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Sample records for austenite

  1. Carbon Concentration of Austenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ławrynowicz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was carried out to examine the influence of temperature and times of austempering process on the maximum extend towhich the bainite reaction can proceed and the carbon content in retained austenite. It should be noted that a small percentage change in theaustenite carbon content can have a significant effect on the subsequent austempering reaction changing the volume fraction of the phasespresent and hence, the resulting mechanical properties. Specimens were prepared from an unalloyed ductile cast iron, austenitised at 950oCfor 60 minutes and austempered by the conventional single-step austempering process at four temperatures between BS and MS, eg., 250,300, 350 and 400oC. The samples were austempered at these temperatures for 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 minutes and finally quenched toambient temperature. Volume fractions of retained austenite and carbon concentration in the residual austenite have been observed byusing X-ray diffraction. Additionally, carbon concentration in the residual austenite was calculated using volume fraction data of austeniteand a model developed by Bhadeshia based on the McLellan and Dunn quasi-chemical thermodynamic model. The comparison ofexperimental data with the T0, T0' and Ae3' phase boundaries suggests the likely mechanism of bainite reaction in cast iron is displacive rather than diffusional. The carbon concentration in retained austenite demonstrates that at the end of bainite reaction the microstructure must consist of not only ausferrite but additionally precipitated carbides.

  2. Austenite formation in C-Mn steel

    OpenAIRE

    Savran, V.I.

    2009-01-01

    The production process of almost all modern steels involves austenitization formation of the austenite phase upon continuous heating. Many of the microstructural features and properties that are obtained upon subsequent cooling are to a large extend determined by the evolution of the microstructure and chemical inhomogeneities during austenitization. In spite of its importance, austenitization so far has received much less attention than the transformations on cooling; however, the interest i...

  3. A study of austenitization of SG iron

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Uma Batra; Pankaj Tandon; Kulbir Kaur

    2000-10-01

    Austenitization process of three SG irons with varying compositions and as cast matrix microstructure has been studied at three austenitization temperatures of 850, 900 and 950C for different time periods. Microstructure, hardness and X-ray diffraction have been used to reveal the nature of dependence of the process on austenitization temperature, time and as cast structure. The optimum austenitization time is maximum for ferritic and minimum for pearlitic matrix.

  4. Expanded austenite; crystallography and residual stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The identity of expanded austenite as developing during low temperature nitriding and/or carburizing of austenitic stainless steel has been under debate since the very first observation of this phase. In the present article recent results obtained with i) homogeneous samples of various uniform...

  5. Bainitic stabilization of austenite in low alloy steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, M.L.; Olson, G.B.

    1992-01-01

    Stabilization of retained austenite via bainitic transformation was studied in a triple-phase, ferrite/bainite/austenite steel 0.26C1.52Si-1.2Mn. Volume fraction and stability of retained austenite are varied by isothermal transformation time at 752F following intercritical annealing at 1418F. Austenite stability is measured using the Bolling-Richman technique. Austenite content is measured by and austenite carbon content is estimated from lattice parameters. Strength and ductility measured in both uniaxial and plane-strain tension are correlated with austenite amount and stability. While austenite content peaks at 3 minutes transformation time, stability continues to increase out to 5 minutes associated with a saturation of austenite carbon content and continued refinement of austenite particle size. Despite the reduced austenite content of 8 percent, the higher stability provided by the 5 minutes treatment gives superior mechanical properties.

  6. Bainitic stabilization of austenite in low alloy steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, M.L.; Olson, G.B.

    1992-12-31

    Stabilization of retained austenite via bainitic transformation was studied in a triple-phase, ferrite/bainite/austenite steel 0.26C1.52Si-1.2Mn. Volume fraction and stability of retained austenite are varied by isothermal transformation time at 752F following intercritical annealing at 1418F. Austenite stability is measured using the Bolling-Richman technique. Austenite content is measured by and austenite carbon content is estimated from lattice parameters. Strength and ductility measured in both uniaxial and plane-strain tension are correlated with austenite amount and stability. While austenite content peaks at 3 minutes transformation time, stability continues to increase out to 5 minutes associated with a saturation of austenite carbon content and continued refinement of austenite particle size. Despite the reduced austenite content of 8 percent, the higher stability provided by the 5 minutes treatment gives superior mechanical properties.

  7. Austenite formation during intercritical annealing

    OpenAIRE

    A. Lis; J. Lis

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper is the effect of the soft annealing of initial microstructure of the 6Mn16 steel on the kinetics of the austenite formation during next intercritical annealing.Design/methodology/approach: Analytical TEM point analysis with EDAX system attached to Philips CM20 was used to evaluate the concentration of Mn, Ni and Cr in the microstructure constituents of the multiphase steel and mainly Bainite- Martensite islands.Findings: The increase in soft annealing time from 1-60 hou...

  8. Influence of retained austenite on the grain size of austenite after reaustenitization of steels for heavy forgings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, H.J.; Tacke, G.; Hougardy, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    In this investigation the grain size of austenite reaustenitization of different microstructures containing different volume fractions of retained austenite was determined. The austenite grain size after austenitization of martensite and lower bainite was coarse for heating rates lower than a minimum value, which is dependent on the chemical composition. In this case, the austenite forms by rapid growth of retained austenite in the initial microstructure. At heating rates higher than the critical value, formation of austenite starts at the ferrite-carbide phase boundaries giving a fine austenite grain. The formation of austenite from microstructures free of retained austenite, such as pearlite, always occurred by nucleation on the ferrite-carbide interphase resulting in fine austenite grains. (orig.).

  9. High Mn austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy includes, in weight percent: >4 to 15 Mn; 8 to 15 Ni; 14 to 16 Cr; 2.4 to 3 Al; 0.4 to 1 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; 0.05 to 0.2 C; 0.01 to 0.02 B; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1W; up to 3 Cu; up to 1 Si; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni, and wherein the alloy forms an external continuous scale including alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, the particles including at least one of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase FCC austenitic matrix microstructure that is essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  10. Mathematical Model of the Processoof Pearlite Austenitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olejarczyk-Wożeńska I.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a mathematical model of the pearlite - austenite transformation. The description of this process uses the diffusion mechanism which takes place between the plates of ferrite and cementite (pearlite as well as austenite. The process of austenite growth was described by means of a system of differential equations solved with the use of the finite difference method. The developed model was implemented in the environment of Delphi 4. The proprietary program allows for the calculation of the rate and time of the transformation at an assumed temperature as well as to determine the TTT diagram for the assigned temperature range.

  11. Study on austenitic nitrocarburizing without compound layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X. [Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying, Shandong (China); Kong, C.; Qiao, Y. [Shandong Polytechnic Univ., Jinan, Shandong (China)

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an advanced austenitic nitrocarburizing process. Medium-carbon steel was used in austenitic nitrocarburizing with methanol/ammonia atmospheres. A particular hardened case without compound layer was obtained at 680 C processing temperature and a moderate nitrogen potential level and for steel 45 nitrocarburized, there is a fine-grain region beneath the austenite case. The forming and developing mechanism of the fine-grain region was analyzed and the microhardness profiles of the layer before and after ageing were determined. Having the advantages of shorter processing time and a superior hardened case, this treatment is expected to supersede the conventional ferritic nitrocarburizing process in many wear resistance applications.

  12. The sub-zero Celsius treatment of precipitation hardenable semi-austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    A precipitation hardenable semi-austenitic stainless steel AISI 632 grade was austenitized according to industrial specifications and thereafter subjected to isothermal treatment at sub-zero Celsius temperatures. During treatment, austenite transformed to martensite. The isothermal austenite...

  13. Influence of Martensite Fraction on the Stabilization of Austenite in Austenitic-Martensitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiuliang; De Cooman, Bruno C.; Biermann, Horst; Mola, Javad

    2016-05-01

    The influence of martensite fraction ( f α') on the stabilization of austenite was studied by quench interruption below M s temperature of an Fe-13Cr-0.31C (mass pct) stainless steel. The interval between the quench interruption temperature and the secondary martensite start temperature, denoted as θ, was used to quantify the extent of austenite stabilization. In experiments with and without a reheating step subsequent to quench interruption, the variation of θ with f α' showed a transition after transformation of almost half of the austenite. This trend was observed regardless of the solution annealing temperature which influenced the martensite start temperature. The transition in θ was ascribed to a change in the type of martensite nucleation sites from austenite grain and twin boundaries at low f α' to the faults near austenite-martensite (A-M) boundaries at high f α'. At low temperatures, the local carbon enrichment of such boundaries was responsible for the enhanced stabilization at high f α'. At high temperatures, relevant to the quenching and partitioning processing, on the other hand, the pronounced stabilization at high f α' was attributed to the uniform partitioning of the carbon stored at A-M boundaries into the austenite. Reduction in the fault density of austenite served as an auxiliary stabilization mechanism at high temperatures.

  14. Transformation in Austenitic Stainless Steel Sheet under Different Loading Directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogaard, van den A.H.; Krauer, J.; Hora, P.

    2011-01-01

    The stress-strain relation for austenitic stainless steels is based on 2 main contributions: work hardening and a phase transformation from austenite to martensite. The transformation is highly temperature dependent. In most models for phase transformation from austenite to martensite, the stress tr

  15. Modeling of austenite to ferrite transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohsen Kazeminezhad

    2012-06-01

    In this research, an algorithm based on the -state Potts model is presented for modeling the austenite to ferrite transformation. In the algorithm, it is possible to exactly track boundary migration of the phase formed during transformation. In the algorithm, effects of changes in chemical free energy, strain free energy and interfacial energies of austenite–austenite, ferrite–ferrite and austenite–ferrite during transformation are considered. From the algorithm, the kinetics of transformation and mean ferrite grain size for different cooling rates are calculated. It is found that there is a good agreement between the calculated and experimental results.

  16. Expanded austenite, crystallography and residual stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    compositions and (b) unravelling of the contributions of stress-depth and composition-depth profiles in expanded austenite layers are summarised and discussed. It is shown through simulation of line profiles that the combined effects of composition gradients, stress gradients and stacking fault gradients can...

  17. A characteristic of austenitic ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tabor

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the results of investigations of the mechanical properties conducted on austenitic ductile iron with an addi-tion of 23-24% Ni. The examined mechanical properties included: tensile strength (Rm, proof stress (Rp0,2, elongation (A5 and reduction of area (Z at reduced and low temperatures.

  18. Expanded austenite in nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steel grades; Analise da austenita expandida em camadas nitretadas em acos inoxidaveis austeniticos e superaustenitico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casteletti, L.C.; Fernandes, F.A.P.; Heck, S.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia de Materais, Aeronautica e Automobilistica; Oliveira, A.M. [Instituto de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Maranhao (IFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil); Gallego, J., E-mail: gallego@dem.feis.unesp.b [UNESP, Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil). Dept. Engenharia Mecanica

    2010-07-01

    In this work nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steels were analyzed through optical microscopy and X-rays diffraction analysis (XRD). It was observed that the formation of N supersaturated phase, called expanded austenite, has promoted significant increment of hardness (> 1000HV). XRD results have indicated the anomalous displacement of the diffracted peaks, in comparison with the normal austenite. This behavior, combined with peaks broadening, it was analyzed in different nitriding temperatures which results showed good agreement with the literature. (author)

  19. Thermal substructure of hot deformed austenite substructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernshtejn, M.L.; Kaputkina, L.M.; Nikishov, N.A. (Moskovskij Inst. Stali i Splavov (USSR))

    1982-01-01

    Effect of hot working different regimes on formation of austenite structure and substructure of the 60N20 and 60Kh5G6 steels and kinetics of softening processes at postdeformation isothermal (at deformation temperature) heating, is investigated. It is shown, that variation of hot working regimes permits to obtain a wide range of structural and substructural austenite conditions. Rate decrease and temperature increase promotes obtaining after hot working and conservation under cooling conditions of developed polygonized substructure. Similar polygonized isotropic substructure with a rather low density of dislocations inside of subgrains promotes decelerating of initial stages of recrystallization development under conditions of hot working and regulated post-deformation heatings. Alloying by carbide-forming elements (chromium and manganese) delays development of recrystallization (in comparison with alloying with nickel), even if the steel is in the condition of single-phase solid solution.

  20. Ferritic-austenitic cast steel - selected problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Stradomski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The author has been involved in the problems occurring in the manufacture of ferritic-austenitic cast steel castings for many years. The author’s remarks and investigation results reported in this article will enable potential manufacturers to determine their own technical capabilities and structural determinants related to the chemical composition of material, which are crucial to the good quality of a casting. Particular emphasis should be laid on the role of enhanced carbon content, the presence of copper, the precipitates of the ζ phase, and the nature of solidification structure in the tendency of duplex-type cast steel to cracking. It seems that in view of the pro-ecological activities undertaken, including flue gas desulphurization in coal-fired power plants, efforts should be made in steel foundries to introduce selected grades of ferritic-austenitic cast steel to production.

  1. Austenitic Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels : A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavanya Raman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Materials play an important role in the fast breeder reactors.  Materials used in cladding tube and fuel pins should have better creep and void swelling resistance. To overcome these difficulties, a new class of material known as oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS steels are used. There are two groups of ODS steels, the ferritic and the austenitic ODS steels based on the matrix. The present paper reviews the current status of research in austenitic ODS steels. The interaction of dislocations with finely dispersed incoherent, hard particles that governs the strength and high temperature properties of ODS materials is briefly reviewed. The synthesis route adopted for these ODS steels, which is mostly through powder metallurgy route is also discussed. The role of various oxides such as Y2O3, ZrO2and TiO2and the clusters formed in these ODS steels on the mechanical properties and void swelling characteristics is also discussed.

  2. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  3. Embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-12-31

    The microstructure of type-308 austenitic stainless steel weld metal containing {gamma} and {delta} and ferrite is shown. Typical composition of the weld metal is Cr-20.2, Ni-9.4, Mn-1.7, Si-0.5, C-0.05, N-0.06 and balance Fe (in wt %). Exposure of austenitic stainless steel welds to elevated temperatures can lead to extensive changes in the microstructural features of the weld metal. On exposure to elevated temperatures over a long period of time, a continuous network of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide forms at the austenite/ferrite interface. Upon aging at temperatures between 550--850 C, ferrite in the weld has been found to be unstable and transforms to sigma phase. These changes have been found to influence mechanical behavior of the weld metal, in particular the creep-rupture properties. For aging temperatures below 550 C the ferrite decomposes spinodally into {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} phases. In addition, precipitation of G-phase occurs within the decomposed ferrite. These transformations at temperatures below 550 C lead to embrittlement of the weld metal as revealed by the Charpy impact properties.

  4. Crystallography of lath martensite and stabilization of retained austenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarikaya. M.

    1982-10-01

    TEM was used to study the morphology and crystallography of lath martensite in low and medium carbon steels in the as-quenched and 200/sup 0/C tempered conditions. The steels have microduplex structures of dislocated lath martensite and continuous thin films of retained austenite at the lath interfaces. Stacks of laths form the packets which are derived from different (111) variants of the same austenite grain. The residual parent austenite enables microdiffraction experiments with small electron beam spot sizes for the orientation relationships (OR) between austenite and martensite. All three most commonly observed ORs, namely Kurdjumov-Sachs, Nishiyama-Wassermann, and Greninger-Troiano, operate within the same sample.

  5. Analysis of effort of carbides and austenite in austenitic cast steel cooled violently

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tuleja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the analysis the effort of phases which are present in the austenitic cast steel Fe-Ni-Cr-C, applied for elements of technological instrumentation for carburising furnaces. The reduced stresses σred in the carbides and the austenitic matrix were determined in accordance with the assumed hypotheses of effort, on the basis of the structural stresses σx, σy, σz and σ1, σ2, σ3 calculated by the finite element method for two model location cases of the carbides towards the cast steel surface. The hypotheses referred to the crack condition were applied to evaluate the elastic carbide efforts, while for the elastic-plastic austenitic matrix - the hypotheses referred to the plasticity condition were used. There were compared the reduced stresses σred determined in accordance with various hypotheses and the correctness of their applying. It was demonstrated on the basis of the executed analysis of the effort that the carbides are destroyed only when they are not entirely surrounded by the austenitic matrix.

  6. Microstructural evolution in deformed austenitic TWinning Induced Plasticity steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Tol, R.T.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis studies the effect of plastic deformation on the stability of the austenitic microstructure against martensitic transformation and diffusional decomposition and its role in the phenomenon of delayed fracture in austenitic manganese (Mn)-based TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steels. Th

  7. Lattice expansion of carbon-stabilized expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice parameter of expanded austenite was determined as a function of the content of interstitially dissolved carbon in homogeneous, carburized thin stainless steel foils. For the first time this expansion of the face-centered cubic lattice is determined on unstrained austenite. It is found...

  8. X-ray fractography studies on austenitic stainless steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajanna, K.; Pathiraj, B.; Kolster, B.H.

    1996-01-01

    In this investigation, the fracture surfaces of SS 304 and SS 316 austenitic steels were analysed using the X-ray fractography technique. In both cases, a decrease in the austenite content was observed at the fracture surface as a result of deformation induced martensite, indicating a linear relatio

  9. Reverted austenite in PH 13-8 Mo maraging steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnitzer, Ronald, E-mail: ronald.schnitzer@unileoben.ac.at [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Radis, Rene [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, Vienna University of Technology, Favoritenstrasse 9-11, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Institute for Materials Science and Welding, Graz University of Technology, Kopernikusgasse 24, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Noehrer, Matthias [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Schober, Michael [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Hochfellner, Rainer [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Zinner, Silvia [Boehler Edelstahl GmbH and Co KG, Mariazeller Strasse 25, A-8605 Kapfenberg (Austria); Povoden-Karadeniz, E.; Kozeschnik, Ernst [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, Vienna University of Technology, Favoritenstrasse 9-11, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Leitner, Harald [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, University of Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2010-07-01

    The mechanical properties of maraging steels are strongly influenced by the presence of reverted austenite. In this study, the morphology and chemical composition of reverted austenite in a corrosion resistant maraging steel was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). Two types of austenite, i.e. granular and elongated, are present after aging at 575 {sup o}C, whereby the content of the latter increases during aging. The investigations revealed that the austenite phase is enriched in Ni, which prevents the transformation to martensite during cooling. Inside and next to the austenitc areas, Mo and Cr-rich carbides, which form during the aging treatment, were found. Various aging treatments were performed to obtain the activation energy for the formation of reverted austenite. Additionally, the experimental data are compared with thermodynamic and kinetic simulations. Based on these results and the chemical composition changes of the phases, a model for the formation of reverted austenite is presented. It is concluded that precipitation of B2-ordered NiAl and formation of reverted austenite take place simultaneously during aging and that dissolution of precipitates is not essential for the initial formation of reverted austenite.

  10. Wear behavior of austenite containing plate steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Christina E.

    As a follow up to Wolfram's Master of Science thesis, samples from the prior work were further investigated. Samples from four steel alloys were selected for investigation, namely AR400F, 9260, Hadfield, and 301 Stainless steels. AR400F is martensitic while the Hadfield and 301 stainless steels are austenitic. The 9260 exhibited a variety of hardness levels and retained austenite contents, achieved by heat treatments, including quench and tempering (Q&T) and quench and partitioning (Q&P). Samples worn by three wear tests, namely Dry Sand/Rubber Wheel (DSRW), impeller tumbler impact abrasion, and Bond abrasion, were examined by optical profilometry. The wear behaviors observed in topography maps were compared to the same in scanning electron microscopy micrographs and both were used to characterize the wear surfaces. Optical profilometry showed that the scratching abrasion present on the wear surface transitioned to gouging abrasion as impact conditions increased (i.e. from DSRW to impeller to Bond abrasion). Optical profilometry roughness measurements were also compared to sample hardness as well as normalized volume loss (NVL) results for each of the three wear tests. The steels displayed a relationship between roughness measurements and observed wear rates for all three categories of wear testing. Nanoindentation was used to investigate local hardness changes adjacent to the wear surface. DSRW samples generally did not exhibit significant work hardening. The austenitic materials exhibited significant hardening under the high impact conditions of the Bond abrasion wear test. Hardening in the Q&P materials was less pronounced. The Q&T microstructures also demonstrated some hardening. Scratch testing was performed on samples at three different loads, as a more systematic approach to determining the scratching abrasion behavior. Wear rates and scratch hardness were calculated from scratch testing results. Certain similarities between wear behavior in scratch testing

  11. Texture Dependent Young's Modulus in Austenitic Cladding

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    In Austenitic claddings of pressure vessel steel columnar grains with a 〈100〉-fiber axis oriented perpendicular to the surface have been previously observed. The fiber axis is parallel to the steepest temperature gradient. Since high temperature gradients also exist in the plane of cladding, preferred orientation should be found there.This was proved with {111}- and {220}-pole figures taken of the cladding in addition to {200}-pole figures. From these pole figures it could be concluded that t...

  12. Tribocorrosion wear of austenitic and martensitic steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rozing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of tribocorrosion wear caused by an aggressive acidic media. Tests were conducted on samples made of stainless steel AISI 316L, 304L and 440C. Austenitic steels were tested in their nitrided state and martensitic in quenched and tempered and then induction hardened state. Electrochemical corrosion resistance testing and analysis of the microstructure and hardness in the cross section was carried out on samples of selected steels. To test the possibility of applying surface modification of selected materials in conditions of use, tests were conducted on samples/parts in a worm press for final pressing.

  13. Austenite Recrystallization and Controlled Rolling of Low Carbon Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Lin-xiu; ZHANG Zhong-ping; SHE Guang-fu; LIU Xiang-hua; WANG Guo-dong

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic recrystallization and static recrystallization in a low carbon steel were investigated through single-pass and double-pass experiments. The results indicate that as the deformation temperature increases and the strain rate decreases, the shape of the stress-strain curve is changed from dynamic recovery shape to dynamic recrystallization shape. The austenite could not recrystallize within a few seconds after deformation at temperature below 900 ℃. According to the change in microstructure during deformation, the controlled rolling of low carbon steel can be divided into four stages: dynamic recrystallization, dynamic recovery, strain-induced ferrite transformation, and rolling in two-phase region. According to the microstructure after deformation, the controlled rolling of low carbon steel can be divided into five regions: non-recrystallized austenite, partly-recrystallized austenite, fully-recrystallized austenite, austenite to ferrite transformation, and dual phase.

  14. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eghlimi, Abbas, E-mail: a.eghlimi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, Morteza [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eskandarian, Masoomeh [Department of Materials Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zabolian, Azam [Department of Natural Resources, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Szpunar, Jerzy A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld

  15. Austenite Formation from Martensite in a 13Cr6Ni2Mo Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bojack, A.; Zhao, L.; Morris, P.F.; Sietsma, J.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of austenitization treatment of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel (X2CrNiMoV13-5-2) on austenite formation during reheating and on the fraction of austenite retained after tempering treatment is measured and analyzed. The results show the formation of austenite in two stage

  16. Modeling of Austenite Grain Growth During Austenitization in a Low Alloy Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dingqian; Chen, Fei; Cui, Zhenshan

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to develop a pragmatic model to predict austenite grain growth in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel steel. Austenite grain growth kinetics has been investigated under different heating conditions, involving heating temperature, holding time, as well as heating rate. Based on the experimental results, the mathematical model was established by regression analysis. The model predictions present a good agreement with the experimental data. Meanwhile, grain boundary precipitates and pinning effects on grain growth were studied by transmission electron microscopy. It is found that with the increasing of the temperature, the second-phase particles tend to be dissolved and the pinning effects become smaller, which results in a rapid growth of certain large grains with favorable orientation. The results from this study provide the basis for the establishment of large-sized ingot heating specification for SA508-III steel.

  17. Stable atomic structure of NiTi austenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A [Ames Laboratory; Johnson, Duane D [Ames Laboratory

    2014-08-01

    Nitinol (NiTi), the most widely used shape-memory alloy, exhibits an austenite phase that has yet to be identified. The usually assumed austenitic structure is cubic B2, which has imaginary phonon modes, hence it is unstable. We suggest a stable austenitic structure that “on average” has B2 symmetry (observed by x-ray and neutron diffraction), but it exhibits finite atomic displacements from the ideal B2 sites. The proposed structure has a phonon spectrum that agrees with that from neutron scattering, has diffraction spectra in agreement with x-ray diffraction, and has an energy relative to the ground state that agrees with calorimetry data.

  18. Formation of austenite in peritectic Fe-C-X alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalinushkin, E.P.; Sitalo, J. [State Metall. Acad. of Ukraine, Dnepropetrovsk (Ukraine); Fras, E.; Kapturkiewicz, W.; Burbelko, A.A. [Akademia Gorniczo-Hutnicza, Cracow (Poland)

    2000-07-01

    The mechanism for the formation of peritectic austenite in ferrous alloys was examined. The basic role, played by the mechanisms, is well known in technical literature; like diffusion transport through the solid phase which forms an envelope of austenite (peritectic transformation) and a mechanism of transport through channels of liquid in the envelope of austenite (peritectic reaction). Our calculations show that the peritectic transformation prevails at the initial stage of the grain growth, but afterwards the leading role is taken over by the transport through the channels of liquid. Images of the microstructure support the calculations and transport mechanism. (orig.)

  19. Carbon content of austenite in austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, L.C. [Kuang Wu Inst. of Tech. and Commerce, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1998-06-05

    The development of austempered ductile iron (ADI) is a major achievement in cast iron technology. The austempering heat treatment enables the ductile cast iron containing mainly strong bainitic ferrite and ductile carbon-enriched austenite, with some martensite transforms from austenite during cooling down to room temperature. A key factor controlling the stability of the retained austenite can be evaluated soundly using the thermodynamics principles. It is the purpose here to demonstrate that the data of ADI from numerous sources have a similar trend.

  20. Texture and microstructure of the austenite in multiphased steel sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regle, H. [ARCELOR Group, CMC-IRSID, Maizieres-les-Metz (France); Maruyama, N.; Yoshinaga, N. [Nippon Steel Corp. - Technical Development Bureau, Futtsu (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    In this paper we present results obtained in collaboration between NSC and Arcelor on the austenite of a multiphased steel and on a 70%Ni-30Fe alloy. The work concerns the formation of the crystallographic textures during the recrystallisation of austenite, since these textures have a strong influence, after the phase transformation, on the forming properties of the sheets. The microstructure and the textures of the austenite and the FeNi alloy were measured with X-Ray diffraction techniques and with EBSD on a high resolution FEG-SEM. (orig.)

  1. Modeling of Incubation Time for Austenite to Ferrite Phase Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiao-guang; LIU Zhen-yu; WU Di; WANG Wei; JIAO Si-hai

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of the classical nucleation theory, a new model of incubation time for austenite to ferrite transformation has been developed, in which the effect of deformation on austenite has been taken into consideration. To prove the precision of modeling, ferrite transformation starting temperature (Ar3) has been calculated using the Scheil′s additivity rule, and the Ar3 values were measured using a Gleeble 1500 thermomechanical simulator. The Ar3 values provided by the modeling method coincide with the measured ones, indicating that the model is precise in predicting the incubation time for austenite to ferrite transformation in hot deformed steels.

  2. Nanostructured Bainite-Austenite Steel for Armours Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burian W.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured bainite-austenite steels are applied in the armours construction due to their excellent combination of strength and ductility which enables to lower the armour weight and to improve the protection efficiency. Mechanical properties of the bainite-austenite steels can be controlled in the wide range by chemical composition and heat treatment. In the paper the results of investigation comprising measuring of quasi - static mechanical properties, dynamic yield stress and firing tests of bainite-austenite steel NANOS-BA® are presented. Reported results show that the investigated bainite-austenite steel can be used for constructing add-on armour and that the armour fulfils requirements of protection level 2 of STANAG 4569. Obtained reduction in weight of the tested NANOS-BA® plates in comparison with the present solutions is about 30%.

  3. MODULATED STRUCTURES AND ORDERING STRUCTURES IN ALLOYING AUSTENITIC MANGANESE STEEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L. He; Z.H. Jin; J.D. Lu

    2001-01-01

    The microstructure of Fe-10Mn-2Cr-1.5C alloy has been investigated with transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometer. The superlattice diffraction spots and satellite reflection pattrens have been observed in the present alloy, which means the appearence of the ordering structure and modulated structure in the alloy. It is also proved by X-ray diffraction analysis that the austenite in the alloy is more stable than that in traditional austenitic manganese steel. On the basis of this investigation,it is suggested that the C-Mn ordering clusters exist in austenitic manganese steel and the chromium can strengthen this effect by linking the weaker C-Mn couples together,which may play an important role in work hardening of austenitic manganese steel.

  4. Research on Mediate Temperature Decomposition of High Nitrogen Austenite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-ling; BEI Duo-hui; HU Ming-juan; ZHU Zu-chang

    2004-01-01

    The decomposed products from high nitrogen austenite aging at 225℃ were investigated by TEM. It is found that the shape of decomposition products inside the austenite grains is not regular and not strictly oriented. Preferential nucleation of γ-Fe4N at dislocations and grain boundaries has been observed. It also has been found that during the first stage of the high nitrogen austenite decomposition a large quantity of ultra-fine γ-Fe4N precipitate inside the parent austenite, which has been thought to be the undecomposed region before. The ultimate products are composed of highly dispersed α-Fe and γ-Fe4N, with both of them maintaining nanometer scale. The micro-hardness of them can be as high as900HV.

  5. Austenite Formation from Martensite in a 13Cr6Ni2Mo Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The influence of austenitization treatment of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel (X2CrNiMoV13-5-2) on austenite formation during reheating and on the fraction of austenite retained after tempering treatment is measured and analyzed. The results show the formation of austenite in two stages. This is probably due to inhomogeneous distribution of the austenite-stabilizing elements Ni and Mn, resulting from their slow diffusion from martensite into austenite and carbide and nitride dis...

  6. Microstructural studies of advanced austenitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, J. A.; Ren, Jyh-Ching [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (USA). Dept. of Materials Science

    1989-11-15

    This report presents the first complete microstructural and analytical electron microscopy study of Alloy AX5, one of a series of advanced austenitic steels developed by Maziasz and co-workers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for their potential application as reheater and superheater materials in power plants that will reach the end of their design lives in the 1990's. The advanced steels are modified with carbide forming elements such as titanium, niobium and vanadium. When combined with optimized thermo-mechanical treatments, the advanced steels exhibit significantly improved creep rupture properties compared to commercially available 316 stainless steels, 17--14 Cu--Mo and 800 H steels. The importance of microstructure in controlling these improvements has been demonstrated for selected alloys, using stress relaxation testing as an accelerated test method. The microstructural features responsible for the improved creep strengths have been identified by studying the thermal aging kinetics of one of the 16Ni--14Cr advanced steels, Alloy AX5, in both the solution annealed and the solution annealed plus cold worked conditions. Time-temperature-precipitation diagrams have been developed for the temperature range 600 C to 900 C and for times from 1 h to 3000 h. 226 refs., 88 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. In situ observations of austenite grain growth in Fe-C-Mn-Si super bainitic steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Liu; Guang Xu; Yu-long Zhang; Hai-jiang Hu; Lin-xin Zhou; Zheng-liang Xue

    2013-01-01

    In situ observations of austenite grain growth in Fe-C-Mn-Si super bainitic steel were conducted on a high-temperature laser scanning confocal microscope during continuous heating and subsequent isothermal holding at 850, 1000, and 1100◦C for 30 min. A grain growth model was proposed based on experimental results. It is indicated that the austenite grain size increases with austenitizing temperature and holding time. When the austenitizing temperature is above 1100◦C, the austenite grains grow rapidly, and abnormal austenite grains occur. In addition, the eff ect of heating rate on austenite grain growth was investigated, and the relation between austenite grains and bainite morphology after bainitic transformations was also discussed.

  8. INFLUENCE OF ABNORMAL AUSTENITE GRAIN GRAIN GROWTH IN QUENCHED ABNT 5135 STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Brito Ferreira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Grain size in the steels is a relevant aspect in quenching and tempering heat treatments. It is known that high austenitizing temperature and long time provide an increase in austenitic grain sizes. Likewise, after hardening of low alloy steel, the microstructure consists of martensite and a volume fraction of retained austenite. This paper evaluates the influence of austenite grain size on the volume fraction of retained austenite measured by metallographic analyses and X-ray diffraction. The Mi and Mf temperatures were calculated using an empirical equation and experimentally determined by differential thermal analysis. The mechanical behavior of the steel was evaluated by Vickers microhardness testing. Differently from other results published in the literature that steel hardenability increases with the austenite grain size, it was observed that the increase in austenite grain promotes greater volume fraction of retained austenite after water quenching.

  9. Kinetics of austenite formation during continuous heating in a low carbon steel

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Fernando Lucas Gonçalves e; Andrade, Margareth Spangler; Cota, André Barros

    2007-01-01

    The kinetics and microstructural evolution of austenite formation in a low carbon steel, with initial microstructure composed of ferrite and pearlite, were studied during continuous heating, by using dilatometric analysis and measurements of microstructural parameters. The formation of austenite was observed to occur in two stages: (a) pearlite dissolution and (b) ferrite to austenite transformation. The critical temperatures of austenite formation in continuous heating increase with increasi...

  10. Influence of cooling conditions and amount of retained austenite on the fracture of austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VYACHESLAV GORYANY

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available SEM Analysis of fracture surfaces from tensile test specimens of thick-walled, austempered ductile irons (diameter 160 mm shows different fracture behavior depending on the austenite retained in the matrix. The results show ductile fractures only in areas containing retained austenite sections. In section areas without or with a very low content of retained austenite, only brittle fracture without any plastic deformation occurs. The content of retained austenite determines the amount of ductile fracture in the microstructure.

  11. High Energy Rate Forming Induced Phase Transition in Austenitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, T.; Kuzsella, L.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the effects of explosion hardening on the microstructure and the hardness of austenitic stainless steel have been studied. The optimum explosion hardening technology of austenitic stainless steel was researched. In case of the explosive hardening used new idea means indirect hardening setup. Austenitic stainless steels have high plasticity and can be cold formed easily. However, during cold processing the hardening phenomena always occurs. Upon the explosion impact, the deformation mechanism indicates a plastic deformation and this deformation induces a phase transformation (martensite). The explosion hardening enhances the mechanical properties of the material, includes the wear resistance and hardness [1]. In case of indirect hardening as function of the setup parameters specifically the flayer plate position the hardening increased differently. It was find a relationship between the explosion hardening setup and the hardening level.

  12. Nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Yang and Yibin Ren

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have prompted the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel in medical stainless steels, the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steels, and emphatically, the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength and good plasticity, better corrosion and wear resistances, and superior biocompatibility compared to the currently used 316L stainless steel, the newly developed high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventional medical stainless steels.

  13. Recrystallization and formation of austenite in deformed lath martensitic structure of low carbon steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokizane, M.; Matsumura, N.; Tsuzaki, K.; Maki, T.; Tamura, I.

    1982-08-01

    The effect of prior deformation on the processes of tempering and austenitizing of lath martensite was studied by using low carbon steels. The recrystallization of as-quenched lath martensite was not observed on tempering while the deformed lath martensite easily recrystallized. The behavior of austenite formation in deformed specimens was different from that in as-quenched specimens because of the recrystallization of deformed lath martensite. The austenitizing behavior (and thus the austenite grain size) in deformed specimens was controlled by the competition of austenite formation with the recrystallization of lath martensite. In the case of as-quenched (non-deformed) lath martensite, the austenite particles were formed preferentially at prior austenite grain boundaries and then formed within the austenite grains mainly along the packet, block, and lath boundaries. On the other hand, in the case of lightly deformed (30 to 50 pct) lath martensite, the recrystallization of the matrix rapidly progressed prior to the formation of austenite, and the austenite particles were formed mainly at the boundaries of fairly fine recrystallized ferrite grains. When the lath martensite was heavily deformed (75 to 84 pct), the austenite formation proceeded almost simultaneously with the recrystallization of lath martensite. In such a situation, very fine austenite grain structure was obtained most effectively.

  14. Austenite and ferrite grain size evolution in plain carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Militzer, M.; Giumelli, A.; Hawbolt, E.B.; Meadowcroft, T.R. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    1995-01-01

    Grain size evolution in a 0.17%C, 0.74%Mn plain carbon steel is investigated using a Gleeble 1500 thermomechanical simulator. Austenite grain growth measurements in the temperature range from 900 to 1150{degrees}C have been used to validate the Abbruzzese and Luecke model, which is recommended for simulating grain growth during reheating. For run-out table conditions, the ferrite grain size decreases from 1l{mu}m to 4{mu}m when the cooling rate from the austenite is increased from 1 to 80{degrees}C/s.

  15. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  16. Investigations on the fracture toughness of austempered ductile irons austenitized at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, P. Prasad; Putatunda, Susil K

    2003-05-25

    Ductile cast iron was austenitized at four different temperatures and subsequently austempered at six different temperatures. Plane strain fracture toughness was evaluated under all the heat treatment conditions and correlated with the microstructural features such as the austenite content and the carbon content of the austenite. Fracture mechanism was studied by scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the optimum austempering temperature for maximum fracture toughness decreased with increasing austenitizing temperature. This could be interpreted in terms of the microstructural features. A study of the fracture mechanism revealed that good fracture toughness is unlikely to be obtained when austempering temperature is less than half of the austenitizing temperature on the absolute scale.

  17. Control of relaxation cracking in austenitic high temperature components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortel, J.C. van

    2007-01-01

    The degradation mechanism "relaxation cracking" is acting in austenitic components operating between 550°C (1020°F) and 750°C (1380°F). The brittle failures are always located in cold formed areas or in welded joints and are mostly addressed within 1 year service. More than 10 different names can be

  18. Effect of shot peening on metastable austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fargas, G., E-mail: gemma.fargas@upc.edu [CIEFMA - Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Centre de Recerca en Nanoenginyeria, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Roa, J.J.; Mateo, A. [CIEFMA - Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CRnE, Centre de Recerca en Nanoenginyeria, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-08-12

    In this work, shot peening was performed in a metastable austenitic stainless steel EN 1.4318 (AISI 301LN) in order to evaluate its effect on austenite to martensite phase transformation and also the influence on the fatigue limit. Two different steel conditions were considered: annealed, i.e., with a fully austenitic microstructure, and cold rolled, consisting of a mixture of austenite and martensite. X-ray diffraction, electron back-scattered diffraction and focus ion beam, as well as nanoindentation techniques, were used to elucidate deformation mechanisms activated during shot peening and correlate with fatigue response. Results pointed out that extensive plastic deformation and phase transformation developed in annealed specimens as a consequence of shot peening. However, the increase of roughness and the generation of microcracks led to a limited fatigue limit improvement. In contrast, shot peened cold rolled specimens exhibited enhanced fatigue limit. In the latter case, the main factor that determined the influence on the fatigue response was the distance from the injector, followed successively by the exit speed of the shots and the coverage factor.

  19. Martensite Formation in Partially and Fully Austenitic Plain Carbon Steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Bohemen, S.M.C.; Sietsma, J.

    2009-01-01

    The progress of martensite formation in plain carbon steels Fe-0.46C, Fe-0.66C, and Fe-0.80C has been investigated by dilatometry. It is demonstrated that carbon enrichment of the remaining austenite due to intercritical annealing of Fe-0.46C and Fe-0.66C does not only depress the start temperature

  20. Accurate modelling of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowers, O. D.; Duxbury, D. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.

    2014-02-01

    The ultrasonic inspection of austenitic steel welds is challenging due to the formation of highly anisotropic and heterogeneous structures post-welding. This is due to the intrinsic crystallographic structure of austenitic steel, driving the formation of dendritic grain structures on cooling. The anisotropy is manifested as both a `steering' of the ultrasonic beam and the back-scatter of energy due to the macroscopic granular structure of the weld. However, the quantitative effects and relative impacts of these phenomena are not well-understood. A semi-analytical simulation framework has been developed to allow the study of anisotropic effects in austenitic stainless steel welds. Frequency-dependent scatterers are allocated to a weld-region to approximate the coarse grain-structures observed within austenitic welds and imaged using a simulated array. The simulated A-scans are compared against an equivalent experimental setup demonstrating excellent agreement of the Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. Comparison of images of the simulated and experimental data generated using the Total Focusing Method (TFM) indicate a prominent layered effect in the simulated data. A superior grain allocation routine is required to improve upon this.

  1. Effect of initial microstructure on austenite formation kinetics in high-strength experimental microalloyed steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edgar Lpez-Martnez; Octavio Vzquez-Gmez; Hctor Javier Vergara-Hernndez; Bernardo Campillo

    2015-01-01

    Austenite formation kinetics in two high-strength experimental microalloyed steels with different initial microstructures compris-ing bainite–martensite and ferrite–martensite/austenite microconstituents was studied during continuous heating by dilatometric analysis. Austenite formation occurred in two steps:(1) carbide dissolution and precipitation and (2) transformation of residual ferrite to austenite. Di-latometric analysis was used to determine the critical temperatures of austenite formation and continuous heating transformation diagrams for heating rates ranging from 0.03°C×s−1 to 0.67°C×s−1. The austenite volume fraction was fitted using the Johnson–Mehl–Avrami–Kolmogorov equation to determine the kinetic parameters k and n as functions of the heating rate. Both n and k parameters increased with increasing heat-ing rate, which suggests an increase in the nucleation and growth rates of austenite. The activation energy of austenite formation was deter-mined by the Kissinger method. Two activation energies were associated with each of the two austenite formation steps. In the first step, the austenite growth rate was controlled by carbon diffusion from carbide dissolution and precipitation;in the second step, it was controlled by the dissolution of residual ferrite to austenite.

  2. Austenite Formation from Martensite in a 13Cr6Ni2Mo Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojack, A.; Zhao, L.; Morris, P. F.; Sietsma, J.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of austenitization treatment of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel (X2CrNiMoV13-5-2) on austenite formation during reheating and on the fraction of austenite retained after tempering treatment is measured and analyzed. The results show the formation of austenite in two stages. This is probably due to inhomogeneous distribution of the austenite-stabilizing elements Ni and Mn, resulting from their slow diffusion from martensite into austenite and carbide and nitride dissolution during the second, higher temperature, stage. A better homogenization of the material causes an increase in the transformation temperatures for the martensite-to-austenite transformation and a lower retained austenite fraction with less variability after tempering. Furthermore, the martensite-to-austenite transformation was found to be incomplete at the target temperature of 1223 K (950 °C), which is influenced by the previous austenitization treatment and the heating rate. The activation energy for martensite-to-austenite transformation was determined by a modified Kissinger equation to be approximately 400 and 500 kJ/mol for the first and the second stages of transformation, respectively. Both values are much higher than the activation energy found during isothermal treatment in a previous study and are believed to be effective activation energies comprising the activation energies of both mechanisms involved, i.e., nucleation and growth.

  3. Reverse Austenite Transformation and Grain Growth in a Low-Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcin, Thomas; Ueda, Keiji; Militzer, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    The mechanisms controlling the reverse austenite transformation and the subsequent grain growth are examined in a low-carbon steel during slow continuous heating. The ex-situ metallographic analysis of quenched samples is complemented by in-situ dilatometry of the phase transformation and real-time laser ultrasonic measurements of the austenite grain size. Although the initial state of the microstructure (bainite or martensite) has only limited impact on the austenite transformation temperature, it has significant influence on the mean austenite grain size and the rate of grain growth. The coarsening of austenite islands during reverse transformation occurring from the martensitic microstructure is responsible for a large austenite grain structure at the completion of the austenite formation. On the other hand, a much finer austenite grain size is obtained when the austenite transforms from the bainite microstructure. Upon further heating, the rate of austenite grain growth is limited by the presence of nanometric precipitates present in the bainite microstructure leading to a significantly finer austenite grain size. These results give important guidance for the design of thermomechanical-controlled processing of heavy-gage steel plates.

  4. Formation of Austenite During Intercritical Annealing of Dual-Phase Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speich, G. R.; Demarest, V. A.; Miller, R. L.

    1981-08-01

    The formation of austenite during intercritical annealing at temperatures between 740 and 900 °C was studied in a series of 1.5 pct manganese steels containing 0.06 to 0.20 pct carbon and with a ferrite-pearlite starting microstructure, typical of most dual-phase steels. Austenite formation was separated into three stages: (1) very rapid growth of austenite into pearlite until pearlite dissolution is complete; (2) slower growth of austenite into ferrite at a rate that is controlled by carbon diffusion in austenite at high temperatures (~85O °C), and by manganese diffusion in ferrite (or along grain boundaries) at low temperatures (~750 °C); and (3) very slow final equilibration of ferrite and austenite at a rate that is controlled by manganese diffusion in austenite. Diffusion models for the various steps were analyzed and compared with experimental results.

  5. The Varying Effects of Uniaxial Compressive Stress on the Bainitic Transformation under Different Austenitization Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxing Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, thermal simulation experiments under different austenitization temperatures and different stress states were conducted. High-temperature laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM, thermal dilatometry, and scanning electron microscope (SEM were used to quantitatively investigate the effects of the uniaxial compressive stress on bainitic transformation at 330 °C following different austenitization temperatures. The transformation plasticity was also analyzed. It was found that the promotion degree of stress on bainitic transformation increases with the austenitization temperature due to larger prior austenite grain size as well as stronger promoting effect of mechanical driving force on selected variant growth at higher austenitization temperatures. The grain size and the yield strength of prior austenite are other important factors which influence the promotion degree of stress on bainitic transformation, besides the mechanical driving force provided by the stress. Moreover, the transformation plasticity increases with the austenitization temperature.

  6. Application of advanced austenitic alloys to fossil power system components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    Most power and recovery boilers operating in the US produce steam at temperatures below 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) and pressures below 24 MPa (3500 psi). For these operating conditions, carbon steels and low alloy steels may be used for the construction of most of the boiler components. Austenitic stainless steels often are used for superheater/reheater tubing when these components are expected to experience temperatures above 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) or when the environment is too corrosive for low alloys steels. The austenitic stainless steels typically used are the 304H, 321H, and 347H grades. New ferritic steels such as T91 and T92 are now being introduced to replace austenitic: stainless steels in aging fossil power plants. Generally, these high-strength ferritic steels are more expensive to fabricate than austenitic stainless steels because the ferritic steels have more stringent heat treating requirements. Now, annealing requirements are being considered for the stabilized grades of austenitic stainless steels when they receive more than 5% cold work, and these requirements would increase significantly the cost of fabrication of boiler components where bending strains often exceed 15%. It has been shown, however, that advanced stainless steels developed at ORNL greatly benefit from cold work, and these steels could provide an alternative to either conventional stainless steels or high-strength ferritic steels. The purpose of the activities reported here is to examine the potential of advanced stainless steels for construction of tubular components in power boilers. The work is being carried out with collaboration of a commercial boiler manufacturer.

  7. Structure and mechanical properties of austenitic steel after cold rolling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kurc-Lisiecka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the paper is to determine the influence of the cold plastic deformation within the range 18-79% and heat treatment in a temperature range of 500 to 700°C on the microstructure and mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel grade X5CrNi18-8.Design/methodology/approach: The investigations included observations of the microstructure on a light microscope, researches of mechanical properties in a static tensile test and hardness measurements made by Vickers’s method. The analysis of the phase composition was carried out on the basis of X-ray researches. Whereas, X-ray quantitative phase analysis was carried out by the Averbach Cohen method.Findings: Heat treatment of X5CrNi18-8 stainless steel in the range 500-700°C causes a significant decrease of the mechanical properties (Rm, Rp0.2 and increase of elongation (A. Hardness of investigated steel drops with decrease of cold working degree and increase of heat treatment temperature.Research limitations/implications: The analysis of the obtained results permits to state that the heat treatment causes an essential changes of the microstructure connected with fading of cold deformation. Heating of cold rolled austenitic stainless steels can cause a reverse transformation α’ → γ.Practical implications: Two-phase structure α’+γ of austenitic Cr-Ni steel in deformed state working at elevated temperature undergo a transformation. It significantly influences mechanical properties of steel. Austenite phase undergoes a recrystallization, while martensite α’ phase undergoes reverse transformation.Originality/value: The analytic dependence of the yield point of the investigated steel on the cold working degree in cold rolling process has been confirmed. Revealing this relation is of essential practical importance for the technology of sheetmetal forming of austenitic steel.

  8. Influence of reverted austenite on the texture and magnetic properties of 350 maraging steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Hamilton F.G., E-mail: hamilton@ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceará, Campus do Pici-Bloco 729, CEP 60440-554 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Silva, Jean J. [Universidade Federal do Ceará, Campus do Pici-Bloco 729, CEP 60440-554 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Silva, Manoel R. [Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Campus Sede Itajubá/IFQ- Instituto de Física e Química, Itajubá, MG (Brazil); Gomes da Silva, Marcelo J., E-mail: mgsilva@ufc.br [Universidade Federal do Ceará, Campus do Pici-Bloco 729, CEP 60440-554 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2015-11-01

    The aging temperature to improve magnetic properties in Maraging-350 steel (Mar-350) is limited by the onset of austenite reversion. The traditional process of cooling after aging is to remove the piece from the oven and then to air cool it. The purpose of this research was to characterize the reverted austenite and to investigate the effect of cooling below the martensite start temperature (M{sub s}) on the magnetic properties. The Mar350 samples aged at temperatures above 550 °C, and subsequently cooled in liquid nitrogen presented less austenite than samples cooled in air, resulting in higher magnetization saturation and a lower coercive force. A combination of optical microscopy (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques were used to characterize the presence of reverted austenite. The crystallographic texture of both martensite and reverted austenite were analyzed. The texture of the reverted austenite coincides with the texture of the parent austenite indicating that a phenomenon of texture memory is present. - Highlights: • Cooling maraging samples in liquid nitrogen reduces reverted austenite fraction. • Retained austenite increases coercive force and decreases saturation magnetization. • Reverted and parent austenites have the same crystallographic texture. • Memory effect found during reversion transformation.

  9. First-principles study of helium, carbon, and nitrogen in austenite, dilute austenitic iron alloys, and nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, D. J.; Ferguson, D.; Gardner, S.; Ackland, G. J.

    2013-07-01

    An extensive set of first-principles density functional theory calculations have been performed to study the behavior of He, C, and N solutes in austenite, dilute Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloys, and Ni in order to investigate their influence on the microstructural evolution of austenitic steel alloys under irradiation. The results show that austenite behaves much like other face-centered cubic metals and like Ni in particular. Strong similarities were also observed between austenite and ferrite. We find that interstitial He is most stable in the tetrahedral site and migrates with a low barrier energy of between 0.1 and 0.2 eV. It binds strongly into clusters as well as overcoordinated lattice defects and forms highly stable He-vacancy (VmHen) clusters. Interstitial He clusters of sufficient size were shown to be unstable to self-interstitial emission and VHen cluster formation. The binding of additional He and V to existing VmHen clusters increases with cluster size, leading to unbounded growth and He bubble formation. Clusters with n/m around 1.3 were found to be most stable with a dissociation energy of 2.8 eV for He and V release. Substitutional He migrates via the dissociative mechanism in a thermal vacancy population but can migrate via the vacancy mechanism in irradiated environments as a stable V2He complex. Both C and N are most stable octahedrally and exhibit migration energies in the range from 1.3 to 1.6 eV. Interactions between pairs of these solutes are either repulsive or negligible. A vacancy can stably bind up to two C or N atoms with binding energies per solute atom up to 0.4 eV for C and up to 0.6 eV for N. Calculations in Ni, however, show that this may not result in vacancy trapping as VC and VN complexes can migrate cooperatively with barrier energies comparable to the isolated vacancy. This should also lead to enhanced C and N mobility in irradiated materials and may result in solute segregation to defect sinks. Binding to larger vacancy clusters

  10. Thermodynamic stability of austenitic Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janus

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The performed research was aimed at determining thermodynamic stability of structures of Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron castings. Examined were 35 alloys. The castings were tempered at 900 °C for 2 hours. Two cooling speeds were used: furnace-cooling and water-cooling. In the alloys with the nickel equivalent value less than 20,0 %, partial transition of austenite to martensite took place. The austenite decomposition ratio and the related growth of hardness was higher for smaller nickel equivalent value and was clearly larger in annealed castings than in hardened ones. Obtaining thermodynamically stable structure of castings requires larger than 20,0 % value of the nickel equivalent.

  11. COLD ROLLING ORTHODONTIC WIRES OF AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL AISI 304

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Santos Messner

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steels wires are widely used in the final stages of orthodontic treatment. The objective of this paper is to study the process of conformation of rectangular wires from round wires commercial austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 by the process of cold rolling. The wire quality is evaluated by means of dimensional analysis, microhardness measurements, tensile strength and fractographic analysis of the wires subjected to tensile tests. Also a study on the application of finite element method to simulate the process, comparing the force and rolling stress obtained in the rolling is done. The simulation results are consistent with those obtained in the actual process and the rolled wires show ductile fracture, tensile strength and dimensional variations appropriate to orthodontic standards. The fracture morphology shows the model cup-cone type besides the high deformation and hardness inherent in the cold rolling process.

  12. Autofocus imaging: Experimental results in an anisotropic austenitic weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.; Hunter, A.

    2012-05-01

    The quality of an ultrasonic array image, especially for anisotropic material, depends on accurate information about acoustic properties. Inaccuracy of acoustic properties causes image degradation, e.g., blurring, errors in locating of reflectors and introduction of artifacts. In this paper, for an anisotropic austenitic steel weld, an autofocus imaging technique is presented. The array data from a series of beacons is captured and then used to statistically extract anisotropic weld properties by using a Monte-Carlo inversion approach. The beacon and imaging systems are realized using two separated arrays; one acts as a series of beacons and the other images these beacons. Key to the Monte-Carlo inversion scheme is a fast forward model of wave propagation in the anisotropic weld and this is based on the Dijkstra algorithm. Using this autofocus approach a measured weld map was extracted from an austenitic weld and used to reduce location errors, initially greater than 6mm, to less than 1mm.

  13. Carbide Dissolution during Intercritical Austenitization in Bearing Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui; MI Zhenli; ZHANG Xiaolei; TANG Di; WANG Yide

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the carbide dissolution mechanism of high carbon-chromium bearing steel during the intercritical austenitization, the database of TCFE7 of Thermo-calc and MOBFE of DICTRA software were used to calculate the elements diffusion kinetic and the evolution law of volume fraction of carbide. DIL805A dilatometer was used to simulate the intercritical heat treatment. The microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscopy(SEM), and the micro-hardness was tested. The experimental results indicate that the dissolution of carbide is composed of two stages:initial austenite growth governed by carbon diffusion which sharply moves up the micro-hardness of quenched martensite, and subsequent growth controlled by diffusion of Cr elements in M3C. The volume fraction of M3C decreases with the increasing holding time, and the metallographic analysis shows a great agreement with values calculated by software.

  14. Laser borided composite layer produced on austenitic 316L steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikołajczak, Daria; Kulka, Michał; Makuch, Natalia

    2016-12-01

    Abstract Austenitic 316L steel is well-known for its good resistance to corrosion and oxidation. Therefore, this material is often used wherever corrosive media or high temperatures are to be expected. The main drawback of this material is very low hardness and low resistance to mechanical wear. In this study, the laser boriding was used in order to improve the wear behavior of this material. As a consequence, a composite surface layer was produced. The microstructure of laser-borided steel was characterized by only two zones: re-melted zone and base material. In the re-melted zone, a composite microstructure, consisting of hard ceramic phases (borides) and a soft austenitic matrix, was observed. A significant increase in hardness and wear resistance of such a layer was obtained.

  15. Laser borided composite layer produced on austenitic 316L steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikołajczak Daria

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Austenitic 316L steel is well-known for its good resistance to corrosion and oxidation. Therefore, this material is often used wherever corrosive media or high temperatures are to be expected. The main drawback of this material is very low hardness and low resistance to mechanical wear. In this study, the laser boriding was used in order to improve the wear behavior of this material. As a consequence, a composite surface layer was produced. The microstructure of laser-borided steel was characterized by only two zones: re-melted zone and base material. In the re-melted zone, a composite microstructure, consisting of hard ceramic phases (borides and a soft austenitic matrix, was observed. A significant increase in hardness and wear resistance of such a layer was obtained.

  16. Abnormal austenite-ferrite transformation behavior in pure iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yongchang; F.Sommer; E.J. Mittemeijer

    2004-01-01

    The austenite → ferrite transformation is the most important reaction route in the manufacture of Fe-based materials. Here the austenite (γ) → ferrite (α)transformation of pure iron was systematically explored by high-resolution dilatometry. Abnormal transformation kinetics, multi-peak discontinuous reaction, was recognized in pure iron according to the variation of the ferrite-formation rate. The occurrence the one or the other type of γ→α trans formation strongly depends on the grain size: the transformation type changes from abnormal to normal (single-peak continuous reaction) with decreasing grain size. The inherent reason for the occurrence of abnormal transformation could be attributed to the repeated nucleation in front of the moving γ/α interface induced by the accumulation of elastic and plastic accommodation energy.

  17. STRUCTURAL STABILITY OF HIGH NITROGEN AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Bakajová

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the structural stability of an austenitic stainless steel with high nitrogen content. The investigated steel was heat treated at 800°C using different annealing times. Investigation was carried out using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and thermodynamic calculations. Three phases were identified by electron diffraction: Cr2N, sigma – phase and M23C6. The thermodynamic prediction is in good agreement with the experimental result. The only is the M23C6 carbide phase which is not thermodynamically predicted. Cr2N is the majority secondary phase and occurs in the form of discrete particles or cells (lamellas of Cr2N and austenite.

  18. Phase stability of high manganese austenitic steels for cryogenic applications

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, K

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the austenitic stability against a' martensitic transformation of three non-magnetic austenitic steels : a new stainless steel X2CrMnNiMoN 19-12-11-1 grade, a traditional X8CrMnNiN 19-11-6 grade and a high manganese X8MnCrNi 28-7-1 grade. Measurements of relative magnetic susceptibility at room temperature are performed on strained tensile specimens at 4.2 K. A special extensometer for high precision strain measurements at low temperature has been developed at CERN to test specimens up to various levels of plastic strain. Moreover, the high precision strain recording of the extensometer enables a detailed study of the serrated yield phenomena associated with 4.2 K tensile testing and their influence on the evolution of magnetic susceptibility. The results show that high Mn contents increase the stability of the austenitic structure against a' martensitic transformation, while keeping high strength at cryogenic temperature. Moreover, proper elaboration through primary and possi...

  19. Corrosion resistance of kolsterised austenitic 304 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudaia, F. B.; Khalil, E. O.; Esehiri, A. F.; Daw, K. E.

    2015-03-01

    Austenitic stainless suffers from low wear resistance in applications where rubbing against other surfaces is encountered. This drawback can be overcome by surface treatment such as coating by hard materials. Other treatments such as carburization at relatively low temperature become applicable recently to improve hardness and wear resistance. Carburization heat treatment would only be justified if the corrosion resistance is unaffected. In this work samples of 304 stainless steels treated by colossal supersaturation case carburizing (known as Kolsterising) carried out by Bodycote Company was examined for pitting corrosion resistance at room temperature and at 50 °C. Comparison with results obtained for untreated samples in similar testing conditions show that there is no deterioration in the pitting resistance due to the Kolsterising heat treatment. X ray diffraction patterns obtained for Kolsterising sample showed that peaks correspond to the austenite phase has shifted to lower 2θ values compared with those of the untreated sample. The shift is an indication for expansion of austenite unit cells caused by saturation with diffusing carbon atoms. The XRD of Kolsterising samples also revealed additional peaks appeared in the patterns due to formation of carbides in the kolsterised layer. Examination of these additional peaks showed that these peaks are attributed to a type of carbide known as Hagg carbide Fe2C5. The absence of carbides that contain chromium means that no Cr depletion occurred in the layer and the corrosion properties are maintained. Surface hardness measurements showed large increase after Kolsterising heat treatment.

  20. Corrosion resistance of kolsterised austenitic 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abudaia, F. B., E-mail: fabudaia@yahoo.com; Khalil, E. O., E-mail: ekhalil9@yahoo.com; Esehiri, A. F., E-mail: Hope-eseheri@hotmail.co.uk; Daw, K. E., E-mail: Khawladaw@yahoo.com [University of Tripoli Department of Materials and Metallurgical Eng, Tripoli-Libya P.O.Box13589 (Libya)

    2015-03-30

    Austenitic stainless suffers from low wear resistance in applications where rubbing against other surfaces is encountered. This drawback can be overcome by surface treatment such as coating by hard materials. Other treatments such as carburization at relatively low temperature become applicable recently to improve hardness and wear resistance. Carburization heat treatment would only be justified if the corrosion resistance is unaffected. In this work samples of 304 stainless steels treated by colossal supersaturation case carburizing (known as Kolsterising) carried out by Bodycote Company was examined for pitting corrosion resistance at room temperature and at 50 °C. Comparison with results obtained for untreated samples in similar testing conditions show that there is no deterioration in the pitting resistance due to the Kolsterising heat treatment. X ray diffraction patterns obtained for Kolsterising sample showed that peaks correspond to the austenite phase has shifted to lower 2θ values compared with those of the untreated sample. The shift is an indication for expansion of austenite unit cells caused by saturation with diffusing carbon atoms. The XRD of Kolsterising samples also revealed additional peaks appeared in the patterns due to formation of carbides in the kolsterised layer. Examination of these additional peaks showed that these peaks are attributed to a type of carbide known as Hagg carbide Fe{sub 2}C{sub 5}. The absence of carbides that contain chromium means that no Cr depletion occurred in the layer and the corrosion properties are maintained. Surface hardness measurements showed large increase after Kolsterising heat treatment.

  1. Solidification cracking in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Shankar; T P S Gill; S L Mannan; S Sundaresan

    2003-06-01

    Solidification cracking is a significant problem during the welding of austenitic stainless steels, particularly in fully austenitic and stabilized compositions. Hot cracking in stainless steel welds is caused by low-melting eutectics containing impurities such as S, P and alloy elements such as Ti, Nb. The WRC-92 diagram can be used as a general guide to maintain a desirable solidification mode during welding. Nitrogen has complex effects on weld-metal microstructure and cracking. In stabilized stainless steels, Ti and Nb react with S, N and C to form low-melting eutectics. Nitrogen picked up during welding significantly enhances cracking, which is reduced by minimizing the ratio of Ti or Nb to that of C and N present. The metallurgical propensity to solidification cracking is determined by elemental segregation, which manifests itself as a brittleness temperature range or BTR, that can be determined using the varestraint test. Total crack length (TCL), used extensively in hot cracking assessment, exhibits greater variability due to extraneous factors as compared to BTR. In austenitic stainless steels, segregation plays an overwhelming role in determining cracking susceptibility.

  2. Retained austenite thermal stability in a nanostructured bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avishan, Behzad, E-mail: b_avishan@sut.ac.ir [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Garcia-Mateo, Carlos, E-mail: cgm@cenim.csic.es [Department of Physical Metallurgy, National Centre for Metallurgical Research (CENIM-CSIC), MATERALIA Research Group, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Yazdani, Sasan, E-mail: yazdani@sut.ac.ir [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Caballero, Francisca G., E-mail: fgc@cenim.csic.es [Department of Physical Metallurgy, National Centre for Metallurgical Research (CENIM-CSIC), MATERALIA Research Group, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-15

    The unique microstructure of nanostructured bainite consists of very slender bainitic ferrite plates and high carbon retained austenite films. As a consequence, the reported properties are opening a wide range of different commercial uses. However, bainitic transformation follows the T{sub 0} criteria, i.e. the incomplete reaction phenomena, which means that the microstructure is not thermodynamically stable because the bainitic transformation stops well before austenite reaches an equilibrium carbon level. This article aims to study the different microstructural changes taking place when nanostructured bainite is destabilized by austempering for times well in excess of that strictly necessary to end the transformation. Results indicate that while bainitic ferrite seems unaware of the extended heat treatment, retained austenite exhibits a more receptive behavior to it. - Highlights: • Nanostructured bainitic steel is not thermodynamically stable. • Extensive austempering in these microstructures has not been reported before. • Precipitation of cementite particles is unavoidable at longer austempering times. • TEM, FEG-SEM and XRD analysis were used for microstructural characterization.

  3. Development of Cast Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, G.; Yamamoto, Y.; Brady, M. P.; Walker, L. R.; Meyer, H. M., III; Leonard, D. N.

    2016-09-01

    Cast Fe-Ni-Cr chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels with Ni levels up to 45 wt.% are used at high temperatures in a wide range of industrial applications that demand microstructural stability, corrosion resistance, and creep strength. Although alumina scales offer better corrosion protection at these temperatures, designing cast austenitic alloys that form a stable alumina scale and achieve creep strength comparable to existing cast chromia-forming alloys is challenging. This work outlines the development of cast Fe-Ni-Cr-Al austenitic stainless steels containing about 25 wt.% Ni with good creep strength and the ability to form a protective alumina scale for use at temperatures up to 800-850°C in H2O-, S-, and C-containing environments. Creep properties of the best alloy were comparable to that of HK-type cast chromia-forming alloys along with improved oxidation resistance typical of alumina-forming alloys. Challenges in the design of cast alloys and a potential path to increasing the temperature capability are discussed.

  4. Development of Cast Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, G.; Yamamoto, Y.; Brady, M. P.; Walker, L. R.; Meyer, H. M., III; Leonard, D. N.

    2016-11-01

    Cast Fe-Ni-Cr chromia-forming austenitic stainless steels with Ni levels up to 45 wt.% are used at high temperatures in a wide range of industrial applications that demand microstructural stability, corrosion resistance, and creep strength. Although alumina scales offer better corrosion protection at these temperatures, designing cast austenitic alloys that form a stable alumina scale and achieve creep strength comparable to existing cast chromia-forming alloys is challenging. This work outlines the development of cast Fe-Ni-Cr-Al austenitic stainless steels containing about 25 wt.% Ni with good creep strength and the ability to form a protective alumina scale for use at temperatures up to 800-850°C in H2O-, S-, and C-containing environments. Creep properties of the best alloy were comparable to that of HK-type cast chromia-forming alloys along with improved oxidation resistance typical of alumina-forming alloys. Challenges in the design of cast alloys and a potential path to increasing the temperature capability are discussed.

  5. STRUCTURAL CHANGES IN Cr-V LEDEBURITIC STEEL DURING AUSTENITIZING AND QUENCHING

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The Vanadis 6 PM Cr-V ledeburitic steel was austenitized at temperatures from the range 1000 – 1200 oC and nitrogen gas quenched. Structural changes were investigated by light microscopy and SEM. Obtained result fixed that the M7C3-carbides underwent a complete dissolution in the austenite while MC-phase remained almost completely unaffected. The saturation of the austenite by chromium and partly vanadium induced formation of increased portion of non-martensitic structural components after qu...

  6. AN INVESTIGATION OF RETAINED AUSTENITE CONTENTS IN CARBURIZED SAE 8620 STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, retained austenite contents in carburized  SAE 8620 (21NiCrMo2) steel were investigated. Carburizing programs were carried out in gas atmosphere at 940°C. X-ray diffraction was used to determine retained austenite contents in the case-hardened microstructures of the carburized specimens. Test results indicated that maximum retained austenite contents at the microstructures of the carburized specimens that carburized 45 minute, 3 h and 5 h carburizing times at ...

  7. Effect of Cu, Mo, Si on the content of retained austenite of austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mi, Y. [Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, the effects of Cu, Mo, Si contents on the volume fraction of retained austenite of austempered ductile iron (ADI) are analyzed exactly by X-ray diffraction, and the fracture modes of test samples with different volume fraction of retained austenite are investigated by SEM. It is shown that the retained austenite content increases with the content of copper, decreases with the content of molybdenum, and reaches the maximum with a certain content of silicon. When the retained austenite content decreases, the fracture modes of test samples change from ductile fracture to cleavage fracture.

  8. Effect of Austenite Deformation on Continuous Cooling Transformation Microstructures for 22CrSH Gear Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bing-xin; JIANG Ying-tian; XU Xu-dong; LIU Xiang-hua; WANG Guo-dong

    2007-01-01

    The effect of compressive deformation of austenite on continuous cooling transformation microstructures for 22CrSH gear steel has been investigated using a Gleeble 1500 thermal simulator. The experimental results show that the deformation of austenite promotes the formation of proeutectoid ferrite and pearlite, and leads to the increase of critical cooling rate of proeutectoid ferrite plus pearlite microstructure. The grain boundary allotriomorphic ferrite occupies the austenite grain surfaces when the prior deformation takes place or the cooling rate is decreased, which causes a transition from bainite to acicular ferrite. The deformation enhances the stability of transformation from austenite to acicular ferrite, which results in an increase of M/A constituent.

  9. The Kinetics of Formation and Decomposition of Austenite in Relation to Carbide Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, Henrique Duarte; Van Steenberge, Nele; Sietsma, Jilt; Terryn, Herman

    2017-02-01

    The effect of the carbide morphology on the kinetics of austenite formation and its decomposition was investigated by a combination of measurements of austenite fraction by dilatometry and metallography. These measurements show that coarse carbide morphology is generated by fast cooling through the early stages of eutectoid transformation, enabling fast precipitation of pro-eutectoid ferrite, followed by slow cooling during the final stages of transformation, during the precipitation of carbides. Additionally, a strong influence of the morphology of carbides on the kinetics of austenite formation is observed. The presence of coarse carbides can determine the rate of austenite formation during intercritical annealing as a result of its slow dissolution kinetics.

  10. Effect of Austenitic and Austeno-Ferritic Electrodes on 2205 Duplex and 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Dissimilar Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Jagesvar; Taiwade, Ravindra V.

    2016-09-01

    This study addresses the effect of different types of austenitic and austeno-ferritic electrodes (E309L, E309LMo and E2209) on the relationship between weldability, microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of shielded metal arc welded duplex/austenitic (2205/316L) stainless steel dissimilar joints using the combined techniques of optical, scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive spectrometer and electrochemical. The results indicated that the change in electrode composition led to microstructural variations in the welds with the development of different complex phases such as vermicular ferrite, lathy ferrite, widmanstatten and intragranular austenite. Mechanical properties of welded joints were diverged based on compositions and solidification modes; it was observed that ferritic mode solidified weld dominated property wise. However, the pitting corrosion resistance of all welds showed different behavior in chloride solution; moreover, weld with E2209 was superior, whereas E309L exhibited lower resistance. Higher degree of sensitization was observed in E2209 weld, while lesser in E309L weld. Optimum ferrite content was achieved in all welds.

  11. Effect of Austenitic and Austeno-Ferritic Electrodes on 2205 Duplex and 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Dissimilar Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Jagesvar; Taiwade, Ravindra V.

    2016-11-01

    This study addresses the effect of different types of austenitic and austeno-ferritic electrodes (E309L, E309LMo and E2209) on the relationship between weldability, microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of shielded metal arc welded duplex/austenitic (2205/316L) stainless steel dissimilar joints using the combined techniques of optical, scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive spectrometer and electrochemical. The results indicated that the change in electrode composition led to microstructural variations in the welds with the development of different complex phases such as vermicular ferrite, lathy ferrite, widmanstatten and intragranular austenite. Mechanical properties of welded joints were diverged based on compositions and solidification modes; it was observed that ferritic mode solidified weld dominated property wise. However, the pitting corrosion resistance of all welds showed different behavior in chloride solution; moreover, weld with E2209 was superior, whereas E309L exhibited lower resistance. Higher degree of sensitization was observed in E2209 weld, while lesser in E309L weld. Optimum ferrite content was achieved in all welds.

  12. Nitrogen diffusion and nitrogen depth profiles in expanded austenite: experimental assessment, numerical simulation and role of stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    The present paper addresses the experimental assessment of the concentration dependent nitrogen diffusion coefficient in stress free expanded austenite foils from thermogravimetry, the numerical simulation of nitrogen concentration depth profiles on growth of expanded austenite into stainless steel...

  13. Structure and substructure of austenite formed during heating of quenched and thermomechanically strengthened steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernshtejn, M.L.; Kaputkina, L.M.; Prokoshkin, S.D.; Lyuttsau, A.V.; Prokoshkina, V.G. (Moskovskij Inst. Stali i Splavov (USSR))

    1982-06-01

    Mechanism of ..cap alpha.. ..-->.. ..gamma.. transformation in chromium and chromium-nickel steels, peculiarities of substructure formation of austenite formed at repeated heating after quenching and high-temperature thermomechanical treatment and its stability to recrystallization in steels with different martensite morphology and temperature of the initial stage of austenite formation are investigated.

  14. Kinetics analysis of two-stage austenitization in supermartensitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nießen, Frank; Villa, Matteo; Hald, John

    2017-01-01

    The martensite-to-austenite transformation in X4CrNiMo16-5-1 supermartensitic stainless steel was followed in-situ during isochronal heating at 2, 6 and 18 K min−1 applying energy-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction at the BESSY II facility. Austenitization occurred in two stages, separated...

  15. In Situ Techniques for the Investigation of the Kinetics of Austenitization of Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nießen, Frank; Villa, Matteo; Apel, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The austenitization and inter-critical annealing of X4CrNiMo16-5-1 (1.4418) supermartensitic stainless steel were investigated in-situ with synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), dilatometry and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) under isochronal heating conditions. Austenitization occurred...

  16. Fatigue behaviors and damage mechanism of a Cr-Mn-N austenitic steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Z.; Cai, P.; Yu, Tianbo;

    2017-01-01

    Four-point bending fatigue tests were conducted on a Cr-Mn-N austenitic steel at room temperature, at frequency of 20 Hz and the stress ratio of R = 0.1, in air. The fatigue strength of this Cr-Mn-N austenitic steel was measured to be 503 MPa in the maximum stress from the S-N curve obtained...

  17. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure investigation of nitrogen stabilized expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny;

    2010-01-01

    As-delivered austenitic stainless steel and nitrogen stabilized expanded austenite, both fully nitrided and denitrided (in H2), were investigated with Cr, Fe and Ni extended X-ray absorption fine structure. The data shows pronounced short-range ordering of Cr and N. For the denitrided specimen...

  18. Austenite formation during intercritical annealing in C-Mn cold-rolled dual phase steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李声慈; 康永林; 朱国明; 邝霜

    2015-01-01

    Two different kinds of experimental techniques were used to in-situ study the austenite formation during intercritical annealing in C-Mn dual phase steel. The microstructure evolution was observed by confocal laser scanning microscope, and the austenite isothermal and non-isothermal transformation kinetics were studied by dilatometry. The results indicate that banded structure is produced for the reason of composition segregation and the competition between recrystallization and phase transformation. Austenite prefers to nucleate not only at ferrite/ferrite grain boundaries, but also inside the grains of ferrite. Furthermore, the austenitizing process is accomplished mainly via migration of the existing austenite/ferrite interface rather than nucleation of new grains. The incubation process can be divided into two stages which are controlled by carbon and manganese diffusion, respectively. During the incubation process, the nucleation rate of austenite decreases, and austenite growth changes from two-dimensional to one-dimensional. The partitioning coefficient, defined as the ratio of manganese content in the austenite to that in the adjacent ferrite, increases with increasing soaking time.

  19. Oxidation of molecular tritium in austenitic stainless steel containments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blet, V.; Brossard, P.; Falanga, A.; Guidon, H.; Le Sergent, C. (CEA, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (FR)); Clavier, B. (USSI Ingenierie, BP 72, 92223 Bagneux (FR))

    1992-03-01

    This paper discusses the rate of oxidation of molecular tritium. determined at room temperature in closed austenitic stainless steel containments versus the tritium concentration of tritium-oxygen gaseous mixtures. With our experimental conditions, the overall rate of oxidation is found to depend not only on tritium concentration but also on initial oxygen concentration. The tritiated water which is produced, does not remain in the gaseous phase but is partially trapped on the surface oxides. In addition, kinetics of reaction are strongly dependent on the geometry of the cylindrical containments. When the vessel diameter is smaller than 4 mm, tritiated water formation is significantly reduced.

  20. Kinetics of the austenite formation during intercritical annealing

    OpenAIRE

    J. Lis; A. Lis

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: of this paper is the effect of the microstructure of the 6Mn16 steel after soft annealing on the kinetics of the austenite formation during next intercritical annealing.Design/methodology/approach: Analytical TEM point analysis with EDAX system attached to Philips CM20 was used to evaluate the concentration of Mn in the microstructure constituents of the multiphase steel,Findings: The increase in soft annealing time from 1-60 hours at 625 °C increases Mn partitioning between ferrite ...

  1. Modeling the austenite decomposition into ferrite and bainite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Fateh

    2005-12-01

    Novel advanced high-strength steels such as dual-phase (DP) and transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels, are considered as promising materials for new generation of lightweight vehicles. The superior mechanical properties of these steels, compared to classical high strength steels, are associated with their complex microstructures. The desired phase configuration and morphology can only be achieved through well-controlled processing paths with rather tight processing windows. To implement such challenging processing stages into the current industrial facilities a significant amount of development efforts, in terms of mill trials, have to be performed. Alternatively, process models as predictive tools can be employed to aid the process development' and also to design new steel grades. Knowledge-based process models are developed by virtue of the underlying physical phenomena occurring during the industrial processing and are validated with experimental data. The goal of the present work is to develop an integrated microstructure model to adequately describe the kinetics of austenite decomposition into polygonal ferrite and bainite, such that for complex thermal paths simulating those of industrial practice, the final microstructure in advanced high strength steels can reasonably be predicted. This is in particular relevant to hot-rolled DP and TRIP steels, where the intercritical ferrite evolution due to its crucial influence on the onset and kinetics of the subsequent bainite formation, has to be quantified precisely. The calculated fraction, size and spatial carbon distribution of the intercritical austenite are employed as input to characterize adequately the kinetic of the bainite reaction. Pertinent to ferrite formation, a phenomenological, physically-based model was developed on the ground of the mixed-mode approach. The model deals with the growth stage since nucleation site saturation at prior austenite grain boundaries is likely to be attained

  2. Decomposition kinetics of expanded austenite with high nitrogen contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the decomposition kinetics of synthesized homogeneous expanded austenite formed by gaseous nitriding of stainless steel AISI 304L and AISI 316L with nitrogen contents up to 38 at.% nitrogen. Isochronal annealing experiments were carried out in both inert (N2) and reducing (H2......) atmospheres. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermogravimetry were applied for identification of the decomposition reactions and X-ray diffraction analysis was applied for phase analysis. CrN precipitated upon annealing; the activation energies are 187 kJ/mol and 128 kJ/mol for AISI 316L and AISI 304L...

  3. Laser borided composite layer produced on austenitic 316L steel

    OpenAIRE

    Mikołajczak Daria; Kulka Michał; Makuch Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Austenitic 316L steel is well-known for its good resistance to corrosion and oxidation. Therefore, this material is often used wherever corrosive media or high temperatures are to be expected. The main drawback of this material is very low hardness and low resistance to mechanical wear. In this study, the laser boriding was used in order to improve the wear behavior of this material. As a consequence, a composite surface layer was produced. The microstructure of laser-borided steel w...

  4. Laser Welding Of Finned Tubes Made Of Austenitic Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Stolecki M.; Bijok H.; Kowal Ł.; Adamiec J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the technology of welding of finned tubes made of the X5CrNi1810 (1.4301) austenitic steel, developed at Energoinstal SA, allowing one to get high quality joints that meet the requirements of the classification societies (PN-EN 15614), and at the same time to significantly reduce the manufacturing costs. The authors described an automatic technological line equipped with a Trumph disc laser and a tube production technological process. To assess the quality of the joints, ...

  5. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel Precipitation During Isothermal Annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Domankova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The time-temperature-precipitation in high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel was investigated using light optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The isothermal precipitation kinetics curves and the corresponding precipitation activation energy were obtained. The diffusion activation energy of M2N precipitation is 129 kJ/mol. The results show that critical temperature for M2N precipitation is about 825°C with the corresponding incubation period 2.5 min.

  6. Influence of austenitizing temperature on microstructure and mechanical properties of AISI 431 martensitic stainless steel electron beam welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajasekhar, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, SVITS, Mahaboob Nagar 509 001 (India)], E-mail: adula.rajasekhar@rediffmail.com; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Mohandas, T. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Murti, V.S.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, SVITS, Mahaboob Nagar 509 001 (India)

    2009-05-15

    The relative effects of various austenitizing temperatures on microstructure and mechanical properties of electron beam welds of AISI 431martensitic stainless steel were studied. The post-weld heat treatments consist of austenitizing the weld samples for 1 h at various temperatures, i.e., at 950 deg. C, 1000 deg. C, 1050 deg. C, 1100 deg. C and at 1150 deg. C and air cooling followed by double tempering, i.e., tempering at 670 + 600 deg. C. In the as-welded condition the microstructure contains dendritic structure with ferrite network and retained austenite in a matrix of un-tempered martensite. The prior austenite grain size increased with increase in austenitizing temperature. Parent metal grain size was coarser as compared to grain size in the weld zone in respective conditions. Retained austenite content increased with increase in the austenitizing temperature. Presence of undissolved carbides was observed in welds and parent metal austenitized up to 1000 deg. C and they dissolved at austenitizing temperature {>=} 1050 deg. C. Coarsening of martensite laths was observed after tempering. The martensite laths were coarser in the samples subjected to higher austenitizing temperatures. Optimum mechanical properties, i.e., strength, hardness and toughness were observed when austenitized between 1050 deg. C and 1100 deg. C followed by tempering. Austenitizing at 1150 deg. C and tempering resulted in inferior mechanical properties. The mechanism for the observed trends is discussed in relation to the microstructure, fracture features and mechanical properties.

  7. Secondary Austenite Morphologies in Fusion Zone of Welded Joint after Postweld Heat Treatment with a Continuous Wave Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heping Liu; Xuejun Jin

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve the weldability of duplex stainless steels,obtaining more secondary austenite in the weld metal is an effective way.Therefore,optimizing the secondary austenite by changing its morphology,volume fraction and stability may be expected to enhance the ductility of the weld.The secondary austenite morphologies in the fusion zone of the laser continuously heat treated welds of 2205 duplex stainless steel were investigated.The secondary austenite morphologies were found to be influenced by different laser power level.The secondary austenite with penniform,freely grown and dendritic shape appeared in the course of 4,6 and 8 kW continuous heat treatment,respectively.It was found that there were three kinds of morphologies of secondary austenite in the fusion zone treated by different power,i.e.,widmannst¨atten austenite,grain boundary austenite and intragranular austenite.The results demonstrated that the mechanism of the secondary austenite formation was a displacement mechanism during the initial austenite lath formation and a diffusion mechanism during cooling.The nitrides provided the nitrogen for the transformation and at the same time acted as nucleation sites for the secondary austenite.

  8. Deformation behavior of duplex austenite and ε-martensite high-Mn steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Hyuk Kwon, Byeong-Chan Suh, Sung-Il Baik, Young-Woon Kim, Jong-Kyo Choi and Nack J Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deformation and work hardening behavior of Fe–17Mn–0.02C steel containing ε-martensite within the austenite matrix have been investigated by means of in situ microstructural observations and x-ray diffraction analysis. During deformation, the steel shows the deformation-induced transformation of austenite → ε-martensite → α'-martensite as well as the direct transformation of austenite → α'-martensite. Based on the calculation of changes in the fraction of each constituent phase, we found that the phase transformation of austenite → ε-martensite is more effective in work hardening than that of ε-martensite → α'-martensite. Moreover, reverse transformation of ε-martensite → austenite has also been observed during deformation. It originates from the formation of stacking faults within the deformed ε-martensite, resulting in the formation of 6H-long periodic ordered structure.

  9. Influence of austenitizing temperature on apparent morphologies of as-quenched microstructures of steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yue-jun; LI Yi-min; HUANG Bai-yun

    2006-01-01

    The effects of austenitizing temperature on the morphologies and substructures of as-quenched microstructure were investigated by using 13 medium and high carbon steels. The formation reasons of various morphologies of martensite quenched at different austenitizing temperatures were also studied. The results show that the packet martensite in medium and high carbon steels quenched at higher austenitizing temperature is entirely different from that in as-quenched low carbon steels, which is still plate martensite, and not lath martensite. All the change laws of as-quenched microstructures in medium and high carbon steels are identical with an increase in austenitizing temperature, and the austenitizing temperature can merely change the combined morphology of martensitic platelets,but cannot alter the type of product of martensitic transformation in commercial steels.

  10. The sub-zero Celsius treatment of precipitation hardenable semi-austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    A precipitation hardenable semi-austenitic stainless steel AISI 632 grade was austenitized according to industrial specifications and thereafter subjected to isothermal treatment at sub-zero Celsius temperatures. During treatment, austenite transformed to martensite. The isothermal austenite-to-martensite...... treatment. Magnetometry showed that the additional thermal step in boiling nitrogen yields a minor increment of the fraction of martensite, but has a noteworthy accelerating effect on the transformation kinetics, which more pronounced when the isothermal holding is performed at a higher temperature. Data...... transformation was monitored in situ by magnetometry and data was used to sketch a TTT diagram for transformation. As an alternative treatment, after austenitization the material was immersed in boiling nitrogen and up-quenched to room temperature by immersion in water prior to be subjected to isothermal...

  11. Corrosion of an austenite and ferrite stainless steel weld

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRANIMIR N. GRGUR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Dissimilar metal connections are prone to frequent failures. These failures are attributed to the difference in the mechanical properties across the weld, the coefficients of thermal expansion of the two types of steels and the resulting creep at the interface. For the weld analyzed in this research, it was shown that corrosion measurements can be used for a proper evaluation of the quality of weld material and for the prediction of whether or not the material, after the applied welding process, can be in service without failures. It was found that the corrosion of the weld analyzed in this research resulted from the simultaneous activity of different types of corrosion. In this study, electrochemical techniques including polarization and metallographic analysis were used to analyze the corrosion of a weld material of ferrite and austenitic stainless steels. Based on surface, chemical and electrochemical analyses, it was concluded that corrosion occurrence was the result of the simultaneous activity of contact corrosion (ferrite and austenitic material conjuction, stress corrosion (originating from deformed ferrite structure and inter-granular corrosion (due to chromium carbide precipitation. The value of corrosion potential of –0.53 V shows that this weld, after the thermal treatment, is not able to repassivate a protective oxide film.

  12. EBSD study of a hot deformed austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadeh, H., E-mail: h-m@gmx.com [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Cabrera, J.M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundacio CTM Centre Tecnologic, Av. Bases de Manresa 1, 08242 Manresa (Spain); Najafizadeh, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Calvillo, P.R. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundacio CTM Centre Tecnologic, Av. Bases de Manresa 1, 08242 Manresa (Spain)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructural characterization of an austenitic stainless steel by EBSD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The role of twins in the nucleation and growth of dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Grain refinement through the discontinuous dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of recrystallized fraction using the grain average misorientation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Relationship between recrystallization and the frequency of high angle boundaries. - Abstract: The microstructural evolution of a 304 H austenitic stainless steel subjected to hot compression was studied by the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. Detailed data about the boundaries, coincidence site lattice (CSL) relationships and grain size were acquired from the orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) maps. It was found that twins play an important role in the nucleation and growth of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) during hot deformation. Moreover, the conventional discontinuous DRX (DDRX) was found to be in charge of grain refinement reached under the testing conditions studied. Furthermore, the recrystallized fraction (X) was determined from the grain average misorientation (GAM) distribution based on the threshold value of 1.55 Degree-Sign . The frequency of high angle boundaries showed a direct relationship with X. A time exponent of 1.11 was determined from Avrami analysis, which was related to the observed single-peak behavior in the stress-strain flow curves.

  13. Optimization of Melt Treatment for Austenitic Steel Grain Refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekakh, Simon N.; Ge, Jun; Richards, Von; O'Malley, Ron; TerBush, Jessica R.

    2017-02-01

    Refinement of the as-cast grain structure of austenitic steels requires the presence of active solid nuclei during solidification. These nuclei can be formed in situ in the liquid alloy by promoting reactions between transition metals (Ti, Zr, Nb, and Hf) and metalloid elements (C, S, O, and N) dissolved in the melt. Using thermodynamic simulations, experiments were designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a predicted sequence of reactions targeted to form precipitates that could act as active nuclei for grain refinement in austenitic steel castings. Melt additions performed to promote the sequential precipitation of titanium nitride (TiN) onto previously formed spinel (Al2MgO4) inclusions in the melt resulted in a significant refinement of the as-cast grain structure in heavy section Cr-Ni-Mo stainless steel castings. A refined as-cast structure consisting of an inner fine-equiaxed grain structure and outer columnar dendrite zone structure of limited length was achieved in experimental castings. The sequential of precipitation of TiN onto Al2MgO4 was confirmed using automated SEM/EDX and TEM analyses.

  14. Partial transformation of austenite in Al-Mn-Si TRIP steel upon tensile straining: an in situ EBSD study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Trine Nybo; Adachi, Y.; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos;

    2013-01-01

    The transformation of austenite to martensite in an Al–Mn–Si transformation-induced plasticity steel was investigated with in situ electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements under tensile straining. The visualisation of the microstructure upon straining allows for an investigation...... of the stability of austenite grains against strain-induced transformation, with particular focus on the grain size and the location of the austenite grains. The findings confirm that size and location of austenite grains are significant parameters for their stability. Small austenite grains were observed...... to be more stable than large grains, while austenite grains located beside bainitic ferrite are the most stable. Moreover, it is demonstrated that austenite grains transform gradually...

  15. Formation and Growth Kinetics of Reverted Austenite During Tempering of a High Co-Ni Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Marina; Ressel, Gerald; Méndez Martín, Francisca; Ploberger, Sarah; Marsoner, Stefan; Ebner, Reinhold

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that high Co-Ni steels exhibit excellent toughness. Since the good toughness in these steels is supposed to be related to thin layers of austenite between martensite crystals, this work presents an experimental study corroborated with diffusional calculations to characterize the evolution of reverted austenite. Atom probe measurements were conducted for analyzing the element distribution in austenite and martensite during tempering. These results were correlated with crystallographic information, which was obtained by using transmission electron microscopy investigations. Additionally, the experimental findings were compared with kinetic calculations with DICTRA™. The investigations reveal that reverted austenite formation during tempering is connected with a redistribution of Ni, Co, Cr, and Mo atoms. The austenite undergoes a Ni and Cr enrichment and a Co depletion, while in the neighboring martensite, a zone of Ni and Cr depletion and Co enrichment is formed. The changes in the chemical composition of austenite during tempering affect the stability of the austenite against phase transformation to martensite during plastic deformation and have thus decisive influence on the toughness of the material.

  16. Austenite grain growth simulation considering the solute-drag effect and pinning effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiyama, Naoto; Nishibata, Toshinobu; Seki, Akira; Hirata, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The pinning effect is useful for restraining austenite grain growth in low alloy steel and improving heat affected zone toughness in welded joints. We propose a new calculation model for predicting austenite grain growth behavior. The model is mainly comprised of two theories: the solute-drag effect and the pinning effect of TiN precipitates. The calculation of the solute-drag effect is based on the hypothesis that the width of each austenite grain boundary is constant and that the element content maintains equilibrium segregation at the austenite grain boundaries. We used Hillert’s law under the assumption that the austenite grain boundary phase is a liquid so that we could estimate the equilibrium solute concentration at the austenite grain boundaries. The equilibrium solute concentration was calculated using the Thermo-Calc software. Pinning effect was estimated by Nishizawa’s equation. The calculated austenite grain growth at 1473–1673 K showed excellent correspondence with the experimental results. PMID:28179962

  17. Composition-dependent variation of magnetic properties and interstitial ordering in homogeneous expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Bastian K.; Ståhl, Kenny; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin;

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structure and magnetic properties of austenitic stainless steel with a colossal interstitial content, so-called expanded austenite, are currently not completely understood. In the present work, the magnetic properties of homogeneous samples of expanded austenite, as prepared by lowera......The crystal structure and magnetic properties of austenitic stainless steel with a colossal interstitial content, so-called expanded austenite, are currently not completely understood. In the present work, the magnetic properties of homogeneous samples of expanded austenite, as prepared...... by lowerature nitriding of thin foils, were investigated with magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy. At room temperature, expanded austenite is paramagnetic for relatively low and for relatively high nitrogen contents (yN = 0.13 and 0.55, respectively, where yN is the interstitial nitrogen occupancy), while...... ferromagnetism is observed for intermediate nitrogen loads. Spontaneous volume magnetostriction was observed in the ferromagnetic state and the Curie temperature was found to depend strongly on the nitrogen content. For the first time, X-ray diffraction evidence for the occurrence of long-range interstitial...

  18. Effect of Austenitizing Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Hardness of Martensitic Stainless Steel AISI 420

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, L. D.; Du Toit, M.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of austenitizing on the microstructure and hardness of two martensitic stainless steels was examined with the aim of supplying heat-treatment guidelines to the user that will ensure a martensitic structure with minimal retained austenite, evenly dispersed carbides and a hardness of between 610 and 740 HV (Vickers hardness) after quenching and tempering. The steels examined during the course of this examination conform in composition to medium-carbon AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel, except for the addition of 0.13% vanadium and 0.62% molybdenum to one of the alloys. Steel samples were austenitized at temperatures between 1000 and 1200 °C, followed by oil quenching. The as-quenched microstructures were found to range from almost fully martensitic structures to martensite with up to 35% retained austenite after quenching, with varying amounts of carbides. Optical and scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the microstructures, and X-ray diffraction was employed to identify the carbide present in the as-quenched structures and to quantify the retained austenite contents. Hardness tests were performed to determine the effect of heat treatment on mechanical properties. As-quenched hardness values ranged from 700 to 270 HV, depending on the amount of retained austenite. Thermodynamic predictions (using the CALPHAD™ model) were employed to explain these microstructures based on the solubility of the carbide particles at various austenitizing temperatures.

  19. The formation of twinned austenite in Fe-10Cr-10Ni-2W maraging steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suk, J.I.; Hong, S.H.; Nam, S.W. (Dept. of Minerals Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 150, Cheongyang, Seoul (KR))

    1991-12-01

    The precipitation hardening mechanisms in high strength maraging steels have been studied in detail by many investigators, but limited information is available on the formation of austenite during aging. Some investigations have been concerned with the understanding of the effect of reverted austenite formed during aging on the mechanical properties. However, only a few investigations have been reported on the morphology and crystallographic feature of austenite. Shiang and Wayman first reported the twin-related and coupled morphology of Widmanstatten austenite plates which were frequently observed in maraging steel. In addition, Ameyama et al. reported the morphology and crystallographic features of austenite formed in ferrite grain during aging in a two-phase stainless steel, and found that each side of the austenite pair of twins satisfies the Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S) orientation relationship with the parent phase. The morphology and crystallographic features of the reverted austenite formed during aging of Fe-10Cr-10Ni-2W stainless maraging steel have been investigated in this paper. The major strengthening precipitate in Fe-10Cr-10Ni-2W maraging steels has been identified as the rod-shaped {eta}-Ni{sub 3}Ti phase in our previous study. The peculiar morphology of the austenite, i.e., twinned austenite, also has been found in our studies of maraging steel in the Fe-10Cr-10Ni-2W lath martensite. In addition, computer simulation of the diffraction pattern is used to confirm the orientation relationships, such as the Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S) relationship, the Nishiyama-Wasserman (N-W) relationship and the twin relationship by comparisons with the experimentaly observed results.

  20. The Influence of Saturation of Cast Iron Austenite with Carbon on the Ausferrite Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Giętka

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Austenitizing during quench hardening of the ductile cast iron influences the content of carbon in austenite depending on the soaking heat. On the other hand, the saturation of austenite impacts its transformation in the ausferritizing process of a metal matrix and forming of microstructure. Ductile cast iron with the ferrite matrix was hardened with isothermal transformation in the range of ausferritizing in temperature tpi = 400 i 300 0C and the range of time τpi = 7,5 �� 240 min. Specimens were gradually austenitized. They were soaked in the nominal temperature tγ = 950 0C, then precooled to the temperature tγ’ = 850 and 800 0C. Microstructure was investigated, there were also defined the proportion of austenite in the matrix of the cast iron and the content of carbon in it and hardness and impact strength in unnotched specimens. It was stated, that the precooling temperature deciding on the content of carbon in austenite influences kinetics of the ausferritic transformation, the content of carbon in the γ phase and impact strength and, in a less degree, hardness. As a result of gradual austenitizing the cast iron after quench hardening, in some conditions of treatment, reached mechanical properties corresponding, according to the ASTM A 897 standard, with high grades of ADI. Chilling in the range of austenitizing in temperature 850 and 800 0C led to the decrease of carbon in austenite what influenced positively on the matrix microstructure and properties of the ADI. Investigations in this range will be continued.

  1. Microstructural Features of Austenite Formation in C35 and C45 alloys

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The microstructural evolution during continuous heating experiments has been studied for two C-Mn steels with carbon contents in the range 0.35 to 0.45 wt pct using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). It is shown that the formation of the austenitic phase is possible in pearlite as well as in ferrite regions. Thus, a considerable overlap in time of ferrite-to-austenite and pearlite-to-austenite transformations is likely to occur. An...

  2. Stacking faults and microstrains in strain-hardened surface of nitrogen-alloyed austenitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narkevich, N.; Syrtanov, M.; Mironov, Yu.; Surikova, N.

    2016-11-01

    X-ray diffractometry has been applied to examine the effect of ultrasonic forging and frictional treatment on structural parameters and oriented microstrains responsible for the generation of residual microstresses in austenitic steel Fe-17Cr-19Mn-0.52N. The maximum stacking fault density α = 0.067 is observed in the steel surface layer of thickness 5 µm after frictional treatment. A decrease in the austenite lattice parameter after deformation treatment is associated with the change in the sign (direction) of residual stresses. Surface deformation treatment induces compression of the austenite lattice along the normal to the surface.

  3. Austenite layer and precipitation in high Co-Ni maraging steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenchong; Zhang, Chi; Yang, Zhigang

    2014-12-01

    In high Co-Ni maraging steel, austenite has a great effect on the fracture toughness of the steel and the precipitated carbides are the main strengthening phase. In this study, both austenite layers and precipitation were observed and their formation theory was analyzed by Thermo-Calc simulation and several reported results. TEM and HRTEM observation results showed that the thickness of the austenite layers was about 5-10 nm and the length of the needle-like precipitated carbides was less than 10nm. The carbides maintained coherent or semi-coherent relation with the matrix.

  4. Modeling of microstructural evolution during dynamic recrystallization in coarse Nb microalloyed austenite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Zhang; Wangyue Yang; Zuqing Sun

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the microstructural evolution during dynamic recrystallization in coarse Nb microalloyed austenite in thin slab direct rolling (TSDR) processing. A model was developed to predict the change of the austenite grain size during the dynamic recrystallization, by using the law of mixtures. The equations initially developed for partial static recrystallization were used for partial dynamic recrystallization, by adjusting the value of the constant. The results show that the change of the austenite grain size can be reasonably described by using the equations developed according to the law of mixtures.

  5. Thermal deformation behavior and microstructure of nuclear austenitic stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Gleeble-1500D thermal simulation tester was employed in the hot-compression investigation of as-cast nuclear 304 austenitic stainless steel under conditions: deformation temperature 950―1200℃; deformations 30% and 50%; deformation rates 0.01 and 0.1 s?1. The results show that the flow stress decreases with temperature rise under the same strain rate and deformation, that the flow stress increases with deformation under the same temperature and strain rate, and that the flow stress increases with strain rate under the same temperature condition, i.e., work hardening becomes distinct. Materials exhibit better strength-toughness when the strain rate is 0.01 s-1, the deformation is 50%, and the temperature is 1050℃.

  6. Austenite Formation Kinetics During Rapid Heating in a Microalloyed Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BURNETT,M.E.; DYKHUIZEN,RONALD C.; KELLEY,J. BRUCE; PUSKAR,JOSEPH D.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.

    1999-09-07

    The model parameters for the normalized 1054V1 material were compared to parameters previously generated for 1026 steel, and the transformation behavior was relatively consistent. Validation of the model predictions by heating into the austenite plus undissolved ferrite phase field and rapidly quenching resulted in reasonable predictions when compared to the measured volume fractions from optical metallography. The hot rolled 1054V1 material, which had a much coarser grain size and a non-equilibrium volume fraction of pearlite, had significantly different model parameters and the on heating transformation behavior of this material was less predictable with the established model. The differences in behavior is consistent with conventional wisdom that normalized micro-structure produce a more consistent response to processing, and it reinforces the need for additional work in this area.

  7. Surface treatment and corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel biomaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravcová, M.; Palček, P.; Zatkalíková, V.; Tański, T.; Król, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this article results from corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L after different surface treatments are published. “As received” surface and surface after grinding resulted in lower resistance to pitting corrosion in physiological solution than electrochemically polished in H3PO4+H2SO4+H2O. Electropolishing also improved the surface roughness in comparison with the “as received” surface. Deposition of Al2O3 nanometric ALD coating improves the corrosion resistance of stainless steel in chloride-containing environment by shifting the breakdown potential toward more positive values. This oxide coating not only improves the corrosion resistance but it also affects the wettability of the surface, resulting in hydrophobic surface.

  8. Small punch creep test in a 316 austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saucedo-Munoz, M. L.; Komazaki, S. I.; Hashida, T.; Lopez-Hirata, V. M.

    2015-03-30

    The small punch creep test was applied to evaluate the creep behavior of a 316 type austenitic stainless steel at temperatures of 650, 675 and 700 degree centigrade. The small punch test was carried out using a creep tester with a specimen size of 10x10x0.3 mm at 650, 675 and 700 degree centigrade using loads from 199 to 512 N. The small punch creep curves show the three stages found in the creep curves of the conventional uniaxial test. The conventional creep relationships which involve parameters such as creep rate, stress, time to rupture and temperature were followed with the corresponding parameters of small punch creep test and they permitted to explain the creep behavior in this steel. The mechanism and activation energy of the deformation process were the grain boundary sliding and diffusion, respectively, during creep which caused the intergranular fracture in the tested specimens. (Author)

  9. Multiaxial elastoplastic cyclic loading of austenitic 316L steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Mazánová

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic stress-strain response and fatigue damage character has been investigated in austenitic stainless steel 316L. Hollow cylindrical specimens have been cyclically deformed in combined tension-compression and torsion under constant strain rate condition and different constant strain and shear strain amplitudes. In-phase and 90° out-of-phase cyclic straining was applied and the stress response has been monitored. Cyclic hardening/softening curves were assessed in both channels. Cyclic softening followed for higher strain amplitudes by long-term cyclic hardening was observed. Cyclic stress-strain curves were determined. Study of the surface damage in fractured specimens revealed the types and directions of principal cracks and the sources of fatigue crack initiation in slip bands.

  10. The propagation of ultrasound in an austenitic weld

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Søren; Sørensen, Mads Peter; Kristensen, Anders Wang

    2000-01-01

    , slices of different thicknesses from the original weld have been fabricated. Through-transmission A-scans have then been produced for each weld slice and compared with the corresponding numerical simulation. A comparison of the direction of ultrasound propagation through the weld for the two approaches......The propagation of ultrasound through an austenitic weld is investigated experimentally as well as in a numerical simulation. The weld is insonified at normal incidence to the fusion line with a longitudinal contact transducer. In order to experimentally trace the ultrasound through the weld...... shows quite good agreement. However, attenuation due to scattering at grain boundaries in the weld is poorly modelled in the simulation. In order to improve this, a better model of the weld is needed....

  11. Production of Austenitic Steel for the LHC Superconducting Dipole Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Bertinelli, F; Komori, T; Peiro, G; Rossi, L

    2006-01-01

    The austenitic-steel collars are an important component of the LHC dipole magnets, operating at cryogenic temperature under high mechanical stress. The required steel, known as YUS 130S, has been specifically developed for this application by Nippon Steel Corporation (NSC), who was awarded a CERN contract in 1999 for the supply of 11 500 tonnes. In 2005 - after six years of work - the contract is being successfully completed, with final production being ensured since October 2003 by Nippon Steel & Sumikin Stainless Steel Corporation (NSSC). The paper describes the steel properties, its manufacturing and quality control process, organization of production, logistics and contract follow-up. Extensive statistics have been collected relating to mechanical, physical and technological parameters. Specific attention is dedicated to measurements of magnetic permeability performed at cryogenic temperatures by CERN, the equipment used and statistical results. Reference is also made to the resulting precision of the...

  12. Laser Welding Of Finned Tubes Made Of Austenitic Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stolecki M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the technology of welding of finned tubes made of the X5CrNi1810 (1.4301 austenitic steel, developed at Energoinstal SA, allowing one to get high quality joints that meet the requirements of the classification societies (PN-EN 15614, and at the same time to significantly reduce the manufacturing costs. The authors described an automatic technological line equipped with a Trumph disc laser and a tube production technological process. To assess the quality of the joints, one performed metallographic examinations, hardness measurements and a technological attempt to rupture the fin. Analysis of the results proved that the laser-welded finned tubes were performed correctly and that the welded joints had shown no imperfections.

  13. Microstructural evolution in fast-neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    The present work has focused on the specific problem of fast-neutron-induced radiation damage to austenitic stainless steels. These steels are used as structural materials in current fast fission reactors and are proposed for use in future fusion reactors. Two primary components of the radiation damage are atomic displacements (in units of displacements per atom, or dpa) and the generation of helium by nuclear transmutation reactions. The radiation environment can be characterized by the ratio of helium to displacement production, the so-called He/dpa ratio. Radiation damage is evidenced microscopically by a complex microstructural evolution and macroscopically by density changes and altered mechanical properties. The purpose of this work was to provide additional understanding about mechanisms that determine microstructural evolution in current fast reactor environments and to identify the sensitivity of this evolution to changes in the He/dpa ratio. This latter sensitivity is of interest because the He/dpa ratio in a fusion reactor first wall will be about 30 times that in fast reactor fuel cladding. The approach followed in the present work was to use a combination of theoretical and experimental analysis. The experimental component of the work primarily involved the examination by transmission electron microscopy of specimens of a model austenitic alloy that had been irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. A major aspect of the theoretical work was the development of a comprehensive model of microstructural evolution. This included explicit models for the evolution of the major extended defects observed in neutron irradiated steels: cavities, Frank faulted loops and the dislocation network. 340 refs., 95 figs., 18 tabs.

  14. Precipitation hardening in Fe--Ni base austenitic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, K.M.

    1979-05-01

    The precipitation of metastable Ni/sub 3/X phases in the austenitic Fe--Ni-base alloys has been investigated by using various combinations of hardening elements, including Ti, Ta, Al, and Nb. The theoretical background on the formation of transition precipitates has been summarized based on: atomic size, compressibility, and electron/atom ratio. A model is proposed from an analysis of static concentration waves ordering the fcc lattice. Ordered structure of metastable precipitates will change from the triangularly ordered ..gamma..', to the rectangularly ordered ..gamma..'', as the atomic ratio (Ti + Al)/(Ta + Nb) decreases. The concurrent precipitation of ..gamma..' and ..gamma..'' occurs at 750/sup 0/C when the ratio is between 1.5 and 1.9. Aging behavior was studied over the temperature range of 500/sup 0/C to 900/sup 0/C. Typical hardness curves show a substantial hardening effect due to precipitation. A combination of strength and fracture toughness can be developed by employing double aging techniques. The growth of these coherent intermediate precipitates follows the power law with the aging time t : t/sup 1/3/ for the spherical ..gamma..' particles; and t/sup 1/2/ for the disc-shaped ..gamma..''. The equilibrium ..beta.. phase is observed to be able to nucleate on the surface of imbedded carbides. The addition of 5 wt % Cr to the age-hardened alloys provides a non-magnetic austenite which is stable against the formation of mechanically induced martensite.Cr addition retards aging kinetics of the precipitation reactions, and suppresses intergranular embrittlement caused by the high temperature solution anneal. The aging kinetics are also found to be influenced by solution annealing treatments.

  15. Thermal Stability of Austenite and Properties of Quenching & Partitioning (Q&P) Treated AHSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, R. M.; Wang, L.; Jin, X. J.

    A Fe-0.2C-1.87Mn-1.42Si-0.0405Al steel subjected to an appropriate Quenching & Partitioning treatment (Q&P) exhibits the combination of high tensile strength (1311 MPa) and high elongation (13.6%). The thermal decomposition of retained austenite in the as-treated steel has been studied at an elevated temperature of 500oC by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Activation energy has been obtained by performing a Kissinger analysis method. The DSC results show that the activation energy of thermal decomposition of the retained austenite in this Q&P steel is 221.3KJ/mol, which is in a good agreement with the result of retained austenite in similar chemical composition steel subjected to a TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) treatment. This investigation helps to investigate the stability of retained austenite in Q&P steels upon cooling or under external stress.

  16. A Feasibility Study on Low Temperature Thermochemical Treatments of Austenitic Stainless Steel in Fluidized Bed Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruman, Esa; Sun, Yong; Triwiyanto, Askar; Manurung, Yupiter H. P.; Adesta, Erry Y.

    2011-04-01

    In this work, the feasibility of using an industrial fluidized bed furnace to perform low temperature thermochemical treatments of austenitic stainless steels has been studied, with the aim to produce expanded austenite layers with combined wear and corrosion resistance, similar to those achievable by plasma and gaseous processes. Several low temperature thermochemical treatments were studied, including nitriding, carburizing, combined nitridingcarburizing (hybrid treatment), and sequential carburizing and nitriding. The results demonstrate that it is feasible to produce expanded austenite layers on the investigated austenitic stainless steel by the fluidized bed heat treatment technique, thus widening the application window for the novel low temperature processes. The results also demonstrate that the fluidized bed furnace is the most effective for performing the hybrid treatment, which involves the simultaneous incorporation of nitrogen and carbon together into the surface region of the component in nitrogen and carbon containing atmospheres. Such hybrid treatment produces a thicker and harder layer than the other three processes investigated.

  17. Effect of Primary Factor on Cavitation Resistance of Some Austenitic Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zai-you; ZHU Jin-hua

    2003-01-01

    The cavitation resistance of six kinds of austenitic metals was investigated using a rotating disc rig. The research results show that cavitation resistance of the austenitic metals is obviously raised due to cavitation-induced martensite and greatly influenced by mechanism of martensitic transformation. The cavitation resistance of two stress-induced martensite Fe-Mn-Si-Cr shape memory alloys is much better than that of three strain-induced martensite austenitic stainless steels. The Fe-Mn-Si-Cr shape memory alloys possess excellent cavitation resistance mainly because of their excellent elasticity in local small-zone. The first principal factor for cavitation resistance of metastable austenitic metals is unloaded rebounding depth, and the second one is energy dissipation resulted from cavitation-induced martensite.

  18. Comparing the possibilities of austenite content determination in austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Myszka

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents various methods for assessment of the austenite volume fraction in Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI. Tests were carried out on two types of ADI, i.e. unalloyed and alloyed with the addition of 0.72%Cu and 0.27%Mo, heat treated under different conditions of isothermal transformation to obtain different austenite volume fractions. The test material was then subjected to metallographic examinations, X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, an analysis using the author's genuine programme of artificial neural networks, image analysis and magnetic measurements. The results were compared with each other indicating the possibility of a quantitative measurement of austenite and other phases present in cast iron. It was found that different methods of measurement are not fully consistent with each other but show similar results of the austenite content.

  19. Interface Migration between Martensite and Austenite during Quenching and Partitioning (Q&P) Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning ZHONG; Xiaodong WANG; Yonghua RONG; Li WANG

    2006-01-01

    An Fe-0.2C-1.5Si-1.67Mn steel was subjected to quenching and partitioning (Q&P) process, and the interface migration between martensite and austenite at an elevated partitioning temperature was observed. The interface migration is excluded in constrained paraequilibrium (CPE) model. Based on "endpoint" predicted by CPE model the thermodynamic condition of interface migration is analyzed, that is, the difference in the chemical potential of iron in both ferrite (martenisite) and austenite produces the driving force of the iron atoms to migrate from one phase to the other phase. In addition, the interface migration can change the austenite fraction; as a result, the austenite fraction at partitioning temperature may be higher than that at quenching temperature through the interface migration, but this phenomenon cannot be explained by CPE model.

  20. Static Recrystallization Behavior of Hot Deformed Austenite for Micro-Alloyed Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie HUANG; Zhou XU; Xin XING

    2003-01-01

    Static recrystallization behavior of austenite for micro-alloyed steel during hot rolling was studied and the influence (τ-ε diagram) of holding time and deformation at different deformations and isothermal temperatures on microstructuralstate of austen

  1. Fabrication of high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels with excellent mechanical and pitting corrosion properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-bing Li; Zhou-hua Jiang; Yang Cao; Zu-rui Zhang

    2009-01-01

    18Cr18Mn2Mo0.9N high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel exhibits high strength and good ductility at room temperature. The steel shows typical duc-tile-brittle transition behavior and excellent pitting corrosion resistance properties.

  2. Effect of Grain Size on Mechanical Properties of Nickel-Free High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hua-bing; JIANG Zhou-hua; ZHANG Zu-rui; YANG Yan

    2009-01-01

    The fine grained structures of nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels had been obtained by means of cold rolling and subsequent annealing.The relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties and gain size of nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels was examined.High strength and good ductility of the steel were found.In the grain size range,the Hall-Petch dependency for yield stress,tensile strength,and hardness was valid for grain size ranges for the nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel.In the present study,the ductility of cold rolled nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel decreased with annealing time when the grain size was refined.The fracture surfaces of the tensile specimens in the grain size range were covered with dimples as usually seen in a ductile fracture mode.

  3. HYDROGEN-ASSISTED FRACTURE IN FORGED TYPE 304L AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Switzner, Nathan; Neidt, Ted; Hollenbeck, John; Knutson, J.; Everhart, Wes; Hanlin, R. [University of Missouri-Kansas City; Bergen, R. [Precision Metal Products; Balch, D. K. [Sandia Natl Laboratory

    2012-09-06

    Austenitic stainless steels generally have good resistance to hydrogen-assisted fracture; however, structural designs for high-pressure gaseous hydrogen are constrained by the low strength of this class of material. Forging is used to increase the low strength of austenitic stainless steels, thus improving the efficiency of structural designs. Hydrogen-assisted racture, however, depends on microstructural details associated with manufacturing. In this study, hydrogen-assisted fracture of forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is investigated. Microstructural variation in multi-step forged 304L was achieved by forging at different rates and temperatures, and by process annealing. High internal hydrogen content in forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is achieved by thermal precharging in gaseous hydrogen and results in as much as 50% reduction of tensile ductility.

  4. Effect of Plastic Deformation on Magnetic Properties of Fe-40%Ni-2%Mn Austenitic Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Selva Büyükakkas; H Aktas; S Akturk

    2007-01-01

    The effects of plastic deformation on the magnetic properties of austenite structure in an Fe-40%Ni-2%Mn alloy is investigated by using Mssbauer spectroscopy and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) techniques The morphology of the alloy has been obtained by using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The magnetic behaviour of austenite state is ferromagnetic. After plastic deformation, a mixed magnetic structure including both paramagnetic and ferromagnetic states has been obtained at the room temperature. The volume fraction changes, the effective hyperfine fields of the ferromagnetic austenite phase and isomery shift values have also been determined by Mssbauer spectroscopy. The Curie point (TC) and the Neel temperature (TN) have been investigated by means of DSC system for non-deformed and deformed Fe-Ni-Mn alloy. The plastic deformation of the alloy reduces the TN and enhances the paramagnetic character of austenitic Fe-Ni-Mn alloy.

  5. Fundamental study of the austenite formation and decomposition in low-silicon, aluminum added TRIP steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose Enrique

    2005-11-01

    TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steels are under development for automotive applications that require high strength and excellent formability. Conventional TRIP steels consist of a multiphase microstructure comprised of a ferrite matrix with a dispersion of bainite and metastable retained austenite. The high ductility exhibited by these steels results from the transformation of the metastable retained austenite to martensite during straining. In conventional TRIP steel processing, the multiphase microstructure is obtained by controlled cooling from the alpha + gamma region to an isothermal holding temperature. During this holding, bainite forms and carbon is rejected out into the austenite, which lowers the Ms temperature and stabilizes the austenite to room temperature. In this research project, a fundamental study of a low-Si, Mo-Nb added cold rolled TRIP steel with and without Al additions was conducted. In this study, the recrystallization of cold-rolled ferrite, the formation of austenite during intercritical annealing and the characteristics of the decomposition of the intercritically annealed austenite by controlled cooling rates were systematically assessed. Of special interest were: (i) the effect of the initial hot band microstructure, (ii) the formation of epitaxial ferrite during cooling from the intercritical annealing temperature to the isothermal holding temperature, (iii) the influence of the intercritically annealed austenite on the formation of bainite during the isothermal holding temperature, and (iv) the influence of the processing variables on the type, amount, composition and stability of the retained austenite. During this research study, techniques such as OM, SEM, EBSD, TEM, XRD and Magnetometry were used to fully characterize the microstructures. Furthermore, a Gleeble 3500 unit at US Steel Laboratories was used for dilatometry studies and to simulate different CGL processing routes, from which specimens were obtained to evaluate

  6. Plasma Nitriding of Austenitic Stainless Steel with Severe Surface Deformation Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Shi-jun; GAO Yu-zhou; WANG Liang; SUN Jun-cai; HEI Zu-kun

    2004-01-01

    The dc glow discharge plasma nitriding of austenite stainless steel with severe surface deformation layer is used to produce much thicker surface modified layer. This kind of layers has useful properties such as a high surface hardness of about 1500 Hv 0.1 and high resistance to frictional wear. This paper presents the structures and properties of low temperature plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel with severe surface deformation layer.

  7. KINETICS OF α'-MARTENSITE FORMATION DURING FATIGUE DEFORMATION IN METASTABLE AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuzaki, K.; T. Maki; Tamura, I.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of applied total strain range on the critical condition necessary for the onset of α'-martensitic transformation kinetics during the fatigue deformation was studied in AISI type 304 metastable austenitic stainless steel at room temperature. In the case of fatigue deformation, the α'-martensite formation was observed even in the condition that the saturated stress amplitude of austenite phase is smaller than the critical applied stress for the onset of α'-martensite formation for th...

  8. a Study Into the Effects of AN Austenitic Weld on Ultrasonic Array Imaging Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, A. J.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Zhang, J.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2011-06-01

    An industrial application of ultrasonic array imaging is the inspection of austenitic welds with high inhomogeneity and anisotropy. These result in attenuation and perturbation of the signals that adversely affects imaging performance. Here, the effects of perturbations introduced by an austenitic weld on array imaging performance are investigated experimentally. It is shown that three major factors contribute to the degradation of image quality: timing errors, phase errors, and multi-path propagation and scattering.

  9. Austenite Grain Growth and Precipitate Evolution in a Carburizing Steel with Combined Niobium and Molybdenum Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enloe, Charles M.; Findley, Kip O.; Speer, John G.

    2015-11-01

    Austenite grain growth and microalloy precipitate size and composition evolution during thermal processing were investigated in a carburizing steel containing various additions of niobium and molybdenum. Molybdenum delayed the onset of abnormal austenite grain growth and reduced the coarsening of niobium-rich precipitates during isothermal soaking at 1323 K, 1373 K, and 1423 K (1050 °C, 1100 °C, and 1150 °C). Possible mechanisms for the retardation of niobium-rich precipitate coarsening in austenite due to molybdenum are considered. The amount of Nb in solution and in precipitates at 1373 K (1100 °C) did not vary over the holding times evaluated. In contrast, the amount of molybdenum in (Nb,Mo)C precipitates decreased with time, due to rejection of Mo into austenite and/or dissolution of fine Mo-rich precipitates. In hot-rolled alloys, soaking in the austenite regime resulted in coarsening of the niobium-rich precipitates at a rate that exceeded that predicted by the Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner relation for volume-diffusion-controlled coarsening. This behavior is attributed to an initial bimodal precipitate size distribution in hot-rolled alloys that results in accelerated coarsening rates during soaking. Modification of the initial precipitate size distribution by thermal processing significantly lowered precipitate coarsening rates during soaking and delayed the associated onset of abnormal austenite grain growth.

  10. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure investigation of annealed carbon expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas L.; Somers, Marcel A. J.;

    2012-01-01

    Carbon expanded austenite synthesized through carburizing of austenitic stainless steel powder at 380°C was annealed at 470°C and investigated with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and synchrotron powder diffraction (SPD). SPD showed that the samples consisted of carbon expanded...... austenite and Hägg carbide, Ξ-M5C2. EXAFS showed that the Cr atoms were mainly present in environments similar to the carbides Hägg Ξ-M5C2 and M23C6. The environments of the Fe and Ni atoms were concluded to be largely metallic austenite. Light optical micrograph of stainless steel AISI 316 gas......-carburized in a temperature regime around 470°C. The surface zone is converted into carbon expanded austenite; the high interstitial content of carbon dissolved in the surface results in highly favorable materials properties. In the present article the local atomic environment of (annealed) carbon expanded austenite...

  11. Theoretical and experimental study of carburisation and decarburisation of a meta-stable austenitic steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles West

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Metastable austenitic stainless steels are known to undergo a partial transformation of austenite to martensite as a consequence of plastic deformation. In the case of cyclic loading, a certain level of plastic strain must be exceeded, and phase formation takes place after an incubation period, during which the necessary amount of plastic deformation is accumulated. The susceptibility of the austenitic phase to deformation-induced martensite formation is strongly affected by the temperature of loading and the stability of austenite, which itself depends on the chemical composition. A key element in this regard is carbon which stabilizes the austenitic phase. It is shown in this study that the carbon concentration can be analysed systematically and reproducible by means of annealing treatments, if the parameters of these treatments are carefully defined on the basis of advanced theoretical thermodynamic and kinetic considerations. First results on the effect of carbon concentration and temperature of fatigue testing on the austenite/martensite transformation are presented, in order to illustrate the significance of these parameters on the martensite formation rate.

  12. Microstructural evolution of GCr15 steel during austenitizing and quenching considering C and Cr content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘青龙; 钱东升; 魏文婷

    2016-01-01

    Microstructural evolution of GCr15 steels with different C and Cr contents during austenitizing and quenching was studied. Thermodynamic analysis of cementite dissolution was implied to obtain the critical temperature. The coordination numberx in FexCr3-xC and the volume fraction of undissolved cementite were computed according to element conservation and equilibrium phase diagram. TheMS (martensite transformation temperature) was calculated by using empirical formula. The retained austenite content was calculated with further consideration of quenching temperature. The results showed that the coordination number and the undissolved cementite content were promoted by the austenitizing temperature and carbon content of the steel. Increasing Cr element reduced the coordination number.GCr15 steels with different components had nearly the sameMS when austenitization at 830 °C to 860 °C. The interaction of C and Cr complicated the evolution ofMS and retained austenite content. The results were in good agreement with the literature, which could guide to obtain specified retained austenite and/or carbides.

  13. On the measurement of austenite in supermartensitic stainless steel by X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolchard, Julian Richard, E-mail: tolchard@material.ntnu.no [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Sømme, Astri; Solberg, Jan Ketil [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Solheim, Karl Gunnar [Statoil, Stavanger (Norway)

    2015-01-15

    Sections of a 13Cr supermartensitic stainless steel were investigated to determine the optimum sample preparation for measurement of the austenite content by X-ray diffraction. The surface of several samples was mechanically ground or polished using media of grit sizes in the range 1–120 μm. The strained surface layer was afterwards removed stepwise by electropolishing, and the austenite content measured at each step. It was found that any level of mechanical grinding or polishing results in a reduction of the measured austenite fraction relative to the true bulk value, and that coarser grinding media impart greater damage and greater reduction in the measured austenite content. The results thus highlight the importance of the electropolishing step in preparation of such samples, but suggest that the American Society for Testing and Materials standard E975-03 substantially overestimates the amount of material which needs to be removed to recover the true “bulk” content. - Highlights: • Quantitative Rietveld analysis of austenite/martensite ratio in supermartensitic stainless steels • Critical evaluation of sample preparation for residual austenite measurements by X-ray diffraction • Highlighting of the importance of electropolishing as a final preparation step.

  14. In Situ Thermo-magnetic Investigation of the Austenitic Phase During Tempering of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo Supermartensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojack, A.; Zhao, L.; Morris, P. F.; Sietsma, J.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of austenite during tempering of a 13Cr6Ni2Mo supermartensitic stainless steel (X2CrNiMoV13-5-2) was investigated using an in situ thermo-magnetic technique to establish the kinetics of the martensite to austenite transformation and the stability of austenite. The austenite fraction was obtained from in situ magnetization measurements. It was found that during heating to the tempering temperature 1 to 2 vol pct of austenite, retained during quenching after the austenitization treatment, decomposed between 623 K and 753 K (350 °C and 480 °C). The activation energy for martensite to austenite transformation was found by JMAK-fitting to be 233 kJ/mol. This value is similar to the activation energy for Ni and Mn diffusion in iron and supports the assumption that partitioning of Ni and Mn to austenite are mainly rate determining for the austenite formation during tempering. This also indicates that the stability of austenite during cooling after tempering depends on these elements. With increasing tempering temperature the thermal stability of austenite is decreasing due to the lower concentrations of austenite-stabilizing elements in the increased fraction of austenite. After cooling from the tempering temperature the retained austenite was further partially decomposed during holding at room temperature. This appears to be related to previous martensite formation during cooling.

  15. Effects Of The Combined Heat And Cryogenic Treatment On The Stability Of Austenite In A High Co-Ni Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruber M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The stability of austenite is one of the most dominant factors affecting the toughness properties of high Co-Ni steels such as Aermet 100 and AF1410. Thus, the aim of this work was to get a deeper understanding on the impact of combined heat and cryogenic treatment on the stability of retained and reverted austenite. In order to characterize the evolution of the phase fraction of austenite during tempering at different temperatures and times, X-ray diffraction analyses were carried out. The stability of austenite, which was formed during tempering, was analyzed with dilatometric investigations by studying the transformation behavior of the austenite during cooling from tempering temperature down to −100°C. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy investigations were performed to characterize the chemical composition and phase distribution of austenite and martensite before and after tempering.

  16. Intermetallic Strengthened Alumina-Forming Austenitic Steels for Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Bin [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Baker, Ian [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)

    2016-03-31

    In order to achieve energy conversion efficiencies of >50 % for steam turbines/boilers in power generation systems, the materials required must be strong, corrosion-resistant at high temperatures (>700°C), and economically viable. Austenitic steels strengthened with Laves phase and L12 precipitates, and alloyed with aluminum to improve oxidation resistance, are potential candidate materials for these applications. The creep resistance of these alloys is significantly improved through intermetallic strengthening (Laves-Fe2Nb + L12-Ni3Al precipitates) without harmful effects on oxidation resistance. Microstructural and microchemical analyses of the recently developed alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) steels (Fe-14Cr-32Ni-3Nb-3Al-2Ti-based) indicated they are strengthened by Ni3Al(Ti) L12, NiAl B2, Fe2Nb Laves phase and MC carbide precipitates. Different thermomechanical treatments (TMTs) were performed on these stainless steels in an attempt to further improve their mechanical properties. The thermo-mechanical processing produced nanocrystalline grains in AFA alloys and dramatically increased their yield strength at room temperature. Unfortunately, the TMTs didn’t increase the yield strengths of AFA alloys at ≥700ºC. At these temperatures, dislocation climb is the dominant mechanism for deformation of TMT alloys according to strain rate jump tests. After the characterization of aged AFA alloys, we found that the largest strengthening effect from L12 precipitates can be obtained by aging for less than 24 h. The coarsening behavior of the L12 precipitates was not influenced by carbon and boron additions. Failure analysis and post-mortem TEM analysis were performed to study the creep failure mechanisms of these AFA steels after creep tests. Though the Laves and B2-NiAl phase precipitated along the boundaries can improve the creep properties, cracks were

  17. Austenite nucleation and growth observed on the level of individual grains by three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Savran, V.I.; Offerman, S. E.; Sietsma, J.

    2010-01-01

    Austenite nucleation and growth is studied during continuous heating using three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3-D XRD) microscopy at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) (Grenoble, France). Unique in-situ observations of austenite nucleation and growth kinetics were made for two commercial medium-carbon low-alloy steels (0.21 and 0.35 wt pct carbon with an initial microstructure of ferrite and pearlite). The measured austenite volume fraction as a function of temperature shows...

  18. The influence of silicon and aluminum on austenite deformation behavior during fatigue and tensile loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnhoff, Gregory R.

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) for automobile light-weighting utilize Si and Al alloying to retain austenite in the microstructure during thermal partitioning treatments. This research project utilized fully austenitic steels with varied Si and Al compositions to understand the effect of these elements on austenite deformation response, including deformation induced martensite formation and deformation twinning. Specific focus was directed at understanding austenite deformation response during fatigue loading. Independent alloying additions of 2.5 wt pct Si and Al were made to a base steel composition of 15 Ni - 11 Cr - 1 Mn - 0.03 C (wt pct). Weak beam dark field transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging of dissociated dislocations was implemented to experimentally determine the influences of Si and Al on austenite stacking fault energy (SFE). The 2.5 wt pct Si alloying addition decreased the SFE by 6.4 mJ/m2, while the 2.5 wt pct Al alloying increased the SFE by 12 mJ/m2. Fully reversed, total strain controlled, low cycle fatigue (LCF) tests indicated that all four alloys underwent primary cyclic hardening and stabilization. Secondary cyclic strain hardening was correlated to BCC martensite formation using Feritscope magnetic fraction measurements of LCF specimens; the formation of 1 pct martensite led to 7 MPa of secondary hardening. TEM showed that martensite predominantly formed as parallel, irregular bands through strain induced nucleation on austenite shear bands. The austenite shear bands consisted of austenite {111} planes with concentrated dislocations, stacking faults, and/or HCP epsilon-martensite. Aluminum alloying promoted martensite formation during LCF, while Si suppressed martensite. Therefore, the strain induced nucleation process was not suppressed by the increased SFE associated with Al alloying. Tensile testing indicated that Si alloying promoted deformation twinning by lowering the SFE. Similarly to LCF loading, Al promoted

  19. Effect of martensite to austenite reversion on the formation of nano/submicron grained AISI 301 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimi, M.; Najafizadeh, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kermanpur, A., E-mail: ahmad_k@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eskandari, M. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-11-15

    The martensite to austenite reversion behavior of 90% cold rolled AISI 301 stainless steel was investigated in order to refine the grain size. Cold rolled specimens were annealed at 600-900 deg. C, and subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Feritscope, and hardness measurements. The effects of annealing parameters on the formation of fully-austenitic nano/submicron grained structure and the mechanisms involved were studied. It was found that annealing at 800 deg. C for 10 s exhibited the smallest average austenite grain size of 240 {+-} 60 nm with an almost fully-austenitic structure.

  20. Pearlite transformation in high carbon steels deformed in metastable austenite region; Jun`antei austenite iki de kakoshita kotansoko no pearlite hentai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daito, Y.; Aihara, K.; Nishizawa, T. [Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-09-01

    Pearlite structure was discussed noticing particularly on the state of nucleus composition, for the case when high carbon steels mainly structured by pearlite was processed in metastable austenite region below the point A1 which is thought a non-recrystallized region. When the processing amount is increased in the metastable austenite region, the size of pearlite colonies decreased. This is because of increase in nucleus producing site as a result of the processing. Even with a steel of eutectoid carbon concentration of an equilibrium diagram, proeuctoid ferrite is produced if the processing is given in the metastable austenite region. Furthermore, the production amount of the proeuctoid ferrite increased with increasing processing amount. If the processing is given in the metastable austenite region, the region that becomes a single pearlite structure shifted to hypereuctoid carbon concentration side as the transformation temperature has fallen. The result of an experiment performed in carbon concentration at which the single pearlite structure is obtained agreed well with drive force equilibrium line of ferrite and cementite as calculated based on the Gibbs energy. 18 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel core internal welds.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Park, J.-H.; Ruther, W. E.; Sanecki, J. E.; Strain, R. V.; Zaluzec, N. J.

    1999-04-14

    Microstructural analyses by several advanced metallographic techniques were conducted on austenitic stainless steel mockup and core shroud welds that had cracked in boiling water reactors. Contrary to previous beliefs, heat-affected zones of the cracked Type 304L, as well as 304 SS core shroud welds and mockup shielded-metal-arc welds, were free of grain-boundary carbides, which shows that core shroud failure cannot be explained by classical intergranular stress corrosion cracking. Neither martensite nor delta-ferrite films were present on the grain boundaries. However, as a result of exposure to welding fumes, the heat-affected zones of the core shroud welds were significantly contaminated by oxygen and fluorine, which migrate to grain boundaries. Significant oxygen contamination seems to promote fluorine contamination and suppress thermal sensitization. Results of slow-strain-rate tensile tests also indicate that fluorine exacerbates the susceptibility of irradiated steels to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. These observations, combined with previous reports on the strong influence of weld flux, indicate that oxygen and fluorine contamination and fluorine-catalyzed stress corrosion play a major role in cracking of core shroud welds.

  2. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands.

  3. Austenite steel transformations under the influence of fatigue loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Skibicki

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Behavior of materials and structures in fatigue non-proportional loading conditions, characterized by the principal axes rotation during fatigue cycles, is an important issue because of its impact on fatigue properties. The article presents results of an analysis ofmicrostructural steel X5CrNi18-10, subjected to proportional fatigue loadings: torsion and push-pull, as well as non-proportional ones.Variability of the principal axes positions of non-proportional loadings was obtained by using a loading program with alternately realized torsion and tension-compression blocks. The work includes an analysis of one-phase microstructure and microhardness tests of fatigue samples were carried out. The cyclic loading value accepted for the tests caused an martensite transformation induced by plastic strain and occurrence of slip bands in the grains of austenite. A comparative analysis revealed differences in the transformation intensity, depending on the type of applied loading and on the degree of its non-proportionality.

  4. Proof of fatigue strength of ferritic and austenitic nuclear components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, E.; Herter, K.H.; Schuler, X.; Weissenberg, T. [Materialpruefungsanstalt, Univ. Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    For the construction, design and operation of nuclear components and systems the appropriate technical codes and standards provide material data, detailed stress analysis procedures and a design philosophy which guarantees a reliable behaviour of the structural components throughout the specified lifetime. Especially for cyclic stress evaluation the different codes and standards provide different fatigue analyses procedures to be performed considering the various mechanical and thermal loading histories and geometric complexities of the components. For the fatigue design curves used as limiting criteria the influence of different factors like e.g., environment, surface finish and temperature must be taken into consideration in an appropriate way. Fatigue tests were performed with low alloy steels as well as with Nb- and Ti-stabilized German austenitic stainless steels in air and simulated high temperature boiling water reactor environment. The experimental results are compared and valuated with the mean data curves in air as well as with mean data curves under high temperature water environment published in the international literature. (orig.)

  5. Grain Boundary Assemblies in Dynamically-Recrystallized Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Tikhonova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The grain boundary misorientation distributions associated with the development of dynamic recrystallization were studied in a high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel subjected to hot working. Under conditions of discontinuous dynamic recrystallization, the relationships between the grain or subgrain sizes and flow stresses can be expressed by power law functions with different grain/subgrain size exponents of about −0.76 (for grain size or −1.0 (for subgrain size. Therefore, the mean grain size being much larger than the subgrain size under conditions of low flow stress gradually approaches the size of the subgrains with an increase in the flow stress. These dependencies lead to the fraction of high-angle boundaries being a function of the flow stress. Namely, the fraction of ordinary high-angle boundaries in dynamically-recrystallized structures decreases with a decrease in the flow stress. On the other hand, the fraction of special boundaries, which are associated with annealing twins, progressively increases with a decrease of the flow stress.

  6. Antibacterial and corrosive properties of copper implanted austenitic stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Xiong; Bo-fan Xu; Hong-wei Ni

    2009-01-01

    Copper ions were implanted into austenitic stainless steel (SS) by metal vapor vacuum arc with a energy of 100 keV and an ions dose range of (0.5-8.0)x 1017 cm-2. The Cu-implanted SS was annealed in an Ar atmosphere furnace. Glancing X-ray diffraction (GXRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) were used to reveal the phase com-positions, microstructures, and concentration profiles of copper ions in the implanted layer. The results show that the antibacterialproperty of Cu-implanted SS is attributed to Cu9.9Fe0.1 which precipitated as needles. The depth of copper in Cu-implanted SS with annealing treatment is greater than that in Cu-implanted SS without annealing treatment, which improves the antibacterial property against S. Aureus. The salt wetting-drying combined cyclic test was used to evaluate the corrosion-resistance of antibacterial SS, and the results reveal that the antibacterial SS has a level of corrosion-resistance equivalent to that of un-implanted SS.

  7. TEM studies of plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stróz, D; Psoda, M

    2010-03-01

    Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and X-ray phase analysis were used to study the structure of a layer formed during nitriding the AISI 316L stainless steel at temperature 440 degrees C. It was found that the applied treatment led to the formation of 6-microm-thick layer of the S-phase. There is no evidence of CrN precipitation. The X-ray diffraction experiments proved that the occurred austenite lattice expansion - due to nitrogen atoms - depended on the crystallographic direction. The cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy studies showed that the layer consisted of a single cubic phase that contained a lot of defects such as dislocations, stacking faults, slip bands and twins. The high-resolution electron microscopy observations were applied to study the defect formation due to the nitriding process. It was shown that the presence of great number of stacking faults leads to formation of nanotwins. Weak, forbidden {100} reflections were still another characteristic feature of the S-phase. These were not detected in the X-ray spectra of the phase. Basing on the high-resolution electron microscopy studies it can be suggested that the short-range ordering of the nitrogen atoms in the octahedral sites inside the f.c.c. matrix lattice takes place and gives rise to appearance of these spots. It is suggested that the cubic lattice undergoes not only expansion but also slight rombohedral distortion that explains differences in the lattice expansion for different crystallographic directions.

  8. Salt spray corrosion behaviour of austenitic stainless steel matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasco, F.; Abenojar, J.; Torralba, J.M. [Dept. de Ciencia de Materiales e Ing. Metalurgica, Univ. Carlos III de Madrid, Leganes (Spain); Lima, W.M. [Univ. Estadual de Maringa, Maringa PR (Brazil); Marce, R.; Bas, J.A. [AMES S.A., Sant Vicenc dels Horts Barcelona (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    This work deals with the possibility of using intermetallics as addition to P/M stainless steel in order to try to sinter these steels in nitrogen-base atmospheres. 316L was chosen as stainless steel matrix, and two intermetallics (from Ti-Al and Cr-Al binary systems), with a sieve size of less than 80 {mu}m, were added in the amount of 3% vol. to obtain MMCs. Powders were mixed, compacted at 700 MPa by uniaxial compacting, and then sintered at two temperatures (1120 and 1230 C) in five different atmospheres (95N{sub 2}/5H{sub 2}, 80N{sub 2}/20H{sub 2}, 25N{sub 2}/75H{sub 2}, hydrogen and vacuum). A complete microstructural study was carried out both by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Corrosion tests by salt spray fog were done in order to measure the possible improvements of intermetallic addition on the corrosion behaviour of these steels. SEM studies were also carried out on as corroded samples in order to understand the mechanisms of corrosion. Intermetallics absorb nitrogen from the nitrogen based atmospheres, and they develop a duplex (ferrite / austenite) microstructure when composite materials are sintered in hydrogen and vacuum. These microstructural features explain the results obtained in salt spray fog test. (orig.)

  9. Effect of alloying elements on solidification of primary austenite in Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janus

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the research, determined were direction and intensity of alloying elements influence on solidification way (directional orvolumetric of primary austenite dendrites in hypoeutectic austenitic cast iron Ni-Mn-Cu. 50 cast shafts dia. 20 mm were analysed.Chemical composition of the alloy was as follows: 1.7 to 3.3 % C, 1.4 to 3.1 % Si, 2.8 to 9.9 % Ni, 0.4 to 7.7 % Mn, 0 to 4.6 % Cu, 0.14 to0.16 % P and 0.03 to 0.04 % S. The discriminant analysis revealed that carbon influences solidification of primary austenite dendrites most intensively. It clearly increases the tendency to volumetric solidification. Influence of the other elements is much weaker. This means that the solidification way of primary austenite dendrites in hypoeutectic austenitic cast iron Ni-Mn-Cu does not differ from that in an unalloyed cast iron.

  10. Austenite phase formation in rapidly solidified Fe-Cr-Mn-C steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.R.; Davies, H.A.; Rainforth, W.M.

    1999-12-10

    Steels having compositions (wt%) 0.05--0.5C, 12.5--20Cr, 8--25Mn and 0--0.51N have been chill-block melt-spun to ribbons in order to investigate systematically, by X-ray diffractometry and electron microscopy, the effects of rapid solidification and of solute concentrations on the formation of the austenite phase. The austenite is most easily formed at (wt%) 16Cr--8Mn for 0.3C ribbons while {alpha}{prime}-martensite or {epsilon}-martensite was observed at lower concentrations of Cr or Mn and {alpha}-ferrite appeared for Cr {gt} 18 wt%. The volume fraction of austenite in the steel ribbons studied was found, by multiple regression analysis, to obey the equation {gamma}(%) = 94 + 26.8C + Mn x (8.4 {minus} 0.08Mn {minus} 0.44Cr) {minus} (Cr {minus} 17.7){sup 2}. Thus, the effect of Mn on {gamma} formation followed a non-linear function, containing an interaction term including the Cr and Mn contents, and first- and second-order terms involving the Mn concentration. This indicates the ranges over when Mn is a {gamma}-former or an {alpha}-former. Iso-austenitic lines, constructed on the basis of this new equation, are nearly orthogonal to those in the Schaeffler diagram for Cr-Mn steels so that use of the latter for prediction of the austenite content in the present case would be inappropriate.

  11. Formation of austenite and dissolution of carbides in Fe-8.2Cr-C alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shtansky, D.; Nakai, K.; Ohmori, Y. [Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism of austenite formation and the kinetics of carbide dissolution have been studied in Fe-8.2Cr-0.2C and Fe-8.2Cr-0.96 C (numbers indicate mass%) alloys with ferrite lamellar carbide and ferrite spheroidized carbide initial structures. The morphology of austenite formation in the range of 850 to 900 C has been examined in detail by transmission electron microscopy. The mechanisms of austenite nucleation and growth have been distinguished as they depend on the composition, starting microstructure and austenitizing temperature. The effects of both austenitising temperature in the range of 850 to 1150 C and a time on the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbide evolution have also been investigated. Different morphologies of transformation products have been observed. The orientation relationships between ferrite, austenite and carbides were determined. The observed results can be explained by assuming local equilibrium at the moving interfaces during the reactions. (orig.) 47 refs.

  12. Microstructural and Stress Corrosion Cracking Characteristics of Austenitic Stainless Steels Containing Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Peter L.; Chou, Peter H.; Morra, Martin M.; Lawrence Nelson, J.; Rebak, Raul B.

    2009-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) core internal components in nuclear light water reactors (LWRs) are susceptible to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). One of the effects of irradiation is the hardening of the SS and a change in the dislocation distribution in the alloy. Irradiation may also alter the local chemistry of the austenitic alloys; for example, silicon may segregate and chromium may deplete at the grain boundaries. The segregation or depletion phenomena at near-grain boundaries may enhance the susceptibility of these alloys to environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). The objective of the present work was to perform laboratory tests in order to better understand the role of Si in the microstructure, properties, electrochemical behavior, and susceptibility to EAC of austenitic SSs. Type 304 SS can dissolve up to 2 pct Si in the bulk while maintaining a single austenite microstructure. Stainless steels containing 12 pct Cr can dissolve up to 5 pct bulk Si while maintaining an austenite structure. The crack growth rate (CGR) results are not conclusive about the effect of the bulk concentration of Si on the EAC behavior of SSs.

  13. Examination of Spheroidal Graphite Growth and Austenite Solidification in Ductile Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Jingjing; Richards, Von L.; Van Aken, David C.

    2016-09-01

    Microstructures of a ductile iron alloy at different solidification stages were captured in quenching experiments. Etched microstructures showed that spheroidal graphite particles and austenite dendrites nucleated independently to a significant extent. Growth of the austenite dendrite engulfed the spheroidal graphite particles after first contacting the nodule and then by forming an austenite shell around the spheroidal graphite particle. Statistical analysis of the graphite size distribution was used to determine the nodule diameter when the austenite shell was completed. In addition, multiple graphite nucleation events were discerned from the graphite particle distributions. Majority of graphite growth occurred when the graphite was in contact with the austenite. Circumferential growth of curved graphene layers appeared as faceted growth fronts sweeping around the entire surface of a spheroidal graphite particle which was at the early growth stage. Mismatches between competing graphene growth fronts created gaps, which divided the spheroidal graphite particle into radially oriented conical substructures. Graphene layers continued growing in each conical substructure to further extend the size of the spheroidal graphite particle.

  14. Enhanced mechanical properties of type AISI301LN austenitic stainless steel through advanced thermo mechanical process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Junxia, E-mail: huangjunxia@baosteel.com [Shanghai Baosteel Research Institute, Shanghai 200431 (China); Ye Xiaoning; Gu Jiaqing; Chen Xu [Shanghai Baosteel Research Institute, Shanghai 200431 (China); Xu Zhou [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 69% of strain induced martensite were obtained after 80% thickness reduction at 0 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The best annealing regime was determined for diffusional controlled reversion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of grain size on mechanical properties conforms with the H-P relationship. - Abstract: The effect of annealing temperature and time on the grain size of reversed austenite and mechanical properties was studied based on AISI301LN austenitic stainless steel in this paper. Cold rolling at 0 Degree-Sign C was employed to obtain the strain-induced martensite, followed by annealing treatment at the temperature range of 650-900 Degree-Sign C for 1-20 min. The relationship between the volume fraction of strain-induced martensite and cold reduction was analyzed by Ferritescope MP30 and X-ray diffraction. The grain growth of reversed austenite was observed by FEG-SEM and the mechanical properties were determined by tensile tests and Vickers hardness tests. Austenite grain sizes under 3 {mu}m can be obtained after annealing in the range of 700-900 Degree-Sign C for 1-20 min. The finest austenite grain size was produced after annealing at 700 Degree-Sign C for 20 min, which had a good combination of yield strength ( Almost-Equal-To 830 MPa), tensile strength ( Almost-Equal-To 953 MPa) and elongation ( Almost-Equal-To 36%).

  15. Effect of Niobium on Isothermal Transformation of Austenite to Ferrite in HSLA Low-Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Jian-chun; LIU Qing-you; YONG Qi-long; SUN Xin-jun

    2007-01-01

    Using thermomechanical simulation experiment, the kinetics of the isothermal transformation of austenite to ferrite in two HSLA low-carbon steels containing different amounts of niobium was investigated under the conditions of both deformation and undeformation. The results of optical microstructure observation and quantitative metallography analysis showed that the kinetics of the isothermal transformation of austenite to ferrite in lower niobium steel with and without deformation suggests a stage mechanism, wherein there exists a linear relationship between the logarithms of holding time and ferrite volume fraction according to Avrami equation, whereas the isothermal transformation of austenite to ferrite in high niobium steel proceeds via a two stage mechanism according to micrographs, wherein, the nucleation rate of ferrite in the initial stage of transformation is low, and in the second stage,the rate of transformation is high and the transformation of residual austenite to ferrite is rapidly complete. Using carbon extraction replica TEM, niobium carbide precipitation for different holding time was investigated and the results suggested that NbC precipitation and the presence of solute niobium would influence the transformation of austenite to ferrite. The mechanism of the effect of niobium on the isothermal transformation was discussed.

  16. Investigation of austenitizing temperature on wear behavior of austempered gray iron (AGI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, T.; Sutradhara, G.

    2016-09-01

    This study is about finding the effect of austenitizing temperature on microstructure and wear behavior of copper alloyed austempered gray iron (AGI), and then comparing it with an as- cast (solidified) state. Tensile and wear tests specimens are prepared from as-cast gray iron material, and austenitized at different temperatures and then austempered at a fixed austempering temperature. Resulting microstructures are characterized through optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-Ray diffraction. Wear test is carried out using a block-on-roller multi-tribotester with sliding speed of 1.86 m/sec. In this investigation, wear behavior of all these austempered materials are determined and co-related with the micro structure. Hence the wear surface under scanning electron microscope showed that wear occurred mainly due to adhesion and delamination under dry sliding condition. The test results indicate that the austenitizing temperature has remarkable effect on resultant micro structure and wear behavior of austempered materials. Wear behavior is also found to be dependent on the hardness, tensile strength, austenite content and carbon content in austenite. It is shown that coarse ausferrite micro structure exhibited higher wear depth than fine ausferrite microstructure.

  17. Study of biocompatibility of medical grade high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Menghua; Yin, Tieying; Wang, Yazhou; Du, Feifei; Zou, Xingzheng; Gregersen, Hans; Wang, Guixue

    2014-10-01

    Adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the living organism have resulted in development of high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also improves steel properties. The cell cytocompatibility, blood compatibility and cell response of high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel were studied in vitro. The mechanical properties and microstructure of this stainless steel were compared to the currently used 316L stainless steel. It was shown that the new steel material had comparable basic mechanical properties to 316L stainless steel and preserved the single austenite organization. The cell toxicity test showed no significant toxic side effects for MC3T3-E1 cells compared to nitinol alloy. Cell adhesion testing showed that the number of MC3T3-E1 cells was more than that on nitinol alloy and the cells grew in good condition. The hemolysis rate was lower than the national standard of 5% without influence on platelets. The total intracellular protein content and ALP activity and quantification of mineralization showed good cell response. We conclude that the high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel is a promising new biomedical material for coronary stent development.

  18. A review on nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talha, Mohd; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2013-10-01

    The field of biomaterials has become a vital area, as these materials can enhance the quality and longevity of human life. Metallic materials are often used as biomaterials to replace structural components of the human body. Stainless steels, cobalt-chromium alloys, commercially pure titanium and its alloys are typical metallic biomaterials that are being used for implant devices. Stainless steels have been widely used as biomaterials because of their very low cost as compared to other metallic materials, good mechanical and corrosion resistant properties and adequate biocompatibility. However, the adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have promoted the development of "nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels" for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel and emphatically the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steel, as well as the development of nickel-free nitrogen containing stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength, better corrosion and wear resistance and superior biocompatibility in comparison to the currently used austenitic stainless steel (e.g. 316L), the newly developed nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventionally used medical stainless steels.

  19. The study of high speed fine turning of austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.S. Lin

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this research paper is focused on the surface roughness variation in high speed fine turning of the austenitic stainless steel.Design/methodology/approach: A series of experimental tests have been done to evaluate the possibility of high speed fine turning of the austenitic stainless steel from the surface roughness variation and machining stability.Findings: It was found that, the smaller the feed rate, the smaller the surface roughness value. But when the feed rate smaller than the critical feed rate, the chatter will occurs and the surface roughness of the work piece would be deteriorated.The higher the cutting speed is, the higher the cutting temperature of cutting tool is. The cutting tool will be soften and the surface roughness of the workpiece will be deteriorated.Research limitations/implications: The tool chattering would caused poor surface roughness in high speed fine turning for feed rate smaller than 0.02 mm/rev. The chatter suppression method must be considered when high speed fine turning of austenitic stainless steel.Originality/value: Most of the stainless steel machining proceeds at low cutting speed because the austenitic stainless steel is a hard machining material. The research result of this paper indicated that high speed fine turning of austenitic stainless steel is possible.

  20. INFLUENCE OF STRUCTURAL STATE OF CARBON STEEL IN THE PROCESS OF AUSTENITE APPEARING DURING REHEATING DOUBLE-PHASE (A+Y FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. I. Kindratskyi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of research results for the kinetics of austenitization process the order of the original structures in the direction of increasing the rate of austenite formation is determined.

  1. INFLUENCE OF STRUCTURAL STATE OF CARBON STEEL IN THE PROCESS OF AUSTENITE APPEARING DURING REHEATING DOUBLE-PHASE (A+Y) FIELD

    OpenAIRE

    Kindratskyi, B. I.; Yakovliev, S. O.; I. E. Kramar; O. I. Shaptala

    2010-01-01

    Based on the analysis of research results for the kinetics of austenitization process the order of the original structures in the direction of increasing the rate of austenite formation is determined.

  2. Cast heat-resistant austenitic steel with improved temperature creep properties and balanced alloying element additions and methodology for development of the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankiw, Roman I; Muralidharan, Govindrarajan; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Maziasz, Philip J

    2012-11-27

    The present invention addresses the need for new austenitic steel compositions with higher creep strength and higher upper temperatures. The new austenitic steel compositions retain desirable phases, such as austenite, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and MC in its microstructure to higher temperatures. The present invention also discloses a methodology for the development of new austenitic steel compositions with higher creep strength and higher upper temperatures.

  3. Microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of a low-carbon quenching and partitioning steel after partial and full austenitization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan-song Li; Hong-ye Gao; Hideharu Nakashima; Satoshi Hata; Wen-huai Tian

    2016-01-01

    In this work, low-carbon steel specimens were subjected to the quenching and partitioning process after being partially or fully austenitized to investigate their microstructural evolution and mechanical properties. According to the results of scanning electron micros-copy and transmission electron microscopy observations, X-ray diffraction analysis, and tensile tests, upper bainite or tempered martensite appears successively in the microstructure with increasing austenitization temperature or increasing partitioning time. In the partially austeni-tized specimens, the retained austenite grains are carbon-enriched twice during the heat treatment, which can significantly stabilize the phases at room temperature. Furthermore, after partial austenitization, the specimen exhibits excellent elongation, with a maximum elongation of 37.1%. By contrast, after full austenitization, the specimens exhibit good ultimate tensile strength and high yield strength. In the case of a specimen with a yield strength of 969 MPa, the maximum value of the ultimate tensile strength reaches 1222 MPa. During the partitioning process, carbon partitioning and carbon homogenization within austenite affect interface migration. In addition, the volume fraction and grain size of retained austenite observed in the final microstructure will also be affected.

  4. EFFECT OF AUSTENITIC CRYSTAL ORIENTATION IN A MULTIPHASE STEEL ANALYZED BY A DISCRETE DISLOCATION-TRANSFORMATION MODEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, J.; Turteltaub, S.; Van der Giessen, E.

    2009-01-01

    A discrete dislocation-transformation model is used to analyze the response of an aggregate of ferritic and austenitic grains that can transform into martensite. In particular, the influence of the crystal orientation of the austenitic grains on the plastic and transformation behavior is studied. It

  5. Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Investigation of Carbon Stabilized Expanded Austenite and Carbides in Stainless Steel AISI 316

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny;

    2011-01-01

    Low temperature carburized AISI 316 stainless steel - carbon expanded austenite - was investigated with EXAFS and synchrotron diffraction together with synthesized carbides of the type M3C2, M7C3 and M23C6. It was found that the chemical environment of carbon expanded austenite is not associated ...

  6. On the Carbon Solubility in Expanded Austenite and Formation of Hägg Carbide in AISI 316 Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Ståhl, Kenny; Brink, Bastian;

    2016-01-01

    –420 °C and 465–470 °C, respectively. Hägg carbide (x-M5C2)develops when the carbon content in the expanded austenite exceeds the metastable solubility limit; the transformation of carbon expanded austenite into Hägg carbide occurs irrespective of carburizing temperature in the investigated temperature...

  7. Shot-peening effect on the structure, microhardness, and compressive stresses of the austenitic steel 1.4539

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Nasiłowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents shot-peening effect on the structure, microhardness, and compressive stresses of the austenitic steel 1.4539. The research shows strengthening of the top layer and the formation of compressive stresses in the subsurface layers of the shot-peening elements.[b]Keyword[/b]: austenitic steel 1.4539, residual stresses, Waisman-Phillips’a method

  8. Characteristics of the Austenitic Steels Used in the LHC Main Dipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Lanza, C

    2002-01-01

    The LHC dipole structure is assembled using austenitic steel collars and austenitic steel end-laminations. The collars will be fine-blanked starting from 11'000 tonnes of steel; the end-laminations require 1'700 tonnes of steel. The procurement of the austenitic steels was divided in two phases: first we qualified different grades from different producers then we made the call for tender, adjudicated the contract and started the series production. The first part of this paper summarises the results of the first qualification phase when extensive checks and measurements were carried out on five different grades. The second part describes the approach used to control the series production and the results obtained. At the time of writing about 19% of the steel for collars and end-laminations has been manufactured and delivered.

  9. Kinetics of decomposition of undercooled austenite formed in the critical range of temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shveikin, V. P.; Khotinov, V. A.; Farber, V. M.

    2007-11-01

    Using dilatometric and microstructural methods, the thermokinetic diagrams of decomposition of undercooled austenite formed upon heating in the intercritical temperature range have been constructed for a group of steels with 0.05 0.10% C, 0.15 1.63% Mn, 0.17 1.18% Si, and 0.003% B. The effect of the compositions of the steels, temperature of heating in the two-phase region, and rate of subsequent cooling on the kinetics of the formation of austenite and products of its decomposition has been considered. The carbon content in austenite at different temperatures of its formation has been estimated from the position of the temperature of the onset of the martensitic transformation.

  10. Unraveling the Effect of Thermomechanical Treatment on the Dissolution of Delta Ferrite in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezayat, Mohammad; Mirzadeh, Hamed; Namdar, Masih; Parsa, Mohammad Habibi

    2016-02-01

    Considering the detrimental effects of delta ferrite stringers in austenitic stainless steels and the industrial considerations regarding energy consumption, investigating, and optimizing the kinetics of delta ferrite removal is of vital importance. In the current study, a model alloy prone to the formation of austenite/delta ferrite dual phase microstructure was subjected to thermomechanical treatment using the wedge rolling test aiming to dissolve delta ferrite. The effect of introducing lattice defects and occurrence of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) were investigated. It was revealed that pipe diffusion is responsible for delta ferrite removal during thermomechanical process, whereas when the DRX is dominant, the kinetics of delta ferrite dissolution tends toward that of the static homogenization treatment for delta ferrite removal that is based on the lattice diffusion of Cr and Ni in austenite. It was concluded that the optimum condition for dissolution of delta ferrite can be defined by the highest rolling temperature and strain in which DRX is not pronounced.

  11. An On-Heating Dilation Conversional Model for Austenite Formation in Hypoeutectoid Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seok-Jae; Clarke, Kester D.; van Tyne, Chester J.

    2010-09-01

    Dilatometry is often used to study solid-state phase transformations. While most steel transformation studies focus on the decomposition of austenite, this article presents an on-heating dilation conversional model to determine phase fraction based on measured volume changes during the formation of austenite in ferrite-pearlite hypoeutectoid steels. The effect of alloying elements on the transformation strain is incorporated into the model. Comparison of the conversional model predictions to measured transformation temperature ( A c3) shows excellent agreement. The pearlite decomposition finish temperature ( A pf ) predicted by the conversional model more closely matches experimental results when compared to standard lever rule calculations. Results show that including the effects of substitutional alloying elements (in addition to carbon) improves phase fraction predictions. The conversional model can be used to quantitatively predict intercritical austenite fraction with application to modeling, induction heating, intercritical annealing, and more complex heat treatments for hypoeutectoid steels.

  12. Modeling of Ni Diffusion Induced Austenite Formation in Ferritic Stainless Steel Interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ming; Molin, Sebastian; Zhang, L.

    2015-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steel interconnect plates are widely used in planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) or electrolysis cell (SOEC) stacks. During stack production and operation, nickel from the Ni/YSZ fuel electrode or from the Ni contact component diffuses into the IC plate, causing transformation...... of the ferritic phase into an austenitic phase in the interface region. This is accompanied with changes in volume and in mechanical and corrosion properties of the IC plates. In this work, kinetic modeling of the inter-diffusion between Ni and FeCr based ferritic stainless steel was conducted, using the CALPHAD...... approach with the DICTRA software. The kinetics of inter-diffusion and austenite formation was explored in full detail, as functions of layer thickness, temperature, time, and steel composition. The simulation was further validated by comparing with experimental results. Growth of the austenite phase...

  13. Microstructures of Austenitic Stainless Steel Produced by Twin-Roll Strip Caster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Fu-xiang; WANG Xin-hua; WANG Wan-jun

    2012-01-01

    The microstructures of austenitic stainless steel strip were studied using color metallographic method and electron probe micro analysis (EPMA). In the cast strips, there are three kinds of solidification structures: fine cel- lular dendrite in the surface layer, equiaxed grains in the center and fine dendrite between them. The solidification mode in the surface layer is the primary austenite AF mode because of extremely high cooling rate, with the retained ferrite located around the primary cellular austenite. In the fine dendrite zone, the solidification mode of molten stainless steel changes to FA mode and the residual ferrite with fish-bone morphology is located at the core of the dendrite. The retained ferrite of equiaxed grains in the center is located in the center of broken primary ferrite dendrite with vermicular morphology.

  14. Cellular automaton simulation of microstructure evolution during austenite decomposition under continuous cooling conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R Varma; R Sasikumar; S G K Pillai; P K Nair

    2001-06-01

    A two-dimensional diffusion based model is developed to describe transformation of austenite into ferrite and pearlite under continuous cooling conditions. The nucleation of ferrite is assumed to occur over grain boundaries and the nucleation of pearlite is assumed to be taking place all over the grain and at growing ferrite–austenite interfaces, when the composition and temperature conditions are favourable. A cellular automaton algorithm, with transformation rules based on this model is used for the growth of ferrite and pearlite. Model predicted results for continuous cooling transformations are verified by comparing the model predicted microstructure features with the experimental measurements for two sets of plain carbon steels of different composition and austenite grain size. Using the model, it is possible to generate results like undercooling to start ferrite and pearlite transformations, which are difficult to obtain experimentally.

  15. Corrosion fatigue behaviour of 317LN austenitic stainless steel in phosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoro, J. [Ingenieria y Ciencia de los Materiales, ETSI Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: javier.onoro@upm.es

    2009-10-15

    The corrosion fatigue crack-growth behaviour of AISI 317LN stainless steel was evaluated in air and in 85% phosphoric acid at 20 deg. C. Austenitic stainless steels with high molybdenum content have high corrosion resistance and good mechanical properties. However, this increase in the molybdenum content and other elements such as nitrogen can also modify the microstructure. This leads to a modification of its mechanical properties. The corrosion fatigue crack-growth rate was higher in phosphoric acid immersion than in air. Austenitic stainless steels with a fully austenitic microstructure were more ductile, tough, and behave better against corrosion fatigue. The higher resistance to corrosion fatigue was directly associated to its higher resistance to corrosion.

  16. Analytical Investigation of Prior Austenite Grain Size Dependence of Low Temperature Toughness in Steel Weld Metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.F. Zhang; P. Hall; H. Terasak; M. Sato; Y. Komizo

    2012-01-01

    Prior austenite grain size dependence of the low temperature impact toughness has been addressed in the bainitic weld metals by in situ observations.Usually,decreasing the grain size is the only approach by which both the strength and the toughness of a steel are increased.However,low carbon bainitic steel with small grain size shows a weakening of the low temperature impact toughness in this study.By direct tracking of the morphological evolution during phase transformation,it is found that large austenite grain size dominates the nucleation of intragranular acicular ferrite,whereas small austenite grain size leads to grain boundary nucleation of bainite.This kinetics information will contribute to meet the increasing low temperature toughness requirement of weld metals for the storage tanks and offshore structures.

  17. Review of environmental effects on fatigue crack growth of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking of piping, pressure vessel cladding, and core components in light water reactors are potential concerns to the nuclear industry and regulatory agencies. The degradation processes include intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel (SS) piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and propagation of fatigue or stress corrosion cracks (which initiate in sensitized SS cladding) into low-alloy ferritic steels in BWR pressure vessels. Crack growth data for wrought and cast austenitic SSs in simulated BWR water, developed at Argonne National Laboratory under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsorship over the past 10 years, have been compiled into a data base along with similar data obtained from the open literature. The data were analyzed to develop corrosion-fatigue curves for austenitic SSs in aqueous environments corresponding to normal BWR water chemistries, for BWRs that add hydrogen to the feedwater, and for pressurized water reactor primary-system-coolant chemistry.

  18. Determination of the concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    The concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite was determined from of the rate of retracting nitrogen from thin initially N-saturated coupons. Nitrogen saturated homogeneous foils of expanded austenite were obtained by nitriding AISI 304 and AISI 316 in pure...... ammonia at 693 K and 718 K. Denitriding experiments were performed by equilibrating the foils with a successively lower nitrogen activity, as imposed by a gas mixture of ammonia and hydrogen. The concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite was approximated...... in the composition range where nitrogen can be extracted by hydrogen gas at the diffusion temperature. Numerical simulation of the denitriding experiments shows that the thus determined concentration dependent diffusion coefficients are an accurate approximation of the actual diffusivity of nitrogen in expanded...

  19. Wearing Quality of Austenitic, Duplex Cast Steel, Gray and Spheroidal Graphite Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The current work presents the research results of abrasion wear and adhesive wear at rubbing and liquid friction of new austenitic, austenitic-ferritic (“duplex” cast steel and gray cast iron EN-GJL-250, spheroidal graphite iron EN-GJS-600-3, pearlitic with ledeburitic carbides and spheroidal graphite iron with ledeburitic carbides with a microstructure of the metal matrix: pearlitic, upper bainite, mixture of upper and lower bainite, martensitic with austenite, pearlitic-martensitic-bainitic-ausferritic obtained in the raw state. The wearing quality test was carried out on a specially designed and made bench. Resistance to abrasion wear was tested using sand paper P40. Resistance to adhesive wear was tested in interaction with steel C55 normalized, hardened and sulfonitrided. The liquid friction was obtained using CASTROL oil. It was stated that austenitic cast steel and “duplex” are characterized by a similar value of abrasion wear and adhesive wear at rubbing friction. The smallest decrease in mass was shown by the cast steel in interaction with the sulfonitrided steel C55. Austenitic cast steel and “duplex��� in different combinations of friction pairs have a higher wear quality than gray cast iron EN-GJL- 250 and spheroidal graphite iron EN-GJS-600-3. Austenitic cast steel and “duplex” are characterized by a lower wearing quality than the spheroidal graphite iron with bainitic-martensitic microstructure. In the adhesive wear test using CASTROL oil the tested cast steels and cast irons showed a small mass decrease within the range of 1÷2 mg.

  20. Relations of abrasion resistance and hardness of 16Cr-3C white irons with retained austenite content

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiping Sun; Rulin Zuo; Cong Li; Baoluo Shen; Shengji Gao; Sijiu Huang

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between the retained austenite content of the matrix in 16Cr-3C white irons and the abrasion resistance was investigated. The results show that: (1) the abrasion resistance can be improved by sub-critical heat treatment, which could be attributed to the decrease of the retained austenite content; (2) both the abrasion resistance and hardness can be improved by controlling the retained austenite content below 20%-30% and arrive at the maximum when the retained austenite content is reduced to about 10%; (3) the abrasion resistance decreases abruptly once the retained austenite content is lower than 10%, which stems from both the in situ transformation of (Fe, Cr)23C6 to M3C carbides and the formation of pearlitic matrix.

  1. Chemical gradients across phase boundaries between martensite and austenite in steel studied by atom probe tomography and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmitrieva, O.; Ponge, D.; Inden, G.; Millan, J.; Choi, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany); Sietsma, J. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty 3mE, Dept. MSE, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Raabe, D., E-mail: d.raabe@mpie.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2011-01-15

    Partitioning at phase boundaries of complex steels is important for their properties. We present atom probe tomography results across martensite/austenite interfaces in a precipitation-hardened maraging-TRIP steel (12.2 Mn, 1.9 Ni, 0.6 Mo, 1.2 Ti, 0.3 Al; at.%). The system reveals compositional changes at the phase boundaries: Mn and Ni are enriched while Ti, Al, Mo and Fe are depleted. More specific, we observe up to 27 at.% Mn in a 20 nm layer at the phase boundary. This is explained by the large difference in diffusivity between martensite and austenite. The high diffusivity in martensite leads to a Mn flux towards the retained austenite. The low diffusivity in the austenite does not allow accommodation of this flux. Consequently, the austenite grows with a Mn composition given by local equilibrium. The interpretation is based on DICTRA and mixed-mode diffusion calculations (using a finite interface mobility).

  2. Thermal Stability of Retained Austenite in TRIP Steel After Different Treatments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Wen; LI Lin; Bruno C De Cooman; Patrick Wollants; YANG Chun-xia

    2008-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of retained austenite in TRIP steel was investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The decomposition curve was abnormal, and the decomposition temperature and the activation energy were measured by the Kissinger method, which were all higher than those in quenched steel. The thermal decomposition data of samples soaked in liquid nitrogen after TRIP treatment were all similar to those without additional low temperature treatment. It indicated that there is a high thermal stability in retained austenite of the TRIP steel at low temperature, which was also proved by XRD analysis.

  3. Plastic deformation effect of the corrosion resistance in case of austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraszti, F.; Kovacs, T.

    2017-02-01

    The corrosion forms are different in case of the austenitic steel than in case of carbon steels. Corrosion is very dangerous process, because that corrosion form is the intergranular corrosion. The austenitic stainless steel shows high corrosion resistance level. It knows that plastic deformation and the heat treating decrease it’s resistance. The corrosion form in case of this steel is very special and the corrosion tests are difficult. We tested the selected steel about its corrosion behaviour after high rate deformation. We wanted to find a relationship between the corrosion resistance decreasing and the rate of the plastic deformation. We wanted to show this behaviour from mechanical and electrical changing.

  4. Investigation of coatings of austenitic steels produced by supersonic laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorunov, A. I.; Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.

    2017-02-01

    The structure and properties of stainless austenitic steel coatings obtained by the supersonic laser deposition are studied in the paper. Implantation of the powder particles into the substrate surface and simultaneous plastic deformation at partial melting improved the mechanical properties of the coatings - tensile strength limit was 650 MPa and adhesion strength was 105 MPa. It was shown that insufficient laser power leads to disruption of the deposition process stability and coating cracking. Surface temperature increase caused by laser heating above 1300 °C resulted in coating melting. The X-ray analysis showed that radiation intensifies the cold spray process and does not cause changes in the austenitic base structure.

  5. Work Hardening Behavior and Stability of Retained Austenite for Quenched and Partitioned Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cun-yu WANG; Ying CHANG; Jie YANG; Wen-quan CAO; Han DONG; Yi-de WANG

    2016-01-01

    Both microstructure and mechanical properties of low alloy steels treated by quenching and partitioning (Q&P)process were examined.The mixed microstructure of martensite and large-fractioned retained austenite (about 27�3%)was characterized and analyzed,excellent combinations of total elongation of 1 9% and tensile strength of 1 835 MPa were obtained,and three-stage work hardening behavior was demonstrated during tensile test.The en-hanced mechanical properties and work hardening behavior were explained based on the transformation-induced plas-ticity effect of large-fractioned austenite.

  6. General and Localized corrosion of Austenitic and Borated Stainless Steels in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Fix; J. Estill; L. Wong; R. Rebak

    2004-05-28

    Boron containing stainless steels are used in the nuclear industry for applications such as spent fuel storage, control rods and shielding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion resistance of three borated stainless steels with standard austenitic alloy materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Tests were conducted in three simulated concentrated ground waters at 90 C. Results show that the borated stainless were less resistant to corrosion than the witness austenitic materials. An acidic concentrated ground water was more aggressive than an alkaline concentrated ground water.

  7. General and Localized Corrosion of Austenitic And Borated Stainless Steels in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estill, J C; Rebak, R B; Fix, D V; Wong, L L

    2004-03-11

    Boron containing stainless steels are used in the nuclear industry for applications such as spent fuel storage, control rods and shielding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion resistance of three borated stainless steels with standard austenitic alloy materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Tests were conducted in three simulated concentrated ground waters at 90 C. Results show that the borated stainless were less resistant to corrosion than the witness austenitic materials. An acidic concentrated ground water was more aggressive than an alkaline concentrated ground water.

  8. Influence of Simulated Outside-Reactor Irradiation on Anticorrosion Property of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The influence of γ-ray irradiation on the properties of inside-reactor stainless steel structures was studied by simulating the working condition of pressurized water reactor (PWR) first circuit and the outside-reactor γ-ray irradiation. The result shows that the simulated outside-reactor irradiation (irradiation dose 4.4 × 104 Gy) has no influence on anticorrosion properties of solutionized SUS304 austenitic stainless steel, including intergranular corrosion (IC) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Anticorrosion properties (IC, SCC) of sensitized SUS304 austenitic stainless steel are reduced by simulated outside-reactor irradiation. The longer the sensitizedtime is, the more obvious the influence is.

  9. The effect of grain size on the mechanical response of a metastable austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinclair C.W.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The combination of high environmental resistance and excellent strength, elongation and energy absorption make austenitic stainless steels potentially attractive for transportation applications. In the case of metastable grades that undergo a strain induced martensitic transformation it is possible to significantly change the mechanical properties simply by changing the austenite grain size. Predicting such behaviour using physically based models is, however, extremely challenging. Here, some recent work on the coupling between grain size and mechanical response will be presented for a metastable AISI 301 LN stainless steel. Successes and continuing challenges will be highlighted.

  10. Microstructure Changes during Cavitation Erosion for a Steel with Metastable Austenite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The characteristics of microstructure changes during cavitation erosion (CE) were investigatedby the use of XRD and TEM analyses for steel (ZG0Cr13Mn8N) with metastable austenite.The results show that the microstructure of the surface layer of the specimens consists of α'-martensite, metastable austenite and a few ε-martensite before CE. CE obviously increases dislocation density and straight or planar dislocations on the surface, and induces γ → ε, ε → α'and γ → α'-martensitic transformation.

  11. Short-term low-temperature glow discharge nitriding of 316L austenitic steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Frączek

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The AISI 316L austenitic steel after glow discharge nitriding at temperature of T = 673 K and duration of τ=14,4 ks, for two different variants of specimen arrangement in the glow-discharge chamber was investigated. In order to assess the effectiveness of nitriding process, the surface layers profile analysis examination, surface hardness and hardness profile examination, the analysis of surface layer structures and corrosion resistance tests were performed. It has been found that application of a booster screen effects in a nitrogen diffusion depth increment into the 316L austenitic steel surface, what results in the surface layer thickness escalation.

  12. Thermodynamic Calculation Study on Effect of Manganese on Stability of Austenite in High Nitrogen Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingchuan; Zhang, Bingchun; Yang, Ke

    2016-07-01

    A series of high nitrogen steels were studied by using thermodynamic calculations to investigate the effect of manganese on the stability of austenite. Surprisingly, it was found that the austenite stabilizing ability of manganese was strongly weakened by chromium, but it was strengthened by molybdenum. In addition, with an increase of manganese content, the ferrite stabilizing ability of chromium significantly increased, but that of molybdenum decreased. Therefore, strong interactions exist between manganese and the other alloying elements, which should be the main reason for the difference among different constituent diagrams.

  13. Key Technique of Austenitic Stainless Steel on-line Solution Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Sheng-li; LI Wei-juan; LIU Shuang; LI Ying; ZHAO Fei

    2004-01-01

    Generally the methods of solution treatment of austenitic stainless steel are bifurcated on-line solution and off-line solution . For a founded enterprise, it is necessary to find out how to get across alterations and search a measure of on -line solution disposal with less investment and higher efficiency. By studying and analysingin laboratory, several key points and the methods settle them are presented, which offers a new route to realize austenitic stainless steel on-line solution. By reducing the cost greatly, it makes the enterprise larger benefits.

  14. Small punch creep test in a 316 austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saucedo-Muñoz, Maribel L.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The small punch creep test was applied to evaluate the creep behavior of a 316 type austenitic stainless steel at temperatures of 650, 675 and 700 °C. The small punch test was carried out using a creep tester with a specimen size of 10×10×0.3 mm at 650, 675 and 700 °C using loads from 199 to 512 N. The small punch creep curves show the three stages found in the creep curves of the conventional uniaxial test. The conventional creep relationships which involve parameters such as creep rate, stress, time to rupture and temperature were followed with the corresponding parameters of small punch creep test and they permitted to explain the creep behavior in this steel. The mechanism and activation energy of the deformation process were the grain boundary sliding and diffusion, respectively, during creep which caused the intergranular fracture in the tested specimens.El ensayo de termofluencia por indentación se utilizó para evaluar el comportamiento a la termofluencia en un acero inoxidable austenítico 316. Este ensayo se realizó en una máquina de indentación con muestras de 10×10×0,3 mm a temperaturas de 650, 675 y 700 °C con cargas de 199 a 512 N. Las curvas de termofluencia del ensayo mostraron las tres etapas características observadas en el ensayo convencional de tensión. Asimismo, las principales relaciones de termofluencia entre parámetros como velocidad de termofluencia, esfuerzo, tiempo de ruptura y temperatura se observaron en los parámetros correspondientes al ensayo de indentación, lo que permitió caracterizar el comportamiento de termofluencia en este acero. El mecanismo y la energía de activación del proceso de deformación en la termofluencia corresponden al deslizamiento de los límites de grano y la difusión a través de los mismos, respectivamente, lo cual causó la fractura intergranular en las muestras ensayadas.

  15. The adhesion of hot-filament CVD diamond films on AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijnsters, J.G.; Shankar, P.; Enckevort, W.J.P. van; Schermer, J.J.; Meulen, J.J. ter

    2004-01-01

    Steel ball indentation and scratch adhesion testing of hot filament chemical vapour deposited diamond films onto AISI type 316 austenitic stainless steel substrates using two different interlayer systems, namely chromium nitride and borided steel, have been investigated. In order to compare the adhe

  16. Formation of austenite in high Cr ferritic/martensitic steels by high fluence neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z.; Faulkner, R. G.; Morgan, T. S.

    2008-12-01

    High Cr ferritic/martensitic steels are leading candidates for structural components of future fusion reactors and new generation fission reactors due to their excellent swelling resistance and thermal properties. A commercial grade 12%CrMoVNb ferritic/martensitic stainless steel in the form of parent plate and off-normal weld materials was fast neutron irradiated up to 33 dpa (1.1 × 10 -6 dpa/s) at 400 °C and 28 dpa (1.7 × 10 -6 dpa/s) at 465 °C, respectively. TEM investigation shows that the fully martensitic weld metal transformed to a duplex austenite/ferrite structure due to high fluence neutron irradiation, the austenite was heavily voided (˜15 vol.%) and the ferrite was relatively void-free; whilst no austenite phases were detected in plate steel. Thermodynamic and phase equilibria software MTDATA has been employed for the first time to investigate neutron irradiation-induced phase transformations. The neutron irradiation effect is introduced by adding additional Gibbs free energy into the system. This additional energy is produced by high energy neutron irradiation and can be estimated from the increased dislocation loop density caused by irradiation. Modelling results show that neutron irradiation reduces the ferrite/austenite transformation temperature, especially for high Ni weld metal. The calculated results exhibit good agreement with experimental observation.

  17. Formation of austenite in high Cr ferritic/martensitic steels by high fluence neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z. [IPTME, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3U (United Kingdom)], E-mail: zheng.lu@lboro.ac.uk; Faulkner, R.G.; Morgan, T.S. [IPTME, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3U (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-01

    High Cr ferritic/martensitic steels are leading candidates for structural components of future fusion reactors and new generation fission reactors due to their excellent swelling resistance and thermal properties. A commercial grade 12%CrMoVNb ferritic/martensitic stainless steel in the form of parent plate and off-normal weld materials was fast neutron irradiated up to 33 dpa (1.1 x 10{sup -6} dpa/s) at 400 deg. C and 28 dpa (1.7 x 10{sup -6} dpa/s) at 465 deg. C, respectively. TEM investigation shows that the fully martensitic weld metal transformed to a duplex austenite/ferrite structure due to high fluence neutron irradiation, the austenite was heavily voided ({approx}15 vol.%) and the ferrite was relatively void-free; whilst no austenite phases were detected in plate steel. Thermodynamic and phase equilibria software MTDATA has been employed for the first time to investigate neutron irradiation-induced phase transformations. The neutron irradiation effect is introduced by adding additional Gibbs free energy into the system. This additional energy is produced by high energy neutron irradiation and can be estimated from the increased dislocation loop density caused by irradiation. Modelling results show that neutron irradiation reduces the ferrite/austenite transformation temperature, especially for high Ni weld metal. The calculated results exhibit good agreement with experimental observation.

  18. Very high cycle regime fatigue of thin walled tubes made from austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, J.V.; Mayer, H.; Brøndsted, P.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue life data of cold worked tubes (diameter 4 mm, wall thicknesses 0.25 and 0.30 mm) of an austenitic stainless steel, AISI 904 L, were measured in the regime ranging from 2 × 105 to 1010 cycles to failure. The influence of the loading frequency was investigated as data were obtained...

  19. Effect of electromagnetic stirring on solidification structure of austenitic stainless steel in horizontal continuous casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    An investigation on the influence of low frequency rotary electromagnetic stirring on solidification structure of austenitic stainless steel in horizontal continuous casting was experimentally conducted and carried out on an industrial trial basis. The results show that application of appropriate electromagnetic stirring parameters can obviously improve the macrostructure of austenitic stainless steel, in which both columnar and equiaxed grains can be greatly refined and shrinkage porosity or cavity zone along centerline can be remarkably decreased due to eliminating intracrystalline and enlarging equiaxed grains zone. The industrial trials verify that the electromagnetic stirring intensity of austenitic stainless steel should be higher than that of plain carbon steel. Electromagnetic stirring has somewhat affected the macrostructure of austenitic stainless steel even if the magnetic flux density of the electromagnetic stirring reaches 90 mT (amplitude reaches 141 mT ) in average at frequency f=3-4Hz, which provides a reference for the optimization of design and process parameters when applying the rotary electromagnetic stirrer

  20. Influence of Plastic Deformation on Low Temperature Surface Hardening of Austenitic Stainless Steel by Gaseous Nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin;

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses an investigation of the influence of plastic deformation on low temperature surface hardening by gaseous nitriding of two commercial austenitic stainless steels: AISI 304 and EN 1.4369. The materials were plastically deformed to different equivalent strains by uniaxial...

  1. The influence of texture on phase transformation in metastable austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilkhuijsen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Metastable austenitic stainless steels are used in many applications, from shavers and kitchen sinks to various applications in the food industry. The diversity in applications of this type of steels is possible due to the many positive properties of the steel. It is not only esthetically pleasing,

  2. An Investigation on Low-Temperature Thermochemical Treatments of Austenitic Stainless Steel in Fluidized Bed Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruman, E.; Sun, Y.; Triwiyanto, A.; Manurung, Y. H. P.; Adesta, E. Y.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, the feasibility of using an industrial fluidized bed furnace to perform low-temperature thermochemical treatments of austenitic stainless steels has been studied, with the aim to produce expanded austenite layers with combined wear and corrosion resistance, similar to those achievable by plasma and gaseous processes. Several low-temperature thermochemical treatments were studied, including nitriding, carburizing, combined nitriding-carburizing (hybrid treatment), and sequential carburizing and nitriding. The results demonstrate that it is feasible to produce expanded austenite layers on the investigated austenitic stainless steel by the fluidized bed heat treatment technique, thus widening the application window for the novel low-temperature processes. The results also demonstrate that the fluidized bed furnace is the most effective for performing the hybrid treatment, which involves the simultaneous incorporation of nitrogen and carbon together into the surface region of the component in nitrogen- and carbon-containing atmospheres. Such hybrid treatment produces a thicker and harder layer than the other three processes investigated.

  3. About Reverted Austenite in Carburized Layers of Low-Carbon Martensitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A. S.; Bogdanova, M. V.; Vylezhnev, V. P.

    2015-05-01

    Processes of surface hardening in low-carbon martensitic steel 24Kh2G2NMFTB under carburizing and subsequent quenching from the intercritical temperature range are studied. Special features of formation of reverted austenite with high strength and stability are considered.

  4. Compatibility of Austenitic Steel With Molten Lead-Bismuth-Tin Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Rui-qian; LI Yan; WANG Xiao-min

    2011-01-01

    The compatibility of the austenitic AISI 304 steel with Pb-Bi-Sn alloy was analyzed. The AISI 304 steels were immersed in stagnant molten Pb-33.3Bi-33. 3Sn alloy at 400, 500 and 600℃ for different exposure times (100-2 000 h) respectively. XRay diffractio

  5. Experimental determination of the constitutive behaviour of a metastable austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, J.; Nolles, H.; Datta, K.; Geijselaers, H.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents measurements to describe the constitutive behaviour of a semi-austenitic precipitation hardenable stainless steel called Sandvik Nanoflex™, during metal forming and hardening. The material is metastable, which causes strain-induced transformation during forming. Depending on th

  6. Modeling of the Austenite-Martensite Transformation in Stainless and TRIP Steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijselaers, H.J.M.; Hilkhuijsen, P.; Bor, T.C.; Perdahcioglu, E.S.; Boogaard, van den A.H.; Zhang, S.-H.; Liu, X.-H.; Gheng, M.; Li, J.

    2013-01-01

    The transformation of austenite to martensite is a dominant factor in the description of the constitutive behavior during forming of TRIP assisted steels. To predict this transformation different models are currently available. In this paper the transformation is regarded as a stress induced process

  7. Effect of Multi-Step Tempering on Retained Austenite and Mechanical Properties of Low Alloy Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamid Reza Bakhsheshi-Rad; Ahmad Monshi; Hossain Monajatizadeh; Mohd Hasbullah Idris; Mohammed Rafiq Abdul Kadir; Hassan Jafari

    2011-01-01

    The effect of multi-step tempering on retained austenite content and mechanical properties of low alloy steel used in the forged cold back-up roll was investigated.Microstructural evolutions were characterized by optical microscope,X-ray diffraction,scanning electron microscope and Feritscope,while the mechanical properties were determined by hardness and tensile tests.The results revealed that the content of retained austenite decreased by about 2% after multi-step tempering.However,the content of retained austenite increased from 3.6% to 5.1% by increasing multi-step tempering temperature.The hardness and tensile strength increased as the austenitization temperature changed from 800 to 920 ℃,while above 920 ℃,hardness and tensile strength decreased.In addition,the maximum values of hardness,ultimate and yield strength were obtained via triple tempering at 520 ℃,while beyond 520 ℃,the hardness,ultimate and yield strength decreased sharply.

  8. Effect of bainite transformation and retained austenite on mechanical properties of austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toshio; Abe, Toshihiko; Tada, Shuji

    1996-06-01

    Austempered ductile iron (ADI) has excellent mechanical properties, but its Young's modulus is low. Austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel (AGS) has been developed in order to obtain a new material with superior mechanical properties to ADI. Its carbon content (approximately 1.0 pct) is almost one-third that of a standard ADI; thus, the volume of graphite is also less. Young's modulus of AGS is 195 to 200 GPa and is comparable to that of steel. Austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel has an approximately 200 MPa higher tensile strength than ADI and twice the Charpy absorbed energy of ADI. The impact properties and the elongation are enhanced with increasing volume fraction of carbon-enriched retained austenite. At the austempering temperature of 650 K, the volume fraction of austenite is approximately 40 pct for 120 minutes in the 2.4 pct Si alloy, although it decreases rapidly in the 1.4 pct Si alloy. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that appropriate quantity of silicon retards the decomposition of the carbon-enriched retained austenite. For austempering at 570 K, the amount of the carbon-enriched austenite decreases and the ferrite is supersaturated with carbon, resulting in high tensile strength but low toughness.

  9. Effect of bainite transformation and retained austenite on mechanical properties of austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Toshio; Abe, Toshihiko; Tada, Shuji [Tohoku National Industrial Research Inst., Sendai (Japan). Materials Engineering Div.

    1996-06-01

    Austempered ductile iron (ADI) has excellent mechanical properties, but its Young`s modulus is low. Austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel (AGS) has been developed in order to obtain a new material with superior mechanical properties to ADI. Its carbon content (approximately 1.0 pct) is almost one-third that of a standard ADI; thus, the volume of graphite is also less. Young`s modulus of AGS is 195 to 200 GPa and is comparable to that of steel. Austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel has an approximately 200 MPa higher tensile strength than ADI and twice the Charpy absorbed energy of ADI. The impact properties and the elongation are enhanced with increasing volume fraction of carbon-enriched retained austenite. At the austempering temperature of 650 K, the volume fraction of austenite is approximately 40 pct for 120 minutes in the 2.4 pct Si alloy, although it decreases rapidly in the 1.4 pct Si alloy. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that appropriate quantity of silicon retards the decomposition of the carbon-enriched retained austenite. For austempering at 570 K, the amount of the carbon-enriched austenite decreases and the ferrite is supersaturated with carbon, resulting in high tensile strength but low toughness.

  10. Stress and Composition of Carbon Stabilized Expanded Austenite on Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Low-temperature gaseous carburizing of stainless steel is associated with a colossal supersaturation of the fcc lattice with carbon, without the development of carbides. This article addresses the simultaneous determination of stress and composition profiles in layers of carbon xpanded austenite...

  11. Model Predictive Control of the Exit Part Temperature for an Austenitization Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari S. Ganesh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Quench hardening is the process of strengthening and hardening ferrous metals and alloys by heating the material to a specific temperature to form austenite (austenitization, followed by rapid cooling (quenching in water, brine or oil to introduce a hardened phase called martensite. The material is then often tempered to increase toughness, as it may decrease from the quench hardening process. The austenitization process is highly energy-intensive and many of the industrial austenitization furnaces were built and equipped prior to the advent of advanced control strategies and thus use large, sub-optimal amounts of energy. The model computes the energy usage of the furnace and the part temperature profile as a function of time and position within the furnace under temperature feedback control. In this paper, the aforementioned model is used to simulate the furnace for a batch of forty parts under heuristic temperature set points suggested by the operators of the plant. A model predictive control (MPC system is then developed and deployed to control the the part temperature at the furnace exit thereby preventing the parts from overheating. An energy efficiency gain of 5.3 % was obtained under model predictive control compared to operation under heuristic temperature set points tracked by a regulatory control layer.

  12. The Influence of Stress on Interstitial Diffusion - Carbon Diffusion Data in Austenite Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The present paper addresses the influence of chemical induced stresses on diffusion in interstitial systems. This is exemplified by simulations of carbon diffusion in austenite at high temperatures and it is shown that old well established literature data is flawed by the occurrence of composition...

  13. Effect of electromagnetic stirring on solidification structure of austenitic stainless steel in horizontal continuous casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Shu-cai

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available An investigation on the influence of low frequency rotary electromagnetic stirring on solidification structure of austenitic stainless steel in horizontal continuous casting was experimentally conducted and carried out on an industrial trial basis. The results show that application of appropriate electromagnetic stirring parameters can obviously improve the macrostructure of austenitic stainless steel, in which both columnar and equiaxed grains can be greatly refined and shrinkage porosity or cavity zone along centerline can be remarkably decreased due to eliminating intracrystalline and enlarging equiaxed grains zone. The industrial trials verify that the electromagnetic stirring intensity of austenitic stainless steel should be higher than that of plain carbon steel. Electromagnetic stirring has somewhat affected the macrostructure of austenitic stainless steel even if the magnetic flux density of the electromagnetic stirring reaches 90 mT (amplitude reaches 141 mT in average at frequency f=3-4Hz, which provides a reference for the optimization of design and process parameters when applying the rotary electromagnetic stirrer.

  14. Crack growth rates and fracture toughness of irradiated austenitic stainless steels in BWR environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-01-21

    In light water reactors, austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in reactor core internal components because of their high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods degrades the fracture properties of these steels by changing the material microstructure (e.g., radiation hardening) and microchemistry (e.g., radiation-induced segregation). Experimental data are presented on the fracture toughness and crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast austenitic SSs, including weld heat-affected-zone materials, that were irradiated to fluence levels as high as {approx} 2x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 3 dpa) in a light water reactor at 288-300 C. The results are compared with the data available in the literature. The effects of material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry on CGRs under cyclic and stress corrosion cracking conditions were determined. A superposition model was used to represent the cyclic CGRs of austenitic SSs. The effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness of these steels, as well as the effects of material and irradiation conditions and test temperature, have been evaluated. A fracture toughness trend curve that bounds the existing data has been defined. The synergistic effects of thermal and radiation embrittlement of cast austenitic SS internal components have also been evaluated.

  15. Nondestructive testing of austenitic casting and dissimilar metal welds; Kaksimetalliliitosten ja austeniittisten valujen testaustekniikoiden vertailu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahdenperae, K. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1995-01-01

    The publication is a literature study of nondestructive testing of dissimilar metal welds and cast austenitic components in PWR and BWR plants. A major key to the successful testing is a realistic mockup made of the materials to be tested. The inspectors must also be trained and validated using suitable mockups. (42 refs., 27 figs., 10 tabs.).

  16. Nitriding Process Characterization of Cold Worked AISI 304 and 316 Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Alfredo Monteiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The nitriding behavior of austenitic stainless steels (AISI 304 and 316 was studied by different cold work degree (0% (after heat treated, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% before nitride processing. The microstructure, layer thickness, hardness, and chemical microcomposition were evaluated employing optical microscopy, Vickers hardness, and scanning electron microscopy techniques (WDS microanalysis. The initial cold work (previous plastic deformations in both AISI 304 and 306 austenitic stainless steels does not show special influence in all applied nitriding kinetics (in layer thicknesses. The nitriding processes have formed two layers, one external layer formed by expanded austenite with high nitrogen content, followed by another thinner layer just below formed by expanded austenite with a high presence of carbon (back diffusion. An enhanced diffusion can be observed on AISI 304 steel comparing with AISI 316 steel (a nitrided layer thicker can be noticed in the AISI 304 steel. The mechanical strength of both steels after nitriding processes reveals significant hardness values, almost 1100 HV, on the nitrided layers.

  17. Effect of austenitizing conditions on the impact properties of an alloyed austempered ductile iron of initially ferritic matrix structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delia, M.; Alaalam, M.; Grech, M. [Univ. of Malta (Malta). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials

    1998-04-01

    The effect of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure and impact properties of an austempered ductile iron (ADI) containing 1.6% Cu and 1.6% Ni as the main alloying elements was investigated. Impact tests were carried out on samples of initially ferritic matrix structure and which had been first austenitized at 850, 900, 950, and 1,000 C for 15 to 360 min and austempered at 360 C for 180 min. Results showed that the austenitizing temperature, T{sub {gamma}}, and time, t{sub {gamma}} have a significant effect on the impact properties of the alloy. This has been attributed to the influence of these variables on the carbon kinetics. Microstructures of samples austenitized at 950 and 1,000 C contain no pro-eutectoid ferrite. The impact properties of the former structures are independent of t{sub {gamma}}, while those solution treated at 1,000 C are generally low and show wide variation over the range of soaking time investigated. For fully ausferritic structures, impact properties fall with an increase in T{sub {gamma}}. This is particularly evident at 1,000 C. As the T{sub {gamma}} increases, the amount of carbon dissolved in the original austenite increases. This slows down the rate of austenite transformation and results in coarser structures with lower mechanical properties. Optimum impact properties are obtained following austenitizing between 900 and 950 C for 120 to 180 min.

  18. Mechanical properties of steels with a microstructure of bainite/martensite and austenite islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syammach, Sami M.

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are continually being developed in order to reduce weight and improve safety for automotive applications. There is need for economic steels with improved strength and ductility combinations. These demands have led to research and development of third generation AHSS. Third generation AHSS include steel grades with a bainitic and tempered martensitic matrix with retained austenite islands. These steels may provide improved mechanical properties compared to first generation AHSS and should be more economical than second generation AHSS. There is a need to investigate these newer types of steels to determine their strength and formability properties. Understanding these bainitic and tempered martensitic steels is important because they likely can be produced using currently available production systems. If viable, these steels could be a positive step in the evolution of AHSS. The present work investigates the effect of the microstructure on the mechanical properties of steels with a microstructure of bainite, martensite, and retained austenite, so called TRIP aided bainitic ferrite (TBF) steels. The first step in this project was creating the desired microstructure. To create a microstructure of bainite, martensite, and austenite an interrupted austempering heat treatment was used. Varying the heat treatment times and temperatures produced microstructures of varying amounts of bainite, martensite, and austenite. Mechanical properties such as strength, ductility, strain hardening, and hole-expansion ratios were then evaluated for each heat treatment. Correlations between mechanical properties and microstructure were then evaluated. It was found that samples after each of the heat treatments exhibited strengths between 1050 MPa and 1350 MPa with total elongations varying from 8 pct to 16 pct. By increasing the bainite and austenite volume fraction the strength of the steel was found to decrease, but the ductility increased. Larger

  19. Effect of austenitizing conditions on the impact properties of an alloyed austempered ductile iron of initially ferritic matrix structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delia, M.; Alaalam, M.; Grech, M.

    1998-04-01

    The effect of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure and impact properties of an austempered ductile iron (ADI) containing 1.6% Cu and 1.6% Ni as the main alloying elements was investigated. Impact tests were carried out on samples of initially ferritic matrix structure and which had been first austenitized at 850,900, 950, and 1000°C for 15 to 360 min and austempered at 360°C for 180 min. Results showed that the austenitizing temperature, Tγ, and time, tγ, have a significant effect on the impact properties of the alloy. This has been attributed to the influence of these variables on the carbon kinetics. The impact energy is generally high after short tγ, and it falls with further soaking. In samples austenitized at 850 and 900°C, these trends correspond to the gradual disappearance of the pro-eutectoid ferrite and the attainment of fully developed ausferritic structures. In initially ferritic structures, the carbon diffusion distances involved during austenitization are large compared to those in pearlitic structures. This explains the relatively long soaking periods required to attain fully ausferritic structures, which in spite of the lower impact energy values, have a better combination of mechanical properties. Microstructures of samples austenitized at 950 and 1000°C contain no pro-eutectoid ferrite. The impact properties of the former structures are independent of tγ, while those solution treated at 1000°C are generally low and show wide variation over the range of soaking time investigated. For fully ausferritic structures, impact properties fall with an increase in Tγ. This is particularly evident at 1000°C. As the Tγ increases, the amount of carbon dissolved in the original austenite increases. This slows down the rate of austenite transformation and results in coarser structures with lower mechanical properties. Optimum impact properties are obtained following austenitizing between 900 and 950°C for 120 to 180 min.

  20. RESULTS OF CHARACTERIZATION TESTS OF THE SURFACES OF A COMMERCIALLY CARBURIZED AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, K

    2004-01-07

    A commercial surface carburization treatment that shows promise for hardening the surfaces of the stainless steel target vessel of the Spallation Neutron Source against cavitation erosion and pitting caused by the action of pulsed pressure waves in the liquid mercury target has been investigated. To verify promotional claims for the treatment and to uncover any factors that might be of concern for the integrity of a carburized target vessel, some characterization tests of the nature of the surface layers of carburized austenitic 316LN stainless steel were conducted. The findings support most of the claims. The carburized layer is about 35 {micro}m thick. Its indentation hardness is about five times larger than that of the substrate steel and declines rapidly with depth into the layer. The surface is distorted by the treatment, and the austenite lattice is enlarged. The corrosion resistance of the carburized layer in an acid medium is greater than that for untreated austenite. The layer is not brittle; it is plastically deformable and is quite resistant to cracking during straining. Contrary to the provider's assertations, the maximum carbon content of the layer is much less than 6-7 wt% carbon, and the carbon is not simply contained in supersaturated solid solution; some of it is present in a previously unreported iron carbide phase located at the very surface. Large variations were found in the thickness of the layer, and they signify that controls may be needed to ensure a uniform thickness for treatment of the SNS target vessel. Inclusion stringers and {delta}-ferrite phase embraced in the treated layer are less resistant to chemical attack than the treated austenite. From a cavitation pitting perspective under SNS bombardment, such non-austenitic phases may provide preferential sites for pitting. The shallow depth of the hardened layer will require use of protection measures to avoid mishandling damage to the layer during assembly and installation of a

  1. Experimental Determination of the Primary Solidification Phase dependency on the solidification velocity for 17 different austenitic stainless steel compositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Birthe Nørgaard; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Yardy, John;

    1997-01-01

    to the austenite phase.Most stainless steels are weldable by conventional welding techniques. However, during laser weldng the solidification velocities can be very much higher than by conventional welding techniques. By increasing the solidification velocity to a critical value known as the transition velocity......, the primary solidification phase is found to change from ferrite to austenite.A novel laser remelting technique has been modified to enable the transition velocity for laser welded austenitic stainless steels to be deermined experimentally and on the basis of results from 17 different alloy compositions...... an equation for the calculation of the transition velocity from alloy composition is proposed....

  2. Persamaan Empiris Pertumbuhan Butir Austenit Baja HSLA-0,019% Nb pada Proses Pendinginan non-Isotermal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ariati

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The strength of a final steel product is affected by its final austenite grain size. The applied model for austenite grain growth by Beck and Sellars actually based on the isothermal condition assumption, whilst most of the materials processing take place under non-isothermal condition. Hence, this situation results in deviation of product specification. This paper examines the austenite grain growth under non-isothermal condition of HSLA-0.019%Nb single composition after single pass hot-rolling process and predicts its final austenite grain size. The material was hot-rolled about 0.3-0.4 at a temperature of 900-1100 0C, cooling rate of 7-12 0K/s, in a time period of 25-50 second, and quenched by using water jetspray. The results show that austenite grain growth after hot-rolled can be illustrated as a function of cooling rate. Grain size decreases as the cooling rate increases. Non-isothermal austenite grain growth was obtained by modifying Beck and Sellar’s empirical model, in which the cooling rate is 1/Crm where m = 14 and an additional constant of B is 1014. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia: Kekuatan akhir produk manufaktur baja antara lain ditentukan oleh besar butir austenit. Persamaan pertumbuhan butir austenit yang selama ini digunakan yaitu Persamaan Beck dan Sellars umumnya berasumsi bahwa proses berjalan pada kondisi isotermal, sementara hampir semua proses manufaktur berjalan dalam kondisi non-isotermal. Dengan demikian, persamaan yang ada tidak tepat untuk digunakan karena sering menyebabkan tidak tercapainya spesifikasi produk. Penelitian ini dilakukan pada baja paduan rendah HSLA-0.019%Nb, dengan mengamati pertumbuhan butir austenit pada kondisi non-isotermal setelah dilakukan proses deformasi canai panas satu pass. Pendekatan yang digunakan adalah memberikan regangan deformasi 0,3-0,4, dengan proses canai panas dan temperatur deformasi 900-1100 0C, kecepatan pendinginan 7-12 0K/detik, dalam rentang waktu 25-50 detik, dan

  3. The Effects of Austenitizing Conditions on the Microstructure and Wear Resistance of a Centrifugally Cast High-Speed Steel Roll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Minwoo; Lee, Young-Kook

    2016-07-01

    The influences of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure and wear resistance of a centrifugally cast high-speed steel roll were investigated through thermodynamic calculation, microstructural analysis, and high-temperature wear tests. When the austenitizing temperature was between 1323 K and 1423 K (1050 °C and 1150 °C), coarse eutectic M2C plates were decomposed into a mixture of MC and M6C particles. However, at 1473 K (1200 °C), the M2C plates were first replaced by both new austenite grains and MC particles without M6C particles, and then remaining M2C particles were dissolved during the growth of MC particles. The wear resistance of the HSS roll was improved with increasing austenitizing temperature up to 1473 K (1200 °C) because the coarse eutectic M2C plates, which are vulnerable to crack propagation, changed to disconnected hard M6C and MC particles.

  4. The critical analysis of austenitic manganese steel T130Mn135 used for castings in the mining industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josan, A.; Pinca Bretotean, C.; Putan, V.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the critical analysis of making technology of austenitic manganese steel T130Mn135, used for castings of the type Mills hammer at a Romanian foundry. Are analyzed 11 charges of steel for castings and is determined the diagram of the heat treatment. After the applying of the heat treatment results a single-phase structure, consisting of homogeneous austenite. For all the 11 charges is presented the variation of chemical composition.

  5. Synergistic effect of austenitizing temperature and hot plastic deformation strain on the precipitation behavior in novel HSLA steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chih-Yuan, E-mail: chen6563@gmail.com [Department of Energy Engineering, National United University, Miaoli 36003, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chien-Chon [Department of Energy Engineering, National United University, Miaoli 36003, Taiwan (China); Yang, Jer-Ren, E-mail: jryang@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2015-07-15

    Examination of thin foils of specimens with various austenitizing conditions by transmission electron microscopy revealed randomly homogeneous precipitation in the ferrite for each experimental condition. Though no interphase precipitation was found in the present study, two types of random precipitation morphologies were identified in the ferrite matrix. One was randomly and homogeneously precipitated carbides of smaller size (<10 nm), and the other was randomly precipitated carbides of larger size (10–30 nm). Transmission electron microscopy results provided evidence that both types of precipitation carbides could be associated with the supersaturation of microalloying elements in the ferrite and austenite, respectively. A higher austenitizing temperature treatment can lead to more microalloying elements dissolving in the austenite such that many tiny carbides precipitation at the low isothermal holding temperature, which is believed to effectively strengthen the ferrite. Vickers hardness data revealed that, in specimens austenitized at 1200 °C and deformed at 900 °C with strains of 10% and 30%, the ranges of hardness distribution were 250–360 HV 0.1 and 310–400 HV 0.1, respectively. For specimens austenitized at 1000 °C and deformed at 900 °C with strains of 10% and 30%, the ranges of hardness distribution were 220–250 HV 0.1 and 220–260 HV 0.1, respectively. Therefore, the average Vickers hardness increased with the austenitizing temperature and deformation strain. However, a wider range of hardness distribution occurred in specimens that underwent treatment at higher austenitizing temperatures. The wider Vickers hardness distribution reflects non-uniform precipitation in each ferrite grain.

  6. Mechanical Behaviors of Ultrafine-Grained 301 Austenitic Stainless Steel Produced by Equal-Channel Angular Pressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C. X.; Yang, G.; Wang, C.; Zhang, Z. F.; Wu, S. D.

    2011-07-01

    The technique of equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) was used to refine the microstructure of an AISI 301 austenitic stainless steel (SS). An ultrafine-grained (UFG) microstructure consisting mainly of austenite and a few martensite was achieved in 301 steel after ECAP processing for four passes at 523 K (250 °C). By submitting the as-ECAP rods to annealing treatment in the temperature range from 853 K to 893 K (580 °C to 620 °C) for 60 minutes, fully austenitic microstructures with grain sizes of 210 to 310 nm were obtained. The uniaxial tensile tests indicated that UFG 301 austenitic SS had an excellent combination of high yield strength (>1.0 GPa) and high elongation-to-fracture (>30 pct). The tensile stress-strain curves exhibited distinct yielding peak followed by obvious Lüders deformation. Measurements showed that Lüders elongation increased with an increase in strength as well as a decrease in grain size. The microstructural changes in ultrafine austenite grains during tensile deformation were tracked by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. It was found that the strain-induced phase transformation from austenite to martensite took place soon after plastic deformation. The transformation rate with strain and the maximum strain-induced martensite were promoted significantly by ultrafine austenite grains. The enhanced martensitic transformation provided extra strain-hardening ability to sustain the propagation of Lüders bands and large uniform plastic deformation. During tensile deformation, the Lüders bands and martensitic transformation interacted with each other and made great contribution to the excellent mechanical properties in UFG austenitic SS.

  7. The Change of Austenitic Stainless Steel Elements Content in the Inner Parts of VVER-440 Reactor during Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smutný, Vladimír; Hep, Jaroslav; Novosad, Petr

    2009-08-01

    Neutron activation induces the element transmutation in materials surrounding the reactor active core. The objective of the present paper is to calculate and evaluate the change of austenitic stainless steel 08Ch18N10T elements content through neutron induced activation, in inner parts of VVER-440 - in the baffle and in the barrel. Particularly the content changes of Mn in austenitic stainless steel. The neutron flux density and then the neutron activation of austenitic stainless steel elements in parts at the core are calculated. Neutron activation represents a measure of austenitic stainless steel elements transmutation. The power distribution is determined as an average value of several cycles power distribution in the middle of a cycle for the NPP Dukovany. The power distribution is calculated with the code MOBY-DICK [1]. The neutron flux density is calculated with the code TORT [2]. The neutron activation of austenitic stainless steel elements in the baffle and in the barrel is calculated with the system EASY-2007 containing the code FISPACT-2007 [3]. The calculation of the changing austenitic stainless steel elements content is performed depending on the moment of the supposed end of reactor operation - 40 years. There is also necessary monitoring and benchmarking of steel element content change, because the neutron flux calculation, particularly in thermal region, shows a considerable uncertainty, e.g. [4]. The motivation for this work is the study focused to stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels induced by radiation inside PWR and BWR, e.g. [5]. The paper could be a suggestion to estimation of austenitic stainless steel corrosion damage induced by neutrons in inner parts of VVER-440 reactor.

  8. Relation of martensite-retained austenite and its effect on microstructure and mechanical properties of the quenched and partitioned steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG CunYu; CHANG Ying; LI XiaoDong; ZHAO KunMin; DONG Han

    2016-01-01

    A two-step quenching and partitioning (Q&P) treatment was applied to low-carbon alloy steels.The relation of initial martensite-retained austenite-fresh martensite and its effect on microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated by experiments.The results reveal that the volume fraction of retained austenite can reach the peak value of 17%,and the corresponding volume fractions of initial martensite and fresh martensite are 40% and 43%,respectively,when the tested steel is treated by initial quenching at 330℃,partitioning at 500℃ for 60s and final quenching to room temperature.Moreover,the micromorphologies of austenite and martensite become finer with the increasing of initial martensite fraction.The elongation is the highest when the volume fractions of initial martensite and retained austenite are 70% and 11%,respectively,meanwhile,the yield strength increases and tensile strength decreases gradually with the increase of initial martensite fraction,which proves that the mechanical properties including elongation,yield strength and tensile strength are based on the comprehensive effect of the retained austenite fraction,the finer microstructure and austenite stability.

  9. The phase diagrams with influence of biquadratic exchange coupling on martensitic–austenitic transformations for core–surface nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yalçın, Orhan, E-mail: o.yalcin@nigde.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Niğde University, Niğde 51240 (Turkey); Erdem, Rıza [Department of Physics, Akdeniz University, Antalya 07058 (Turkey); Özüm, Songül; Demir, Zafer [Institute of Sciences, Niğde University, Niğde 51240 (Turkey)

    2015-09-01

    Recently, origin of the martensite–austenite transitions in core–surface type magnetic nanoparticles has been investigated theoretically and it has been indicated that repulsive biquadratic exchange coupling (K<0.0) causes the coexisting martensite and austenite phases. In the present paper, the phase diagrams of homogeneous and composite nanoparticles in the k{sub B}T/J{sub 0}−D/J{sub 0} plane are studied for the presence and absence of attractive biquadratic exchange interaction in addition to repulsive biquadratic exchange interaction. Significant changes in the phase diagram points are discussed in the presence of martensitic and austenitic transformations. Four regions in the phase diagrams are found as second-order, martensitic–austenitic, T{sub Cid} and first-order phase transition regimes. - Highlights: • The phase diagrams have been observed for HM- and CM-NPs with martensitic (M) and austenitic (A) phases. • The thermal hysteresis loops have also been plotted for CM-NPs. • The four separate regions in phase diagrams called first-order phase transition (1st), martensitic/austenitic transition (M–A), second-order phase transition (2nd) and T{sub Cid} have been observed.

  10. Dissimilar Friction Stir Welding Between UNS S31603 Austenitic Stainless Steel and UNS S32750 Superduplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoro, Maria Claudia; Pereira, Victor Ferrinho; Mei, Paulo Roberto; Ramirez, Antonio Jose

    2015-02-01

    In order to verify the viability of dissimilar UNS S31603 austenitic and UNS S32750 superduplex stainless steels joined by friction stir welding, 6-mm-thick plates were welded using a PCBN-WRe tool. The welded joints were performed in position control mode at rotational speeds of 100 to 300 rpm and a feed rate of 100 mm/min. The joints performed with 150 and 200 rpm showed good appearance and no defects. The metallographic analysis of both joints showed no internal defects and that the material flow pattern is visible only in the stirred zone (SZ) of the superduplex steel. On the SZ top, these patterns are made of regions of different phases (ferrite and austenite), and on the bottom and central part of the SZ, these patterns are formed by alternated regions of different grain sizes. The ferrite grains in the superduplex steel are larger than those in the austenitic ones along the SZ and thermo-mechanically affected zone, explained by the difference between austenite and ferrite recrystallization kinetics. The amount of ferrite islands present on the austenitic steel base metal decreased near the SZ interface, caused by the dissolving of the ferrite in austenitic matrix. No other phases were found in both joints. The best weld parameters were found to be 200 rpm rotation speed, 100 mm/min feed rate, and tool position control.

  11. Prediction of Austenitization and Homogenization of Q235 Plain Carbon Steel during Reheating Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the austenitization and homogenization process of Q235 plain carbon steel during reheating is predictedusing a two-dimensional model which has been developed for the prediction of diffusive phase transformation (e.g.α to γ). The diffusion equations are solved within each phase (α and γ) and an explicit finite volume techniqueformulated for a regular hexagonal grid are used. The discrete interface is represented by special volume elementsα/γ, an volume element α undergoes a transition to an interface state before it becomes γ. The procedure allowsus to handle the displacement of the interface while respecting the flux condition at the interface. The simulatedmicrostructure shows the dissolution of ferrite particles in the austenite matrix is presented at different stages ofthe phase transformation. Specifically, the influence of the microstructure scale and the heating rate on the phasetransformation kinetics has been investigated. The experimental results agree well with the simulated ones.

  12. On the formation of stacking fault tetrahedra in irradiated austenitic stainless steels – A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schibli, Raluca, E-mail: raluca.stoenescu@gmail.com; Schäublin, Robin

    2013-11-15

    Irradiated austenitic stainless steels, because of their low stacking fault energy and high shear modulus, should exhibit a high ratio of stacking fault tetrahedra relative to the overall population of radiation induced nanometric defects. Experimental observations of stacking fault tetrahedra by transmission electron microscopy in commercial-purity stainless steels are however scarce, while they abundantly occur in high-purity or model austenitic alloys irradiated at both low and high temperatures, but not at around 673 K. In commercial alloys, the little evidence of stacking fault tetrahedra does not follow such a trend. These contradictions are reviewed and discussed. Reviewing the three possible formation mechanisms identified in the literature, namely the Silcox and Hirsch Frank loop dissociation, the void collapse and the stacking fault tetrahedra growth, it seems that the later dominates under irradiation.

  13. Film-induced stress enhancing stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金许; 陈浩; 王燕斌; 乔利杰; 褚武扬

    2001-01-01

    A constant deflection device designed for use within a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to investigate the change in dislocation configuration ahead of a crack tip during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of type 310 austenitic stainless steel in a boiling MgCl2 solution, and the initiation process of stress corrosion microcrack. Results showed that corrosion process during SCC enhanced dislocation emission, multiplication and motion. Microcracks of SCC were initiated when the corrosion-enhanced dislocation emission and motion reached critical state.   A passive film formed during corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in the boiling MgCl2 solution generated a tensile stress. During SCC, the additive tensile stress generated at the metal/passive film interface helps enhance dislocation emission and motion.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Austenite Recrystallization in CSP Hot Rolled C-Mn Steel Strip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Guang-bo; LIU Zheng-dong; DONG Han; GAN Yong; KANG Yong-lin; LI Lie-jun; MAO Xin-ping

    2007-01-01

    An integrated mathematical model is developed to predict the microstructure evolution of C-Mn steel during multipass hot rolling on the CSP production line, and the thermal evolution, the temperature distribution, the deformation, and the austenite recrystallization are simulated. The characteristics of austenite recrystallization of hot rolled C-Mn steel in the CSP process are also discussed. The simulation of the microstructure evolution of C-Mn steel ZJ510L during CSP multipass hot rolling indicates that dynamic recrystallization and metadynamic recrystallization may easily occur in the first few passes, where nonuniform recrystallization and inhomogeneous grain size microstructure may readily occur; during the last few passes, static recrystallization may occur dominantly, and the microstructure will become more homogeneous and partial recrystallization may occur at relatively low temperature.

  15. Study on comprehensive properties of duplex austenitic surfacing alloys for impacting abrasion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, comprehensive property crack resistance, work hardening and abrasion resistance of a series of double-phases austenitic alloys(FAW) has been studied by means of SEM, TEM and type MD-10 impacting wear test machine. FAW alloys are of middle chromium and low manganese, including Fe-Cr-Mo-C alloy,Fe-Cr-Mn-C alloy and Fe-Cr-Mn-Ni-C alloy, that are designed for working in condition of impacting abrasion resistance hardfacing.Study results show that the work hardening mechanism of FAW alloys are mainly deformation high dislocation density and dynamic carbide aging, the form of wearing is plastic chisel cutting. Adjusting the amount of carbon, nickel, manganese and other elements in austenitic phase area, the FAW alloy could fit different engineering conditions of high impacting, high temperature and so on.

  16. TDA method application to austenite transformation in nodular cast iron with carbides assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gumienny

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the possibility of TDA method using to austenite transformation in nodular cast iron with carbides assessment is presented. Studies were conducted on cast iron with about 2% molybdenum and 0,70% to 4,50% nickel. On diagrams, where TDA curves are pre- sented, on time axis a logarithmic scale was applied. It has not been used up to now. It was found, that during cooling and crystallization of cast iron in TDA probe, on the derivative curve there is a slight thermal effect from austenite to upper bainite or martensite transformation. Depending on nickel concentration austeniteupper bainite transformation start temperature changed (Bus, while MS temperature was independent of it. An influence of nickel on eutectic transformation temperature in nodular cast iron with carbides was determined too.

  17. On qualification of TOFD technique for austenitic stainless steel welds inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Ona, R. [Tecnatom, San Sebastian de los Reyes (Spain); Viggianiello, S.; Bleuze, A. [Metalscan, Saint-Remy (France)

    2006-07-01

    Time of Flight Diffraction (TOFD) technique is gaining ground as a solid method for detection and sizing of defects. It has been reported that TOFD technique provides good results on the inspection of fine grain steels. However, there are few results regarding the application and performance of this technique on austenitic stainless steels. A big challenge of these inspections is the coarse grain structure that produces low signal to noise ratio and may mask the diffraction signals. Appropriate transducer design, selection of technique parameters and analysis tools could overcome the actual difficulties. In this paper, the main design aspects and parameters of the TOFD technique for austenitic steels are presented. It follows the description of qualification tests carried out to validate the technique for inspecting stainless steels welds. To conclude, discussion of results from actual inspections is shown. (orig.)

  18. Influence of surface texture on the galling characteristics of lean duplex and austenitic stainless steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadman, Boel; Eriksen, J.; Olsson, M.;

    2010-01-01

    of sheet materials and lubricants. The strip reduction test, a severe sheet forming tribology test was used to simulate the conditions during ironing. This investigation shows that the risk of galling is highly dependent on the surface texture of the duplex steel. Trials were also performed......Two simulative test methods were used to study galling in sheet forming of two types of stainless steel sheet: austenitic (EN 1.4301) and lean duplex LDX 2101 (EN 1.4162) in different surface conditions. The pin-on-disc test was used to analyse the galling resistance of different combinations...... in an industrial tool used for high volume production of pump components, to compare forming of LDX 2101 and austenitic stainless steel with equal thickness. The forming forces, the geometry and the strains in the sheet material were compared for the same component. It was found that LDX steels can be formed...

  19. Diffusion of nitrogen in austenitic phase: Application to nitriding of stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torchane Lazhar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The nitriding treatment of the martensitic stainless steels aims to harden and to introduce compressive stresses on the surface of steel. Hardening is resulting of the martensitic transformation of the austenitic matrix enriched into nitrogen during cooling and of the germination and the nitride growth. In order to preserve the stainless character of the nitrided layer, it is imperative to control precipitation within the zone affected by the treatment. Our task consists in showing that is possible to control the composition of the gas atmosphere containing ammonia and argon and to carry out on the surface of nitrided samples at 1050°C two types of configuration of layers : a single phase layer made up by martensite enriched in nitrogen α’N and or a two phase layer made up by austenite γN and martensite α’N enriched in nitrogen.

  20. HEALING OF HYDROGEN ATTACK CRACK IN AUSTENITE STAINLESS STEEL UNDER HEAT TREATMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.G. Li; C.F. Dong; H. Chen

    2002-01-01

    The specimens of 304 austenite stainless steel with the hydrogen attack bubbles orcracks were heat treated at 600℃ for 6h. The SEM and TEM observations on thespecimens before and after the heat treatment showed that the bubbles or cracks could behealed completely by heat treatment. The healing of hydrogen attack bubbles or cracksis closely related to heat diffusion of Fe and C atoms in austenite. The driving forceof crack healing results fram the plastic deforming energy Es induced by the growthof hydrogen attack bubbles or cracks. The critical condition of healing of bubbles orcracks is Es ≥ 2γ/r (where γγ is the surface tension, r is the radius of bubbles or halflength of crack). During healing of the hydrogen attack bubbles or cracks, the recovery,polygonization and recrystallization of the sub-grain also occured.

  1. A powder metallurgy austenitic stainless steel for application at very low temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano; Liimatainen, J; Kumpula, M

    2000-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider to be built at CERN will require 1232 superconducting dipole magnets operating at 1.9 K. By virtue of their mechanical properties, weldability and improved austenite stability, nitrogen enriched austenitic stainless steels have been chosen as the material for several of the structural components of these magnets. Powder Metallurgy (PM) could represent an attractive production technique for components of complex shape for which dimension tolerances, dimensional stability, weldability are key issues during fabrication, and mechanical properties, ductility and leak tightness have to be guaranteed during operation. PM Hot Isostatic Pressed test plates and prototype components of 316LN-type grade have been produced by Santasalo Powdermet Oy. They have been fully characterized and mechanically tested down to 4.2 K at CERN. The fine grained structure, the absence of residual stresses, the full isotropy of mechanical properties associated to the low level of Prior Particle Boundaries oxides ...

  2. Secondary Hardening, Austenite Grain Coarsening and Surface Decarburization Phenomenon in Nb-Bearing Spring Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The secondary hardening, the austenite grain coarsening and the surface decarburization phenomenon of Nb-bearing spring steel were investigated, and the effects of niobium on tempered microstructure was studied using scanning electron microscope. The results show that the micro-addition of niobium increases the tempering resistance and produces secondary hardening. The effect of niobium on the size and distribution of cementite particles is one of the primary reasons to increase the hardness after tempering. The grain-coarsening temperature of the spring steel is raised 150 ~C due to Nb-addition. Furthermore, both the secondary hardening and the austenite grain coarsening phenomenon congruously demonstrate niobium begins observably dissolving above 1 100 ℃ in the spring steel. Be- sides, niobium microalloying is an effective and economy means to decrease the decarburization sensitivity of the spring steels.

  3. Evaluation of High Temperature Corrosion Resistance of Finned Tubes Made of Austenitic Steel And Nickel Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turowska A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper was to evaluate the resistance to high temperature corrosion of laser welded joints of finned tubes made of austenitic steel (304,304H and nickel alloys (Inconel 600, Inconel 625. The scope of the paper covered the performance of corrosion resistance tests in the atmosphere of simulated exhaust gases of the following chemical composition: 0.2% HCl, 0.08% SO2, 9.0% O2 and N2 in the temperature of 800°C for 1000 hours. One found out that both tubes made of austenitic steel and those made of nickel alloy displayed good resistance to corrosion and could be applied in the energy industry.

  4. Characterization of Austenite Dynamic Recrystallization under Different Z Parameters in a Microalloyed Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Shaban; B. Eghbali

    2011-01-01

    A low carbon Nb-Ti microalloyed steel was subjected to hot torsion testing over the temperature range 850-1100℃ and strain rates 0.01-1 s-1 to study the influence of deformation conditions on the dynamic recrystallization characteristics of austenite. The results show that dynamic recrystallization occurs more easily with the decrease of strain rate and the increase of deformation temperature. The complete dynamically recrystallized grain size as a function of Zener-Hollomon parameter was established. It was found that dynamically recrystallized grain sizes decrease with increasing strain rate and decreasing deformation temperature. The effect of microalloying elements on peak strain was investigated and the solute drag corrected peak strain was determined. Also, the dynamic recrystallization map of austenite was obtained by using recrystallization critical parameters.

  5. Effect of Austenite Recrystallization on Microstructure and Properties of Q345 Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Fu-xian; LI Yan-mei; LIU Yan-chun; WANG Guo-dong

    2005-01-01

    The Q345 plate steel austenite recrystallization behavior and strain accumulation during rolling were investigated through thermal simulation and rolling. The effect of the recrystallization behavior on the microstructure and properties of the steel was discussed and analyzed. The control principles of the pass reduction in the austenite recrystallization region and partial recrystallization region were established. It is found that to increase the thickness of intermediate billet in the finish temperature interval of 880-820 ℃ is favorable to grain refinement.The result has been applied to the industrial production of the 3 500 mm plate mill of Shougang Group. The average grain size of the steel plate conforms to ASTM No. 10-12, and the grade of band structure has been reduced to below 1.5.

  6. Effect of silicon and prior deformation of austenite on isothermal transformation in low carbon steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minghui CAI; Hun DING; Jiansu ZHANG; Long LI

    2009-01-01

    Isothermal transformation (TTT) behavior of the low carbon steels with two Si con-tents (0.50 wt pct and 1.35 wt pct) was investigated with and without the prior deformation. The results show that Si and the prior deformation of the austenite have significant effects on the transformation of the ferrite and bainite. The addition of Si refines the ferrite grains, accelerates the polygonal ferrite transformation and the formation of M/A constituents, leading to the improvement of the strength. The ferrite grains formed under the prior deformation of the austenite become more ho-mogeneous and refined. However, the influence of deformation on the tensile strength of both steels is dependent on the isothermal temperatures. Thermodynamic calcu-lation indicates that Si and prior deformation reduce the incubation time of both ferrite and bainite transformation, but the effect is weakened by the decrease of the isothermal temperatures.

  7. Corrosion properties of S-phase layers formed on medical grade austenitic stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhagiar, Joseph; Dong, Hanshan

    2012-02-01

    The corrosion properties of S-phase surface layers formed in AISI 316LVM (ASTM F138) and High-N (ASTM F1586) medical grade austenitic stainless steels by plasma surface alloying with nitrogen (at 430°C), carbon (at 500°C) and both carbon and nitrogen (at 430°C) has been investigated. The corrosion behaviour of the S-phase layers in Ringer's solutions was evaluated using potentiodynamic and immersion corrosion tests. The corrosion damage was evaluated using microscopy, hardness testing, inductive coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The experimental results have demonstrated that low-temperature nitriding, carburising and carbonitriding can improve the localised corrosion resistance of both industrial and medical grade austenitic stainless steels as long as the threshold sensitisation temperature is not reached. Carburising at 500°C has proved to be the best hardening treatment with the least effect on the corrosion resistance of the parent alloy.

  8. The effect of hydrogen on strain hardening and fracture mechanism of high-nitrogen austenitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, G. G.; Astafurova, E. G.; Melnikov, E. V.; Moskvina, V. A.; Vojtsik, V. F.; Galchenko, N. K.; Zakharov, G. N.

    2016-07-01

    High-nitrogen austenitic steels are perspective materials for an electron-beam welding and for producing of wear-resistant coatings, which can be used for application in aggressive atmospheres. The tensile behavior and fracture mechanism of high-nitrogen austenitic steel Fe-20Cr-22Mn-1.5V-0.2C-0.6N (in wt.%) after electrochemical hydrogen charging for 2, 10 and 40 hours have been investigated. Hydrogenation of steel provides a loss of yield strength, uniform elongation and tensile strength. The degradation of tensile properties becomes stronger with increase in charging duration - it occurs more intensive in specimens hydrogenated for 40 hours as compared to ones charged for 2-10 hours. Fracture analysis reveals a hydrogen-induced formation of brittle surface layers up to 6 μm thick after 40 hours of saturation. Hydrogenation changes fracture mode of steel from mixed intergranular-transgranular to mainly transgranular one.

  9. Size-dependent characteristics of ultra-fine oxygen-enriched nanoparticles in austenitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yinbin; Mo, Kun; Zhou, Zhangjian; Liu, Xiang; Lan, Kuan-Che; Zhang, Guangming; Miller, Michael K.; Powers, Kathy A.; Stubbins, James F.

    2016-11-01

    Here, a coordinated investigation of the elemental composition and morphology of ultra-fine-scale nanoparticles as a function of size within a variety of austenitic oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels is reported. Atom probe tomography was utilized to evaluate the elemental composition of these nanoparticles. Meanwhile, the crystal structures and orientation relationships were determined by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The nanoparticles with sufficient size (>4 nm) to maintain a Y2Ti2-xO7-2x stoichiometry were found to have a pyrochlore structure, whereas smaller YxTiyOz nanoparticles lacked a well-defined structure. The size-dependent characteristics of the nanoparticles in austenitic ODS steels differ from those in ferritic/martensitic ODS steels.

  10. Ascertainment of the hybridization states of Fe atoms in austenite and martensite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙振国; 刘志林; 李志林

    1997-01-01

    Based on Yu Ruihuang’s theory of electron structure calculation, applying the boundary condition that "the electron density of the contacting surface between atoms must be continuous" advanced by Cheng Kaijia, the hybridization states of Fec and Fef atoms in C-containing structure unit of austenite and FeⅠ, FeⅡ and FeⅢ atoms in C-containing unit of martensite are ascertained. The hybrid levels of Fec and Fef atoms in austenite are 13 and 14, respectively; and those of FeⅠ , FeⅡ and FeⅢ atoms are 12, 10 and 9, respectively. When the C content is low, the 11th, 10th and 9th levels are also the probable atom, state in martensite.

  11. Magnetic analysis of martensitic and austenitic phases in metamagnetic NiMn(In, Sn) alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lázpita, P., E-mail: patricia.lazpita@ehu.es [University of Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Leioa (Spain); Escolar, J. [University of Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Leioa (Spain); Chernenko, V.A. [University of Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Leioa (Spain); BCMaterials, Parque Tecnológico de Bizkaia, Ed. 500, Derio 48160 (Spain); Ikerbasque, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao 48013 (Spain); Barandiarán, J.M. [University of Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Leioa (Spain); BCMaterials, Parque Tecnológico de Bizkaia, Ed. 500, Derio 48160 (Spain)

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • NiMnIn austenite and martensite have similar Ising-type critical exponents. • NiMnIn critical exponents rule out disordered states as spin-glass in martensite. • In NiMnIn alloys, magnetism arises mainly from moments localized at Mn atoms. • NiCoMnSn critical exponents are close to the ones from tricritical mean field model. • NiCoMnSn complex magnetic state results from three different magnetic atoms. - Abstract: Two different metamagnetic shape memory alloys of nominal composition Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 36}In{sub 14} and Ni{sub 42}Co{sub 8}Mn{sub 39}Sn{sub 11} have been studied by means of modified Arrott plots to give insight into the magnetic states of both the austenitic and martensitic phases. For Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 36}In{sub 14} alloy, the same critical exponents (β = 0.32 and γ = 2.0) are obtained in austenite and martensite. They suggest that localized moments at Mn atoms are responsible for the magnetism of both phases according to the Ising model. The martensite, however, displays a rather complex behavior because β continuously changes with temperature. In Ni{sub 43}Co{sub 6.5}Mn{sub 39}Sn{sub 11.5}, critical exponents in the austenite are β = 0.27 and γ = 1.0. They are close to the tricritical mean field model, but no reliable fits were obtained in the martensite. The results are discussed in terms of microscopically different magnetic states in two alloys reflecting a complex interplay between the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic contributions.

  12. Modeling Recrystallization of Austenite for C-Mn Steels during Hot Deformation by Cellular Automaton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By using a cellular automaton method, microstructure evolution of recrystallization in austenite during hot deformation was simulated for C-Mn steels. A model takes into account the influence of deformation temperature, strain, and strain rate on the dynamic recrystallization fraction, and the effect of the keeping time on the static recrystallization fraction based on a hot deformation test on a Gleeble-1500 simulator. In addition, the size changing of γ grains during continuous hot deformation was simulated by applying the model.

  13. Modeling of Ni Diffusion Induced Austenite Formation in Ferritic Stainless Steel Interconnects

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ming; Molin, Sebastian; Zhang, L.; Ta, Na; Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Kiebach, Wolff-Ragnar; Du, Y

    2015-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steel interconnect plates are widely used in planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) or electrolysis cell (SOEC) stacks. During stack production and operation, nickel from the Ni/YSZ fuel electrode or from the Ni contact component diffuses into the IC plate, causing transformation of the ferritic phase into an austenitic phase in the interface region. This is accompanied with changes in volume and in mechanical and corrosion properties of the IC plates. In this work, kinetic mo...

  14. Internal hydrogen-induced subcritical crack growth in austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J. H.; Altstetter, C. J.

    1991-11-01

    The effects of small amounts of dissolved hydrogen on crack propagation were determined for two austenitic stainless steel alloys, AISI 301 and 310S. In order to have a uniform distribution of hydrogen in the alloys, they were cathodically charged at high temperature in a molten salt electrolyte. Sustained load tests were performed on fatigue precracked specimens in air at 0 ‡C, 25 ‡C, and 50 ‡C with hydrogen contents up to 41 wt ppm. The electrical potential drop method with optical calibration was used to continuously monitor the crack position. Log crack velocity vs stress intensity curves had definite thresholds for subcritical crack growth (SCG), but stage II was not always clearly delineated. In the unstable austenitic steel, AISI 301, the threshold stress intensity decreased with increasing hydrogen content or increasing temperature, but beyond about 10 wt ppm, it became insensitive to hydrogen concentration. At higher concentrations, stage II became less distinct. In the stable stainless steel, subcritical crack growth was observed only for a specimen containing 41 wt ppm hydrogen. Fractographic features were correlated with stress intensity, hydrogen content, and temperature. The fracture mode changed with temperature and hydrogen content. For unstable austenitic steel, low temperature and high hydrogen content favored intergranular fracture while microvoid coalescence dominated at a low hydrogen content. The interpretation of these phenomena is based on the tendency for stress-induced phase transformation, the different hydrogen diffusivity and solubility in ferrite and austenite, and outgassing from the crack tip. After comparing the embrittlement due to internal hydrogen with that in external hydrogen, it is concluded that the critical hydrogen distribution for the onset of subcritical crack growth is reached at a location that is very near the crack tip.

  15. Antibacterial Properties of an Austenitic Antibacterial Stainless Steel and Its Security for Human Body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke YANG; Manqi L(U)

    2007-01-01

    An austenitic antibacterial stainless steel is reported in this paper. The very fine and dispersive ε-Cu precipitations in the matrix of the antibacterial steel after the antibacterial treatment endow the steel with antibacterial function. The antibacterial function is strong, long-term and broad-spectrum, and can be maintained even after repeated wear and long time dipping in water. The steel is safe for human body and could be used widely in daily application.

  16. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitnaker, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  17. Ultrasonic inspection for circumferential butt joint of austenitic stainless steel with carbon steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan Shengyun; Xiong Lasen

    2006-01-01

    Tthe practical application of ultrasonic wave inspection in welded joint by austenitic stainless steel with carbon steel is presented. It is shown from the experimental results that the high frequency narrow-pulsed longitudinal ultrasonic wave inspection technique can detect the defects in deferent sound path and location within the tested welded joint clearly and exactly. The study in the paper may provide a new approach for further application of ultrasonic inspection in coarse-grained materials.

  18. Stress Induce Martensitic Transformations in Hydrogen Embrittlement of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenak, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In austenitic type stainless steels, hydrogen concentration gradients formed during electrochemical charging and followed by hydrogen loss during aging, at room temperature, surface stresses, and martensitic phases α'-BCC and ɛ-HCP developed. The basic relationship between the X-ray diffraction peak broadening and the hydrogen gradients, formed during charging and aging at room temperature in such austenitic stainless steels, were analyzed. The results demonstrate that the impact of stresses must be considered in the discussion of phase transformations due to hydrogenation. Austenitic stainless steels based on iron-nickel-chromium, have relatively low stacking fault energy γSFE and undergo: quenching to low temperatures, plastic deformation, sensitization heat treatments, high pressure (≥3-5 × 109 Pa) by hydrogen or other gases, electrochemical charging (when the sample is cathode) and when is irradiation by various ions the samples in vacuum. All the above mentioned induce formation of ɛ and α' in the face-centered cubic (FCC) austenite γ matrix. The highest stresses cause formation of mainly α' phase and ɛ-martensite, and both are involved in plastic deformation processes and promoting crack propagation at the surface. In 310 steel, the crack propagation is based on deformation processes following ɛ-martensitic formation only. Formations of ɛ- and α'-martensites were noted along the fracture surfaces and ahead of the crack tip. The cracks propagated through the ɛ-martensitic plates, which formed along the active slip planes, while α' phase was always found in the high-stress region on the ends of the ligaments from both sides of the crack surfaces undergoing propagation.

  19. Effects of titanium additions to austenitic ternary alloys on microstructural evolution and void swelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okita, T; Wolfer, W G; Garner, F A; Sekimura, N

    2003-12-01

    Ternary austenitic model alloys were modified with 0.25 wt.% titanium and irradiated in FFTF reactor at dose rates ranging over more than two orders in magnitude. While lowering of dose rate strongly increases swelling by shortening the incubation dose, the steady state swelling rate is not affected by dose rate. Although titanium addition strongly alters the void microstructure, swelling at {approx} 420 C does not change with titanium additions, but the sensitivity to dose rate is preserved.

  20. Combined nano-SIMS/AFM/EBSD analysis and atom probe tomography, of carbon distribution in austenite/ε-martensite high-Mn steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Jae-Bok; Lee, B-H; Choi, P; Lee, S-G; Park, C-G

    2013-09-01

    We introduce a new experimental approach for the identification of the atomistic position of interstitial carbon in a high-Mn binary alloy consisting of austenite and ε-martensite. Using combined nano-beam secondary ion mass spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction analyses, we clearly observe carbon partitioning to austenite. Nano-beam secondary ion mass spectroscopy and atom probe tomography studies also reveal carbon trapping at crystal imperfections as identified by transmission electron microscopy. Three main trapping sites can be distinguished: phase boundaries between austenite and ε-martensite, stacking faults in austenite, and prior austenite grain boundaries. Our findings suggest that segregation and/or partitioning of carbon can contribute to the austenite-to-martensite transformation of the investigated alloy.

  1. Homogeneous formation of epsilon carbides within the austenite during the isothermal transformation of a ductile iron at 410 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, I.; Aranzabal, J.; Castro, F.; Urcola, J. J.

    1995-05-01

    The transformation of a ductile iron at 410 °C for different times, after austenitization for 30 minutes at 900 °C, is analyzed in detail. Upper bainite and a high volume fraction of austenite are formed for intermediate annealing times. A certain amount of martensite is observed after quenching not only for short transformation times but also for intermediate times. The formation of the martensite on cooling after intermediate transformation times is due to the decrease in carbon concentration of the retained austenite because of the homogeneous precipitation of epsilon carbides within. This homogeneous precipitation of epsilon carbide inside austenite is unambiguously observed. The epsilon carbide, pre-precipitated in austenite, which transforms to martensite on cooling, continues growing in the martensite after transformation. For long times of austempering at 410 °C, some complex large carbides or silicocarbides are formed, probably from the epsilon carbide, which result in the total decomposition of austenite.

  2. Kinetic study of austenite formation during continuous heating of unalloyed ductile iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Octavio Vzquez-Gmez; Jos Antonio Barrera-Godnez; Hctor Javier Vergara-Hernndez

    2015-01-01

    The austenite formation kinetics in unalloyed cast ductile iron was studied on the basis of dilatometry measurements, and Avrami’s equation was used to estimate the material’s kinetic parameters. A continuous heating transformation diagram was constructed us-ing heating rates in the range of 0.06 to 0.83°C⋅s−1. As the heating rate was augmented, the critical temperatures, c1A and Aα, as well as the intercritical range, which was evaluated as the difference between the critical temperatures, α c1Δ T =A −A , increased. At a low heating rate, the kinetics of austenite formation was slow as a consequence of the iron’s silicon content. The effect of heating rate on k and n, the kinetic parameters of Avrami’s equation, was also determined. Parameter n, which is associated with nucleation sites and growth geometry, de-creased with an increase in heating rate. In addition, parameter k increased with the increase of heating rate, suggesting that the nucleation and growth rates are carbon-and silicon-diffusion controlled during austenite formation under continuous heating.

  3. Improvement of steam oxidation resistance of martensitic and austenitic alloys by Al-containing coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoedler, Reinhard; Straub, Stefan [Alstom Power Systems GmbH, Mannheim (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    An increase of steam power plant efficiency is necessary to reduce the emissions and to reduce fuel consumption. To obtain this goal, the steam temperature must be increased considerably. Present alloys, however, show oxide scale growth and spallation at elevated temperatures. These shortcomings can be avoided by applying coatings to martensitic and austenitic steels. Therefore, diffusion coatings on martensitic 9 - 11 % - Cr steels and 79 % - Cr austenitic steels were applied and exposed to flowing steam for operating times up to 15.000 h at 650 C. The coating process was optimized with respect to surface preparation, heat treatment and other process parameters. Metallographic analysis was performed after the oxidation tests by light optical (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). With energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) in SEM the distribution of the elements was determined in order to assess the diffusion velocity of different coating constituents. This allows an estimation of the coating lifetime. The best coating showed that only a few {mu}m of oxide scales have formed as compared to several 100 {mu}m on the uncoated steel (under the same test conditions). Thus, these types of coatings can be a promising solution for preventing oxidation of martensitic and austenitic steels. (orig.)

  4. Cyclic deformation behaviour of austenitic steels at ambient and elevated temperatures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Th Nebel; D Eifler

    2003-02-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to characterise cyclic deformation behaviour and plasticity-induced martensite formation of metastable austenitic stainless steels at ambient and elevated temperatures, taking into account the influence of the alloying elements titanium and niobium. Titanium and niobium are ferrite-stabilising elements which influence the ferrite crystallisation. Furthermore, They form carbides and/or carbonitrides and thus limit the austenite-stabilising effect of carbon and nitrogen. Several specimen batches of titanium and niobium alloyed austenite and of a pure Cr-Ni-steel for comparison were tested under stress and total strain control at a frequency of 5 Hz and triangular load-time waveforms. Stress-strain-hysteresis and temperature measurements were used at ambient temperature to characterise cyclic deformation behaviour. Plasticity-induced martensite content was detected with non-destructive magnetic measuring techniques. The experiments yield characteristic cyclic deformation curves and corresponding magnetic signals according to the actual fatigue state and the amount of martensite. Fatigue behaviour of X6CrNiTi1810 (AISI 321), X10CrNiCb189 (AISI 348) and X5CrNi1810 (AISI 304) is characterised by cyclic hardening and softening effects which are strongly influenced by specific loading conditions. Martensite formation varies with the composition, loading conditions, temperature and number of cycles.

  5. High Nb, Ta, and Al creep- and oxidation-resistant austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Santella, Michael L [Knoxville, TN; Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge, TN; Liu, Chain-tsuan [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-13

    An austenitic stainless steel HTUPS alloy includes, in weight percent: 15 to 30 Ni; 10 to 15 Cr; 2 to 5 Al; 0.6 to 5 total of at least one of Nb and Ta; no more than 0.3 of combined Ti+V; up to 3 Mo; up to 3 Co; up to 1 W; up to 0.5 Cu; up to 4 Mn; up to 1 Si; 0.05 to 0.15 C; up to 0.15 B; up to 0.05 P; up to 1 total of at least one of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; less than 0.05 N; and base Fe, wherein the weight percent Fe is greater than the weight percent Ni wherein said alloy forms an external continuous scale comprising alumina, nanometer scale sized particles distributed throughout the microstructure, said particles comprising at least one composition selected from the group consisting of NbC and TaC, and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure, said austenitic matrix being essentially delta-ferrite-free and essentially BCC-phase-free.

  6. Features of deformation localization in stable austenitic steel under thermomechanical treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litovchenko, I. Yu.; Akkuzin, S. A.; Polekhina, N. A.; Tyumentsev, A. N.

    2016-11-01

    Features of structural states of Fe-18Cr-14Ni-Mo austenitic steel after thermomechanical treatment, including low-temperature and warm rolling deformation, were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that mechanical twinning in multiple systems and strain localization bands contribute to grain fragmentation with the formation of the submicrocrystalline austenitic structure. These bands lie in the microtwin structure, have high-angle (≈60°-90°, ) misorientations of the crystal lattice relative to the matrix and localize significant (up to ≈1) shear strain. In areas of the bands, structural states with high (tens of deg/μm) curvature of the crystal lattice and high local internal stresses are observed. The internal structure of the bands is presented by nanoscale fragments of austenite and α'-martensite. The presence of specific misorientations and fragments of martensite means that the formation mechanism of localized deformation bands are direct plus reverse (γ → α' → γ) martensitic transformations with the reverse transformation follows by an alternative path. These structural states provide high strength properties of steel: the yield strength is up to 1150 MPa.

  7. Determination of Proper Austenitization Temperatures for Hot Stamping of AISI 4140 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadian, Pedram; Parsa, Mohammad Habibi; Shakeri, Amid

    2014-04-01

    High strength steels are desirable materials for use in automobile bodies in order to reduce vehicle weight and increase the safety of car passengers, but steel grades with high strength commonly show poor formability. Recently, steels with controlled microstructures and compositions are used to gain adequate strength after hot stamping while maintaining good formability during processing. In this study, microstructure evolutions and changes in mechanical properties of AISI 4140 steel sheets resulting from the hot stamping process at different austenitization temperatures were investigated. To determine the proper austenitization temperatures, the results were compared with those of the cold-worked and cold-worked plus quench-tempered specimens. Comparisons showed that the austenitization temperatures of 1000 and 1100 °C are proper for hot stamping of 3-mm-thick AISI 4140 steel sheets due to the resultant martensitic microstructure which led to the yield and ultimate tensile strength of 1.3 and 2.1 GPa, respectively. Such conditions resulted in more favorable simultaneous strength and elongation than those of hot-stamped conventional boron steels.

  8. Development of a robust modeling tool for radiation-induced segregation in austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Field, Kevin G [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Allen, Todd R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Busby, Jeremy T [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components has been linked to changes in grain boundary composition due to irradiation induced segregation (RIS). This work developed a robust RIS modeling tool to account for thermodynamics and kinetics of the atom and defect transportation under combined thermal and radiation conditions. The diffusion flux equations were based on the Perks model formulated through the linear theory of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Both cross and non-cross phenomenological diffusion coefficients in the flux equations were considered and correlated to tracer diffusion coefficients through Manning’s relation. The preferential atomvacancy coupling was described by the mobility model, whereas the preferential atom-interstitial coupling was described by the interstitial binding model. The composition dependence of the thermodynamic factor was modeled using the CALPHAD approach. Detailed analysis on the diffusion fluxes near and at grain boundaries of irradiated austenitic stainless steels suggested the dominant diffusion mechanism for chromium and iron is via vacancy, while that for nickel can swing from the vacancy to the interstitial dominant mechanism. The diffusion flux in the vicinity of a grain boundary was found to be greatly influenced by the composition gradient formed from the transient state, leading to the oscillatory behavior of alloy compositions in this region. This work confirms that both vacancy and interstitial diffusion, and segregation itself, have important roles in determining the microchemistry of Fe, Cr, and Ni at irradiated grain boundaries in austenitic stainless steels.

  9. Phase Equilibrium and Austenite Decomposition in Advanced High-Strength Medium-Mn Bainitic Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Grajcar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The work addresses the phase equilibrium analysis and austenite decomposition of two Nb-microalloyed medium-Mn steels containing 3% and 5% Mn. The pseudobinary Fe-C diagrams of the steels were calculated using Thermo-Calc. Thermodynamic calculations of the volume fraction evolution of microstructural constituents vs. temperature were carried out. The study comprised the determination of the time-temperature-transformation (TTT diagrams and continuous cooling transformation (CCT diagrams of the investigated steels. The diagrams were used to determine continuous and isothermal cooling paths suitable for production of bainite-based steels. It was found that the various Mn content strongly influences the hardenability of the steels and hence the austenite decomposition during cooling. The knowledge of CCT diagrams and the analysis of experimental dilatometric curves enabled to produce bainite-austenite mixtures in the thermomechanical simulator. Light microscopy (LM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to assess the effect of heat treatment on morphological details of produced multiphase microstructures.

  10. A simplified LBB evaluation procedure for austenitic and ferritic steel piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, R.M.; Wichman, K.R.

    1997-04-01

    The NRC previously has approved application of LBB analysis as a means to demonstrate that the probability of pipe rupture was extremely low so that dynamic loads associated with postulated pipe break could be excluded from the design basis (1). The purpose of this work was to: (1) define simplified procedures that can be used by the NRC to compute allowable lengths for circumferential throughwall cracks and assess margin against pipe fracture, and (2) verify the accuracy of the simplified procedures by comparison with available experimental data for piping having circumferential throughwall flaws. The development of the procedures was performed using techniques similar to those employed to develop ASME Code flaw evaluation procedures. The procedures described in this report are applicable to pipe and pipe fittings with: (1) wrought austenitic steel (Ni-Cr-Fe alloy) having a specified minimum yield strength less than 45 ksi, and gas metal-arc, submerged arc and shielded metal-arc austentic welds, and (2) seamless or welded wrought carbon steel having a minimum yield strength not greater than 40 ksi, and associated weld materials. The procedures can be used for cast austenitic steel when adequate information is available to place the cast material toughness into one of the categories identified later in this report for austenitic wrought and weld materials.

  11. A phase-field model for incoherent martensitic transformations including plastic accommodation processes in the austenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundin, J.; Raabe, D.; Emmerich, H.

    2011-10-01

    If alloys undergo an incoherent martensitic transformation, then plastic accommodation and relaxation accompany the transformation. To capture these mechanisms we develop an improved 3D microelastic-plastic phase-field model. It is based on the classical concepts of phase-field modeling of microelastic problems (Chen, L.Q., Wang Y., Khachaturyan, A.G., 1992. Philos. Mag. Lett. 65, 15-23). In addition to these it takes into account the incoherent formation of accommodation dislocations in the austenitic matrix, as well as their inheritance into the martensitic plates based on the crystallography of the martensitic transformation. We apply this new phase-field approach to the butterfly-type martensitic transformation in a Fe-30 wt%Ni alloy in direct comparison to recent experimental data (Sato, H., Zaefferer, S., 2009. Acta Mater. 57, 1931-1937). It is shown that the therein proposed mechanisms of plastic accommodation during the transformation can indeed explain the experimentally observed morphology of the martensitic plates as well as the orientation between martensitic plates and the austenitic matrix. The developed phase-field model constitutes a general simulations approach for different kinds of phase transformation phenomena that inherently include dislocation based accommodation processes. The approach does not only predict the final equilibrium topology, misfit, size, crystallography, and aspect ratio of martensite-austenite ensembles resulting from a transformation, but it also resolves the associated dislocation dynamics and the distribution, and the size of the crystals itself.

  12. Effect of microstructure on the stability of retained austenite in transformation-induced-plasticity steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timokhina, I. B.; Hodgson, P. D.; Pereloma, E. V.

    2004-08-01

    Two Fe-0.2C-1.55Mn-1.5Si (in wt pct) steels, with and without the addition of 0.039Nb (in wt pct), were studied using laboratory rolling-mill simulations of controlled thermomechanical processing. The microstructures of all samples were characterized by optical metallography, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The microstructural behavior of phases under applied strain was studied using a heat-tinting technique. Despite the similarity in the microstructures of the two steels (equal amounts of polygonal ferrite, carbide-free bainite, and retained austenite), the mechanical properties were different. The mechanical properties of these transformation-induced-plasticity (TRIP) steels depended not only on the individual behavior of all these phases, but also on the interaction between the phases during deformation. The polygonal ferrite and bainite of the C-Mn-Si steel contributed to the elongation more than these phases in the C-Mn-Si-Nb-steel. The stability of retained austenite depends on its location within the microstructure, the morphology of the bainite, and its interaction with other phases during straining. Granular bainite was the bainite morphology that provided the optimum stability of the retained austenite.

  13. Review of environmental effects on fatigue crack growth of austenitic stainless steels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shack, W. J.; Kassner, T. F.; Energy Technology

    1994-07-11

    Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking of piping, pressure vessel cladding, and core components in light water reactors are potential concerns to the nuclear industry and regulatory agencies. The degradation processes include intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel (SS) piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and propagation of fatigue or stress corrosion cracks (which initiate in sensitized SS cladding) into low-alloy ferritic steels in BWR pressure vessels. Crack growth data for wrought and cast austenitic SSs in simulated BWR water, developed at Argonne National Laboratory under US Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsorship over the past 10 years, have been compiled into a data base along with similar data obtained from the open literature. The data were analyzed to develop corrosion-fatigue curves for austenitic SSs in aqueous environments corresponding to normal BWR water chemistries, for BWRs that add hydrogen to the feedwater, and for pressurized water reactor primary-system-coolant chemistry. The corrosion-fatigue data and curves in water were compared with the air line in Section XI of the ASME Code.

  14. Z phase stability in AISI 316LN + Nb austenitic steels during creep at 650 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vodarek, Vlastimil [Technical Univ. Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2010-07-01

    The creep resistance of austenitic CrNi(Mo) steels strongly depends on microstructural stability during creep exposure. Nitrogen additions to CrNi(Mo) austenitic steels can significantly improve the creep strength. One of the most successful methods of improving the long-term creep resistance of austenitic steels is based on increasing the extent of precipitation strengthening during creep exposure. The role of precipitates in the achievements of good creep properties has been extensively studied for a long time. Although many minor phases are now well documented there are still contractions and missing thermodynamic data about some minor phases. This contribution deals with results of microstructural studies on the minor phase evolution in wrought AISI 316LN niobium stabilised steels during long-term creep exposure at 650 C. Microstructural investigations were carried out on specimens taken from both heads and gauge lengths of ruptured test-pieces by means of optical metallography, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The attention has been paid to evaluation of thermodynamic and dimensional stability of Z phase and other nitrogen bearing minor phases. Only two nitrogen-bearing minor phases formed in the casts investigated: Z phase and M{sub 6}X. The dimensional stability of Z phase particles was very high. (orig.)

  15. Thermal and mechanical stability of retained austenite in aluminum-containing multiphase TRIP steels

    CERN Document Server

    Zwaag, S; Kruijver, S O; Sietsma, J

    2002-01-01

    Stability of retained austenite is the key issue to understand transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) effect. In this work, both thermal stability and mechanical stability are investigated by thermo-magnetic as well as in situ conventional X-ray diffraction and micro synchrotron radiation diffraction measurements. The thermal stability in a 0.20C-1.52Mn-0.25Si-0.96Al (wt%) TRIP steel is studied in the temperature range between 5 and 300 K under a constant magnetic field of 5T. It is found that almost all austenite transforms thermally to martensite upon cooling to 5K and M sub s and M sub f temperatures are analyzed to be 355 and 115 K. Transformation kinetics on the fraction versus temperature relation are well described by a model based on thermodynamics. From the in situ conventional X-ray and synchrotron diffraction measurements in a 0.17C-1.46Mn-0.26Si-1.81Al (wt%) steel, the volume fraction of retained austenite is found to decrease as the strain increases according to Ludwigson and Berger relation. T...

  16. A Hybrid Low Temperature Surface Alloying Process for Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y. Sun

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a novel, hybrid process developed to engineer the surfaces of austenitic stainless steels at temperatures below 450℃ for the improvement in wear and corrosion resistance. The process is carried out in the plasma of a glow discharge containing both nitrogen and carbon reactive species, and facilitates the incorporation of both nitrogen and carbon into the austenite surface to form a dual-layer structure comprising a nitrogen-rich layer on top of a carbon-rich layer.Both layers can be precipitation-free at sufficiently low processing temperatures, and contain nitrogen and carbon respectively in supersaturated fcc austenite solid solutions. The resultant hybrid structure offers several advantages over the conventional low temperature nitriding and the newly developed carburizing processes in terms of mechanical and chemical properties, including higher surface hardness, a hardness gradient from the surface towards the layer-core interface, uniform layer thickness, and much enhanced corrosion resistance. This paper discusses the main features of this hybrid process and the various structural and properties characteristics of the resultant engineered surfaces.

  17. Dislocation Strengthening without Ductility Trade-off in Metastable Austenitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiabin; Jin, Yongbin; Fang, Xiaoyang; Chen, Chenxu; Feng, Qiong; Liu, Xiaowei; Chen, Yuzeng; Suo, Tao; Zhao, Feng; Huang, Tianlin; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xi; Fang, Youtong; Wei, Yujie; Meng, Liang; Lu, Jian; Yang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Strength and ductility are mutually exclusive if they are manifested as consequence of the coupling between strengthening and toughening mechanisms. One notable example is dislocation strengthening in metals, which invariably leads to reduced ductility. However, this trend is averted in metastable austenitic steels. A one-step thermal mechanical treatment (TMT), i.e. hot rolling, can effectively enhance the yielding strength of the metastable austenitic steel from 322 ± 18 MPa to 675 ± 15 MPa, while retaining both the formability and hardenability. It is noted that no boundaries are introduced in the optimized TMT process and all strengthening effect originates from dislocations with inherited thermal stability. The success of this method relies on the decoupled strengthening and toughening mechanisms in metastable austenitic steels, in which yield strength is controlled by initial dislocation density while ductility is retained by the capability to nucleate new dislocations to carry plastic deformation. Especially, the simplicity in processing enables scaling and industrial applications to meet the challenging requirements of emissions reduction. On the other hand, the complexity in the underlying mechanism of dislocation strengthening in this case may shed light on a different route of material strengthening by stimulating dislocation activities, rather than impeding motion of dislocations.

  18. Effects of Nitrogen Content and Austenitization Temperature on Precipitation in Niobium Micro-alloyed Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei CAO; Zhong-min YANG; Ying CHEN; Hui-min WANG; Xiao-li ZHAO

    2015-01-01

    The influences of nitrogen content and austenitization temperature on Nb(C,N)precipitation in niobium micro-alloyed steels were studied by different methods:optical microscopy,tensile tests,scanning electron mi-croscopy,transmission electron microscopy,physicochemical phase analysis,and small-angle X-ray scattering. The results show that the strength of the steel with high nitrogen content is slightly higher than that of the steel with low nitrogen content.The increase in the nitrogen content does not result in the increase in the amount of Nb(C,N) precipitates,which mainly depends on the niobium content in the steel.The mass fraction of small-sized Nb(C,N) precipitates (1-10 nm)in the steel with high nitrogen content is less than that in the steel with low nitrogen con-tent.After austenitized at 1 150 ℃,a number of large cuboidal and needle-shaped particles are detected in the steel with high nitrogen content,whereas they dissolve after austenitized at 1 200 ℃ and the Nb(C,N)precipitates become finer in both steels.Furthermore,the results also show that part of the nitrogen in steel involves the formation of al-loyed cementite.

  19. The detection of flaws in austenitic welds using the decomposition of the time-reversal operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Laura J.; Mulholland, Anthony J.; Tant, Katherine M. M.; Gachagan, Anthony; Harvey, Gerry; Bird, Colin

    2016-04-01

    The non-destructive testing of austenitic welds using ultrasound plays an important role in the assessment of the structural integrity of safety critical structures. The internal microstructure of these welds is highly scattering and can lead to the obscuration of defects when investigated by traditional imaging algorithms. This paper proposes an alternative objective method for the detection of flaws embedded in austenitic welds based on the singular value decomposition of the time-frequency domain response matrices. The distribution of the singular values is examined in the cases where a flaw exists and where there is no flaw present. A lower threshold on the singular values, specific to austenitic welds, is derived which, when exceeded, indicates the presence of a flaw. The detection criterion is successfully implemented on both synthetic and experimental data. The datasets arising from welds containing a flaw are further interrogated using the decomposition of the time-reversal operator (DORT) method and the total focusing method (TFM), and it is shown that images constructed via the DORT algorithm typically exhibit a higher signal-to-noise ratio than those constructed by the TFM algorithm.

  20. Electron work functions of ferrite and austenite phases in a duplex stainless steel and their adhesive forces with AFM silicon probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liqiu; Hua, Guomin; Yang, Binjie; Lu, Hao; Qiao, Lijie; Yan, Xianguo; Li, Dongyang

    2016-02-12

    Local electron work function, adhesive force, modulus and deformation of ferrite and austenite phases in a duplex stainless steel were analyzed by scanning force microscopy. It is demonstrated that the austenite has a higher electron work function than the ferrite, corresponding to higher modulus, smaller deformation and larger adhesive force. Relevant first-principles calculations were conducted to elucidate the mechanism behind. It is demonstrated that the difference in the properties between austenite and ferrite is intrinsically related to their electron work functions.

  1. Effet d'un enrichissement en nickel sur la stabilite mecanique de l'austenite de reversion lorsque soumise a de la fatigue oligocyclique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Stephane

    The effect of nickel enrichment on the mechanical stability of the reversed austenite contained in martensitic stainless steels 13%Cr-4%Ni and 13%Cr-6%Ni was investigated. The main objective of the study was to observe their microstructure and to compare the dynamic behaviour of the reversed austenite. Tempers made at different temperatures showed that the 6% Ni alloy began to form more austenite and at a lower temperature. SEM and TEM analysis were used to see the austenite and measure its chemical composition. It has been observed that it was richer in Ni than the surrounding martensite. This enrichment increased with tempering temperature and caused an impoverishment of the surrounding martensite. The study also showed that the chemical composition of the austenite formed at the peak (maximum) of both alloys was similar. For a same tempering, this suggests Ni can help to form more austenite but this austenite is not necessarily richer in Ni. The analysis also showed that the austenite was predominantly lamellar and located at the interface and/or inside the martensite laths. Low cycle fatigue tests have shown that the austenite of the 6% Ni alloy was the most mechanically stable even if its Ni content was lower than the 4% Ni alloy austenite. This behaviour was explained by a thinner and narrower morphology of this phase. For a different content of Ni and different quantity of austenite, the most mechanically stable one was in the 4% Ni alloy. It turned out that its reversed austenite was thinner and its surrounding martensite was a bit harder than the 6% Ni alloy austenite. The effect of Ni enrichment of an alloy would be beneficial regarding the mechanical stability if a suitable tempering is made. This tempering must form a thin lamellar austenite in a sufficiently hard martensite. More Ni in the austenite would not necessarily raise the mechanical stability. It could contribute but it seems that it is not be the main factor governing the mechanical stability

  2. Microstructure evolution and phase composition of high-manganese austenitic steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Dobrzański

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the paper is to determine the influence of hot-working conditions on microstructure evolution and phase composition of new-developed high-manganese austenitic steels.Design/methodology/approach: Determination of processes controlling strain hardening was carried out in continuous compression test using Gleeble 3800 thermo-mechanical simulator. Evaluation of processes controlling work hardening and occurring after deformation at 900°C were identified by microstructure observations of the specimens solution heat-treated after plastic deformation to a true strain equal 0.23, 0.50 and 0.91. Phase composition of steels was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis.Findings: The steels have a fine-grained austenite microstructure with many annealing twins to a temperature of about 1000°C. The initiation of dynamic recrystallization occurs already after true deformation equal 0.29. Participation of fine grains arranged in a matrix of dynamically recovered grains essentially increases after increasing true strain to 0.5. Fully dynamically recrystallized microstructure of steel can be obtained after the true strain equal 0.9. The conditions of hot-working influence phase state of investigated steels. Steel no. 1 keeps stable austenite microstructure independently from conditions of plastic deformation. Steel with initial bi-phase microstructure keeps a certain portion of εmartensite, yet dependant on conditions of hot-working.Research limitations/implications: To determine in detail the hot-working behaviour of developed steels, a progress of microstructure evolution in subsequent stages of multi-stage compression test should be investigated.Practical implications: The obtained microstructure – hot-working conditions relationships and stress-strain curves can be useful in determination of power-force parameters of hot-rolling for sheets with fine-grained austenitic structures.Originality/value: The hot-working behaviour and

  3. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by super duplex filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eghlimi, Abbas, E-mail: a.eghlimi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, Morteza [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eskandarian, Masoomeh [Department of Materials Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zabolian, Azam [Department of Natural Resources, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Szpunar, Jerzy A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon SK S7N 5A9 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    In the present paper, microstructural changes across an as-welded dissimilar austenitic/duplex stainless steel couple welded by a super duplex stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process is characterized with optical microscopy and electron back-scattered diffraction techniques. Accordingly, variations of microstructure, texture, and grain boundary character distribution of base metals, heat affected zones, and weld metal were investigated. The results showed that the weld metal, which was composed of Widmanstätten austenite side-plates and allotriomorphic grain boundary austenite morphologies, had the weakest texture and was dominated by low angle boundaries. The welding process increased the ferrite content but decreased the texture intensity at the heat affected zone of the super duplex stainless steel base metal. In addition, through partial ferritization, it changed the morphology of elongated grains of the rolled microstructure to twinned partially transformed austenite plateaus scattered between ferrite textured colonies. However, the texture of the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone was strengthened via encouraging recrystallization and formation of annealing twins. At both interfaces, an increase in the special character coincident site lattice boundaries of the primary phase as well as a strong texture with <100> orientation, mainly of Goss component, was observed. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Weld metal showed local orientation at microscale but random texture at macroscale. • Intensification of <100> orientated grains was observed adjacent to the fusion lines. • The austenite texture was weaker than that of the ferrite in all duplex regions. • Welding caused twinned partially transformed austenites to form at SDSS HAZ. • At both interfaces, the ratio of special CSL boundaries of the primary phase increased.

  4. Synergistic Computational and Microstructural Design of Next- Generation High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaman, Ibrahim [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States); Arroyave, Raymundo [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-07-31

    The purpose of this project was to: 1) study deformation twinning, its evolution, thermal stability, and the contribution on mechanical response of the new advanced stainless steels, especially at elevated temperatures; 2) study alumina-scale formation on the surface, as an alternative for conventional chromium oxide, that shows better oxidation resistance, through alloy design; and 3) design new generation of high temperature stainless steels that form alumina scale and have thermally stable nano-twins. The work involved few baseline alloys for investigating the twin formation under tensile loading, thermal stability of these twins, and the role of deformation twins on the mechanical response of the alloys. These baseline alloys included Hadfield Steel (Fe-13Mn-1C), 316, 316L and 316N stainless steels. Another baseline alloy was studied for alumina-scale formation investigations. Hadfield steel showed twinning but undesired second phases formed at higher temperatures. 316N stainless steel did not show signs of deformation twinning. Conventional 316 stainless steel demonstrated extensive deformation twinning at room temperature. Investigations on this alloy, both in single crystalline and polycrystalline forms, showed that deformation twins evolve in a hierarchical manner, consisting of micron–sized bundles of nano-twins. The width of nano-twins stays almost constant as the extent of strain increases, but the width and number of the bundles increase with increasing strain. A systematic thermomechanical cycling study showed that the twins were stable at temperatures as high as 900°C, after the dislocations are annealed out. Using such cycles, volume fraction of the thermally stable deformation twins were increased up to 40% in 316 stainless steel. Using computational thermodynamics and kinetics calculations, we designed two generations of advanced austenitic stainless steels. In the first generation, Alloy 1, which had been proposed as an alumina

  5. Modelling of kinetics and dilatometric behavior of non-isothermal pearlite-to-austenite transformation in an eutectoid steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia de Andres, C.; Capdevila, C. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain); Cabellero, F.G. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain)]|[Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy; Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy

    1998-08-11

    Austenitization is an inevitable occurrence during the heat treatment of steels. Despite this consideration, less attention has been paid so far to the study of the formation of austenite as compared with the vast amount of research on its decomposition. That is because the steel properties depend basically on the transformation processes following austenitization. However, the initial austenitic condition is important to the development of the final microstructure and its mechanical properties. The Avrami equation is generally used to model transformations under isothermal conditions. However, in this paper the authors present a model in which this equation has been applied successfully in the modelling of the pearlite-to-austenite transformation during continuous heating in a eutectoid steel with a fully pearlitic initial microstructure. Moreover, since dilatometric analysis is a technique very often employed to study phase transformations in steels, calculations of relative change in length have been made as function of temperature, and the differences between theoretical and experimental results have been analyzed.

  6. The influence of chromium on the pearlite-austenite transformation kinetics of the Fe–Cr–C ternary steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Lingnan; Liu, Yaohui, E-mail: liuyaohui2005@126.com; Liu, Jia' an; Song, Yulai; Li, Shasha; Zhang, Renhang; Li, Tuanjie; Liang, Yan

    2015-11-05

    The Fe–Cr–C ternary steels containing different contents of Cr were successfully cast and further processed in the lab. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), optical microscope (OM), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were employed to investigate the transformation of the Fe–Cr–C ternary steels from pearlite to austenite. It is found that the values of Ac1 and Ac3 are raised with increase in the content of Cr. In addition, the information on the transformation kinetics was obtained from experiment results and the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov model (JMAK). The obtained austenitic transformation kinetic process has been described in three overlapping steps: site saturation nucleation, diffusion-controlled growth, and impingement correction. The pre-exponential factor for diffusion decreases firstly and then increases. The activation energy for diffusion increases with the Cr content. In addition, Cr strongly affects the effective diffusion distance, the austenite nucleation sites, and the carbon activity gradient during the austenitic transformation kinetic process. - Highlights: • The pearlite-austenite transformation kinetics is researched by DSC. • The transformation kinetics is analyzed by experiment results and the JMAK model. • The activation energy and the diffusion coefficient are discussed.

  7. Effect of Treatment Time on the Microstructure of Austenitic Stainless Steel During Low-Temperature Liquid Nitrocarburizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuanhua; Zhang, Qiang; Zeng, Dezhi; Fan, Hongyuan

    2014-09-01

    The effect of treatment time on the microstructure of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel during liquid nitrocarburizing (LNC) at 703 K (430 °C) was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Experimental results revealed that the modified layer was covered with the alloy surface and the modified layer depth increased extensively from 2 to 33.4 μm with increasing treatment time. SEM and XRD showed that when the 304 stainless steel sample was subjected to LNC at 703 K (430 °C) for less than 4 hours, the main phase of the modified layer was expanded austenite. When the treatment time was prolonged to 8 hours, the abundant expanded austenite was formed and it partially transformed into CrN and ferrite subsequently. With the increased treatment time, more and more CrN precipitate transformed in the overwhelming majority zone in the form of a typical dendritic structure in the nearby outer part treated for 40 hours. Still there was a single-phase layer of the expanded austenite between the CrN part and the inner substrate. TEM showed the expanded austenite decomposition into the CrN and ferrite after longtime treatment even at low temperature.

  8. An investigation on microstructure and mechanical propertiesof a Nb-microalloyed nano/ultrafine grained 201 austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samaei Baghbadorani, H., E-mail: h.samaeibaghbadorani@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kermanpur, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafizadeh, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fould Institute of Technology, Fouldshare 84916-63763 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Behjati, P.; Rezaee, A.; Moallemi, M. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, 84156-83111 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-11

    The present study was aimed to investigate the mechanical properties of a nano/ultrafine grained Nb-containing 201 austenitic stainless steel. For this purpose, 90% cold rolled sheets with fully martensitic microstructure were isothermally annealed at 900 °C for different times of 1 to 1800 s, leading to the reversion of strain- induced α′-martensite to austenite and significant grain refinement. Ferritescopy, X-ray diffractometery and optical/electron microscopy techniques along with hardness measurements and tensile tests were used to study the evolution in microstructure and mechanical properties in the course of annealing. It was found that heavy cold-rolling promoted formation of Nb-rich carbonitrides which effectively retarded the growth of fine reverted austenite grains. The obtained results showed that the complete transformation of martensite to austenite took about 60 s with the corresponding austenite grain size of about 90 nm. This sample had an ultrahigh yield strength of 1170 MPa, which was almost four times higher than that of the raw material and outstanding elongation of 37%. Further, the true stress–strain curves of the reversion annealed samples revealed two distinct uniform elongation stages (stage I and stage II), whereas, the onset of stage II was concurrent with pronounced strain hardening. This was related to the sharp increase in the formation of α′-martensite upon tensile straining.

  9. Influence of the amount and morphology of retained austenite on the mechanical properties of an austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aranzabal, J. [INASMET, San Sebastian (Spain); Gutierrez, I.; Rodriguez-Ibabe, J.M.; Urcola, J.J. [CEIT, San Sebastian (Spain). Dept. of Materials

    1997-05-01

    High Si contents in nodular cast irons lead to a significant volume fraction of retained austenite in the material after the austempering treatment. In the present work, the influence of the amount and morphology of this phase on the mechanical properties (proof stress, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), elongation, and toughness) has been analyzed for different austempering conditions. After 300 C isothermal treatments at intermediate times, the austenite is plastically stable at room temperature and contributes, together with the bainitic ferrite, to the proof stress and the toughness of the material. For austenite volume fractions higher than 25 pct, the proof stress is controlled by this phase and the toughness depends mainly on the stability of {gamma}. In these conditions (370 C and 410 C treatments), the present material exhibits a transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) effect, which leads to an improvement in ductility. It is shown that the strain level necessary to initiate the martensitic transformation induced by deformation depends on the carbon content of the austenite. The martensite formed under TRIP conditions can be of two different types: autotempered plate martensite, which forms at room temperature from an austenite with a quasi-coherent epsilon carbide precipitation, and lath martensite nucleated at twin boundaries and twin intersections.

  10. The microstructural dependence of wear resistance in austenite containing plate steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfram, Preston Charles

    The purpose of this project was to examine the microstructural dependence of wear resistance of various plate steels, with interests in exploring the influence of retained austenite (RA). Materials resistant to abrasive wear are desirable in the industrial areas of agriculture, earth moving, excavation, mining, mineral processing, and transportation. Abrasive wear contributes to significant financial cost associated with wear to the industry. The motivation for the current study was to determine whether it would be beneficial from a wear resistance perspective to produce plate steels with increased amounts of retained austenite. This thesis investigates this motivation through a material matrix containing AR400F, Abrasive (0.21 wt pct C, 1.26 wt pct Mn, 0.21 wt pct Si, 0.15 wt pct Ni, 0.18 wt pct Mo), Armor (0.46 wt pct C, 0.54 wt pct Mn, 0.36 wt pct Si, 1.74 wt pct Ni, 0.31 wt pct Mo), 9260, 301SS, Hadfield, and SAE 4325 steels. The Abrasive, Armor and 9260 steels were heat treated using different methods such as quench and temper, isothermal bainitic hold, and quench and partitioning (Q&P). These heat treatments yielded various microstructures and the test matrix allowed for investigation of steels with similar hardness and varying levels of RA. The wear test methods used consisted of dry sand rubber wheel (DSRW), impeller-tumbler impact-abrasion (impeller), and Bond abrasion wear testing. DSRW and impeller wear resistance was found to increase with hardness and retained austenite levels at certain hardness levels. Some Q&P samples exhibited similar or less wear than the Hadfield steels in DSRW and impeller tests. Scanning electron microscopy investigation of wear surfaces revealed different wear mechanisms for the different wear test methods ranging from micro-plowing, to micro-cutting and to fragmentation.

  11. Hardness analysis of welded joints of austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolska, S.

    2016-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in the modern world. The continuous increase in the use of stainless steels is caused by getting greater requirements relating the corrosion resistance of all types of devices. The main property of these steels is the ability to overlap a passive layer of an oxide on their surface. This layer causes that they become resistant to oxidation. One of types of corrosion-resistant steels is ferritic-austenitic steel of the duplex type, which has good strength properties. It is easily formable and weldable as well as resistant to erosion and abrasive wear. It has a low susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking, to stress corrosion, to intercrystalline one, to pitting one and to crevice one. For these reasons they are used, among others, in the construction of devices and facilities designed for chemicals transportation and for petroleum and natural gas extraction. The paper presents the results which shows that the particular specimens of the ][joint representing both heat affected zones (from the side of the 2205 steel and the 316L one) and the weld are characterized by higher hardness values than in the case of the same specimens for the 2Y joint. Probably this is caused by machining of edges of the sections of metal sheets before the welding process, which came to better mixing of native materials and the filler metal. After submerged arc welding the 2205 steel still retains the diphase, austenitic-ferritic structure and the 316L steel retains the austenitic structure with sparse bands of ferrite σ.

  12. Surface structure and properties of ion-nitrided austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannula, S.P.; Nenonen, P. (Metallurgy Lab., Technical Research Centre, Espoo (Finland)); Hirvonen, J.P. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Helsinki (Finland))

    1989-12-10

    The near surface structure and nitrogen concentration of the low-temperature low-pressure ion-nitrided stainless steels (SS) was studied by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nuclear resonance broadening (NRB) and microhardness techniques. The surface nitrogen content as determined by NRB was found to increase with nitriding time such that at long nitriding times the surface nitrogen concentration was higher than for any equilibrium nitride in the Fe-N system. Nitrogen contents were slightly higher for type-304 than for type-316 stainless steels. Simultaneously with increasing surface nitrogen content, a strong shift and broadening of X-ray diffraction peaks occured. In the surface of the nitrided layer expanded austenite as well as {epsilon}-phase analogous to {epsilon}-martensite is formed. At long nitriding times (high nitrogen surface contents) the structure of the surface corresponds to cubic MN{sub 1-x} nitride. At intermediate nitriding times (and nitrogen contents) possibly some {epsilon}'-nitride is also formed. TEM study of the surface layer showed that after long nitriding times the expanded austenite with occasional weak primitive lattice reflections was the dominating phase and the hexagonal {epsilon}-phase was habited as thin platelets on the (111) planes of the nitrogen supersaturated austenite. The hardness of the compound layer can be as high as 25 GPa. The high hardness is suggested to result from nitrogen supersaturation, high dislocation density and thin platelets of {epsilon}-phase in the surface of the compound layer. (orig.).

  13. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steels Manufactured by Nitrogen Gas Alloying and Adding Nitrided Ferroalloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hua-bing; JIANG Zhou-hua; SHEN Ming-hui; YOU Xiang-mi

    2007-01-01

    A simple and feasible method for the production of high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels involves nitrogen gas alloying and adding nitrided ferroalloys under normal atmospheric conditions. Alloying by nitrogen gas bubbling in Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo series alloys was carried out in MoSi2 resistance furnace and air induction furnace under normal atmospheric conditions. The results showed that nitrogen alloying could be accelerated by increasing nitrogen gas flow rate, prolonging residence time of bubbles, increasing gas/molten steel interfaces, and decreasing the sulphur and oxygen contents in molten steel. Nitrogen content of 0.69% in 18Cr18Mn was obtained using air induction furnace by bubbling of nitrogen gas from porous plug. In addition, the nickel-free, high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels with sound and compact macrostructure had been produced in the laboratory using vacuum induction furnace and electroslag remelting furnace under nitrogen atmosphere by the addition of nitrided alloy with the maximum nitrogen content of 0.81 %. Pores were observed in the ingots obtained by melting and casting in vacuum induction furnace with the addition of nitrided ferroalloys and under nitrogen atmosphere. After electroslag remelting of the cast ingots, they were all sound and were free of pores. The yield of nitrogen increased with the decrease of melting rate in the ESR process. Due to electroslag remelting under nitrogen atmosphere and the consequential addition of aluminum as deoxidizer to the slag, the loss of manganese decreased obviously. There existed mainly irregular Al2O3 inclusions and MnS inclusions in ESR ingots, and the size of most of the inclusions was less than 5 μm. After homogenization of the hot rolled plate at 1 150 ℃× 1 h followed by water quenching, the microstructure consisted of homogeneous austenite.

  14. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chopra, O. K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gruber, Eugene E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shack, William J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (≤3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC

  15. Laser etching of austenitic stainless steels for micro-structural evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghra, Chetan; Kumar, Aniruddha; Sathe, D. B.; Bhatt, R. B.; Behere, P. G.; Afzal, Mohd

    2015-06-01

    Etching is a key step in metallography to reveal microstructure of polished specimen under an optical microscope. A conventional technique for producing micro-structural contrast is chemical etching. As an alternate, laser etching is investigated since it does not involve use of corrosive reagents and it can be carried out without any physical contact with sample. Laser induced etching technique will be beneficial especially in nuclear industry where materials, being radioactive in nature, are handled inside a glove box. In this paper, experimental results of pulsed Nd-YAG laser based etching of few austenitic stainless steels such as SS 304, SS 316 LN and SS alloy D9 which are chosen as structural material for fabrication of various components of upcoming Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) at Kalpakkam India were reported. Laser etching was done by irradiating samples using nanosecond pulsed Nd-YAG laser beam which was transported into glass paneled glove box using optics. Experiments were carried out to understand effect of laser beam parameters such as wavelength, fluence, pulse repetition rate and number of exposures required for etching of austenitic stainless steel samples. Laser etching of PFBR fuel tube and plug welded joint was also carried to evaluate base metal grain size, depth of fusion at welded joint and heat affected zone in the base metal. Experimental results demonstrated that pulsed Nd-YAG laser etching is a fast and effortless technique which can be effectively employed for non-contact remote etching of austenitic stainless steels for micro-structural evaluation.

  16. Microstructural changes within similar coronary stents produced from two different austenitic steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Sabine; Meissner, Andreas; Fischer, Alfons

    2009-04-01

    Coronary heart disease has become the most common source for death in western industrial countries. Since 1986, a metal vessel scaffold (stent) is inserted to prevent the vessel wall from collapsing [Puel, J., Joffre, F., Rousseau, H., Guermonprez, B., Lancelin, B., Valeix, B., Imbert, G., Bounhoure, J.P, 1987. Endo-prothéses coronariennes autoexpansives dans la Préevention des resténoses apés angioplastie transluminale. Archives des Maladies du Coeur et des Vaisseaux, 1311--1312]. Most of these coronary stents are made from CrNiMo-steel (AISI 316L). Due to its austenitic structure, the material shows strength and ductility combined with corrosion resistance and a satisfactory biocompatibility. However, recent studies indicate that Nickel is under discussion as to its allergenic potential. Other typically used materials like Co-Base L605 or Tantalum alloys are relatively expensive and are not used so often. Newly developed austenitic high-nitrogen CrMnMoN-steels (AHNS) may offer an alternative. Traditional material tests revealed that strength and ductility, as well as corrosion resistance and biocompatibility, are as good as or even better than those of 316L [Vogt, J.B., Degallaix, S., Foct J., 1984. Low cycle fatigue life enhancement of 316L stainless steel by nitrogen alloying. International Journal of Fatigue 6 (4), 211-215, Menzel, J., Stein, G., 1996. High nitrogen containing Ni-free austenitic steels for medical applications. ISIJ Intern 36 (7), 893-900, Gavriljuk, V.G., Berns, H., 1999. High nitrogen steels, Springer Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg]. However, because of a strut diameter of about 100 microm, the cross section consists of about five to ten crystal grains (oligo-crystalline). Thus very few, or even just one, grain can be responsible for the success or failure of the whole stent. During implantation, the structure of coronary artery stents is subjected to distinct inhomogeneous plastic deformation due to crimping and dilation.

  17. Swelling analysis of austenitic stainless steels by means of ion irradiation and kinetic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohyama, Akira [Kyoto Univ., Institute of Advanced Energy, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Donomae, Takako [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-03-01

    The influences of irradiation environment on the swelling behavior of austenitic stainless steel has been studied, to aid understanding the origin of the difference in swelling response of PNC316 stainless steel in fuel-pin environment and in materials irradiation capsules, in terms of irradiation conditions, damage mechanism and material conditions. This work focused on the theoretical investigation of the influence of temperature variation on microstructural development of austenitic stainless steels during irradiation, using a kinetic rate theory model. A modeling and calculation on non-steady irradiation effects were first carried out. A fully dynamic model of point defect evolution and extended defect development, which accounts for cascade damage, was developed and successfully applied to simulate the interstitial loop evolution in low temperature regimes. The influence of cascade interstitial clustering on dislocation loop formation has also been assessed. The establishment of a basis for general assessment of non-steady irradiation effects in austenitic stainless steels was advanced. The developed model was applied to evaluate the influences of temperature variation in formerly carried out CMIR and FFTF/MFA-1 FBR irradiation experiments. The results suggested the gradual approach of microstructural features to equilibrium states in all the temperature variation conditions and no sign of anomalous behavior was noted. On the other hand, there is the influence of temperature variation on microstructural development under the neutron irradiation, like CMIR. So there are some possibilities of the work of mechanism which is not taken care on this model, for example the effect of the precipitate behavior which is sensitive to irradiation temperature. (author)

  18. Effect of the Content of Retained Austenite and Grain Size on the Fatigue Bending Strength of Steels Carburized in a Low-Pressure Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kula, P.; Dybowski, K.; Lipa, S.; Januszewicz, B.; Pietrasik, R.; Atraszkiewicz, R.; Wołowiec, E.

    2014-11-01

    The effect of the content of retained austenite and of the initial austenite grain size on high-cycle fatigue of two low-alloy steels 16MnCr5 and 17CrNi6-6 after carburizing in a low-pressure atmosphere (acetylene, ethylene and hydrogen) and subsequent high-pressure gas quenching is investigated.

  19. In situ observation of austenite grain growth behavior in the simulated coarse-grained heat-affected zone of Ti-microalloyed steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang-liang Wan; Kai-ming Wu; Gang Huang; Ran Wei; Lin Cheng

    2014-01-01

    The austenite grain growth behavior in a simulated coarse-grained heat-affected zone during thermal cycling was investigated via in situ observation. Austenite grains nucleated at ferrite grain boundaries and then grew in different directions through movement of grain boundaries into the ferrite phase. Subsequently, the adjacent austenite grains impinged against each other during theα→γtransformation. After theα→γtransformation, austenite grains coarsened via the coalescence of small grains and via boundary migration between grains. The growth process of austenite grains was a continuous process during heating, isothermal holding, and cooling in simulated thermal cy-cling. Abundant finely dispersed nanoscale TiN particles in a steel specimen containing 0.012wt%Ti effectively retarded the grain boundary migration, which resulted in refined austenite grains. When the Ti concentration in the steel was increased, the number of TiN particles de-creased and their size coarsened. The big particles were not effective in pinning the austenite grain boundary movement and resulted in coarse austenite grains.

  20. THE EFFECT OF SHIELDING-GAS COMPOSITIONS ON THE MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL WELDMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan YILMAZ

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, austenitic stainless steel is becoming very important and widely used in the industry due to their superior properties. Therefore, welding process of those has gained popularity in the construction of stainless steel. Gas metal arc welding (GMAW and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW processes are easily used and more suitable compared with the other welding process for the austenitic stainless steel welding applications. In this study, the effect of shielding gases used in the welding process on the microstructure and mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel weldments has been investigated using the knowledge available in the literature. It is stressed in the study that shielding-gas composition has great influence on the microstructure and mechanical properties of stainless steel weldment. The gases of Ar+H2, Ar+CO2, Ar+N2 used for welding process effects on microstructure therefore, mechanical properties of weldments.

  1. Role of quaternary additions on dislocated martensite, retain austenite and mechanical properties of Fe/Cr/C structural steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, B.V.N.

    1978-02-01

    The influence of quaternary alloy additions of Mn and Ni to Fe/Cr/C steels which have been designed to provide superior mechanical properties has been investigated. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray analysis revealed increasing amounts of retained austenite with Mn up to 2 w/o and with 5 w/o Ni additions after quenching from 1100/sup 0/C. This is accompanied by a corresponding improvement in toughness properties of the quaternary alloys. In addition, the generally attractive combinations of strength and toughness in these quaternary alloys is attributed to the production of dislocated lath martensite from a homogeneous austenite phase free from undissolved alloy carbides. Grain-refining resulted in a further increase in the amount of retained austenite.

  2. OPTIMIZATION OF SURFACE ROUGHNESS OF AISI 304 AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL IN DRY TURNING OPERATION USING TAGUCHI DESIGN METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. PHILIP SELVARAJ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work is concentrated with the dry turning of AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel (ASS. This paper presents the influence of cutting parameters like cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut on the surface roughness of austenitic stainless steel during dry turning. A plan of experiments based on Taguchi’s technique has been used to acquire the data. An orthogonal array, the signal to noise (S/N ratio and the analysis of variance (ANOVA are employed to investigate the cutting characteristics of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel bars using TiC and TiCN coated tungsten carbide cutting tool. Finally the confirmation tests that have been carried out to compare the predicted values with the experimental values confirm its effectiveness in the analysis of surface roughness.

  3. Modelling the evolution of composition-and stress-depth profiles in austenitic stainless steels during low-temperature nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2016-01-01

    that accompanies the dissolution of high nitrogen contents in expanded austenite. An intriguing phenomenon during low-temperature nitriding is that the residual stresses evoked by dissolution of nitrogen in the solid state, affect the thermodynamics and the diffusion kinetics of nitrogen dissolution......Nitriding of stainless steel causes a surface zone of expanded austenite, which improves the wear resistance of the stainless steel while preserving the stainless behaviour. During nitriding huge residual stresses are introduced in the treated zone, arising from the volume expansion....... In the present paper solid mechanics was combined with thermodynamics and diffusion kinetics to simulate the evolution of composition-depth and stress-depth profiles resulting from nitriding. The model takes into account a composition-dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite, short range...

  4. Determination of Thermal Diffusivity of Austenitic Steel Using Pulsed Infrared Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kochanowski K.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The simple method of determining thermal diffusivity of solid materials at room temperature using the pulsed infrared thermography (IRT is proposed. The theoretical basis of the method and experimental results are presented. The study was conducted on austenitic steel 316L. Theobtained results show that the thermal diffusivity value of the tested steel determined by means of pulsed infrared thermography is very approximate to the values given in the literature, obtained by using more complicated methods. The differences between these values are 0.5%.

  5. Effects of Strain Rate and Plastic Work on Martensitic Transformation Kinetics of Austenitic Stainless Steel 304

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang PENG; Xiang-huai DONG; Kai LIU; Huan-yang XIE

    2015-01-01

    The martensitic transformation behavior and mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel 304 were studied by both experiments and numerical simulation. Room temperature tensile tests were carried out at various strain rates to investigate the effect on volume fraction of martensite, temperature increase and flow stress. The results show that with increasing strain rate, the local temperature increases, which suppresses the transformation of martensite. To take into account the dependence on strain level, strain rate sensitivity and thermal effects, a kinetic model of martensitic transformation was proposed and constitutive modeling on stress-strain response was conducted. The validity of the proposed model has been proved by comparisons between simulation results and experimental ones.

  6. Prediction of microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel welds by modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilpas, M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Materials and Structural Integrity

    1999-07-01

    The present study focuses on the ability of several computer models to accurately predict the solidification, microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel weld metals. Emphasis was given to modelling the effect of welding speed on solute redistribution and ultimately to the prediction of weld pitting corrosion resistance. Calculations were experimentally verified by applying autogenous GTA- and laser processes over the welding speed range of 0.1 to 5 m/min for several austenitic stainless steel grades. Analytical and computer aided models were applied and linked together for modelling the solidification behaviour of welds. The combined use of macroscopic and microscopic modelling is a unique feature of this work. This procedure made it possible to demonstrate the effect of weld pool shape and the resulting solidification parameters on microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance. Microscopic models were also used separately to study the role of welding speed and solidification mode in the development of microsegregation and pitting corrosion resistance. These investigations demonstrate that the macroscopic model can be implemented to predict solidification parameters that agree well with experimentally measured values. The linked macro-micro modelling was also able to accurately predict segregation profiles and CPT-temperatures obtained from experiments. The macro-micro simulations clearly showed the major roles of weld composition and welding speed in determining segregation and pitting corrosion resistance while the effect of weld shape variations remained negligible. The microscopic dendrite tip and interdendritic models were applied to welds with good agreement with measured segregation profiles. Simulations predicted that weld inhomogeneity can be substantially decreased with increasing welding speed resulting in a corresponding improvement in the weld pitting corrosion resistance. In the case of primary austenitic

  7. Mössbauer investigation of austenite formation together with Cr depletion in aged turbine blade steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmann, E.; Jaen, J.; Vértes, A.; Csöme, L.; Tibiássy, B.; Káldor, M.

    1990-07-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy and hardness measurements were used to study annealing effect on turbine blade steels. Hyperfine field distribution method was applied to follow the changes in the concentration of alloying elements being in the martensite after various heat treatments. Our results imply that upon annealing at a given temperature (400-640°C), formation of austenite takes place (similarly as found earlier [1] in some cases), simultaneously with a significant depletion (up to 4%) of Cr (and other alloying elements) in the martensite.

  8. Depth distribution analysis of Martensitic transformations in Xe implanted austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, E.; Gerritsen, E.; Chechenin, N.G.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years the implantation of noble gases in metals has been found to induce some exciting phenomena such as formation of inclusions containing solid gas at extremely high pressures. In stainless steels these inclusions are the origin of a stress-induced martensitic fcc → bcc phase...... transformation in the implanted layer. In this work we present results from a depth distribution analysis of the martensitic phase change occurring in Xe implanted single crystals of austenitic stainless steel. Analysis was done by in situ RBS/channeling analysis, X-ray diffraction and cross-section transmission...

  9. Performance evaluation of vegetable-based oils in drilling austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belluco, Walter; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    The efficiency of six cutting oils was evaluated in drilling AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel using conventional HSS-Co tools by measurements of tool life, tool wear, cutting forces and chip formation. Seven tools were tested with each fluid to catastrophic failure. Cutting forces and chip...... in a measurement capability comparable to that obtained using tool life as a performance criterion. As a consequence, it is suggested that drilling thrust can be used to assess the performance of cutting fluids in drilling stainless steel, resulting in considerable time savings and cost reduction with respect...

  10. Hydrogen Silsesquioxane based silica glass coatings for the corrosion protection of austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lampert, Felix; Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Din, Rameez Ud

    2016-01-01

    The application of stainless steels in hostile environments, such as concentrated acid or hot sea water, requires additional surface treatments, considering that the native surface oxide does not guarantee sufficient corrosion protection under these conditions. In the present work, silica-like thin......-film barrier coatings were deposited on AISI 316L grade austenitic stainless steel with 2B surface finish from Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) spin-on-glass precursor and thermally cured to tailor the film properties. Results showed that curing at 500 °C resulted in a film-structure with a polymerized siloxane...

  11. Mechanism of Austenite Evolution During Deformation of Ultra-High Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shu-lan; SUN Xin-jun; DONG Han

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of transformation of austenite to cementite and pearlite during the deformation of ultra-high carbon steel was discussed. The results indicate that the pearlite and cementite can be induced by deformation be-tween Acm to Arcm. The transformation during deformation is still considered as a diffusion-controlled process. With the increase of time and reduction, the pearlite fraction increased. At the beginning of the transformation, the pearli- te was lamelliform. When the rate of reduction was increased to 70%, some of the induced lamellar pearlite was bro-ken up under deformation.

  12. Migration and accumulation at dislocations of transmutation helium in austenitic steels upon neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, A. V.; Portnykh, I. A.

    2016-04-01

    The model of the migration and accumulation at dislocations of transmutation helium and the formation of helium-vacancy pore nuclei in austenitic steels upon neutron irradiation has been proposed. As illustrations of its application, the dependences of the characteristics of pore nuclei on the temperature of neutron irradiation have been calculated. The results of the calculations have been compared with the experimental data in the literature on measuring the characteristics of radiation-induced porosity that arises upon the irradiation of shells of fuel elements of a 16Cr-19Ni-2Mo-2Mn-Si-Ti-Nb-V-B steel in a fast BN600 neutron reactor at different temperatures.

  13. Microstructural evolution and change in hardness during creep of NF709 austenitic stainless steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan ZHAO; Jie ZHAO; Xiaona LI

    2011-01-01

    Microstructural evolution and the change in hardness during creep deformation of NF709 austenitic stainless steel were investigated. Creep tests were carried out at 650 ℃ for 2932 h under a load of 210 MPa for comparison with aging specimen at 650 ℃ for 3000 h. The hardness results indicated that applied stress during creep process induced hardness increase. Analysis of longitudinal section microstructure showed that the creep damage caused by pores and the grain boundary hardening caused by elongated grains could be the factors leading to hardness differences. The G phase dispersedly precipitated in intragranular and interacted with dislocations during creep process, indicating strain hardening.

  14. Deformation and Damage Mechanisms in Ultrafine-Grained Austenitic Stainless Steel During Cyclic Straining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Atef S.

    2013-04-01

    The ultrafine-grained (UFG) structure of an austenitic stainless steel (Type 301LN), processed by controlled phase-reversion annealing, was fatigued to study the deformation and damage mechanisms during cyclic straining. Fatigue cracking along the grain boundaries and the formation of extended persistent slip band-like shear bands (SBs) were observed to be the fatigue-induced microstructural features in the ultrafine-grained structure. Characterization of SBs was performed by electron backscattered diffraction and atomic force microscopy to study the fine features.

  15. Fatigue damage evaluation of austenitic stainless steel using nonlinear ultrasonic waves in low cycle regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Xuan, Fu-Zhen

    2014-05-01

    The interrupted low cycle fatigue test of austenitic stainless steel was conducted and the dislocation structure and fatigue damage was evaluated subsequently by using both transmission electron microscope and nonlinear ultrasonic wave techniques. A "mountain shape" correlation between the nonlinear acoustic parameter and the fatigue life fraction was achieved. This was ascribed to the generation and evolution of planar dislocation structure and nonplanar dislocation structure such as veins, walls, and cells. The "mountain shape" correlation was interpreted successfully by the combined contribution of dislocation monopole and dipole with an internal-stress dependent term of acoustic nonlinearity.

  16. Elastic interaction between twins during tensile deformation of austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Nicolai Ytterdal; Winther, Grethe; Dale, Darren

    2016-01-01

    In austenite, the twin boundary normal is a common elastically stiff direction shared by the two twins, which may induce special interactions. By means of three-dimensional X-ray diffraction this elastic interaction has been analysed and compared to grains separated by conventional grain boundaries....... However, the components of the Type II stress normal to the twin boundary plane exhibit the same large variations as for the grain boundaries. Elastic grain interactions are therefore complex and must involve the entire set of neighbouring grains. The elastic-regime stress along the tensile direction...

  17. Mechanized ultrasonic inspection of austenitic pipe systems; Mechanisierte Ultraschallpruefung von austenitischen Rohrleitungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dressler, K.; Luecking, J.; Medenbach, S. [ABB ZAQ GmbH, Essen (Germany)

    1999-08-01

    The contribution explains the system of standard testing methods elaborated by ABB ZAQ GmbH for inspection of austenitic plant components. The inspection tasks explained in greater detail are basic materials testing (straight pipes, bends, and pipe specials), and inspection of welds and dissimilar welds. The techniques discussed in detail are those for detection and sizing of defects. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Das Ziel dieses Beitrages ist die Vorstellung der von der ABB ZAQ GmbH eingesetzten Standardprueftechniken fuer die Pruefung austenitischer Anlagenkomponenten. Im einzelnen wird die Grundwerkstoffpruefung (Rohre, Boegen, Formstuecke), die Schweissnahtpruefung und die Mischnahtpruefung angesprochen. Es werden dabei die Techniken fuer `Detection` und `Sizing` differenziert betrachtet und erlaeutert. (orig.)

  18. Joining silicon carbide to austenitic stainless steel through diffusion welding; Stellingen behorende bij het proefschrift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krugers, Jan-Paul

    1993-01-19

    In this thesis, the results are presented of a study dealing with joining silicon carbide to austenitic stainless steel AIS316 by means of diffusion welding. Welding experiments were carried out without and with the use of a metallic intermediate, like copper, nickel and copper-nickel alloys at various conditions of process temperature, process time, mechanical pressure and interlayer thickness. Most experiments were carried out in high vacuum. For reasons of comparison, however, some experiments were also carried out in a gas shielded environment of 95 vol.% Ar and 5 vol.% H2.

  19. Improved Accident Tolerance of Austenitic Stainless Steel Cladding through Colossal Supersaturation with Interstitial Solutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, Frank [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-10-13

    We proposed a program-supporting research project in the area of fuel-cycle R&D, specifically on the topic of advanced fuels. Our goal was to investigate whether SECIS (surface engineering by concentrated interstitial solute – carbon, nitrogen) can improve the properties of austenitic stainless steels and related structural alloys such that they can be used for nuclear fuel cladding in LWRs (light-water reactors) and significantly excel currently used alloys with regard to performance, safety, service life, and accident tolerance.

  20. A study of corrosion electrochemical properties of martensite-austenite steel Cr15Ni6Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cihal, V.; Hubackova, J.; Kubelka, J.; Mezanec, K.

    1985-11-01

    The steel Cr15Ni6Mo (UHB 119) exhibits a very satisfactory corrosion resistance. However, its superior passivating ability depends on the heat treatment method used. The use of two-step tempering leads primarily to an improved resistance to reactivation and optimum properties are achieved when the basic matrix contains about 40% stable austenite in fine form. This structural state requires the use of tempering temperatures from 625 to 650/sup 0/C in Step 1, and 525/sup 0/C in Step 2 of tempering.

  1. Structure and mechanical properties of austenitic 316L steel produced by selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, P. A.; Zisman, A. A.; Petrov, S. N.; Goncharov, I. S.

    2016-10-01

    The mechanical properties and the impact toughness of austenitic 316L steel produced by selective laser melting at a laser power of 175-190 W have been studied. It is shown that the selective laser melting method makes it possible to significantly increase the strength properties of the steel with some decrease in the ductility and the impact toughness as compared to those of the steel produced by a traditional technology. The laser power influences insignificantly. The methods of making notches and its orientation is found to influence the impact toughness.

  2. Thermal stability of the cellular structure of an austenitic alloy after selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazaleeva, K. O.; Tsvetkova, E. V.; Balakirev, E. V.; Yadroitsev, I. A.; Smurov, I. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    The thermal stability of the cellular structure of an austenitic Fe-17% Cr-12% Ni-2% Mo-1% Mn-0.7% Si-0.02% C alloy produced by selective laser melting in the temperature range 20-1200°C is investigated. Metallographic analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy show that structural changes in the alloy begin at 600-700°C and are fully completed at ~1150°C. Differential scanning calorimetry of the alloy with a cellular structure reveals three exothermic processes occurring upon annealing within the temperature ranges 450-650, 800-1000, and 1050-1200°C.

  3. Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High Temperature Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbins, James [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Heuser, Brent [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Robertson, Ian [Kyushu Univ. (Japan); Sehitoglu, Huseyin [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Sofronis, Petros [Kyushu Univ. (Japan); Gewirth, Andrew [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    2015-04-22

    This “Blue Sky” project was directed at exploring the opportunities that would be gained by developing Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys based on the Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloy system. A great deal of research effort has been directed toward ferritic and ferritic/martensitic ODS alloys which has resulted in reasonable advances in alloy properties. Similar gains should be possible with austenitic alloy which would also take advantage of other superior properties of that alloy system. The research effort was aimed at the developing an in-depth understanding of the microstructural-level strengthening effects of ODS particles in austentic alloys. This was accomplished on a variety of alloy compositions with the main focus on 304SS and 316SS compositions. A further goal was to develop an understanding other the role of ODS particles on crack propagation and creep performance. Since these later two properties require bulk alloy material which was not available, this work was carried out on promising austentic alloy systems which could later be enhanced with ODS strengthening. The research relied on a large variety of micro-analytical techniques, many of which were available through various scientific user facilities. Access to these facilities throughout the course of this work was instrumental in gathering complimentary data from various analysis techniques to form a well-rounded picture of the processes which control austenitic ODS alloy performance. Micromechanical testing of the austenitic ODS alloys confirmed their highly superior mechanical properties at elevated temperature from the enhanced strengthening effects. The study analyzed the microstructural mechanisms that provide this enhanced high temperature performance. The findings confirm that the smallest size ODS particles provide the most potent strengthening component. Larger particles and other thermally- driven precipitate structures were less effective contributors and, in some cases, limited

  4. Hydrogen-plasticity in the austenitic alloys; Interactions hydrogene-plasticite dans les alliages austenitiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De lafosse, D. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, Lab. PECM-UMR CNRS 5146, 42 - Saint-Etienne (France)

    2007-07-01

    This presentation deals with the hydrogen effects under stresses corrosion, in austenitic alloys. The objective is to validate and characterize experimentally the potential and the limits of an approach based on an elastic theory of crystal defects. The first part is devoted to the macroscopic characterization of dynamic hydrogen-dislocations interactions by aging tests. then the hydrogen influence on the plasticity is evaluated, using analytical classic models of the elastic theory of dislocations. The hydrogen influence on the flow stress of bcc materials is analyzed experimentally with model materials. (A.L.B.)

  5. Reconstruction of size and depth of simulated defects in austenitic steel plate using pulsed infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocka-Fotek, Olga; Oliferuk, Wiera; Maj, Michał

    2012-07-01

    In this paper the size and depth (distance from the tested surface) of defects in austenitic steel were estimated using pulse infrared thermography. The thermal contrast calculated from the surface distribution of the temperature is dependent on both these parameters. Thus, two independent experimental methods of defect size and depth determination were proposed. The defect size was estimated on the basis of surface distribution of the time derivative of the temperature, whereas the defect depth was assessed from the dependence of surface thermal contrast vs. cooling time.

  6. Austenitic steel corrosion in IGCC environment. Characterisation by photon and nuclear microprobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillmann, Philippe; Weulersse, Katia; Regad, Belkacem; Moulin, Gérard; Barrett, Ray; Bonnin-Mosbah, Michelle; Lequien, Stéphane; Berger, Pascal

    2001-07-01

    An austenitic steel sample was treated simulating particular working conditions of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant. Several classical characterisation techniques were used to investigate the oxide scales. In addition, micro-particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) analyses were performed and permit us to identify several phases constitutive of the oxide. Moreover, micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) experiments allow us to determine the valence of the vanadium incorporated in the scale in the form of microscopic islets. The comparison of all these results leads to the proposal of a corrosion mechanism for this alloy.

  7. INFLUENCE OF HOT-REDUCTION PARAMETERS ON THE STEEL AUSTENITE STRUCTURE OF A RAILWAY WHEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor VAKULENKO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The formation of grain structures with boundaries similar to substructures is one of the factors contributing to grain refinement in hot-reduction carbon steel. At the forming of a rim, the slight cooling-down (100-150°С of the surface volumes is sufficient to increase their strength characteristics. After that, an increase in the magnitude of the hot-hardening of metal in the central rim volumes will lead to the formation of a more uniform fine-grain austenite structure over the rim section.

  8. The Formation of Multipoles during the High-Temperature Creep of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howell, J.; Nielsson, O.; Horsewell, Andy

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that multipole dislocation configurations can arise during power-law creep of certain austenitic stainless steels. These multipoles have been analysed in some detail for two particular steels (Alloy 800 and a modified AISI 316L) and it is suggested that they arise either during...... instantaneous loading or during the primary creep stage. Trace analysis has shown that the multipoles are confined to {1 1 1} planes during primary creep but are not necessarily confined to these planes during steady-state creep unless they are pinned by interstitials....

  9. Surface stability and conductivity of a high Cr and Ni austenitic stainless steel plates for PEMFC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Rujin; SUN Juncai; WANG Jianli

    2006-01-01

    In order to use stainless steel as bipolar plate for PEMFC, electrochemical behavior of a high Cr and Ni austenitic stainless steel was studied in the solutions containing different concentration of H2SO4 and 2 mg·L-1 F-, and interfacial contact resistance was measured after corrosion tests. The experimental results show that the passive current density lowers with decreasing the concentration of H2SO4. The interfacial contact resistance between carbon paper and passive film formed in the simulated PEMFC environment is higher than the goal of bipolar plate for PEMFC. Surface conductivity should be further reduced by surface modification.

  10. An analysis of non-classical austenite-martensite interfaces in CuAlNi

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, J M; Seiner, H

    2011-01-01

    Ball and Carstensen theoretically investigated the possibility of the occurrence of non-classical austenite-martensite interfaces and studied the cubic-to-tetragonal case extensively. Here, we aim to present an analysis of such interfaces recently observed by Seiner et al. in CuAlNi single crystals, undergoing a cubic-to-orthorhombic transition. We show that they can be described by the non-linear elasticity model for martensitic transformations and we make some predictions regarding the volume fractions of the martensitic variants involved, as well as the habit plane normals.

  11. Micromagnetic and Mössbauer spectroscopic investigation of strain-induced martensite in austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészáros, L.; Kéldor, M.; Hidasi, B.; Vértes, A.; Czakó-Nagy, I.

    1996-08-01

    Strain-induced martensite in 18/8 austenitic stainless steel was studied. Magnetic measurements and Mössbauer spectroscopic investigations were performed to characterize the amount of α’-martensite due to room-temperature plastic tensile loading. The effects of cold work and annealing heat treatment were explored using magnetic Barkhausen noise, saturation polarization, coercive force, hardness, and conversion electron Mössbauer spectra measurements. The results of the magnetic measurements were compared to results obtained by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The suggested Barkhausen noise measurement technique proved to be a useful quantitative and nondestructive method for determining the ferromagnetic phase ratio of the studied alloy.

  12. Mechanical characteristics and swelling of austenitic Fe-Cr-Mn steels irradiated in the SM-2 and BOR-60 reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamardin, V. K.; Bulanova, T. M.; Neustroev, V. S.; Ivanov, L. I.; Djomina, E. V.; Platov, Yu. M.

    1991-03-01

    Three types of austenitic Fe-Cr-Mn stainless steels were irradiated simultaneously with Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic steel at temperatures from 400 to 800°C in the mixed spectrum of the high flux SM-2 reactor to 10 dpa and 700 appm of He and in the BOR-60 reactor to 60 dpa without He generation. The paper presents the swelling and mechanical properties of steels irradiated in the BOR-60 and SM-2 as a function of the concentration of transmuted He and the value of atomic displacement.

  13. Influence of Plastic Deformation on Low Temperature Surface Hardening of Austenitic and Precipitation Hardening Stainless Steels by Gaseous Nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin;

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses an investigation of the influence of plastic deformation on low temperature surface hardening by gaseous nitriding of three commercial austenitic stainless steels: AISI 304, EN 1.4369 and Sandvik Nanoflex® with various degrees of austenite stability. The materials were...... plastically deformed to different equivalent strains by uniaxial tension. Gaseous nitriding of the strained material was performed in ammonia gas at atmospheric pressure at 703 K (430 °C) and 693 K (420 °C) depending on the material. Microstructural characterization of the as-deformed states and the nitrided...

  14. OPTIMIZATION OF SURFACE ROUGHNESS OF AISI 304 AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL IN DRY TURNING OPERATION USING TAGUCHI DESIGN METHOD

    OpenAIRE

    D. PHILIP SELVARAJ; Chandramohan, P.

    2010-01-01

    The present work is concentrated with the dry turning of AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel (ASS). This paper presents the influence of cutting parameters like cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut on the surface roughness of austenitic stainless steel during dry turning. A plan of experiments based on Taguchi’s technique has been used to acquire the data. An orthogonal array, the signal to noise (S/N) ratio and the analysis of variance (ANOVA) are employed to investigate the cutting cha...

  15. The influence of annealing in the ferrite-plus-austenite phase field on the stability of vanadium carbide precipitates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locci, I. E.; Michal, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of rapid excursions into the ferrite-plus-austenite two-phase field on V4C3 precipitates formed by tempering in the ferrite phases was investigated. Heat treatments were first performed to produce a starting microstructure of fine vanadium carbide particles precipitated in a ferrite matrix, and the microstructure was then subjected to various short-time heat treatment cycles that transformed part of the matrix to austenite. TEM was used to determine the effects of the matrix change on the size, morphology, and distribution of the vanadium carbide particles.

  16. Corrosion Behavior of the Stressed Sensitized Austenitic Stainless Steels of High Nitrogen Content in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Almubarak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of high nitrogen content on corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels in seawater under severe conditions such as tensile stresses and existence of sensitization in the structure. A constant tensile stress has been applied to sensitized specimens types 304, 316L, 304LN, 304NH, and 316NH stainless steels. Microstructure investigation revealed various degrees of stress corrosion cracking. SCC was severe in type 304, moderate in types 316L and 304LN, and very slight in types 304NH and 316NH. The electrochemical polarization curves showed an obvious second current peak for the sensitized alloys which indicated the existence of second phase in the structure and the presence of intergranular stress corrosion cracking. EPR test provided a rapid and efficient nondestructive testing method for showing passivity, degree of sensitization and determining IGSCC for stainless steels in seawater. A significant conclusion was obtained that austenitic stainless steels of high nitrogen content corrode at a much slower rate increase pitting resistance and offer an excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking in seawater.

  17. Crack initiation in smooth fatigue specimens of austenitic stainless steel in light water reactor environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Smith, J. L.

    1999-04-08

    The fatigue design curves for structural materials specified in Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code are based on tests of smooth polished specimens at room temperature in air. The effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves; however, recent test data illustrate the detrimental effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of austenitic stainless steels (SSs). Certain loading and environmental conditions have led to test specimen fatigue lives that are significantly shorter than those obtained in air. Results of fatigue tests that examine the influence of reactor environments on crack initiation and crack growth of austenitic SSs are presented. Block loading was used to mark the fracture surface to determine crack length as a function of fatigue cycles in water environments, Crack lengths were measured by scanning electron microscopy. The mechanism for decreased fatigue life in LWR environments is discussed, and crack growth rates in the smooth fatigue specimens are compared with existing data from studies of crack growth rates.

  18. Flexural Strength and Toughness of Austenitic Stainless Steel Reinforced High-Cr White Cast Iron Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, H. E. M.; Abd El-Aziz, Kh.; Abd El-Raouf, H.; Elbanna, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    Flexural behavior of high-Cr white cast iron (WCI) reinforced with different shapes, i.e., I- and T-sections, and volume fractions of austenitic stainless steel (310 SS) were examined under three-point bending test. The dimensions of casted beams used for bending test were (50 × 100 × 500 mm3). Carbon and alloying elements diffusion enhanced the metallurgical bond across the interface of casted beams. Carbon diffusion from high-Cr WCI into 310 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-carbides in 310 SS near the interface and Ni diffusion from 310 SS into high-Cr WCI led to the formation of austenite within a network of M7C3 eutectic carbides in high-Cr WCI near the interface. Inserting 310 SS plates into high-Cr WCI beams resulted in a significant improvement in their toughness. All specimens of this metal matrix composite failed in a ductile mode with higher plastic deformation prior to failure. The high-Cr WCI specimen reinforced with I-section of 310 SS revealed higher toughness compared to that with T-section at the same volume fraction. The presence of the upper flange increased the reinforcement efficiency for delaying the crack growth.

  19. Cutting Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel by Using Laser Cutting Process without Assist Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Ozaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, laser cutting is used in many industries. Generally, in laser cutting of metallic materials, suitable assist gas and its nozzle are needed to remove the molten metal. However, because of the gas nozzle should be set closer to the surface of a workpiece, existence of the nozzle seems to prevent laser cutting from being used flexible. Therefore, the new cutting process, Assist Gas Free laser cutting or AGF laser cutting, has been developed. In this process, the pressure at the bottom side of a workpiece is reduced by a vacuum pump, and the molten metal can be removed by the air flow caused by the pressure difference between both sides of the specimen. In this study, cutting properties of austenitic stainless steel by using AGF laser cutting with 2 kW CO2 laser were investigated. Laser power and cutting speed were varied in order to study the effect of these parameters on cutting properties. As a result, austenitic stainless steel could be cut with dross-free by AGF laser cutting. When laser power was 2.0 kW, cutting speed could be increased up to 100 mm/s, and kerf width at specimen surface was 0.28 mm.

  20. CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC RELATIONS OF CEMENTITE–AUSTENITE–FERRITE IN THE DIFFUSIVE DECOMPOSITION OF AUSTENITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOLSHAKOV V. I.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary. It was made a search for new and more accurate orientation relations between the crystal lattice in the pearlite and bainite austenite decomposition products. Methods. It were used the methods: transmission electron microscopy, the micro-, mathematical matrix and stereographic analysis. The purpose of the research is with theoretical, numerical and experimental methods to set up to a 0.2 degree angular orientation relations between the lattices of ferrite and cementite in the austenite decomposition products in the temperature range 400 ... 700С. Results. It was established a new, refined value for grids in the diffusion decay of γ → α + (α + θ. Practical significance. It was proposed a new oriented dependence and the corresponding double gnomonic projection with poles to planes α and θ phases, which can be used in patterns of crystallographic lattices relations studies at phase transitions, as well as the subsequent modeling of complex physical processes of structure formation in metals and binary systems.

  1. Atomistic simulation of martensite-austenite phase transition in nanoscale nickel-titanium crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kexel, Christian; Schramm, Stefan; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2015-09-01

    Shape-memory (SM) alloys can, after initial inelastic deformation, reconstruct their pristine lattice structure upon heating. The underlying phenomenon is the structural solid-solid phase transition from low-temperature lower-symmetry martensite to the high-temperature higher-symmetry austenite. Conventional nickel-titanium (NiTi) with near-equiatomic concentration already possesses an eminent importance for many applications, whereas the nanostructured equivalent can exhibit yet enhanced thermomechanical properties. However, no plausible microscopic theory of the SM effect in NiTi exists, especially for nanoscale systems. We investigate the thermally induced martensite-austenite phase transition in free equiatomic nanocrystals, comprising up to approximately 40 000 atoms, by means of molecular-dynamics simulations (MD) using a classical Gupta-type many-body scheme. Thereby we complement and extend a previously published study [D. Mutter, P. Nielaba, Eur. Phys. J. B 84, 109 (2011)]. The structural transition, revealing features of a first-order phase transition, is demonstrated. It is contrasted with the melting phase transition, a quantum solid model and bulk experimental findings. Moreover, a nucleation-growth process is observed as well as the irreversibility of the transition upon cooling.

  2. Microstructural Changes in a High-Manganese Austenitic Fe-Mn-Al-C Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witkowska M.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Microstructural changes in the age-hardenable Fe-28wt.%Mn-9wt.%Al-1wt.%C steel during ageing at 550°C for various times have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The steel was produced in an induction furnace and the ingot, after homogenization at 1150°C for 3 hours under a protective argon atmosphere, was hot-rolled and subsequently cold-rolled up to 23% reduction. The sheet was then aged at 550°C for various times in an argon atmosphere and cooled in air. XRD analysis and TEM observations revealed a modulated structure and superlattice reflections produced by spinodal decomposition, which occurred during ageing at 550°C. Theexistence of satellites suggests that either (Fe, Mn3AlCx carbides were formed within the austenite matrix by spinodal decomposition during cooling or chemical fluctuactions occurred between the (Fe, Mn3AlCx carbides and the austenitic matrix.

  3. Scale-bridging analysis on deformation behavior of high-nitrogen austenitic steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Ha, Heon-Young; Hwang, Byoungchul; Kim, Sung-Joon; Shin, Eunjoo; Lee, Jong Wook

    2013-08-01

    Scale-bridging analysis on deformation behavior of high-nitrogen austenitic Fe-18Cr-10Mn-(0.39 and 0.69)N steels was performed by neutron diffraction, electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Two important modes of deformation were identified depending on the nitrogen content: deformation twinning in the 0.69 N alloy and strain-induced martensitic transformation in the 0.39 N alloy. The phase fraction and deformation faulting probabilities were evaluated based on analyses of peak shift and asymmetry of neutron diffraction profiles. Semi in situ EBSD measurement was performed to investigate the orientation dependence of deformation microstructure and it showed that the variants of ε martensite as well as twin showed strong orientation dependence with respect to tensile axis. TEM observation showed that deformation twin with a {111} mathematical left angle bracket 112 mathematical right angle bracket crystallographic component was predominant in the 0.69 N alloy whereas two types of strain-induced martensites (ε and α' martensites) were observed in the 0.39 N alloy. It can be concluded that scale-bridging analysis using neutron diffraction, EBSD, and TEM can yield a comprehensive understanding of the deformation mechanism of nitrogen-alloyed austenitic steels.

  4. Ameliorated Austenite Carbon Content Control in Austempered Ductile Irons by Support Vector Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Yun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Austempered ductile iron has emerged as a notable material in several engineering fields, including marine applications. The initial austenite carbon content after austenization transform but before austempering process for generating bainite matrix proved critical in controlling the resulted microstructure and thus mechanical properties. In this paper, support vector regression is employed in order to establish a relationship between the initial carbon concentration in the austenite with austenization temperature and alloy contents, thereby exercising improved control in the mechanical properties of the austempered ductile irons. Particularly, the paper emphasizes a methodology tailored to deal with a limited amount of available data with intrinsically contracted and skewed distribution. The collected information from a variety of data sources presents another challenge of highly uncertain variance. The authors present a hybrid model consisting of a procedure of a histogram equalizer and a procedure of a support-vector-machine (SVM- based regression to gain a more robust relationship to respond to the challenges. The results show greatly improved accuracy of the proposed model in comparison to two former established methodologies. The sum squared error of the present model is less than one fifth of that of the two previous models.

  5. Intergranular Corrosion Behavior of Low-Nickel and 304 Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansod, Ankur V.; Patil, Awanikumar P.; Moon, Abhijeet P.; Khobragade, Nilay N.

    2016-09-01

    Intergranular corrosion (IGC) susceptibility for Cr-Mn austenitic stainless steel and 304 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) was estimated using electrochemical techniques. Optical and SEM microscopy studies were carried out to investigate the nature of IGC at 700 °C with increasing time (15, 30, 60, 180, 360, 720, 1440 min) according to ASTM standard 262 A. Quantitative analysis was performed to estimate the degree of sensitization (DOS) using double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DLEPR) and EIS technique. DLEPR results indicated that with the increase in thermal aging duration, DOS becomes more severe for both types of stainless steel. The DOS for Cr-Mn ASS was found to be higher (65.12% for 1440 min) than that of the AISI 304 ASS (23% for 1440 min). The higher degree of sensitization resulted in lowering of electrical charge capacitance resistance. Chronoamperometry studies were carried out at a passive potential of 0.4 V versus SCE and was observed to have a higher anodic dissolution of the passive film of Cr-Mn ASS. EDS studies show the formation of chromium carbide precipitates in the vicinity of the grain boundary. The higher Mn content was also observed for Cr-Mn ASS at the grain boundary.

  6. Titanium diffusion coatings on austenitic steel obtained by the pack cementation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRELA BRITCHI

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The surface of specimens made of 316L austenitic steel was modified by titanium diffusion. The diffusion coatings were obtained by packing in a powder mixture consisting of titanium powder, NH4Cl and Al2O3 powder. The procedure required high temperatures, over 900 °C, and long durations. Atomic titanium was formed in the muffle during the process. Titanium atoms from the metallic part surfaces diffuse towards the interior and a diffusion layer is formed as a function of the steel composition. Titanium diffusion into the surface of 316L austenitic steel determines the formation of a complex coating: a thin layer of TiN at the exterior and a layer consisting of compounds containing Ti, Ni and Fe in the interior of the coating. The obtained coatings were continuous, adherent and had a hardness higher than that of the substrate material. The diffusion coatings were investigated by optical and electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Vickers microhardness tests.

  7. Impact Toughness Properties of Nickel- and Manganese-Free High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh; Akbari, Alireza; Mohammadzadeh, Mina

    2016-12-01

    A large amount of manganese (>10 wt pct) in nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels (Ni-free HNASSs) can induce toxicity. In order to develop Ni-free HNASSs with low or no manganese, it is necessary to investigate their mechanical properties for biomedical applications. This work aims to study the Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact toughness properties of a Ni- and Mn-free Fe-22.7Cr-2.4Mo-1.2N HNASS plate in the temperature range of 103 K to 423 K (-170 °C to 150 °C). The results show that unlike conventional AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel, the Ni- and Mn-free HNASS exhibits a sharp ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT). The intergranular brittle fracture associated with some plasticity and deformation bands is observed on the fracture surface at 298 K (25 °C). Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis of the impact-tested sample in the longitudinal direction indicates that deformation bands are parallel to {111} slip planes. By decreasing the temperature to 273 K, 263 K, and 103 K (0 °C, -10 °C, and -70 °C), entirely intergranular brittle fracture occurs on the fracture surface. The fracture mode changes from brittle fracture to ductile as the temperature increases to 423 K (150 °C). The decrease in impact toughness is discussed on the basis of temperature sensitivity of plastic flow and planarity of deformation mechanism.

  8. Erosion-corrosion behavior of austenitic cast iron in an acidic slurry medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Sun, Lan; Liu, Yu-zhen; Fan, Hong-yuan

    2015-06-01

    A series of austenitic cast iron samples with different compositions were cast and a part of nickel in the samples was replaced by manganese for economic reason. Erosion-corrosion tests were conducted under 2wt% sulfuric acid and 15wt% quartz sand. The results show that the matrix of cast irons remains austenite after a portion of nickel is replaced with manganese. (Fe,Cr)3C is a common phase in the cast irons, and nickel is the main alloying element in high-nickel cast iron; whereas, (Fe,Mn)3C is observed with the increased manganese content in low-nickel cast iron. Under erosion-corrosion tests, the weight-loss rates of the cast irons increase with increasing time. Wear plays a more important role than corrosion in determining the weight loss. It is indicated that the processes of weight loss for the cast irons with high and low nickel contents are different. The erosion resistance of the cast iron containing 7.29wt% nickel and 6.94wt% manganese is equivalent to that of the cast iron containing 13.29wt% nickel.

  9. Effects of the Process Parameters on Austenitic Stainless Steel by TIG-Flux Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heryueh HUANG; Shengwen SHYU; Kuanghung TSENG; Changpin CHOU

    2006-01-01

    The effects of the process parameters of TIG (tungsten inset gas)-flux welding on the welds morphology,angular distortion, ferrite content and hot cracking in austenitic stainless steel were investigated. Autogenous TIG welding process was applied to the type 304 stainless steel through a thin layer of activating flux to produce a bead on plate welded joint. TiO2, SiO2, Fe2O3, Cr2O3, ZnO and MnO2 were used as the activating fluxes. The experimental results indicated that the TIG-flux welding can increase the weld depth/width ratio and reduce the HAZ (heat affected zone) range, and therefore the angular distortion of the weldment can be reduced. It was also found that the retained ferrite content within the TIG-flux welds is increased, and has a beneficial effect in reducing hot cracking tendency for stainless steels of the austenitic type weld metals. A plasma column constriction increases the current density at the anode spot and then a substantial increase in penetration of the TIG-flux welds can be obtained.

  10. Dynamic recrystallization and precipitation in high manganese austenitic stainless steel during hot compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amir Momeni; Shahab Kazemi; Golam Ebrahimi; Alireza Maldar

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic recrystallization and precipitation in a high manganese austenitic stainless steel were investigated by hot compression tests over temperatures of 950-1150°C at strain rates of 0.001 s-1-1 s-1. All the flow curves within the studied deformation regimes were typ-ical of dynamic recrystallization. A window was constructed to determine the value of apparent activation energy as a function of strain rate and deformation temperature. The kinetics of dynamic recrystallization was analyzed using the Avrami kinetics equation. A range of apparent activation energy for hot deformation from 303 kJ/mol to 477 kJ/mol is obtained at different deformation regimes. Microscopic characterization confirms that under a certain deformation condition (medium Zener-Hollomon parameter (Z) values), dynamic recrystalliza-tion appears at first, but large particles can not inhibit the recrystallization. At low or high Z values, dynamic recrystallization may occur be-fore dynamic precipitation and proceeds faster. In both cases, secondary phase precipitation is observed along prior austenite grain bounda-ries. Stress relaxation tests at the same deformation temperatures also confirm the possibility of dynamic precipitation. Unexpectedly, the Avrami's exponent value increases with the increase of Z value. It is associated with the priority of dynamic recrystallization to dynamic pre-cipitation at higher Z values.

  11. Equi-biaxial loading effect on austenitic stainless steel fatigue life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gourdin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue lifetime assessment is essential in the design of structures. Under-estimated predictions may result in unnecessary in service inspections. Conversely, over-estimated predictions may have serious consequences on the integrity of structures. In some nuclear power plant components, the fatigue loading may be equibiaxial because of thermal fatigue. So the potential impact of multiaxial loading on the fatigue life of components is a major concern. Meanwhile, few experimental data are available on austenitic stainless steels. It is essential to improve the fatigue assessment methodologies to take into account the potential equi-biaxial fatigue damage. Hence this requires obtaining experimental data on the considered material with a strain tensor in equibiaxial tension. Two calibration tests (with strain gauges and image correlation were used to obtain the relationship between the imposed deflection and the radial strain on the FABIME2 specimen. A numerical study has confirmed this relationship. Biaxial fatigue tests are carried out on two austenitic stainless steels for different values of the maximum deflection, and with a load ratio equal to -1. The interpretation of the experimental results requires the use of an appropriate definition of strain equivalent. In nuclear industry, two kinds of definition are used: von Mises and TRESCA strain equivalent. These results have permitted to estimate the impact of the equibiaxiality on the fatigue life of components

  12. Microstructure and Properties of Plasma Source Nitrided AISI 316 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G. Y.; Lei, M. K.

    2016-11-01

    Plasma source nitriding is a relatively new nitriding technology which can overcome those inherent shortcomings associated with conventional direct current plasma nitriding technology such as the arcing surface damage, the edging effect and the hollow cathode effect. There is considerable study on the properties of nitrided samples for laboratorial scale plasma source nitriding system; however, little information has been reported on the industrial-scale plasma source nitriding system. In this work, AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel samples were nitrided by an industrial-scale plasma source nitriding system at various nitriding temperatures (350, 400, 450 and 500 °C) with a floating potential. A high-nitrogen face-centered-cubic phase (γN) formed on the surface of nitrided sample surface. As the nitriding temperature was increased, the γN phase layer thickness increased, varying from 1.5 μm for the lowest nitriding temperature of 350 °C, to 30 μm for the highest nitriding temperature of 500 °C. The maximum Vickers microhardness of the γN phase layer with a peak nitrogen concentration of 20 at.% is about HV 0.1 N 15.1 GPa at the nitriding temperature of 450 °C. The wear and corrosion experimental results demonstrated that the γN phase was formed on the surface of AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel by plasma source nitriding, which exhibits not only high wear resistance, but also good pitting corrosion resistance.

  13. Relationship between localized strain and irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in an austenitic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMurtrey, M.D., E-mail: mdmcm@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Was, G.S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Patrick, L.; Farkas, D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2011-04-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Austenitic steel is more susceptible to intergranular corrosion after irradiation. {yields} Simulation and experiment used to study cracking in irradiated austentic steel. {yields} Cracking occurs at random high angle boundaries normal to the tensile stress. {yields} Cracking at boundaries with high normal stress and inability to accommodate strain. {yields} Boundary type, angle, and Taylor and Schmid factors affect strain accommodation. - Abstract: Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking may be linked to the local slip behavior near grain boundaries that exhibit high susceptibility to cracking. Fe-13Cr-15Ni austenitic steel was irradiated with 2 MeV protons at 360 deg. C to 5 dpa and strained in 288 deg. C simulated BWR conditions. Clusters of grains from the experiment were created in an atomistic simulation and then virtually strained using molecular dynamic simulation techniques. Cracking and grain orientation data were characterized in both the experiment and the simulation. Random high angle boundaries with high surface trace angles with respect to the tensile direction were found to be the most susceptible to cracking. Grain boundary cracking susceptibility was also found to correlate strongly with slip continuity, indicating that the strain accommodation at the boundary is related to cracking resistance. Higher cracking susceptibility was also found at grain boundaries adjacent to grains with low Schmid factor or high Taylor factor. The basic trends reported here are supported by both the experiments and the simulations.

  14. Sub-zero austenite to martensite transformation in a Fe-Ni-0.6wt.%C alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Pantleon, Karen; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Martensitic transformation in a model Fe-Ni-0.6wt%C alloy was investigated at sub-zero Celsius temperature. The influence of the thermal path in determining the conditions leading to the formation of martensite was studied. In the investigation, samples were austenitized and quenched, whereafter...

  15. Grain-to-Grain Variations in NbC Particle Size Distributions in an Austenitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlow, Claire; Ralph, B.; Silverman, B.;

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative information has been obtained concerning the size distributions of NbC precipitate particles in different grains in a deformed and aged austenitic stainless steel specimen. The precipitate size distributions obtained differ from one grain to another. The average disparity measured be...

  16. Assessment of the integrity of ferritic-austenitic dissimilar weld joints of different grades of Cr-Mo ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, Sunil; Mathew, M.D. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Metallurgy and Materials Group

    2010-07-01

    Integrity of the 2.25 Cr-1Mo / Alloy 800, 9Cr-1Mo / Alloy 800 and 9Cr-1Mo-VNb / Alloy 800 ferritic-austenitic dissimilar joints, fusion welded employing Inconel 182 electrode, has been assessed under creep conditions at 823 K. The dissimilar weld joints displayed lower creep rupture strength than their respective ferritic steel base metals. The strength reduction was more for 2.25Cr-1Mo steel joint and least for 9Cr-1Mo steel joint. The failure location in the joints was found to shift from the ferritic steel base metal to the intercritical region of heat-affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic steel (type IV cracking) with decrease in stress. At still lower stresses the failure occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface. Localized creep deformation and cavitation in the soft intercritical HAZ induced type IV failure whereas creep cavitation at the weld interface particles induced ferritic / austenitic interface cracking due to high creep strength mismatch across it. Micromechanisms of type IV failure and interface cracking in the ferritic / austenitic joints and different susceptibility to failure for different grades of ferritic steels are discussed based on microstructural investigation, mechanical testing and finite element analysis. (Note from indexer: paper contains many typographical errors.)

  17. Changes in the mechanical properties and microstructure of anisotropic austenitic stainless sheet steel after uniaxial tensile test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yankov Emil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to study the changes in the characteristics of an austenitic sheet material X5CrNi18-10 (1.4301, AISI 304 after a plastic deformation. Samples are cut out from the sheet material at three different directions - 0°, 45° and 90° angle to the rolling direction. The changes in the mechanical properties and microstructure of the anisotropic austenitic steel are investigated by mechanical tests (uniaxial tension tests and hardness measurements and structural analyses (optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction. It is established that the strain induced phase transformation of the metastable austenite to martensite during the tension tests changes the magnetic properties of the steel. It is found out that the sheet anisotropy effect on the uniform deformation, the thickness reduction and structure of the austenite sheet material is more essential for the plastic deformation behaviour than the strain-induced γ → α′ phase transformation.

  18. Characterization of Low Temperature Ferrite/Austenite Transformations in the Heat Affected Zone of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Arc Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, T A; Elmer, J W; Babu, S S; Vitek, J M

    2003-08-20

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) has been used to identify a previously unobserved low temperature ferrite ({delta})/austenite({gamma}) phase transformation in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) welds. In this ''ferrite dip'' transformation, the ferrite transforms to austenite during heating to peak temperatures on the order of 750 C, and re-transforms to ferrite during cooling, resulting in a ferrite volume fraction equivalent to that in the base metal. Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) and laser dilatometry measurements during Gleeble{reg_sign} thermal simulations are performed in order to verify the existence of this low temperature phase transformation. Thermodynamic and kinetic models for phase transformations, including both local-equilibrium and para-equilibrium diffusion controlled growth, show that diffusion of substitutional alloying elements does not provide a reasonable explanation for the experimental observations. On the other hand, the diffusion of interstitial alloying elements may be rapid enough to explain this behavior. Based on both the experimental and modeling results, two mechanisms for the ''ferrite dip'' transformation, including the formation and decomposition of secondary austenite and an athermal martensitic-type transformation of ferrite to austenite, are considered.

  19. Effect of Grain Size on Void Formation during High-Energy Electron Irradiation of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Bachu Narain

    1974-01-01

    Thin foils of an ‘ experimental ’ austenitic stainless steel, with and without dispersions of aluminium oxide particles, are irradiated with 1 MeV electrons in a High Voltage Electron Microscope at 600°C. Evidence of grain size dependent void nucleation, void concentration, and void volume swelling...

  20. On the determination of stress profiles in expanded austenite by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and successive layer removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas L.; Winther, Grethe

    2015-01-01

    Surface layers of expanded austenite resulting from nitriding typically exhibit large gradients in residual stress and composition. Evaluation of residual-stress profiles is explored by means of grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD), probing shallow depths, combined with successive layer r...

  1. Microstructural Evolution of a Low-Carbon Steel during Application of Quenching and Partitioning Heat Treatments after Partial Austenitization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santofimia, M.J.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.

    2008-01-01

    The “quenching and partitioning” (Q&P) process has been studied in a low-carbon steel containing 1.1 wt pct aluminum by heat treatments consisting of partial austenitization at 900 °C and subsequent rapid cooling to a quenching temperature in the range between 125 °C and 175 °C, followed by an isoth

  2. Effects of Nitrogen Concentration on Microstructure and Antibac-terial Property of Copper-Bearing Austenite Stainless Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhixia ZHANG; Laizhu JIANG; Gang LIN; Zhou XU

    2008-01-01

    Austenite antibacterial stainless steels have been found to have wide applications in hospitals and food indus-tries. In recent years epsilon copper precipitation in antibacterial stainless steels has obtained much research interest due to its antibacterial action. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of nitro-gen concentration on the precipitation of epsilon copper and antibacterial property. Two kinds of austenite antibacterial stainless steels containing copper and different nitrogen concentration (0.02 and 0.08 wt pct, re-spectively) were prepared and the microstructures were characterized by a combination of electron microscopy and thermodynamic analysis. A mathematical expression was deduced to predict the effect of nitrogen con-centration on the activity coefficient of copper, In(fCu/focu)=0.53524+4.11xN-0.48x2N. Higher nitrogen was found to increase the free energy difference of copper concentration distribution between precipitation phase and austenite matrix, stimulate the aggregation of copper atoms from austenite, increase the precipitation amount and consequently enhance the antibacterial property of steel.

  3. Gas bubbles evolution peculiarities in ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels and alloys under helium-ion irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chernov, [No Value; Kalashnikov, AN; Kahn, BA; Binyukova, SY

    2003-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to investigate the gas bubble evolution in model alloys of the Fe C system, ferritic-martensitic steels of 13Cr type, nickel and austenitic steels under 40-keV helium-ion it. radiation up to a fluence of 5 x 10(20) m(-2) at the temperature of 920 K. It

  4. PRECIPITATION BEHAVIOR OF M2N IN A HIGH-NITROGEN AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL DURING ISOTHERMAL AGING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F. Shi; L.J. Wang; W.F. Cui; C.M. Liu

    2007-01-01

    The precipitation behavior of M2N and the microstructural evolution in a Cr-Mn austenitic stainless steel with a high nitrogen content of 0.43mass% during isothermal aging has been investigated using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy ( SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The aging treatments have led to the decomposition of nitrogen supersaturated austenitic matrix through discontinuous cellular precipitation. The precipitated cells comprise alternate lamellae of M2N precipitate and austenitic matrix. This kind of precipitate morphology is similar to that of pearlite. However, owing to the non-eutectoidic mechanism of the reaction, the growth characteristic of the cellular precipitates is different from that of pearlite in Fe-C binary alloys. M2N precipitate in the cell possesses a hexagonal crystal structure with the parameters a=0.4752nm and c=0.4429nm, and the orientation relationship between the MN precipitates and austenite determined from the SADP is [01110]M2N// [101]γ,[2-1-10]M2N// [010]γ.

  5. Synergistic Computational and Microstructural Design of Next- Generation High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaman, Ibrahim [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States); Arroyave, Raymundo [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-07-31

    The purpose of this project was to: 1) study deformation twinning, its evolution, thermal stability, and the contribution on mechanical response of the new advanced stainless steels, especially at elevated temperatures; 2) study alumina-scale formation on the surface, as an alternative for conventional chromium oxide, that shows better oxidation resistance, through alloy design; and 3) design new generation of high temperature stainless steels that form alumina scale and have thermally stable nano-twins. The work involved few baseline alloys for investigating the twin formation under tensile loading, thermal stability of these twins, and the role of deformation twins on the mechanical response of the alloys. These baseline alloys included Hadfield Steel (Fe-13Mn-1C), 316, 316L and 316N stainless steels. Another baseline alloy was studied for alumina-scale formation investigations. Hadfield steel showed twinning but undesired second phases formed at higher temperatures. 316N stainless steel did not show signs of deformation twinning. Conventional 316 stainless steel demonstrated extensive deformation twinning at room temperature. Investigations on this alloy, both in single crystalline and polycrystalline forms, showed that deformation twins evolve in a hierarchical manner, consisting of micron–sized bundles of nano-twins. The width of nano-twins stays almost constant as the extent of strain increases, but the width and number of the bundles increase with increasing strain. A systematic thermomechanical cycling study showed that the twins were stable at temperatures as high as 900°C, after the dislocations are annealed out. Using such cycles, volume fraction of the thermally stable deformation twins were increased up to 40% in 316 stainless steel. Using computational thermodynamics and kinetics calculations, we designed two generations of advanced austenitic stainless steels. In the first generation, Alloy 1, which had been proposed as an alumina

  6. INFLUENCE OF AUSTENITE GRAIN SIZE TO DEVELOPMENT OF DECARBONIZATION IN PRODUCTION OF ROLLED STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PARUSOV E. V.

    2016-08-01

    ]. The paper [11] acknowledges the influence of micro-additives of boron on changes in the austenite grain size and accordingly the length of borders in high-carbon steels with austenitizing temperature increase within the range of 900…1 100ºС. The purpose of work is to research the effect of austenite grain size on the decarburization depth in carbon (base steel and boron micro-alloyed steel.

  7. Surface modification of austenitic steel by various glow-discharge nitriding methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Borowski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen intensive research on modifying glow-discharge nitriding processes. One of the most commonly used glow-discharge methods includes cathodic potential nitriding (conventional method, and active screen plasma nitriding. Each of these methods has a number of advantages. One very important, common feature of these techniques is full control of the microstructure, chemical and phase composition, thickness and the surface topography of the layers formed. Another advantage includes the possibility of nitriding such materials as: austenitic steels or nickel alloys, i.e. metallic materials which do not diffuse nitrogen as effectively as ferritic or martensitic steels. However, these methods have some disadvantages as well. In the case of conventional plasma nitriding, engineers have to deal with the edge effect, which makes it difficult to use this method for complexly shaped components. In turn, in the case of active screen plasma nitriding, the problem disappears. A uniform, smooth layer forms, but is thinner, softer and is not as resistant to friction compared to layers formed using the conventional method. Research is also underway to combine these methods, i.e. use an active screen in conventional plasma nitriding at cathodic potential. However, there is a lack of comprehensive data presenting a comparison between these three nitriding processes and the impact of pulsating current on the formation of the microstructure and functional properties of austenitic steel surfaces. The article presents a characterisation of nitrided layers produced on austenitic X2CrNiMo17-12-2 (AISI 316L stainless steel in the course of glow-discharge nitriding at cathodic potential, at plasma potential and at cathodic potential incorporating an active screen. All processes were carried out at 440 °C under DC glow-discharge conditions and in 100 kHz frequency pulsating current. The layers were examined in terms of their microstructure, phase and

  8. On the Mechanisms for Martensite Formation in YAG Laser Welded Austenitic NiTi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, J. P.; Braz Fernandes, F. M.; Miranda, R. M.; Schell, N.

    2016-03-01

    Extensive work has been reported on the microstructure of laser-welded NiTi alloys either superelastic or with shape memory effect, motivated by the fact that the microstructure affects the functional properties. However, some effects of laser beam/material interaction with these alloys have not yet been discussed. This paper aims to discuss the mechanisms for the occurrence of martensite in the heat-affected zone and in the fusion zone at room temperature, while the base material is fully austenitic. For this purpose, synchrotron radiation was used together with a simple thermal analytic mathematical model. Two distinct mechanisms are proposed for the presence of martensite in different zones of a weld, which affects the mechanical and functional behavior of a welded component.

  9. Evaluation of the corrosion resistance of plasma nitrided austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mareci, Daniel; Bolat, Georgiana [Technical Univ. Iasi (Romania). Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection; Strugaru, Sorin Iacob; Munteanu, Corneliu [Technical Univ. Iasi (Romania). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering; Souto, Ricardo M. [Univ. of La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain). Dept. of Chemistry

    2015-03-15

    Plasma nitriding at 500 C for 14 h was applied to austenitic 304 stainless steel for surface hardening. The effect of surface treatment on the corrosion resistance of the material was investigated in naturally-aerated 0.5 M NaCl solution for 30 days using linear potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods. Both as-cast and plasma nitrided stainless steel samples underwent spontaneous passivation, though the nitrided sample exhibited more positive zero current potential, higher breakdown potential, and lower anodic current densities than the as-cast material. Impedance spectra were interpreted in terms of a duplex passive film, corrosion resistance mainly arising from a thin inner compact layer, whereas the outer layer was more porous and less sealing. Capacitive behaviour and high corrosion resistance were observed in the low and medium frequency ranges for the nitrided samples.

  10. Effect Of Temperature Variation On Wear Behaviour Of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, S. K.; Ahmad, S.; Abdullah, B.; Pahroraji, H. F.; Hamami, G.

    2016-11-01

    The effects of boronizing temperatures on the wear and hardness properties of austenitic stainless steel were investigated in this study. The samples were prepared in accordance to standard samples preparation for wear and hardness test. Pack boronizing were conducted using EKabor®1 powder medium at two different temperatures which are 850°C and 950°C. The wear resistance properties were evaluated though pin on disk test and the surface characterization was analyzed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM), observation. Vickers microhardness tester was performed to obtain the hardness of the samples. The results indicated that there are presences of FeB and Fe2B phases on both samples, but thicker FeB phase was produced at Po-950 samples. This resulted in reduction of abrasion wear properties but major improvement of the hardness properties of boronized stainless steel.

  11. Microstructural observations of HFIR-irratiated austenitic stainless steels including welds from JP9-16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawai, T.; Shiba, K.; Hishinuma, A.

    1996-04-01

    Austenitic stainless steels, including specimens taken from various electron beam (EB) welds, have been irradiated in HFIR Phase II capsules, JP9-16. Fifteen specimens irradiated at 300, 400, and 500{degrees}C up to 17 dpa are so far examined by a transmission electron microscope (TEM). In 300{degrees}C irradiation, cavities were smaller than 2nm and different specimens showed little difference in cavity microstructure. At 400{degrees}C, cavity size was larger, but still very small (<8 nm). At 500{degrees}C, cavity size reached 30 nm in weld metal specimens of JPCA, while cold worked JPCA contained a small (<5 nm) cavities. Inhomogeneous microstructural evolution was clearly observed in weld-metal specimens irradiated at 500{degrees}C.

  12. Effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on deformation behavior of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Alexander, D.J.; Grossbeck, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Shiba, K.

    1996-04-01

    An austenitic stainless steel, designated 316LN-IG, has been chosen for the first wall/shield (FW/S) structure for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The proposed operational temperature range for the structure (100 to 250{degree}C) is below the temperature regimes for void swelling (400-600{degree}C) and for helium embrittlement (500-700{degree}C). However, the proposed neutron dose is such that large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, and strain hardening capacity could be encountered which could significantly affect fracture properties. Definition of the irradiation regimes in which this phenomenon occurs is essential to the establishment of design rules to protect against various modes of failure.

  13. Influence of the austenitic stainless steel microstructure on the void swelling under ion irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouxel Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the role of different metallurgical parameters on the void formation mechanisms, various austenitic stainless steels were elaborated and irradiated with heavy ions. Two alloys, in several metallurgical conditions (15Cr/15Ni–Ti and 15Cr/25Ni–Ti, were irradiated in the JANNUS-Saclay facility at 600 °C with 2 MeV Fe2+ ions up to 150 dpa. Resulting microstructures were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM. Different effects on void swelling are highlighted. Only the pre-aged samples, which were consequently solute and especially titanium depleted, show cavities. The nickel-enriched matrix shows more voids with a smaller size. Finally, the presence of nano-precipitates combined with a dense dislocation network decreases strongly the number of cavities.

  14. The Effect of Post-Bond Heat Treatment on Tensile Property of Diffusion Bonded Austenitic Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sunghoon; Kim, Sung Kwan; Jang, Changheui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Sah, Injin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Diffusion bonding is the key manufacturing process for the micro-channel type heat exchangers. In this study, austenitic alloys such as Alloy 800HT, Alloy 690, and Alloy 600, were diffusion bonded at various temperatures and the tensile properties were measured up to 650 ℃. Tensile ductility of diffusion bonded Alloy 800HT was significantly lower than that of base metal at all test temperatures. While, for Alloy 690 and Alloy 600, tensile ductility of diffusion bonded specimens was comparable to that of base metals up to 500 ℃, above which the ductility became lower. The poor ductility of diffusion bonded specimen could have caused by the incomplete grain boundary migration and precipitates along the bond-line. Application of post-bond heat treatment (PBHT) improved the ductility close to that of base metals up to 550 ℃. Changes in tensile properties were discussed in view of the microstructure in the diffusionbonded area.

  15. Research on High-Speed Drilling Performances of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.W.Zhong; Y.P.Ma; F.H.Sun; M.Chen

    2004-01-01

    Due to specific properties arising from their structure (high ductility, high toughness,strong tenacious and low heat conductivity), the stainless steels have poor machinability. The drilling of the stainless steels becomes the machining difficulty for their serious work-hardening and abrasion of tools. In this paper, the austenitic stainless steel is used as the work-piece to perform the contrastive experiments with the TiN coated and TiAlN-coated high-speed steel drills. The cutting force, torque, cutting temperature, and the abrasion of drills and tool life are tested and analyzed in the process of high-speed drilling. Experiment results show the effect of drilling speed on cutting force, cutting temperature, and drill wear. TiAlN-coated drills demonstrate better performances in high speed drilling. The research results will be of great benefit in the selection of drills and in the control of tool wear in high speed drilling of stainless steels.

  16. On the Plasma (ion) Carburized Layer of High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y. Ueda; N. Kanayama; K. Ichii; T. Oishi; H. Miyake

    2004-01-01

    The manganese concentration of austenitic stainless steel decreases from the inner layer towards the surface of the plasma (ion) carburized layer due to the evaporation of manganese from the specimen surface. The carbon concentration in the carburized layer is influenced by alloyed elements such as Ct, Ni, Si, and Mo, as well as Nitrogen. This study examined the effects of nitrogen on the properties of the carburized layer of high nitrogen stainless steel. Plasma (ion)carburizing was carried out for 14.4 ks at 1303 K in an atmosphere of CH4+H2 gas mixtures under a pressure of 350 Pa. The plasma carburized layer of the high nitrogen stainless steel was thinner than that of an austentric stainless steel containing no nitrogen. This suggested that the nitrogen raised the activity of carbon in the plasma carburized layer, GDOES measurement indicated that the nitrogen level in the layer did not vary after plasma (ion) carburizing.

  17. Effect of Plasma Nitriding Temperatures on Characteristics of Aisi 201 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuxin; Zheng, Shaomei

    2016-10-01

    Samples of AISI 201 austenitic stainless steel were produced by plasma nitriding at 350∘C, 390∘C, 420∘C, 450∘C and 480∘C for 5h. Systematic characterization of the nitrided layer was carried out in terms of micrograph observations, phase identification, chemical composition depth profiling, surface microhardness measurements and electrochemical corrosion tests. The results show that the surface hardness and the layer thickness increased with increasing temperature. XRD indicated that a single S-phase layer was formed during low temperature (≤420∘C), while Cr2N or CrN phase was formed besides S-phase when nitrided at 450∘C and 480∘C. The specimen treated at 390∘C presents a much enhanced corrosion resistance compared to the untreated substrate. The corrosion resistance deteriorated for samples treated above 450∘C due to the formation of chromium nitrides.

  18. Corrosion Fatigue of Austenitic Stainless Steel in Different Hot Chloride Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, A.; Mori, G.; Panzenboeck, M. [Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Leoben (Austria); Pippan, R. [Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Science, Leoben (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steel was investigated under cyclic loading in electrolytes with different chloride contents and pH and at different temperatures. The testing solutions were 13.2 % NaCl (80,000 ppm Cl-) at 80 °C and 43 % CaCl{sub 2} (275,000 ppm Cl-) at 120 °C. In addition to S-N curves in inert and corrosive media, the fracture surfaces were investigated with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to analyse the type of attack. The experimental results showed that a sharp decrease in corrosion fatigue properties can be correlated with the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking. The correlation of occurring types of damage in different corrosion systems is described.

  19. Precipitation kinetics in austenitic 18Cr-30Ni-Nb cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Garbiak

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The study presents the results of investigations on the precipitation kinetics in austenitic 18%Cr-30%Ni cast steel stabilised with an addition of 1.84 wt% niobium. Phase analysis of isolates extracted from the alloy subjected to annealing within the temperature range of 600–1000oC during 10–1000 h was made. The phase constitution of the isolates mainly comprised niobium carbides of the NbC type and complex chromium carbides of the Cr23C6 type. In specimens annealed within the temperature range of 700–900oC, a high-silicon G phase was additionally identified. The highest kinetics of the precipitation process was recorded after annealing at the temperatures of 800 and 900oC.

  20. Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I [Greensburg, PA

    2010-07-06

    A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

  1. Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I [Greensburg, PA

    2011-08-23

    A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

  2. Effect of Harmonic Microstructure on the Corrosion Behavior of SUS304L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Prabhat K.; Shekhar, S.; Nakatani, M.; Ota, M.; Vajpai, S. K.; Ameyama, K.; Mondal, K.

    2016-12-01

    Corrosion behavior of a harmonic structured SUS304L austenitic stainless steel was examined and compared with nonharmonic structured SUS304L stainless steel and conventional 304 stainless steel in 3.5 pct NaCl solution. The study was performed using linear polarization, potentiodynamic polarization, cyclic polarization, and a salt fog exposure test for 30 days. Characterization was accomplished using a scanning electron microscope, an electron probe microanalyzer, and Raman spectroscopy. Improved pitting corrosion resistance was found in the case of the harmonic structured steel as compared to that of the nonharmonic and the conventional 304 stainless steel. Harmonically distributed fine-grained structure, less porosity, and higher fraction of passive α-FeOOH are attributed to the improvement in corrosion resistance of the harmonic structured steel.

  3. Determination of Concentration Dependent Diffusion Coefficients of Carbon in Expanded Austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract. In the present paper various experimental procedures to experimentally determine the concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of carbon in expanded austenite are evaluated. To this end thermogravimetric carburization was simulated for various experimental conditions and the evaluated...... composition dependent diffusivity of carbon derived from the simulated experiments was compared with the input data. The most promising procedure for an accurate determination is shown to be stepwise gaseous carburizing of thin foils in a gaseous atmosphere; the finer the stepsize, the more accurate...... the approximation of the diffusivity. Thermogravimetry was applied to continuously monitor the weight change of thin foils of AISI 316 during carburizing in CO-H2 gas mixtures for one of the simulated experimental procedures....

  4. Empirical modeling of shot peening parameters for welded austenitic stainless steel using grey relational analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Lakhwinder; Aggarwal, M. L. [YMCA University of Science and Technology, Haryana (India); Khan, R. A. [Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi (India)

    2012-06-15

    The attempt of this paper is to present an effective approach for the optimization of the shot peening process of welded AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel with multi performance characteristics using Grey relational analysis (GRA) based on Taguchi orthogonal array. Twenty-seven experimental runs are performed to determine best process parameters level. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) is carried out to identify significant peening parameters. The response tables are obtained for analyzing the optimal levels of shot peening parameters and major factors that affect the quality function. The multiple performance characteristics including tensile strength, surface hardness and surface roughness are the quality functions considered for the optimization. Further mathematical models are developed using regression analysis for the tensile strength, surface hardness and surface roughness. It will be very helpful to the engineers in deciding the levels of the shot peening parameters for desired performance characteristics.

  5. Microstructural and electrochemical characterization of laser deposited 18-10 austenitic stainless steel clad layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouquet, F. (GEMPPM/CALFETMAT, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Sallamand, P. (GEMPPM/CALFETMAT, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Millet, J.P. (GEMPPM/CALFETMAT, 69 Villeurbanne (France) Physicochimie Industrielle, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Frenk, A. (GEMPPM/CALFETMAT, 69 Villeurbanne (France) Centre de Traitement des Materiaux par Laser (CTML), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland)); Wagniere, J.D. (GEMPPM/CALFETMAT, 69 Villeurbanne (France) Centre de Traitement des Materiaux par Laser (CTML), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (Switzerland))

    1993-11-01

    The present work reports on 18-10 stainless steel coatings produced by laser powder cladding technique on a mild steel. Uniform clad layers - about 600 [mu]m thick - have been produced through partially overlapping single cladding tracks. The clad layers thus obtained show excellent adherence, no cracks, few porosities and good chemical homogeneity. The microstructure is dendritic or cellular. Dentrites or cells have an austenitic structure and a small amount of [delta]-ferrite is detected in the interdendritic areas. The corrosion resistance of the clad layers is tested by electrochemical techniques in various neutral or acidified aqueous saline media, deaerated or naturally aerated. In every case, the coatings show an excellent uniform corrosion resistance. (orig.).

  6. The Gibbs Thomson effect in magnetron-sputtered austenitic stainless steel films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusenza, S.; Borchers, C.; Carpene, E.; Schaaf, P.

    2007-03-01

    Magnetron sputtering of austenitic stainless steel AISI 316, which has a face-centred cubic structure (γ), leads to films exhibiting a body-centred cubic (α) structure or a mixture of α- and γ-phases. The microstructure of the deposited films was studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. With increasing deposition temperature a phase transformation from α- to γ-phase was observed in these films. Instantaneous recording of the electromotive force shows that nickel content and deposition temperature are crucial factors for phase stability and phase formation. In room temperature deposited stainless steel films, the phase transformation after vacuum annealing can be described by the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami kinetic model. These phase transformations in stainless steel films during annealing can be explained with the Gibbs-Thomson effect, where the grain boundary energy raises the Gibbs free energy.

  7. The Gibbs-Thomson effect in magnetron-sputtered austenitic stainless steel films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusenza, S [Universitaet Goettingen, II Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Borchers, C [Universitaet Goettingen, II Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Carpene, E [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Schaaf, P [Universitaet Goettingen, II Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2007-03-14

    Magnetron sputtering of austenitic stainless steel AISI 316, which has a face-centred cubic structure ({gamma}), leads to films exhibiting a body-centred cubic ({alpha}) structure or a mixture of {alpha}- and {gamma}-phases. The microstructure of the deposited films was studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. With increasing deposition temperature a phase transformation from {alpha}- to {gamma}-phase was observed in these films. Instantaneous recording of the electromotive force shows that nickel content and deposition temperature are crucial factors for phase stability and phase formation. In room temperature deposited stainless steel films, the phase transformation after vacuum annealing can be described by the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami kinetic model. These phase transformations in stainless steel films during annealing can be explained with the Gibbs-Thomson effect, where the grain boundary energy raises the Gibbs free energy.

  8. Properties, structure and creep resistance of austenitic steel Super 304H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielinski, Adam; Dobrzanski, Janusz; Purzynska, Hanna [Institute for Ferrous Metallurgy, Gliwice (Poland); Golanski, Grzegorz [Czestochowa Univ. of Technology (Poland). Inst. of Materials Engineering

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents selected material characteristics of Super 304H austenitic steel used for elements of boilers with super- and ultra-critical steam parameters. In particular, abridged and long-term creep tests with and without elongation measurement during testing and investigations of microstructural changes due to long-term impact of temperature and stress were carried out. The practical aspect of the use of creep test and structure investigation results in forecasting the durability of materials operating under creep conditions was presented. The characteristics of steels with regard to creep tests and structure investigations developed in this paper are used for estimation of changes in functional properties of the material of elements operating under creep conditions.

  9. Numerical simulation and experimental investigation of laser dissimilar welding of carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouie Esfahani, M. R.; Coupland, J.; Marimuthu, S.

    2015-07-01

    This study reports an experimental and numerical investigation on controlling the microstructure and brittle phase formation during laser dissimilar welding of carbon steel to austenitic stainless steel. The significance of alloying composition and cooling rate were experimentally investigated. The investigation revealed that above a certain specific point energy the material within the melt pool is well mixed and the laser beam position can be used to control the mechanical properties of the joint. The heat-affected zone within the high-carbon steel has significantly higher hardness than the weld area, which severely undermines the weld quality. A sequentially coupled thermo-metallurgical model was developed to investigate various heat-treatment methodology and subsequently control the microstructure of the HAZ. Strategies to control the composition leading to dramatic changes in hardness, microstructure and service performance of the dissimilar laser welded fusion zone are discussed.

  10. The development of a tensile-shear punch correlation for yield properties of model austenitic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankin, G.L.; Faulkner, R.G. [Loughborough Univ. (United Kingdom); Hamilton, M.L.; Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The effective shear yield and maximum strengths of a set of neutron-irradiated, isotopically tailored austentic alloys were evaluated using the shear punch test. The dependence on composition and neutron dose showed the same trends as were observed in the corresponding miniature tensile specimen study conducted earlier. A single tensile-shear punch correlation was developed for the three alloys in which the maximum shear stress or Tresca criterion was successfully applied to predict the slope. The correlation will predict the tensile yield strength of the three different austenitic alloys tested to within {+-}53 MPa. The accuracy of the correlation improves with increasing material strength, to within {+-} MPa for predicting tensile yield strengths in the range of 400-800 MPa.

  11. Ultrasonic Sound Field Mapping Through Coarse Grained Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Larche, Michael R.; Diaz, Aaron A.

    2014-08-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been involved with nondestructive examination (NDE) of coarse-grained cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) components for over 30 years. More recent work has focused on mapping the ultrasonic sound fields generated by low-frequency phased array probes that are typically used for the evaluation of CASS materials for flaw detection and characterization. The casting process results in the formation of large grained material microstructures that are nonhomogeneous and anisotropic. The propagation of ultrasonic energy for examination of these materials results in scattering, partitioning and redirection of these sound fields. The work reported here provides an assessment of sound field formation in these materials and provides recommendations on ultrasonic inspection parameters for flaw detection in CASS components.

  12. TEM investigation of the as-quenched compound layer formed by austenitic nitrocarburizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Y.; Wang, Y.; Hu, G.; Chen, X. [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China)

    1998-07-01

    The as-quenched compound layer of a 0.2% C steel formed by austenitic nitrocarburizing is found to be composed of single-phase {epsilon}-nitrocarbide with an hexagonal structure, as determined by electron diffraction. The difference in the site occupancy of nitrogen or carbon atoms may result in the formation of various types of {epsilon}-nitrocarbide; that is, {epsilon}-Fe{sub 2}(N,C), {epsilon}-Fe{sub 2{center_dot}3}(N,C), and {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}(N,C). By a comparison of the intensities of the superlattice reflection spots observed in the electron diffraction patterns with those in computed simulation patterns, the phase in the compound layer of the as-quenched sample was identified as {epsilon}-Fe{sub 2{center_dot}3}(N,C).

  13. Hydrogen solubility and diffusion in austenitic stainless steels studied with thermal desorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagodzinskyy, Y.; Todoshchenko, O.; Papula, S.; Haenninen, H. [Laboratory of Engineering Materials, School of Science and Technology, Aalto University, Espoo (Finland)

    2011-01-15

    Hydrogen solubility and diffusion in austenitic stainless steels, namely AISI 310, AISI 301LN and AISI 201, are studied with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) after electrochemical potentiostatic hydrogen pre-charging. Temperature dependencies of hydrogen desorption for all studied steels manifest a complex main peak caused by hydrogen releasing from the steel lattice by diffusion. Depending on the steel and heating rate the peak is situated from 350 to 500 K and its shape reflects a specific of hydrogen diffusion in stainless steels, which are multicomponent alloys. Analysis of the TDS curves is based on the hydrogen diffusion model taking into account trapping of hydrogen atoms in the energetically deep interstitial positions in the steel crystal lattice. Diffusion coefficient of hydrogen and its total content after the same charging procedure are obtained from the TDS curves and compared for the studied steels. (Copyright copyright 2011 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Effects of Austenite Stabilization on the Onset of Martensite Transformation in T91 Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baoqun NING; Yongchang LIU; Qingzhi SHI; Zhiming GAO; Liushuan YANG

    2008-01-01

    The influences of thermal stabilization of austenitic on the onset temperature for a martensite transformation in T91 ferritic heat-resistant steel were studied by high-resolution differential dilatometer. The phase trans-formation kinetic information was obtained by adopting lever rule from the recorded dilatometric curves. The results show that an inverse stabilization, featured by the damage of "the atmosphere of carbon atoms" and the increase of the starting temperature for martensite transformation takes place when the T91 ferritic steel is isothermally treated above the Ms point, and it becomes strong with increasing the holding time. While the continued temperature for martensite transformation decreases gradually when isothermally holding at a temperature below Ms point. The observed inverse stabilization behavior could be attributed to the relatively high temperature of Ms point in the explored T91 ferritic heat-resistant steel.

  15. Effect of Carbon and Nitrogen Content on Deformation and Fracture of AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Menapace

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of small differences in the content of carbon and nitrogen on the room temperature tensile deformation and fracture behaviour of an AISI 304 stainless steel was studied. In the steel containing the lower amount of carbon and nitrogen, a higher amount of strain induced alfa’ martensite is formed, which increases strain hardening rate and both uniform and total elongation at fracture. The presence of large martensitic areas in the cross section causes strain localization at the austenite/martensite interface, which promotes the nucleation of cracks and their propagation along the interface. This results in a decrease of Ultimate Tensile Strength. Strain induced transformation slightly reduces strain rate sensitivity, as well.

  16. Large size austenitic stainless steel forgings for nuclear and cryogenic application - development, manufacturing and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Keizo; Suzuki, Komei; Sato, Ikuo; Murai, Etuso (Japan Steel Works Ltd., Muroran Plant, Hokkaido (Japan))

    1992-01-01

    The high quality one-piece large austenetic stainless steel forgings are required in the several components such as nuclear reactors and run tanks for rocket engine test stand in order to assure the structural integrity and to make it easy to fabricate and inspect the components. When the austenitic stainless steel forgings are increased in size, various problems must be overcome to assure the high quality forgings. The ingot making and hot working play an important role in determining the quality of the products. In such points, the lastest manufacturing techniques such as steel making of large size ingot and hot working to get uniform and fine grains are discussed together with the fundamental data of the material properties. (orig.).

  17. Composite model of microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steel under fast neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, R.E.; Odette, G.R.

    1986-01-01

    A rate-theory-based model has been developed which includes the simultaneous evolution of the dislocation and cavity components of the microstructure of irradiated austenitic stainless steels. Previous work has generally focused on developing models for void swelling while neglecting the time dependence of the dislocation structure. These models have broadened our understanding of the physical processes that give rise to swelling, e.g., the role of helium and void formation from critically-sized bubbles. That work has also demonstrated some predictive capability by successful calibration to fit the results of fast reactor swelling data. However, considerable uncertainty about the values of key parameters in these models limits their usefulness as predictive tools. Hence the use of such models to extrapolate fission reactor swelling data to fusion reactor conditions is compromised.

  18. Surface Modification by Nitrogen Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation on Austenitic AISI 304 Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miguel CASTRO-COLIN; William DURRER; Jorge ALPEZ; Enrique RAMIREZ-HOMS

    2016-01-01

    Surfaces of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel plates nitrided by plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) technology were studied by means of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES)and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)to determine the effect of the nitriding process on the surface and subjacent layers.Elemental compositions obtained by AES and XPS at varying depths indicate that the saturation of N is relatively constant as a function of depth,indicating the reliability of PIII technology for subsurface saturation.It is concluded that the concentrations of both Cr and O increase with depth,the subjacent oxide is driven by the Ar+ sputtering process used to access the lower layers,and then N is bound to Cr.

  19. Novel approaches to determining residual stresses by ultramicroindentation techniques: Application to sandblasted austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frutos, E. [Centro de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, CIBER-BBN, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain)] [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CENIM-CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Multigner, M. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CENIM-CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Centro de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, CIBER-BBN, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain); Gonzalez-Carrasco, J.L., E-mail: jlg@cenim.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CENIM-CSIC, 28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Centro de Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, CIBER-BBN, Instituto de Salud Carlos III (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    This research addresses the determination of residual stresses in sandblasted austenitic steel by ultramicroindentation techniques using a sharp indenter, of which the sensitivity to residual stress effects is said to be inferior to that of spherical ones. The introduction of an angular correction in the model of Wang et al. which relates variations in the maximum load to the presence of residual stresses is proposed. Similarly, the contribution to the hardness of grain size refinement and work hardening, developed as a consequence of the severe plastic deformation during blasting, is determined in order to avoid overestimation of the residual stresses. Measurements were performed on polished cross sections along a length of several microns, thus obtaining a profile of the residual stresses. Results show good agreement with those obtained by synchrotron radiation on the same specimens, which validates the method and demonstrates that microindentation using sharp indenters may be sensitive to the residual stress effect.

  20. Mechanical and Electrochemical Characterization of Super-Solidus Sintered Austenitic Stainless Steel (316L)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuchamy, A.; Raja Annamalai, A.; Ranka, Rishabh

    2016-08-01

    The present study compares the mechanical and electrochemical behaviour of austenitic (AISI 316L) stainless steel compacted at various pressures (200, 400 and 600 MPa) and conventionally sintered at super-solidus temperature of 1,400°C. The electrochemical behaviour was investigated in 0.1 N H2SO4 solution by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The shrinkage decreased and densification has been increased with increasing pressure. The mechanical and electrochemical behaviour with pressure has been correlated with densification response and microstructure (pore type, volume and morphology). Highest densification ( 92% theoretical) achieved at 600 MPa (compaction pressure) and 1,400°C (sintering temperature) resulted in excellent combination of tensile strength and ductility (456 ± 40 MPa, 25 ± 1.1%), while showing excellent corrosion resistance (0.1 mmpy or 4.7 mpy).

  1. Correlation between locally deformed structure and oxide film properties in austenitic stainless steel irradiated with neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimi, Yasuhiro; Kitsunai, Yuji; Kasahara, Shigeki; Chatani, Kazuhiro; Koshiishi, Masato; Nishiyama, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in high-temperature water for neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels (SSs), the locally deformed structures, the oxide films formed on the deformed areas, and their correlation were investigated. Tensile specimens made of irradiated 316L SSs were strained 0.1%-2% at room temperature or at 563 K, and the surface structures and crystal misorientation among grains were evaluated. The strained specimens were immersed in high-temperature water, and the microstructures of the oxide films on the locally deformed areas were observed. The appearance of visible step structures on the specimens' surface depended on the neutron dose and the applied strain. The surface oxides were observed to be prone to increase in thickness around grain boundaries (GBs) with increasing neutron dose and increasing local strain at the GBs. No penetrative oxidation was observed along GBs or along surface steps.

  2. Active flux tungsten inert gas welding of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Klobčar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the effects of flux assisted tungsten inert gas (A-TIG welding of 4 (10 mm thick austenitic stainless steel EN X5CrNi1810 (AISI 304 in the butt joint. The sample dimensions were 300 ´ 50 mm, and commercially available active flux QuickTIG was used for testing. In the planned study the influence of welding position and weld groove shape was analysed based on the penetration depth. A comparison of microstructure formation, grain size and ferrit number between TIG welding and A-TIG welding was done. The A-TIG welds were subjected to bending test. A comparative study of TIG and A-TIG welding shows that A-TIG welding increases the weld penetration depth.

  3. Effect of Electrode Types on the Solidification Cracking Susceptibility of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. U. Anaele

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of electrode types on the solidification cracking susceptibility of austenitic stainless steel weld metal was studied. Manual metal arc welding method was used to produce the joints with the tungsten inert gas welding serving as the control. Metallographic and chemical analyses of the fusion zones of the joints were conducted. Results indicate that weldments produced from E 308-16 (rutile coated, E 308-16(lime-titania coated electrodes, and TIG welded joints fall within the range of 1.5≤Creq./Nieq.≤1.9 and solidified with a duplex mode and were found to be resistant to solidification cracking. The E 308-16 weld metal had the greatest resistance to solidification cracking. Joints produced from E 310-16 had Creq./Nieq. ratio 1.9 and solidified with ferrite mode. It had a low resistance to solidification cracking.

  4. Relative merits of duplex and austenitic stainless steels for applications in the oil and gas industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Elisabeth; Wegrelius, Lena; Pettersson, Rachel [Outokumpu Stainless AB, Avesta (Sweden)

    2012-07-01

    The broad range of available stainless steel grades means that these materials can fulfil a wide variety of requirements within the oil and gas industry. The duplex grades have the advantage of higher strength than standard austenitic grades, while the superaustenitic grades provide a cost-effective alternative to nickel-base alloys in a number of cases. The paper presents the results of various types of laboratory testing to rank the grades in terms of resistance to pitting, crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Results from field testing in actual or simulated service conditions are discussed and a number of application examples, including process piping flexible, heat exchangers and topside equipment are presented. (author)

  5. Formation of laves phase in a refractory austenitic steel due to long-term heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, L. V.; Shal'kevich, A. B.

    2011-07-01

    Steels of the Fe - Cr - Ni -Mo - Nb - Al - C system are studied by methods of phase physicochemical analysis and electron microscopy with the aim to determine the causes of changes in mechanical properties after long-term heating at a temperature of 600 - 700°C. Grain-boundary formation of particles of a Laves phase is shown to cause decrease in the impact toughness and transformation of particles of γ'-phase under conditions of creep. The effect of alloying elements on the chemical composition of the multicomponent Laves phase is studied depending on the temperatures of hardening, aging, and subsequent heating. Concentration correspondence between the chemical composition of the austenite and the intermetallic tcp phase formed in aging is discovered. A computational scheme for predicting the possibility of formation of Laves phases in multicomponent alloys is suggested.

  6. Ultrasonic inspectability of austenitic stainless steel and dissimilar metal weld joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudovikov, S.; Bulavinov, A.; Kroening, M. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Zerstoerungsfreie Pruefverfahren IZFP, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Since their invention in 1912, austenitic stainless steel materials are widely used in a variety of industry sectors. In particular, austenitic stainless steel material is qualified to meet the design criteria of high quality, safety related applications, for example, the primary loop of the most of the nuclear power plants in the world, due to high durability and corrosion resistance. Certain operating conditions may cause a range of changes in the integrity of the component, and therefore require nondestructive testing at reasonable intervals. These in-service inspections are often performed using ultrasonic techniques, in particular when cracking is of specific concern. However, the coarse, dendritic grain structure of the weld material, formed during the welding process, is extreme and unpredictably anisotropic. Such structure is no longer direction-independent to the ultrasonic wave propagation; therefore, the ultrasonic beam deflects and redirects and the wave front becomes distorted. Thus, the use of conventional ultrasonic testing techniques using fixed beam angles is very limited and the application of ultrasonic Phased Array techniques becomes desirable. The ''Sampling Phased Array'' technique, invented and developed by Fraunhofer IZFP, allows the acquisition of time signals (A-scans) for each individual transducer element of the array along with image reconstruction techniques using ''SynFoc'' algorithms. The reconstruction considers the sound propagation from each image pixel to the individual sensor element. For anisotropic media, where the sound beam is deflected and the sound path is not known a-priory, we implement a new phase adjustment called ''Reverse Phase Matching'' technique. This algorithm permits the acquisition of phase-corrected A-scans that represent the actual sound propagation in the anisotropic structure; this technique can be utilized for image reconstruction. (orig.)

  7. Investigation of corrosion of welded joints of austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolska, S.

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of corrosion resistance of materials is one of the most important tests that allow determining their functional properties. Among these tests the special group consist electrochemical investigations, which let to accelerate the course of the process. These investigations allow rapidly estimating corrosion processes occurring in metal elements under the influence of the analysed environment. In the paper are presented results of investigations of the resistance to pitting corrosion of the steel of next grades: austenitic 316L and duplex 2205. It was also analysed the corrosion resistance of welded joints of these grades of steel. The investigations were conducted in two different corrosion environments: in the neutral one (3.5 % sodium chloride) and in the aggressive one (0.1 M sulphuric acid VI). The obtained results indicate different resistance of analysed grades of steel and their welded joints in relation to the corrosion environment. The austenitic 316L steel characterizes by the higher resistance to the pitting corrosion in the aggressive environment then the duplex 2205 steel. In the paper are presented results of potentiodynamic tests. They showed that all the specimens are less resistant to pitting corrosion in the environment of sulphuric acid (VI) than in the sodium chloride one. The 2205 steel has higher corrosion resistance than the 316L stainless steel in 3.5% NaCl. On the other hand, in 0.1 M H2SO4, the 316L steel has a higher corrosion resistance than the 2205 one. The weld has a similar, very good resistance to pitting corrosion like both steels.

  8. Metallurgical Source of Cryogenic Intergranular Fracture of Fe-38Mn Austenitic Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    SEM and Field emitting TEM-EDAX were used to investigate the fracture surface of series impact specimens and the grain boundary chemistries of VIM (vacuum-induction-melted) Fe-38Mn austenitic alloy before and after ESR (electroslag remelting,). The quantity and the size of inclusions were also examined. The results show that the VIM Fe-38Mn aust enitinic alloy water-quenched from 1 100 ℃ undergoes an obvious ductile-to-brittle transition, and the impact work at ambient temperature is 242 J, the corresponding fracture surface exhibits adimple character. However, the impact work at 77 K of VIM alloy is only 25 J and the fracture mode is IGF (intergranular f racture). After ESR, the impact work at ambient temperature is 320 J and the fra cture surface exhibits a character of "volcano lava" (meaning excellent toughn ess); The impact work at 77 K is up to 300 J and the fracture mode is microvoid coalescence mixed with quasi-cleavage. The segregation of Mn is not found in all specimens, but the segregation of S is observed, and the S segregation is decreased after ESR. The examined results of inclusions show that ESR reduces the quantity and improves the morphology of inclusions. From the above results it can be seen that the cryogenic IGF of VIM Fe-38Mn austenitic alloy is related to the S segregation at grain boundary. After ESR the decrease in the quantity and size of inclusion results in the increase of the impact work at ambient temperature, while the restriction of IGF is related to the decrease in the total level, and hence in the grain boundary segregation of S.

  9. The Impact of Retained Austenite Characteristics on the Two-Body Abrasive Wear Behavior of Ultrahigh Strength Bainitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, Balaji; Hodgson, Peter; Timokhina, Ilana; Beladi, Hossein

    2016-10-01

    In the current study, a high-carbon, high-alloy steel (0.79 pct C, 1.5 pct Si, 1.98 pct Mn, 0.98 pct Cr, 0.24 pct Mo, 1.06 pct Al, and 1.58 pct Co in wt pct) was subjected to an isothermal bainitic transformation at a temperature range of 473 K to 623 K (200 °C to 350 °C), resulting in different fully bainitic microstructures consisting of bainitic ferrite and retained austenite. With a decrease in the transformation temperature, the microstructure was significantly refined from ~300 nm at 623 K (350 °C) to less than 60 nm at 473 K (200 °C), forming nanostructured bainitic microstructure. In addition, the morphology of retained austenite was progressively altered from film + blocky to an exclusive film morphology with a decrease in the temperature. This resulted in an enhanced wear resistance in nanobainitic microstructures formed at low transformation temperature, e.g., 473 K (200 °C). Meanwhile, it gradually deteriorated with an increase in the phase transformation temperature. This was mostly attributed to the retained austenite characteristics ( i.e., thin film vs blocky), which significantly altered their mechanical stability. The presence of blocky retained austenite at high transformation temperature, e.g., 623 K (350 °C) resulted in an early onset of TRIPing phenomenon during abrasion. This led to the formation of coarse martensite with irregular morphology, which is more vulnerable to crack initiation and propagation than that of martensite formed from the thin film austenite, e.g., 473 K (200 °C). This resulted in a pronounced material loss for the fully bainitic microstructures transformed at high temperature, e.g., 623 K (350 °C), leading to distinct sub-surface layer and friction coefficient curve characteristics. A comparison of the abrasive behavior of the fully bainitic microstructure formed at 623 K (350 °C) and fully pearlitic microstructure demonstrated a detrimental effect of blocky retained austenite with low mechanical stability on

  10. Protective coating of austenitic steel using robotized GMAW temper-bead technique; Rechargement d'inox austenitique en MAG temperbead robotise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpreau, J.M. [Electricite de France (EDF/R and D), Recherche et Developpement, 92 - Chatou (France); Dainelli, P. [Institut de Soudure, 57 - Yutz (France)

    2009-07-15

    This paper summarises experimental results obtained in a study of GMAW temper-bead on low alloyed steel with austenitic consumables. Temper-bead on low alloyed steel with austenitic consumables is mainly used for repairing operations of heavy components such as vessel reactor of nuclear power plants. Experimental work aims at showing the performance of GMAW compared to GTAW and the consequences of GMAW temper-bead on 2OMND5 heat affected zones. (authors)

  11. Characterization of the structural details of residual austenite in the weld metal of a 9Cr1MoNbV welded rotor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Liu; Hui-jun Ji; Peng Liu; Peng Wang; Feng-gui Lu; Yu-lai Gao

    2014-01-01

    The existence of residual austenite in weld metal plays an important role in determining the properties and dimensional accuracy of welded rotors. An effective corrosive agent and the metallographic etching process were developed to clearly reveal the characteristics of residual austenite in the weld metal of a 9Cr1MoNbV welded rotor. Moreover, the details of the distribution, shape, length, length-to-width ratio, and the content of residual austenite were systematically characterized using the Image-Pro Plus image analysis software. The results revealed that the area fraction of residual austenite was approximately 6.3% in the observed weld seam; the average area, length, and length-to-width ratio of dispersed residual austenite were quantitatively evaluated to be (5.5 ± 0.1)μm2, (5.0 ± 0.1)μm, and (2.2 ± 0.1), re-spectively. The newly developed corrosive agent and etching method offer an appropriate approach to characterize residual austenite in the weld metal of welded rotors in detail.

  12. Analysis of phase transformation from austenite to martensite in NiTi alloy strips under uniaxial tension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Phase transformation from austenite to martensite in NiTi alloy strips under the uniaxial tension has been observed in experiments and numerically simulated as a localized deformation. This work presents an analysis using the theory of phase transformation. The jump of deformation gradient across the interface between two phases and the Maxwell relation are considered. Governing equations for the phase transformation are derived. The analysis is reduced to finding the minimum value of the loading at which the governing equations have a unique, real and physically acceptable solution. The equations are solved numerically and it is verified that the unique solution exists definitely.The Maxwell stress, the stresses and strains inside both austenite and martensite phases,and the transformation-front orientation angle are determined to be in reasonably good agreement with experimental observations.

  13. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part II. Fatigue crack growth rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolin, B.; Minkin, A.; Smirnov, V.; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Potapova, V.

    2016-11-01

    The experimental data on the fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) have been obtained for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various radiation swelling. The performed study of the fracture mechanisms for cracked specimens under cyclic loading has explained why radiation swelling affects weakly FCGR unlike its effect on fracture toughness. Mechanical modeling of fatigue crack growth has been carried out and the dependencies for prediction of FCGR in irradiated austenitic steel with and with no swelling are proposed and verified with the obtained experimental results. As input data for these dependencies, FCGR for unirradiated steel and the tensile mechanical properties for unirradiated and irradiated steels are used.

  14. Effect of copper on the formation of strain-induced martensite in two austenitic stainless steels AISI 304

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilapa, Leonidas Cayo Mamani, E-mail: leonidas@ifsc.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Santa Catarina, Rua Pavão, 1337, Bairro Costa e Silva, Joinville, SC CEP 89220-200 (Brazil); Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Silva de, E-mail: carlos.a@ufsc.br [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário Reitor João David Ferreira Lima, Trindade, Florianópolis, SC CEP 88040-970 (Brazil); Silva, Manoel Ribeiro da, E-mail: mrsilva@unifei.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Instituto de Ciências, Itajubá (Brazil)

    2015-01-12

    The transformation of strain-induced martensite in two metastable austenitic stainless steels, AISI 304, with the same basic composition and concentrations of Cu variables was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and magnetic measurements. The deformations to induce the formation of martensite were performed using the test of conformability with Nakajima tooling at room temperature. The results obtained for the various samples showed that the steel with lower content of Cu presented higher degree of magnetization. Also it was observed that the martensite magnetic α′ and paramagnetic ε are formed at the intersection of dislocation, in the grain boundary, inside and at the edge of twinned and the stacking faults in the austenite.

  15. A review of irradiation effects on LWR core internal materials - IASCC susceptibility and crack growth rates of austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, O. K.; Rao, A. S.

    2011-02-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels because of their relatively high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to neutron irradiation for extended periods changes the microstructure (radiation hardening) and microchemistry (radiation-induced segregation) of these steels, and degrades their fracture properties. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is another degradation process that affects LWR internal components exposed to neutron radiation. The existing data on irradiated austenitic SSs were reviewed to evaluate the effects of key parameters such as material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry on IASCC susceptibility and crack growth rates of these materials in LWR environments. The significance of microstructural and microchemistry changes in the material on IASCC susceptibility is also discussed. The results are used to determine (a) the threshold fluence for IASCC and (b) the disposition curves for cyclic and IASCC growth rates for irradiated SSs in LWR environments.

  16. OPTIMIZATION OF SURFACE ROUGHNESS AND TOOL FLANK WEAR IN TURNING OF AISI 304 AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL WITH CVD COATED TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. KALADHAR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel is a popularly used grade in the various fields of manufacturing because of its high ductility, high durability and excellent corrosion resistance. High work hardening, low heat conductivity and high built up edge (BUE formation made this as difficult-to- machine material. Poor surface quality and rapid tool wear are the common problems encountered while machining it. In the present work, an attempt has been made to explore the influence of machining parameters on the performance measures, surface roughness and flank wear in turning of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel with a two layer Chemical vapour deposition(CVD coated tool. In order to achieve this, Taguchi approach has been employed. The results revealed that the cutting speed most significantly, influences both surface roughness and flank wear. In addition to this the optimal setting of process parameters and optimal ranges of performance measures are predicted.

  17. Narrow gap TIG and electron beam weld inspection in austenitic stainless steel using pulse echo, TOFD and phased array ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirk, K.P.; Turner, J.L. [Phoenix Inspection Systems Limited, Warrington (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    'Full-text:' Narrow gap Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and Electron Beam (EB) welding techniques are being considered for the splice joint welds on the austenitic stainless steel Vacuum Vessel in the next generation of experimental Fusion Power stations under the ITER programme. Under the programme there is a requirement to develop automated ultrasonic NDT techniques to inspect material up to 60 mm thick in both weld types. These narrow welds are difficult to inspect because of the steep fusion faces made more difficult in this project by the beam scattering effects of austenitic stainless steel welds and the very limited access from only one side of the vessel. The paper details the development of the combined Pulse Echo, TOFD and Phased Array techniques on behalf of ITER. The authors describe the philosophy behind the inspections, results and possible transfer of the technology to other sectors of industry. (author)

  18. Effect of zirconium addition on the austenite grain coarsening behavior and mechanical properties of 900 Mpa low carbon bainite steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The ultra-free bainitic microstructure of a 900 MPa low carbon bainitic Cu-Ni-Mo-B steel was obtained by a newly developed relaxation precipitation control (RPC) phase transformation processing.In a pan-cake like prior-anstenite grain,the microstructure consisted of lath bainite,a little of abnormal granular bainite,and acicular ferrite.The effect of zirconium carbonitrides on the austenite grain coarsening behavior was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).The results show that,the lath is narrower with increasing cooling rate.The ratio of all kinds of bainitic microstructure is proper with the intermediate cooling rate;and Zr-containing precipitates distribute uniformly,which restrains austenite grain growing in heat-affected welding zone.

  19. Effects of Thermocapillary Forces during Welding of 316L-Type Wrought, Cast and Powder Metallurgy Austenitic Stainless Steels

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is now under construction at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). This 27 km long accelerator requires 1248 superconducting dipole magnets operating at 1.9 K. The cold mass of the dipole magnets is closed by a shrinking cylinder with two longitudinal welds and two end covers at both extremities of the cylinder. The end covers, for which fabrication by welding, casting or Powder Metallurgy (PM) was considered, are dished-heads equipped with a number of protruding nozzles for the passage of the different cryogenic lines. Structural materials and welds must retain high strength and toughness at cryogenic temperature. AISI 316L-type austenitic stainless steel grades have been selected because of their mechanical properties, ductility, weldability and stability of the austenitic phase against low-temperature spontaneous martensitic transformation. 316LN is chosen for the fabrication of the end covers, while the interconnection components to be welded on the protrud...

  20. Orientation dependence of variant selection and intersection reactions of ɛ martensite in a high-manganese austenitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Sawaguchi, T.; Ogawa, K.; Yin, F.; Zhao, X.

    2011-09-01

    The orientation dependence of ɛ martensite during loading of a polycrystalline austenitic Fe-30Mn-4Si-2Al steel has been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction, emphasising the variant selection rule and plate-plate intersection reactions. Two types of plate-plate intersection reactions, which are characterised by incident shear direction of either 30° or 90° with respect to the intersection axis, were found in the grains along the [001]-[111] directions and [001]-[101] directions, respectively. In the intersecting volume of the latter type reaction, a γ phase rotated 90° from the austenite matrix along the ⟨011⟩ zone axis of the intersecting ɛ plates, which was theoretically predicted by Sleeswyk [A.W. Sleeswyk, Philos. Mag. 7 (1962) p.1597], has been experimentally observed for the first time.

  1. Replacement of Ni by Mn in High-Ni-Containing Austenitic Cast Steels used for Turbo-Charger Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seungmun; Jo, Yong Hee; Jeon, Changwoo; Choi, Won-Mi; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Oh, Yong-Jun; Kim, Gi-Yong; Jang, Seongsik; Lee, Sunghak

    2017-02-01

    High-temperature tensile properties of austenitic cast steels fabricated by replacing Ni by Mn in a 20 wt pct Ni-containing steel were investigated. In a steel where 8 wt pct Ni was replaced by 9.2 wt pct of Mn, 17.4 and 9.8 pct of ferrite existed in equilibrium phase diagrams and actual microstructures, respectively, because a role of Mn as an austenite stabilizer decreased, and led to deterioration of high-temperature properties. When 2 to 6 wt pct Ni was replaced by 2.3 to 6.9 wt pct Mn, high-temperature properties were comparable to those of the 20 wt pct Ni-containing steel because ferrites were absent, which indicated the successful replacement of 6 wt pct Ni by Mn, with cost reduction of 27 pct.

  2. Analysis of Magnetism in High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel and Its Elimination by High Temperature Gas Nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Wan; Yibin Ren; Bingchun Zhang; Ke Yang

    2011-01-01

    Stable austenitic structure in medical stainless steels is basically required for surgical implantation. A weak magnetism was found in a high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel for cardiovascular stent application. This magnetic behavior in high nitrogen stainless steel was investigated by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The results showed that the magnetism came from the composition segregation of ferrite formation elements such as Cr and Mo in the steel and some δ-ferrites were locally formed during the pressurized electroslag remelting process. The magnetism of high nitrogen stainless steel could be eliminated by a proper high temperature gas nitriding (HTGN).

  3. Effect of austenitization heat treatment on the magnetic properties of Fe-40wt% Ni-2wt% Mn alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Buyukakkas; H. Aktas; S. Akturk

    2007-01-01

    The effect of austenitization heat treatment on magnetic properties was examined by means of M(o)ssbauer spectroscopy on an Fe-40wt%Ni-2wt%Mn alloy. The morphology of the alloy was obtained by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) under different heat treatment conditions. The magnetic behavior of the non heat-treated alloy is ferromagnetic. A mixed magnetic structure including both paramagnetic and ferromagnetic states was obtained at 800℃ after 6 and 12 h heat treatments. In addition, the magnetic structure of the heat-treated alloy at 1150℃ for 12 h was ferromagnetic. With the volume fraction changing, the effective hyperfine field of the ferromagnetic austenite phase and isomery shift values were also determined by M(o)ssbauer spectroscopy.

  4. Multi-scale modeling of the impact response of a strain-rate sensitive high-manganese austenitic steel

    OpenAIRE

    Canadinç, Demircan; Önal, Orkun; Özmenci, Cemre

    2014-01-01

    A multi-scale modeling approach was applied to predict the impact response of a strain rate sensitive high-manganese austenitic steel. The roles of texture, geometry, and strain rate sensitivity were successfully taken into account all at once by coupling crystal plasticity and finite element (FE) analysis. Specifically, crystal plasticity was utilized to obtain the multi-axial flow rule at different strain rates based on the experimental deformation response under uniaxial ten...

  5. Microstructure in the Weld Metal of Austenitic-Pearlitic Dissimilar Steels and Diffusion of Element in the Fusion Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Microstructure and alloy element distribution in the welded joint between austenitic stainless steel(1Cr18Ni9Ti)and pearlitic heat-resistant steel (1Cr5Mo)were researched by means of light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy(SEM)and electron probe microanalysis(EPMA).Microstructure, divisions of the fusion zone and elemental diffusion distributions in the welded joints were investigated. Furthermore, solidification microstructure and δ-ferrite distribution in the weld metal of these steels are also discussed.

  6. Effect of Heat Treatment on Residual Stresses in the Zone of Fusion of Austenitic and Vessel Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlybov, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the structure and physical and mechanical properties of flat specimens cut from a massive billet from steel 15Kh2MFA with an austenitic facing on one side is studied. The hardness and the microhardness of the specimens are determined. Acoustic and x-ray studies are performed. The causes of residual stresses giving rise to deformation and formation of cracks in the faced steel are established. Ways to solve the problem are suggested.

  7. The Features of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Metastable Austenitic Steel Subjected to Low-Temperature and Subsequent Warm Deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litovchenko, I. Yu.; Akkuzin, S. A.; Polekhina, N. A.; Tyumentsev, A. N.; Naiden, E. P.

    2016-10-01

    The features of microstructure and phase composition of metastable austenitic steel subjected to thermomechanical treatment, including low-temperature processing accompanied by warm rolling deformation, are investigated. Direct (γ → α΄) and reverse strain-induced martensitic transformations are shown to take place, followed by the formation of submicrocrystalline states and 3-4-fold increase in the yield point values. The mechanisms of formation of submicrocrystalline states and the reasons for increased strength are discussed.

  8. The Strain-Hardening Behavior of Partially Austenitized and the Austempered Ductile Irons with Dual Matrix Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicli, Volkan; Erdogan, Mehmet

    2008-04-01

    In the current study, an unalloyed ductile iron containing 3.50 C wt.%, 2.63 Si wt.%, 0.318 Mn wt.%, and 0.047 Mg wt.% was intercritically austenitized (partially austenitized) in two-phase regions (α + γ) at different temperatures for 20 min and then was quenched into salt bath held at austempering temperature of 365 °C for various times to obtain different ausferrite plus proeutectoid ferrite volume fractions. Fine and coarse dual matrix structures (DMS) were obtained from two different starting conditions. Some specimens were also conventionally austempered from 900 °C for comparison. The results showed that a structure having proeutectoid ferrite plus ausferrite (bainitic ferrite + high-carbon austenite (retained or stabilized austenite)) has been developed. Both of the specimens with ˜75% ausferrite volume fraction (coarse structure) and the specimen with ˜82% ausferrite volume fraction (fine structure) exhibited the best combination of high strength and ductility compared to the pearlitic grades, but their ductility is slightly lower than the ferritic grades. These materials also satisfy the requirements for the strength of the quenched and tempered grades and their ductility is superior to this grade. The correlation between the strain-hardening rates of the various austempered ductile iron (ADI) with DMS and conventionally heat-treated ADI microstructures as a function of strain was conducted by inspection of the respective tensile curves. For this purpose, the Crussard-Jaoul (C-J) analysis was employed. The test results also indicate that strain-hardening behavior of ADI with dual matrix is influenced by the variations in the volume fractions of the phases, and their morphologies, the degree of ausferrite connectivity and the interaction intensities between the carbon atoms and the dislocations in the matrix. The ADI with DMS generally exhibited low strain-hardening rates compared to the conventionally ADI.

  9. Carburization of austenitic and ferritic alloys in hydrocarbon environments at high temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serna, A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The technical and industrial aspects of high temperature corrosion of materials exposed to a variety of aggressive environments have significant importance. These environments include combustion product gases and hydrocarbon gases with low oxygen potentials and high carbon potentials. In the refinery and petrochemical industries, austenitic and ferritic alloys are usually used for tubes in fired furnaces. The temperature range for exposure of austenitic alloys is 800-1100 °C, and for ferritic alloys 500-700 °C, with carbon activities ac > 1 in many cases. In both applications, the carburization process involves carbon (coke deposition on the inner diameter, carbon absorption at the metal surface, diffusion of carbon inside the alloy, and precipitation and transformation of carbides to a depth increasing with service. The overall kinetics of the internal carburization are approximately parabolic, controlled by carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation. Ferritic alloys exhibit gross but uniform carburization while non-uniform intragranular and grain-boundary carburization is observed in austenitic alloys.

    La corrosión a alta temperatura, tal como la carburación de materiales expuestos a una amplia variedad de ambientes agresivos, tiene especial importancia desde el punto de vista técnico e industrial. Estos ambientes incluyen productos de combustión, gases e hidrocarburos con bajo potencial de oxígeno y alto potencial de carbono. En las industrias de refinación y petroquímica, las aleaciones austeníticas y ferríticas se utilizan en tuberías de hornos. El rango de temperatura de exposición para aleaciones austeníticas está entre 800-1.100°C y para aleaciones ferríticas está entre 500-700°C, con actividades de carbono ac>1 en algunos casos. En tuberías con ambas aleaciones, el proceso de carburación incluye deposición de carbón (coque en el diámetro interno, absorción de carbono en la superficie

  10. Effect of alloying elements on branching of primary austenite dendrites in Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janus

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the research, determined were direction and intensity of influence of individual alloying elements on branching degree of primary austenite dendrites in austenitic cast iron Ni-Mn-Cu. 30 cast shafts dia. 20 mm were analysed. Chemical composition of the alloywas as follows: 2.0 to 3.3 % C, 1.4 to 3.1 % Si, 2.8 to 9.5 % Ni, 0.4 to 7.7 % Mn, 0 to 4.6 % Cu, 0.14 to 0.16 % P and 0.03 to 0.04 % S.Analysis was performed separately for the dendrites solidifying in directional and volumetric way. The average distance "x" between the2nd order arms was accepted as the criterion of branching degree. It was found that influence of C, Si, Ni, Mn and Cu on the parameter "x"is statistically significant. Intensity of carbon influence is decidedly higher than that of other elements, and the influence is more intensive in the directionally solidifying dendrites. However, in the case of the alloyed cast iron Ni-Mn-Cu, combined influence of the alloying elements on solidification course of primary austenite can be significant.

  11. Effect of Prior Austenite Grain Size Refinement by Thermal Cycling on the Microstructural Features of As-Quenched Lath Martensite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Javier; Santofimia, Maria Jesus

    2016-11-01

    Current trends in steels are focusing on refined martensitic microstructures to obtain high strength and toughness. An interesting manner to reduce the size of martensitic substructure is by reducing the size of the prior austenite grain (PAG). This work analyzes the effect of PAGS refinement by thermal cycling on different microstructural features of as-quenched lath martensite in a 0.3C-1.6Si-3.5Mn (wt pct) steel. The application of thermal cycling is found to lead to a refinement of the martensitic microstructures and to an increase of the density of high misorientation angle boundaries after quenching; these are commonly discussed to be key structural parameters affecting strength. Moreover, results show that as the PAGS is reduced, the volume fraction of retained austenite increases, carbides are refined and the concentration of carbon in solid solution as well as the dislocation density in martensite increase. All these microstructural modifications are related with the manner in which martensite forms from different prior austenite conditions, influenced by the PAGS.

  12. Stability of retained austenite in high carbon steel under compressive stress: an investigation from macro to nano scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, R.; Pahlevani, F.; Quadir, M. Z.; Sahajwalla, V.

    2016-10-01

    Although high carbon martensitic steels are well known for their industrial utility in high abrasion and extreme operating environments, due to their hardness and strength, the compressive stability of their retained austenite, and the implications for the steels’ performance and potential uses, is not well understood. This article describes the first investigation at both the macro and nano scale of the compressive stability of retained austenite in high carbon martensitic steel. Using a combination of standard compression testing, X-ray diffraction, optical microstructure, electron backscattering diffraction imaging, electron probe micro-analysis, nano-indentation and micro-indentation measurements, we determined the mechanical stability of retained austenite and martensite in high carbon steel under compressive stress and identified the phase transformation mechanism, from the macro to the nano level. We found at the early stage of plastic deformation hexagonal close-packed (HCP) martensite formation dominates, while higher compression loads trigger body-centred tetragonal (BCT) martensite formation. The combination of this phase transformation and strain hardening led to an increase in the hardness of high carbon steel of around 30%. This comprehensive characterisation of stress induced phase transformation could enable the precise control of the microstructures of high carbon martensitic steels, and hence their properties.

  13. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Dissimilar Friction Stir Weld between Austenitic Stainless Steel and Low Carbon Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Jafarzadegan; A.Abdollah-zadeh; A.H.Feng; T.Saeid; J.Shen; H.Assadi

    2013-01-01

    Dissimilar fusion welding of austenitic stainless steels to carbon steels has some metallurgical and technical problems.It was suggested that the solid-state nature of friction stir welding (FSW) can overcome these problems and produce a sound weld with reliable mechanical properties.In this study,plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by FSW at tool rotational speed of 600 r/min and welding speed of 50 mm/min.In the stir zone (SZ) of 304 stainless steel,the results showed a refined grain structure with some features of metadynamic recrystallization.In the SZ of st37 steel,the hot deformation of material in the austenite region produced small austenite grains.These grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite by cooling the material after FSW.The production of fine grains increased the hardness and tensile strength in the SZ of both sides with respect to their base metals (BMs).

  14. Determination of the orientation relationship between austenite and incommensurate 7M modulated martensite in Ni-Mn-Ga alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z.B. [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Zhang, Y.D. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures et de Mecanique des Materiaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, Universite Paul Verlaine - Metz, 57045 Metz (France); Esling, C., E-mail: claude.esling@univ-metz.fr [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures et de Mecanique des Materiaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, Universite Paul Verlaine - Metz, 57045 Metz (France); Zhao, X. [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Zuo, L., E-mail: lzuo@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2011-04-15

    For Ni-Mn-Ga ferromagnetic shape memory alloys, a large magnetic-field-induced strain could be reached through the reorientation of martensitic variants in the martensite state. Owing to the collective and displacive nature of the austenite to martensite transformation, a certain orientation relationship (OR) between the parent and the product phase is required to minimize the transformation strain and the strain energy generated, which brings about self-accommodating groups of martensitic variants with specific orientation correlations. In this work, the microstructural and crystallographic characteristics of martensitic variants in a polycrystalline Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 30}Ga{sub 20} alloy were investigated by electron backscatter diffraction analysis. With accurate orientation measurement on inherited martensitic variants, the local orientations of parent austenite grains were predicted using four classical OR for the martensitic transformation. Furthermore, a specific OR, namely the Pitsch relation with (1 0 1){sub A}//(1 2-bar 10-bar){sub 7M} and [1 0 1-bar]{sub A}//[10-bar 10-bar 1]{sub 7M}, was unambiguously determined by considering the magnitude of discontinuity between the lattices of the product and parent phases and the structural modulation of the incommensurate 7M modulated martensite. The present procedure to determine the OR, without recourse to the presence of retained austenite, is in general applicable to a variety of materials with modulated superstructure for insight into their martensitic transformation processes.

  15. Evaluation of Tensile Property of Austenitic Alloys Exposed to High-Temperature S-CO{sub 2} Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyunmyung; Lee, Ho Jung; Jang, Changheui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Super-critical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle has been considered to replace the current steam Rankine cycle in Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) in order to improve the inherent safety and thermal efficiency. Several austenitic alloys are considered as the structural materials for high temperature S-CO{sub 2} environment. Microstructural change after long-term exposure to high temperature S-CO{sub 2} environment could affect to the mechanical properties. In this study, candidate materials (austenitic stainless steels and Alloy 800HT) were exposed to S-CO{sub 2} to assess oxidation resistance and the change in tensile properties. Loss of ductility was observed for some austenitic stainless steels even after 250 h exposure. The contribution of S-CO{sub 2} environment on such changes was analyzed based on the characterization of the surface oxide and carburization of the materials in which 316H and 800H showed different oxidation behaviors.

  16. Analysis Of The Austenite Grain Growth In Low-Alloy Boron Steel With High Resistance To Abrasive Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Białobrzeska B.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Today low-alloy steels with boron achieve high resistance to abrasive wear and high strength. These features are obtained by using advanced technology of manufacturing. This makes boron steels increasingly popular and their application more diverse. Application of these steels can extend the lifetime of very expensive machine construction in many industries such as mining, the automotive, and agriculture industries. An interesting subgroup of these materials is steel with boron intended for heat treatment. These steels are supplied by the manufacturer after cold or hot rolling so that it is possible for them to be heat treated in a suitable manner by the purchaser for its specific application. Very important factor that determines the mechanical properties of final product is austenite grain growth occurring during hot working process such us quenching or hot rolling. Investigation of the effect of heating temperature and holding time on the austenite grain size is necessary to understand the growth behavior under different conditions. This article presents the result of investigation of austenite grain growth in selected low-allow boron steel with high resistance to abrasive wear and attempts to describe the influence of chemical composition on this process.

  17. Mechanical and tribological properties of high-nitrogen austenitic steels; Mechanische und tribologische Eigenschaften von hochstickstoffhaltigen Austeniten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, A.; Weiss, S. [Universitaet Duisburg Essen, Institut fuer Produkt Engineering, Werkstofftechnik, Lotharstr. 1, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Tikhovskiy, I. [MPI fuer Eisenforschung, Duesseldorf (Germany); Buescher, R. [Stryker Osteosynthesis GmbH, Schoenkirche, Universtaet Duisburg-Essen (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    Austenitic stainless steels provide a fair combination of strength, toughness and corrosion resistance. Undergoing tribological stresses - in particular under self-mating contact situations - their performance is not sufficient. Thus the more wear resistant austenitic Co-base alloys with different carbon contents are applied under these circumstances, which may prevail in medical applications. Austenitic high-Nitrogen Steels might be an alternative under these circumstances. Strength, corrosion resistance and tribologcial properties are similar to those of CoCrMo-alloys, while their toughness is higher. This contribution presents the metallurgical mechanisms, which bring about this combination of properties. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Austenitische rostfreie Staehle zeichnen sich durch eine guenstige Kombination von Festigkeit, Zaehigkeit und Korrosionsbestaendigkeit aus. Dagegen sind sie unter tribologischen Belastungen insbesondere im artgleichen Kontakt nicht verschleissbestaendig. Unter diesen Randbedingungen, die vielfach in der Medizintechnik vorliegen, werden daher die verschleissbestaendigeren aber ebenfalls austenitischen Co-Basislegierungen mit unterschiedlichen Kohlenstoffgehalten eingesetzt. Hochstickstoffhaltige austenitische Staehle koennen hier als eine weitere Moeglichkeit angesehen werden. Ihre Festigkeit, Korrosions- und Verschleissbestaendigkeit sind denen der Co-Basislegierungen vergleichbar, wobei die Zaehigkeit aber deutlich hoeher ist. In dem Beitrag werden die metallkundlichen Mechanismen vorgestellt, die zu dieser Kombination von Eigenschaften fuehren. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Stability of retained austenite in high carbon steel under compressive stress: an investigation from macro to nano scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, R; Pahlevani, F; Quadir, M Z; Sahajwalla, V

    2016-10-11

    Although high carbon martensitic steels are well known for their industrial utility in high abrasion and extreme operating environments, due to their hardness and strength, the compressive stability of their retained austenite, and the implications for the steels' performance and potential uses, is not well understood. This article describes the first investigation at both the macro and nano scale of the compressive stability of retained austenite in high carbon martensitic steel. Using a combination of standard compression testing, X-ray diffraction, optical microstructure, electron backscattering diffraction imaging, electron probe micro-analysis, nano-indentation and micro-indentation measurements, we determined the mechanical stability of retained austenite and martensite in high carbon steel under compressive stress and identified the phase transformation mechanism, from the macro to the nano level. We found at the early stage of plastic deformation hexagonal close-packed (HCP) martensite formation dominates, while higher compression loads trigger body-centred tetragonal (BCT) martensite formation. The combination of this phase transformation and strain hardening led to an increase in the hardness of high carbon steel of around 30%. This comprehensive characterisation of stress induced phase transformation could enable the precise control of the microstructures of high carbon martensitic steels, and hence their properties.

  19. Microstructural Variations Across a Dissimilar 316L Austenitic: 9Cr Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel Weld Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Karthikeyan, T.; Dasgupta, Arup; Sudha, C.; Hajra, R. N.; Albert, S. K.; Saroja, S.; Jayakumar, T.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discuss the microstructural variations across a dissimilar weld joint between SS316 and 9Cr-RAFM steel and its modifications on post weld heat treatments (PWHT). Detailed characterization showed a mixed microstructure of austenite and martensite in the weld which is in agreement with the phases predicted using Schaeffler diagram based on composition measurements. The presence of very low volume fraction of δ-ferrite in SS316L has been identified employing state of the art electron back-scattered diffraction technique. PWHT of the ferritic steel did not reduce the hardness in the weld metal. Thermal exposure at 973 K (700 °C) showed a progressive reduction in hardness of weld joint with duration of treatment except in austenitic base metal. However, diffusion annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) for 100 hours resulted in an unexpected increase in hardness of weld metal, which is a manifestation of the dilution effects and enrichment of Ni on the transformation characteristics of the weld zone. Migration of carbon from ferritic steel aided the precipitation of fine carbides in the austenitic base metal on annealing at 973 K (700 °C); but enhanced diffusion at 1073 K (880 °C) resulted in coarsening of carbides and thereby reduction of hardness.

  20. Biocompatibility studies of low temperature nitrided and collagen-I coated AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinesi, M; Stio, M; Treves, C; Borgioli, F

    2013-06-01

    The biocompatibility of austenitic stainless steels can be improved by means of surface engineering techniques. In the present research it was investigated if low temperature nitrided AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel may be a suitable substrate for bioactive protein coating consisting of collagen-I. The biocompatibility of surface modified alloy was studied using as experimental model endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) in culture. Low temperature nitriding produces modified surface layers consisting mainly of S phase, the supersaturated interstitial solid solution of nitrogen in the austenite lattice, which allows to enhance surface microhardness and corrosion resistance in PBS solution. The nitriding treatment seems to promote the coating with collagen-I, without chemical coupling agents, in respect of the untreated alloy. For biocompatibility studies, proliferation, lactate dehydrogenase levels and secretion of two metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) were determined. Experimental results suggest that the collagen protection may be favourable for endothelial cell proliferation and for the control of MMP-2 release.

  1. Investigations on structure–property relationships of activated flux TIG weldments of super-duplex/austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devendranath Ramkumar, K., E-mail: ramdevendranath@gmail.com; Bajpai, Ankur; Raghuvanshi, Shubham; Singh, Anshuman; Chandrasekhar, Aditya; Arivarasu, M.; Arivazhagan, N.

    2015-06-25

    This research work articulated the effect of SiO{sub 2} flux assisted tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding on the microstructure and mechanical properties of marine grade stainless steel weldments, such as super-duplex stainless steel (UNS S32750) and austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316L). The studies showed that the use of flux decreased the heat input required to obtain complete penetration. Microstructure studies revealed the presence of ferrite at the heat affected zone of AISI 316L and the fusion zone which obviated the hot cracking tendency. Tensile studies corroborated that the joint strength was sufficiently greater than that of the parent metals. Impact toughness slightly impoverished owing to the presence of large platelets of Widmanstätten austenite in the fusion zone. The study also explored the structure–property relationships of the flux assisted weldments using the combined techniques of optical and scanning electron microscopy analysis. Owing to the better metallurgical and mechanical properties, this study recommends the use of SiO{sub 2} flux for joining the dissimilar metals involving austenitic and super-duplex stainless steels.

  2. Assessment of void swelling in austenitic stainless steel PWR core internals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. M.; Energy Technology

    2006-01-31

    As many pressurized water reactors (PWRs) age and life extension of the aged plants is considered, void swelling behavior of austenitic stainless steel (SS) core internals has become the subject of increasing attention. In this report, the available database on void swelling and density change of austenitic SSs was critically reviewed. Irradiation conditions, test procedures, and microstructural characteristics were carefully examined, and key factors that are important to determine the relevance of the database to PWR conditions were evaluated. Most swelling data were obtained from steels irradiated in fast breeder reactors at temperatures >385 C and at dose rates that are orders of magnitude higher than PWR dose rates. Even for a given irradiation temperature and given steel, the integral effects of dose and dose rate on void swelling should not be separated. It is incorrect to extrapolate swelling data on the basis of 'progressive compounded multiplication' of separate effects of factors such as dose, dose rate, temperature, steel composition, and fabrication procedure. Therefore, the fast reactor data should not be extrapolated to determine credible void swelling behavior for PWR end-of-life (EOL) or life-extension conditions. Although the void swelling data extracted from fast reactor studies is extensive and conclusive, only limited amounts of swelling data and information have been obtained on microstructural characteristics from discharged PWR internals or steels irradiated at temperatures and at dose rates comparable to those of a PWR. Based on this relatively small amount of information, swelling in thin-walled tubes and baffle bolts in a PWR is not considered a concern. As additional data and relevant research becomes available, the newer results should be integrated with existing data, and the worthiness of this conclusion should continue to be scrutinized. PWR baffle reentrant corners are the most likely location to experience high swelling

  3. Carbon-content dependent effect of magnetic field on austenitic decomposition of steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xiaoxue, E-mail: zhangxiaoxue1213@gmail.com [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (MOE), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures et de Mecanique des Materiaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, University of Metz, 57045 Metz (France); Wang Shoujing, E-mail: wsj210725@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (MOE), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Zhang Yudong, E-mail: yudong.zhang@univ-metz.fr [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures et de Mecanique des Materiaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, University of Metz, 57045 Metz (France); Esling, Claude, E-mail: claude.esling@univ-metz.fr [Laboratoire d' Etude des Microstructures et de Mecanique des Materiaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, University of Metz, 57045 Metz (France); Zhao Xiang, E-mail: zhaox@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (MOE), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Zuo Liang, E-mail: lzuo@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials (MOE), Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2012-04-15

    The transformed microstructures of the high-purity Fe-0.12C alloy and Fe-0.36C alloy heat treated without and with a 12 T magnetic field have been investigated to explore the carbon-content dependent field effect on austenitic decomposition in steels. Results show that, the field-induced transformed morphology characteristics in different alloys differ from each other. In the Fe-0.12C alloy, the pearlite colonies are elongated along the field direction, and shaped by the chained and elongated proeutectoid ferrite grains in the field direction. However, in the Fe-0.36C alloy, the field mainly reduces the amount of Widmaenstatten ferrite and elongates the formed proeutectoid ferrite grains in the field direction. No clear field direction alignment is obtained. The magnetic field also demonstrates carbon-content dependent effect on the texture of the formed ferrite. It clearly enhances the Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 001 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket fiber of the ferrite in the transverse field direction in the Fe-0.36C alloy. This field effect is related to the crystal lattice distortion induced by carbon solution and this impact becomes stronger with the increase of the carbon content. For the Fe-0.12C alloy, this field effect is greatly reduced due to the reduced carbon oversaturation in ferrite and elevated formation temperature. The orientation relationships (ORs) between the pearlitic ferrite and the pearlitic cementite in both alloys are less affected by the magnetic field. No obvious changes in the either type of the appearing ORs and their number of occurrences are detected. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbon-content dependent field effect on austenitic decomposition is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The field-induced morphology features vary with the carbon content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The field effect on ferrite texture is more pronounced in high carbon content alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic field hardly

  4. Material Characterization of Fatigue Specimens made from Meta-stable Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niffenegger, M.; Grosse, M.; Kalkhof, D.; Leber, H. [Paul Scherrer Institut Villigen (Switzerland); Vincent, A.; Pasco, L.; Morin, M. [Insa de Lyon (France)

    2003-07-01

    The main objective of the EU-project CRETE (Contract No.: FIS5-1999-00280) was to assess the capability and the reliability of innovative NDT-inspection techniques for the detection of material degradation, induced by thermal fatigue and neutron irradiation, of metastable austenitic and ferritic low-alloy steel. Several project partners tested aged or irradiated samples, using various techniques (acoustic, magnetic and thermoelectric). However, these indirect methods require a careful interpretation of the measured signal in terms of micro-structural evolutions due to ageing of the material. Therefore the material had to be characterized in its undamaged, as well as in its damaged state. The present report summarises only the material characterization of the fatigue specimens. It is issued simultaneously as an PSI Bericht and the CRETE work package 3 (WP3) report. Each partner according to their own specifications purchased three materials under investigation, namely AISI 347, AISI 321 and AISI 304L. After sending the material to PSI, all fatigue specimens were manufactured by the same Swiss company. Each partner was responsible for his fatigue tests which are documented in the report WP1, written by FANP. In order to characterize the material in its unfatigued as well as in its fatigued state and to consider microstructural changes related to fatigue damage the methods listed below were employed either by PSI or by INSA de Lyon: (1) Inductive Coupled Plasma Emission Photometry (ICP-OES) was applied to determine the chemical composition, (2) Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for observing cracks, slip bands between grain and twin boundaries, - Ferromaster for measuring the magnetic permeability, (3) Physical Properties Measuring System (PPMS) for measuring magnetization characteristics, (4) Neutron- and advanced X-ray diffraction methods for the quantitative determination of martensite, - Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for the observation of crystalline

  5. Automatic TIG welding of austenitic stainless steels in nitrogen and nitrogen-based gas mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorc, B.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper treats studies of TIG gas-shielded arc welding using pure nitrogen, N2+ 5-20 % Ar gas mixtures and N2 + 2-10 % H2 gas mixtures. A weld root shielding was provided by nitrogen gas. Welding in N2 requires by 40 % lower welding current than welding in argon. The study showed that porosity was an issue due to overalloying of N2 in the weld pool; it can, however, be avoided with adequate welding parameters, particularly sufficiently high welding speed and controlled low heat input. The microstructure of all-weld metal is fully austenitic (γ. Hydrogen reduces nitrogen solubility in the weld pool and produces an austenitic-ferritic (γ+δ microstructure. Titanium increases nitrogen solubility in the weld pool and strongly reacts with nitrogen. Consequently, there is a high fraction of TiN inclusions in the weld metal.

    Hemos efectuado las investigaciones de la soldadura TIG en nitrógeno puro, las mezclas de gas N2 + 5 hasta un 20 % Ar, así como también N2 + 2 hasta un 10 % H2. Para la protección se utilizó nitrógeno. Para la soldadura se necesitan aproximadamente un 40 % menos de corriente de soldadura, comparado con la soldadura de argón. La investigación ha mostrado que la porosidad es un problema de absorción excesiva de la fundición con nitrógeno y que es posible suprimir la porosidad mediante parámetros adecuados de soldadura, sobre todo con una suficiente velocidad de soldadura y, con ella, una pequeña emisión controlada de calor. El hidrógeno reduce la solubilidad del nitrógeno en la fundición y acciona la segregación de ferrita. El titanio aumenta la solubilidad del nitrógeno en la fundición y reacciona fuertemente con el nitrógeno, de tal modo que en la soldadura hay una gran parte de inclusiones TiN.

  6. The Prediction of Long-Term Thermal Aging in Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yang, Ying; Lach, Timothy G.

    2017-02-15

    Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) materials are extensively used for many massive primary coolant system components of light water reactors (LWRs) including coolant piping, valve bodies, pump casings, and piping elbows. Many of these components are operated in complex and persistently damaging environments of elevated temperature, high pressure, corrosive environment, and sometimes radiation for long periods of time. Since a large number of CASS components are installed in every nuclear power plant and replacing such massive components is prohibitively expensive, any significant degradation in mechanical properties that affects structural integrity, cracking resistance in particular, of CASS components will raise a serious concern on the performance of entire power plant. The CASS materials for nuclear components are highly corrosion-resistant Fe-Cr-Ni alloys with 300 series stainless steel compositions and mostly austenite (γ)–ferrite (δ) duplex structures, which result from the casting processes consisting of alloy melting and pouring or injecting liquid metal into a static or spinning mold. Although the commonly used static and centrifugal casting processes enable the fabrication of massive components with proper resistance to environmental attacks, the alloying and microstructural conditions are not highly controllable in actual fabrication, especially in the casting processes of massive components. In the corrosion-resistant Fe-Cr-Ni alloy system, the minor phase (i.e., the δ-ferrite phase) is inevitably formed during the casting process, and is in a non-equilibrium state subject to detrimental changes during exposure to elevated temperature and/or radiation. In general, relatively few critical degradation modes are expected within the current design lifetime of 40 years, given that the CASS components have been processed properly. It has been well known, however, that both the thermal aging and the neutron irradiation can cause degradation of static

  7. Phase equilibria in the UO 2-austenitic steel system up to 3000°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleykamp, Heiko

    1997-08-01

    The pseudobinary UO 2-austenitic steel system was investigated by DTA up to 1500°C, by isothermal annealing up to 2000°C, by induction heating up to 2850°C and by arc melting up to about 3000°C. The system is characterized by a degenerate eutectic at 1433°C on the steel side and a monotectic at 2830°C and about 1 mol% steel. The maximum solubility of steel in solid U0 2 is 0.6 mol%, that in liquid U0 2 at 3000°C is about 4 mol%. U0 2 and steel form (Fe, Mn, Cr) 2O 3 precipitates between 1300 and 2600°C as U02 becomes hypostoichiometric. Liquid steel is stabilized to higher temperatures above its boiling point at 2790°C by dissolution of uranium and decomposes peritectically to liquid UO 2-χ and gas at estimated 3200°C. The critical data of the single-phase U0 2-steel melt based on the application of the Redlich-Kister model are Tc = 4900°C, Pc = 300 bar and χ c, steel = 0.41.

  8. Methods for the In-Situ Characterization of Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramuhalli, P.; Good, M. S.; Harris, R. J.; Bond, L. J.; Ruud, C. O.; Diaz, A. A.; Anderson, M. T.

    2011-06-01

    Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) that was commonly used in U.S. nuclear power plants is a coarse-grained, elastically anisotropic material. Its engineering properties made it a material of choice for selected designs of nuclear power reactor systems. However, the material manufacturing and fabrication processes result in a variety of coarse-grain microstructures that make current ultrasonic in-service inspection of components quite challenging. To address inspection needs, new ultrasonic inspection approaches are being sought. However, overcoming the deleterious and variable effects of the microstructure on the interrogating ultrasonic beam may require knowledge of the microstructure, for potential optimization of inspection parameters to enhance the probability of detection (POD). The ability to classify microstructure type (e.g. polycrystalline or columnar) has the potential to guide selection of optimal NDE approaches. This paper discusses the application of ultrasonic and electromagnetic methods for classifying CASS microstructures, when making measurements from the outside surface of the component. Results to date demonstrate the potential of these measurements to discriminate between two consistent microstructures—equiaxed-grain material versus columnar-grain material. The potential for fusion of ultrasonic and electromagnetic measurements for in-situ microstructure characterization in CASS materials will be explored.

  9. Methods for the In-Situ Characterization of Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Good, Morris S.; Harris, Robert V.; Bond, Leonard J.; Ruud, Clayton O.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2011-06-29

    Cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) that was commonly used in U.S. nuclear power plants is a coarse-grained, elastically anisotropic material. Its engineering properties made it a material of choice for selected designs of nuclear power reactor systems. However, the fabrication processes result in a variety of coarse-grain microstructures that make current ultrasonic in-service inspection of components quite challenging. To address inspection needs, new ultrasonic inspection approaches are being sought. However, overcoming the deleterious and variable effects of the microstructure on the interrogating ultrasonic beam may require knowledge of the microstructure, for potential optimization of inspection parameters to enhance the probability of detection (POD). The ability to classify microstructure type (e.g. polycrystalline or columnar) has the potential to guide selection of optimal NDE approaches. This paper discusses the application of ultrasonic and electromagnetic methods for classifying CASS microstructures, when making measurements from the outside surface of the component. Results to date demonstrate the potential of these measurements to discriminate between two consistent microstructures - equiaxed-grain material versus columnar-grain material. The potential for fusion of ultrasonic and electromagnetic measurements for in-situ microstructure characterization in CASS materials will be explored.

  10. Analysis of the strain induced martensitic transformation in austenitic steel subjected to dynamic perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaera R.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An experimental and numerical analysis on the martensitic transformation in AISI 304 steel sheets subjected to perforation by conical and hemispherical projectiles is reported. Two target thicknesses are considered, 0.5 and 1.0 mm, and impact velocities range from 35 to 200 m/s. The perforation mechanisms are identified and the effect of the projectile nose-shape on the ability of the target for energy absorption is evaluated. Martensite has been detected in all the impacted samples and the role played by the projectile nose-shape on the transformation is highlighted. A 3D model implemented in ABAQUS/Explicit allowed to simulate the perforation tests. The material is defined through a constitutive description developed by the authors to describe the strain induced martensitic transformation taking place in metastable austenitic steels at high strain rates. The numerical results are compared with the experimental evidence and satisfactory matching is obtained. The numerical model succeeds in describing the perforation mechanisms associated to each projectile-target configuration analysed.

  11. Effect of Colouring Process on Pitting Susceptibility of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.S.Mahmoud; M.M.Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Colouring of the austenitic stainless steel alloy (20.45% Cr, 8.57% Ni) was carried out in NaNO3-KNO3 eutectic melt without and with additions of Na2O2, NaCl and their mixtures at different temperatures ranging from 400-600℃, under open-circuit and galvanostatic anodic polarization conditions. The produced colours greatly depend on the thickness of oxide films, which in turn depends on the composition of the molten bath and its temperature. The more attractive, bright, adherent and uniform coloured oxide films can be obtained at 400, 450 and 500℃ in molten nitrate bath containing NaCl and Na2O2 mixtures. The pitting corrosion susceptibility of the coloured oxide films was tested in FeCl3 and NaCl as corrosive media. The obtained results indicate that the pitting corrosion susceptibility of the coloured oxide films greatly depends on the previous operating conditions of the colouring process of the stainless steel specimens such as the composition of molten bath, temperature and technique of colouring process.

  12. Changes of structure and crystallographic texture of cladding tubes from austenitic steel under thermal creep testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovich, Yu; Isaenkova, M.; Fesenko, V.; Dobrokhotov, P.; Tselishchev, A.

    2016-04-01

    The process of changes in structure and crystallographic texture of cladding tubes from austenitic steel ChS68 under thermal creep testing were studied. Testing of tubes was conducted at the temperature 700 oC in the air by their stretching in axial direction under the stress 160 MPa until rupture. By data of phase and texture analysis a number of processes, accompanying plastic deformation of tubes during thermal creep tests at elevated temperature, were identified. The main texture components of original tube, as well as texture components of different parts of the tested tube are {110} and {112}. In the rupture zone the component of the texture of tension with axis along the tube axis becomes stronger. This effect is connected with activation of dislocation slip in the deformed area of tested tube near the new-formed neck. At the same time the character of texture changes in the zone of tube rupture indicates to development of the dynamic recrystallization, conditioned by the total influence of all factors, which control the passage in the tube of thermal creep. In addition, it was revealed the activation of martensitic transformations in the zone of maximal deformation of tube as a result of its creep tests.

  13. Sodium corrosion behavior of austenitic alloys and selective dissolution of chromium and nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T.; Mutoh, I.; Yagi, T.; Ikenaga, Y.

    1986-06-01

    The corrosion behavior of six austenitic alloys and reference Type 316 stainless steel (SS) has been examined in a flowing sodium environment at 700°C for up to about 4000 h. The alloys with a range of nickel content between ~ 15 and 43 wt% were designed and manufactured with an expectation of improved swelling resistance during fast neutron irradiation, compared to reference Type 316 SS. The corrosion loss of the alloys at zero downstream position and the concentrations of chromium, nickel and iron in the surface region were determined as a function of corrosion time. The selective dissolution of nickel and chromium played an important role in sodium corrosion of the alloys. During the initial period, accelerated corrosion took place and selective dissolution of chromium and nickel proceeded at a rapid rate. During the subsequent period, the overall corrosion rate and depletion of chromium and nickel decreased with increasing time until the corrosion rate and the surface concentrations of chromium, nickel and iron, which depended on composition of the alloys, reached the steady-state after about 2000 h. Also, the corrosion rate increased with increasing original nickel content of the alloys. Microstructural examination revealed surface attack of the alloys with higher nickel contents, in particular for the two precipitation strengthened Fe-Ni alloys. The alloys showed a trend of increasing carbon and nitrogen contents.

  14. The evolution of mechanical property change in irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, G. E.

    1993-11-01

    The evolution of mechanical properties in austenitic stainless steels during irradiation is reviewed. Changes in strength, ductility and fracture toughness are strongly related to the evolution of the damage microstructure and microstructurally-based models for strengthening reasonably correlate the data. Irradiation-induced defects promote work softening and flow localization which in turn leads to significant reductions in ductility and fracture toughness beyond about 10 dpa. The effects of irradiation on fatigue appear to be modest except at high temperature where helium embrittlement becomes important. The swelling-independent component of irradiation creep strain increases linearly with dose and is relatively insensitive to material variables and irradiation temperature, except at low temperatures where accelerated creep may occur as a result of low vacancy mobility. Creep rupture life is a strong function of helium content, but is less sensitive to metallurgical conditions. Irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking appears to be related to the evolution of radiation-induced segregation/depletion at grain boundaries, and hence may not be significant at low irradiation temperatures.

  15. Anisotropic Radiation-Induced Segregation in 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel with Grain Boundary Character

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher M. Barr; Gregory A. Vetterick; Kinga A. Unocic; Khalid Hattar; Xian-Ming Bai; Mitra L. Taheri

    2014-04-01

    Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) and subsequent depletion of chromium along grain boundaries has been shown to be an important factor in irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking in austenitic face-centered cubic (fcc)-based alloys used for nuclear energy systems. A full understanding of RIS requires examination of the effect of the grain boundary character on the segregation process. Understanding how specific grain boundary structures respond under irradiation would assist in developing or designing alloys that are more efficient at removing point defects, or reducing the overall rate of deleterious Cr segregation. This study shows that solute segregation is dependent not only on grain boundary misorientation, but also on the grain boundary plane, as highlighted by markedly different segregation behavior for the __3 incoherent and coherent grain boundaries. The link between RIS and atomistic modeling is also explored through molecular dynamic simulations of the interaction of vacancies at different grain boundary structures through defect energetics in a simple model system. A key insight from the coupled experimental RIS measurements and corresponding defect–grain boundary modeling is that grain boundary–vacancy formation energy may have a critical threshold value related to the major alloying elements’ solute segregation.

  16. Mechanical Properties, Short Time Creep, and Fatigue of an Austenitic Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Brnic

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The correct choice of a material in the process of structural design is the most important task. This study deals with determining and analyzing the mechanical properties of the material, and the material resistance to short-time creep and fatigue. The material under consideration in this investigation is austenitic stainless steel X6CrNiTi18-10. The results presenting ultimate tensile strength and 0.2 offset yield strength at room and elevated temperatures are displayed in the form of engineering stress-strain diagrams. Besides, the creep behavior of the steel is presented in the form of creep curves. The material is consequently considered to be creep resistant at temperatures of 400 °C and 500 °C when subjected to a stress which is less than 0.9 of the yield strength at the mentioned temperatures. Even when the applied stress at a temperature of 600 °C is less than 0.5 of the yield strength, the steel may be considered as resistant to creep. Cyclic tensile fatigue tests were carried out at stress ratio R = 0.25 using a servo-pulser machine and the results were recorded. The analysis shows that the stress level of 434.33 MPa can be adopted as a fatigue limit. The impact energy was also determined and the fracture toughness assessed.

  17. Bainite transformation as a displacive decomposition of austenite. Sendan gata hentai to shite toraeta bainite hentai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omori, Y. (Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd., Osaka (Japan))

    1990-07-20

    In the typical textures of hypo-eutictoid steel (hyper-eutictoid steel), there are pro-eutictoid ferrite and pearlite which are generated by the diffusion mechanism and martensite ({alpha}') which is generated by non-diffusion transformation. However, when austenite ({gamma}) is decomposed in the temperature range between about 900K and the Ms point at which martensite transformation starts, bainite is generated. Concerning the bainite generation mechanism, the views are separated into the standpoint of considering that transformation of substitutional atoms progresses in a manner of non-diffusion (the displacive transformation group) and the standpoint that such transformation is basically diffusion transformation only with shorter diffusion distance (the diffusion transformation group). In this article, the concept that the above transformation is displacive transformation is explained. In other words, after stating in detail on bainite transformation behavior, crystals of bainite transformation, and so forth, it discusses on what is bainite. Finally in this article, it is pointed out that the bainite texture has the nature that it cannot be decided simply either the diffusion transformation texture or the non-diffusion transformation texture. 95 refs., 11 figs.

  18. Microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steel irradiated with triple-beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Shozo; Miwa, Yukio; Yamaki, Daiju [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Zhang Yichuan

    1997-03-01

    An austenitic stainless steel was simultaneously irradiated with nickel, helium and hydrogen ions at the temperature range of 573-673 K. The damage level and injected concentration of He and H ions in the triple-beam irradiated region are 57 dpa, 19000 and 18000 at.ppm, respectively. Following to irradiation, the cross sectional observation normal to the incident surface of the specimen was carried out with a transmission electron microscope. Two bands parallel to the incident surface were observed in the irradiated specimen, which consist of dislocation loops and lines of high number density. These locate in the range of the depth of 0.4 to 1.3 {mu}m and 1.8 to 2.4 {mu}m from the incident surface, respectively. The region between two bands, which corresponds to the triple beam irradiated region, shows very low number density of dislocations than that in each band. Observation with higher magnification of this region shows that fine cavities with high number density uniformly distribute in the matrix. (author)

  19. High Temperature Tensile Properties of Unirradiated and Neutron Irradiated 20 Cr-35 Ni Austenitic Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, R.B.; Solly, B.

    1966-12-15

    The tensile properties of an unirradiated and neutron irradiated (at 40 deg C) 20 % Cr, 35 % Ni austenitic steel have been studied at 650 deg C, 750 deg C and 820 deg C. The tensile elongation and mode of fracture (transgranular) of unirradiated specimens tested at room temperature and 650 deg C are almost identical. At 750 deg C and 820 deg C the elongation decreases considerably and a large part of the total elongation is non-uniform. Furthermore, the mode of fracture at these temperatures is intergranular and microscopic evidence suggests that fracture is caused by formation and linkup of grain boundary cavities. YS and UTS decrease monotonically with temperature. Irradiated specimens show a further decrease in ductility and an increase in the tendency to grain boundary cracking. Irradiation has no significant effect on the YS, but the UTS are reduced. The embrittlement of the irradiated specimens is attributed to the presence of He and Li atoms produced during irradiation and the possible mechanisms are discussed. Prolonged annealing of irradiated and unirradiated specimens at 650 deg C appears to have no significant effect on tensile properties.

  20. Inter-laminar shear stress in hybrid CFRP/austenitic steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bolted joints are the most common solution for joining composite components in aerospace structures. Critical structures such as wing to fuselage joints, or flight control surface fittings use bolted joining techniques. Recent research concluded that higher bearing strengths in composite bolted joints can be achieved by a CFRP/ Titanium hybrid lay-up in the vicinity of the bolted joint. The high costs of titanium motivate a similar research with the more cost competitive austenitic steel. An experimental program was performed in order to compare the apparent inter-laminar shear stress (ILSS of a CFRP reference beam with the ILSS of hybrid CFRP/Steel beams utilizing different surface treatments in the metallic ply. The apparent ILSS was determined by short beam test, a three-point bending test. Finite element models using cohesive elements in the CFRP/Steel interface were built to simulate the short beam test in the reference beam and in the highest interlaminar shear stress hybrid beam. The main parameters for a FEM simulation of inter laminar shear are the cohesive elements damage model and appropriate value for the critical energy release rate. The results show that hybrid CFRP/Steel have a maximum ILSS very similar to the ILSS of the reference beam. Hybrid CFRP/Steel is a competitive solution when compared with the reference beam ILSS. FEM models were able to predict the maximum ILSS in each type of beam.

  1. Systematic Study of Nanocrystalline Plasma Electrolytic Nitrocarburising of 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel for Corrosion Protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A number of studies have been reported on the use of nanocrystalline plasma electrolytic nitrocarburising technology for surface hardening of stainless steels for higher corrosion resistance resulted from this technique. However, very few studies have focused on the optimization of the nanocrystalline plasma electrolytic nitrocarburising process parameters. In this study, a design of experiment (DOE) technique, the Taguchi method, has been used to optimize the nanocrystalline plasma electrolytic nitrocarburising not only for surface hardening but also for the corrosion protection of 316L austenitic stainless steel by controlling the coating process's factors. The experimental design consisted of four factors (Urea concentration, electrical conductivity of electrolyte, voltage and duration of process), each containing three levels. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements were carried out to determine the corrosion resistance of the coated samples. The results were analyzed with related software. An analysis of the mean of signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio indicated that the corrosion resistance of nanocrystalline plasma electrolytic nitrocarburised 316L stainless steel was influenced significantly by the levels in the Taguchi orthogonal array. The optimized coating parameters for corrosion resistance are 1150 g/L for urea concentration, 360 mS/cm for electrical conductivity of electrolyte, 260 V for applied voltage, 6 min for treatment time. The percentage of contribution for each factor was determined by the analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results showed that the applied voltage is the most significant factor affecting the corrosion resistance of the coatings.

  2. INVESTIGATING SPOT WELD GROWTH ON 304 AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL (2 mm SHEETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NACHIMANI CHARDE

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Resistance spot welding (RSW has revolutionized automotive industries since early 1970s for its mechanical assemblies. To date one mechanical assembly out five is welded using spot welding technology in various industries and stainless steel became very popular among common materials. As such this research paper analyses the spot weld growth on 304 austenitic stainless steels with 2mm sample sheets. The growth of a spot weld is primarily determined by its parameters such as current, weld time, electrode tip and force. However other factors such as electrode deformations, corrosions, dissimilar materials and material properties are also affect the weld growth. This paper is intended to analyze only the effects of nuggets growth due to the current and weld time increment with constant force and unchanged electrode tips. A JPC 75kVA spot welder was used to accomplish it and the welded samples were undergone tensile test, hardness test and metallurgical test to characterize the formation of weld nuggets.

  3. Radiation induced microstructures in ODS 316 austenitic steel under dual-beam ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, He Ken [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen’s University, Kingston K7L3N6, Ontario (Canada); Yao, Zhongwen, E-mail: yaoz@me.queensu.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen’s University, Kingston K7L3N6, Ontario (Canada); Zhou, Zhangjian; Wang, Man [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Kaitasov, Odile [Centre de Spectrométrie Nucléaire et de Spectrométrie de Masse, Orsay 91405 (France); Daymond, Mark R. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen’s University, Kingston K7L3N6, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    An ODS 316 austenitic steel was fabricated and irradiated using dual ion beams (1 MeV Kr{sup +} and 15 keV He{sup +}) with in-situ transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation. Cavities formed at a low dose in samples irradiated with simultaneous helium injection. It was found that Y–Ti–O particles acted as strong traps for cavity formation at low doses. Helium exhibited a significant effect on cavity development. Cavities were also preferentially nucleated along grain boundaries, phase boundaries and twin boundaries. Irradiation induced lattice defects mainly consisted of small 1/2〈1 1 0〉 perfect loops and 1/3〈1 1 1〉 Frank loops. An increment of helium injection rate also greatly enhanced the Frank loop growth. Small (<10 nm) Y–Ti–O particles were found to be unstable after irradiation to high doses. M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates were observed after irradiation and helium might play a major role in their formation.

  4. Fracture behavior of neutron-irradiated high-manganese austenitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, H.; Miyata, K.; Narui, M.; Kayano, H.

    1991-03-01

    The instrumented Charpy impact test was applied to study the fracture behavior of high-manganese austenitic steels before and after neutron irradiations. Quarter-size specimens of a commercial high-manganese steel (18% Mn-5% Ni-16% Cr), three reference steels (21% Mn-1% Ni-9% Cr, 20% Mn-1% Ni-11% Cr, 15% Mn-1% Ni-13% Cr) and two model steels (17% Mn-4.5% Si-6.5% Cr, 22% Mn-4.5% Si-6.5% Cr-0.2% N) were used for the impact tests at temperatures between 77 and 523 K. The load-deflection curves showed typical features corresponding to characteristics of the fracture properties. The temperature dependences of fracture energy and failure deflection obtained from the curves clearly demonstrate only small effects up to 2 × 10 23 n/m 2 ( E > 0.1 MeV) and brittleness at room temperature in 17% Mn-Si-Cr steel at 1.6 × 10 25 n/m 2 ( E > 0.1 MeV), while ductility still remains in 22%Mn-Si-Cr steel.

  5. Tensile properties of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and the weld joints after neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, K.; Ioka, I.; Jitsukawa, S.; Hamada, A.; Hishinuma, A. [and others

    1996-10-01

    Tensile specimens of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and its weldments fabricated with Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and Electron Beam (EB) welding techniques were irradiated to a peak dose of 19 dpa and a peak helium level of 250 appm in the temperature range between 200 and 400{degrees}C in spectrally tailored capsules in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The He/dpa ratio of about 13 appm/dpa is similar to the typical helium/dpa ratio of a fusion reactor environment. The tensile tests were carried out at the irradiation temperature in vacuum. The irradiation caused an increase in yield stress to levels between 670 and 800 MPa depending on the irradiation temperature. Total elongation was reduced to less than 10%, however the specimens failed in a ductile manner. The results were compared with those of the specimens irradiated using irradiation capsules producing larger amount of He. Although the He/dpa ratio affected the microstructural change, the impact on the post irradiation tensile behavior was rather small for not only base metal specimens but also for the weld joint and the weld metal specimens.

  6. Comparison of hydrogen gas embrittlement of austenitic and ferritic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perng, T. P.; Altstetter, C. J.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogen-induced slow crack growth (SCG) was compared in austenitic and ferritic stainless steels at 0 to 125 °Cand 11 to 216 kPa of hydrogen gas. No SCG was observed for AISI 310, while AISI 301 was more susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement and had higher cracking velocity than AL 29-4-2 under the same test conditions. The kinetics of crack propagation was modeled in terms of the hydrogen transport in these alloys. This is a function of temperature, microstructure, and stress state in the embrittlement region. The relatively high cracking velocity of AISI 301 was shown to be controlled by the fast transport of hydrogen through the stress-induced α' martensite at the crack tip and low escape rate of hydrogen through the γ phase in the surrounding region. Faster accumulation rates of hydrogen in the embrittlement region were expected for AISI 301, which led to higher cracking velocities. The mechanism of hydrogen-induced SCG was discussed based upon the concept of hydrogen-enhanced plasticity.

  7. Stress-induced martensitic transformation in metastable austenitic stainless steels: Effect on fatigue crack growth rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Z.; Ahmed, M.

    1996-04-01

    This paper addresses the influence of cyclic stress-induced martensitic transformation on fatigue crack growth rates in metastable austenitic stainless steels. At low applied stress and mean stress values in AISI type 301 stainless steel, fatigue crack growth rate is substantially retarded due to a cyclic stress-induced γ-α' and γ-ɛ martensitic transformation occurring at the crack-tip plastic zone. It is suggested that the transformation products produce a compressive residual stress at the tip of the fatigue crack, which essentially lowers the effective stress intensity and hence retards the fatigue crack growth rate. At high applied stress or mean stress values, fatigue crack growth rates in AISI type 301 steels become almost equal to those of stable AISI type 302 alloy. As the amount of transformed products increases (with an increase in applied or mean stress), the strain-hardening effect brought about by the transformed martensite phase appears to accelerate fatigue crack growth, offsetting the contribution from the compressive residual stress produced by the positive volume change of γ → α' or ɛ transformation.

  8. Characterization of Bimetallic Castings with an Austenitic Working Surface Layer and an Unalloyed Cast Steel Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents the technology of bimetallic castings based on the founding method of layer coating directly in the cast process of the so-called method of mold cavity preparation. The prepared castings consist of two fundamental parts, i.e., the base and the working surface layer. The base part of the bimetallic casting is typical foundry material, i.e., unalloyed cast steel, whereas the working layer is a plate of austenitic alloy steel sort X2CrNi 18-9. The quality of the joint between the base part and the working layer was evaluated on the basis of ultrasonic non-destructive testing and structure examinations containing metallographic macro- and microscopic studies with the use of a light microscope (LOM) with microhardness measurements and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) with microanalysis of the chemical composition (energy dispersive spectroscopy—EDS). On the basis of the obtained results it was confirmed that the decisive phenomena needed to create a permanent joint between the two components of the bimetallic casting are carbon and heat transport in the direction from the high-carbon and hot base material which was poured into the mold in the form of liquid metal to the low-carbon and cold material of the working layer which was placed in the mold cavity in the form of a monolithic insert.

  9. Parametric optimization during machining of AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel using CVD coated DURATOMIC cutting insert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kaladhar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, Taguchi method is applied to determine the optimum process parameters for turning of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel on CNC lathe. A Chemical vapour deposition (CVD coated cemented carbide cutting insert is used which is produced by DuratomicTM technology of 0.4 and 0.8 mm nose radii. The tests are conducted at four levels of Cutting speed, feed and depth of cut. The influence of these parameters are investigated on the surface roughness and material removal rate (MRR. The Analysis Of Variance (ANOVA is also used to analyze the influence of cutting parameters during machining. The results revealed that cutting speed significantly (46.05% affected the machined surface roughness values followed by nose radius (23.7%. The influence of the depth of cut (61.31% in affecting material removal rate (MRR is significantly large. The cutting speed (20.40% is the next significant factor. Optimal range and optimal level of parameters are also predicted for responses.

  10. Surface modification of austenitic thermal-spray coatings by low-temperature nitrocarburizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, T.; Mehner, T.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    Thermal-spray coatings of austenitic materials are mainly used under corrosive conditions. The relatively poor wear resistance strongly limits their use. In comparative studies between nitrocarburized and untreated thermal-spray coatings, the influence of the nitrogen and carbon enrichment on the properties of the coatings and the microstructure was investigated. The cross-section micrograph of the nitrocarburized coating shows the S-phase formation in the surface layer region. The depth profile of the nitrogen and carbon concentration was determined by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOS) analysis. A selective enrichment of the surface layer region with nitrogen and carbon by means of thermochemical heat treatment increases the wear resistance. The interstitially dissolved nitrogen and carbon causes the formation of strong compressive residual stresses and high surface hardness. Increases in the service life of existing applications or new material combinations with face-centred cubic friction partners are possible. In the absence of dimensional change, uniform as well as partial nitrogen enrichment of the thermal spray coating is possible. Nitrocarburized coatings demonstrate a significant improvement in adhesive wear resistance and extremely high surface hardness.

  11. Microstructural and Texture Development in Two Austenitic Steels with High-Manganese Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacharya, Basudev; Ray, Ranjit Kumar; Leffers, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Two austenitic steels, Fe-21.3Mn-3.44Si-3.74Al-0.5C and Fe-29.8Mn-2.96Si-2.73Al-0.52C, were subjected to cold rolling with 30 to 80 pct reduction with an increment of 10 pct and subsequently the development of their microstructures and textures were studied. The overall texture after 80 pct cold...... reduction was Brass type. A weak Copper component {112}〈111〉 was present at the early stage of deformation, which disappeared completely after 60 pct cold reduction. Extensive shear banding took place in both the steels, right from rather low cold rolling levels, which became more prominent at higher...... amounts of cold rolling. Formation of twin bands, along with cellular dislocation network, was observed in Steel A after 30 pct cold rolling. In case of Steel B, denser twin bands and dislocation cellular network were observed in early stage of deformation. After 80 pct cold reduction, the development...

  12. Impact of the nanostructuration on the corrosion resistance and hardness of irradiated 316 austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, E.; Prasath Babu, R.; Monnet, I.; Etienne, A.; Moisy, F.; Pralong, V.; Enikeev, N.; Abramova, M.; Sauvage, X.; Radiguet, B.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of grain size and irradiation defects on the mechanical behavior and the corrosion resistance of a 316 stainless steel have been investigated. Nanostructured samples were obtained by severe plastic deformation using high pressure torsion. Both coarse grain and nanostructured samples were irradiated with 10 MeV 56Fe5+ ions. Microstructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Surface mechanical properties were evaluated thanks to hardness measurements and the corrosion resistance was studied in chloride environment. Nanostructuration by high pressure torsion followed by annealing leads to enrichment in chromium at grain boundaries. However, irradiation of nanostructured samples implies a chromium depletion of the same order than depicted in coarse grain specimens but without metallurgical damage like segregated dislocation loops or clusters. Potentiodynamic polarization tests highlight a definitive deterioration of the corrosion resistance of coarse grain steel with irradiation. Downsizing the grain to a few hundred of nanometers enhances the corrosion resistance of irradiated samples, despite the fact that the hardness of nanocrystalline austenitic steel is only weakly affected by irradiation. These new experimental results are discussed in the basis of couplings between mechanical and electrical properties of the passivated layer thanks to impedance spectroscopy measurements, hardness properties of the surfaces and local microstructure evolutions.

  13. Damage structure of austenitic stainless steel 316LN irradiated at low temperature in HFIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, N.; Robertson, J.P.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wakai, E. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst. (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    TEM disk specimens of austenitic stainless steel 316LN irradiated to damage levels of about 3 dpa at irradiation temperatures of either about 90 C or 250 C have been investigated by using transmission electron microscopy. The irradiation at 90 C and 250 C induced a dislocation loop density of 3.5 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3} and 6.5 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3}, a black dot density of 2.2 {times} 10{sup 23} m{sup {minus}3} and 1.6 {times} 10{sup 23} m{sup {minus}3}, respectively, in the steels, and a high density (<1 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3}) of precipitates in matrix. Cavities could be observed in the specimens after the irradiation. It is suggested that the dislocation loops, the black dots, and the precipitates cause irradiation hardening, an increase in the yield strength and a decrease in the uniform elongation, in the 316LN steel irradiated at low temperature.

  14. Estimation of the kinetics of martensitic transformation in austenitic stainless steels by conventional and novel approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirdel, M., E-mail: mshirdel1989@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirzadeh, H., E-mail: hmirzadeh@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Advanced Metalforming and Thermomechanical Processing Laboratory, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parsa, M.H., E-mail: mhparsa@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center of Excellence for High Performance Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Advanced Metalforming and Thermomechanical Processing Laboratory, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-29

    A comparative study was carried out on the kinetics of the martensitic transformation in a 304L stainless steel during cold rolling by conventional and novel approaches. The phase analysis based on X-ray diffraction patterns and metallography and also magnetic measurements based on ferritescope readings were utilized to elucidate the kinetics of the martensitic transformation. A straightforward magnetic measurement approach for evaluating the amount of strain-induced martensite in metastable austenitic stainless steels has been introduced in this study. This technique collects the data throughout the bulk of the material to give a realistic estimate of the amount of ferromagnetic martensite. This is an advantage over the surface collecting methods such as ferritescope readings, which overestimates the amount of martensite due to its inhomogeneous distribution through the thickness based on the frictional effects between the rolls and the specimen surface. The proposed approach can be applied in various designs for static/continuous magnetic measurement of bulk materials that is advantageous compared with the conventional vibrating sample magnetometer technique which is useful for static measurement of bulk materials with specific shapes. Moreover, in analogy to ferritescope, the output data of the developed device is directly related to the amount of martensite.

  15. Void Swelling and Microstructure of Austenitic Stainless Steels Irradiated in the BOR - 60 Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yang, Yong [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Huang, Yina [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Allen, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Alexandreanu, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-11-01

    As nuclear power plants age and neutron fluence increases, detrimental effects resulting from radiation damage have become an increasingly important issue for the operational safety and structural integrity of core internal components. In this study, irradiated specimens of reactor core internal components were characterized by transmission electron microscopy. The specimens had been irradiated to 5.5-45 dpa in the BOR-60 reactor at a dose rate close to 10-6 dpa/s and temperature of about 320°C. No voids were observed in the austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys at all doses. Despite the possibility that fine voids below the TEM resolution limit may be present, it was clear that void swelling was insignificant in all examined alloys up to 45 dpa. Irradiated microstructures of the studied alloys were dominated by a high density of Frank loops. The mean size and density of the Frank loops varied from one material to another, but saturated with increasing dose above ~10 dpa. While no irradiation-induced precipitations were present below 24.5 dpa, fine precipitates were evident in several alloys at 45 dpa.

  16. High-cycle fatigue behavior of ultrafine-grained austenitic stainless and TWIP steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, A.S. [Materials Engineering Laboratory (4KOMT), Box 4200, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez Canal University, Box 43721, Suez (Egypt); Karjalainen, L.P., E-mail: pentti.karjalainen@oulu.fi [Materials Engineering Laboratory (4KOMT), Box 4200, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland)

    2010-08-20

    High-cycle fatigue behavior of ultrafine-grained (UFG) 17Cr-7Ni Type 301LN austenitic stainless and high-Mn Fe-22Mn-0.6C TWIP steels were investigated in a reversed plane bending fatigue and compared to the behavior of steels with conventional coarse grain (CG) size. Optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine fatigue damage mechanisms. Testing showed that the fatigue limits leading to fatigue life beyond 4 x 10{sup 6} cycles were about 630 MPa for 301LN while being 560 MPa for TWIP steel, and being 0.59 and 0.5 of the tensile strength respectively. The CG counterparts were measured to have the fatigue limits of 350 and 400 MPa. The primary damage caused by fatigue took place by grain boundary cracking in UFG 301LN, while slip band cracking occurred in CG 301LN. However, in the case of TWIP steel, the fatigue damage mechanism is similar in spite of the grain size. In the course of cycling neither the formation of a martensite structure nor mechanical twinning occurs, but intense slip bands are created with extrusions and intrusions. Fatigue crack initiates preferentially on grain and twin boundaries, and especially in the intersection sites of slip bands and boundaries.

  17. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Ultrafine-Grained Austenitic Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiaodong; Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Tae Kyu; Kim, Seul Cham; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Jang, Jinsung

    2016-11-01

    316L stainless steel based austenitic oxide dispersion strengthened (AODS) steel was fabricated by mechanical alloying (MA) and hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The AODS sample exhibited an ultrafine-grained (UFG) structure with a bimodal grain size distribution (large grains of about 1200 nm and fine grains of about 260 nm). Two groups of oxide particles were observed; fine Y2Ti2O7 of about 7.7 nm and coarse Cr2O3 particles of about 200 nm in diameter. Tensile tests of the hot-rolled AODS steel samples showed yield strength of up to 890 MPa at room temperature, which is nearly four times higher than that of conventional 316L stainless steel. Micro-indentation and hardness tests indicated even higher yield strength of up to 1200 MPa, which shows a good agreement with the calculated value by combining of the grain refinement strengthening by the Hall-Petch relation and the dispersion strengthening by the Orowan mechanism. The lower strength from tensile tests should be attributed to the formation of micro-cracks at the interfaces between coarse Cr2O3 particles and the matrix. Coarse Cr2O3 particles were also frequently observed inside the fracture surface dimples of the creep ruptured sample at 923 K (650 °C) and 140 MPa. It is thus suggested that the yield strength and elongation could be further improved by controlling the coarse Cr2O3 particles.

  18. Effect of Structural Heterogeneity on In Situ Deformation of Dissimilar Weld Between Ferritic and Austenitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, M.; Santosh, R.; Das, S. K.; Das, G.; Mahato, B.; Korody, J.; Kumar, S.; Singh, P. K.

    2015-08-01

    Low-alloy steel and 304LN austenitic stainless steel were welded using two types of buttering material, namely 309L stainless steel and IN 182. Weld metals were 308L stainless steel and IN 182, respectively, for two different joints. Cross-sectional microstructure of welded assemblies was investigated. Microhardness profile was determined perpendicular to fusion boundary. In situ tensile test was performed in scanning electron microscope keeping low-alloy steel-buttering material interface at the center of gage length. Adjacent to fusion boundary, low-alloy steel exhibited carbon-depleted region and coarsening of matrix grains. Between coarse grain and base material structure, low-alloy steel contained fine grain ferrite-pearlite aggregate. Adjacent to fusion boundary, buttering material consisted of Type-I and Type-II boundaries. Within buttering material close to fusion boundary, thin cluster of martensite was formed. Fusion boundary between buttering material-weld metal and weld metal-304LN stainless steel revealed unmixed zone. All joints failed within buttering material during in situ tensile testing. The fracture location was different for various joints with respect to fusion boundary, depending on variation in local microstructure. Highest bond strength with adequate ductility was obtained for the joint produced with 309L stainless steel-buttering material. High strength of this weld might be attributed to better extent of solid solution strengthening by alloying elements, diffused from low-alloy steel to buttering material.

  19. Fiber laser welding of austenitic steel and commercially pure copper butt joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuryntsev, S. V.; Morushkin, A. E.; Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.

    2017-03-01

    The fiber laser welding of austenitic stainless steel and commercially pure copper in butt joint configuration without filler or intermediate material is presented. In order to melt stainless steel directly and melt copper via heat conduction a defocused laser beam was used with an offset to stainless steel. During mechanical tests the weld seam was more durable than heat affected zone of copper so samples without defects could be obtained. Three process variants of offset of the laser beam were applied. The following tests were conducted: tensile test of weldment, intermediate layer microhardness, optical metallography, study of the chemical composition of the intermediate layer, fractography. Measurements of electrical resistivity coefficients of stainless steel, copper and copper-stainless steel weldment were made, which can be interpreted or recalculated as the thermal conductivity coefficient. It shows that electrical resistivity coefficient of cooper-stainless steel weldment higher than that of stainless steel. The width of intermediate layer between stainless steel and commercially pure copper was 41-53 μm, microhardness was 128-170 HV0.01.

  20. The independence of irradiation creep in austenitic alloys of displacement rate and helium to dpa ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Grossbeck, M.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The majority of high fluence data on the void swelling and irradiation creep of austenitic steels were generated at relatively high displacement rates and relatively low helium/dpa levels that are not characteristic of the conditions anticipated in ITER and other anticipated fusion environments. After reanalyzing the available data, this paper shows that irradiation creep is not directly sensitive to either the helium/dpa ratio or the displacement rate, other than through their possible influence on void swelling, since one component of the irradiation creep rate varies with no correlation to the instantaneous swelling rate. Until recently, however, the non-swelling-related creep component was also thought to exhibit its own strong dependence on displacement rate, increasing at lower fluxes. This perception originally arose from the work of Lewthwaite and Mosedale at temperatures in the 270-350{degrees}C range. More recently this perception was thought to extend to higher irradiation temperatures. It now appears, however, that this interpretation is incorrect, and in fact the steady-state value of the non-swelling component of irradiation creep is actually insensitive to displacement rate. The perceived flux dependence appears to arise from a failure to properly interpret the impact of the transient regime of irradiation creep.