the configurational energy, allowes modelling of material hysteresis loops. On the other hand, a phenomenological treatment based on a local investigation of two single crystals with a visualisation of microscopic parameters allows to perceive the phase transition mechanisms (nucleation, growth). All the obtained results show the importance of entropy production (or of the definition of the configurational energy term) for the correct description of hysteresis loops (subloops or external). (orig.)

  19. Deformation localization and dislocation channel dynamics in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussev, Maxim N.; Field, Kevin G.; Busby, Jeremy T.

    2015-05-01

    The dynamics of deformation localization and dislocation channel formation were investigated in situ in a neutron-irradiated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel and a model 304-based austenitic alloy by combining several analytical techniques including optic microscopy and laser confocal microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Channel formation was observed at ∼70% of the polycrystalline yield stress of the irradiated materials (σ0.2). It was shown that triple junction points do not always serve as a source of dislocation channels; at stress levels below the σ0.2, channels often formed near the middle of the grain boundary. For a single grain, the role of elastic stiffness value (Young's modulus) in channel formation was analyzed; it was shown that in the irradiated 304 steels the initial channels appeared in "soft" grains with a high Schmid factor located near "stiff" grains with high elastic stiffness. The spatial organization of channels in a single grain was analyzed; it was shown that secondary channels operating in the same slip plane as primary channels often appeared at the middle or at one-third of the way between primary channels. The twinning nature of dislocation channels was analyzed for grains of different orientation using TEM. In the AISI 304 steel, channels in grains oriented close to 〈0 0 1〉||TA (tensile axis) and 〈1 0 1〉||TA were twin free and grain with 〈1 1 1〉||TA and grains oriented close to a Schmid factor maximum contained deformation twins.

  20. Effect of Continuous and Pulsed Current on the Metallurgical and Mechanical Properties of Gas Tungsten Arc Welded AISI 4340 Aeronautical and AISI 304 L Austenitic Stainless Steel Dissimilar Joints

    OpenAIRE

    Arivarasu, Moganraj; Ramkumar Kasinath, Devendranath; Natarajan, Arivazhagan

    2015-01-01

    In this research work, the weldability of low alloyed AISI 4340 aeronautical steel and AISI 304L austenitic stainless steel joined by continuous current (CC) and pulsed current (PC) gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) techniques, using ER309L and ERNiCr-3 filler metals was investigated. The main focus of the study involves the investigation on the effect of continuous and pulsed current mode of GTA welding process on the metallurgical and mechanical properties of these dissimilar weldments. Micro...

  1. INFLUENCE OF AUSTENITE GRAIN SIZE TO DEVELOPMENT OF DECARBONIZATION IN PRODUCTION OF ROLLED STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PARUSOV E. V.

    2016-08-01

    ]. The paper [11] acknowledges the influence of micro-additives of boron on changes in the austenite grain size and accordingly the length of borders in high-carbon steels with austenitizing temperature increase within the range of 900…1 100ºС. The purpose of work is to research the effect of austenite grain size on the decarburization depth in carbon (base steel and boron micro-alloyed steel.

  2. Effect of Si on the reversibility of stress-induced martensite in Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanford, N.; Dunne, D.P.

    2010-01-01

    Fe-Mn-Si is a well-characterized ternary shape memory alloy. Research on this alloy has consistently shown that the addition of 5-6 wt.% Si is desirable to enhance the reversibility of stress-induced martensite vis-a-vis shape memory. This paper examines the effect of Si on the morphology and the crystallography of the martensite in the Fe-Mn-Si system. It is concluded that the addition of Si increases the c/a ratio of the martensite, reduces the transformation volume change and decreases the atomic spacing difference between the parallel close-packed directions in the austenite-martensite interface (habit) plane. It is proposed that, in addition to austenite strengthening, Si enhances reversibility by reducing the volume change and the interfacial atomic mismatch between the martensite and the austenite. Although shape memory is improved, transformation reversibility remains limited by the necessary misfit dislocations that accommodate the atomic spacing differences in the interface.

  3. Corrosion behavior of nickel-containing alloys in artificial sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randin, J P

    1988-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of various nickel-containing alloys was measured in artificial sweat (perspiration) using the Tafel extrapolation method. It was found that Ni, CuNi 25 (coin alloy), NiAl (colored intermetallic compounds), WC + Ni (hard metal), white gold (jewelry alloy), FN42 and Nilo Alby K (controlled expansion alloys), and NiP (electroless nickel coating) are in an active state and dissolve readily in oxygenated artificial sweat. By contrast, austenitic stainless steels, TiC + Mo2C + Ni (hard metal), NiTi (shape-memory alloy), Hastelloy X (superalloy), Phydur (precipitation hardening alloy), PdNi and SnNi (nickel-containing coatings) are in a passive state but may pit under certain conditions. Cobalt, Cr, Ti, and some of their alloys were also investigated for the purpose of comparison. Cobalt and its alloys have poor corrosion resistance except for Stellite 20. Chromium and high-chromium ferritic stainless steels have a high pitting potential but the latter are susceptible to crevice corrosion. Ti has a pitting potential greater than 3 V. Comparison between the in vitro measurements of the corrosion rate of nickel-based alloys and the clinical observation of the occurrence of contact dermatitis is discussed.

  4. Investigations on the fracture toughness of austempered ductile irons austenitized at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, P. Prasad; Putatunda, Susil K

    2003-05-25

    Ductile cast iron was austenitized at four different temperatures and subsequently austempered at six different temperatures. Plane strain fracture toughness was evaluated under all the heat treatment conditions and correlated with the microstructural features such as the austenite content and the carbon content of the austenite. Fracture mechanism was studied by scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the optimum austempering temperature for maximum fracture toughness decreased with increasing austenitizing temperature. This could be interpreted in terms of the microstructural features. A study of the fracture mechanism revealed that good fracture toughness is unlikely to be obtained when austempering temperature is less than half of the austenitizing temperature on the absolute scale.

  5. On the lattice parameters of the B19' martensite in binary Ti-Ni shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokoshkin, S.D.; Khmelevskaya, I.Yu.; Korotitskij, A.V.; Trubitsyna, I.B.; Brailovskij, V.; Tyurenn, S.

    2003-01-01

    The concentration, temperature and deformation dependences of the B19' martensite lattice parameters (MLP) in the Ti-(47.0-50.7) at. % Ni binary alloys are studied through the X-ray diffractometry. The MLP concentration dependences exist in the behind-the-equiatomic area of the nickel concentrations. It is shown that the MLP temperature dependences are approximately similar for all the studied alloys. The martensite formation from the austenite containing the developed dislocation structure in the Ti-50.0 at. % Ni alloy and from the aged austenite in the Ti-50.7 at. % Ni alloy leads to the MLP change. The MLP change is not linked with the transition from the B2 → B19' transformation scheme to the B2 → R → B19'. The martensite deformation reorientation or its plastic deformation with compression up to 25% does not lead to the MLP change [ru

  6. Alloy Design Based on Computational Thermodynamics and Multi-objective Optimization: The Case of Medium-Mn Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristeidakis, John S.; Haidemenopoulos, Gregory N.

    2017-05-01

    A new alloy design methodology is presented for the identification of alloy compositions, which exhibit process windows (PWs) satisfying specific design objectives and optimized for overall performance. The methodology is applied to the design of medium-Mn steels containing Al and/or Ni. By implementing computational alloy thermodynamics, a large composition space was investigated systematically to map the fraction and stability of retained austenite as a function of intercritical annealing temperature. Alloys exhibiting PWs, i.e., an intercritical annealing range, which when applied satisfies the given design objectives, were identified. A multi-objective optimization method, involving Pareto optimality, was then applied to identify a list of optimum alloy compositions, which maximized retained austenite amount and stability, as well as intercritical annealing temperature, while minimized overall alloy content. A heuristic approach was finally employed in order to rank the optimum alloys. The methodology provided a final short list of alloy compositions and associated PWs ranked according to their overall performance. The proposed methodology could be the first step in the process of computational alloy design of medium-Mn steels or other alloy systems.

  7. Degradable and porous Fe-Mn-C alloy for biomaterials candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratesa, Yudha; Harjanto, Sri; Larasati, Almira; Suharno, Bambang; Ariati, Myrna

    2018-02-01

    Nowadays, degradable implants attract attention to be developed because it can improve the quality of life of patients. The degradable implant is expected to degrade easily in the body until the bone healing process already achieved. However, there is limited material that could be used as a degradable implant, polymer, magnesium, and iron. In the previous study, Fe-Mn-C alloys had succesfully produced austenitic phase. However, the weakness of the alloy is degradation rate of materials was considered below the expectation. This study aimed to produce porous Fe-Mn-C materials to improve degradation rate and reduce the density of alloy without losing it non-magnetic properties. Potassium carbonate (K2CO3) were chosen as filler material to produce foam structure by sintering and dissolution process. Multisteps sintering process under argon gas environment was performed to generate austenite phase. The product showed an increment of the degradation rate of the foamed Fe-Mn-C alloy compared with the solid Fe-Mn-C alloy without losing the Austenitic Structure

  8. Mechanical properties and oxidation and corrosion resistance of reduced-chromium 304 stainless steel alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.; Gyorgak, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to identify effective substitutes for part of the Cr in 304 stainless steel as a method of conserving the strategic element Cr. Although special emphasis was placed on tensile properties, oxidation and corrosion resistance were also examined. Results indicate that over the temperature range of -196 C to 540 C the yield stress of experimental austenitic alloys with only 12 percent Cr compare favorably with the 18 percent Cr in 304 stainless steel. Oxidation resistance and in most cases corrosion resistance for the experimental alloys were comparable to the commercial alloy. Effective substitutes for Cr included Al, Mo, Si, Ti, and V, while Ni and Mn contents were increased to maintain an austenitic structure.

  9. Analysis of the retained austenite stability in TRIP steels by X-ray and neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Dong Min; Choi, Il Dong; Shin, Eun Joo

    2005-01-01

    The energy absorption of an automotive sheet steel during crash, that is, at a high speed deformation is very important to the safety of passengers. Therefore, property data and deformation mechanisms of materials under high strain rate conditions are needed to choose proper materials for automobiles. Dynamic mechanical properties of low carbon TRIP steels with varying retained austenite stabilities were evaluated over a wide range of strain rates using a high-velocity hydraulic tensile testing machine. The effect of retained austenite stability on high speed deformation behavior can be evaluated by the proper estimation of transformation in retained austenite. The quantity of transformed retained austenite after deformation was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and high resolution neutron diffraction and compared the results from two test methods. The carbon in retained austenite was analyzed by neutron diffraction. High stability retained austenite has higher carbon content than low stability retained austenite and transformed slowly

  10. The Varying Effects of Uniaxial Compressive Stress on the Bainitic Transformation under Different Austenitization Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxing Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, thermal simulation experiments under different austenitization temperatures and different stress states were conducted. High-temperature laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM, thermal dilatometry, and scanning electron microscope (SEM were used to quantitatively investigate the effects of the uniaxial compressive stress on bainitic transformation at 330 °C following different austenitization temperatures. The transformation plasticity was also analyzed. It was found that the promotion degree of stress on bainitic transformation increases with the austenitization temperature due to larger prior austenite grain size as well as stronger promoting effect of mechanical driving force on selected variant growth at higher austenitization temperatures. The grain size and the yield strength of prior austenite are other important factors which influence the promotion degree of stress on bainitic transformation, besides the mechanical driving force provided by the stress. Moreover, the transformation plasticity increases with the austenitization temperature.

  11. Assessment of Deformation Twinning in Cold Rolled Austenitic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deformation twinning has traditionally been studied with Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). In this study, an assessment of deformation twinning in Austenitic Stainless Steel (ASS), type 304L, cold rolled to 20% reduction was investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Electron Back Scatter ...

  12. Effect of shot peening on metastable austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fargas, G.; Roa, J.J.; Mateo, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, shot peening was performed in a metastable austenitic stainless steel EN 1.4318 (AISI 301LN) in order to evaluate its effect on austenite to martensite phase transformation and also the influence on the fatigue limit. Two different steel conditions were considered: annealed, i.e., with a fully austenitic microstructure, and cold rolled, consisting of a mixture of austenite and martensite. X-ray diffraction, electron back-scattered diffraction and focus ion beam, as well as nanoindentation techniques, were used to elucidate deformation mechanisms activated during shot peening and correlate with fatigue response. Results pointed out that extensive plastic deformation and phase transformation developed in annealed specimens as a consequence of shot peening. However, the increase of roughness and the generation of microcracks led to a limited fatigue limit improvement. In contrast, shot peened cold rolled specimens exhibited enhanced fatigue limit. In the latter case, the main factor that determined the influence on the fatigue response was the distance from the injector, followed successively by the exit speed of the shots and the coverage factor

  13. To the corrosion of austenitic steels in sodium loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schad, M.

    1978-03-01

    This report describes the comparison between experimental corrosion and calculated corrosion effects on austenitic steels exposed to liquid sodium. As basis for the calculations served a diffusion model. The comparison showed that the model is able to predict the corrosion effects. In addition the model was used to calculate the corrosion effect along an actual fuel rod. (orig.) [de

  14. Phase Transformation of Metastable Austenite in Steel during Nano indentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Taehong; Lee, Sung Bo; Han, Heung Nam; Park, Kyungtae

    2013-01-01

    These can produce geometrical softening accompanied by a sudden displacement excursion during load-controlled nanoindentation, which referred to in the literature as a pop-in. In this study, phase transformation of metastable austenite to stress-induced ε martensite which causes pop-ins during nanoindentation of steel will be reported and discussed. This study investigated the relationship between pop-in behavior of austenite in the early stage of nanoindentation and formation of ε martensite based on microstructural analyses. The load-displacement curve obtained from nanoindentation revealed stepwise pop-ins in the early stage of plastic deformation. From analyses of high resolution TEM images, a cluster of banded structure under the indent turned out a juxtaposition of (111) planes of γ austenite and (0001) planes of ε martensite. The calculation of displacement along indentation axis for (111) slip system by formation of ε martensite showed that geometrical softening can also occur by ε martensite formation when considering that the stress-induced ε martensite transformation is the predominant deformation mode in the early stage of plastic deformation and its monopartial nature as well. These microstructural investigations strongly suggest that the pop-in behavior in the early stage of plastic deformation of austenite is closely related to the formation of ε martensite

  15. Phase Transformation of Metastable Austenite in Steel during Nano indentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Taehong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Bo; Han, Heung Nam [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyungtae [Hanbat National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    These can produce geometrical softening accompanied by a sudden displacement excursion during load-controlled nanoindentation, which referred to in the literature as a pop-in. In this study, phase transformation of metastable austenite to stress-induced ε martensite which causes pop-ins during nanoindentation of steel will be reported and discussed. This study investigated the relationship between pop-in behavior of austenite in the early stage of nanoindentation and formation of ε martensite based on microstructural analyses. The load-displacement curve obtained from nanoindentation revealed stepwise pop-ins in the early stage of plastic deformation. From analyses of high resolution TEM images, a cluster of banded structure under the indent turned out a juxtaposition of (111) planes of γ austenite and (0001) planes of ε martensite. The calculation of displacement along indentation axis for (111) slip system by formation of ε martensite showed that geometrical softening can also occur by ε martensite formation when considering that the stress-induced ε martensite transformation is the predominant deformation mode in the early stage of plastic deformation and its monopartial nature as well. These microstructural investigations strongly suggest that the pop-in behavior in the early stage of plastic deformation of austenite is closely related to the formation of ε martensite.

  16. Carbon diffusion in carbon-supersaturated ferrite and austenite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jiří; Král, Lubomír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 586, FEB (2014), s. 129-135 ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0148; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : carbon diffusion * Carbon supersaturation * Carbon supersaturation * Ferrite * Austenite Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 2.999, year: 2014

  17. Retained austenite stability investigation in TRIP steel using neutron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zrník, J.; Muránsky, Ondrej; Lukáš, Petr; Nový, Z.; Šittner, Petr; Horňák, P.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 437, č. 1 (2006), s. 114-119 ISSN 0921-5093 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : TRIP steel * austenite conditioning * neutron diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.490, year: 2006

  18. Nitrogen and carbon expanded austenite produced by PIII

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blawert, C.; Kalvelage, H.; Mordike, B. L.; Collins, G. A.; Short, K. T.; Jirásková, Yvonna; Schneeweiss, Oldřich

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 136, č. 1 (2001), s. 181-187 ISSN 0257-8972 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 516.60 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : austenite * plasma immersion ion implantation * carbonitride Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.236, year: 2001

  19. Control of relaxation cracking in austenitic high temperature components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortel, J.C. van

    2007-01-01

    The degradation mechanism "relaxation cracking" is acting in austenitic components operating between 550°C (1020°F) and 750°C (1380°F). The brittle failures are always located in cold formed areas or in welded joints and are mostly addressed within 1 year service. More than 10 different names can be

  20. Tensile and fracture properties of an Fe14Mn8Ni1Mo-0.7C fully austenitic weld metal at 4 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobler, R. L.; Trevisan, R. E.; Reed, R. P.

    A fully austenitic steel butt weld 21 mm thick was produced by submerged arc welding using an experimental filler metal composition: Fe14Mn8Ni1Mo0.7C. The tensile and fracture properties of this weld were measured in liquid helium to evaluate its candidacy for applications at 4 K. The yield strength (1115 MPa) and toughness ( K lc ≈ 192 MPa m1/2) combination of this material compares favourably with existing base metal properties for AISI 304 type alloys. A conventional ductile fracture consisting of void formation and coalescence was shown by both tensile and fracture toughness specimens.

  1. Development, Integration, and Testing of a Nano-Satellite Coupling Mechanism Using Shape Memory Alloy for an Interference Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    symmetric to cambered. The medical field uses SMA for stents, filters, orthodontic wires , and for minimally invasive surgery. The oil industry uses SMA...Shape Memory Alloy, SMA, Nickel Titanium, NiTi, Nichrome wire , press-fit, interference joint, austenite, twinned martensite, detwinned martensite...13  C.  COMPARE DEVELOPED DEVICES ................................................. 14  1.  Nichrome Burn Wire

  2. Application of Corrosion Test for Austenitic SS 304 in PWR with Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance (EQCM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Seok; Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Jong Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2011-01-01

    The secondary system of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is a loop composed of: a) steam generator, b) steam transport piping, c) steam turbine and d) condenser and some optional component. The materials of these components are mainly carbon steel, different grades of stainless steel, high nickel alloys (Inconel-600 and Incoloy-800), Copper alloys. Among these materials, austenitic stainless steel 304 is widely used in tubing for large-surface condenser exposed to seawater as coolant of steam condenser. Stainless steels show much greater resistance to erosion-corrosion than copper alloys used in steam condenser tubing and are also immune to ammonia attack, ammonia induced stress corrosion cracking. Also, the chloride induced stress corrosion cracking has not been reported in stainless steel tubing in power plant condenser. Nevertheless, it is well known that stainless steels are susceptible to pitting and crevice corrosion in the seawater environment including chloride ions. Metallic materials exposed to untreated seawater suffer the well-known phenomenon of fouling consisting of the formation of an unwanted deposit that covers the surfaces in contact with the water. Five types of fouling are usually considered as biological, corrosion, particulate, chemical and precipitation fouling. Pitting corrosion is aggravated by stagnant or low flow conditions in which sludge such as corrosion of copper alloys in the secondary system can form in the tube surface. From the operational maintenance viewpoint, pitting attack has destructive effect of structural materials on operation of NPP. Countermeasures such as copper alloys replacement, water chemistry control and chemical cleaning were implemented to mitigate the pitting. Although the many studies are performed macroscopically to reduce pitting corrosion in the secondary system, little work has been done to understand mechanism of fouling formation and to confirm the quantitative analysis of the fouling between the metal

  3. New Equation for Prediction of Martensite Start Temperature in High Carbon Ferrous Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jihye; Shim, Jae-Hyeok; Lee, Seok-Jae

    2018-02-01

    Since previous equations fail to predict M S temperature of high carbon ferrous alloys, we first propose an equation for prediction of M S temperature of ferrous alloys containing > 2 wt pct C. The presence of carbides (Fe3C and Cr-rich M 7C3) is thermodynamically considered to estimate the C concentration in austenite. Especially, equations individually specialized for lean and high Cr alloys very accurately reproduce experimental results. The chemical driving force for martensitic transformation is quantitatively analyzed based on the calculation of T 0 temperature.

  4. Passive and transpassive behaviour of Alloy 31 in a heavy brine LiBr solution

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Domene, Ramón Manuel; Blasco Tamarit, María Encarnación; García García, Dionisio Miguel; García Antón, José

    2013-01-01

    The passive and transpassive behaviour of Alloy 31, a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031), has been investigated in a LiBr heavy brine solution (400 g/l) at 25 °C using potentiostatic polarisation combined with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and Mott–Schottky analysis. The passive film formed on Alloy 31 has been found to be p-type and/or n-type in electronic character, depending on the film formation potential. The thickness of the film formed at potentials within ...

  5. Effects of carbon and nitrogen in austenitic stainless steel on sensitization behavior through TTS and CCS diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borah, D.; Roychowdhury, S.; Kain, V.; Ghosh Acharyya, S.

    2012-01-01

    Intergranular Corrosion (IGC) and Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) are important corrosion issues for austenitic stainless steels (SS) used in nuclear, chemical process and power industries etc. Time-temperature-sensitisation (TTS) and continuous-cooling-sensitization (CCS) diagrams represent the susceptibility to sensitisation. TTS and CCS diagrams for ditch microstructure also can be used to predict the operations/heat treatments which are to be avoided to prevent component materials from IGC degradation. In the present study austenitic SS grades 304, SS 304L, 304LN and SS 304L (NAG) were subjected to heat treatment at a temperature range of 550 ℃ to 850 ℃ for different time durations ranging from 2 min to 300 h. This was followed by double loop potentiodynamic reactivation testing (DL-EPR) on all the materials in all the different heat treated conditions for correlating to the susceptibility to IGC and IGSCC. The TTS and CCS diagrams for 'ditch' microstructure and DL-EPR value of 1 were derived for all the studied materials. In addition, a comprehensive analysis of the effect of alloying additions e.g. C and N etc. on the sensitization kinetics and susceptibility to IGC and IGSCC has been established in this study. (author

  6. Thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fissolo, A.

    2001-01-01

    This report deals with the thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels as AISI 316 LN and 304 L. Such damage has been clearly observed for some components used in Fast Breeder reactors (FBR) and Pressure Water Reactor (PWR). In order to investigate thermal fatigue, quasi-structural specimen have been used. In this frame, facilities enforcing temperature variations similar to those found under the operation conditions have been progressively developed. As for components, loading results from impeded dilatation. In the SPLASH facility, the purpose was to establish accurate crack initiation conditions in order to check the relevance of the usual component design methodology. The tested specimen is continuously heated by the passage of an electrical DC current, and submitted to cyclic thermal down shock (up to 1000 deg C/s) by means of periodical spraying of water on two opposite specimen faces. The number of cycles to crack initiation N i is deduced from periodic examinations of the quenched surfaces, by means of optical microscopy. It is considered that initiation occurs when at least one 50μm to 150□m long crack is observed. Additional SPLASH tests were performed for N >> N i , with a view to investigate the evolution of a surface multiple cracking network with the number of cycles N. The CYTHIA test was mainly developed for the purpose of assessing crack growth dynamics of one isolated crack in thermal fatigue conditions. Specimens consist of thick walled tubes with a 1 mm circular groove is spark-machined at the specimen centre. During the test, the external wall of the tube is periodically heated by using a HF induction coil (1 MHz), while its internal wall is permanently cooled by flowing water. Total crack growth is derived from post-mortem examinations, whereby the thermal fatigue final rupture surface is oxidized at the end of the test. The specimen is broken afterwards under mechanical fatigue at room temperature. All the tests confirm that

  7. The Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanism of Alloy 600 Steam Generator Tubes: Materials Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Youngsuk; Kim, Sungsoo; Kim, Daewhan

    2013-01-01

    The problem is that intergranular (IG) cracking of austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys occurs even in Ar with no corrosion or oxidation of grain boundaries being accompanied. This fact suggests that IG cracking has nothing to do with grain boundary (GB) corrosion or oxidation. This fact cast a doubt about the current notion that applied stresses are required to initiate IG cracking or PWSCC. These facts indicate that PWSCC is closely related to internal factors of materials, not to external factors such as grain boundary oxidation or corrosion or applied stresses. Given that austenitic alloys including Alloy 600 are a kind of solid solution alloys with alloying elements dissolved in the matrix as solutes, ordering of alloying elements of Fe, Cr and Ni occur in Alloy 600 during exposure to reactor operating condition. We suggest that atomic ordering is the main internal factor to govern PWSCC or IG cracking of austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys because lattice contraction due to atomic ordering induces internal stresses which are large enough to cause GB cracking. The aim of this work is to provide experimental evidence for our suggestion. To this end, water quenching (WQ) or air cooling (AC) or furnace cooling (FC) was applied respectively to Alloy 600 after solution treatment at 1095 .deg. C for 0.5h to make Alloy 600 with either disorder (DO) or different degrees of short range order, respectively. Alloy 600 showed lattice contraction upon aging at 400 .deg. C whose extent increased with increasing cooling rate: the water-quenched (WQ) Alloy 600 exhibited the largest amount of lattice contraction than the furnace-cooled (FC) or air-cooled (AC) one. Yonezawa's experiments have indeed shown that the WQ-Alloy 600 with the largest amount of lattice contraction upon aging at 400 .deg. C is the most susceptible to PWSCC when compared to the AC- or FC-Alloy 600 with the lesser amount of lattice contraction. These observations demonstrate, for the first time, that PWSCC of Alloy 600 is

  8. Modification of the grain boundary microstructure of the austenitic PCA stainless steel to improve helium embrittlement resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Grain boundary MC precipitation was produced by a modified thermal-mechanical pretreatment in 25% cold worked (CW) austenitic prime candidate alloy (PCA) stainless steel prior to HFIR irradiation. Postirradiation tensile results and fracture analysis showed that the modified material (B3) resisted helium embrittlement better than either solution annealed (SA) or 25% CW PCA irradiated at 500 to 600 0 C to approx.21 dpa and 1370 at. ppM He. PCA SA and 25% CW were not embrittled at 300 to 400 0 C. Grain boundary MC survives in PCA-B3 during HFIR irradiation at 500 0 C but dissolves at 600 0 C; it does not form in either SA or 25% CW PCA during similar irradiation. The grain boundary MC appears to play an important role in the helium embrittlement resistance of PCA-B3

  9. Imaging and size analysis of stress corrosion cracks in austenitic components using the synthetic aperture focus technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spies, Martin; Rieder, Hans; Dillhoefer, Alexander; Dugan, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Riss formation and growth by intercrystalline stress corrosion cracking occurs especially in nickel alloys in case of mixed steels and also in the heat-affected zone in some austenitic Cr-Ni steels. In view of the strong branching of these cracks, amplitude-based ultrasonic methods of measurement may fail. The contribution describes the detection and size analysis of stress corrosion cracks. The synthetic aperture focus technique (SAFT) was used to improve the signal-noise ratio of the ultrasonic inspection data, especially for crack tip identification. several test bodies with intercrystalline stress corrosion cracks with depths ranging from 2.5 mm to 16 mm were analyzed successfully by a combination of conventional techniques for acquisition of B-scan data, followed by SAFT processing.

  10. Effect of Q&P heat treatment on fine microstructure and mechanical properties of a low-alloy medium-carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Rahim; Kheirandish, Shahram; Mirdamadi, Shamsoddin

    2018-01-01

    The current research investigates the effect of ultrafine microstructure resulted from Quench and Partitioning (Q&P) process on obtaining ultra-high strengths in a low-alloy steel with 4wt.% carbon. The purpose of Q&P heat treatment is to enrich the austenite with carbon by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to austenite, in order to stabilize it to the room temperature. The microstructure, consequently, is consists of martensite, retained austenite and in some conditions bainite. Two-step Q&P heat treatment with quench and partitioning temperatures equal to 120°C and 300°C respectively were applied to the samples at different times. Mechanical behavior was studied by tensile test. The microstructure of the samples was observed using SEM, and TEM and to quantify the amount of retained austenite X-ray diffraction was used. The retained austenite grain size was estimated to be about 0.5 µm and the highest amount of retained austenite obtained was 10 vol%. All samples showed a yield strength and a tensile strength of above 900MPa and 1500MP respectively. The yield strength increased with increase in partitioning time, whereas tensile strength showed an inverse behavior. The elongation in samples varied from 5% to 9% which seemed to not have a direct connection with the amount of retained austenite, but instead it was related to the ferritic structures formed during partitioning such as coalesced martensite, bainite and tempered martensite.

  11. Kinetics of austenite-ferrite and austenite-pearlite transformations in a 1025 carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawbolt, E. B.; Chau, B.; Brimacombe, J. K.

    1985-04-01

    Isothermal and continuous-cooling transformation kinetics have been measured dilatometrically for the γ → α + γ' and γ' → P reactions in a 1025 steel. The isothermal transformation of austenite for each reaction was found to fit the Avrami equation after the fraction transformed was normalized to unity at the completion of the reaction and a transformation-start time was determined. The transformation kinetics under isothermal conditions therefore were characterized in terms of the n and b parameters from the Avrami equation together with the transformation-start times. The parameter n was found to be independent of temperature over the range studied (645 to 760 ‡C) and to have values of 0.99 and 1.33 for the ferrite and pearlite reactions, respectively. This indicates that the nucleation condition is essentially constant and site saturation occurs early in the transformation process. The continuous-cooling experiments were conducted at cooling rates of 2 to 150 ‡C per second to determine the transformation-start times for the ferrite and pearlite reactions and the completion time for transformation to pearlite under CCT conditions. Both reactions were found to obey the Additivity Principle for continuous cooling provided that the incubation (pre-transformation) period was not included in the transformation time. The isothermal transformation data and CCT transformation-start times have been incorporated in a mathematical model to predict continuous-cooling transformation kinetics that agree closely with measurements made at three cooling rates.

  12. Influence of nitrogen alloying on hydrogen embrittlement in AISI 304-type stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannula, Simo-Pekka; Hänninen, Hannu; Tähtinen, Seppo

    1984-12-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement of AISI 304-type austenitic stainless steels has been studied with special emphasis on the effects of the nitrogen content of the steels. Hydrogen charging was found to degrade the mechanical properties of all the steels studied, as measured by a tensile test. The fracture surfaces of hydrogen charged specimens were brittle cleavage-like whereas the uncharged specimens showed ductile, dimpled fracture. In sensitized materials transgranular cleavage mode of fracture was replaced by an intergranular mode of fracture and the losses of mechanical properties were higher. Nitrogen alloying decreased the hydrogen-induced losses of mechanical properties by increasing the stability of austenite. In sensitized steels the stability of austenite and nitrogen content were found to have only a minor effect on hydrogen embrittlement, except when sensitization had caused α'-martensite transformation at the grain boundaries.

  13. Single pit propagation on austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heurtault, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemical characterization of metastable events such as pitting corrosion of stainless steel in chloride electrolyte remains complex because many individual processes may occur simultaneously on the alloy surface. To overcome these difficulties, an experimental setup, the flow micro-device, has been developed to achieve the initiation of a single pit and to propagate the single pit in three dimensions. In this work, we take advantage of such a device in order to revisit the pitting process on a 316L stainless steel in a chloride - sulphate bulk. In a first step, the time evolution of the pit geometry (depth, radius) and the chemical evolution of the pit solution investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy have shown that the pit depth propagation depends on the formation of a metal chloride and sulphate gel in the pit solution, and is controlled by the metallic cations diffusion from the pit bottom to the pit mouth. The pit radius growth is defined by the initial surface de-passivation, by the presence of a pit cover and by the gel development in the solution. all of these phenomena are function of applied potential and chemical composition of the solution. In a last step, it was demonstrated that a critical chloride concentration is needed in order to maintain the pit propagation. This critical concentration slightly increases with the pit depth. From statistical analysis performed on identical experiments, a zone diagram showing the pit stability as a function of the chloride concentration and the pit dimensions was built. (author) [fr

  14. Development of Stronger and More Reliable Cast Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) Based on Scientific Design Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, G.; Sikka, V.K.; Pankiw, R.I.

    2006-04-15

    The goal of this program was to increase the high-temperature strength of the H-Series of cast austenitic stainless steels by 50% and upper use temperature by 86 to 140 F (30 to 60 C). Meeting this goal is expected to result in energy savings of 38 trillion Btu/year by 2020 and energy cost savings of $185 million/year. The higher strength H-Series of cast stainless steels (HK and HP type) have applications for the production of ethylene in the chemical industry, for radiant burner tubes and transfer rolls for secondary processing of steel in the steel industry, and for many applications in the heat-treating industry. The project was led by Duraloy Technologies, Inc. with research participation by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and industrial participation by a diverse group of companies. Energy Industries of Ohio (EIO) was also a partner in this project. Each team partner had well-defined roles. Duraloy Technologies led the team by identifying the base alloys that were to be improved from this research. Duraloy Technologies also provided an extensive creep data base on current alloys, provided creep-tested specimens of certain commercial alloys, and carried out centrifugal casting and component fabrication of newly designed alloys. Nucor Steel was the first partner company that installed the radiant burner tube assembly in their heat-treating furnace. Other steel companies participated in project review meetings and are currently working with Duraloy Technologies to obtain components of the new alloys. EIO is promoting the enhanced performance of the newly designed alloys to Ohio-based companies. The Timken Company is one of the Ohio companies being promoted by EIO. The project management and coordination plan is shown in Fig. 1.1. A related project at University of Texas-Arlington (UT-A) is described in Development of Semi-Stochastic Algorithm for Optimizing Alloy Composition of High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) for Desired

  15. Nonswelling alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-01-01

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses

  16. Laser borided composite layer produced on austenitic 316L steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikołajczak Daria

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Austenitic 316L steel is well-known for its good resistance to corrosion and oxidation. Therefore, this material is often used wherever corrosive media or high temperatures are to be expected. The main drawback of this material is very low hardness and low resistance to mechanical wear. In this study, the laser boriding was used in order to improve the wear behavior of this material. As a consequence, a composite surface layer was produced. The microstructure of laser-borided steel was characterized by only two zones: re-melted zone and base material. In the re-melted zone, a composite microstructure, consisting of hard ceramic phases (borides and a soft austenitic matrix, was observed. A significant increase in hardness and wear resistance of such a layer was obtained.

  17. Carbides nucleation and growth processes in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, F.A.; Otero, E.; Ballester, A.; Leiro, J.

    1986-01-01

    The nucleation and growth process at some carbides with high chromium content inside an austenitic matrix corresponding to a 304 type inoxidable steel are studied. The precipitate growth seems to be controlled, at least at temperatures above 973 K, by the diffusion of carbon atoms from the matrix phase to the beginning of the second phase which is normally placed in the grain boundaries. A relationship between the percentage of precipitated carbide, as a function of the carbon excess in the saturated austenitic solid solution, and the time employed for each work temperature is established. From these data, some aspects relating to the morphologie, the carbide localization and the influence of these factors in the steel sensibilization to the grain corrosion, are interpreted. (author)

  18. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of Solidified Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aktaş Çelik G.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the family of stainless steels, cast austenitic stainless steels (CASSs are preferably used due to their high mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. These steels owe their properties to their microstructural features consisting of an austenitic matrix and skeletal or lathy type δ-ferrite depending on the cooling rate. In this study, the solidification behavior of CASSs (304L and 316L grades was studied using ThermoCalc software in order to determine the solidification sequence and final microstructure during cooling. Theoretical findings were supported by the microstructural examinations. For the mechanical characterization, not only hardness measurements but also tribological studies were carried out under dry sliding conditions and worn surfaces were examined by microscopy and 3D profilometric analysis. Results were discussed according to the type and amount of microstructural features.

  19. Electron microscopy and plastic deformation of industrial austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Barry

    1976-01-01

    The different mechanisms of plastic deformation observed in austenitic stainless steels are described and the role of transmission electron microscopy in the elucidation of the mechanisms is presented. At temperatures below 0,5Tm, different variants of dislocation glide are competitive: slip of perfect and partial dislocations, mechanical twinning and strain-induced phase transformations. The predominance of one or other of these mechanisms can be rationalized in terms of the temperature and composition dependence of the stacking fault energy and the thermodynamic stability of the austenite. At temperatures above 0,5Tm dislocation climb and diffusion of point defects become increasingly important and at these temperatures recovery, recrystallization and precipitation can also occur during deformation [fr

  20. Residual stress studies of austenitic and ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrenko, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    Residual studies have been made on austenitic and ferritic steels of the types used as structural materials. The residual stress results presented here will include residual stress measurements in the heat-affected zone on butt welded Type 304 stainless steel pipes, and the stresses induced in Type 304 austenitic stainless steel and Type A508 ferritic steel by several surface preparations. Such surface preparation procedures as machining and grinding can induce large directionality effects in the residual stresses determined by X-ray techniques and some typical data will be presented. A brief description is given of the mobile X-ray residual stress apparatus used to obtain most of the data in these studies. (author)

  1. Partial transient liquid phase diffusion bonding of Zircaloy-4 to stabilized austenitic stainless steel 321

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atabaki, M. Mazar, E-mail: m.mazaratabaki@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University Technology Malaysia, 81310 (Malaysia); Hanzaei, A. Talebi [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    An innovative method was applied for bonding Zircaloy-4 to stabilized austenitic stainless steel 321 using an active titanium interlayer. Specimens were joined by a partial transient liquid phase diffusion bonding method in a vacuum furnace at different temperatures under 1 MPa dynamic pressure of contact. The influence of different bonding temperatures on the microstructure, microindentation hardness, joint strength and interlayer thickness has been studied. The diffusion of Fe, Cr, Ni and Zr has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy elemental analyses. Results showed that control of the heating and cooling rate and 20 min soaking at 1223 K produces a perfect joint. However, solid-state diffusion of the melting point depressant elements into the joint metal causes the solid/liquid interface to advance until the joint is solidified. The tensile strength of all the bonded specimens was found around 480-670 MPa. Energy dispersive spectroscopy studies indicated that the melting occurred along the interface of the bonded specimens as a result of the transfer of atoms between the interlayer and the matrix during bonding. This technique provides a reliable method of bonding zirconium alloy to stainless steel.

  2. Crack growth rates of irradiated austenitic stainless steel weld heat affected zone in BWR environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Gruber, E. E.; Daum, R. S.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of reactor pressure vessels because of their superior fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods can exacerbate the corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of these steels by affecting the material microchemistry, material microstructure, and water chemistry. Experimental data are presented on crack growth rates of the heat affected zone (HAZ) in Types 304L and 304 SS weld specimens before and after they were irradiated to a fluence of 5.0 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 0.75 dpa) at {approx}288 C. Crack growth tests were conducted under cycling loading and long hold time trapezoidal loading in simulated boiling water reactor environments on Type 304L SS HAZ of the H5 weld from the Grand Gulf reactor core shroud and on Type 304 SS HAZ of a laboratory-prepared weld. The effects of material composition, irradiation, and water chemistry on growth rates are discussed.

  3. In vitro corrosion resistance of plasma source ion nitrided austenitic stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, M K; Zhu, X M

    2001-04-01

    Plasma source ion nitriding has emerged as a low-temperature, low-pressure nitriding approach for low-energy implanting nitrogen ions and then diffusing them into steel and alloy. In this work, a single high nitrogen face-centered-cubic (f.c.c.) phase (gammaN) formed on the 1Cr18Ni9Ti and AISI 316L austenitic stainless steels with a high nitrogen concentration of about 32 at % was characterized using Auger electron spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, glancing angle X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance of the gammaN-phase layer was studied by the electrochemical cyclic polarization measurement in Ringer's solutions buffered to pH from 3.5 to 7.2 at a temperature of 37 degrees C. No pitting corrosion in the Ringer's solutions with pH = 7.2 and 5.5 was detected for the gammaN-phase layers on the two stainless steels. The high pitting potential for the gammaN-phase layers is higher, about 500 and 600 mV, above that of the two original stainless steels, respectively, in the Ringer's solution with pH = 3.5. The corroded surface morphologies of the gammaN-phase layers observed by scanning electron microscopy are consistent with the results of the electrochemical polarization measurement.

  4. Pitting and stress corrosion cracking behavior in welded austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, B.T.; Chen, Z.K.; Luo, J.L.; Patchett, B.M.; Xu, Z.H.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of microstructural changes in 304 austenitic stainless steel induced by the processes of gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and laser-beam welding (LBW) on the pitting and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviors was investigated. According to the in situ observations with scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) and the breakdown potentials of the test material with various microstructures, the GTAW process made the weld metal (WM) and heat-affected zone (HAZ) more sensitive to pitting corrosion than base metal (BM), but the LBW process improved the pitting resistance of the WM. In the initiation stage of SCC, the cracks in the BM and HAZ propagated in a transgranular mode. Then, the crack growth mechanism changed gradually into a mixed transgranular + intergranular mode. The cracks in the WM were likely to propagate along the dendritic boundaries. The crack initiation rate, crack initiation lifetime and crack propagation rate indicated that the high-to-low order of SCC resistance is almost the same as that for pitting resistance. High heat-input (and low cooling rate) was likely to induce the segregation of alloying elements and formation of Cr-depleted zones, resulting in the degradation in the corrosion resistance

  5. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue lives of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Gavenda, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code fatigue design curves for structural materials do not explicitly address the effects of reactor coolant environments on fatigue life. Recent test data indicate a significant decrease in fatigue life of pressure vessel and piping materials in light water reactor (LWR) environments. Fatigue tests have been conducted on Types 304 and 316NG stainless steel in air and LWR environments to evaluate the effects of various material and loading variables, e.g., steel type, strain rate, dissolved oxygen (DO) in water, and strain range, on fatigue lives of these steels. The results confirm the significant decrease in fatigue life in water. The environmentally assisted decrease in fatigue life depends both on strain rate and DO content in water. A decrease in strain rate from 0.4 to 0.004%/s decreases fatigue life by a factor of ∼ 8. However, unlike carbon and low-alloy steels, environmental effects are more pronounced in low-DO than in high-DO water. At ∼ 0.004%/s strain rate, reduction in fatigue life in water containing <10 ppb D is greater by a factor of ∼ 2 than in water containing ≥ 200 ppb DO. Experimental results have been compared with estimates of fatigue life based on the statistical model. The formation and growth of fatigue cracks in austenitic stainless steels in air and LWR environments are discussed

  6. The Investigation of Strain-Induced Martensite Reverse Transformation in AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cios, G.; Tokarski, T.; Żywczak, A.; Dziurka, R.; Stępień, M.; Gondek, Ł.; Marciszko, M.; Pawłowski, B.; Wieczerzak, K.; Bała, P.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive study on the strain-induced martensitic transformation and reversion transformation of the strain-induced martensite in AISI 304 stainless steel using a number of complementary techniques such as dilatometry, calorimetry, magnetometry, and in-situ X-ray diffraction, coupled with high-resolution microstructural transmission Kikuchi diffraction analysis. Tensile deformation was applied at temperatures between room temperature and 213 K (-60 °C) in order to obtain a different volume fraction of strain-induced martensite (up to 70 pct). The volume fraction of the strain-induced martensite, measured by the magnetometric method, was correlated with the total elongation, hardness, and linear thermal expansion coefficient. The thermal expansion coefficient, as well as the hardness of the strain-induced martensitic phase was evaluated. The in-situ thermal treatment experiments showed unusual changes in the kinetics of the reverse transformation (α' → γ). The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the reverse transformation may be stress assisted—strains inherited from the martensitic transformation may increase its kinetics at the lower annealing temperature range. More importantly, the transmission Kikuchi diffraction measurements showed that the reverse transformation of the strain-induced martensite proceeds through a displacive, diffusionless mechanism, maintaining the Kurdjumov-Sachs crystallographic relationship between the martensite and the reverted austenite. This finding is in contradiction to the results reported by other researchers for a similar alloy composition.

  7. Effect of initial grain size on dynamic recrystallization in high purity austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Wahabi, M. [Centre SMS, CNRS UMR 5146, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158, cours Fauriel-42023, Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France); Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB - Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028-Barcelona (Spain); Gavard, L. [Centre SMS, CNRS UMR 5146, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158, cours Fauriel-42023, Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France); Montheillet, F. [Centre SMS, CNRS UMR 5146, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, 158, cours Fauriel-42023, Saint-Etienne Cedex 2 (France); Cabrera, J.M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB - Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028-Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: jose.maria.cabrera@upc.edu; Prado, J.M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB - Universidad Politecnica de Cataluna, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028-Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-10-15

    The influence of initial microstructure on discontinuous dynamic recrystallization (DDRX) has been investigated by using high purity and ultra high purity austenitic stainless steels with various initial grain sizes. After uniaxial compression tests at constant strain rates and various temperatures, the steady state microstructure or the state corresponding to the maximum strain ({epsilon} = 1) attained in the test was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy aided with automated electron back scattering diffraction. Recrystallized grain size d {sub rec} and twin boundary fraction f {sub TB} measurements were carried out. The mechanical behavior was also investigated by comparing experimental stress-strain curves with various initial grain sizes. DDRX kinetics was described by the classical Avrami equation. It was concluded that larger initial grain sizes promoted a delay in the DDRX onset in the two alloys. It was also observed that the softening process progressed faster for smaller initial grain sizes. The effect of initial grain size is larger in the HP material and becomes more pronounced at low temperature.

  8. Investigation on the optimized heat treatment procedure for laser fabricated IN718 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaocheng; Yang, Li; Chen, Tingyi; Zhang, Weihui; Huang, Xiwang; Dai, Jun

    2017-12-01

    The laser fabricated IN718 alloys were prepared by laser cladding system. The microstructure and microhardness of laser fabricated IN718 alloys were investigated after heat treatment. The microstructure and the elevated temperature mechanical properties of laser fabricated IN718 alloys were analyzed. The results showed that the microstructure of laser fabricated IN718 alloy consisted of austenitic matrix and dendritic Laves/γ eutectic. Most all Laves/γ eutectic was dissolved into austenitic matrix, and the complete recrystallization and the large grains occurred in the laser fabricated IN718 alloy after homogenization at 1080-1140 °C for 1 h, the dendritic Laves/γ eutectic was refined and the partial recrystallization occurred during the solid solution at 940-1000 °C for 1.5 h, the microhardness of the double aging (DA) alloys was about more than twice that of as-fabricated IN718 alloy. The recrystallized microstructure was obtained in the heat-treated laser fabricated IN718 alloy after 1100 °C/1 h air cooling (AC), 980 °C/1.5 h (AC), 700 °C/8 h furnace cooling (FC, 100 °C/h) to 600 °C/8 h (AC). The microhardness and the elevated temperature tensile strength were more than twice that of as-fabricated IN718 alloy due to a large concentration of γ″ phase precipitation to improve the transgranular strength and large grain to guarantee the grain boundary strength. The fracture morphologies of as-fabricated and heat-treated laser fabricated IN718 alloys were presented as the fiber dimples, the fracture mechanism of as-fabricated and heat-treated laser fabricated IN718 alloys was ductile fracture.

  9. Creep embrittlement of austenitic stainless steels with titanium addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felsen, M.F.

    1983-04-01

    Some cold-worked austenitic stainless steels of the 316 type with titanium addition exhibit a low creep ductility and a notch sensitivity in the temperature range of 550 0 C to 750 0 C and for times to rupture from 10 to 10000 hours. It has been shown that this embrittlement increases highly with cold-work percentage, with solution annealing temperature, and depends on chemical composition because these factors can modify the difference of hardness between grains and grain boundaries

  10. Internal frictions of austenitic stainless steels at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubono, K.; Owa, S.; Mio, N.; Akasaka, N.; Hirakawa, H.

    Internal frictions were measured for three types of austenitic stainless steel, AISI 304, 310S and 316, in the temperature range 4-300 K. The intrinsic friction is presented in terms of the quality factor of a 20 kHz eigenmode vibration of discs made from each material. Temperature dependence is also given for the resonant frequency of each disc. These mechanical properties show some peculiarities at low temperature.

  11. Determination of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Macedo, W.A. de.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels were done by X-ray diffraction, quantitative metallography (point count) and by means of one specific commercial apparatus whose operational principle is magnetic-inductive: The Ferrite Content Meter 1053 / Institut Dr. Foerster. The results obtained were comparated with point count, the reference method. It was also investigated in these measurements the influence of the martensite induced by mechanical deformation. Determinations by X-ray diffraction, by the ratio between integrated intensities of the ferrite (211) and austenite (311) lines, are in excelent agreement with those taken by point count. One correction curve for the lectures of the commercial equipment in focus was obtained, for the range between zero and 20% of delta ferrite in 18/8 stainless steels. It is demonstrated that, depending on the employed measurement method and surface finishing of the material to be analysed, the presence of martensite produced by mechanical deformation of the austenitic matrix is one problem to be considered. (Author) [pt

  12. Determination of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Macedo, W.A. de.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels were done by X-ray difraction, quantitative metallography (point count) and by means of one specific commercial apparatus whose operational principle is magnetic-inductive: The Ferrite Content Meter 1053 / Institut Dr. Forster. The results obtained were comparated with point count, the reference method. It was also investigated in these measurements the influence of the martensite induced by mechanical deformation. Determinations by X-ray diffraction, by the ratio between integrated intensities of the ferrite (211) and austenite (311) lines, are in excelent agreement with those taken by point count. One correction curve for the lectures of the commercial equipment in focus was obtained, for the range between zero and 20% of delta ferrite in 18/8 stainless steels. It is demonstrated that, depending on the employed measurement method and surface finishing of the material to be analysed, the presence of martensite produced by mechanical deformation of the austenitic matrix is one problem to be considered. (Author) [pt

  13. Cryogenic properties of austenitic stainless steels for superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohara, K.; Kato, T.; Ono, Y.; Sasaki, T.; Suzuki, S.

    1983-01-01

    The present study examines the magnetic and mechanical properties of a variety of austenitic stainless steels and high maganese steel which are candidate materials for the superconducting magnet attached to high energy particle accelerators. The effect of a specified heat treatment for the precipitation of intermetallic compound Nb3Sn to be used as superconductor on ductility and toughness are especially examined. It is found that nitrogen-strengthened austenitic stainless steels have high strength and good ductility and toughness, but that these are destroyed by precipitation treatment. The poor ductility and toughness after precipitation are caused by a weakening of the grain boundaries due to the agglomerated chromium carbide percipitates. The addition of vanadium suppresses this effect by refining the grain. Austenitic steels are found to have low magnetic permeabilities and Neel temperatures, and show serrated flow in traction test due to strained martensitic transformation. High manganese steel has extremely low permeability, a Neel temperature about room temperature, and has a serrated flow in traction test due to adiabatic deformation at liquid helium temperature

  14. Corrosion resistance of kolsterised austenitic 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abudaia, F. B.; Khalil, E. O.; Esehiri, A. F.; Daw, K. E.

    2015-01-01

    Austenitic stainless suffers from low wear resistance in applications where rubbing against other surfaces is encountered. This drawback can be overcome by surface treatment such as coating by hard materials. Other treatments such as carburization at relatively low temperature become applicable recently to improve hardness and wear resistance. Carburization heat treatment would only be justified if the corrosion resistance is unaffected. In this work samples of 304 stainless steels treated by colossal supersaturation case carburizing (known as Kolsterising) carried out by Bodycote Company was examined for pitting corrosion resistance at room temperature and at 50 °C. Comparison with results obtained for untreated samples in similar testing conditions show that there is no deterioration in the pitting resistance due to the Kolsterising heat treatment. X ray diffraction patterns obtained for Kolsterising sample showed that peaks correspond to the austenite phase has shifted to lower 2θ values compared with those of the untreated sample. The shift is an indication for expansion of austenite unit cells caused by saturation with diffusing carbon atoms. The XRD of Kolsterising samples also revealed additional peaks appeared in the patterns due to formation of carbides in the kolsterised layer. Examination of these additional peaks showed that these peaks are attributed to a type of carbide known as Hagg carbide Fe 2 C 5 . The absence of carbides that contain chromium means that no Cr depletion occurred in the layer and the corrosion properties are maintained. Surface hardness measurements showed large increase after Kolsterising heat treatment

  15. Phase stability of high manganese austenitic steels for cryogenic applications

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, K

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the austenitic stability against a' martensitic transformation of three non-magnetic austenitic steels : a new stainless steel X2CrMnNiMoN 19-12-11-1 grade, a traditional X8CrMnNiN 19-11-6 grade and a high manganese X8MnCrNi 28-7-1 grade. Measurements of relative magnetic susceptibility at room temperature are performed on strained tensile specimens at 4.2 K. A special extensometer for high precision strain measurements at low temperature has been developed at CERN to test specimens up to various levels of plastic strain. Moreover, the high precision strain recording of the extensometer enables a detailed study of the serrated yield phenomena associated with 4.2 K tensile testing and their influence on the evolution of magnetic susceptibility. The results show that high Mn contents increase the stability of the austenitic structure against a' martensitic transformation, while keeping high strength at cryogenic temperature. Moreover, proper elaboration through primary and possi...

  16. Low ductility creep failure in austenitic weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.G.

    Creep tests have been carried out for times of up to approx. 22,000 hrs on three austenitic weld metals of nominal composition 17Cr-8Ni-2Mo, 19Cr-12Ni-3Mo+Nb and 17Cr-10Ni-2Mo. The two former deposits were designed to produce delta-ferrite contents in the range 3-9% while the latter was designed to be fully austenitic. The common feature of all three weld metals was that they all gave very low strains at failure, typically approx. 1%. The microstructures of the failed creep specimens have been studied using optical and electron microscopy and the precipitate structures related to the occurrence of low creep strains. Creep deformation and fracture mechanisms in austenitic materials in general have been reviewed and this has been used as a basis for discussion of the observations of the present work. Finally, some of the factors that can be controlled to improve long-term creep ductility have been appraised

  17. Ultrasonic examination of austenitic welds at reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelmann, X.

    1991-01-01

    Austenitic welds play an important role in reactor pressure vessels (RPV) both of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs). These pressure retaining joints still pose problems for ultrasonic examination. During the last few years some progress has been achieved in overcoming these problems. The state of the art of the practical application is described in 'The Handbook on Ultrasonic Examination of Austenitic Welds' of the International Institute of Welding which was issued in 1986. This document was prepared by an international working group. Sulzer Brothers Limited, Winterthur Switzerland as manufacturer of both BWR and PWR RPVs has a long experience with ultrasonic examination of austenitic welds. In General Electric BWR RPVs the main recirculation line, the feedwater line and additional lines are connected to nozzles of the RPV with dissimilar metal welds joining stainless steel to carbon steel. The control rod drive (CRD) housings are attached to the RPV with complex weld joints. Framatome and Westinghouse RPVs also are provided with welds between the vessel and the main coolant line. This paper presents examples of ultrasonic approaches and examination results. Aspects of fabrication, preservice and inservice inspections are also covered. Complex weld joint design both from the point of material and geometry make ultrasonic examination sometimes extremely difficult but based on case by case investigations reliable solutions can often be realized. (orig.)

  18. EFFECTS OF AUSTENITIZATION ON STRUCTURE FORMATION СHROMO-MOLYBDENUM-VANADIUM STEEL AFTER HIGH TEMPERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Lutsenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of austenitization temperature of chrome-molybdenum-vanadium steel on structure formation at the softening heat treatment is studied. It is shown that the decline of the austenitization temperature promotes to reduce the micro-hardness values due to the intensification of spheroidizing of pearlite after the overcooling and high tempering. Increasing the austenitization temperature leads to formation of an uneven structure after tempering.

  19. Effect of Cu, Mo, Si on the content of retained austenite of austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mi, Y. [Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, the effects of Cu, Mo, Si contents on the volume fraction of retained austenite of austempered ductile iron (ADI) are analyzed exactly by X-ray diffraction, and the fracture modes of test samples with different volume fraction of retained austenite are investigated by SEM. It is shown that the retained austenite content increases with the content of copper, decreases with the content of molybdenum, and reaches the maximum with a certain content of silicon. When the retained austenite content decreases, the fracture modes of test samples change from ductile fracture to cleavage fracture.

  20. Use of overlapped reflection for determining the retained austenite by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garin, J.L.; Gonzalez, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    Retainec austenite in high-carbon steels has been determined by means of new computation techniques applied to the processing of X-ray diffraction data. Instead of using the traditional procedure based on the weak (200) reflections of martensite and austenite, intensity measurements of the overlapped (110) peak of martensite and (111) peak of austenite were performed. The separation of the peaks was based on a Pearson VII function, which is capable of describing all diffraction profiles. The accuracy of integrated intensities was then improved with the beneficial effects of higher precision in the calculation of the amount of retained austenite. (author) [pt

  1. Enhanced stress corrosion resistance from steels having a dual-phase austenite-martensite microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatasubramanian, T.V.; Baker, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    A high strength steel with an austenite-martensite duplex microstructure has been produced by extruding nickel coated steel powder. The austenite is present as a continuous network surrounding a high strength martensite. The steel exhibits superior resistance to stress corrosion cracking in 3.5 pct NaCl solution, the effectiveness of the austenite in improving stress corrosion cracking resistance increases as yield strength increases. The austenite reduces the effective stress intensity at the advancing crack tip and at the same time shields the crack tip from the corrosive environment

  2. Stress analysis of martensitic transformation in Cu-Al-Be polycrystalline and single-crystalline shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaouache, B.; Berveiller, S.; Inal, K.; Eberhardt, A.; Patoor, E.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the martensitic transformation in a shape memory alloy during a superelastic loading, focusing on internal strains, stresses and phases fractions. The behavior of the austenite phase is studied by X-ray diffraction stress analysis during in situ tensile test at room temperature. Both single-crystal and polycrystal samples have been investigated. The results are discussed with the aim to correlate the microstructural variations with the local stress state evolution in the austenitic phase while variants of martensite form and develop during a superelastic loading

  3. Study of phase transformations in Fe-Mn-Cr Alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schule, W.; Panzarasa, A.; Lang, E.

    1988-01-01

    Nickel free alloys for fusion reactor applications are examined. Phase changes in fifteen, mainly austenitic iron-manganese-chromium-alloys of different compositions were investigated in the temperature range between -196 0 C and 1000 0 C after different thermo-mechanical treatments. A range of different physical measuring techniques was employed to investigate the structural changes occurring during heating and cooling and after cold-work: electrical resistivity techniques, differential thermal analysis, magnetic response, Vickers hardness and XRD measurement. The phase boundary between the α Fe-phase and the γ-phase of the iron manganese alloy is approximately maintained if chromium is added to the two component materials. Consequently all the alloy materials for contents of manganese smaller than about 30% Mn are not stable below 500 0 C. This concerns also the AMCR alloys. However the α Fe-phase is not formed during slow cooling from 1000 0 C to ambient temperature and is only obtained if nucleation sites are provided and after very long anneals. A cubic α Mn-type-phase is found for alloys with 18% Cr and 15% Mn, with 13% Cr and 25% Mn, with 10% Cr and 30% Mn, and with 10% Cr and 40% Mn. For these reasons the γ-phase field of the iron-chromium-manganese alloys is very small below 600 0 C and much narrower than reported in the literature. 95 figs. 22 refs

  4. Carburization and tensile behavior of alloy 800 in liquid sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadio, Sergio; D'alessandro, Gianni; Vittori, Marco

    1983-05-01

    The carbon transfer has been analyzed in the Alloy 800/sodium/stainless steel system by determining the carbon-uptake of Alloy 800 foils, which were exposed in liquid sodium of known carburizing potential. p ]Under equilibrium conditions between 650 and 550°C the measured total carbon concentrations in the Alloy 800 labs were found to be roughly related to the carbon activities of the sodium environment by the equation already stated for the 18Cr- {8}/{10} Ni stainless steels, extrapolated to the chemical composition of the Ni-rich austenitic alloy. However the Alloy 800 was not found to undergo any decarburization in low-carbon activity environments. The carbon diffusion kinetics was determined as a function of temperature, it was found to be similar to that reported for the AISI-304 type of steel. p ]The effects of sodium exposure on microstructural and mechanical properties of several Alloy 800 heats were examined at 550°C as a function of the active carbon concentration in the sodium and of the {Ti}/{C} ratio in the alloys.

  5. Irradiation induced surface segregation in concentrated alloys: a contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandjean, Y.

    1996-01-01

    A new computer modelization of irradiation induced surface segregation is presented together with some experimental determinations in binary and ternary alloys. The model we propose handles the alloy thermodynamics and kinetics at the same level of sophistication. Diffusion is described at the atomistic level and proceeds vis the jumps of point defects (vacancies, dumb-bell interstitials): the various jump frequencies depend on the local composition in a manner consistent with the thermodynamics of the alloy. For application to specific alloys, we have chosen the simplest statistical approximation: pair interactions in the Bragg Williams approximation. For a system which exhibits the thermodynamics and kinetics features of Ni-Cu alloys, the model generates the behaviour parameters (flux and temperature) and of alloy composition. Quantitative agreement with the published experimental results (two compositions, three temperatures) is obtained with a single set of parameters. Modelling austenitic steels used in nuclear industry requires taking into account the contribution of dumbbells to mass transport. The effects of this latter contribution are studied on a model of Ni-Fe. Interstitial trapping on dilute impurities is shown to delay or even suppress the irradiation induced segregation. Such an effect is indeed observed in the experiments we report on Fe 50 Ni 50 and Fe 49 Ni 50 Hf 1 alloys. (author)

  6. Pitting corrosion of low-Cr austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullard, S.J.; Covino, B.S. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The Albany Research Center has investigated the pitting corrosion resistance of experimental low-Cr stainless steels and several commercial stainless steels in chloride-containing aqueous and atmospheric environments. Previous research had shown the experimental alloys to be as corrosion resistant as commercial stainless steels in chloride-free acid environments. The alloys studied were Fe-8Cr-16Ni-5.5Si-1Cu-(0-1)Mo, 304 SS, and 316 SS. These alloys were examined by immersion and electrochemical tests in 3.5 wt. pct. NaCl and 6 wt.pct.FeCl 3 . Results of these tests showed that the addition of one weight percent Mo improved the pitting resistance of the low-Cr alloy and that the Mo-containing experimental alloy was as resistant to pitting as the commercial alloys. Electrochemical tests did, however, show the experimental alloys to be slightly less resistant to pitting than the commercial alloys. Because of these results, the low-Cr alloy with one weight percent Mo and 304 SS were exposed for one year to a marine atmospheric environment on the coast of Oregon. The marine atmospheric corrosion resistance of the low-Cr alloy was found to be comparable to that for type 304 stainless steel

  7. Hydrogen formation in metals and alloys during fusion reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimin, S.; Takatsu, Hideyuki; Mori, Seiji

    1994-08-01

    The results of neutron transport calculations of the hydrogen formation based on the JENDL gas-production cross section file are discussed for some metals and alloys, namely 51 V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Mo, austenitic stainless steel (Ti modified 316SS:PCA), ferritic steel (Fe-8Cr-2W:F82H) and the vanadium-base alloy (V-5Cr-5Ti). Impact of the steel fraction in steel/water homogeneous blanket/shield compositions on the hydrogen formation rate in above-mentioned metals and alloys is discussed both for the hydrogen formation in the first wall and the blanket/shield components. The results obtained for the first wall are compared with those for the helium formation obtained at JAERI by the same calculational conditions. Hydrogen formation rates at the first wall having 51 V, Cr, Fe, Ni and Mo are larger than those of helium by 3-8 times. (author)

  8. Toughness testing and high-temperature oxidation evaluations of advanced alloys for core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Chen, Xiang [ORNL

    2016-09-16

    Alloy X-750 was procured from Carpenter Technology and Bodycote in this year. An appropriate TMT was developed on Alloy 439 to obtain materials with refined grain size for property screening tests. Charpy V-notch impact tests were completed for the three ferritic steels Grade 92, Alloy 439, and 14YWT. Fracture toughness tests at elevated temperatures were completed for 14YWT. The tests will be completed for the other alloys in next fiscal year. Steam oxidation tests of the three ferritic steels, 316L, and Zr–2.5Nb have been completed. The steam tests of the Ni-based superalloys and the other austenitic stainless steels will be continued and finished in next fiscal year. Performance ranking in terms of steam oxidation resistance and impact/fracture toughness of the alloys will be deduced.

  9. Radioactive material package closures with the use of shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koski, J.A.; Bronowski, D.R.

    1997-11-01

    When heated from room temperature to 165 C, some shape memory metal alloys such as titanium-nickel alloys have the ability to return to a previously defined shape or size with dimensional changes up to 7%. In contrast, the thermal expansion of most metals over this temperature range is about 0.1 to 0.2%. The dimension change of shape memory alloys, which occurs during a martensite to austenite phase transition, can generate stresses as high as 700 MPa (100 kspi). These properties can be used to create a closure for radioactive materials packages that provides for easy robotic or manual operations and results in reproducible, tamper-proof seals. This paper describes some proposed closure methods with shape memory alloys for radioactive material packages. Properties of the shape memory alloys are first summarized, then some possible alternative sealing methods discussed, and, finally, results from an initial proof-of-concept experiment described

  10. Peculiar high temperature corrosion of martensite alloy under impact of Estonian oil shale fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallermo, H.; Klevtsov, I. [Thermal Engineering Department of Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    The superheaters` surfaces of oil shale steam boiler made of pearlitic and austenitic alloys, are subject to intensive corrosion, mainly due to presence of chlorine in external deposits. The applicability of martensitic alloys X1OCrMoVNb91 and X20CrMoV121 for superheaters is examined here and empirical equations allowing to predict alloys` corrosion resistance in the range of operational temperatures are established. Alloy X1OCrMoVNb91 is found been most perspective for superheaters of boilers firing fossil fuel that contain alkaline metals and chlorine. The abnormal dependence of corrosion resistance of martensitic alloys on temperature is revealed, namely, corrosion at 580 deg C in presence of oil shale fly ash is more intensive than at 620 deg C. (orig.) 2 refs.

  11. Effects of carbon content on high-temperature mechanical and thermal fatigue properties of high-boron austenitic steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High-temperature mechanical properties of high-boron austenitic steels (HBASs were studied at 850 °C using a dynamic thermal-mechanical simulation testing machine. In addition, the thermal fatigue properties of the alloys were investigated using the self-restraint Uddeholm thermal fatigue test, during which the alloy specimens were cycled between room temperature and 800°C. Stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the surface cracks and cross-sectional microstructure of the alloy specimens after the thermal fatigue tests. The effects of carbon content on the mechanical properties at room temperature and high-temperature as well as thermal fatigue properties of the HBASs were also studied. The experimental results show that increasing carbon content induces changes in the microstructure and mechanical properties of the HBASs. The boride phase within the HBAS matrix exhibits a round and smooth morphology, and they are distributed in a discrete manner. The hardness of the alloys increases from 239 (0.19wt.% C to 302 (0.29wt.% C and 312 HV (0.37wt.% C; the tensile yield strength at 850 °C increases from 165.1 to 190.3 and 197.1 MPa; and the compressive yield strength increases from 166.1 to 167.9 and 184.4 MPa. The results of the thermal fatigue tests (performed for 300 cycles from room temperature to 800 °C indicate that the degree of thermal fatigue of the HBAS with 0.29wt.% C (rating of 2–3 is superior to those of the alloys with 0.19wt.% (rating of 4–5 and 0.37wt.% (rating of 3–4 carbon. The main cause of this difference is the ready precipitation of M23(C,B6-type borocarbides in the alloys with high carbon content during thermal fatigue testing. The precipitation and aggregation of borocarbide particles at the grain boundaries result in the deterioration of the thermal fatigue properties of the alloys.

  12. Corrosion of alloy 800H and the effect of surface-applied CeO2 in a sulphidizing/oxidizing/carburizing environment at 700°C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroosnijder, M.F.; Guttmann, V.; Fransen, T.; de Wit, J.H.W.

    The corrosion behavior of a wrought austenitic Fe-20Cr-32Ni steel, Alloy 800H, was studied in a simulated coal-gasification atmosphere at 700°C for exposure times up to 2500 hr. The influence of preoxidation and CeO2-surface application followed by preoxidation on the corrosion resistance of this

  13. The Influence of Mo, Cr and B Alloying on Phase Transformation and Mechanical Properties in Nb Added High Strength Dual Phase Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girina, O.; Fonstein, N.; Yakubovsky, O.; Panahi, D.; Bhattacharya, D.; Jansto, S.

    The influence of Nb, Mo, Cr and B on phase transformations and mechanical properties are studied in a 0.15C-2.0Mn-0.3Si-0.020Ti dual phase steel separately and in combination. The formation and decomposition of austenite together with recrystallization of ferrite are evaluated by dilatometry and constructed CCT-diagrams in laboratory processed cold rolled material cooled after full austenitization and from intercritical temperature range. The effect of alloying elements on formation of austenite through their effect on initial hot rolled structure is taken into account. The interpretation of phase transformations during heating and cooling is supported by metallography. The effect of alloying elements on mechanical properties and structure are evaluated by annealing simulations. It has been shown that mechanical properties are strongly influenced by alloying additions such as Nb, Mo, Cr and B through their effect on ferrite formation during continuous cooling and corresponding enrichment of remaining austenite by carbon. Depending on combined effect of these alloying elements, different phase transformations can be promoted during cooling. This allows controlling of final microstructural constituents and mechanical properties.

  14. Evaluation of non-conformities of hip prostheses made of titanium alloys and stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra, Ewerton de Oliveira Teotonio; Nascimento, Jose Jeferson da Silva; Luna, Carlos Bruno Barreto; Morais, Crislene Rodrigues da Silva; Campos, Karla Valeria Miranda de

    2017-01-01

    A large number of metallic alloys has satisfactory behavior when used to manufacture implants for hip prostheses. However, they must be in conformity with standards, to ensure their quality for long periods without losing its functionality. Therefore, this paper aims to study the non-conformities in two hip prostheses, one of titanium and other stainless steel according to standards. The implants studied passed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence, tensile test and optical microscopy (OM). Specimens for the tensile test were made according to ASTM E 8M, as well, MO samples passed by metallographic procedure. The results evidenced that some chemical compositions showed in relation to the standards. The XRD analysis showed peaks of austenite and absence of ferrite for the stainless steel, while the titanium alloy presents an alpha phase (HCP) more significant than the beta phase (BCC). The stainless steel alloys and titanium have yield strength and tensile strength that meet the standards. On the other hand, the elastic modulus of the titanium alloy and stainless steel, comes to be ten times greater than the human bone. Therefore, the high modulus of elasticity of the alloys, favors bone resorption problems. The stainless steel microstructure is typical of an austenitic matrix, while the titanium alloy presents α + β microstructure. (author)

  15. Surface and microstructural characterization of commercial breeder reactor candidate alloys exposed to 7000C sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anantatmula, R.P.; Brehm, W.F.

    1979-03-01

    Sodium compatibility screening tests were performed on several commercial austenitic alloys at 700 0 C for 2000 hours for applications as breeder reactor fuel cladding. The sodium-exposed surfaces were characterized by Optical Metallography, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA). Sodium exposure generally resulted in the depletion of Ni, Cr, Ti, Si, Mn and Nb, and enrichment of Fe and Mo at the surface. The average thickness of the depleted zone was 5 μm. The alloys can be divided into three groups based on corrosion rate, and each group has its own characteristic surface structure. Grain-orientation dependent striations were seen in alloys with low corrosion rates, while alloys with intermediate corrosion rates displayed micron-size nodes enriched with Fe and Mo. The high corrosion rate alloys exhibited scale-like formations on the surface with irregularly shaped holes. In addition, the data importantly point out that a ferrite layer will form at the sodium-exposed surface of these austenitic alloys after prolonged exposure

  16. Material Characterization of Fatigue Specimens made from Meta-stable Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niffenegger, M.; Grosse, M.; Kalkhof, D.; Leber, H. [Paul Scherrer Institut Villigen (Switzerland); Vincent, A.; Pasco, L.; Morin, M. [Insa de Lyon (France)

    2003-07-01

    The main objective of the EU-project CRETE (Contract No.: FIS5-1999-00280) was to assess the capability and the reliability of innovative NDT-inspection techniques for the detection of material degradation, induced by thermal fatigue and neutron irradiation, of metastable austenitic and ferritic low-alloy steel. Several project partners tested aged or irradiated samples, using various techniques (acoustic, magnetic and thermoelectric). However, these indirect methods require a careful interpretation of the measured signal in terms of micro-structural evolutions due to ageing of the material. Therefore the material had to be characterized in its undamaged, as well as in its damaged state. The present report summarises only the material characterization of the fatigue specimens. It is issued simultaneously as an PSI Bericht and the CRETE work package 3 (WP3) report. Each partner according to their own specifications purchased three materials under investigation, namely AISI 347, AISI 321 and AISI 304L. After sending the material to PSI, all fatigue specimens were manufactured by the same Swiss company. Each partner was responsible for his fatigue tests which are documented in the report WP1, written by FANP. In order to characterize the material in its unfatigued as well as in its fatigued state and to consider microstructural changes related to fatigue damage the methods listed below were employed either by PSI or by INSA de Lyon: (1) Inductive Coupled Plasma Emission Photometry (ICP-OES) was applied to determine the chemical composition, (2) Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for observing cracks, slip bands between grain and twin boundaries, - Ferromaster for measuring the magnetic permeability, (3) Physical Properties Measuring System (PPMS) for measuring magnetization characteristics, (4) Neutron- and advanced X-ray diffraction methods for the quantitative determination of martensite, - Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for the observation of crystalline

  17. Deformation of a super-elastic NiTiNb alloy with controllable stress hysteresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, S.; Schaffer, J. E. [Fort Wayne Metals Research Products Corporation, 9609 Ardmore Ave., Fort Wayne, Indiana 46809 (United States); Ren, Y. [Adanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Wang, L. [Beijing Institute of Technology, 5 South Zhongguancun St., Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2016-06-27

    Room temperature deformation of a Ni{sub 46.7}Ti{sub 42.8}Nb{sub 10.5} alloy was studied by in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Compared to binary NiTi alloy, the Nb dissolved in the matrix significantly increased the onset stress for Stress-Induced Martensite Transformation (SIMT). The secondary phase, effectively a Nb-nanowire dispersion in a NiTi-Nb matrix, increased the elastic stiffness of the bulk material, reduced the strain anisotropy in austenite families by load sharing during SIMT, and increased the stress hysteresis by resisting reverse phase transformation during unloading. The stress hysteresis can be controlled over a wide range by heat treatment through its influences on the residual stress of the Nb-nanowire dispersion and the stability of the austenite.

  18. Mechanodynamical analysis of nickel-titanium alloys for orthodontics application; Analise mecanodinamica de ligas de niquel-titanio para aplicacao ortodontica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arruda, Carlos do Canto

    2002-07-01

    Nickel-titanium alloys may coexist in more than one crystalline structure. There is a high temperature phase, austenite, and a low temperature phase, martensite. The metallurgical basis for the superelasticity and the shape memory effect relies in the ability of these alloys to transform easily from one phase to another. There are three essential factors for the orthodontist to understand nickel-titanium alloys behaviour: stress; deflection; and temperature. These three factors are related to each other by the stress-deflection, stress-temperature and deflection-temperature diagrams. This work was undertaken with the objective to analyse commercial nickel-titanium alloys for orthodontics application, using the dynamical mechanical analyser - DMA. Four NiTi 0,017 X 0,025'' archwires were studied. The archwires were Copper NiTi 35 deg C (Ormco), Neo Sentalloy F200 (GAC), Nitinol Superelastic (Unitek) and NiTi (GAC). The different mechanodynamical properties such as elasticity and damping moduli were evaluated. Each commercial material was evaluated with and without a 1 N static force, aiming to evaluate phase transition temperature variation with stress. The austenitic to martensitic phase ratio, for the experiments without static force, was in the range of 1.59 to 1.85. For the 1 N static force tests the austenitic to martensitic phase ratio, ranged from 1.28 to 1.57 due to the higher martensite elasticity modulus. With elastic modulus variation with temperature behaviour, the orthodontist has the knowledge of the force variation applied in the tooth in relation to the oral cavity temperature change, for nickel-titanium alloys that undergo phase transformation. The damping capacity of the studied alloys depends on the materials state: martensitic phase; austenitic phase or during phase transformation. The martensitic phase shows higher dumping capacity. During phase transformation, an internal friction peak may be observed for the CuNiTi 35 deg C and Neo

  19. Shape Memory Alloys (Part II: Classification, Production and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ivanic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Shape memory alloys (SMAs have been extensively investigated because of their unique shape memory behaviour, i.e. their ability to recover their original shape they had before deformation. Shape memory effect is related to the thermoelastic martensitic transformation. Austenite to martensite phase transformation can be obtained by mechanical (loading and thermal methods (heating and cooling. Depending on thermomechanical conditions, SMAs demonstrate several thermomechanical phenomena, such as pseudoelasticity, superelasticity, shape memory effect (one-way and two-way and rubber-like behaviour. Numerous alloys show shape memory effect (NiTi-based alloys, Cu-based alloys, Fe-based alloys etc.. Nitinol (NiTi is the most popular and the most commonly used SMA due to its superior thermomechanical and thermoelectrical properties. NiTi alloys have greater shape memory strain and excellent corrosion resistance compared to Cu – based alloys. However, they are very costly. On the other hand, copper-based alloys (CuZn and CuAl based alloys are much less expensive, easier to manufacture and have a wider range of potential transformation temperatures. The characteristic transformation temperatures of martensitic transformation of CuAlNi alloys can lie between −200 and 200 °C, and these temperatures depend on Al and Ni content. Among the Cu – based SMAs, the most frequently applied are CuZnAl and CuAlNi alloys. Although CuZnAl alloys with better mechanical properties are the most popular among the Cu-based SMAs, they lack sufficient thermal stability, while CuAlNi shape memory alloys, in spite of their better thermal stability, have found only limited applications due to insufficient formability owing to the brittle γ2 precipitates. The most important disadvantage of polycrystalline CuAlNi alloys is a small reversible deformation (one-way shape memory effect: up to 4 %; two-way shape memory effect: only approximately 1.5 % due to intergranular

  20. Empirical Study of the Multiaxial, Thermomechanical Behavior of NiTiHf Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Dhwanil; Noebe, Ronald D.; Stebner Aaron P.

    2013-01-01

    An empirical study was conducted to characterize the multiaxial, thermomechanical responses of new high temperature NiTiHf alloys. The experimentation included loading thin walled tube Ni(sub 50.3)Ti(sub 29.7)Hf(sub 20) alloy samples along both proportional and nonproportional axial-torsion paths at different temperatures while measuring surface strains using stereo digital image correlation. A Ni(sub 50.3)Ti(sub 33.7)Hf(sub 16) alloy was also studied in tension and compression to document the effect of slightly depleting the Hf content on the constitutive responses of NiTiHf alloys. Samples of both alloys were made from nearly texture free polycrystalline material processed by hot extrusion. Analysis of the data shows that very small changes in composition significantly alter NiTiHf alloy properties, as the austenite finish (Af) temperature of the 16-at Hf alloy was found to be approximately 60 C less than the 20-at Hf alloy (approximately 120 C vs. 180 C). In addition, the 16-at Hf alloy exhibited smaller compressive transformation strains (2 vs. 2.5 percent). Multi-axial characterization of the 20-at % Hf alloy showed that while the random polycrystal transformation strains in tension (4 percent) and compression (2.5 percent) are modest in comparison with binary NiTi (6 percent, 4 percent), the torsion performance is superior (7 vs. 4 shear strain width to the pseudoelastic plateau).

  1. High-temperature steam oxidation testing of select advanced replacement alloys for potential core internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pint, Bruce A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-19

    Coupons from a total of fourteen commercial and custom fabricated alloys were exposed to 1 bar full steam with ~10 ppb oxygen content at 600 and 650°C. The coupons were weighed at 500-h intervals with a total exposure time of 5,000 h. The fourteen alloys are candidate alloys selected under the ARRM program, which include three ferritic steels (Grade 92, 439, and 14YWT), three austenitic stainless steels (316L, 310, and 800), seven Ni-base superalloys (X750, 725, C22, 690, 625, 625 direct-aging, and 625- plus), and one Zr-alloy (Zr–2.5Nb). Among the alloys, 316L and X750 are served as reference alloys for low- and high-strength alloys, respectively. The candidate Ni-base superalloy 718 was procured too late to be included in the tests. The corrosion rates of the candidate alloys can be approximately interpreted by their Cr, Ni and Fe content. The corrosion rate was significantly reduced with increasing Cr content and when Ni content is above ~15 wt%, but not much further reduced when Fe content is less than ~55 wt%. Simplified thermodynamics analyses of the alloy oxidation provided reasonable indications for the constituents of oxide scales formed on the alloys and explanations for the porosity and exfoliation phenomena because of the nature of specific types of oxides.

  2. Influence of the solution temperature on the corrosion behavior of an austenitic stainless steel in phosphoric acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanez-Ferrandiz, M.V.; Blasco-Tamarit, E.; Garcia-Garcia, D.M.; Garcia-Anton, J. [Valencia Univ. Politecnica, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear. ETSI Industriales, Valencia (Spain); Guenbour, A.; Bakour, S.; Benckokroun, A. [University Mohammed V-Agdal, Lab. Corrosion-Electrochimie, Faculty of Sciences, Rabat (Morocco)

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the present work is to study the effect of the solution temperature on the corrosion resistance of a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031) used as base metal, the welded metal obtained by TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding using a Nickel-base alloy (UNS N06059) as filler metal, and the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of the base metal. The materials were tested in 5.5 M phosphoric acid solution at 25 C, 40 C, 60 C and 80 C. Open Circuit Potential tests and potentiodynamic anodic polarization curves have been carried out to obtain information about the electrochemical behavior of the materials. Corrosion potentials and corrosion current densities were obtained from Tafel analysis. The critic potentials and passivation current densities of the studied materials were also analyzed. The galvanic corrosion generated by the electrical contact between the welded metal, the base metal and the HAZ, was estimated from the polarisation diagrams according to the Mixed Potential Theory. The samples were etched to study their microstructure by Optical Microscopy. Results demonstrated that the corrosion potential values shift to more anodic potentials as temperature increases. The corrosion current densities and the passive current densities increased with temperature. Open circuit potential values were located in the passive zone of the potentiodynamic curves, which means that the materials passivated spontaneously. (authors)

  3. Determination of local carbon content in austenite during intercritical annealing of dual phase steels by PEELS analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Junceda, A.; Caballero, F.G.; Capdevila, C.; Garcia de Andres, C.

    2007-01-01

    Parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy has allowed to analyse and quantify local variations in the carbon concentration of austenite islands transformed during the intercritical annealing treatment of commercial dual-phase steels. These changes in the carbon content of different austenite regions are responsible for the different volume fractions of tempered martensite, martensite and retained austenite obtained after intercritical annealing and overaging treatment. This technique reveals how carbon distribution in austenite evolves as the transformation process advances

  4. The influence of austenitization temperature on the anizothermal eutectoid transformation of spheroidal cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Szykowny

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the work one can find the research of anizothermal eutectoid transformation of unalloyed austenitized spheroidal cast iron in thetemperature 875 or 1000oC. By means of the matallographic method one prepered TTT diagrams. On the basis of the quantitativematallographic analysis the influence of austenitization temperature on the mechanism and kinetics of the eutectoid transformation wasinterpreted.

  5. Effect of austenite deformation temperature on Nb clustering and precipitation in microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereloma, E.V.; Kostryzhev, A.G.; AlShahrani, A.; Zhu, C.; Cairney, J.M.; Killmore, C.R.; Ringer, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of thermomechanical processing conditions on Nb clustering and precipitation in both austenite and ferrite in a Nb–Ti microalloyed steel was studied using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. A decrease in the deformation temperature increased the Nb-rich precipitation in austenite and decreased the extent of precipitation in ferrite. Microstructural mechanisms that explain this variation are discussed

  6. Simulation of the Growth of Austenite from As-Quenched Martensite in Medium Mn Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyan, Fei; Yan, Jia-Yi; Höglund, Lars; Ågren, John; Borgenstam, Annika

    2018-04-01

    As part of an ongoing development of third-generation advanced high-strength steels with acceptable cost, austenite reversion treatment of medium Mn steels becomes attractive because it can give rise to a microstructure of fine mixture of ferrite and austenite, leading to both high strength and large elongation. The growth of austenite during intercritical annealing is crucial for the final properties, primarily because it determines the fraction, composition, and phase stability of austenite. In the present work, the growth of austenite from as-quenched lath martensite in medium Mn steels has been simulated using the DICTRA software package. Cementite is added into the simulations based on experimental observations. Two types of systems (cells) are used, representing, respectively, (1) austenite and cementite forming apart from each other, and (2) austenite forming on the cementite/martensite interface. An interfacial dissipation energy has also been added to take into account a finite interface mobility. The simulations using the first type of setup with an addition of interfacial dissipation energy are able to reproduce the observed austenite growth in medium Mn steels reasonably well.

  7. In-vitro long term and electrochemical corrosion resistance of cold deformed nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels in simulated body fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talha, Mohd; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2014-07-01

    This work was focused on the evaluation of the corrosion behavior of deformed (10% and 20% cold work) and annealed (at 1050 °C for 15 min followed by water quenching) Ni-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels (HNSs) in simulated body fluid at 37°C using weight loss method (long term), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to understand the surface morphology of the alloys after polarization test. It has been observed that cold working had a significant influence on the corrosion resistant properties of these alloys. The weight loss and corrosion rates were observed to decrease with increasing degree of cold working and nitrogen content in the alloy. The corrosion resistance of the material is directly related to the resistance of the passive oxide film formed on its surface which was enhanced with cold working and nitrogen content. It was also observed that corrosion current densities were decreased and corrosion potentials were shifted to more positive values. By seeing pit morphology under SEM, shallower and smaller pits were associated with HNSs and cold worked samples, indicating that corrosion resistance increases with increasing nitrogen content and degree of cold deformation. X-ray diffraction profiles of annealed as well as deformed alloys were revealed and there is no evidence for formation of martensite or any other secondary phases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel Precipitation During Isothermal Annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Domankova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The time-temperature-precipitation in high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel was investigated using light optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The isothermal precipitation kinetics curves and the corresponding precipitation activation energy were obtained. The diffusion activation energy of M2N precipitation is 129 kJ/mol. The results show that critical temperature for M2N precipitation is about 825°C with the corresponding incubation period 2.5 min.

  9. Austenite stability in the high strength metastable stainless steels

    OpenAIRE

    S.J. Pawlak

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present paper was to study the peculiarities of the austenite to martensite phase transformation (A-M), which is an essential step in the production technology of the high strength metastable stainless steels.Design/methodology/approach: The desired control over A-M transformation have been achieved by proper design of the steel chemistry, cold working and heat treatment.Findings: For a range of steel compositions, it was shown that severe cold working leads to fully m...

  10. Residual stresses associated with welds in austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidler, R.

    1978-01-01

    Two exploratory welds have been made with AISI 316 austenitic steel and Armex GT electrodes by the manual metal-arc process, and residual stress measurements made in the as-welded condition and after various periods of stress relief. The results show that substantial stress relief occurs at temperatures of 850 0 and 750 0 C after 1 hr, but is not complete. The stress distributions are compared with those obtained from ferritic welds and the effect of differences in thermal expansion coefficients is examined using finite element analysis. (author)

  11. Void swelling behaviour of austenitic stainless steel during electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Zhongqi; Xiao Hong; Peng Feng; Ti Zhongxin

    1994-04-01

    The irradiation swelling behaviour of 00Cr17Ni14Mo2 austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316L) was investigated by means of high voltage electron microscope. Results showed that in solution annealed condition almost no swelling incubation period existed, and the swelling shifted from the transition period to the steady-state one when the displacement damage was around 40 dpa. In cold rolled condition there was evidently incubation period, and when the displacement damage was up to 84 dpa the swelling still remained in the transition period. The average size and density of voids in both conditions were measured, and the factors, which influenced the void swelling, were discussed. (3 figs.)

  12. Mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steels in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, G.J.

    1978-03-01

    A detailed review of the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steels in liquid sodium is presented. Consideration has been given to the influence of the of the impurities in reactor sodium and metallurgical variables upon the stress rupture life, the low cycle fatigue and combined creep/fatigue resistance, elastic-plastic crack propagation rates, the high cycle fatigue life, tensile properties and fracture toughness. The effects of exposure to contaminated sodium prior to testing are also discussed. Examples of the success of mechanistic interpretations of materials behaviour in sodium are given and additionally, the extent to which mechanical properties in sodium may be predicted with the use of appropriate data. (author)

  13. Deformation Behavior of An Austenitic Steel by Neutron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjo, Stefanus; Abe, Jun; Aizawa, Kazuya; Gong, Wu; Iwahashi, Takaaki

    An austenitic stainless steel type 304, which is one of the most popular materials in use, was tensile deformed and in situ neutron diffraction measurement was performed. The neutron diffraction measurement was conducted using an engineering materials diffractometer installed at MLF/J-PARC. Because of the combination of the high neutron intensity, the high counting rate and an event data recording method, in situ neutron diffraction during tensile loading at plastic deformation could be performed without any interruption for load or displacement. Intergranular strains and bulky stress observed during deformation were discussed on the crystal orientation dependence.

  14. Empirical Formulae for The Calculation of Austenite Supercooled Transformation Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trzaska J.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents empirical formulae for the calculation of austenite supercooled transformation temperatures, basing on the chemical composition, austenitising temperature and cooling rate. The multiple regression method was used. Four equations were established allowing to calculate temperature of the start area of ferrite, perlite, bainite and martensite at the given cooling rate. The calculation results obtained do not allow to determine the cooling rate range of ferritic, pearlitic, bainitic and martensite transformations. Classifiers based on logistic regression or neural network were established to solve this problem.

  15. Composition-dependent variation of magnetic properties and interstitial ordering in homogeneous expanded austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brink, Bastian K.; Ståhl, Kenny; Christiansen, Thomas L.; Frandsen, Cathrine; Hansen, Mikkel F.; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structure and magnetic properties of austenitic stainless steel with a colossal interstitial content, so-called expanded austenite, are currently not completely understood. In the present work, the magnetic properties of homogeneous samples of expanded austenite, as prepared by low-temperature nitriding of thin foils, were investigated with magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy. At room temperature, expanded austenite is paramagnetic for relatively low and for relatively high nitrogen contents (y N  = 0.13 and 0.55, respectively, where y N is the interstitial nitrogen occupancy), while ferromagnetism is observed for intermediate nitrogen loads. Spontaneous volume magnetostriction was observed in the ferromagnetic state and the Curie temperature was found to depend strongly on the nitrogen content. For the first time, X-ray diffraction evidence for the occurrence of long-range interstitial order of nitrogen atoms in expanded austenite was observed for high nitrogen contents.

  16. Electrical Resistance Alloys and Low-Expansion Alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Torben

    1996-01-01

    The article gives an overview of electrical resistance alloys and alloys with low thermal expansion. The electrical resistance alloys comprise resistance alloys, heating alloys and thermostat alloys. The low expansion alloys comprise alloys with very low expansion coefficients, alloys with very low...

  17. Impact Strength of Austenitic and Ferritic-Austenitic Cr-Ni Stainless Cast Steel in -40 and +20°C Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalandyk B.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies described in this paper relate to common grades of cast corrosion resistant Cr-Ni steel with different matrix. The test materials were subjected to heat treatment, which consisted in the solution annealing at 1060°C followed by cooling in water. The conducted investigations, besides the microstructural characteristics of selected cast steel grades, included the evaluation of hardness, toughness (at a temperature of -40 and +20oC and type of fracture obtained after breaking the specimens on a Charpy impact testing machine. Based on the results of the measured volume fraction of ferrite, it has been found that the content of this phase in cast austenitic steel is 1.9%, while in the two-phase ferritic-austenitic grades it ranges from 50 to 58%. It has been demonstrated that within the scope of conducted studies, the cast steel of an austenitic structure is characterised by higher impact strength than the two-phase ferritic-austenitic (F-A grade. The changing appearance of the fractures of the specimens reflected the impact strength values obtained in the tested materials. Fractures of the cast austenitic Cr-Ni steel obtained in these studies were of a ductile character, while fractures of the cast ferritic-austenitic grade were mostly of a mixed character with the predominance of brittle phase and well visible cleavage planes.

  18. Gaseous carburising of self-passivating Fe–Cr-Ni alloys in acetylene-hydrogen mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    temperatures, carbon stabilised expanded austenite develops, which has high hardness, while retaining the corrosion performance of the untreated alloy; for relatively high temperatures, Cr based carbides develop, and eventually, the material deteriorates by metal dusting corrosion.......Gaseous carburising of self-passivating Fe–Cr–Ni alloys in acetylene–hydrogen was investigated for temperatures up to 823 K. Acetylene–hydrogen gas mixtures allow both the activation of the surface and the subsequent carburising at a high and adjustable carburising potential. For relatively low...

  19. Smart materials activation analysis on example of nickel and titanium alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieczorek Bartosz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on research concerning activation time of elements made of Ni-Ti alloy (55/45% vol. The activation time is a period of time required for alloy to reach it’s austenitic transformation (Af temperature. For examined wire it reached values up to 60 °C. Heating of NiTi wire was conducted by retaining heat. In this paper the influence of wire length and electric current power on heating time is presented. This research allows to determine the correlation between the increase of temperature and time. For given electric current values. This data is useful for effective design of SMA actuators‥

  20. On the existence of declared 9 R phase in Fe-Ni invar alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabanova, I. G.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Kataeva, N. V.

    2016-07-01

    An analysis of recently reported electron diffraction patterns suggests that metastable austenitic Fe-32Ni alloy subjected to α → γ transformation upon slow heating does not exhibit any signs of formation of the 9 R phase; the conventional nanocrystalline γ phase with an fcc lattice is formed instead. Extended lamellae with a layered structure, erroneously identified as a new phase of the (3 R + 9 R) type in Fe-32Ni alloy, are conventional twinning (midrib) regions of each initial α crystal, in which γ-phase twin nanolamellae are formed upon heating.

  1. Martensitic transformation in Heusler alloys Mn2YIn (Y=Ni, Pd and Pt): Theoretical and experimental investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Hongzhi; Liu, Bohua; Xin, Yuepeng; Jia, Pengzhong; Meng, Fanbin; Liu, Enke; Wang, Wenhong; Wu, Guangheng

    2015-01-01

    The martensitic transformation and electronic structure of Heusler alloys Mn 2 YIn (Y=Ni, Pd, Pt) have been investigated by both first-principles calculation and experimental investigation. Theoretical calculation reveals that, the energy difference ΔE between the tetragonal martensitic phase and cubic austenitic phase increases with Y varying from Ni to Pt in Mn 2 YIn. Thus a structural transition from cubic to tetragonal is most likely to happen in Heusler alloy Mn 2 PtIn. A single Heusler phase can be obtained in both Mn 2 PtIn and Mn 2 PdIn. A martensitic transformation temperature of 615 K has been identified in Mn 2 PtIn. And in Mn 2 PdIn, the austenitic phase is stable and no martensitic transformation is observed till 5 K. This indicates there may exist a positive relation between ΔE and martensitic transformation temperature. Calculated results show that Mn 2 YIn are all ferrimagnets in both austenitic and martensitic phases. The magnetic properties are mainly determined by the antiparallel aligned Mn spin moments. These findings can help to develop new FSMAs with novel properties. - Highlights: • Positive relation between ΔE and martensitic transformation temperature has been observed. • Heusler alloy Mn 2 PdIn has been synthesized successfully and investigated. • Martensitic transformation in Heusler alloys can be predicted by first -principles calculations

  2. Fusion Welding of AerMet 100 Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ENGLEHART, DAVID A.; MICHAEL, JOSEPH R.; NOVOTNY, PAUL M.; ROBINO, CHARLES V.

    1999-08-01

    A database of mechanical properties for weldment fusion and heat-affected zones was established for AerMet{reg_sign}100 alloy, and a study of the welding metallurgy of the alloy was conducted. The properties database was developed for a matrix of weld processes (electron beam and gas-tungsten arc) welding parameters (heat inputs) and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) conditions. In order to insure commercial utility and acceptance, the matrix was commensurate with commercial welding technology and practice. Second, the mechanical properties were correlated with fundamental understanding of microstructure and microstructural evolution in this alloy. Finally, assessments of optimal weld process/PWHT combinations for cotildent application of the alloy in probable service conditions were made. The database of weldment mechanical properties demonstrated that a wide range of properties can be obtained in welds in this alloy. In addition, it was demonstrated that acceptable welds, some with near base metal properties, could be produced from several different initial heat treatments. This capability provides a means for defining process parameters and PWHT's to achieve appropriate properties for different applications, and provides useful flexibility in design and manufacturing. The database also indicated that an important region in welds is the softened region which develops in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and analysis within the welding metallurgy studies indicated that the development of this region is governed by a complex interaction of precipitate overaging and austenite formation. Models and experimental data were therefore developed to describe overaging and austenite formation during thermal cycling. These models and experimental data can be applied to essentially any thermal cycle, and provide a basis for predicting the evolution of microstructure and properties during thermal processing.

  3. Monitoring of Fatigue Degradation in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkhof, D.; Niffenegger, M.; Leber, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    During cyclic loading of austenitic stainless steel, it was observed that microstructural changes occurred; these affect both the mechanical and physical properties of the material. For certain steels, a strain-induced martensite phase transformation was seen. The investigations showed that, for the given material and loading conditions, the volume fraction of martensite depends on the cycle number, temperature and initial material state. It was also found that the martensite content continuously increased with the cycle number. Therefore, the volume fraction of martensite was used as an indication of fatigue usage. It was noted that the temperature dependence of the martensite formation could be described by a Boltzmann function, and that the martensite content decreased with increasing temperature. Two different heats of the austenitic stainless steel X6CrNiTi18-10 (AISI 321, DIN 1.4541) were investigated. It was found that the martensite formation rate was much higher for the cold-worked than for the solution-annealed material. All applied techniques - neutron diffraction and advanced magnetic methods - were successful in detecting the presence of martensite in the differently fatigued specimens. (author)

  4. Fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in different environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Yawas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid and wet steam corrosive media has been investigated. The immersion time in the corrosive media was 30 days to simulate the effect on stainless steel structures/equipment in offshore and food processing applications and thereafter annealing heat treatment was carried out on the samples. The findings from the fatigue tests show that seawater specimens have a lower fatigue stress of 0.5 × 10−5 N/mm2 for the heat treated sample and 0.1 × 10−5 N/mm2 for the unheat-treated sample compared to the corresponding hydrochloric acid and steam samples. The post-welding heat treatment was found to increase the mechanical properties of the austenitic stainless steel especially tensile strength but it reduces the transformation and thermal stresses of the samples. These findings were further corroborated by the microstructural examination of the stainless steel specimen.

  5. EBSD study of a hot deformed austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadeh, H., E-mail: h-m@gmx.com [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Cabrera, J.M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundacio CTM Centre Tecnologic, Av. Bases de Manresa 1, 08242 Manresa (Spain); Najafizadeh, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Calvillo, P.R. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundacio CTM Centre Tecnologic, Av. Bases de Manresa 1, 08242 Manresa (Spain)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructural characterization of an austenitic stainless steel by EBSD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The role of twins in the nucleation and growth of dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Grain refinement through the discontinuous dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of recrystallized fraction using the grain average misorientation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Relationship between recrystallization and the frequency of high angle boundaries. - Abstract: The microstructural evolution of a 304 H austenitic stainless steel subjected to hot compression was studied by the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. Detailed data about the boundaries, coincidence site lattice (CSL) relationships and grain size were acquired from the orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) maps. It was found that twins play an important role in the nucleation and growth of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) during hot deformation. Moreover, the conventional discontinuous DRX (DDRX) was found to be in charge of grain refinement reached under the testing conditions studied. Furthermore, the recrystallized fraction (X) was determined from the grain average misorientation (GAM) distribution based on the threshold value of 1.55 Degree-Sign . The frequency of high angle boundaries showed a direct relationship with X. A time exponent of 1.11 was determined from Avrami analysis, which was related to the observed single-peak behavior in the stress-strain flow curves.

  6. Hydrogen-plasticity interactions in austenitic alloys; Interactions hydrogene-plasticite dans les alliages austenitiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delafosse, D.; Girardin, G. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint-Etienne, Centre SMS, PECM-CNRS, 42 - Saint-Etienne (France)

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this work is to validate and to experimentally characterize the potential and limits of an approach based on an elastic theory of crystal defects. At first, is macroscopically characterized the dynamic interactions of hydrogen-dislocations by aging tests. Then, the hydrogen influence on plasticity mechanisms is estimated while being supported by classical analytical models of the elastic theory of dislocations. At last, is experimentally analyzed the hydrogen influence on the gliding stress of CFC materials with model materials. (O.M.)

  7. Delineation of Prior Austenite Grain Boundaries in a Low Alloy High Performance Steel (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-31

    optical microscope . Both polarized light microscopy 122 and bright field optical microscopy techniques were assessed to determine which technique...attack the PAGBs, although light etching of intragranular 86 microstructural features is not uncommon. To remove the lightly etched intragranular...features 87 (while retaining the more deeply etched PAGBs) in the micrographs, a light repolish/back-polish 88 3 Distribution A. Approved for public

  8. QUANTIFICATION OF AUSTENITE-MARTENSITE IN LOW ALLOY STEEL BY IMAGE ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    JULIO DAMIAN SUNI MAMANI

    2013-01-01

    O objetivo deste trabalho foi desenvolver uma metodologia para quantificação, por microscopia, do microconstituinte Austenita-Martensita (AM) em um aço de alta resistência e baixa liga (ABRL) da classe API5LX80. Foram obtidas imagens de Microscopia Ótica (MO) em campo claro e Eletrônica de Varredura (MEV), nos modos de elétrons secundários (SE) e retroespalhados (BSE). As imagens foram quantificadas por Processamento e Análise Digital de Imagens (PADI) e os resultados dos dois tipos de micros...

  9. Austenite-martensite interfaces in strained foils of CuAlNi alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ostapovets, Andrej; Paidar, Václav; Zárubová, Niva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 3 (2009), 342-344 ISSN 1862-5282 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 149; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200100627 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : martensitic transformation * CuAlNi * habit planes Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.862, year: 2009

  10. Corrosion of austenitic and martensitic stainless steels in flowing 17Li-83Pb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broc, M.; Flament, T.; Fauvet, P.; Sannier, J.

    1988-01-01

    With regard to the behaviour of 316 L stainless steel at 400 0 C in flowing anisothermal 17Li-83Pb the mass transfer suffered by this steel appears to be quite important without noticeable influence of constant or cyclic stress. Evaluation made from solution-annealed specimens leads to a corrosion rate of approximately 30 μm yr -1 at steady state to which a depth of 25 μm has to be added to take into account the initial period phenomena. On the other hand, with semi-stagnant 17Li-83Pb at 400 0 C, the mass transfer of 316 L steel appears to be lower and more acceptable after a 3000-h exposure; but long-time kinetics data have to be achieved in order to see if that better behaviour is persistent and does not correspond to a longer incubation period. As for the martensitic steels their corrosion rate at 450 0 C in the thermal convection loop TULIP is constant up to 3000 h and five times lower than that observed for 316 L steel in the same conditions. (orig.)

  11. On the lattice parameters of phases in binary Ti-Ni shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokoshkin, S.D.; Korotitskiy, A.V.; Brailovski, V.; Turenne, S.; Khmelevskaya, I.Yu.; Trubitsyna, I.B.

    2004-01-01

    An X-ray diffractometry study of Ti-47.0 to 50.7 at.%Ni alloys was performed. In the 50.0-50.7 at.% range of nickel content, a concentration dependence of B19 ' -martensite lattice parameters (MLP) is observed. MLP are found to be identical for 47.0 and 50.0 at.% of nickel content. The temperature dependence of MLP is observed, and this dependence is enhanced in the reverse transformation temperature range for Ti-50.0 at.%Ni alloy. MLP are different for the quenched martensite and for the martensite formed from the austenite containing a well-developed dislocation substructure. It is proven that the presence of an intermediate R-phase during martensitic transformation is not responsible for the changes in MLP, observed in hyper-equiatomic alloys or in alloys having a highly dislocated austenite substructure. In the 50.0 at.%Ni alloy, no changes in MLP are observed after a 25% cold-deformation of the already formed thermal martensite

  12. Thermal Aging Effect on Corrosion Resistance in Fusion Boundary of A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Taeho; Ham, Junhyuk; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Dissimilar metal weldment (DMW) is frequently used for joining low-alloy steel pressure vessel nozzles and steam generator nozzles to nickel-based wrought alloy or austenitic stainless steel components in high energy systems. This feature also significantly hinders C diffusion from the ferrite base metal to the weld metal. Until now, stress corrosion cracking has not occurred in DMWs where a High-Cr weld metal (such as Alloy 152 or Alloy 690), which is Ni-base weld metal including relative high Cr, is used as the weld metal in the weld between the nickel-based alloy and low-alloy steel. To understand the microstructure and corrosion evolution on fusion boundary between low-alloy steel and Ni-base weld metal, microstructural analysis and polarization test were performed with A533 Gr. B/Alloy 152/Alloy 690. Remarkable changes were observed in corrosion resistance and hardness at fusion boundary between low-alloy steel and Ni-base weld metal. The precipitate, which has different potential with peripheral region, can cause galvanic corrosion or pitting corrosion and is the one of hardening methods by disturbing movement of the dislocation. At initial step of heat treatment, the number of precipitates was increased. In fusion boundary between A533 Gr. B and Alloy 152, the corrosion resistance was decreased, and the hardness was increased. Next, at further step, the number of precipitates.

  13. The austempering study of alloyed ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric, Olivera [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)]. E-mail: oliverae@vin.bg.ac.yu; Jovanovic, Milan [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Sid-baranin, Leposava [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia and Montenegro); Rajnovic, Dragan [University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences, Novi Sad (Serbia and Montenegro); Zec, Slavica [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-07-01

    Austempered ductile iron (ADI) proved to be an excellent material as it possesses attractive properties: high strength, ductility and toughness are combined with good wear resistance and machinability. These properties can be achieved upon adequate heat treatment which yields optimum microstructure for a given chemical composition. In this paper an investigation has been conducted on ADI alloyed with 0.45%Cu and austempered in a range of times and temperatures. The microstructure and fracture mode developed throughout these treatments have been identified by means of light and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It was shown that strength, elongation and impact energy strongly depend on amounts of bainitic ferrite and retained austenite. Based on these results an optimal processing window has been established.

  14. Thermo-mechanical processing of austenitic steel to mitigate surface related degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idell, Yaakov Jonathan

    Thermo-mechanical processing plays an important role in materials property optimization through microstructure modification, required by demanding modern materials applications. Due to the critical role of austenitic stainless steels, such as 316L, as structural components in harsh environments, e.g. in nuclear power plants, improved degradation resistance is desirable. A novel two-dimensional plane strain machining process has shown promise achieving significant grain size refinement through severe plastic deformation (SPD) and imparting large strains in the surface and subsurface regions of the substrate in various metals and alloys. The deformation process creates a heavily deformed 20 -- 30 micron thick nanocrystalline surface layer with increased hardness and minimal martensite formation. Post-deformation processing annealing treatments have been applied to assess stability of the refined scale microstructures and the potential for obtaining grain boundary engineered microstructures with increased fraction of low-energy grain boundaries and altered grain boundary network structure. Varying the deformation and heat treatment process parameters, allows for development of a full understanding of the nanocrystalline layer and cross-section of the surface substrate created. Micro-characterization was performed using hardness measurements, magnetometry, x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy to assess property and microstructural changes. This study provides a fundamental understanding of two-dimensional plane strain machining as a thermo-mechanical processing technique, which may in the future deliver capabilities for creating grain boundary engineered surface modified components, typified by a combination of grain refinement with improved grain boundary network interconnectivity attributes suitable for use in harsh environments, such as those in commercial nuclear power plants where improved resistance to irradiation stress corrosion

  15. Modeling of the mechanical behavior of austenitic stainless steels under pure fatigue and fatigue relaxation loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajjaji-Rachdi, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are potential candidates for structural components of sodium-cooled fast neutron reactors. Many of these components will be subjected to cyclic loadings including long hold times (1 month) under creep or relaxation at high temperature. These hold times are unattainable experimentally. The aim of the present study is to propose mechanical models which take into account the involved mechanisms and their interactions during such complex loadings. First, an experimental study of the pure fatigue and fatigue-relaxation behavior of 316L(N) at 500 C has been carried out with very long hold times (10 h and 50 h) compared with the ones studied in literature. Tensile tests at 600 C with different applied strain rates have been undertaken in order to study the dynamic strain ageing phenomenon. Before focusing on more complex loadings, the mean field homogenization approach has been used to predict the mechanical behavior of different FCC metals and alloys under low cycle fatigue at room temperature. Both Hill-Hutchinson and Kroener models have been used. Next, a physically-based model based on dislocation densities has been developed and its parameters measured. The model allows predictions in a qualitative agreement with experimental data for tensile loadings. Finally, this model has been enriched to take into account visco-plasticity, dislocation climb and interaction between dislocations and solute atoms, which are influent during creep-fatigue or fatigue relaxation at high temperature. The proposed model uses three adjustable parameters only and allows rather accurate prediction of the behavior of 316L(N) steel under tensile loading and relaxation. (author) [fr

  16. An investigation into the room temperature mechanical properties of nanocrystalline austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskandari, Mostafa; Zarei-Hanzaki, Abbas; Abedi, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Strength of nanocrystalline specimens follows a trend of a remarkable rise along with a small drop in ductility in comparison to the coarse-grained one. ► Universal correlation of linear type (UTS = mτ max ) between shear punch test data and the tensile strength may be unreliable for the nanocrystalline materials. ► Actual relation between the maximum shear and ultimate tensile strength follows an empirical formula of UTS=0.013τ max 2 -25.62τ max +13049. -- Abstract: The present work has been conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties of nanostructured 316L and 301 austenitic stainless steels. The nanocrystalline structures were produced through martensite treatment which includes cold rolling followed by annealing treatment. The effect of equivalent rolling strain and annealing parameters on the room temperature mechanical behavior of the experimental alloys have been studied using the shear punch testing technique. The standard uniaxial tension tests were also carried out to adapt the related correlation factors. The microstructures and the volume fraction of phases were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and feritscopy methods, respectively. The results indicate that the strength of nanocrystalline specimens remarkably increases, but the ductility in comparison to the coarse-grained one slightly decreases. In addition the strength of nanocrystalline specimens has been increased by decreasing the annealing temperature and increasing the equivalent rolling strain. The analysis of the load–displacement data has also disclosed that the universal correlation of linear type (UTS = mτ max ) between shear punch test data and the tensile strength is somehow unreliable for the nanocrystalline materials. The results suggest that the actual relation between the maximum shear strength and ultimate tensile strength follows a second order equation of type UTS=aτ max 2 -bτ max +c.

  17. Stainless alloys with shape memory effect: relationship between thermal-mechanical treatment, martensite content {epsilon} and hardness; Ligas inoxidaveis com efeito de memoria de forma: relacao entre tratamento termo-mecanico, teor de martensita {epsilon} e dureza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otubo, Jorge; Mei, Paulo Roberto [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica; Koshimizu, Sadamu; Martinez, Luis Gallego [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1996-12-31

    The stainless alloys with shape memory effect (SME) developed in Japan since 1990, and in Brazil by this group since 1994, have presented better recovery than the conventional Fe-Mn-Si alloys. These alloys present outstanding corrosion resistance, which allows a wide range of practical applications. This work analyses the relationship between the thermal-mechanical treatment such as solubilization and thermal cycling for SME enhancing, the martensite content {epsilon} and the hardness, for two stainless alloys, with and without cobalt addition, respectively. The results show that the hardness variations are much more dependents on the austenitic matrix than the martensite content {epsilon} 12 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Effect of cold working on biocompatibility of Ni-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels using Dalton's Lymphoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talha, Mohd [Centre of Advanced Study, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University) Varanasi 221005, Uttar Pradesh (India); Kumar, Sanjay [Centre of Advanced Study, Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, Uttar Pradesh (India); Behera, C.K. [Centre of Advanced Study, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University) Varanasi 221005, Uttar Pradesh (India); Sinha, O.P., E-mail: opsinha.met@itbhu.ac.in [Centre of Advanced Study, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University) Varanasi 221005, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2014-02-01

    The aims of the present work are to explore the effect of cold working on in-vitro biocompatibility of indigenized low cost Ni-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels (HNSs) and to compare it with conventionally used biomedical grade, i.e. AISI 316L and 316LVM, using Dalton's Lymphoma (DL) cell line. The MTT assay [3-(4,5-dimethythiazol 2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] was performed on DL cell line for cytotoxicity evaluation and cell adhesion test. As a result, it was observed that the HNS had higher cell proliferation and cell growth and it increases by increasing nitrogen content and degree of cold working. The surface wettability of the alloys was also investigated by water contact angle measurements. The value of contact angles was found to decrease with increase in nitrogen content and degree of cold working. This indicates that the hydrophilic character increases with increasing nitrogen content and degree of cold working which further attributed to enhance the surface free energy (SFE) which would be conducive to cell adhesion which in turn increases the cell proliferation. - Graphical abstract: Effect of cold working on in-vitro biocompatibility of indigenized Ni-free nitrogen bearing austenitic stainless steels was explored using Dalton's Lymphoma cell line. Cell proliferation and cell adhesion increase by increasing the degree of cold working and nitrogen content in steel indicating that indigenized material is more biocompatible and no negative effect of cold working on these steels. - Highlights: • Effect of cold working on biocompatibility of Ni-free austenitic stainless steels • Cell proliferation and adhesion increase with nitrogen and degree of cold working. • Contact angle values decrease with nitrogen and degree of cold working.

  19. Ultrasound-induced martensitic transition in ferromagnetic Ni2.15Mn0.81Fe0.04Ga shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchelnikov, V.; Dikshtein, I.; Grechishkin, R.; Khudoverdyan, T.; Koledov, V.; Kuzavko, Y.; Nazarkin, I.; Shavrov, V.; Takagi, T.

    2004-01-01

    The experimental observation of direct and reverse martensitic transformation due to ultrasound processing of Ni-Mn-Ga alloy is discussed. It was found that martensite-austenite as well as austenite-martensite structural transitions can be induced by the intense ultrasound at constant temperature. During the experiments low magnetic field susceptibility measurements and optical detection of twin domains arising due to martensitic transformation were performed in situ. The non-thermal nature of the effect is confirmed making use of the pulsed ultrasound technique

  20. Partial transformation of austenite in Al-Mn-Si TRIP steel upon tensile straining: an in situ EBSD study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Trine Nybo; Adachi, Y.; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos

    2013-01-01

    of the stability of austenite grains against strain-induced transformation, with particular focus on the grain size and the location of the austenite grains. The findings confirm that size and location of austenite grains are significant parameters for their stability. Small austenite grains were observed......The transformation of austenite to martensite in an Al–Mn–Si transformation-induced plasticity steel was investigated with in situ electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements under tensile straining. The visualisation of the microstructure upon straining allows for an investigation...... to be more stable than large grains, while austenite grains located beside bainitic ferrite are the most stable. Moreover, it is demonstrated that austenite grains transform gradually...

  1. Impact of Reversed Austenite on the Impact Toughness of the High-Strength Steel of Low Carbon Medium Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guanqiao; Gao, Xiuhua; Zhang, Dazheng; Du, Linxiu; Hu, Jun; Liu, Zhenguang

    2018-01-01

    We elucidate the relationship between the volume fraction of austenite and the Charpy impact toughness in a medium-Mn steel in terms of microstructural evolution with impact temperature. Different from retained austenite in the matrix after direct quenching, sub-micron lath-shaped morphology-reversed austenite in medium-Mn steel was produced by intercritical annealing. We found that reversed austenite steadily affected the fracture mode; only ductile fractures and dimples decreased with decreasing impact temperature. After the impact fracture test, the content of reversed austenite in the matrix increased slightly with a decreasing impact temperature due to the stability of the austenite grains caused by recrystallization of α' martensite. Reversed austenite slightly decreased during the impact process with a decreasing impact temperature.

  2. Microstructural characterization of superaustenitic stainless steel surface alloys formed using laser treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, K.; Deshmukh, M. B.; Khanna, A. S.; Gasser, A.

    2000-09-01

    Conventional stainless steels (SS’s) such as AISI type 304 SS are used in many industrial applications due to their excellent weldability and good mechanical properties. However, in contacts with chlorides, they suffer from localized corrosion. AISI type 304 SS was alloyed at the surface with chromium, nickel, and molybdenum using a CO2 laser carried under varying laser processing parameters. The objective is to create a surface alloy with composition and microstructure, suitable for marine environments. The surface alloys were characterized using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and revealed the presence of the austenitic phase. Analysis by SEM-energy dispersive analysis (EDAX) revealed good compositional homogeneity with molybdenum contents in the range of 3 to 15 wt.%. The dendrite arm spacing (DAS) measured at the surface and bottom of the surface alloy using an image analyzer was found to be in good correlation with calculated cooling rates.

  3. Effect of Prior Austenite Grain Size on the Morphology of Nano-Bainitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kritika; Kumar, Avanish; Singh, Aparna

    2018-04-01

    The strength in nanostructured bainitic steels primarily arises from the fine platelets of bainitic ferrite embedded in carbon-enriched austenite. However, the toughness is dictated by the shape and volume fraction of the retained austenite. Therefore, the exact determination of processing-morphology relationships is necessary to design stronger and tougher bainite. In the current study, the morphology of bainitic ferrite in Fe-0.89C-1.59Si-1.65Mn-0.37Mo-1Co-0.56Al-0.19Cr (wt pct) bainitic steel has been investigated as a function of the prior austenite grain size (AGS). Specimens were austenitized at different temperatures ranging from 900 °C to 1150 °C followed by isothermal transformation at 300 °C. Detailed microstructural characterization has been carried out using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the bainitic laths transformed in coarse austenite grains are finer resulting in higher hardness, whereas smaller austenite grains lead to the formation of thicker bainitic laths with a large fraction of blocky type retained austenite resulting in lower hardness.

  4. Microstructural characterization of a league austenitic type - ferritic used in production of tubes conformed; Caracterizacao microestrutural de uma liga do tipo austeno - ferritica utilizada na producao de tubos conformados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loureiro, Amanda Thais; Batista, Andre Luis de Brito; Cardoso, Claudine Guimaraes Leite; Correa, Douglas; Santos, Claudinei dos; Cabral, Ricardo de Freitas

    2014-12-15

    The duplex stainless steels possess at room temperature ferritic austenitic two-phase structure giving the alloy higher corrosion resistance and oxidation with significant toughness. In this research, we used the metallurgical techniques that guarantee the characterization of the material as received and also the analysis of their behavior when subjected to heating at high temperature (1000 °C) at different times. Analyses were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The results confirm the thickening the thickness of the oxide layer with increasing time of exposure to high temperature. (author)

  5. Morphology Evolution on the Fracture Surface and Fracture Mechanisms of Multiphase Nanostructured ZrCu-Base Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Qiu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A multiphase nanostructured ZrCu-base bulk alloy which showed a unique microstructure consisting of sub-micrometer scale Zr2Cu solid solution, nano-sized twinned plate-like ZrCu martensite (ZrCu (M, and retained ZrCu (B2 austenite was fabricated by copper mold casting. The observation of periodic morphology evolution on the fracture surface of the multiphase nanostructured ZrCu-base alloys has been reported, which suggested a fluctuant local stress intensity along the crack propagation. It is necessary to investigate the compressive deformation behavior and the fracture mechanism of the multiphase alloy and the relation to the unique microstructures. The results obtained in this study provide a better understanding of the deformation and fracture mechanisms of multiphase hybrid nanostructured ZrCu-based alloys and give guidance on how to improve the ductility/toughness of bulk ZrCu-based alloys.

  6. Effect of heat-treatment on phase transition temperatures of a superelastic NiTi alloy for medical use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeung, K.W.K.; Cheung, K.M.C.; Lu, W.W.; Luk, K.D.K. [Univ. of Hong Kong (China). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery; Chung, C.Y. [City Univ. of Hong Kong, Kowloon (China). Dept. of Physics and Materials Science

    2002-07-01

    Surgical correction of scoliosis typically uses stainless steel or titanium alloy spinal instrumentation to straighten the scoliotic spine by 70% only. Our aim is to develop a method to overcome this by using an implantable superelastic (SE) nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloy rod, which will impose a continuous gradual correction force to the spine after the surgery so as to achieve a superior correction. More than 75 specimens made of a Ti-50.0 at% Ni alloy were treated by different heat treatment routes. The Austenitic transition temperature of the NiTi alloy can be adjusted to be available at 37.5 C by altering the heat treatment parameters: time and temperature of heat treatment. The experimental results showed that the heat treatment temperature should set between 400-500 C and the heat treatment time should be less than 60 minutes for the alloy. (orig.)

  7. The Influence of Saturation of Cast Iron Austenite with Carbon on the Ausferrite Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Giętka

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Austenitizing during quench hardening of the ductile cast iron influences the content of carbon in austenite depending on the soaking heat. On the other hand, the saturation of austenite impacts its transformation in the ausferritizing process of a metal matrix and forming of microstructure. Ductile cast iron with the ferrite matrix was hardened with isothermal transformation in the range of ausferritizing in temperature tpi = 400 i 300 0C and the range of time τpi = 7,5 �� 240 min. Specimens were gradually austenitized. They were soaked in the nominal temperature tγ = 950 0C, then precooled to the temperature tγ’ = 850 and 800 0C. Microstructure was investigated, there were also defined the proportion of austenite in the matrix of the cast iron and the content of carbon in it and hardness and impact strength in unnotched specimens. It was stated, that the precooling temperature deciding on the content of carbon in austenite influences kinetics of the ausferritic transformation, the content of carbon in the γ phase and impact strength and, in a less degree, hardness. As a result of gradual austenitizing the cast iron after quench hardening, in some conditions of treatment, reached mechanical properties corresponding, according to the ASTM A 897 standard, with high grades of ADI. Chilling in the range of austenitizing in temperature 850 and 800 0C led to the decrease of carbon in austenite what influenced positively on the matrix microstructure and properties of the ADI. Investigations in this range will be continued.

  8. The effect of austenitizing conditions in the ductile iron hardening process on longitudinal ultrasonic wave velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Orłowicz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of a research on the effect of austenitizing temperature and time adopted in the hardening operation on the ultrasonic wave velocity in ductile iron. It has been found that with increasing austenitizing temperature and with the passage of the austenitizing time, a monotonic decrease of the ultrasonic longitudinal wave velocity value occurred. Implementation of ultrasonic testing of results obtained in the course of the cast iron hardening process both in production and as-cast conditions, requires development of a test methodology that must take into account the influence of base material structure (degree of nodularization, graphite precipitation count on the ultrasound wave velocity.

  9. Composition-dependent variation of magnetic properties and interstitial ordering in homogeneous expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Bastian K.; Ståhl, Kenny; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2016-01-01

    ferromagnetism is observed for intermediate nitrogen loads. Spontaneous volume magnetostriction was observed in the ferromagnetic state and the Curie temperature was found to depend strongly on the nitrogen content. For the first time, X-ray diffraction evidence for the occurrence of long-range interstitial......The crystal structure and magnetic properties of austenitic stainless steel with a colossal interstitial content, so-called expanded austenite, are currently not completely understood. In the present work, the magnetic properties of homogeneous samples of expanded austenite, as prepared...

  10. Kinetics analysis of two-stage austenitization in supermartensitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nießen, Frank; Villa, Matteo; Hald, John

    2017-01-01

    The martensite-to-austenite transformation in X4CrNiMo16-5-1 supermartensitic stainless steel was followed in-situ during isochronal heating at 2, 6 and 18 K min−1 applying energy-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction at the BESSY II facility. Austenitization occurred in two stages, separated...... by a temperature region in which the transformation was strongly decelerated. The region of limited transformation was more concise and occurred at higher austenite phase fractions and temperatures for higher heating rates. The two-step kinetics was reproduced by kinetics modeling in DICTRA. The model indicates...

  11. Enhancement in magnetocaloric properties of NiMnGa alloy through stoichiometric tuned phase transformation and magneto-thermal transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Sushmita; Roy, R. K.; Ghosh, M.; Basu Mallick, A.; Mitra, A.; Panda, A. K.

    2017-10-01

    The investigation is focussed on phase generation and magnetocaloric properties of a series of Ni77-XMnXGa23 (x = 22, 23, 24, 25, 27) alloys prepared through arc melting furnace. With increase in Mn content, the alloys showed systematic transition from a non-modulated martensite (NM) to a fully austenitic parent phase through an appearance and coexistence of modulated (M) structure. Intermediate Mn containing alloy (#Mn24) not only displayed high magnetic entropy change (ΔSM) of -7.7 J/kg-1K-1 but also large Refrigerant Capacity (RC) of 169 J.Kg-1 at magnetic field change of 3 T compared to other alloys. The coexisting martensite (NM, M) and parent austenite as well as overlapping thermomagnetic and structural transformation was deliverable through tuning of alloy chemistry wherein Ni was systematically substituted by Mn. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) supported the proposition with existence of martensite plates of different morphology in Mn24 alloy exhibiting superior magnetocaloric properties.

  12. Effect of Si and Mn additions on ferrite and austenite phase fractions in 25Cr-7Ni-1.5Mo-3W base super duplex stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, S.W.; Lee, Z.-H.; Lee, H.M.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of heat treatment and Si and Mn additions on the ferrite and austenite phase fractions of the super duplex stainless steel (SDSS), Fe-25Cr-7Ni-1.5Mo-3W-Si-Mn-0.25N (numbers are all in wt.% unless specified otherwise), was investigated. The thermodynamic calculations of phase equilibria and phase fractions were performed using the Thermo-Calc program. Based on the calculated results, specific compositions of Si and Mn were selected and alloys with these compositions were analysed by Feritscope, X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy. The calculated phase fractions and experimentally analysed ones were compared and there was a good agreement between calculations and measurements. The optimum heat treatment condition for Fe-25Cr-7Ni-1.5Mo-3W-0.5Si-0.5Mn-0.25N is to hold at 1050 to 1100 C for 2 h in considering the ferrite to austenite ratio of 50:50 and to avoid second phase precipitation such as the σ phase. It was suggested that an excessive addition of more than 0.8Si and 1.0Mn may induce the σ phase precipitation. (orig.)

  13. Temperature Effect on the Corrosion Behaviour of Alloy 31 in polluted H3PO4 and Analysis of the Corrosion Products by Laser Raman Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Escrivá Cerdán, Clara; Blasco-Tamarit, E.; García-García, D.M.; Garcia-Anton, Jose; Ben-Bachir, A.

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical behaviour of Alloy 31, a highly alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031), in a 40 wt.% H3PO4 solution polluted with 2 wt.% H2SO4, 0.06 wt.% KCl and 0.6 wt.% HF was evaluated by cyclic potentiodinamic curves at different temperatures (20, 40, 60 and 80 degrees C). Temperature was found to favour both cathodic and anodic reactions. The corrosion products forming on the surface of Alloy 31 were indentified in situ by Laser Raman microscope. Corrosion products were mainly i...

  14. Effect of temperature on the passive state of Alloy 31 in a LiBr solution: Passivation and Mott-Schottky analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Domene, Ramón Manuel; Blasco-Tamarit, E.; García-García, D.M.; Garcia-Anton, Jose

    2015-01-01

    The passive behaviour of Alloy 31, a highly-alloyed austenitic stainless steel (UNS N08031), has been investigated in a LiBr heavy brine (700 g/l) at different temperatures using potentiostatic polarisation and Mott-Schottky analysis. Cation vacancies have been found to be the dominant defect in the passive films formed on Alloy 31. An increase in temperature enhanced the generation of cation vacancies at the film/solution interface and raised the steady-state passive current density. The den...

  15. Phonon dispersion in the ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni2MnGa studied by neutron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorderwisch, P.; Shapiro, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Neutron spectroscopy is an ideal technique to study the structure and dynamics of crystals. For the ferromagnetic shape memory alloy Ni 2 MnGa, all previously obtained information from inelastic neutron scattering experiments is restricted to the phonon dispersion in the austenitic (fcc) phase of alloys with different compositions. For the (tetragonally distorted) martensitic phase recent inelastic neutron scattering data are presented. These new data were taken on a single crystal with stoichiometric composition. A single-variant martensitic phase of the sample has been obtained by the application of magnetic fields in horizontal or vertical direction with respect to the scattering plane used in the experiments. The measured phonon-dispersion curves are compared with recently published ab initio (zero-temperature) phonon-dispersion calculations. The anomalous phonon behavior observed in both, the austenitic and martensitic phase is discussed

  16. Resistance to abrasive wear and mechanical properties of ferritic-martensitic and ferritic-austenitic structures of the steels C 22, C 45, and X 2 CrNiMoN 22 5 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenheinrich, M.

    1989-01-01

    Two-phase, ferritic-martensitic structures were produced with the help of the unalloyed carbon steels C 22 and C 45, and ferritic-austenitic structures were produced by thermal and/or thermo-mechanical treatment with the help of the high-alloy steel X2CrNiMoN 22 5 3. The phase portion, distribution, form and size were varied. The structures were analyzed quantitatively and described with the help of structure factors such as duplex and dispersion parameters. The mechanical characteristics of structures in tensile, impact and rolling tests were studied. The abrasive wear resistance of the structures against flint was determined in a tribological system in accordance with the abrasive-paper method. The mechanical characteristics were influenced by the structure factors. An optimum of wear resistance was exhibited by ferritic-martensitic structures with an island-shaped coarse and hard martensite stored in a ferritic matrix. The abrasive wear resistance of the ferrite-austenite structure increased as the percentage of austenite increased, although the structure hardness decreased. (orig.) With 62 figs., 28 tabs [de

  17. The effect of alloy elements on the microstructure and properties of austempered ductile irons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, B.Y.; Chen, E.T.; Lei, T.S. [National Taiwan Institute of Technology, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-05-01

    Ductile cast iron has already demonstrated excellent mechanical properties. If given proper austempering, it can exhibit even more outstanding characteristics. The process of austempering for ductile cast iron is similar to steel, and requires an adequate completely, and then rapidly quenching the austenitizing temperature allowing the matrix of ductile iron to be austenitized completely, and then rapidly quenching the austenitized ductile iron down to 300 C--400 C. Caution is required to prevent austenite from transforming into proeutectoid ferrite or pearlite. Finally, the ductile iron must be kept in an isothermal condition for a proper length of time. Many kinds of experimental techniques such as quantitative metallography, magnetic change, dilatometry, X-ray diffraction, electrical resistivity change etc., may be used to measure the phase transformation during the austempering of ductile irons. However, the method of measuring the change of electrical resistivity, not only provides continuous and complete data, but also the time to start and to finish for both stages of the reaction can be significantly determined. In this paper, the effect of alloy elements on the microstructure and property of ADI was investigated. First, the specimens containing Mn, Cu, Ni and Mo were made separately, then a PC-controlled vacuum heat treating system was used for the heat treatments.

  18. Formability of Annealed Ni-Ti Shape Memory Alloy Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fann, K. J.; Su, J. Y.; Chang, C. H.

    2018-03-01

    Ni-Ti shape memory alloy has two specific properties, superelasiticity and shape memory effect, and thus is widely applied in diverse industries. To extend its application, this study attempts to investigate the strength and cold formability of its sheet blank, which is annealed at various temperatures, by hardness test and by Erichsen-like cupping test. As a result, the higher the annealing temperature, the lower the hardness, the lower the maximum punch load as the sheet blank fractured, and the lower the Erichsen-like index or the lower the formability. In general, the Ni-Ti sheet after annealing has an Erichsen-like index between 8 mm and 9 mm. This study has also confirmed via DSC that the Ni-Ti shape memory alloy possesses the austenitic phase and shows the superelasticity at room temperature.

  19. Corrosion of iron-base alloys by lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selle, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A review of corrosion mechanisms operating in lithium-iron-base alloy systems is presented along with data obtained with thermal-convection loops of niobium-stabilized 2 1 / 4 percent Cr-1 percent Mo steel and types 304L and 321 stainless steels. A corrosion rate of 2.3 μm/year (0.09 mil/year) was obtained on the 2 1 / 4 percent Cr-1 percent Mo steel at 600 0 C. Considerably more mass transport of alloying constituents and a maximum corrosion rate of about 14 μm/year (0.55 mil/year) was obtained with the austenitic stainless steels. Results of metallography, x-ray fluorescence analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and weight-change data are presented and discussed

  20. Surface protection of austenitic steels by carbon nanotube coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLucas, T.; Schütz, S.; Suarez, S.; Mücklich, F.

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, surface protection properties of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) deposited on polished austenitic stainless steel are evaluated. Electrophoretic deposition is used as a coating technique. Contact angle measurements reveal hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic wetting characteristics of the carbon nanotube coating depending on the additive used for the deposition. Tribological properties of carbon nanotube coatings on steel substrate are determined with a ball-on-disc tribometer. Effective lubrication can be achieved by adding magnesium nitrate as an additive due to the formation of a holding layer detaining CNTs in the contact area. Furthermore, wear track analysis reveals minimal wear on the coated substrate as well as carbon residues providing lubrication. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy is used to qualitatively analyse the elemental composition of the coating and the underlying substrate. The results explain the observed wetting characteristics of each coating. Finally, merely minimal oxidation is detected on the CNT-coated substrate as opposed to the uncoated sample.

  1. The propagation of ultrasound in an austenitic weld

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Søren; Sørensen, Mads Peter; Kristensen, Anders Wang

    2000-01-01

    The propagation of ultrasound through an austenitic weld is investigated experimentally as well as in a numerical simulation. The weld is insonified at normal incidence to the fusion line with a longitudinal contact transducer. In order to experimentally trace the ultrasound through the weld......, slices of different thicknesses from the original weld have been fabricated. Through-transmission A-scans have then been produced for each weld slice and compared with the corresponding numerical simulation. A comparison of the direction of ultrasound propagation through the weld for the two approaches...... shows quite good agreement. However, attenuation due to scattering at grain boundaries in the weld is poorly modelled in the simulation. In order to improve this, a better model of the weld is needed....

  2. Austenitic Biomaterial Cracks Evaluation by Advanced Nondestructive Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Smetana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE of austenitic stainless steels. Eddy current, ultrasonic testing and non-contact magnetic field mapping methods are used for this purpose. ECA (Eddy Current Array and TOFD (Time of Flight Diffraction are methods that have become widely-used in the field of NDE and this is the reason for their utilization. Magnetic field mapping is nowadays an effective method of evaluation of surface-breaking defects mainly in ferromagnetic materials. The fluxgate sensor-based measurement is presented and discussed. The artificial fatigue and stress-corrosion material’s cracks are inspected. Experimental results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  3. Characteristic of Low Temperature Carburized Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istiroyah; Pamungkas, M. A.; Saroja, G.; Ghufron, M.; Juwono, A. M.

    2018-01-01

    Low temperature carburizing process has been carried out on austenitic stainless steel (ASS) type AISI 316L, that contain chromium in above 12 at%. Therefore, conventional heat treatment processes that are usually carried out at high temperatures are not applicable. The sensitization process due to chromium migration from the grain boundary will lead to stress corrosion crack and decrease the corrosion resistance of the steel. In this study, the carburizing process was carried out at low temperatures below 500 °C. Surface morphology and mechanical properties of carburized specimens were investigated using optical microscopy, non destructive profilometer, and Vicker microhardness. The surface roughness analysis show the carburising process improves the roughness of ASS surface. This improvement is due to the adsorption of carbon atoms on the surface of the specimen. Likewise, the hardness test results indicate the carburising process increases the hardness of ASS.

  4. Residual stresses of water-jet peened austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Shobu, Takahisa; Shiro, Ayumi

    2013-01-01

    The specimen material was austenitic stainless steel, SUS316L. The residual stress was induced by water-jet peening. The residual stress was measured using the 311 diffraction with conventional X-rays. The measured residual stress showed the equi-biaxial stress state. To investigate thermal stability of the residual stress, the specimen was aged thermally at 773K in air to 1000h. The residual stress kept the equi-biaxial stress state against the thermal aging. Lattice plane dependency of the residual stress induced by water-jet peening was evaluated using hard synchrotron X-rays. The residual stress measured by the soft lattice plane showed the equi-biaxial stress state, but the residual stress measured by the hard lattice plane did not. In addition, the distributions of the residual stress in the depth direction were measured using a strain scanning method with hard synchrotron X-rays and neutrons. (author)

  5. Production of Austenitic Steel for the LHC Superconducting Dipole Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Bertinelli, F; Komori, T; Peiro, G; Rossi, L

    2006-01-01

    The austenitic-steel collars are an important component of the LHC dipole magnets, operating at cryogenic temperature under high mechanical stress. The required steel, known as YUS 130S, has been specifically developed for this application by Nippon Steel Corporation (NSC), who was awarded a CERN contract in 1999 for the supply of 11 500 tonnes. In 2005 - after six years of work - the contract is being successfully completed, with final production being ensured since October 2003 by Nippon Steel & Sumikin Stainless Steel Corporation (NSSC). The paper describes the steel properties, its manufacturing and quality control process, organization of production, logistics and contract follow-up. Extensive statistics have been collected relating to mechanical, physical and technological parameters. Specific attention is dedicated to measurements of magnetic permeability performed at cryogenic temperatures by CERN, the equipment used and statistical results. Reference is also made to the resulting precision of the...

  6. Temperature dependent measurement of internal damping of austenitic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oravcová Monika

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is aimed on the analysis of the internal damping changes of austenitic stainless steels AISI 304, AISI 316L and AISI 316Ti depending from temperature. In experimental measurements only resonance method was used which is based on continuous excitation of oscillations of the specimens and the whole apparatus vibrates at the frequency near to the resonance. Microplastic processes and dissipation of energy within the metals are evaluated and investigated by internal damping measurements. Damping capacity of materials is closely tied to the presence of defects including second phase particles and voids. By measuring the energy dissipation in the material, we can determine the elastic characteristics, Youngs modulus, the level of stress relaxation and many other.

  7. Multiaxial elastoplastic cyclic loading of austenitic 316L steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Mazánová

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic stress-strain response and fatigue damage character has been investigated in austenitic stainless steel 316L. Hollow cylindrical specimens have been cyclically deformed in combined tension-compression and torsion under constant strain rate condition and different constant strain and shear strain amplitudes. In-phase and 90° out-of-phase cyclic straining was applied and the stress response has been monitored. Cyclic hardening/softening curves were assessed in both channels. Cyclic softening followed for higher strain amplitudes by long-term cyclic hardening was observed. Cyclic stress-strain curves were determined. Study of the surface damage in fractured specimens revealed the types and directions of principal cracks and the sources of fatigue crack initiation in slip bands.

  8. Magnetic properties of the austenitic stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Tsuchiya, K.; Itoh, K.; Kobayashi, S.

    2002-01-01

    The magnetization was measured for the austenitic stainless steel of SUS304, SUS304L, SUS316, and SUS316L with the temperature from 5K to 300K and the magnetic field from 0T to 10T. The field dependences of the magnetizations changed at about 0.7T and 4T. The dependence was analyzed with ranges of 0-0.5T, 1-3T, and 5-10T. There was not so much difference between those stainless steels for the usage at small fields and 300 K. The SUS316 and SUS316L samples showed large non-linearity at high fields and 5K. Therefore, SUS304 was recommended for usage at high fields and low temperatures to design superconducting magnets with the linear approximation of the field dependence of magnetization

  9. Laser Welding Of Finned Tubes Made Of Austenitic Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stolecki M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the technology of welding of finned tubes made of the X5CrNi1810 (1.4301 austenitic steel, developed at Energoinstal SA, allowing one to get high quality joints that meet the requirements of the classification societies (PN-EN 15614, and at the same time to significantly reduce the manufacturing costs. The authors described an automatic technological line equipped with a Trumph disc laser and a tube production technological process. To assess the quality of the joints, one performed metallographic examinations, hardness measurements and a technological attempt to rupture the fin. Analysis of the results proved that the laser-welded finned tubes were performed correctly and that the welded joints had shown no imperfections.

  10. Weld repair issues in thick section austenitic pipework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, S.J.; Price, A.T.

    1989-03-01

    Thick section austenitic Type 316 Stainless steel, in the solution treated condition, has been used in Central Electricity Generating Board plant in the United Kingdom for some three decades and has given good service. Repair and replacement of this material after long term service is becoming a requirement and is complicated by the precipitation hardening and sensitisation of the materials. This paper summarises the compositional, microstructural and ageing characteristics of the wrought material and weld metals and the consequences for materials properties. Post weld heat treatment options are outlined and sensitisation to stress corrosion cracking is discussed. Finally, some examples of cracking that has occurred in plant after long term operation are given and weld repair research requirements are noted. (author)

  11. Study on ductile fracture evaluation for austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Naoki; Shimakawa, Takashi; Kashima, Koichi; Michiba, Kouji; Hiramatsu, Hideki.

    1994-01-01

    In the development of Fast Breeder Reactors (FBRs), structural integrity must be assured for components subjected to high temperatures up to 550degC, even though possible defects are presumed. Nonlinear fracture mechanics is one of the most effective approaches to evaluate ductile fracture behavior of cracked components. In this study, ductile fracture tests were conducted at room temperature and 550degC for austenitic stainless steel SUS304 and 316FR, which were candidates for FBR structural material. The applicability of fracture parameters was investigated from tests using small CT specimens, small CCT specimens, and wide CCT specimens. Fracture tests under the condition of combined tension and bending loads were also performed to investigate the effect of additional bending stress due to the temperature gradient through thickness. It was ascertained that fracture load could be predicted based on the net section collapse criterion and was not so affected by an additional bending stress. (author)

  12. Injection moulding of low expansion Fe-Ni-Co alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, R.M. do; Justino, J.G.; Fredel, M.C.; Wendhausen, P.A.P.; Klein, A.N.; Almeida Buschinelli, A.J. de [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Univ. Federal de Santa Catarina Florianopolis (Brazil)

    2001-07-01

    Low-expansion alloys (Fe-Ni-Co) are used in specific applications that require accurate dimensional control, such as standards for length measurement, radar resonant cavities, components for nuclear reactors and parts for ceramic-metal joining. This work investigates the production of the Fe-28%Ni-18%Co and Fe-28%Ni-23%Co alloys by powder injection moulding. The mixtures were characterised in the capillar rheometer. The microstructure was characterised with a scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction and the coefficient of thermal expansion determined with a linear dilatometer. The mixtures presented a pseudoplastic rheological behaviour and a viscosity level adequate to the injection moulding. The microstructure of the two alloys was constituted of an austenitic phase and the residual porosity (8.5%). Dilatometric behaviour of two alloys is characterised by two distinct regions, demonstrating the presence of the Invar effect and different transition temperature depending on the cobalt content. Coefficients of thermal expansion for both alloys can be considered adequate for brazing with alumina. (orig.)

  13. austenitic steel corrosion by oxygen-containing liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivollier, Matthieu

    2017-01-01

    France is planning to construct the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. They will use liquid sodium as heat transfer fluid and will be made of 316L(N) austenitic steel as structural materials. To guarantee optimal operation on the long term, the behavior of this steel must be verified. This is why corrosion phenomena of 316L(N) steel by liquid sodium have to be well-understood. Literature points out that several corrosion phenomena are possible. Dissolved oxygen in sodium definitely influences each of the corrosion phenomenon. Therefore, the austenitic steel corrosion in oxygen-containing sodium is proposed in this study. Thermodynamics data point out that sodium chromite formation on 316L(N) steel is possible in sodium containing roughly 10 μg.g -1 of oxygen for temperature lower than 650 C (reactor operating conditions).The experimental study shows that sodium chromite is formed at 650 C in the sodium containing 200 μg.g -1 of oxygen. At the same concentration and at 550 C, sodium chromite is clearly observed only for long immersion time (≥ 5000 h). Results at 450 C are more difficult to interpret. Furthermore, the steel is depleted in chromium in all cases.The results suggest the sodium chromite is dissolved in the sodium at the same time it is formed. Modelling of sodium chromite formation - approached by chromium diffusion in steel (in grain and grain boundaries -, and dissolution - assessed by transport in liquid metal - show that simultaneous formation and dissolution of sodium chromite is a possible mechanism able to explain our results. (author) [fr

  14. A review of hot cracking in austenitic stainless steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, V.; Gill, T.P.S.; Mannan, S.L.; Rodriguez, P.

    1991-01-01

    The occurrence of hot cracking in austenitic stainless steel weldments is discussed with respect to its origin and metallurgical contributory factors. Of the three types of hot cracking, namely solidification cracking, liquation and ductility dip cracking, solidification cracking occurs in the interdendritic regions in weld metal while liquation and ductility dip cracking occur intergranularly in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). Segregation of impurity and minor elements such as sulphur, phosphorous, silicon, niobium, boron etc to form low melting eutectic phases has been found to be the major cause of hot cracking. Control of HAZ cracking requires minimisation of impurity elements in the base metal. In stabilized stainless steels containing niobium, higher amounts of delta-ferrite have been found necessary to prevent cracking than in unstabilized compositions. Titanium compounds have been found to cause liquation cracking in maraging steels and titanium containing stainless steels and superalloys. In nitrogen added stainless steels, cracking resistance decreases when the solidification mode changes to primary austenitic due to nitrogen addition. A review of the test methods to evaluate hot cracking behaviour showed that several external restraint and semi-self-restraint tests are available. The finger Test, WRC Fissure Bend Test, the PVR test and the Varestraint Test are described along with typical test results. Hot ductility testing to reveal HAZ cracking tendency during welding is described, which is of particular importance to stabilized stainless steels. Based on the literature, recommendations are made for welding stabilized and nitrogen added steels, indicating areas of further work. (author). 81 refs., 30 figs., 1 tab

  15. Role of alloying additions on the properties of Cu–Al–Mn shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, Rupa; Jain, Ashish Kumar; Kumar, Pravir; Hussain, Shahadat; Pandey, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    are significantly high than conventionally reported except with the addition of Mg in which case no distinct peaks have been recorded. The range of martensite retention is the maximum in ternary Cu–Al–Mn alloys; addition of quaternary elements decreases this range significantly. Presence of Ni delays austenite formation and completion [As and Af] significantly as compared to the ternary alloys; whereas with other additions the As and Af temperatures are brought forward. This means that whereas the alloys without quaternary additions would be better suited for its shape memory properties, ternary alloys would be better suited for higher transition temperatures. The role of different alloying additions has been highlighted in the findings. Variations in properties have been attained due to different additions and improvements attained in terms of higher transformation temperatures and martensite formation due to the alloying additions

  16. Role of alloying additions on the properties of Cu–Al–Mn shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, Rupa, E-mail: rupadasgupta@ampri.res.in; Jain, Ashish Kumar; Kumar, Pravir; Hussain, Shahadat; Pandey, Abhishek

    2015-01-25

    are significantly high than conventionally reported except with the addition of Mg in which case no distinct peaks have been recorded. The range of martensite retention is the maximum in ternary Cu–Al–Mn alloys; addition of quaternary elements decreases this range significantly. Presence of Ni delays austenite formation and completion [As and Af] significantly as compared to the ternary alloys; whereas with other additions the As and Af temperatures are brought forward. This means that whereas the alloys without quaternary additions would be better suited for its shape memory properties, ternary alloys would be better suited for higher transition temperatures. The role of different alloying additions has been highlighted in the findings. Variations in properties have been attained due to different additions and improvements attained in terms of higher transformation temperatures and martensite formation due to the alloying additions.

  17. On the measurement of the stacking-fault energies of face centered cubic metal and austenitic stainless steels by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, J.F.A.

    1985-01-01

    An X-rays diffraction method was applied to measure the Stacking-Fault Energies (SFE) of the AISI 304, AISI 316, AISI 347 and DIN-WERKSTOFF 1.4970 Austenitic Stainless Steels. The SFE determination plays an important role in the research of the mechanical behaviour of the Metal and Alloys, their deformation mechanisms, stability of microstructure amd electronic configuration. The method is based on the relationship between the SFE and the ratio of the Mean Square Strain to the Stacking-Fault probability. The Mean Square Strain was evaluated by Fourier Analysis of X-rays Diffraction profiles, corrected to reduce instrumental effects, followed by the application of the Warren-Averbach method to the Fourier Coefficients. The Stacking-Fault probabilities were derived from the changes of peak separations between cold-worked and annealed specimens. (author) [pt

  18. Principles of alloy design in high nitrogen 12% chromium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goecmen, A.; Ernst, P.; Holmes, P.

    1999-01-01

    12% chromium steels are hardened by a martensitic transformation and by precipitation reactions of the martensite during a subsequent tempering treatment. The original alloy design of these steels is based on the intensifying effect of C on the martensitic transformation hardening as well as on the effects of V and Mo on intensity and stability of carbide precipitation hardening reactions. Advanced alloy design of high carbon 12% chromium steels makes use of f.c.c.-MX type carbonitrides to improve grain refinement and tempering resistance, whereas alloying with about 0.05 wt.-% nitrogen already plays a decisive role. In this paper, new alloy design opportunities provided by high nitrogen are reviewed, which promise to achieve a best possible compromise between grain size limitation, particle hardening and particle stability of 12% chromium steels. The crucial effects of the solubility product of MX-type phases on grain coarsening resistance, precipitation hardening and particle stability are reviewed. The advantages of high nitrogen steels to improve these properties are rationalized to result from the lower solubility of nitrides compared with carbides. As an advantageous opportunity of the achievable higher grain coarsening resistance, the normalizing temperature in high nitrogen steels can be increased in order to increase the amount of the less soluble and thereby slow coarsening f.c.c.-nitrides. In addition, as a consequence of a higher normalizing temperature, the solubility gap of nitrides in the austenite is expanded, which in turn enables an effective precipitation hardening due to low soluble nitrides in the metastable austenite before the martensitic transformation

  19. Modeling of mechanical properties for ferrous shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Manabu; Ide, Yusuke; Mizote, Shinichiro; Naoi, Hisashi; Tsukimori, Kazuyuki

    2002-08-01

    In order to acquire technical data that are necessary for manufacture and design of the simulation test device for analyzing the core mechanics of Fast Breeder Reactor, ferrous shape memory alloy of Fe-28%Mn-6%Si-5%Cr is melted, forged and heat-treated. The microstructures are austenite. The specimens are deformed of up to 16% work-strain by tensile and compressive test, resulting in appearance of epsilon-martensite that is induced by stress. Then, heating at 673K for 10 minutes causes austenitic transformation from epsilon-martensite and shape memory strains are measured. We also investigate shape memory character of specimens, which are given, so called 'training treatment' of 5% pre-strain and recovery heat treatment. As a result, there is little difference between tensile and compressive test without training treatment and shape memory strain is 2% after being given 5% work-strain and recovery heat treatment. On the other hand, training treatment is remarkable and shape memory strain reaches to 3.7% after 5% work-strain. We analyze shape recovery character of this alloy specimen at three-point bending by using finite element method, and indicate possibility that its deformation behavior can be estimated from mechanical properties' data obtained at tensile and compressive test. (author)

  20. Microstructure and phase identification in type 304 stainless steel-zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham, D.P.; McDeavitt, S.M.; Park, J.

    1996-01-01

    Stainless steel-zirconium alloys have been developed at Argonne National Laboratory to contain radioactive metal isotopes isolated from spent nuclear fuel. This article discusses the various phases that are formed in as-cast alloys of type 304 stainless steel and zirconium that contain up to 92 wt pct Zr. Microstructural characterization was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and crystal structure information was obtained by X-ray diffraction. Type 304SS-Zr alloys with 5 and 10 wt pct Zr have a three-phase microstructure--austenite, ferrite, and the Laves intermetallic, Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni) 2+x , whereas alloys with 15, 20, and 30 wt pct Zr contain only two phases--ferrite and Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni) 2+x . Alloys with 45 to 67 wt pct Zr contain a mixture of Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni) 2+x and Zr 2 (Ni,Fe), whereas alloys with 83 and 92 wt pct Zr contain three phases--α-Zr, Zr 2 (Ni,Fe), and Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni) 2+x . Fe 3 Zr-type and Zr 3 Fe-type phases were not observed in the type 304SS-Zr alloys. The changes in alloy microstructure with zirconium content have been correlated to the Fe-Zr binary phase diagram

  1. A novel sandwich Fe-Mn damping alloy with ferrite shell prepared by vacuum annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Bingnan; Peng, Huabei; Wen, Yuhua

    2018-04-01

    To improve the corrosion resistance of high strength Fe-Mn damping alloys, we fabricated a novel sandwich Fe-17.5Mn damping alloy with Mn-depleted ferrite shell by vacuum annealing at 1100 °C. The formation behavior of the ferrite shell obeys the parabolic law for the vacuum annealed Fe-17.5Mn alloy at 1100 °C. The sandwich Fe-17.5Mn alloy with ferrite shell exhibits not only better corrosion resistance but also higher damping capacity than the conventional annealed Fe-17.5Mn alloy under argon atmosphere. The existence of only ferrite shell on the surface accounts for the better corrosion in the sandwich Fe-17.5Mn alloy. The better damping capacity in the sandwich Fe-17.5Mn alloy is owed to more stacking faults inside both ɛ martensite and γ austenite induced by the stress from ferrite shell. Vacuum annealing is a new way to improve the corrosion resistance and damping capacity of Fe-Mn damping alloys.

  2. Creep-Rupture Behavior of Ni-Based Alloy Tube Bends for A-USC Boilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingledecker, John

    Advanced ultrasupercritical (A-USC) boiler designs will require the use of nickel-based alloys for superheaters and reheaters and thus tube bending will be required. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section II PG-19 limits the amount of cold-strain for boiler tube bends for austenitic materials. In this summary and analysis of research conducted to date, a number of candidate nickel-based A-USC alloys were evaluated. These alloys include alloy 230, alloy 617, and Inconel 740/740H. Uniaxial creep and novel structural tests and corresponding post-test analysis, which included physical measurements, simplified analytical analysis, and detailed microscopy, showed that different damage mechanisms may operate based on test conditions, alloy, and cold-strain levels. Overall, creep strength and ductility were reduced in all the alloys, but the degree of degradation varied substantially. The results support the current cold-strain limits now incorporated in ASME for these alloys for long-term A-USC boiler service.

  3. Effects of austenitization temperature on the microstructure of 15BCr30 and PL22 boron steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Suski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies boron precipitation and segregation at austenitic grain boundaries for low carbon boron steels types: PL22 and 15BCr30. The following parameters were evaluated: percentage of martensite/bainite, size and nucleation sites of austenitic grains and precipitates sizes. Three austenitization temperatures were studied (870, 1050 and 1200 °C. The highest martensite percentage occurred for 1050 °C. Iron-borocarbides were detected at grain boundaries for all tested temperatures. At 870 °C the coarse iron-borocarbides are due to non-solubility and coalescence. The highest martensite percentage at 1050 °C is caused by the discrete precipitation of iron-borocarbides at austenitic grains boundaries. The discrete precipitation was due to the low non-equilibrium segregation of boron at grain boundaries. The low non-equilibrium segregation and the small grain size at 1050 °C reduce the total boron concentration at grain boundaries.

  4. HYDROGEN-ASSISTED FRACTURE IN FORGED TYPE 304L AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Switzner, Nathan; Neidt, Ted; Hollenbeck, John; Knutson, J.; Everhart, Wes; Hanlin, R. [University of Missouri-Kansas City; Bergen, R. [Precision Metal Products; Balch, D. K. [Sandia Natl Laboratory

    2012-09-06

    Austenitic stainless steels generally have good resistance to hydrogen-assisted fracture; however, structural designs for high-pressure gaseous hydrogen are constrained by the low strength of this class of material. Forging is used to increase the low strength of austenitic stainless steels, thus improving the efficiency of structural designs. Hydrogen-assisted racture, however, depends on microstructural details associated with manufacturing. In this study, hydrogen-assisted fracture of forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is investigated. Microstructural variation in multi-step forged 304L was achieved by forging at different rates and temperatures, and by process annealing. High internal hydrogen content in forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is achieved by thermal precharging in gaseous hydrogen and results in as much as 50% reduction of tensile ductility.

  5. Numerical Modelling of Micro-Stresses in Carbonised Austenitic Cast Steel under Rapid Cooling Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuleja J.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of the numerical modelling of micro-stresses in carbonised austenitic cast steel being developed during rapid cooling due to differences in the values of thermal expansion coefficients for this material phases – carbides and austenitic matrix. Micro-stresses are indicated as the main cause of crack initiation in the tooling elements of carburising furnaces being mainly made of austenitic cast steel. A calculation model of carbonised and thermally fatigued austenitic cast steel was developed based on the microstructure images obtained using light microscopy techniques and the phase composition evaluated with the X-ray diffraction method. The values of the stress tensor components and the reduced stress in the complex models of test material structure were determined numerically by the finite element method. The effort analysis was performed and the areas where development of cracks is to be expected were identified, which was experimentally confirmed.

  6. Derivation of tensile flow characteristics for austenitic materials from instrumented indentation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K-W; Kim, K-H; Kim, J-Y; Kwon, D

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a method for deriving the tensile flow characteristics of austenitic materials from an instrumented indentation technique is presented along with its experimental verification. We proposed a modified algorithm for austenitic materials that takes their hardening behaviour into account. First, the true strain based on sine function instead of tangent function was adapted. It was proved that the sine function shows constant degrees of hardening which is a main characteristic of the hardening of austenitic materials. Second, a simple and linear constitutive equation was newly suggested to optimize indentation flow curves. The modified approach was experimentally verified by comparing tensile properties of five austenitic materials from uniaxial tensile test and instrumented indentation tests

  7. The influence of nickel-nitrogen ratio on the deformation behaviour of austenitic stainless steels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schmid, OE

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the effect that a partial substitution of nickel with nitrogen has on the deformation behaviour of a metastable austenitic stainless steel, AISI 301. The effect on the tensile deformation behaviour is studied in detail...

  8. Experimental determination of the constitutive behaviour of a metastable austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, J.; Nolles, H.; Datta, K.; Datta, K.; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents measurements to describe the constitutive behaviour of a semi-austenitic precipitation hardenable stainless steel called Sandvik Nanoflex™, during metal forming and hardening. The material is metastable, which causes strain-induced transformation during forming. Depending on

  9. Tailoring plasticity of austenitic stainless steels for nuclear applications: Review of mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels below 400 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meric de Bellefon, G., E-mail: mericdebelle@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Duysen, J.C. van [EDF R& D (France); University of Tennessee-Knoxville (United States); Unité Matériaux et Transformation (UMET) CNRS, Université de Lille (France)

    2016-07-15

    AISI 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels were invented in the early 1900s and are still trusted by materials and mechanical engineers in numerous sectors because of their good combination of strength, ductility, and corrosion resistance, and thanks to decades of experience and data. This article is part of an effort focusing on tailoring the plasticity of both types of steels to nuclear applications. It provides a synthetic and comprehensive review of the plasticity mechanisms in austenitic steels during tensile tests below 400 °C. In particular, formation of twins, extended stacking faults, and martensite, as well as irradiation effects and grain rotation are discussed in details. - Highlights: • This article is part of an effort to tailor the plasticity of 304L and 316L steels for nuclear applications. • It reviews mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels during tensile tests. • Formation of twins, extended stacking faults, and martensite, grain rotation, and irradiation effects are discussed.

  10. Residual stress distribution in ferritic to austenitic steel joints made by laser welding,

    OpenAIRE

    Iordachescu, Mihaela; Ruiz Hervías, Jesús; Luzin, V.; Scutelnicu, Elena; Valiente Cancho, Andrés; Ocaña Moreno, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    In this study, autogenous laser welding was used to join thin plates of low carbon ferritic and austenitic stainless steel. Due to the differences in the thermo-physical properties of base metals, this kind of weld exhibits a complex microstructure, which frequently leads to an overall loss of joint quality. Four welded samples were prepared by using different sets of processing parameters, with the aim of minimizing the induced residual stress field. The dissimilar austenitic-ferritic joints...

  11. Austenite stability in reversion-treated structures of a 301LN steel under tensile loading

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Järvenpää, A.; Jaskari, M.; Man, Jiří; Karjalainen, L. P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 127, MAY (2017), s. 12-26 ISSN 1044-5803 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-32665S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : austenitic stainless steel * austenite stability * grain size * reversion annealing * tensile straining * deformation induced martensite Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis Impact factor: 2.714, year: 2016

  12. Fundamental study of the austenite formation and decomposition in low-silicon, aluminum added TRIP steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose Enrique

    2005-11-01

    TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steels are under development for automotive applications that require high strength and excellent formability. Conventional TRIP steels consist of a multiphase microstructure comprised of a ferrite matrix with a dispersion of bainite and metastable retained austenite. The high ductility exhibited by these steels results from the transformation of the metastable retained austenite to martensite during straining. In conventional TRIP steel processing, the multiphase microstructure is obtained by controlled cooling from the alpha + gamma region to an isothermal holding temperature. During this holding, bainite forms and carbon is rejected out into the austenite, which lowers the Ms temperature and stabilizes the austenite to room temperature. In this research project, a fundamental study of a low-Si, Mo-Nb added cold rolled TRIP steel with and without Al additions was conducted. In this study, the recrystallization of cold-rolled ferrite, the formation of austenite during intercritical annealing and the characteristics of the decomposition of the intercritically annealed austenite by controlled cooling rates were systematically assessed. Of special interest were: (i) the effect of the initial hot band microstructure, (ii) the formation of epitaxial ferrite during cooling from the intercritical annealing temperature to the isothermal holding temperature, (iii) the influence of the intercritically annealed austenite on the formation of bainite during the isothermal holding temperature, and (iv) the influence of the processing variables on the type, amount, composition and stability of the retained austenite. During this research study, techniques such as OM, SEM, EBSD, TEM, XRD and Magnetometry were used to fully characterize the microstructures. Furthermore, a Gleeble 3500 unit at US Steel Laboratories was used for dilatometry studies and to simulate different CGL processing routes, from which specimens were obtained to evaluate

  13. Friction welding of Al-Cu-SiC composite to AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel

    OpenAIRE

    Özdemir, Niyazi; Balaban, Zülküf

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates thefeasibility of joining an aluminium matrix composite reinforced with 5, 10 and15 vol. % of SiCp particles to AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel by usingfriction welding technique. In the present study, optical and electronmicroscopy as well as lap shear strength test and microhardness measurementswere used to evaluate the quality of bonding of Al-Cu-SiC and AISI 304austenitic stainless steel joints produced by friction welding

  14. Study of Ferrite During Refinement of Prior Austenite Grains in Microalloyed Steel Continuous Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang; Wen, Guanghua; Tang, Ping

    2017-12-01

    The formation of coarse prior austenite grain is a key factor to promote transverse crack, and the susceptibility to the transverse crack can be reduced by refining the austenite grain size. In the present study, the high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) was used to simulate two types of double phase-transformation technologies. The distribution and morphology of ferrites under different cooling conditions were analyzed, and the effects of ferrite distribution and morphology on the double phase-transformation technologies were explored to obtain the suitable double phase-change technology for the continuous casting process. The results indicate that, under the thermal cycle TH0 [the specimens were cooled down to 913 K (640 °C) at a cooling rate of 5.0 K/s (5.0 °C/s)], the width of prior austenite grain boundaries was thick, and the dislocation density at grain boundaries was high. It had strong inhibition effect on crack propagation; under the thermal cycle TH1 [the specimens were cooled down to 1073 K (800 °C) at a cooling rate of 5.0 K/s (5.0 °C/s) and then to 913 K (640 °C) at a cooling rate of 1.0 K/s (1.0 °C/s)], the width of prior austenite grain boundary was thin, and the dislocation density at grain boundaries was low. It was beneficial to crack propagation. After the first phase change, the developed film-like ferrite along the austenite grain boundaries improved the nucleation conditions of new austenitic grains and removed the inhibition effect of the prior austenite grain boundaries on the austenite grain size.

  15. Nitriding Process Characterization of Cold Worked AISI 304 and 316 Austenitic Stainless Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, Waldemar Alfredo; Pereira, Silvio Andre Lima; Vatavuk, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The nitriding behavior of austenitic stainless steels (AISI 304 and 316) was studied by different cold work degree (0% (after heat treated), 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%) before nitride processing. The microstructure, layer thickness, hardness, and chemical microcomposition were evaluated employing optical microscopy, Vickers hardness, and scanning electron microscopy techniques (WDS microanalysis). The initial cold work (previous plastic deformations) in both AISI 304 and 306 austenitic stainless ...

  16. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of laser processed NiTi alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marattukalam, Jithin J; Singh, Amit Kumar; Datta, Susmit; Das, Mitun; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bontha, Srikanth; Kalpathy, Sreeram K

    2015-12-01

    Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™), a commercially available additive manufacturing technology, has been used to fabricate dense equiatomic NiTi alloy components. The primary aim of this work is to study the effect of laser power and scan speed on microstructure, phase constituents, hardness and corrosion behavior of laser processed NiTi alloy. The results showed retention of large amount of high-temperature austenite phase at room temperature due to high cooling rates associated with laser processing. The high amount of austenite in these samples increased the hardness. The grain size and corrosion resistance were found to increase with laser power. The surface energy of NiTi alloy, calculated using contact angles, decreased from 61 mN/m to 56 mN/m with increase in laser energy density from 20 J/mm(2) to 80 J/mm(2). The decrease in surface energy shifted the corrosion potentials to nobler direction and decreased the corrosion current. Under present experimental conditions the laser power found to have strong influence on microstructure, phase constituents and corrosion resistance of NiTi alloy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Electrochemical Corrosion Behavior of Oxidation Layer on Fe30Mn5Al Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Xue-mei

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Fe30Mn5Al alloy was oxidized at 800℃ in air for 160h, the oxidation-induced layer about 15μm thick near the scale-metal interface was induced to transform to ferrite and become enriched in Fe and depletion in Mn. The effect of the oxidation-induced Mn depletion layer on the electrochemical corrosion behavior of Fe30Mn5Al alloy was evaluated. The results show that in 1mol·L-1 Na2SO4 solution, the anodic polarization curve of the Mn depletion layer exhibits self-passivation, compared with Fe30Mn5Al austenitic alloy, and the corrosion potential Evs SCE is increased to -130mV from -750mV and the passive current density ip is decreased to 29μA/cm2 from 310μA/cm2. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy(EIS of the Mn depletion layer has the larger diameter of capacitive arc, the higher impedance modulus|Z|, and the wider phase degree range, and the fitted polarization resistant Rt is increased to 9.9kΩ·cm2 from 2.7kΩ·cm2 by using an equivalent electric circuit of Rs-(Rt//CPE. The high insulation of the Mn depletion layer leads to an improved corrosion resistance of Fe30Mn5Al austenitic alloy.

  18. Theoretical and experimental study of carburisation and decarburisation of a meta-stable austenitic steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles West

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Metastable austenitic stainless steels are known to undergo a partial transformation of austenite to martensite as a consequence of plastic deformation. In the case of cyclic loading, a certain level of plastic strain must be exceeded, and phase formation takes place after an incubation period, during which the necessary amount of plastic deformation is accumulated. The susceptibility of the austenitic phase to deformation-induced martensite formation is strongly affected by the temperature of loading and the stability of austenite, which itself depends on the chemical composition. A key element in this regard is carbon which stabilizes the austenitic phase. It is shown in this study that the carbon concentration can be analysed systematically and reproducible by means of annealing treatments, if the parameters of these treatments are carefully defined on the basis of advanced theoretical thermodynamic and kinetic considerations. First results on the effect of carbon concentration and temperature of fatigue testing on the austenite/martensite transformation are presented, in order to illustrate the significance of these parameters on the martensite formation rate.

  19. Structure and properties of high-temperature austenitic steels for superheater tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinov, V. M.

    2009-12-01

    The structure and properties of high-temperature austenitic steels intended for superheater tubes are analyzed. Widely used Kh18N10T (AISI 304) and Kh16N13M3 (AISI 316) steels are found not to ensure a stable austenitic structure and stable properties during long-term thermal holding under stresses. The hardening of austenitic steels by fine particles of vanadium and niobium carbides and nitrides and γ'-phase and Fe2W and Fe2Mo Laves phase intermetallics is considered. The role of Cr23C6 chromium carbides, the σ phase, and coarse precipitates of an M 3B2 phase and a boron-containing eutectic in decreasing the time to failure and the stress-rupture strength of austenitic steels is established. The mechanism of increasing the stress-rupture strength of steels by boron additions is described. The chemical compositions, mechanical properties, stress-rupture strength, and creep characteristics of Russian and foreign austenitic steels used or designed for superheater tubes intended for operation under stress conditions at temperatures above 600°C are presented. The conditions are found for increasing the strength, plasticity, and thermodeformation stability of austenite in steels intended for superheater tubes operating at 700°C under high stresses for a long time.

  20. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure investigation of annealed carbon expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas L.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon expanded austenite synthesized through carburizing of austenitic stainless steel powder at 380°C was annealed at 470°C and investigated with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and synchrotron powder diffraction (SPD). SPD showed that the samples consisted of carbon expanded...... austenite and Hägg carbide, Ξ-M5C2. EXAFS showed that the Cr atoms were mainly present in environments similar to the carbides Hägg Ξ-M5C2 and M23C6. The environments of the Fe and Ni atoms were concluded to be largely metallic austenite. Light optical micrograph of stainless steel AISI 316 gas......-carburized in a temperature regime around 470°C. The surface zone is converted into carbon expanded austenite; the high interstitial content of carbon dissolved in the surface results in highly favorable materials properties. In the present article the local atomic environment of (annealed) carbon expanded austenite...