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Sample records for austenite

  1. Carbon Concentration of Austenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ławrynowicz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was carried out to examine the influence of temperature and times of austempering process on the maximum extend towhich the bainite reaction can proceed and the carbon content in retained austenite. It should be noted that a small percentage change in theaustenite carbon content can have a significant effect on the subsequent austempering reaction changing the volume fraction of the phasespresent and hence, the resulting mechanical properties. Specimens were prepared from an unalloyed ductile cast iron, austenitised at 950oCfor 60 minutes and austempered by the conventional single-step austempering process at four temperatures between BS and MS, eg., 250,300, 350 and 400oC. The samples were austempered at these temperatures for 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 minutes and finally quenched toambient temperature. Volume fractions of retained austenite and carbon concentration in the residual austenite have been observed byusing X-ray diffraction. Additionally, carbon concentration in the residual austenite was calculated using volume fraction data of austeniteand a model developed by Bhadeshia based on the McLellan and Dunn quasi-chemical thermodynamic model. The comparison ofexperimental data with the T0, T0' and Ae3' phase boundaries suggests the likely mechanism of bainite reaction in cast iron is displacive rather than diffusional. The carbon concentration in retained austenite demonstrates that at the end of bainite reaction the microstructure must consist of not only ausferrite but additionally precipitated carbides.

  2. Expanded austenite in nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steel grades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casteletti, L.C.; Fernandes, F.A.P.; Heck, S.C.; Gallego, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this work nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steels were analyzed through optical microscopy and X-rays diffraction analysis (XRD). It was observed that the formation of N supersaturated phase, called expanded austenite, has promoted significant increment of hardness (> 1000HV). XRD results have indicated the anomalous displacement of the diffracted peaks, in comparison with the normal austenite. This behavior, combined with peaks broadening, it was analyzed in different nitriding temperatures which results showed good agreement with the literature. (author)

  3. Anelasticity in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-dependent anelastic deformation mechanisms arise in austenitic stainless steel when load is removed during a high-temperature creep test. This phenomenon is investigated by conducting creep tests, with intermittent load removal, on AISI Type 316H austenitic stainless steel at 550 and 650 °C, supported by in situ measurement of creep-induced intergranular residual strains by neutron diffraction. All the cyclic tests exhibit anelastic behaviour on unloading and develop substantially lower load-on creep strain rates, reduced ductility and longer rupture times than baseline steady-load creep tests at similar conditions. The mechanisms underlying the observed anelastic behaviour and changes in macroscopic creep properties are discussed with reference to the development of intergranular strains and dislocation behaviour.

  4. Austenitization of FerriticDuctile Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzyńska A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Austenitization is the first step of heat treatment preceding the isothermal quenching of ductile iron in austempered ductile iron (ADI manufacturing. Usually, the starting material for the ADI production is ductile iron with more convenient pearlitic matrix. In this paper we present the results of research concerning the austenitizing of ductile iron with ferritic matrix, where all carbon dissolved in austenite must come from graphite nodules. The scope of research includedcarrying out the process of austenitization at 900° Cusing a variable times ranging from 5 to 240minutes,and then observations of the microstructure of the samples after different austenitizing times. These were supplemented with micro-hardness testing. The research showed that the process of saturating austenite with carbon is limited by the rate of dissolution of carbon from nodular graphite precipitates

  5. Expanded austenite; crystallography and residual stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The identity of expanded austenite as developing during low temperature nitriding and/or carburizing of austenitic stainless steel has been under debate since the very first observation of this phase. In the present article recent results obtained with i) homogeneous samples of various uniform co...

  6. Expanded austenite, crystallography and residual stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2010-01-01

    The identity of expanded austenite as developing during low temperature nitriding and/or carburising of austenitic stainless steel has been under debate since the very first observation of this phase. In the present article, recent results obtained with (a) homogeneous samples of various uniform ...

  7. Modeling of austenite to ferrite transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It should be noted that the values of the parameters in modeling procedure can be found in an earlier study (Tong et al 2004). 4. Results and discussion. In figures 1(a)–(c), the achieved results from the modeling of austenite to ferrite transformation are exhibited. In figure 1(a), the austenite grains achieved from the normal ...

  8. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    The ultrasonic examination of austenitic stainless steel weld metal has always been regarded as a difficult proposition because of the large and variable ultrasonic attenuations and back scattering obtained from apparently similar weld deposits. The work to be described shows how the existence of a fibre texture within each weld deposit (as a result of epitaxial growth through successive weld beads) produces a systematic variation in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the velocity of sound, depending upon the angle between the ultrasonic beam and the fibre axis. Development work has shown that it is possible to adjust the welding parameters to ensure that the crystallographic texture within each weld is compatible with improved ultrasonic transmission. The application of the results to the inspection of a specific weld in type 316 weld metal is described

  9. Consitutive modeling of metastable austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih

    2008-01-01

    Metastable austenitic stainless steels combine high formability and high strength, which are generally opposing properties in materials. This property is a consequence of the martensitic phase transformation that takes place during deformation. This transformation is purely mechanically induced

  10. Longitudinal wave ultrasonic inspection of austenitic weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, B.S.; Hudgell, R.J.; Seed, H.

    1980-01-01

    Successful volumetric inspection of LMFBR primary circuits, and also much of the secondary circuit, is dependent on the availability of satisfactory examination procedures for austenitic welds. Application of conventional ultrasonic techniques is hampered by the anisotropic, textured structure of the weld metal and this paper describes development work on the use of longitudinal wave techniques. In addition to confirming the dominant effects of the weld structure on ultrasound propagation some results are given of studies utilising deliberately induced defects in Manual Metal Arc Welds in 50 mm plate together with preliminary work on the inspection of narrow austenitic welds fabricated by automatic processes. (author)

  11. Recycle of radiologically contaminated austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imrich, K.J.; Leader, D.R.; Iyer, N.C.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy owns large quantities of radiologically contaminated austenitic stainless steel which could by recycled for reuse if appropriate release standards were in place. Unfortunately, current policy places the formulation of a release standard for USA industry years, if not decades, away. The Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and various university and industrial partners are participating in initiative to recycle previously contaminated austenitic stainless steels into containers for the storage and disposal of radioactive wastes. This paper describes laboratory scale experiments which demonstrated the decontamination and remelt of stainless steel which had been contaminated with radionuclides

  12. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-01-01

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K

  13. Mechanized ultrasonic inspection of austenitic pipe systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dressler, K.; Luecking, J.; Medenbach, S.

    1999-01-01

    The contribution explains the system of standard testing methods elaborated by ABB ZAQ GmbH for inspection of austenitic plant components. The inspection tasks explained in greater detail are basic materials testing (straight pipes, bends, and pipe specials), and inspection of welds and dissimilar welds. The techniques discussed in detail are those for detection and sizing of defects. (orig./CB) [de

  14. Modeling of austenite to ferrite transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this research, an algorithm based on the Q-state Potts model is presented for modeling the austenite to ferrite transformation. In the algorithm, it is possible to exactly track boundary migration of the phase formed during transformation. In the algorithm, effects of changes in chemical free energy, strain free energy ...

  15. Expanded austenite in nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steel grades; Analise da austenita expandida em camadas nitretadas em acos inoxidaveis austeniticos e superaustenitico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casteletti, L.C.; Fernandes, F.A.P.; Heck, S.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia de Materais, Aeronautica e Automobilistica; Oliveira, A.M. [Instituto de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Maranhao (IFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil); Gallego, J., E-mail: gallego@dem.feis.unesp.b [UNESP, Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil). Dept. Engenharia Mecanica

    2010-07-01

    In this work nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steels were analyzed through optical microscopy and X-rays diffraction analysis (XRD). It was observed that the formation of N supersaturated phase, called expanded austenite, has promoted significant increment of hardness (> 1000HV). XRD results have indicated the anomalous displacement of the diffracted peaks, in comparison with the normal austenite. This behavior, combined with peaks broadening, it was analyzed in different nitriding temperatures which results showed good agreement with the literature. (author)

  16. Interpretation of dynamic tensile behavior by austenite stability in ferrite-austenite duplex lightweight steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaeyeong; Jo, Min Cheol; Jeong, Hyeok Jae; Sohn, Seok Su; Kwak, Jai-Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2017-11-16

    Phenomena occurring in duplex lightweight steels under dynamic loading are hardly investigated, although its understanding is essentially needed in applications of automotive steels. In this study, quasi-static and dynamic tensile properties of duplex lightweight steels were investigated by focusing on how TRIP and TWIP mechanisms were varied under the quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. As the annealing temperature increased, the grain size and volume fraction of austenite increased, thereby gradually decreasing austenite stability. The strain-hardening rate curves displayed a multiple-stage strain-hardening behavior, which was closely related with deformation mechanisms. Under the dynamic loading, the temperature rise due to adiabatic heating raised the austenite stability, which resulted in the reduction in the TRIP amount. Though the 950 °C-annealed specimen having the lowest austenite stability showed the very low ductility and strength under the quasi-static loading, it exhibited the tensile elongation up to 54% as well as high strain-hardening rate and tensile strength (1038 MPa) due to appropriate austenite stability under dynamic loading. Since dynamic properties of the present duplex lightweight steels show the excellent strength-ductility combination as well as continuously high strain hardening, they can be sufficiently applied to automotive steel sheets demanded for stronger vehicle bodies and safety enhancement.

  17. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  18. Niobium segregation in the austenitic grain boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, P.R.; Farah, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The segregation of niobium and carbon in the boundary of the old austenitic grain (martensitic sample) of a steel 0,4%C/0,03%Nb, homogenized in 1350 0 C for one hour, with the help of the ionic microprobe, using oxygen as primary beam, is studied. The niobium segregation in Fe /0,58Nb homogenized samples at 1300 0 C by 8 hours and cooled in water, using the electronic microprobe is also studied. (E.G.) [pt

  19. Effect of Austenite Stability on Pack Aluminizing of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Christopher; Kvryan, Armen; Kasnakjian, Shahan; Coronado, Armando; Sujittosakul, Sutine; Villalpando, Obed; Ravi, Vilupanur A.

    2015-01-01

    Aluminide coatings were applied to the surfaces of several austenitic stainless steels—UNS S30300, S30400, S30900, S31000, and S31600 (Type 303, 304, 309, 310, and 316)—by the halide activated pack cementation process. The coating compositions, microstructures, and hardness were determined for the different steels coated at 850°C for 25 h. The stability of the austenite phase for each type of steel was calculated by determining the ratio of the nickel to the chromium equivalents based on their nominal compositions. The thickness of the inner diffusion zone in the coating was shown to be inversely related to the austenite stability of the steels. Microhardness measurements were obtained across the coating thickness and into the substrate. The hardness values followed the same trends as the aluminum composition profile into the substrate.

  20. Solidification cracking in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solidification cracking is a significant problem during the welding of austenitic stainless steels, particularly in fully austenitic and stabilized compositions. Hot cracking in stainless steel welds is caused by low-melting eutectics containing impurities such as S, P and alloy elements such as Ti, Nb. The WRC-92 diagram can be ...

  1. Microstructural evolution in deformed austenitic TWinning Induced Plasticity steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Tol, R.T.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis studies the effect of plastic deformation on the stability of the austenitic microstructure against martensitic transformation and diffusional decomposition and its role in the phenomenon of delayed fracture in austenitic manganese (Mn)-based TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steels.

  2. Reverted austenite in PH 13-8 Mo maraging steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnitzer, Ronald; Radis, Rene; Noehrer, Matthias; Schober, Michael; Hochfellner, Rainer; Zinner, Silvia; Povoden-Karadeniz, E.; Kozeschnik, Ernst; Leitner, Harald

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of maraging steels are strongly influenced by the presence of reverted austenite. In this study, the morphology and chemical composition of reverted austenite in a corrosion resistant maraging steel was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT). Two types of austenite, i.e. granular and elongated, are present after aging at 575 o C, whereby the content of the latter increases during aging. The investigations revealed that the austenite phase is enriched in Ni, which prevents the transformation to martensite during cooling. Inside and next to the austenitc areas, Mo and Cr-rich carbides, which form during the aging treatment, were found. Various aging treatments were performed to obtain the activation energy for the formation of reverted austenite. Additionally, the experimental data are compared with thermodynamic and kinetic simulations. Based on these results and the chemical composition changes of the phases, a model for the formation of reverted austenite is presented. It is concluded that precipitation of B2-ordered NiAl and formation of reverted austenite take place simultaneously during aging and that dissolution of precipitates is not essential for the initial formation of reverted austenite.

  3. Examination of carbon partitioning into austenite during tempering of bainite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero, Francesca G. [CENIM-CSIC, Madrid, Spain; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Clarke, A. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Garcia-Mateo, C. [CENIM-CSIC, Madrid, Spain

    2010-01-01

    The redistribution of carbon after tempering of a novel nanocrystalline bainitic steel consisting of a mixture of supersaturated ferrite and retained austenite has been analyzed by atom probe tomography. No direct evidence supporting the additional carbon enrichment of austenite beyond that initially achieved during the bainite heat treatment was obtained during subsequent tempering of this high carbon, high silicon steel.

  4. Static strain aging in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, S.N.

    1978-07-01

    The static strain aging effects were investigated in austenitic stainless steels by measuring the yield points developed in tensile tests following the arrest of the crosshead for some period of time. The results appear to indicate that the dragging of dislocations in the interval of temperatures from 100 to 300 0 C, where the strain aging is effective, does not apparently depend on the Cottrell's atmosphere. Moreover the influence of the pre-deformation and time on the yield point intensity displayed the existence of stages. The strain aging mechanics and the reasons for the stages were discussed. (Author) [pt

  5. Tribocorrosion wear of austenitic and martensitic steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rozing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of tribocorrosion wear caused by an aggressive acidic media. Tests were conducted on samples made of stainless steel AISI 316L, 304L and 440C. Austenitic steels were tested in their nitrided state and martensitic in quenched and tempered and then induction hardened state. Electrochemical corrosion resistance testing and analysis of the microstructure and hardness in the cross section was carried out on samples of selected steels. To test the possibility of applying surface modification of selected materials in conditions of use, tests were conducted on samples/parts in a worm press for final pressing.

  6. Prediction on Austenite Grain Growth in High Carbon Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The austenite grain growth behavior of Ti-bearing and Ti-free steel was investigated using confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM and transmission electron microscope (TEM.Samples were held for 60min at 1123-1473K and then austenite grain sizes for different holding time at a series of temperatures were measured.The results show that austenite grain size of both steels increases with the increase of temperature.Besides,the austenite grain size of both steels grows with the holding time,which meets parabolic equation.The second phase particle was observed.The equation of Ostwald ripening was introduced to calculate the size of particle,and the volume fraction equation of second phase particle was applied to calculate the volume fraction of particle.Meanwhile,the modified Gladman model was adopted to predict austenite grain growth.The predicted results agree well with the measured results.

  7. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza; Eskandarian, Masoomeh; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld

  8. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by austenitic filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eghlimi, Abbas, E-mail: a.eghlimi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, Morteza [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eskandarian, Masoomeh [Department of Materials Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zabolian, Azam [Department of Natural Resources, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Szpunar, Jerzy A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture across an as-welded dissimilar UNS S32750 super duplex/UNS S30403 austenitic stainless steel joint welded by UNS S30986 (AWS A5.9 ER309LMo) austenitic stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process was evaluated by optical micrography and EBSD techniques. Due to their fabrication through rolling process, both parent metals had texture components resulted from deformation and recrystallization. The weld metal showed the highest amount of residual strain and had large austenite grain colonies of similar orientations with little amounts of skeletal ferrite, both oriented preferentially in the < 001 > direction with cub-on-cube orientation relationship. While the super duplex stainless steel's heat affected zone contained higher ferrite than its parent metal, an excessive grain growth was observed at the austenitic stainless steel's counterpart. At both heat affected zones, austenite underwent some recrystallization and formed twin boundaries which led to an increase in the fraction of high angle boundaries as compared with the respective base metals. These regions showed the least amount of residual strain and highest amount of recrystallized austenite grains. Due to the static recrystallization, the fraction of low degree of fit (Σ) coincident site lattice boundaries, especially Σ3 boundaries, was increased in the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone, while the formation of subgrains in the ferrite phase increased the content of < 5° low angle boundaries at that of the super duplex stainless steel. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Extensive grain growth in the HAZ of austenitic stainless steel was observed. • Intensification of < 100 > orientated grains was observed adjacent to both fusion lines. • Annealing twins with Σ3 CSL boundaries were formed in the austenite of both HAZ. • Cub-on-cube OR was observed between austenite and ferrite in the weld

  9. Measurement and tailoring of residual stress in expanded austenite on austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Winther, Grethe

    2017-01-01

    Expanded austenite on stainless steel with a high interstitial nitrogen content is characterized by elasto-plastic accommodation of the large composition-induced lattice expansion leading to huge compressive residual stress. The elasto-plastic accommodation as well as the (steep) concentration...... profile has implications for the measurement strategy to determine lattice strains and associated residual stresses with X-ray diffraction. Lattice strain measurements were performed on nitrided as well as subsequently de-nitrided expanded austenite on AISI 316L stainless steel, for various grazing...... incidence angles. It is demonstrated that keeping the information depth constant by choosing appropriate combinations of grazing incidence and tilt angle leads to reliable results for the 111 reflection, while the 200 reflection should be avoided. Further, it is shown for the first time that the residual...

  10. Carbon content of austenite in austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, L.C. [Kuang Wu Inst. of Tech. and Commerce, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1998-06-05

    The development of austempered ductile iron (ADI) is a major achievement in cast iron technology. The austempering heat treatment enables the ductile cast iron containing mainly strong bainitic ferrite and ductile carbon-enriched austenite, with some martensite transforms from austenite during cooling down to room temperature. A key factor controlling the stability of the retained austenite can be evaluated soundly using the thermodynamics principles. It is the purpose here to demonstrate that the data of ADI from numerous sources have a similar trend.

  11. Cast alumina forming austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P

    2013-04-30

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy consisting essentially of, in terms of weight percent ranges 0.15-0.5C; 8-37Ni; 10-25Cr; 2.5-5Al; greater than 0.6, up to 2.5 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Nb and Ta; up to 3Mo; up to 3Co; up to 1W; up to 3Cu; up to 15Mn; up to 2Si; up to 0.15B; up to 0.05P; up to 1 total of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Hf, and Zr; steel alloys is also disclosed.

  12. Tough and corrosion resistant austenitic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, T.E.

    1977-01-01

    The invention concerns austenitic alloys of high corrosion resistance, which can be deformed hot and tempered, so that they can be forged, rolled, and drawn into tubes and other shapes. The alloys have a basis of nickel, chromium and iron. The silicon content is between 2 and 4% by weight, and the molybdenum content is between 0 and 2% by weight. The alloys can be hardened by ageing and contain up to 0.1% by weight of boron. The other alloying materials are 1 to 3.5% by weight of manganese, 4 to 7.5% by weight of cobalt, 2.5 to 8% by weight of copper and 0.05 to 0.25% by weight of carbon. (IHOE) [de

  13. Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shunichi; Hida, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Michio; Ando, Tomozumi; Shirai, Tasuku.

    1982-05-01

    Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds has been considered difficult because of the high noise level and remarkable attenuation of ultrasonic waves. To improve flaw detectability in this kind of steel, various inspection techniques have been studied. A series of tests indicated: (1) The longitudinal angle beam transducers newly developed during this study can detect 4.8 mm dia. side drilled holes in dissimilar metal welds (refraction angle: 55 0 from SUS side, 45 0 from CS side) and in cast stainless steel welds (refraction angle: 45 0 , inspection frequency: 1 MHz). (2) Cracks more than 5% t in depth in the heat affected zones of fine-grain stainless steel pipe welds can be detected by the 45 0 shear wave angle beam method (inspection frequency: 2 MHz). (3) The pattern recognition method using frequency analysis technology was presumed useful for discriminating crack signals from spurious echoes. (author)

  14. Low-temperature creep of austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, R. P.; Walsh, R. P.

    2017-09-01

    Plastic deformation under constant load (creep) in austenitic stainless steels has been measured at temperatures ranging from 4 K to room temperature. Low-temperature creep data taken from past and unreported austenitic stainless steel studies are analyzed and reviewed. Creep at cryogenic temperatures of common austenitic steels, such as AISI 304, 310 316, and nitrogen-strengthened steels, such as 304HN and 3116LN, are included. Analyses suggests that logarithmic creep (creep strain dependent on the log of test time) best describe austenitic stainless steel behavior in the secondary creep stage and that the slope of creep strain versus log time is dependent on the applied stress/yield strength ratio. The role of cold work, strain-induced martensitic transformations, and stacking fault energy on low-temperature creep behavior is discussed. The engineering significance of creep on cryogenic structures is discussed in terms of the total creep strain under constant load over their operational lifetime at allowable stress levels.

  15. Nanostructured Bainite-Austenite Steel for Armours Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burian W.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured bainite-austenite steels are applied in the armours construction due to their excellent combination of strength and ductility which enables to lower the armour weight and to improve the protection efficiency. Mechanical properties of the bainite-austenite steels can be controlled in the wide range by chemical composition and heat treatment. In the paper the results of investigation comprising measuring of quasi - static mechanical properties, dynamic yield stress and firing tests of bainite-austenite steel NANOS-BA® are presented. Reported results show that the investigated bainite-austenite steel can be used for constructing add-on armour and that the armour fulfils requirements of protection level 2 of STANAG 4569. Obtained reduction in weight of the tested NANOS-BA® plates in comparison with the present solutions is about 30%.

  16. Effects of austenitizing temperature in quenched niobium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, F.B.C. de; Assuncao, F.C.R.

    1980-01-01

    Three steel compositions with varying Nb content were austenitized at different temperatures and quenched in cold water. Metallographic examination and hardness measurements provided a basis for explaining the hardening mechanism and the role of Nb on the process. (Author) [pt

  17. Chemically Induced Phase Transformation in Austenite by Focused Ion Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basa, Adina; Thaulow, Christian; Barnoush, Afrooz

    2014-03-01

    A highly stable austenite phase in a super duplex stainless steel was subjected to a combination of different gallium ion doses at different acceleration voltages. It was shown that contrary to what is expected, an austenite to ferrite phase transformation occurred within the focused ion beam (FIB) milled regions. Chemical analysis of the FIB milled region proved that the gallium implantation preceded the FIB milling. High resolution electron backscatter diffraction analysis also showed that the phase transformation was not followed by the typical shear and plastic deformation expected from the martensitic transformation. On the basis of these observations, it was concluded that the change in the chemical composition of the austenite and the local increase in gallium, which is a ferrite stabilizer, results in the local selective transformation of austenite to ferrite.

  18. Ion-nitriding of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, O.; Hertz, D.; Lebrun, J.P.; Michel, H.

    1995-01-01

    Although ion-nitriding is an extensively industrialized process enabling steel surfaces to be hardened by nitrogen diffusion, with a resulting increase in wear, seizure and fatigue resistance, its direct application to stainless steels, while enhancing their mechanical properties, also causes a marked degradation in their oxidation resistance. However, by adaption of the nitriding process, it is possible to maintain the improved wear resistant properties while retaining the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel. The controlled diffusion permits the growth of a nitrogen supersaturated austenite layer on parts made of stainless steel (AISI 304L and 316L) without chromium nitride precipitation. The diffusion layer remains stable during post heat treatments up to 650 F for 5,000 hrs and maintains a hardness of 900 HV. A very low and stable friction coefficient is achieved which provides good wear resistance against stainless steels under diverse conditions. Electrochemical and chemical tests in various media confirm the preservation of the stainless steel characteristics. An example of the application of this process is the treatment of Reactor Control Rod Cluster Assemblies (RCCAs) for Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactors

  19. Austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G. D.; Powell, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    This invention describes a composition for an austenitic stainless steel which has been found to exhibit improved high temperature stress rupture properties. The composition of this alloy is about (in wt. %): 12.5 to 14.5 Cr; 14.5 to 16.5 Ni; 1.5 to 2.5 Mo; 1.5 to 2.5 Mn; 0.1 to 0.4 Ti; 0.02 to 0.08 C; 0.5 to 1.0 Si; 0.01 maximum, N; 0.02 to 0.008 P; 0.002 to 0.008 B; 0.004-0.0010 S; 0.02-0.05 Nb; 0.01-0.05 V; 0.005-0.02 Ta; 0.02-0.05 Al; 0.01-0.04 Cu; 0.02-0.05 Co; 0.03 maximum, As; 0.01 maximum, O; 0.01 maximum, Zr; and with the balance of the alloy being essentially iron. The carbon content of the alloy is adjusted such that wt. % Ti/(wt. % C+wt. % N) is between 4 and 6, and most preferably about 5. In addition the sum of the wt. % P+wt. % B+wt. % S is at least 0.03 wt. %. This alloy is believed to be particularly well suited for use as fast breeder reactor fuel element cladding

  20. Effect of austenitization conditions on kinetics of isothermal transformation of austenite of structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopleva, E.V.; Bayazitov, V.M.; Abramov, O.V.; Kozlova, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    Effect of austenization of kinetics of pearlite and bainite transformations for steels with different carbon content differing by alloying character and degree has been investigated. Austenization temperature increase is shown to leads to retardation of ferrite-pearlite transformation in low- and medium-carbon alloyed steels. Step-like holding in the region of austenite stable state (850, 950 deg) after high-temperature heating (1100 deg C) increases the rate of transformation partially recovering its kinetics and decomposition velocity after low-temperature heating in steels alloyed advantageously with carbide-forming elements (08Kh2G2F, 30Kh3) and does not affect kinetics in the 35Kh, 30KhGSN2A, 45N5 steels. Increase of heating temperature and growth of an austenite grain cause considerable acceleration of bainite transformation, increase of the temperaure of bainite transformation beginning and increase of the transformation amplitude in the 08Kh2G2F, 30Kh3 steels and affect weakly kinetics in steels with mixed alloying (30KhGSN2A) or low-alloy one (35Kh). The bainite transformation rate in the 45N5 steelite does not depend on austenization. The effect of additional acceleration of bainite transformation as a result holding after high-temperature heating in those steels, where activation of transformation occurs with increase of heating temperature

  1. Modeling of Non-isothermal Austenite Formation in Spring Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Wang, Baoyu; Tang, Xuefeng; Li, Junling

    2017-12-01

    The austenitization kinetics description of spring steel 60Si2CrA plays an important role in providing guidelines for industrial production. The dilatometric curves of 60Si2CrA steel were measured using a dilatometer DIL805A at heating rates of 0.3 K to 50 K/s (0.3 °C/s to 50 °C/s). Based on the dilatometric curves, a unified kinetics model using the internal state variable (ISV) method was derived to describe the non-isothermal austenitization kinetics of 60Si2CrA, and the abovementioned model models the incubation and transition periods. The material constants in the model were determined using a genetic algorithm-based optimization technique. Additionally, good agreement between predicted and experimental volume fractions of transformed austenite was obtained, indicating that the model is effective for describing the austenitization kinetics of 60Si2CrA steel. Compared with other modeling methods of austenitization kinetics, this model, which uses the ISV method, has some advantages, such as a simple formula and explicit physics meaning, and can be probably used in engineering practice.

  2. Abnormal growth of austenite grain of low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qingbo; Sun Ying

    2006-01-01

    Niobium is an important alloying element for the steel. To know further the effect of Nb in the steel, the contrast experiments on the austenite grain growth of the 0.015%Nb and free Nb steels were carried out using Gleeble 1500 thermomechanical simulator. The experimental results indicate that the austenite grain of 0.015%Nb steel is finer than that of Nb free steel at 1150-1230 deg. C. And when the heating temperature arrives the critical temperature 1240 deg. C, the austenite grain of Nb steel suddenly grows up, while the austenite grain of Nb free steel changes little. Finally, the austenite grain of Nb steel is obviously coarser than that of Nb free steel. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using a carbon extraction replica technique, the precipitates of Nb(C,N) were not observed in the 0.015%Nb steel. It is concluded that the grain-boundary internal adsorption of Nb atoms leads to the result

  3. Solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel filler metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Braski, D.N.

    1980-02-01

    Thermal analysis and interrupted solidification experiments on selected austenitic stainless steel filler metals provided an understanding of the solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel welds. The sequences of phase separations found were for type 308 stainless steel filler metal, L + L + delta + L + delta + γ → γ + delta, and for type 310 stainless steel filler metal, L → L + γ → γ. In type 308 stainless steel filler metal, ferrite at room temperature was identified as either the untransformed primary delta-ferrite formed during the initial stages of solidification or the residual ferrite after Widmanstaetten austenite precipitation. Microprobe and scanning transmission electron microscope microanalyses revealed that solute extensively redistributes during the transformation of primary delta-ferrite to austenite, leading to enrichment and stabilization of ferrite by chromium. The type 310 stainless steel filler metal investigated solidifies by the primary crystallization of austenite, with the transformation going to completion at the solidus temperature. In our samples residual ferrite resulting from solute segregation was absent at the intercellular or interdendritic regions

  4. Influence of Parameters of Quenching and Partitioning Process on Microstructure and Fraction of Retained Austenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shirali

    2015-07-01

    of partitioning temperature made the retained austenite films become thicker and its volume fraction increase. On the other hand, by increasing the quenching temperature, carbon content of retained austenite increased sharply.

  5. Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties in Dissimilar Austenitic/Super Duplex Stainless Steel Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Mehdi; Eghlimi, Abbas; Shamanian, Morteza

    2014-10-01

    To study the effect of chemical composition on microstructural features and mechanical properties of dissimilar joints between super duplex and austenitic stainless steels, welding was attempted by gas tungsten arc welding process with a super duplex (ER2594) and an austenitic (ER309LMo) stainless steel filler metal. While the austenitic weld metal had vermicular delta ferrite within austenitic matrix, super duplex stainless steel was mainly comprised of allotriomorphic grain boundary and Widmanstätten side plate austenite morphologies in the ferrite matrix. Also the heat-affected zone of austenitic base metal comprised of large austenite grains with little amounts of ferrite, whereas a coarse-grained ferritic region was observed in the heat-affected zone of super duplex base metal. Although both welded joints showed acceptable mechanical properties, the hardness and impact strength of the weld metal produced using super duplex filler metal were found to be better than that obtained by austenitic filler metal.

  6. Influence of cooling conditions and amount of retained austenite on the fracture of austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VYACHESLAV GORYANY

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available SEM Analysis of fracture surfaces from tensile test specimens of thick-walled, austempered ductile irons (diameter 160 mm shows different fracture behavior depending on the austenite retained in the matrix. The results show ductile fractures only in areas containing retained austenite sections. In section areas without or with a very low content of retained austenite, only brittle fracture without any plastic deformation occurs. The content of retained austenite determines the amount of ductile fracture in the microstructure.

  7. Precipitation reactions in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoch, M.; Yung-Shih Chen

    1979-01-01

    The precipitation reactions for commercial austenitic stainless steels (AISI type 347, 321, 316, 316L, 304 and 304L) and Ti-modified AISI type 316 SS were studied in the temperature range of 750 0 C-1350 0 C. Specimens were held at the temperature for 15 to 25 hours to ensure that equilibrium conditions were reached and followed by a water quench to prevent further precipitation reactions during cooling process. The precipitates were extracted from bulk specimens by anodic dissolution and identified by x-ray diffraction analysis. In Ti-stabilized 321 SS, large TiN and Ti 2 S (Ti 4 C 2 S2) precipitates were present in solution treated and subsequent annealed specimens. Small TiC precipitates were present in specimens annealed below 1150 0 C. The M 23 C 6 precipitates were found to be present after annealing at 850 0 C for 25 hours. The amount of M 23 C 6 was found to increase with decreased Ti content as shown in the Ti-motified 316 SS. In Nb-stabilized 347 SS, Nb(CN) precipitates were present in solution treated as well as annealed specimens. The M 23 C 6 precipitates were detected at an annealing temperature of 1050 0 C, which is higher than the precipitation temperature detected in 321 SS. Thermodynamic calculations were carried out to obtain the temperature where precipitation starts, and the temperatures where 50, 90 and 99% of the precipitates should be formed. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the calculations. (orig.) [de

  8. High cycle fatigue of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, J.P.; Lehmann, D.; Picker

    1990-01-01

    This study concerns the evaluation of material data to be used in LMFBR design codes. High cycle fatigue properties of three austenitic stainless steels are evaluated: type AISI 316 (UKAEA tests), type AISI 316L (CEA tests) and type AISI 304 (Interatom tests). The data on these steels comprised some 550 data points from 14 casts. This data set covered a wide range of testing parameters: temperature from 20-625 0 C, frequency from 1-20 000 Hz, constant amplitude and random fatigue loading, with and without mean stress, etc. However, the testing conditions chosen by the three partners differed considerably because they had been fixed independently and not harmonized prior to the tests. This created considerable difficulties for the evaluations. Experimental procedures and statistical treatments used for the three subsets of data are described and discussed. Results are presented in tables and graphs. Although it is often difficult to single out the influence of each parameter due to the different testing conditions, several interesting conclusions can be drawn: The HCF properties of the three steels are consistent with the 0.2% proof stress, the fatigue limit being larger than the latter at temperatures above 550 0 C. The type 304 steel has lower tensile properties than the two other steels and hence also lower HCF properties. Parameters which clearly have a significant effect of HCF behaviour are mean stress or R-ratio (less in the non-endurance region than in the endurance region), temperature, cast or product. Other parameters have probably a weak or no effect but it is difficult to conclude due to insufficient data: environment, specimen orientation, frequency, specimen geometry

  9. Austenitic Reversion of Cryo-rolled Ti-Stabilized Austenitic Stainless Steel: High-Resolution EBSD Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiamiyu, A. A.; Odeshi, A. G.; Szpunar, J. A.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) was cryo-rolled and subsequently annealed at 650 and 800 °C to reverse BCC α'-martensite to FCC γ-austenite. The texture evolution associated with the reversion at the selected temperatures was investigated using high-resolution EBSD. After the reversion, TiC precipitates were observed to be more stable in 650 °C-annealed specimens than those reversed at 800 °C. {110} texture was mainly developed in specimens subjected to both annealing temperatures. However, specimens reversed at 650 °C have stronger texture than those annealed at 800 °C, even at the higher annealing time. The strong intensity of {110} texture component is attributed to the ability of AISI 321 ASS to memorize the crystallographic orientation of the deformed austenite, a phenomenon termed texture memory. The development of weaker texture in 800 °C-annealed specimens is attributed to the residual strain relief in grains, dissolution of grain boundary precipitates, and an increase in atomic migration along the grain boundaries. Based on the observed features of the reversed austenite grains and estimation from an existing model, it is suspected that the austenite reversion at 650 and 800 °C undergone diffusional and martensitic shear reversion, respectively.

  10. Nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Ren, Yibin

    2010-02-01

    The adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have prompted the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel in medical stainless steels, the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steels, and emphatically, the development of high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength and good plasticity, better corrosion and wear resistances, and superior biocompatibility compared to the currently used 316L stainless steel, the newly developed high-nitrogen nickel-free stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventional medical stainless steels.

  11. Effect of multiple austenitizing treatments on HT-9 steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emigh, R.A.

    1985-12-01

    The effect of multiple austenitizing treatments on the toughness of an Fe-12Cr-1.0Mo-0.5W-0.3V (HT-9) steel was studied. The resulting microstructures were characterized by their mechanical properties, precipitated carbide distribution, and fracture surface appearance. It was proposed that multiple transformations would refine the martensite structure and improve toughness. Optical and scanning electron microscopic observations revealed that the martensite packet structure was somewhat refined by a second austenite transformation. Transmission electron microscopy studies of carbon extraction replicas showed that this multiple step treatment had eliminated grain boundary carbide films seen in single treated specimens on prior austenite grain boundaries. The 0.2% yield strength, tensile strength, and elongation were relatively unchanged, but the toughness measured by fatigue pre-cracked Charpy impact tests increased for the multiple step specimens

  12. Hydrogen induced ductility losses in austenitic stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, J.A.; West, A.J.

    1978-06-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the tensile behavior of austenitic stainless steel welds was studied in two AISI 300 series alloys and two nitrogen strengthened alloys. The microstructure of these welds typically contained several percent ferrite in an austenite matrix. Hydrogen was found to reduce the ductility of all welds; however, the severity of ductility loss decreased with increasing stacking fault energy, as observed in previous studies on wrought material. In the lowest stacking fault energy welds, 304L and 308L, hydrogen changed the fracture mode from simple rupture to a mixed mode of ductile and brittle fracture associated with the austenite ferrite interface. Higher stacking fault energy welds, 309S and 22-13-5, showed smaller losses in ductility. In these materials hydrogen assisted the ductile rupture process by aiding void growth and coalescence, without changing the fracture mode. Varying the amount of ferrite from approximately one to 10 percent had no significant effect on performance in hydrogen.

  13. Pearlitic Lamellae Spheroidisation During Austenitization and Subsequent Temperature Hold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauserova D.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Typical processing routes for bearing steels include a soft annealing stage. The purpose of this procedure is to obtain a microstructure containing globular carbides in ferritic matrix. A newly developed process called ASR (Accelerated Spheroidisation and Refinement cuts the carbide spheroidisation times several fold, producing considerably finer globular carbides than conventional soft annealing. Finer microstructure also leads to more homogeneous and finer structure after final hardening process. The present paper explores process of the accelerated spheroidisation (ASR in steel 100CrMnSi6-4 with initial pearlitic structure. Cementite lamellae morphology was observed in different stages of austenitization. The heat treatment was performed using induction heating in quenching dilatometer. There was analysed influence of austenitization temperature and austenitization time on spheroidisation. Hardness and carbide morphology was observed. Deep etching was used to reveal evolution of cementitic lamellae fragmentation. It is favourable process especially in induction treatment of small parts.

  14. On the elusive crystal structure of expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Bastian; Ståhl, Kenny; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2017-01-01

    No consistent structural description exists for expanded austenite that accurately accounts for the hkl-dependent peak shifts and broadening observed in diffraction experiments. The best available description for homogeneous samples is a face-centered cubic lattice with stacking faults. Here Debye...... simulations of stacking fault effects were compared to experimental data for macro-stress free homogeneous expanded austenite to show that a faulted structure cannot explain the observed peak displacement anomalies. Instead it is argued that the shifts are the combined result of elastic and plastic anisotropy...

  15. Failure of austenitic stainless steel tubes during steam generator operation

    OpenAIRE

    M. Głowacka; J. Łabanowski; S. Topolska

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: of this study is to analyze the causes of premature failure of steam generator coil made of austenitic stainless steel. Special attention is paid to corrosion damage processes within the welded joints.Design/methodology/approach: Examinations were conducted several segments of the coil made of seamless cold-formed pipes Ø 23x2.3 mm, of austenitic stainless steel grade X6CrNiTi18-10 according to EN 10088-1:2007. The working time of the device was 6 months. The reason for the withdrawa...

  16. Uncertainty in retained austenite measurements applied to individual crystallographic orientations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creuziger, A.; Gnäupel-Herold, T.

    2015-04-01

    A technique to measure the phase volume fraction of an individual orientation and the uncertainty in the measurement is demonstrated in this paper. The technique of complete pole figure averaging using neutron diffraction was used to assess the phase fraction of retained austenite in transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels and quantify the uncertainty in the phase fraction. In parallel, an ensemble of orientation distribution functions was calculated to assess crystallographic volume fractions of particular orientations and the uncertainty of these volume fractions using Monte Carlo techniques. These methods were combined to measure the retained austenite phase volume fraction of an individual orientation.

  17. Examination of carbon partitioning into austenite during tempering of bainite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, Amy J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caballero, Francisca G [CENIM-CSIC, MADRIS, SPAIN; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Garcia - Mateo, C [CENIM-CSIC, MADRID, SPAIN

    2010-01-01

    The redistribution of carbon after tempering of a novel nanocrystalline bainitic steel consisting of a mixture of supersaturated ferrite and retained austenite, has been analyzed by atom probe tomography. Direct supporting evidence of additional austenite carbon enrichment beyond that initially achieved during the bainite heat treatment was not obtained during subsequent tempering of this high carbon, high silicon steel. Evidence of competing reactions during tempering, such as the formation of carbon clusters in bainitic ferrite that signify the onset of the transitional carbides precipitation, was observed.

  18. Oxidation resistant high creep strength austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Pint, Bruce A.; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Maziasz, Philip J.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Lu, Zhao P.

    2010-06-29

    An austenitic stainless steel displaying high temperature oxidation and creep resistance has a composition that includes in weight percent 15 to 21 Ni, 10 to 15 Cr, 2 to 3.5 Al, 0.1 to 1 Nb, and 0.05 to 0.15 C, and that is free of or has very low levels of N, Ti and V. The alloy forms an external continuous alumina protective scale to provide a high oxidation resistance at temperatures of 700 to 800.degree. C. and forms NbC nanocarbides and a stable essentially single phase fcc austenitic matrix microstructure to give high strength and high creep resistance at these temperatures.

  19. Investigations on the fracture toughness of austempered ductile irons austenitized at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, P. Prasad; Putatunda, Susil K

    2003-05-25

    Ductile cast iron was austenitized at four different temperatures and subsequently austempered at six different temperatures. Plane strain fracture toughness was evaluated under all the heat treatment conditions and correlated with the microstructural features such as the austenite content and the carbon content of the austenite. Fracture mechanism was studied by scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the optimum austempering temperature for maximum fracture toughness decreased with increasing austenitizing temperature. This could be interpreted in terms of the microstructural features. A study of the fracture mechanism revealed that good fracture toughness is unlikely to be obtained when austempering temperature is less than half of the austenitizing temperature on the absolute scale.

  20. Analysis of the retained austenite stability in TRIP steels by X-ray and neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Dong Min; Choi, Il Dong; Shin, Eun Joo

    2005-01-01

    The energy absorption of an automotive sheet steel during crash, that is, at a high speed deformation is very important to the safety of passengers. Therefore, property data and deformation mechanisms of materials under high strain rate conditions are needed to choose proper materials for automobiles. Dynamic mechanical properties of low carbon TRIP steels with varying retained austenite stabilities were evaluated over a wide range of strain rates using a high-velocity hydraulic tensile testing machine. The effect of retained austenite stability on high speed deformation behavior can be evaluated by the proper estimation of transformation in retained austenite. The quantity of transformed retained austenite after deformation was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and high resolution neutron diffraction and compared the results from two test methods. The carbon in retained austenite was analyzed by neutron diffraction. High stability retained austenite has higher carbon content than low stability retained austenite and transformed slowly

  1. The Varying Effects of Uniaxial Compressive Stress on the Bainitic Transformation under Different Austenitization Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxing Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, thermal simulation experiments under different austenitization temperatures and different stress states were conducted. High-temperature laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM, thermal dilatometry, and scanning electron microscope (SEM were used to quantitatively investigate the effects of the uniaxial compressive stress on bainitic transformation at 330 °C following different austenitization temperatures. The transformation plasticity was also analyzed. It was found that the promotion degree of stress on bainitic transformation increases with the austenitization temperature due to larger prior austenite grain size as well as stronger promoting effect of mechanical driving force on selected variant growth at higher austenitization temperatures. The grain size and the yield strength of prior austenite are other important factors which influence the promotion degree of stress on bainitic transformation, besides the mechanical driving force provided by the stress. Moreover, the transformation plasticity increases with the austenitization temperature.

  2. Assessment of Deformation Twinning in Cold Rolled Austenitic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deformation twinning has traditionally been studied with Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). In this study, an assessment of deformation twinning in Austenitic Stainless Steel (ASS), type 304L, cold rolled to 20% reduction was investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Electron Back Scatter ...

  3. Effect of shot peening on metastable austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fargas, G.; Roa, J.J.; Mateo, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, shot peening was performed in a metastable austenitic stainless steel EN 1.4318 (AISI 301LN) in order to evaluate its effect on austenite to martensite phase transformation and also the influence on the fatigue limit. Two different steel conditions were considered: annealed, i.e., with a fully austenitic microstructure, and cold rolled, consisting of a mixture of austenite and martensite. X-ray diffraction, electron back-scattered diffraction and focus ion beam, as well as nanoindentation techniques, were used to elucidate deformation mechanisms activated during shot peening and correlate with fatigue response. Results pointed out that extensive plastic deformation and phase transformation developed in annealed specimens as a consequence of shot peening. However, the increase of roughness and the generation of microcracks led to a limited fatigue limit improvement. In contrast, shot peened cold rolled specimens exhibited enhanced fatigue limit. In the latter case, the main factor that determined the influence on the fatigue response was the distance from the injector, followed successively by the exit speed of the shots and the coverage factor

  4. To the corrosion of austenitic steels in sodium loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schad, M.

    1978-03-01

    This report describes the comparison between experimental corrosion and calculated corrosion effects on austenitic steels exposed to liquid sodium. As basis for the calculations served a diffusion model. The comparison showed that the model is able to predict the corrosion effects. In addition the model was used to calculate the corrosion effect along an actual fuel rod. (orig.) [de

  5. Cyclic deformation behaviour of austenitic steels at ambient and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. The aim of the present investigation is to characterise cyclic deforma- tion behaviour and plasticity-induced martensite formation of metastable austenitic stainless steels at ambient and elevated temperatures, taking into account the influ- ence of the alloying elements titanium and niobium. Titanium and niobium are.

  6. Phase Transformation of Metastable Austenite in Steel during Nano indentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Taehong; Lee, Sung Bo; Han, Heung Nam; Park, Kyungtae

    2013-01-01

    These can produce geometrical softening accompanied by a sudden displacement excursion during load-controlled nanoindentation, which referred to in the literature as a pop-in. In this study, phase transformation of metastable austenite to stress-induced ε martensite which causes pop-ins during nanoindentation of steel will be reported and discussed. This study investigated the relationship between pop-in behavior of austenite in the early stage of nanoindentation and formation of ε martensite based on microstructural analyses. The load-displacement curve obtained from nanoindentation revealed stepwise pop-ins in the early stage of plastic deformation. From analyses of high resolution TEM images, a cluster of banded structure under the indent turned out a juxtaposition of (111) planes of γ austenite and (0001) planes of ε martensite. The calculation of displacement along indentation axis for (111) slip system by formation of ε martensite showed that geometrical softening can also occur by ε martensite formation when considering that the stress-induced ε martensite transformation is the predominant deformation mode in the early stage of plastic deformation and its monopartial nature as well. These microstructural investigations strongly suggest that the pop-in behavior in the early stage of plastic deformation of austenite is closely related to the formation of ε martensite

  7. Phase Transformation of Metastable Austenite in Steel during Nano indentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Taehong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Bo; Han, Heung Nam [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyungtae [Hanbat National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    These can produce geometrical softening accompanied by a sudden displacement excursion during load-controlled nanoindentation, which referred to in the literature as a pop-in. In this study, phase transformation of metastable austenite to stress-induced ε martensite which causes pop-ins during nanoindentation of steel will be reported and discussed. This study investigated the relationship between pop-in behavior of austenite in the early stage of nanoindentation and formation of ε martensite based on microstructural analyses. The load-displacement curve obtained from nanoindentation revealed stepwise pop-ins in the early stage of plastic deformation. From analyses of high resolution TEM images, a cluster of banded structure under the indent turned out a juxtaposition of (111) planes of γ austenite and (0001) planes of ε martensite. The calculation of displacement along indentation axis for (111) slip system by formation of ε martensite showed that geometrical softening can also occur by ε martensite formation when considering that the stress-induced ε martensite transformation is the predominant deformation mode in the early stage of plastic deformation and its monopartial nature as well. These microstructural investigations strongly suggest that the pop-in behavior in the early stage of plastic deformation of austenite is closely related to the formation of ε martensite.

  8. Carbon diffusion in carbon-supersaturated ferrite and austenite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jiří; Král, Lubomír

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 586, FEB (2014), s. 129-135 ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0148; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : carbon diffusion * Carbon supersaturation * Carbon supersaturation * Ferrite * Austenite Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 2.999, year: 2014

  9. Retained austenite stability investigation in TRIP steel using neutron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zrník, J.; Muránsky, Ondrej; Lukáš, Petr; Nový, Z.; Šittner, Petr; Horňák, P.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 437, č. 1 (2006), s. 114-119 ISSN 0921-5093 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : TRIP steel * austenite conditioning * neutron diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.490, year: 2006

  10. Factors which determine the swelling rate of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Once void nucleation subsides, the swelling rate of many austenitic alloys becomes rather insensitive to variables that control the transient regime of swelling. Models are presented which describe the roles of nickel, chromium and silicon in void nucleation. The relative insensitivity of steady-state swelling to temperature, displacement rate and composition is also discussed

  11. Nitrogen and carbon expanded austenite produced by PIII

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blawert, C.; Kalvelage, H.; Mordike, B. L.; Collins, G. A.; Short, K. T.; Jirásková, Yvonna; Schneeweiss, Oldřich

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 136, č. 1 (2001), s. 181-187 ISSN 0257-8972 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 516.60 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : austenite * plasma immersion ion implantation * carbonitride Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.236, year: 2001

  12. Control of relaxation cracking in austenitic high temperature components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortel, J.C. van

    2007-01-01

    The degradation mechanism "relaxation cracking" is acting in austenitic components operating between 550°C (1020°F) and 750°C (1380°F). The brittle failures are always located in cold formed areas or in welded joints and are mostly addressed within 1 year service. More than 10 different names can be

  13. Thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fissolo, A.

    2001-01-01

    This report deals with the thermal fatigue cracking of austenitic stainless steels as AISI 316 LN and 304 L. Such damage has been clearly observed for some components used in Fast Breeder reactors (FBR) and Pressure Water Reactor (PWR). In order to investigate thermal fatigue, quasi-structural specimen have been used. In this frame, facilities enforcing temperature variations similar to those found under the operation conditions have been progressively developed. As for components, loading results from impeded dilatation. In the SPLASH facility, the purpose was to establish accurate crack initiation conditions in order to check the relevance of the usual component design methodology. The tested specimen is continuously heated by the passage of an electrical DC current, and submitted to cyclic thermal down shock (up to 1000 deg C/s) by means of periodical spraying of water on two opposite specimen faces. The number of cycles to crack initiation N i is deduced from periodic examinations of the quenched surfaces, by means of optical microscopy. It is considered that initiation occurs when at least one 50μm to 150□m long crack is observed. Additional SPLASH tests were performed for N >> N i , with a view to investigate the evolution of a surface multiple cracking network with the number of cycles N. The CYTHIA test was mainly developed for the purpose of assessing crack growth dynamics of one isolated crack in thermal fatigue conditions. Specimens consist of thick walled tubes with a 1 mm circular groove is spark-machined at the specimen centre. During the test, the external wall of the tube is periodically heated by using a HF induction coil (1 MHz), while its internal wall is permanently cooled by flowing water. Total crack growth is derived from post-mortem examinations, whereby the thermal fatigue final rupture surface is oxidized at the end of the test. The specimen is broken afterwards under mechanical fatigue at room temperature. All the tests confirm that

  14. Kinetics of austenite-ferrite and austenite-pearlite transformations in a 1025 carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawbolt, E. B.; Chau, B.; Brimacombe, J. K.

    1985-04-01

    Isothermal and continuous-cooling transformation kinetics have been measured dilatometrically for the γ → α + γ' and γ' → P reactions in a 1025 steel. The isothermal transformation of austenite for each reaction was found to fit the Avrami equation after the fraction transformed was normalized to unity at the completion of the reaction and a transformation-start time was determined. The transformation kinetics under isothermal conditions therefore were characterized in terms of the n and b parameters from the Avrami equation together with the transformation-start times. The parameter n was found to be independent of temperature over the range studied (645 to 760 ‡C) and to have values of 0.99 and 1.33 for the ferrite and pearlite reactions, respectively. This indicates that the nucleation condition is essentially constant and site saturation occurs early in the transformation process. The continuous-cooling experiments were conducted at cooling rates of 2 to 150 ‡C per second to determine the transformation-start times for the ferrite and pearlite reactions and the completion time for transformation to pearlite under CCT conditions. Both reactions were found to obey the Additivity Principle for continuous cooling provided that the incubation (pre-transformation) period was not included in the transformation time. The isothermal transformation data and CCT transformation-start times have been incorporated in a mathematical model to predict continuous-cooling transformation kinetics that agree closely with measurements made at three cooling rates.

  15. Laser borided composite layer produced on austenitic 316L steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikołajczak Daria

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Austenitic 316L steel is well-known for its good resistance to corrosion and oxidation. Therefore, this material is often used wherever corrosive media or high temperatures are to be expected. The main drawback of this material is very low hardness and low resistance to mechanical wear. In this study, the laser boriding was used in order to improve the wear behavior of this material. As a consequence, a composite surface layer was produced. The microstructure of laser-borided steel was characterized by only two zones: re-melted zone and base material. In the re-melted zone, a composite microstructure, consisting of hard ceramic phases (borides and a soft austenitic matrix, was observed. A significant increase in hardness and wear resistance of such a layer was obtained.

  16. Carbides nucleation and growth processes in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, F.A.; Otero, E.; Ballester, A.; Leiro, J.

    1986-01-01

    The nucleation and growth process at some carbides with high chromium content inside an austenitic matrix corresponding to a 304 type inoxidable steel are studied. The precipitate growth seems to be controlled, at least at temperatures above 973 K, by the diffusion of carbon atoms from the matrix phase to the beginning of the second phase which is normally placed in the grain boundaries. A relationship between the percentage of precipitated carbide, as a function of the carbon excess in the saturated austenitic solid solution, and the time employed for each work temperature is established. From these data, some aspects relating to the morphologie, the carbide localization and the influence of these factors in the steel sensibilization to the grain corrosion, are interpreted. (author)

  17. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of Solidified Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aktaş Çelik G.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the family of stainless steels, cast austenitic stainless steels (CASSs are preferably used due to their high mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. These steels owe their properties to their microstructural features consisting of an austenitic matrix and skeletal or lathy type δ-ferrite depending on the cooling rate. In this study, the solidification behavior of CASSs (304L and 316L grades was studied using ThermoCalc software in order to determine the solidification sequence and final microstructure during cooling. Theoretical findings were supported by the microstructural examinations. For the mechanical characterization, not only hardness measurements but also tribological studies were carried out under dry sliding conditions and worn surfaces were examined by microscopy and 3D profilometric analysis. Results were discussed according to the type and amount of microstructural features.

  18. Thermodynamic stability of austenitic Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janus

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The performed research was aimed at determining thermodynamic stability of structures of Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron castings. Examined were 35 alloys. The castings were tempered at 900 °C for 2 hours. Two cooling speeds were used: furnace-cooling and water-cooling. In the alloys with the nickel equivalent value less than 20,0 %, partial transition of austenite to martensite took place. The austenite decomposition ratio and the related growth of hardness was higher for smaller nickel equivalent value and was clearly larger in annealed castings than in hardened ones. Obtaining thermodynamically stable structure of castings requires larger than 20,0 % value of the nickel equivalent.

  19. Electron microscopy and plastic deformation of industrial austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Barry

    1976-01-01

    The different mechanisms of plastic deformation observed in austenitic stainless steels are described and the role of transmission electron microscopy in the elucidation of the mechanisms is presented. At temperatures below 0,5Tm, different variants of dislocation glide are competitive: slip of perfect and partial dislocations, mechanical twinning and strain-induced phase transformations. The predominance of one or other of these mechanisms can be rationalized in terms of the temperature and composition dependence of the stacking fault energy and the thermodynamic stability of the austenite. At temperatures above 0,5Tm dislocation climb and diffusion of point defects become increasingly important and at these temperatures recovery, recrystallization and precipitation can also occur during deformation [fr

  20. Residual stress studies of austenitic and ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrenko, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    Residual studies have been made on austenitic and ferritic steels of the types used as structural materials. The residual stress results presented here will include residual stress measurements in the heat-affected zone on butt welded Type 304 stainless steel pipes, and the stresses induced in Type 304 austenitic stainless steel and Type A508 ferritic steel by several surface preparations. Such surface preparation procedures as machining and grinding can induce large directionality effects in the residual stresses determined by X-ray techniques and some typical data will be presented. A brief description is given of the mobile X-ray residual stress apparatus used to obtain most of the data in these studies. (author)

  1. Diagnostic experimental results on the hydrogen embrittlement of austenitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavriljuk, V.G.; Shivanyuk, V.N.; Foct, J

    2003-03-14

    Three main available hypotheses of hydrogen embrittlement are analysed in relation to austenitic steels based on the studies of the hydrogen effect on the interatomic bonds, phase transformations and microplastic behaviour. It is shown that hydrogen increases the concentration of free electrons, i.e. enhances the metallic character of atomic interactions, although such a decrease in the interatomic bonding cannot be a reason for brittleness and rather assists an increased plasticity. The hypothesis of the critical role of the hydrogen-induced {epsilon} martensite was tested in the experiment with the hydrogen-charged Si-containing austenitic steel. Both the fraction of the {epsilon} martensite and resistance to hydrogen embrittlement were increased due to Si alloying, which is at variance with the pseudo-hydride hypothesis. The hydrogen-caused early start of the microplastic deformation and an increased mobility of dislocations, which are usually not observed in the common mechanical tests, are revealed by the measurements of the strain-dependent internal friction, which is consistent with the hypothesis of the hydrogen-enhanced localised plasticity. An influence of alloying elements on the enthalpy E{sub H} of hydrogen migration in austenitic steels is studied using the temperature-dependent internal friction and a correlation is found between the values of E{sub H} and hydrogen-caused decrease in plasticity. A mechanism for the transition from the hydrogen-caused microplasticity to the apparent macrobrittle fracture is proposed based on the similarity of the fracture of hydrogenated austenitic steels to that of high nitrogen steels.

  2. Creep embrittlement of austenitic stainless steels with titanium addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felsen, M.F.

    1983-04-01

    Some cold-worked austenitic stainless steels of the 316 type with titanium addition exhibit a low creep ductility and a notch sensitivity in the temperature range of 550 0 C to 750 0 C and for times to rupture from 10 to 10000 hours. It has been shown that this embrittlement increases highly with cold-work percentage, with solution annealing temperature, and depends on chemical composition because these factors can modify the difference of hardness between grains and grain boundaries

  3. Internal frictions of austenitic stainless steels at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubono, K.; Owa, S.; Mio, N.; Akasaka, N.; Hirakawa, H.

    Internal frictions were measured for three types of austenitic stainless steel, AISI 304, 310S and 316, in the temperature range 4-300 K. The intrinsic friction is presented in terms of the quality factor of a 20 kHz eigenmode vibration of discs made from each material. Temperature dependence is also given for the resonant frequency of each disc. These mechanical properties show some peculiarities at low temperature.

  4. Determination of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Macedo, W.A. de.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels were done by X-ray diffraction, quantitative metallography (point count) and by means of one specific commercial apparatus whose operational principle is magnetic-inductive: The Ferrite Content Meter 1053 / Institut Dr. Foerster. The results obtained were comparated with point count, the reference method. It was also investigated in these measurements the influence of the martensite induced by mechanical deformation. Determinations by X-ray diffraction, by the ratio between integrated intensities of the ferrite (211) and austenite (311) lines, are in excelent agreement with those taken by point count. One correction curve for the lectures of the commercial equipment in focus was obtained, for the range between zero and 20% of delta ferrite in 18/8 stainless steels. It is demonstrated that, depending on the employed measurement method and surface finishing of the material to be analysed, the presence of martensite produced by mechanical deformation of the austenitic matrix is one problem to be considered. (Author) [pt

  5. Determination of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Macedo, W.A. de.

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of delta ferrite volumetric fraction in AISI 304 austenitic stainless steels were done by X-ray difraction, quantitative metallography (point count) and by means of one specific commercial apparatus whose operational principle is magnetic-inductive: The Ferrite Content Meter 1053 / Institut Dr. Forster. The results obtained were comparated with point count, the reference method. It was also investigated in these measurements the influence of the martensite induced by mechanical deformation. Determinations by X-ray diffraction, by the ratio between integrated intensities of the ferrite (211) and austenite (311) lines, are in excelent agreement with those taken by point count. One correction curve for the lectures of the commercial equipment in focus was obtained, for the range between zero and 20% of delta ferrite in 18/8 stainless steels. It is demonstrated that, depending on the employed measurement method and surface finishing of the material to be analysed, the presence of martensite produced by mechanical deformation of the austenitic matrix is one problem to be considered. (Author) [pt

  6. Cryogenic properties of austenitic stainless steels for superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohara, K.; Kato, T.; Ono, Y.; Sasaki, T.; Suzuki, S.

    1983-01-01

    The present study examines the magnetic and mechanical properties of a variety of austenitic stainless steels and high maganese steel which are candidate materials for the superconducting magnet attached to high energy particle accelerators. The effect of a specified heat treatment for the precipitation of intermetallic compound Nb3Sn to be used as superconductor on ductility and toughness are especially examined. It is found that nitrogen-strengthened austenitic stainless steels have high strength and good ductility and toughness, but that these are destroyed by precipitation treatment. The poor ductility and toughness after precipitation are caused by a weakening of the grain boundaries due to the agglomerated chromium carbide percipitates. The addition of vanadium suppresses this effect by refining the grain. Austenitic steels are found to have low magnetic permeabilities and Neel temperatures, and show serrated flow in traction test due to strained martensitic transformation. High manganese steel has extremely low permeability, a Neel temperature about room temperature, and has a serrated flow in traction test due to adiabatic deformation at liquid helium temperature

  7. Corrosion resistance of kolsterised austenitic 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abudaia, F. B.; Khalil, E. O.; Esehiri, A. F.; Daw, K. E.

    2015-01-01

    Austenitic stainless suffers from low wear resistance in applications where rubbing against other surfaces is encountered. This drawback can be overcome by surface treatment such as coating by hard materials. Other treatments such as carburization at relatively low temperature become applicable recently to improve hardness and wear resistance. Carburization heat treatment would only be justified if the corrosion resistance is unaffected. In this work samples of 304 stainless steels treated by colossal supersaturation case carburizing (known as Kolsterising) carried out by Bodycote Company was examined for pitting corrosion resistance at room temperature and at 50 °C. Comparison with results obtained for untreated samples in similar testing conditions show that there is no deterioration in the pitting resistance due to the Kolsterising heat treatment. X ray diffraction patterns obtained for Kolsterising sample showed that peaks correspond to the austenite phase has shifted to lower 2θ values compared with those of the untreated sample. The shift is an indication for expansion of austenite unit cells caused by saturation with diffusing carbon atoms. The XRD of Kolsterising samples also revealed additional peaks appeared in the patterns due to formation of carbides in the kolsterised layer. Examination of these additional peaks showed that these peaks are attributed to a type of carbide known as Hagg carbide Fe 2 C 5 . The absence of carbides that contain chromium means that no Cr depletion occurred in the layer and the corrosion properties are maintained. Surface hardness measurements showed large increase after Kolsterising heat treatment

  8. Phase stability of high manganese austenitic steels for cryogenic applications

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, K

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the austenitic stability against a' martensitic transformation of three non-magnetic austenitic steels : a new stainless steel X2CrMnNiMoN 19-12-11-1 grade, a traditional X8CrMnNiN 19-11-6 grade and a high manganese X8MnCrNi 28-7-1 grade. Measurements of relative magnetic susceptibility at room temperature are performed on strained tensile specimens at 4.2 K. A special extensometer for high precision strain measurements at low temperature has been developed at CERN to test specimens up to various levels of plastic strain. Moreover, the high precision strain recording of the extensometer enables a detailed study of the serrated yield phenomena associated with 4.2 K tensile testing and their influence on the evolution of magnetic susceptibility. The results show that high Mn contents increase the stability of the austenitic structure against a' martensitic transformation, while keeping high strength at cryogenic temperature. Moreover, proper elaboration through primary and possi...

  9. Low ductility creep failure in austenitic weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.G.

    Creep tests have been carried out for times of up to approx. 22,000 hrs on three austenitic weld metals of nominal composition 17Cr-8Ni-2Mo, 19Cr-12Ni-3Mo+Nb and 17Cr-10Ni-2Mo. The two former deposits were designed to produce delta-ferrite contents in the range 3-9% while the latter was designed to be fully austenitic. The common feature of all three weld metals was that they all gave very low strains at failure, typically approx. 1%. The microstructures of the failed creep specimens have been studied using optical and electron microscopy and the precipitate structures related to the occurrence of low creep strains. Creep deformation and fracture mechanisms in austenitic materials in general have been reviewed and this has been used as a basis for discussion of the observations of the present work. Finally, some of the factors that can be controlled to improve long-term creep ductility have been appraised

  10. Ultrasonic examination of austenitic welds at reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelmann, X.

    1991-01-01

    Austenitic welds play an important role in reactor pressure vessels (RPV) both of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs). These pressure retaining joints still pose problems for ultrasonic examination. During the last few years some progress has been achieved in overcoming these problems. The state of the art of the practical application is described in 'The Handbook on Ultrasonic Examination of Austenitic Welds' of the International Institute of Welding which was issued in 1986. This document was prepared by an international working group. Sulzer Brothers Limited, Winterthur Switzerland as manufacturer of both BWR and PWR RPVs has a long experience with ultrasonic examination of austenitic welds. In General Electric BWR RPVs the main recirculation line, the feedwater line and additional lines are connected to nozzles of the RPV with dissimilar metal welds joining stainless steel to carbon steel. The control rod drive (CRD) housings are attached to the RPV with complex weld joints. Framatome and Westinghouse RPVs also are provided with welds between the vessel and the main coolant line. This paper presents examples of ultrasonic approaches and examination results. Aspects of fabrication, preservice and inservice inspections are also covered. Complex weld joint design both from the point of material and geometry make ultrasonic examination sometimes extremely difficult but based on case by case investigations reliable solutions can often be realized. (orig.)

  11. EFFECTS OF AUSTENITIZATION ON STRUCTURE FORMATION СHROMO-MOLYBDENUM-VANADIUM STEEL AFTER HIGH TEMPERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Lutsenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of austenitization temperature of chrome-molybdenum-vanadium steel on structure formation at the softening heat treatment is studied. It is shown that the decline of the austenitization temperature promotes to reduce the micro-hardness values due to the intensification of spheroidizing of pearlite after the overcooling and high tempering. Increasing the austenitization temperature leads to formation of an uneven structure after tempering.

  12. Effect of Cu, Mo, Si on the content of retained austenite of austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mi, Y. [Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, the effects of Cu, Mo, Si contents on the volume fraction of retained austenite of austempered ductile iron (ADI) are analyzed exactly by X-ray diffraction, and the fracture modes of test samples with different volume fraction of retained austenite are investigated by SEM. It is shown that the retained austenite content increases with the content of copper, decreases with the content of molybdenum, and reaches the maximum with a certain content of silicon. When the retained austenite content decreases, the fracture modes of test samples change from ductile fracture to cleavage fracture.

  13. Use of overlapped reflection for determining the retained austenite by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garin, J.L.; Gonzalez, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    Retainec austenite in high-carbon steels has been determined by means of new computation techniques applied to the processing of X-ray diffraction data. Instead of using the traditional procedure based on the weak (200) reflections of martensite and austenite, intensity measurements of the overlapped (110) peak of martensite and (111) peak of austenite were performed. The separation of the peaks was based on a Pearson VII function, which is capable of describing all diffraction profiles. The accuracy of integrated intensities was then improved with the beneficial effects of higher precision in the calculation of the amount of retained austenite. (author) [pt

  14. Enhanced stress corrosion resistance from steels having a dual-phase austenite-martensite microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatasubramanian, T.V.; Baker, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    A high strength steel with an austenite-martensite duplex microstructure has been produced by extruding nickel coated steel powder. The austenite is present as a continuous network surrounding a high strength martensite. The steel exhibits superior resistance to stress corrosion cracking in 3.5 pct NaCl solution, the effectiveness of the austenite in improving stress corrosion cracking resistance increases as yield strength increases. The austenite reduces the effective stress intensity at the advancing crack tip and at the same time shields the crack tip from the corrosive environment

  15. Determination of local carbon content in austenite during intercritical annealing of dual phase steels by PEELS analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Junceda, A.; Caballero, F.G.; Capdevila, C.; Garcia de Andres, C.

    2007-01-01

    Parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy has allowed to analyse and quantify local variations in the carbon concentration of austenite islands transformed during the intercritical annealing treatment of commercial dual-phase steels. These changes in the carbon content of different austenite regions are responsible for the different volume fractions of tempered martensite, martensite and retained austenite obtained after intercritical annealing and overaging treatment. This technique reveals how carbon distribution in austenite evolves as the transformation process advances

  16. Controlling radiation induced segregation in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmedabadi, Parag M.; Kain, Vivekanand

    2011-01-01

    In-core components of austenitic stainless steels in light water reactors (LWRs) are susceptible to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in high temperature and high pressure oxygenated water at temperature around 300 deg C . Though, the exact mechanism for IASCC is not fully understood, radiation-induced segregation (RIS) is considered to be a part of a complex process that leads to IASCC. Therefore, controlling RIS in austenitic stainless steels may lead to improvement in resistance to IASCC. RIS is non-equilibrium segregation/depletion of alloying elements in austenitic stainless steels at LWR operating temperatures. RIS occurs due to adsorption of point defects at grain boundaries and leads to segregation of Si and P and depletion of Cr at grain boundaries. Thus by controlling point defect flux towards grain boundaries, the extent of RIS at grain boundaries can be controlled. An extensive study was carried out to simulate and control RIS in austenitic stainless steels using proton irradiation at 300 deg C . The primary aim of this study was to reduce point defect flux towards grain boundaries. Various approaches viz. grain boundary engineering, addition of oversized alloying element, residual strain within matrix and presence of fine precipitates within the grains and at grain boundaries were employed to control RIS in austenitic stainless steels. A novel approach involving combination of electrochemical technique followed by atomic force microscopic (AFM) examination has been used to examine the nature and the extent of RIS. Type 304, 316 and 347 stainless steels were irradiated at 300 deg C (in FOTIA and PELLETRON) in the range of 0.2 to 1.0 dpa using proton beam. The results obtained so far have indicated that a small amount of pre-strain within the grains is very effective in reducing the flux of point defects towards grain boundaries and reducing the extent of RIS at grain boundaries. The presence of NbC precipitates within the grains is

  17. The influence of austenitization temperature on the anizothermal eutectoid transformation of spheroidal cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Szykowny

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In the work one can find the research of anizothermal eutectoid transformation of unalloyed austenitized spheroidal cast iron in thetemperature 875 or 1000oC. By means of the matallographic method one prepered TTT diagrams. On the basis of the quantitativematallographic analysis the influence of austenitization temperature on the mechanism and kinetics of the eutectoid transformation wasinterpreted.

  18. Effect of austenite deformation temperature on Nb clustering and precipitation in microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereloma, E.V.; Kostryzhev, A.G.; AlShahrani, A.; Zhu, C.; Cairney, J.M.; Killmore, C.R.; Ringer, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of thermomechanical processing conditions on Nb clustering and precipitation in both austenite and ferrite in a Nb–Ti microalloyed steel was studied using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. A decrease in the deformation temperature increased the Nb-rich precipitation in austenite and decreased the extent of precipitation in ferrite. Microstructural mechanisms that explain this variation are discussed

  19. Non-uniformity of hot plastic strain of stainless steels with austenitic-ferritic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laricheva, L.P.; Peretyat'ko, V.N.; Rostovtsev, A.N.; Levius, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Non-uniformity of hot strain of stainless steels of various alloying was investigated. Steels with austenite and δ-ferrite structure of two classes were chosen for investigation: 08Kh18N10T steel of austenitic class and 08Kh21N5T steel of austenitic-ferritic class. Tests were conducted for samples subjected to preliminary thermal treatment: heating up to 1250 deg C, holding during 0.5 h, cooling in water. The heat treatment enabled to produce large grains of austenite and δ-ferrite (about 30 μm) in 08Kh21N5T steel, and sufficient amount of δ-ferrite (up to 50%) in 08Kh18N10T steel. It is shown that hot strain of austenitic-ferritic steels is non-uniform. δ-ferrite strain is more pronounced as compared to austenite. The ratio of mean δ-ferrite strain to the mean austenite strain grows with increase of the degree of general steel strain and temperature. The ratio of mean phase strains in 08Kh18N10T steel is higher as compared to 08Kh21N5T steel, general strain and temperature being equal. Temperature effect on the ratio of δ-ferrite and austenite strains is more pronounced for 08Kh18N10T steel. It is explaind by the value of ratios of phase strain resistance and temperature effect on them

  20. Simulation of the Growth of Austenite from As-Quenched Martensite in Medium Mn Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyan, Fei; Yan, Jia-Yi; Höglund, Lars; Ågren, John; Borgenstam, Annika

    2018-04-01

    As part of an ongoing development of third-generation advanced high-strength steels with acceptable cost, austenite reversion treatment of medium Mn steels becomes attractive because it can give rise to a microstructure of fine mixture of ferrite and austenite, leading to both high strength and large elongation. The growth of austenite during intercritical annealing is crucial for the final properties, primarily because it determines the fraction, composition, and phase stability of austenite. In the present work, the growth of austenite from as-quenched lath martensite in medium Mn steels has been simulated using the DICTRA software package. Cementite is added into the simulations based on experimental observations. Two types of systems (cells) are used, representing, respectively, (1) austenite and cementite forming apart from each other, and (2) austenite forming on the cementite/martensite interface. An interfacial dissipation energy has also been added to take into account a finite interface mobility. The simulations using the first type of setup with an addition of interfacial dissipation energy are able to reproduce the observed austenite growth in medium Mn steels reasonably well.

  1. Market Opportunities for Austenitic Stainless Steels in SO2 Scrubbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Harold T.

    1980-10-01

    Recent U.S. federal legislation has created new opportunities for SO2 scrubbers because all coals, even low-sulfur western coals, will probably require scrubbing to remove SO2 from gaseous combustion products. Scrubbing, the chemical absorption of SO2 by vigorous contact with a slurry—usually lime or limestone—creates an aggressive acid-chloride solution. This presents a promising market for pitting-resistant austenitic stainless steels, but there is active competition from rubber and fiberglass-lined carbon steel. Since the latter are favored on a first-cost basis, stainless steels must be justified on a cost/performance or life-cost basis. Nickel-containing austenitic alloys are favored because of superior field fabricability. Ferritic stainless steels have little utility in this application because of limitations in weldability and resulting poor corrosion resistance. Inco corrosion test spools indicate that molybdenum-containing austenitic alloys are needed. The leanest alloys for this application are 316L and 317L. Low-carbon grades of stainless steel are specified to minimize corrosion in the vicinity of welds. More highly alloyed materials may be required in critical areas. At present, 16,000 MW of scrubber capacity is operational and 17,000 MW is under construction. Another 29,000 MW is planned, bringing the total to 62,000 MW. Some 160,000 MW of scrubber capacity is expected to be placed in service over the next 10 years. This could translate into a total potential market of 80,000 tons of alloy plate for new power industry construction in the next decade. Retrofitting of existing power plants plus scrubbers for other applications such as inert gas generators for oil tankers, smelters, municipal incinerators, coke ovens, the pulp and paper industry, sulfuric acid plants, and fluoride control in phosphoric acid plants will add to this large market.

  2. High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steel Precipitation During Isothermal Annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Domankova

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The time-temperature-precipitation in high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel was investigated using light optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The isothermal precipitation kinetics curves and the corresponding precipitation activation energy were obtained. The diffusion activation energy of M2N precipitation is 129 kJ/mol. The results show that critical temperature for M2N precipitation is about 825°C with the corresponding incubation period 2.5 min.

  3. Austenite stability in the high strength metastable stainless steels

    OpenAIRE

    S.J. Pawlak

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present paper was to study the peculiarities of the austenite to martensite phase transformation (A-M), which is an essential step in the production technology of the high strength metastable stainless steels.Design/methodology/approach: The desired control over A-M transformation have been achieved by proper design of the steel chemistry, cold working and heat treatment.Findings: For a range of steel compositions, it was shown that severe cold working leads to fully m...

  4. Resistance Element Welding of Magnesium Alloy/austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manladan, S. M.; Yusof, F.; Ramesh, S.; Zhang, Y.; Luo, Z.; Ling, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Multi-material design is increasingly applied in the automotive and aerospace industries to reduce weight, improve crash-worthiness, and reduce environmental pollution. In the present study, a novel variant of resistance spot welding technique, known as resistance element welding was used to join AZ31 Mg alloy to 316 L austenitic stainless steel. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the joints were evaluated. It was found that the nugget consisted of two zones, including a peripheral fusion zone on the stainless steel side and the main fusion zone. The tensile shear properties of the joints are superior to those obtained by traditional resistance spot welding.

  5. Residual stresses associated with welds in austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidler, R.

    1978-01-01

    Two exploratory welds have been made with AISI 316 austenitic steel and Armex GT electrodes by the manual metal-arc process, and residual stress measurements made in the as-welded condition and after various periods of stress relief. The results show that substantial stress relief occurs at temperatures of 850 0 and 750 0 C after 1 hr, but is not complete. The stress distributions are compared with those obtained from ferritic welds and the effect of differences in thermal expansion coefficients is examined using finite element analysis. (author)

  6. Void swelling behaviour of austenitic stainless steel during electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Zhongqi; Xiao Hong; Peng Feng; Ti Zhongxin

    1994-04-01

    The irradiation swelling behaviour of 00Cr17Ni14Mo2 austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316L) was investigated by means of high voltage electron microscope. Results showed that in solution annealed condition almost no swelling incubation period existed, and the swelling shifted from the transition period to the steady-state one when the displacement damage was around 40 dpa. In cold rolled condition there was evidently incubation period, and when the displacement damage was up to 84 dpa the swelling still remained in the transition period. The average size and density of voids in both conditions were measured, and the factors, which influenced the void swelling, were discussed. (3 figs.)

  7. Mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steels in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, G.J.

    1978-03-01

    A detailed review of the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steels in liquid sodium is presented. Consideration has been given to the influence of the of the impurities in reactor sodium and metallurgical variables upon the stress rupture life, the low cycle fatigue and combined creep/fatigue resistance, elastic-plastic crack propagation rates, the high cycle fatigue life, tensile properties and fracture toughness. The effects of exposure to contaminated sodium prior to testing are also discussed. Examples of the success of mechanistic interpretations of materials behaviour in sodium are given and additionally, the extent to which mechanical properties in sodium may be predicted with the use of appropriate data. (author)

  8. Deformation Behavior of An Austenitic Steel by Neutron Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjo, Stefanus; Abe, Jun; Aizawa, Kazuya; Gong, Wu; Iwahashi, Takaaki

    An austenitic stainless steel type 304, which is one of the most popular materials in use, was tensile deformed and in situ neutron diffraction measurement was performed. The neutron diffraction measurement was conducted using an engineering materials diffractometer installed at MLF/J-PARC. Because of the combination of the high neutron intensity, the high counting rate and an event data recording method, in situ neutron diffraction during tensile loading at plastic deformation could be performed without any interruption for load or displacement. Intergranular strains and bulky stress observed during deformation were discussed on the crystal orientation dependence.

  9. Empirical Formulae for The Calculation of Austenite Supercooled Transformation Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trzaska J.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents empirical formulae for the calculation of austenite supercooled transformation temperatures, basing on the chemical composition, austenitising temperature and cooling rate. The multiple regression method was used. Four equations were established allowing to calculate temperature of the start area of ferrite, perlite, bainite and martensite at the given cooling rate. The calculation results obtained do not allow to determine the cooling rate range of ferritic, pearlitic, bainitic and martensite transformations. Classifiers based on logistic regression or neural network were established to solve this problem.

  10. Composition-dependent variation of magnetic properties and interstitial ordering in homogeneous expanded austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brink, Bastian K.; Ståhl, Kenny; Christiansen, Thomas L.; Frandsen, Cathrine; Hansen, Mikkel F.; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2016-01-01

    The crystal structure and magnetic properties of austenitic stainless steel with a colossal interstitial content, so-called expanded austenite, are currently not completely understood. In the present work, the magnetic properties of homogeneous samples of expanded austenite, as prepared by low-temperature nitriding of thin foils, were investigated with magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy. At room temperature, expanded austenite is paramagnetic for relatively low and for relatively high nitrogen contents (y N  = 0.13 and 0.55, respectively, where y N is the interstitial nitrogen occupancy), while ferromagnetism is observed for intermediate nitrogen loads. Spontaneous volume magnetostriction was observed in the ferromagnetic state and the Curie temperature was found to depend strongly on the nitrogen content. For the first time, X-ray diffraction evidence for the occurrence of long-range interstitial order of nitrogen atoms in expanded austenite was observed for high nitrogen contents.

  11. Impact Strength of Austenitic and Ferritic-Austenitic Cr-Ni Stainless Cast Steel in -40 and +20°C Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalandyk B.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies described in this paper relate to common grades of cast corrosion resistant Cr-Ni steel with different matrix. The test materials were subjected to heat treatment, which consisted in the solution annealing at 1060°C followed by cooling in water. The conducted investigations, besides the microstructural characteristics of selected cast steel grades, included the evaluation of hardness, toughness (at a temperature of -40 and +20oC and type of fracture obtained after breaking the specimens on a Charpy impact testing machine. Based on the results of the measured volume fraction of ferrite, it has been found that the content of this phase in cast austenitic steel is 1.9%, while in the two-phase ferritic-austenitic grades it ranges from 50 to 58%. It has been demonstrated that within the scope of conducted studies, the cast steel of an austenitic structure is characterised by higher impact strength than the two-phase ferritic-austenitic (F-A grade. The changing appearance of the fractures of the specimens reflected the impact strength values obtained in the tested materials. Fractures of the cast austenitic Cr-Ni steel obtained in these studies were of a ductile character, while fractures of the cast ferritic-austenitic grade were mostly of a mixed character with the predominance of brittle phase and well visible cleavage planes.

  12. Monitoring of Fatigue Degradation in Austenitic Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkhof, D.; Niffenegger, M.; Leber, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    During cyclic loading of austenitic stainless steel, it was observed that microstructural changes occurred; these affect both the mechanical and physical properties of the material. For certain steels, a strain-induced martensite phase transformation was seen. The investigations showed that, for the given material and loading conditions, the volume fraction of martensite depends on the cycle number, temperature and initial material state. It was also found that the martensite content continuously increased with the cycle number. Therefore, the volume fraction of martensite was used as an indication of fatigue usage. It was noted that the temperature dependence of the martensite formation could be described by a Boltzmann function, and that the martensite content decreased with increasing temperature. Two different heats of the austenitic stainless steel X6CrNiTi18-10 (AISI 321, DIN 1.4541) were investigated. It was found that the martensite formation rate was much higher for the cold-worked than for the solution-annealed material. All applied techniques - neutron diffraction and advanced magnetic methods - were successful in detecting the presence of martensite in the differently fatigued specimens. (author)

  13. Evaluation of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Foil for Advanced Recuperators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Maziasz, Philip J [ORNL; Matthews, Wendy [Capstone Turbines

    2011-01-01

    A corrosion- and creep-resistant austenitic stainless steel has been developed for advanced recuperator applications. By optimizing the Al and Cr contents, the alloy is fully austenitic for creep strength while allowing the formation of a chemically stable external alumina scale at temperatures up to 900 C. An alumina scale eliminates long-term problems with the formation of volatile Cr oxy-hydroxides in the presence of water vapor in exhaust gas. As a first step in producing foil for primary surface recuperators, three commercially cast heats have been rolled to 100 m thick foil in the laboratory to evaluate performance in creep and oxidation testing. Results from initial creep testing are presented at 675 C and 750 C, showing excellent creep strength compared with other candidate foil materials. Laboratory exposures in humid air at 650 800 C have shown acceptable oxidation resistance. A similar oxidation behavior was observed for sheet specimens of these alloys exposed in a modified 65 kW microturbine for 2871 h. One composition that showed superior creep and oxidation resistance has been selected for the preparation of a commercial batch of foil. DOI: 10.1115/1.4002827

  14. Fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in different environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Yawas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue behavior of welded austenitic stainless steel in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid and wet steam corrosive media has been investigated. The immersion time in the corrosive media was 30 days to simulate the effect on stainless steel structures/equipment in offshore and food processing applications and thereafter annealing heat treatment was carried out on the samples. The findings from the fatigue tests show that seawater specimens have a lower fatigue stress of 0.5 × 10−5 N/mm2 for the heat treated sample and 0.1 × 10−5 N/mm2 for the unheat-treated sample compared to the corresponding hydrochloric acid and steam samples. The post-welding heat treatment was found to increase the mechanical properties of the austenitic stainless steel especially tensile strength but it reduces the transformation and thermal stresses of the samples. These findings were further corroborated by the microstructural examination of the stainless steel specimen.

  15. EBSD study of a hot deformed austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadeh, H., E-mail: h-m@gmx.com [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Cabrera, J.M. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundacio CTM Centre Tecnologic, Av. Bases de Manresa 1, 08242 Manresa (Spain); Najafizadeh, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Calvillo, P.R. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, ETSEIB, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fundacio CTM Centre Tecnologic, Av. Bases de Manresa 1, 08242 Manresa (Spain)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructural characterization of an austenitic stainless steel by EBSD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The role of twins in the nucleation and growth of dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Grain refinement through the discontinuous dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determination of recrystallized fraction using the grain average misorientation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Relationship between recrystallization and the frequency of high angle boundaries. - Abstract: The microstructural evolution of a 304 H austenitic stainless steel subjected to hot compression was studied by the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. Detailed data about the boundaries, coincidence site lattice (CSL) relationships and grain size were acquired from the orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) maps. It was found that twins play an important role in the nucleation and growth of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) during hot deformation. Moreover, the conventional discontinuous DRX (DDRX) was found to be in charge of grain refinement reached under the testing conditions studied. Furthermore, the recrystallized fraction (X) was determined from the grain average misorientation (GAM) distribution based on the threshold value of 1.55 Degree-Sign . The frequency of high angle boundaries showed a direct relationship with X. A time exponent of 1.11 was determined from Avrami analysis, which was related to the observed single-peak behavior in the stress-strain flow curves.

  16. Modeling of the Recrystallization and Austenite Formation Overlapping in Cold-Rolled Dual-Phase Steels During Intercritical Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollat, M.; Massardier, V.; Fabregue, D.; Buscarlet, E.; Keovilay, F.; Perez, M.

    2017-10-01

    Austenite formation kinetics of a DP1000 steel was investigated from a ferrite-pearlite microstructure (either fully recrystallized or cold-rolled) during typical industrial annealing cycles by means of dilatometry and optical microscopy after interrupted heat treatments. A marked acceleration of the kinetics was found when deformed ferrite grains were present in the microstructure just before austenite formation. After having described the austenite formation kinetics without recrystallization and the recrystallization kinetics of the steel without austenite formation by simple JMAK laws, a mixture law was used to analyze the kinetics of the cold-rolled steel for which austenite formation and recrystallization may occur simultaneously. In the case where the interaction between these two phenomena is strong, three main points were highlighted: (i) the heating rate greatly influences the austenite formation kinetics, as it affects the degree of recrystallization at the austenite start temperature; (ii) recrystallization inhibition above a critical austenite fraction accelerates the austenite formation kinetics; (iii) the austenite fractions obtained after a 1 hour holding deviate from the local equilibrium fractions given by Thermo-Calc, contrary to the case of the recrystallized steel. This latter result could be due to the fact that the dislocations of the deformed ferrite matrix could promote the diffusion of the alloying elements of the steel and accelerate austenite formation.

  17. Partial transformation of austenite in Al-Mn-Si TRIP steel upon tensile straining: an in situ EBSD study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Trine Nybo; Adachi, Y.; da Silva Fanta, Alice Bastos

    2013-01-01

    of the stability of austenite grains against strain-induced transformation, with particular focus on the grain size and the location of the austenite grains. The findings confirm that size and location of austenite grains are significant parameters for their stability. Small austenite grains were observed......The transformation of austenite to martensite in an Al–Mn–Si transformation-induced plasticity steel was investigated with in situ electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements under tensile straining. The visualisation of the microstructure upon straining allows for an investigation...... to be more stable than large grains, while austenite grains located beside bainitic ferrite are the most stable. Moreover, it is demonstrated that austenite grains transform gradually...

  18. Impact of Reversed Austenite on the Impact Toughness of the High-Strength Steel of Low Carbon Medium Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Guanqiao; Gao, Xiuhua; Zhang, Dazheng; Du, Linxiu; Hu, Jun; Liu, Zhenguang

    2018-01-01

    We elucidate the relationship between the volume fraction of austenite and the Charpy impact toughness in a medium-Mn steel in terms of microstructural evolution with impact temperature. Different from retained austenite in the matrix after direct quenching, sub-micron lath-shaped morphology-reversed austenite in medium-Mn steel was produced by intercritical annealing. We found that reversed austenite steadily affected the fracture mode; only ductile fractures and dimples decreased with decreasing impact temperature. After the impact fracture test, the content of reversed austenite in the matrix increased slightly with a decreasing impact temperature due to the stability of the austenite grains caused by recrystallization of α' martensite. Reversed austenite slightly decreased during the impact process with a decreasing impact temperature.

  19. Effects of Austenitizing Conditions on the Microstructure of AISI M42 High-Speed Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwa Luo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influences of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure of AISI M42 high-speed steel were investigated through thermodynamic calculation, microstructural analysis, and in-situ observation by a confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM. Results show that the network morphology of carbides could not dissolve completely and distribute equably in the case of the austenitizing temperature is 1373 K. When the austenitizing temperature reaches 1473 K, the excessive increase in temperature leads to increase in carbide dissolution, higher dissolved alloying element contents, and unwanted grain growth. Thus, 1453 K is confirmed as the best austenitizing condition on temperature for the steel. In addition, variations on the microstructure and hardness of the steel are not obvious when holding time ranges from 15 to 30 min with the austenitizing temperature of 1453 K. However, when the holding time reaches 45 min, the average size of carbides tends to increase because of Ostwald ripening. Furthermore, the value of Ms and Mf decrease with the increase of cooling rate. Hence, high cooling rate can depress the martensitic transformation and increase the content of retained austenite. As a result, the hardness of the steel is the best (65.6 HRc when the austenitizing temperature reaches 1453 K and is held for 30 min.

  20. Effect of Prior Austenite Grain Size on the Morphology of Nano-Bainitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kritika; Kumar, Avanish; Singh, Aparna

    2018-04-01

    The strength in nanostructured bainitic steels primarily arises from the fine platelets of bainitic ferrite embedded in carbon-enriched austenite. However, the toughness is dictated by the shape and volume fraction of the retained austenite. Therefore, the exact determination of processing-morphology relationships is necessary to design stronger and tougher bainite. In the current study, the morphology of bainitic ferrite in Fe-0.89C-1.59Si-1.65Mn-0.37Mo-1Co-0.56Al-0.19Cr (wt pct) bainitic steel has been investigated as a function of the prior austenite grain size (AGS). Specimens were austenitized at different temperatures ranging from 900 °C to 1150 °C followed by isothermal transformation at 300 °C. Detailed microstructural characterization has been carried out using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the bainitic laths transformed in coarse austenite grains are finer resulting in higher hardness, whereas smaller austenite grains lead to the formation of thicker bainitic laths with a large fraction of blocky type retained austenite resulting in lower hardness.

  1. The Influence of Saturation of Cast Iron Austenite with Carbon on the Ausferrite Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Giętka

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Austenitizing during quench hardening of the ductile cast iron influences the content of carbon in austenite depending on the soaking heat. On the other hand, the saturation of austenite impacts its transformation in the ausferritizing process of a metal matrix and forming of microstructure. Ductile cast iron with the ferrite matrix was hardened with isothermal transformation in the range of ausferritizing in temperature tpi = 400 i 300 0C and the range of time τpi = 7,5 �� 240 min. Specimens were gradually austenitized. They were soaked in the nominal temperature tγ = 950 0C, then precooled to the temperature tγ’ = 850 and 800 0C. Microstructure was investigated, there were also defined the proportion of austenite in the matrix of the cast iron and the content of carbon in it and hardness and impact strength in unnotched specimens. It was stated, that the precooling temperature deciding on the content of carbon in austenite influences kinetics of the ausferritic transformation, the content of carbon in the γ phase and impact strength and, in a less degree, hardness. As a result of gradual austenitizing the cast iron after quench hardening, in some conditions of treatment, reached mechanical properties corresponding, according to the ASTM A 897 standard, with high grades of ADI. Chilling in the range of austenitizing in temperature 850 and 800 0C led to the decrease of carbon in austenite what influenced positively on the matrix microstructure and properties of the ADI. Investigations in this range will be continued.

  2. The effect of austenitizing conditions in the ductile iron hardening process on longitudinal ultrasonic wave velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Orłowicz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of a research on the effect of austenitizing temperature and time adopted in the hardening operation on the ultrasonic wave velocity in ductile iron. It has been found that with increasing austenitizing temperature and with the passage of the austenitizing time, a monotonic decrease of the ultrasonic longitudinal wave velocity value occurred. Implementation of ultrasonic testing of results obtained in the course of the cast iron hardening process both in production and as-cast conditions, requires development of a test methodology that must take into account the influence of base material structure (degree of nodularization, graphite precipitation count on the ultrasound wave velocity.

  3. Composition-dependent variation of magnetic properties and interstitial ordering in homogeneous expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Bastian K.; Ståhl, Kenny; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2016-01-01

    ferromagnetism is observed for intermediate nitrogen loads. Spontaneous volume magnetostriction was observed in the ferromagnetic state and the Curie temperature was found to depend strongly on the nitrogen content. For the first time, X-ray diffraction evidence for the occurrence of long-range interstitial......The crystal structure and magnetic properties of austenitic stainless steel with a colossal interstitial content, so-called expanded austenite, are currently not completely understood. In the present work, the magnetic properties of homogeneous samples of expanded austenite, as prepared...

  4. Kinetics analysis of two-stage austenitization in supermartensitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nießen, Frank; Villa, Matteo; Hald, John

    2017-01-01

    The martensite-to-austenite transformation in X4CrNiMo16-5-1 supermartensitic stainless steel was followed in-situ during isochronal heating at 2, 6 and 18 K min−1 applying energy-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction at the BESSY II facility. Austenitization occurred in two stages, separated...... by a temperature region in which the transformation was strongly decelerated. The region of limited transformation was more concise and occurred at higher austenite phase fractions and temperatures for higher heating rates. The two-step kinetics was reproduced by kinetics modeling in DICTRA. The model indicates...

  5. Surface protection of austenitic steels by carbon nanotube coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLucas, T.; Schütz, S.; Suarez, S.; Mücklich, F.

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, surface protection properties of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) deposited on polished austenitic stainless steel are evaluated. Electrophoretic deposition is used as a coating technique. Contact angle measurements reveal hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic wetting characteristics of the carbon nanotube coating depending on the additive used for the deposition. Tribological properties of carbon nanotube coatings on steel substrate are determined with a ball-on-disc tribometer. Effective lubrication can be achieved by adding magnesium nitrate as an additive due to the formation of a holding layer detaining CNTs in the contact area. Furthermore, wear track analysis reveals minimal wear on the coated substrate as well as carbon residues providing lubrication. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy is used to qualitatively analyse the elemental composition of the coating and the underlying substrate. The results explain the observed wetting characteristics of each coating. Finally, merely minimal oxidation is detected on the CNT-coated substrate as opposed to the uncoated sample.

  6. The propagation of ultrasound in an austenitic weld

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halkjær, Søren; Sørensen, Mads Peter; Kristensen, Anders Wang

    2000-01-01

    The propagation of ultrasound through an austenitic weld is investigated experimentally as well as in a numerical simulation. The weld is insonified at normal incidence to the fusion line with a longitudinal contact transducer. In order to experimentally trace the ultrasound through the weld......, slices of different thicknesses from the original weld have been fabricated. Through-transmission A-scans have then been produced for each weld slice and compared with the corresponding numerical simulation. A comparison of the direction of ultrasound propagation through the weld for the two approaches...... shows quite good agreement. However, attenuation due to scattering at grain boundaries in the weld is poorly modelled in the simulation. In order to improve this, a better model of the weld is needed....

  7. Austenitic Biomaterial Cracks Evaluation by Advanced Nondestructive Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Smetana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE of austenitic stainless steels. Eddy current, ultrasonic testing and non-contact magnetic field mapping methods are used for this purpose. ECA (Eddy Current Array and TOFD (Time of Flight Diffraction are methods that have become widely-used in the field of NDE and this is the reason for their utilization. Magnetic field mapping is nowadays an effective method of evaluation of surface-breaking defects mainly in ferromagnetic materials. The fluxgate sensor-based measurement is presented and discussed. The artificial fatigue and stress-corrosion material’s cracks are inspected. Experimental results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  8. Characteristic of Low Temperature Carburized Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istiroyah; Pamungkas, M. A.; Saroja, G.; Ghufron, M.; Juwono, A. M.

    2018-01-01

    Low temperature carburizing process has been carried out on austenitic stainless steel (ASS) type AISI 316L, that contain chromium in above 12 at%. Therefore, conventional heat treatment processes that are usually carried out at high temperatures are not applicable. The sensitization process due to chromium migration from the grain boundary will lead to stress corrosion crack and decrease the corrosion resistance of the steel. In this study, the carburizing process was carried out at low temperatures below 500 °C. Surface morphology and mechanical properties of carburized specimens were investigated using optical microscopy, non destructive profilometer, and Vicker microhardness. The surface roughness analysis show the carburising process improves the roughness of ASS surface. This improvement is due to the adsorption of carbon atoms on the surface of the specimen. Likewise, the hardness test results indicate the carburising process increases the hardness of ASS.

  9. Characterization of the sodium corrosion behavior of commercial austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiels, S.A.; Bagnall, C.; Keeton, A.R.; Witkowski, R.E.; Anantatmula, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    During the course of an on-going evaluation of austenitic alloys for potential liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) fuel pin cladding application, a series of commercial alloys was selected for study. The data obtained led to the recognition of an underlying pattern of behavior and enabled the prediction of surface chemistry changes. The changes in surface topographical development from alloy to alloy are shown and the important role played by the element molybdenum in this development is indicated. The presentation also illustrates how a total damage equation was evolved to encompass all aspects of weight loss and metal/sodium interactions: wall thinning ferrite layer formation and intergranular attack. The total damage equation represents a significant departure from the classical description of sodium corrosion in which weight loss is simply translated into wall thinning

  10. Residual stresses of water-jet peened austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Shobu, Takahisa; Shiro, Ayumi

    2013-01-01

    The specimen material was austenitic stainless steel, SUS316L. The residual stress was induced by water-jet peening. The residual stress was measured using the 311 diffraction with conventional X-rays. The measured residual stress showed the equi-biaxial stress state. To investigate thermal stability of the residual stress, the specimen was aged thermally at 773K in air to 1000h. The residual stress kept the equi-biaxial stress state against the thermal aging. Lattice plane dependency of the residual stress induced by water-jet peening was evaluated using hard synchrotron X-rays. The residual stress measured by the soft lattice plane showed the equi-biaxial stress state, but the residual stress measured by the hard lattice plane did not. In addition, the distributions of the residual stress in the depth direction were measured using a strain scanning method with hard synchrotron X-rays and neutrons. (author)

  11. Production of Austenitic Steel for the LHC Superconducting Dipole Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Bertinelli, F; Komori, T; Peiro, G; Rossi, L

    2006-01-01

    The austenitic-steel collars are an important component of the LHC dipole magnets, operating at cryogenic temperature under high mechanical stress. The required steel, known as YUS 130S, has been specifically developed for this application by Nippon Steel Corporation (NSC), who was awarded a CERN contract in 1999 for the supply of 11 500 tonnes. In 2005 - after six years of work - the contract is being successfully completed, with final production being ensured since October 2003 by Nippon Steel & Sumikin Stainless Steel Corporation (NSSC). The paper describes the steel properties, its manufacturing and quality control process, organization of production, logistics and contract follow-up. Extensive statistics have been collected relating to mechanical, physical and technological parameters. Specific attention is dedicated to measurements of magnetic permeability performed at cryogenic temperatures by CERN, the equipment used and statistical results. Reference is also made to the resulting precision of the...

  12. Influence of phosphorus on point defects in an austenitic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulanger, L.

    1988-06-01

    The influence of phosphorus on points defects clusters has been studied in an austenitic alloy (Fe/19% at. Cr/13% at. Ni). Clusters are observed by transmission electron microscopy. After quenching and annealing, five types of clusters produced by vacancies or phosphorus-vacancies complexes are observed whose presence depends on cooling-speed. Vacancy concentration (with 3.6 10 -3 at. P) in clusters is about 10 -5 and apparent vacancy migration is 2 ± 0.1 eV. These observations suggest the formation of metastable small clusters during cooling which dissociate during annealing and migrate to create the observed clusters. With phosphorus, the unfrequent formation of vacancy loops has been observed during electron irradiation. Ions irradiations show that phosphorus does not favour nucleation of interstitial loops but slowers their growth. It reduces swelling by decreasing voids diameter. Phosphorus forms vacancy complexes whose role is to increase the recombination rate and to slow vacancy migration [fr

  13. Temperature dependent measurement of internal damping of austenitic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oravcová Monika

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is aimed on the analysis of the internal damping changes of austenitic stainless steels AISI 304, AISI 316L and AISI 316Ti depending from temperature. In experimental measurements only resonance method was used which is based on continuous excitation of oscillations of the specimens and the whole apparatus vibrates at the frequency near to the resonance. Microplastic processes and dissipation of energy within the metals are evaluated and investigated by internal damping measurements. Damping capacity of materials is closely tied to the presence of defects including second phase particles and voids. By measuring the energy dissipation in the material, we can determine the elastic characteristics, Youngs modulus, the level of stress relaxation and many other.

  14. Fracture of Fe--Cr--Mn austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Tensile tests of Tenelon (U.S. Steel), a nitrogen-strengthened iron-base alloy containing 18% chromium and 15% manganese, demonsterated that cleavage fracture can occur in some austenitic steels and is promoted by the presence of hydrogen. Tensile failure of Tenelon at 78 0 K occurred with no detectable necking at low strain levels. The fracture surface contained cleavage facets that lay along coherent twin boundaries oriented transversely to the tensile axis. Charging gaseous hydrogen at 679 MPa pressure and 650 0 K had no significant effect on the mechanical behavior or fracture mode at 78 0 K, but raised the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature from less than 200 0 K to about 250 0 K

  15. Multiaxial elastoplastic cyclic loading of austenitic 316L steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Mazánová

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic stress-strain response and fatigue damage character has been investigated in austenitic stainless steel 316L. Hollow cylindrical specimens have been cyclically deformed in combined tension-compression and torsion under constant strain rate condition and different constant strain and shear strain amplitudes. In-phase and 90° out-of-phase cyclic straining was applied and the stress response has been monitored. Cyclic hardening/softening curves were assessed in both channels. Cyclic softening followed for higher strain amplitudes by long-term cyclic hardening was observed. Cyclic stress-strain curves were determined. Study of the surface damage in fractured specimens revealed the types and directions of principal cracks and the sources of fatigue crack initiation in slip bands.

  16. Magnetic properties of the austenitic stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Tsuchiya, K.; Itoh, K.; Kobayashi, S.

    2002-01-01

    The magnetization was measured for the austenitic stainless steel of SUS304, SUS304L, SUS316, and SUS316L with the temperature from 5K to 300K and the magnetic field from 0T to 10T. The field dependences of the magnetizations changed at about 0.7T and 4T. The dependence was analyzed with ranges of 0-0.5T, 1-3T, and 5-10T. There was not so much difference between those stainless steels for the usage at small fields and 300 K. The SUS316 and SUS316L samples showed large non-linearity at high fields and 5K. Therefore, SUS304 was recommended for usage at high fields and low temperatures to design superconducting magnets with the linear approximation of the field dependence of magnetization

  17. Laser Welding Of Finned Tubes Made Of Austenitic Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stolecki M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the technology of welding of finned tubes made of the X5CrNi1810 (1.4301 austenitic steel, developed at Energoinstal SA, allowing one to get high quality joints that meet the requirements of the classification societies (PN-EN 15614, and at the same time to significantly reduce the manufacturing costs. The authors described an automatic technological line equipped with a Trumph disc laser and a tube production technological process. To assess the quality of the joints, one performed metallographic examinations, hardness measurements and a technological attempt to rupture the fin. Analysis of the results proved that the laser-welded finned tubes were performed correctly and that the welded joints had shown no imperfections.

  18. Fatigue crack growth in metastable austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, Z.; Chang, G.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The research reported here is an investigation of the influence of the mechanically induced martensitic transformation on the fatigue crack growth rate in 304-type steels. The alloys 304L and 304LN were used to test the influence of composition, the testing temperatures 298 K and 77 K were used to study the influence of test temperature, and various load ratios (R) were used to determine the influence of the load ratio. It was found that decreasing the mechanical stability of the austenite by changing composition or lowering temperature decreases the fatigue crack growth rate. The R-ratio effect is more subtle. The fatigue crack growth rate increases with increasing R-ratio, even though this change increases the martensite transformation. Transformation-induced crack closure can explain the results in the threshold regime, but cannot explain the R-ratio effect at higher cyclic stress intensities. 26 refs., 6 figs

  19. Dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puli, Ramesh, E-mail: rameshpuli2000@gmail.com; Janaki Ram, G.D.

    2012-12-15

    Friction surfacing involves complex thermo-mechanical phenomena. In this study, the nature of dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L coatings was investigated using electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the alloy 316L undergoes discontinuous dynamic recrystallization under conditions of moderate Zener-Hollomon parameter during friction surfacing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L friction surfaced coatings is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfacing leads to discontinuous dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strain rates in friction surfacing exceed 400 s{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated grain size matches well with experimental observations in 316L coatings.

  20. Weld repair issues in thick section austenitic pipework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, S.J.; Price, A.T.

    1989-03-01

    Thick section austenitic Type 316 Stainless steel, in the solution treated condition, has been used in Central Electricity Generating Board plant in the United Kingdom for some three decades and has given good service. Repair and replacement of this material after long term service is becoming a requirement and is complicated by the precipitation hardening and sensitisation of the materials. This paper summarises the compositional, microstructural and ageing characteristics of the wrought material and weld metals and the consequences for materials properties. Post weld heat treatment options are outlined and sensitisation to stress corrosion cracking is discussed. Finally, some examples of cracking that has occurred in plant after long term operation are given and weld repair research requirements are noted. (author)

  1. Study on ductile fracture evaluation for austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Naoki; Shimakawa, Takashi; Kashima, Koichi; Michiba, Kouji; Hiramatsu, Hideki.

    1994-01-01

    In the development of Fast Breeder Reactors (FBRs), structural integrity must be assured for components subjected to high temperatures up to 550degC, even though possible defects are presumed. Nonlinear fracture mechanics is one of the most effective approaches to evaluate ductile fracture behavior of cracked components. In this study, ductile fracture tests were conducted at room temperature and 550degC for austenitic stainless steel SUS304 and 316FR, which were candidates for FBR structural material. The applicability of fracture parameters was investigated from tests using small CT specimens, small CCT specimens, and wide CCT specimens. Fracture tests under the condition of combined tension and bending loads were also performed to investigate the effect of additional bending stress due to the temperature gradient through thickness. It was ascertained that fracture load could be predicted based on the net section collapse criterion and was not so affected by an additional bending stress. (author)

  2. Influence of titanium on the tempering structure of austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghuezaiel, M.J.

    1985-10-01

    The microstructure of titanium-stabilized and initially deformed (approximately 20%) austenitic stainless steels used in structures of fast neutrons reactors has been studied after one hour duration annealings (500 0 C) by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, microhardness and transmission electron microscopy. The studied alloys were either of industrial type CND 17-13 (0.23 to 0.45 wt% Ti) or pure steels (18% Cr, 14% Ni, 0 or 0.3 wt% Ti). During tempering, the pure steels presented some restauration before recristallization. In the industrial steels, only recristallization occurred, and this only in the most deformed steel. Precipitation does not occur in the titanium-free pure steel. In industrial steels, many intermetallic phases are formed when recristallization starts [fr

  3. austenitic steel corrosion by oxygen-containing liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivollier, Matthieu

    2017-01-01

    France is planning to construct the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. They will use liquid sodium as heat transfer fluid and will be made of 316L(N) austenitic steel as structural materials. To guarantee optimal operation on the long term, the behavior of this steel must be verified. This is why corrosion phenomena of 316L(N) steel by liquid sodium have to be well-understood. Literature points out that several corrosion phenomena are possible. Dissolved oxygen in sodium definitely influences each of the corrosion phenomenon. Therefore, the austenitic steel corrosion in oxygen-containing sodium is proposed in this study. Thermodynamics data point out that sodium chromite formation on 316L(N) steel is possible in sodium containing roughly 10 μg.g -1 of oxygen for temperature lower than 650 C (reactor operating conditions).The experimental study shows that sodium chromite is formed at 650 C in the sodium containing 200 μg.g -1 of oxygen. At the same concentration and at 550 C, sodium chromite is clearly observed only for long immersion time (≥ 5000 h). Results at 450 C are more difficult to interpret. Furthermore, the steel is depleted in chromium in all cases.The results suggest the sodium chromite is dissolved in the sodium at the same time it is formed. Modelling of sodium chromite formation - approached by chromium diffusion in steel (in grain and grain boundaries -, and dissolution - assessed by transport in liquid metal - show that simultaneous formation and dissolution of sodium chromite is a possible mechanism able to explain our results. (author) [fr

  4. Microstructural evolution in fast-neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    The present work has focused on the specific problem of fast-neutron-induced radiation damage to austenitic stainless steels. These steels are used as structural materials in current fast fission reactors and are proposed for use in future fusion reactors. Two primary components of the radiation damage are atomic displacements (in units of displacements per atom, or dpa) and the generation of helium by nuclear transmutation reactions. The radiation environment can be characterized by the ratio of helium to displacement production, the so-called He/dpa ratio. Radiation damage is evidenced microscopically by a complex microstructural evolution and macroscopically by density changes and altered mechanical properties. The purpose of this work was to provide additional understanding about mechanisms that determine microstructural evolution in current fast reactor environments and to identify the sensitivity of this evolution to changes in the He/dpa ratio. This latter sensitivity is of interest because the He/dpa ratio in a fusion reactor first wall will be about 30 times that in fast reactor fuel cladding. The approach followed in the present work was to use a combination of theoretical and experimental analysis. The experimental component of the work primarily involved the examination by transmission electron microscopy of specimens of a model austenitic alloy that had been irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. A major aspect of the theoretical work was the development of a comprehensive model of microstructural evolution. This included explicit models for the evolution of the major extended defects observed in neutron irradiated steels: cavities, Frank faulted loops and the dislocation network. 340 refs., 95 figs., 18 tabs.

  5. Precipitation hardening in Fe--Ni base austenitic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, K.M.

    1979-05-01

    The precipitation of metastable Ni/sub 3/X phases in the austenitic Fe--Ni-base alloys has been investigated by using various combinations of hardening elements, including Ti, Ta, Al, and Nb. The theoretical background on the formation of transition precipitates has been summarized based on: atomic size, compressibility, and electron/atom ratio. A model is proposed from an analysis of static concentration waves ordering the fcc lattice. Ordered structure of metastable precipitates will change from the triangularly ordered ..gamma..', to the rectangularly ordered ..gamma..'', as the atomic ratio (Ti + Al)/(Ta + Nb) decreases. The concurrent precipitation of ..gamma..' and ..gamma..'' occurs at 750/sup 0/C when the ratio is between 1.5 and 1.9. Aging behavior was studied over the temperature range of 500/sup 0/C to 900/sup 0/C. Typical hardness curves show a substantial hardening effect due to precipitation. A combination of strength and fracture toughness can be developed by employing double aging techniques. The growth of these coherent intermediate precipitates follows the power law with the aging time t : t/sup 1/3/ for the spherical ..gamma..' particles; and t/sup 1/2/ for the disc-shaped ..gamma..''. The equilibrium ..beta.. phase is observed to be able to nucleate on the surface of imbedded carbides. The addition of 5 wt % Cr to the age-hardened alloys provides a non-magnetic austenite which is stable against the formation of mechanically induced martensite.Cr addition retards aging kinetics of the precipitation reactions, and suppresses intergranular embrittlement caused by the high temperature solution anneal. The aging kinetics are also found to be influenced by solution annealing treatments.

  6. A review of hot cracking in austenitic stainless steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, V.; Gill, T.P.S.; Mannan, S.L.; Rodriguez, P.

    1991-01-01

    The occurrence of hot cracking in austenitic stainless steel weldments is discussed with respect to its origin and metallurgical contributory factors. Of the three types of hot cracking, namely solidification cracking, liquation and ductility dip cracking, solidification cracking occurs in the interdendritic regions in weld metal while liquation and ductility dip cracking occur intergranularly in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). Segregation of impurity and minor elements such as sulphur, phosphorous, silicon, niobium, boron etc to form low melting eutectic phases has been found to be the major cause of hot cracking. Control of HAZ cracking requires minimisation of impurity elements in the base metal. In stabilized stainless steels containing niobium, higher amounts of delta-ferrite have been found necessary to prevent cracking than in unstabilized compositions. Titanium compounds have been found to cause liquation cracking in maraging steels and titanium containing stainless steels and superalloys. In nitrogen added stainless steels, cracking resistance decreases when the solidification mode changes to primary austenitic due to nitrogen addition. A review of the test methods to evaluate hot cracking behaviour showed that several external restraint and semi-self-restraint tests are available. The finger Test, WRC Fissure Bend Test, the PVR test and the Varestraint Test are described along with typical test results. Hot ductility testing to reveal HAZ cracking tendency during welding is described, which is of particular importance to stabilized stainless steels. Based on the literature, recommendations are made for welding stabilized and nitrogen added steels, indicating areas of further work. (author). 81 refs., 30 figs., 1 tab

  7. Microstructural evolution in fast-neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoller, R.E.

    1987-12-01

    The present work has focused on the specific problem of fast-neutron-induced radiation damage to austenitic stainless steels. These steels are used as structural materials in current fast fission reactors and are proposed for use in future fusion reactors. Two primary components of the radiation damage are atomic displacements (in units of displacements per atom, or dpa) and the generation of helium by nuclear transmutation reactions. The radiation environment can be characterized by the ratio of helium to displacement production, the so-called He/dpa ratio. Radiation damage is evidenced microscopically by a complex microstructural evolution and macroscopically by density changes and altered mechanical properties. The purpose of this work was to provide additional understanding about mechanisms that determine microstructural evolution in current fast reactor environments and to identify the sensitivity of this evolution to changes in the He/dpa ratio. This latter sensitivity is of interest because the He/dpa ratio in a fusion reactor first wall will be about 30 times that in fast reactor fuel cladding. The approach followed in the present work was to use a combination of theoretical and experimental analysis. The experimental component of the work primarily involved the examination by transmission electron microscopy of specimens of a model austenitic alloy that had been irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. A major aspect of the theoretical work was the development of a comprehensive model of microstructural evolution. This included explicit models for the evolution of the major extended defects observed in neutron irradiated steels: cavities, Frank faulted loops and the dislocation network. 340 refs., 95 figs., 18 tabs

  8. Comparing the possibilities of austenite content determination in austempered ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Myszka

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents various methods for assessment of the austenite volume fraction in Austempered Ductile Iron (ADI. Tests were carried out on two types of ADI, i.e. unalloyed and alloyed with the addition of 0.72%Cu and 0.27%Mo, heat treated under different conditions of isothermal transformation to obtain different austenite volume fractions. The test material was then subjected to metallographic examinations, X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis, an analysis using the author's genuine programme of artificial neural networks, image analysis and magnetic measurements. The results were compared with each other indicating the possibility of a quantitative measurement of austenite and other phases present in cast iron. It was found that different methods of measurement are not fully consistent with each other but show similar results of the austenite content.

  9. Effects of austenitization temperature on the microstructure of 15BCr30 and PL22 boron steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Suski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies boron precipitation and segregation at austenitic grain boundaries for low carbon boron steels types: PL22 and 15BCr30. The following parameters were evaluated: percentage of martensite/bainite, size and nucleation sites of austenitic grains and precipitates sizes. Three austenitization temperatures were studied (870, 1050 and 1200 °C. The highest martensite percentage occurred for 1050 °C. Iron-borocarbides were detected at grain boundaries for all tested temperatures. At 870 °C the coarse iron-borocarbides are due to non-solubility and coalescence. The highest martensite percentage at 1050 °C is caused by the discrete precipitation of iron-borocarbides at austenitic grains boundaries. The discrete precipitation was due to the low non-equilibrium segregation of boron at grain boundaries. The low non-equilibrium segregation and the small grain size at 1050 °C reduce the total boron concentration at grain boundaries.

  10. HYDROGEN-ASSISTED FRACTURE IN FORGED TYPE 304L AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Switzner, Nathan; Neidt, Ted; Hollenbeck, John; Knutson, J.; Everhart, Wes; Hanlin, R. [University of Missouri-Kansas City; Bergen, R. [Precision Metal Products; Balch, D. K. [Sandia Natl Laboratory

    2012-09-06

    Austenitic stainless steels generally have good resistance to hydrogen-assisted fracture; however, structural designs for high-pressure gaseous hydrogen are constrained by the low strength of this class of material. Forging is used to increase the low strength of austenitic stainless steels, thus improving the efficiency of structural designs. Hydrogen-assisted racture, however, depends on microstructural details associated with manufacturing. In this study, hydrogen-assisted fracture of forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is investigated. Microstructural variation in multi-step forged 304L was achieved by forging at different rates and temperatures, and by process annealing. High internal hydrogen content in forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is achieved by thermal precharging in gaseous hydrogen and results in as much as 50% reduction of tensile ductility.

  11. Numerical Modelling of Micro-Stresses in Carbonised Austenitic Cast Steel under Rapid Cooling Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuleja J.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of the numerical modelling of micro-stresses in carbonised austenitic cast steel being developed during rapid cooling due to differences in the values of thermal expansion coefficients for this material phases – carbides and austenitic matrix. Micro-stresses are indicated as the main cause of crack initiation in the tooling elements of carburising furnaces being mainly made of austenitic cast steel. A calculation model of carbonised and thermally fatigued austenitic cast steel was developed based on the microstructure images obtained using light microscopy techniques and the phase composition evaluated with the X-ray diffraction method. The values of the stress tensor components and the reduced stress in the complex models of test material structure were determined numerically by the finite element method. The effort analysis was performed and the areas where development of cracks is to be expected were identified, which was experimentally confirmed.

  12. Application of Moessbauer effect in the study of austenite retained in low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, A.L.T. de; Silva, E.G. da

    1979-01-01

    Moessbauer effect measurements of two samples of low carbon alloy having micro-structure of granular bainite type and martensite type have been done. The concentration of the retained austenite in both samples was determined by Moessbauer effect and x-rays there, being agreement for the higher austenite content sample. Concentration of carbon in the MA (Martensite - Austenite) constituents of bainite is also ditermined, the results being in agreement with metallographic considerations. Carbon enrichments are shown as responsible by the stabilization of the austenite in the granular bainite. Spectra of both samples present three magnetic configurations for α-iron with medium magnetic fields iqual to 335, 307 and 280 KOe. (A.R.H.) [pt

  13. Role of Austenitization and Pre-Deformation on the Kinetics of the Isothermal Bainitic Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambers, H.-G.; Tschumak, S.; Maier, H. J.; Canadinc, D.

    2009-06-01

    The role of time-temperature path on the isothermal austenite-to-bainite phase transformation of low alloy 51 CrV 4 steel was investigated and the corresponding microstructures were analyzed. The important finding is that an incomplete initial austenitization treatment leaves undissolved carbides in the matrix, such that lower carbon and chromium content in the matrix result, eventually accelerating the phase transformation. Furthermore, the residual carbides constitute additional nucleation sites for the bainite plates, speeding up the process even further. Also, both plastic pre-deformation of the supercooled austenite and application of external elastic stresses during the phase transformation lead to transformation plasticity by enhancing the stress fields, providing a driving force for the growth of bainite plates along a preferred orientation. Overall, the current results constitute the first step toward establishing a database for constructing a realistic microstructure-based model for simulating metal forming operations involving austenite-to-bainite phase transformation.

  14. Derivation of tensile flow characteristics for austenitic materials from instrumented indentation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K-W; Kim, K-H; Kim, J-Y; Kwon, D

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a method for deriving the tensile flow characteristics of austenitic materials from an instrumented indentation technique is presented along with its experimental verification. We proposed a modified algorithm for austenitic materials that takes their hardening behaviour into account. First, the true strain based on sine function instead of tangent function was adapted. It was proved that the sine function shows constant degrees of hardening which is a main characteristic of the hardening of austenitic materials. Second, a simple and linear constitutive equation was newly suggested to optimize indentation flow curves. The modified approach was experimentally verified by comparing tensile properties of five austenitic materials from uniaxial tensile test and instrumented indentation tests

  15. The influence of nickel-nitrogen ratio on the deformation behaviour of austenitic stainless steels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schmid, OE

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the effect that a partial substitution of nickel with nitrogen has on the deformation behaviour of a metastable austenitic stainless steel, AISI 301. The effect on the tensile deformation behaviour is studied in detail...

  16. Experimental determination of the constitutive behaviour of a metastable austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, J.; Nolles, H.; Datta, K.; Datta, K.; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents measurements to describe the constitutive behaviour of a semi-austenitic precipitation hardenable stainless steel called Sandvik Nanoflex™, during metal forming and hardening. The material is metastable, which causes strain-induced transformation during forming. Depending on

  17. Tailoring plasticity of austenitic stainless steels for nuclear applications: Review of mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels below 400 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meric de Bellefon, G., E-mail: mericdebelle@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States); Duysen, J.C. van [EDF R& D (France); University of Tennessee-Knoxville (United States); Unité Matériaux et Transformation (UMET) CNRS, Université de Lille (France)

    2016-07-15

    AISI 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels were invented in the early 1900s and are still trusted by materials and mechanical engineers in numerous sectors because of their good combination of strength, ductility, and corrosion resistance, and thanks to decades of experience and data. This article is part of an effort focusing on tailoring the plasticity of both types of steels to nuclear applications. It provides a synthetic and comprehensive review of the plasticity mechanisms in austenitic steels during tensile tests below 400 °C. In particular, formation of twins, extended stacking faults, and martensite, as well as irradiation effects and grain rotation are discussed in details. - Highlights: • This article is part of an effort to tailor the plasticity of 304L and 316L steels for nuclear applications. • It reviews mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels during tensile tests. • Formation of twins, extended stacking faults, and martensite, grain rotation, and irradiation effects are discussed.

  18. Residual stress distribution in ferritic to austenitic steel joints made by laser welding,

    OpenAIRE

    Iordachescu, Mihaela; Ruiz Hervías, Jesús; Luzin, V.; Scutelnicu, Elena; Valiente Cancho, Andrés; Ocaña Moreno, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    In this study, autogenous laser welding was used to join thin plates of low carbon ferritic and austenitic stainless steel. Due to the differences in the thermo-physical properties of base metals, this kind of weld exhibits a complex microstructure, which frequently leads to an overall loss of joint quality. Four welded samples were prepared by using different sets of processing parameters, with the aim of minimizing the induced residual stress field. The dissimilar austenitic-ferritic joints...

  19. Austenite stability in reversion-treated structures of a 301LN steel under tensile loading

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Järvenpää, A.; Jaskari, M.; Man, Jiří; Karjalainen, L. P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 127, MAY (2017), s. 12-26 ISSN 1044-5803 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-32665S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : austenitic stainless steel * austenite stability * grain size * reversion annealing * tensile straining * deformation induced martensite Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis Impact factor: 2.714, year: 2016

  20. Diffusion Couple Alloying of Refractory Metals in Austenitic and Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    temperature (DBTT) and lower upper shelf energy (USE) obtained via a Charpy impact test (austenitic steels , however, do not experience DBTT) as seen in...ALLOYING OF REFRACTORY METALS IN AUSTENITIC AND FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEELS by Alexander L. McGinnis March 2012 Thesis Advisor: Luke...Ferritic/Martensitic Steels 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Alexander L. McGinnis 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval

  1. Fundamental study of the austenite formation and decomposition in low-silicon, aluminum added TRIP steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose Enrique

    2005-11-01

    TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steels are under development for automotive applications that require high strength and excellent formability. Conventional TRIP steels consist of a multiphase microstructure comprised of a ferrite matrix with a dispersion of bainite and metastable retained austenite. The high ductility exhibited by these steels results from the transformation of the metastable retained austenite to martensite during straining. In conventional TRIP steel processing, the multiphase microstructure is obtained by controlled cooling from the alpha + gamma region to an isothermal holding temperature. During this holding, bainite forms and carbon is rejected out into the austenite, which lowers the Ms temperature and stabilizes the austenite to room temperature. In this research project, a fundamental study of a low-Si, Mo-Nb added cold rolled TRIP steel with and without Al additions was conducted. In this study, the recrystallization of cold-rolled ferrite, the formation of austenite during intercritical annealing and the characteristics of the decomposition of the intercritically annealed austenite by controlled cooling rates were systematically assessed. Of special interest were: (i) the effect of the initial hot band microstructure, (ii) the formation of epitaxial ferrite during cooling from the intercritical annealing temperature to the isothermal holding temperature, (iii) the influence of the intercritically annealed austenite on the formation of bainite during the isothermal holding temperature, and (iv) the influence of the processing variables on the type, amount, composition and stability of the retained austenite. During this research study, techniques such as OM, SEM, EBSD, TEM, XRD and Magnetometry were used to fully characterize the microstructures. Furthermore, a Gleeble 3500 unit at US Steel Laboratories was used for dilatometry studies and to simulate different CGL processing routes, from which specimens were obtained to evaluate

  2. Friction welding of Al-Cu-SiC composite to AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel

    OpenAIRE

    Özdemir, Niyazi; Balaban, Zülküf

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates thefeasibility of joining an aluminium matrix composite reinforced with 5, 10 and15 vol. % of SiCp particles to AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel by usingfriction welding technique. In the present study, optical and electronmicroscopy as well as lap shear strength test and microhardness measurementswere used to evaluate the quality of bonding of Al-Cu-SiC and AISI 304austenitic stainless steel joints produced by friction welding

  3. Corrosion And Thermal Processing In Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Deposited Austenitic Stainless Steel Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    testing (ASTM G5) of low pressure cold spray austenitic stainless steel coatings. Several different powders and heat treatments will be applied to...diffusion eliminating the local low chromium region. The low carbon type stainless steel alloys as used here are generally considered to be...maximum 200words) This thesis presents research on the corrosion properties and effects of heat treatment on austenitic stainless steel coatings

  4. Study of Ferrite During Refinement of Prior Austenite Grains in Microalloyed Steel Continuous Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang; Wen, Guanghua; Tang, Ping

    2017-12-01

    The formation of coarse prior austenite grain is a key factor to promote transverse crack, and the susceptibility to the transverse crack can be reduced by refining the austenite grain size. In the present study, the high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) was used to simulate two types of double phase-transformation technologies. The distribution and morphology of ferrites under different cooling conditions were analyzed, and the effects of ferrite distribution and morphology on the double phase-transformation technologies were explored to obtain the suitable double phase-change technology for the continuous casting process. The results indicate that, under the thermal cycle TH0 [the specimens were cooled down to 913 K (640 °C) at a cooling rate of 5.0 K/s (5.0 °C/s)], the width of prior austenite grain boundaries was thick, and the dislocation density at grain boundaries was high. It had strong inhibition effect on crack propagation; under the thermal cycle TH1 [the specimens were cooled down to 1073 K (800 °C) at a cooling rate of 5.0 K/s (5.0 °C/s) and then to 913 K (640 °C) at a cooling rate of 1.0 K/s (1.0 °C/s)], the width of prior austenite grain boundary was thin, and the dislocation density at grain boundaries was low. It was beneficial to crack propagation. After the first phase change, the developed film-like ferrite along the austenite grain boundaries improved the nucleation conditions of new austenitic grains and removed the inhibition effect of the prior austenite grain boundaries on the austenite grain size.

  5. Nitriding Process Characterization of Cold Worked AISI 304 and 316 Austenitic Stainless Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, Waldemar Alfredo; Pereira, Silvio Andre Lima; Vatavuk, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The nitriding behavior of austenitic stainless steels (AISI 304 and 316) was studied by different cold work degree (0% (after heat treated), 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%) before nitride processing. The microstructure, layer thickness, hardness, and chemical microcomposition were evaluated employing optical microscopy, Vickers hardness, and scanning electron microscopy techniques (WDS microanalysis). The initial cold work (previous plastic deformations) in both AISI 304 and 306 austenitic stainless ...

  6. Materials design of high nitrogen manganese austenitic stainless TWIP steels for strip casting

    OpenAIRE

    Mosecker, Linda

    2016-01-01

    High nitrogen manganese austenitic stainless TWIP steels achieve attractive mechanical properties and excellent strain hardening behavior. However, high nitrogen steel melting methods are generally associated with high pressures to enhance the nitrogen solubility in the melt. Thin strip casting offers an attractive option that not only shortens the process route but also allows the alloying with nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. In the present work, the materials design of austenitic Fe-Cr-Mn...

  7. Theoretical and experimental study of carburisation and decarburisation of a meta-stable austenitic steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles West

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Metastable austenitic stainless steels are known to undergo a partial transformation of austenite to martensite as a consequence of plastic deformation. In the case of cyclic loading, a certain level of plastic strain must be exceeded, and phase formation takes place after an incubation period, during which the necessary amount of plastic deformation is accumulated. The susceptibility of the austenitic phase to deformation-induced martensite formation is strongly affected by the temperature of loading and the stability of austenite, which itself depends on the chemical composition. A key element in this regard is carbon which stabilizes the austenitic phase. It is shown in this study that the carbon concentration can be analysed systematically and reproducible by means of annealing treatments, if the parameters of these treatments are carefully defined on the basis of advanced theoretical thermodynamic and kinetic considerations. First results on the effect of carbon concentration and temperature of fatigue testing on the austenite/martensite transformation are presented, in order to illustrate the significance of these parameters on the martensite formation rate.

  8. Structure and properties of high-temperature austenitic steels for superheater tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinov, V. M.

    2009-12-01

    The structure and properties of high-temperature austenitic steels intended for superheater tubes are analyzed. Widely used Kh18N10T (AISI 304) and Kh16N13M3 (AISI 316) steels are found not to ensure a stable austenitic structure and stable properties during long-term thermal holding under stresses. The hardening of austenitic steels by fine particles of vanadium and niobium carbides and nitrides and γ'-phase and Fe2W and Fe2Mo Laves phase intermetallics is considered. The role of Cr23C6 chromium carbides, the σ phase, and coarse precipitates of an M 3B2 phase and a boron-containing eutectic in decreasing the time to failure and the stress-rupture strength of austenitic steels is established. The mechanism of increasing the stress-rupture strength of steels by boron additions is described. The chemical compositions, mechanical properties, stress-rupture strength, and creep characteristics of Russian and foreign austenitic steels used or designed for superheater tubes intended for operation under stress conditions at temperatures above 600°C are presented. The conditions are found for increasing the strength, plasticity, and thermodeformation stability of austenite in steels intended for superheater tubes operating at 700°C under high stresses for a long time.

  9. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure investigation of annealed carbon expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas L.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Carbon expanded austenite synthesized through carburizing of austenitic stainless steel powder at 380°C was annealed at 470°C and investigated with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and synchrotron powder diffraction (SPD). SPD showed that the samples consisted of carbon expanded...... austenite and Hägg carbide, Ξ-M5C2. EXAFS showed that the Cr atoms were mainly present in environments similar to the carbides Hägg Ξ-M5C2 and M23C6. The environments of the Fe and Ni atoms were concluded to be largely metallic austenite. Light optical micrograph of stainless steel AISI 316 gas......-carburized in a temperature regime around 470°C. The surface zone is converted into carbon expanded austenite; the high interstitial content of carbon dissolved in the surface results in highly favorable materials properties. In the present article the local atomic environment of (annealed) carbon expanded austenite...

  10. Tailoring plasticity of austenitic stainless steels for nuclear applications: Review of mechanisms controlling plasticity of austenitic steels below 400 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meric de Bellefon, G.; van Duysen, J. C.

    2016-07-01

    AISI 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steels were invented in the early 1900s and are still trusted by materials and mechanical engineers in numerous sectors because of their good combination of strength, ductility, and corrosion resistance, and thanks to decades of experience and data. This article is part of an effort focusing on tailoring the plasticity of both types of steels to nuclear applications. It provides a synthetic and comprehensive review of the plasticity mechanisms in austenitic steels during tensile tests below 400 °C. In particular, formation of twins, extended stacking faults, and martensite, as well as irradiation effects and grain rotation are discussed in details.

  11. Development of nano/sub-micron grain structures in metastable austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekhara, Shreyas

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation is a part of a collaborative work between the University of Texas, Austin-Texas, the University of Oulu, Oulu-Finland, and Outokumpu Stainless Oy, Tornio-Finland, to develop commercial austenitic stainless steels with high strength and ductility. The idea behind this work involves cold-rolling a commercial metastable austenitic stainless steel - AISI 301LN stainless steel to produce strain-induced martensite, followed by an annealing treatment to generate nano/sub-micron grained austenite. AISI 301LN stainless steel sheets are cold-rolled to 63% reduction and subsequently annealed at 600°C, 700°C, 800°C, 900°C and 1000°C for 1, 10 and 100 seconds. The samples are analyzed by X-Ray diffraction, SQUID, transmission electron microscopy, and tensile testing to fundamentally understand the microstructural evolution, the mechanism for the martensite → austenite reversion, the formation of nano/sub-micron austenite grains, and the relationship between the microstructure and the strength obtained in this stainless steel. The results show that cold-rolled AISI 301LN stainless steel consist of dislocation-cell martensite, heavily deformed lath-martensite and austenite shear bands. Subsequent annealing at 600°C for short durations of 1 and 10 seconds leads to negligible martensite to austenite reversion. These 600°C samples exhibit a similar microstructure to the cold-rolled sample. However, for samples annealed at 600°C for 100 seconds and those annealed at higher temperatures (700°C, 800°C, 900°C and 1000°C) exhibit equiaxed austenitic grains of sizes 0.2mum-10mum and secondary phase precipitates. The microstructural analysis also reveals that the martensite → austenite reversion occurs via a diffusion-type reversion mechanism. In this regard, a generalized form of Avrami's equation is used to model the kinetics of martensite → austenite phase reversion. The results from the model agree reasonably well with the experiments. Furthermore

  12. Characterization of the Carbon and Retained Austenite Distributions in Martensitic Medium Carbon, High Silicon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Donald H.; Cross, Steven M.; Kim, Sangho; Grandjean, Fernande; Long, Gary J.; Miller, Michael K.

    2007-08-01

    The retained austenite content and carbon distribution in martensite were determined as a function of cooling rate and temper temperature in steel that contained 1.31 at. pct C, 3.2 at. pct Si, and 3.2 at. pct noniron metallic elements. Mössbauer spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), transmission synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD), and atom probe tomography were used for the microstructural analyses. The retained austenite content was an inverse, linear function of cooling rate between 25 and 560 K/s. The elevated Si content of 3.2 at. pct did not shift the start of austenite decomposition to higher tempering temperatures relative to SAE 4130 steel. The minimum tempering temperature for complete austenite decomposition was significantly higher (>650 °C) than for SAE 4130 steel (˜300 °C). The tempering temperatures for the precipitation of transition carbides and cementite were significantly higher (>400 °C) than for carbon steels (100 °C to 200 °C and 200 °C to 350 °C), respectively. Approximately 90 pct of the carbon atoms were trapped in Cottrell atmospheres in the vicinity of the dislocation cores in dislocation tangles in the martensite matrix after cooling at 560 K/s and aging at 22 °C. The 3.2 at. pct Si content increased the upper temperature limit for stable carbon clusters to above 215 °C. Significant autotempering occurred during cooling at 25 K/s. The proportion of total carbon that segregated to the interlath austenite films decreased from 34 to 8 pct as the cooling rate increased from 25 to 560 K/s. Developing a model for the transfer of carbon from martensite to austenite during quenching should provide a means for calculating the retained austenite. The maximum carbon content in the austenite films was 6 to 7 at. pct, both in specimens cooled at 560 K/s and at 25 K/s. Approximately 6 to 7 at. pct carbon was sufficient to arrest the transformation of austenite to martensite. The chemical potential of carbon is the same in

  13. Intermetallic Strengthened Alumina-Forming Austenitic Steels for Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Bin [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Baker, Ian [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)

    2016-03-31

    In order to achieve energy conversion efficiencies of >50 % for steam turbines/boilers in power generation systems, the materials required must be strong, corrosion-resistant at high temperatures (>700°C), and economically viable. Austenitic steels strengthened with Laves phase and L12 precipitates, and alloyed with aluminum to improve oxidation resistance, are potential candidate materials for these applications. The creep resistance of these alloys is significantly improved through intermetallic strengthening (Laves-Fe2Nb + L12-Ni3Al precipitates) without harmful effects on oxidation resistance. Microstructural and microchemical analyses of the recently developed alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) steels (Fe-14Cr-32Ni-3Nb-3Al-2Ti-based) indicated they are strengthened by Ni3Al(Ti) L12, NiAl B2, Fe2Nb Laves phase and MC carbide precipitates. Different thermomechanical treatments (TMTs) were performed on these stainless steels in an attempt to further improve their mechanical properties. The thermo-mechanical processing produced nanocrystalline grains in AFA alloys and dramatically increased their yield strength at room temperature. Unfortunately, the TMTs didn’t increase the yield strengths of AFA alloys at ≥700ºC. At these temperatures, dislocation climb is the dominant mechanism for deformation of TMT alloys according to strain rate jump tests. After the characterization of aged AFA alloys, we found that the largest strengthening effect from L12 precipitates can be obtained by aging for less than 24 h. The coarsening behavior of the L12 precipitates was not influenced by carbon and boron additions. Failure analysis and post-mortem TEM analysis were performed to study the creep failure mechanisms of these AFA steels after creep tests. Though the Laves and B2-NiAl phase precipitated along the boundaries can improve the creep properties, cracks were

  14. Reaction of uranium and plutonium carbides with austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouchnino, M.

    1967-01-01

    The reaction of uranium and plutonium carbides with austenitic steels has been studied between 650 and 1050 deg. C using UC, steel and (UPu)C, steel diffusion couples. The steels are of the type CN 18.10 with or without addition of molybdenum. The carbides used are hyper-stoichiometric. Tests were also carried out with UCTi, UCMo, UPuCTi and UPuCMo. Up to 800 deg. C no marked diffusion of carbon into stainless steel is observed. Between 800 and 900 deg. C the carbon produced by the decomposition of the higher carbides diffuses into the steel. Above 900 deg. C, decomposition of the monocarbide occurs according to a reaction which can be written schematically as: (U,PuC) + (Fe,Ni,Cr) → (U,Pu) Fe 2 + Cr 23 C 6 . Above 950 deg. C the behaviour of UPuCMo and that of the titanium (CN 18.12) and nickel (NC 38. 18) steels is observed to be very satisfactory. (author) [fr

  15. Surface modification of austenitic stainless steel by titanium ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, P.J.; Hyvarinen, J.; Samandi, M.

    1995-01-01

    The wear properties of AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel implanted with Ti were investigated for ion doses in the range (2.3-5.4)x10 16 ionscm -2 and average ion energies of 60 and 90keV. The implanted layer was examined by Rutherford backscattering, from which the retained doses were determined, and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. Following implantation, the surface microhardness was observed to increase with the greatest change occurring at higher ion energy. Pin-on-disc wear tests and associated friction measurements were also performed under both dry and lubricated conditions using applied loads of 2N and 10N. In the absence of lubrication, breakthrough of the implanted layer occurred after a short sliding time; only for a dose of 5.1x10 16 ionscm -2 implanted at an average energy of 90keV was the onset of breakthrough appreciably delayed. In contrast, the results of tests with lubrication showed a more gradual variation, with the extent of wear decreasing with implant dose at both 2N and 10N loads. Finally, the influence of Ti implantation on possible wear mechanisms is discussed in the light of information provided by several surface characterization techniques. ((orig.))

  16. High cycle fatigue of austenitic stainless steels under random loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthier, J.P.; Petrequin, P.

    1987-08-01

    To investigate reactor components, load control random fatigue tests were performed at 300 0 C and 550 0 C, on specimens from austenitic stainless steels plates in the transverse orientation. Random solicitations are produced on closed loop servo-hydraulic machines by a mini computer which generates random load sequence by the use of reduced Markovian matrix. The method has the advantage of taking into account the mean load for each cycle. The solicitations generated are those of a stationary gaussian process. Fatigue tests have been mainly performed in the endurance region of fatigue curve, with scattering determination using stair case method. Experimental results have been analysed aiming at determining design curves for components calculations, depending on irregularity factor and temperature. Analysis in term of mean square root fatigue limit calculation, shows that random loading gives more damage than constant amplitude loading. Damage calculations following Miner rule have been made using the probability density function for the case where the irregularity factor is nearest to 100 %. The Miner rule is too conservative for our results. A method using design curves including random loading effects with irregularity factor as an indexing parameter is proposed

  17. Deuterium retention in ITER-grade austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemanič, Vincenc; Žumer, Marko; Zajec, Bojan

    2008-11-01

    In view of the construction of ITER, it is essential to confirm that the retention of tritium by the large interior surface area of stainless steel will not become an issue for safety or operating inventory reasons. Retention of deuterium in ITER-grade austenitic stainless steel samples was studied during t = 24 h exposures to pure gaseous deuterium at p = 0.01 mbar and 0.1 mbar and T = 100 °C, 250 °C and 400 °C, respectively. The required high sensitivity for distinguishing hydrogen isotopes involved in the process (H2, HD and D2) was gained after suppression of the native hydrogen concentration by a thermal treatment at T = 400 °C for t = 200 h. The quantity of retained deuterium was determined by measuring the absolute pressure change during the deuterium exposure and subsequent mass spectrometry revealing an intense isotope exchange reaction. The retained amount of 2.6 × 1016 D cm-2 was the highest at T = 400 °C and p = 0.1 mbar and noticeably less at lower deuterium pressure and temperature. Our results, when compared with similar tritium exposures, do not exceed the limits set in the generic safety analysis for the ITER. They manifest that an extremely high sensitivity for deuterium absorption and release can be gained with a precise pressure measuring technique, otherwise attributed exclusively to tritium scintillation methods.

  18. Inspection of austenitic welds with ultrasonic phased array technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, A.; Fernandez, F. [Tecnatom (Spain); Dutruc, R.; Ferriere, R. [Metalscan (France)

    2011-07-01

    This series of slides presents the use of ultrasonic phased array technology in the inspection of austenitic welds. The inspection from outside surface (the inspection is performed in contact using wedges to couple the probe to the outer surface of the component) shows that longitudinal wave is the most adequate for perpendicular scans and transversal ultrasonic wave is the most adequate for parallel scans. Detection and length sizing are performed optimally in perpendicular scans. The inspection from inside surface shows: -) Good results in the detection of defects (Sizing has met the requirements imposed by the Authority of the Russian Federation); -) The new design of the mechanical equipment and of the numerous ultrasonic beams refracted by the array probes has increased the volume inspected. The design of the mechanical equipment has also allowed new areas to be inspected (example a piping weld that was not accessible from the outer surface; -) The ultrasonic procedure and Inspection System developed have been validated by the Authority of the Russian Federation. Phase array technique supplies solutions to solve accessibility concerns and improve the ultrasonic inspections of nuclear components

  19. Grain Boundary Assemblies in Dynamically-Recrystallized Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Tikhonova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The grain boundary misorientation distributions associated with the development of dynamic recrystallization were studied in a high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel subjected to hot working. Under conditions of discontinuous dynamic recrystallization, the relationships between the grain or subgrain sizes and flow stresses can be expressed by power law functions with different grain/subgrain size exponents of about −0.76 (for grain size or −1.0 (for subgrain size. Therefore, the mean grain size being much larger than the subgrain size under conditions of low flow stress gradually approaches the size of the subgrains with an increase in the flow stress. These dependencies lead to the fraction of high-angle boundaries being a function of the flow stress. Namely, the fraction of ordinary high-angle boundaries in dynamically-recrystallized structures decreases with a decrease in the flow stress. On the other hand, the fraction of special boundaries, which are associated with annealing twins, progressively increases with a decrease of the flow stress.

  20. Dynamic Recrystallization during Hot Deformation of 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchattiwar, A.; Sarkar, A.; Chakravartty, J. K.; Kashyap, B. P.

    2013-08-01

    The kinetics of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) during hot compression of 304 austenitic stainless steel was studied over the temperature range of 900-1200 °C and strain rate range of 0.002-0.1 s-1. The initiation and evolution of DRX were investigated using the process variables derived from flow curves. By the regression analysis for conventional hyperbolic sine equation, the activation energy for DRX was determined as Q = 475 kJ mol-1. The temperature and strain rate domain where DRX occurred were identified from the strain rate sensitivity contour map. The critical stress (and strain) for the initiation of DRX was determined from the inflection point on the work hardening rate (θ = dσ/ dɛ) versus flow stress (σ) curve. The saturation stress of the dynamic recovery (DRV) curve was calculated from the θ-σ plot at the same condition at which DRX occurred. Progress of fraction recrystallization was determined from the difference between the generated DRV curve and the experimental DRX curve. In addition, the microstructural evolution at different strain levels during DRX was characterized and compared with the calculated fraction recrystallization.

  1. Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Was, G.S.; Atzmon, M.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to determine the mechanism of irradiation-assisted stress-corrosion cracking (IASCC) in austenitic stainless steel. High-energy protons have been used to produce grain boundary segregation and microstructural damage in samples of controlled impurity content. The densities of network dislocations and dislocation loops were determined by transmission electron microscopy and found to resemble those for neutron irradiation under LWR conditions. Grain boundary compositions were determined by in situ fracture and Auger spectroscopy, as well as by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Cr depletion and Ni segregation were observed in all irradiated samples, with the degree of segregation depending on the type and amount of impurities present. P, and to a lesser extent P, impurities were observed to segregate to the grain boundaries. Irradiation was found to increase the susceptibility of ultra-high-purity (UHP), and to a much lesser extent of UHP+P and UHP+S, alloys to intergranular SCC in 288 degree C water at 2 ppm O 2 and 0.5 μS/cm. No intergranular fracture was observed in arcon atmosphere, indicating the important role of corrosion in the embrittlement of irradiated samples. The absence of intergranular fracture in 288 degree C argon and room temperature tests also suggest that the embrittlement is not caused by hydrogen introduced by irradiation. Contrary to common belief, the presence of P impurities led to a significant improvement in IASCC over the ultrahigh purity alloy

  2. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands. PMID:26601037

  3. Overview of Intergranular Fracture of Neutron Irradiated Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hojná

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steels are normally ductile and exhibit deep dimples on fracture surfaces. These steels can, however, exhibit brittle intergranular fracture under some circumstances. The occurrence of intergranular fracture in the irradiated steels is briefly reviewed based on limited literature data. The data are sorted according to the irradiation temperature. Intergranular fracture may occur in association with a high irradiation temperature and void swelling. At low irradiation temperature, the steels can exhibit intergranular fracture at low or even at room temperatures during loading in air and in high temperature water (~300 °C. This paper deals with the similarities and differences for IG fractures and discusses the mechanisms involved. The intergranular fracture occurrence at low temperatures might be correlated with decohesion or twinning and strain martensite transformation in local narrow areas around grain boundaries. The possibility of a ductile-to-brittle transition is also discussed. In case of void swelling higher than 3%, quasi-cleavage at low temperature might be expected as a consequence of ductile-to-brittle fracture changes with temperature. Any existence of the change in fracture behavior in the steels of present thermal reactor internals with increasing irradiation dose should be clearly proven or disproven. Further studies to clarify the mechanism are recommended.

  4. Investigations on the ratchetting behaviour of austenitic pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, D.; Krolop, S.; Scheffold, A.; Stegmeyer, R.

    1994-01-01

    Reversed bending tests at room temperature with pipes with and without internal pressure were carried out. The pipes were manufactured from the austenitic steel X10 CrNiNb 18 9. Under internal pressure ratchetting was observed in circumferential direction. The component tests were accompanied by numerical computations using a nonlinear kinematic hardening rule and superposed isotropic hardening. In total the constitutive model needed 13 parameters to be fitted when isotropic hardening resulted in a cyclic saturation. Uniaxial monotonic and cyclic loading tests served for characterizing the material. A reasonable parameter fitting with respect to describe ratchetting required load controlled nonzero mean-stress tests. On condition, that the loading will lead to cyclic saturation, ratchetting could be well predicted in the pipe with the found set of parameters. An extension of the isotropic hardening rule in the constitutive model was proposed allowing to describe various types of isotropic hardening. In a first step it was shown that under uniaxial conditions the extension reproduces continuous isotropic hardening up to incipient cracking quite well. (orig.)

  5. Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel Made by Additive Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, William E; Slotwinski, John A

    2014-01-01

    Using uniaxial tensile and hardness testing, we evaluated the variability and anisotropy of the mechanical properties of an austenitic stainless steel, UNS S17400, manufactured by an additive process, selective laser melting. Like wrought materials, the mechanical properties depend on the orientation introduced by the processing. The recommended stress-relief heat treatment increases the tensile strength, reduces the yield strength, and decreases the extent of the discontinuous yielding. The mechanical properties, assessed by hardness, are very uniform across the build plate, but the stress-relief heat treatment introduced a small non-uniformity that had no correlation to position on the build plate. Analysis of the mechanical property behavior resulted in four conclusions. (1) The within-build and build-to-build tensile properties of the UNS S17400 stainless steel are less repeatable than mature engineering structural alloys, but similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (2) The anisotropy of the mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material of this study is larger than that of mature structural alloys, but is similar to other structural alloys made by additive manufacturing. (3) The tensile mechanical properties of the UNS S17400 material fabricated by selective laser melting are very different from those of wrought, heat-treated 17-4PH stainless steel. (4) The large discontinuous yielding strain in all tests resulted from the formation and propagation of Lüders bands.

  6. Dynamical recrystallization of high purity austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavard, L.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is to optimize the performance of structural materials. The elementary mechanisms (strain hardening and dynamical regeneration, germination and growth of new grains) occurring during the hot working of metals and low pile defect energy alloys have been studied for austenitic stainless steels. In particular, the influence of the main experimental parameters (temperature, deformation velocity, initial grain size, impurities amount, deformation way) on the process of discontinuous dynamical recrystallization has been studied. Alloys with composition equal to those of the industrial stainless steel-304L have been fabricated from ultra-pure iron, chromium and nickel. Tests carried out in hot compression and torsion in order to cover a wide range of deformations, deformation velocities and temperatures for two very different deformation ways have allowed to determine the rheological characteristics (sensitivity to the deformation velocity, apparent activation energy) of materials as well as to characterize their microstructural deformations by optical metallography and electron back-scattered diffraction. The influence of the initial grain size and the influence of the purity of the material on the dynamical recrystallization kinetics have been determined. An analytical model for the determination of the apparent mobility of grain boundaries, a semi-analytical model for the dynamical recrystallization and at last an analytical model for the stationary state of dynamical recrystallization are proposed as well as a new criteria for the transition between the refinement state and the state of grain growth. (O.M.)

  7. Influence of Austenitizing Parameters on Mechanical Behavior of Press Hardened Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golem, Lindsay

    Recent increases in the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standard have led to an increased focus on lightweight materials for use in vehicle architectures. In particular, press hardened steels (PHS) have been identified as suitable materials to reduce vehicle mass while maintaining or possibly improving vehicle crash performance. A fundamental understanding of the mechanical behavior of PHS with respect to changes in processing conditions is critical to their proper use. In this work, 22MnB5 Al-Si coated blanks were austenitized at several different times and temperatures to produce a range of prior austenite grain sizes. Mechanical behavior was evaluated using smooth sided tensile testing, double edge notch tensile testing, and free bend testing. Metrics, such as notch tensile strength, notch strength ratio, and notch displacement, which is based on the fracture mechanics parameter crack tip opening displacement, were derived from double edge notch tensile testing to assess material notch sensitivity and toughness as a function of processing conditions. Additionally, bend angle at maximum load, post uniform bending slope, and energy for fracture were measured using free bend testing to provide another means for evaluating mechanical behavior. Increasing the austenitizing temperature and hold time resulted in an increase in the measured prior austenite grain size; however, elevated austenitizing temperatures also increased the thickness of the coating interdiffusion layer. In the coated material, tensile strength decreased with increasing prior austenite grain size for both notched and smooth sided tensile samples, but minimal difference was observed in the strain to failure results. Notch displacement, bend angle at maximum load, and energy for fracture during free bend testing all decreased with increasing prior austenite grain size in the coated PHS and also showed a significant drop in measured behavior for the 1025 °C for 30 minutes austenitizing condition

  8. Study of biocompatibility of medical grade high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Menghua; Yin, Tieying; Wang, Yazhou; Du, Feifei; Zou, Xingzheng; Gregersen, Hans; Wang, Guixue

    2014-10-01

    Adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the living organism have resulted in development of high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steels for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also improves steel properties. The cell cytocompatibility, blood compatibility and cell response of high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel were studied in vitro. The mechanical properties and microstructure of this stainless steel were compared to the currently used 316L stainless steel. It was shown that the new steel material had comparable basic mechanical properties to 316L stainless steel and preserved the single austenite organization. The cell toxicity test showed no significant toxic side effects for MC3T3-E1 cells compared to nitinol alloy. Cell adhesion testing showed that the number of MC3T3-E1 cells was more than that on nitinol alloy and the cells grew in good condition. The hemolysis rate was lower than the national standard of 5% without influence on platelets. The total intracellular protein content and ALP activity and quantification of mineralization showed good cell response. We conclude that the high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel is a promising new biomedical material for coronary stent development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Relationship between austenite stability and martensite formation in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, Baoqun; Zhao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Aimed at investigating the relationship between austenite stability and martensite formation in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, the fully austenitized steel was cooled to a temperature above or below the start temperature of martensite transformation (M s o , 406 C), which occurs upon continuous cooling from the austenitizing temperature to room temperature, and held for different times (10 min, 25 min, and 45 min) followed by cooling to room temperature. The concept of primary and secondary martensite is introduced to indicate that two different, sequential, martensites formed in this processing. When cooled to 650 C or 450 C for different times, the austenite stability decreased with prolonged holding time, and during the subsequent cooling the primary martensite start temperature (M s ) was raised to a value higher than M s o . In contrast, M s was reduced to a level lower than M s o when cooled to 420 C or 410 C for 45 min. On the other hand, as the steel was isothermally quenched at temperatures below M s o , during the subsequent cooling a secondary martensite reaction could be observed, and the secondary martensite start temperature (M s ') decreased with holding time. Retained austenite in the form of thin films along martensite lath boundaries was obtained when cooled to 380 C or below for different times. (orig.)

  10. A review on nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talha, Mohd; Behera, C K; Sinha, O P

    2013-10-01

    The field of biomaterials has become a vital area, as these materials can enhance the quality and longevity of human life. Metallic materials are often used as biomaterials to replace structural components of the human body. Stainless steels, cobalt-chromium alloys, commercially pure titanium and its alloys are typical metallic biomaterials that are being used for implant devices. Stainless steels have been widely used as biomaterials because of their very low cost as compared to other metallic materials, good mechanical and corrosion resistant properties and adequate biocompatibility. However, the adverse effects of nickel ions being released into the human body have promoted the development of "nickel-free nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels" for medical applications. Nitrogen not only replaces nickel for austenitic structure stability but also much improves steel properties. Here we review the harmful effects associated with nickel and emphatically the advantages of nitrogen in stainless steel, as well as the development of nickel-free nitrogen containing stainless steels for medical applications. By combining the benefits of stable austenitic structure, high strength, better corrosion and wear resistance and superior biocompatibility in comparison to the currently used austenitic stainless steel (e.g. 316L), the newly developed nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel is a reliable substitute for the conventionally used medical stainless steels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. On the spheroidal graphite growth and the austenite solidification in ductile irons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Jingjing

    Evolutions of austenite and nodular/spheroidal graphite particles during solidifications of ductile irons were experimentally investigated. Spheroidal graphite particle and austenite dendrite were found nucleated independently in liquid. Austenite dendrite engulfed the spheroidal graphite particles after contact and an austenite shell formed around a spheroidal graphite particle. The graphite diameter at which the austenite shell closed around nodule was determined. Statistically determined graphite size distributions indicated multiple graphite nucleation events during solidification. Structures in a graphite nodule varied depending on the growth stages of the nodule in ductile iron. Curved graphene layers appearing as faceted growth ledges swept circumferentially around the surface of a graphite nodule at early growth stages. Mismatches between the growth fronts created gaps which divided a nodule into radially oriented conical substructures (3-D). Columnar substructure was observed in the periphery of a nodule (formed during the intermediate growth stages) on its 2-D cross section. A columnar substructure consisted of parallel peripheral grains, with their c-axes approximately parallel. Graphene layers continued building up in individual conical substructure, and a graphite nodule increased its size accordingly. Method for characterizing the crystal structures of graphite based on the selected area diffraction pattern was developed. Both hexagonal structure and rhombohedral structure were found in the spheroidal graphite particles. Possible crystallographic defects associated with hexagonal-rhombohedral structure transition were discussed. Schematic models for introducing tilt angles to the graphite lattice with basal plane tilt boundaries were constructed.

  12. Influence of Ti on the Hot Ductility of High-manganese Austenitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongbo; Liu, Jianhua; Wu, Bowei; Su, Xiaofeng; Li, Shiqi; Ding, Hao

    2017-07-01

    The influence of Ti addition ( 0.10 wt%) on hot ductility of as-cast high-manganese austenitic steels has been examined over the temperature range 650-1,250 °C under a constant strain rate of 10-3 s-1 using Gleeble3500 thermal simulation testing machine. The fracture surfaces and particles precipitated at different tensile temperatures were characterized by means of scanning electron microscope and X-ray energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS). Hot ductility as a function of reduction curves shows that adding 0.10 wt% Ti made the ductility worse in the almost entire range of testing temperatures. The phases' equilibrium diagrams of precipitates in Ti-bearing high-Mn austenitic steel were calculated by the Thermo-Calc software. The calculation result shows that 0.1 wt% Ti addition would cause Ti(C,N) precipitated at 1,499 °C, which is higher than the liquidus temperature of high-Mn austenitic steel. It indicated that Ti(C,N) particles start forming in the liquid high-Mn austenitic steel. The SEM-EDS results show that Ti(C,N) and TiC particles could be found along the austenite grain boundaries or at triple junction, and they would accelerate the extension of the cracks along the grain boundaries.

  13. Radio-induced brittleness of austenitic stainless steels at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    1969-02-01

    In a first part, the author recalls some metallurgical characteristics and properties of iron (atomic properties, crystalline structure, transformation), of iron carbon systems and steels (ferrite, austenite, cementite, martensite, bainite, phase diagrams of iron chromium alloy and iron nickel alloy), aspects regarding the influence of addition elements in the case of stainless steels (mutual interaction of carbon, chromium and nickel in their iron alloys, indication of the various stainless steels, i.e. martensitic, ferritic, austenitic, austenitic-ferritic, and non ferrous), and presents and discusses various mechanical tests (tensile tests, torsion tests, resilience tests, hardness tests, creep tests). In a second part, he discusses the effects of irradiation on austenitic stainless steels: irradiation and deformation under low temperature, irradiation at intermediate temperature, irradiation at high temperature. The third part addresses mechanisms of intergranular fracture in different temperature ranges (400-600, 700-750, and about 800 C). The author then discusses the effect of Helium on the embrittlement of austenitic steels, and finally evokes the perspective of development of a damage model

  14. Rapid nickel diffusion in cold-worked type 316 austenitic steel at 360-500 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arioka, Koji; Iijima, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of nickel in cold-worked Type 316 austenitic steel was determined by the diffusion couple method in the temperature range between 360 and 500 C. A diffusion couple was prepared by electroless nickel plating on the surface of a 20 % cold-worked Type 316 austenitic steel specimen. The growth in width of the interdiffusion zone was proportional to the square root of diffusion time until 14 055 h. The diffusion coefficient of nickel (D Ni ) in cold-worked Type 316 austenitic steel was determined by extrapolating the concentration-dependent interdiffusion coefficient to 11 at.% of nickel. The value of D Ni at 360 C was about 5 000 times higher than the lattice diffusion coefficient of nickel in Type 316 austenitic steel. The determined activation energy 117 kJ mol -1 was 46.6 % of the activation energy 251 kJ mol -1 for the lattice diffusion of nickel in Type 316 austenitic steel.

  15. Proceedings of the specialists' meeting on reliability of the ultrasonic inspection of austenitic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The contributions of this meeting addressed several topics: the fundamentals of ultrasonic examination of austenitic materials (effect of anisotropy on propagation, improvement of ultrasonic testing to thick bimetallic welds, aspects of the ultrasonic testing of austenitic steel structures, utilization of a Fisher linear discriminant function in intergranular stress corrosion cracking or IGSCC detection, case of coarse grain austenitic welds, efforts of the Argonne National Laboratory), instruments and methods (longitudinal wave ultrasonic inspection, Grass echo suppression technique during the ultrasonic inspection of fuel cladding tubes, inspections of fillet and butt welds, improvement by signal averaging techniques, multiple bearing angle crack detector for cladded pipes examinations, flow-to-grain echo enhancement by split-spectrum processing, ultrasonic imaging techniques, ultrasonic inspection of pipe weldments for IGSCC), industrial practice (ultrasonic testing techniques for fabrication and in-service inspection, experiences in ultrasonic examination of austenitic steel components, experience and practice on nuclear piping in Spain, detection of underclad defects, sizing of cracks perpendicular to stainless overlay), and reliability (survey of ultrasonic testing in austenitic weld material, examination of electron beam welds, factors affecting the reliability of ultrasonic examination, detectability of IGSCC, ultrasonic inspection reliability for primary piping systems)

  16. Rapid nickel diffusion in cold-worked type 316 austenitic steel at 360-500 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arioka, Koji [Institute of Nuclear Safety Systems, Inc., Mihama (Japan); Iijima, Yoshiaki [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science; Miyamoto, Tomoki [Kobe Material Testing Laboratory Co. Ltd., Harima (Japan)

    2017-10-15

    The diffusion coefficient of nickel in cold-worked Type 316 austenitic steel was determined by the diffusion couple method in the temperature range between 360 and 500 C. A diffusion couple was prepared by electroless nickel plating on the surface of a 20 % cold-worked Type 316 austenitic steel specimen. The growth in width of the interdiffusion zone was proportional to the square root of diffusion time until 14 055 h. The diffusion coefficient of nickel (D{sub Ni}) in cold-worked Type 316 austenitic steel was determined by extrapolating the concentration-dependent interdiffusion coefficient to 11 at.% of nickel. The value of D{sub Ni} at 360 C was about 5 000 times higher than the lattice diffusion coefficient of nickel in Type 316 austenitic steel. The determined activation energy 117 kJ mol{sup -1} was 46.6 % of the activation energy 251 kJ mol{sup -1} for the lattice diffusion of nickel in Type 316 austenitic steel.

  17. Effect of alloying elements on solidification of primary austenite in Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janus

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Within the research, determined were direction and intensity of alloying elements influence on solidification way (directional orvolumetric of primary austenite dendrites in hypoeutectic austenitic cast iron Ni-Mn-Cu. 50 cast shafts dia. 20 mm were analysed.Chemical composition of the alloy was as follows: 1.7 to 3.3 % C, 1.4 to 3.1 % Si, 2.8 to 9.9 % Ni, 0.4 to 7.7 % Mn, 0 to 4.6 % Cu, 0.14 to0.16 % P and 0.03 to 0.04 % S. The discriminant analysis revealed that carbon influences solidification of primary austenite dendrites most intensively. It clearly increases the tendency to volumetric solidification. Influence of the other elements is much weaker. This means that the solidification way of primary austenite dendrites in hypoeutectic austenitic cast iron Ni-Mn-Cu does not differ from that in an unalloyed cast iron.

  18. INFLUENCE OF STRUCTURAL STATE OF CARBON STEEL IN THE PROCESS OF AUSTENITE APPEARING DURING REHEATING DOUBLE-PHASE (A+Y FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. I. Kindratskyi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on the analysis of research results for the kinetics of austenitization process the order of the original structures in the direction of increasing the rate of austenite formation is determined.

  19. Internal Friction of Austenitic Fe-Mn-C-Al Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Kook; Jeong, Sohee; Kang, Jee-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Min

    2017-12-01

    The internal friction (IF) spectra of Fe-Mn-C-Al alloys with a face-centered-cubic (fcc) austenitic phase were measured at a wide range of temperature and frequency ( f) to understand the mechanisms of anelastic relaxations occurring particularly in Fe-Mn-C twinning-induced plasticity steels. Four IF peaks were observed at 346 K (73 °C) (P1), 389 K (116 °C) (P2), 511 K (238 °C) (P3), and 634 K (361 °C) (P4) when f was 0.1 Hz. However, when f increased to 100 Hz, whereas P1, P2, and P4 disappeared, only P3 remained without the change in peak height, but with the increased peak temperature. P3 matches well with the IF peak of Fe-high Mn-C alloys reported in the literature. The effects of chemical composition and vacancy (v) on the four IF peaks were also investigated using various alloys with different concentrations of C, Mn, Al, and vacancy. As a result, the defect pair responsible for each IF peak was found as follows: a v-v pair for P1, a C-v pair for P2, a C-C pair for P3, and a C-C-v complex (major effect) + a Mn-C pair (minor effect) for P4. These results showed that the IF peaks of Fe-Mn-C-Al alloys reported previously were caused by the reorientation of C in C-C pairs, not by the reorientation of C in Mn-C pairs.

  20. Prediction of Austenite Formation Temperatures Using Artificial Neural Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, P; Schmidl, E; Grund, T; Lampke, T

    2016-01-01

    For the modeling and design of heat treatments, in consideration of the development/ transformation of the microstructure, different material data depending on the chemical composition, the respective microstructure/phases and the temperature are necessary. Material data are, e.g. the thermal conductivity, heat capacity, thermal expansion and transformation data etc. The quality of thermal simulations strongly depends on the accuracy of the material data. For many materials, the required data - in particular for different microstructures and temperatures - are rare in the literature. In addition, a different chemical composition within the permitted limits of the considered steel alloy cannot be predicted. A solution for this problem is provided by the calculation of material data using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). In the present study, the start and finish temperatures of the transformation from the bcc lattice to the fcc lattice structure of hypoeutectoid steels are calculated using an Artificial Neural Network. An appropriate database containing different transformation temperatures (austenite formation temperatures) to train the ANN is selected from the literature. In order to find a suitable feedforward network, the network topologies as well as the activation functions of the hidden layers are varied and subsequently evaluated in terms of the prediction accuracy. The transformation temperatures calculated by the ANN exhibit a very good compliance compared to the experimental data. The results show that the prediction performance is even higher compared to classical empirical equations such as Andrews or Brandis. Therefore, it can be assumed that the presented ANN is a convenient tool to distinguish between bcc and fcc phases in hypoeutectoid steels. (paper)

  1. Prediction of Austenite Formation Temperatures Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, P.; Schmidl, E.; Grund, T.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    For the modeling and design of heat treatments, in consideration of the development/ transformation of the microstructure, different material data depending on the chemical composition, the respective microstructure/phases and the temperature are necessary. Material data are, e.g. the thermal conductivity, heat capacity, thermal expansion and transformation data etc. The quality of thermal simulations strongly depends on the accuracy of the material data. For many materials, the required data - in particular for different microstructures and temperatures - are rare in the literature. In addition, a different chemical composition within the permitted limits of the considered steel alloy cannot be predicted. A solution for this problem is provided by the calculation of material data using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). In the present study, the start and finish temperatures of the transformation from the bcc lattice to the fcc lattice structure of hypoeutectoid steels are calculated using an Artificial Neural Network. An appropriate database containing different transformation temperatures (austenite formation temperatures) to train the ANN is selected from the literature. In order to find a suitable feedforward network, the network topologies as well as the activation functions of the hidden layers are varied and subsequently evaluated in terms of the prediction accuracy. The transformation temperatures calculated by the ANN exhibit a very good compliance compared to the experimental data. The results show that the prediction performance is even higher compared to classical empirical equations such as Andrews or Brandis. Therefore, it can be assumed that the presented ANN is a convenient tool to distinguish between bcc and fcc phases in hypoeutectoid steels.

  2. Crack growth in an austenitic stainless steel at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polvora, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    This study deals with crack propagation at 650 deg C on an austenitic stainless steel referenced by Z2 CND 17-12 (316L(NN)). It is based on an experimental work concerning two different cracked specimens: CT specimens tested at 650 deg C in fatigue, creep and creep-fatigue with load controlled conditions (27 tests), tube specimens containing an internal circumferential crack tested in four points bending with displacement controlled conditions (10 tests). Using the fracture mechanics tools (K, J and C* parameters), the purpose here is to construct a methodology of calculation in order to predict the evolution of a crack with time for each loading condition using a fracture mechanics global approach. For both specimen types, crack growth is monitored by using a specific potential drop technique. In continuous fatigue, a material Paris law at 650 deg C is used to correlate crack growth rate with the stress intensity factor range corrected with a factor U(R) in order to take into account the effects of crack closure and loading ratio R. In pure creep on CT specimens, crack growth rate is correlated to the evolution of the C* parameter (evaluated experimentally) which can be estimated numerically with FEM calculations and analytically by using a simplified method based on a reference stress approach. A modeling of creep fatigue growth rate is obtained from a simple summation of the fatigue contribution and the creep contribution to the total crack growth. Good results are obtained when C* parameter is evaluated from the simplified expression C* s . Concerning the tube specimens tested in 4 point bending conditions, a simulation based on the actual A 16 French guide procedure proposed at CEA. (authors)

  3. In-situ investigation of strain-induced martensitic transformation kinetics in an austenitic stainless steel by inductive measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso de Celada Casero, C.; Kooiker, Harm; Groen, Manso; Post, J; San Martin, D

    2017-01-01

    An inductive sensor developed by Philips ATC has been used to study in-situ the austenite (γ) to martensite (α′) phase transformation kinetics during tensile testing in an AISI 301 austenitic stainless steel. A correlation between the sensor output signal and the volume fraction of α′-martensite

  4. Influence of Plastic Deformation on Low Temperature Surface Hardening of Austenitic and Precipitation Hardening Stainless Steels by Gaseous Nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses an investigation of the influence of plastic deformation on low temperature surface hardening by gaseous nitriding of three commercial austenitic stainless steels: AISI 304, EN 1.4369 and Sandvik Nanoflex® with various degrees of austenite stability. The materials were...

  5. Shot-peening effect on the structure, microhardness, and compressive stresses of the austenitic steel 1.4539

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Nasiłowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents shot-peening effect on the structure, microhardness, and compressive stresses of the austenitic steel 1.4539. The research shows strengthening of the top layer and the formation of compressive stresses in the subsurface layers of the shot-peening elements.[b]Keyword[/b]: austenitic steel 1.4539, residual stresses, Waisman-Phillips’a method

  6. Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Investigation of Carbon Stabilized Expanded Austenite and Carbides in Stainless Steel AISI 316

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny

    2011-01-01

    Low temperature carburized AISI 316 stainless steel - carbon expanded austenite - was investigated with EXAFS and synchrotron diffraction together with synthesized carbides of the type M3C2, M7C3 and M23C6. It was found that the chemical environment of carbon expanded austenite is not associated ...

  7. Nitrogen diffusion and nitrogen depth profiles in expanded austenite: experimental assessment, numerical simulation and role of stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    The present paper addresses the experimental assessment of the concentration dependent nitrogen diffusion coefficient in stress free expanded austenite foils from thermogravimetry, the numerical simulation of nitrogen concentration depth profiles on growth of expanded austenite into stainless steel...... to composition-depth profiles....

  8. Determination of the concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    in the composition range where nitrogen can be extracted by hydrogen gas at the diffusion temperature. Numerical simulation of the denitriding experiments shows that the thus determined concentration dependent diffusion coefficients are an accurate approximation of the actual diffusivity of nitrogen in expanded......The concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite was determined from of the rate of retracting nitrogen from thin initially N-saturated coupons. Nitrogen saturated homogeneous foils of expanded austenite were obtained by nitriding AISI 304 and AISI 316 in pure...... ammonia at 693 K and 718 K. Denitriding experiments were performed by equilibrating the foils with a successively lower nitrogen activity, as imposed by a gas mixture of ammonia and hydrogen. The concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite was approximated...

  9. Strength of "Light" Ferritic and Austenitic Steels Based on the Fe - Mn - Al - C System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaputkina, L. M.; Svyazhin, A. G.; Smarygina, I. V.; Kindop, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The phase composition, the hardness, the mechanical properties at room temperature, and the resistance to hot (950 - 1000°C) and warm (550°C) deformation are studied for cast deformable "light" ferritic and austenitic steels of the Fe - (12 - 25)% Mn - (0 - 15)% Al - (0 - 2)% C system alloyed additionally with about 5% Ni. The high-aluminum high-manganese low-carbon and carbonless ferritic steels at a temperature of about 0.5 T melt have a specific strength close to that of the austenitic steels and may be used as weldable scale-resistant and wear-resistant materials. The high-carbon Fe - (20 - 24)% Mn - (5 - 9)% Al - 5% Ni - 1.5% C austenitic steels may be applied as light high-strength materials operating at cryogenic temperatures after a solution treatment and as scale- and heat-resistant materials in an aged condition.

  10. Microstructural investigations and monitoring of low-cycle fatigue degradation in meta-stable austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosse, M.; Kalkhof, D.; Niffenegger, M.

    2000-01-01

    The microstructural changes in the pre-crack stage of low-cycle fatigue (LCF) damage in austenitic pipework steels have been characterised by neutron and X-ray diffraction. The LCF damage evolution in the meta-stable austenitic steel causes a deformation-induced phase transformation from austenite to martensite. Thresholds exist for the formation of martensite as a function of both the load amplitude and the number of LCF cycles. Magnetic stray field and eddy-current measurements were chosen to transfer the results of material characterisation to an on-line monitoring non destructive testing (NDT) method. The density and distribution of martensite obtained from neutron diffraction experiments were used for the calibration of these methods. Both techniques were able to detect the very low amount of martensite in the different-aged specimens (0.5 - 3.1 vol % martensite, usage factors from 0 to 1). (authors)

  11. Corrosion Behavior of Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steels in Lithium Bromide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayo Samuel AFOLABI

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behavior of austenitic and duplex stainless steels in various concentrations of lithium, bromide solution was investigated by using the conventional weight loss measurement method. The results obtained show that corrosion of these steels occurred due to the aggressive bromide ion in the medium. Duplex stainless steel shows a greater resistance to corrosion than austenitic stainless steel in the medium. This was attributed to equal volume proportion of ferrite and austenite in the structure of duplex stainless steel coupled with higher content of chromium in its composition. Both steels produced electrochemical noise at increased concentrations of lithium bromide due to continuous film breakdown and repair caused by reduction in medium concentration by the alkaline corrosion product while surface passivity observed in duplex stainless steel is attributed to film stability on this steel.

  12. Enhanced Stability of Retained Austenite by Quenching and Double Partitioning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Z. R.; Zhao, X. M.

    2017-12-01

    In the present study, a novel quenching and double partitioning (Q&DP) process is proposed. The quenching and partitioning (Q&P) process was accompanied by a second partitioning process, which led to the enhanced stability of retained austenite. The chemical composition of the investigated steel was 0.24C-1.9Mn-1.85Si, without an excess addition of alloying elements. This process aims to enhance the stability of retained austenite by controlling martensitic transformation and carbon partitioning. By applying this process, the uniform and total elongation is increased, without obvious reduction in ultimate tensile strength. An optimum combination of strength and ductility (ultimate tensile strength: 1304MPa; total elongation: 23%) was achieved by quenching to 65°C and subsequent second partitioning treatment, after the first quenching to 300°C and partitioning process. The enhanced mechanical properties were attributed to the increased amount of stabilized film-like austenite.

  13. Application of Moessbauer effect to the study of austenite retained in low carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, A.L.T. de; Silva, E.G. da

    1979-01-01

    Moessbauer effect measurements were performed in two samples of low carbon, low alloy steels, one with a bainite granular microstructure and the other a martensitic one. The concentration of the retained austenite was determined in both samples by Moessbauer spectrometry and X radiation, a very good agreement for the sample with a greater austenite content having been observed. From the assumption that the carbon atoms in the f.c.c. matrix repel one another due to Coulomb interactions, giving origin to quadrupolar interactions, it was possible to determine carbon concentration in the MA (Martensite Austenite) components of bainite, the results being in good agreement with the one obtained from metallographic considerations. (I.C.R.) [pt

  14. Image based EFIT simulation for nondestructive ultrasonic testing of austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahata, Kazuyuki; Hirose, Sohichi; Schubert, Frank; Koehler, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    The ultrasonic testing (UT) of an austenitic steel with welds is difficult due to the acoustic anisotropy and local heterogeneity. The ultrasonic wave in the austenitic steel is skewed along crystallographic directions and scattered by weld boundaries. For reliable UT, a straightforward simulation tool to predict the wave propagation is desired. Here a combined method of elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) and digital image processing is developed as a wave simulation tool for UT. The EFIT is a grid-based explicit numerical method and easily treats different boundary conditions which are essential to model wave propagation in heterogeneous materials. In this study, the EFIT formulation in anisotropic and heterogeneous materials is briefly described and an example of a two dimensional simulation of a phased array UT in an austenitic steel bar is demonstrated. In our simulation, a picture of the surface of the steel bar with a V-groove weld is scanned and fed into the image based EFIT modeling. (author)

  15. A macroscopic model to simulate the mechanically induced martensitic transformation in metastable austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdahcıoğlu, E.S.; Geijselaers, H.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanically induced martensitic transformation and the associated transformation plasticity phenomena in austenitic stainless steels are studied. The mechanisms responsible for the transformation are investigated and put into perspective based on experimental evidence. The stress and strain partitioning into the austenite and martensite phases are formulated using a mean-field homogenization approach. At this intermediate length-scale the average stress in the austenite phase is computed and utilized to compute the mechanical driving force resolved in the material. The amount of transformation and the transformation plasticity is derived as a function of the driving force. The mechanical response of the material is obtained by combining the homogenization and the transformation models. The model is verified by mechanical tests under biaxial loading conditions during which different transformation rates are observed. As a final verification of the model, a bending test is used which manifests the stress-state dependency of the transformation.

  16. Effect of austenitizing temperature on microstructure in 16Mn steel treated by cerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Bin; Song, Bo; Pan, Ning; Hu, Qing-Yun; Mao, Jing-Hong

    2011-12-01

    The change of inclusions and microstructure of 16Mn steel treated by Ce were observed, and the effect of austenitizing temperature on the microstructure was also examined. The results show that the inclusions are transformed from Si-Mn-Al composite oxide and MnS into AlCeO3, Ce2O2S, and MnS composite inclusions after being treated by Ce. Plenty of intragranular ferrites are formed in 16Mn steel containing ˜0.017wt% Ce. A large amount of intragranular acicular ferrites are formed after being austenitized for 20 min at 1473 K. The prior austenite grain size fit for the formation of intragranular acicular ferrites is about 120 μm.

  17. Some data of second sequence non standard austenitic ingot, A2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurdin Effendi; Aziz K Jahja; Bandriana; Wisnu Ari Adi

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis of second sequence austenite stainless steel named A2 using extracted minerals from Indonesian mines has been carried out. The starting materials for austenite alloy consist of granular ferro scrap, nickel, ferro-chrome, ferro-manganese, and ferro-silicon. The second sequence composition differs from the former first sequence. This A2 sequence contained more nickel, meanwhile titanium element had not been added explicitly to it, and just been found from raw materials contents or impurities, as well as carbon content in the alloy. However before the actual alloying work started, the first important step was to carry out the determination of the fractional amount of each starting material necessary to form an austenite stainless steel alloy as specified. Once the component fraction of each base alloy-element was determined, the raw materials are weighed on the mini-balance. After the fractional quantities of each constituent have been computed, an appropriate amount of these base materials are weighed separately on the micro scale. The raw materials were then placed in the induction foundry furnace, which was operated by an electromagnetic inductive-thermal system. The foundry furnace system performs the stirring of the molten materials automatically. The homogenized molten metals were poured down into sand casting prepared in advance. Some of the austenite stainless steel were normalized at 600°C for 6 hours. The average density is 7.8 g cm -1 and the average hardness value of 'normalized' austenite stainless-steels is in the range of 460 on the Vickers scale. The microstructure observation concludes that an extensive portion of the sample's structure is dendritic and the surface turns out to be homogenous. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the material belongs to the fcc crystallographic system, which fits in with the austenite class of the alloy. The experimental fractional elemental composition data acquired by OES method turn out to

  18. Wearing Quality of Austenitic, Duplex Cast Steel, Gray and Spheroidal Graphite Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The current work presents the research results of abrasion wear and adhesive wear at rubbing and liquid friction of new austenitic, austenitic-ferritic (“duplex” cast steel and gray cast iron EN-GJL-250, spheroidal graphite iron EN-GJS-600-3, pearlitic with ledeburitic carbides and spheroidal graphite iron with ledeburitic carbides with a microstructure of the metal matrix: pearlitic, upper bainite, mixture of upper and lower bainite, martensitic with austenite, pearlitic-martensitic-bainitic-ausferritic obtained in the raw state. The wearing quality test was carried out on a specially designed and made bench. Resistance to abrasion wear was tested using sand paper P40. Resistance to adhesive wear was tested in interaction with steel C55 normalized, hardened and sulfonitrided. The liquid friction was obtained using CASTROL oil. It was stated that austenitic cast steel and “duplex” are characterized by a similar value of abrasion wear and adhesive wear at rubbing friction. The smallest decrease in mass was shown by the cast steel in interaction with the sulfonitrided steel C55. Austenitic cast steel and “duplex��� in different combinations of friction pairs have a higher wear quality than gray cast iron EN-GJL- 250 and spheroidal graphite iron EN-GJS-600-3. Austenitic cast steel and “duplex” are characterized by a lower wearing quality than the spheroidal graphite iron with bainitic-martensitic microstructure. In the adhesive wear test using CASTROL oil the tested cast steels and cast irons showed a small mass decrease within the range of 1÷2 mg.

  19. Role of Austenite in Brittle Fracture of Bond Region of Super Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Yoshihiko; Ikeuchi, Kenji; Kuroda, Toshio

    Weld simulation of heat-affected zone (HAZ) was performed to investigate the mechanism by which austenite affects the toughness of super duplex stainless steel. Thermal cycles of various peak temperatures in the range from 1373 K to 1673 K corresponding to the HAZ were applied to SAF2507 super duplex stainless steel specimens. Charpy impact test was carried out using the specimens after the weld simulation, and the fracture surfaces were observed by SEM using three-dimensionally reconstruction technique. Austenite content decreased with increasing the peak temperature when the peak temperature exceeded 1473 K and the impact value decreased with increasing the peak temperature and decreasing the austenite content. The thermal cycle of the peak temperature of 1673 K corresponding to weld bond region caused decreasing of austenite content which was 22% lower than that of the base metal. The ductile-brittle transition temperature was measured. As a result the temperature increased rapidly in the weld bond region, the peak temperature of which exceeded 1623 K by the grain growth of ferrite matrix occurring subsequently to the completely dissolution of austenite. The morphology of the fracture surfaces after impact testing at 77 K showed cleavage fracture of ferrite. The {100} orientations of cleavage fracture facets were measured using three-dimensional images of the fracture surfaces and the results were visualized as the orientation color maps. The results showed that there were cleavage fractures consisting of a few facets parallel to each other. It was considered that a few facets existed in one ferrite grain. It was concluded that Widmanstätten austenite divided the large fracture into smaller cleavage facets in a ferrite grain and then suppressed the degradation of bond toughness of duplex stainless steel.

  20. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part I. Ductility and fracture toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margolin, B., E-mail: mail@crism.ru; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Minkin, A.; Potapova, V.; Smirnov, V.

    2016-11-15

    The radiation swelling effect on the fracture properties of irradiated austenitic steels under static loading has been studied and analyzed from the mechanical and physical viewpoints. Experimental data on the stress-strain curves, fracture strain, fracture toughness and fracture mechanisms have been represented for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various swelling. Some phenomena in mechanical behaviour of irradiated austenitic steels have been revealed and explained as follows: a sharp decrease of fracture toughness with swelling growth; untypical large increase of fracture toughness with decrease of the test temperature; some increase of fracture toughness after preliminary cyclic loading. Role of channel deformation and channel fracture has been clarified in the properties of irradiated austenitic steel and different tendencies to channel deformation have been shown and explained for the same austenitic steel irradiated at different temperatures and neutron doses.

  1. Analysis of recrystallization behavior of hot-deformed austenite reconstructed from electron backscattering diffraction orientation maps of lath martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Manabu; Ushioda, Kohsaku; Miyamoto, Goro; Furuhara, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    The recrystallization behavior of hot-deformed austenite of a 0.55% C steel at 800 °C was investigated by a method of reconstructing the parent austenite orientation map from an electron backscattering diffraction orientation map of lath martensite. Recrystallized austenite grains were clearly distinguished from un-recrystallized austenite grains. Very good correlation was confirmed between the static recrystallization behavior investigated mechanically by double-hit compression tests and the change in austenite microstructure evaluated by the reconstruction method. The recrystallization behavior of hot-deformed 0.55% C steel at 800 °C is directly revealed and it was observed that by addition of 0.1% V the recrystallization was significantly retarded.

  2. Effect of deformation temperature on niobium clustering, precipitation and austenite recrystallisation in a Nb–Ti microalloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostryzhev, Andrii G.; Al Shahrani, Abdullah; Zhu, Chen; Ringer, Simon P.; Pereloma, Elena V.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of deformation temperature on Nb solute clustering, precipitation and the kinetics of austenite recrystallisation were studied in a steel containing 0.081C–0.021Ti–0.064 Nb (wt%). Thermo-mechanical processing was carried out using a Gleeble 3500 simulator. The austenite microstructure was studied using a combination of optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atom probe microscopy, enabling a careful characterisation of grain size, as well as Nb-rich clustering and precipitation processes. A correlation between the austenite recrystallisation kinetics and the chemistry, size and number density of Nb-rich solute atom clusters, and NbTi(C,N) precipitates was established via the austenite deformation temperature. Specifically, we have determined thresholds for the onset of recrystallisation: for deformation levels above 75% and temperatures above 825 °C, Nb atom clusters <8 nm effectively suppressed austenite recrystallisation

  3. Quantification of retained austenite by X-ray diffraction and saturation magnetization in a supermartensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sicupira, Felipe Lucas [Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais - Escola de Engenharia da UFMG, 31270–901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Sandim, Maria José R.; Sandim, Hugo R.Z. [Escola de Engenharia de Lorena – USP, 12600–970 Lorena, SP (Brazil); Santos, Dagoberto Brandão [Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais - Escola de Engenharia da UFMG, 31270–901 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Renzetti, Reny Angela, E-mail: renzetti.ra@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Itajubá - UNIFEI, 35903–087 Itabira, MG (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    The good performance of supermartensitic stainless steels is strongly dependent on the volume fraction of retained austenite at room temperature. The present work investigates the effect of secondary tempering temperatures on this phase transformation and quantifies the amount of retained austenite by X-ray diffraction and saturation magnetization. The steel samples were tempered for 1 h within a temperature range of 600–800 °C. The microstructure was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. Results show that the amount of retained austenite decreased with increasing secondary tempering temperature in both quantification methods. - Highlights: • The phase transformation during secondary tempering temperatures was observed. • Phases were quantified by X-ray diffraction and DC-saturation magnetization. • More retained austenite forms with increasing secondary tempering temperature. • The retained austenite is mainly located at the grain and lath boundaries.

  4. Residual stress distribution in ferritic-austenitic steel joints made by laser welding

    OpenAIRE

    Iordachescu, Mihaela; Ocaña Moreno, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    The present investigation addresse the influence of laser welding process-ing parameters used for joining dis-similar metals (ferritic to austenitic steel), on the induced residual stress field. Welding was performed on a Nd:YAG laser DY033 (3300 W) in a continuous wave (CW), keyhole mode. The base metals (BM) employed in this study are AISI 1010 carbon steel (CS) and AISI 304L austenitic stainless steel (SS). Pairs of dissimilar plates of 200 mm x 45 mm x 3 mm were butt joined by laser weldi...

  5. General and Localized corrosion of Austenitic and Borated Stainless Steels in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, D.; Estill, J.; Wong, L.; Rebak, R.

    2004-01-01

    Boron containing stainless steels are used in the nuclear industry for applications such as spent fuel storage, control rods and shielding. It was of interest to compare the corrosion resistance of three borated stainless steels with standard austenitic alloy materials such as type 304 and 316 stainless steels. Tests were conducted in three simulated concentrated ground waters at 90 C. Results show that the borated stainless were less resistant to corrosion than the witness austenitic materials. An acidic concentrated ground water was more aggressive than an alkaline concentrated ground water

  6. Effect of alloying elements on solidification of primary austenite in Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    A. Janus; A. Kurzawa

    2011-01-01

    Within the research, determined were direction and intensity of alloying elements influence on solidification way (directional orvolumetric) of primary austenite dendrites in hypoeutectic austenitic cast iron Ni-Mn-Cu. 50 cast shafts dia. 20 mm were analysed.Chemical composition of the alloy was as follows: 1.7 to 3.3 % C, 1.4 to 3.1 % Si, 2.8 to 9.9 % Ni, 0.4 to 7.7 % Mn, 0 to 4.6 % Cu, 0.14 to0.16 % P and 0.03 to 0.04 % S. The discriminant analysis revealed that carbon influences solidifica...

  7. Effect of microstructure on tensile properties of austenite-ferrite welded joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bakić

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Complex microstructure of austenite-ferrite welded joint has been investigated, focused on its influence on local tensile properties. Tensile properties (yield strength and hardening coefficient have been evaluated by using finite element method to simulate the strain distributions obtained experimentally. The three-dimensional model of V-joint specimen has been used with seven different materials, simulating two base metals, the weld metal and two sub-regions of two heat-affected zones - fine grain and coarse grain. In this way local tensile properties of the whole austenite-ferrite welded joint have been evaluated.

  8. Investigation of strain-induced martensitic transformation in metastable austenite using nanoindentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, T.-H.; Oh, C.-S.; Kim, D.H.; Oh, K.H.; Bei, H.; George, E.P.; Han, H.N.

    2010-01-01

    Strain-induced martensitic transformation of metastable austenite was investigated by nanoindentation of individual austenite grains in multi-phase steel. A cross-section prepared through one of these indented regions using focused ion beam milling was examined by transmission electron microscopy. The presence of martensite underneath the indent indicates that the pop-ins observed on the load-displacement curve during nanoindentation correspond to the onset of strain-induced martensitic transformation. The pop-ins can be understood as resulting from the selection of a favorable martensite variant during nanoindentation.

  9. Investigation of Strain-Induced Martensitic Transformation in Metastable Austenite using Nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, T.-H. [Seoul National University; Oh, C.-S. [Korean Institute of Materials Science; Kim, D. H. [Seoul National University; Oh, K. H. [Seoul National University; Bei, Hongbin [ORNL; George, Easo P [ORNL; Han, H. N. [Seoul National University

    2010-01-01

    Strain-induced martensitic transformation of metastable austenite was investigated by nanoindentation of individual austenite grains in multi-phase steel. A cross-section prepared through one of these indented regions using focused ion beam milling was examined by transmission electron microscopy. The presence of martensite underneath the indent indicates that the pop-ins observed on the load-displacement curve during nanoindentation correspond to the onset of strain-induced martensitic transformation. The pop-ins can be understood as resulting from the selection of a favorable martensite variant during nanoindentation.

  10. Hydrogen Absorption Induced Slow Crack Growth in Austenitic Stainless Steels for Petrochemical Pressure Vessel Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronnie Rusli

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Type 304Land type 309 austenitic stainless steels were tested either by exposed to gaseous hydrogen or undergoing polarized cathodic charging. Slow crack growth by straining was observed in type 304L, and the formation of α‘ martensite was indicated to be precursor for such cracking. Gross plastic deformation was observed at the tip of the notch, and a single crack grew slowly from this region in a direction approximately perpendicular to the tensile axis. Martensite formation is not a necessary condition for hydrogen embrittlement in the austenitic phase.

  11. Measurement techniques of magnetic properties for evaluation of neutron irradiation damage on austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagata, Ichiro; Konno, Shotaro; Hayashi, Takehiro; Takaya, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    The remote-controlled equipment for measurement of magnetic flux density has been developed in order to evaluate the irradiation damage of austenitic stainless steels. Magnetic flux densities by neutron irradiation in austenitic stainless steels, SUS304 and Fast Breeder Reactor grade type 316 (316FR), have been measured by the equipment. The results show that irradiation damage affected to magnetic flux density, and indicate the measuring method of magnetic flux density using a small magnetizer with a permanent magnet of 2 mm in diameter is less affected by specimen shape. (author)

  12. Effect of cold working on nitriding process of AISI 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Silvio Andre de Lima

    2012-01-01

    The nitriding behavior of AISI 304 and 316 austenitic stainless steel was studied by different cold work degree before nitriding processes. The microstructure, thickness, microhardness and chemical micro-composition were evaluated through optical microscopy, microhardness, scanner electronic microscopy and x ray diffraction techniques. Through them, it was observed that previous plastic deformations do not have influence on layer thickness. However, a nitrided layer thicker can be noticed in the AISI 304 steel. In addition, two different layers can be identified as resulted of the nitriding, composed for austenitic matrix expanded by nitrogen atoms and another thinner immediately below expanded by Carbon atoms. (author)

  13. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure investigation of nitrogen stabilized expanded austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    As-delivered austenitic stainless steel and nitrogen stabilized expanded austenite, both fully nitrided and denitrided (in H2), were investigated with Cr, Fe and Ni extended X-ray absorption fine structure. The data shows pronounced short-range ordering of Cr and N. For the denitrided specimen...... the N atoms remaining in the solid state after H2-reduction are trapped by Cr atoms. Quantitative interpretation in terms of the local distortions around Cr atoms and their N coordination number reveals that no Cr–N clusters or CrN platelets are present....

  14. High temperature crack initiation in an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laiarinandrasana, Lucien

    1994-01-01

    The study deals with crack initiation at 600 deg. C and 650 deg. C, on an austenitic stainless steel referenced by Z2 CND 17 12. The behaviour laws of the studied plate were updated in comparison with existing data. Forty tests were carried out on CT specimens, with continuous fatigue with load or displacement controlled, pure creep, pure relaxation, creep-fatigue and creep-relaxation loadings. The practical initiation definition corresponds to a small crack growth of about the grain size, monitored by electrical potential drop technique. The time necessary for the crack to initiate is predicted with fracture mechanics global and local approaches, with the help of microstructural observations and finite element results. An identification of a 'Paris' law' for continuous cyclic loading and of a unique correlation between the initiation time and C h * for creep tests was established. For the local approach, crack initiation by creep can be interpreted as the reaching of a critical damage level, by using a damage incremental rule. For creep-fatigue tests, crack growth rates at initiation are greater than those of Paris' law for continuous fatigue. A calculation of a transition time between elastic-plastic and creep domains shows that crack initiation can be interpreted whether by providing Paris' law with an acceleration term when the dwell period is less than the transition time, or by calculating a creep contribution which relies on C h * parameter when the dwell period and/or the initiation times are greater than the transition time. Creep relaxation tests present crack growth rates at initiation which are less than those for 'equivalent' creep-fatigue tests. These crack growth rates decrease when increasing hold time, but also when temperature decreases. Though, for hold times which are important enough and at lower temperature, there is no effect of the dwell period insofar as crack growth rate is equal to continuous fatigue

  15. Crack initiation at high temperature on an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laiarinandrasana, L.

    1994-01-01

    The study deals with crack initiation at 600 degrees Celsius and 650 degrees Celsius, on an austenitic stainless steel referenced by Z2 CND 17 12. The behaviour laws of the studied plate were update in comparison with existing data. Forty tests were carried out on CT specimens, with continuous fatigue with load or displacement controlled, pure creep, pure relaxation, creep-fatigue and creep-relaxation loadings. The practical initiation definition corresponds to a small crack growth of about the grain size, monitored by electrical potential drop technique. The time necessary for the crack to initiate is predicted with fracture mechanics global and local approaches, with the helps of microstructural observations and finite elements results. An identification of a 'Paris'law' for continuous cyclic loading and of a unique correlation between the initiation time and C * k for creep tests was established. For the local approach, crack initiation by creep can be interpreted as the reaching of a critical damage level, by using a damage incremental rule. For creep-fatigue tests, crack growth rates at initiation are greater than those of Paris'law for continuous fatigue. A calculation of a transition time between elastic-plastic and creep domains shows that crack initiation can be interpreted whether by providing Paris'law with an acceleration term when the dwell period is less than the transition time, or by calculating a creep contribution which relies on C * k parameter when the dwell period and/or the initiation times are greater than the transition time. Creep relaxation tests present crack growth rates at initiation which are less than those for 'equivalent' creep-fatigue tests. These crack growth rates when increasing hold time, but also when temperature decreases. Though, for hold times which are important enough and at lower temperature, there is no effect of the dwell period insofar as crack growth rate is equal to continuous fatigue Paris law predicted ones

  16. Effect of bainite transformation and retained austenite on mechanical properties of austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Toshio; Abe, Toshihiko; Tada, Shuji [Tohoku National Industrial Research Inst., Sendai (Japan). Materials Engineering Div.

    1996-06-01

    Austempered ductile iron (ADI) has excellent mechanical properties, but its Young`s modulus is low. Austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel (AGS) has been developed in order to obtain a new material with superior mechanical properties to ADI. Its carbon content (approximately 1.0 pct) is almost one-third that of a standard ADI; thus, the volume of graphite is also less. Young`s modulus of AGS is 195 to 200 GPa and is comparable to that of steel. Austempered spheroidal graphite cast steel has an approximately 200 MPa higher tensile strength than ADI and twice the Charpy absorbed energy of ADI. The impact properties and the elongation are enhanced with increasing volume fraction of carbon-enriched retained austenite. At the austempering temperature of 650 K, the volume fraction of austenite is approximately 40 pct for 120 minutes in the 2.4 pct Si alloy, although it decreases rapidly in the 1.4 pct Si alloy. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that appropriate quantity of silicon retards the decomposition of the carbon-enriched retained austenite. For austempering at 570 K, the amount of the carbon-enriched austenite decreases and the ferrite is supersaturated with carbon, resulting in high tensile strength but low toughness.

  17. Inter granular stress corrosion cracking of Ignalina NPP austenitic piping of outside diameter 325 mm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedzinskas, L.; Klimasauskas, A.

    2003-01-01

    The Inter Granular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) of Ignalina NPP main circulation circuit piping, produced from austenitic stainless steel is presented covering current performances and further 'Ageing Management' related actions and plans as well as experience (lessons learned) on solving IGSCC phenomenon, which is currently under investigations and no yet comprehensive answer how to avoid it. (author)

  18. Elastic interaction between twins during tensile deformation of austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Nicolai Ytterdal; Winther, Grethe; Dale, Darren

    2016-01-01

    In austenite, the twin boundary normal is a common elastically stiff direction shared by the two twins, which may induce special interactions. By means of three-dimensional X-ray diffraction this elastic interaction has been analysed and compared to grains separated by conventional grain boundari...

  19. Influence of surface texture on the galling characteristics of lean duplex and austenitic stainless steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadman, Boel; Eriksen, J.; Olsson, M.

    2010-01-01

    Two simulative test methods were used to study galling in sheet forming of two types of stainless steel sheet: austenitic (EN 1.4301) and lean duplex LDX 2101 (EN 1.4162) in different surface conditions. The pin-on-disc test was used to analyse the galling resistance of different combinations...

  20. Neutron Diffraction Investigation of Low and High Cycle Fatigue Austenite Stainless Steels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taran, Yu. V.; Schreiber, J.; Mikula, Pavol; Lukáš, Petr; Neov, Dimitar; Vrána, Miroslav

    347/349, - (2000), s. 322-327 ISSN 0255-5476 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV202/97/K038 Keywords : austenite * diffraction * fatigue * martensite * neutron * residual stress * strain Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.597, year: 2000

  1. Dependence of corrosion properties of AISI 304L stainless steel on the austenite grain size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabooni, Soheil; Rashtchi, Hamed; Eslami, Abdoulmajid; Karimzadeh, Fathallah; Enayati, Mohammad Hossein; Raeissi, Keyvan; Imani, Reihane Faghih [Isfahan Univ. of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Materials Engineering; Ngan, Alfonso Hing Wan [The Univ. of Hong Kong (China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2017-07-15

    The corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steels is known to be hampered by the loss of chromium available for passive surface layer formation as a result of chromium carbide precipitation at austenite grain boundaries during annealing treatments. Although high-temperature annealing can promote carbide dissolution leading to better corrosion resistance, grain coarsening also results, which would lead to poorer mechanical properties. Processing methods to achieve both good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties are thus highly desirable for austenitic stainless steels. In the present study, we show that the corrosion resistance of AISI 304L stainless steel can be improved by grain refinement into the ultrafine-grained regime. Specifically, samples with different austenite grain sizes in the range of 0.65-12 μm were studied by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. All samples showed a typical passive behavior with similar corrosion potential, but the corrosion current density decreased significantly with decreasing grain size. The results show that the sample with the finest grain size had the best corrosion resistance due to a higher resistance of the passive layer to pitting attacks. This study indicates that grain refinement which improves mechanical properties can also significantly improve the corrosion resistance of AISI 304L stainless steel.

  2. Weld metal characterization of 316L(N) austenitic stainless steel by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present work is focused on EBW of 316L(N) austenitic stainless steel varying the welding parameters such as beam power and welding speed. This study is carried out by analyzing the mechanical and metallurgical properties of the welded material. The mechanical properties have been evaluated using tensile, impact, ...

  3. Crack growth rates and fracture toughness of irradiated austenitic stainless steels in BWR environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-01-21

    In light water reactors, austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in reactor core internal components because of their high strength, ductility, and fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods degrades the fracture properties of these steels by changing the material microstructure (e.g., radiation hardening) and microchemistry (e.g., radiation-induced segregation). Experimental data are presented on the fracture toughness and crack growth rates (CGRs) of wrought and cast austenitic SSs, including weld heat-affected-zone materials, that were irradiated to fluence levels as high as {approx} 2x 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 3 dpa) in a light water reactor at 288-300 C. The results are compared with the data available in the literature. The effects of material composition, irradiation dose, and water chemistry on CGRs under cyclic and stress corrosion cracking conditions were determined. A superposition model was used to represent the cyclic CGRs of austenitic SSs. The effects of neutron irradiation on the fracture toughness of these steels, as well as the effects of material and irradiation conditions and test temperature, have been evaluated. A fracture toughness trend curve that bounds the existing data has been defined. The synergistic effects of thermal and radiation embrittlement of cast austenitic SS internal components have also been evaluated.

  4. Austenitic-ferritic stainless steels: A state-of-the-art review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronenko, B. I.

    1997-10-01

    Austenitic-ferritic stainless steels, more commonly known as duplex stainless steels, or DSS for short, consist of two basic phases. One is austenite, A, and the other is ferrite, F, present in about equal amounts (but not less than 30% each). The two phases owe their corrosion resistance to the high chromium content. Compared to austenitic stainless steels, ASS, they are stronger (without sacrificing ductility), resist corrosion better, and cost less due to their relatively low nickel content. DSS can be used in an environment where standard ASS are not durable enough, such as chloride solutions (ships, petrochemical plant, etc.). Due to their low nickel content and the presence of nickel, DSS have good weldability. However, they have a limited service temperature range (from -40 to 300°) because heating may cause them to give up objectionable excess phases and lower the threshold of cold brittleness in the heat-affected zone of welded joints. State-of-the art DSS are alloyed with nitrogen to stabilize their austenite, and in this respect the nitrogen does the job of nickel. Also, nitrogen enhances the strength and resistance to pitting and improves the structure of welds.

  5. Forgings made of austenitic chromium-nickel steels for the low temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruendler, O.; Schwarz, W.; Koren, M.

    1981-01-01

    The authors discuss the low temperature application of austenitic chromium-nickel steels for energy production and process techniques. Material requirements are presented, and the behaviour, mechanical and physical properties of such steels are discussed. The manufacture of forgings is considered and test results presented. (Auth.)

  6. Forgings made of austenitic chromium-nickel steels for the low temperature range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruendler, O.; Schwarz, W.; Koren, M. (Vereinigte Edelstahlwerke A.G. (VEW), Kapfenberg (Austria))

    1981-09-01

    The authors discuss the low temperature application of austenitic chromium-nickel steels for energy production and process techniques. Material requirements are presented, and the behaviour, mechanical and physical properties of such steels are discussed. The manufacture of forgings is considered and test results presented.

  7. The Formation of Multipoles during the High-Temperature Creep of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howell, J.; Nielsson, O.; Horsewell, Andy

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that multipole dislocation configurations can arise during power-law creep of certain austenitic stainless steels. These multipoles have been analysed in some detail for two particular steels (Alloy 800 and a modified AISI 316L) and it is suggested that they arise either during...

  8. Very high cycle regime fatigue of thin walled tubes made from austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, J.V.; Mayer, H.; Brøndsted, P.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue life data of cold worked tubes (diameter 4 mm, wall thicknesses 0.25 and 0.30 mm) of an austenitic stainless steel, AISI 904 L, were measured in the regime ranging from 2 × 105 to 1010 cycles to failure. The influence of the loading frequency was investigated as data were obtained...

  9. Microstructure of austenitic stainless steels of various phase stabilities after cyclic and tensile deformation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weidner, A.; Glage, A.; Martin, S.; Man, Jiří; Klemm, V.; Martin, U.; Polák, Jaroslav; Rafaja, D.; Biermann, H.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 102, - (2011), s. 1374-1377 ISSN 1862-5282 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : austenite stability * martensitic phase transformation * electron channelling contrast Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.830, year: 2011

  10. Discontinuous precipitation in a nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel on solution nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh; Akbari, Alireza; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg

    2017-01-01

    Chromium-rich nitride precipitates in production of nickel-free austenitic stainless steel plates via pressurised solution nitriding of Fe–22.7Cr–2.4Mo ferritic stainless steel at 1473 K (1200 °C) under a nitrogen gas atmosphere was investigated. The microstructure, chemical and phase composition...

  11. Quantitative analysis of retained austenite in laser melted martensitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Seleka, T

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available of this study was to determine if X-ray diffraction (XRD) was sufficient for quantifying the volume percentage of retained austenite. After a preliminary qualitative analysis, a Rietveld full pattern refinement program was used to quantify the volume percentage...

  12. Microstructure of super-austenitic steels after long-term annealing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kraus, M.; Kroupa, Aleš; Miodownik, P.; Svoboda, Milan; Vřešťál, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 101, č. 6 (2010), s. 729-735 ISSN 1862-5282 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/07/1078 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : phase equilibria * microstructure * super-austenitic steel Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 0.860, year: 2010

  13. Stress and Composition of Carbon Stabilized Expanded Austenite on Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Low-temperature gaseous carburizing of stainless steel is associated with a colossal supersaturation of the fcc lattice with carbon, without the development of carbides. This article addresses the simultaneous determination of stress and composition profiles in layers of carbon xpanded austenite ...

  14. The effect of prior tempering on cryogenic treatment to reduce retained austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stratton, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The consensus view is that a high carbon case gives gears the best overall properties provided that there is no carbide network and that the retained austenite has been reduced below 20% by cryogenic treatment. This view is effectively enshrined in the SAE AMS 2759/7 standard. The cryogenic treatment usually takes place immediately after the quench to avoid austenite stabilisation. However, for some parts with complex geometries that might crack during the treatment, a short low temperature temper is carried out first. Little is known on how this temper affects the subsequent cryogenic treatment. Three carburizing steels used extensively in the aerospace industry were carburized to produce high retained austenite levels in the case using two different, but typical carburizing cycles. The retained austenite was determined by XRD before and after cryogenic treatment carried out in accordance with the standard and compared with that obtained when an intermediate temper was used. This study shows that for three typical carburizing steels, carburized using typical cycles, the efficacy of the cryogenic treatment is reduced only slightly after the temper, and not enough to be industrially significant. (author)

  15. The role of silicon in carbon partitioning processes in martensite/austenite microstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim Lee, B.N.; Sietsma, J.; Santofimia Navarro, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding carbon redistribution in steels is crucial in developing advanced high strength steels. For instance, Quenching & Partitioning (Q&P) processes rely on the partitioning of carbon from martensite into austenite, where at the end of the heat treatment the carbon-enriched

  16. Fully automated orientation relationship calculation and prior austenite reconstruction by random walk clustering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomes, E.; Kestens, L.A.I.

    2015-01-01

    Two new methods, one for determining the experimentally observed Orientation Relationship (OR) and another for reconstructing prior austenite phase, are proposed. Both methods are based on the angular deviation of the OR at the grain boundaries. The first algorithm identifies the optimum OR using

  17. High temperature strength and aging behavior of 12%Cr-15%Mn austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Kazuya; Bae, Dong-Su; Sakai, Hidenori; Hosoi, Yuzo

    1993-01-01

    High Mn-Cr austenitic steels are still considered to be an important high temperature structural material from the point of view of reduced radio-activation. The objective of the present study is to make a fundamental research of mechanical properties and microstructure of 12%Cr-15%Mn austenitic steels. Especially the effects of alloying elements of V and Ti on the mechanical properties and microstructure evolution of high Mn-Cr steels were studied. Precipitation behaviors of carbides, nitrides and σ phase are investigated and their remarkable effects on the high temperature strength are found. The addition of V was very effective for strengthening the materials with the precipitation of fine VN. Ti was also found to be beneficial for the improvement of high temperature strength properties. The results of high temperature strengths of the 12Cr-15Mn austenitic steels were compared with those of the other candidate and/or reference materials, for example, JFMS (modified 9Cr-2Mo ferritic stainless steel) and JPCAs (modified 316 austenitic stainless steels). (author)

  18. Modelling the X-ray powder diffraction of nitrogen-expanded austenite using the Debye formula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny

    2008-01-01

    Stress-free and homogeneous samples of nitrogen-expanded austenite, a defect-rich f.c.c. structure with a high interstitial nitrogen occupancy (between 0.36 and 0.61), have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction and Debye simulations. The simulations confirm the presence of deformation...... to be indistinguishable to X-ray powder diffraction....

  19. Nitriding Process Characterization of Cold Worked AISI 304 and 316 Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Alfredo Monteiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The nitriding behavior of austenitic stainless steels (AISI 304 and 316 was studied by different cold work degree (0% (after heat treated, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% before nitride processing. The microstructure, layer thickness, hardness, and chemical microcomposition were evaluated employing optical microscopy, Vickers hardness, and scanning electron microscopy techniques (WDS microanalysis. The initial cold work (previous plastic deformations in both AISI 304 and 306 austenitic stainless steels does not show special influence in all applied nitriding kinetics (in layer thicknesses. The nitriding processes have formed two layers, one external layer formed by expanded austenite with high nitrogen content, followed by another thinner layer just below formed by expanded austenite with a high presence of carbon (back diffusion. An enhanced diffusion can be observed on AISI 304 steel comparing with AISI 316 steel (a nitrided layer thicker can be noticed in the AISI 304 steel. The mechanical strength of both steels after nitriding processes reveals significant hardness values, almost 1100 HV, on the nitrided layers.

  20. Modeling of the Austenite-Martensite Transformation in Stainless and TRIP Steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Hilkhuijsen, P.; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Zhang, S.-H.; Liu, X.-H.; Gheng, M.; Li, J.

    2013-01-01

    The transformation of austenite to martensite is a dominant factor in the description of the constitutive behavior during forming of TRIP assisted steels. To predict this transformation different models are currently available. In this paper the transformation is regarded as a stress induced process

  1. Environmental Degradation of Dissimilar Austenitic 316L and Duplex 2205 Stainless Steels Welded Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topolska S.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes structure and properties of dissimilar stainless steels welded joints between duplex 2205 and austenitic 316L steels. Investigations were focused on environmentally assisted cracking of welded joints. The susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC and hydrogen embrittlement was determined in slow strain rate tests (SSRT with the strain rate of 2.2 × 10−6 s−1. Chloride-inducted SCC was determined in the 35% boiling water solution of MgCl2 environment at 125°C. Hydrogen assisted SCC tests were performed in synthetic sea water under cathodic polarization condition. It was shown that place of the lowest resistance to chloride stress corrosion cracking is heat affected zone at duplex steel side of dissimilar joins. That phenomenon was connected with undesirable structure of HAZ comprising of large fractions of ferrite grains with acicular austenite phase. Hydrogen assisted SCC tests showed significant reduction in ductility of duplex 2205 steel while austenitic 316L steel remains almost immune to degradation processes. SSR tests of dissimilar welded joints revealed a fracture in the area of austenitic steel.

  2. Model Predictive Control of the Exit Part Temperature for an Austenitization Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari S. Ganesh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Quench hardening is the process of strengthening and hardening ferrous metals and alloys by heating the material to a specific temperature to form austenite (austenitization, followed by rapid cooling (quenching in water, brine or oil to introduce a hardened phase called martensite. The material is then often tempered to increase toughness, as it may decrease from the quench hardening process. The austenitization process is highly energy-intensive and many of the industrial austenitization furnaces were built and equipped prior to the advent of advanced control strategies and thus use large, sub-optimal amounts of energy. The model computes the energy usage of the furnace and the part temperature profile as a function of time and position within the furnace under temperature feedback control. In this paper, the aforementioned model is used to simulate the furnace for a batch of forty parts under heuristic temperature set points suggested by the operators of the plant. A model predictive control (MPC system is then developed and deployed to control the the part temperature at the furnace exit thereby preventing the parts from overheating. An energy efficiency gain of 5.3 % was obtained under model predictive control compared to operation under heuristic temperature set points tracked by a regulatory control layer.

  3. Recent experimental and theoretical insights on the swelling of austenitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Wolfer, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    Once void nucleation subsides, the swelling rate of many austenitic alloys becomes rather insensitive to the variables that determine the duration of the transient regime of swelling. Models are presented which describe the roles of nickel, chromium and silicon in void nucleation. The relative insensitivity of steady-state swelling to temperature and composition is also discussed

  4. Effect of Heat Treatment on Conductivity of Metastable Alloys with Ferromagnetic and Paramagnetic Austenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uvarov, A. N.; Sandovskii, V. A.; Vil'danova, N. F.; Anufrieva, E. I.

    2013-11-01

    Invars N30K10T3 and N28K10T3 and nonmagnetic austenitic alloy N25Kh2T3 are studied after different kinds of treatment, i.e., quenching, mechanical phase hardening, and deformation followed by aging. The structure and the conductivity of the alloys are determined. An optimum treatment for providing high electric conductivity is suggested.

  5. Quantitative determination of retained austenite in the continuous annealing production line of cold-rolled steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Fumihiko; Kitagawa, Hajime.

    1987-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction method has been developed for quantitative determination of retained austenite in the continuous annealing production line, CAL, of cold rolled steel sheets. A new unit of diffractometer(Cr-K α source with two proportional counters) was specially designed for the CAL. Intensities of {220} austenite reflection, I γ , and background, I BG , are measured separately by the two detectors. From I γ and I BG , real-time calculation of normalized intensity of austenite, I S , is executed by the following equation ; I S = (I γ -I BG )/I BG . I S was little affected by the fluctuation of the distance between the diffractometer and travelling material. Normalized intensity is well correlated both with the tensile strength and with volume fraction of martensite, of high strength ''dual-phase'' steel sheets. From this findings, the presently developed X-ray diffractometer unit is proved to be successfully employable in the CAL as an effectual method for control of material properties in the high strength ''dual-phase'' steel sheet by monitoring the normalized intensity of austenite. (author)

  6. The efficiency of ion nitriding of austenitic stainless steel 304 using the “active screen”

    OpenAIRE

    M. Ogórek; Z. Skuza; T. Frączek

    2015-01-01

    The study examined layers were formed on the outer surface of austenitic stainless steel 304 under glow discharge conditions in the low-temperature and short-term ion nitriding. The outer layers analyzed in the work produced in parallel in the classical process of cathode and a novel method of “active screen”, intensifying the process of nitriding.

  7. The efficiency of ion nitriding of austenitic stainless steel 304 using the “active screen”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ogórek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study examined layers were formed on the outer surface of austenitic stainless steel 304 under glow discharge conditions in the low-temperature and short-term ion nitriding. The outer layers analyzed in the work produced in parallel in the classical process of cathode and a novel method of “active screen”, intensifying the process of nitriding.

  8. Effect of metallurgical variables on the austenite stability in fatigued AISI 304 type steels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Man, Jiří; Smaga, M.; Kuběna, Ivo; Eifler, D.; Polák, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 185, NOV (2017), s. 139-159 ISSN 0013-7944 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Austenitic stainless steel * Chemical banding * Color metallography * Deformation induced martensite * Low cycle fatigue Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis Impact factor: 2.151, year: 2016

  9. Nanotwin Formation in High-Manganese Austenitic Steels Under Explosive Shock Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadinc, D.; Uzer, B.; Elmadagli, M.; Guner, F.

    2018-04-01

    The micro-deformation mechanisms active in a high-manganese austenitic steel were investigated upon explosive shock loading. Single system of nanotwins forming within primary twins were shown to govern the deformation despite the elevated temperatures attained during testing. The benefits of nanotwin formation for potential armor materials were demonstrated.

  10. Quantitative evaluation of ultrasonic sound fields in anisotropic austenitic welds using 2D ray tracing model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkoori, S. R.; Rahaman, M.-U.; Chinta, P. K.; Kreutzbruck, M.; Prager, J.

    2012-05-01

    Ultrasonic investigation of inhomogeneous anisotropic materials such as austenitic welds is complicated because its columnar grain structure leads to curved energy paths, beam splitting and asymmetrical beam profiles. A ray tracing model has potential advantage in analyzing the ultrasonic sound field propagation and there with optimizing the inspection parameters. In this contribution we present a 2D ray tracing model to predict energy ray paths, ray amplitudes and travel times for the three wave modes quasi longitudinal, quasi shear vertical, and shear horizontal waves in austenitic weld materials. Inhomogenity in the austenitic weld material is represented by discretizing the inhomogeneous region into several homogeneous layers. At each interface between the layers the reflection and transmission problem is computed and yields energy direction, amplitude and energy coefficients. The ray amplitudes are computed accurately by taking into account directivity, divergence and density of rays, phase relations as well as transmission coefficients. Ultrasonic sound fields obtained from the ray tracing model are compared quantitatively with the 2D Elastodynamic Finite Integration Technique (EFIT). The excellent agreement between both models confirms the validity of the presented ray tracing results. Experiments are conducted on austenitic weld samples with longitudinal beam transducer as transmitting probe and amplitudes at the rear surface are scanned by means of electrodynamical probes. Finally, the ray tracing model results are also validated through the experiments.

  11. Imaging of transverse cracks in austenitic welds with RT-SAFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhne, C.; Kolkoori, S. R.; Rahman, M.-U.; Prager, J.

    2014-02-01

    The synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) is an imaging technique commonly used in ultrasonic inspection. In order to apply SAFT to the inspection of austenitic welds, the inhomogeneous anisotropic nature of the weld structure has to be taken into account. A suitable approach to accomplish this, is to couple the SAFT-algorithm with a ray tracing program (RT-SAFT). While SAFT-imaging of cracks in austenitic welds by use of ray tracing has been carried out before, all attempts so far were limited to longitudinal cracks which usually allows a treatment as 2-dimensional problem. In case of transverse cracks, a full 3-dimensional ray tracing is necessary in order to perform a SAFT-reconstruction. In this paper, we give an outline of our attempts to reconstruct images of transverse cracks in austenitic welds, utilizing 3-dimensional ray tracing and a layered structure model derived from an empirical model of grain orientations in welds. We present results of this RT-SAFT on experimental data taken from transverse cracks in different austenitic welds, which show that size and position of the cracks can be estimated with good accuracy, and compare them to images obtained by assuming an isotropic homogeneous medium which corresponds to the application of the classical SAFT-algorithm.

  12. Effect of austenitizing conditions on the impact properties of an alloyed austempered ductile iron of initially ferritic matrix structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delia, M.; Alaalam, M.; Grech, M. [Univ. of Malta (Malta). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials

    1998-04-01

    The effect of austenitizing conditions on the microstructure and impact properties of an austempered ductile iron (ADI) containing 1.6% Cu and 1.6% Ni as the main alloying elements was investigated. Impact tests were carried out on samples of initially ferritic matrix structure and which had been first austenitized at 850, 900, 950, and 1,000 C for 15 to 360 min and austempered at 360 C for 180 min. Results showed that the austenitizing temperature, T{sub {gamma}}, and time, t{sub {gamma}} have a significant effect on the impact properties of the alloy. This has been attributed to the influence of these variables on the carbon kinetics. Microstructures of samples austenitized at 950 and 1,000 C contain no pro-eutectoid ferrite. The impact properties of the former structures are independent of t{sub {gamma}}, while those solution treated at 1,000 C are generally low and show wide variation over the range of soaking time investigated. For fully ausferritic structures, impact properties fall with an increase in T{sub {gamma}}. This is particularly evident at 1,000 C. As the T{sub {gamma}} increases, the amount of carbon dissolved in the original austenite increases. This slows down the rate of austenite transformation and results in coarser structures with lower mechanical properties. Optimum impact properties are obtained following austenitizing between 900 and 950 C for 120 to 180 min.

  13. Influence of Ti(C,N precipitates on austenite growth of micro-alloyed steel during continuous casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Austenite grain size is an important influence factor for ductility of steel at high temperatures during continuous casting. Thermodynamic and kinetics calculations were performed to analyze the characteristics of Ti(C,N precipitates formed during the continuous casting of micro-alloyed steel. Based on Andersen-Grong equation, a coupling model of second phase precipitation and austenite grain growth has been established, and the influence of second precipitates on austenite grain growth under different cooling rates is discussed. Calculations show that the final sizes of austenite grains are 2.155, 1.244, 0.965, 0.847 and 0.686 mm, respectively, under the cooling rate of 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 ℃·s-1, when ignoring the pinning effect of precipitation on austenite growth. Whereas, if taking the pinning effect into consideration, the grain growth remains stable from 1,350 ℃, the calculated final sizes of austenite grains are 1.46, 1.02, 0.80, 0.67 and 0.57 mm, respectively. The sizes of final Ti(C,N precipitates are 137, 79, 61, 51 and 43 nm, respectively, with the increase of cooling rate from 1 to 10 ℃·s-1. Model validation shows that the austenite size under different cooling rates coincided with the calculation results. Finally, the corresponding measures to strengthen cooling intensity at elevated temperature are proposed to improve the ductility and transverse crack of slab.

  14. High nitrogen-dosed austenitic-stainless steels and duplex steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harzenmoser, M.A.E.

    1990-01-01

    The austenitic grades represent the most important group in the family of stainless steels. Nitrogen addition to austenitic stainless steels provides much higher yield strength. It was the goal of the present work to develop new high strength austenitic and duplex stainless steels and to investigate the beneficial influence of nitrogen. More than 40 small ingots up to a weight of 1.5 kg were melted in a specially developed high pressure induction furnace. In addition 20 more alloys produced by a pressurized electro slag remelting facility were included in this investigation. The nitrogen content was varied between 0.37 and 1.47 wt.%. New coefficients are proposed for the nickel equivalent in the Schaeffler diagram; these are from 0.12 to 0.24 for manganese and 18 for nitrogen. The increase in yield strength by interstitially dissolved nitrogen is due to solid solution hardening and to increased grain boundary hardening. The addition of 1% nitrogen gives a yield strength of more than 759 MPa. The toughness remains very good. At room temperature nitrogen alloyed Fe-Cr-Mn austenitic steels give the highest product of strength and toughness. Nitrogen containing austenitic stainless steels show a substantial increase in strength at low temperature. From room temperature to 4K the yield strength is more than tripled. Nitrogen alloyed Fe-Cr-Mn austenitic stainless steels exhibit a ductile to brittle transition as the temperature is lowered. This is due to a planar deformation mode which could be caused by low stacking fault energy. Nickel improves the low temperature toughness and also raises the stacking fault energy. In the temperature range from 600 to 900 o C, Cr 2 N precipitate. The minimal time for precipitation is longer by a factor of 10 than in Fe-Cr-Ni grade. Nitrogen decreases the corrosion rate in austenitic and duplex stainless steels. The resistance to pitting corrosion can be described by the equation W L = %Cr + 3.3 %Mo + 30 %N. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  15. Dissolution mechanism of austenitic stainless steels in lead-bismuth eutectic at 500 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, M.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the future nuclear power plants studies, lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) is foreseen as a coolant in the primary or the secondary circuit in three nuclear systems. The use of this liquid alloy induces corrosion issues for structural steels. In liquid lead alloys, steels can undergo two corrosion phenomena: dissolution or oxidation depending on the temperature and the dissolved oxygen content in LBE. The goal of this study is to identify the dissolution mechanisms of austenitic steels in LBE at 500 deg. C. Four Fe-Cr-Ni model austenitic steels, the 316L steel and five other industrial steels were corroded in LBE up to, respectively, 3000, 6000 and 200 h. The dissolution mechanism is identical for all steels: it starts by a preferential dissolution of chromium and nickel. This dissolution leads to the formation of a ferritic corrosion layer penetrated by LBE and containing between 5 and 10 at% of chromium and almost no nickel. This study demonstrates that dissolutions of nickel and chromium are linked. Otherwise, the corrosion kinetics is linear whatever the tested austenitic steel. The controlling steps of the austenitic steels' corrosion rates have been identified. Natural convection in the LBE bath leads to the formation of a diffusion boundary layer at the steel surface. Chromium diffusion in this diffusion boundary layer seems to control the corrosion rates of the model and industrial austenitic steels except the 316L steel. Indeed, the corrosion rate of the 316L steel is controlled by an interfacial reaction which is either the simultaneous dissolution of nickel and chromium in Ni, Cr compounds or the nickel and chromium dissolution catalyzed by the dissolved oxygen in LBE. This study has permitted to highlight the major role of chromium on the corrosion mechanisms and the corrosion rates of austenitic steels: the corrosion rate increases when chromium activity increases. Finally, the impact of the dissolved oxygen and the minor alloying

  16. The effect of chemical composition and austenite conditioning on the transformation behavior of microalloyed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousavi Anijdan, S.H.; Rezaeian, Ahmad; Yue, Steve

    2012-01-01

    In this investigation, by using continuous cooling torsion (CCT) testing, the transformation behavior of four microalloyed steels under two circumstances of austenite conditioning and non-conditioning was studied. A full scale hot-rolling schedule containing a 13-pass deformation was employed for the conditioning of the austenite. The CCT tests were then employed till temperature of ∼ 540 °C and the flow curves obtained from this process were analyzed. The initial and final microstructures of the steels were studied by optical and electron microscopes. Results show that alloying elements would decrease the transformation temperature. This effect intensifies with the gradual increase of Mo, Nb and Cu as alloying elements added to the microalloyed steels. As well, austenite conditioning increased the transformation start temperature due mainly to the promotion of polygonal ferrite formation that resulted from a pancaked austenite. The final microstructures also show that CCT alone would decrease the amount of bainite by inducing ferrite transformation in the two phase region. In addition, after the transformation begins, the deformation might result in the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization in the ferrite region. This could lead to two different ferrite grain sizes at the end of the CCT. Moreover, the Nb bearing steels show no sign of decreasing the strength level after the transformation begins in the non-conditioned situation and their microstructure is a mix of polygonal ferrite and bainite indicating an absence of probable dynamic recrystallization in this condition. In the conditioned cases, however, these steels show a rapid decrease of the strength level and their final microstructures insinuate that ferrite could have undergone a dynamic recrystallization due to deformation. Consequently, no bainite was seen in the austenite conditioned Nb bearing steels. The pancaking of austenite in the latest cases produced fully polygonal ferrite structures

  17. Image analysis measurements of prior austenitic grain size of 9Cr-1Mo martensitic steels in function of the austenitization conditions. Quantification par analyse d'images de la taille de l'ancien grain austenitique d'aciers martensitiques 9Cr-1Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcelo, F.; Brachet, J.C. (CEA Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Technologie des Materiaux)

    1994-02-01

    The size grain of the high temperature phase (austenite) can influence mechanical properties as well as some physical properties of 9Cr-1Mo martensitic steels. Automated image analysis makes it possible to quantify the size of an austenitic grain with respect to the heat treatment conditions of austenitization (time-temperature). The results obtained on a 9Cr-1Mo steel have made it possible to describe the growth kinetics of the austenitic grain of this steel. (authors). 21 refs., 14 figs.

  18. Austenitic steels of the new generation used for power plant installations with supercritical parameters and their welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brozda, J.

    2006-01-01

    Combustion of bituminous coal and lignite in power boilers brings into the atmosphere a lot of contaminations. The emission of pollutants can be reduced by the application of supercritical steam parameters, which also improves the efficiency of power units, but in that case constructional materials of the new generation are needed, among them austenitic steels. The development of power units with supercritical and ultra supercritical steam parameters is presented as well as applied structural materials. Austenitic steels used in power boiler constructions are listed. Basic characteristics of austenitic steels of the new generation are given and principles of their forming and welding. (author)

  19. In-situ neutron diffraction analysis on deformation behavior of duplex high Mn steel containing austenite and ɛ-martensite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ki Hyuk; Jeong, Jae Suk; Choi, Jong-Kyo; Koo, Yang Mo; Tomota, Yo; Kim, Nack J.

    2012-10-01

    The deformation behavior of Fe-17Mn-0.02C steel containing ɛ-martensite within austenite matrix has been investigated via in-situ neutron diffraction study at 298 K and 77 K. Based on the analyses of changes in phase fraction and lattice strain, it has been shown that the steel shows the deformation-induced phase transformation of austenite → ɛ-martensite → α'-martensite and the direct transformation of austenite → α'-martensite at both temperatures. However, the kinetics of such transformations vary with temperature, resulting in a higher and more persistent work hardening at 77 K than at 298 K.

  20. Comprehensive Deformation Analysis of a Newly Designed Ni-Free Duplex Stainless Steel with Enhanced Plasticity by Optimizing Austenite Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moallemi, Mohammad; Zarei-Hanzaki, Abbas; Eskandari, Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    A new metastable Ni-free duplex stainless steel has been designed with superior plasticity by optimizing austenite stability using thermodynamic calculations of stacking fault energy and with reference to literature findings. Several characterization methods comprising optical microscopy, magneti...

  1. Static Recrystallized Grain Size of Coarse-Grained Austenite in an API-X70 Pipeline Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Qingyun; Li, Guiyan; Li, Dahang

    2013-12-01

    The effects of initial grain size and strain on the static recrystallized grain size of coarse-grained austenite in an API-X70 steel microalloyed with Nb, V, and Ti were investigated using a Gleeble-3800 thermomechanical simulator. The results indicate that the static recrystallized grain size of coarse-grained austenite decreases with decreasing initial grain size and increasing applied strain. The addition of microalloying elements can lead to a smaller initial grain size for hot deformation due to the grain growth inhibition during reheating, resulting in decreasing of static recrystallized grain size. Based on the experimental data, an equation for the static recrystallized grain size was derived using the least square method. The grain sizes calculated using this equation fit well with the measured ones compared with the equations for fine-grained austenite and for coarse-grained austenite of Nb-V microalloyed steel.

  2. On the Carbon Solubility in Expanded Austenite and Formation of Hägg Carbide in AISI 316 Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Ståhl, Kenny; Brink, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    range (380–470 °C). The maximum solubility of carbon in expanded austenite (380 °C) is found to correspond to an occupancy (yC) of 0.220 of the interstitial octahedral sites of the austenite lattice (i.e., 4.74wt%C). Decomposition of Hägg carbide into M7C3 occurs upon prolonged carburizing treatment...

  3. Two strain-hardening mechanisms in nanocrystalline austenitic steel: An in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schloth, P.; Weisser, M.A.; Van Swygenhoven, H.; Van Petegem, S.; Susila, P.; Subramanya Sarma, V.; Murty, B.S.; Lauterbach, S.; Heilmaier, M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour of nanocrystalline austenitic steels with and without yttria particles was investigated using in situ synchrotron diffraction during tensile deformation. Two different strain-hardening regimes were found. The first regime can be assigned predominantly to a martensitic phase transformation, the second to deformation twinning in the fragmented retained austenite. The kinetics of martensitic phase transformation is remarkably enhanced in the nanocrystalline structure.

  4. Applying Ultrasonic Phased Array Technology to Examine Austenitic Coarse-Grained Structures for Light Water Reactor Piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is evaluating the capabilities and limitations of phased array (PA) technology to detect service-type flaws in coarse-grained austenitic piping structures. The work is being sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Research. This paper presents initial work involving the use of PA technology to determine the effectiveness of detecting and accurately characterizing flaws on the far-side of austenitic piping welds

  5. Studies Regarding the Elaboration of the Manganese Austenitic Steel in the Induction Electric Furnace with Acid Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Marta

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper forwards a method of elaborating the manganese austenitic steel in induction electric furnaces with a capacity of 250 Kg having an acid furnace coating. Considering the fact that when elaborating the manganese austenitic steel sulphur can be obtained under 0.02% constitutes an additional reason to attempt the elaboration of this steel in the electric furnaces through induction with acid coating, even if the load has over 0.02% S.

  6. Effects of alloying elements on the kinetics of austenitization from pearlite in Fe-C-M alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yuan; Enomoto, Masato; Yang, Zhigang; Li, Zhaodong; Zhang, Chi

    2013-03-01

    The effects of alloying elements on the kinetics of austenitization from pearlite structure were studied by computer simulation in Fe-C-M ternary alloys, where M is Mn, Cr, Si or Ni, assuming local equilibrium conditions at all transformation interfaces. A thin austenite film was assumed to nucleate at ferrite/cementite interfaces and grow in one dimension. The existence of a partition to no-partition transition temperature (PNTT) was rationalized. Above the PNTT, the growth rate of austenite is governed by the difference in carbon activity between austenite/cementite and ferrite/austenite interfaces; a substitutional element influences the reaction rate by affecting carbon activity. Below the PNTT, redistribution of M is necessary. The PNTT increases with the concentration of all alloy elements except Ni, which has a large segregation tendency in austenite from both ferrite and cementite, as well as repulsive interaction with carbon. The amount of overheating at PNTT from Ae1 increases in the order Si (∼Ni), Mn and Cr, essentially in agreement with a recently reported experiment.

  7. Influence of Short Austenitization Treatments on the Mechanical Properties of Low-Alloy Steels for Hot Forming Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzweissig, Martin Joachim; Lackmann, Jan; Konrad, Stefan; Schaper, Mirko; Niendorf, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    The current work elucidates an improvement of the mechanical properties of tool-quenched low-alloy steel by employing extremely short austenitization durations utilizing a press heating arrangement. Specifically, the influence of different austenitization treatments—involving austenitization durations ranging from three to 15 seconds—on the mechanical properties of low-alloy steel in comparison to an industrial standard furnace process was examined. A thorough set of experiments was conducted to investigate the role of different austenitization durations and temperatures on the resulting mechanical properties such as hardness, bending angle, tensile strength, and strain at fracture. The most important finding is that the hardness, the bending angle as well as the tensile strength increase with shortened austenitization durations. Furthermore, the ductility of the steels exhibits almost no difference following the short austenitization durations and the standard furnace process. The enhancement of the mechanical properties imposed by the short heat treatments investigated, is related to a refinement of microstructural features as compared to the standard furnace process.

  8. Influence of Silicon on Swelling and Microstructure in Russian Austenitic Stainless Steels Irradiated to High Neutron Doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porollo, S.I.; Shulepin, S.V.; Konobeev, Y.V.; Garner, F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: For some applications in fusion devices austenitic stainless steels are still considered to be candidates for use as structural components, but high neutron exposures must be endured by the steels. Operational experience of fast reactors in Western Europe, USA and Japan provides evidence of the possible use of austenitic steels up to ∼ 150 dpa. Studies aimed at improvement of existing Russian austenitic steels are being carried out in Russia. For improvement of irradiation resistance of Russian steels it is necessary to understand the basic mechanisms responsible for deterioration of steel properties. This understanding can be achieved by continuing detailed investigations of the microstructure of cladding steels after irradiation to high doses. By investigating the evolution of radiation-induced microstructure in neutron irradiated steels of different chemical composition one can study the effect of chemical variations on steel properties. Silicon is one of the most important chemical elements that strongly influence the behavior of austenitic steel properties under irradiation. In this paper results are presented of investigations of the effect of silicon additions on void swelling and microstructure of base austenitic stainless steel EI-847 (0.06C-16Cr-15Ni- 3Mo-Nb) irradiated as fuel pin cladding of both regular and experimental assemblies in the BOR-60, BN-350 and BN-600 fast reactors to neutron doses up to 49 dpa. The possible mechanisms of silicon's effect on void swelling in austenitic stainless steels are presented and analyzed. (authors)

  9. A Basic Study on the Defect Detectability of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weldments using Ultrasonic Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, M. H.; Park, K. H.; Seo, D. M.; Yoon, K. S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the ultrasonic characteristics of weldment and detectability of defects of weldment in Austenitic Stainless Steel Type 304 that is composed of mostly coolant piping system in nuclear power plants. The results of this experiment show as follows: 1. When the ultrasonic beam detects the defects on the side of base metal and on the opposite side of weldment, the indications which was detected on the screen show different amplitude and different metal path each. 2. The ultrasonically estimated notch depth is generally oversized than actual notch depth. 3. It is easy for the false indication to show up on the screen because of columnar structure of weldment in austenitic stainless steel. 4. The higher frequencies of transducer have more difficulties to detect the defects of the opposite side of weldment because of ultrasonic attenuation in weldment and the longitudinal transmitter-receiver transducer is the most effective in detecting the opposite side defects of weldment

  10. Correlation Between Microstructure and Mechanical Properties Before and After Reversion of Metastable Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargas, Gemma; Zapata, Ana; Roa, Joan Josep; Sapezanskaia, Ina; Mateo, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Reversion treatments are a way to improve the mechanical response of metastable austenitic stainless steels by means of grain refinement. To effectively apply those treatments, the steel must be previously deformed to induce a significant amount of martensitic transformation. In this work, the effect of reversion treatments was studied on a commercial AISI 301LN grade subjected to an industrial cold rolling process, with thickness reductions not higher than 40 pct. Microstructural changes and evolution of both monotonic and cyclic mechanical properties were investigated after cold rolling and upon reversion treatments. Results revealed that the finer austenitic microstructure obtained after reversion leads to an interesting combination of properties, with strong increments in hardness and yield strength, and also fatigue limit improvement, as compared to the initial annealed condition.

  11. Correlation between microstructure and mechanical properties of stable mixtures formed by austenite and martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckstein, C.B.

    1982-03-01

    The influence of martensite in mechanical properties of stable mixtures formed by austenite and martensite was studied by varying the amount of martensite in the mixtures. Microstructural parameters were determined by Optical Quantitative Metallography and used to establish the correlation between the mechanical response of the mixtures in tension and their microstructures. The 'in situ' deformation of each phase in mixtures was determined experimentally in terms of the rule of mixtures. It is shown that the partitioning of the deformation depends on the amount of martensite in the mixture and that it tends to a condition of isostrain at higher martensite volume fractions. Optical observation of fractured specimens showed that the beginning of the fracture process may related to regions of the austenite grain boundaries where they meet martensite plates. (Author) [pt

  12. Fatigue crack growth of 316NG austenitic stainless steel welds at 325 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. F.; Xiao, J.; Chen, Y.; Zhou, J.; Qiu, S. Y.; Xu, Q.

    2018-02-01

    316NG austenitic stainless steel is a commonly-used material for primary coolant pipes of pressurized water reactor systems. These pipes are usually joined together by automated narrow gap welding process. In this study, welds were prepared by narrow gap welding on 316NG austenitic stainless steel pipes, and its microstructure of the welds was characterized. Then, fatigue crack growth tests were conducted at 325 °C. Precipitates enriched with Mn and Si were found in the fusion zone. The fatigue crack path was out of plane and secondary cracks initiated from the precipitate/matrix interface. A moderate acceleration of crack growth was also observed at 325°Cair and water (DO = ∼10 ppb) with f = 2 Hz.

  13. Solubility of niobium in austenite in the presence of Nb(C,N)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, P.R.; Bresciani Filho, E.

    1983-01-01

    It was developed some equations to calculate the solubility of niobium in austenite in the presence of NbC sub(0.87) or NbN. These equations were applied to steels with carbon, nitrogen and niobium content varying from 10 -3 to 1 wt %, and for 800-1300 0 C temperature range. The results obtained were compared with experimental data from literature, and showed a good agreement. Using those equations, it was developed an algorithm to calculate the solubility of niobium in austenite in the presence of niobium carbonitride (NbC sub(x) N sub(y)). The results obtained by this method were compared with experimental data, and also showed a good agreement. (Author) [pt

  14. Effect of chlorides and sulfates on the EAC of austenitic stainless steel in PWR environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couvant, T.; Herms, E.; Combrade, P.; Vaillant, F.; De Curieres, I.; Boursier, J.M.; Raquet, O.; De Bouvier, O.

    2007-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in primary and auxiliary circuits of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). Moreover, some components (Canopy or Omega seals, dead legs, etc.) suffer from environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) that is, in a most cases related to the presence of tiny concentrations of pollutants. Stress corrosion tests were conducted on austenitic stainless steels (AISI 304L, 316L) in polluted simulated PWR primary environment at temperatures from 150 o C to 300 o C. When sulfates were present (> 1 μg.g -1 ), shallow cracking indicating some sensitivity to EAC was observed in Constant Elongation Rate Tests (CERTs) in deaerated environment but not in aerated environment. When chlorides were present, EAC was only observed in aerated environment, depending on the chloride and sulfate contents. In aerated environment a significant synergy between chlorides and sulfates led to an increase in the susceptibility to EAC. A deleterious effect of the cold work was also noted. (author)

  15. Influence of impact energy on work hardening ability of austenitic manganese steel and its mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiaoyun

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available To further understand the hardening mechanism of austenitic manganese steel under actual working conditions, the work hardening ability was studied and the microstructures of austenitic manganese steel were observed under different impact energies. The work hardening mechanism was also analyzed. The results show that the best strain hardening effect could be received only when the impact energy reaches or exceeds the critical impact energy. The microstructural observations reveal that dislocations, stacking faults and twins increase with raising impact energy of the tested specimens. The hardening mechanism changes at different hardening degrees. It is mainly dislocation and slip hardening below the critical impact energy, but it changes to the twinning hardening mechanism when the impact energy is above the critical impact energy.

  16. Small angle neutron scattering and Moessbauer effect in nitrogen-bearing austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadutov, V.M.; Garamus, V.M.; Islamov, A.Kh.

    2002-01-01

    The phase composition and changes in the close atomic order under the effect of the low-temperature annealing of the Fe-Cr-Mn-N steel are studied with application of the neutron diffraction and the Moessbauer spectroscopy method. The small angle neutron scattering (SANS) in the high-nitrogen Fe-19% Cr-19% Mn-0.9 N and Fe-18% Cr-10% Mn-16% Ni-0.5% N austenite is studied. The measurements and analysis of the neutron diffraction and the Moessbauer spectra are carried out. The character of the SANS in the nitrogen-bearing austenite is related to the existence of the micrononuniformities, the structure whereof depends on the nickel alloying. The average size and form of the nonuniformities are evaluated [ru

  17. Improvement of corrosion resistance in austenitic stainless steel by grain boundary character distribution control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yun; Kaneda, Junya; Kasahara, Shigeki; Shigenaka, Naoto

    2012-01-01

    Strauss test, Coriou test and Huey test were conducted on a Type 316L austenitic stainless steel. Improvement in grain boundary corrosion resistance was verified after raising low Σ coincidence site lattice (CSL) grain boundary (GB) frequency by controlling grain boundary character distribution (GBCD). During crevice corrosion test under gamma-ray irradiation, initiation frequency of GB corrosion after GBCD controlled specimens decreased to 1/10 of GBCD uncontrolled counterpart along with lower depth of corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) propagation rate of GBCD controlled specimen decreased to less than 1/2 of GBCD uncontrolled specimen in high temperature and high pressure water. Based on these results, we expect that GBCD control will improve corrosion resistance of austenitic material in a wide range of application and environment. (author)

  18. A powder metallurgy austenitic stainless steel for application at very low temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano; Liimatainen, J; Kumpula, M

    2000-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider to be built at CERN will require 1232 superconducting dipole magnets operating at 1.9 K. By virtue of their mechanical properties, weldability and improved austenite stability, nitrogen enriched austenitic stainless steels have been chosen as the material for several of the structural components of these magnets. Powder Metallurgy (PM) could represent an attractive production technique for components of complex shape for which dimension tolerances, dimensional stability, weldability are key issues during fabrication, and mechanical properties, ductility and leak tightness have to be guaranteed during operation. PM Hot Isostatic Pressed test plates and prototype components of 316LN-type grade have been produced by Santasalo Powdermet Oy. They have been fully characterized and mechanically tested down to 4.2 K at CERN. The fine grained structure, the absence of residual stresses, the full isotropy of mechanical properties associated to the low level of Prior Particle Boundaries oxides ...

  19. Results of a round robin test on NDT methods for austenitic pipe welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neundorf, B.

    2002-01-01

    A research programme sponsored by the German utilities (VGB PowerTech) was performed at MPA Stuttgart between 1993 and 1999. Objectives of the programme were to gain information on the feasibility of evaluation methods and of influential parameters on the results of non-destructive testing. Circumferential weld specimens of typical austenitic pipe or pipe-elbow connections which originate from replaced components of nuclear power plants were investigated in a round robin test. Teams of different NDT vendors and research institutes performed blind tests using ultrasonic testing, radiographic testing (conventional evaluation of films and evaluation of digitised films) or digital radiographic testing. The test pieces consisted of cut-out austenitic weld specimens containing service induced cracks. (orig.) [de

  20. Natural composite in austenitic alloys with a structure of the complete discontinuous decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemtsova, N.D.; Anufrieva, E.I.; Uvarov, A.I.; Vasechkina, T.P.; Sandovskij, V.A.

    2002-01-01

    The papers are reviewed on heat treatment conditions resulting in a 100% degree of discontinuous precipitation in austenite on ageing metastable Fe-Ni-Ti alloys (N2KhT2, N26T3, N25T5, N24Kh2T3, N29T3, N29KhT3, N26Kh5T3). Mechanical properties and structure of the alloys are investigated after various heat and thermomechanical treatments. It is revealed that discontinuous precipitation is accomplished by way of migration of low-angle boundaries as the matrix is supersaturated essentially with alloying elements. The alloys with the structure of 100% discontinuous precipitation can be treated as natural composites consisting of alternating plates of intermetallic compound and austenite. Temperature dependences of strength and plastic properties of a composite material and a hardened alloy are compared [ru

  1. Mechanism of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in light water reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.; Muscara, J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the mechanism of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels (SSs) in light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments. The effects of key material and loading variables on the fatigue lives of wrought and cast austenitic SSs in air and LWR environments have been evaluated. The influence of reactor coolant environments on the formation and growth of fatigue cracks in polished smooth SS specimens is discussed. The results indicate that the fatigue lives of these steels are decreased primarily by the effects of the environment on the growth of cracks <200 μm and, to a lesser extent, on enhanced growth rates of longer cracks. The fracture morphology in the specimens has been characterized. Exploratory fatigue tests were conducted to study the effects of surface micropits or minor differences in the surface oxide on fatigue crack initiation. (author)

  2. Fatigue behaviors and damage mechanism of a Cr-Mn-N austenitic steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Z.; Cai, P.; Yu, Tianbo

    2017-01-01

    Four-point bending fatigue tests were conducted on a Cr-Mn-N austenitic steel at room temperature, at frequency of 20 Hz and the stress ratio of R = 0.1, in air. The fatigue strength of this Cr-Mn-N austenitic steel was measured to be 503 MPa in the maximum stress from the S-N curve obtained....... It was found that multi-site crack nucleation took place on the surface of the steel during fatigue, and that the crack population (i.e., fatigue weak-links) was found to be a Weibull function of the applied stress. Usually only one or two of the initiated cracks could lead to the final failure of the samples...

  3. A review of compatibility of IFR fuel and austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiser, D.D. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Interdiffusion experiments have been conducted to investigate the compatibility of various austenitic stainless steels with U-Pu-Zr alloys, which are alloys to be employed as fuel for the Integral Fast Reactor being developed by Argonne National Laboratory. These tests have also studied the compatibility of austenitic stainless steels with fission products, like the minor actinides (Np and Am) and lanthanides (Ce and Nd), that are generated during the fission process in an IFR. This paper compares the results of these investigations in the context of fuel-cladding compatibility in IFR fuel elements, specifically focusing on the relative Interdiffusion behavior of the components and the types of phases that develop based on binary phase diagrams. Results of Interdiffusion tests are assessed in the light of observations derived from post-test examinations of actual irradiated fuel elements

  4. In situ TEM study of stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.X.; Chu, W.Y.; Wang, Y.B.; Qiao, L.J.

    2003-01-01

    A constant deflection device designed for use within a transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to investigate the change in dislocation configuration ahead of a crack tip during stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of type 310 austenitic stainless steel in a boiling MgCl 2 solution, and the initiation of stress corrosion microcracking. Results showed that crack tip corrosion processes during SCC-enhanced dislocation emission, multiplication and motion. SCC microcracks initiated when the corrosion-enhanced dislocation emission and motion had fully develop. A passive film formed during corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in the boiling MgCl 2 solution generated a tensile stress. During SCC, the additive tensile stress generated at the metal/passive film interface assists the applied stress to enhance dislocation emission and motion

  5. The effect of variations in carbon activity on the carburization of austenitic steels in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwyther, J.R.; Hobdell, M.R.; Hooper, A.J.

    1978-07-01

    Experience has shown that the liquid sodium coolant of fast breeder reactors is an effective carbon-transport medium; the resulting carburization of thin austenitic stainless steel components (eg IHX and fuel cladding) could adversely affect their mechanical integrity. The degree and nature of steel carburization depend, inter alia, on the carbon activity of the sodium environment. Exploratory tests are described in which specimens of austenitic stainless steel were carburized in sodium, the carbon activity of which was continuously monitored by a BNL electrochemical carbon meter. The sodium carbon activity was initially high, but decreased with time, simulating conditions equivalent to plant start-up or coolant clean-up following accidental oil ingress. The extent and nature of steel carburization was identified by metallography, electron microscopy, X-ray crystallography and chemical analysis. (author)

  6. Design of Wear-Resistant Austenitic Steels for Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, J. N.; Casati, R.; Lecis, N.; Andrianopoli, C.; Varone, A.; Montanari, R.; Vedani, M.

    2018-03-01

    Type 316L stainless steel feedstock powder was modified by alloying with powders containing carbide/boride-forming elements to create improved wear-resistant austenitic alloys that can be readily processed by Selective Laser Melting. Fe-based alloys with high C, B, V, and Nb contents were thus produced, resulting in a microstructure that consisted of austenitic grains and a significant amount of hard carbides and borides. Heat treatments were performed to modify the carbide distribution and morphology. Optimal hard-phase spheroidization was achieved by annealing the proposed alloys at 1150 °C for 1 hour followed by water quenching. The total increase in hardness of samples containing 20 pct of C/B-rich alloy powder was of 82.7 pct while the wear resistance could be increased by a factor of 6.

  7. Influence of laser shock peening on irradiation defects in austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiaofeng; Su, Qing; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Chenfei; Lu, Yongfeng; Nastasi, Michael; Cui, Bai

    2017-06-01

    The laser shock peening process can generate a dislocation network, stacking faults, and deformation twins in the near surface of austenitic stainless steels by the interaction of laser-driven shock waves with metals. In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) irradiation studies suggest that these dislocations and incoherent twin boundaries can serve as effective sinks for the annihilation of irradiation defects. As a result, the irradiation resistance is improved as the density of irradiation defects in laser-peened stainless steels is much lower than that in untreated steels. After heating to 300 °C, a portion of the dislocations and stacking faults are annealed out while the deformation twins remain stable, which still provides improved irradiation resistance. These findings have important implications on the role of laser shock peening on the lifetime extension of austenitic stainless steel components in nuclear reactor environments.

  8. Empirical Formulas for the Calculations of the Hardness of Steels Cooled From the Austenitizing Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trzaska J.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the equations applied for the purpose of the calculations of the hardness of continuously cooled structural steels upon the basis of the temperature of austenitizing. The independent variables of the hardness model were: the mass concentrations of elements, the austenitizing temperature and the cooling rate. The equations were developed with the application of the following methods: multiple regression and logistic regression. In this paper, attention was paid to preparing data for the purpose of calculations, to the methodology of the calculations, and also to the assessment of the quality of developed formulas. The collection of empirical data was prepared upon the basis of more than 500 CCT diagrams.

  9. Corrosion behaviour of electropolished AISI 316L austenitic biomaterial in physiological solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatkalíková, V.; Markovičová, L.; Škorvanová, M.

    2017-11-01

    Due to suitable mechanical properties, satisfactory corrosion resistance and relatively low cost, austenitic stainless steels are important biomaterials for manufacture of implants and various medical instruments and devices. Their corrosion properties and biocompatibility are significantly affected by protective passive surface film quality, which depends on used mechanical and chemical surface treatment. This article deals with corrosion resistance of AISI 316L stainless steel, which is the most widely used Cr-Ni-Mo austenitic biomaterial. Corrosion behaviour of five various surfaces (original, electropolished, three surfaces with combined treatment finished by electropolishing) is evaluated on the bases of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization tests performed in physiological solution at the temperature of 37± 0.5 °C.

  10. Evaluation of High Temperature Corrosion Resistance of Finned Tubes Made of Austenitic Steel And Nickel Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turowska A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper was to evaluate the resistance to high temperature corrosion of laser welded joints of finned tubes made of austenitic steel (304,304H and nickel alloys (Inconel 600, Inconel 625. The scope of the paper covered the performance of corrosion resistance tests in the atmosphere of simulated exhaust gases of the following chemical composition: 0.2% HCl, 0.08% SO2, 9.0% O2 and N2 in the temperature of 800°C for 1000 hours. One found out that both tubes made of austenitic steel and those made of nickel alloy displayed good resistance to corrosion and could be applied in the energy industry.

  11. The use of different techniques for determination of pitting corrosion potential of austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskelinen, P.; Forsen, O.; Onnela, J.; Ylaesaari, S.; Haenninen, H.

    1992-01-01

    Three different techniques for pitting corrosion potential measurement on austenitic stainless steel (Fe18Cr10Ni) were compared: conventional polarization method, a new Avesta electrochemical corrosion measurement cell and a scratch technique. Special attention was paid to the effects of crevice corrosion during pitting corrosion potential measurement and to their elimination. Development of a rapid test technique for reliable pitting corrosion potential determination was aimed at and resulted from comparison of the different techniques

  12. Austenitic stainless steel-to-ferritic steel transition joint welding for elevated temperature service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, J.F.; Goodwin, G.M.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1978-01-01

    Transition weld joints between ferritic steels and austenitic stainless steels are required for fossil-fired power plants and proposed nuclear plants. The experience with these dissimilar-metal transition joints has been generally satisfactory, but an increasing number of failures of these joints is occurring prematurely in service. These concerns with transition joint service history prompted a program to develop more reliable joints for application in proposed nuclear power plants

  13. Potentiodynamic corrosion studies on laser beam welded austenitic stainless steel AISI 321

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Adithya R.; Niranjhan, P.; Abijith, M. N.; Arivarasu, M.; Manikandan, M.; Padmanaban, R.; Arivazhagan, N.

    2017-11-01

    In this study, the microstructure and corrosion characteristics of laser beam welded austenitic stainless plates has been studied. CO2 Laser beam produced defect free weldments in AISI 321 with no trace of heat affected zone. The microstructural studies revealed distributed ferrites in the weld zone. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were carried out on the weldments in 5% NaCl environment in order to understand corrosion current, potential and rate.

  14. Determination of Concentration Dependent Diffusion Coefficients of Carbon in Expanded Austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract. In the present paper various experimental procedures to experimentally determine the concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of carbon in expanded austenite are evaluated. To this end thermogravimetric carburization was simulated for various experimental conditions and the evaluat...... the approximation of the diffusivity. Thermogravimetry was applied to continuously monitor the weight change of thin foils of AISI 316 during carburizing in CO-H2 gas mixtures for one of the simulated experimental procedures....

  15. Use of Direct Current Resistivity Measurements to Assess AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel Sensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Mesquita, Ramaiany Carneiro; Mecury, José Manoel Rivas; Tanaka, Auro Atsumi; Sousa, Regina Célia de

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the feasibility of using direct current electrical resistivity measurements to evaluate AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel sensitization. ASTM A262 – Practice A and double loop electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation (DL-EPR) tests were performed to assess the degree of sensitization (DoS) qualitatively and quantitatively, and electrical resistivity (ER) was measured by the four-point direct-current potential drop method. The results indicate that the DoS incr...

  16. The Similar and Dissimilar Spot Welding of 304 and 316L Austenitic Stainless Steels

    OpenAIRE

    ÇINAR, Özgür; ALYANAKOĞLU, Ahmet Erdem; ÇAKIR, Talha; ÇETİNER, Burcu Nilgün; TOPCU, İsmail; EKİCİ, Bülent; GÜLLÜOĞLU, Arif Nihat

    2017-01-01

    Being one of the eldest electric welding process, theresistance spot welding offers practical and time saving applications in thefield of joining metals of several manufacturing industries such as automotive,white goods and machinery. Even light weight metals, i.e. aluminum andmagnesium has lately been taking attention of researchers and producers, thesteels, especially austenitic stainless steels are still being used in widerange of applications due to their combination of excellent corrosio...

  17. Microstructural and Texture Development in Two Austenitic Steels with High-Manganese Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacharya, Basudev; Ray, Ranjit Kumar; Leffers, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Two austenitic steels, Fe-21.3Mn-3.44Si-3.74Al-0.5C and Fe-29.8Mn-2.96Si-2.73Al-0.52C, were subjected to cold rolling with 30 to 80 pct reduction with an increment of 10 pct and subsequently the development of their microstructures and textures were studied. The overall texture after 80 pct cold ...

  18. Characterization of strain-induced martensitic transformation in a metastable austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausild, P.; Davydov, V.; Drahokoupil, J.; Landa, M.; Pilvin, P.

    2010-01-01

    Kinetics of deformation-induced martensitic transformation in metastable austenitic steel AISI 301 was characterized by several techniques including classical light metallography, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and electron back scattered diffraction. In situ monitoring of magnetic properties, acoustic emission and temperature increase during tensile tests at different strain rates was also performed. Results obtained by different methods are compared and discussed.

  19. The effects of fast-neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper reviews the effects of fast-neutron irradiation on the tensile properties of austenitic stainless steels at irradiation temperatures of less than 400 degrees Celcius, using as an example, work carried out at Pelindaba on an AISI 316 type steel produced in South Africa. Damage produced in these steels at higher irradiation temperatures and fluences is also briefly discussed. The paper concludes with a discussion of some methods of overcoming or decreasing the effects of irradiation damage [af

  20. Investigation of retained austenite stability in Mn-Si TRIP steel in tensile deformation condition

    OpenAIRE

    O. Muránsky; P. Horňak; P. Lukáš; J. Zrník; P. Šittner

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to contribute to a better understanding of the role of the key factors governing the formation of multiphase TRIP aided steel.Design/methodology/approach: The present work reports the results of in-situ neutron diffraction experiments focused on monitoring the phase evolution in three TRIP steel samples subjected to different thermomechanical processing and mechanical loading to evaluate the stability of retained austenite.Findings: In-situ neutron diffractio...

  1. Stability of austenitic 316L steel against martensite formation during cyclic straining

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Man, Jiří; Obrtlík, Karel; Petrenec, Martin; Beran, Přemysl; Smaga, M.; Weidner, A.; Dluhoš, J.; Kruml, Tomáš; Biermann, H.; Eifler, D.; Polák, Jaroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 10, - (2011), s. 1279-1284 E-ISSN 1877-7058. [ICM11 -International Conference on The Mechanical Behavior of Materials /11./. Lake Como, 05.06.2011-09.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/2371 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : low cycle fatigue * 316L austenitic stainless steel * deformation-induced martensite Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  2. Neutron diffraction analysis of retained austenite stability in Mn-Si steel during plastic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muransky, Ondrej; Lukas, Petr; Zrnik, Jozef; Sittner, Petr

    2006-01-01

    High strength and ductility of the transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels is attributed to the transformation-induced plasticity effect resulting from the strain-induced martensitic transformation of the retained austenite in the multiphase (ferrite, bainite) microstructure. This paper reports the results of in situ neutron diffraction experiments focused on monitoring the evolution of the phase fractions and phase stresses in three different TRIP steel samples subjected to tensile loading at room temperature

  3. Development of Ultra-Fine-Grained Structure in AISI 321 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiamiyu, A. A.; Szpunar, J. A.; Odeshi, A. G.; Oguocha, I.; Eskandari, M.

    2017-12-01

    Ultra-fine-grained (UFG) structure was developed in AISI 321 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) using cryogenic rolling followed by annealing treatments at 923 K, 973 K, 1023 K, and 1073 K (650 °C, 700 °C, 750 °C, and 800 °C) for different lengths of time. The α'-martensite to γ-austenite reversion behavior and the associated texture development were analyzed in the cryo-rolled specimens after annealing. The activation energy, Q, required for the reversion of α'-martensite to γ-austenite in the steel was estimated to be 80 kJ mol-1. TiC precipitates and unreversed triple junction α'-martensite played major roles in the development of UFG structure through the Zener pinning of grain boundaries. The optimum annealing temperature and time for the development of UFG structure in the cryo-rolled AISI 321 steel are (a) 923 K (650 °C) for approximately 28800 seconds and (b) 1023 K (750 °C) for 600 seconds, with average grain sizes of 0.22 and 0.31 µm, respectively. Annealing at 1023 K (750 °C) is considered a better alternative since the volume fraction of precipitated carbides in specimens annealed at 1023 K (750 °C) are less than those annealed at 923 K (650 °C). More so, the energy consumption during prolonged annealing time to achieve an UFG structure at 923 K (650 °C) is higher due to low phase reversion rate. The hardness of the UFG specimens is 195 pct greater than that of the as-received steel. The higher volume fraction of TiC precipitates in the UFG structure may be an additional source of hardening. Micro and macrotexture analysis indicated {110}〈uvw〉 as the major texture component of the austenite grains in the UFG structure. Its intensity is stronger in the specimen annealed at low temperatures.

  4. An ultrasonic inspection procedure for the Sizewell B cast austenitic pump bowls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booler, R.V.; Pearce, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    As part of the safety case for the Sizewell B PWR the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) has carried out a validated ultrasonic inspection of the reactor coolant pump bowls. These are cast from austenitic steel. The techniques used to generate realistic defects in casting and repair weld samples of representative macrostructure are discussed. The use of these test blocks to optimise techniques and develop an inspection procedure is also described. Finally, the programme for operator validation is presented. (author)

  5. Effect of metallurgical variables on the austenite stability in fatigued AISI 304 type steels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Man, Jiří; Smaga, M.; Kuběna, Ivo; Eifler, D.; Polák, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 185, NOV (2017), s. 139-159 ISSN 0013-7944. [XVIII International Colloquium Mechanical Fatigue of Metals. Gijón, 05.11.2016-07.11.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-32665S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Austenitic stainless steel * Deformation induced martensite * Color metallography * Chemical banding * Low cycle fatigue Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis Impact factor: 2.151, year: 2016

  6. Thermal and mechanical stability of retained austenite in aluminum-containing multiphase TRIP steels

    CERN Document Server

    Zwaag, S; Kruijver, S O; Sietsma, J

    2002-01-01

    Stability of retained austenite is the key issue to understand transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) effect. In this work, both thermal stability and mechanical stability are investigated by thermo-magnetic as well as in situ conventional X-ray diffraction and micro synchrotron radiation diffraction measurements. The thermal stability in a 0.20C-1.52Mn-0.25Si-0.96Al (wt%) TRIP steel is studied in the temperature range between 5 and 300 K under a constant magnetic field of 5T. It is found that almost all austenite transforms thermally to martensite upon cooling to 5K and M sub s and M sub f temperatures are analyzed to be 355 and 115 K. Transformation kinetics on the fraction versus temperature relation are well described by a model based on thermodynamics. From the in situ conventional X-ray and synchrotron diffraction measurements in a 0.17C-1.46Mn-0.26Si-1.81Al (wt%) steel, the volume fraction of retained austenite is found to decrease as the strain increases according to Ludwigson and Berger relation. T...

  7. The detection of flaws in austenitic welds using the decomposition of the time-reversal operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Laura J; Mulholland, Anthony J; Tant, Katherine M M; Gachagan, Anthony; Harvey, Gerry; Bird, Colin

    2016-04-01

    The non-destructive testing of austenitic welds using ultrasound plays an important role in the assessment of the structural integrity of safety critical structures. The internal microstructure of these welds is highly scattering and can lead to the obscuration of defects when investigated by traditional imaging algorithms. This paper proposes an alternative objective method for the detection of flaws embedded in austenitic welds based on the singular value decomposition of the time-frequency domain response matrices. The distribution of the singular values is examined in the cases where a flaw exists and where there is no flaw present. A lower threshold on the singular values, specific to austenitic welds, is derived which, when exceeded, indicates the presence of a flaw. The detection criterion is successfully implemented on both synthetic and experimental data. The datasets arising from welds containing a flaw are further interrogated using the decomposition of the time-reversal operator (DORT) method and the total focusing method (TFM), and it is shown that images constructed via the DORT algorithm typically exhibit a higher signal-to-noise ratio than those constructed by the TFM algorithm.

  8. The Influence of Porosity on Corrosion Attack of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Z.; Ismail, A.; Ahmad, S.

    2017-10-01

    Porous metals also known as metal foams is a metallic body having spaces orpores through which liquid or air may pass. Porous metals get an attention from researchers nowadays due to their unique combination of properties includes excellent mechanical and electrical, high energy absorption, good thermal and sound insulation and water and gas permeability. Porous metals have been applied in numerous applications such as in automotive, aerospace and also in biomedical applications. This research reveals the influence of corrosion attack in porous austenitic stainless steel 316L. The cyclic polarization potential analysis was performed on the porous austenitic stainless steel 316L in 3.5% NaCl solution. The morphology and the element presence on the samples before and after corrosion attack was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) respectively to determine the corrosion mechanism structure. The cyclic polarization potential analysis showed the result of (E corr ) for porous austenitic stainless steel type 316L in the range of -0.40v to -0.60v and breakdown potential (E b ) is -0.3v to -0.4v in NaCl solution.

  9. Features of austenite formation in low-carbon steel upon heating in the intercritical temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, D. O.; Smirnov, A. I.

    2017-11-01

    The features of austenite formation upon continuous heating of low-carbon steel at the rates of 90-0.15 K/s in the intercritical temperature range (ICTR) have been studied. It has been found that, in the initially high-tempered, initially quenched, and initially cold-deformed steel, the α → γ transition in the ICTR consists of three stages. The thermokinetic diagrams of the austenite formation with the indication of the positions of the critical points Ac 1 and Ac 3 and also of the temperature ranges of the development of each identified stage of the α → γ transformation have been constructed. A complex of structural studies has been carried out, and a scheme of the austenite formation upon continuous heating at a rate of 90 K/s in the ICTR for the initially high-tempered steel, initially quenched steel, and initially cold-deformed low-carbon steel has been suggested, which reflects all stages of this process.

  10. Investigation on Microstructure of Heat Treated High Manganese Austenitic Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzafar A.K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of manganese addition and annealing heat treatment on microstructure of austenitic cast irons with high manganese content (Mn-Ni-resist were investigated. The complex relationship between the development of the solidification microstructures and buildup of microsegregation in Mn-Ni-resist was obtained by using microstructure analysis and EDS analysis. The annealing heat treatment was applied at 700°C up to 1000°C to investigate the effect of the annealing temperature on the microstructure. This experiment describes the characterization of microsegregation in Mn-Ni-reist was made by means of point counting microanalysis along the microstructure. With this method, the differences of silicon, manganese and nickel distribution in alloys solidified in the microstructure were clearly evidenced. The results show microstructure consists of flake graphite embedded in austenitic matrix and carbides. There is segregation of elements in the Late To Freeze (LTF region after solidification from melting. Manganese positively with high concentration detected in the LTF region. As for heat treatment, higher annealing temperature on the Mn-Ni-resist was reduced carbide formation. The higher annealing temperature shows carbide transformed into a smaller size and disperses through the austenitic matrix structure. The size of carbide decreased with increasing annealing temperature as observed in the microstructure.

  11. A simplified LBB evaluation procedure for austenitic and ferritic steel piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, R.M.; Wichman, K.R.

    1997-04-01

    The NRC previously has approved application of LBB analysis as a means to demonstrate that the probability of pipe rupture was extremely low so that dynamic loads associated with postulated pipe break could be excluded from the design basis (1). The purpose of this work was to: (1) define simplified procedures that can be used by the NRC to compute allowable lengths for circumferential throughwall cracks and assess margin against pipe fracture, and (2) verify the accuracy of the simplified procedures by comparison with available experimental data for piping having circumferential throughwall flaws. The development of the procedures was performed using techniques similar to those employed to develop ASME Code flaw evaluation procedures. The procedures described in this report are applicable to pipe and pipe fittings with: (1) wrought austenitic steel (Ni-Cr-Fe alloy) having a specified minimum yield strength less than 45 ksi, and gas metal-arc, submerged arc and shielded metal-arc austentic welds, and (2) seamless or welded wrought carbon steel having a minimum yield strength not greater than 40 ksi, and associated weld materials. The procedures can be used for cast austenitic steel when adequate information is available to place the cast material toughness into one of the categories identified later in this report for austenitic wrought and weld materials.

  12. Orientation relationship between austenite and non-modulated martensite in Ni–Mn–Ga single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chulist, R.; Faryna, M.; Szczerba, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    In-situ electron back scatter diffraction experiments were used to accurately determine the orientation relationships between austenite and martensite in non-modulated Ni–Mn–Ga single crystals. Using a heating stage device direct orientation measurements of austenite and martensite in single-, two- and self-accommodated state were performed. The initial single crystals show a typical self-accommodated microstructure composed of a mixture of variants allowing the distribution of martensitic variants with minimal macroscopic shear. The martensitic variants are observed on different length scales: starting from a few nanometers up to a few micrometers. The corresponding experimental pole figures reveal a strongly asymmetric distribution of martensitic variants with respect to the parent cubic orientation. Combining the microstructural and crystallographic orientation information it is obvious that a hierarchy in twin formation exists. At first the main martensitic variants arise by Bain strain and rigid body rotation. Subsequently, the remaining variants follow a specific crystallographic orientation relationship. Using training procedure a single- or two-variant state in martensite can be obtained. In-situ heating experiments reveal that such configurations show a different orientation relationship between the martensitic variants and austenite compared to that in a self-accommodated state. It strongly suggests that the orientation relationship between these two phases is not strictly fixed, as given by the main models describing this relation, but also depends on the number and width of martensitic variants. The results are discussed with respect to lattice parameters, number of variants and existing models in the literature.

  13. Growth of creep life of type-347H austenitic stainless steel by micro-alloying elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → B, Ce and N can improve the creep life significantly at high temperature. → The precipitate of B element at the grain boundaries can improve the creep life. → The removing O through Ce provided the steel with longer creep life. → N increased the creep life by stabilizing austenite and solid solution strengthening. - Abstract: The creep life of type-347H austenitic stainless steel modified with B, Ce and N was measured, and microstructures were analyzed by optical microscope, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results indicate that B, Ce and N can improve the creep life significantly at high temperature. The growth of creep life was mainly due to the precipitate of B in the elemental form at the grain boundaries and the removing O through Ce. N addition made for solid solution strengthening and effectively suppressed the precipitate of δ-ferrite at high temperature. The micro-alloying elements have a beneficial effect on creep life of type-347H austenitic stainless steel at high temperature.

  14. Low-temperature nitriding of austenitic steel in a vibrofluidized bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraz, V. R.; Grachev, S. V.

    1999-11-01

    The prospects for use of a vibrofluidized bed (VFB) for low-temperature nitrogen saturation of high-strength austenitic steel based on Cr-Ni-Mn (12Kh17N8G2S2MF) are considered. The positive effect of preliminary plastic deformation on the intensity of nitriding is described. The temperature and time parameters of nitriding in a VFB for strain-aging austenitic steel 12Kh17N8G2S2MF are shown to be adequate for the regimes of the final heat-treatment operation of aging. This creates the possibility of combining the operations of surface alloying and strain aging into a single cycle. This combined treatment increases substantially the resistance of the steel to cyclic loads while preserving the strength parameters. It is shown that the presented method of low-temperature nitriding in a VFB is expedient for improving the service characteristics of austenitic steel 12Kh17N8G2S2MF used for production of force springs of automobile brake systems.

  15. The Effect of Solute Nb on the Austenite-to-Ferrite Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Tao; Militzer, Matthias

    2015-02-01

    Niobium is a widely used micro-alloying element in steels that can retard the austenite-to-ferrite transformation primarily by solute drag when Nb remains in solution. It is critical to develop quantitative models to predict the effect of Nb on the transformation kinetics. In the present work, dedicated continuous cooling transformation (CCT) studies were performed for a low-carbon steel microalloyed with 0.047 wt pct Nb starting from fully recrystallized austenite states with the same grain size but different amounts of Nb in solution. The austenite-to-ferrite transformation kinetics is described from a fundamental perspective by assuming a mixed-mode reaction including solute drag of Nb. Using the solute drag model of Fazeli and Militzer, the intrinsic interface mobility, trans-interface diffusivity of Nb, and its binding energy to the interface have been determined from the CCT data. The interfacial parameters are critically analyzed and compared with independent measurements of diffusion and grain boundary segregation.

  16. Phase Equilibrium and Austenite Decomposition in Advanced High-Strength Medium-Mn Bainitic Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Grajcar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The work addresses the phase equilibrium analysis and austenite decomposition of two Nb-microalloyed medium-Mn steels containing 3% and 5% Mn. The pseudobinary Fe-C diagrams of the steels were calculated using Thermo-Calc. Thermodynamic calculations of the volume fraction evolution of microstructural constituents vs. temperature were carried out. The study comprised the determination of the time-temperature-transformation (TTT diagrams and continuous cooling transformation (CCT diagrams of the investigated steels. The diagrams were used to determine continuous and isothermal cooling paths suitable for production of bainite-based steels. It was found that the various Mn content strongly influences the hardenability of the steels and hence the austenite decomposition during cooling. The knowledge of CCT diagrams and the analysis of experimental dilatometric curves enabled to produce bainite-austenite mixtures in the thermomechanical simulator. Light microscopy (LM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were used to assess the effect of heat treatment on morphological details of produced multiphase microstructures.

  17. Summary of the PISC round robin results on wrought and cast austenitic steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaitre, P.; Koble, T.D.; Crutzen, S.

    1995-01-01

    Within the framework of Action 4 of the third phase of the Programme for the Inspection of Steel Components (PISC III) three capability studies on stainless steel welds have been conducted. The first capability study used a series of 6 wrought-to-wrought stainless steel assemblies that contained a number of flaws such as intergranular stress corrosion cracks, mechanical and thermal fatigue cracks and PISC type A flaws. The second capability study used two wrought-to-cast austenitic steel assemblies that contained lack of fusion flaws and PISC type A flaws. The third capability study used three cast-to-cast austenitic steel assemblies that contained lack of fusion flaws, mechanical fatigue cracks and PISC type A flaws. In total more than 25 teams from 10 different countries participated. A lot of information was obtained on the performance of the inspection techniques used with respect to detection, false calls, depth and length sizing. Different flaw categories were considered to identify those difficult to detect. Furthermore an analysis at the level of techniques was performed which identified some of the more effective techniques and procedures. In this paper the main conclusions from these capabilities studies on austenitic steel welds will be discussed. (author). 12 refs, 14 figs, 1 tab

  18. Development of a robust modeling tool for radiation-induced segregation in austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ying [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Field, Kevin G [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Allen, Todd R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Busby, Jeremy T [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of austenitic stainless steels in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components has been linked to changes in grain boundary composition due to irradiation induced segregation (RIS). This work developed a robust RIS modeling tool to account for thermodynamics and kinetics of the atom and defect transportation under combined thermal and radiation conditions. The diffusion flux equations were based on the Perks model formulated through the linear theory of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Both cross and non-cross phenomenological diffusion coefficients in the flux equations were considered and correlated to tracer diffusion coefficients through Manning’s relation. The preferential atomvacancy coupling was described by the mobility model, whereas the preferential atom-interstitial coupling was described by the interstitial binding model. The composition dependence of the thermodynamic factor was modeled using the CALPHAD approach. Detailed analysis on the diffusion fluxes near and at grain boundaries of irradiated austenitic stainless steels suggested the dominant diffusion mechanism for chromium and iron is via vacancy, while that for nickel can swing from the vacancy to the interstitial dominant mechanism. The diffusion flux in the vicinity of a grain boundary was found to be greatly influenced by the composition gradient formed from the transient state, leading to the oscillatory behavior of alloy compositions in this region. This work confirms that both vacancy and interstitial diffusion, and segregation itself, have important roles in determining the microchemistry of Fe, Cr, and Ni at irradiated grain boundaries in austenitic stainless steels.

  19. Corrosion of austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels exposed to supercritical carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, L.; Anderson, M.; Taylor, D.; Allen, T.R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Oxidation is the primary corrosion phenomenon for the steels exposed to S-CO 2 . → The austenitic steels showed significantly better corrosion resistance than the ferritic-martensitic steels. → Alloying elements (e.g., Mo and Al) showed distinct effects on oxidation behavior. - Abstract: Supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO 2 ) is a potential coolant for advanced nuclear reactors. The corrosion behavior of austenitic steels (alloys 800H and AL-6XN) and ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels (F91 and HCM12A) exposed to S-CO 2 at 650 deg. C and 20.7 MPa is presented in this work. Oxidation was identified as the primary corrosion phenomenon. Alloy 800H had oxidation resistance superior to AL-6XN. The FM steels were less corrosion resistant than the austenitic steels, which developed thick oxide scales that tended to exfoliate. Detailed microstructure characterization suggests the effect of alloying elements such as Al, Mo, Cr, and Ni on the oxidation of the steels.

  20. Bainite transformation of low carbon Mn-Si TRIP-assisted multiphase steels: influence of silicon content on cementite precipitation and austenite retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacques, P.; Catlin, T.; Geerlofs, N.; Kop, T.; Zwaag, S. van der; Delannay, F.

    1999-01-01

    Studies dealing with TRIP-assisted multiphase steels have emphasized the crucial role of the bainite transformation of silicon-rich intercritical austenite in the achievement of a good combination of strength and ductility. The present work deals with the bainite transformation in two steels differing in their silicon content. It is shown that both carbon enrichment of residual austenite and cementite precipitation influences the kinetics of the bainite transformation. A minimum silicon content is found to be necessary in order to prevent cementite precipitation from austenite during the formation of bainitic ferrite in such a way as to allow stabilisation of austenite by carbon enrichment. (orig.)

  1. Mitigating the Risk of Stress Corrosion of Austenitic Stainless Steels in Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Boilers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, A.; Owen, J.; Quirk, G.; G, Lewis; Rudge, A.; Woolsey, I.S.

    2012-09-01

    Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors (AGRs) operated in the UK by EDF Energy have once-through boilers, which deliver superheated steam at high temperature (∼500 deg. C) and pressure (∼150 bar) to the HP turbine. The boilers have either a serpentine or helical geometry for the tubing of the main heat transfer sections of the boiler and each individual tube is fabricated from mild steel, 9%Cr1%Mo and Type 316 austenitic stainless steel tubing. Type 316 austenitic stainless steel is used for the secondary (final) superheater and steam tailpipe sections of the boiler, which, during normal operation, should operate under dry, superheated steam conditions. This is achieved by maintaining a specified margin of superheat at the upper transition joint (UTJ) between the 9%Cr1%Mo primary superheater and the Type 316 secondary superheater sections of the boiler. Operating in this mode should eliminate the possibility of stress corrosion cracking of the Type 316 tube material on-load. In recent years, however, AGRs have suffered a variety of operational problems with their boilers that have made it difficult to maintain the specified superheat margin at the UTJ. In the case of helical boilers, the combined effects of carbon deposition on the gas side and oxide deposition on the waterside of the tubing have resulted in an increasing number of austenitic tubes operating with less than the specified superheat margin at the UTJ and hence the possibility of wetting the austenitic section of the boiler. Some units with serpentine boilers have suffered creep-fatigue damage of the high temperature sections of the boiler, which currently necessitates capping the steam outlet temperature to prevent further damage. The reduction in steam outlet temperature has meant that there is an increased risk of operation with less than the specified superheat margin at the UTJ and hence stress corrosion cracking of the austenitic sections of the boiler. In order to establish the risk of stress

  2. Surface hardening of austenitic stainless steels via low-temperature colossal supersaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan

    The Swagelok Company has recently developed a low-temperature (470°C) carburization technology for austenitic stainless steels, that increases the surface hardness from 200 to 1200 HV25 without sacrificing corrosion resistance. In order to investigate the microstructural changes responsible for these outstanding properties, bulk specimens, thin foils, and powder specimens of several different low-temperature carburized 316 stainless steels have been studied. XRD studies revealed that the low-temperature carburization of 316 austenitic stainless steels lead to a colossal supersaturation of interstitial carbon in the austenite. While the equilibrium solubility of carbon is 0.03 at% at the carburization temperature of 470°C, high-precision XRD determination of the lattice parameter after carburization indicated a carbon concentration of >10at% in solid solution---a colossal supersaturation! This astonishing result was confirmed by a completely independent experimental method, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). Residual stress measurements indicated that low-temperature carburization caused an enormous compressive residual stress of 2 GPa at the surface. The enormous compressive residual stress and a high density of stacking faults caused broadening and shifting of the austenite peaks in X-ray diffraction scans. Analysis of the underlying thermodynamics and kinetics indicate that the key to colossal supersaturation is to kinetically suppress the formation of M23C6. The colossal supersaturation of carbon in the austenite is the dominant feature responsible for the unusual hardness. Only during the extended (>40h) carburization times, M5C 2 carbide (Hagg carbide), instead of M23C6, was observed to form. In addition, TEM studies indicated the presence of a small amount of a second carbide phase, M7C3. The particles of both carbides have the shape of long needles, containing a high density of planar defects normal to the long axis of the needles. The concept of "low

  3. Characterization of microstructure and texture across dissimilar super duplex/austenitic stainless steel weldment joint by super duplex filler metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eghlimi, Abbas, E-mail: a.eghlimi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamanian, Morteza [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Eskandarian, Masoomeh [Department of Materials Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71348-51154 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zabolian, Azam [Department of Natural Resources, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Szpunar, Jerzy A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon SK S7N 5A9 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    In the present paper, microstructural changes across an as-welded dissimilar austenitic/duplex stainless steel couple welded by a super duplex stainless steel filler metal using gas tungsten arc welding process is characterized with optical microscopy and electron back-scattered diffraction techniques. Accordingly, variations of microstructure, texture, and grain boundary character distribution of base metals, heat affected zones, and weld metal were investigated. The results showed that the weld metal, which was composed of Widmanstätten austenite side-plates and allotriomorphic grain boundary austenite morphologies, had the weakest texture and was dominated by low angle boundaries. The welding process increased the ferrite content but decreased the texture intensity at the heat affected zone of the super duplex stainless steel base metal. In addition, through partial ferritization, it changed the morphology of elongated grains of the rolled microstructure to twinned partially transformed austenite plateaus scattered between ferrite textured colonies. However, the texture of the austenitic stainless steel heat affected zone was strengthened via encouraging recrystallization and formation of annealing twins. At both interfaces, an increase in the special character coincident site lattice boundaries of the primary phase as well as a strong texture with <100> orientation, mainly of Goss component, was observed. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Weld metal showed local orientation at microscale but random texture at macroscale. • Intensification of <100> orientated grains was observed adjacent to the fusion lines. • The austenite texture was weaker than that of the ferrite in all duplex regions. • Welding caused twinned partially transformed austenites to form at SDSS HAZ. • At both interfaces, the ratio of special CSL boundaries of the primary phase increased.

  4. Investigation on the crystallography of the transformation products of reverted austenite in intercritically reheated coarse grained heat affected zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Yang; Shang, Chengjia; Chen, Liang; Subramanian, Sundaresa

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Area of reverted austenite is traced out by crystallographic information. ► Bainite and martensite regions were confirmed within it. ► The martensite region is considered as the blocky MA particles. ► Martensite region has high deformation to initiate fracture. ► More uniform transformation of the reverted austenite is good for toughness. -- Abstract: In present study the intercritically reheated coarse grained heat affected zone (ICCGHAZ) showing the worst impact toughness in the heat affected zone of multi-pass welding was simulated by Gleeble-1500, and its microstructure was investigated in detail by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD). With the crystallographic information from EBSD scanning the area of a single reverted austenite grain which formed during the thermal cycles of second pass simulation was traced out. Within it two regions with different characteristic both in morphology and crystallography were found out, showing an un-uniform transformation of the reverted austenite. The region I is a bainitic region containing larger bainitic ferrite grains, while the region II is made up of several clusters containing tiny grains. Based on the crystallographic information each cluster was determined as martensite island thereby should be considered as blocky Martensite/Austenite constituent (M/A), which is hard phase and harmful for toughness. Analysis on the level of deformation shows that the region II is much higher deformed than the region I, indicating there is high stress concentration within the region II. The possible influence of the region I and the region II on fracture is discussed under the early proposed M/A’s fracture-initiating mechanisms. It suggests that the main cause of the toughness reduction is the un-uniform transformation of the reverted austenite, and the toughness performance of the ICCGHAZ could be improved if the transformation of the reverted

  5. A comparative study of ray tracing and CIVA simulation for ultrasonic examination of anisotropic inhomogeneous austenitic welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolkoori, S. R.; Shokouhi, P.; Hoehne, C.; Rahman, M.-U.; Kreutzbruck, M.; Prager, J.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic examination of anisotropic inhomogeneous austenitic welds is challenging, because of the columnar grain structure of the weld leads to beam skewing and splitting. Modeling tools play an important role in understanding the ultrasound field propagation and optimization of experimental parameters during the ultrasonic testing of austenitic welds as well as the interpretation of the test results. In this contribution, an efficient theoretical model based on the ray tracing concepts is developed to calculate the ultrasonic fields in inhomogeneous austenitic welds quantitatively. The developed model determines the ultrasound fields by taking into account the directivity of the ray source, the inhomogenity of the weld as well as ray transmission coefficients. Directivity of the ray source in columnar grained austenitic materials (including layback orientation) is obtained in three dimensions based on Lamb's reciprocity theorem. Ray energy reflection and transmission coefficients at an interface between two general columnar grained austenitic materials are calculated in three dimensions. The ray tracing model predictions on inhomogeneous austenitic weld material are compared against those from CIVA, a commercial non-destructive modeling and simulation tool. The ultrasonic modeling tools in CIVA are based on semi-analytical solutions. For beam propagation simulation, a so-called "pencil method" is used, which involves modeling the probe as a set of individual source points, each radiating "a bundle" of diverging rays into the medium and integrating those elementary contributions. Inhomogenity in the weld region is approximated by mapping the grain orientations on weld macrograph. Simulation results for ultrasonic field profiles for an austenitic weld are shown to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental results.

  6. Influence of the amount and morphology of retained austenite on the mechanical properties of an austempered ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aranzabal, J. [INASMET, San Sebastian (Spain); Gutierrez, I.; Rodriguez-Ibabe, J.M.; Urcola, J.J. [CEIT, San Sebastian (Spain). Dept. of Materials

    1997-05-01

    High Si contents in nodular cast irons lead to a significant volume fraction of retained austenite in the material after the austempering treatment. In the present work, the influence of the amount and morphology of this phase on the mechanical properties (proof stress, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), elongation, and toughness) has been analyzed for different austempering conditions. After 300 C isothermal treatments at intermediate times, the austenite is plastically stable at room temperature and contributes, together with the bainitic ferrite, to the proof stress and the toughness of the material. For austenite volume fractions higher than 25 pct, the proof stress is controlled by this phase and the toughness depends mainly on the stability of {gamma}. In these conditions (370 C and 410 C treatments), the present material exhibits a transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) effect, which leads to an improvement in ductility. It is shown that the strain level necessary to initiate the martensitic transformation induced by deformation depends on the carbon content of the austenite. The martensite formed under TRIP conditions can be of two different types: autotempered plate martensite, which forms at room temperature from an austenite with a quasi-coherent epsilon carbide precipitation, and lath martensite nucleated at twin boundaries and twin intersections.

  7. The Role of Retained Austenite on the Mechanical Properties of a Low Carbon 3Mn-1.5Ni Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Zhang, Wei-na; Liu, Zhen-yu; Wang, Guo-dong

    2017-12-01

    The present studies focus on the correlation between retained austenite characteristics and the cryogenic temperature Charpy impact toughness, strength, and plasticity. The steels with different volume fractions and stabilities of retained austenite were prepared by quenching followed by intercritical heat treatment, and the microstructure was characterized using scanning electron microscope, electron back-scattered diffraction, and X-ray diffraction. The grain size, dislocation density, crack initiation energy, and crack propagation energy were quantified. It has been demonstrated that the volume fraction of retained austenite plays a significant role in the reduction of the measured yield strength and the effect of tempered martensite/ferrite matrix on cryogenic temperature impact toughness can be assumed to be similar due to the similar grain size, dislocation density and element content in solution for different heat treatments. It was found that the stability of retained austenite plays a determining role in the increase of cryogenic temperature impact toughness. Furthermore, the dependence of the crack propagation energy on retained austenite is much greater than that of the crack initiation energy. Generally, an excellent UTS × TEL does not produce good cryogenic temperature impact toughness.

  8. Hydrogen embrittlement of super austenitic stainless steel welded joints; Fragilizacao por hidrogenio em juntas soldadas de acos inoxidaveis superausteniticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes, Ramon S. Cortes [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Centro Politecnico. Inst. de Tecnologia para o Desenvolvimento (LACTEC); Berthier, Thiana; Kuromoto, Neide K. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Lab. de Materiais e Tratamento de Superficies. Lab. de Nanopropriedades Mecanicas

    2004-09-15

    The austenitic stainless steel embrittlement is usually present on sulphurous medium due to the hydrogen presence, resulting on cracks and corrosion on acid medium. Several researches carried out on the behaviour of hydrogenated stainless steel structures, had shown that the hydrogen induces superficial phase transformation during hydrogenation period and cracks formation after this period. These are due to the permeation of the hydrogen into the material, which is apprehended on preferential site, resulting on high pressure zones of molecular hydrogen. These zones may lead the crack formation, compromising the mechanical properties. There are few results on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steel, considering the transformations induced on welded unions. This work evaluates the cracks nucleation on welded unions of super austenitic stainless steel AISI 904L exposed to hydrogen rich environments and its relation to the reduction of material ductility. The samples were welded by the Mig/Mag process, followed by hydrogenation which were cathodic on sulfuric acid solution at room temperature. The results showed that the tested super austenitic stainless steel has a significant amount of cracks and no phase transformation has occurred after hydronization. (author)

  9. Standard practice for X-Ray determination of retained austenite in steel with near random crystallographic orientation

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers the determination of retained austenite phase in steel using integrated intensities (area under peak above background) of X-ray diffraction peaks using chromium Kα or molybdenum Kα X-radiation. 1.2 The method applies to carbon and alloy steels with near random crystallographic orientations of both ferrite and austenite phases. 1.3 This practice is valid for retained austenite contents from 1 % by volume and above. 1.4 If possible, X-ray diffraction peak interference from other crystalline phases such as carbides should be eliminated from the ferrite and austenite peak intensities. 1.5 Substantial alloy contents in steel cause some change in peak intensities which have not been considered in this method. Application of this method to steels with total alloy contents exceeding 15 weight % should be done with care. If necessary, the users can calculate the theoretical correction factors to account for changes in volume of the unit cells for austenite and ferrite resulting from vari...

  10. Effect of Composition and Deformation on Coarse-Grained Austenite Transformation in Nb-Mo Microalloyed Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isasti, N.; Jorge-Badiola, D.; Taheri, M. L.; López, B.; Uranga, P.

    2011-12-01

    Thermomechanical processing of microalloyed steels containing niobium can be performed to obtain deformed austenite prior to transformation. Accelerated cooling can be employed to refine the final microstructure and, consequently, to improve both strength and toughness. This general rule is fulfilled if the transformation occurs on a quite homogeneous austenite microstructure. Nevertheless, the presence of coarse austenite grains before transformation in different industrial processes is a usual source of concern, and regarding toughness, the coarsest high-angle boundary units would determine its final value. Sets of deformation dilatometry tests were carried out using three 0.06 pct Nb microalloyed steels to evaluate the effect of Mo alloying additions (0, 0.16, and 0.31 pct Mo) on final transformation from both recrystallized and unrecrystallized coarse-grained austenite. Continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams were created, and detailed microstructural characterization was achieved through the use of optical microscopy (OM), field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM), and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The resultant microstructures ranged from polygonal ferrite (PF) and pearlite (P) at slow cooling ranges to bainitic ferrite (BF) accompanied by martensite (M) for fast cooling rates. Plastic deformation of the parent austenite accelerated both ferrite and bainite transformation, moving the CCT curves to higher temperatures and shorter times. However, an increase in the final heterogeneity was observed when BF packets were formed, creating coarse high-angle grain boundary units.

  11. Numerical simulation of hydrogen-assisted crack initiation in austenitic-ferritic duplex steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mente, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels have been used for a long time in the offshore industry, since they have higher strength than conventional austenitic stainless steels and they exhibit a better ductility as well as an improved corrosion resistance in harsh environments compared to ferritic stainless steels. However, despite these good properties the literature shows some failure cases of duplex stainless steels in which hydrogen plays a crucial role for the cause of the damage. Numerical simulations can give a significant contribution in clarifying the damage mechanisms. Because they help to interpret experimental results as well as help to transfer results from laboratory tests to component tests and vice versa. So far, most numerical simulations of hydrogen-assisted material damage in duplex stainless steels were performed at the macroscopic scale. However, duplex stainless steels consist of approximately equal portions of austenite and δ-ferrite. Both phases have different mechanical properties as well as hydrogen transport properties. Thus, the sensitivity for hydrogen-assisted damage is different in both phases, too. Therefore, the objective of this research was to develop a numerical model of a duplex stainless steel microstructure enabling simulation of hydrogen transport, mechanical stresses and strains as well as crack initiation and propagation in both phases. Additionally, modern X-ray diffraction experiments were used in order to evaluate the influence of hydrogen on the phase specific mechanical properties. For the numerical simulation of the hydrogen transport it was shown, that hydrogen diffusion strongly depends on the alignment of austenite and δ-ferrite in the duplex stainless steel microstructure. Also, it was proven that the hydrogen transport is mainly realized by the ferritic phase and hydrogen is trapped in the austenitic phase. The numerical analysis of phase specific mechanical stresses and strains revealed that if the duplex stainless steel is

  12. In Situ Investigation of the Evolution of Lattice Strain and Stresses in Austenite and Martensite During Quenching and Tempering of Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, M.; Niessen, F.; Somers, M. A. J.

    2018-01-01

    Energy dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate in situ the evolution of lattice strains and stresses in austenite and martensite during quenching and tempering of a soft martensitic stainless steel. In one experiment, lattice strains in austenite and martensite were me...

  13. Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition based methodology for ultrasonic testing of coarse grain austenitic stainless steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Govind K; Kumar, Anish; Jayakumar, T; Purnachandra Rao, B; Mariyappa, N

    2015-03-01

    A signal processing methodology is proposed in this paper for effective reconstruction of ultrasonic signals in coarse grained high scattering austenitic stainless steel. The proposed methodology is comprised of the Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) processing of ultrasonic signals and application of signal minimisation algorithm on selected Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs) obtained by EEMD. The methodology is applied to ultrasonic signals obtained from austenitic stainless steel specimens of different grain size, with and without defects. The influence of probe frequency and data length of a signal on EEMD decomposition is also investigated. For a particular sampling rate and probe frequency, the same range of IMFs can be used to reconstruct the ultrasonic signal, irrespective of the grain size in the range of 30-210 μm investigated in this study. This methodology is successfully employed for detection of defects in a 50mm thick coarse grain austenitic stainless steel specimens. Signal to noise ratio improvement of better than 15 dB is observed for the ultrasonic signal obtained from a 25 mm deep flat bottom hole in 200 μm grain size specimen. For ultrasonic signals obtained from defects at different depths, a minimum of 7 dB extra enhancement in SNR is achieved as compared to the sum of selected IMF approach. The application of minimisation algorithm with EEMD processed signal in the proposed methodology proves to be effective for adaptive signal reconstruction with improved signal to noise ratio. This methodology was further employed for successful imaging of defects in a B-scan. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Microstructural changes within similar coronary stents produced from two different austenitic steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Sabine; Meissner, Andreas; Fischer, Alfons

    2009-04-01

    Coronary heart disease has become the most common source for death in western industrial countries. Since 1986, a metal vessel scaffold (stent) is inserted to prevent the vessel wall from collapsing [Puel, J., Joffre, F., Rousseau, H., Guermonprez, B., Lancelin, B., Valeix, B., Imbert, G., Bounhoure, J.P, 1987. Endo-prothéses coronariennes autoexpansives dans la Préevention des resténoses apés angioplastie transluminale. Archives des Maladies du Coeur et des Vaisseaux, 1311--1312]. Most of these coronary stents are made from CrNiMo-steel (AISI 316L). Due to its austenitic structure, the material shows strength and ductility combined with corrosion resistance and a satisfactory biocompatibility. However, recent studies indicate that Nickel is under discussion as to its allergenic potential. Other typically used materials like Co-Base L605 or Tantalum alloys are relatively expensive and are not used so often. Newly developed austenitic high-nitrogen CrMnMoN-steels (AHNS) may offer an alternative. Traditional material tests revealed that strength and ductility, as well as corrosion resistance and biocompatibility, are as good as or even better than those of 316L [Vogt, J.B., Degallaix, S., Foct J., 1984. Low cycle fatigue life enhancement of 316L stainless steel by nitrogen alloying. International Journal of Fatigue 6 (4), 211-215, Menzel, J., Stein, G., 1996. High nitrogen containing Ni-free austenitic steels for medical applications. ISIJ Intern 36 (7), 893-900, Gavriljuk, V.G., Berns, H., 1999. High nitrogen steels, Springer Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg]. However, because of a strut diameter of about 100 microm, the cross section consists of about five to ten crystal grains (oligo-crystalline). Thus very few, or even just one, grain can be responsible for the success or failure of the whole stent. During implantation, the structure of coronary artery stents is subjected to distinct inhomogeneous plastic deformation due to crimping and dilation.

  15. Hardness analysis of welded joints of austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolska, S.

    2016-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in the modern world. The continuous increase in the use of stainless steels is caused by getting greater requirements relating the corrosion resistance of all types of devices. The main property of these steels is the ability to overlap a passive layer of an oxide on their surface. This layer causes that they become resistant to oxidation. One of types of corrosion-resistant steels is ferritic-austenitic steel of the duplex type, which has good strength properties. It is easily formable and weldable as well as resistant to erosion and abrasive wear. It has a low susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking, to stress corrosion, to intercrystalline one, to pitting one and to crevice one. For these reasons they are used, among others, in the construction of devices and facilities designed for chemicals transportation and for petroleum and natural gas extraction. The paper presents the results which shows that the particular specimens of the ][joint representing both heat affected zones (from the side of the 2205 steel and the 316L one) and the weld are characterized by higher hardness values than in the case of the same specimens for the 2Y joint. Probably this is caused by machining of edges of the sections of metal sheets before the welding process, which came to better mixing of native materials and the filler metal. After submerged arc welding the 2205 steel still retains the diphase, austenitic-ferritic structure and the 316L steel retains the austenitic structure with sparse bands of ferrite σ.

  16. Swelling analysis of austenitic stainless steels by means of ion irradiation and kinetic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohyama, Akira; Donomae, Takako

    1999-03-01

    The influences of irradiation environment on the swelling behavior of austenitic stainless steel has been studied, to aid understanding the origin of the difference in swelling response of PNC316 stainless steel in fuel-pin environment and in materials irradiation capsules, in terms of irradiation conditions, damage mechanism and material conditions. This work focused on the theoretical investigation of the influence of temperature variation on microstructural development of austenitic stainless steels during irradiation, using a kinetic rate theory model. A modeling and calculation on non-steady irradiation effects were first carried out. A fully dynamic model of point defect evolution and extended defect development, which accounts for cascade damage, was developed and successfully applied to simulate the interstitial loop evolution in low temperature regimes. The influence of cascade interstitial clustering on dislocation loop formation has also been assessed. The establishment of a basis for general assessment of non-steady irradiation effects in austenitic stainless steels was advanced. The developed model was applied to evaluate the influences of temperature variation in formerly carried out CMIR and FFTF/MFA-1 FBR irradiation experiments. The results suggested the gradual approach of microstructural features to equilibrium states in all the temperature variation conditions and no sign of anomalous behavior was noted. On the other hand, there is the influence of temperature variation on microstructural development under the neutron irradiation, like CMIR. So there are some possibilities of the work of mechanism which is not taken care on this model, for example the effect of the precipitate behavior which is sensitive to irradiation temperature. (author)

  17. Atypical transitions in material response during constant strain rate, hot deformation of austenitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Utpal; Aashranth, B.; Samantaray, Dipti; Kumar, Santosh; Davinci, M. Arvinth; Albert, Shaju K.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2017-10-01

    Work hardening, dynamic recovery and dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurring during hot working of austenitic steel have been extensively studied. Various empirical models describe the nature and effects of these phenomena in a typical framework. However, the typical model is sometimes violated following atypical transitions in deformation mechanisms of the material. To ascertain the nature of these atypical transitions, researchers have intentionally introduced discontinuities in the deformation process, such as interrupting the deformation as in multi-step rolling and abruptly changing the rate of deformation. In this work, we demonstrate that atypical transitions are possible even in conventional single-step, constant strain rate deformation of austenitic steel. Towards this aim, isothermal, constant true strain rate deformation of austenitic steel has been carried out in a temperature range of 1173-1473 K and strain rate range of 0.01-100 s-1. The microstructural response corresponding to each deformation condition is thoroughly investigated. The conventional power-law variation of deformation grain size (D) with peak stress (σp) during DRX is taken as a typical model and experimental data is tested against it. It is shown that σp-D relations exhibit an atypical two-slope linear behaviour rather than a continuous power law relation. Similarly, the reduction in σp with temperature (T) is found to consist of two discrete linear segments. In practical terms, the two linear segments denote two distinct microstructural responses to deformation. As a consequence of this distinction, the typical model breaks down and is unable to completely relate microstructural evolution to flow behaviour. The present work highlights the microstructural mechanisms responsible for this atypical behavior and suggests strategies to incorporate the two-slope behaviour in the DRX model.

  18. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels in BWR Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chopra, O. K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gruber, Eugene E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Shack, William J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2010-06-01

    The internal components of light water reactors are exposed to high-energy neutron irradiation and high-temperature reactor coolant. The exposure to neutron irradiation increases the susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) because of the elevated corrosion potential of the reactor coolant and the introduction of new embrittlement mechanisms through radiation damage. Various nonsensitized SSs and nickel alloys have been found to be prone to intergranular cracking after extended neutron exposure. Such cracks have been seen in a number of internal components in boiling water reactors (BWRs). The elevated susceptibility to SCC in irradiated materials, commonly referred to as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), is a complex phenomenon that involves simultaneous actions of irradiation, stress, and corrosion. In recent years, as nuclear power plants have aged and irradiation dose increased, IASCC has become an increasingly important issue. Post-irradiation crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests have been performed to provide data and technical support for the NRC to address various issues related to aging degradation of reactor-core internal structures and components. This report summarizes the results of the last group of tests on compact tension specimens from the Halden-II irradiation. The IASCC susceptibility of austenitic SSs and heat-affected-zone (HAZ) materials sectioned from submerged arc and shielded metal arc welds was evaluated by conducting crack growth rate and fracture toughness tests in a simulated BWR environment. The fracture and cracking behavior of HAZ materials, thermally sensitized SSs and grain-boundary engineered SSs was investigated at several doses (≤3 dpa). These latest results were combined with previous results from Halden-I and II irradiations to analyze the effects of neutron dose, water chemistry, alloy compositions, and welding and processing conditions on IASCC

  19. The microstructural dependence of wear resistance in austenite containing plate steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfram, Preston Charles

    The purpose of this project was to examine the microstructural dependence of wear resistance of various plate steels, with interests in exploring the influence of retained austenite (RA). Materials resistant to abrasive wear are desirable in the industrial areas of agriculture, earth moving, excavation, mining, mineral processing, and transportation. Abrasive wear contributes to significant financial cost associated with wear to the industry. The motivation for the current study was to determine whether it would be beneficial from a wear resistance perspective to produce plate steels with increased amounts of retained austenite. This thesis investigates this motivation through a material matrix containing AR400F, Abrasive (0.21 wt pct C, 1.26 wt pct Mn, 0.21 wt pct Si, 0.15 wt pct Ni, 0.18 wt pct Mo), Armor (0.46 wt pct C, 0.54 wt pct Mn, 0.36 wt pct Si, 1.74 wt pct Ni, 0.31 wt pct Mo), 9260, 301SS, Hadfield, and SAE 4325 steels. The Abrasive, Armor and 9260 steels were heat treated using different methods such as quench and temper, isothermal bainitic hold, and quench and partitioning (Q&P). These heat treatments yielded various microstructures and the test matrix allowed for investigation of steels with similar hardness and varying levels of RA. The wear test methods used consisted of dry sand rubber wheel (DSRW), impeller-tumbler impact-abrasion (impeller), and Bond abrasion wear testing. DSRW and impeller wear resistance was found to increase with hardness and retained austenite levels at certain hardness levels. Some Q&P samples exhibited similar or less wear than the Hadfield steels in DSRW and impeller tests. Scanning electron microscopy investigation of wear surfaces revealed different wear mechanisms for the different wear test methods ranging from micro-plowing, to micro-cutting and to fragmentation.

  20. Microstructural Evolutions During Annealing of Plastically Deformed AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel: Martensite Reversion, Grain Refinement, Recrystallization, and Grain Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghizadeh, Meysam; Mirzadeh, Hamed

    2016-08-01

    Microstructural evolutions during annealing of a plastically deformed AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated. Three distinct stages were identified for the reversion of strain-induced martensite to austenite, which were followed by the recrystallization of the retained austenite phase and overall grain growth. It was shown that the primary recrystallization of the retained austenite postpones the formation of an equiaxed microstructure, which coincides with the coarsening of the very fine reversed grains. The latter can effectively impair the usefulness of this thermomechanical treatment for grain refinement at both high and low annealing temperatures. The final grain growth stage, however, was found to be significant at high annealing temperatures, which makes it difficult to control the reversion annealing process for enhancement of mechanical properties. Conclusively, this work unravels the important microstructural evolution stages during reversion annealing and can shed light on the requirements and limitations of this efficient grain refining approach.

  1. OPTIMIZATION OF SURFACE ROUGHNESS OF AISI 304 AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL IN DRY TURNING OPERATION USING TAGUCHI DESIGN METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. PHILIP SELVARAJ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work is concentrated with the dry turning of AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel (ASS. This paper presents the influence of cutting parameters like cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut on the surface roughness of austenitic stainless steel during dry turning. A plan of experiments based on Taguchi’s technique has been used to acquire the data. An orthogonal array, the signal to noise (S/N ratio and the analysis of variance (ANOVA are employed to investigate the cutting characteristics of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel bars using TiC and TiCN coated tungsten carbide cutting tool. Finally the confirmation tests that have been carried out to compare the predicted values with the experimental values confirm its effectiveness in the analysis of surface roughness.

  2. The role of nitrogen in improving pitting corrosion resistance of high-alloy austenitic and duplex stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilpas, M.; Haenninen, H.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of nitrogen alloyed shielding gas on weld nitrogen content and pitting corrosion resistance of super austenitic (6%Mo) and super duplex stainless steels have been studied with special emphasis on microsegregation behaviour of Cr, Mo and N. The measurements performed with the 6%Mo steel indicate that all these elements segregate interdendritically in the fully austenitic weld metal. With nitrogen addition to the shielding gas the enrichment of nitrogen to the interdendritic regions is more pronounced than to the dendrite cores due to which the pitting corrosion resistance of the dendrite cores increases only marginally. In the super duplex steel welds nitrogen enriches in austenite increasing its pitting corrosion resistance more effectively. In these welds the pitting corrosion resistance of the ferrite phase remains lower. (orig.)

  3. Development of Austenitic ODS Strengthened Alloys for Very High Temperature Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbins, James [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Heuser, Brent [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Robertson, Ian [Kyushu Univ. (Japan); Sehitoglu, Huseyin [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Sofronis, Petros [Kyushu Univ. (Japan); Gewirth, Andrew [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    2015-04-22

    This “Blue Sky” project was directed at exploring the opportunities that would be gained by developing Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloys based on the Fe-Cr-Ni austenitic alloy system. A great deal of research effort has been directed toward ferritic and ferritic/martensitic ODS alloys which has resulted in reasonable advances in alloy properties. Similar gains should be possible with austenitic alloy which would also take advantage of other superior properties of that alloy system. The research effort was aimed at the developing an in-depth understanding of the microstructural-level strengthening effects of ODS particles in austentic alloys. This was accomplished on a variety of alloy compositions with the main focus on 304SS and 316SS compositions. A further goal was to develop an understanding other the role of ODS particles on crack propagation and creep performance. Since these later two properties require bulk alloy material which was not available, this work was carried out on promising austentic alloy systems which could later be enhanced with ODS strengthening. The research relied on a large variety of micro-analytical techniques, many of which were available through various scientific user facilities. Access to these facilities throughout the course of this work was instrumental in gathering complimentary data from various analysis techniques to form a well-rounded picture of the processes which control austenitic ODS alloy performance. Micromechanical testing of the austenitic ODS alloys confirmed their highly superior mechanical properties at elevated temperature from the enhanced strengthening effects. The study analyzed the microstructural mechanisms that provide this enhanced high temperature performance. The findings confirm that the smallest size ODS particles provide the most potent strengthening component. Larger particles and other thermally- driven precipitate structures were less effective contributors and, in some cases, limited

  4. Mechanized ultrasonic inspection of austenitic pipe systems; Mechanisierte Ultraschallpruefung von austenitischen Rohrleitungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dressler, K.; Luecking, J.; Medenbach, S. [ABB ZAQ GmbH, Essen (Germany)

    1999-08-01

    The contribution explains the system of standard testing methods elaborated by ABB ZAQ GmbH for inspection of austenitic plant components. The inspection tasks explained in greater detail are basic materials testing (straight pipes, bends, and pipe specials), and inspection of welds and dissimilar welds. The techniques discussed in detail are those for detection and sizing of defects. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Das Ziel dieses Beitrages ist die Vorstellung der von der ABB ZAQ GmbH eingesetzten Standardprueftechniken fuer die Pruefung austenitischer Anlagenkomponenten. Im einzelnen wird die Grundwerkstoffpruefung (Rohre, Boegen, Formstuecke), die Schweissnahtpruefung und die Mischnahtpruefung angesprochen. Es werden dabei die Techniken fuer `Detection` und `Sizing` differenziert betrachtet und erlaeutert. (orig.)

  5. Hydrogen-plasticity in the austenitic alloys; Interactions hydrogene-plasticite dans les alliages austenitiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De lafosse, D. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, Lab. PECM-UMR CNRS 5146, 42 - Saint-Etienne (France)

    2007-07-01

    This presentation deals with the hydrogen effects under stresses corrosion, in austenitic alloys. The objective is to validate and characterize experimentally the potential and the limits of an approach based on an elastic theory of crystal defects. The first part is devoted to the macroscopic characterization of dynamic hydrogen-dislocations interactions by aging tests. then the hydrogen influence on the plasticity is evaluated, using analytical classic models of the elastic theory of dislocations. The hydrogen influence on the flow stress of bcc materials is analyzed experimentally with model materials. (A.L.B.)

  6. Influence of Plastic Deformation on Low Temperature Surface Hardening of Austenitic Stainless Steel by Gaseous Nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottoli, Federico; Winther, Grethe; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses an investigation of the influence of plastic deformation on low temperature surface hardening by gaseous nitriding of two commercial austenitic stainless steels: AISI 304 and EN 1.4369. The materials were plastically deformed to different equivalent strains by uniaxial...... tension. Gaseous nitriding of the strained material was performed in ammonia gas at atmospheric pressure at 703 K. Microstructural characterization of the as-deformed states and the nitrided case produced included X-ray diffraction analysis, reflected light microscopy, microhardness testing. The results...

  7. Effects of phosphorus, silicon and sulphur on microstructural evolution in austenitic stainless steels during electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuya, K.; Nakahigashi, S.; Ozaki, S.; Shima, S.

    1991-01-01

    Fe-18Cr-9Ni-1,5Mn austenitic alloys containing phosphorus, silicon and sulphur were irradiated by 1 MeV electrons at 573-773 K. Phosphorus increased the interstitial loop nucleation and decreased the void swelling by increasing void number density and suppressing void growth. Silicon had a similar effect to phosphorus but its effect was weaker than phosphorus. Sulphur enhanced void swelling through increasing the void density. Nickel enrichment at grain boundaries was suppressed only in the alloy containing phosphorus. These phosphorus effects may be explained by a strong interaction with interstitials resulting in a high density of sinks for point defects. (orig.)

  8. Fatigue hardening and softening studies on strain hardened 18-8 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishna Prasad, C.; Vasudevan, R.

    1976-01-01

    Metals when subjected to fatigue harden or soften depending on their previous mechanical history. Annealed or mildly cold worked metals are known to harden while severely cold worked metals soften when subjected to fatigue loading. In the present work samples of austenitic 18-8 steel cold worked to 11% and 22% reduction in area were mounted in a vertical pulsator and fatigued in axial tension-compression. Clear cut effects were produced and it was noticed that these depended on the extent of cold work, the amplitude as well as the number of cycles of fatigue and mean stress if any. (orig.) [de

  9. Joining silicon carbide to austenitic stainless steel through diffusion welding; Stellingen behorende bij het proefschrift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krugers, Jan-Paul

    1993-01-19

    In this thesis, the results are presented of a study dealing with joining silicon carbide to austenitic stainless steel AIS316 by means of diffusion welding. Welding experiments were carried out without and with the use of a metallic intermediate, like copper, nickel and copper-nickel alloys at various conditions of process temperature, process time, mechanical pressure and interlayer thickness. Most experiments were carried out in high vacuum. For reasons of comparison, however, some experiments were also carried out in a gas shielded environment of 95 vol.% Ar and 5 vol.% H2.

  10. Influence of the austenitizing temperature in the cleavage facet size of Niocor 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darwish, F.A.I.; Teixeira, J.C.G.; Fernandes, R.A.; Juer, S.

    1983-01-01

    Convetional Charpy specimens of Niocor 2 steel cooled in air from various austenitizing temperatures were fractured at -196 0 C so as to insure failure by cleavage. The cleavage facet size distribution was determined and then correlated with the grain size and other aspects of the microstructure. The results that the average facet size can be increased through a coarsening of the microstructure. For the case where the γ→α transformation products are predominantely acicular, the facet size is shown to depend on substructural aspects primarily the lath packet size. (Author) [pt

  11. Elastic constants of an Fe-5Cr-26Mn austenitic steel, 76 to 400 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledbetter, H.M.; Austin, M.W.

    1983-01-01

    By measuring longitudinal-mode and transverse-mode sound velocities at frequencies near 10 MHz, we determined the complete engineering elastic constants - bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young modulus, Poisson ratio - for an Fe-5Cr-26Mn austenitic steel between 76 and 400 K. Due to a magnetic transition, all elastic constants behave anomalously below about 360 K. The bulk modulus begins to soften during cooling at some higher temperature. Except for Poisson's ratio, below the 360-K magnetic transition, all elastic constants resume an apparently normal temperature dependence. After increasing abruptly at the magnetic transition, Poisson's ratio increases with decreasing temperature

  12. The sub-zero Celsius treatment of precipitation hardenable semi-austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    -to-martensite transformation was monitored in situ by magnetometry and data was used to sketch a TTT diagram for transformation. As an alternative treatment, after austenitization the material was immersed in boiling nitrogen and up-quenched to room temperature by immersion in water prior to be subjected to isothermal...... treatment. Magnetometry showed that the additional thermal step in boiling nitrogen yields a minor increment of the fraction of martensite, but has a noteworthy accelerating effect on the transformation kinetics, which more pronounced when the isothermal holding is performed at a higher temperature. Data...

  13. Active flux tungsten inert gas welding of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304

    OpenAIRE

    Klobčar, D.; Tušek; Bizjak, M.; Simončič, S.; Lešer, V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the effects of flux assisted tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) welding of 4 (10) mm thick austenitic stainless steel EN X5CrNi1810 (AISI 304) in the butt joint. The sample dimensions were 300 ´ 50 mm, and commercially available active flux QuickTIG was used for testing. In the planned study the influence of welding position and weld groove shape was analysed based on the penetration depth. A comparison of microstructure formation, grain size and ferrit number between TIG welding a...

  14. Martensitic transformation in an intergranular corrosion area of austenitic stainless steel during thermal cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Yen, Hung-Wei; Trimby, Patrick; Moody, Steven; Miller, Sarah; Chensee, Martin; Ringer, Simon; Cairney, Julie

    2014-01-01

    An oxidation-assisted martensitic phase transformation was observed in an austenitic stainless steel after thermal cycling up to 970 °C in air in a solar thermal steam reformer. The intergranular corrosion areas were investigated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structural-and-chemical maps revealed that within intergranular corrosion areas this martensitic transformation primarily occurs in oxidation-induced chromium-depleted zones, rather than due to only sensitization. This displacive transformation may also play a significant role in the rate at which intergranular corrosion takes place

  15. Modeling of Ni Diffusion Induced Austenite Formation in Ferritic Stainless Steel Interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ming; Molin, Sebastian; Zhang, L.

    2015-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steel interconnect plates are widely used in planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) or electrolysis cell (SOEC) stacks. During stack production and operation, nickel from the Ni/YSZ fuel electrode or from the Ni contact component diffuses into the IC plate, causing transformation...... of the ferritic phase into an austenitic phase in the interface region. This is accompanied with changes in volume and in mechanical and corrosion properties of the IC plates. In this work, kinetic modeling of the inter-diffusion between Ni and FeCr based ferritic stainless steel was conducted, using the CALPHAD...

  16. Modeling of Ni Diffusion Induced Austenite Formation in Ferritic Stainless Steel Interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ming; Alimadadi, Hossein; Molin, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Ferritic stainless steel interconnect plates are widely used in planar solid oxide fuel cell and electrolysis cell stacks. During stack production and operation, nickel from the Ni/yttria stabilized zirconia fuel electrode or from the Ni contact component layer diffuses into the interconnect plate......, causing transformation of the ferritic phase into an austenitic phase in the interface region. This is accompanied with changes in volume, and in mechanical and corrosion properties of the interconnect plates. In this work, kinetic modeling of the inter-diffusion between Ni and FeCr based ferritic...

  17. An Overview of the Cyclic Partial Austenite-Ferrite Transformation Concept and Its Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; van der Zwaag, Sybrand

    2017-06-01

    Over the past decades, the mechanism of interface migration during the austenite-ferrite transformation in steels has attracted significant attention from physical metallurgists. There are two challenging research questions in this field: (i) What is the effect of (substitutional) alloying elements on migrating interfaces? and (ii) How to accurately determine the value of interface mobility?. Recently, a cyclic partial phase transformation approach has been proposed to study interface migration, and new insights into the above two questions have been provided. An overview of the cyclic partial phase transformation concept is given, and pathways for future research are suggested.

  18. The effect of oxidation on the creep behavior of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assis, A.M.C.A.; Monteiro, S.N.

    1979-01-01

    The manifestation of superficial oxidation in creep rupture tests performed with three austenitic, stainless steels under constant load in furnaces open to the atmosphere, between the temperature of 550 0 C and 800 0 C is discussed. There is experimental evidence that the superficial oxidation effects are associated, in each material, to the testing temperature, to the duration of the test and to the degree of deformation reached. The influence of the oxidatio is related to the acting deformation mechanisms. The possible corrosion action on the characteristics of the mechanical behavior of the materials under creep is analysed. (Author) [pt

  19. Real time neutron transmission investigation of the austenite-bainite transformation in grey iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meggers, Kay; Priesmeyer, Hans G.; Trela, Walter J.; Bowman, Charles D.; Dahms, Michael

    1994-01-01

    The first successful application of a new method to investigate phase transformations in real time, like the decomposition of austenite into bainite in grey iron, is described. During the ongoing transformation, transmission spectra of thermal neutrons, which contain Bragg edges corresponding to the crystal structure of the transforming phases, are recorded. By evaluating the height of these Bragg edges, which is a measure of the volume fraction of the phase, at different transformation times, the transformation can be followed in-situ in a time resolved manner. The method is compared to other previously used methods (micrographs, dilatometry, diffraction techniques); also a summary and an outlook are given. ((orig.))

  20. Determination of Stress Profiles in Expanded Austenite by Combining Successive Layer Removal and GI-XRD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2014-01-01

    The present work deals with the evaluation of the residual-stress profile in expanded-austenite by successive removal steps using GI-XRD. Preliminary results indicate stresses of several GPa's from 111 and 200 diffraction lines. These stresses appear largest for the 200 reflection. The strain......-free lattice parameter decayed smoothly with depth, while for the compressive stress a maximum value is observed at some depth below the surface. Additionally a good agreement was found between the nitrogen profile determined with GDOES analysis and the strain-free lattice parameter from XRD....

  1. Interpretation of the influences of irradiation upon fatigue crack propagation in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, G.J.

    1982-04-01

    An interpretation of the influences of neutron irradiation upon fatigue crack propagation in austenitic stainless steels is given. The approach has been to extend a previously developed rationalisation of the effects of various test and materials variables upon fatigue crack propagation in unirradiated stainless steels to include irradiated stainless steels. Irradiation has diverse influences upon the rate of fatigue crack propagation depending on the exact irradiation and test conditions. It has been shown that by considering the underlying mechanisms of failure, some confidence is established in trends in data in a subject where information is very scarce and difficult to obtain. (author)

  2. On the Cutting Performance of Coated HSS Taps When Machining of Austenitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwkova, Petra; Piska, Miroslav

    2014-12-01

    The paper deals with a quality of the PVD coated HSS taps when cutting the stainless austenitic chromiumnickel non-stabilized steel DIN 1.4301 (X5CrNi 18-10). The main attention is focused on the analysis of loading (cutting moment, specific energy) of the HSS taps by means of pieso-electrical dynamometer Kistler 9272 and the relation between the quality of duplex and triplex PVD coatings and their effects on the quality of machined thread surfaces and tool life of the taps. The results showed a safe and stabilized cutting with acceptable quality of threads for HSSE with the TiN+TiCN+DLC coating.

  3. Effect of plastic deformation on the magnetic properties of selected austenitic stainless steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Oršulová

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Austenitic stainless steels are materials, that are widely used in various fields of industry, architecture and biomedicine. Their specific composition of alloying elements has got influence on their deformation behavior. The main goal of this study was evaluation of magnetic properties of selected steels, caused by plastic deformation. The samples were heat treated in different intervals of temperature before measuring. Then the magnetic properties were measured on device designed for measuring of magnetism. From tested specimens, only AISI 304 confirmed effect of plastic deformation on the magnetic properties. Magnetic properties changed with increasing temperature.

  4. Pitting corrosion in austenitic stainless steel water tanks of hotel trains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, D. A.; Garcia, A. M.; Ranninger, C.; Molina, B.

    2011-01-01

    The water storage tanks of hotel trains suffered pitting corrosion. To identify the cause, the tanks were subjected to a detailed metallographic study and the chemical composition of the austenitic stainless steels used in their construction was determined. Both the tank water and the corrosion products were further examined by physicochemical and microbiological testing. Corrosion was shown to be related to an incompatibility between the chloride content of the water and the base and filler metals of the tanks. These findings formed the basis of recommendations aimed at the prevention and control of corrosion in such tanks. (Author) 18 refs.

  5. Quantitative description of changes in the structure in austenitic steels after hot temperature deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuc, D.; Rodak, K.; Niewielski, G.; Hetmanczyk, M.

    1998-01-01

    An investigation on the structural changes in austenitic hard deformable Cr-Mn and Cr-Ni steels during dynamic recrystallization has been presented in the paper. The influence of the factors (strain rate, deformation, temperature) on the geometric characteristic of grains has been taken into consideration. Investigation of the structure were performed using metallographic microscope and transmission electron microscope. The results of researched should widen the theoretical background in order to the model of phenomena, which accompany the dynamic recovery and dynamic recrystallization. (author)

  6. Interim fatigue design curves for carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    Both temperature and oxygen affect fatigue life; at the very low dissolved-oxygen levels in PWRs and BWRs with hydrogen water chemistry, environmental effects on fatigue life are modest at all temperatures (T) and strain rates. Between 0.1 and 0.2 ppM, the effect of dissolved-oxygen increases rapidly. In oxygenated environments, fatigue life depends strongly on strain rate and T. A fracture mechanics model is developed for predicting fatigue lives, and interim environmentally assisted cracking (EAC)-adjusted fatigue curves are proposed for carbon steels, low-alloy steels, and austenitic stainless steels

  7. Machining and Phase Transformation Response of Room-Temperature Austenitic NiTi Shape Memory Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaynak, Yusuf

    2014-09-01

    This experimental work reports the results of a study addressing tool wear, surface topography, and x-ray diffraction analysis for the finish cutting process of room-temperature austenitic NiTi alloy. Turning operation of NiTi alloy was conducted under dry, minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) and cryogenic cooling conditions at various cutting speeds. Findings revealed that cryogenic machining substantially reduced tool wear and improved surface topography and quality of the finished parts in comparison with the other two approaches. Phase transformation on the surface of work material was not observed after dry and MQL machining, but B19' martensite phase was found on the surface of cryogenically machined samples.

  8. Determination of Thermal Diffusivity of Austenitic Steel Using Pulsed Infrared Thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kochanowski K.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The simple method of determining thermal diffusivity of solid materials at room temperature using the pulsed infrared thermography (IRT is proposed. The theoretical basis of the method and experimental results are presented. The study was conducted on austenitic steel 316L. Theobtained results show that the thermal diffusivity value of the tested steel determined by means of pulsed infrared thermography is very approximate to the values given in the literature, obtained by using more complicated methods. The differences between these values are 0.5%.

  9. Potential high fluence response of pressure vessel internals constructed from austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Greenwood, L.R.; Harrod, D.L.

    1993-08-01

    Many of the in-core components in pressurized water reactors are constructed of austenitic stainless steels. The potential behavior of these components can be predicted using data on similar steels irradiated at much higher displacement rates in liquid-metal reactors or water-cooled mixed-spectrum reactors. Consideration of the differences between the pressurized water environment and that of the other reactors leads to the conclusion that significant amounts of void swelling, irradiation creep, and embrittlement will occur in some components, and that the level of damage per atomic displacement may be larger in the pressurized water environment

  10. Experimental Determination of the Primary Solidification Phase dependency on the solidification velocity for 17 different austenitic stainless steel compositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Birthe Nørgaard; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Yardy, John

    1997-01-01

    When studying laser welding of austenitic stainless steel, hot cracking is frequently observed. To prevent hot cracking in laser welded stainless steel it is advantageous to obtain primary solidification of the ferrite phase that subsequently, on cooling, transforms in the solid state to the aust......When studying laser welding of austenitic stainless steel, hot cracking is frequently observed. To prevent hot cracking in laser welded stainless steel it is advantageous to obtain primary solidification of the ferrite phase that subsequently, on cooling, transforms in the solid state...

  11. Moessbauer effect and neutron scattering in austenitic high nitrogen steel Fe-19Cr-19Mn-0.9N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadutov, V.M.; Garamus, V.M.; Islamov, A.Kh.

    1999-01-01

    Austenitic high nitrogen Fe-19Cr-19Mn-0.9N steel was studied by means of Moessbauer analysis and neutron diffraction and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) after solution treatment at 1125 C and ageing at 250-350 C. The redistribution of nitrogen atoms in austenite after ageing was detected in Moessbauer measurements. SANS was observed in annealed and aged samples characterizing an existence of the inhomogeneities in steel of atomic and magnetic nature. The linear size and shape of inhomogeneities is estimated on the basis of analysis of the integral parameters of scattering curves. (orig.)

  12. Work hardening mechanism in high nitrogen austenitic steel studied by in situ neutron diffraction and in situ electron backscattering diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojima, M.; Adachi, Y.; Tomota, Y.; Ikeda, K.; Kamiyama, T.; Katada, Y.

    2009-01-01

    With a focus on microstructural hierarchy, work hardening behaviour in high nitrogen-bearing austenitic steel (HNS) was investigated mainly by a combined technique of in situ neutron diffraction and in situ electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD). Stress partitioning due to difference in deformability among grains is enhanced in HNS. The larger stress partitioning among [h k l]-oriented family grains seems to realize high work hardening at a small strain. At a larger strain, dislocation density is higher in HNS than in low nitrogen austenitic steel (LNS), which is a possible reason for high work hardening after straining proceeds, resulting in large uniform elongation.

  13. Anomalous lattice softening of Ni.sub.2./sub.MnGa austenite due to magnetoelastic coupling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heczko, Oleg; Seiner, Hanuš; Sedlák, Petr; Kopeček, Jaromír; Landa, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 7 (2012), "07A929-1"-"07A929-3" ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA101/09/0702; GA ČR GAP107/10/0824; GA ČR(CZ) GAP107/11/0391 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520; CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : Ni-Mn-Ga austenite * anomalous lattice softening * premartensitic transformation * magnetostriction * elastic constants of ferromagnetic austenite Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.210, year: 2012

  14. Modelling the evolution of composition-and stress-depth profiles in austenitic stainless steels during low-temperature nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2016-01-01

    that accompanies the dissolution of high nitrogen contents in expanded austenite. An intriguing phenomenon during low-temperature nitriding is that the residual stresses evoked by dissolution of nitrogen in the solid state, affect the thermodynamics and the diffusion kinetics of nitrogen dissolution....... In the present paper solid mechanics was combined with thermodynamics and diffusion kinetics to simulate the evolution of composition-depth and stress-depth profiles resulting from nitriding. The model takes into account a composition-dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite, short range...

  15. Study of the microstructure and of microhardness variation of a Ni-Fe-Cr austenitic alloy by niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho e Camargo, M.U. de; Lucki, G.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanisms of hardening and corrosion resistance increase in Ni-Fe-Cr austenitic stainless steels by Nb additions are of interest to nuclear technology Niobium additions to a 321 type stainless steel were made in order to study the microhardness, electrical resistivity and metallography. Experimental measurements results are shown. The effect of Nb additions as a micro-alloying element and the thermal and mechanical processes (cold working in particular) in the microstructure and microhardness properties of the 11% Ni - 70%Fe - 17% Cr austenitic alloys were studied. (Author) [pt

  16. Effects of thermal oxidation and subsequent pickling on pitting geometry of austenitic stainless steels in chloride solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alar, Vesna; Esih, Ivan; Budic, Ivan; Brod, Slavonski [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Dept. of Materials

    2011-07-01

    Harmful effects of thermal oxides formed on austenitic stainless steels (SS) like AISI 304 and 316L by heating in air or other oxidizing gases on their pitting liability in chloride solutions have been studied by pursuing geometric characteristics of corrosion process (pits density, their depths, and mouth areas, ie. penetrating and superficial detrimental consequences etc.). The possibility of preventing the decay of thermally oxidized austenitic SS by chemical removal (pickling) of oxides before exposure to chloride solutions was successfully applied on simple specimens but serious difficulties arose on welded parts and on parts exposed to other temperature gradients during manufacture or in exploitation. (orig.)

  17. Method for the calculation of volumetric fraction of retained austenite through the software for analysis of digital images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, S.; Costa, F.H.; Hashimoto, T.M.; Pereira, M.S.; Abdalla, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    In order to calculate the volume fraction of the retained austenite in aeronautic multiphase steels, it was used a digital analysis software for image processing. The materials studied were steels AISI 43XX with carbon content between 30, 40 and 50%, heat treated by conventional quenching and isothermal cooling in bainitic and intercritical region, characterized by optical microscopy, etching by reagent Sodium Metabisulfite (10%) for 30 seconds, with forced drying. The results were compared with the methods of X-Ray Diffraction and Magnetic Saturation through photomicrographs, showing that with this technic it is possible to quantify the percentage of retained austenite in the martensitic matrix, in the different types of steels. (author)

  18. Structure, mechanical, and tribotechnical properties of an austenitic nitrogen steel after frictional treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narkevich, N. A.; Shulepov, I. A.; Mironov, Yu. P.

    2017-04-01

    The features of the structure and the mechanical and tribotechnical properties of an austenitic nitrogen steel (Cr16.5, Mn18.8, C0.07, N0.53, Si0.52 wt %, and Fe for balance) after frictional treatment have been studied. It has been shown that, along with twinning, the nitrogen austenite upon frictional treatment undergoes a γ → stacking fault → ɛ transformation. The strengthening of the steel by the frictional treatment manifests in a delay of the onset of the plastic flow. In the structure of the surface layer with a thickness of 5 μm, a high concentration of stacking faults has been detected. The mechanical properties depend on the orientation of the acting stresses relative to the direction of the frictional treatment. Upon the sliding friction of a ball made of hard alloy (94%WC + 6%Co) on the strengthened surface, an anomalously low coefficient of friction of 0.13 is observed. The coefficient of friction in the presence of abrasive particles in the form of wear debris increases to 0.50; however, the wear rate is almost two times lower compared to the same characteristic for a nonstrengthened surface of the nitrogen steel tested under the same conditions.

  19. Ameliorated Austenite Carbon Content Control in Austempered Ductile Irons by Support Vector Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Yun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Austempered ductile iron has emerged as a notable material in several engineering fields, including marine applications. The initial austenite carbon content after austenization transform but before austempering process for generating bainite matrix proved critical in controlling the resulted microstructure and thus mechanical properties. In this paper, support vector regression is employed in order to establish a relationship between the initial carbon concentration in the austenite with austenization temperature and alloy contents, thereby exercising improved control in the mechanical properties of the austempered ductile irons. Particularly, the paper emphasizes a methodology tailored to deal with a limited amount of available data with intrinsically contracted and skewed distribution. The collected information from a variety of data sources presents another challenge of highly uncertain variance. The authors present a hybrid model consisting of a procedure of a histogram equalizer and a procedure of a support-vector-machine (SVM- based regression to gain a more robust relationship to respond to the challenges. The results show greatly improved accuracy of the proposed model in comparison to two former established methodologies. The sum squared error of the present model is less than one fifth of that of the two previous models.

  20. Upset Resistance Welding of Carbon Steel to Austenitic Stainless Steel Narrow Rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozlati, Ashkaan; Movahedi, Mojtaba; Mohammadkamal, Helia

    2016-11-01

    Effects of welding current (at the range of 2-4 kA) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of upset resistance welds of AISI-1035 carbon steel to AISI-304L austenitic stainless steel rods were investigated. The results showed that the joint strength first increased by raising the welding current up to 3 kA and then decreased beyond it. Increasing trend was related to more plastic deformation, accelerated diffusion, reduction of defects and formation of mechanical locks at the joint interface. For currents more than 3 kA, decrease in the joint strength was mainly caused by formation of hot spots. Using the optimum welding current of 3 kA, tensile strength of the joint reached to 76% of the carbon steel base metal strength. Microstructural observations and microhardness results confirmed that there was no hard phase, i.e., martensite or bainite, at the weld zone. Moreover, a fully austenitic transition layer related to carbon diffusion from carbon steel was observed at the weld interface.

  1. Mass transfer behavior of a modified austenitic stainless steel in lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel that was developed to resist neutron damage was exposed to lithium in the high-temperature part of a thermal convection loop for 6700 h. Specimens of this Prime Candidate Alloy (PCA) composed of 65.0 Fe-15.9 Ni-13.0 Cr-1.9 Mo-1.9 Mn-1.7 Si-0.5 Ti-0.05 C (wt %) were exposed at 600 and 570 0 C in both solution annealed and cold worked forms. The dissolution process was found to be similar to other austenitic alloys in flowing lithium: weight losses of PCA eventually became linearly proportional to exposure time with the specimen surfaces exhibiting porous layers depleted in nickel and chromium. However, the measured weight losses and dissolution rates of these PCA specimens were higher than those of type 316 stainless steel exposed under similar conditions and can be attributed to the higher nickel concentration of the former alloy. The effect of cold work on dissolution rates was less definitive, particularly at 570 0 C. At longer exposure times, the annealed PCA specimen exposed at 600 0 C suffered greater dissolution than the cold worked material, while no effect of prior deformation was observed by analysis of the respective surfaces

  2. CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC RELATIONS OF CEMENTITE–AUSTENITE–FERRITE IN THE DIFFUSIVE DECOMPOSITION OF AUSTENITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOLSHAKOV V. I.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary. It was made a search for new and more accurate orientation relations between the crystal lattice in the pearlite and bainite austenite decomposition products. Methods. It were used the methods: transmission electron microscopy, the micro-, mathematical matrix and stereographic analysis. The purpose of the research is with theoretical, numerical and experimental methods to set up to a 0.2 degree angular orientation relations between the lattices of ferrite and cementite in the austenite decomposition products in the temperature range 400 ... 700С. Results. It was established a new, refined value for grids in the diffusion decay of γ → α + (α + θ. Practical significance. It was proposed a new oriented dependence and the corresponding double gnomonic projection with poles to planes α and θ phases, which can be used in patterns of crystallographic lattices relations studies at phase transitions, as well as the subsequent modeling of complex physical processes of structure formation in metals and binary systems.

  3. Influence of Hold Time on Creep-Fatigue Behavior of an Advanced Austenitic Alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, Mark; Carroll, Laura

    2011-01-01

    An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high temperature-ultrafine precipitate strengthened), is a candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS provides improved creep resistance through a composition based on 316 stainless steel (SS) with additions of Ti and Nb to form nano-scale MC precipitates in the austenitic matrix. The low cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of a HT-UPS alloy has been investigated at 650 C, 1.0% total strain, and an R ratio of -1 with hold times as long as 9000 sec at peak tensile strain. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is compared to that of 316 SS. The cycles to failure are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and the deformed microstructures. Cracking in both alloys is transgranular (initiation and propagation) in the case of continuous cycle fatigue, while the primary cracks also propagate transgranularly during creep-fatigue cycling. Internal grain boundary damage as a result of the tensile hold is present in the form of fine cracks for hold times of 3600 sec and longer and substantially more internal cracks are visible in 316 SS than HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material are different. An equiaxed cellular structure is observed in 316 SS, whereas tangles of dislocations are present at the nanoscale MC precipitates in HT-UPS and no cellular substructure is observed.

  4. Impact Toughness Properties of Nickel- and Manganese-Free High Nitrogen Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh; Akbari, Alireza; Mohammadzadeh, Mina

    2016-12-01

    A large amount of manganese (>10 wt pct) in nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels (Ni-free HNASSs) can induce toxicity. In order to develop Ni-free HNASSs with low or no manganese, it is necessary to investigate their mechanical properties for biomedical applications. This work aims to study the Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact toughness properties of a Ni- and Mn-free Fe-22.7Cr-2.4Mo-1.2N HNASS plate in the temperature range of 103 K to 423 K (-170 °C to 150 °C). The results show that unlike conventional AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel, the Ni- and Mn-free HNASS exhibits a sharp ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT). The intergranular brittle fracture associated with some plasticity and deformation bands is observed on the fracture surface at 298 K (25 °C). Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis of the impact-tested sample in the longitudinal direction indicates that deformation bands are parallel to {111} slip planes. By decreasing the temperature to 273 K, 263 K, and 103 K (0 °C, -10 °C, and -70 °C), entirely intergranular brittle fracture occurs on the fracture surface. The fracture mode changes from brittle fracture to ductile as the temperature increases to 423 K (150 °C). The decrease in impact toughness is discussed on the basis of temperature sensitivity of plastic flow and planarity of deformation mechanism.

  5. Development of advanced austenitic stainless steels resistant to void swelling under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouxel, Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of studies about Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR) of generation IV, the CEA is developing new austenitic steel grades for the fuel cladding. These steels demonstrate very good mechanical properties but their use is limited because of the void swelling under irradiation. Beyond a high irradiation dose, cavities appear in the alloys and weaken the material. The reference material in France is a 15Cr/15Ni steel, named AIM1, stabilized with titanium. This study try to understand the role played by various chemical elements and microstructural parameters on the formation of the cavities under irradiation, and contribute to the development of a new grade AIM2 more resistant to swelling. In an analytical approach, model materials were elaborated with various chemical compositions and microstructures. Ten grades were cast with chemical variations in Ti, Nb, Ni and P. Four specific microstructures for each alloy highlighted the effect of dislocations, solutes or nano-precipitates on the void swelling. These materials were characterized using TEM and SANS, before irradiation with Fe 2+ (2 MeV) ions in the order to simulate the damages caused by neutrons. Comparing the irradiated microstructures, it is demonstrated that the solutes have a dominating effect on the formation of cavities. Specifically titanium in solid solution reduces the swelling whereas niobium does not show this effect. Finally, a matrix enriched by 15% to 25% of nickel is still favorable to limit swelling in these advanced austenitic stainless steels. (author) [fr

  6. Effect of Chemical Composition on Susceptibility to Weld Solidification Cracking in Austenitic Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoi, Kota; Shinozaki, Kenji

    2017-12-01

    The influence of the chemical composition, especially the niobium content, chromium equivalent Creq, and nickel equivalent Nieq, on the weld solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region in the Schaeffler diagram was investigated. Specimens were fabricated using the hot-wire laser welding process with widely different compositions of Creq, Nieq, and niobium in the region. The distributions of the susceptibility, such as the crack length and brittle temperature range (BTR), in the Schaeffler diagram revealed a region with high susceptibility to solidification cracking. Addition of niobium enhanced the susceptibility and changed the distribution of the susceptibility in the diagram. The BTR distribution was in good agreement with the distribution of the temperature range of solidification (Δ T) calculated by solidification simulation based on Scheil model. Δ T increased with increasing content of alloying elements such as niobium. The distribution of Δ T was dependent on the type of alloying element owing to the change of the partitioning behavior. Thus, the solidification cracking susceptibility in the austenite single-phase region depends on whether the alloy contains elements. The distribution of the susceptibility in the region is controlled by the change in Δ T and the segregation behavior of niobium with the chemical composition.

  7. Corrosion Behavior of the Stressed Sensitized Austenitic Stainless Steels of High Nitrogen Content in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Almubarak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of high nitrogen content on corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steels in seawater under severe conditions such as tensile stresses and existence of sensitization in the structure. A constant tensile stress has been applied to sensitized specimens types 304, 316L, 304LN, 304NH, and 316NH stainless steels. Microstructure investigation revealed various degrees of stress corrosion cracking. SCC was severe in type 304, moderate in types 316L and 304LN, and very slight in types 304NH and 316NH. The electrochemical polarization curves showed an obvious second current peak for the sensitized alloys which indicated the existence of second phase in the structure and the presence of intergranular stress corrosion cracking. EPR test provided a rapid and efficient nondestructive testing method for showing passivity, degree of sensitization and determining IGSCC for stainless steels in seawater. A significant conclusion was obtained that austenitic stainless steels of high nitrogen content corrode at a much slower rate increase pitting resistance and offer an excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking in seawater.

  8. High corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel alloyed with nitrogen in an acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metikos-Hukovic, M., E-mail: mmetik@fkit.h [Department of Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb, Savska 16, P.O. Box 177, 100000 Zagreb (Croatia); Babic, R. [Department of Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb, Savska 16, P.O. Box 177, 100000 Zagreb (Croatia); Grubac, Z. [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry and Technology, University of Split, 21000 Split (Croatia); Petrovic, Z. [Department of Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb, Savska 16, P.O. Box 177, 100000 Zagreb (Croatia); Lajci, N. [Faculty of Mine and Metallurgy, University of Prishtina, 10000 Prishtina, Kosovo (Country Unknown)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} ASS alloyed with nitrogen treated at 1150 {sup o}C exhibits microstructure homogeneity. {yields} Passivation peak of ASS corresponds to oxidation of metal and absorbed hydrogen. {yields} Transfer phenomena and conductivity depend on the film formation potential. {yields} Electronic structure of the passive film and its corrosion resistance correlate well. {yields} Passive film on ASS with nitrogen is low disordered and high corrosion resistant. - Abstract: Passivity of austenitic stainless steel containing nitrogen (ASS N25) was investigated in comparison with AISI 316L in deareated acid solution, pH 0.4. A peculiar nature of the passivation peak in a potentiodynamic curve and the kinetic parameters of formation and growth of the oxide film have been discussed. The electronic-semiconducting properties of the passive films have been correlated with their corrosion resistance. Alloying austenitic stainless steel with nitrogen increases its microstructure homogeneity and decreases the concentration of charge carriers, which beneficially affects the protecting and electronic properties of the passive oxide film.

  9. Mechanical properties microstructure correlation in neutron irradiated heat-affected zones of austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoenescu, R.; Schaeublin, R.; Gavillet, D.; Baluc, N.

    2007-05-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on austenitic stainless steels, usually used for the manufacturing of internal elements of nuclear reactors (e.g. the core shrouds), are the alteration of the microstructure, and, as a consequence, of the mechanical properties. The present study is aimed at extending knowledge upon the impact of neutron-irradiation on the heat-affected zone of welded materials, which was influenced by the thermal cycles upon fusion welding. An austenitic stainless steel weld type AISI 304 from a decommissioned experimental pressurised water reactor has been used in the present study. The welded material has been irradiated during 11 reactor cycles to a maximum dpa dose of 0.35 and a temperature of around 573 K. The mechanical properties and microstructure are determined on specimens from heat-affected zone and base materials, with different dose levels. The mechanical properties were determined by performing tensile tests on small flat specimens at two deformation temperatures: room temperature and about 573 K. The characterisation of the microstructure was made by transmission electron microscopy. The correlation between mechanical properties and microstructure after neutron irradiation is made using the dispersed obstacle hardening model. It was found that the measured radiation hardening cannot be explained solely by the presence of the irradiation-induced defects observed in TEM. Smaller irradiation-induced features not resolvable in TEM may also contribute to radiation hardening.

  10. Microstructure, Texture, and Mechanical Property Analysis of Gas Metal Arc Welded AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Saptarshi; Mukherjee, Manidipto; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-03-01

    The present study elaborately explains the effect of welding parameters on the microstructure, texture, and mechanical properties of gas metal arc welded AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel sheet (as received) of 4 mm thickness. The welded joints were prepared by varying welding speed (WS) and current simultaneously at a fixed heat input level using a 1.2-mm-diameter austenitic filler metal (AISI 316L). The overall purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the variation of welding conditions on: (i) Microstructural constituents using optical microscope and transmission electron microscope; (ii) Micro-texture evolution, misorientation distributions, and grain boundaries at welded regions by measuring the orientation data from electron back scattered diffraction; and (iii) Mechanical properties such as hardness and tensile strength, and their correlation with the microstructure and texture. It has been observed that the higher WS along with the higher welding current (weld metal W1) can enhance weld metal mechanical properties through alternation in microstructure and texture of the weld metal. Higher δ-ferrite formation and high-angle boundaries along with the + grain growth direction of the weld metal W1 were responsible for dislocation pile-ups, SFs, deformation twinning, and the induced martensite with consequent strain hardening during tensile deformation. Also, fusion boundary being the weakest link in the welded structure, failure took place mainly at this region.

  11. The microstructural, mechanical, and fracture properties of austenitic stainless steel alloyed with gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolman, D. G.; Bingert, J. F.; Field, R. D.

    2004-11-01

    The mechanical and fracture properties of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) alloyed with gallium require assessment in order to determine the likelihood of premature storage-container failure following Ga uptake. AISI 304 L SS was cast with 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 wt pct Ga. Increased Ga concentration promoted duplex microstructure formation with the ferritic phase having a nearly identical composition to the austenitic phase. Room-temperature tests indicated that small additions of Ga (less than 3 wt pct) were beneficial to the mechanical behavior of 304 L SS but that 12 wt pct Ga resulted in a 95 pct loss in ductility. Small additions of Ga are beneficial to the cracking resistance of stainless steel. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis indicated that 3 wt pct Ga alloys showed the greatest resistance to crack initiation and propagation as measured by fatigue crack growth rate, fracture toughness, and tearing modulus. The 12 wt pct Ga alloys were least resistant to crack initiation and propagation and these alloys primarily failed by transgranular cleavage. It is hypothesized that Ga metal embrittlement is partially responsible for increased embrittlement.

  12. Austenite grain growth and microstructure control in simulated heat affected zones of microalloyed HSLA steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei [Department of Machine Tools and Factory Management, Technical University of Berlin, Pascalstraße 8 – 9, 10587, Berlin (Germany); Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205, Berlin (Germany); Kannengiesser, Thomas [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205, Berlin (Germany); Institute of Materials and Joining Technology, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Universitetsplatz 2, 39106, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2014-09-08

    The roles of microalloying niobium, titanium and vanadium for controlling austenite grain growth, microstructure evolution and hardness were investigated at different simulated heat affected zones (HAZ) for high strength low alloy (HSLA) S690QL steel. High resolution FEG-SEM has been used to characterize fine bainitic ferrite, martensite and nanosized second phases at simulated coarse and fine grain HAZs. It was found that for Ti bearing steel (Ti/N ratio is 2) austenite grain had the slowest growth rate due to the presence of most stable TiN. The fine cuboidal particles promoted intragranular acicular ferrite (IGF) formation. Nb bearing steel exhibited relatively weaker grain growth retardation compared with titanium bearing steels and a mixed microstructure of bainite and martensite was present for all simulated HAZs. IGF existed at coarse grain HAZ of Ti+V bearing steel but it was totally replaced by bainite at fine grain HAZs. Hardness result was closely related to the morphology of bainitic ferrite, intragranular ferrite and second phases within ferrite. The microstructure and hardness results of different simulated HAZs were in good agreement with welded experimental results.

  13. Crystal structure and lattice dynamics of Fe-Cr-Mn-Ni-N austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beskrovni, A.; Jadrowski, E.; Danilkin, S.; Fuess, H.; Wieder, T.; Neova-Baeva, M.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. High nitrogen austenitic steels are of high strength, corrosion resistance and offer structural stability. The properties of these steels depend on the interstitial (N) and substitution (Cr, Ni, Mn) atom content. The present study investigates the effect of the Mn and Cr content on crystal structure and interatomic bonding. Nitrogen austenitic steels with composition Fe-19Cr-xMn-0.5N (x = 9/23 wt.%) and Fe-xCr-11Ni-0.5N (x=15/29 wt.%) were studied with X-Ray and neutron scattering methods. It was found that Mn and Cr expand FCC lattice in the both steels. However modification of the metal atom frequency spectrum, g(ε), is different. Mn additions cause the decrease of metal atom frequencies. The softening of the Me-Me interaction is an agreement with the theoretical model predictions based on volume changes. Modification of g(ε) caused by Cr atoms is more complicated. It was concluded that alloying with Cr alters the electronic states. The decrease of the width of the nitrogen localised vibrations with increasing Cr content was noted and is probably connected with stress-induced ordering. (author)

  14. Effect of prior cold work on creep properties of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayanand, V.D.; Parameswaran, P.; Nandagopal, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Laha, K.; Mathew, M.D.

    2013-01-01

    Prior cold worked (PCW) titanium-modified 14Cr–15Ni austenitic stainless steel (SS) is used as a core-structural material in fast breeder reactor because of its superior creep strength and resistance to void swelling. In this study, the influence of PCW in the range of 16–24% on creep properties of IFAC-1 SS, a titanium modified 14Cr–15Ni austenitic SS, at 923 K and 973 K has been investigated. It was found that PCW has no appreciable effect on the creep deformation rate of the steel at both the test temperatures; creep rupture life increased with PCW at 923 K and remained rather unaffected at 973 K. The dislocation structure along with precipitation in the PCW steel was found to change appreciably depending on creep testing conditions. A well-defined dislocation substructure was observed on creep testing at 923 K; a well-annealed microstructure with evidences of recrystallization was observed on creep testing at 973 K

  15. Flow Softening Index for Assessment of Dynamic Recrystallization in an Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aashranth, B.; Samantaray, Dipti; Kumar, Santosh; Dasgupta, Arup; Borah, Utpal; Albert, Shaju K.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2017-07-01

    The present study proposes a novel technique to assess dynamic recrystallization (DRX) and related microstructural phenomena during hot deformation of austenite. A `Flow Softening Index (FSI)' has been identified on the basis of investigations on elevated temperature deformation behaviour of austenitic stainless steel. This index corresponds to dominant microstructural phenomena at different deformation conditions. For this investigation, experimental results obtained from isothermal, constant true strain rate compression tests in a temperature range of 1173 (900)-1473 K (1200 °C) and strain rate range of 0.01-100 s-1 have been used. Resultant microstructures have been quantified using average grain size and grain size distributions. The dominant microstructural phenomena have been identified at different conditions using electron backscatter diffraction. Low FSI values are associated with the grain growth, intermediate values with DRX, and high values with the work-hardening and flow localisation phenomena. FSI also quantitatively indexes the average grain size and grain size distributions at different temperature-strain rate combinations. Analysis of the specific deformation conditions, particularly where 3.4 < FSI < 3.5, indicates a common thermo-mechanical origin of flow localisation and DRX. The potential technological implications thereof are discussed and a semi-empirical model of microstructural evolution is developed for the studied material.

  16. Effects of metallurgical variables on swelling of modified 316 and higher Ni austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibahara, Itaru; Akasaka, Naoaki; Onose, Shoji

    1996-01-01

    The effects of solute elements and cold-work on swelling in modified 316 and higher Ni advanced austenitic stainless steels developed for FBR core material were investigated together with the posted model alloys. The Si, P, B, Ti, Nb modified and cold-worked steels exhibited an improved swelling resistance. In the temperature range between 400 and 500 C, the swelling was suppressed significantly by an addition of 0.8 wt% Si. The beneficial effect of Si appears to be reduced in the steels without Ti and Nb tending to form γ' precipitates. In the temperature range between 500 and 600 C, a needle-like phosphide precipitates played an important role in suppressing void growth. Additions of Ti and/or Nb were found to stabilize the phosphide phase and extended the swelling incubation period. In the improved austenitic steels, the synergistic effect of cold-working and P, B, Ti, Nb additions act beneficially to stabilize the dislocation structure and to form finely dispersed precipitates during irradiation

  17. Overview of microstructural evolution in neutron-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are important structural materials common to several different reactor systems, including light water and fast breeder fission, and magnetic fusion reactors (LWR, FBR, and MFR, respectively). The microstructures that develop in 300 series austenitic stainless steels during neutron irradiation at 60-700 C include combinations of dislocation loops and networks, bubbles and voids, and various kinds of precipitate phases (radiation-induced, or -enhanced or -modified thermal phases). Many property changes in these steels during neutron irradiation are directly or indirectly related to radiation-induced microstructural evolution. Even more important is the fact that radiation-resistance of such steels during either FBR or MFR irradiation is directly related to control of the evolving microstructure during such irradiation. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the large and complex body of data accumulated from various fission reactor irradiation experiments conducted over the many years of research on microstructural evolution in this family of steels. The data can be organized into several different temperature regimes which then define the nature of the dominant microstructural components and their sensitivities to irradiation parameters (dose, helium/dpa ratio, dose rate) or metallurgical variables (alloy composition, pretreatment). The emphasis in this paper will be on the underlying mechanisms driving the microstructure to evolve during irradiation or those enabling microstructural stability related to radiation resistance. (orig.)

  18. On the capability of austenitic steel to withstand cyclic deformations during service at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etienne, C.F.; Dortland, W.; Zeedijk, H.B.

    1975-01-01

    Safe design for structures with steels for elevated temperatures necessitates screening these materials on the basis of objective criteria for ductility, besides screening them on elevated temperature strength. Because creep and fatigue damage may occur during operation, the ductility of a steel after a long operation time is more important than the ductility in the as delivered condition. This paper describes results of an investigation into the ductility of some austenitic Cr-Ni-steels. In order to determine the capability of the steels to withstand cyclic plastic deformation in the aged condition, various ageing treatments were applied before determining the ductility in low-cycle fatigue testing. Correlating the ductility with the sizes of the carbide precipitates made it possible to predict the ductility behaviour during long service times. This led to the conclusion that for an austenitic steel with a high thermal stability (17.5 per cent Cr-11 per cent Ni) the ductility can decrease considerably during service at elevated temperature. Nevertheless it is expected that the remaining ductility of such steels in aged condition will be amply sufficient to withstand the cyclic deformations that occur during normal service. (author)

  19. Capability of austenitic steel to withstand cyclic deformations during service at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etienne, C.F.; Dortland, W.; Zeedijk, H.B.

    1975-01-01

    Safe design for structures with steels for elevated temperatures necessitates screening these materials on the basis of objective criteria for ductility, besides screening them on elevated temperature strength. Because creep and fatigue damage may occur during operation, the ductility of a steel after a long operation time is more important than the ductility in the as delivered condition. Results of an investigation into the ductility of austenitic Cr--Ni-steels are described. In order to determine the capability of the steels to withstand cyclic plastic deformations in the aged condition, various aging treatments were applied before determining the ductility in low-cycle fatigue testing. Correlating the ductility with the sizes of the carbide precipitates made it possible to predict the ductility behavior during long service times. This led to the conclusion that for an austenitic steel with a high thermal stability (17.5 percent Cr--11 percent Ni) the ductility can decrease considerably during service at elevated temperature. Nevertheless it is expected that the remaining ductility of such steels in aged condition will be amply sufficient to withstand the cyclic deformations that occur during normal service

  20. Equi-biaxial loading effect on austenitic stainless steel fatigue life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gourdin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue lifetime assessment is essential in the design of structures. Under-estimated predictions may result in unnecessary in service inspections. Conversely, over-estimated predictions may have serious consequences on the integrity of structures. In some nuclear power plant components, the fatigue loading may be equibiaxial because of thermal fatigue. So the potential impact of multiaxial loading on the fatigue life of components is a major concern. Meanwhile, few experimental data are available on austenitic stainless steels. It is essential to improve the fatigue assessment methodologies to take into account the potential equi-biaxial fatigue damage. Hence this requires obtaining experimental data on the considered material with a strain tensor in equibiaxial tension. Two calibration tests (with strain gauges and image correlation were used to obtain the relationship between the imposed deflection and the radial strain on the FABIME2 specimen. A numerical study has confirmed this relationship. Biaxial fatigue tests are carried out on two austenitic stainless steels for different values of the maximum deflection, and with a load ratio equal to -1. The interpretation of the experimental results requires the use of an appropriate definition of strain equivalent. In nuclear industry, two kinds of definition are used: von Mises and TRESCA strain equivalent. These results have permitted to estimate the impact of the equibiaxiality on the fatigue life of components

  1. Calculation of ultrasonic reflection and transmission in anisotropic austenitic layered structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Michael; Mirwald-Schulz, Birgit; Neumann, Eberhard

    2000-01-01

    The theory of plane wave propagation in layered structures has been applied in the formulation of Nayfeh in order to calculate scattering coefficients due to reflection and transmission at the grain boundaries in austenitic weld metal and cast material. Each layer is assumed to be a cubic homogeneous mono-crystal. Lower symmetries of the layer down to the triclinic case may also be assumed, e.g., transverse isotropy of the columnar grained texture in austenitic weld metal. The layers are rigidly bonded and the multi-layer package embedded in water or between solid substrates. Scattering coefficients are calculated by a transfer matrix approach. Ultrasonic properties of the single layers are algebraically linked together resulting in a simple operator for calculation of reflection and transmission coefficients at the multi-layer package boundaries. Critical angle phenomena may cause failure of solution and are limiting the range of application of the transfer matrix approach, as they cause the matrix numerical condition to decrease down to singularity. This is handled by using complex algebra. The transfer matrix method has been applied to multi-layer packages immersed in water. In case of solid substrates of the multi-layer package transmission is occurring at a larger range of incidence angles

  2. Comparison of material property specifications of austenitic steels in fast breeder reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderborck, Y.; Van Mulders, E.

    1985-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are very widely used in components for European Fast Breeder Reactors. The Activity Group Nr.3 ''Materials'', within Working Group ''Codes and Standards'' of the Fast Reactor Co-Ordination Committee of the European Communities, has decided to initiate a study to compare the material property specifications of the austenitic stainless steel used in the European Fast Breeder Technology. Hence, this study would allow one to view rapidly the designation of a particular steel grade in different European countries and to compare given property values for a same grade. There were dissimilarities, differences or voids appear, it could lead to an attempt to complete and/or to uniformize the nationally given values, so that on a practical level interchangeability, availability and use ease design and construction work. A selection of the materials and of their properties has been made by the Working Group. Materials examined are Stainless Steel AISI 304, 304 L, 304 LN, 316, 316 L, 316 LN, 316''Ti stab.'', 316''Nb stab''., 321, 347

  3. Mechanical and microstructural aspects of severe plastic deformation of austenitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, K.; Pawlicki, J.; Tkocz, M.

    2012-05-01

    The paper presents the effects of severe plastic deformation by multiple compression in the orthogonal directions on the microstructure and the mechanical properties of austenitic steel. Several deformation variants were conducted with different number of passes. FEM simulations were performed in order to evaluate the actual values of the effective strain in the examined, central parts of the compressed samples. The deformed microstructure was investigated by means of the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) supported by the electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD). X-ray phase analysis was performed to evaluate the martensite volume fraction. The mechanical properties were determined by means of the digital image correlation method and hardness testing. It is shown that the applied forming technique leads to strong grain refinement in the austenitic steel. Moreover, deformation induces the martensitic γ- α' transformation. The microstructural changes cause an improvement in the strength properties. The material exhibits the ultimate tensile strength of 1560 MPa and the yield stress of 1500 MPa after reaching the effective strain of 10.

  4. Mechanical and microstructural aspects of severe plastic deformation of austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodak, K; Pawlicki, J; Tkocz, M

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the effects of severe plastic deformation by multiple compression in the orthogonal directions on the microstructure and the mechanical properties of austenitic steel. Several deformation variants were conducted with different number of passes. FEM simulations were performed in order to evaluate the actual values of the effective strain in the examined, central parts of the compressed samples. The deformed microstructure was investigated by means of the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) supported by the electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD). X-ray phase analysis was performed to evaluate the martensite volume fraction. The mechanical properties were determined by means of the digital image correlation method and hardness testing. It is shown that the applied forming technique leads to strong grain refinement in the austenitic steel. Moreover, deformation induces the martensitic γ– α' transformation. The microstructural changes cause an improvement in the strength properties. The material exhibits the ultimate tensile strength of 1560 MPa and the yield stress of 1500 MPa after reaching the effective strain of 10.

  5. Moessbauer spectroscopy of He irradiated austenitic stainless steel SUS304 at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horii, Kiyomasa; Ishibashi, Tetsu; Toriyama, Tamotsu; Wakabayashi, Hidehiko; Iijima, Hiroshi [Musashi Inst. of Tech., Tokyo (Japan); Kawasaki, Katsunori; Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Sakamoto, Isao

    1996-04-01

    SUS 304 austenitic stainless steel causes the magnetic transition at 60 K, and the Young`s modulus lowers. In addition, its composition elements have the large (n,{alpha}) reaction cross section to high energy neutrons, and helium is apt to be generated, and this is a factor that lowers the material strength. In the He-irradiated parts in austenitic stainless steel, the precursory state of martensite transformation should exist, and its effect is considered to be observable by carrying out low temperature Moessbauer spectroscopy. As to the preparation of He-irradiation samples, the SUS 304 foils used and the irradiation conditions are described. The measurement of low temperature Moessbauer spectra for the samples without irradiation and with irradiation is reported. In order to determine the magnetic transition point, the thermal scanning measurement was carried out for the samples without or with irradiation. The martensite transformation was measured by X-ray diffraction and transmission type Moessbauer spectroscopy. In order to observe the state of the sample surfaces, the measurement by internal conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy was performed. These results and the temperature dependence of the Moessbauer spectra for the irradiated parts are reported. (K.I.)

  6. Development of Creep-Resistant and Oxidation-Resistant Austenitic Stainless Steels for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziasz, Philip J.

    2018-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are cost-effective materials for high-temperature applications if they have the oxidation and creep resistance to withstand prolonged exposure at such conditions. Since 1990, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed advanced austenitic stainless steels with creep resistance comparable to Ni-based superalloy 617 at 800-900°C based on specially designed "engineered microstructures" utilizing a microstructure/composition database derived from about 20 years of radiation effect data on steels. The wrought high temperature-ultrafine precipitate strengthened (HT-UPS) steels with outstanding creep resistance at 700-800°C were developed for supercritical boiler and superheater tubing for fossil power plants in the early 1990s, the cast CF8C-Plus steels were developed in 1999-2001 for land-based gas turbine casing and diesel engine exhaust manifold and turbocharger applications at 700-900°C, and, in 2015-2017, new Al-modified cast stainless steels with oxidation and creep resistance capabilities up to 950-1000°C were developed for automotive exhaust manifold and turbocharger applications. This article reviews and summarizes their development and their properties and applications.

  7. Microstructural Evolution of a Low-Carbon Steel during Application of Quenching and Partitioning Heat Treatments after Partial Austenitization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santofimia, M.J.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.

    2008-01-01

    The “quenching and partitioning” (Q&P) process has been studied in a low-carbon steel containing 1.1 wt pct aluminum by heat treatments consisting of partial austenitization at 900 °C and subsequent rapid cooling to a quenching temperature in the range between 125 °C and 175 °C, followed by an

  8. Hydrogen-Induced Delayed Cracking in TRIP-Aided Lean-Alloyed Ferritic-Austenitic Stainless Steels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papula, Suvi; Sarikka, Teemu; Anttila, Severi; Talonen, Juho; Virkkunen, Iikka; Hänninen, Hannu

    2017-06-03

    Susceptibility of three lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels to hydrogen-induced delayed cracking was examined, concentrating on internal hydrogen contained in the materials after production operations. The aim was to study the role of strain-induced austenite to martensite transformation in the delayed cracking susceptibility. According to the conducted deep drawing tests and constant load tensile testing, the studied materials seem not to be particularly susceptible to delayed cracking. Delayed cracks were only occasionally initiated in two of the materials at high local stress levels. However, if a delayed crack initiated in a highly stressed location, strain-induced martensite transformation decreased the crack arrest tendency of the austenite phase in a duplex microstructure. According to electron microscopy examination and electron backscattering diffraction analysis, the fracture mode was predominantly cleavage, and cracks propagated along the body-centered cubic (BCC) phases ferrite and α'-martensite. The BCC crystal structure enables fast diffusion of hydrogen to the crack tip area. No delayed cracking was observed in the stainless steel that had high austenite stability. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence of α'-martensite increases the hydrogen-induced cracking susceptibility.

  9. Hydrogen-Induced Delayed Cracking in TRIP-Aided Lean-Alloyed Ferritic-Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi Papula

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility of three lean-alloyed ferritic-austenitic stainless steels to hydrogen-induced delayed cracking was examined, concentrating on internal hydrogen contained in the materials after production operations. The aim was to study the role of strain-induced austenite to martensite transformation in the delayed cracking susceptibility. According to the conducted deep drawing tests and constant load tensile testing, the studied materials seem not to be particularly susceptible to delayed cracking. Delayed cracks were only occasionally initiated in two of the materials at high local stress levels. However, if a delayed crack initiated in a highly stressed location, strain-induced martensite transformation decreased the crack arrest tendency of the austenite phase in a duplex microstructure. According to electron microscopy examination and electron backscattering diffraction analysis, the fracture mode was predominantly cleavage, and cracks propagated along the body-centered cubic (BCC phases ferrite and α’-martensite. The BCC crystal structure enables fast diffusion of hydrogen to the crack tip area. No delayed cracking was observed in the stainless steel that had high austenite stability. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence of α’-martensite increases the hydrogen-induced cracking susceptibility.

  10. Surface analysis of localized corrosion of austenitic 316L and duplex 2205 stainless steels in simulated body solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conradi, Marjetka; Schön, Peter Manfred; Kocijan, Aleksandra; Jenko, M.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on cyclic voltammetry and in situ electrochemical atomic force microscopy (EC-AFM) studies of localized corrosion of duplex 2205 stainless steel (DSS 2205) and austenitic stainless steel of the type AISI 316L in two model solutions, including artificial saliva (AS) and a simulated

  11. Gas bubbles evolution peculiarities in ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels and alloys under helium-ion irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chernov, [No Value; Kalashnikov, AN; Kahn, BA; Binyukova, SY

    2003-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to investigate the gas bubble evolution in model alloys of the Fe C system, ferritic-martensitic steels of 13Cr type, nickel and austenitic steels under 40-keV helium-ion it. radiation up to a fluence of 5 x 10(20) m(-2) at the temperature of 920 K. It

  12. Sub-zero austenite to martensite transformation in a Fe-Ni-0.6wt.%C alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Pantleon, Karen; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Martensitic transformation in a model Fe-Ni-0.6wt%C alloy was investigated at sub-zero Celsius temperature. The influence of the thermal path in determining the conditions leading to the formation of martensite was studied. In the investigation, samples were austenitized and quenched, whereafter...

  13. Measured resolved shear stresses and Bishop-Hill stress states in individual grains of austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Nicolai Ytterdal; Oddershede, Jette; Beaudoin, Armand

    2017-01-01

    The full three-dimensional stress state of 172 individual bulk grains in austenitic stainless steel 316L at 0.1 and 1% sample elongation has been determined with sufficient accuracy to allow comparison with the theoretical Bishop-Hill stress states for plastically deforming grains as well...

  14. Changes in the mechanical properties and microstructure of anisotropic austenitic stainless sheet steel after uniaxial tensile test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yankov Emil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to study the changes in the characteristics of an austenitic sheet material X5CrNi18-10 (1.4301, AISI 304 after a plastic deformation. Samples are cut out from the sheet material at three different directions - 0°, 45° and 90° angle to the rolling direction. The changes in the mechanical properties and microstructure of the anisotropic austenitic steel are investigated by mechanical tests (uniaxial tension tests and hardness measurements and structural analyses (optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction. It is established that the strain induced phase transformation of the metastable austenite to martensite during the tension tests changes the magnetic properties of the steel. It is found out that the sheet anisotropy effect on the uniform deformation, the thickness reduction and structure of the austenite sheet material is more essential for the plastic deformation behaviour than the strain-induced γ → α′ phase transformation.

  15. Constitutive modeling of hot horming of austenitic stainless steel 316LN by accounting for recrystallization in the dislocation evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooiker, Harmen; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.

    2016-01-01

    Hot compression test data taken from Zhang [1] of metastable austenitic stainless steel AISI 316LN over a range of strain rates and temperatures shows typical dynamic recovery and recrystallization behavior. It is proposed to model this behavior by incorporating not only the hardening and recovery

  16. In-Situ Measurements of Load Partitioning in a Metastable Austenitic Stainless Steel: Neutron and Magnetomechanical Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maréchal, David; Sinclair, Chad W.; Dufour, Philippe; Jacques, Pascal J.; Mithieux, Jean-Denis

    2012-12-01

    In order to construct physically based models of the mechanical response of metastable austenitic steels, one must know the load partitioning between the austenite and the strain-induced martensitic phases. While diffraction-based techniques have become common for such measurements, they often require access to large facilities. In this work, we have explored a simple magnetic technique capable of providing a measure of the stresses in an embedded ferromagnetic phase. This technique makes use of the coupling between the elastic strain and the magnetic response of the α^'-martensite in an austenitic stainless steel undergoing straining. The magnetic technique proposed here is compared to neutron diffraction measurements made on the same material and is shown to give nearly identical results. The resulting predictions of the load partitioning to the α^'-martensite phase suggest that α^' deforms in a complex fashion, reflecting the fact that the microstructure is progressively transformed from austenite to martensite with straining. In particular, it is shown that the apparent hardening of the α^'-martensite suggests elastic deformation as an important source of high macroscopic work-hardening rate in this material.

  17. Austenite-to-ferrite transformation in low alloy steels during thermornechanically controlled process studied by in situ neutron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Xu, PG.; Tomota, Y.; Lukáš, Petr; Muránsky, Ondrej; Adachi, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 435, č. 5 (2006), s. 46-53 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1048107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : austenite-to-ferrite tranformation * neutron diffraction * thermomechanically controlled prosess Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.490, year: 2006

  18. On the determination of stress profiles in expanded austenite by grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and successive layer removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas L.; Winther, Grethe

    2015-01-01

    Surface layers of expanded austenite resulting from nitriding typically exhibit large gradients in residual stress and composition. Evaluation of residual-stress profiles is explored by means of grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD), probing shallow depths, combined with successive layer...

  19. Modeling of Work Hardening During Hot Rolling of Vanadium and Niobium Microalloyed Steels in the Low Temperature Austenite Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalimba, Stephen Akonda; Mostert, Roelf; Stumpf, Waldo; Siyasiya, Charles; Banks, Kevin

    2017-11-01

    This work extends the application of the well-established Estrin and Mecking (EM) work-hardening model in unstable low temperature austenite region. The interaction between work hardening, recovery and softening attributed to recrystallization and transformation to ferrite under dynamic conditions is considered. Experimental parameters were varied to study the effects of strain, strain rate and temperature during hot rolling in the low temperature austenite region. Hot compression tests were performed two microalloyed steels—one containing V and the other Nb—at strain rates between 0.1 and 10 s-1 over a temperature range of 750-1000 °C. A model is presented that describes the influence of dynamic recovery on flow behavior in the unstable austenite region. The modified work-hardening model incorporates an additional fitting parameter to the EM model and is dependent on the recovery and softening rates. The new model improved prediction in the unstable austenite region, while the original EM model gave better correlation at relatively higher temperatures when dynamic recrystallization is dominant or at relatively lower temperatures when only dynamic recrystallization to ferrite was the softening mechanism.

  20. Residual Stress Formation Relating to Peak Temperature- and Austenite Grain Size-based Phase Transformation of S355 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaproth, Fabian; Vollertsen, Frank

    Nowadays thermal forming processes of steel are state of the art in industrial applications. Nevertheless, the influences of thermal induced phase-transformation on residual stresses and strength have not been fully observed. Times needed for transformation are affected by the initial austenite grain size, while the prevailing peak temperature influences austenite grain growth. Higher temperatures lead to larger austenite grains, leading to increased times for transformation. In order to get an embraced understanding of such effects numerical simulations of phase-transformations are mandatory. In this paper simulations of thermal forming processes, using S355 steel, are presented. Different continuous-cooling-transformation-diagrams (cct-diagrams) of specific austenite grain sizes for temperatures between transformation point AC3 and melting temperature are implemented in the model. It is shown that resulting magnitudes of residual stresses vary between 248 N/mm2 and 550 N/mm2. Finally an approach for the impact on relevant peak temperatures in the heat affected zone is outlined.

  1. Synergistic Computational and Microstructural Design of Next- Generation High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaman, Ibrahim [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States); Arroyave, Raymundo [Texas A& M Engineering Experiment Station, College Station, TX (United States)

    2015-07-31

    The purpose of this project was to: 1) study deformation twinning, its evolution, thermal stability, and the contribution on mechanical response of the new advanced stainless steels, especially at elevated temperatures; 2) study alumina-scale formation on the surface, as an alternative for conventional chromium oxide, that shows better oxidation resistance, through alloy design; and 3) design new generation of high temperature stainless steels that form alumina scale and have thermally stable nano-twins. The work involved few baseline alloys for investigating the twin formation under tensile loading, thermal stability of these twins, and the role of deformation twins on the mechanical response of the alloys. These baseline alloys included Hadfield Steel (Fe-13Mn-1C), 316, 316L and 316N stainless steels. Another baseline alloy was studied for alumina-scale formation investigations. Hadfield steel showed twinning but undesired second phases formed at higher temperatures. 316N stainless steel did not show signs of deformation twinning. Conventional 316 stainless steel demonstrated extensive deformation twinning at room temperature. Investigations on this alloy, both in single crystalline and polycrystalline forms, showed that deformation twins evolve in a hierarchical manner, consisting of micron–sized bundles of nano-twins. The width of nano-twins stays almost constant as the extent of strain increases, but the width and number of the bundles increase with increasing strain. A systematic thermomechanical cycling study showed that the twins were stable at temperatures as high as 900°C, after the dislocations are annealed out. Using such cycles, volume fraction of the thermally stable deformation twins were increased up to 40% in 316 stainless steel. Using computational thermodynamics and kinetics calculations, we designed two generations of advanced austenitic stainless steels. In the first generation, Alloy 1, which had been proposed as an alumina

  2. INFLUENCE OF AUSTENITE GRAIN SIZE TO DEVELOPMENT OF DECARBONIZATION IN PRODUCTION OF ROLLED STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PARUSOV E. V.

    2016-08-01

    ]. The paper [11] acknowledges the influence of micro-additives of boron on changes in the austenite grain size and accordingly the length of borders in high-carbon steels with austenitizing temperature increase within the range of 900…1 100ºС. The purpose of work is to research the effect of austenite grain size on the decarburization depth in carbon (base steel and boron micro-alloyed steel.

  3. Cast, heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels having reduced alloying element content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Maziasz, Philip J [Oak Ridge, TN; Pankiw, Roman I [Greensburg, PA

    2010-07-06

    A cast, austenitic steel composed essentially of, expressed in weight percent of the total composition, about 0.4 to about 0.7 C, about 20 to about 30 Cr, about 20 to about 30 Ni, about 0.5 to about 1 Mn, about 0.6 to about 2 Si, about 0.05 to about 1 Nb, about 0.05 to about 1 W, about 0.05 to about 1.0 Mo, balance Fe, the steel being essentially free of Ti and Co, the steel characterized by at least one microstructural component selected from the group consisting of MC, M.sub.23C.sub.6, and M(C, N).

  4. Beneficial effect of shot peening on steamside oxidation of 300-series austenitic steels: An electrochemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystrianský, Václav; Krausová, Aneta; Macák, Jan; Děd, Jiří; Eltai, Elsadig; Hamouda, Abdel Magid

    2018-01-01

    The formation of a protective oxide ensures the good corrosion resistance of austenitic steels in high temperature steam. However after long-term interaction even the protective oxide may tend to exfoliate and cause operational problems. With shot peening believed to be an effective method for mitigating steamside oxidation and exfoliation, we compared oxide layers formed on two materials: AISI 316H with a rugged untreated surface and Super304H with a shot-peened surface. In addition to conventional methods (SEM/EDS, Raman spectroscopy), Mott-Schottky analysis was used to characterize the oxide layers in order to determine the quality of the protective oxide. The oxides formed on Super 304H showed unexpected semiconducting behaviour with a significantly lower charge carrier density, thereby supporting the benefits of shot peening. Our findings extend the knowledge applicable to the design of more efficient coal-fired power plants.

  5. The sub-zero Celsius treatment of precipitation hardenable semi-austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    -to-martensite transformation was monitored in situ by magnetometry and data was used to sketch a TTT diagram for transformation. As an alternative treatment, after austenitization the material was immersed in boiling nitrogen and up-quenched to room temperature by immersion in water prior to be subjected to isothermal...... treatment. Magnetometry showed that the additional thermal step in boiling nitrogen yields a minor increment of the fraction of martensite, but has a noteworthy accelerating effect on the transformation kinetics, which more pronounced when the isothermal holding is performed at a higher temperature. Data...... is interpreted in terms of instantaneous nucleation of martensite during cooling followed by time dependent growth during isothermal holding....

  6. Novel approaches to determining residual stresses by ultramicroindentation techniques: Application to sandblasted austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frutos, E.; Multigner, M.; Gonzalez-Carrasco, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    This research addresses the determination of residual stresses in sandblasted austenitic steel by ultramicroindentation techniques using a sharp indenter, of which the sensitivity to residual stress effects is said to be inferior to that of spherical ones. The introduction of an angular correction in the model of Wang et al. which relates variations in the maximum load to the presence of residual stresses is proposed. Similarly, the contribution to the hardness of grain size refinement and work hardening, developed as a consequence of the severe plastic deformation during blasting, is determined in order to avoid overestimation of the residual stresses. Measurements were performed on polished cross sections along a length of several microns, thus obtaining a profile of the residual stresses. Results show good agreement with those obtained by synchrotron radiation on the same specimens, which validates the method and demonstrates that microindentation using sharp indenters may be sensitive to the residual stress effect.

  7. Study of ultrasound waves attenuation: application to the nondestructive control of austenitic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasonic propagation simulation in anisotropic and heterogeneous media is essential for nondestructive testing by ultrasounds of multipass austenitic stainless steel welds that are specific of piping in nuclear power stations. Scattering at grain boundaries leads to a strong attenuation as a function of grain orientation. Attenuation measurement is complex. The implemented technique allows taking into account the physical reality of the beams and the material anisotropy. Ultrasonic propagation through the samples is modeled with transmission coefficients calculated with any incidence on a triclinic material. This method results in an increase of the attenuation versus grain orientation. For the first time, measured attenuation coefficients are integrated into a simulation code that validated them by comparison with experience. (author)

  8. Influence of TiC precipitation in austenitic stainless steel on strength, ductility and helium embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesternich, W.; Matta, M.K.; Rothaut, J.

    1984-01-01

    Creep experiments were performed on 1.4970 (German DIN standard) and 316 (AISI standard) type austenitic steels after various thermomechanical pretreatments and after α-implantation. The microstructure introduced by the pretreatments was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and the behaviour of strength and ductility is correlated to the dislocation and precipitate distributions. He embrittlement can be suppressed in these simulation experiments when dispersive TiC precipitate distributions are produced by the proper pretreatments or are allowed to form during creep testing. It is shown that adequate pretreatment results in a significantly superior behaviour of the 1.4970 steel as compared to the 316 type steel in all three investigated properties, i.e. strength, ductility and resistance to He embrittlement. (orig.)

  9. The influence of He on the high temperature fracture of an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saguees, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    The Ti-stabilised DIN 1.4970 austenitic stainless steel is an important candidate for high temperature - high neutron fluence applications which will create appreciable amounts of He within the matrix. In order to determine the mechanical effects associated with the presence of He alone a set of tensile specimens was cyclotron implanted to uniform He concentrations in the 10 -6 to 10 -4 at. range and later creep tested at 700 0 C and 800 0 C. The elongation to fracture values of the implanted specimens were reduced with respect to those of unimplanted controls. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) examination revealed that fracture starts as intergranular and subsequently propagates in a transgranular fashion, the intergranular part being much more extended in the implanted material. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) examination revealed He segregation at the grain boundary precipitates. A mechanism of He embrittlement is discussed in terms of the present results

  10. Development of a high temperature austenitic stainless steel for Stirling engine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, D.L.; Lemkey, F.D.

    1986-01-01

    An alloy, designed NASAUT 4G-A1, was developed which exhibited an excellent balance of oxidation resistance and high temperature strength while maintaining an austenitic matrix necessary for hydrogen compatibility. This alloy, having the composition 15Cr-15Mn-2Mo-1Nb-1Si-1.5C-bal. Fe in wt%, was microstructurally characterized and shown to contain a fine M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ precipitated phase. Subsequent heat treatments were shown to substantially modify this microstructure resulting in improved mechanical properties. Yield, creep and low cycle fatigue strengths were found to be superior to the best iron base alloy thus far identified as a potential heater head candidate material, XF-818

  11. Empirical relations for tensile properties of austenitic stainless steels irradiated in mixed-spectrum reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossbeck, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    An assessment has been made of available tensile property data relevant to the design of fusion reactors, especially near term devices expected to operate at lower temperatures than power reactors. Empirical relations have been developed for the tensile properties as a functions of irradiation temperature for neutron exposures of 10-15, 20, 30, and 50 dpa. It was found that yield strength depends little on the particular austenitic alloy and little on the helium concentration. Strength depends upon initial condition of the alloy only for exposures of less than 30 dpa. Uniform elongation was found to be more sensitive to alloy and condition. It was also more sensitive than strength to helium level. However, below 500deg C, helium only appeared to have an efect at 10-15 dpa. At higher temperatures, helium embrittlement was apparent, and its threshold temperature decreased with increasing neutron exposure level. (orig.)

  12. Improving of wear resistance of alloys with metastable austenite structure in abrasion wearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, V.S.; Brykov, N.N.; Pugachev, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of grain composition of abrasive masses upon the wear resistance of alloys having a metastable austenitic structure is studied. The investigations have been carried out on Kh12F1 steel, using diffraction and hardness measurements and the metallographic analysis. Experimental data indicate that the specific wear of the stable alloys increases substantially with the size of abrasive particles. As regards the metastable alloys, the increase in the size of the abrasive grains has little effect upon the specific wear, as the increasing abradability of the grains is compensated for by the strengthening of the rubbing surfaces, this resulting from the ability of the metal surface layer to underao structure transformations in the course of wear

  13. Effect of phosphorus on the swelling and precipitation behavior of austenitic stainless steels during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.H.; Mansur, L.K.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    It has been observed that increasing the volume fraction of the needle-shaped iron phosphide phase in austenitic stainless steels tends to inhibit void swelling during neutron irradiation. An earlier analysis showed that this effect could not be accounted for in terms of enhanced point defect recombination at particle-matrix interfaces. The behavior of the iron phosphide phase has been further examined using dual ion beam irradiations. It was found that the particle-matrix interface serves as a site for the nucleation of a very fine dispersion of helium bubbles. It is thought that since a high number density of cavities lowers the number of helium atoms per cavity, the irradiation time for the cavities to accumulate the critical number of gas atoms for bias-driven growth is correspondingly increased. Although the phosphide phase nucleates rapidly, it eventually undergoes dissolution if either the G or Laves phase develops with increasing dose

  14. Crack resistance of austenitic pipes with circumferential through-wall cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, K.; Grueter, L.; Setz, W.; Bhandari, S.; Debaene, J.P.; Faidy, C.; Schwalbe, K.H.

    1993-01-01

    For monotonously increasing load the correct evaluation of the crack resistance properties of a structure is essential for safety analyses. Considerable attention has been given to the through-wall case, since this is generally believed to be the controlling case with regard to complete pipe failure. The maximum load conditions for circumferential crack growth in pipes under displacement-controlled loadings has been determined. The need for crack resistance curves, measured on circumferentially through-wall cracked straight pipes of austenitic stainless steel 316L under bending, is emphasized by the limitation in the data range on small specimens and by the differences in the procedures. To answer open questions and to improve calculational methods a joint fracture mechanics program is being performed by Electricite de France, Novatome and Siemens-Interatom. The working program contains experimental and theoretical investigations on the applicability of small-specimen data to real structures. 10 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  15. Performance evaluation of vegetable-based oils in drilling austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belluco, Walter; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    breaking were recorded for each bore, and tool wear was measured at constant intervals. A commercial mineral-based oil was taken as reference product, and five vegetable-based cutting fluids at different levels of additivation were tested. All measured parameters were in agreement, confirming......The efficiency of six cutting oils was evaluated in drilling AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel using conventional HSS-Co tools by measurements of tool life, tool wear, cutting forces and chip formation. Seven tools were tested with each fluid to catastrophic failure. Cutting forces and chip...... to tool life testing. All vegetable-based fluids performed better than the reference product. The best performance was obtained with a cutting fluid yielding 177% increases in tool life and 7% reduction in thrust force. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  16. Influence of the austenitic stainless steel microstructure on the void swelling under ion irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rouxel Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the role of different metallurgical parameters on the void formation mechanisms, various austenitic stainless steels were elaborated and irradiated with heavy ions. Two alloys, in several metallurgical conditions (15Cr/15Ni–Ti and 15Cr/25Ni–Ti, were irradiated in the JANNUS-Saclay facility at 600 °C with 2 MeV Fe2+ ions up to 150 dpa. Resulting microstructures were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM. Different effects on void swelling are highlighted. Only the pre-aged samples, which were consequently solute and especially titanium depleted, show cavities. The nickel-enriched matrix shows more voids with a smaller size. Finally, the presence of nano-precipitates combined with a dense dislocation network decreases strongly the number of cavities.

  17. Empirical modeling of shot peening parameters for welded austenitic stainless steel using grey relational analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Lakhwinder; Aggarwal, M. L.; Khan, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    The attempt of this paper is to present an effective approach for the optimization of the shot peening process of welded AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel with multi performance characteristics using Grey relational analysis (GRA) based on Taguchi orthogonal array. Twenty-seven experimental runs are performed to determine best process parameters level. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) is carried out to identify significant peening parameters. The response tables are obtained for analyzing the optimal levels of shot peening parameters and major factors that affect the quality function. The multiple performance characteristics including tensile strength, surface hardness and surface roughness are the quality functions considered for the optimization. Further mathematical models are developed using regression analysis for the tensile strength, surface hardness and surface roughness. It will be very helpful to the engineers in deciding the levels of the shot peening parameters for desired performance characteristics

  18. Diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and silicon nitride to austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krugers, J.P.; Ouden, G. den

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the results are reported of a study dealing with diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and silicon nitride (both reaction-bonded and hot-pressed) to austenitic stainless steel (type AISI 316). Experiments were carried out in high vacuum (in the range of 10 -3 -10 -4 Pa) and in an inert gas atmosphere (95 vol% Ar, 5 vol% H 2 ), at temperatures between 1000 and 1300deg C and at various pressures. It was found that under specific conditions the steel could be bonded to both grades of silicon nitride. It was not possible, however, to produce an acceptable bond between steel and silicon carbide. The bonded combinations were tested mechanically by means of shear strength testing. It was found that the higher the process temperature or the longer the process time the stronger the bond. (orig.)

  19. Thermal Aging Performance of Domestic Cast Austenitic Stainless Steels in Nuclear Power Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chengliang, Li; Xiaoyun, Deng; Zhiying, Yin; Yuangang, Duan

    The domestic cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) used for PWR main coolant lines face thermal aging phenomenon during long-term service at reactor operating temperatures in the range of 280-320°C. The accelerated thermal aging experiment of CASS at an elevated temperature of 400°C was carried out. The decrease regularity of absorbed energy of CASS at room temperature was obtained by Charpy impact test, and the variation trend of impacted specimen's fracture surfaces of CASS at different aging time was observed by scanning electron microscope. The experimental results show that: after 15,000 hours of accelerated thermal aging, the domestic CASS gradually reaches a thermal aging saturation, and its absorbed energy suffers a dramatic loss, dropping to almost 41-45% of the initial value, but still meets the assessment indicators for unaged state required by design specifications.

  20. Austenite – ferrite transformation temperature regression equations for low carbon steels with cooling rate account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Záhumenský, P.; Kohútek, I.; Semeňák, J.

    2017-12-01

    The austenite-ferrite transformation temperatures evaluated by dilatometry using thermo-mechanical simulator Gleeble 1500D are investigated in this paper. The effect of cooling rates 1, 5, 10 and 15°C/s on the upper and lower critical transformation temperatures was evaluated for 30 specimens of six material groups. Considering the cooling rate from dilatometry tests and chemical composition (C ≤ 0.2%, Mn ≤ 2%, Si ≤ 0.26%) of particular specimens, the regression equations for both transformation temperatures were derived. These relations have to be satisfied to avoid the crack formation during continuous casting, as well as to provide the hot rolling control. The proposed regression equations are compared with 32 similar ones adopted from 1961 to 2017 and exhibit a good conformity and accuracy.

  1. Structure and phase composition of titanium nitride coating on austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubovitskaya, N.V.; Kolenchenko, L.D.; Larikov, L.N.

    1989-01-01

    Structure and phase composition of titanium nitride coating deposited on 08Kh18N10T steel substrate using ''Bulat'' device are studied. Use of complex investigation methods permitted despite small coating thickness (1μm) to aquire information on hardness, porosity, to study phase composition in all coating thickness. The surface layer (∼0.1 μm) consists of ε-Ti 2 N, TiN 0.6 , TiC 0.35 , that is formed with carbon participation from oil vacuum. In more deeper layers beside ε-Ti 2 N TiC 0.14 N 0.77 is present. Effect of carbon diffusion from substrate to forming coating is stated. Gradient of element concentrations in the substrate-coating interface causes recrystallization of austenite

  2. The Effect of Calcium Treatment on Pitting Corrosion of Type 316L Austenitic Stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Heon; LeeSoo Chan; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Hee San

    2001-01-01

    Pitting in chloride containing aqueous solution occurs mainly on manganese sulphide. Adding a slight amount of Ca as an alloying element prevents the MnS formation, since Ca is a stronger sulphide former than Mn. In this work, calcium treated Type 316L austenitic stainless steels have been investigated electrochemically to evaluate the effect of modified inclusions on pitting corrosion. Staircase polarization measurements were performed in 3.5% NaCl solution, where the occurrence of pits in materials caused current spikes. During staircase polarization test, steels with calcium treatment show low and discontinuous current spikes while those without calcium treatment show high and continuous current spikes. The results show that calcium treatment in Ca/S ratio of 1 ∼ 2 leads to an increase in the pitting potential of several hundred mV. A relationship between the calcium treatment and pit initiation sites was described

  3. Discrimination of ultrasonic indications from austenitic stainless-steel pipe welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, G.P.; Manning, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    The inspection of butt-welded stainless-steel pipe joints in nuclear power plants is routinely performed using ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation methods. However, discrimination between crack and geometric/weld (malignant versus benign) indications is principally based on operator experience, variations in signal amplitude, and the location of the reflector. In response to the inspection problem, a pattern-recognition methodology has been developed to discriminate intergranular stress-corrosion cracking from geometric/weld reflectors in austenitic stainless-steel pipes. Results demonstrate that the algorithm can provide discrimination comparable to or better than those supplied by well trained operators. Preliminary results show that the pattern-recognition algorithm approach yields a better than 90% index of performance. (author)

  4. Testing of intergranular and pitting corrosion in sensitized welded joints of austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bore V. Jegdic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pitting corrosion resistance and intergranular corrosion of the austenitic stainless steel X5Cr Ni18-10 were tested on the base metal, heat affected zone and weld metal. Testing of pitting corrosion was performed by the potentiodynamic polarization method, while testing of intergranular corrosion was performed by the method of electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation with double loop. The base metal was completely resistant to intergranular corrosion, while the heat affected zone showed a slight susceptibility to intergranular corrosion. Indicators of pitting corrosion resistance for the weld metal and the base metal were very similar, but their values are significantly higher than the values for the heat affected zone. This was caused by reduction of the chromium concentration in the grain boundary areas in the heat affected zone, even though the carbon content in the examined stainless steel is low (0.04 wt. % C.

  5. Shallow-Land Buriable PCA-type austenitic stainless steel for fusion application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, M.

    1991-01-01

    Neutron-induced activity in the PCA (Primary Candidate Alloy) austenitic stainless steel is examined, when used for first-wall components in a DEMO fusion reactor. Some low-activity definitions, based on different waste management and disposal concepts, are introduced. Activity in the PCA is so high that any recycling of the irradiated material can be excluded. Disposal of PCA radioactive wastes in Shallow-Land Buriable (SLB) is prevented as well. Mo, Nb and some impurity elements have to be removed or limited, in order to reduce the radioactivity of the PCA. Possible low-activity versions of the PCA are introduced (PCA-la); they meet the requirements for SLB and may also be recycled under certain conditions. (author)

  6. Localised corrosion processes of austenitic stainless steel bipolar plates for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Claudio; Bozzini, Benedetto

    This research addresses the problem of localised corrosion of stainless steel PEMFC bipolar plates. The susceptibility to pitting and crevice corrosion of austenitic AISI 304 stainless steel has been investigated both by post-mortem microscopic analysis of the end-plates of a laboratory single-cell and by studies of electrochemically corroded stainless steels, in the presence of specially-designed crevice-formers simulating the operating conditions of a PEMFC. This work is based on optical and scanning-electron microscopies as well as potentiostatic and potentiodynamic measurements. The crevice-formers we considered were: Teflon, graphite and AISI 304. The samples, coupled to the crevice-formers have been tested in aqueous solutions containing Cl -, SO 4 2- and F -. From the E-log i plot, the values of corrosion, pitting, crevice and protection potential have been obtained and perfect and imperfect passivity conditions have been identified.

  7. Ductility, strength and hardness relation after prior incremental deformation (ratcheting) of austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kussmaul, K.; Diem, H.K.; Wachter, O.

    1993-01-01

    Experimental investigations into the stress/strain behavior of the niobium stabilized austenitic material with the German notation X6 CrNiNb 18 10 proved that a limited incrementally applied prior deformation will reduce the total deformation capability only by the amount of the prior deformation. It could especially be determined on the little changes in the reduction of area that the basically ductile deformation behavior will not be changed by the type of the prior loading. There is a correlation between the amount of deformation and the increase in hardness. It is possible to correlate both the changes in hardness and the material properties. In the case of low cycle fatigue tests with alternating temperature an incremental increase in total strain (ratcheting) was noted to depend on the strain range applied

  8. Perspective on present and future alloy development efforts on austenitic stainless steels for fusion application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address important questions concerning how to effect further alloy development of austenitic stainless steels for resistance, and to what extent the behavior of other properties under irradiation, such as strength/embrittlement, fatigue/irradiation creep, corrosion (under irradiation), and radiation-induced activation must be influenced. To summarize current understanding, helium has been found to have major effects on swelling and embrittlement, but several metallurgical avenues are available for significant improvement relative to type 316 stainless steel. Studies on fatigue and irradiation creep, particularly including helium effects, are preliminary but have yet to reveal engineering problems requiring additional alloy development remedies. The effects of irradiation on corrosion behavior are unknown, but higher alloy nickel contents make thermal corrosion in lithium worse. 67 refs. (JDB)

  9. Evaluation of residual stress distribution in austenitic stainless steel pipe butt-welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Akira; Noda, Michiyasu; Takahashi, Shigeru; Oumaya, Toru; Serizawa, Hisashi; Murakawa, Hidekazu

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports measured and estimated results of residual stress distributions of butt-welded austenitic stainless steel pipe in order to improve estimation accuracy of welding residual stress. Neutron diffraction and strain gauge method were employed for the measurement of the welding residual stress and its detailed distributions on inner and outer surface of the pipe as well as the distributions within the pipe wall were obtained. Finite element method was employed for the estimation. Transient and residual stresses in 3D butt-welded joint model were computed by employing Iterative Substructure Method and also commercial FEM code ABAQUS for a reference. The measured and estimated distributions presented typical characteristic of straight butt-welded pipe which had decreasing trend along the axial direction and bending type distributions through wall of the pipe. Both results were compared and the accuracy of measurement and estimation was discussed. (author)

  10. Determination of austenite vs. α-ferrite in steel by neutron and X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Als-Nielsen, J.; Clausen, K.

    1984-06-01

    Neutron and X-ray diffraction studies for determining the relative content of fcc (austenite) and bcc (α-ferrite) phases in steel samples are reported. In addition to determine the relative content of phases the diffraction method also provides information about the strain fields in the sample by the concomitant broadening of diffraction peaks. Neutron diffraction has the advantage that large sample volumes (several cc) are probed, and the effect of texture can thus be eliminated. X-ray diffraction patterns can be registered in a short time thus allowing kinetic studies of phase changes during heat treatment or mechanical treatment. In addition it is possible to probe different surface thickness by utilizing different X-ray wavelengths. Measurements of this type can be carried out on a commercial contract basis in the Solid State Physics Division at Risoe National Laboratory. (author)

  11. Structure and composition of phases occurring in austenitic stainless steels in thermal and irradiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E.H.; Maziasz, P.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Transmission electron diffraction techniques coupled with quantitative x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy have been used to characterize the phases which develop in austenitic stainless steels during exposure to thermal and to irradiation environments. In AISI 316 and Ti-modified stainless steels some thirteen phases have been identified and characterized in terms of their crystal structure and chemical composition. Irradiation does not produce any completely new phases. However, as a result of radiation-induced segregation, principally of Ni and Si, and of enhanced diffusion rates, several major changes in phase relationships occur during irradiation. Firstly, phases characteristic of remote regions of the phase diagram appear unexpectedly, and dissolve during postirradiation annealing (radiation-induced phases). Secondly, some phases develop with their compositions significantly altered by the incorporation of Ni or Si (radiation-modified phases). In addition, several phases develop at significantly lower temperaures during neutron irradiation (radiation-enhanced phases). 18 figures, 9 tables

  12. Induced effects in Fe-Ni-Cr austenitic alloys by electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguenin, D.

    1989-01-01

    Materials behaviour under high energetic particles exposure has to be know for technological aspects, but also for microscopic material state physics. Large macroscopic investigations have been developed but reliability with theoretical calculations or fundamental physics measurements is not clear. We present four experimental procedures in order to characterize austenitic Fe-Ni-Cr synthetic alloys in the atomic scale. First, results obtained about vacancy and interstitial, after electrical resistivity measurements and monoenergetical or classical positron annihilation process, are discussed. Then, defects clustering and microstructural evolution is investigated using positron lifetime measurements and high resolution electronic microscopy. In this study, special care has been taken to understand the composition effect as a function of the irradiation conditions [fr

  13. Cryogenic deformation microstructures of 32Mn-7Cr-1Mo-0.3N austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Ruidong; Qiu Liang; Wang Tiansheng; Wang Cunyu; Zheng Yangzeng

    2005-01-01

    The cryogenic deformation microstructures of impact and tensile specimens of 32Mn-7Cr-1Mo-0.3N austenitic steel were investigated using light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the deformation microstructures of the impact specimens are mainly composed of stacking faults, network dislocation, slip bands, and a few mechanical twins and ε-martensite. These microstructures cross with each other in a crystal angle. The deformation microstructures of the tensile specimens consist only of massive slip bands, in which a few mechanical twins and ε-martenite are located. Because of the larger plastic deformation the slip band traces become bent. All the deformation microstructures are formed on the {111} planes and along the orientation

  14. Carburizing plasma in a low temperature austenitic stainless steel AISI 304

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mota, W.T.; Ramos, F.D.; Rocha, R.C.; Barcelos, M.V.; Barcelos, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    The industrial use of thermochemical treatment assisted by the cold plasma has been widely employed in recent years, mainly oriented to the excellent results obtained in the surface modification of engineering materials, when compared to more traditional methods. In this work, we studied the plasma carburizing low temperature steel AISI 304 mechanical parts used in construction. The thermochemical treatment was performed at a fixed gas atmosphere 7% CH 4 (g) and 93 % H 2 (g), 350 ° C and times of 1, 3 and 5 hours. Samples being tested for Vickers hardness, abrasive microwear, microstructure evaluation by optical microscopy and SEM and X-ray diffraction. The results show significant improvement in surface hardness, wear resistance and good formation of expanded austenite layer and no identifiers peaks of carbides. The results achieved are due to diffusion/adsorption of carbon present in the gaseous atmosphere to the evaluated samples. (author)

  15. Analysis of the austenitic stainless steel's r-value behavior at elevated temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dušan Arsić

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the anisotropy properties of austenitic steel AISI 304 (X5CrNi18-10 at elevated temperatures is presented in this paper. Considerations of the anisotropy problems are presented in the theoretical part of the paper, as well as the procedure for determination of the normal anisotropy coefficient. The experimental part of the paper describes the plan, methodology and equipment for testing of material's normal anisotropy and mechanical characteristics. The objective of conducting the experiments was to investigate influence of temperature on normal anisotropy, as well as on the mechanical properties of the considered material. The normal anisotropy was monitored by the coefficient – the so-called "r-value". Besides that, the tensile strength, yield stress and elongation at break were monitored, also. The tests were done on the 0.7 mm thick sheet metal within the temperature range 20 to 700°C.

  16. Tool Wear Analysis due to Machining In Super Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polishetty Ashwin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents tool wear study when a machinability test was applied using milling on Super Austenitic Stainless Steel AL6XN alloy. Eight milling trials were performed under two cutting speeds, 100 m/min and 150 m/min, combined with two feed rates at 0.1mm/tooth and 0.15 mm/tooth and two depth of cuts at 2 mm and 3 mm. An Alicona 3D optical surface profilometer was used to scan cutting inserts flank and rake face areas for wear. Readings such as maximum and minimum deviations were extracted and used to analyse the outcomes. Results showed various types of wear were generated on the tool rake and flank faces. The common formed wear was the crater wear. The formation of the build-up edge was observed on the rake face of the cutting tool.

  17. Effect of hydrogen on the microstructure, mechanical properties and phase transformations in austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.Y.; Xing, Z.S.

    1989-01-01

    Effect of high-pressure hydrogen charging on the microstructure, mechanical properties and phase transformations in austenitic steels has been investigated and discussed. The results show that the strength and impact toughness of the steels increase slightly and that the ductility decreases after hydrogen charging. The existence of δ-ferrite deteriorates the resistance to hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of the steels. The occurrence of carbide in the steel resulted from aging reduces the ductility of the steel and makes the steel sensitive to HE. The existence of sufficient hydrogen promotes the ε-martensitic transformation and suppresses the α'-martensitic transformation. The permeabilities and diffusivities of hydrogen in the steels have also been determined. (orig.)

  18. Elasto-plastic hardening models adjustment to ferritic, austenitic and austenoferritic Rebar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hortigóna, B.; Gallardo, J.M.; Nieto-García, E.J.; López, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    The elastoplastic behaviour of steel used for structural member fabrication has received attention to facilitate a mechanical-resistant design. New Zealand and South African standards have adopted various theoretical approaches to describe such behaviour in stainless steels. With respect to the building industry, describing the tensile behaviour of steel rebar used to produce reinforced concrete structures is of interest. Differences compared with the homogenous material described in the above mentioned standards and related literatures are discussed in this paper. Specifically, the presence of ribs and the TEMPCORE® technology used to produce carbon steel rebar may alter the elastoplastic model. Carbon steel rebar is shown to fit a Hollomon model giving hardening exponent values on the order of 0.17. Austenitic stainless steel rebar behaviour is better described using a modified Rasmussen model with a free fitted exponent of 6. Duplex stainless steel shows a poor fit to any previous model. [es

  19. Effect of Carbon Fraction on Stacking Fault Energy of Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Ho; Ha, Heon-Young; Hwang, Byoungchul; Kim, Sung-Joon; Shin, Eunjoo

    2012-12-01

    The effect of C fraction (C/N) on stacking fault energy (SFE) of austenitic Fe-18Cr-10Mn steels with a fixed amount of C + N (0.6 wt pct) was investigated by means of neutron diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The SFE were evaluated by the Rietveld whole-profile fitting combined with the double-Voigt size-strain analysis for neutron diffraction profiles using neutron diffraction. The measured SFE showed distinguishable difference and were well correlated with the change in deformation microstructure. Three-dimensional linear regression analyses yielded the relation reflecting the contribution of both C + N and C/N: SFE (mJ/m2) = -5.97 + 39.94(wt pct C + N) + 3.81(C/N). As C fraction increased, the strain-induced γ→ ɛ martensitic transformation was suppressed, and deformation twinning became the primary mode of plastic deformation.

  20. Bauschinger Effect in an Austenitic Steel: Neutron Diffraction and a Multiscale Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajoui, Jamal; Gloaguen, David; Legrand, Vincent; Oum, Guy; Kelleher, Joe; Kockelmann, Winfried

    2016-05-01

    The generation of internal stresses/strains arising from mechanical deformations in single-phase engineering materials was studied. Neutron diffraction measurements were performed to study the evolution of intergranular strains in austenitic steel during sequential loadings. Intergranular strains expand due to incompatibilities between grains and also resulting from single-crystal elastic and plastic anisotropy. A two-level homogenization approach was adopted in order to predict the mechanical state of deformed polycrystals in relation to the microstructure during Bauschinger tests. A mechanical description of the grain was developed through a micro-meso transition based on the Kröner model. The meso-macro transition using a self-consistent approach was applied to deduce the global behavior. Mechanical tests and neutron diffraction measurements were used to validate and assess the model.

  1. Effect of solution treatment conditions on the sensitization of austenitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIAOFEI YU

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the impact of the conditions of solution treatment on the degree of sensitization (DOS of austenitic stainless steel (AISI 304 was investigated in detail. The results derived from the electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation (EPR test indicated that the DOS decreased as the solution treatment temperature and time increased. The reason for this was studied via the SEM morphologies and EDS results, which indicated that the grain size influenced the DOS. Furthermore, cellular automaton (CA was utilized to simulate grain growth, the precipitation of Cr-rich carbides and the three dimensional distribution of the chromium concentration, which vividly illuminated the effect of the grain size on the DOS and was in accordance with the experiment results.

  2. Effect of Carbon and Nitrogen Content on Deformation and Fracture of AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Menapace

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of small differences in the content of carbon and nitrogen on the room temperature tensile deformation and fracture behaviour of an AISI 304 stainless steel was studied. In the steel containing the lower amount of carbon and nitrogen, a higher amount of strain induced alfa’ martensite is formed, which increases strain hardening rate and both uniform and total elongation at fracture. The presence of large martensitic areas in the cross section causes strain localization at the austenite/martensite interface, which promotes the nucleation of cracks and their propagation along the interface. This results in a decrease of Ultimate Tensile Strength. Strain induced transformation slightly reduces strain rate sensitivity, as well.

  3. Perspective on present and future alloy development efforts on austenitic stainless steels for fusion application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address important questions concerning how to effect further alloy development of austenitic stainless steels for resistance, and to what extent the behavior of other properties under irradiation, such as strength/embrittlement, fatigue/irradiation creep, corrosion (under irradiation), and radiation-induced activation must be influenced. To summarize current understanding, helium has been found to have major effects on swelling and embrittlement, but several metallurgical avenues are available for significant improvement relative to type 316 stainless steel. Studies on fatigue and irradiation creep, particularly including helium effects, are preliminary but have yet to reveal engineering problems requiring additional alloy development remedies. The effects of irradiation on corrosion behavior are unknown, but higher alloy nickel contents make thermal corrosion in lithium worse. 67 refs

  4. The thermal expansion of austenitic manganese and manganese-chromium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, F.

    1977-01-01

    The linear coefficient of thermal expansion was determined by dilatometer for 5 Mn steels and 6 Mn-Cr steels between -196 and +500 0 C. Because of the antiferromagnetic properties, the thermal expansion of austenitic Mn and Mn-Cr steels is determined by the position of the magnetic changeover temperature (Neel temperature), which depends on the chemical composition of the steel. Below the Neel temperature, the thermal coefficient of expansion is greatly reduced by volumetric magnetostriction (Invar effect). For this reason, one can only give approximate values for thermal expansion for all Mn and Mn-Cr steels in the temperature range of -100 0 C to about +100 0 C. (GSC) [de

  5. Austenite Grain Size Estimtion from Chord Lengths of Logarithmic-Normal Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian H.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Linear section of grains in polyhedral material microstructure is a system of chords. The mean length of chords is the linear grain size of the microstructure. For the prior austenite grains of low alloy structural steels, the chord length is a random variable of gamma- or logarithmic-normal distribution. The statistical grain size estimation belongs to the quantitative metallographic problems. The so-called point estimation is a well known procedure. The interval estimation (grain size confidence interval for the gamma distribution was given elsewhere, but for the logarithmic-normal distribution is the subject of the present contribution. The statistical analysis is analogous to the one for the gamma distribution.

  6. Investigations on the creep-rupture behaviour of the austenitic stainless steel AISI 316 NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schirra, M.; Heger, S.; Ritter, B.

    1991-08-01

    The report describes the creep-rupture tests carried out with a 17Cr-13Ni-2Mo-steel in the frame of the German-Spanish collaboration (KfK-CIEMAT). The material studied is the austenitic steel AISI 316(L) selected as potential first-wall material for NET (Next European Torus). The test program on base material with a NET specified batch comprises in the temperature range 500-750deg C the rupture-time-range till 40 000 h. The results permit statements on the creep- and creep-rupture behaviour and ductility. Metallographic examinations give informations about the fracture behaviour and demonstrate the complex precipitation behaviour. The results are compared with literature data and own results from two batches of the European Fast-Breeder-Program. (orig.) [de

  7. Hydrogen Silsesquioxane based silica glass coatings for the corrosion protection of austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lampert, Felix; Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Din, Rameez Ud

    2016-01-01

    The application of stainless steels in hostile environments, such as concentrated acid or hot sea water, requires additional surface treatments, considering that the native surface oxide does not guarantee sufficient corrosion protection under these conditions. In the present work, silica-like thin......-film barrier coatings were deposited on AISI 316L grade austenitic stainless steel with 2B surface finish from Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) spin-on-glass precursor and thermally cured to tailor the film properties. Results showed that curing at 500 °C resulted in a film-structure with a polymerized siloxane...... backbone and a reduced amount of Si-H moieties. The coatings showed good substrate coverage and the average thickness was between 200 and 400 nm on the rough substrate surface, however, film thicknesses of > 1400 nm were observed at substrate defects. Deposition of these films significantly improved...

  8. Grain boundary chromium concentration effects on the IGSCC and IASCC of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Arey, B.W.; Charlot, L.A.

    1993-08-01

    Comparisons are made between grain boundary composition and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of 304 and 309 austenitic stainless steels in high-temperature water environments. Chromium depletion had the dominant effect on cracking resistance with the extent of IG cracking controlled by the interfacial chromium concentration. The minimum chromium concentration required to promote cracking was a function of the applied strain rate during slow-strain-rate tensile tests in 288 C air-saturated water. Depletion from bulk levels of 18 wt% to ∼13.5 wt% Cr at grain boundaries prompted 100% IG cracking at a strain rate of 1 x 10 -6 s -1 , while embrittlement was observed with only a slight depletion to ∼17 wt% at 2 x 10 -7 s -1 . Insights into critical interfacial compositions promoting IGSCC are discussed in reference to cracking of irradiated stainless steel nuclear reactor core components

  9. Investigations on the mechanisms of PWSCC of strain hardened austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couvant, T.; Legras, L. [EDF/R and D, Moret-sur-Loing (France); Pokor, C. [EDF/DIN/CEIDRE, DLCH, Avoine (France); Vaillant, F. [EDF/R and D, Moret-sur-Loing (France); Brechet, Y. [LTPCM/INPG, Grenoble (France); Boursier, J.M. [EDF/R and D, Moret-sur-Loing (France); Moulart, P. [EDF/DIN/CEIDRE, DLCH, Avoine (France)

    2007-07-01

    Limited cases of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) have been recently observed in French PWRs (heaters of pressurizers), in high strain hardened non-sensitized austenitic stainless steels exposed to primary environment. Consequently, a R and D program has been conducted, in addition to hot laboratories investigations, in order to understand the mechanisms responsible for PWSCC at 360{sup o}C. Stress corrosion tests were performed on AISI 304L and 316L, in hydrogenated primary environments (7.2 < pH{sub 320{sup o}C} < 9.2) at 360{sup o}C. Particular attention was directed towards the correlation between selective oxidation and strain localization due to microtwining and strain incompatibilities. Based on electron microscope examinations (SEM and TEM), a description of the possible contribution of the strain localization in the mechanism of PWSCC is proposed. Experimental results are finally compared to hot laboratory observations of pressurizer heaters. (author)

  10. Fundamental flow and fracture analysis of prime candidate alloy (PCA) for path a (austenitics)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, G.E.; Jayakumar, M.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1982-01-01

    Room temperature microhardness tests have been performed on samples of Prime Candidate Alloy (PCA) for the austenitics (Path A) subjected to various thermomechanical treatments (TMT). The TMTs have effected various microstructures, which have been well characterized by optical metallography and TEM. For comparison, microhardness tests have been performed on samples of N-lot, DO heat and MFE 316 stainless steel with similar TMTs. The results indicate that the TMTs investigated can significantly alter the microhardness of the PCA in a manner which is consistent with microstructural changes. Moreover, while PCA had the lowest microhardness of the four alloys types after cold working, its microhardness increased while the others decreased to comparable values after aging for 2 h at 750 0 C

  11. Austenite Continuous Cooling Transformation of Wear-Resistant Steel with Hardness 500HBW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Feng; Xiaodong, Liu; Demin, Sun

    The phase transformation rule, microstructures and properties of 500HBW wear-resistant steel produced in Jinan Company of Shandong Iron and Steel Co. ltd. have been investigated in this paper. When the chemical composition of steel is given, the cooling rates after austeniting affect on the properties of steel greatly. The hardness and tensile strength increasing as increasing of cooling rates. The main cause is due to appearance and increasing of Bainite and Martensite other than Ferrite and Pearlite at room temperature. The cooling rate has distinct effects upon the mechanical properties of steel plates. With the 3-55°C/s cooling rate, the tensile strength vary in 979-1690MPa, the hardness changed from 341 to 596HV10. In the procedure of manufacture of 500HBW wear-resistant steels, the quickly cooling rate should be got to keep suitable microstructure and good hardness and toughness.

  12. Topological characterization of static strain aging of type AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, S.N.; Miranda, P.E.V. de

    1981-01-01

    Static strain aging of type AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel was studied from room temperature up to 623K by conducting tests in which the load was held approximately constant. The aging times varied between 10s and 100h, using a plastic pre-deformation of 9%. The static strain aging of 304 steel furnished an activation energy of 23.800 cal/mol. This implies that vacancies play an important role on the aging process. The curve of the variation of the discontinuous yielding with aging time presented different stages, to which specific mathematical expressions were developed. These facts permited the conclusion that Snock type mechanisms are responsible for the aging in such conditions. (Author) [pt

  13. Effects on Machining on Surface Residual Stress of SA 508 and Austenitic Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Seong Ho; Park, Chi Yong; Yang, Jun Seok; Lee, Jeong Geun; Park, Jai Hak

    2011-01-01

    Primary water stress corrosion cracking has occurred in dissimilar weld areas in nuclear power plants. Residual stress is a driving force in the crack. Residual stress may be generated by weld or surface machining. Residual stress due to surface machining depends on the machining method, e.g., milling, grinding, or EDM. The stress is usually distributed on or near the surface of the material. We present the measured residual stress for machining on SA 508 and austenitic stainless steels such as TP304 and F316. The residual stress can be tensile or compressive depending on the machining method. The depth and the magnitude of the residual stress depend on the material and the machining method

  14. Active flux tungsten inert gas welding of austenitic stainless steel AISI 304

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Klobčar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the effects of flux assisted tungsten inert gas (A-TIG welding of 4 (10 mm thick austenitic stainless steel EN X5CrNi1810 (AISI 304 in the butt joint. The sample dimensions were 300 ´ 50 mm, and commercially available active flux QuickTIG was used for testing. In the planned study the influence of welding position and weld groove shape was analysed based on the penetration depth. A comparison of microstructure formation, grain size and ferrit number between TIG welding and A-TIG welding was done. The A-TIG welds were subjected to bending test. A comparative study of TIG and A-TIG welding shows that A-TIG welding increases the weld penetration depth.

  15. Relative merits of duplex and austenitic stainless steels for applications in the oil and gas industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Elisabeth; Wegrelius, Lena; Pettersson, Rachel [Outokumpu Stainless AB, Avesta (Sweden)

    2012-07-01

    The broad range of available stainless steel grades means that these materials can fulfil a wide variety of requirements within the oil and gas industry. The duplex grades have the advantage of higher strength than standard austenitic grades, while the superaustenitic grades provide a cost-effective alternative to nickel-base alloys in a number of cases. The paper presents the results of various types of laboratory testing to rank the grades in terms of resistance to pitting, crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Results from field testing in actual or simulated service conditions are discussed and a number of application examples, including process piping flexible, heat exchangers and topside equipment are presented. (author)

  16. Recent Developments of Advanced Austenitic and Duplex Stainless Steels for Oil and Gas Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Guocai; Kangas, Pasi

    The demands for fuel and the development of the fuel exploitation processes have made it economically possible to produce oil-gas from deeper and more corrosive wells where the parameters such as high chloride, H2S or CO2 content, high temperature and pressure, erosion and bioactivities in seawater should be considered. In these applications, special grades of stainless steels with greater corrosion resistance at a broad range of temperatures and high strength have to be used to meet the requirements. This paper provides an overview on the development, properties and applications of these advanced materials for oil & gas industry. They include recently developed advanced super austenitic stainless steels with high Mo, Ni, Cr and N contents with a PRE (pitting resistance equivalent) number up to 52 and hyper duplex stainless steels.

  17. Contribution on the influence of transformation structures under consideration of austenite deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peisker, D.; Doktorowski, A.; Dittrich, D.

    2001-01-01

    Hot forming represents a substantial part of the manufacturing process of many steel products. The crucial microstructural transformation process, which influences the characteristics of a steel considerably, is undisputed the γ/α-transformation. A successful aid to the interpretation of possible microstructural transformation processes during cooling from the austenitizing or deformation temperature is the determination and handling of CCT diagrams. In this article two steels are examined which differ only in their titanium content. Dilatometric investigations were performed varying the three parameters' transformation temperature, strain and cooling strategy. The insights gathered are illustrated and discussed with the aid of CCT diagrams. An additional transformation below A c1 with a brief curing reheat up to A c3 + 20 K leads to a substantially finer structure. The exploitation of this effect may be of great industrial importance. (orig.)

  18. Phase transformations of under-cooled austenite of new bainitic materials for scissors crossovers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Pacyna

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains CCT diagrams presenting a transformation kinetics of under-cooled austenite from two new bainitic cast steels which the scissors crossovers for heavy-duty railway tracks (min. 230kN/axle at the speed up to 200 km/h are made of. The cooling ranges of UIC60 type railway tracks plot on the CCT diagrams indicate that there is a 100% bainitic structure in the scissors crossovers made of these cast steels as well, but mainly it would be a favourable for cracking resistance lower bainite. The achievable hardness of scissors crossovers made of new materials make it possible to use high–temperature tempering resulting in obtaining of good crack resistance. However one should provide a good quality of castings made.

  19. Effects of Austenitizing and Forging on Mechanical Properties of MIL A-12560/AISI 4340 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbirowo, S.; Adjiantoro, B.; Romijarso, T. B.

    2017-05-01

    Laterite steels might be used for alternative armored steels. Their properties can be improved in various ways, such as by heat treatment. This paper reports the influences of tempering temperature on the hardness and microstructure of the modified MIL A-12560/AISI 4340 steels. Samples were austenitized at 1200, 1000, and 800°C and forged at 100, 75, and 50 tons. Mechanical properties consisted of Hardness measurement was conducted by Brinell indentation and metallographic observation was conducted by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that increasing forging force until 100 tons can decrease hardness. The formation of the microstructure consists of tempered martensite containing ferrite and dual phase perlite. The presence of void and porous can also decrease hardness. Decreasing austenizing temperature from 1200 °C to 800°C can increase material strength and hardness.

  20. Numerical simulation and experimental investigation of laser dissimilar welding of carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouie Esfahani, M. R.; Coupland, J.; Marimuthu, S.

    2015-07-01

    This study reports an experimental and numerical investigation on controlling the microstructure and brittle phase formation during laser dissimilar welding of carbon steel to austenitic stainless steel. The significance of alloying composition and cooling rate were experimentally investigated. The investigation revealed that above a certain specific point energy the material within the melt pool is well mixed and the laser beam position can be used to control the mechanical properties of the joint. The heat-affected zone within the high-carbon steel has significantly higher hardness than the weld area, which severely undermines the weld quality. A sequentially coupled thermo-metallurgical model was developed to investigate various heat-treatment methodology and subsequently control the microstructure of the HAZ. Strategies to control the composition leading to dramatic changes in hardness, microstructure and service performance of the dissimilar laser welded fusion zone are discussed.