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Sample records for auroral kilometric radiation

  1. Control factor of solar cycle variation of auroral kilometric radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Kumamoto,Atsushi/Ono, Takayuki/Oya,Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Solar cycle variations of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) observed by the Akebono satellite have been compared with the variations of F10.7 and solar wind dynamic pressure. F10.7 and solar wind dynamic pressure show different solar cycle variations: F10.7 increases during solar maximum and decreases during solar minimum. Solar wind dynamic pressure suddenly increases in the declining phase of solar activity and gradually decreases. The pressure minimum occurs during solar maximum. Statisti...

  2. Hollowness of the observed auroral kilometric radiation pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presumably also generated by electron cyclotron emission, the earth's auroral kilometric radiation would be expected to exhibit a hollow pattern in the direction of the source magnetic field, similar to that reported for the comparable emissions from Jupiter. Although previously overlooked, such hollowness is clearly present in the new pattern measurements of Green and Gallagher (1985) at 56 kHz, occupying source-centered latitudes of 30 degree to 45 degree and hence occurring exactly where it was predicted and previously observed. Being distributed in longitude and spanning the entire evening sector, presumably reflecting a similar longitudinal distribution of auroral zone sources, this hollowness is attributed to sources beamed preferentially in the poleward magnetic meridian

  3. 3D PiC code investigations of Auroral Kilometric Radiation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient (∼1%) electron cyclotron radio emissions are known to originate in the X mode from regions of locally depleted plasma in the Earths polar magnetosphere. These emissions are commonly referred to as the Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR). AKR occurs naturally in these polar regions where electrons are accelerated by electric fields into the increasing planetary magnetic dipole. Here conservation of the magnetic moment converts axial to rotational momentum forming a horseshoe distribution in velocity phase space. This distribution is unstable to cyclotron emission with radiation emitted in the X-mode. Initial studies were conducted in the form of 2D PiC code simulations [1] and a scaled laboratory experiment that was constructed to reproduce the mechanism of AKR. As studies progressed, 3D PiC code simulations were conducted to enable complete investigation of the complex interaction dimensions. A maximum efficiency of 1.25% is predicted from these simulations in the same mode and frequency as measured in the experiment. This is also consistent with geophysical observations and the predictions of theory.

  4. 3D PiC code simulations for a laboratory experimental investigation of Auroral Kilometric Radiation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, K. M.; Speirs, D. C.; Ronald, K.; McConville, S. L.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Bingham, R.; Cross, A. W.; Robertson, C. W.; Whyte, C. G.; He, W.; Vorgul, I.; Cairns, R. A.; Kellett, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR), occurs naturally in the polar regions of the Earth's magnetosphere where electrons are accelerated by electric fields into the increasing planetary magnetic dipole. Here conservation of the magnetic moment converts axial to rotational momentum forming a horseshoe distribution in velocity phase space. This distribution is unstable to cyclotron emission with radiation emitted in the X-mode. In a scaled laboratory reproduction of this process, a 75-85 keV electron beam of 5-40 A was magnetically compressed by a system of solenoids and emissions were observed for cyclotron frequencies of 4.42 GHz and 11.7 GHz resonating with near cut-off TE0,1 and TE0,3 modes, respectively. Here we compare these measurements with numerical predictions from the 3D PiC code KARAT. The 3D simulations accurately predicted the radiation modes and frequencies produced by the experiment. The predicted conversion efficiency between electron kinetic and wave field energy of around 1% is close to the experimental measurements and broadly consistent with quasi-linear theoretical analysis and geophysical observations.

  5. 3D PiC code simulations for a laboratory experimental investigation of Auroral Kilometric Radiation mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, K M; Speirs, D C; Ronald, K; McConville, S L; Phelps, A D R; Bingham, R; Cross, A W; Robertson, C W; Whyte, C G; He, W [SUPA Department of Physics, John Anderson Building, 107 Rottenrow, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Vorgul, I; Cairns, R A [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, St Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Kellett, B J [Space Science and Technology Department, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)], E-mail: karen.gillespie@strath.ac.uk

    2008-12-15

    Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR), occurs naturally in the polar regions of the Earth's magnetosphere where electrons are accelerated by electric fields into the increasing planetary magnetic dipole. Here conservation of the magnetic moment converts axial to rotational momentum forming a horseshoe distribution in velocity phase space. This distribution is unstable to cyclotron emission with radiation emitted in the X-mode. In a scaled laboratory reproduction of this process, a 75-85 keV electron beam of 5-40 A was magnetically compressed by a system of solenoids and emissions were observed for cyclotron frequencies of 4.42 GHz and 11.7 GHz resonating with near cut-off TE{sub 0,1} and TE{sub 0,3} modes, respectively. Here we compare these measurements with numerical predictions from the 3D PiC code KARAT. The 3D simulations accurately predicted the radiation modes and frequencies produced by the experiment. The predicted conversion efficiency between electron kinetic and wave field energy of around 1% is close to the experimental measurements and broadly consistent with quasi-linear theoretical analysis and geophysical observations.

  6. 3D PiC code simulations for a laboratory experimental investigation of Auroral Kilometric Radiation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR), occurs naturally in the polar regions of the Earth's magnetosphere where electrons are accelerated by electric fields into the increasing planetary magnetic dipole. Here conservation of the magnetic moment converts axial to rotational momentum forming a horseshoe distribution in velocity phase space. This distribution is unstable to cyclotron emission with radiation emitted in the X-mode. In a scaled laboratory reproduction of this process, a 75-85 keV electron beam of 5-40 A was magnetically compressed by a system of solenoids and emissions were observed for cyclotron frequencies of 4.42 GHz and 11.7 GHz resonating with near cut-off TE0,1 and TE0,3 modes, respectively. Here we compare these measurements with numerical predictions from the 3D PiC code KARAT. The 3D simulations accurately predicted the radiation modes and frequencies produced by the experiment. The predicted conversion efficiency between electron kinetic and wave field energy of around 1% is close to the experimental measurements and broadly consistent with quasi-linear theoretical analysis and geophysical observations.

  7. Kilometric radio waves generated along auroral field lines observed by ground facilities - A theoretical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Wu, C. S.; Yoon, Peter H.

    1991-01-01

    A theory of generation of radio waves observed by ground-based facilities in the frequency range 150-700 kHz is discussed. This work is a continuation of an earlier discussion (Wu et al., 1989) in which it was proposed that the trapped electrons along the auroral field lines can lead to a cyclotron instability which amplifies the whistler waves observed at ground level. The objective of the present study is to investigate the propagation effect on the wave amplification and to examine whether the proposed mechanism is indeed viable.

  8. The influence of Titan on Saturn kilometric radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Menietti

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that the occurrence probability of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR appears to be influenced by the local time of Titan. Using a more extensive set of data than the original study, we confirm the correlation of higher occurrence probability of SKR when Titan is located near local midnight. In addition, the direction finding capability of the Cassini Radio Plasma Wave instrument (RPWS is used to determine if this radio emission emanates from particular source regions. We find that most source regions of SKR are located in the mid-morning sector of local time even when Titan is located near midnight. However, some emission does appear to have a source in the Saturnian nightside, consistent with electron precipitation from field lines that have recently mapped to near Titan.

  9. Terrestrial kilometric radiation. III - Average spectral properties. [observations by IMP-6 and RAE-2 satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, M. L.; Alexander, J. K.

    1977-01-01

    The spectral properties of terrestrial kilometric radiation (TKR) derived from observations made during radio-astronomy experiments on board the Imp 6 and Radio Astronomy Explorer 2 spacecraft are studied. As viewed from near the equatorial plane, TKR is most intense and most often observed in the 2100-2400 LT zone and is rarely seen in the 0900-1200 LT zone. The absolute flux levels in the 100- to 600-kHz TKR band increase significantly with increasing substorm activity as inferred from the auroral electrojet index (AE). In the late-evening sector the median power increases by about 3 orders of magnitude between quiet periods (AE less than 75 gammas) and disturbed periods (AE above 200 gammas). The peak flux density usually occurs near 250 kHz, although the frequency of the peak in the flux spectrum appears to vary inversely with AE from a maximum near 300 kHz during very quiet times to a minimum below 200 kHz during very disturbed times. The half-power bandwidth is typically 100% of the peak frequency. The variation of TKR flux density with apparent source altitude indicates that source strength decreases more rapidly than the inverse square of distance.

  10. Linear prediction studies for the solar wind and Saturn kilometric radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Taubenschuss

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The external control of Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR by the solar wind has been investigated in the frame of the Linear Prediction Theory (LPT. The LPT establishes a linear filter function on the basis of correlations between input signals, i.e. time profiles for solar wind parameters, and output signals, i.e. time profiles for SKR intensity. Three different experiments onboard the Cassini spacecraft (RPWS, MAG and CAPS yield appropriate data sets for compiling the various input and output signals. The time period investigated ranges from DOY 202 to 326, 2004 and is only limited due to limited availability of CAPS plasma data for the solar wind. During this time Cassini was positioned mainly on the morning side on its orbit around Saturn at low southern latitudes. Four basic solar wind quantities have been found to exert a clear influence on the SKR intensity profile. These quantities are: the solar wind bulk velocity, the solar wind ram pressure, the magnetic field strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF and the y-component of the IMF. All four inputs exhibit nearly the same level of efficiency for the linear prediction indicating that all four inputs are possible drivers for triggering SKR. Furthermore, they act at completely different lag times ranging from ~13 h for the ram pressure to ~52 h for the bulk velocity. The lag time for the magnetic field strength is usually beyond ~40 h and the lag time for the y-component of the magnetic field is located around 30 h. Considering that all four solar wind quantities are interrelated in a corotating interaction region, only the influence of the ram pressure seems to be of reasonable relevance. An increase in ram pressure causes a substantial compression of Saturn's magnetosphere leading to tail collapse, injection of hot plasma from the tail into the outer magnetosphere and finally to an intensification of auroral dynamics and SKR emission. So, after the onset of magnetospheric

  11. Accaleration of Electrons of the Outer Electron Radiation Belt and Auroral Oval Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, Elizaveta; Ovchinnikov, Ilya; Riazantseva, Maria; Znatkova, Svetlana; Pulinets, Maria; Vorobjev, Viachislav; Yagodkina, Oksana; Stepanova, Marina

    2016-07-01

    We summarize the results of experimental observations demonstrating the role of auroral processes in the formation of the outer electron radiation belt and magnetic field distortion during magnetic storms. We show that the auroral oval does not mapped to the plasma sheet proper (region with magnetic field lines stretched in the tailward direction). It is mapped to the surrounding the Earth plasma ring in which transverse currents are closed inside the magnetosphere. Such currents constitute the high latitude continuation of the ordinary ring current. Mapping of the auroral oval to the region of high latitude continuation of the ordinary ring current explains the ring like shape of the auroral oval with finite thickness near noon and auroral oval dynamics during magnetic storms. The auroral oval shift to low latitudes during storms. The development of the ring current produce great distortion of the Earth's magnetic field and corresponding adiabatic variations of relativistic electron fluxes. Development of the asymmetric ring current produce the dawn-dusk asymmetry of such fluxes. We analyze main features of the observed processes including formation of sharp plasma pressure profiles during storms. The nature of observed pressure peak is analyzed. It is shown that the observed sharp pressure peak is directly connected with the creation of the seed population of relativistic electrons. The possibility to predict the position of new radiation belt during recovery phase of the magnetic storm using data of low orbiting and ground based observations is demonstrated.

  12. Generation of radiation at combination frequencies in the region of the auroral electric jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapustin, I.N.; Pertsovskii, R.A.; Vasil' ev, A.N.; Smirnov, V.S.; Raspopov, O.M.; Solov' eva, L.E.; Ul' yachenko, A.A.; Arykov, A.A.; Galakhova, N.V.

    1977-03-05

    An experiment was performed aimed at recording radiation at combination frequencies when the ionosphere is acted upon, by high-power amplitude-modulated short-wave radio emission in the region of the auroral electric jet. It is found that the intensity of the radiation at the combination frequency depends on the distance between the auroral current jet from the center of the zone of the active action in the ionosphere, as well as on the strength of the current in the electric jet.

  13. Ion cyclotron harmonics in the Saturn downward current auroral region

    OpenAIRE

    Menietti, J.D.; Schippers, P.; Santolík, O; Gurnett, D. A.; Crary, F.; Coates, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of intense upgoing electron beams and diffuse ion beams have been reported during a pass by Cassini in a downward current auroral region, nearby a source region of Saturn kilometric radiation. Using the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument low frequency waveform receiver and the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer Investigation (CAPS) instrument we have been able to identify ion cyclotron harmonic waves associated with the particle beams. These observations indicate si...

  14. Energy deposition and non-equilibrium infared radiation of energetic auroral electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yadong; Gao, Bo; Zhu, Guangsheng; Li, Ziguang

    2016-07-01

    Infrared radiation caused by energetic auroral electrons plays an important role in the thermospheric hear budget, and may be seen as background by infrared surveillance sensors. The auroral electron deposition leads to the ionization, excitation, and dissociation of neutral species(N2,O2,and O), and initiates a series of chemical reaction in the upper atmosphere, finally causes the optical emission of infared excited emitters. In this study, the whole progress from the initial auroral electrons energy deposition to the final infrared emissions has been modeled, which including space plasma, atmospheric physical chemistry, and radiative transfer. The initial atmosphere parameters before auroral disturbing are given by MSIS00 model. The primary electron flux at the top of atmosphere is given by a statistical fitting with the sum of three distribution terms, a power law, a Maxwellian and a Guassian. A semi-emprical model is used in the calculation of energy depositon of single primary electron. The total integral ion pairs production rate is obtained after combining with the initial primary electron flux. The production rate and flux of secondary electrons are modeled with a continuous slow down approximation, using different excitation, ionization, dissociation cross sections of N2, O2, and O to electrons. The photochemical reactions with auroral disturbance is analysed, and its calculation model is established. A "three-step" calculation method is created to obtain number densities of eleven species in the hight between 90-160 km, which containing N2+, O2+, O+, O2+(a4Π), O+(2D), O+(2P), N2(A3Σ), N(2D), N(4S), NO+, and N+. Number densities of different vibraional levels of NO and NO+ are got with steady state assumption, considering 1-12 vibrational levels of NO and 1-14 vibrational levels of NO+. The infared emissions and the spectral lines of the two radiating bodies are calculated with a fuzzy model of spectral band.

  15. Relationship between solar wind corotating interaction regions and the phasing and intensity of Saturn kilometric radiation bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Badman

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Voyager spacecraft measurements of Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR identified two features of these radio emissions: that they pulse at a period close to the planetary rotation period, and that the emitted intensity is correlated with the solar wind dynamic pressure (Desch and Kaiser, 1981; Desch, 1982; Desch and Rucker, 1983. In this study the inter-relation between the intensity and the pulsing of the SKR is analysed using Cassini spacecraft measurements of the interplanetary medium and SKR over the interval encompassing Cassini's approach to Saturn, and the first extended orbit. Cassini Plasma Spectrometer ion data were only available for a subset of the dates of interest, so the interplanetary conditions were studied primarily using the near-continuously available magnetic field data, augmented by the ion moment data when available. Intense SKR bursts were identified when solar wind compressions arrived at Saturn. The intensity of subsequent emissions detected by Cassini during the compression intervals was variable, sometimes remaining intense for several planetary rotations, sometimes dimming and rarely disappearing. The timings of the initial intense SKR peaks were sometimes independent of the long-term pulsing behaviour identified in the SKR data. Overall, however, the pulsing of the SKR peaks during the disturbed intervals was not significantly altered relative to that during non-compression intervals.

  16. The Square Kilometre Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Minh; Lazio, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be the premier instrument to study radiation at centimetre and metre wavelengths from the cosmos, and in particular neutral hydrogen, the most abundant element in the universe. The SKA will probe the dawn of galaxy formation as well as allow advances in many other areas of astronomy, such as fundamental physics, astro-biology and cosmology. The SKA will have a collecting area of up to one million square metres spread over at least 3000 km, providing a collecting area more than twenty times greater than the current largest radio telescope. Its field of view on the sky will be several tens of square degrees with potentially several large (100 square degrees) independent beams at the lower frequencies, providing a survey speed many thousands of times greater than current facilities. This paper summarises the key science drivers of the SKA and provides an update on the international project.

  17. Multi-Spacecraft Observations of Saturn Kilometric Radio Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDowall, R. J.; Hess, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR) is the auroral radio emission of Saturn, which has been observed by Voyager 1 & 2, Cassini, and Ulysses. Ulysses is able to detect the intense intervals of SKR from distances up to 10 AU, because of its long antennas (72 m tip-to-tip) and sensitive radio receivers. Studies of SKR by A. Lecacheux gave the surprising result that the periodicity of SKR varied with time; it was not locked to a planetary rotation of Saturn. This result has been confirmed by Cassini radio observations. Here, we compare Ulysses and Cassini observations of SKR to constrain a mode! for the SKR emission geometry. SpecifIcally, we examine the question - are the brighter sources of 5KR fixed in Saturn longitude or local time? The results have significant consequences for our understanding of SKR and its varying periodicity

  18. Wave-particle interaction in the auroral ionosphere in LF and HF range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma wave observations using the sounding rockets, S-310JA-11 and S-310JA-12 have disclosed the following new aspects of wave-particle interaction processes in the auroral ionosphere: 1) generation of intense Z-mode waves by auroral particles through the inverse Landau damping, 2) confirmation of the leaked components of auroral kilometric radiation, and 3) detection of naturally generated electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ESCH) waves in the frequency range lower than the local electron cyclotron frequency. It is pointed out that Z-mode waves in the auroral region have a very important role because the waves are easily generated being coupled with the particle precipitation. The leaked component of AKR is an important manifestation of the mode conversion processes. The generation of ESCH waves are associated with the nonlinear wave-particle interaction. The newly detected ESCH wave phenomena correspond to n = 0 case of the fDn emissions. (author)

  19. External control of the Saturn kilometric radiation by the solar wind - Comparison between Voyager 1 and 2 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, H. O.; Rabl, G. K. F.; Desch, M. D.

    1989-01-01

    The long-term modulation of Saturn's nonthermal radio emission in the kilometric wavelength range has been studied based upon data obtained by Voyagers 1 and 2. A comparison of the ballistic and hydrodynamic propagation of solar wind features from the spacecraft to Saturn allows the uncertainty inherent in the projection to be determined. The results confirm the previous suggestion that momentum, ram pressure, and kinetic energy flux are the primary solar wind parameters that drive the nonthermal radio emission. It is suggested that, under certain conditions and for limited periods of time, the magnetic properties and time derivatives of the solar wind have increased importance.

  20. Laboratory study of auroral cyclotron emission processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald, Kevin

    2007-11-01

    Electrons encounter an increasing magnetic field and increase in pitch angle as they descend towards the auroral ionosphere, according to the conservation of the magnetic moment. This process results in a horseshoe shaped distribution function in electron velocity space which has been observed by satellites [1]. Research has shown this distribution to be unstable to a cyclotron maser instability [2] and the emitted Auroral Kilometric Radiation is observed to be polarised in the extraordinary mode. Experimental results are presented based on an electron beam of energy 75keV having a cyclotron frequency of 4.45GHz, compressed using magnet coils to mimic the naturally occurring phenomenon. The emitted radiation spectrum was observed to be close to the cyclotron frequency. Electron transport measurements confirmed that the horseshoe distribution function was obtained. Measurements of the antenna pattern radiated from the output window demonstrated the radiation to be polarised and propagating perpendicular to the static magnetic field. The radiation generation efficiency was estimated to be 2% in close agreement to the numerical predictions of the 2D PiC code KARAT. The efficiency was also comparable with estimates of the astrophysical phenomenon. [1] R. J. Strangeway et al, Geophys. Rev. Lett., 25, 1998, pp. 2065-2068 [2] I Vorgul et al, Physics of Plasmas, 12, 2005, pp. 1-8

  1. External control of the Saturn kilometric radiation by the solar wind: comparison between Voyager 1 and 2 observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relatively long periods of observation of Saturn's non-thermal radio emission (SKR) in the kilometric wavelength range by Voyagers 1 and 2 (V1, V2) allowed a detailed investigation of the long-term modulation of SKR to be made. Previous studies have shown that the solar wind quantities momentum, ram pressure and kinetic energy flux are the dominant drivers of SKR. On the basis of these earlier investigations the present study includes several important improvements in order to derive a consistent view of the external control of SKR. A comparison of ballistic and hydrodynamic propagation of solar wind features from the spacecraft to Saturn allows the uncertainty inherent in the projection to be checked. The present study also includes the complete set of the solar wind time derivative profiles in order to check the response of SKR to the onset of any external influence. The main outcome of this study confirms that momentum, ram pressure, and kinetic energy flux are the primary solar wind parameters in stimulating SKR. There are indications that, under certain conditions and for limited periods of time, magnetic properties and time derivatives of the solar wind have increased importance

  2. The Square Kilometre Array

    OpenAIRE

    Lazio, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is intended as the next-generation radio telescope and will address fundamental questions in astrophysics, physics, and astrobiology. The international science community has developed a set of Key Science Programs: (1) Emerging from the Dark Ages and the Epoch of Reionization, (2) Galaxy Evolution, Cosmology, and Dark Energy, (3) The Origin and Evolution of Cosmic Magnetism, (4) Strong Field Tests of Gravity Using Pulsars and Black Holes, and (5) The Cradle of...

  3. Study of AKR hollow pattern characteristics at sub-auroral regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Sawas, Sami; Galopeau, Patrick; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Schwingenschuh, Konrad

    2014-05-01

    The Earth's auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) is expected to exhibit a hollow pattern similar to that reported for the comparable emissions from Jupiter (e.g. Jovian decametric emissions - DAM). The hollow pattern is a hollow cone beam with apex at the point of AKR emission, axis tangent to the magnetic field direction, and an opening angle of the order of 80°. The properties of the hollow cone can be derived from the so-called dynamic spectrum which displays the radiation versus the observation time and the frequency. We analyze the auroral kilometric radiation recorded by the electric field experiment (ICE) onboard DEMETER micro-satellite. The dynamic spectra lead us to study the occurrence of the AKR recorded in the sub-auroral regions when the micro-satellite was at altitudes of about 700 km. We address in this contribution issues concerning the characteristics (occurrence, latitude and longitude) of the AKR hollow beam and their relations to the seasonal and solar activity variations.

  4. The Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Rawlings, Steve

    2011-01-01

    We review the current status of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) by outlining the science drivers for its Phase-1 (SKA1) and setting out the timeline for the key decisions and milestones on the way to the planned start of its construction in 2016. We explain how Phase-2 SKA (SKA2) will transform the research scope of the SKA infrastructure, placing it amongst the great astronomical observatories and survey instruments of the future, and opening up new areas of discovery, many beyond the confines of conventional astronomy.

  5. Saturn's auroral morphology and field-aligned currents during a solar wind compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badman, S. V.; Provan, G.; Bunce, E. J.; Mitchell, D. G.; Melin, H.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Radioti, A.; Kurth, W. S.; Pryor, W. R.; Nichols, J. D.; Jinks, S. L.; Stallard, T. S.; Brown, R. H.; Baines, K. H.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    On 21-22 April 2013, during a coordinated auroral observing campaign, instruments onboard Cassini and the Hubble Space Telescope observed Saturn's aurora while Cassini traversed Saturn's high latitude auroral field lines. Signatures of upward and downward field-aligned currents were detected in the nightside magnetosphere in the magnetic field and plasma measurements. The location of the upward current corresponded to the bright ultraviolet auroral arc seen in the auroral images, and the downward current region was located poleward of the upward current in an aurorally dark region. Within the polar cap magnetic field and plasma fluctuations were identified with periods of ∼20 and ∼60 min. The northern and southern auroral ovals were observed to rock in latitude in phase with the respective northern and southern planetary period oscillations. A solar wind compression impacted Saturn's magnetosphere at the start of 22 April 2013, identified by an intensification and extension to lower frequencies of the Saturn kilometric radiation, with the following sequence of effects: (1) intensification of the auroral field-aligned currents; (2) appearance of a localised, intense bulge in the dawnside (04-06 LT) aurora while the midnight sector aurora remained fainter and narrow; and (3) latitudinal broadening and poleward contraction of the nightside aurora, where the poleward motion in this sector is opposite to that expected from a model of the auroral oval's usual oscillation. These observations are interpreted as the response to tail reconnection events, initially involving Vasyliunas-type reconnection of closed mass-loaded magnetotail field lines, and then proceeding onto open lobe field lines, causing the contraction of the polar cap region on the night side.

  6. 3D-modelling of the stellar auroral radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Leto, P; Buemi, C S; Umana, G; Ingallinera, A; Cerrigone, L

    2016-01-01

    The electron cyclotron maser is the coherent emission process that gives rise to the radio lighthouse effect observed in the hot magnetic chemically peculiar star CU Virginis. It has also been proposed to explain the highly circularly polarized radio pulses observed on some ultra cool dwarfs, with spectral type earlier than M7. Such kind of coherent events resemble the auroral radio emission from the magnetized planets of the solar system. In this paper, we present a tridimensional model able to simulate the timing and profile of the pulses emitted by those stars characterized by a dipolar magnetic field by following the hypothesis of the laminar source model, used to explain the beaming of the terrestrial auroral kilometric radiation. This model proves to be a powerful tool to understand the auroral radio-emission phenomenon, allowing us to derive some general conclusions about the effects of the model's free parameters on the features of the coherent pulses, and to learn more about the detectability of such...

  7. 3D modelling of stellar auroral radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leto, P.; Trigilio, C.; Buemi, C. S.; Umana, G.; Ingallinera, A.; Cerrigone, L.

    2016-06-01

    The electron cyclotron maser is the coherent emission process that gives rise to the radio lighthouse effect observed in the hot magnetic chemically peculiar star CU Virginis. It has also been proposed to explain the highly circularly polarized radio pulses observed in some ultracool dwarfs with spectral type earlier than M7. Coherent events of this kind resemble auroral radio emission from the magnetized planets of the Solar system. In this article, we present a three-dimensional model able to simulate the timing and profile of the pulses emitted by those stars characterized by a dipolar magnetic field by following the hypothesis of the laminar source model, used to explain the beaming of terrestrial auroral kilometric radiation. This model proves to be a powerful tool with which to understand the auroral radio emission phenomenon, allowing us to derive some general conclusions about the effects of the model's free parameters on the features of coherent pulses and to learn more about the detectability of such pulsed radio emission.

  8. Characterization of a Penning discharge for investigation of auroral radio wave generation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR), observed by satellites in the Earth's magnetosphere, is naturally generated in regions of partial plasma depletion (auroral density cavity) in the polar magnetosphere at approximately 3200 km altitude. As an electron descends through these regions of partial plasma depletion along magnetic field lines towards the Earth's ionosphere, the field lines increases and, through conservation of the magnetic moment, the electron gives up axial velocity in favour of perpendicular velocity. This results in a horseshoe-shaped distribution function in parallel/perpendicular-velocity space which is unstable to X-mode radiation, near the cyclotron frequency. Power levels as high as GW levels have been recorded with frequencies around 300 kHz. The background plasma frequency within the auroral density cavity is approximately 9 kHz corresponding to a plasma density 1 cm−3. A laboratory experiment scaled from auroral frequency to microwave frequency has previously been reported. Here, the addition of a Penning trap to simulate the background plasma of the density cavity is reported, with measurements ne ∼ 2 × 1014–2.17 × 1015 m−3, fpe ∼ 128–418 MHz and fce ∼ 5.21 GHz giving a ratio of ωce/ωpe comparable to the magnetospheric AKR source region.

  9. Planetary period oscillations in Saturn's magnetosphere: Further comments on the relationship between post-equinox properties deduced from magnetic field and Saturn kilometric radiation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, S. W. H.; Provan, G.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the planetary period oscillations (PPOs) observed by the Cassini spacecraft in Saturn's magnetosphere, in particular the relationship between the properties of the PPOs in the post-equinox interval as observed in magnetic field data by Andrews et al. (2012) and Provan et al. (2013, 2014) and in Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR) emissions by Fischer et al. (2014, 2015), whose results are somewhat discrepant. We show that differences in the reported PPO periods, a fundamental property which should be essentially identical in the two data sets, can largely be accounted for by the phenomenon of dual modulation of the SKR emissions in polarization-separated data, in which the modulation associated with one hemisphere is also present in the other. Misidentification of the modulations results in a reported reversal in the SKR periods in the initial post-equinox interval, south for north and vice versa, relative to the magnetic oscillations whose hemispheric origin is more securely identified through the field component phase relations. Dual modulation also results in the apparent occurrence of phase-locked common periods in the northern and southern SKR data during later intervals during which two separate periods are clearly discerned in the magnetic data through beat modulations in both phase and amplitude. We further show that the argument of Fischer et al. (2015) concerning the phase relation between the magnetic field oscillations and the SKR modulations is erroneous, the phase difference between them revealing the local time (LT) of the upward field-aligned current of the PPO current system at times of SKR modulation maxima. Furthermore, this LT is found to vary significantly over the Cassini mission from dawn, to dusk, and to noon, depending on the LT of apoapsis where the spacecraft spends most time. These variations are consistent with the view that the SKR modulation is fundamentally a rotating system like the magnetic perturbations, though

  10. An Overview of the Square Kilometre Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Minh T.; Lazio, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be the premier instrument to study radiation at centimetre and metre wavelengths from the cosmos, and in particular hydrogen, the most abundant element in the universe. The SKA will probe the dawn of galaxy formation as well as allow advances in many other areas of astronomy, such as fundamental physics, astrobiology and cosmology. Phase 1, which will be about 10% of the full SKA collecting area, will be built in Australia and South Africa. This paper describes the key science drivers of the SKA, provides an update on recent SKA Organisation activities and summarises the baseline design for Phase 1.

  11. Electron-cylotron maser radiation from electron holes: downward current region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electron-cyclotron maser emission theory from electron holes is applied to holes generated in the downward current region of the aurora. It is argued that the main background auroral kilometric radiation source may still be located in the upward current region electron-ring (horseshoe distribution while the fine structure is caused by electron holes predominantly in the downward current region. There the existence of electron holes is well established and electron densities are high enough for substantial maser growth rates. Trapping of radiation by the holes provides strong amplification. Upward motion of holes favours the escape of radiation both, from the holes and from the downward current region, into the upward current region. Since upward and downward current regions always exist simultaneously, they are acting in tandem in generating auroral kilometric radiation and its fine structure by the same mechanism though in different ways. This mechanism solves the long-standing problem of auroral kilometric radiation fine structure.

  12. Globalisation of science in kilometres

    CERN Document Server

    Waltman, Ludo; van Eck, Nees Jan

    2011-01-01

    The ongoing globalisation of science has undisputedly a major impact on how and where scientific research is being conducted nowadays. Yet, the big picture remains blurred. It is largely unknown where this process is heading, and at which rate. Which countries are leading or lagging? Many of its key features are difficult if not impossible to capture in measurements and comparative statistics. Our empirical study measures the extent and growth rate of globalisation in terms of the physical distance between co-authoring researchers. Our computations, drawing on 21 million research publications across all countries and fields of science, reveals that contemporary science has globalised at a fairly steady rate during recent decades. The average collaboration distance per publication has increased from 334 kilometres in 1980 to 1553 in 2009. Despite significant differences in globalisation rates across countries and fields of science, we observe a pervasive process in motion, moving towards a truly interconnected...

  13. Laboratory Reproduction of Auroral Magnetospheric Radio Wave Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald, K.; Speirs, D. C.; McConville, S. L.; Gillespie, K. M.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Cross, A. W.; Bingham, R.; Robertson, C. W.; Whyte, C. G.; Vorgul, I.; Cairns, R. A.; Kellett, B. J.; He, W.

    2008-10-01

    Auroral Kilometric Radiation, AKR, occurs naturally in the polar regions of the Earth's magnetosphere where electrons are accelerated by electric fields into the increasing planetary magnetic dipole. Here conservation of the magnetic moment converts axial to rotational momentum forming a horseshoe distribution in velocity phase space. This distribution is unstable to cyclotron emissions and radiation is emitted in the X-mode. In the laboratory a 75-85kV electron beam of 5-40A was magnetically compressed by a system of solenoids. Results are presented for an electron beam gyrating at cyclotron frequencies of 4.42GHz and 11.7GHz resonating with near cut-off TE01 and TE03 modes respectively. Measurements of the electron transport combined with numerical simulations demonstrated that a horseshoe distribution function was formed in electron velocity space. Analysis of the experimental measurements allowed the inference of the 1D number density as a function of the electron beam pitch angle. The total power emitted experimentally was ~19-35 kW with a maximum RF emission efficiency of ~2%. These results were compared to those obtained numerically using a 2D PiC code KARAT with a maximum efficiency of 2% predicted for the same mode and frequency, consistent with astrophysical and theoretical results.

  14. Laboratory Reproduction of Auroral Magnetospheric Radio Wave Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auroral Kilometric Radiation, AKR, occurs naturally in the polar regions of the Earth's magnetosphere where electrons are accelerated by electric fields into the increasing planetary magnetic dipole. Here conservation of the magnetic moment converts axial to rotational momentum forming a horseshoe distribution in velocity phase space. This distribution is unstable to cyclotron emissions and radiation is emitted in the X-mode. In the laboratory a 75-85kV electron beam of 5-40A was magnetically compressed by a system of solenoids. Results are presented for an electron beam gyrating at cyclotron frequencies of 4.42GHz and 11.7GHz resonating with near cut-off TE01 and TE03 modes respectively. Measurements of the electron transport combined with numerical simulations demonstrated that a horseshoe distribution function was formed in electron velocity space. Analysis of the experimental measurements allowed the inference of the 1D number density as a function of the electron beam pitch angle. The total power emitted experimentally was ∼19-35 kW with a maximum RF emission efficiency of ∼2%. These results were compared to those obtained numerically using a 2D PiC code KARAT with a maximum efficiency of 2% predicted for the same mode and frequency, consistent with astrophysical and theoretical results.

  15. Forecast of auroral activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique is developed to predict auroral activity based on a sample of over 9000 auroral sites identified in global auroral images obtained by an ultraviolet imager on the NASA Polar satellite during a 6-month period. Four attributes of auroral activity sites are utilized in forecasting, namely, the area, the power, and the rates of change in area and power. This new technique is quite accurate, as indicated by the high true skill scores for forecasting three different levels of auroral dissipation during the activity lifetime. The corresponding advanced warning time ranges from 22 to 79 min from low to high dissipation levels

  16. The Spanish Square Kilometre Array White Book

    CERN Document Server

    Pulido, J A Acosta; Alberdi, A; Alcolea, J; Alfaro, E J; Alonso-Herrero, A; Anglada, G; Arnalte-Mur, P; Ascasibar, Y; Ascaso, B; Azulay, R; Bachiller, R; Baez-Rubio, A; Battaner, E; Blasco, J; Brook, C B; Bujarrabal, V; Busquet, G; Caballero-Garcia, M D; Carrasco-Gonzalez, C; Casares, J; Castro-Tirado, A J; Colina, L; Colomer, F; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I; del Olmo, A; Desmurs, J-F; Diego, J M; Dominguez-Tenreiro, R; Estalella, R; Fernandez-Soto, A; Florido, E; Font, J; Font, J A; Fuente, A; Garcia-Burillo, S; Garcia-Benito, R; Garcia-Lorenzo, B; de Paz, A Gil; Girart, J M; Goicoechea, J R; Gomez, J F; Gonzalez-Garcia, M; Gonzalez-Martin, O; Gonzalez-Serrano, J I; Gorgas, J; Gorosabel, J; Guijarro, A; Guirado, J C; Hernandez-Garcia, L; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Herrero-Illana, R; Hu, Y-D; Huelamo, N; Huertas-Company, M; Iglesias-Paramo, J; Jeong, S; Jimenez-Serra, I; Knapen, J H; Lineros, R A; Lisenfeld, U; Marcaide, J M; Marquez, I; Marti, J; Marti, J M; Martinez-Gonzalez, E; Martin-Pintado, J; Marti-Vidal, I; Masegosa, J; Mayen-Gijon, J M; Mezcua, M; Mimica, S/ Migliari P; Moldon, J; Morata, O; Negueruela, I; Oates, S R; Osorio, M; Palau, A; Paredes, J M; Perea, J; Perez-Gonzalez, P G; Perez-Montero, E; Perez-Torres, M A; Perucho, M; Planelles, S; Pons, J A; Prieto, A; Quilis, V; Ramirez-Moreta, P; Almeida, C Ramos; Rea, N; Ribo, M; Rioja, M J; Espinosa, J M Rodriguez; Ros, E; Rubiño-Martin, J A; Ruiz-Granados, B; Sabater, J; Sanchez, M A P; Usero, A; Verdes-Montenegro, L; Vidal-Garcia, A; Vielva, P; Vilchez, J; Zhang, B-B

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is called to revolutionise essentially all areas of Astrophysics. With a collecting area of about a square kilometre, the SKA will be a transformational instrument, and its scientific potential will go beyond the interests of astronomers. Its technological challenges and huge cost requires a multinational effort, and Europe has recognised this by putting the SKA on the roadmap of the European Strategy Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI). The Spanish SKA White Book is the result of the coordinated effort of 119 astronomers from 40 different research centers. The book shows the enormous scientific interest of the Spanish astronomical community in the SKA and warrants an optimum scientific exploitation of the SKA by Spanish researchers, if Spain enters the SKA project.

  17. Advancing Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Fender, Rob; Govoni, Federica; Green, Jimi; Hoare, Melvin; Jarvis, Matt; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Keane, Evan; Koopmans, Leon; Kramer, Michael; Maartens, Roy; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Mellema, Garrelt; Oosterloo, Tom; Prandoni, Isabella; Pritchard, Jonathan; Santos, Mario; Seymour, Nick; Stappers, Ben; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Tian, Wen Wu; Umana, Grazia; Wagg, Jeff; Bourke, Tyler L; AASKA14

    2015-01-01

    In 2014 it was 10 years since the publication of the comprehensive ‘Science with the Square Kilometre Array’ book and 15 years since the first such volume appeared in 1999. In that time numerous and unexpected advances have been made in the fields of astronomy and physics relevant to the capabilities of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). The SKA itself progressed from an idea to a developing reality with a baselined Phase 1 design (SKA1) and construction planned from 2017. To facilitate the publication of a new, updated science book, which will be relevant to the current astrophysical context, the meeting "Advancing Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array" was held in Giardina Naxos, Sicily. Articles were solicited from the community for that meeting to document the scientific advances enabled by the first phase of the SKA and those pertaining to future SKA deployments, with expected gains of 5 times the Phase 1 sensitivity below 350 MHz, about 10 times the Phase 1 sensitivity above 350 MHz and with f...

  18. Transient Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Fender, Rob; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Donnarumma, Immacolata; Murphy, Tara; Deller, Adam; Paragi, Zsolt; Chatterjee, Shami

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the possibilities for transient and variable-source astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array. While subsequent chapters focus on the astrophysics of individual events, we focus on the broader picture, and how to maximise the science coming from the telescope. The SKA as currently designed will be a fantastic and ground-breaking facility for radio transient studies, but the scientifc yield will be dramatically increased by the addition of (i) near-real-time commensal searches of data streams for events, and (ii) on occasion, rapid robotic response to Target-of-Opprtunity style triggers.

  19. Auroral Tomography Workshop, Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In ionospheric and atmospheric physics the importance of multi-station imaging has grown as a consequence of the availability of scientific grade CCD cameras with digital output and affordable massive computing power. Tomographic inversion techniques are used in many different areas, e.g. medicine, plasma research and space physics. The tomography workshop was announced to gather a limited group of people interested in auroral tomography or tomographic inversion methods in general. ALIS (Auroral Large Imaging System) is a multi-station ground-based system developed primarily for three-dimensional auroral imaging, however other non-auroral objects can be studied with ALIS, e.g. stratospheric clouds. Several of the contributions in the workshop dealt with problems related to geometries similar to the ALIS-configuration. The Proceedings contain written contributions received either in abstract form or as full papers. The Proceedings also contain contributions intended for the Workshop but not presented due to the absence of the speaker. Separate abstracts have been prepared for 15 of the 17 papers

  20. Square Kilometre Array key science: a progressive retrospective

    OpenAIRE

    Carilli, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    I summarize the science drivers presented at the workshop for Phase I of the Square Kilometre Array: 'Advancing Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array'. I build from the historical perspective of the original Key Science programs: 'Science with a Square Kilometre Array', and consider progress in astrophysics since 2004. I then present my 'score card' of the primary science drivers proposed by the Science Working Groups, and further developed in the white papers and presentations at the ...

  1. Science with the Square Kilometre Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazio, Joseph; Huynh, Minh

    2010-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is the centimeter- and meter-wavelength telescope for the 21st Century. Its Key Science Projects are (a) The end of the Dark Ages, involving searches for an H i signature and the first metalrich systems; (b) Testing theories of gravitation using an array of pulsars to search for gravitational waves and relativistic binaries to probe the strong-field regime; (c) Observations of H i to a redshift z 2 from which to study the evolution of galaxies and dark energy. (d) Astrobiology including planetary formation within protoplanetary disks; and (c) The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetism, both within the Galaxy and in intergalactic space. The SKA will operate over the wavelength range of at least 1.2 cm to 4 m (70 MHz to 25 GHz), providing milliarcsecond resolution at the shortest wavelengths.

  2. Thousands of kilometres to visit CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Students from the Columbus high school in the state of Mississippi with their physics teacher Ken Wester (left at rear) and Michel Della Negra, CMS spokesman (in front).An American school at CERN ? Unusual, to say the least... Yet 15 students from the class of Ken Wester, physics teacher in the Columbus High School, Mississippi, didn't hesitate to travel thousands of kilometres to come to CERN. Ken Wester participated last year in CERN's High School Teacher programme. Enthralled by his visit, he has organised the trip for his final year students to visit CERN. The 18-year-olds arrived on the 10th March and spent two days at the laboratory, visiting the CMS construction site and the AD antimatter factory, before leaving on a tour of Switzerland and Germany.

  3. The Square Kilometre Array: An Engineering Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Peter J

    2005-01-01

    This volume is an up-to-date and comprehensive overview of the engineering of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a revolutionary instrument which will be the world’s largest radio telescope. Expected to be completed by 2020, the SKA will be a pre-eminent tool in probing the Early Universe and in enhancing greatly the discovery potential of radio astronomy in many other fields. This book, containing 36 refereed papers written by leaders in SKA engineering, has been compiled by the International SKA Project Office and is the only contemporary compendium available. It features papers dealing with pivotal technologies such as antennas, RF systems and data transport. As well, overviews of important SKA demonstrator instruments and key system design issues are included. Practising professionals, and students interested in next-generation telescopes, will find this book an invaluable reference.

  4. Cosmology with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Rawlings, Steve

    2011-01-01

    We review how the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will address fundamental questions in cosmology, focussing on its use for neutral Hydrogen (HI) surveys. A key enabler of its unique capabilities will be large (but smart) receptors in the form of aperture arrays. We outline the likely contributions of Phase-1 of the SKA (SKA1), Phase-2 SKA (SKA2) and pathfinding activities (SKA0). We emphasise the important role of cross-correlation between SKA HI results and those at other wavebands such as: surveys for objects in the EoR with VISTA and the SKA itself; and huge optical and near-infrared redshift surveys, such as those with HETDEX and Euclid. We note that the SKA will contribute in other ways to cosmology, e.g. through gravitational lensing and $H_{0}$ studies.

  5. Far ultraviolet auroral imager

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU LiPing; WANG YongMei; WANG YingJian; ZHANG ZhongMou; LU JianGong

    2009-01-01

    Reviewing the technology development of imaging the global FUV auroral morphology,we introduce a space-based FUV auroral imager prototype developed by the Center for Space Science and Applied Research(CSSAR).It is designed to obtain continuous observations on the temporal and spatial morphology of the aurora which occupies highly elliptical high-altitude near-polar orbits.Primarily composed of a telescope system,image intensifier system,CCD,and collection and control system,the instrument works in the spectral region from 140-190 nm in the field of view 25°×25°,and the spatial resolution is better than 0.1°.

  6. HI Science with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Staveley-Smith, Lister

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be a formidable instrument for the detailed study of neutral hydrogen (HI) in external galaxies and in our own Galaxy and Local Group. The sensitivity of the SKA, its wide receiver bands, and the relative freedom from radio frequency interference at the SKA sites will allow the imaging of substantial number of high-redshift galaxies in HI for the first time. It will also allow imaging of galaxies throughout the Local Volume at resolutions of <100 pc and detailed investigations of galaxy disks and the transition between disks, halos and the intergalactic medium (IGM) in the Milky Way and external galaxies. Together with deep optical and millimetre/sub-mm imaging, this will have a profound effect on our understanding of the formation, growth and subsequent evolution of galaxies in different environments. This paper provides an introductory text to a series of nine science papers describing the impact of the SKA in the field of HI and galaxy evolution. We propose a nested...

  7. Altitude Variations of the Peak Auroral Emissions within Auroral Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangalli, L.

    2015-12-01

    The MIRACLE network monitors auroral activity in the Fennoscandian sector of Europe. Network stations cover the range of 55° to 57° magnetic latitude North and span two hours in magnetic local time. Some of the MIRACLE network stations include digital all-sky cameras (ASC) with overlapping field-of-views located at the latitude aurora occurs. The ASCs in this network operate at three different wavelengths: 427.8 nm (blue line), 557.7 nm (green line) and 630.0 nm (red line). These wavelengths are selected using narrow band filters. The new ASC systems are based on electron multiplying CCDs (emCCD), which allow higher time and spatial resolutions. The peak auroral emission altitude is determined using two ASC images from a station pair. Different auroral events are used to evaluate the altitude variations of the peak auroral emissions within auroral structures and its evolution in time.

  8. Observation of large-scale density cavities and parametric-decay instabilities in the high-altitude discrete auroral ionosphere under pulsed electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, A Y; Chen, J; Lee, L C; Liu, L Y

    2009-03-13

    A large density cavity that measured 2000 km across and 500 km in height was observed by DEMETER and Formosat/COSMIC satellites in temporal and spatial relation to a new mode of propagation of electromagnetic (em) pulses between discrete magnetic field-aligned auroral plasmas to high altitudes. Recorded positive plasma potential from satellite probes is consistent with the expulsion of electrons in the creation of density cavities. High-frequency decay spectra support the concept of parametric instabilities fed by free energy sources. PMID:19392121

  9. The auroral electron accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model of the auroral electron acceleration process is presented in which the electrons are accelerated resonantly by lower-hybrid waves. The essentially stochastic acceleration process is approximated for the purposes of computation by a deterministic model involving an empirically derived energy transfer function. The empirical function, which is consistent with all that is known of electron energization by lower-hybrid waves, allows many, possibly all, observed features of the electron distribution to be reproduced. It is suggested that the process occurs widely in both space and laboratory plasmas. (author)

  10. Auroral electron acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two theories of auroral electron acceleration are discussed. Part 1 examines the currently widely held view that the acceleration is an ordered process in a quasi-static electric field. It is suggested that, although there are many factors seeming to support this theory, the major qualifications and uncertainties that have been identified combine to cast serious doubt over its validity. Part 2 is devoted to a relatively new interpretation in terms of stochastic acceleration in turbulent electric fields. This second theory, which appears to account readily for most known features of the electron distribution function, is considered to provide a more promising approach to this central question in magnetospheric plasma physics. (author)

  11. Searching for Extraterrestrial Intelligence with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Siemion, Andrew P V; Cheng-Jin, Jin; Chennamangalam, Jayanth; Cordes, James; DeBoer, David R; Falcke, Heino; Garrett, Mike; Garrington, Simon; Gurvits, Leonid; Hoare, Melvin; Korpela, Eric J; Lazio, Joseph; Messerschmitt, David; Morrison, Ian S; O'Brien, Tim; Paragi, Zsolt; Penny, Alan; Spitler, Laura; Tarter, Jill; Werthimer, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The vast collecting area of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), harnessed by sensitive receivers, flexible digital electronics and increased computational capacity, could permit the most sensitive and exhaustive search for technologically-produced radio emission from advanced extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) ever performed. For example, SKA1-MID will be capable of detecting a source roughly analogous to terrestrial high-power radars (e.g. air route surveillance or ballistic missile warning radars, EIRP (EIRP = equivalent isotropic radiated power, ~10^17 erg sec^-1) at 10 pc in less than 15 minutes, and with a modest four beam SETI observing system could, in one minute, search every star in the primary beam out to ~100 pc for radio emission comparable to that emitted by the Arecibo Planetary Radar (EIRP ~2 x 10^20 erg sec^-1). The flexibility of the signal detection systems used for SETI searches with the SKA will allow new algorithms to be employed that will provide sensitivity to a much wider variety of si...

  12. Auroral Spatial Structures Probe Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration —    Methodology Fly a high altitude sounding rocket with multiple sub-payloads to measure electric and magnetic fields during an auroral event. Use...

  13. Pathway to the Square Kilometre Array - The German White Paper -

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Allen, B; Banerjee, R; Beck, R; Becker, W; Bomans, D J; Breitschwerdt, D; Brüggen, M; Brunthaler, A; Catinella, B; Champion, D; Ciardi, B; Crocker, R; de Avillez, M A; Dettmar, R J; Engels, D; Enßlin, T; Enke, H; Fieseler, T; Gizon, L; Hackmann, E; Hartmann, B; Henkel, C; Hoeft, M; Iapichino, L; Innes, D; James, C; Jasche, J; Jones, D; Kagramanova, V; Kauffmann, G; Keane, E; Kerp, J; Klöckner, H -R; Kokkotas, K; Kramer, M; Krause, M; Krupp, N; Kunz, J; Lämmerzahl, C; Lee, K J; List, M; Liu, K; Lobanov, A; Mann, G; Merloni, A; Middelberg, E; Niemeyer, J; Noutsos, A; Perlick, V; Reich, W; Richter, P; Roy, A; Saintonge, A; Schäfer, G; Schaffner-Bielich, J; Schinnerer, E; Schleicher, D; Schneider, P; Schwarz, D J; Sedrakian, A; Sesana, A; Smolčić, V; Solanki, S; Tuffs, R; Vetter, M; Weber, E; Weller, J; Wex, N; Wucknitz, O; Zwaan, M

    2013-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is the most ambitious radio telescope ever planned. With a collecting area of about a square kilometre, the SKA will be far superior in sensitivity and observing speed to all current radio facilities. The scientific capability promised by the SKA and its technological challenges provide an ideal base for interdisciplinary research, technology transfer, and collaboration between universities, research centres and industry. The SKA in the radio regime and the European Extreme Large Telescope (E-ELT) in the optical band are on the roadmap of the European Strategy Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI) and have been recognised as the essential facilities for European research in astronomy. This "White Paper" outlines the German science and R&D interests in the SKA project and will provide the basis for future funding applications to secure German involvement in the Square Kilometre Array.

  14. Auroral physics at Jupiter: Outstanding issues to be addressed by Juno

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, W. S.; Connerney, J. E. P.; McComas, D. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Gladstone, R.; Adriani, A.; Bagenal, F.; Bolton, S. J.

    2015-10-01

    Juno is on course to enter polar orbit at Jupiter on July 4, 2016. After a small number of preliminary orbits during which the orbital period is reduced, approximately 30 science orbits will be executed to explore the interior of Jupiter, hence, its origin. A second primary objective of the mission, and the subject of this talk, is to carry out the first exploration of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere with an emphasis on the physics of the Jovian aurora. All previous missions to Jupiter, including Ulysses, remained at low Jovian latitudes at close range, hence, our knowledge of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere and, in particular auroral processes, is a composite of remote sensing (such as radio emissions in the hectometric and decametric bands as well as IR and UV images); application of observations of Earth's auroral and polar cap particles, fields, and auroral emissions; and modeling. While these likely inform our expectations of what Juno will actually measure qualitatively, Juno will provide the first in depth exploration of auroral processes at another planet, other than a small number of very brief encounters of Saturn's kilometric radio source region by Cassini. With a reasonably complete suite of in situ magnetospheric measurements coupled with remote sensing, Juno will enable us to compare the physics of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere with those expectations. Certainly, understanding the nature of auroral currents and mechanisms for particle acceleration are high on the list of priorities for these studies. In addition, it is expected that Juno will greatly improve our understanding of the mapping of auroral processes from high latitudes and low altitudes to the middle and outer magnetosphere.

  15. Spatial monitoring of auroral emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A ground based technique to monitor the three-dimensional distribution of auroral emissions is presented. The system is composed of two subsystems. A monochromatic imaging system with digitizing capability monitors the two-dimensional variation of auroral intensity with 50 degree field of view. A second height measuring system obtains in real time the height distribution of the auroral luminosity within the field of view of the imaging system. This paper is a report of the stepwise development of the complete system. The measurements will be carried out in the magnetic meridian plane through the EISCAT-site in Norway and the Kiruna Geophysical Institute. The operation of the optical system will as much as possible be combined with incoherent scatter radar measurements. (author)

  16. Influence of the ionosphere on the altitude of discrete auroral arcs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Deehr

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The altitude of the maximum luminosity of single, discrete auroral arcs was measured by photometric triangulation from two stations (College and Fort Yukon, Alaska located 226km apart on nearly the same magnetic meridian. The average height of the evening aurora decreases smoothly with increasing solar depression angle (sda from 160km near 12° sda to 100km after 18° sda. The average height remains constant until around 12° sda in the morning. This diurnal variation is similar to that of the electron density in the F region of the ionosphere. Thus, the behavior is consistent with the concept that the mean auroral electron energy increases as the ionospheric conductivity decreases due to ionospheric recombination in the evening twilight. However, the mean electron energy decreases in magnitude at dawn when the solar ionizing radiation returns and the electron density in the F region increases. The magnetospheric acceleration mechanism associated with discrete auroral arcs thus appears to be inversely proportional to the ionospheric conductivity, because the time variation of the acceleration mechanism coincides with the local F region electron density and not with any obvious magnetospheric process. Previous auroral altitude observations, using similar triangulation methods, showed that the altitude of discrete auroral arcs increases as a function of latitude. When these data are corrected for the twilight effect, the dependence of altitude on latitude disappears. Thus, the average altitude of discrete auroral arcs and, by inference the magnetospheric auroral electron acceleration mechanism, is significantly influenced by the initial ionospheric conductance.

  17. Aurores boréales

    OpenAIRE

    Génot, Vincent

    1998-01-01

    Aurores boréales photographiées près d'Abisko (Suède, 68°21'N,18°49'E) en décembre 1998 par Vincent Génot (chercheur au CESR - Centre d'Etudes Spatiales des Rayonnements -, Toulouse, France) & Stéphanie Michiels.

  18. Ionospheric control of auroral occurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Analogous to color CRTs, the aurora is a visual manifestation of the bombardment of atomic and molecular neutrals in the upper atmosphere by magnetic field-guided energetic charged particles (mainly electrons) from above. Based on this framework, the magnetosphere is the source of energetic particles, whereas the ionosphere is merely a passive 'illuminated target'. However, it is not clear if the magnetosphere is acting along in the energization of the particles because the energization occurs at the magnetosphere-ionosphere interface. The discovery of suppression of auroral acceleration events in sunlight [Newell et al., 1996] provides a new interpretation - the ionosphere is also playing an active role in the auroral production. The auroral sunlight effect is often attributed to an ionospheric feedback mechanism in which the background ionospheric conductance determines if an acceleration is required. However, a relationship between the background ionospheric conductance and the aurora has not been identified. In this presentation, we provide solid evidence to confirm that the ionospheric conductance plays a key role in modulating auroral intensity to a degree that may surpass its source's manipulation. This study is based on 56,675 Earth's disk FUV images of the polar regions acquired by TIMED/GUVI between February 2002 and November 2007. It is found that the occurrence rate of visible aurora reduces when the polar ionosphere is exposed to sunlight. Furthermore, the energy flux carried by precipitating electrons shows anti-correlation with the ionospheric background conductance. Suppression of the auroral energy flux is also found to continue in twilight until the ionosphere is totally in darkness - a strong evidence of ionospheric manipulation because the magnetospheric sunlight condition does not change. The present study suggests a new mechanism that governs our space disturbances, in addition to the more familiar

  19. Source-finding for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder

    OpenAIRE

    Whiting, Matthew; Humphreys, Ben

    2012-01-01

    The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) presents a number of challenges in the area of source finding and cataloguing. The data rates and image sizes are very large, and require automated processing in a high-performance computing environment. This requires development of new tools, that are able to operate in such an environment and can reliably handle large datasets. These tools must also be able to accommodate the different types of observations ASKAP will make: continuum ...

  20. Square Kilometre Array key science: a progressive retrospective

    CERN Document Server

    Carilli, Christopher L

    2014-01-01

    I summarize the science drivers presented at the workshop for Phase I of the Square Kilometre Array: 'Advancing Astrophysics with the Square Kilometre Array'. I build from the historical perspective of the original Key Science programs: 'Science with a Square Kilometre Array', and consider progress in astrophysics since 2004. I then present my 'score card' of the primary science drivers proposed by the Science Working Groups, and further developed in the white papers and presentations at the meeting, assuming a conservative high frequency of 3GHz. The science case for the SKA phase I is compelling, with the right mix of killer applications (eg. pulsars and gravity, 21cm cosmology), foundational radio astronomy (eg. cosmic magnetism, baryon cycle, high energy phenomena), and high risk-high return 'game-changing' programs (eg. fast radio bursts, BAO intensity mapping, SETI). A strong case was made at the conference for band 5 (4 to 15GHz), in particular in the area of planet formation and exobiology. Such a cap...

  1. Auroral Electrojet Index Designed to Provide a Global Measure, Hourly Intervals, of Auroral Zone Magnetic Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Auroral Electrojet (AE) index is designed to provide a global quantitative measure of auroral zone magnetic activity produced by enhanced ionospheric currents...

  2. Longitudinal and Hemispheric Variations of Nighttime E-Layer Electron Density in the Auroral Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, X.; Wang, W.; Dou, X.; Burns, A. G.; Yue, X.

    2014-12-01

    The longitudinal patterns of nighttime E layer electron density in the auroral zone are analyzed in both hemispheres using COSMIC observation under quiet and solar minimum conditions. These l patterns are compared with the variations of particle precipitating energy flux from TIMED/GUVI under similar geophysical conditions, and also the solar radiation source of the auroral E layer are discussed. Our main conclusions are: (1) the nighttime maximum E-layer electron density presents pronounced longitudinal variations in the auroral zone, which depends on seasons and hemispheres. In local winter of both hemispheres and in northern equinox, maximum electron density is located in most western sectors within magnetic longitudes of 120-360°E. In local summer of both hemispheres and in southern equinox, greater the electron density occurs in a wide longitudinal sector centered at 0°E. (2) Hemispheric asymmetry occurs in auroral E layer electron density in all seasons, including equinox. In local winter, the maximum density of the northern hemisphere is much higher than that of southern hemisphere. In equinox, the longitudinal patterns of the electron density are out of phase between the two hemispheres. (3) The effects of the auroral precipitation are dominant in building the E layer electron density in the auroral zone for all seasons, except in southern summer in sector of 300-90°E MLON, where strong solar radiation takes place.

  3. Mapping auroral activity with Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, N. A.; MacDonald, E. A.; Heavner, M.; Tapia, A. H.; Lalone, N.

    2015-05-01

    Twitter is a popular, publicly accessible, social media service that has proven useful in mapping large-scale events in real time. In this study, for the first time, the use of Twitter as a measure of auroral activity is investigated. Peaks in the number of aurora-related tweets are found to frequently coincide with geomagnetic disturbances (detection rate of 91%). Additionally, the number of daily aurora-related tweets is found to strongly correlate with several auroral strength proxies (ravg≈0.7). An examination is made of the bias for location and time of day within Twitter data, and a first-order correction of these effects is presented. Overall, the results suggest that Twitter can provide both specific details about an individual aurora and accurate real-time indication of when, and even from where, an aurora is visible.

  4. On the formation of auroral arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new mechanism for auroral arc formation is presented. The characteristic linear shape of auroral arcs is determined by magnetically connected plasma clouds in the distant equatorial magnetosphere. These clouds originate as high speed plasma beams in the magnetotail and in the solar wind. It is found that the free energy for driving an auroral arc is provided by the difference of pressure between the cloud and the ambient plasma. (author)

  5. Auroral and photoelectron fluxes in cometary ionospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analytical yield spectrum method has been used to ascertain photoelectron and auroral electron fluxes in cometary ionospheres, with a view to determining the effects of cometocentric distances, solar zenith angle, and solar minimum and maximum conditions. Auroral electron fluxes are thus calculated for monoenergetic and observed primary electron spectra; auroral electrons are found to make a larger contribution to the observed electron spectrum than EUV-generated photoelectrons. Good agreement is established with extant theoretical works. 55 refs

  6. The renaissance of radio astronomy: towards the Square Kilometre Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, C.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, I will give a brief overview of the largest radio telescope in the world, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). The history of this instrument, its development as a huge international project, as well as its main scientific goals, will be summarised. I will then focus on a particular science case by presenting how the first phase of the SKA (SKA1), whose observations are expected to start in the early 2020's, will change our radio view of the largest gravitationally bound structures of the Universe: galaxy clusters.

  7. Reconstruction of Fine Scale Auroral Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hirsch, Michael; Zettergren, Matthew; Dahlgren, Hanna; Goenka, Chhavi; Akbari, Hassanali

    2015-01-01

    We present a feasibility study for a high frame rate, short baseline auroral tomographic imaging system useful for estimating parametric variations in the precipitating electron number flux spectrum of dynamic auroral events. Of particular interest are auroral substorms, characterized by spatial variations of order 100 m and temporal variations of order 10 ms. These scales are thought to be produced by dispersive Alfv\\'en waves in the near-Earth magnetosphere. The auroral tomography system characterized in this paper reconstructs the auroral volume emission rate to estimate the characteristic energy and location in the direction perpendicular to the geomagnetic field of peak electron precipitation flux using a distributed network of precisely synchronized ground-based cameras. As the observing baseline decreases, the tomographic inverse problem becomes highly ill-conditioned; as the sampling rate increases, the signal-to-noise ratio degrades and synchronization requirements become increasingly critical. Our a...

  8. Advanced Stellar Compass Summary for the Auroral Lites mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif

    1998-01-01

    This document provides technical and managerial information about the Advanced Stellar Compass and its possible use in the Auroral Lites Project.The Auroral Lites is a NASA project.......This document provides technical and managerial information about the Advanced Stellar Compass and its possible use in the Auroral Lites Project.The Auroral Lites is a NASA project....

  9. Hemispheric Assymeries in Auroral Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    It is widely accepted that the space weather related electrodynamic forcing of the geospace environment acts through the high geomagnetic latitude regions. At high latitudes inter-hemispheric asymmetries are largely due to the differences in solar illumination, the direction of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field components and to a lesser extent, due to differences between the two hemispheric internal fields. So far most research regarding interhemispheric differences concentrated on learning about the basic magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling mechanisms. It has been well established that sunlit conditions affect the energy flux of auroral precipitation resulting from the reduction in the mean energy of the auroral electrons in the sunlit summer hemisphere. This can be explained by the partial shorting out of the particle accelerating fields by the sunlight induced conductivity. It has also been found that sunlit conditions reduce the particle fluxes and therefore the associated field aligned currents. Unless the precipitation-induced conductivities overwhelm the sunlit component of conductivity, this would imply that the magnetospheric current generator responds to the ionospheric load in a highly non-linear manner. Interhemispheric currents may also play an important role that has not been fully explored. Interhemispheric asymmetries in substorm morphology have been explored critically because conjugacy implies that substorms have a common source at equatorial latitudes. In some cases the lack of conjugacy of substorms could be explained by considering the magnitude and direction of the IMF.

  10. Turbulent acceleration of auroral electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the characteristic peak in the auroral electron velocity distribution can be generated stochastically through resonant interactions with lower-hybrid electrostatic turbulence. The peak itself is shown to be a direct consequence of restrictions imposed on reflexion of electron velocities in the frame of reference of individual wave packets by the limitation in group velocity. A Monte-Carlo model demonstrates how the various properties of the acceleration region are reflected in the resultant electron distribution. It is shown, in particular, that the width of the peak is governed by the amplitude of the turbulence, while the amplitude of the peak reflects the column density of wave energy. Electron distributions encountered within three auroral arcs are interpreted to yield order of magnitude estimates of the amplitude and rms electric field of lower-hybrid wave packets. The velocities and frequencies of the resonant waves, the net electric field, the column density of wave energy and the electric-field energy density are also estimated. The results are found to be consistent with available electric-field measurements. A general broadening of the electron distribution caused by less systematic interactions between electrons and wave packets is shown to have a negligible effect on the peak resulting from the reflexion process; it does, though, lead to the creation of a characteristic high-energy tail. (author)

  11. Reionization and the Cosmic Dawn with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Mellema, Garrelt; Abdalla, Filipe; Bernardi, Gianni; Ciardi, Benedetta; Daiboo, Soobash; de Bruyn, Ger; Datta, Kanan K; Falcke, Heino; Ferrara, Andrea; Iliev, Ilian T; Iocco, Fabio; Jelić, Vibor; Jensen, Hannes; Joseph, Ronniy; Kloeckner, Hans-Rainer; Labroupoulos, Panos; Meiksin, Avery; Mesinger, Andrei; Offringa, Andre; Pandey, V N; Pritchard, Jonathan R; Santos, Mario G; Schwarz, Dominik J; Semelin, Benoit; Vedantham, Harish; Yatawatta, Sarod; Zaroubi, Saleem

    2012-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will have a low frequency component (SKA-low) which has as one of its main science goals the study of the redshifted 21cm line from the earliest phases of star and galaxy formation in the Universe. This 21cm signal provides a new and unique window on both the formation of the first stars and accreting black holes and the later period of substantial ionization of the intergalactic medium. The signal will teach us fundamental new things about the earliest phases of structure formation, cosmology and even has the potential to lead to the discovery of new physical phenomena. Here we present a white paper with an overview of the science questions that SKA-low can address, how we plan to tackle these questions and what this implies for the basic design of the telescope.

  12. Source-finding for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Whiting, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) presents a number of challenges in the area of source finding and cataloguing. The data rates and image sizes are very large, and require automated processing in a high-performance computing environment. This requires development of new tools, that are able to operate in such an environment and can reliably handle large datasets. These tools must also be able to accommodate the different types of observations ASKAP will make: continuum imaging, spectral-line imaging, transient imaging. The ASKAP project has developed a source-finder known as Selavy, built upon the Duchamp source-finder (Whiting 2012). Selavy incorporates a number of new features, which we describe here. Since distributed processing of large images and cubes will be essential, we describe the algorithms used to distribute the data, find an appropriate threshold and search to that threshold and form the final source catalogue. We describe the algorithm used to define a varying threshold t...

  13. Cosmology with the Square Kilometre Array by SKA-Japan

    CERN Document Server

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Kohri, Kazunori; Namikawa, Toshiya; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Shimabukuro, Hayato; Takahashi, Keitaro; Takahashi, Tomo; Yokoyama, Shuichiro; Yoshikawa, Kohji

    2016-01-01

    In the past several decades, the standard cosmological model has been established and its parameters have been measured to a high precision, while there are still many of the fundamental questions in cosmology; such as the physics in the very early Universe, the origin of the cosmic acceleration and the nature of the dark matter. The future world's largest radio telescope, Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will be able to open the new frontier of cosmology and will be one of the most powerful tools for cosmology in the next decade. The cosmological surveys conducted by the SKA would have the potential not only to answer these fundamental questions but also deliver the precision cosmology. In this article we briefly review the role of the SKA from the view point of the modern cosmology. The cosmology science led by the SKA-Japan Consortium (SKA-JP) Cosmology Science Working Group is also discussed.

  14. Radio Quiet Protection at the Australian Square Kilometre array site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey-Smith, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    Radio astronomy relies on the detection of very faint signals from the universe. Many radio telescopes are now detrimentally affected by radio frequency interference (RFI), which results from a wide range of active spectrum users such as communications, aviation and satellites. This is why many new radio observatories are being sited at increasingly remote locations.The site for the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders in Australia is the Murchison Radio-Astronomy Observatory (MRO). The MRO is located more than 350km from the nearest population centre and has a large radio-quiet zone that is managed under a range of legislative agreements.In this talk I will describe the radio quiet zone, what protection it gives, how it works and how astronomers interact with the spectrum management authorities.

  15. SKA-Japan Pulsar Science with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Keitaro; Iwata, Kengo; Kameya, Osamu; Kumamoto, Hiroki; Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Mikami, Ryo; Naruko, Atsushi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Shibata, Shinpei; Terasawa, Toshio; Yonemaru, Naoyuki; Yoo, Chulmoon

    2016-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array will revolutionize pulsar studies with its wide field-of-view, wide-band observation and high sensitivity, increasing the number of observable pulsars by more than an order of magnitude. Pulsars are of interest not only for the study of neutron stars themselves but for their usage as tools for probing fundamental physics such as general relativity, gravitational waves and nuclear interaction. In this article, we summarize the activity and interests of SKA-Japan Pulsar Science Working Group, focusing on an investigation of modified gravity theory with the supermassive black hole in the Galactic Centre, gravitational-wave detection from cosmic strings and binary supermassive black holes, a study of the physical state of plasma close to pulsars using giant radio pulses and determination of magnetic field structure of Galaxy with pulsar pairs.

  16. Radio Continuum Surveys with Square Kilometre Array Pathfinders

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, Ray P; Bacon, D; Beck, Rainer; Bell, Martin; Beswick, R J; Best, Philip; Bhatnagar, Sanjay; Bonafede, Annalisa; Brunetti, Gianfranco; Budavari, Tamas; Cassano, Rossella; Condo, J J; Cress, Catherine; Dabbech, Arwa; Feain, I; Fender, Rob; Ferrari, Chiara; Gaensler, B M; Giovannini, G; Haverkorn, Marijke; Heald, George; van der Heyden, Kurt; Hopkins, A M; Jarvis, M; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Kothes, Roland; van Langevelde, Huib; Lazio, Joseph; Mao, Minnie Y; Martınez-Sansigre, Alejo; Mary, David; McAlpine, Kim; Middelberg, E; Murphy, Eric; Padovani, P; Paragi, Zsolt; Prandoni, I; Raccanelli, A; Rigby, Emma; Roseboom, I G; Rottgering, H; Sabater, Jose; Salvato, Mara; Scaife, Anna M M; Schilizzi, Richard; Seymour, N; Smith, Dan J B; Umana, Grazia; Zhao, G -B; Zinn, Peter-Christian

    2012-01-01

    In the lead-up to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project, several next-generation radio telescopes and upgrades are already being built around the world. These include APERTIF (The Netherlands), ASKAP (Australia), eMERLIN (UK), VLA (USA), e-EVN (based in Europe), LOFAR (The Netherlands), Meerkat (South Africa), and the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). Each of these new instruments has different strengths, and coordination of surveys between them can help maximise the science from each of them. A radio continuum survey is being planned on each of them with the primary science objective of understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies over cosmic time, and the cosmological parameters and large-scale structures which drive it. In pursuit of this objective, the different teams are developing a variety of new techniques, and refining existing ones. Here we describe these projects, their science goals, and the technical challenges which are being addressed to maximise the science return.

  17. Pine Island glacier ice shelf melt distributed at kilometre scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Dutrieux

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available By thinning and accelerating, West Antarctic ice streams are contributing about 10% of the observed global sea level rise. Much of this ice loss is from Pine Island Glacier, which has thinned since at least 1992, driven by changes in ocean heat transport beneath its ice shelf and retreat of the grounding line. Details of the processes driving this change, however, remain largely elusive, hampering our ability to predict the future behaviour of this and similar systems. Here, a Lagrangian methodology is developed to measure oceanic melting of such rapidly advecting ice. High-resolution satellite and airborne observations of ice surface velocity and elevation are used to quantify patterns of basal melt under the Pine Island Glacier ice shelf and the associated adjustments to ice flow. At the broad scale, melt rates of up to 100 m yr−1 occur near the grounding line, reducing to 30 m yr−1 just 20 km downstream. Between 2008 and 2011, basal melting was largely compensated by ice advection, allowing us to estimate an average loss of ice to the ocean of 87 km3 yr−1, in close agreement with 2009 oceanographically constrained estimates. At smaller scales, a network of basal channels typically 500 m to 3 km wide is sculpted by concentrated melt, with kilometre-scale anomalies reaching 50% of the broad-scale basal melt. Basal melting enlarges the channels close to the grounding line, but farther downstream melting tends to diminish them. Kilometre-scale variations in melt are a key component of the complex ice–ocean interaction beneath the ice shelf, implying that greater understanding of their effect, or very high resolution models, are required to predict the sea-level contribution of the region.

  18. Pine Island Glacier ice shelf melt distributed at kilometre scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Dutrieux

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available By thinning and accelerating, West Antarctic ice streams are contributing about 10% of the observed global sea level rise. Much of this ice loss is from Pine Island Glacier, which has thinned since at least 1992, driven by changes in ocean heat transport beneath its ice shelf and retreat of the grounding line. Details of the processes driving this change, however, remain largely elusive, hampering our ability to predict the future behaviour of this and similar systems. Here, a Lagrangian methodology is developed to measure oceanic melting of such rapidly advecting ice. High-resolution satellite and airborne observations of ice surface velocity and elevation are used to quantify patterns of basal melt under the Pine Island Glacier ice shelf and the associated adjustments to ice flow. At the broad scale, melt rates of up to 100 m yr−1 occur near the grounding line, reducing to 30 m yr−1 just 20 km downstream. Between 2008 and 2011, basal melting was largely compensated by ice advection, allowing us to estimate an average loss of ice to the ocean of 87 km3 yr−1, in close agreement with 2009 oceanographically-constrained estimates. At smaller scales, a network of basal channels typically 500 m to 3 km wide is sculpted by concentrated melt, with kilometre-scale anomalies reaching 50% of the broad-scale basal melt. Basal melting enlarges the channels close to the grounding line, but farther downstream melting tends to diminish them. Kilometre-scale variations in melt are a key component of the complex ice-ocean interaction beneath the ice shelf, implying that greater understanding of their effect, or very high resolution models, are required to predict the sea-level contribution of the region.

  19. Statistical analysis of extreme auroral electrojet indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masao; Yoneda, Asato; Oda, Mitsunobu; Tsubouchi, Ken

    2015-09-01

    Extreme auroral electrojet activities can damage electrical power grids due to large induced currents in the Earth, degrade radio communications and navigation systems due to the ionospheric disturbances and cause polar-orbiting satellite anomalies due to the enhanced auroral electron precipitation. Statistical estimation of extreme auroral electrojet activities is an important factor in space weather research. For this estimation, we utilize extreme value theory (EVT), which focuses on the statistical behavior in the tail of a distribution. As a measure of auroral electrojet activities, auroral electrojet indices AL, AU, and AE, are used, which describe the maximum current strength of the westward and eastward auroral electrojets and the sum of the two oppositely directed in the auroral latitude ionosphere, respectively. We provide statistical evidence for finite upper limits to AL and AU and estimate the annual expected number and probable intensity of their extreme events. We detect two different types of extreme AE events; therefore, application of the appropriate EVT analysis to AE is difficult.

  20. Waterhole: An auroral-ionosphere perturbation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, B. A.; Yau, A. W.; Creutzberg, F.; Pongratz, M. B.

    A sounding rocket carrying 100 kg of high explosives and plasma diagnostic instrumentation was launched from Churchill Research Range on 6 April 1980 over a premidnight auroral arc. The object of the experiment was to produce an ionospheric hole or plasma density depletion at about 300 km altitude on field lines connected to an auroral arc. The plasma depletion is produced when the explosive by-products (mostly water) charge-exchange with the ambient O+ ions and then rapidly recombine. It was speculated that the presence of the "hole" would interfere with the field-aligned current systems associated with the arc and would in turn perturb the auroral source mechanism. The release occurred about 10 km poleward of the auroral arc fieldlines. As expected, a large ionospheric hole was detected by rocket-borne plasma sensors. Within a few seconds following the release (a) the energetic electron precipitation observed in the hole dropped to background levels, (b) the luminosity of the auroral arc observed by a ground-based auroral scanning photometer decreased by a factor of two, and (c) the ionospheric E region density below the hole decayed at a rate consistent with a sudden reduction in particle precipitation. The simultaneous onset of these gross changes in electron precipitation coincident with the release strongly suggests a cause and effect relationship. In particular, these results suggest that the ionospheric plasma and the field-aligned current systems play a crucial role in the auroral acceleration process.

  1. Auroral Phenomena in Brown Dwarf Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, J. Sebastian; Hallinan, Gregg

    2016-01-01

    Since the unexpected discovery of radio emission from brown dwarfs some 15 years ago, investigations into the nature of this emission have revealed that, despite their cool and neutral atmospheres, brown dwarfs harbor strong kG magnetic fields, but unlike the warmer stellar objects, they generate highly circularly polarized auroral radio emission, like the giant planets of the Solar System. Our recent results from Keck LRIS monitoring of the brown dwarf LSR1835+32 definitively confirm this picture by connecting the auroral radio emission to spectroscopic variability at optical wavelengths as coherent manifestations of strong large-scale magnetospheric auroral current systems. I present some of the results of my dissertation work to understand the nature brown dwarf auroral phenomena. My efforts include a survey of Late L dwarfs and T dwarfs, looking for auroral Hα emission and a concurrent survey looking for the auroral emission of H3+ from brown dwarfs with radio pulse detections. I discuss the potential connection of this auroral activity to brown dwarf weather phenomena and how brown dwarf aurorae may differ from the analogous emission of the magnetized giant planets in the Solar System.

  2. Quasi-Stationary Global Auroral Ionospheric Model: E-layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaeva, Vera; Gordeev, Evgeny; Kotikov, Andrey; Makarova, Ludmila; Shirochkov, Aleksander

    2014-05-01

    E-layer Auroral Ionospheric Model (E-AIM) is developed to provide temporal and spatial density distribution of the main ionosphere neutral species (NO, N(4S),N(2D)), and ions (N2+, NO+,O2+,O+) in the altitude range from 90 to 150 km. NRLMSISE-00 model [Picone et al., JGR 2003] is used for neutral atmosphere content and temperature determination, that is the input for the E-AIM model. The E-AIM model based on chemical equilibrium state in E-layer that reaches in chemical reactions between ionospheric species considering solar radiation ionization source, superposed with sporadic precipitation of magnetospheric electrons. The chemical equilibrium state in each location under specific solar and geomagnetic activity conditions reaches during numerical solution of the continuity equations for the neutrals and ions using the high-performance Gear method [Gear, 1971] for ordinary differential equation (ODE) systems. Applying the Gear method for solving stiff ODE system strongly reduce the computation time and machine resources comparing to widely used methods and provide an opportunity to calculate the global spatial E-layer ion content distribution. In contrast to the mid-latitude ionosphere, structure and dynamics of the auroral zone ionosphere (φ ≡ 60-75° MLat) associated not only with shortwave solar radiation. Precipitating magnetospheric particle flux is the most important ionization source and is the main cause of E-layer disturbances. Precipitated electrons with initial energies of 1 - 30 keV influence the auroral ionosphere E-layer. E-AIM model can estimate ionization rate corresponds to auroral electron precipitation in two different ways: 1. with direct electron flux satellite data; 2. with differential energy spectrum reconstructed from OVATION-Prime empirical model [Newell, JGR 2009] average values, that allows to estimate ionosphere ion content for any time and location in the auroral zone. Comparison of E-AIM results with direct ionospheric observations

  3. Cometary kilometric radio waves and plasma waves correlated with ion pick-up effect at Comet Halley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oya, H.; Morioka, A.; Miyake, W.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1985-01-01

    Bow-shock movements at Comet Halley are inferred from the discrete spectra of the cometary kilometric radiation (30-195 kHz); the observed emissions can be interpreted as being generated and propagating from the moving shock. The shock motion is possibly associated with the time variation of the solar wind and cometary outgassing. It is concluded that these plasma wave phenomena are manifestations of ion pick-up processes, which occur even in a remote region 7 million to 10 million km from the cometary nucleus.

  4. Etude des émissions radio aurorales de Saturne, modélisation et aurores UV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Laurent

    2008-09-01

    Cette thèse porte sur l'étude du rayonnement radio auroral kilométrique de Saturne (SKR pour Saturn Kilometric Radiation) observé de façon quasi-continue par les antennes radio de la sonde Cassini depuis son entrée en orbite autour de Saturne en juillet 2004. Comme les rayonnements radio auroraux des autres planètes magnétisées, le SKR est généré sur des lignes de champ magnétique de haute latitude prés des pôles magnétiques. Tirant parti de plusieurs années d'observations, les propriétés macroscopiques du SKR (spectre, polarisation, conjuguaison des sources de chaque hémisphère, mode d'émission) sont déduites par une analyse statistique. Elles montrent en particulier que les caractéristiques de l'émission dépendent fortement de la position de l'observateur. Ceci est une conséquence directe de l'anisotropie du SKR qui engendre de forts effets de visibilité, visibles dans les cartes d'intensité temps-fréquence (arcs, régions d'invisibilité de l'émission). La simulation de ces effets de visibilité apporte de nouvelles contraintes sur les propriétés microscopiques des sources (énergie et distribution des électrons auroraux). Le SKR est connu pour être modulé à une période variable. Une analyse de la variation de cette période radio sur plusieurs années révèle des oscillations à court terme de l'ordre de 20-30 jours dont l'origine est attribuée à la variation de la vitesse caractéristique du vent solaire au niveau de Saturne. Une étude parallèle du rayonnement auroral kilométrique terrestre (AKR), observé lors du survol de la Terre par Cassini en août 1999, met en évidence la découverte d'une modulation diurne semblable à celle du SKR. Enfin, la technique de goniopolarimétrie permet de faire de l'imagerie radio des sources du SKR. L'étude de leur distribution moyenne montre pour la première fois l'existence d'un ovale radio. La comparaison des images des sources du SKR avec celles des ovales auroraux (observ

  5. Spectral distribution of auroral energy according to model representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Examples of high-altitude distributions of the auroral energy radiation in the central oval line for τG = 0 and 12 hours within the spectrum interval 0.02-0.1 μm, 0.1-0.2 μm, 0.2-0.3 μm, 0.3-0.4 μm, 0.3-0.7 μmn, 0.3-1.3 μm for various Kp-values under moderate solar activity F10.7 = 150 at the time of the winter solstice are presented. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Auroral Morphologies of Jupiter and Saturn

    OpenAIRE

    Grodent, Denis

    2015-01-01

    We review the principal differences and similarities of the morphologies of Jupiter and Saturn's auroral emissions. We then show some examples of UV images that are expected to be acquired with Cassini UVIS at Saturn and Juno UVS at Jupiter.

  7. Scalable Data Mining and Archiving for the Square Kilometre Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D. L.; Mattmann, C. A.; Hart, A. F.; Lazio, J.; Bennett, T.; Wagstaff, K. L.; Thompson, D. R.; Preston, R.

    2011-12-01

    As the technologies for remote observation improve, the rapid increase in the frequency and fidelity of those observations translates into an avalanche of data that is already beginning to eclipse the resources, both human and technical, of the institutions and facilities charged with managing the information. Common data management tasks like cataloging both data itself and contextual meta-data, creating and maintaining scalable permanent archive, and making data available on-demand for research present significant software engineering challenges when considered at the scales of modern multi-national scientific enterprises such as the upcoming Square Kilometre Array project. The NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), leveraging internal research and technology development funding, has begun to explore ways to address the data archiving and distribution challenges with a number of parallel activities involving collaborations with the EVLA and ALMA teams at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), and members of the Square Kilometre Array South Africa team. To date, we have leveraged the Apache OODT Process Control System framework and its catalog and archive service components that provide file management, workflow management, resource management as core web services. A client crawler framework ingests upstream data (e.g., EVLA raw directory output), identifies its MIME type and automatically extracts relevant metadata including temporal bounds, and job-relevant/processing information. A remote content acquisition (pushpull) service is responsible for staging remote content and handing it off to the crawler framework. A science algorithm wrapper (called CAS-PGE) wraps underlying code including CASApy programs for the EVLA, such as Continuum Imaging and Spectral Line Cube generation, executes the algorithm, and ingests its output (along with relevant extracted metadata). In addition to processing, the Process Control System has been leveraged to provide data

  8. Auroral electrodynamics of plasma boundary regions

    OpenAIRE

    Liléo, Sónia

    2009-01-01

    The electrodynamic coupling between the auroral ionosphere and the magnetosphere is the main subject of this thesis. Satellite measurements of electric and magnetic fields and of charged particles are used to explore three distinct plasma boundaries, magnetically linked to the nightside auroral ionosphere. These boundaries are the inner edge of the plasma sheet (PS), and the inner and the outer edges of the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL). Strong ionospheric electric fields with amplitudes...

  9. Investigations of auroral dynamics: techniques and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is an experimental investigation of the dynamics of the aurora, describing both the systems developed for the optical measurements and the results obtained. It is found that during a auroral arc deformation, a fold travelling eastward along the arc is associated with an enhanced F-region ion temperature of 2700 K, measured by EISCAT, indicative of enhanced ionspheric electric fields. It is shown that for an auroral break-up, the large-scale westward travelling surge (WTS) is the last developed spiral in a sequence of spiral formations. It is proposed that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is the responsible process. In another event it is shown that large-amplitude long-lasting pulsations, observed both in ground-based magnetic field and photometer recordings, correspond to strong modulations of the particle intensity at the equatorial orbit (6.6 Re). In this event a gradual transition occurs between pulses classified as Ps6/auroral torches toward pulses with characteristics of substorms. The observations are explained by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a magnetospheric boundary layer. The meridional neutral wind, at about 240 km altitude, is found to be reduced prior to or at the onset of auroral activity. These findings are suggestive of large-scale reconfigurations of the ionspheric electric fields prior to auroral onsets. A new real time triangulation technique developed to determine the altitude of auroral arcs is presented, and an alternative method to analyze incoherent scatter data is discussed. (With 46 refs.) (author)

  10. Observation of auroral fading before breakup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have obtained detailed observations of the onset of auroral breakup using a variety of instruments with time resolution of some tens of seconds. Rapid sequences of all-sky photographs, and fast meridian scans by photometers, show that breakup is usually preceded by moderate brightening, followed by fading of the auroral brightness lasting one or two minutes, before the actual breakup itself. At the time of the fading there is a brief darkening of the poleward sky. Often the breakup is preceded by one or more rapid intensifications, each one preceded by local fading. Pseudo-breakups may also occur without the development of a major event. A bonafide breakup may begin on the fading arc, on an adjacent arc, or in an entirely new region nearby. This optical activity is closely correlated with the development of auroral radar echoes, suggesting that variations in the ionospheric and magnetospheric electric and magnetic fields are responsible for the observed auroral variations. Data from the IMS magnetometer network provide some indication of a correlated response by the local auroral and ionospheric current, although this could be partly due to changes in conductivity. Riometer recordings show a slow decrease in ionsperic radio wave absorption over a period of about ten minutes prior to breakup, with the largest decrease essentially to quiet-time values in the region of auroral fading and subsequent breakup. The implications of these observations regarding the trigger mechanism for the expansion phase of a magnetospheric substorm are discussed. (author)

  11. The lunar Askaryan technique with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    James, Clancy W; Bray, Justin D; Buitink, Stijn; Dagkesamanskii, Rustam D; Ekers, Ronald D; Falcke, Heino; Gayley, Ken G; Huege, Tim; Mevius, Maaijke; Mutel, Robert L; Protheroe, Raymond J; Scholten, Olaf; Spencer, Ralph E; ter Veen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    The lunar Askaryan technique is a method to study the highest-energy cosmic rays, and their predicted counterparts, the ultra-high-energy neutrinos. By observing the Moon with a radio telescope, and searching for the characteristic nanosecond-scale Askaryan pulses emitted when a high-energy particle interacts in the outer layers of the Moon, the visible lunar surface can be used as a detection area. Several previous experiments, at Parkes, Goldstone, Kalyazin, Westerbork, the ATCA, Lovell, LOFAR, and the VLA, have developed the necessary techniques to search for these pulses, but existing instruments have lacked the necessary sensitivity to detect the known flux of cosmic rays from such a distance. This will change with the advent of the SKA. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will be the world's most powerful radio telescope. To be built in southern Africa, Australia and New Zealand during the next decade, it will have an unsurpassed sensitivity over the key 100 MHz to few-GHZ band. We introduce a planned expe...

  12. Science with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP)

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, Simon; Gupta, Neeraj

    2009-01-01

    The future of cm and m-wave astronomy lies with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), a telescope under development by a consortium of 17 countries that will be 50 times more sensitive than any existing radio facility. Most of the key science for the SKA will be addressed through large-area imaging of the Universe at frequencies from a few hundred MHz to a few GHz. The Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) is a technology demonstrator aimed in the mid-frequency range, and achieves instantaneous wide-area imaging through the development and deployment of phased-array feed systems on parabolic reflectors. The large field-of-view makes ASKAP an unprecedented synoptic telescope that will make substantial advances in SKA key science. ASKAP will be located at the Murchison Radio Observatory in inland Western Australia, one of the most radio-quiet locations on the Earth and one of two sites selected by the international community as a potential location for the SKA. In this paper, we outline the ASKAP project and summarise ...

  13. Origins of the Earth's Diffuse Auroral Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Binbin; Thorne, Richard M.; Zhang, Xiaojia; Bortnik, Jacob; Pu, Zuyin; Xie, Lun; Hu, Ze-jun; Han, Desheng; Shi, Run; Zhou, Chen; Gu, Xudong

    2016-02-01

    The Earth's diffuse auroral precipitation provides the major source of energy input into the nightside upper atmosphere and acts as an essential linkage of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Resonant wave-particle interactions play a dominant role in the scattering of injected plasma sheet electrons, leading to the diffuse auroral precipitation. We review the recent advances in understanding the origin of the diffuse aurora and in quantifying the exact roles of various magnetospheric waves in producing the global distribution of diffuse auroral precipitation and its variability with the geomagnetic activity. Combined scattering by upper-and lower-band chorus accounts for the most intense inner magnetospheric electron diffuse auroral precipitation on the nightside. Dayside chorus can be responsible for the weaker dayside electron diffuse auroral precipitation. Pulsating auroras, the dynamic auroral structures embedded in the diffuse aurora, can be mainly caused by modulation of the excitation of lower band chorus due to macroscopic density variations in the magnetosphere. Electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves are an important or even dominant cause for the nightside electron diffuse auroral precipitation beyond {˜}8Re and can also contribute to the occurrence of the pulsating aurora at high L-shells. Scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves could quite possibly be the leading candidate responsible for the ion precipitation (especially the reversed-type events of the energy-latitude dispersion) in the regions of the central plasma sheet and ring current. We conclude the review with a summary of current understanding, outstanding questions, and a number of suggestions for future research.

  14. Origins of the Earth's Diffuse Auroral Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Binbin; Thorne, Richard M.; Zhang, Xiaojia; Bortnik, Jacob; Pu, Zuyin; Xie, Lun; Hu, Ze-jun; Han, Desheng; Shi, Run; Zhou, Chen; Gu, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    The Earth's diffuse auroral precipitation provides the major source of energy input into the nightside upper atmosphere and acts as an essential linkage of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Resonant wave-particle interactions play a dominant role in the scattering of injected plasma sheet electrons, leading to the diffuse auroral precipitation. We review the recent advances in understanding the origin of the diffuse aurora and in quantifying the exact roles of various magnetospheric waves in producing the global distribution of diffuse auroral precipitation and its variability with the geomagnetic activity. Combined scattering by upper-and lower-band chorus accounts for the most intense inner magnetospheric electron diffuse auroral precipitation on the nightside. Dayside chorus can be responsible for the weaker dayside electron diffuse auroral precipitation. Pulsating auroras, the dynamic auroral structures embedded in the diffuse aurora, can be mainly caused by modulation of the excitation of lower band chorus due to macroscopic density variations in the magnetosphere. Electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves are an important or even dominant cause for the nightside electron diffuse auroral precipitation beyond {˜}8Re and can also contribute to the occurrence of the pulsating aurora at high L-shells. Scattering by electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves could quite possibly be the leading candidate responsible for the ion precipitation (especially the reversed-type events of the energy-latitude dispersion) in the regions of the central plasma sheet and ring current. We conclude the review with a summary of current understanding, outstanding questions, and a number of suggestions for future research.

  15. Auroral pulsations and accompanying VLF emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Tagirov

    Full Text Available Results of simultaneous TV observations of pulsating auroral patches and ELF-VLF-emissions in the morning sector carried out in Sodankylä (Finland on February 15, 1991 are presented. Auroral pulsating activity was typical having pulsating patches with characteristic periods of about 7 s. Narrow-band hiss emissions and chorus elements at intervals of 0.3–0.4 s formed the main ELF-VLF activity in the frequency range 1.0–2.5 kHz at the same time. The analysis of auroral images with time resolution of 0.04 s allowed perfectly separate analysis of spatial and temporal variations in the auroral luminosity. Mutual correspondence between the behaviour of the luminous auroral patches and the appearance of ELF noise type hiss emissions and VLF chorus trains was found in two intervals chosen for analysis. While the hiss emissions were associated with the appearance of luminosity inside a limited area close to the zenith, the structured VLF emissions were accompanied by rapid motion of luminosity inside the area. The spatial dimension of the pulsating area was about 45–50 km and luminosity propagated inside it with velocity of about 10–12 kms. We discuss a new approach to explain the 5–15 s auroral pulsation based on the theory of flowing cyclotron maser and relaxation characteristics of ionosphere.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions · Space plasma physics (wave-particle interactions

  16. Quantum teleportation over 143 kilometres using active feed-forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Song; Herbst, Thomas; Scheidl, Thomas; Wang, Daqing; Kropatschek, Sebastian; Naylor, William; Wittmann, Bernhard; Mech, Alexandra; Kofler, Johannes; Anisimova, Elena; Makarov, Vadim; Jennewein, Thomas; Ursin, Rupert; Zeilinger, Anton

    2012-09-13

    The quantum internet is predicted to be the next-generation information processing platform, promising secure communication and an exponential speed-up in distributed computation. The distribution of single qubits over large distances via quantum teleportation is a key ingredient for realizing such a global platform. By using quantum teleportation, unknown quantum states can be transferred over arbitrary distances to a party whose location is unknown. Since the first experimental demonstrations of quantum teleportation of independent external qubits, an internal qubit and squeezed states, researchers have progressively extended the communication distance. Usually this occurs without active feed-forward of the classical Bell-state measurement result, which is an essential ingredient in future applications such as communication between quantum computers. The benchmark for a global quantum internet is quantum teleportation of independent qubits over a free-space link whose attenuation corresponds to the path between a satellite and a ground station. Here we report such an experiment, using active feed-forward in real time. The experiment uses two free-space optical links, quantum and classical, over 143 kilometres between the two Canary Islands of La Palma and Tenerife. To achieve this, we combine advanced techniques involving a frequency-uncorrelated polarization-entangled photon pair source, ultra-low-noise single-photon detectors and entanglement-assisted clock synchronization. The average teleported state fidelity is well beyond the classical limit of two-thirds. Furthermore, we confirm the quality of the quantum teleportation procedure without feed-forward by complete quantum process tomography. Our experiment verifies the maturity and applicability of such technologies in real-world scenarios, in particular for future satellite-based quantum teleportation. PMID:22951967

  17. Radio Continuum Surveys with Square Kilometre Array Pathfinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Ray P.; Afonso, J.; Bacon, D.; Beck, Rainer; Bell, Martin; Beswick, R. J.; Best, Philip; Bhatnagar, Sanjay; Bonafede, Annalisa; Brunetti, Gianfranco; Budavári, Tamás; Cassano, Rossella; Condon, J. J.; Cress, Catherine; Dabbech, Arwa; Feain, I.; Fender, Rob; Ferrari, Chiara; Gaensler, B. M.; Giovannini, G.; Haverkorn, Marijke; Heald, George; Van der Heyden, Kurt; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarvis, M.; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Kothes, Roland; Van Langevelde, Huib; Lazio, Joseph; Mao, Minnie Y.; Martínez-Sansigre, Alejo; Mary, David; Mcalpine, Kim; Middelberg, E.; Murphy, Eric; Padovani, P.; Paragi, Zsolt; Prandoni, I.; Raccanelli, A.; Rigby, Emma; Roseboom, I. G.; Röttgering, H.; Sabater, Jose; Salvato, Mara; Scaife, Anna M. M.; Schilizzi, Richard; Seymour, N.; Smith, Dan J. B.; Umana, Grazia; Zhao, G.-B.; Zinn, Peter-Christian

    2013-03-01

    In the lead-up to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project, several next-generation radio telescopes and upgrades are already being built around the world. These include APERTIF (The Netherlands), ASKAP (Australia), e-MERLIN (UK), VLA (USA), e-EVN (based in Europe), LOFAR (The Netherlands), MeerKAT (South Africa), and the Murchison Widefield Array. Each of these new instruments has different strengths, and coordination of surveys between them can help maximise the science from each of them. A radio continuum survey is being planned on each of them with the primary science objective of understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies over cosmic time, and the cosmological parameters and large-scale structures which drive it. In pursuit of this objective, the different teams are developing a variety of new techniques, and refining existing ones. To achieve these exciting scientific goals, many technical challenges must be addressed by the survey instruments. Given the limited resources of the global radio-astronomical community, it is essential that we pool our skills and knowledge. We do not have sufficient resources to enjoy the luxury of re-inventing wheels. We face significant challenges in calibration, imaging, source extraction and measurement, classification and cross-identification, redshift determination, stacking, and data-intensive research. As these instruments extend the observational parameters, we will face further unexpected challenges in calibration, imaging, and interpretation. If we are to realise the full scientific potential of these expensive instruments, it is essential that we devote enough resources and careful study to understanding the instrumental effects and how they will affect the data. We have established an SKA Radio Continuum Survey working group, whose prime role is to maximise science from these instruments by ensuring we share resources and expertise across the projects. Here we describe these projects, their science goals

  18. The Auroral Zone: A citizen science project to classify auroral imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaddock, D.; Spanswick, E.; Gillies, D. M.; Quinney, A.; Donovan, E.; Murray, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Currently, over 40 million images of the aurora have been recorded by University of Calgary all-sky imagers. Analysis of these images is an important and crucial step in the advancement of auroral physics. The number of images waiting to be analyzed is expected to increase dramatically with the introduction of TREx (Transition Region Explorer), a new high resolution imaging network set to be deployed in late 2016. In order to classify large amounts of images in a short period of time, we have designed a citizen science project aimed at engaging the general public in auroral science, called "The Auroral Zone". This project facilitates a symbiotic relationship between the scientific community and the general public. Using the data from this website, a large database of classified auroral images will be created and then used for future analysis by the scientific community. In exchange, the general public can learn about the aurora and contribute to auroral physics in a tangible way. The ultimate aim of this project is to create an ever expanding database of all-sky images classified by arc type (i.e. single arc, diffuse aurora, multiple arc, etc.) and filtered for adverse viewing conditions (i.e. snow, rain, light pollution, etc). We aim to introduce "The Auroral Zone" into the school systems to interest young scientists in the spectacular natural phenomenon that defines the Canadian North. "The Auroral Zone" is a collaborative project between the University of Calgary, Canadian Space Agency, AuroraMAX, and Aurorasaurus.

  19. Auroral Electrojet Indices Designed to Provide a Global Measure, 2.5-Minute Intervals, of Auroral Zone Magnetic Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Auroral Electrojet index (AE) is designed to provide a global quantitative measure of auroral zone magnetic activity produced by enhanced ionospheric currents...

  20. Auroral Electrojet Index Designed to Provide a Global Measure, l-minute Intervals, of Auroral Zone Magnetic Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Auroral Electrojet index (AE) is designed to provide a global quantitative measure of auroral zone magnetic activity produced by enhanced ionospheric currents...

  1. Electrondynamics of the auroral E region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study concentrates on the signatures of the interaction process seen closest to the Earth - i.e. in the region where the visible aurora is produced. A number of experimental investigations are presented which look at details of the dynamics and electrodynamics of auroral ionisation features in the ionospheric E region. The studies are based primarily on measurement with the EISCAT UHF incoherent scatter radar which is located in northern Scandinavia. Initial calibration of the radar, and some measurements of the properties of the background atmosphere are described first. These are a necessary basis for the detailed studies which follow, which are of two aspects of auroral electrodynamics - substorms and aurorally-associated sporadic E layers. For the substorm studies, all-sky camera observations of the aurora over Scandinavia and ultra-violet images from the Viking satellite are used to identify the auroral forms corresponding to EISCAT measurements. This allows the determination of representative conductivities for the different auroral features which are characteristic of the substorm development. These conductivities are an important input for modelling studies of the electric current systems and have not previously been measured directly. Particle measurements from the Viking satellite are used together with EISCAT to determine the origin of the particles precipitated into the ionosphere during the energy-storage phase prior to the substorm. The sporadic E layers studies address the question of how ion layers and associated neutral sodium layers can be produced by some process which is common in association with auroral activity. Two candidates are considered - gravity waves and electric fields. (author)

  2. Auroral Electrojet (AE, AL, AO, AU) - A Global Measure of Auroral Zone Magnetic Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The AE index is derived from geomagnetic variations in the horizontal component observed at selected (10-13) observatories along the auroral zone in the northern...

  3. Small-scale structure of the auroral electron and ion acceleration mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High time resolution data obtained from sounding rocket flights reaching altitudes of 1,000 km now permit spatial measurements on the order of the particle gyrodiameters. The electron precipitation responsible for the auroral light emission has two distinct populations; the isotropic in pitch angle electrons that apparently have a magnetospheric source and have been further accelerated within one or two Re of the ionosphere, and, a very field-aligned component which is cold and apparently has an ionospheric source. The field-aligned component provides much of the fine structure and dynamic motion of the visual aurora. Time dispersion of these electrons also places their acceleration region one to two Re from the ionosphere. Much of the heavy ion population of the trapped radiation comes from the ionosphere. These ions apparently receive their initial acceleration transverse to B at altitudes on the order of 1,000 km during auroral events and then are further accelerated as they pass through the higher altitude auroral acceleration region. Recent measurements show that the volume of transverse ion acceleration can be as small as several tens of meters transverse to B and arc also volumes of ionospheric density depletion and intense waves near the lower hybrid frequency having electric field amplitudes of hundreds of mv/m. These regions of microscale transverse ion acceleration are generally co-located with the auroral field-aligned electron bursts

  4. Ground and satellite observations of auroral fragmentation into patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiokawa, Kazuo; Nishi, Katsuki

    2016-07-01

    We review characteristic auroral fragmentation which is the process by which uniform aurora is broken into several fragments to form auroral patches, based on the all-sky camera observations at Tromsoe, Norway and THEMIS chain in Canada. The auroral fragmentation occurs as finger-like structures developing predominantly in meridional direction with speeds of several tens m/s and scale sizes of several tens kilometers without any shearing motion. These features suggest that pressure-driven instability in the balance between the earthward magnetic-tension force and the tailward pressure gradient force in the magnetosphere is the main driving force of the auroral fragmentation. Thus, these observations indicate that auroral fragmentation associated with pressure-driven instability is a process that creates auroral patches. Auroral fragmentation is seen from midnight to dawn local time and usually appears at the beginning of the substorm recovery phase, near the low latitude boundary of the auroral region. One example of plasma and magnetic field observations by the THEMIS satellite in the conjugate magnetosphere shows diamagnetic anti-phase variations of magnetic and plasma pressures with time scales of several to tens minutes associated with the auroral fragmentation. This observation also supports the idea of pressure-driven instability to cause the auroral fragmentation into patches.

  5. Power and Submarine Cable Systems for the KM3NeT kilometre cube Neutrino Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Sedita, M; Hallewell, G

    2009-01-01

    The KM3NeT EU-funded consortium, pursuing a cubic kilometre scale neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean Sea, is developing technical solutions for the construction of this challenging project, to be realized several kilometres below the sea level. In this framework a proposed DC/DC power system has been designed, maximizing reliability and minimizing difficulties and expensive underwater activities. The power conversion, delivery, transmission and distribution network will be described with particular attention to: the main electro-optical cable, on shore and deep sea power conversion, the subsea distribution network and connection systems, together with installation and maintenance issues.

  6. Auroral backscatter observed at HF from Ottawa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bistatic HF radar recordings of auroral scattering sources north of Ottawa are reported. Doppler frequency spreads over + or - 100 Hz were obtained at least 35 percent of the time. The peak of the Doppler frequency distribution was sometimes shifted from zero by as much as 50 Hz, and significant contributions often occurred at Doppler frequencies greater than 150 Hz. Signals received simultaneously on both arms of a two-arm direction-finding array were used to identify the specific elevations and bearings of the backscatter signals. A detailed study of a particular hour-long period is reported, and a large number of 'apparent' auroral backscatter sources are identified. The source regions, probably located in the F layer, were elongated mainly in the north-south direction and extended over at least 3 deg of latitude. North-south corridors were found between such sources in which echo returns were either absent or very weak. 14 references

  7. Auroral bright spot sequence near 14 MLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical observations of a dayside auroral brightening sequence, by means of all-sky TV cameras and meridian scanning photometers, have been combined with EISCAT ion drift observations within the same invariant latitude - MLT sector. The reported events, covering a 35 min interval around 14 MLT, are embedded within a longer period of similar auroral activity between 0830 (1200 MLT) and 1300 UT (1600 MLT). These observations are discussed in relation to recent models of boundary layer plasma dynamics and the associated magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. The ionospheric events may correspond to large-scale wavelike motions of the low-latitude boundary layer. Based on this interpretation the observed spot size, speed and repetition period (∼ 10 min) give a wavelenght ∼ 900 km in the present case. The events can also be explained as ionospheric signatures of newly opened flux tubes associated with reconnection bursts at the magnetopause near 1400 MLT. 46 refs., 11 figs

  8. Experimental study of diffuse auroral precipitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First chapter is devoted to low energy electron precipitation in the evening sector of the auroral magnetosphere, during quiet and disturbed magnetic periods. Four subjects are studied in detail: the latitude distribution of the varied auroral forms and their relations to external magnetosphere; the time coefficients related to precipitations, the form and the dynamic of the diffuse precipitation equatorial frontier; the precipitation effect on the ionosphere concentration. The last part of the chapter shows that the plasma convection in the magnetosphere, associated to wave-particle interactions near the equatorial accounts for the principal characteristics of the evening sector diffuse electronic precipitations. The second chapter deals with subauroral precipitations of low energy ions, after the magnetospheric substorms, in the high latitude regions of the morning sector

  9. The convection electric field in auroral substorms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerløv, Jesper Wittendorff; Hoffman, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) electric field and ion drift data are used in a statistical study of the ionospheric convection electric field in bulge-type auroral substorms. Thirty-one individual DE 2 substorm crossings were carefully selected and organized by the use of global auroral images obtained...... this database enabled us to compile a model of the ionospheric convection electric field. The characteristics of the premidnight convection reversal show a pronounced local time dependency. Far west of the surge it is a fairly well defined point reversal or convection shear. Approaching the surge and within...... the surge it is a region of weak electric fields increasing in width toward midnight that separates regions of equatorward and poleward electric fields. Therefore we adopt the term Harang region rather than the Harang discontinuity for the premidnight convection reversal. A relatively narrow convection...

  10. Monitoring auroral electrojets with satellite data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Moretto, T.

    2013-01-01

    The strong horizontal ionospheric currents in the auroral oval constitute an important space weather parameter. Here we present a method to estimate the latitude location and intensity of these currents from measurements of variations in the magnetic field magnitude made by low Earth polar orbiting...... satellites. The method is simple enough to be implemented for real-time monitoring, especially since it does not require the full vector field measurement. We demonstrate the method on 5 years of Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) data and show how the monitoring depends on the local time of the...... and complement existing ground-based indices. The CHAMP magnetometer in 350–450km altitude easily measures an electrojet which on the ground would produce an Auroral Electrojet (AE)-type signal as small as 20 nT. Thus, while the signal decreases roughly proportionally to the square of the distance to...

  11. A numerical simulation of auroral ionospheric electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallinckrodt, A. J.

    1985-01-01

    A computer simulation of auroral ionospheric electrodynamics in the altitude range 80 to 250 km has been developed. The routine will either simulate typical electron precipitation profiles or accept observed data. Using a model background ionosphere, ion production rates are calculated from which equilibrium electron densities and the Hall and Pedersen conductivities may be determined. With the specification of suitable boundary conditions, the entire three-dimensional current system and electric field may be calculated within the simulation region. The results of the application of the routine to a typical inverted-V precipitation profile are demonstrated. The routine is used to explore the observed anticorrelation between electric field magnitude and peak energy in the precipitating electron spectrum of an auroral arc.

  12. Sophus Peter Tromholt: an outstanding pioneer in auroral research

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, K.; P. Stauning

    2012-01-01

    The Danish school teacher Sophus Peter Tromholt (1851–1896) was self-taught in physics, astronomy, and auroral sciences. Still, he was one of the brightest auroral researchers of the 19th century. He was the first scientist ever to organize and analyse correlated auroral observations over a wide area (entire Scandinavia) moving away from incomplete localized observations. Tromholt documented the relation between auroras and sunspots and demonstrated the daily, seasonal and solar cyc...

  13. Cluster in situ studies of the auroral acceleration region

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bin

    2014-01-01

    This thesis addresses a central topic in auroral physics, namely particle accelerationproducing intense aurora as well as energetic plasma outflow. Cluster satellitemeasurements of electric and magnetic fields, electrons and ions, collected across auroralfield lines, are used to study various aspects of the quasi-static auroral accelerationregion (AAR), its relation to the auroral density cavity, and the relative role of quasistaticand Alfvénic acceleration for producing aurora.The accelerati...

  14. Propagation of auroral hiss at high altitudes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Santolík, Ondřej; Gurnett, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 10 (2002), s. 119-1-119-4, doi: 10.1029/2001GL013666. ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/01/1064 Grant ostatní: NASA(US) NAG5-7943 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3042911; CEZ:MSM 113200004 Keywords : auroral hiss * electron beams * wave measurement Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.150, year: 2002

  15. Modeling the Perpendicular Electric Field Structure in the Vicinity of Auroral Precipitation Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, J. D.; Noel, J. A.; Perron, P.; St-Maurice, J.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a model of auroral electrodynamics which allows one to quantitatively understand the relationship between parallel electric currents and precipitation-induced conductivity gradients. The latitudinal structure of the modeled perpendicular electric field strength also generally conforms to observed structure. However the magnitude of the perpendicular electric field perturbations around an auroral arc is not well reproduced by the model, and we believe the discrepancy lies in one or more of three avenues we are now exploring: first, the effect of shear-modified current-driven, electrostatic ion-acoustic instability on the parallel current density; second, the role of the non-linear, inertial term in the electron momentum balance; third, the finite energy available below any given altitude to support the perpendicular electric field and the finite propagation time required to access energy from higher in the magnetosphere. These three areas of physics have required improvements to our model. The first two physical factors require us to consider a non-Ohmic relationship between the parallel electric field and the parallel current density. The third factor has required us to adopt a time-dependent method of solution for the electric field and the magnetic field disturbance, rather than the time-independent solution of the scalar electric potential with time-dependent conductivities that we had heretofore employed. Additionally, all of these new aspects of physics have required significant changes in our code to raise the practical upper boundary for the top of the domain. This has had to be done while not losing the advantage our model has of solving the time-dependent, coupled ionosphere-thermosphere-electrodynamics with a sub-kilometre resolution in latitude within the E-region, and while also avoiding any loss in L-shell resolution while achieving this increase in domain height. Some preliminary results are presented and compared with observations.

  16. Investigation of Io's auroral hiss emissions due to its motion in Jupiter's magnetosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohsen H. Moghimi

    2012-01-01

    The left-hand side of the auroral hiss emission observed by Galileo has a frequency time profile shaped very similar to the funnel shape observed in the Earth's auroral region.This close similarity indicates that we can use the theory of whistlermode propagation near the resonance cone to locate the emission source.The general characteristics of the whistler mode are discussed.Then the position of the emission source is investigated using a geometrical method that takes into account the trajectory of Galileo.Initially a point source is assumed.Then the possibility of a sheet source aligned along the magnetic field lines which are tangent to the surface of Io is investigated.Both types of sources show that the whistler mode radiation originates very close to the surface of Io.

  17. Turbulence-double-layer synergetic auroral electron acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this letter we present a theoretical discussion on the problem of the auroral electron acceleration that supports the conjecture of wave-particle interaction (turbulence) assisting the auroral electron acceleration due to a dc magnetic field aligned electric field, created by a double layer, working as to enhance the electron flux

  18. Two theories of auroral electron acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two theories of auroral electron acceleration are discussed. The first is the currently widely held view that the acceleration is an ordered process in a quasi-static electric field. It is suggested that, although there are many factors seeming to support this theory, the major qualifications and uncertainties that have been identified combine to cast serious doubt over its validity. The second is a relatively new interpretation in terms of stochastic acceleration in turbulent electric fields. This second theory, which appears to account readily for most known features of the electron distribution function, is considered to provide a more promising approach to this central question in magnetospheric plasma physics. (author)

  19. Carl Størmer Auroral Pioneer

    CERN Document Server

    Egeland, Alv

    2013-01-01

    This biography summarizes the seminal contributions to auroral and space science of Carl Størmer (1874 - 1957). He was the first to develop precise photographic methods to calculate heights and morphologies of diverse auroral forms during four solar cycles. Størmer independently devised numerical techniques to determine the trajectories of high-energy charged particles allowed and forbidden in the Earth’s magnetic field. His theoretical analyses explained cosmic ray access to the upper atmosphere, 20 years before they were identified by other scientists. Størmer’s crowning achievement, “The Polar Aurora,” published when he was 81 years old, stands to this day as a regularly cited guide in graduate-level courses on space physics.   The authors present the life of this prodigious scientist in relation to the cultural life of early 20th century in Norway and to the development of the space sciences in the post-Sputnik era.

  20. ISIS-II Scanning Auroral Photometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anger, C D; Fancott, T; McNally, J; Kerr, H S

    1973-08-01

    The ISIS-II dual wavelength scanning auroral photometer is designed to map the distribution of auroral emissions at 5577 A and 3914 A over the portion of the dark earth visible to the spacecraft. A combination of internal electronic scanning and the natural orbital and rotational motions of the spacecraft causes a dual wavelength photometer to be scanned systematically across the earth. The data will be reproduced directly in the form of separate pictures representing emissions at each wavelength, which will be used to study the large-scale distribution and morphology of auroras, to study the ratio of 3914-A and 5577-A emissions thought to depend upon the energies of exciting particles), and to compare with results from other instruments on board the spacecraft and on the ground. The Red Line Photometer experiment on the same spacecraft is described in an accompanying paper by Shepherd et al. [Appl. Opt. 12, 1767 (1973)]. The instrument can be thought of as the photometric equivalent of an all-sky color camera which will view the aurora from above instead of below and with a much wider vantage point unobstructed by cloud and haze. In one satellite pass, the instrument will be capable of surveying (in one hemisphere) the entire polar region in which auroras normally occur. PMID:20125605

  1. Cluster in the Auroral Acceleration Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, Jolene S.; Fazakerley, Andrew N.; Marklund, Gorun; Dandouras, Iannis; Christopher, Ivar W.; Kistler, Lynn; Lucek, Elizabeth; Masson, Arnaud; Taylor, Matthew G.; Mutel, Robert L.; Santolik, Ondrej; Bell, Timothy F.; Fung, Shing; Pottelette, Raymond; Hanasz, Jan; Schreiber, Roman; Hull, Arthur J.

    2010-01-01

    Due to a fortuitous evolution of the Cluster orbit, the Cluster spacecraft penetrated for the first time in its mission the heart of Earth's auroral acceleration region (AAR) in December 2009 and January 2010. During this time a special AAR campaign was carried out by the various Cluster instrument teams with special support from ESA and NASA facilities. We present some of the first multi-spacecraft observations of the waves, particles and fields made during that campaign. The Cluster spacecraft configuration during these AAR passages was such that it allowed us to explore the differences in the signatures of waves, particles, and fields on the various spacecraft in ways not possible with single spacecraft. For example, one spacecraft was more poleward than the other three (C2), one was at higher altitude (C1), and one of them (0) followed another (C4) through the AAR on approximately the same track but delayed by three minutes. Their separations were generally on the order of a few thousand km or less and occasionally two of them were lying along the same magnetic field line. We will show some of the first analyses of the data obtained during the AAR campaign, where upward and downward current regions, and the waves specifically associated with those regions, as well as the auroral cavities, were observed similarly and differently on the various spacecraft, helping us to explore the spatial, as well as the temporal, aspects of processes occurring in the AAR.

  2. The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder: Performance of the Boolardy Engineering Test Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, D.; Allison, J. R.; Bannister, K.; Bell, M. E.; Bignall, H. E.; Chippendale, A. P.; Edwards, P. G.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Hegarty, S.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Indermuehle, B. T.; Lenc, E.; Marvil, J.; Popping, A.; Raja, W.; Reynolds, J. E.; Sault, R. J.; Serra, P.; Voronkov, M. A.; Whiting, M.; Amy, S. W.; Axtens, P.; Ball, L.; Bateman, T. J.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Bolton, R.; Brodrick, D.; Brothers, M.; Brown, A. J.; Bunton, J. D.; Cheng, W.; Cornwell, T.; DeBoer, D.; Feain, I.; Gough, R.; Gupta, N.; Guzman, J. C.; Hampson, G. A.; Hay, S.; Hayman, D. B.; Hoyle, S.; Humphreys, B.; Jacka, C.; Jackson, C. A.; Jackson, S.; Jeganathan, K.; Joseph, J.; Koribalski, B. S.; Leach, M.; Lensson, E. S.; MacLeod, A.; Mackay, S.; Marquarding, M.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Mirtschin, P.; Mitchell, D.; Neuhold, S.; Ng, A.; Norris, R.; Pearce, S.; Qiao, R. Y.; Schinckel, A. E. T.; Shields, M.; Shimwell, T. W.; Storey, M.; Troup, E.; Turner, B.; Tuthill, J.; Tzioumis, A.; Wark, R. M.; Westmeier, T.; Wilson, C.; Wilson, T.

    2016-09-01

    We describe the performance of the Boolardy Engineering Test Array, the prototype for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. Boolardy Engineering Test Array is the first aperture synthesis radio telescope to use phased array feed technology, giving it the ability to electronically form up to nine dual-polarisation beams. We report the methods developed for forming and measuring the beams, and the adaptations that have been made to the traditional calibration and imaging procedures in order to allow BETA to function as a multi-beam aperture synthesis telescope. We describe the commissioning of the instrument and present details of Boolardy Engineering Test Array's performance: sensitivity, beam characteristics, polarimetric properties, and image quality. We summarise the astronomical science that it has produced and draw lessons from operating Boolardy Engineering Test Array that will be relevant to the commissioning and operation of the final Australian Square Kilometre Array Path telescope.

  3. Micro-meteoroid seismic uplift and regolith concentration on kilometric scale asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, Raphael F; Mimoun, David

    2015-01-01

    Seismic shaking is an attractive mechanism to explain the destabilisation of regolith slopes and the regolith migration found on the surfaces of asteroids (Richardson et al. 2004; Miyamoto et al. 2007). Here, we use a continuum mechanics method to simulate the seismic wave propagation in an asteroid. Assuming that asteroids can be described by a cohesive core surrounded by a thin non-cohesive regolith layer, our numerical simulations of vibrations induced by micro-meteoroids suggest that the surface peak ground accelerations induced by micro-meteoroid impacts may have been previously under-estimated. Our lower bound estimate of vertical accelerations induced by seismic waves is about 50 times larger than previous estimates. It suggests that impact events triggering seismic activity are more frequent than previously assumed for asteroids in the kilometric and sub-kilometric size range. The regolith lofting is also estimated by a first order ballistic approximation. Vertical displacements are small, but lofting...

  4. The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder: System Architecture and Specifications of the Boolardy Engineering Test Array

    OpenAIRE

    Hotan, A. W.; Bunton, J. D.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Humphreys, B.; Jeffs, B. D.; Shimwell, T.; Tuthill, J.; Voronkov, M.; G. Allen; Amy, S.; Ardern, K.; Axtens, P.; Ball, L; Bannister, K.; Barker, S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the system architecture of a newly constructed radio telescope - the Boolardy Engineering Test Array, which is a prototype of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. Phased array feed technology is used to form multiple simultaneous beams per antenna, providing astronomers with unprecedented survey speed. The test array described here is a 6-antenna interferometer, fitted with prototype signal processing hardware capable of forming at least 9 dual-pola...

  5. The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder: Performance of the Boolardy Engineering Test Array

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, D.; J. R. Allison; Bannister, K.; Bell, M. E.; Bignall, H. E.; Chippendale, A. P.; Edwards, P. G.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Hegarty, S; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Indermuehle, B. T.; Lenc, E.; Marvil, J.; Popping, A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the performance of the Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA), the prototype for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope ASKAP. BETA is the first aperture synthesis radio telescope to use phased array feed technology, giving it the ability to electronically form up to nine dual-polarization beams. We report the methods developed for forming and measuring the beams, and the adaptations that have been made to the traditional calibration and imaging procedures in o...

  6. Preliminary results from Project Waterhole - an auroral modification experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sounding rocket carrying 100 kg of high explosives and plasma diagnostic instrumentation was launched from Churchill Research Ranch on 6 April 1980 over a premidnight auroral arc. The object of the experiment was to produce an ionospheric hole or plasma density depletion near 300 km altitude on field lines connected to an auroral arc. The plasma depletion is produced when the explosive by-products (mostly water) charge-exchange with the ambient O+ ions and then rapidly recombine. It was speculated that the presence of the 'hole' would interfere with the field-aligned current systems associated with the arc and would in turn perturb the auroral source mechanism. The release occurred about 10 km poleward of the auroral arc field lines. As expected, a large ionospheric hole was detected by the rocket-borne plasma sensors. Within a few seconds following the release, (a) the energetic electron precipitation observed in the hole dropped to background levels, (b) the luminosity of the auroral arc observed by a ground-based auroral scanning photometer decreased by a factor of two, and (c) the ionospheric E region density below the hole decayed at a rate consistent with a sudden reduction in particle precipitation. The simultaneous onset of these gross changes in electron precipitation coincident with the release strongly suggests a cause and effect relationship and demonstrates the intimate relationship that exists between the state of the ionospheric plasma and the auroral acceleration mechanism

  7. Sophus Peter Tromholt: an outstanding pioneer in auroral research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Moss

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Danish school teacher Sophus Peter Tromholt (1851–1896 was self-taught in physics, astronomy, and auroral sciences. Still, he was one of the brightest auroral researchers of the 19th century. He was the first scientist ever to organize and analyse correlated auroral observations over a wide area (entire Scandinavia moving away from incomplete localized observations. Tromholt documented the relation between auroras and sunspots and demonstrated the daily, seasonal and solar cycle-related variations in high-latitude auroral occurrence frequencies. Thus, Tromholt was the first ever to deduce from auroral observations the variations associated with what is now known as the auroral oval termed so by Khorosheva (1962 and Feldstein (1963 more than 80 yr later. He made reliable and accurate estimates of the heights of auroras several decades before this important issue was finally settled through Størmer's brilliant photographic technique. In addition to his three major scientific works (Tromholt, 1880a, 1882a, and 1885a, he wrote numerous short science notes and made huge efforts to collect historical auroral observations (Tromholt, 1898. Furthermore, Tromholt wrote a large number of popular science articles in newspapers and journals and made lecture tours all over Scandinavia and Germany, contributing to enhance the public educational level and awareness. He devoted most of his life to auroral research but as a self-taught scientist, he received little acclaim within the contemporary academic scientific society. With his non-academic background, trained at a college of education – not a university – he was never offered a position at a university or a research institution. However, Sophus Tromholt was an outstanding pioneer in auroral research.

  8. Sophus Peter Tromholt: an outstanding pioneer in auroral research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, K.; Stauning, P.

    2012-03-01

    The Danish school teacher Sophus Peter Tromholt (1851-1896) was self-taught in physics, astronomy, and auroral sciences. Still, he was one of the brightest auroral researchers of the 19th century. He was the first scientist ever to organize and analyse correlated auroral observations over a wide area (entire Scandinavia) moving away from incomplete localized observations. Tromholt documented the relation between auroras and sunspots and demonstrated the daily, seasonal and solar cycle-related variations in high-latitude auroral occurrence frequencies. Thus, Tromholt was the first ever to deduce from auroral observations the variations associated with what is now known as the auroral oval termed so by Khorosheva (1962) and Feldstein (1963) more than 80 yr later. He made reliable and accurate estimates of the heights of auroras several decades before this important issue was finally settled through Størmer's brilliant photographic technique. In addition to his three major scientific works (Tromholt, 1880a, 1882a, and 1885a), he wrote numerous short science notes and made huge efforts to collect historical auroral observations (Tromholt, 1898). Furthermore, Tromholt wrote a large number of popular science articles in newspapers and journals and made lecture tours all over Scandinavia and Germany, contributing to enhance the public educational level and awareness. He devoted most of his life to auroral research but as a self-taught scientist, he received little acclaim within the contemporary academic scientific society. With his non-academic background, trained at a college of education - not a university - he was never offered a position at a university or a research institution. However, Sophus Tromholt was an outstanding pioneer in auroral research.

  9. Scintillations of the Uranian kilometric radiation - Implications for the downstream magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, B. M.; Aubier, M. G.; Desch, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of the planetary radio astronomy observations conducted on board Voyager 2, with emphasis placed on the characteristics of the strong (3 to 6 dB) modulations of the broadband smooth Uranian radio emissions recorded from January 27-30, 1986, when the spacecraft was outbound from Uranus. The modulations were characterized by two superposed periods of about 100 sec and about 10 sec. It is suggested that the long-period modulation is due to the magnetopause surface waves, while the short-period modulations are due to the signature of ion cyclotron turbulence above the proton gyrofrequency, related to the magnetopause boundary layer.

  10. Quantum teleportation and entanglement distribution over 100-kilometre free-space channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Juan; Ren, Ji-Gang; Lu, He; Cao, Yuan; Yong, Hai-Lin; Wu, Yu-Ping; Liu, Chang; Liao, Sheng-Kai; Zhou, Fei; Jiang, Yan; Cai, Xin-Dong; Xu, Ping; Pan, Ge-Sheng; Jia, Jian-Jun; Huang, Yong-Mei; Yin, Hao; Wang, Jian-Yu; Chen, Yu-Ao; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2012-08-01

    Transferring an unknown quantum state over arbitrary distances is essential for large-scale quantum communication and distributed quantum networks. It can be achieved with the help of long-distance quantum teleportation and entanglement distribution. The latter is also important for fundamental tests of the laws of quantum mechanics. Although quantum teleportation and entanglement distribution over moderate distances have been realized using optical fibre links, the huge photon loss and decoherence in fibres necessitate the use of quantum repeaters for larger distances. However, the practical realization of quantum repeaters remains experimentally challenging. Free-space channels, first used for quantum key distribution, offer a more promising approach because photon loss and decoherence are almost negligible in the atmosphere. Furthermore, by using satellites, ultra-long-distance quantum communication and tests of quantum foundations could be achieved on a global scale. Previous experiments have achieved free-space distribution of entangled photon pairs over distances of 600 metres (ref. 14) and 13 kilometres (ref. 15), and transfer of triggered single photons over a 144-kilometre one-link free-space channel. Most recently, following a modified scheme, free-space quantum teleportation over 16 kilometres was demonstrated with a single pair of entangled photons. Here we report quantum teleportation of independent qubits over a 97-kilometre one-link free-space channel with multi-photon entanglement. An average fidelity of 80.4 ± 0.9 per cent is achieved for six distinct states. Furthermore, we demonstrate entanglement distribution over a two-link channel, in which the entangled photons are separated by 101.8 kilometres. Violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality is observed without the locality loophole. Besides being of fundamental interest, our results represent an important step towards a global quantum network. Moreover, the high

  11. Current Closure in the Auroral Ionosphere: Results from the Auroral Current and Electrodynamics Structure Rocket Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeppler, S. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Bounds, S. R.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; LaBelle, J. W.; Dombrowski, M. P.; Lessard, M.; Pfaff, R. F.; Rowland D. E.; Jones, S.; Heinselman, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    The Auroral Current and Electrodynamics Structure (ACES) mission consisted of two sounding rockets launched nearly simultaneously from Poker Flat Research Range, AK on January 29, 2009 into a dynamic multiple-arc aurora. The ACES rocket mission was designed to observe electrodynamic and plasma parameters above and within the current closure region of the auroral ionosphere. Two well instrumented payloads were flown along very similar magnetic field footprints, at different altitudes, with small temporal separation between both payloads. The higher altitude payload (apogee 360 km), obtained in-situ measurements of electrodynamic and plasma parameters above the current closure region to determine the input signature. The low altitude payload (apogee 130 km), made similar observations within the current closure region. Results are presented comparing observations of the electric fields, magnetic components, and the differential electron energy flux at magnetic footpoints common to both payloads. In situ data is compared to the ground based all-sky imager data, which presents the evolution of the auroral event as the payloads traversed through magnetically similar regions. Current measurements derived from the magnetometers on the high altitude payload observed upward and downward field-aligned currents. The effect of collisions with the neutral atmosphere is investigated to determine if it is a significant mechanism to explain discrepancies in the low energy electron flux. The high altitude payload also observed time-dispersed arrivals in the electron flux and perturbations in the electric and magnetic field components, which are indicative of Alfven waves.

  12. Current New Zealand Activities in Radio Astronomy: Building Capacity in Engineering & Science for the Square Kilometre Array

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kitaev, V.; Hollitt, C. P.; N. Jones; Motleno, T. C.

    2010-01-01

    We present an update on the NZ-wide advances in the field of Radio Astronomy and Radio Engineering with a particular focus on contributions, not thus reported elsewhere, which hope to either directly or indirectly contribute to New Zealand's engagement with the international Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project. We discuss the status of the SKA project in New Zealand with particular reference to activities of the New Zealand Square Kilometre Array Research and Development Consortium.

  13. Interhemispheric asymmetries in the occurrence of magnetically conjugate sub-auroral polarisation streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, M. L.; Pinnock, M.; Wild, J. A.; Lester, M.; Yeoman, T. K.; Milan, S. E.; Ye, H.; Devlin, J. C.; Frey, H. U.; Kikuchi, T.

    2005-06-01

    Earthward injections of energetic ions and electrons mark the onset of magnetospheric substorms. In the inner magnetosphere (L{sim}4), the energetic ions drift westward and the electrons eastward, thereby enhancing the equatorial ring current. Wave-particle interactions can accelerate these particles to radiation belt energies. The ions are injected slightly closer to Earth in the pre-midnight sector, leading to the formation of a radial polarisation field in the inner magnetosphere. This maps to a poleward electric field just equatorward of the auroral oval in the ionosphere. The poleward electric field is subsequently amplified by ionospheric feedback, thereby producing auroral westward flow channels (AWFCs). In terms of electric field strength, AWFCs are the strongest manifestation of substorms in the ionosphere. Because geomagnetic flux tubes are essentially equi-potentials, similar AWFC signatures should be observed simultaneously in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Here we present magnetically conjugate SuperDARN radar observations of AWFC activity observed in the pre-midnight sector during two substorm intervals including multiple onsets during the evening of 30 November 2002. The Northern Hemisphere observations were made with the Japanese radar located at King Salmon, Alaska (57circLambda ), and the Southern Hemisphere observations with the Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER) located at Bruny Island, Tasmania (-55circLambda ). LANL geosynchronous satellite observations of energetic ion and electron fluxes monitored the effects of substorms in the inner magnetosphere (L{sim}6). The radar-observed AWFC activity was coincident with activity observed at geosynchronous orbit, as well as westward current surges in the ionosphere observed using ground-based magnetometers. The location of AWFCs with respect to the auroral oval was inferred from FUV auroral images recorded on board the IMAGE spacecraft. DMSP SSIES ion drift measurements

  14. RFP for the Auroral Multiscale Midex (AMM) Mission star tracker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels; Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif;

    1999-01-01

    This document is in response to the John Hopkins University - Applied Physics Laboratory RFP for the Auroral Multiscale Midex Mission star tracker.It describes the functionality, the requirements and the performance of the ASC Star Tracker.......This document is in response to the John Hopkins University - Applied Physics Laboratory RFP for the Auroral Multiscale Midex Mission star tracker.It describes the functionality, the requirements and the performance of the ASC Star Tracker....

  15. Ionospheric heating, upwelling, and depletions in auroral current systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettergren, M. D.; Semeter, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    This research investigates aspects of ionospheric dynamics relevant to magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in auroral arc current systems. Auroral electric fields and particle precipitation deposit energy in the ionosphere, often resulting in enhanced ion or electron temperatures. This heating has a wide variety of consequences for the ionosphere. High ion temperatures alter chemical balance in the lower F-region, resulting in conversion to a molecular ion plasma, faster recombination, and plasma depletions. Pressure enhancements resulting from both ion and electron heating are capable of generating intense ion upflows. Ion upflow and depletion processes redistribute and structure the auroral plasma in ways that are likely of consequence to wave coupling of the magnetosphere and ionosphere. These implications are examined through the use of a fluid-kinetic model of the auroral ionosphere and new incoherent scatter radar data analysis techniques. Results indicate that enhanced recombination of molecular ions in auroral downward current regions may work in concert with well-known electrodynamic depletion processes, in the F-region ionosphere. Furthermore, ionospheric upflows in auroral upward and downward current regions may be quite different in terms of intensity and types of upflowing ions.

  16. Dayside Auroral Activity During Solar Maximum and Minimum Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawie, M.; Fasel, G. J.; Flicker, J.; Angelo, A.; Bender, S.; Alyami, M.; Sibeck, D. G.; Sigernes, F.; Lorentzen, D. A.; Green, D.

    2014-12-01

    It is well documented that the dayside auroral oval shifts equatorward when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz-component turns southward [Burch, 1973; Akasofu, 1977; Horwitz and Akasofu, 1977; Sandholt et al., 1986, 1988]. During these periods of oval expansion dayside transients are observed to move away from the poleward edge of the auroral oval and drift poleward. These poleward-moving auroral forms are believed to be ionospheric signatures of dayside merging. The dayside auroral oval usually begins to contract when the interplanetary magnetic field turns sharply northward, Bz>0. Eighteen years of meridian scanning photometer (MSP) data from the Kjell Henriksen Observatory in Longyearbyen, Norway are analyzed. During the boreal winter the Sun is several degrees below the horizon. This permits optical observations throughout the daytime period. The MSP Data is selected two hours before and after local noon in Longyearbeyn. Solar wind data (solar wind pressure and speed, along with the IMF Bx, By, Bz components) are collected for each interval and combined with the MSP observations. This data is then separated using solar maximum and minimum periods. Auroral activity (oval expansions and contractions along with the frequency and number of poleward-moving auroral forms) is documented for both solar maximum and minimum periods.

  17. The Murchison Widefield Array: The Square Kilometre Array Precursor at Low Radio Frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Tingay, S. J.; Goeke, R.; Bowman, J.D.; Emrich, D.; Ord, S. M.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M F; Booler, T.; Crosse, B.; Pallot, D.; Wicenec, A.; Arcus, W.; Barnes, D; Bernardi, G.; Briggs, F.

    2012-01-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is one of three Square Kilometre Array Precursor telescopes and is located at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory in the Murchison Shire of the mid-west of Western Australia, a location chosen for its extremely low levels of radio frequency interference. The MWA operates at low radio frequencies, 80–300 MHz, with a processed bandwidth of 30.72 MHz for both linear polarisations, and consists of 128 aperture arrays (known as tiles) distributed over a ~3...

  18. Square Kilometre Array Telescope—Precision Reference Frequency Synchronisation via 1f-2f Dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Zhu, X.; Gao, C.; Bai, Y.; Dong, J. W.; Wang, L. J.

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project is an international effort to build the world’s largest radio telescope, with a one-square-kilometre collecting area. In addition to its ambitious scientific objectives, such as probing cosmic dawn and the cradle of life, the SKA demands several revolutionary technological breakthroughs, such as ultra-high precision synchronisation of the frequency references for thousands of antennas. In this report, with the purpose of application to the SKA, we demonstrate a frequency reference dissemination and synchronisation scheme in which the phase-noise compensation function is applied at the client site. Hence, one central hub can be linked to a large number of client sites, thus forming a star-shaped topology. As a performance test, a 100-MHz reference frequency signal from a hydrogen maser (H-maser) clock is disseminated and recovered at two remote sites. The phase-noise characteristics of the recovered reference frequency signal coincide with those of the H-maser source and satisfy the SKA requirements. PMID:26349544

  19. Square Kilometre Array Telescope--Precision Reference Frequency Synchronisation via 1f-2f Dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B; Zhu, X; Gao, C; Bai, Y; Dong, J W; Wang, L J

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project is an international effort to build the world's largest radio telescope, with a one-square-kilometre collecting area. In addition to its ambitious scientific objectives, such as probing cosmic dawn and the cradle of life, the SKA demands several revolutionary technological breakthroughs, such as ultra-high precision synchronisation of the frequency references for thousands of antennas. In this report, with the purpose of application to the SKA, we demonstrate a frequency reference dissemination and synchronisation scheme in which the phase-noise compensation function is applied at the client site. Hence, one central hub can be linked to a large number of client sites, thus forming a star-shaped topology. As a performance test, a 100-MHz reference frequency signal from a hydrogen maser (H-maser) clock is disseminated and recovered at two remote sites. The phase-noise characteristics of the recovered reference frequency signal coincide with those of the H-maser source and satisfy the SKA requirements. PMID:26349544

  20. Snowpack modelling in the Pyrenees driven by kilometric-resolution meteorological forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quéno, Louis; Vionnet, Vincent; Dombrowski-Etchevers, Ingrid; Lafaysse, Matthieu; Dumont, Marie; Karbou, Fatima

    2016-07-01

    Distributed snowpack simulations in the French and Spanish Pyrenees are carried out using the detailed snowpack model Crocus driven by the numerical weather prediction system AROME at 2.5 km grid spacing, during four consecutive winters from 2010 to 2014. The aim of this study is to assess the benefits of a kilometric-resolution atmospheric forcing to a snowpack model for describing the spatial variability of the seasonal snow cover over a mountain range. The evaluation is performed by comparisons to ground-based measurements of the snow depth, the snow water equivalent and precipitations, to satellite snow cover images and to snowpack simulations driven by the SAFRAN analysis system. Snow depths simulated by AROME-Crocus exhibit an overall positive bias, particularly marked over the first summits near the Atlantic Ocean. The simulation of mesoscale orographic effects by AROME gives a realistic regional snowpack variability, unlike SAFRAN-Crocus. The categorical study of daily snow depth variations gives a differentiated perspective of accumulation and ablation processes. Both models underestimate strong snow accumulations and strong snow depth decreases, which is mainly due to the non-simulated wind-induced erosion, the underestimation of strong melting and an insufficient settling after snowfalls. The problematic assimilation of precipitation gauge measurements is also emphasized, which raises the issue of a need for a dedicated analysis to complement the benefits of AROME kilometric resolution and dynamical behaviour in mountainous terrain.

  1. Observations of magnetic field dipolarization during auroral substorm onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Sigwarth, J. B.; Kokubun, S.

    2000-07-01

    The dynamical behavior of plasmas and magnetic fields in the vicinity of the equatorial crossing of magnetic field lines threading the onset auroral arc is examined for two substorms on November 26, 1997. The locations of the initial brightenings of the auroral arcs were determined with the cameras for visible and far-ultraviolet wavelengths on board the Polar spacecraft. The equatorial positions of the field lines were in the range of radial distances of 8-12RE as computed with models of Earth's global magnetic field. The radial distance of the Geotail spacecraft was 14 RE at a position in the premidnight sector that was 2RE below the current sheet. This spacecraft was embedded in a low-β plasma that was located adjacent to the central hot plasma sheet. For the first substorm, with onset at 1310 UT, no substantial effect was observed in the plasmas and magnetic fields, although the Geotail spacecraft was located only about 2 hours in magnetic local time from the field lines threading the onset auroral arc. For the second substorm onset, at 1354 UT, the spacecraft was positioned within tens of minutes in local time of the position of the magnetic field lines threading the onset auroral arc. This fortuitous spacecraft position in the relatively quiescent plasma and magnetic fields adjacent to the central plasma sheet and within several Earth radii of the position of the onset mechanism allowed determination of the beginning time of the dipolarization of the magnetic fields. This time was simultaneous with the onset brightening of the auroral arc within the approximately 1-min time resolution of the auroral images. The simultaneity of the initial brightening of the auroral arc and of the initiation of the dipolarization of the magnetic field, presumably due to diversion of current from the equatorial current sheet to the ionosphere, provides an important guideline for global dynamical MHD models of Earth's magnetosphere.

  2. Stochastic modeling of the auroral electrojet index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anh, V. V.; Yong, J. M.; Yu, Z. G.

    2008-10-01

    Substorms are often identified by bursts of activities in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system characterized by the auroral electrojet (AE) index. The highly complex nature of substorm-related bursts suggests that a stochastic approach would be needed. Stochastic models including fractional Brownian motion, linear fractional stable motion, Fokker-Planck equation and Itô-type stochastic differential equation have been suggested to model the AE index. This paper provides a stochastic model for the AE in the form of fractional stochastic differential equation. The long memory of the AE time series is represented by a fractional derivative, while its bursty behavior is modeled by a Lévy noise with inverse Gaussian marginal distribution. The equation has the form of the classical Stokes-Boussinesq-Basset equation of motion for a spherical particle in a fluid with retarded viscosity. Parameter estimation and approximation schemes are detailed for the simulation of the equation. The fractional order of the equation conforms with the previous finding that the fluctuations of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system as seen in the AE reflect the fluctuations in the solar wind: they both possess the same extent of long-range dependence. The introduction of a fractional derivative term into the equation to capture the extent of long-range dependence together with an inverse Gaussian noise input describe the right amount of intermittency inherent in the AE data.

  3. Theory for the asymmetry in the auroral ionization density profile for the generation of auroral infrasonic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traveling pressure waves with periods from 10 to 100 seconds are generated in the lower ionosphere by auroral electrojet current filaments as they move supersonically in an equatorward direction. The infrasonic waves produced by the auroral motions propagate to the ground as highly directional bow waves that can be detected by infrasonic microphones on the surface. There is an asymmetry in the reception of auroral infrasonic waves (AIW) with respect to whether the auroral arcs are moving equatorward to poleward. In the literature it is suggested that the asymmetry may be due to anisotropic propagation conditions along the acoustic ray path from the E-region, where AIW are produced, to the surface. Some intrinsic property of the AIW generation mechanism itself has also been suggested as a possible explanation. In this thesis anisotropic propagation is eliminated as the cause of the AIW reception asymmetry. Theoretical calculations, beginning with a model of an auroral precipitation region, are presented to show that there can be a significant difference in the transverse ionization density profiles between an auroral arc that is moving equatorward and an arc that is moving poleward, for a given equatorward-directed E-region ambient electric field. The calculation has been accomplished by solving the equations of motion and continuity for the cross-sectional ionization density profile associated with the transverse motion of a filamentary auroral electrojet. Thus, it is shown that there is an asymmetry in the ionization profiles associated with moving arcs, and in their coupling, that is related to the relative direction of motion of the arc with respect to the ambient electric field, and that it is this asymmetry that is probably the cause of the observed AIW reception asymmetry

  4. DMSP Auroral Charging at Solar Cycle 24 Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, M.; Parker, L. Neergaard; Minow, J. I.

    2013-01-01

    It has been well established that polar orbiting satellites can experience mild to severe auroral charging levels (on the order of a few hundred volts to few kilovolts negative frame potentials) during solar minimum conditions. These same studies have shown a strong reduction in charging during the rising and declining phases of the past few solar cycles with a nearly complete suppression of auroral charging at solar maximum. Recently, we have observed examples of high level charging during the recent approach to Solar Cycle 24 solar maximum conditions not unlike those reported by Frooninckx and Sojka. These observations demonstrate that spacecraft operations during solar maximum cannot be considered safe from auroral charging when solar activity is low. We present a survey of auroral charging events experienced by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F16 satellite during Solar Cycle 24 maximum conditions. We summarize the auroral energetic particle environment and the conditions necessary for charging to occur in this environment, we describe how the lower than normal solar activity levels for Solar Cycle 24 maximum conditions are conducive to charging in polar orbits, and we show examples of the more extreme charging events, sometimes exceeding 1 kV, during this time period.

  5. A Wide Field Auroral Imager (WFAI for low Earth orbit missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Bannister

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive understanding of the solar wind interaction with Earth's coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system requires an ability to observe the charged particle environment and auroral activity from the same platform, generating particle and photon image data which are matched in time and location. While unambiguous identification of the particles giving rise to the aurora requires a Low Earth Orbit satellite, obtaining adequate spatial coverage of aurorae with the relatively limited field of view of current space bourne auroral imaging systems requires much higher orbits. A goal for future satellite missions, therefore, is the development of compact, wide field-of-view optics permitting high spatial and temporal resolution ultraviolet imaging of the aurora from small spacecraft in low polar orbit. Microchannel plate optics offer a method of achieving the required performance. We describe a new, compact instrument design which can observe a wide field-of-view with the required spatial resolution. We report the focusing of 121.6 nm radiation using a spherically-slumped, square-pore microchannel plate with a focal length of 32 mm and an F number of 0.7. Measurements are compared with detailed ray-trace simulations of imaging performance. The angular resolution is 2.7±0.2° for the prototype, corresponding to a footprint ~33 km in diameter for an aurora altitude of 110 km and a spacecraft altitude of 800 km. In preliminary analysis, a more recent optic has demonstrated a full width at half maximum of 5.0±0.3 arcminutes, corresponding to a footprint of ~1 km from the same spacecraft altitude. We further report the imaging properties of a convex microchannel plate detector with planar resistive anode readout; this detector, whose active surface has a radius of curvature of only 100 mm, is shown to meet the spatial resolution and sensitivity requirements of the new wide field auroral imager (WFAI.

  6. Auroral Phenomenology and Magnetospheric Processes: Earth and Other Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-07-01

    The dancing glow of the aurorae, the long tendrils of light that seem to reach up into space, has mesmerized scientists for centuries. More than a beautiful display, the aurorae tell us about the Earth—about its atmosphere, its magnetic field, and its relationship with the Sun. As technology developed, researchers looking beyond Earth's borders discovered an array of auroral processes on planets throughout the solar system. In the AGU monograph Auroral Phenomenology and Magnetospheric Processes: Earth and Other Planets, editors Andreas Keiling, Eric Donovan, Fran Bagenal, and Tomas Karlsson explore the many open questions that permeate the science of auroral physics and the relatively recent field of extraterrestrial aurorae. In this interview, Eos talks to Karlsson about extraterrestrial aurorae, Alfvén waves, and the sounds of the northern lights.

  7. The Auroral Planetary Imaging and Spectroscopy (APIS) service

    CERN Document Server

    Lamy, Laurent; Henry, Florence; Sidaner, Pierre Le

    2015-01-01

    The Auroral Planetary Imaging and Spectroscopy (APIS) service, accessible online, provides an open and interactive access to processed auroral observations of the outer planets and their satellites. Such observations are of interest for a wide community at the interface between planetology and magnetospheric and heliospheric physics. APIS consists of (i) a high level database, built from planetary auroral observations acquired by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) since 1997 with its mostly used Far-UltraViolet spectro-imagers, (ii) a dedicated search interface aimed at browsing efficiently this database through relevant conditional search criteria and (iii) the ability to interactively work with the data online through plotting tools developed by the Virtual Observatory (VO) community, such as Aladin and Specview. This service is VO compliant and can therefore also been queried by external search tools of the VO community. The diversity of available data and the capability to sort them out by relevant physical...

  8. About the relationship between auroral electrojets and ring currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grafe

    Full Text Available The relationship between the storm-time ring current and the auroral electrojets is investigated using IMAGE magnetometer data, DSt and H-SYM, and solar wind data. Statistical results as well as the investigation of single events show that the auroral electrojets occur also during nonstorm conditions without storm-time ring current development and even during the storm recovery phase of increasing DSt. A close correlation between electrojet intensity and ring current intensity was not found. Though the eastward electrojet moves equatorward during the storm main phase there is no unequivocal relationship between the movement of the westward electrojet and the ring current development. All these results suggest that the auroral electrojets and the ring current develop more or less independently of each other.

    Key words: Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions; storms and substorms

  9. Electric field measurements in the auroral E region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dipole electric field, positive ion and electron densities and temperatures, vehicle potential, and plasma sheath measurements have been made in the auroral E region by means of rockets flown from Fort Churchill, Canada. These results are described and compared over the altitude region 100 to 165 km. On a rocket flight launched on 10 December 1969 during very quiet conditions, adjacent to a stable, low intensity auroral arc, the plasma density and temperatures are found to be high and the electric fields large and steady. Electric field components of the order of -17 mv m-1 to +6 mv m-1 were measured along the Earth's magnetic field. The plasma results indicate that these fields may be contributing to enhanced electron temperatures. On a flight of 9 March 1970 during a large magnetic storm with widespread auroral activity, lower plasma densities and temperatures and much smaller and more erratic electric fields were observed with no significant component parallel to the magnetic field. (auth)

  10. The Tianlai project: radio detection of dark energy and the Square Kilometre Array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dark energy makes up about three quarters of the total cosmic density, but its interaction with ordinary matter is very weak, hence its detection is indirect, i. e. through precise observation of the history of the cosmic expansion and the formation of its structure. To improve the accuracy and reliability of measurements, diverse ways of observation are necessary. At present, most dark energy observations are in the optical wavelength regime, while radio detection provides an alternative method with its own niche, although at present it has only just started. China has some basis in radio astronomy and related technology, and there are sites with a good electromagnetic observation environment, so it is possible for her to take the lead in this area. This article describes the Tianlai experiment, which should help China gain experience and develop the necessary technology to participate and play a role in the colossal international Square Kilometre Array radio telescope project. (authors)

  11. Broadband Polarimetry with the Square Kilometre Array: A Unique Astrophysical Probe

    CERN Document Server

    Gaensler, B M; Akahori, Takuya; Banfield, Julie; Beck, Rainer; Carretti, Ettore; Farnes, Jamie; Haverkorn, Marijke; Heald, George; Jones, David; Landecker, Thomas; Mao, Sui Ann; Norris, Ray; O'Sullivan, Shane; Rudnick, Lawrence; Schnitzeler, Dominic; Seymour, Nicholas; Sun, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    Faraday rotation of polarised background sources is a unique probe of astrophysical magnetic fields in a diverse range of foreground objects. However, to understand the properties of the polarised sources themselves and of depolarising phenomena along the line of sight, we need to complement Faraday rotation data with polarisation observations over very broad bandwidths. Just as it is impossible to properly image a complex source with limited u-v coverage, we can only meaningfully understand the magneto-ionic properties of polarised sources if we have excellent coverage in $\\lambda^2$-space. We here propose a set of broadband polarisation surveys with the Square Kilometre Array, which will provide a singular set of scientific insights on the ways in which galaxies and their environments have evolved over cosmic time.

  12. The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder: System Architecture and Specifications of the Boolardy Engineering Test Array

    CERN Document Server

    Hotan, A W; Harvey-Smith, L; Humphreys, B; Jeffs, B D; Shimwell, T; Tuthill, J; Voronkov, M; Allen, G; Amy, S; Ardern, K; Axtens, P; Ball, L; Bannister, K; Barker, S; Bateman, T; Beresford, R; Bock, D; Bolton, R; Bowen, M; Boyle, B; Braun, R; Broadhurst, S; Brodrick, D; Brooks, K; Brothers, M; Brown, A; Cantrall, C; Carrad, G; Chapman, J; Cheng, W; Chippendale, A; Chung, Y; Cooray, F; Cornwell, T; Davis, E; de Souza, L; DeBoer, D; Diamond, P; Edwards, P; Ekers, R; Feain, I; Ferris, D; Forsyth, R; Gough, R; Grancea, A; Gupta, N; Guzman, JC; Hampson, G; Haskins, C; Hay, S; Hayman, D; Hoyle, S; Jacka, C; Jackson, C; Jackson, S; Jeganathan, K; Johnston, S; Joseph, J; Kendall, R; Kesteven, M; Kiraly, D; Koribalski, B; Leach, M; Lenc, E; Lensson, E; Li, L; Mackay, S; Macleod, A; Maher, T; Marquarding, M; McClure-Griffiths, N; McConnell, D; Mickle, S; Mirtschin, P; Norris, R; Neuhold, S; Ng, A; O'Sullivan, J; Pathikulangara, J; Pearce, S; Phillips, C; Qiao, RY; Reynolds, J E; Rispler, A; Roberts, P; Roxby, D; Schinckel, A; Shaw, R; Shields, M; Storey, M; Sweetnam, T; Troup, E; Turner, B; Tzioumis, A; Westmeier, T; Whiting, M; Wilson, C; Wilson, T; Wormnes, K; Wu, X

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the system architecture of a newly constructed radio telescope - the Boolardy Engineering Test Array, which is a prototype of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. Phased array feed technology is used to form multiple simultaneous beams per antenna, providing astronomers with unprecedented survey speed. The test array described here is a 6-antenna interferometer, fitted with prototype signal processing hardware capable of forming at least 9 dual-polarisation beams simultaneously, allowing several square degrees to be imaged in a single pointed observation. The main purpose of the test array is to develop beamforming and wide-field calibration methods for use with the full telescope, but it will also be capable of limited early science demonstrations.

  13. The Murchison Widefield Array: the Square Kilometre Array Precursor at low radio frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Tingay, S J; Bowman, J D; Emrich, D; Ord, S M; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Booler, T; Crosse, B; Pallot, D; Wicenec, A; Arcus, W; Barnes, D; Bernardi, G; Briggs, F; Burns, S; Bunton, J D; Cappallo, R J; Colegate, T; Corey, B E; Deshpande, A; deSouza, L; Gaensler, B M; Greenhill, L J; Hall, J; Hazelton, B J; Herne, D; Hewitt, J N; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kincaid, B B; Koenig, R; Kratzenberg, E; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McKinley, B; McWhirter, S R; Morgan, E; Oberoi, D; Pathikulangara, J; Prabu, T; Remillard, R A; Rogers, A E E; Roshi, A; Salah, J E; Sault, R J; Udaya-Shankar, N; Schlagenhaufer, F; Srivani, K S; Stevens, J; Subrahmanyan, R; Tremblay, S; Wayth, R B; Waterson, M; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L; Wyithe, J S B

    2012-01-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is one of three Square Kilometre Array Precursor telescopes and is located at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory in the Murchison Shire of the mid-west of Western Australia, a location chosen for its extremely low levels of radio frequency interference. The MWA operates at low radio frequencies, 80-300 MHz, with a processed bandwidth of 30.72 MHz for both linear polarisations, and consists of 128 aperture arrays (known as tiles) distributed over a ~3 km diameter area. Novel hybrid hardware/software correlation and a real-time imaging and calibration systems comprise the MWA signal processing backend. In this paper the as-built MWA is described both at a system and sub-system level, the expected performance of the array is presented, and the science goals of the instrument are summarised.

  14. Time domain studies of Active Galactic Nuclei with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Bignall, Hayley; Hovatta, Talvikki; Koay, Jun Yi; Lazio, Joseph; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Reynolds, Cormac

    2015-01-01

    Variability of radio-emitting active galactic nuclei can be used to probe both intrinsic variations arising from shocks, flares, and other changes in emission from regions surrounding the central supermassive black hole, as well as extrinsic variations due to scattering by structures in our own Galaxy. Such interstellar scattering also probes the structure of the emitting regions, with microarcsecond resolution. Current studies have necessarily been limited to either small numbers of objects monitored over long periods of time, or large numbers of objects but with poor time sampling. The dramatic increase in survey speed engendered by the Square Kilometre Array will enable precision synoptic monitoring studies of hundreds of thousands of sources with a cadence of days or less. Statistics of variability, in particular concurrent observations at multiple radio frequencies and in other bands of the electromagnetic spectrum, will probe accretion physics over a wide range of AGN classes, luminosities, and orientat...

  15. Synergy between the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Bacon, David; Abdalla, Filipe B; Brown, Michael; Bull, Philip; Camera, Stefano; Fender, Rob; Grainge, Keith; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jarvis, Matt; Jackson, Neal; Kirk, Donnacha; Mann, Bob; McEwen, Jason; McKean, John; Newman, Jeffrey A; Raccanelli, Alvise; Sahlen, Martin; Santos, Mario; Tyson, Anthony; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    We provide an overview of the science benefits of combining information from the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). We first summarise the capabilities and timeline of the LSST and overview its science goals. We then discuss the science questions in common between the two projects, and how they can be best addressed by combining the data from both telescopes. We describe how weak gravitational lensing and galaxy clustering studies with LSST and SKA can provide improved constraints on the causes of the cosmological acceleration. We summarise the benefits to galaxy evolution studies of combining deep optical multi-band imaging with radio observations. Finally, we discuss the excellent match between one of the most unique features of the LSST, its temporal cadence in the optical waveband, and the time resolution of the SKA.

  16. The Square Kilometre Array Science Data Processor. Preliminary compute platform design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Square Kilometre Array is a next-generation radio-telescope, to be built in South Africa and Western Australia. It is currently in its detailed design phase, with procurement and construction scheduled to start in 2017. The SKA Science Data Processor is the high-performance computing element of the instrument, responsible for producing science-ready data. This is a major IT project, with the Science Data Processor expected to challenge the computing state-of-the art even in 2020. In this paper we introduce the preliminary Science Data Processor design and the principles that guide the design process, as well as the constraints to the design. We introduce a highly scalable and flexible system architecture capable of handling the SDP workload

  17. The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder: Performance of the Boolardy Engineering Test Array

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, D; Bannister, K; Bell, M E; Bignall, H E; Chippendale, A P; Edwards, P G; Harvey-Smith, L; Hegarty, S; Heywood, I; Hotan, A W; Indermuehle, B T; Lenc, E; Marvil, J; Popping, A; Raja, W; Reynolds, J E; Sault, R J; Serra, P; Voronkov, M A; Whiting, M; Amy, S W; Axtens, P; Ball, L; Bateman, T J; Bock, D C -J; Bolton, R; Brodrick, D; Brothers, M; Brown, A J; Bunton, J D; Cheng, W; Cornwell, T; DeBoer, D; Feain, I; Gough, R; Gupta, N; Guzman, J C; Hampson, G A; Hay, S; Hayman, D B; Hoyle, S; Humphreys, B; Jacka, C; Jackson, C A; Jackson, S; Jeganathan, K; Joseph, J; Koribalski, B S; Leach, M; Lensson, E S; MacLeod, A; Mackay, S; Marquarding, M; McClure-Griffiths, N M; Mirtschin, P; Mitchell, D; Neuhold, S; Ng, A; Norris, R; Pearce, S; Qiao, R Y; Schinckel, A E T; Shields, M; Shimwell, T W; Storey, M; Troup, E; Turner, B; Tuthill, J; Tzioumis, A; Wark, R M; Westmeier, T; Wilson, C; Wilson, T

    2016-01-01

    We describe the performance of the Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA), the prototype for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope ASKAP. BETA is the first aperture synthesis radio telescope to use phased array feed technology, giving it the ability to electronically form up to nine dual-polarization beams. We report the methods developed for forming and measuring the beams, and the adaptations that have been made to the traditional calibration and imaging procedures in order to allow BETA to function as a multi-beam aperture synthesis telescope. We describe the commissioning of the instrument and present details of BETA's performance: sensitivity, beam characteristics, polarimetric properties and image quality. We summarise the astronomical science that it has produced and draw lessons from operating BETA that will be relevant to the commissioning and operation of the final ASKAP telescope.

  18. Auroral emission at Jupiter, through Juno's UVS eyes

    OpenAIRE

    Grodent, Denis; Bonfond, Bertrand; Gladstone, G.; Gérard, Jean-Claude; Gustin, Jacques; Radioti, Aikaterini; Dumont, Maïté; Palmaerts, Benjamin; The Juno Science Team

    2015-01-01

    Juno’s orbit insertion around Jupiter will take place in little bit more than one year (July 2016). After a 107-day capture orbit (Oct. 2016), it will perform a series of 33 eleven-day science polar orbits offering unprecedented views of the auroral regions of Jupiter. The science payload of Juno includes an UltraViolet Spectrograph (UVS) that will characterize the UV auroral emissions of Jupiter over all science orbits. It will obtain high-resolution images and spectra that will provide cont...

  19. Auroral electron acceleration by lower-hybrid waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because the particles and electric fields association with inverted-V electron streams do not have the characteristics expected for acceleration by a quasistatic potential difference, the possiblity that the electrons are stochastically accelerated by waves is investigated. It is demonstrated that the lower hybrid waves seen on auroral field lines have the righ properties to account for the electron acceleration. It is further shown that the lower hybrid wave power measured on auroral field lines can be generated by the streaming ions observed at the boundary of the plasma sheet, and that this wave power is sufficient to account for the electron power observed close to the atmosphere. (author)

  20. V and V Efforts of Auroral Precipitation Models: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yihua; Kuznetsova, Masha; Rastaetter, Lutz; Hesse, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Auroral precipitation models have been valuable both in terms of space weather applications and space science research. Yet very limited testing has been performed regarding model performance. A variety of auroral models are available, including empirical models that are parameterized by geomagnetic indices or upstream solar wind conditions, now casting models that are based on satellite observations, or those derived from physics-based, coupled global models. In this presentation, we will show our preliminary results regarding V&V efforts of some of the models.

  1. Height-integrated conductivity in auroral substorms. 1. Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerløv, Jesper Wittendorff; Hoffman, R.A.

    We present height-integrated Hall and Pedersen conductivity (conductance) calculations from 31 individual Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) substorm crossings. All are northern hemisphere (except one) nighttime passes which took place from September 1981 to January 1982. Global auroral images are used to...... select substorms which display a typical bulge-type auroral emission pattern and to organize the position of individual DE 2 passes with respect to key features in the emission pattern. The Hall and Pedersen conductances are calculated from electron precipitation data obtained by the low altitude plasma...

  2. Analysis of auroral infrared emissions observed during the ELIAS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Caledonia

    Full Text Available The ELIAS (Earth Limb Infrared Atmospheric Structure experiment was flown from the Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska in 1983 and successfully monitored visible and infrared emissions from an IBC III+ aurora. Measurements were performed in both staring and scanning modes over several hundred seconds. The data for short- and mid-wave infrared regions have been analyzed in terms of auroral excitation of the NO and NO+ vibrational bands. Auroral excitation efficiencies and kinetic implications are presented.

  3. Jupiter's Various Auroral Emission Enhancements Observed by Hisaki/EXCEED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chihiro

    2016-07-01

    Onboard a JAXA Earth-orbiting platform, the planetary telescope Hisaki monitors extreme ultraviolet emissions from Jovian aurora and Io plasma torus continuously. Hisaki succeeded to detect sporadic, large auroral power enhancements displaying both short- (a few rotations) variations and their modulations by Io's volcanic activity over several weeks. The spectral information taken by Hisaki enables us to investigate (1) the time variation of the auroral electron precipitating fluxes during these emission enhancements, (2) the occurrence statistics of polar-dominant events, and (3) the associated magnetospheric dynamics for these emission enhancement events using Knight's aurora acceleration theory. Expected collaborative observations with Juno will be discussed.

  4. Feedback between neutral winds and auroral arc electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, L. R.; Walterscheid, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The feedback between neutral atmospheric winds and the electrodynamics of a stable, discrete auroral arc is analyzed. The ionospheric current continuity equation and the equation for neutral gas acceleration by ion drag are solved simultaneously, as a function of time. The results show that, in general, the electric field in the ionosphere adjusts to neutral wind acceleration so as to keep auroral field-aligned currents and electron acceleration approximately independent of time. It is thus concluded that the neutral winds that develop as a result of the electrodynamical forcing associated with an arc do not significantly affect the intensity of the arc.

  5. US national report to the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper highlights progress by U.S. authors during 1983-1986 in the broad area of auroral research. Atmospheric emissions and their use as a tool for remote-sensing the dynamics, energetics, and effects of auroral activity is a subject which is emphasized here because of the vast progress made in this area on both observational and theoretical fronts. The evolution of primary auroral electrons, the acceleration of auroral ions, small-scale electric fields, auroral kilometric radiation, auroral empirical models and activity indices are also reviewed. An extensive bibliography is supplied

  6. Fractal approach to the description of the auroral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyshov, A. A., E-mail: achernyshov@iki.rssi.ru; Mogilevsky, M. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation); Kozelov, B. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Polar Geophysical Institute, Kola Science Center (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15

    The plasma of the auroral region, where energetic particles precipitate from the magnetosphere into the ionosphere, is highly inhomogeneous and nonstationary. In this case, traditional methods of classical plasma physics turn out to be inapplicable. In order to correctly describe the dynamic regimes, transition processes, fluctuations, and self-similar scalings in this region, nonlinear dynamics methods based of the concepts of fractal geometry and percolation theory can be used. In this work, the fractal geometry and percolation theory are used to describe the spatial structure of the ionospheric conductivity. The topological properties, fractal dimensions, and connective indices characterizing the structure of the Pedersen and Hall conductivities on the nightside auroral zone are investigated theoretically. The restrictions imposed on the fractal estimates by the condition of ionospheric current percolation are analyzed. It is shown that the fluctuation scalings of the electric fields and auroral glow observed in the auroral zone fit well the restrictions imposed by the critical condition on the percolation of the Pedersen current. Thus, it is demonstrated that the fractal approach is a promising and convenient method for studying the properties of the ionosphere.

  7. Comparison of auroral structures at Earth and Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T.

    Bright, well-defined auroral structures generally mark the presence of strong upward Birkeland (magnetic-field-aligned) currents which couple the magnetosphere to the planetary ionosphere. These Birkeland currents tend to flow in sheets aligned with strong velocity shear layers in the magnetospheric plasma flow as mapped to the ionosphere. At Earth, velocity shear layers are produced in the magnetosphere's response to solar-wind forcing, and occur near the topological separator surface between open and closed magnetic field lines. At Jupiter, strong velocity shear is produced by internal magnetospheric processes far removed from the open-closed boundary. These processes include the enforcement of partial corotation of magnetospheric plasma, responsible for the "main oval" aurora, and the electrodynamic coupling of Jupiter to its Galilean moons, responsible for auroral spots at the magnetic footprints of Io, Europa, and Ganymede, and an auroral tail downstream of Io. Both planets also exhibit "polar-cap" auroral structures that share at least two features in common: they are more time-variable than the oval emissions, and their origins are not understood.

  8. Height-integrated conductivity in auroral substorms. 1. Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerløv, Jesper Wittendorff; Hoffman, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    are highly localized with a typical scale size of similar to 20 km and are associated with energetic (>10 keV) inverted V events. Except in the low-latitude part of the auroral oval the Hall to Pedersen ratio equals or exceeds 1.0, and it peaks in the high-latitude part of the surge where values of 3...

  9. First results of the Auroral Turbulance II rocket experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielides, M.A.; Ranta, A.; Ivchenco, N.;

    1999-01-01

    The Auroral Turbulance II sounding rocket was launched on February 11, 1997 into moderately active nightside aurora from the Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska, US. The experiment consisted of three independent, completely instrumented payloads launched by a single vehicle. The aim of the experiment...

  10. Characterization and diagnostic methods for geomagnetic auroral infrasound waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Justin J.

    Infrasonic perturbations resulting from auroral activity have been observed since the 1950's. In the last decade advances in infrasonic microphone sensitivity, high latitude sensor coverage, time series analysis methods and computational efficiency have elucidated new types of auroral infrasound. Persistent periods of infrasonic activity associated with geomagnetic sub-storms have been termed geomagnetic auroral infrasound waves [GAIW]. We consider 63 GAIW events recorded by the Fairbanks, AK infrasonic array I53US ranging from 2003 to 2014 and encompassing a complete solar cycle. We make observations of the acoustic features of these events alongside magnetometer, riometer, and all-sky camera data in an effort to quantify the ionospheric conditions suitable for infrasound generation. We find that, on average, the generation mechanism for GAIW is confined to a region centered about ~60 0 longitude east of the anti-Sun-Earth line and at ~770 North latitude. We note furthermore that in all cases considered wherein imaging riometer data are available, that dynamic regions of heightened ionospheric conductivity periodically cross the overhead zenith. Consistent features in concurrent magnetometer conditions are also noted, with irregular oscillations in the horizontal component of the field ubiquitous in all cases. In an effort to produce ionosphere based infrasound free from the clutter and unknowns typical of geophysical observations, an experiment was undertaken at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program [HAARP] facility in 2012. Infrasonic signals appearing to originate from a source region overhead were observed briefly on 9 August 2012. The signals were observed during a period when an electrojet current was presumed to have passed overhead and while the facilities radio transmitter was periodically heating the lower ionosphere. Our results suggest dynamic auroral electrojet currents as primary sources of much of the observed infrasound, with

  11. Variations of auroral hydrogen emission near substorm onset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Borovkov

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of coordinated optical ground-based observations of the auroral substorm on 26 March 2004 in the Kola Peninsula are described. Imaging spectrograph data with high spectral and temporal resolution recorded the Doppler profile of the Hα hydrogen emission; this allows us to estimate the average energy of precipitating protons and the emission intensity of the hydrogen Balmer line. Two different populations of precipitating protons were observed during an auroral substorm. The first of these is associated with a diffuse hydrogen emission that is usually observed in the evening sector of the auroral oval and located equatorward of the discrete electron arcs associated with substorm onset. The average energy of the protons during this precipitation was ~20–35 keV, and the energy flux was ~3x10–4Joule/m2s. The second proton population was observed 1–2min after the breakup during 4–5min of the expansion phase of substorm into the zone of bright, discrete auroral structures (N-S arcs. The average energy of the protons in this population was ~60 keV, and the energy flux was ~2.2x10–3Joule/m2s. The observed spatial structure of hydrogen emission is additional evidence of the higher energy of precipitated protons in the second population, relative to the protons in the diffuse aurora. We believe that the most probable mechanism of precipitation of the second population protons was pitch-angle scattering of particles due to non-adiabatic motion in the region of local dipolarization near the equatorial plane.

    Keywords. Auroral ionosphere; Particle precipitation; Storms and substorms

  12. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  13. Possible Gamma-Ray Burst radio detections by the Square Kilometre Array. New perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Ruggeri, Alan Cosimo

    2016-01-01

    The next generation interferometric radio telescope, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which will be the most sensitive and largest radio telescope ever constructed, could greatly contribute to the detection, survey and characterization of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). By the SKA, it will be possible to perform the follow up of GRBs even for several months. This approach would be extremely useful to extend the Spectrum Energetic Distribution (SED) from the gamma to the to radio band and would increase the number of radio detectable GRBs. In principle, the SKA could help to understand the physics of GRBs by setting constraints on theoretical models. This goal could be achieved by taking into account multiple observations at different wavelengths in order to obtain a deeper insight of the sources. Here, we present an estimation of GRB radio detections, showing that the GRBs can really be observed by the SKA. The approach that we present consists in determining blind detection rates derived by a very large sample con...

  14. Japanese Cosmic Dawn/Epoch of Reionization Science with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Kenji; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Inoue, Akio K; Inoue, Susumu; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Shimabukuro, Hayato; Takahashi, Keitaro; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Yajima, Hidenobu; Yokoyama, Shu-ichiro; Yoshikawa, Kohji; Yoshiura, Shintaro

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic reionization is known to be a major phase transition of the gas in the Universe. Since astronomical objects formed in the early Universe, such as the first stars, galaxies and black holes, are expected to have caused cosmic reionization, the formation history and properties of such objects are closely related to the reionization process. In spite of the importance of exploring reionization, our understandings regarding reionization is not sufficient yet. Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is a next-generation large telescope that will be operated in the next decade. Although several programs of next-generation telescopes are currently scheduled, the SKA will be the unique telescope with a potential to directly observe neutral hydrogen up to z~30, and provide us with valuable information on the Cosmic Dawn (CD) and the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). The early science with the SKA will start in a few years; it is thus the time for us to elaborate a strategy for CD/EoR Science with the SKA. The purpose of this do...

  15. Extending cosmological tests of General Relativity with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Bull, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Tests of general relativity (GR) are still in their infancy on cosmological scales, but forthcoming experiments promise to greatly improve their precision over a wide range of distance scales and redshifts. One such experiment, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will carry out several wide and deep surveys of resolved and unresolved neutral hydrogen (HI) 21cm line-emitting galaxies, mapping a significant fraction of the sky from $0 \\le z \\lesssim 6$. I present forecasts for the ability of a suite of possible SKA HI surveys to detect deviations from GR by reconstructing the cosmic expansion and growth history. SKA Phase 1 intensity mapping surveys can achieve sub-1% measurements of $f\\sigma_8$ out to $z\\approx 1$, with an SKA1-MID Band 2 survey out to $z \\lesssim 0.6$ able to surpass contemporary spectroscopic galaxy surveys such as DESI and Euclid in terms of constraints on modified gravity parameters if challenges such as foreground contamination can be tackled effectively. A more futuristic Phase 2 HI survey...

  16. The solar wind control of Jupiter's broad-band kilometric radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, C. H.; Leblanc, Y.; Desch, M. D.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind close to Jupiter are compared with the broad-band kilometric radio emission (bKOM), using data recorded by Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 during 1979. The lower bKOM frequencies, less than about 300 kHz, are found to correlate with the solar wind density and pressure and with the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) magnitude during periods when there is a well-defined magnetic sector structure. The results suggest that lower frequency bKOM events are most likely to occur after a sector boundary has passed Jupiter during the period when the solar wind density and the IMF magnitude are increasing towards the sector center. The average bKOM energy per Jovian rotation tends to have lower values soon after the sector center has passed. Higher-frequency/higher-energy bKOM emission may be contaminated by hectometric emission (HOM) and differently correlated with solar activity. The solar wind control may also be obscured by some stronger control. It is suggested that electron density fluctuations in the Io torus, where the source is believed to be located, may be responsible for variations in the beaming and hence variations in the observed emission.

  17. The Cosmic Dawn and Epoch of Reionization with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Koopmans, L V E; Mellema, G; Abdalla, F; Aguirre, J; Ahn, K; Barkana, R; van Bemmel, I; Bernardi, G; Bonaldi, A; Briggs, F; de Bruyn, A G; Chang, T C; Chapman, E; Chen, X; Ciardi, B; Datta, K K; Dayal, P; Ferrara, A; Fialkov, A; Fiore, F; Ichiki, K; Illiev, I T; Inoue, S; Jelić, V; Jones, M; Lazio, J; Maio, U; Majumdar, S; Mack, K J; Mesinger, A; Morales, M F; Parsons, A; Pen, U -L; Santos, M; Schneider, R; Semelin, B; de Souza, R S; Subrahmanyan, R; Takeuchi, T; Trott, C; Vedantham, H; Wagg, J; Webster, R; Wyithe, S

    2015-01-01

    Concerted effort is currently ongoing to open up the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) ($z\\sim$15-6) for studies with IR and radio telescopes. Whereas IR detections have been made of sources (Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitters, quasars and drop-outs) in this redshift regime in relatively small fields of view, no direct detection of neutral hydrogen, via the redshifted 21-cm line, has yet been established. Such a direct detection is expected in the coming years, with ongoing surveys, and could open up the entire universe from $z\\sim$6-200 for astrophysical and cosmological studies, opening not only the EoR, but also its preceding Cosmic Dawn ($z\\sim$30-15) and possibly even the later phases of the Dark Ages ($z\\sim$200-30). All currently ongoing experiments attempt statistical detections of the 21-cm signal during the EoR, with limited signal-to-noise. Direct imaging, except maybe on the largest (degree) scales at lower redshifts, as well as higher redshifts will remain out of reach. The Square Kilometre Array(SKA) will revolu...

  18. Measurements of the Cosmological Evolution of Magnetic Fields with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Martin; Bolton, Rosie; Geisbuesch, Joern; Green, David A; Riley, Julia

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the potential of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) for measuring the magnetic fields in clusters of galaxies via Faraday rotation of background polarised sources. [...] We find that about 10 per cent of the sky is covered by a significant extragalactic Faraday screen. Most of it has rotation measures between 10 and 100 rad/m/m. We argue that the cluster centres should have up to about 5000 rad/m/m. We show that the proposed mid frequency aperture array of the SKA as well as the lowest band of the SKA dish array are well suited to make measurements for most of these rotation measure values, typically requiring a signal-to-noise of ten. We calculate the spacing of sources forming a grid for the purpose of measuring foreground rotation measures: it reaches a spacing of 36 arcsec for a 100 hour SKA observation per field. We also calculate the statistics for background RM measurements in clusters of galaxies. We find that a first phase of the SKA would allow us to take stacking experiments out to hig...

  19. Interhemispheric asymmetries in the occurrence of magnetically conjugate sub-auroral polarisation streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Earthward injections of energetic ions and electrons mark the onset of magnetospheric substorms. In the inner magnetosphere (L${sim}$4, the energetic ions drift westward and the electrons eastward, thereby enhancing the equatorial ring current. Wave-particle interactions can accelerate these particles to radiation belt energies. The ions are injected slightly closer to Earth in the pre-midnight sector, leading to the formation of a radial polarisation field in the inner magnetosphere. This maps to a poleward electric field just equatorward of the auroral oval in the ionosphere. The poleward electric field is subsequently amplified by ionospheric feedback, thereby producing auroral westward flow channels (AWFCs. In terms of electric field strength, AWFCs are the strongest manifestation of substorms in the ionosphere. Because geomagnetic flux tubes are essentially equi-potentials, similar AWFC signatures should be observed simultaneously in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Here we present magnetically conjugate SuperDARN radar observations of AWFC activity observed in the pre-midnight sector during two substorm intervals including multiple onsets during the evening of 30 November 2002. The Northern Hemisphere observations were made with the Japanese radar located at King Salmon, Alaska (57$^{circ}$$Lambda $, and the Southern Hemisphere observations with the Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER located at Bruny Island, Tasmania (

  20. Auroral electrostatic solitons and supersolitons in a magnetized nonthermal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rufai, O. R. [Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, NRE, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2015-05-15

    Exploiting the spacecraft measurements in the auroral region, finite amplitude nonlinear low frequency electrostatic solitons and supersolitons in a magnetized plasma consisting of cold ions fluid, Boltzmann protons, and nonthermal hot electrons are studied by applying a pseudo-potential technique. The localized solution of the nonlinear structures is obtained through the charge neutrality condition. Further numerical investigation shows the existence of supersoliton solutions at supersonic Mach numbers regime. The amplitude of ion-acoustic structures decreased with an increase in nonthermal electrons and ion density ratio. For the plasma parameters relevant to the auroral zone of the Earth's magnetosphere, the electric field amplitude of supersolitons is found to be about 9 mV/m, which is in agreement with satellite observations.

  1. Auroral Undulations During Magnetic Storms: TIMED/GUVI Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Paxton, L. J.; Morrison, D.; Lui, T.; Kil, H.; Wolven, B.; Meng, C. I.

    2005-05-01

    Giant undulations on the equatorward edge of the diffuse aurora have been identified in TIMED/GUVI auroral images in the far ultraviolet wavelengths. Some new features have been observed: (1) The GUVI 121.6nm auroral images provide direct optical evidence that the undulations occur in the proton aurora, (2) Undulations are not limited to the dusk sector, they can occur in all local time sectors, (3) Both large ionospheric ion drift velocity (1000 m/s and above) and strong velocity shear (> 0.1 1/s) appear to be a necessary condition for the undulation to occur, (4) While almost all of the undulation events are observed during magnetic storms (Dst K-H instability.

  2. A simple kinetic theory of auroral arc scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Y. T.

    1986-01-01

    A kinetic theory of the origins of the auroral arc scale spectrum is presented in this paper. The conceptual basis of the theory is current conservation in a turbulent plasma at the magnetospheric equatorial region in which a field-aligned current is generated and the local electrostatic potential structure is forced to adjust to the presence of the field-aligned current. This simple model uses an ad hoc Ohm's law relationship between the perpendicular current and the perpendicular electric field, but with a negative conductance in the generator region so that J(perpendicular) x E(perpendicular) is less than 0. An exact solution of a simple model of the concept yields a bistatic auroral generator for which multiple-arc formation is predicted if the field-aligned current exceeds a critical value. The predicted scale spectrum is inversely proportional to the square root of the field-aligned current strength spectrum.

  3. Height-integrated conductivity in auroral substorms - 2. Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerløv, Jesper Wittendorff; Hoffman, R.A.

    Calculations of height-integrated conductivity from 31 individual Dynamics Explorer (DE 2) substorm crossings presented by Gjerloev and Hoffman [this issue] are used to compile empirical models of the height-integrated Pedersen and Hall conductivities (conductances) in a bulge-type auroral substorm....... Global auroral images obtained by Dynamics Explorer 1 (DE 1) were used to select substorms displaying a typical bulge-type emission pattern and each individual DE 2 pass was positioned with respect to key features in the observed emission pattern. The conductances were calculated for each DE 2 pass using...... electron precipitation data and a monoenergetic conductance model. All passes were divided into six different sectors, and average conductance profiles were carefully deduced for each of these sectors. Using a simple boxcar filter, smoothed average sector passes were calculated and from linear...

  4. Ancient Norwegian literature in relation to the auroral oval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Poetic Edda and The King's Mirror are well preserved Norse documents from the period between 700 and 1300 A.D. The latter states that the aurora was known to people living in Greenland but probably not observed in Norway at about 1200 A.D. The Poetic Edda does not include any decisive evidence for the aurora being known to the Norse scalds in the Viking era. This is a rather surprising fact as the scalds were much inspired by natural phenomena, and in particular occupied by celestial gestalts. In a search for an explanation of this lack of inspiration from the northern lights among the Norse scalds it is maintained that the position and shape of the auroral oval was different in the Viking era from the present day auroral oval. (orig.)

  5. Threshold of auroral intensification reduced by electron precipitation effect

    CERN Document Server

    Hiraki, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    It has been known that discrete aurora suddenly intensifies and deforms from an arc-like to a variety of wavy/vortex structures, especially during a substorm period. The instability of Alfv$\\acute{\\rm e}$n waves reflected from the ionosphere has been analyzed in order to comprehend the ignition process of auroral intensification. It was presented that the prime key is an enhancement of plasma convection, and the convection electric field has a threshold. This study examined effects of auroral electron precipitation, causing the ionization of neutral atmosphere, on the linear instability of Alfv$\\acute{\\rm e}$n waves. It was found that the threshold of convection electric fields is significantly reduced by increasing the ionization rate, the realistic range of which could be estimated from observed electron energy spectra.

  6. A Failure of Serendipity: the Square Kilometre Array will struggle to eavesdrop on Human-like ETI

    OpenAIRE

    Forgan, D.; Nichol, Bob

    2010-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will operate in frequency ranges often used by military radar and other communications technology. It has been shown that if Extraterrestrial Intelligences (ETIs) communicate using similar technology, then the SKA should be able to detect such transmissions up to distances of ~100 pc (~300 light years) from Earth. However, Mankind has greatly improved its communications technology over the last century, dramatically reducing signal leakage and making the Earth...

  7. A 65 nm CMOS broadband self-calibrated power detector for the square kilometre array radio telescope

    OpenAIRE

    Ge Wu; Leonid Belostotski; James W. Haslett

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a 65 nm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) broadband self-calibrated high-sensitivity power detector for use in the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), the next-generation high-sensitivity radio telescope, is presented. The power detector calibration is performed by adjusting voltages at the bulk terminals of the input transistors to compensate for mismatches in the output voltages because of process, voltage and temperature variations. Measurements show that the power de...

  8. KM3NeT - a multi-kilometre-cubed neutrino telescope for the Mediterranean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KM3NeT will be a multi-cubic-kilometre telescope for the study of neutrinos in the TeV to PeV range. Consisting of arrays of photomultiplier tubes on slender vertical structures anchored to the sea floor, it will detect the Cherenkov light induced by the passage of relativistic particles through the water surrounding the detector. To be located at three sites in the Mediterranean Sea, its Northern latitude, and the sheer size of the detection volume, will make KM3NeT well-positioned to study the expected neutrino flux from galactic objects such as supernova remnants, while it will also be sensitive to higher-energy fluxes, such as that discovered by IceCube. This contribution gives an overview of the KM3NeT detector. The current status of KM3NeT Phase 1 construction, the physics potential of Phase 1.5, and the envisioned final (Phase 2) detector are described. The projected ability of KM3NeT to determine the energies and arrival directions of cosmic neutrinos is presented, in particular the detector resolution to through-going muons and cascade-like interactions inside the instrumented volume. Finally, the projected sensitivities of the different stages of KM3NeT to both diffuse and point-like cosmic neutrino fluxes are given. Specific details of KM3NeT methods and technology, including the ORCA project to resolve the neutrino mass hierarchy and θ23, will be presented in other contributions.

  9. Possible gamma-ray burst radio detections by the Square Kilometre Array. New perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Alan Cosimo; Capozziello, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    The next generation interferometric radio telescope, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which will be the most sensitive and largest radio telescope ever constructed, could greatly contribute to the detection, survey and characterization of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). By the SKA, it will be possible to perform the follow up of GRBs even for several months. This approach would be extremely useful to extend the Spectrum Energetic Distribution (SED) from the gamma to the to radio band and would increase the number of radio detectable GRBs. In principle, the SKA could help to understand the physics of GRBs by setting constraints on theoretical models. This goal could be achieved by taking into account multiple observations at different wavelengths in order to obtain a deeper insight of the sources. Here, we present an estimation of GRB radio detections, showing that the GRBs can really be observed by the SKA. The approach that we present consists in determining blind detection rates derived by a very large sample consisting of merging several GRB catalogues observed by current missions as Swift, Fermi, Agile and INTEGRAL and by previous missions as BeppoSAX, CGRO, GRANAT, HETE-2, Ulysses and Wind. The final catalogue counts 7516 distinct sources. We compute the fraction of GRBs that could be observed by the SKA at high and low frequencies, above its observable sky. Considering the planned SKA sensitivity and through an extrapolation based on previous works and observations, we deduce the minimum fluence in the range 15-150 keV. This is the energy interval where a GRB should emit to be detectable in the radio band by the SKA. Results seem consistent with observational capabilities.

  10. An observation of ionospheric convection and auroral arc motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An all-sky imager operated at Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland has been used to make auroral measurements in correlation with data from the incoherent scatter radar. Reviewing the images as movie sequences with an apparent time compression ratio of 60 allows the eye to discern features which are not apparent in the individual frames. The faint 630 nm airglow background lying poleward of the bright auroral oval arcs appears to be structured in the time lapse observations and drifting at a uniform rate. Analysis of the motion of the airglow structures shows excellent agreement with Doppler radar measurement of the ion drift velocities. Electron density profiles derived from the radar data corroborate the existence of high altitude F-region ionization enhancements. The electron temperature in the patches was about 1,000 K and no higher than outside of the patch signifying that the patches were not produced by local soft electron precipitation. According to the radar Doppler data there was a small component of the drift velocity parallel to the arc at either side of the auroral boundary. The sense of those small components was consistent with drifts driven by a convergent electric field which would also produce an up going field aligned current. The larger component of drift velocity perpendicular to the arc appeared to be continuous on either side of the arc. This drift component shows the existence of an electric field parallel to the arc, showing that the arc was not on an equipotential. During the observations the arc moved slowly in the opposite sense to the ion drift, signifying that the auroral arc motion is not driven by the electric field impressed on the atmosphere by the magnetosphere. Calculations of the expected intensity of the 630 nm emissions are in good agreement with the measured intensities of the moving patches

  11. Particle simulation of auroral double layers. Doctoral thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, B.L.

    1992-06-01

    Externally driven magnetic reconnection has been proposed as a possible mechanism for production of auroral electrons during magnetic substorms. Fluid simulations of magnetic reconnection lead to strong plasma flows towards the increasing magnetic field of the earth. These plasma flows must generate large scale potential drops to preserve global charge neutrality. We have examined currentless injection of plasma along a dipole magnetic field into a bounded region using both analytic techniques and particle simulation.

  12. Coordinated ATS 5 electron flux and simultaneous auroral observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All-sky camera (ASCA) observations were made at the field line conjugate of the ATS 5 satellite. The field of view of these cameras covered the region of the magnetosphere from L=5 to L=11 at the approximate longitude of the ATS field line conjugate. With this coverage, definite statements can be made concerning the correlation of the auroras observed by the ASCA's and the magnetospheric trapped fluxes. In general, auroral forms are not simply correlated with the synchronous altitude electron fluxes. The presence of hot plasma at the ATS 5 satellite is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the occurrence of local auroras. On quiet days the hot plasma does not penetrate into the magnetosphere far enough to reach the ATS 5 orbit. Under these conditions, no auroras are observed at the field line conjugate, but auroras are usually observed on higher-latitude field lines. On more disturbed days, auroral arcs are observed at lower latitudes when the plasma sheet penetrates into the ATS 5 orbit. There is no general correlation between the intensity of the trapped electron fluxes observed by ATS 5 and the intensity of auroras observed by the ASCA's. Auroral displays exhibit very fast fluctuations, whereas the ATS 5 electron fluxes change on a much slower time scale. However, significant qualitative correlation between the ASCA data and the trapped fluxes is observed when a local plasma injection event occurs near ATS 5. The clearest signature of the injection event is magnetic and is most pronounced as a recovery of a negative bay in the north-south component of the field at the ATS 5. The local injection generally produces structured auroras such as breakup events and sometimes westward-traveling surges. A significant correlation is observed with the intensification of a diffuse uniform glow accompanying the structured auroral activity

  13. Latitudinal and longitudinal dispersion of energetic auroral protons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Lorentzen

    Full Text Available Using a collision by collision model from Lorentzen et al., the latitudinal and longitudinal dispersion of single auroral protons are calculated. The proton energies varies from 1 to 50 keV, and are released into the atmosphere at 700 km altitude. The dipole magnetic field has a dip-angle of 8 degrees. Results show that the main dispersion region is at high altitudes (300-350 km and occurs during the first few charge exchange collisions. As the proton travels further down the atmosphere the mean free path becomes smaller, and as a result the spreading effect will not be as pronounced. This means that the first few charge exchange collisions fully determines the width of both the latitudinal and longitudinal dispersion. The volume emission rate was calculated for energies between 1 and 50 keV, and it was found that dayside auroral hydrogen emissions rates were approximately 10 times weaker than nightside emission rates. Simulations were also performed to obtain the dependence of the particle dispersion as a function of initial pitch-angle. It was found that the dispersion varies greatly with initial pitch-angle, and the results are summarized in two tables; a main and an extreme dispersion region.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; · particle precipitation · Space plasma physics · (transport processes

  14. Auroral Spatial Structures Probe Sub-Orbital Mission Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, J.; Swenson, C.; Martineau, R. J.; Fish, C. S.; Conde, M.; Hampton, D.; Crowley, G.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Auroral Spatial Structures Probe, 49.002, was launched January 28, 2015 from the Poker Flat Research Range into active aurora over the northern coast of Alaska. The primary objective of this mission was to determine the contribution of small spatial and temporal scale fluctuations of the electric fields to the larger-scale energy deposition processes associated with the aurora. The Auroral Spatial Structures Probe Sub-Orbital Mission consisted of a formation of 7 spacecraft (a main payload with 6 deployable sub-payloads) designed for multiple temporally spaced co-located measurements of electric and magnetic fields in the earth's ionosphere. The mission was able to make observations at a short time scale and small spatial scale convergence that is unobservable by either satellite or ground-based observations. The payloads included magnetometers, electric field double probes, and Langmuir probes as well as a sweeping impedance probe on the main payload. We present here preliminary results from the measurements taken that hint at the underlying spatial structure of the currents and energy deposition in the aurora. The Poynting flux derived from the observations is shown and implications are discussed in terms of the contribution of small spatial scale, rapid temporal scale fluctuations in the currents that deposit energy in the auroral region. Funding provided by NASA Grants NNX11AE23G and NNX13AN20A.

  15. Effects of interplanetary shock inclinations on auroral power intensity

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, D M; Tsurutani, B T; Gjerloev, J W

    2015-01-01

    We derive fast forward interplanetary (IP) shock speeds and impact angles to study the geoeffectivness of 461 IP shocks that occurred from January 1995 to December 2013 using ACE and WIND spacecraft data. The geomagnetic activity is inferred from the SuperMAG project data. SuperMAG is a large chain which employs more than 300 ground stations to compute enhanced versions of the traditional geomagnetic indices. The SuperMAG auroral electroject SME index, an enhanced version of the traditional AE index, is used as an auroral power (AP) indicator. AP intensity jumps triggered by shock impacts are correlated with both shock speed and impact angle. It is found that high AP intensity events typically occur when high speed IP shocks impact the Earths magnetosphere with the shock normal almost parallel to the Sun-Earth line. This result suggests that symmetric and strong magnetospheric compression leads to favorable conditions for intense auroral power release, as shown previously by simulations and observations. Some...

  16. Testing the Auroral Current-Voltage Relation in Multiple Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, T. G.; Knudsen, D. J.; Cully, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    The well-known current-voltage relation within auroral inverted-V regions [Knight, Planet. Space Sci., 21, 741, 1973] predicts current carried by an auroral flux tube given the total potential drop between a plasma-sheet source region and the ionosphere. Numerous previous studies have tested this relation using spacecraft that traverse auroral arcs at low (ionospheric) or mid altitudes. Typically, the potential drop is estimated at the peak of the inverted-V, and field-aligned current is estimated from magnetometer data; statistical information is then gathered over many arc crossings that occur over a wide range of source conditions. In this study we use electron data from the FAST satellite to examine the current-voltage relation in multiple arc sets, in which the key source parameters (plasma sheet density and temperature) are presumed to be identical. We argue that this approach provides a more sensitive test of the Knight relation, and we seek to explain remaining variability with factors other than source variability. This study is supported by a grant from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  17. A hybrid simulation model for a stable auroral arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Janhunen

    Full Text Available We present a new type of hybrid simulation model, intended to simulate a single stable auroral arc in the latitude/altitude plane. The ionospheric ions are treated as particles, the electrons are assumed to follow a Boltzmann response and the magnetospheric ions are assumed to be so hot that they form a background population unaffected by the electric fields that arise. The system is driven by assumed parallel electron energisation causing a primary negative charge cloud and an associated potential structure to build up. The results show how a closed potential structure and density depletion of an auroral arc build up and how they decay after the driver is turned off. The model also produces upgoing energetic ion beams and predicts strong static perpendicular electric fields to be found in a relatively narrow altitude range (~ 5000–11 000 km.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions; auroral phenomena – Space plasma physics (numerical simulation studies

  18. E-region echo characteristics governed by auroral arc electrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    Full Text Available Observations of a pair of auroral arc features by two imagers, one ground- and one space-based, allows the associated field-aligned current (FAC and electric field structure to be inferred. Simultaneous observations of HF radar echoes provide an insight into the irregularity-generating mechanisms. This is especially interesting for the E-region echoes observed, which form the focus of our analysis, and from which several conclusions can be drawn, summarized as follows. Latitudinal variations in echo characteristics are governed by the FAC and electric field background. Particularly sharp boundaries are found at the edges of auroral arcs. Within regions of auroral luminosity, echoes have Doppler shifts below the ion-acoustic speed and are proportional to the electric field, suggesting scatter from gradient drift waves. Regions of downward FAC are associated with mixed high and low Doppler shift echoes. The high Doppler shift component is greatly in excess of the ion-acoustic speed, but seems to be commensurate with the driving electric field. The low Doppler shift component appears to be much depressed below expectations.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; electric fields and currents

  19. Structure of the auroral precipitation region in the dawn sector: relationship to convection reversal boundaries and field-aligned currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Feldstein

    Full Text Available

    Abstract. Simultaneous DMSP F7 and Viking satellite measurements of the dawnside high-latitude auroral energy electron and ion precipitation show that the region of the low and middle altitude auroral precipitation consists of three characteristic plasma regimes. The recommendation of the IAGA Working Group IIF/III4 at the IAGA Assembly in Boulder, July 1995 to decouple the nomenclature of ionospheric populations from magnetospheric population is used for their notation. The most equatorial regime is the Diffuse Auroral Zone (DAZ of diffuse spatially unstructured precipitating electrons. It is generated by the plasma injection to the inner magnetosphere in the nightside and the subsequent drift plasma to the dawnside around the Earth. Precipitating particles have a hard spectrum with typical energies of electrons and ions of more than 3 keV. In the DAZ, the ion pitch-angle distribution is anisotropic, with the peak near 90°. The next part is the Auroral Oval (AO, a structured electron regime which closely resembles the poleward portion of the night-side auroral oval. The typical electron energy is several keV, and the ion energy is up to 10 keV. Ion distributions are pre-dominantly isotropic. In some cases, this plasma regime may be absent in the pre-noon sector. Poleward of the Auroral Oval, there is the Soft Small Scale Luminosity (SSSL regime. It is caused by structured electron and ion precipitation with typical electron energy of about 0.3 keV and ion energy of about 1 keV. The connection of these low-altitude regimes with plasma domains of the distant magnetosphere is discussed. For mapping of the plasma regimes to the equatorial plane of the magnetosphere, the empirical model by Tsyganenko (1995 and the conceptual model by Alexeev et al. (1996 are used. The DAZ is mapped along the magnetic field lines to the Remnant Layer (RL, which is located in the outer radiation belt region; the zone of structured

  20. Results of the Jupiter Infrared Auroral Mapper from the Juno Earth fly-by

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriani, A.; Mura, A.; Filacchione, G.; Di Iorio, T.; Turrini, D.; Noschese, R.; Cicchetti, A.; Grassi, D.; Sindoni, G.; Zambelli, M.; Piccioni, G.; Capria, M. T.; Tosi, F.; Orosei, R.; Dinelli, B. M.; Moriconi, M. L.; Lunine, J. I.

    2013-12-01

    The InfraRed Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) is simultaneously an imager and a spectrometer on board of the Juno mission. Jupiter's reflected and emitted light in the range 2-5 μm can be sensed through its spectral channel and H3+ emissions analyzed to retrieve auroral parameters. JIRAM is also able to map the infrared Jupiter aurora in the 3.5 μm and planet's thermal emissions in the 5 μm wavelength ranges through its L-band and M-band imager filters . The main scientific goals are the study of auroras, hot spots and other Jupiter atmospheric structures detectable in its working spectral range. Concurrently with the Juno Earth fly-by, that will occur on October 9th of this current year, JIRAM will observe the Moon during its transit approaching the Earth. As the instrument's temperature cannot be actively controlled, operating with a passive cooling system, the Earth will not be observed during the closest approach. A dramatic temperature increase of the instrument, far above its performance limit, is expected in fact by the illumination of the instrument's cooling radiators due to our planet reflection of the solar illumination. The Moon will be the only chance for an extended target observation that JIRAM can experience before Jupiter. Consequently, this opportunity is of pivotal importance being the only chance for a real in-flight test to verify the instrument performances and the radiometric calibration in real observational set up. The instrument will be operated in the same functional configuration that it will use at Jupiter. So far, the only absolute radiometric calibration has been performed in lab during the on ground calibration and functional test sessions. The internal calibration unit is mainly devoted to the spectral calibration checking while the absolute radiometric calibration has to verified and confirmed in flight. Results of lunar observations will be presented.

  1. The Jovian Auroral Distributions Experiment (JADE) on the Juno Mission to Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, D. J.; Alexander, N.; Allegrini, F.; Bagenal, F.; Beebe, C.; Clark, G.; Crary, F.; Desai, M. I.; De Los Santos, A.; Demkee, D.; Dickinson, J.; Everett, D.; Finley, T.; Gribanova, A.; Hill, R.; Johnson, J.; Kofoed, C.; Loeffler, C.; Louarn, P.; Maple, M.; Mills, W.; Pollock, C.; Reno, M.; Rodriguez, B.; Rouzaud, J.; Santos-Costa, D.; Valek, P.; Weidner, S.; Wilson, P.; Wilson, R. J.; White, D.

    2013-05-01

    The Jovian Auroral Distributions Experiment (JADE) on Juno provides the critical in situ measurements of electrons and ions needed to understand the plasma energy particles and processes that fill the Jovian magnetosphere and ultimately produce its strong aurora. JADE is an instrument suite that includes three essentially identical electron sensors (JADE-Es), a single ion sensor (JADE-I), and a highly capable Electronics Box (EBox) that resides in the Juno Radiation Vault and provides all necessary control, low and high voltages, and computing support for the four sensors. The three JADE-Es are arrayed 120∘ apart around the Juno spacecraft to measure complete electron distributions from ˜0.1 to 100 keV and provide detailed electron pitch-angle distributions at a 1 s cadence, independent of spacecraft spin phase. JADE-I measures ions from ˜5 eV to ˜50 keV over an instantaneous field of view of 270∘×90∘ in 4 s and makes observations over all directions in space each 30 s rotation of the Juno spacecraft. JADE-I also provides ion composition measurements from 1 to 50 amu with m/Δm˜2.5, which is sufficient to separate the heavy and light ions, as well as O+ vs S+, in the Jovian magnetosphere. All four sensors were extensively tested and calibrated in specialized facilities, ensuring excellent on-orbit observations at Jupiter. This paper documents the JADE design, construction, calibration, and planned science operations, data processing, and data products. Finally, the Appendix describes the Southwest Research Institute [SwRI] electron calibration facility, which was developed and used for all JADE-E calibrations. Collectively, JADE provides remarkably broad and detailed measurements of the Jovian auroral region and magnetospheric plasmas, which will surely revolutionize our understanding of these important and complex regions.

  2. A statistical study of the THEMIS satellite data for plasma sheet electrons carrying auroral upward field-aligned currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Shiokawa, K.; McFadden, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    -aligned potential difference, particularly during active time (AE > 100 nT). On the other hand, in the dusk side outer magnetosphere (source of the region 1), electron density and temperature are small, thus the thermal current is much smaller than the typical auroral current suggested by Iijima and Potemra (JGR, 1976). From this result, we suppose that electron acceleration is necessary on the dusk side region 1 upward field-aligned current. Our preliminary result, however, does not consider contamination of the radiation belt particles into the ESA data that is apparent inside 9 Re. In the presentation, we show the results with removal of the radiation belt particle contamination.

  3. Measurements of the cosmological evolution of magnetic fields with the Square Kilometre Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Martin; Alexander, Paul; Bolton, Rosie; Geisbüsch, Jörn; Green, David A.; Riley, Julia

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the potential of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) for measuring the magnetic fields in clusters of galaxies via Faraday rotation of background polarized sources. The populations of clusters and radio sources are derived from an analytical cosmological model, combined with an extrapolation of current observational constraints. We adopt an empirical model for the Faraday screen in individual clusters, gauged to observations of nearby clusters and extrapolate the polarization properties for the radio source population from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Very Large Array Sky Survey. We find that about 10 per cent of the sky is covered by a significant extragalactic Faraday screen. Most of it has rotation measures between 10 and 100 rad m-2. We argue that the cluster centres should have up to about 5000 rad m-2. We show that the proposed mid frequency aperture array of the SKA as well as the lowest band of the SKA dish array are well suited to make measurements for most of these rotation measure values, typically requiring a signal-to-noise ratio of 10. We calculate the spacing of sources forming a grid for the purpose of measuring foreground rotation measures: it reaches a spacing of 36 arcsec for a 100 h SKA observation per field. We also calculate the statistics for background rotation measure (RM) measurements in clusters of galaxies. We find that a first phase of the SKA would allow us to take stacking experiments out to high redshifts (>1), and provide improved magnetic field structure measurements for individual nearby clusters. The full SKA aperture array would be able to make very detailed magnetic field structure measurements of clusters with more than 100 background sources per cluster up to a redshift of 0.5 and more than 1000 background sources per cluster for nearby clusters, and could for reasonable assumptions about future measurements of electron densities in high-redshift clusters constrain the power-law index for the magnetic

  4. On the occurrence and motion of decametre-scale irregularities in the sub-auroral, auroral, and polar cap ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    Full Text Available The statistical occurrence of decametre-scale ionospheric irregularities, average line-of-sight (LOS Doppler velocity, and Doppler spectral width in the sub-auroral, auroral, and polar cap ionosphere ( - 57°L to - 88°L has been investigated using echoes recorded with the Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER, a SuperDARN radar located on Bruny Island, Tasmania (147.2° E, 43.4° S geographic; - 54.6 °L. Results are shown for routine soundings made on the magnetic meridian beam 4 and the near zonal beam 15 during the sunspot maximum interval December 1999 to November 2000. Most echoes were observed in the nightside ionosphere, typically via 1.5-hop propagation near dusk and then via 0.5-hop propagation during pre-midnight to dawn. Peak occurrence rates on beam 4 were often > 60% near magnetic midnight and ~ - 70 °L. They increased and shifted equatorward and toward pre-midnight with increasing Kp (i.e. Bz southward. The occurrence rates remained very high for Kp > 4, de-spite enhanced D-region absorption due to particle precipitation. Average occurrence rates on beam 4 exhibited a relatively weak seasonal variation, consistent with known longitudinal variations in auroral zone magnetic activity (Basu, 1975. The average echo power was greatest between 23 and 07 MLT. Two populations of echoes were identified on both beams, those with low spectral width and a mode value of ~ 9 ms-1 (bin size of 2 ms-1 concentrated in the auroral and sub-auroral ionosphere (population A, and those with high spectral width and a mode value of ~ 70 ms-1 concentrated in the polar cap ionosphere (population B. The occurrence of population A echoes maximised post-midnight because of TIGER’s lower latitude, but the subset of the population A echoes observed near dusk had characteristics

  5. A Monte Carlo model of auroral hydrogen emission line profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-C. Gérard

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen line profiles measured from space-borne or ground-based instruments provide useful information to study the physical processes occurring in the proton aurora and to estimate the proton flux characteristics. The line shape of the hydrogen lines is determined by the velocity distribution of H atoms along the line-of-sight of the instrument. Calculations of line profiles of auroral hydrogen emissions were obtained using a Monte Carlo kinetic model of proton precipitation into the auroral atmosphere. In this model both processes of energy degradation and scattering angle redistribution in momentum and charge transfer collisions of the high-energy proton/hydrogen flux with the ambient atmospheric gas are considered at the microphysical level. The model is based on measured cross sections and scattering angle distributions and on a stochastic interpretation of such collisions. Calculations show that collisional angular redistribution of the precipitating proton/hydrogen beam is the dominant process leading to the formation of extended wings and peak shifts in the hydrogen line profiles. All simulations produce a peak shift from the rest line wavelength decreasing with increasing proton energy. These model predictions are confirmed by analysis of ground-based H-β line observations from Poker Flat, showing an anti-correlation between the magnitude of the peak shift and the extent of the blue wing of the line. Our results also strongly suggest that the relative extension of the blue and red wings provides a much better indicator of the auroral proton characteristic energy than the position of the peak wavelength.

  6. Experimental study of plasma dynamics in the auroral ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In March 1979, the third and fourth Porcupine sounding rockets were launched into auroral arcs from a launch site in northern Sweden. At the beginning of each flight two instrumented subpayloads, a xenon ion source, and a barium shaped charge were ejected from the main payload. This thesis covers measurements returned by the instrumented subpayloads of the electric fields, magnetic fields, plasma waves, and particle fluxes in the auroral arcs and during the operation of the xenon ion source. During the fourth flight, the subpayloads flew through the northern edge of an intense auroral arc. Two abrupt decreases in the precipitating electron energy and number flux were observed, and the precipitation boundaries were correlated with 20 to 60 mV/m increases in the ionospheric electric field and 0.1 to 0.2 A/m upward field aligned currents. The divergence of the electric field was calculated using simultaneous measurements by the two subpayloads and showed the expected build up of polarization charge at the precipitation boundaries. The direction and magnitude of the field aligned currents accompanying the electric field increases indicated that the magnetosphere was the source of the electric field perturbations and that the ionosphere was acting as a resistive load. Downward field aligned currents were observed adjacent to the regions of electron precipitation and may have been carried by ionospheric electrons moving up the magnetic field lines. These upward moving electrons may have drifted into the precipitation boundary and could have supplied the current necessary to maintain the observed electric field gradient

  7. Searching African skies the square kilometre array and South Africa's quest to hear the songs of the stars

    CERN Document Server

    Wild, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    An ambitious scientific project is unfolding in the desert of South Africa, with a multi-decade timeline that will eventually see expansion into Western Australia-a project that is detailed and celebrated in this book on the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). The SKA will be the largest and most sensitive radio telescope, expanding the capabilities of scientific probing and addressing significant unanswered questions about the universe, such as on the formation of galaxies and the nature of gravity. Keen technology correspondent Sarah Wild covers the important development with this exploration of i

  8. The Physics of the Cold Neutral Medium: Low-frequency Carbon Radio Recombination Lines with the Square Kilometre Array

    OpenAIRE

    Oonk, J. B. R.; Morabito, L. K.; Salgado, F.; Toribio, M. C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Rottgering, H. J. A.

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will transform our understanding of the role of the cold, atomic gas in galaxy evolution. The interstellar medium (ISM) is the repository of stellar ejecta and the birthsite of new stars and, hence, a key factor in the evolution of galaxies over cosmic time. Cold, diffuse, atomic clouds are a key component of the ISM, but so far this phase has been difficult to study, because its main tracer, the HI 21 cm line, does not constrain the basic physical information...

  9. Solar Array and Auroral Charging Studies of DMSP Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Kelwin

    2013-01-01

    The SSJ electrostatic analyzers and the SSIES plasma instruments on the DMSP spacecraft in low Earth polar orbit can be used to conduct case studies of auroral and solar array charging. We will use a program written in the Interactive Data Language (IDL) to evaluate questionable charging events in the SSJ records by comparing charging signatures in SSJ and SSIES data. In addition, we will assemble a number of case studies of solar array charging showing the signatures from the SSJ data and compare to the SSIES charging signatures. In addition we will use Satellite Tool Kit (STK) to propagate orbits, obtain solar intensity, and use to verify onset of charging with sunrise.

  10. Ground and space observations of medium frequency auroral radio emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Matthew C.

    The auroral zone is a rich source of natural radio emissions that can be observed in space and at ground-level. By studying these waves, scientists can gain insight into the plasma processes that generate them and use the near-Earth space environment as a large-scale plasma physics laboratory. This thesis uses both ground-level and in situ observations to study two kinds of natural radio emissions. First, we report observations of a new kind of auroral radio emission. The waves have frequencies ranging from 1.3-2.2 MHz, bandwidths ranging from 90-272 kHz, and durations ranging from 16-355 s. Spectral analysis of the waveform data has revealed that the emission has a complex combination of at least three kinds of fine structures. For model auroral electron distributions, calculations indicate that Langmuir waves could be excited at frequencies consistent with observations. The remainder of the thesis discusses auroral medium frequency (MF) burst, an impulsive, broadband natural radio emission observed at ground-level within a few minutes of local substorm onset. LaBelle [2011] proposed that MF burst originates as Langmuir/Z-mode waves on the topside of the ionosphere that subsequently mode convert to L-mode waves and propagate to ground-level. Using continuous waveform measurements and combined observations with the Sondrestrom Incoherent Scatter Radar, we have performed two tests of this mechanism. The results of these tests are consistent with the mechanism described in LaBelle [2011]. A survey of 8,624 half-orbits of the DEMETER spacecraft has revealed 68 observations of bursty MF waves. We have compared the wave properties of these waves to those of MF burst and have found that although it is uncertain, the balance of the evidence suggests that the bursty MF waves observed with DEMETER are the same phenomenon as the ground-level MF burst. Finally, we have used numerical simulations to model both the fine structure of MF burst and to estimate the attenuation the

  11. Auroral phenomenology and magnetospheric processes earth and other planets

    CERN Document Server

    Keiling, Andreas; Bagenal, Fran; Karlsson, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Published by the American Geophysical Union as part of the Geophysical Monograph Series. Many of the most basic aspects of the aurora remain unexplained. While in the past terrestrial and planetary auroras have been largely treated in separate books, Auroral Phenomenology and Magnetospheric Processes: Earth and Other Planets takes a holistic approach, treating the aurora as a fundamental process and discussing the phenomenology, physics, and relationship with the respective planetary magnetospheres in one volume. While there are some behaviors common in auroras of the diffe

  12. Investigating the auroral electrojets with low altitude polar orbiting satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moretto, T.; Olsen, Nils; Ritter, P.; Lu, G.

    2002-01-01

    Three geomagnetic satellite missions currently provide high precision magnetic field measurements from low altitude polar orbiting spacecraft. We demonstrate how these data can be used to determine the intensity and location of the horizontal currents that flow in the ionosphere, predominantly in...... the auroral electrojets. First, we examine the results during a recent geomagnetic storm. The currents derived from two satellites at different altitudes are in very good agreement, which verifies good stability of the method. Further, a very high degree of correlation (correlation coefficients of 0...

  13. Multi-Spacecraft Observations of the Auroral Acceleration Region

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghi, Soheil

    2012-01-01

    The two major agents for producing aurora are generally believed to be the quasi-static parallel electric fields, accelerating electrons in the auroral acceleration region (AAR), and Alfvén waves. The Cluster spacecraft quartet has made multi-spacecraft measurements in the AAR possible for the first time. Four event studies are included and discussed in this thesis, using Cluster data inside and at the top of the AAR, to address various open issues regarding the nature of the quasistatic elec...

  14. Daytime measurements of optical auroral emissions from Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical methods have enabled to detect auroral emissions during daytime conditions, and to identify a narrow latitudinal region of energetic particle precipitation from the Indian station Maitri (11 deg38'E; 70deg45'S; 62.8degS I-lat.) in Antarctica. These observations are new. The energetic particles originate within the closed geomagnetic field lines close to the plasmapause region and maximize ∼ 0830 h MLT (magnetic local time) (∼1200 UT). Enhanced proton precipitation activity could also be inferred during a moderate geomagnetic storm, suggesting the enhancement/activation of acceleration mechanisms during this event. (author). 11 refs., 2 figs

  15. Investigating the auroral electrojets with low altitude polar orbiting satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moretto, T.; Olsen, Nils; Ritter, P.;

    2002-01-01

    in the auroral electrojets. First, we examine the results during a recent geomagnetic storm. The currents derived from two satellites at different altitudes are in very good agreement, which verifies good stability of the method. Further, a very high degree of correlation (correlation coefficients of 0...... to another event for which the combined measurements of the three satellites provide a comprehensive view of the current systems. The analysis hereof reveals some surprising results concerning the connection between solar wind driver and the resulting ionospheric currents. Specifically, preconditioning...

  16. Modulation of stable auroral red (SAR) arc occurrence rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data taken by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory photometer chain have been reviewed in a comprehensive search for stable auroral red (SAR) arc events during the period 1968--1978. Results of this search indicate both a seasonal and solar cycle control of SAR arclike events. The occurrence rate of these events is shown to follow the solar activity cycle. though with a phase lag of 2--3 years. Further, a rather distinct summertime minimum of occurrence frequency is pointed out (northern hemisphere). Possible mechanisms for the existence of this effect are discussed

  17. Response of northern winter polar cap to auroral substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kan; Sotirelis, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The three-phase substorm sequence has been generally accepted and is often tied to the Dungey cycle. Although previous studies have mostly agreed on the increase and decrease in the polar cap area during an episode of substorm, there are disparate views on when the polar cap starts to contract relative to substorm onset. Here we address this conflict using high-resolution (~1-3 min) snapshot global auroral images from the ultraviolet imager on board the Polar spacecraft. On the basis of 28 auroral substorm events, all observed in the Northern Hemispheric winter, it is found that the polar cap inflated prior to onset in all events and it attained the largest area ~6 min prior to the substorm expansion phase onset, while the dayside polar cap area remained steady around the onset. The onset of nightside polar cap deflation is found to be attributed to intensifications of aurora on the poleward edge of the nightside oval, mostly in the midnight sector. Although this result supports the loading-unloading and reconnection substorm models, it is not clear if the initial polar cap deflation and the substorm expansion are parts of the same process.

  18. Auroral E-region electron density gradients measured

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Hussey

    Full Text Available In the theory of E-region plasma instabilities, the ambient electric field and electron density gradient are both included in the same dispersion relation as the key parameters that provide the energy for the generation and growth of electrostatic plasma waves. While there exist numerous measurements of ionospheric electric fields, there are very few measurements and limited knowledge about the ambient electron density gradients, ∇Ne, in the E-region plasma. In this work, we took advantage of the EISCAT CP1 data base and studied statistically the vertical electron density gradient length, Lz=Ne/(dNe/dz, at auroral E-region heights during both eastward and westward electrojet conditions and different ambient electric field levels. Overall, the prevailing electron density gradients, with Lz ranging from 4 to 7 km, are found to be located below 100 km, but to move steadily up in altitude as the electric field level increases. The steepest density gradients, with Lz possibly less than 3 km, occur near 110 km mostly in the eastward electrojet during times of strong electric fields. The results and their implications are examined and discussed in the frame of the linear gradient drift instability theory. Finally, it would be interesting to test the implications of the present results with a vertical radar interferometer.Key words: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionospheric irregularities; plasma waves and instabilities  

  19. Auroral X ray emission at Jupiter: Depth effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auroral X-ray emissions from Jupiter with a total power of about 1 GW have been observed by the Einstein Observatory, Roentgen satellite, Chandra X-ray Observatory, and XMM-Newton. Previous theoretical studies have shown that precipitating energetic sulfur and oxygen ions can produce the observed X-rays. This study presents the results of a hybrid Monte Carlo (MC) model for sulfur and oxygen ion precipitation at high latitudes, looks at differences with the continuous slow-down model, and compares the results to synthetic spectra fitted to observations. We concentrate on the effects of altitude on the observed spectrum. The opacity of the atmosphere to the outgoing X-ray photons is found to be important for incident ion energies greater than about 1.2 MeV per nucleon for both sulfur and oxygen. Model spectra are calculated for intensities with and without any opacity effects. These synthetic spectra were compared with the results shown by Hui et al. (2010) which fit Chandra X-ray Observatory observations for the north and south Jovian auroral emissions. Quenching of long-lived excited states of the oxygen ions is found to be important. Opacity considerably diminishes the outgoing X-ray intensity calculated, particularly when the viewing geometry is not favorable.

  20. Auroral electrojets during severely disturbed geomagnetic condition on 24 August 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anand K.; Sinha, A. K.; Saini, S.; Rawat, Rahul

    2015-03-01

    Very intense and highly dynamic eastward and westward currents flowing in the auroral ionosphere are traditionally monitored by the auroral electrojet indices - AUand AL , respectively. In this study we show that on occasions of intense magnetic activity, entire auroral oval could be dominated by the westward flowing currents, which lead to depression not only in AL index but also in supposedly positive AU index. During negative AU intervals, there could be up to ∼ 20 % underestimation of the total maximum intensity of the auroral electrojet represented by AEindex (defined as AU - AL). A detailed investigation of a well-studied extremely intense event of 24 August 2005 has been carried out. Global prevalence of the westward auroral electrojet was clearly observed at the auroral latitudes during the unusually intense substorm (AL ∼ - 4000 nT) on the day. Moreover, along the noon meridian westward electrojet appeared in the auroral region whereas eastward electrojet shifted towards lower latitudes. This paper emphasizes that intense substorms are represented better by AL index than AE index.

  1. 12-hour case study of auroral phenomena in the midnight sector: Electrojet and precipitating particle characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airborne observations of auroral activity at midnight were conducted for a period of 9 hours by employing an ionospheric sounder and all-sky cameras. During the observation period, two substorms occurred. The first substorm was assciated with a compression of the magnetosphere (as measured by Dst) and with oscillations of the earth's bow shock. At this time, auroral activity was characterized by a series of poleward and equatorward motions and by the absence of a breakup phase. Magnetic disturbances were confined to a small region in the midnight sector. The second auroral substorm displayed many of the features assocated with a large-scale polar magnetic substorm. For selected times the locations of the eastward and westward electrojets were inferred from a number of high-latitude magnetic records. All-sky photographs and ionosonde data indicate that the poleward edge of the westward electrojet was bounded by a westward moving auroral surge accompanied by a strong sporadic E ionization. The equatorward electrojet boundary was less well defined by visual auroral forms. Soft particle spectrometer measurements from the Isis 2 satellite were made in conjunction with the aircraft measurements and indicate that large fluxes of field-aligned electrons gave rise to the bright auroral surge, more isotropic fluxes of less energetic electrons contributing to the auroral E layer

  2. The effect of multiple scattering on the aspect sensitivity and polarization of radio auroral echoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Monte Carlo model of radio wave scattering in the auroral electrojet has been developed to investigate multiple scattering of radio auroral echoes. Using this model, predictions of the aspect angle behavior of first-, second-, and third-order scattered power have been made. The results indicate that multiple scattering may be an important effect for VHF radars which observe the auroral E region at large magnetic aspect angles. The model shows that linearly polarized radio waves can become depolarized because of multiple scattering if the radio transmitter is horizontally polarized but not if the radio transmitter is vertically polarized. 52 refs

  3. Coordinated rocket and satellite measurements of an auroral event. I - Satellite observations and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, M. H.; Stewart, A. I.; Sharp, W. E.; Hays, P. B.; Hoffman, R. A.; Brace, L. H.; Doering, J. P.; Peterson, W. K.

    1977-01-01

    Results of a coordinated auroral experiment involving the Atmosphere Explorer C satellite and a sounding rocket are reported. Auroral primary electron fluxes and neutral gas densities measured by instruments on the satellite are used in a model calculation of the thermospheric manifestation of the aurora. There is encouraging agreement between the calculated and measured electron density, electron temperature, secondary electron flux, and O I emissions at 5577 and 6300 A. A discrepancy between the calculated and the rocket-measured 3914-A emission profile is discussed in terms of experiment geometry and auroral physics. The coordinated measurements are used to infer vertical fluxes of ionization and of electron thermal energy at high altitudes

  4. Simultaneous auroral observations described in the historical records of China, Japan and Korea from ancient times to AD 1700

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Willis

    Full Text Available Early auroral observations recorded in various oriental histories are examined in order to search for examples of strictly simultaneous and indisputably independent observations of the aurora borealis from spatially separated sites in East Asia. In the period up to ad 1700, only five examples have been found of two or more oriental auroral observations from separate sites on the same night. These occurred during the nights of ad 1101 January 31, ad 1138 October 6, ad 1363 July 30, ad 1582 March 8 and ad 1653 March 2. The independent historical evidence describing observations of mid-latitude auroral displays at more than one site in East Asia on the same night provides virtually incontrovertible proof that auroral displays actually occurred on these five special occasions. This conclusion is corroborated by the good level of agreement between the detailed auroral descriptions recorded in the different oriental histories, which furnish essentially compatible information on both the colour (or colours of each auroral display and its approximate position in the sky. In addition, the occurrence of auroral displays in Europe within two days of auroral displays in East Asia, on two (possibly three out of these five special occasions, suggests that a substantial number of the mid-latitude auroral displays recorded in the oriental histories are associated with intense geomagnetic storms.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; storms and substorms

  5. Auroral ion precipitation at Jupiter: Predictions for Juno

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozak, N.; Cravens, T. E.; Schultz, D. R.

    2013-08-01

    The spatially localized and highly variable polar cap emissions at Jupiter are part of a poorly understood current system linking the ionosphere and the magnetopause region. Strong X-ray emission has been observed from the polar caps and has been explained by the precipitation of oxygen and sulfur ions of several MeV energy. The present paper presents results of an extended model of the ion precipitation process at Jupiter. Specifically, we add to a previous model a more complete treatment of ionization of the atmosphere, generation of secondary electron fluxes and their escape from the atmosphere, and generation of downward field-aligned currents. Predictions relevant to observations by the upcoming NASA Juno mission are made, namely the existence of escaping electrons with energies from a few eV up to 10 keV, auroral H2 band emission rates of 80 kR, and downward field-aligned currents of at least 2 MA.

  6. Measuring auroral precipitation parameters without in situ microchannel plate instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, K. A.; Hampton, D. L.; Zettergren, M. D.; Conde, M.; Lessard, M.; Michell, R.; Samara, M.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in groundbased detector technology have resulted in accurate, high-sensitivity, emission-line filtered images of aurora with sub- to a few- km resolution over a few 100 km region collected at a few second to a few Hz cadence. By combining these images with information from other groundbased instrumentation (ISR, remote photometers, and FPIs) and using well-documented empirical relationships between intensity and precipitating electron characteristics, these images hold the potential for providing an accurate, mesoscale, 2-D time history of the key parameters (characteristic energy and energy flux) of the precipitating electrons that caused the optical aurora within the imager's field of view. In situ measurements can be more accurate, but they are limited to highly localized 1-D line trajectories and are of limited use for meso-scale modeling. However, a limitation of the groundbased technique is that subvisual (low energy) precipitation is not captured. Onboard measurements of total number flux provide low resource measurements capturing specific boundary crossings and gradients as well as net precipitation including the portion not observed optically. The combination of minimal onboard instrumentation supplementing rigorous groundbased inversions can provide an optimal set of inputs for ionospheric modelling tools. Thus we are investigating the capabilities and limitations of using inversions of groundbased observations in the place of in situ precipitation monitors. While several inversion techniques are possible we will discuss two methods used in the analysis of recent rocket experiments. The first, used for the Cascades2 rocket, compares measured altitude profiles of auroral emissions to those from a 1-D electron transport code to confirm optically that two arcs transited by the rocket were produced by significantly different electron spectra. The second method, for the MICA rocket, uses the 2-D temperature maps from the Scanning Doppler

  7. Fluctuations of precipitated electron intensity in flickering auroral arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on electron spectra associated with two aurorae observed by ground-based television. One auroral arc was observed to flicker, large variations in the precipitated electron energy occurring on a time scale of 114 ms. The major variations occur at the higher energies of the 0.5--20 keV range covered by the detectors. Changes in the particle flux occur primarily in the pitch angle range 00 to 600. Analysis of the video data shows a larger variation in intensity along the lower border of the arc in keeping with the results of the electron spectra. The second arc was not observed to flicker, and the associated electron spectra and video data show no large variations in precipitated electron energy or video intensity modulation. While pitch angle distributions tend to be field-aligned in the first arc, the distributions in the second arc are nearly isotropic or peaked from 600 to 900 in the downward hemisphere

  8. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  9. Field line projections of 6300 AA auroral emissions into the outer magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An empirical magnetospheric model is employed to project auroral intensity boundaries into the magnetosphere. The auroral data are in the form of instantaneous maps of 6300AA emission, acquired with the ISIS-II spacecraft and correspond to fluxes of low energy electrons. These are specific to a particular universal time and date. The magnetospheric model used is a purely empirical one, designed by Mead and Fairfield (1975) from 44.76 x 106 magnetic measurements made by 4 IMP satellites. Their model includes the dipole tilt as a variable, and permits selection from four different disturbance levels, so is particularly suited to these data. In a general way, the auroral projections agree with what is expected, giving some confidence in this application of the model. But a number of features appear that were not predicted, and which should permit new insights into the relationship of specific auroral boundaries to the structure of the magnetosphere. (author)

  10. M and X Class Flares During 2011 to 2013 and their Connection to Auroral Electrojet Indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debojyoti Halder

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Solar bursts recorded in the frequency range 50 to 300 MHz by using log periodic dipole array over Kalyani (22°58´N, 88°46´E have been statistically analyzed for the years 2011-2013. Scatter plots of flare intensity for both M- and X-class flares as well as the number of occurrences of the two categories have been examined. The characteristics of the auroral electrojet indices are correlated directly to the solar flare activity. The auroral indices data obtained from various sources are sorted accordingly. The daily averaged data of the auroral indices are plotted for a period of 5 years, 2009 to 2013. Regression analysis of the indices data has been done meticulously. The regression analysis data are also plotted as residual plots and line fit plots. We have tried to discuss the possible connection between the occurrences of solar flares and the auroral electrojet indices

  11. Relationship between Alfvén Wave and Quasi-Static Acceleration in Earth's Auroral Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottez, Fabrice

    2016-02-01

    There are two main categories of acceleration processes in the Earth's auroral zone: those based on quasi-static structures, and those based on Alfvén wave (AW). AWs play a nonnegligible role in the global energy budget of the plasma surrounding the Earth because they participate in auroral acceleration, and because auroral acceleration conveys a large portion of the energy flux across the magnetosphere. Acceleration events by double layers (DLs) and by AW have mostly been investigated separately, but many studies cited in this chapter show that they are not independent: these processes can occur simultaneously, and one process can be the cause of the other. The quasi-simultaneous occurrences of acceleration by AW and by quasi-static structures have been observed predominantly at the polar cap boundary of auroral arc systems, where often new bright arcs develop or intensify.

  12. Remote auroral activity detection and modeling using low frequency transmitter signal reception at a midlatitude site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Schmitter

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The low frequency propagation conditions along the path from Iceland to Germany (52° N 8° E using the NRK/TFK 37.5 kHz transmitter (63.9° N 22.5° W prove as an easy to monitor and reliable proxy for north auroral activity. Signal processing using wavelet decomposition allows for quantitative activity level estimations. Calibration is based upon NOAA POES auroral activity data. Using an auroral oval model for the local intensity distribution of solar energetic particle precipitation and a wave propagation model ionospheric D-layer height decreases along the path can be derived. This in turn gives a hint to the low latitude extension and intensity of the auroral electrojet currents that can be responsible for communication and power systems failures.

  13. Identification of possible intense historical geomagnetic storms using combined sunspot and auroral observations from East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Willis

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive catalogues of ancient sunspot and auroral observations from East Asia are used to identify possible intense historical geomagnetic storms in the interval 210 BC-AD 1918. There are about 270 entries in the sunspot catalogue and about 1150 entries in the auroral catalogue. Special databases have been constructed in which the scientific information in these two catalogues is placed in specified fields. For the purposes of this study, an historical geomagnetic storm is defined in terms of an auroral observation that is apparently associated with a particular sunspot observation, in the sense that the auroral observation occurred within several days of the sunspot observation. More precisely, a selection criterion is formulated for the automatic identification of such geomagnetic storms, using the oriental records stored in the sunspot and auroral databases. The selection criterion is based on specific assumptions about the duration of sunspot visibility with the unaided eye, the likely range of heliographic longitudes of an energetic solar feature, and the likely range of transit times for ejected solar plasma to travel from the Sun to the Earth. This selection criterion results in the identification of nineteen putative historical geomagnetic storms, although two of these storms are spurious in the sense that there are two examples of a single sunspot observation being associated with two different auroral observations separated by more than half a (synodic solar rotation period. The literary and scientific reliabilities of the East Asian sunspot and auroral records that define the nineteen historical geomagnetic storms are discussed in detail in a set of appendices. A possible time sequence of events is presented for each geomagnetic storm, including possible dates for both the central meridian passage of the sunspot and the occurrence of the energetic solar feature, as well as likely transit times for the ejected solar plasma

  14. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all malignant melanomas arising in the Nordic populations around the year 2000 will be due to exposure to natural ultraviolet radiation, equivalent to an annual number of about 4700 cases, with 2100 in men and 2600 in women, or some 4% of all cancers notified. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the Nordic countries occurs at an average effective dose per capita per year of about 3 mSv (Iceland, 1.1 mSv) from natural sources, and about 1 mSv from man-made sources. While the natural sources are primarily radon in indoor air, natural radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation and gamma radiation from soil and building materials, the man-made sources are dominated by the diagnostic and therapeutic use of ionizing radiation. On the basis of measured levels of radon in Nordic dwellings and associated risk estimates for lung cancer derived from well-conducted epidemiological studies, we estimated that about 180 cases of lung cancer (1% of all lung cancer cases) per year could be avoided in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 if indoor exposure to radon were eliminated, and that an additional 720 cases (6%) could be avoided annually if either radon or tobacco smoking were eliminated. Similarly, it was estimated that the exposure of the Nordic populations to natural sources of ionizing radiation other than radon and to medical sources will each give rise to an annual total of 2120

  15. Cassini nightside observations of the oscillatory motion of Saturn's northern auroral oval

    OpenAIRE

    Bunce, E. J.; Grodent, D. C.; Jinks, S.L.; Andrews, D. J.; Badman, S. V.; Coates, A. J.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Dougherty, M. K.; W. S. Kurth; Mitchell, D.G.; G. Provan

    2014-01-01

    In recent years we have benefitted greatly from the first in-orbit multi-wavelength images of Saturn's polar atmosphere from the Cassini spacecraft. Specifically, images obtained from the Cassini UltraViolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) provide an excellent view of the planet's auroral emissions, which in turn give an account of the large-scale magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and dynamics within the system. However, obtaining near-simultaneous views of the auroral regions with in situ measur...

  16. 2-D Three Fluid Simulation of Upstreaming Ions Above Auroral Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielides, M. A.; Lummerzheim, D.; Otto, A.; Stevens, R. J.

    2006-12-01

    The ionosphere is a rich reservoir of charged particles from which a variable fraction is transported to the magnetosphere. An important transport phenomena is the formation of upward ion flow above auroral structure. A primary region of the outflow is not known, but contributions come from polar cap, dayside cusp/cleft region, auroral oval, or even from mid-latitudes. In the past global magnetospheric models and fluid codes were used to simulate large scale ion outflow above, e.g., the polar-cap aurora. However, satellites orbiting at low- altitudes have repeatingly detected localized ion outflow above the auroral oval. Ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling simulations gave first insides into the small-scale dynamics of aurora. The aim of this study is the investigation of coupled plasma and neutral dynamics in smaller scale aurora to explain the generation, structure, and dynamics of vertical ion upstream. We consider auroral electron precipitation at ionospheric heights in a 2-D three fluid ionospheric-magnetospheric coupling code (Otto and Zhu, 2003). Specially we examine the effects of the electron precipitation, heat conduction and heating in field- aligned current through coulomb collisions or turbulence causing: i) electron heating, ii) electron pressure gradients, and iii) upstreaming of ions through a resulting ambipolar electric field. Our first case studies are performed for different boundary conditions and for different auroral electron precipitation parameters (variation in characteristic auroral energy, auroral energy flux and horizontal scale). The results shall clarify how auroral precipitation can drive ions upwards. Finally we discuss the effect of ion drag and the interaction of the upstreaming ions with a stable neutral constituent. Otto, O. and H. Zhu, Fluid plasma simulation of coupled systems: Ionosphere and magnetosphere, Space Plasma Simulation. Edited by J. Buechner, C. Dum, and M. Scholer., Lecture Notes in Physics, vol. 615, p.193

  17. Effects of Geomagnetic Disturbances on Offshore Magnetic Directional Wellbore Positioning in the Northern Auroral Zone

    OpenAIRE

    Edvardsen, Inge

    2016-01-01

    This thesis focuses on how disturbances in the geomagnetic field, offshore northern Norway, may affect the accuracy of magnetic directional wellbore surveying. The topics discussed are, however, applicable to the entire northern auroral zone. Suggestions on how to manage the effect of increased geomagnetic activity on magnetic directional wellbore survey operations in and near the auroral zone are described. The results from our study of the geomagnetic conditions in the Norwegian Sea ...

  18. Auroral electrojets during deep solar minimum at the end of solar cycle 23

    OpenAIRE

    Pulkkinen, Tuija I.; Tanskanen, E. I.; Viljanen, A.; N. Partamies; Kauristie, K.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the auroral electrojet activity during the deep minimum at the end of solar cycle 23 (2008–2009) by comparing data from the IMAGE magnetometer chain, auroral observations in Fennoscandia and Svalbard, and solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) observations from the OMNI database from that period with those recorded one solar cycle earlier. We examine the eastward and westward electrojets and the midnight sector separately. The electrojets during 2008–2009 were found...

  19. Deducing composition and incident electron spectra from ground-based auroral optical measurements: A study of auroral red line processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We conclude from a study of the production and loss of O(1D) in auroras that the ''traditional'' sources, direct electron impact excitation of atomic oxygen and dissociative recombination of molecular oxygen ions, can account for most of the O I 6300-A emission rate. In a specific application of the model to the comprehensive observation of an auroral event by Sharp et al. (1979), we show that there is no compelling need for the reaction N(2D)+O2→NO+O(1D). We also present a study of the sensitivity of the red line emission rate to a wide variety of input conditions. copyright American Geophysical Union 1989

  20. Severe and localized GNSS scintillation at the poleward edge of the nightside auroral oval during intense substorm aurora

    CERN Document Server

    van der Meeren, Christer; Lorentzen, Dag A; Rietveld, Michael T; Clausen, Lasse B N

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study how GPS, GLONASS, and Galileo navigation signals are compromised by strong irregularities causing severe phase scintillation ($\\mathit{\\sigma }_{\\phi }$ > 1) in the nightside high-latitude ionosphere during a substorm on 3 November 2013. Substorm onset and a later intensification coincided with polar cap patches entering the auroral oval to become auroral blobs. Using Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers and optical data, we show severe scintillation driven by intense auroral emissions in the line of sight between the receiver and the satellites. During substorm expansion, the area of scintillation followed the intense poleward edge of the auroral oval. The intense auroral emissions were colocated with polar cap patches (blobs). The patches did not contain strong irregularities, neither before entering the auroral oval nor after the aurora had faded. Signals from all three GNSS constellations were similarly affected by the irregularities. Furthermore, two receivers space...

  1. Variation of Jupiter's aurora observed by Hisaki/EXCEED:2. estimations of auroral parameters and magnetospheric dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Tao, Chihiro; Kimura, Tomoki; Badman, Sarah V.; André, Nicolas; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Murakami, Go; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Fujimoto, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Jupiter's auroral parameters are estimated from observations by a spectrometer EXCEED (Extreme Ultraviolet Spectroscope for Exospheric Dynamics) onboard JAXA's Earth-orbiting planetary space telescope Hisaki. EXCEED provides continuous auroral spectra covering the wavelength range over 80–148 nm from the whole northern polar region. The auroral electron energy is estimated using a hydrocarbon color ratio adopted for the wavelength range of EXCEED, and the emission power in the long wavelength...

  2. Administrative Circular No. 20 (Rev. 2) – Re-evaluation of the kilometre allowance when using a private vehicle for journeys on official duty

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    Following discussion in the Standing Concertation Committee meeting of 21 March 2011, the kilometre allowance was increased from 0,65 CHF/km to 0,70 CHF/km as from 11 April 2011 which is the first date of the new overtime period. Department Head Office

  3. Interactive Auroral Science for Hearing-Impaired Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, M.; Michell, R. G.; Jahn, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Ibarra, S.; Hampton, D. L.; Powell, D.

    2012-12-01

    Under a NASA E/PO grant, we have partnered with San Antonio's Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children to develop a science class experience where students directly interact with scientists and participate in a research-grade space science measurement campaign. The unique aspect of partnering with Sunshine Cottage lies in Sunshine's approach of auditory-verbal communication. Aided by technology (hearing aids, cochlear implants), a diverse student body with students of all levels of hearing loss (moderate through profound) is taught in an entirely auditory-verbal environment at Sunshine Cottage. Bringing these students into early contact with research work can lay the foundation for future careers in the STEM field that normally they might not consider as indicated by the first year of this collaboration where the student response was distinctly positive. Here we report on the first year of those activities, as they related to a ground based imaging approach to exploring the northern lights and from the point of view of the scientists that participated. The major components of that activity included a site visit to SwRI by the students and their teachers, a semester long lab at school utilizing current research tools and a real-time campaign night. The students used a number of diagnostics to first predict and then verify auroral activity. One of the tools used was the MOOSE observatory which is a community resource state of the art observatory comprised of 5 EMCCD imagers in Alaska, established through an NSF MRI grant. We will discuss the approach and lessons learned during the first year of the project and the directions that we will likely take in the second year. Lessons learned from teaching these students space science related topic can be flowed right back into mainstream classroom settings. One other significant and unexpected aspect of this first year was that we were able to connect two groups of students through skype (in the 4th to 5th grades) that

  4. Impulsive ion injections in the morning auroral region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmons, J. H.; Carlson, C. W.; Boehm, M. H.

    1995-01-01

    Low altitude (less than 1000 km) measurements of ions precipitating into the morning auroral region are presented and analyzed. The ion fluxes exhibited time-energy signatures consistent with impulsive injection onto high-altitude field lines, followed by time-of-flight dispersion. The origin of these ions is investigated through the detailed examination of these signatures in conjunction with simultaneous measurements of precipitating electrons and a magnetic field model. A model is developed which indicates that the source for these particles was located in or near the magnetopause boundary layer, with the position deduced to be in the midlatitude flank region about 20-30 R(sub E) tailward of the Earth. The model explains the existence of multiple injections on a given field line as due to a quasi-periodic source, with the periodicity being about 100-200 s at the source. Several mechanisms are examined in an attempt to explain the injections, with a mechanism related to the propagation of waves on the surface of the boundary layer found to be the most plausible. The observations and results are compared to those of similar experiments and some unifying ideas are discussed.

  5. Langmuir turbulence in the auroral ionosphere 1: Linear theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, D. L.; Goldman, M. V.; Ergun, R. E.; Boehm, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    Intense bursts of Langmuir waves with electric fields of 50 to 500 mV / m have been frequently observed at altitudes greater than 500 km in the auroral ionosphere. These bursts are driven by 20 eV to 4 keV field-aligned electrons, which are embedded in an approximately isotropic nonthermal tail of scattered electrons. The Langmuir bursts are often observed at altitudes where the ionosphere is moderately magnetized (OMEGA (sub e) approximately equals omega (sub pe)). Both the moderate magnetization and the scattered electrons have a major influence on the linear dispersion and damping of Langmuir waves. In particular, the linear dispersion is topologically different depending on whether the magnetic field is subcritical (OMEGA (sub e) less than omega (sub pe)) or supercritical (OMEGA (sub e) greater than omega (sub pe)). The correct dispersion and damping can account for the observed polarization of the Langmuir waves, which is very nearly parallel to the geomagnetic field. Inferred properties of the linear instability driven by the field-aligned electrons are discussed. The linear dispersion and damping derived here provide the basis for a nonlinear turbulence study described in a companion paper (Newman et al., this issue).

  6. Juno's Earth flyby: the Jupiter infrared auroral mapper preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriani, Alberto; Mura, Alessandro; Grassi, Davide; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Di Iorio, Tatiana; Tosi, Federico; Noschese, Raffaella; Moriconi, Maria Luisa; Filacchione, Gianrico; Sindoni, Giuseppe; Cicchetti, Andrea

    The Juno spacecraft has been launched on August 2011 with the goal of investigating the origin and evolution of Jupiter. JIRAM, the Jupiter Infrared Auroral Mapper on board the spacecraft, is a spectro-imager whose science objectives are the auroras’ analysis, the atmospheric component gases retrieval in hot spots and the constraining of the Jupiter’s formation environment through the study of the composition and the abundances of the chemical species in the Jovian atmosphere. To achieve these objectives JIRAM is equipped with a IR imager split in two spectral channels: L band, centered at 3.45 mum with a 290 nm bandwidth, and M band, centered at 4.78 mum with a 480 nm bandwidth, and a spectrometer in the 2.0-5.0 mum interval. JIRAM status and capabilities have been tested on 9 October 2013 during the Juno’s Earth flyby. The instrument targeted the Moon for about half an hour. Beyond the scientific value of the observation, this has been so far the first occasion during the cruise phase to verify the execution of the science observing sequences as they will be operated at Jupiter. Here the first elaboration of that series of observations is presented. The imager in M band has been able to capture the Moon region straddling the terminator. Some surface features are recognizable and have been mapped with the support of the geometric information available for JIRAM data. Spectra from the most prominent surface structure visualized, are also shown.

  7. Volumetric imaging of the auroral ionosphere: Initial results from PFISR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeter, Joshua; Butler, Thomas; Heinselman, Craig; Nicolls, Michael; Kelly, John; Hampton, Donald

    2009-05-01

    The Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) is the first dedicated ISR built with an electronically steerable array. This paper demonstrates the capabilities of PFISR for producing three-dimensional volumetric images of E-region ionization patterns produced by the aurora. The phase table was configured to cycle through 121 beam positions arranged in an 11×11 grid. A 13-baud Barker coded pulse was used, which provided ~1.5-km range resolution out to a maximum range of 250 km. Backscattered power was converted to electron density by correcting for path loss and applying the Buneman approximation assuming equal electron and ion temperatures. The results were then interpolated onto a three-dimensional cartesian grid. Volumetric images are presented at 5-min, 1-min, and 14.6-s integration times (corresponding to 960, 192, and 48 pulses-per-position, respectively) to illustrate the tradeoff between spatio-temporal resolution and data quality. At 14.6 s cadence, variability in plasma density within the volume appears to be fully resolved in space and time, a result that is supported by both observational evidence and theoretical predictions of ionospheric response times. Some potential applications of this mode for studying magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions in the auroral zone are discussed.

  8. Parameterization of ionization rate by auroral electron precipitation in Jupiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Hiraki

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We simulate auroral electron precipitation into the Jovian atmosphere in which electron multi-directional scattering and energy degradation processes are treated exactly with a Monte Carlo technique. We make a parameterization of the calculated ionization rate of the neutral gas by electron impact in a similar way as used for the Earth's aurora. Our method allows the altitude distribution of the ionization rate to be obtained as a function of an arbitrary initial energy spectrum in the range of 1–200 keV. It also includes incident angle dependence and an arbitrary density distribution of molecular hydrogen. We show that there is little dependence of the estimated ionospheric conductance on atomic species such as H and He. We compare our results with those of recent studies with different electron transport schemes by adapting our parameterization to their atmospheric conditions. We discuss the intrinsic problem of their simplified assumption. The ionospheric conductance, which is important for Jupiter's magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system, is estimated to vary by a factor depending on the electron energy spectrum based on recent observation and modeling. We discuss this difference through the relation with field-aligned current and electron spectrum.

  9. Velocities of auroral coherent echoes at 12 and 144 MHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Koustov

    Full Text Available Two Doppler coherent radar systems are currently working at Hankasalmi, Finland, the STARE and CUTLASS radars operating at ~144 MHz and ~12 MHz, respectively. The STARE beam 3 is nearly co-located with the CUTLASS beam 5, providing an opportunity for echo velocity comparison along the same direction but at significantly different radar frequencies. In this study we consider an event when STARE radar echoes are detected at the same ranges as CUT-LASS radar echoes. The observations are complemented by EISCAT measurements of the ionospheric electric field and electron density behaviour at one range of 900 km. Two separate situations are studied; for the first one, CUTLASS observed F-region echoes (including the range of the EIS-CAT measurements, while for the second one CUTLASS observed E-region echoes. In both cases STARE E-region measurements were available. We show that F-region CUT-LASS velocities agree well with the convection component along the CUTLASS radar beam, while STARE velocities are typically smaller by a factor of 2–3. For the second case, STARE velocities are found to be either smaller or larger than CUTLASS velocities, depending on the range. Plasma physics of E-and F-region irregularities is discussed in attempt to explain the inferred relationship between various velocities. Special attention is paid to ionospheric refraction that is important for the detection of 12-MHz echoes.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; plasma waves and instabilities; auroral ionosphere

  10. Juno's Earth flyby: the Jovian infrared Auroral Mapper preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriani, A.; Moriconi, M. L.; Mura, A.; Tosi, F.; Sindoni, G.; Noschese, R.; Cicchetti, A.; Filacchione, G.

    2016-08-01

    The Jovian InfraRed Auroral Mapper, JIRAM, is an image-spectrometer onboard the NASA Juno spacecraft flying to Jupiter. The instrument has been designed to study the aurora and the atmosphere of the planet in the spectral range 2-5 μm. The very first scientific observation taken with the instrument was at the Moon just before Juno's Earth fly-by occurred on October 9, 2013. The purpose was to check the instrument regular operation modes and to optimize the instrumental performances. The testing activity will be completed with pointing and a radiometric/spectral calibrations shortly after Jupiter Orbit Insertion. Then the reconstruction of some Moon infrared images, together with co-located spectra used to retrieve the lunar surface temperature, is a fundamental step in the instrument operation tuning. The main scope of this article is to serve as a reference to future users of the JIRAM datasets after public release with the NASA Planetary Data System.

  11. Ionospheric current system accompanied by auroral vortex streets

    CERN Document Server

    Hiraki, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    High resolution optical measurements have revealed that a sudden brightening of aurora and its deformation from an arc-like to a vortex street structure appear just at the onset of substorm. The instability of Alfv$\\acute{\\rm e}$n waves reflected from the ionosphere has been studied by means of magnetohydrodynamic simulations in order to comprehend the formation of auroral vortex streets. Our previous work reported that an initially placed arc intensifies, splits, and deforms into a vortex street during a couple of minutes, and the prime key is an enhancement of the convection electric field. This study elaborated physics of the ionospheric horizontal currents related to the vortex street in the context of so-called Cowling polarization. One component is due to the perturbed electric field by Alfv$\\acute{\\rm e}$n waves, and the other is due to the perturbed electron density (or polarization) in the ionosphere. It was found that, when a vortex street develops, upward/downward pair currents in its leading/trail...

  12. Characteristics of a stable auroral red arc event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intense (approx.2.2 kR) stable auroral red (SAR) arc was observed on October 23, 1981 by the Dynamics Explorer 1 and 2 satellites as well as by a ground based photometer operated by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory at Battelle Observatory in Richland, Washington, providing a unique series of nearly simultaneous measurements. The DE satellites provided in-situ electric-field and particle measurements at altitudes of about 850 km and 6000 km along approximately the same flux tube as well as in-situ electron temperature and density measurements at 850 km for this red arc. These measurements along with ground-based determination of arc position and intensity allowed a comprehensive analysis of the arc. Calculations of the electron heating rate and temperature which result from the observed precipitating electron flux at the arc location indicate that the heat required to establish the necessary and observed ionospheric electron temperatures is provided by the extrapolated low energy electron particle flux. The available data does not provide sufficient information to uniquely determine the energy source for this flux

  13. Ground-based and satellite observations of high-latitude auroral activity in the dusk sector of the auroral oval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kauristie

    Full Text Available On 7 December 2000, during 13:30–15:30 UT the MIRACLE all-sky camera at Ny Ålesund observed auroras at high-latitudes (MLAT ~ 76 simultaneously when the Cluster spacecraft were skimming the magnetopause in the same MLT sector (at ~ 16:00–18:00 MLT. The location of the auroras (near the ionospheric convection reversal boundary and the clear correlation between their dynamics and IMF variations suggests their close relationship with R1 currents. Consequently, we can assume that the Cluster spacecraft were making observations in the magnetospheric region associated with the auroras, although exact magnetic conjugacy between the ground-based and satellite observations did not exist. The solar wind variations appeared to control both the behaviour of the auroras and the magnetopause dynamics. Auroral structures were observed at Ny Ålesund especially during periods of negative IMF BZ. In addition, the Cluster spacecraft experienced periodic (T ~ 4 - 6 min encounters between magnetospheric and magnetosheath plasmas. These undulations of the boundary can be interpreted as a consequence of tailward propagating magnetopause surface waves. Simultaneous dusk sector ground-based observations show weak, but discernible magnetic pulsations (Pc 5 and occasionally periodic variations (T ~ 2 - 3 min in the high-latitude auroras. In the dusk sector, Pc 5 activity was stronger and had characteristics that were consistent with a field line resonance type of activity. When IMF BZ stayed positive for a longer period, the auroras were dimmer and the spacecraft stayed at the outer edge of the magnetopause where they observed electromagnetic pulsations with T ~ 1 min. We find these observations interesting especially from the viewpoint of previously presented studies relating poleward-moving high-latitude auroras with pulsation activity and MHD waves propagating at the magnetospheric boundary layers

  14. The Physics of the Cold Neutral Medium: Low-frequency Carbon Radio Recombination Lines with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Oonk, J B R; Salgado, F; Toribio, M C; van Weeren, R J; Tielens, A G G M; Rottgering, H J A

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will transform our understanding of the role of the cold, atomic gas in galaxy evolution. The interstellar medium (ISM) is the repository of stellar ejecta and the birthsite of new stars and, hence, a key factor in the evolution of galaxies over cosmic time. Cold, diffuse, atomic clouds are a key component of the ISM, but so far this phase has been difficult to study, because its main tracer, the HI 21 cm line, does not constrain the basic physical information of the gas (e.g., temperature, density) well. The SKA opens up the opportunity to study this component of the ISM through a complementary tracer in the form of low-frequency (<350 MHz) carbon radio recombination lines (CRRL). These CRRLs provide a sensitive probe of the physical conditions in cold, diffuse clouds. The superb sensitivity, large field of view, frequency resolution and coverage of the SKA allows for efficient surveys of the sky, that will revolutionize the field of low-frequency recombination line studie...

  15. A 65 nm CMOS broadband self-calibrated power detector for the square kilometre array radio telescope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Wu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a 65 nm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS broadband self-calibrated high-sensitivity power detector for use in the Square Kilometre Array (SKA, the next-generation high-sensitivity radio telescope, is presented. The power detector calibration is performed by adjusting voltages at the bulk terminals of the input transistors to compensate for mismatches in the output voltages because of process, voltage and temperature variations. Measurements show that the power detector, preceded by an input power-match circuit with 6 dB gain, has an input signal range from −48 to −11 dBm over which a 0.95 dB maximum error in the detected power is observed when the calibration rate is 20 kHz. The proposed broadband power detector has a 3 dB upper band edge of 1.8 GHz, which adequately covers the midband SKA frequency range from 0.7 to 1.4 GHz. The settling time and the calibration time are both <5 μs. The circuit consumes 1.2 mW from a 1.2 V power supply and the input-match circuit consumes another 5.8 mW. The presented power detector achieves the best combination of the detection range and sensitivity of previously published circuits.

  16. Role of ionospheric effects and plasma sheet dynamics in the formation of auroral arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Manju; Rankin, R.

    2001-01-01

    At the ionospheric level, the substorm onset (expansion phase) is marked by the initial brightening and subsequent breakup of a pre-existing auroral arc. According to the field line resonance (FLR) wave model, the substorm-related auroral arc is caused by the field-aligned current carried by FLRs. The FLRs are standing shear Alfvén wave structures that are excited along the dipole/quasi-dipole lines of the geomagnetic field. The FLRs (that can cause auroral arc) thread from the Earthward edge of the plasma sheet and link the auroral arc to the plasma sheet region of 6-15 R_E. The region is associated with magnetic fluctuations that result from the nonlinear wave-wave interactions of the cross-field current-instability. The instability (excited at the substorm onset) disrupts the cross-tail current which is built up during the growth phase of the substorms and results in magnetic fluctuations. The diversion of the current to polar regions can lead to auroral arc intensification. The current FLR model is based on the amplitude equations that describe the nonlinear space-time evolution of FLRs in the presence of ponderomotive forces exerted by large amplitude FLRs (excited during substorms). The present work will modify the FLR wave model to include the effects arising from magnetic fluctuations that result from current disruption near the plasma sheet (6-15 R_E). The nonlinear evolution of FLRs is coupled with the dynamics of plasma sheet through a momentum exchange term (resulting from magnetic fluctuations due to current disruption) in the generalized Ohm's law. The resulting amplitude equations including the effects arising from magnetic fluctuations can be used to study the structure of the auroral arcs formed during substorms. We have also studied the role of feedback mechanism (in a dipole geometry of the geomagnetic field) in the formation of the discrete auroral arc observed on the nightside magnetosphere. The present nonlinear dispersive model (NDM) is

  17. Numerical simulation for a vortex street near the poleward boundary of the nighttime auroral oval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, T.

    2012-02-01

    The formation of a vortex street is numerically studied as an aftermath of a transient (≈1 min) depression of the energy density of injected particles. It is basically assumed that the kinetic energies of auroral particles are substantially provided by nonadiabatic acceleration in the tail current sheet. One of the causes of such energy density depression is an outward (away from the Earth) movement of the neutral line because in such situation, a particle passes the acceleration zone for a shorter time interval while it is inwardly transported in the current sheet. The numerical simulation shows that a long chain of many (≥5) vortices can be formed in the nighttime high-latitude auroral oval as a result of the hybrid Kelvin-Helmholtz/Rayleigh-Taylor (KH/RT) instability. The main characteristics of long vortex chains in the simulation such as the short lifetime (≲2 min) and the correlation between wavelength, λ, and arc system width, A, compare well with those of the periodic auroral distortions observed primarily in the high-latitude auroral oval. Specifically, either λ-A relationship from simulation or observation shows a positive correlation between λ and A but with considerable dispersion in λ. Since auroral vortices arising from the hybrid KH/RT instability are not accompanied by significant rotational motions, the magnetic shear instability caused by undulations in the field-aligned current (FAC) sheet could turn the vortices into spirals which wind or unwind in response to increase or decrease of FACs, respectively.

  18. Statistical study of the GNSS phase scintillation associated with two types of auroral blobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yaqi; Moen, Jøran I.; Miloch, Wojciech J.; Clausen, Lasse B. N.; Oksavik, Kjellmar

    2016-05-01

    This study surveys space weather effects on GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) signals in the nighttime auroral and polar cap ionosphere using scintillation receivers, all-sky imagers, and the European Incoherent Scatter Svalbard radar. We differentiate between two types of auroral blobs: blob type 1 (BT 1) which is formed when islands of high-density F region plasma (polar cap patches) enter the nightside auroral oval, and blob type 2 (BT 2) which are generated locally in the auroral oval by intense particle precipitation. For BT 1 blobs we have studied 41.4 h of data between November 2010 and February 2014. We find that BT 1 blobs have significantly higher scintillation levels than their corresponding polar cap patch; however, there is no clear relationship between the scintillation levels of the preexisting polar cap patch and the resulting BT 1 blob. For BT 2 blobs we find that they are associated with much weaker scintillations than BT 1 blobs, based on 20 h of data. Compared to patches and BT 2 blobs, the significantly higher scintillation level for BT 1 blobs implies that auroral dynamics plays an important role in structuring of BT 1 blobs.

  19. Auroral images and particle precipitations observed by S-310JA-8, -9, and -10 at Syowa Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three sounding rockets were launched in 1984 from Syowa Station in Antarctica into different types of aurora, designated as AURORA I (an active auroral arc at the substorm expansion phase), II (a stable are prior to the substrom onset) and III (a diffuse aurora during the recovery phase). A new television camera was used to take an auroral picture, together with the electron spectrometers to measure the energy spectrum of auroral particles. AURORA I showed greater values in both auroral emission and electron density than for AURORA II. In AURORA III, although the auroral emission intensity was much less in comparison with AURORA I, the electron density showed a pronounced enhancement in the D-region and was comparable with the case of AURORA I above the E-region. As for an energy spectrum of auroral electrons, AURORA I and II showed an inverted-V type monoenergetic peak with much higher energy for AURORA I than for AURORA II, whereas AURORA III exhibits a power-law spectrum with a small superposing monoenergetic peak around 0.5 keV above 200 km in altitude. The television camera showed a dependence of auroral color spectrum on the auroral activity, i.e., the ratio of an apparent emission rate at 427.8 nm and an illuminance in a visible range (400 to 800 nm) becomes greater for brighter aurora. (author)

  20. Highlights in the studies of the relationship of geomagnetic field changes to auroral luminosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the middle of the 18th century Celsius observed that there was a correspondence between a great aurora in Europe and the extreme motion of his observed compass needle. By the nineteenth century it was well established that the geomagnetic field always fluctuated violently at the height of an auroral display, that the high latitude zones of peak field disturbance and luminosity and similar locations, and that there were concurrent solar cycle changes in activity levels for the two phenomena. After the International Geophysical Year of 1957 to 1959 the correspondence of the ionospheric electrojet currents and auroral forms became a focus of observational programs. In these recent times the studies of a relationship between short-period pulsations of the geomagnetic field and luminosity pulsations (or the pulsations of bombarding, low energy electrons causing the auroral intensity changes) appeared prominently in the literature. A summary of the scientific progress in the study of these phenomena is presented in this paper. (author)

  1. Nonlinear interactions of electromagnetic waves with the auroral ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ionosphere provides us with an opportunity to perform plasma experiments in an environment with long confinement times, very large-scale lengths, and no confining walls. The auroral ionosphere with its nearly vertical magnetic field geometry is uniquely endowed with large amount of free energy from electron and ion precipitation along the magnetic field and mega-ampere current across the magnetic field. To take advantage of this giant outdoor laboratory, two facilities HAARP and HIPAS, with frequencies ranging from the radio to optical bands, are now available for active probing of and interaction with this interesting region. The ponderomotive pressures from the self-consistent wave fields have produced significant local perturbations of density and particle distributions at heights where the incident EM frequency matches a plasma resonance. This paper will review theory and experiments covering the nonlinear phenomena of parametric decay instability to wave collapse processes. At HF frequencies plasma lenses can be created by preconditioning pulses to focus what is a normally divergent beam into a high-intensity spot to further enhance nonlinear phenomena. At optical wavelengths a large rotating liquid metal mirror is used to focus laser pulses up to a given height. Such laser pulses are tuned to the same wavelengths of selected atomic and molecular resonances, with resulting large scattering cross sections. Ongoing experiments on dual-site experiments and excitation of ELF waves will be presented. The connection of such basic studies to environmental applications will be discussed. Such applications include the global communication using ELF waves, the ozone depletion and remediation and the control of atmospheric CO2 through the use of ion cyclotron resonant heating

  2. Current-voltage relationship in the auroral particle acceleration region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Morooka

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The current-voltage relationship in the auroral particle acceleration region has been studied statistically by the Akebono (EXOS-D satellite in terms of the charge carriers of the upward field-aligned current. The Akebono satellite often observed field-aligned currents which were significantly larger than the model value predicted by Knight (1973. We compared the upward field-aligned current estimated by three different methods, and found that low-energy electrons often play an important role as additional current carriers, together with the high-energy primary electrons which are expected from Knight's relation. Such additional currents have been observed especially at high and middle altitudes of the particle acceleration region. Some particular features of electron distribution functions, such as "cylindrical distribution functions" and "electron conics", have often been observed coinciding with the additional currents. They indicated time variability of the particle acceleration region. Therefore, we have concluded that the low-energy electrons within the "forbidden" region of electron phase space in the stationary model often contribute to charge carriers of the current because of the rapid time variability of the particle acceleration region. "Cylindrical distribution functions" are expected to be found below the time-varying potential difference. We statistically examined the locations of "cylindrical distribution function", and found that their altitudes are related to the location where the additional currents have been observed. This result is consistent with the idea that the low-energy electrons can also carry significant current when the acceleration region changes in time.

  3. Nonlinear interactions of electromagnetic waves with the auroral ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alfred Y.

    1999-09-01

    The ionosphere provides us with an opportunity to perform plasma experiments in an environment with long confinement times, very large-scale lengths, and no confining walls. The auroral ionosphere with its nearly vertical magnetic field geometry is uniquely endowed with large amount of free energy from electron and ion precipitation along the magnetic field and mega-ampere current across the magnetic field. To take advantage of this giant outdoor laboratory, two facilities HAARP and HIPAS, with frequencies ranging from the radio to optical bands, are now available for active probing of and interaction with this interesting region. The ponderomotive pressures from the self-consistent wave fields have produced significant local perturbations of density and particle distributions at heights where the incident EM frequency matches a plasma resonance. This paper will review theory and experiments covering the nonlinear phenomena of parametric decay instability to wave collapse processes. At HF frequencies plasma lenses can be created by preconditioning pulses to focus what is a normally divergent beam into a high-intensity spot to further enhance nonlinear phenomena. At optical wavelengths a large rotating liquid metal mirror is used to focus laser pulses up to a given height. Such laser pulses are tuned to the same wavelengths of selected atomic and molecular resonances, with resulting large scattering cross sections. Ongoing experiments on dual-site experiments and excitation of ELF waves will be presented. The connection of such basic studies to environmental applications will be discussed. Such applications include the global communication using ELF waves, the ozone depletion and remediation and the control of atmospheric CO2 through the use of ion cyclotron resonant heating.

  4. Velocity of small-scale auroral ionospheric current systems over Indian Antarctic station Maitri

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Girija Rajaram; A N Hanchinal; R Kalra; K Unnikrishnan; K Jeeva; M Sridharan; A Dhar

    2002-03-01

    The Indian Antarctic station Maitri (geog. 70° 45/S, 11° 45/E, geom. 66° .03S, 53°.21E) occupies a sub-auroral location during magnetically quiet conditions ( Kp < 10), but attains an auroral position when the auroral oval shifts equatorwards with increasing strength of magnetic disturbance. At the latter times, triangulation with 3 uxgate magnetometers located at the vertices of a suitable triangle provides a means of monitoring mobile auroral ionospheric current systems over Maitri. The spacing between the magnetometers is typically kept at 75-200 km, keeping in mind the scale-sizes of ∼100 km for these mobile current systems. This work reports the results of two triangulation experiments carried out around Maitri in January 1992 and January 1995, both during Antarctic summer. The velocities estimated for pulsations of the Pc4 and Pc5 type were about 0.59 km/sec in the direction 102°.7 east of due north, in the first case, and about 1-3 km/sec in the second case in the east-west direction. While several magnetometer arrays exist in the northern auroral regions (e.g., the Alberta array in Canada, the Alaskan array in the U.S. and the IMS Scandinavian array), there is no report in literature of triangulation through arrays in Antarctica, except for a one-day study by Neudegg et al 1995 for ULF pulsations of the Pc1 and Pc2 type. The velocities obtained for the Pi3 type of irregular pulsations over Antarctica in the present study tally well with those obtained for northern auroral locations.

  5. THEMIS ground-space observations during the development of auroral spirals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Keiling

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A simultaneous observation of an auroral spiral and its generator region in the near-Earth plasma sheet is rather unlikely. Here we present such observations using the THEMIS spacecraft as well as the THEMIS ground network of all-sky imagers and magnetometers. Two consecutive auroral spirals separated by approximately 14 min occurred during a substorm on 19 February 2008. The spirals formed during the expansion phase and a subsequent intensification, and were among the brightest features in the aurora with diameters of 200–300 km. The duration for the formation and decay of each spiral was less than 60 s. Both spirals occurred shortly after the formation of two oppositely rotating plasma flow vortices in space, which were also accompanied by dipolarizations and ion injections, at ~11 RE geocentric distance. Observations and model calculations also give evidence for a magnetic-field-aligned current generation of approximately 0.1 MA via the flow vortices, connecting the generator region of the spirals with the ionosphere, during the formation of both spirals. In the ionosphere, a pair of equivalent ionospheric current (EIC vortices with opposite rotations (corresponding to upward and downward currents was present during both auroral spirals with enhanced EICs and ionospheric flows at the locations of the auroral spirals and along the auroral arcs. The combined ground and space observations suggest that each auroral spiral was powered by two oppositely rotating plasma flow vortices that caused a current enhancement in the substorm current wedge.

  6. The optical manifestation of dispersive field-aligned bursts in auroral breakup arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, H.; Semeter, J. L.; Marshall, R. A.; Zettergren, M.

    2013-07-01

    High-resolution optical observations of a substorm expansion show dynamic auroral rays with surges of luminosity traveling up the magnetic field lines. Observed in ground-based imagers, this phenomenon has been termed auroral flames, whereas the rocket signatures of the corresponding energy dispersions are more commonly known as field-aligned bursts. In this paper, observations of auroral flames obtained at 50 frames/s with a scientific-grade Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) sensor (30° × 30° field of view, 30 m resolution at 120 km) are used to provide insight into the nature of the precipitating electrons similar to high-resolution particle detectors. Thanks to the large field of view and high spatial resolution of this system, it is possible to obtain a first-order estimate of the temporal evolution in altitude of the volume emission rate from a single sensor. The measured volume emission rates are compared with the sum of modeled eigenprofiles obtained for a finite set of electron beams with varying energy provided by the TRANSCAR auroral flux tube model. The energy dispersion signatures within each auroral ray can be analyzed in detail during a fraction of a second. The evolution of energy and flux of the precipitation shows precipitation spanning over a large range of energies, with the characteristic energy dropping from 2.1 keV to 0.87 keV over 0.2 s. Oscillations at 2.4 Hz in the magnetic zenith correspond to the period of the auroral flames, and the acceleration is believed to be due to Alfvenic wave interaction with electrons above the ionosphere.

  7. Plasma sheet fast flows and auroral dynamics during substorm: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Borodkova

    Full Text Available Interball-1 observations of a substorm development in the mid-tail on 16 December 1998 are compared with the auroral dynamics obtained from the Polar UV imager. Using these data, the relationship between plasma flow directions in the tail and the location of the auroral activation is examined. Main attention is given to tailward and earth-ward plasma flows, interpreted as signatures of a Near Earth Neutral Line (NENL. It is unambiguously shown that in the mid-plasma sheet the flows were directed tailward when the auroral bulge developed equatorward of the spacecraft ionospheric footprint. On the contrary, when active auroras moved poleward of the Interball-1 projection, earthward fast flow bursts were observed. This confirms the concept that the NENL (or flow reversal region is the source of auroras forming the poleward edge of the auroral bulge. The observed earthward flow bursts have all typical signatures of Bursty Bulk Flows (BBFs, described by Angelopolous et al. (1992. These BBFs are related to substorm activations starting at the poleward edge of the expanded auroral bulge. We interpret the BBFs as a result of reconnection pulses occurring tail-ward of Interball-1. In addition, some non-typically observed phenomena were detected in the plasma sheet during this substorm: (i tailward/earthward flows were superimposed on a very strong duskward flow, and (ii wavy structures of both magnetic field and plasma density were registered. The latter observation is probably linked to the filamentary structure of the current sheet.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; plasma sheet; storms and substorms

  8. Modelling and design of Low Noise Amplifiers using strained InGaAs/InAlAs/InP pHEMT for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) application

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Norhawati Binti

    2012-01-01

    The largest 21st century radio telescope, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is now being planned, and the first phase of construction is estimated to commence in the year 2016. Phased array technology, the key feature of the SKA, requires the use of a tremendous number of receivers, estimated at approximately 37 million. Therefore, in the context of this project, the Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) located at the front end of the receiver chain remains the critical block. The demanding specification...

  9. Integration a few kilometres away from the motherland: Albanians' internal migration, settlement and voluntary return in Epirus and the Ionian Islands in Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Gerhard Hetfleisch

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the interconnection between internal migration in Greece, integration and voluntary return prospects of Albanians currently living in Epirus and the Ionian Islands. It is based on field research conducted during 2008 among immigrants who live in Ioannina, Preveza, Arta and Kerkyra. The study highlights the different types of internal trajectories that migrants had follow before settling in the neighbouring areas of Greece, just a few kilometres away from their homeland. ...

  10. Sub-kilometre (intra-crater) mounds in Utopia Planitia, Mars: character, occurrence and possible formation hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soare, Richard J.; Conway, Susan J.; Pearce, Geoffrey D.; Costard, François; Séjourné, Antoine

    2013-08-01

    At the middle latitudes of Utopia Planitia (˜35-45°N; ˜65-101°E) hundreds of small-sized mounds located in sub-kilometre impact craters dot the landscape. Their shape varies from circular to crescentic and their height ranges from ˜10 to 50 m. Often, metre to decametre pitting is observed, as is metres-thick banding or stratification. Mound albedo is relatively high, i.e. ˜0.16. The plain's terrain in the region, previously linked to the latitude-dependent mantle (LDM) of ice-dust, displays pitting and albedo similar to the small intra-crater mounds. Some workers have suggested that the mounds and the plain's terrain share a common ice-dust origin. If so, then scrutinising the mounds could provide analogical insight on the key geological characteristics and spatial distribution of the LDM itself. Other workers have hypothesised that the mounds are eroded sedimentary landforms or periglacial mounds underlain by a perennial ice-core (closed-system pingos). In this article we develop and then discuss each of the three mound-hypotheses in a much more substantial manner than has been done hitherto. Towards this end we use high-resolution images, present a detailed regional-map of mound distribution and establish a regional platform of topographical analysis using MOLA data superposed on a large-scale CTX mosaic. Although the ice-dust hypothesis is consistent with some observations and measurements, we find that a (loess-based) sedimentary hypothesis shows greater plausibility. Of the three hypotheses evaluated, the pingo or periglacial one is the weakest.

  11. Prospect of China's Auroral Fine-structure Imaging System (CAFIS) at Zhongshan station in Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shun-lin; HAN De-sheng; HU Hong-qiao; HUANG De-hong; ZHANG Bei-chen; YANG Hui-gen

    2008-01-01

    A new auroral imaging system is reported which is planned to be deployed at Zhongshan Station in Antarctica in the end of 2009. The system will focus on study of optical auroras in small scales and be called China' s Auroral Fine-structure Imaging System (CAFIS). The project of CAFIS is carried out by support of 'the tenth five-year plan for capacity building' of China. CAFIS will be a powerful groundbased platform for aurora observational experiments. Composing and advantages of CAFIS are introduced in this brief report. Some potential study topics involved CAFIS are also considered.

  12. Auroral spectrograph data annals of the international geophysical year, v.25

    CERN Document Server

    Carrigan, Anne; Norman, S J

    1964-01-01

    Annals of the International Geophysical Year, Volume 25: Auroral Spectrograph Data is a five-chapter text that contains tabulations of auroral spectrograph data. The patrol spectrograph built by the Perkin-Elmer Corporation for the Aurora and Airglow Program of the IGY is a high-speed, low-dispersion, automatic instrument designed to photograph spectra of aurora occurring along a given magnetic meridian of the sky. Data from each spectral frame were recorded on an IBM punched card. The data recorded on the cards are printed onto the tabulations in this volume. These tabulations are available

  13. Temporal and spatial evolution of discrete auroral arcs as seen by Cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Figueiredo, S.; G. T. Marklund; Karlsson, T.; Johansson, T.; Ebihara, Y.; Ejiri, M.; Ivchenko, N.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Nilsson, H.; A. Fazakerley

    2005-01-01

    Two event studies are presented in this paper where intense convergent electric fields, with mapped intensities up to 1350 mV/m, are measured in the auroral upward current region by the Cluster spacecraft, at altitudes between 3 and 5 Earth radii. Both events are from May 2003, Southern Hemisphere, with equatorward crossings by the Cluster spacecraft of the pre-midnight auroral oval.

    Event 1 occurs during the end of the recove...

  14. Radiation chemistry in the Jovian stratosphere - Laboratory simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, Gene D.; Thompson, W. R.; Sagan, Carl

    1992-01-01

    The results of the present low-pressure/continuous-flow laboratory simulations of H2/He/CH4/NH3 atmospheres' plasma-induced chemistry indicate radiation yields of both hydrocarbon and N2-containing organic compounds which increase with decreasing pressure. On the basis of these findings, upper limits of 1 million-1 billion molecules/sq cm/sec are established for production rates of major auroral-chemistry species in the Jovian stratosphere. It is noted that auroral processes may account for 10-100 percent of the total abundances of most of the observed polar-region organic species.

  15. Solar and auroral evidence for an intense recurrent geomagnetic storm during December in AD 1128

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Willis

    Full Text Available The earliest known drawing of sunspots appears in The Chronicle of John of Worcester, which was compiled in the first half of the twelfth century. In this medieval chronicle, the Latin text describing the sunspots is accompanied by a colourful drawing, albeit idealised, which shows the apparent positions and sizes of two sunspots on the solar disk. The date of this observation of sunspots from Worcester, England is firmly established as AD 1128 December 8. Assuming that the drawing was prepared fairly carefully, the angular diameters of the two sunspots are at least about 3 arcmin and 2 arcmin in the northern and southern hemispheres, respectively. Similarly, the heliographic latitudes of both sunspots are within the approximate range of 25°–35°. About five days after this observation of sunspots on the solar disk, on the night of AD 1128 December 13, a red auroral display was observed from Songdo, Korea (the modern city of Kaesong. This auroral observation was recorded in the Koryo-sa, the official Korean chronicle of the period. In addition, five Chinese and five Korean descriptions of auroral displays were recorded in various East-Asian histories between the middle of AD 1127 and the middle of AD 1129. The ten oriental auroral records in this particular interval correspond to six distinct auroral events, which provide evidence for recurrent, though possibly intermittent, auroral activity on a timescale almost exactly equal to the synodic-solar-rotation period (approximately 27 days. The six distinct auroral events were apparently associated with two series of recurrent geomagnetic storms, both of which were sufficiently intense to produce mid-latitude auroral displays in East Asia. These ancient solar and auroral observations are interpreted in terms of present-day understanding of solar-terrestrial physics. Con-temporary ground-based and satellite measurements during the last few decades have indicated that recurrent

  16. Radio wave remote sensing by Cluster and Regatta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    1990-01-01

    A coordinated Cluster/Regatta mission provides unique opportunities for remote sensing studies of terrestrial radio emissions. The scientific questions that can be addressed by remote radio measurements from Cluster and Regatta are described and the technical issues involved are discussed. The radio emission of primary interest is Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR) which is a powerful radio emission generated over the Earth's auroral zones at frequencies from 100 to 500 kHz.

  17. AKR-like emissions observed at low altitude by the DEMETER satellite

    OpenAIRE

    Parrot, Michel; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques

    2012-01-01

    International audience This paper reports observations of Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR) by the low altitude satellite DEMETER (700 km) during the super magnetic storm of November 2004. AKR is generated along auroral field lines at altitudes above ~ 3000 km and escapes from the Earth so that most observations have been made close to the source regions or at large distances from the Earth. However, EM waves with AKR-like frequency spectra detected by the low altitude EXOS-C satellite we...

  18. Auroral research at the Tromsø Northern Lights Observatory: the Harang directorship, 1928-1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Alv; Burke, William J.

    2016-03-01

    The Northern Lights Observatory in Tromsø began as Professor Lars Vegard's dream for a permanent facility in northern Norway, dedicated to the continuous study of auroral phenomenology and dynamics. Fortunately, not only was Vegard an internationally recognized spectroscopist, he was a great salesman and persuaded the Rockefeller Foundation that such an observatory represented an important long-term investment. A shrewd judge of talent, Vegard recognized the scientific and managerial skills of Leiv Harang, a recent graduate from the University of Oslo, and recommended that he become the observatory's first director. In 1929, subsequent to receiving the Rockefeller Foundation grant, the University of Oslo established a low temperature laboratory to support Vegard's spectroscopic investigations. This paper follows the scientific accomplishments of observatory personnel during the 18 years of Harang's directorship. These include: identifying the chemical sources of auroral emissions, discovering the Vegard-Kaplan bands, quantifying height distributions of different auroral forms, interpreting patterns of magnetic field variations, remotely probing auroral electron distribution profiles in the polar ionosphere, and monitoring the evolving states of the ozone layer. The Rockefeller Foundation judges got it right: the Tromsø Nordlysobservatoriet was, and for decades remained, an outstanding scientific investment.

  19. Auroral boundary dynamics observed simultaneously from the Viking spacecraft and from the ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High spatial and temporal resolution auroral imaging from space and from the ground contiues to improve our understanding of auroral dynamics. The ultraviolet imager on the Viking spacecraft gives global information on the activity of the auroral distribution. The ground-based optical facility at Swedish Institute of Space Physics, in Kiruna, Sweden, gives information on the finer-scale auroral structure. Simultaneous satellite- and ground-based measurements using this instrumentation were obtained for three selected events during the spring of 1986. For some aspects the authors find a remarkable correspondence of particular features observed from space and from the ground. For others the different views are complementary in nature. Taken together, they provide a comprehensive picture of presubstorm, substorm, and postsubstorm dynamics. The major findings are (1) a narrow active rayed arc set within a background of softer precipitation that defines what is generally called the diffuse aurora, with repeated fading on the time scale of 5 min; (2) a period of rapid convection manifested by the disappearance of transpolar arcs and the onset of undulations of the poleward boundary arc observed well before substorm onset; and (3) two clearly separated latitudinal regions following substorm onset, the poleward one being more variable on a time scale of 10 min, but the equatorward one having at its equatorward boundary a coherent pulsating feature with periods in the range 1-3 min

  20. Phenomenological analysis of Jovian north auroral H2 Lyman band emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-dispersion spectra taken with the IUE SWP from 1981-88 are examined for gross longitudinal features in Jovian north auroral emission activity and for evidence of long-term trends in auroral characteristics. Integrated photon flux in the H2 Lyman-band region is extracted from each of the spectra, characterizing auroral emission strength at time of exposure. A plot of flux vs. Jovian central meridian longitude (System III) corroborates an enhanced emission region centered at about 1800 reported by Skinner et al., (1984). Curves fit to fluxes grouped as ''scans'' (consecutive exposures made over a single Jovian rotation) vs. longitude characterize width, position and intensity of the enhanced region. Study includes examination of possible long-term variation in auroral peak intensity and width of the enhanced region vs. time, as well as possible correlation of the light curve integrated over longitude as a measure of total power emitted, vs. the longitudinal position of the intensity peak; more energetic aurorae appear to peak at values of central meridian longitude lower than the previously reported 1800. An analysis is made of longitudinal dependence in the ratio of photon flux in the Lyman and Werner bands, an indicator of primary particle energy

  1. Using citizen science reports to define the equatorial extent of auroral visibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, N. A.; MacDonald, E. A.; Viereck, R.

    2016-03-01

    An aurora may often be viewed hundreds of kilometers equatorward of the auroral oval owing to its altitude. As such, the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) Aurora Forecast product provides a "view line" to demonstrate the equatorial extent of auroral visibility, assuming that it is sufficiently bright and high in altitude. The view line in the SWPC product is based upon the latitude of the brightest aurora, for each hemisphere, as specified by the real-time oval variation, assessment, tracking, intensity, and online nowcasting (OVATION) Prime (2010) aurora precipitation model. In this study, we utilize nearly 500 citizen science auroral reports to compare with the view line provided by an updated SWPC aurora forecast product using auroral precipitation data from OVATION Prime (2013). The citizen science observations were recorded during March and April 2015 using the Aurorasaurus platform and cover one large geomagnetic storm and several smaller events. We find that this updated SWPC view line is conservative in its estimate and that the aurora is often viewable further equatorward than is indicated by the forecast. By using the citizen reports to modify the scaling parameters used to link the OVATION Prime (2013) model to the view line, we produce a new view line estimate that more accurately represents the equatorial extent of visible aurora. An OVATION Prime (2013) energy flux-based equatorial boundary view line is also developed and is found to provide the best overall agreement with the citizen science reports, with an accuracy of 91%.

  2. Auroral Current and Electrodynamics Structure Measured by Two SOunding Rockets in Flight Simultaneously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounds, Scott R.; Kaeppler, Steve; Kletzing, Craig; Lessard, Marc; Cohen, Ian J.; Jones, Sarah; Pfaff, Robert F.; Rowland, Douglas E.; Anderson, Brian Jay; Gjerloev, Jesper W.; Labelle, James W.; Dombrowski, Micah P.; Dudok de Wit, Thierry; Heinselman, Craig J.

    2011-01-01

    On January 29, 2009, two identically instrumented sounding rockets were launched into a sub-storm auroral arc from Poker Flat Alaska. Labeled the Auroral Currents and Electrodynamics Structure (ACES) mission, the payloads were launched to different apogees (approx.350km and approx.120km) and staggered in time so as to optimize their magnetic conjunctions. The different altitudes provided simultaneous in-situ measurements of magnetospheric input and output to the ionosphere and the ionospheric response in the lower F and E region. Measurements included 3-axis magnetic field, 2-axis electric field nominally perpendicular to the magnetic field, energetic particles, electron and ion, up to 15keV, cold plasma temperature and density. In addition, PFISR was also operating in a special designed mode to measure electric field and density profiles in the plane defined by the rocket trajectories and laterally to either side of the trajectories. Observation of the measured currents and electrodynamics structure of the auroral form encountered are presented in the context of standard auroral models and the temporal/spatial limitations of mission designs.

  3. Variation of Jupiter's aurora observed by Hisaki/EXCEED: 2. Estimations of auroral parameters and magnetospheric dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chihiro; Kimura, Tomoki; Badman, Sarah V.; André, Nicolas; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Murakami, Go; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Fujimoto, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    Jupiter's auroral parameters are estimated from observations by a spectrometer EXCEED (Extreme Ultraviolet Spectroscope for Exospheric Dynamics) on board Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency's Earth-orbiting planetary space telescope Hisaki. EXCEED provides continuous auroral spectra covering the wavelength range over 80-148 nm from the whole northern polar region. The auroral electron energy is estimated using a hydrocarbon color ratio adopted for the wavelength range of EXCEED, and the emission power in the long wavelength range 138.5-144.8 nm is used as an indicator of total emitted power before hydrocarbon absorption and auroral electron energy flux. The quasi-continuous observations by Hisaki provide the auroral electron parameters and their relation under different auroral activity levels. Short- (within one planetary rotation) enhancements of auroral power accompany increases of the electron number flux rather than the electron energy variations. The relationships between the auroral electron energy (~70-400 keV) and flux (1026-1027/s, 0.08-0.9 μA/m2) estimated from the observations over a 40 day interval are in agreement with field-aligned acceleration theory when incorporating probable magnetospheric parameters. Applying the electron acceleration theory to each observation point, we explore the magnetospheric source plasma variation during these power-enhanced events. Possible scenarios to explain the derived variations are (i) an adiabatic variation of the magnetospheric plasma under a magnetospheric compression and/or plasma injection, and (ii) a change of the dominant auroral component from the main emission (main aurora) to the emission at the open-closed boundary.

  4. Lower thermospheric wind variations in auroral patches during the substorm recovery phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Shin-ichiro; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Hosokawa, Keisuke; Watkins, Brenton J.; Kurihara, Junichi; Tsuda, Takuo T.; Fallen, Christopher T.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the lower thermospheric wind with a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) at Tromsø, Norway, found the largest wind variations in a night during the appearance of auroral patches at the substorm recovery phase. Taking into account magnetospheric substorm evolution of plasma energy accumulation and release, the largest wind amplitude at the recovery phase is a fascinating result. The results are the first detailed investigation of the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupled system at the substorm recovery phase using comprehensive data sets of solar wind, geomagnetic field, auroral pattern, and FPI-derived wind. This study used three events in November 2010 and January 2012, particularly focusing on the wind signatures associated with the auroral morphology, and found three specific features: (1) wind fluctuations that were isolated at the edge and/or in the darker area of an auroral patch with the largest vertical amplitude up to about 20 m/s and with the longest oscillation period about 10 min, (2) when the convection electric field was smaller than 15 mV/m, and (3) wind fluctuations that were accompanied by pulsating aurora. This approach suggests that the energy dissipation to produce the wind fluctuations is localized in the auroral pattern. Effects of the altitudinal variation in the volume emission rate were investigated to evaluate the instrumental artifact due to vertical wind shear. The small electric field values suggest weak contributions of the Joule heating and Lorentz force processes in wind fluctuations. Other unknown mechanisms may play a principal role at the recovery phase.

  5. Substorm associated radar auroral surges: a statistical study and possible generation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Shand

    Full Text Available Substorm-associated radar auroral surges (SARAS are a short lived (15–90 minutes and spatially localised (~5° of latitude perturbation of the plasma convection pattern observed within the auroral E-region. The understanding of such phenomena has important ramifications for the investigation of the larger scale plasma convection and ultimately the coupling of the solar wind, magnetosphere and ionosphere system. A statistical investigation is undertaken of SARAS, observed by the Sweden And Britain Radar Experiment (SABRE, in order to provide a more extensive examination of the local time occurrence and propagation characteristics of the events. The statistical analysis has determined a local time occurrence of observations between 1420 MLT and 2200 MLT with a maximum occurrence centred around 1700 MLT. The propagation velocity of the SARAS feature through the SABRE field of view was found to be predominately L-shell aligned with a velocity centred around 1750 m s–1 and within the range 500 m s–1 and 3500 m s–1. This comprehensive examination of the SARAS provides the opportunity to discuss, qualitatively, a possible generation mechanism for SARAS based on a proposed model for the production of a similar phenomenon referred to as sub-auroral ion drifts (SAIDs. The results of the comparison suggests that SARAS may result from a similar geophysical mechanism to that which produces SAID events, but probably occurs at a different time in the evolution of the event.

    Key words. Substorms · Auroral surges · Plasma con-vection · Sub-auroral ion drifts

  6. Nonlinear model of short-scale electrodynamics in the auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. A. Noël

    Full Text Available The optical detection of auroral subarcs a few tens of m wide as well as the direct observation of shears several m/s per m over km to sub km scales by rocket instrumentation both indicate that violent and highly localized electrodynamics can occur at times in the auroral ionosphere over scales 100 m or less in width. These observations as well as the detection of unstable ion-acoustic waves observed by incoherent radars along the geomagnetic field lines has motivated us to develop a detailed time-dependent two-dimensional model of short-scale auroral electrodynamics that uses current continuity, Ohm's law, and 8-moment transport equations for the ions and electrons in the presence of large ambient electric fields to describe wide auroral arcs with sharp edges in response to sharp cut-offs in precipitation (even though it may be possible to describe thin arcs and ultra-thin arcs with our model, we have left such a study for future work. We present the essential elements of this new model and illustrate the model's usefulness with a sample run for which the ambient electric field is 100 mV/m away from the arc and for which electron precipitation cuts off over a region 100 m wide. The sample run demonstrates that parallel current densities of the order of several hundred µA m-2 can be triggered in these circumstances, together with shears several m/s per m in magnitude and parallel electric fields of the order of 0.1 mV/m around 130 km altitude. It also illustrates that the local ionospheric properties like densities, temperature and composition can strongly be affected by the violent localized electrodynamics and vice-versa.

    Key words: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere, electric fields and currents, ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions

  7. SA13B-1900 Auroral Charging of the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Chandler, Michael O.; Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Electrostatic potential variations of the International Space Station (ISS) relative to the space plasma environment are dominated by interaction of the negatively grounded 160 volt US photovoltaic power system with the plasma environment in sunlight and inductive potential variations across the ISS structure generated by motion of the vehicle across the Earth's magnetic field. Auroral charging is also a source of potential variations because the 51.6? orbital inclination of ISS takes the vehicle to sufficiently high magnetic latitudes to encounter precipitating electrons during geomagnetic storms. Analysis of auroral charging for small spacecraft or isolated insulating regions on ISS predict rapid charging to high potentials of hundreds of volts but it has been thought that the large capacitance of the entire ISS structure on the order of 0.01 F will limit frame potentials to less than a volt when exposed to auroral conditions. We present three candidate auroral charging events characterized by transient ISS structure potentials varying from approximately 2 to 17 volts. The events occur primarily at night when the solar arrays are unbiased and cannot therefore be due to solar array current collection. ISS potential decreases to more negative values during the events indicating electron current collection and the events are always observed at the highest latitudes along the ISS trajectory. Comparison of the events with integral >30 keV electron flux measurements from NOAA TIROS spacecraft demonstrate they occur within regions of precipitating electron flux at levels consistent with the energetic electron thresholds reported for onset of auroral charging of the DMSP and Freja satellites. In contrast to the DMSP and Freja events, one of the ISS charging events occur in sunlight.

  8. Visualizing Space Weather: The Planeterrella Auroral Simulator as a Heliophysics Public Outreach Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masongsong, E. V.; Lilensten, J.; Booth, M. J.; Suri, G.; Heflinger, T. G.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA THEMIS and ARTEMIS satellite missions study "space weather," which describes the solar wind influence on Earth's protective magnetic shield, the magnetosphere. Space weather is important to study and predict because it can damage critical GPS and communications satellites, harm space travelers, and even disable our global electrical grid. The Planeterrella is an innovative heliophysics outreach demonstration, expanding public awareness of space weather by visualizing the sun-Earth connection up close and in-person. Using a glass vacuum chamber, two magnetized spheres and a 1kV power supply, the device can simulate plasma configurations of the solar corona, solar wind, Van Allen radiation belts, and auroral ovals, all of which are observable only by satellites. This "aurora in a bottle" is a modernized version of the original Terrella built by Kristian Birkeland in the 1890s to show that the aurora are electrical in nature. Adapted from plans by Lilensten et al. at CNRS-IPAG, the UCLA Planeterrella was completed in Nov. 2013, the second device of its kind in the U.S., and the centerpiece of the THEMIS/ARTEMIS mobile public outreach exhibit. In combination with captivating posters, 3D magnetic field models, dazzling aurora videos and magnetosphere animations, the Planeterrella has already introduced over 1200 people to the electrical link between our sun and the planets. Most visitors had seen solar flare images in the news, however the Planeterrella experience enhanced their appreciation of the dynamic solar wind and its effects on Earth's invisible magnetic field. Most importantly, visitors young and old realized that magnets are not just cool toys or only for powering hybrid car motors and MRIs, they are a fundamental aspect of ongoing life on Earth and are key to the formation and evolution of planets, moons, and stars, extending far beyond our galaxy to other planetary systems throughout the universe. Novel visualizations such as the Planeterrella can

  9. A study of photopolarimeter system UV absorption data on Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune - Implications for auroral haze formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present investigation of the dark hazes of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune on the basis of Voyager 2 UV data notes a geographic correlation between the auroral zones of Jupiter and Saturn and UV-dark polar regions. While the auroral fluxes and penetration depths on Jupiter and Saturn may suffice for a darkening of the polar regions by auroras' action on methane, Uranus and Neptune are found to be bright at all latitudes. In the former case, this brightness is in keeping with auroral electron energies too small to reach the CH4 homopause at which haze production occurs; in the latter case, a UV-dark band exists from 30 deg S to 5 deg N which is probably unrelated to auroral processes. 63 refs

  10. A real-time hybrid aurora alert system: Combining citizen science reports with an auroral oval model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, N. A.; Kingman, D.; MacDonald, E. A.

    2016-06-01

    Accurately predicting when, and from where, an aurora will be visible is particularly difficult, yet it is a service much desired by the general public. Several aurora alert services exist that attempt to provide such predictions but are, generally, based upon fairly coarse estimates of auroral activity (e.g., Kp or Dst). Additionally, these services are not able to account for a potential observer's local conditions (such as cloud cover or level of darkness). Aurorasaurus, however, combines data from the well-used, solar wind-driven, OVATION Prime auroral oval model with real-time observational data provided by a global network of citizen scientists. This system is designed to provide more accurate and localized alerts for auroral visibility than currently available. Early results are promising and show that over 100,000 auroral visibility alerts have been issued, including nearly 200 highly localized alerts, to over 2000 users located right across the globe.

  11. Equatorial ionospheric response to isolated auroral substorms over a solar cycle (1980-85): evidence of longitudinal anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajkowicz, L. A.

    1996-09-01

    The equatorial ionospheric response to 228 isolated, rapid-onset auroral substorms (as defined from the auroral electrojet index AE) was found from enhancements of the virtual (minimum) height of the F-region (h(') F) in the declining phase of a solar cycle (1980-85). The responses, found for three longitudinal sectors at the equator: Africa (Ouagadougou and Dakar), Asia (Manila) and America (Huancayo), were compared with the response close to the auroral source region at Yakutsk (northern Siberia). The auroral substorm onsets were centered at 17 and 15 UT at sunspot maximum (1980-82) and minimum (1983-85), preceding by 3-5 h the period of post-sunset height rise in the African sector whereas other sectors were in the early afternoon (Huancayo) and morning (Manila). The African response, particularly at Ouagadougou, was distinctly different from other sectors. In the sunspot maximum years (1980-81) the auroral surges were followed after about 3 h by a sharp depression (h(') Fh(') F=0) in 1982. A response polarity reversal (h(') F>0) was noted in this sector for sunspot minimum (1983-85) when large h(') F enhancements were observed at the sunset region. The responses in the Asian and American sector were positive except for a case in Huancayo when response was negative, following an auroral surge before the sunset at this station. It appears that the aurorally generated large-scale travelling ionospheric disturbances (LSTIDs), which first cause positive height enhancements in a sub-auroral location (Yakutsk), subsequently affect the unstable post-sunset ionosphere in the equatorial Africa.

  12. Equatorial ionospheric response to isolated auroral substorms over a solar cycle (1980−85: evidence of longitudinal anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Hajkowicz

    Full Text Available The equatorial ionospheric response to 228 isolated, rapid-onset auroral substorms (as defined from the auroral electrojet index AE was found from enhancements of the virtual (minimum height of the F-region (∆h$^prime$F in the declining phase of a solar cycle (1980–85. The responses, found for three longitudinal sectors at the equator: Africa (Ouagadougou and Dakar, Asia (Manila and America (Huancayo, were compared with the response close to the auroral source region at Yakutsk (northern Siberia. The auroral substorm onsets were centered at 17 and 15 UT at sunspot maximum (1980–82 and minimum (1983–85, preceding by 3–5 h the period of post-sunset height rise in the African sector whereas other sectors were in the early afternoon (Huancayo and morning (Manila. The African response, particularly at Ouagadougou, was distinctly different from other sectors. In the sunspot maximum years (1980–81 the auroral surges were followed after about 3 h by a sharp depression (∆h$^prime$F<0 in the post-sunset height rise, with a period of little or no response (∆h$^prime$F=0 in 1982. A response polarity reversal (∆h$^prime$F>0 was noted in this sector for sunspot minimum (1983–85 when large h$^prime$F enhancements were observed at the sunset region. The responses in the Asian and American sector were positive except for a case in Huancayo when response was negative, following an auroral surge before the sunset at this station. It appears that the aurorally generated large-scale travelling ionospheric disturbances (LSTIDs, which first cause positive height enhancements in a sub-auroral location (Yakutsk, subsequently affect the unstable post-sunset ionosphere in the equatorial Africa.

  13. Separation of spatial and temporal structure of auroral particle precipitation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudouridis, A.; Spence, H.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of the dominant temporal and spatial scales of auroral features is instrumental in understanding the various mechanisms responsible for auroral particle precipitation. Single spacecraft data suffer from temporal/spatial ambiguity. In an effort to separate the temporal and spatial variations of the aurora, we use electron and ion precipitation data from two co-orbiting satellites, F6 and F8 of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP). The two spacecraft have almost identical polar orbits with a small difference in period. As a result the time difference between the two measurements varies with time. We use two statistical tools in order to determine the most probable lifetimes and spatial dimensions of the prevalent auroral features, Cross Correlation Analysis (CCA) and Cross Spectral Analysis (CSA). The CCA is applied to the magnetic latitude series of electron and ion, integral number and energy fluxes measured by the two DMSP spacecraft. As one spacecraft overtakes the other, the variable time lag between the two measurements results in different cross correlation of the two series. We explore the dependence of this variation on the time lag between the satellites. We find that the electron precipitation exhibits a decreasing correlation between the two spacecraft with increasing time lag, whereas there is only a small similar effect for the ion precipitation data. For the CSA we compute the so-called coherence function as a function of frequency (or inverse wavelength), and hence size of the auroral features. The coherence function is a measure of the stability of auroral features of different sizes. We investigate its variation as a function of the time separation between the two DMSP spacecraft measurements. We show that the coherence function of both electrons and ions remains high for up to 1.5 min spacecraft separations for all features larger than about 100 km in width. For smaller features the coherence is lower even for time lags of

  14. Map of natural gamma radiation in Spain: radiometric characterization of different types of surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gamma radioactivity flowing from ground and rocks is due to the presence in these of uranium, thorium and potassium-40. The method of radiometric characterization depends on the purpose of the undertaking. Radiometric characterization can be realized on big surfaces (tens or hundreds of square kilometres studied on a national scale), medium size surfaces (50 to 1000 square kilometres, for example, in epidemiological or biological studies in areas with a determined radiometric background) small surfaces of less than 50 square kilometres (industrial sites, pre-operational studies, etc.). This article considers aspects of radiometric characterization on surfaces of interest and describes the contribution of the MARNA (Natural Provisional Radiation Map of Spain) Project selection and radiometric characterization

  15. High-power ELF radiation generated by modulated HF heating of the ionosphere can cause Earthquakes, Cyclones and localized heating

    OpenAIRE

    De Aquino, Fran

    2011-01-01

    The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) is currently the most important facility used to generate extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic radiation in the ionosphere. In order to produce this ELF radiation the HAARP transmitter radiates a strong beam of high-frequency (HF) waves modulated at ELF. This HF heating modulates the electrons' temperature in the D region ionosphere and leads to modulated conductivity and a time-varying current which then radiates at the modu...

  16. Global Auroral Energy Deposition during Substorm Onset Compared with Local Time and Solar Wind IMF Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, J. F.; Brittnacher, M.; Fillingim, M. O.; Germany, G. A.; Parks, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    The global images made by the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) aboard the IASTP/Polar Satellite are used to derive the global auroral energy deposited in the ionosphere resulting from electron precipitation. During a substorm onset, the energy deposited and its location in local time are compared to the solar wind IMF conditions. Previously, insitu measurements of low orbiting satellites have made precipitating particle measurements along the spacecraft track and global images of the auroral zone, without the ability to quantify energy parameters, have been available. However, usage of the high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution of consecutive UVI images enables quantitative measurement of the energy deposited in the ionosphere not previously available on a global scale. Data over an extended period beginning in January 1997 will be presented.

  17. Mode-coupling and nonlinear Landau damping effects in auroral Farley-Buneman turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Hamza, Abdelaziz M

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental problem of Farley-Buneman turbulence in the auroral $E$-region has been discussed and debated extensively in the past two decades. In the present paper we intend to clarify the different steps that the auroral $E$-region plasma has to undergo before reaching a steady state. The mode-coupling calculation, for Farley-Buneman turbulence, is developed in order to place it in perspective and to estimate its magnitude relative to the anomalous effects which arise through the nonlinear wave-particle interaction. This nonlinear effect, known as nonlinear ``Landau damping'' is due to the coupling of waves which produces other waves which in turn lose energy to the bulk of the particles by Landau damping. This leads to a decay of the wave energy and consequently a heating of the plasma. An equation governing the evolution of the field spectrum is derived and a physical interpration for each of its terms is provided.

  18. Auroral ion beams and ion acoustic wave generation by fan instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satellite observations indicate that efficient energy transport among various plasma particles and between plasma waves and plasma particles is taking place in auroral ion beam regions. These observations show that two characteristic wave types are associated with the auroral ion beam regions: electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron waves with frequencies above hydrogen gyrofrequency, and low frequency waves with frequencies below hydrogen gyrofrequency. We speculate that the low frequency waves can be ion acoustic waves generated through the fan instability. The presence of a cold background ion component is necessary for the onset of this instability. A cold ion component has been directly observed and has been indirectly suggested from observations of solitary wave structures. The wave-particle interaction during the development of the fan instability results in an efficient ion beam heating in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The fan instability development and the ion beam heating is demonstrated in a numerical particle simulation. 23 refs, 16 figs

  19. The far-ultraviolet main auroral emission at Jupiter. Pt. 1. Dawn-dusk brightness asymmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main auroral emission at Jupiter generally appears as a quasi-closed curtain centered around the magnetic pole. This auroral feature, which accounts for approximately half of the total power emitted by the aurorae in the ultraviolet range, is related to corotation enforcement currents in the middle magnetosphere. Early models for these currents assumed axisymmetry, but significant local time variability is obvious on any image of the Jovian aurorae. Here we use far-UV images from the Hubble Space Telescope to further characterize these variations on a statistical basis. We show that the dusk side sector is ∝ 3 times brighter than the dawn side in the southern hemisphere and ∝ 1:1 brighter in the northern hemisphere, where the magnetic anomaly complicates the interpretation of the measurements.We suggest that such an asymmetry between the dawn and the dusk sectors could be the result of a partial ring current in the nightside magnetosphere.

  20. Coordinated rocket and satellite measurements of an auroral event. II - The rocket observations and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, W. E.; Rees, M. H.; Stewart, A. I.

    1979-01-01

    A rocket-borne payload launched into an aurora and a simultaneous overpass of the Atmosphere Explorer C satellite yielded measurements of auroral optical emission rates, thermal ion and electron densities, and low-energy electron fluxes. Model calculations of the thermospheric manifestation of the aurora were performed through use of rocket-determined auroral ionization rates and satellite-determined neutral gas densities. Measured oxygen densities provided a means of assessing the quenching rate of an excited state of N2. Energy transfer from this excited state appears to be the major source of 5577-A emission. Optical emission at 6300 A cannot be explained either by electron impact on atomic oxygen or by dissociative recombination of O2(+).

  1. Unusual rainbow and white rainbow: A new auroral candidate in oriental historical sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Hisashi; Isobe, Hiroaki; Davis Kawamura, Akito; Tamazawa, Harufumi; Miyahara, Hiroko; Kataoka, Ryuho

    2016-06-01

    Solar activity has been recorded as auroras or sunspots in various historical sources. These records are of great importance for investigating both long-term solar activities and extremely intense solar flares. According to previous studies, they were recorded as "vapor," "cloud," or "light," especially in oriental historical sources; however, this terminology has not been discussed adequately, and remains still quite vague. In this paper, we suggest the possibility of using "unusual rainbow" and "white rainbow" as candidates of historical auroras in oriental historical sources, and examine if this is probable. This discovery will help us to make more comprehensive historical auroral catalogues, and require us to add these terms to auroral candidates in oriental historical sources.

  2. "Unusual Rainbow and White Rainbow" A new auroral candidate in oriental historical sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hayakawa, Hisashi; Kawamura, Akito Davis; Tamazawa, Harufumi; Miyahara, Hiroko; Kataoka, Ryuho

    2016-01-01

    Solar activity has been recorded as auroras or sunspots in various historical sources. These records are of much importance for investigating both long-term solar activities and extremely intense solar flares. In previous studies, they were recorded as "vapor," "cloud," or "light," especially in oriental historical sources; however, the terminology was not discussed adequately and is still quite vague. In this paper, we suggest the possibility of "unusual rainbow" and "white rainbow" as candidates of historical auroras in oriental historical sources and examine if it is probable. This discovery will help us to make more comprehensive historical auroral catalogues and require us to add these terms to auroral candidates in oriental historical sources.

  3. Ion distribution effects of turbulence on a kinetic auroral arc model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwall, J. M.; Chiu, Y. T.

    1982-03-01

    An inverted-V auroral arc structure plasma-kinetic model is extended to phenomenologically include the effects of electrostatic turbulence, with k-parallel/k-perpendicular being much less than unity. It is shown that, unless plasma sheet ions are very much more energetic than the electrons, anomalous resistivity is not a large contributor to parallel electrostatic potential drops, since the support of the observed potential drop requires a greater dissipation of energy than can be provided by the plasma sheet. Wave turbulence can, however, be present, with the ion cyclotron turbulence levels suggested by the ion resonance broadening saturation mechanism of Dum and Dupree (1970) being comparable to those observed on auroral field lines. The diffusion coefficient and net growth rate are much smaller than estimates based solely on local plasma properties.

  4. Cluster observations and theoretical identification of broadband waves in the auroral region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Backrud-Ivgren

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Broadband waves are common on auroral field lines. We use two different methods to study the polarization of the waves at 10 to 180 Hz observed by the Cluster spacecraft at altitudes of about 4 Earth radii in the nightside auroral region. Observations of electric and magnetic wave fields, together with electron and ion data, are used as input to the methods. We find that much of the wave emissions are consistent with linear waves in homogeneous plasma. Observed waves with a large electric field perpendicular to the geomagnetic field are more common (electrostatic ion cyclotron waves, while ion acoustic waves with a large parallel electric field appear in smaller regions without suprathermal (tens of eV plasma. The regions void of suprathermal plasma are interpreted as parallel potential drops of a few hundred volts.

  5. The far-ultraviolet main auroral emission at Jupiter. Pt. 1. Dawn-dusk brightness asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfond, B.; Gustin, J.; Gerard, J.C.; Grodent, D.; Radioti, A. [Liege Univ. (Belgium). Lab. de Physique Atmospherique et Planetaire; Palmaerts, B. [Liege Univ. (Belgium). Lab. de Physique Atmospherique et Planetaire; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Goettingen (Germany); Badman, S.V. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Khurana, K.K. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tao, C. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Toulouse (France)

    2015-07-01

    The main auroral emission at Jupiter generally appears as a quasi-closed curtain centered around the magnetic pole. This auroral feature, which accounts for approximately half of the total power emitted by the aurorae in the ultraviolet range, is related to corotation enforcement currents in the middle magnetosphere. Early models for these currents assumed axisymmetry, but significant local time variability is obvious on any image of the Jovian aurorae. Here we use far-UV images from the Hubble Space Telescope to further characterize these variations on a statistical basis. We show that the dusk side sector is ∝ 3 times brighter than the dawn side in the southern hemisphere and ∝ 1:1 brighter in the northern hemisphere, where the magnetic anomaly complicates the interpretation of the measurements.We suggest that such an asymmetry between the dawn and the dusk sectors could be the result of a partial ring current in the nightside magnetosphere.

  6. Aspect angle dependence of backscatter intensity of 1-m auroral plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The backscatter intensities of primary and secondary 1-m unstable plasma waves in the auroral E region have been measured as a function of magnetic aspect angle (α) for electric field values between 25 and 30 mV/m. The variation of the absorption A, measured in decibels, is of the form A = -IaCo cos2 α/(1 + Co cos2 α). The best fits to the observed attenuation yield parameter values of (Ia, Co) = (49.6, 530) and (48.8, 900) for primary and secondary waves, respectively. The backscatter intensity from primary waves has the same aspect angle dependence as the mean Doppler velocity aspect angle-dependence observed in previous auroral radar data sets (Nielsen, 1986). The observations suggest that the radar backscatter cross section of the primary waves maximizes a few kilometers higher in altitude than that of the secondary waves

  7. OVATION Prime-2013: Extension of auroral precipitation model to higher disturbance levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, P. T.; Liou, K.; Zhang, Y.; Sotirelis, T.; Paxton, L. J.; Mitchell, E. J.

    2014-06-01

    OVATION Prime (OP) is an auroral precipitation model parameterized by solar wind driving. Distinguishing features of the model include an optimized solar wind-magnetosphere coupling function (dΦMP/dt) which predicts auroral power significantly better than Kp or other traditional parameters, the separation of aurora into categories (diffuse aurora, monoenergetic, broadband, and ion), the inclusion of seasonal variations, and separate parameter fits for each magnetic latitude (MLAT) × magnetic local time (MLT) bin, thus permitting each type of aurora and each location to have differing responses to season and solar wind input—as indeed they do. We here introduce OVATION Prime-2013, an upgrade to the 2010 version currently widely available. The most notable advantage of OP-2013 is that it uses UV images from the GUVI instrument on the satellite TIMED for high disturbance levels (dΦMP/dt > 1.2 MWb/s which roughly corresponds to Kp = 5+ or 6-). The range of validity is approximately 0 power from Polar UVI. Over the common range of validity of OP-2010 and OP-2013, the two models predict auroral power essentially identically, primarily because hemispheric power calculations were done in a way to minimize the impact of OP-2010s noise. To quantitatively demonstrate the improvement at high disturbance levels would require multiple very large substorms, which are rare, and insufficiently present in the limited data set of Polar UVI hemispheric power values. Nonetheless, although OP-2010 breaks down in a variety of ways above Kp = 5+ or 6-, OP-2013 continues to show the auroral oval advancing equatorward, at least to 55° MLAT or a bit less, and OP-2013 does not develop spurious large noise patches. We will also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of other precipitation models more generally, as no one model fits best all possible uses.

  8. Investigating the location and strength of the auroral electrojets using Swarm

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Ashley; Whaler, Kathy; Beggan, Ciaran; MacMillan, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The auroral electrojets are a key space weather phenomenon. They are formed by horizontal Hall currents that flow within the ionospheric polar regions at an altitude of around 115 km. They form ovals around the magnetic poles but their latitudinal position, width, and strength are highly variable. These are governed by geomagnetic activity and solar wind conditions, along with a global ordering by the main magnetic field. Typically, greater geomagnetic activity will cause the electrojets to i...

  9. Storm time dynamics of auroral electrojets: CHAMP observation and the Space Weather Modeling Framework comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate variations of the location and intensity of auroral currents during two magnetic storm periods based on magnetic field measurements from CHAMP separately for both hemispheres, as well as for the dayside and nightside. The corresponding auroral electrojet current densities are on average enhanced by about a factor of 7 compared to the quiet time current strengths. The nightside westward current densities are on average 1.8 (2.2 times larger than the dayside eastward current densities in the Northern (Southern Hemisphere. Both eastward and westward currents are present during the storm periods with the most intense electrojets appearing during the main phase of the storm, before the ring current maximizes in strength. The eastward and westward electrojet centers can expand to 55° MLat during intense storms, as is observed on 31 March 2001 with Dst=−387 nT. The equatorward shift of auroral currents on the dayside is closely controlled by the southward IMF, while the latitudinal variations on the nightside are better described by the variations of the Dst index. However, the equatorward and poleward motion of the nightside auroral currents occur earlier than the Dst variations. The Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF can capture the general dynamics of the storm time current variations. Both the model and the actual data show that the currents tend to saturate when the merging electric field is larger than 10 mV/m. However, the exact prediction of the temporal development of the currents is still not satisfactory.

  10. Fast Auroral Snapshot Mission Unique Electronics Complete Spacecraft Electronics Contained in a Single Enclosure

    OpenAIRE

    Dougherty, Lamar; Gruner, Timothy; Wilmot, Jonathan; Chiville, Michael

    1995-01-01

    The Fast Auroral Snapshot (FAST) Mission Unique Electronics (MUE), housed in a single container, controls all major spacecraft functions. The functions include, Command and Data Handling (C&DH), Attitude Control and Stabilization (ACS), battery charge control and power distribution which comprise the Power System Electronics (PSE), thermal sensing and control, pyrotechnic device firing, spacecraft health and safety functions, Instrument Data Processing Unit (IDPU) interface and Small Launch V...

  11. Cassini UVIS Saturn Auroral Images from the 2013 HST/Cassini Campaign

    OpenAIRE

    Pryor, Wayne; Jouchoux, Alain; Esposito, Larry; Crary, Franck; Radioti, Aikaterini; Grodent, Denis; Gustin, Jacques; Gérard, Jean-Claude; Kurth, William; Mitchell, Donald; Nichols, Jonathan; Badman, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    In 2013 coordinated observations of Saturn by the Cassini spacecraft and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were obtained. During these observations the Cassini spacecraft provided a high-latitude view of Saturn's auroras. Intense auroras were observed by the Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) from close range (about 5 Saturn radii away). A 6-frame UVIS movie has been constructed from some of the observations from May 20- 21, 2013 showing the evolution of two bright auroral features. We report...

  12. Nonlinear wave structures in collisional plasma of auroral E-region ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Volosevich

    Full Text Available Studies of the auroral plasma with small-scale inhomogenieties producing the VHF-radar reflections (radar aurora when observed in conditions of the saturated Farley-Buneman instability within the auroral E region, show strong nonlinear interactions and density fluctuations of 5–15%. Such nonlinearity and high fluctation amplitudes are inconsistent with the limitations of the weak turbulence theory, and thus a theory for arbitrary amplitudes is needed. To this end, a nonlinear theory is described for electrostatic MHD moving plasma structures of arbitrary amplitude for conditions throughout the altitude range of the collisional auroral E region. The equations are derived, from electron and ion motion self-consistent with the electric field, for the general case of the one-dimensional problem. They take into account nonlinearity, electron and ion inertia, diffusion, deviation from quasi-neutrality, and dynamical ion viscosity. The importance of the ion viscosity for dispersion is stressed, while deviation from the quasi-neutrality can be important only at rather low plasma densities, not typical for the auroral E region. In a small amplitude limit these equations have classical nonlinear solutions of the type of "electrostatic shock wave" or of knoidal waves. In a particular case these knoidal waves degrade to a dissipative soliton. A two-dimensional case of a quasi-neutral plasma is considered in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field by way of the Poisson brackets, but neglecting the nonlinearity and ion inertia. It is shown that in these conditions an effective saturation can be achieved at the stationary turbulence level of order of 10%.

  13. Rocket observation of energetic electrons in the low-altitude auroral ionosphere during the DELTA campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, K.; Asamura, K.; Takashima, T.; Saito, Y.; Mukai, T.

    2006-09-01

    This paper reports on properties of energetic electrons observed by the Auroral Particle Detector (APD) on board the sounding rocket S-310-35, which was launched from And/0ya Rocket Range, Norway, at 0033:00 UT on 13 December 2004 during the DELTA campaign. The APD was designed to measure energy spectra of energetic electrons in the range of 3.5 to 65 keV every 10 ms using avalanche photodiodes. The measurement was done at altitudes of 90-140 km (apogee height of the rocket flight), which corresponded to the collisional interaction region of precipitating electrons with the atmospheric constituents. The overall profile of energetic electron precipitations was consistent with auroral images taken from the ground. The downward fluxes almost always exceeded those of upward electrons, and the ratio of downward to upward fluxes increased with energy and also with altitude. This is reasonably understood in terms of the effect of collisions between the energetic electrons and the atmospheric constituents. An interesting feature in energy spectra of precipitating electrons is the existence of non-thermal electrons at higher energies, regardless of inside or outside of auroral arcs. In order to predict the incident downward spectra at the top of the atmosphere, we have applied an analytic method of Luhmann (1976) to evaluate the collisional effect on the electron spectra. As a result, most of the observed energy spectra of precipitating electrons are well expressed by kappa distributions with the thermal energy of a few hundreds of eV and kappa of 5-8, while the spectrum inside a strong arc is better fitted by the sum of a Maxwellian distribution on the lower energy side and a power law at higher energies. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first direct and reliable measurement of energy spectra of electrons in the 10-keV energy range in the auroral ionosphere.

  14. Composite imaging of convective flows and auroral forms during a substorm cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeter, J. L.; Butler, T.; Zettergren, M. D.; Nicolls, M. J.; Heinselman, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    Measurements obtained with the electronically steerable Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) and a collocated all-sky camera have been used to construct composite images of ionospheric convective flows and auroral forms associated with an isolated substorm on 26 March 2008. The radar was configured to cycle through a 5x5 grid of beam positions. A statistical inversion of line-of-sight velocities was used to construct images of the overlying flow field at 30-km spatial resolution and 1-min time resolution over a 100x100-km field. The flow fields were co-registered with all-sky images recorded at 20-s cadence. Analysis of the composite images has revealed several interesting contrasts between growth-, expansion-, and recover-phase morphology. These include, (1) anti-correlation between ion velocity (electric field) and luminosity (plasma density, hence, conductance) in space and time during growth- and expansion-phases; identical velocities inside and outside the aurora during recovery phase, (2) large tangential velocity directed along auroral boundaries during all phases (consistent with electric field directed into the aurora), irrespective of the orientation of the arc boundary, and (3) large relative drift (~2 km/s) between aurora forms and convective flows during the recovery phase; little or no proper motion during growth phase. The results are interpreted with respect to electrodynamic models of auroral M-I coupling. Composite image showing convective flows (arrows), ion temperature at 200 km (contours), and auroral forms at onset of a pseudo-breakup event.

  15. Thermospheric Control of the Auroral Source of O+Ions for the Magnetosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, Mike

    1984-01-01

    Linear theory, model ion-density profiles and MSIS neutral thermospheric predictions are used to investigate the stability of the auroral, topside ionosphere to oxygen cyclotron waves: variations of the critical height, above which the plasma is unstable, with field-aligned current, thermal ion density and exospheric temperature are considered. In addition, probabilities are assessed that interactions with neutral atomic gases prevent O+ ions from escaping into the magnetosphere after they ha...

  16. Towards a synthesis of substorm electrodynamics: HF radar and auroral observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grocott

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available At 08:35 UT on 21 November 2004, the onset of an interval of substorm activity was captured in the southern hemisphere by the Far UltraViolet (FUV instrument on board the IMAGE spacecraft. This was accompanied by the onset of Pi2 activity and subsequent magnetic bays, evident in ground magnetic data from both hemispheres. Further intensifications were then observed in both the auroral and ground magnetic data over the following ~3 h. During this interval the fields-of-view of the two southern hemisphere Tasman International Geospace Enviroment Radars (TIGER moved through the evening sector towards midnight. Whilst initially low, the amount of backscatter from TIGER increased considerably during the early stages of the expansion phase such that by ~09:20 UT an enhanced dusk flow cell was clearly evident. During the expansion phase the equatorward portion of this flow cell developed into a narrow high-speed flow channel, indicative of the auroral and sub-auroral flows identified in previous studies (e.g. Freeman et al., 1992; Parkinson et al., 2003. At the same time, higher latitude transient flow features were observed and as the interval progressed the flow reversal region and Harang discontinuity became very well defined. Overall, this study has enabled the spatial and temporal development of many different elements of the substorm process to be resolved and placed within a simple conceptual framework of magnetospheric convection. Specifically, the detailed observations of ionospheric flows have illustrated the complex interplay between substorm electric fields and associated auroral dynamics. They have helped define the distinct nature of different substorm current systems such as the traditional substorm current wedge and the more equatorward currents associated with polarisation electric fields. Additionally, they have revealed a radar signature of nightside reconnection which provides the promise of quantifying nightside reconnection in a

  17. Towards a synthesis of substorm electrodynamics: HF radar and auroral observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grocott, A.; Lester, M.; Parkinson, M. L.; Yeoman, T. K.; Dyson, P. L.; Devlin, J. C.; Frey, H. U.

    2006-12-01

    At 08:35 UT on 21 November 2004, the onset of an interval of substorm activity was captured in the southern hemisphere by the Far UltraViolet (FUV) instrument on board the IMAGE spacecraft. This was accompanied by the onset of Pi2 activity and subsequent magnetic bays, evident in ground magnetic data from both hemispheres. Further intensifications were then observed in both the auroral and ground magnetic data over the following ~3 h. During this interval the fields-of-view of the two southern hemisphere Tasman International Geospace Enviroment Radars (TIGER) moved through the evening sector towards midnight. Whilst initially low, the amount of backscatter from TIGER increased considerably during the early stages of the expansion phase such that by ~09:20 UT an enhanced dusk flow cell was clearly evident. During the expansion phase the equatorward portion of this flow cell developed into a narrow high-speed flow channel, indicative of the auroral and sub-auroral flows identified in previous studies (e.g. Freeman et al., 1992; Parkinson et al., 2003). At the same time, higher latitude transient flow features were observed and as the interval progressed the flow reversal region and Harang discontinuity became very well defined. Overall, this study has enabled the spatial and temporal development of many different elements of the substorm process to be resolved and placed within a simple conceptual framework of magnetospheric convection. Specifically, the detailed observations of ionospheric flows have illustrated the complex interplay between substorm electric fields and associated auroral dynamics. They have helped define the distinct nature of different substorm current systems such as the traditional substorm current wedge and the more equatorward currents associated with polarisation electric fields. Additionally, they have revealed a radar signature of nightside reconnection which provides the promise of quantifying nightside reconnection in a way which has

  18. Inhomogeneous transverse electric fields and wave generation in the auroral region : a statistical study

    OpenAIRE

    Hamrin, Maria; ANDRE, M; Ganguli, G; Gavrishchaka, VV; Koepke, ME; Zintl, MW; Ivchenko, N.; Karlsson, T.; Clemmons, JH

    2001-01-01

    We use data from the Freja satellite to investigate the importance of localized transverse DC electric fields for the generation of broadband waves responsible for ion heating in the auroral region. Theoretical models indicate that shear in the plasma Row perpendicular to the geomagnetic field can generate waves in a broad range around the ion gyrofrequency for parallel currents significantly below the threshold of the current-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron instability. We compare in situ...

  19. Dayside convection and auroral morphology during an interval of northward interplanetary magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    Full Text Available We investigate the dayside auroral dynamics and ionospheric convection during an interval when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF had predominantly a positive Bz component (northward IMF but varying By. Polar UVI observations of the Northern Hemisphere auroral emission indicate the existence of a region of luminosity near local noon at latitudes poleward of the dayside auroral oval, which we interpret as the ionospheric footprint of a high-latitude reconnection site. The large field-of-view afforded by the satellite-borne imager allows an unprecedented determination of the dynamics of this region, which has not previously been possible with ground-based observations. The location of the emission in latitude and magnetic local time varies in response to changes in the orientation of the IMF; the cusp MLT and the IMF By component are especially well correlated, the emission being located in the pre- or post-noon sectors for By < 0 nT or By > 0 nT, respectively. Simultaneous ground-based observations of the ionospheric plasma drift are provided by the CUTLASS Finland HF coherent radar. For an interval of IMF By approx 0 nT, these convection flow measurements suggest the presence of a clockwise-rotating lobe cell contained within the pre-noon dayside polar cap, with a flow reversal closely co-located with the high-latitude luminosity region. This pattern is largely consistent with recent theoretical predictions of the convection flow during northward IMF. We believe that this represents the first direct measurement of the convection flow at the imaged location of the footprint of the high-latitude reconnection site.

    Key words: Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; magnetopause · cusp · and boundary layers; plasma convection

  20. Anomalous width variation of rarefactive ion acoustic solitary waves in the context of auroral plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Ghosh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of dynamic, large amplitude solitary waves in the auroral regions of space is well known. Since their velocities are of the order of the ion acoustic speed, they may well be considered as being generated from the nonlinear evolution of ion acoustic waves. However, they do not show the expected width-amplitude correlation for K-dV solitons. Recent POLAR observations have actually revealed that the low altitude rarefactive ion acoustic solitary waves are associated with an increase in the width with increasing amplitude. This indicates that a weakly nonlinear theory is not appropriate to describe the solitary structures in the auroral regions. In the present work, a fully nonlinear analysis based on Sagdeev pseudopotential technique has been adopted for both parallel and oblique propagation of rarefactive solitary waves in a two electron temperature multi-ion plasma. The large amplitude solutions have consistently shown an increase in the width with increasing amplitude. The width-amplitude variation profile of obliquely propagating rarefactive solitary waves in a magnetized plasma have been compared with the recent POLAR observations. The width-amplitude variation pattern is found to fit well with the analytical results. It indicates that a fully nonlinear theory of ion acoustic solitary waves may well explain the observed anomalous width variations of large amplitude structures in the auroral region.

  1. Boundary layer plasmas as a source for high-latitude, early afternoon, auroral arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simultaneous measurements of hot boundary layer plasma from PROGNOZ-7 and particle precipitation from the TIROS/NOAA satellite in nearly magnetically conjugate regions have been used to study the dynamo process responsible for the formation of high latitude, early afternoon, auroral arcs. Characteristic for the PROGNOZ-7 observations in the dayside boundary layer at high latitudes is the frequent occurrence of regions with injected magnetosheath plasma embedded in a 'halo' of antisunward flowing magnetosphere plasma. The injected magnetosheath plasma have several features which indicate that it also acts as a local source of EMF in the boundary layer. The process resembles that of a local MHD dynamo driven by the excess drift velocity of the injected magnetosheath plasma relative to the background magnetospheric plasma. The dynamo region is capable of driving fielc-aligned currents that couple to the ionosphere, where the upward current is associated with the high latitude auroral arcs. We demonstrate that the large-scale morphology as well as the detailed data intercomparison between PROGNOZ-7 and TIROS-N both agree well with a local injection of magnetosheath plasma into the dayside boundary layer as the main dynamo process powering the high-latitude, early afternoon auroral arcs. (Author)

  2. Statistics of 1-m wavelength plasma irregularities and convection in the auroral E region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data from the Sweden and Britain Radar Auroral Experiment have been utilized in a statistical study of auroral backscatter due to 1-m-scale plasma irregularities and of plasma convection in the auroral E layer. An examination of approximately 15,000 hours of backscatter amplitude data indicates that (1) the strongest backscatter is invariably associated with the main electrojets, between 1300-1900 UT and 2300-0300 UT, (2) only weak backscatter occurs in the vicinity of the convection reversals, particularly in the morning sector, and (3) the backscatter intensity can exhibit an aspect angle attenuation of between 0 and 10 dB/deg depending on the absolute intensity measured. Average convection patterns obtained from approximately 1400 hours of two-station measurements reveal a well-defined two-cell structure for all magnetic conditions. As magnetic activity increases the Harang discontinuity moves toward earlier local times, the flow speed increases and the morning convection cell expands relative to the evening cell. 32 references

  3. An empirical determination of the production efficiency for auroral 6300 AA emmission by energetic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auroral data from the Soft Particle Spectrometer and the Red Line Photometer on the ISIS-2 spacecraft have been selected to form an electron energy flux and optical auroral emission data base. The energy fluxes are stored as integrated fluxes over four energy bands, and the corresponding stored optical emission rates are corrected for airglow and for albedo. Because of the variety of electron energy spectra represented in the data base it was possible to perform a regression analysis that yielded the production efficiency for the production of emission for each of the four bands. While the results of this analysis are interesting to compare with theoretical predictions of 6300 AA excitation processes, these statistical results are not as precise as the comparisons of individual experiments where all parameters, such as the atmospheric composition and temperature profiles are measured. The significance of this approach is that it permits a multiparameter description of an electron energy spectrum, and its relationship to a specific optical emission, by purely empirical means. This is particularly useful in the interpretation of ISIS-2 data from the instruments which provided the results, but should find further application in optical-particle auroral studies. (author)

  4. GREECE -- Ground-to-Rocket Electrodynamics-Electrons Correlative Experiment: High resolution rocket and ground-based investigations of small-scale auroral structure and dynamics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Methodology The methodology is based on making comparisons between downward electron flux, DC electric fields, electromagnetic waves, and auroral morphology. The...

  5. Longitudinal (UT effect in the onset of auroral disturbances over two solar cycles as deduced from the AE-index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Hajkowicz

    Full Text Available Statistical study on the universal time variations in the mean hourly auroral electrojet index (AE-index has been undertaken for a 21 y period over two solar cycles (1957–1968 and 1978–1986. The analysis, applied to isolated auroral substorm onsets (inferred from rapid variations in the AE-index and to the bulk of the AE data, indicates that the maximum in auroral activity is largely confined to 09–18 UT, with a distinct minimum at 03–06 UT. The diurnal effect was clearly present throughout all seasons in the first cycle but was mainly limited to northern winter in the second cycle. Severe storms (AE > 1000 nT tended to occur between 9–18 UT irrespective of the seasons whereas all larger magnetic disturbances (AE > 500 nT tended to occur in this time interval mostly in winter. On the whole the diurnal trend was strong in winter, intermediate at equinox and weak in summer. The implication of this study is that Eastern Siberia, Japan and Australia are mostly at night, during the period of maximum auroral activity whereas Europe and Eastern America are then mostly at daytime. The minimum of auroral activity coincides with near-midnight conditions in Eastern America. It appears that the diurnal UT distribution in the AE-index reflects a diurnal change between interplanetary magnetic field orientation and the Earth's magnetic dipole inclination.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere · Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; storms and substorms.

  6. DEMETER observations of bursty MF emissions and their relation to ground-level auroral MF burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, M. C.; LaBelle, J.; Parrot, M.

    2014-12-01

    A survey of medium frequency (MF) electric field data from selected orbits of the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquakes (DEMETER) spacecraft reveals 68 examples of a new type of bursty MF emissions occurring at high latitudes associated with auroral phenomena. These resemble auroral MF burst, a natural radio emission observed at ground level near local substorm onsets. Similar to MF burst, the bursty MF waves observed by DEMETER have broadband, impulsive frequency structure covering 1.5-3.0 MHz, amplitudes of 50-100 μV/m, an overall occurrence rate of ˜0.76% with higher occurrence during active times, and strong correlation with auroral hiss. The magnetic local time distribution of the MF waves observed by DEMETER shows peak occurrence rate near 18 MLT, somewhat earlier than the equivalent peak in the occurrence rate of ground level MF burst, though propagation effects and differences in the latitudes sampled by the two techniques may explain this discrepancy. Analysis of solar wind and SuperMAG data suggests that while the bursty MF waves observed by DEMETER are associated with enhanced auroral activity, their coincidence with substorm onset may not be as exact as that of ground level MF burst. One conjunction occurs in which MF burst is observed at Churchill, Manitoba, within 8 min of MF emissions detected by DEMETER on field lines approximately 1000 km southeast of Churchill. These observations may plausibly be associated with the same auroral event detected by ground level magnetometers at several Canadian observatories. Although it is uncertain, the balance of the evidence suggests that the bursty MF waves observed with DEMETER are the same phenomenon as the ground level MF burst. Hence, theories of MF burst generation in the ionosphere, such as beam-generated Langmuir waves excited over a range of altitudes or strong Langmuir turbulence generating a range of frequencies within a narrow altitude range, need to be revisited to

  7. Measurements of auroral particles by means of sounding rockets of mother-daughter type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scientific objective of the S17 payloads was to study the ionosphere during auroral situations and especially with regards to the local fine structure and a possible separation of spatial and temporal variations of auroral phenomena. The intensities of 8 keV and 2 keV electrons have been measured from one sounding rocket launched into a breakup aurora of moderate activity and from another rocket launched into a very active substorm situation. Both the rockets were of mother-daughter type i.e. had two separated payloads. The general features in the data of different particle energies were very similar over the whole flight time of the rockets. Special events and gradients and well identifiable shapes in the particle intensities were studied to see if the intensity fluctuations obtained from two detectors in one payload or from detectors into separate payloads were time delayed. Such time delays in the particle flux intensities were obvious in both of the rocket measurements and most of these time shifts could be understood as caused by spatial variations in the particle precipitation. In parts of the rocket flights the particle intensity variations were true temporal changes. The time lags between 8 keV and 2 keV electron intensities detected in the same payload, which could be observed and were obtained by crosscorrelation analyses, were in the range less than 0.3 s and most of them less than 0.1 s. If the time differences are assumed to be caused by the velocity dispersion of the particles, the particle data reported here placed the modulation source at a distance of less than 10 000 km from the rocket position. Measurements at the S17-1 mother payload of the electric field have been compared with data of precipitating electrons and low-light-level-TV-recording of the auroral situation. An inverted-V precipitation event was observed and was associated with auroral arcs and with reversals of the measured electric field components implicating the possibility of

  8. Predictive ability of four auroral precipitation models as evaluated using Polar UVI global images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, P. T.; Sotirelis, T.; Liou, K.; Lee, A. R.; Wing, S.; Green, J.; Redmon, R.

    2010-12-01

    Auroral precipitation models have been valuable tools for several decades, but it has been difficult to estimate their objective accuracy. The use of global UV imagers, which make relatively instantaneous estimates of hemispheric auroral power, provides one approach forward. We present the first such validation and quantitative comparison of auroral precipitation models. Specifically, we correlated Polar UVI images with the predictions of four precipitation models. These are the Hardy Kp model, the Brautigam IMF-based model, the Evans nowcast model currently used at NOAA, and OVATION Prime, recently introduced by Newell and colleagues. Because calibration uncertainties exist for all particle detectors, and for imagers as well, we focus on correlation coefficients rather than the absolute magnitudes. To minimize dayglow, the nightside precipitating power (1800-0600 MLT) is considered and only for cases where that entire region is within the Polar UVI field of view. Also, only instances where each model has a prediction are considered (i.e., there must be IMF data, and there must be a NOAA satellite pass within the last 1 h). Altogether, 27,613 1 min ("instantaneous") images satisfied these criteria from 1996 to 1997. The four models investigated predict roughly half the variance in auroral power. From least to best at predicting instantaneous auroral power, the results are Brautigam IMF model (r = 0.68, r2 = 46%); Evans nowcast model (r = 0.70, r2 = 49%); Hardy Kp model (r = 0.72, r2 = 52%); and OVATION Prime IMF (r = 0.75, r2 = 56%). We also considered 1 h averages of UVI images. All four models improved, but the nowcast jumped from third to first: Brautigam IMF (r = 0.69, r2 = 48%); Hardy Kp (r = 0.74, r2 = 55%); OVATION Prime IMF (r = 0.76, r2 = 58%); Evans nowcast (r = 0.77, r2 = 59%). The nowcast approach benefits most from hourly averaging because at times more than one satellite pass is available. In principle, with enough satellites, the nowcast approach

  9. Auroral signatures of Bursty Bulk Flows from magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echim, M.; de Keyser, J. M.; Roth, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    The relationship between bursty bulk flows (BBFs) in the magnetospheric tail and the activation of auroral forms is well established from satellite and ground-based observations. Starting from a self-consistent description of BBFs based on a Vlasov equilibrium we provide a quantitative evaluation of the associated auroral effects by using a quasi-stationary magnetosphere-ionosphere (MI) coupling model. The self-consistent BBF model is based on a kinetic description of a 1-D plasma slab moving in background plasma and electromagnetic field. The model considers two exact constants of motion and one adiabatic invariant (the magnetic moment). It solves the coupled Vlasov-Maxwell system of equations in one spatial dimension (perpendicular to the BBFs plasma bulk velocity and the main magnetic field) assuming the BBF is a 1D structure elongated in the direction of the background magnetic field. The BBF model provides the self-consistent profile of Φm, the electric potential, showing the formation of convergent electric fields at the dawnward flank of the Earth-ward oriented BBFs. It has been shown that magnetospheric convergent electric fields drive field-aligned (FA) potential drops, FA currents and electron precipitation and acceleration. A stationary MI coupling model developed for discontinuity-like magnetospheric generators with convergent electric fields developed earlier is adapted to describe the coupling between the BBFs and the auroral ionosphere. The kernel of the MI coupling model is the condition of current continuity at the topside ionosphere, from which we compute the electric potential in the ionosphere for a given Φm. The MI coupling model is based on a Knight-type current-voltage relationship and a height-integrated conductivity model that depends on the energy deposited in the ionosphere by precipitating electrons. We show that the convergent electric field formed at the flanks of the BBF drive a FA potential drop and downward electron acceleration

  10. Magnetospheric Interaction of the Galilean Satellites with Jupiter: Auroral Emissions from the Satellites and their Magnetic Footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, J. T.

    2003-12-01

    Each of the Galilean satellites of Jupiter has an electrodynamic interaction with Jupiter's magnetic field, due to their motion with respect to the corotating field which sweeps past each satellite. With the exception of Callisto, these interactions can be observed via auroral emissions from the magnetic footprints of each satellite in Jupiter's atmosphere, and also via auroral emissions produced in the satellite's atmosphere. Remote sensing observations from the JIMO spacecraft could provide measurements of these auroral emissions with excellent spatial resolution and time coverage, strongly complementing in situ plasma and field measurements near each satellite. The measurement of the auroral emissions at both ends of the field lines threading each satellite would provide important constraints on the nature and strength of the interaction. Extended time series made possible by remote sensing would reveal the variations of these emissions with the location of each satellite in Jupiter's field and the corotating plasma. The time coverage would also provide a baseline for the interpretation of the in situ measurements, which measure one location at a time. The prospects for this remote sensing by JIMO will be explored based on information from the Hubble Space Telescope measurements of Jupiter's auroral emissions.

  11. Coordinated use of ground-based auroral and high-precision LEO magnetic and electric field measurements to investigate auroral electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, E.

    2008-12-01

    There are now dozens of sensitive All-Sky Imagers (ASIs) deployed in networks spanning latitudes from the subauroral zone into the polar cap and many hours of magnetic local time. These new networks are collecting data with unprecedented spatial coverage and temporal resolution and in numerous scientifically interesting wavelength ranges. As well, direct satellite overflights of ground-based images that were once rare occurrences are becoming increasingly commonplace. This talk will focus on the scientific opportunities afforded by the integrated use of ground-based auroral images and magnetic and electric field data from existing and planned LEO missions including CHAMP, Oersted, and Swarm. These opportunities include exploring the relationship between field-aligned current and Poynting flux and different types of aurora, as well as reducing spatio-temporal ambiguity in the in situ measurements.

  12. The Plausibility of the Stationary Inertial Alfven Wave in Explaining Important Morphological and Temporal Signatures of Auroral Arcs based on Laboratory Experiments and Auroral Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, S. H.; Koepke, M. E.; Gillies, D. M.; Knudsen, D. J.; Vincena, S. T.; Van Compernolle, B.; Donovan, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Stationary Inertial Alfven Wave (StIAW) [Knudsen J. Geophys. Res., 101, 10761 (1996)] is a non-fluctuating, non-travelling, spatially periodic pattern in electromagnetic field and fluid quantities that arises in the simultaneous presence of a magnetic-field-aligned current channel and cross-magnetic field plasma flow. Theory predicts [Finnegan et al., Nonlin. Proc. Geophys., 15, 957 (2008)] that the wave appears as an ion density perturbation that is static in the laboratory frame and that the wave electric field can accelerate electrons parallel to a background magnetic field. For experiments in the afterglow plasma in LAPD-U, results of which are reported on in this poster, the necessary conditions for the stationary wave are generated by a biased segmented electrode that creates a convective flow and a planar-mesh electrode that draws current parallel to the background magnetic field. An electrostatic probe and a retarding field energy analyzer measure fixed (in the laboratory frame) patterns in the ion density and electron energy. Spatial patterns of electron acceleration are reminiscent of the patterns present during the formation of discrete auroral arcs. Observation of long-lived discrete arcs indicates that some arcs require a generation mechanism that supports electron acceleration parallel to auroral field lines for tens of minutes. We present arc lifetime statistics to emphasize the paucity of physical models that explain these observations. *Support from NSF grant PHY-130-1896 and grants from the Canadian Space Agency is gratefully acknowledged. We also thank the THEMIS ASI Teams at U Calgary and UC Berkeley.

  13. Co-Investigator Proposal for Enstrophy - - Filamentation of Auroral Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintner, Paul M.

    2000-01-01

    Cornell University provided three instruments for the Enstrophy experiment: an electric field meter, a plasma wave receiver, and a magnetometer for measuring FAC. The electric field meter consisted of a 6 m Weitzmann boom system with analog signal processing and 12 bit ADC, which yielded one electric field component instantaneously and a two dimensional electric field every half spin. The plasma wave receiver used the same sensing system with the addition of pre-amplifiers in the spheres to sense plasma waves up to and including the electron Langmuir frequency. Signal processing employed a variety of continuous and snap shot techniques depending on the frequency range and band width. The science magnetometer provided by Cornell University was a Billingsly design fluxgate previously used on spacecraft missions but without radiation hardening. The magnetometer was mounted on a one meter, stiff aluminum "flop-down" boom. The Enstrophy payload was launched on february 11, 1999. Because of a design flaw in the event timers, the magnetometer boom was deployed before the payload despun. As a result the magnetometer separated mechanically from the boom but maintained electrical connection. This was confirmed by the calculation of the scalar magnetic field from all three vector components of the magnetic field. However, the individual vector values had no scientific value. The electric field and plasma wave instrumentation worked as designed. The data from these instruments was provided to the University of New Hampshire and to the Principal Investigator, as proposed.

  14. Parallel electric field in the auroral ionosphere: excitation of acoustic waves by Alfvén waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. Israelevich

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a new mechanism for the formation of a parallel electric field observed in the auroral ionosphere. For this purpose, the excitation of acoustic waves by propagating Alfvén waves was studied numerically. We find that the magnetic pressure perturbation due to finite amplitude Alfvén waves causes the perturbation of the plasma pressure that propagates in the form of acoustic waves, and gives rise to a parallel electric field. This mechanism explains the observations of the strong parallel electric field in the small-scale electromagnetic perturbations of the auroral ionosphere. For the cases when the parallel electric current in the small-scale auroral perturbations is so strong that the velocity of current carriers exceeds the threshold of the ion sound instability, the excited ion acoustic waves may account for the parallel electric fields as strong as tens of mV/m.

  15. The dependence of modeled OI 1356 and N2 Lyman Birge Hopfield auroral emissions on the neutral atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germany, G. A.; Torr, M. R.; Richards, P. G.; Torr, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    The sensitivity of selected auroral emissions to anticipated changes in the neutral atmosphere was investigated from the results of a series of sensitivity studies conducted using an auroral emission code developed by Richards and Torr (1990). In particular, the behavior of OI 1356 and two Lyman Birge Hopfield (LBH) bands and their ratios to each other with changing atmospheric composition was examined. It was found that, for anticipated average uncertainties in the neutral atmosphere (factor 2 at auroral altitudes), the resultant change in the modeled intensities is comparable to or less than the uncertainty in the neutral atmosphere. The variation in the I 1356/I 1838 ratio over the equivalent of a solar cycle is less than 50 percent, and the summer-to-winter changes are approximately a factor of 2.

  16. Observed relation between magnetic field aligned electric fields and downward electron energy fluxes in the vicinity of auroral forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using electron observations in the vicinity of, and over, auroral forms obtained from three rocket flights, we have found that the net downward electron energy flux generally varied as V2, where V is the magnetic-field-aligned electric potential difference inferred from the peak in the observed energy spectra of precipitating electrons. We show that this relation implies that V is proportional to the net downward number flux of electrons from the magnetosphere to the auroral ionosphere and thus that increases in V and increases in the net downward number flux of electrons are equally responsible for the enhanced electron energy deposition responsible for auroral forms. This also indicates a direct physical connection may exist between V and the net downward electron number flux

  17. Some characteristics of the parallel electric field acceleration of electrons over discrete auroral arcs as observed from two rocket flights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of energetic electrons from two rocket flights, both crossing discrete auroral arc structures, are examined with respect to low altitude parallel potential drops accelerating electrons of magnetospheric origin downward. In both flights the traversals of magnetic field lines connected to discrete auroral arc structures were associated with inverted V like electron spectral features with the highest peak energies closely related to the brightest auroral forms. The most equatorward inverted V structures, associated with the main arc, seems to mark a boundary south of which the magnetospheric electron population had a higher temperature than north of it. The magnitude and altitude of the potential drop can in principle be obtained by using a model for the acceleration applied to the observed energy and pitch angle distribution of the energetic electrons. A method to study the acceleration mechanism by means of some relations connected to integral flux measurements (eg energy flux and current density of energetic electrons) is suggested. (author)

  18. Large scale patterns of auroral ionospheric convection observed with the Chatanika radar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionospheric convection at auroral latitudes has been examined during a series of long duration experiments with the Chatanika, Alaska, incoherent scatter radar. These experiments have been carefully designed to obtain maximum latitudinal coverage (56 0Λ to 75 0Λ) while maintaining a temporal resolution of 30 min in order to resolve the effects of individual substorms on the convection pattern. Design criteria for the experiments are described together with presentation of observational data acquired during 400 hr of radar operations during various levels of geophysical disturbance. The data accentuate the repeatability of the gross features of the auroral convection and its basic conformity to the two0cell pattern predicted from the large-scale magnetospheric circulation. For moderate to active geomagnetic conditions uniform sunward convection with velocities of 800 to 1200 m/s spans the 62 0Λ to 72 0Λ latitude band at both dawn and dusk. In quieter circumstances the sunward convection continues in this region, but has smaller speeds and is centered at higher latitudes. Little evidence of a throat in the dayside convection pattern is seen at latitudes below 75 0Λ except in very disturbed circumstances. During several experiments coordinated operation of the Chatanika and Millstone Hill, Massachusetts, radars permitted the simultaneous observation of the auroral convection pattern at two different local times. substorms affect the convection at all local times and appears to generally enhance the rate of convection without seriously changing its direction. Near midnight, latitudinal displacements and expansions of the convection pattern during substorms may result in a local rotation or reversal of the direction of convection, while near dawn and dusk, convection velocities are enhanced and the region of sunward flow expands to lower latitudes

  19. Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM): Global Structure and Dynamics Driven by Auroral and Joule Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougher, S. W.; J. Il. Waite, Jr.; Majeed, T.

    2005-01-01

    A growing multispectral database plus recent Galileo descent measurements are being used to construct a self-consistent picture of the Jupiter thermosphere/ionosphere system. The proper characterization of Jupiter s upper atmosphere, embedded ionosphere, and auroral features requires the examination of underlying processes, including the feedbacks of energetics, neutral-ion dynamics, composition, and magnetospheric coupling. A fully 3-D Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM) has been developed and exercised to address global temperatures, three-component neutral winds, and neutral-ion species distributions. The domain of this JTGCM extends from 20-microbar (capturing hydrocarbon cooling) to 1.0 x 10(exp -4) nbar (including aurora/Joule heating processes). The resulting JTGCM has been fully spun-up and integrated for greater than or equal to40 Jupiter rotations. Results from three JTGCM cases incorporating moderate auroral heating, ion drag, and moderate to strong Joule heating processes are presented. The neutral horizontal winds at ionospheric heights vary from 0.5 km/s to 1.2 km/s, atomic hydrogen is transported equatorward, and auroral exospheric temperatures range from approx.1200-1300 K to above 3000 K, depending on the magnitude of Joule heating. The equatorial temperature profiles from the JTGCM are compared with the measured temperature structure from the Galileo AS1 data set. The best fit to the Galileo data implies that the major energy source for maintaining the equatorial temperatures is due to dynamical heating induced by the low-latitude convergence of the high-latitude-driven thermospheric circulation. Overall, the Jupiter thermosphere/ionosphere system is highly variable and is shown to be strongly dependent on magnetospheric coupling which regulates Joule heating.

  20. A Rocket-Base Study of Auroral Electrodynamics Within the Current Closure Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeppler, Stephen R.; Kletzing, Craig; Bounds, Scott R.; Sigsbee, Kristine M.; Gjerloev, Jesper W.; Anderson, Brian Jay; Korth, Haje; Lessard, Marc; Labelle, James W.; Dombrowski, Micah P.; Pfaff, Robert F.; Rowland, Douglas E.; Jones, Sarah; Heinselman, Craig J.; DudokdeWit, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    The Auroral Current and Electrodynamics Structure (ACES) mission consisted of two sounding rockets launched nearly simultaneously from Poker Flat Research Range, AK on January 29, 2009 into a dynamic multiple-arc aurora. The ACES rocket mission, in conjunction with the PFISR Radar, was designed to observe the three-dimensional current system of a stable auroral arc system. ACES utilized two well instrumented payloads flown along very similar magnetic field footprints, at various altitudes with small temporal separation between both payloads. ACES High, the higher altitude payload (apogee 360 km), took in-situ measurements of the plasma parameters above the current closure region to provide the input signature into the lower ionosphere. ACES Low, the low-altitude payload (apogee 130 km), took similar observations within the current closure region, where cross-field currents can flow. We present results comparing observations of the electric fields, magnetic fields, electron flux, and the electron temperature at similar magnetic footpoints between both payloads. We further present data from all-sky imagers and PFISR detailing the evolution of the auroral event as the payloads traversed regions connected by similar magnetic footpoints. Current measurements derived from the magnetometers on both payloads are further compared. We examine data from both PFISR and observations on the high-altitude payload which we interpreted as a signature of electron acceleration by means of Alfv n waves. We further examine all measurements to understand ionospheric conductivity and how energy is being deposited into the ionosphere through Joule heating. Data from ACES is compared against models of Joule heating to make inferences regarding the effect of collisions at various altitudes.

  1. Jupiter's auroral-related thermal infrared emission from IRTF-TEXES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, James; Orton, Glenn; Greathouse, Thomas; Fletcher, Leigh; Irwin, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    Auroral processes on Jupiter can be observed at a large range of wavelengths. Charged particles of the solar wind are deflected by Jupiter’s magnetic field and penetrate the atmosphere at high latitudes. This results in ion and/or electron precipitation, which produces emission at X-ray, UV, visible, near-infrared and even radio wavelengths. These observations indicate three distinct features of the aurora: 1) filament-like oval structures fixed at the magnetic poles (~80°W (System III) in the south, ~180°W in the north), 2) spatially-continuous but transient aurora that fill these oval regions and 3) discrete spots associated with the magnetic footprints of Io and other Galilean satellites. However, observations in the thermal infrared indicate the aurora also modify the neutral atmosphere. Enhanced emission of CH4 is observed coincident with the auroral ovals and indicates heightened stratospheric temperatures possibly as a result of joule heating by the influx of charged particles. Stronger emission is also observed of C2H2, C2H4, C2H6 and even C6H6 though previous work has struggled to determine whether this is a temperature or compositional effect. In order to quantify the auroral effects on the neutral atmosphere and to support the 2016 Juno mission (which has no thermal infrared instrument) we have performed a retrieval analysis of IRTF-TEXES (Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph, 5- to 25-μm) spectra obtained on Dec 11th 2014 near solar maximum. The instrument slit was scanned east-west across high latitudes in each hemisphere and Jupiter’s rotation was used to obtain ~360° longitudinal coverage. Spectra of H2 S(1), CH4, C2H2, C2H4 and C2H6 emission were measured at a resolving power of R = 85000, allowing a large vertical range in the atmosphere (100 - 0.001 mbar) to be sounded. Preliminary retrievals of the vertical temperature profile from H2 S(1) and CH4 measurements at 60°N, 180°W (on aurora), in comparison to 60°N, 60°W (quiescent

  2. Upwelling to Outflowing Oxygen Ions at Auroral Latitudes during Quiet Times: Exploiting a New Satellite Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmon, Robert J.

    The mechanisms by which thermal O+ escapes from the top of the ionosphere and into the magnetosphere are not fully understood even with 30 years of active research. This thesis introduces a new database, builds a simulation framework around a thermospheric model and exploits these tools to gain new insights into the study of O+ ion outflows. A dynamic auroral boundary identification system is developed using Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft observations at 850 km to build a database characterizing the oxygen source region. This database resolves the ambiguity of the expansion and contraction of the auroral zone. Mining this new dataset, new understanding is revealed. We describe the statistical trajectory of the cleft ion fountain return flows over the polar cap as a function of activity and the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field y-component. A substantial peak in upward moving O+ in the morning hours is discovered. Using published high altitude data we demonstrate that between 850 and 6000 km altitude, O+ is energized predominantly through transverse heating; and acceleration in this altitude region is relatively more important in the cusp than at midnight. We compare data with a thermospheric model to study the effects of solar irradiance, electron precipitation and neutral wind on the distribution of upward O+ at auroral latitudes. EUV irradiance is shown to play a dominant role in establishing a dawn-focused source population of upwelling O+ that is responsible for a pre-noon feature in escaping O+ fluxes. This feature has been corroborated by observations on platforms including the Dynamics Explorer 1 (DE-1), Polar, and Fast Auroral Snapshot SnapshoT (FAST) spacecraft. During quiet times our analysis shows that the neutral wind is more important than electron precipitation in establishing the dayside O+ upwelling distribution. Electron precipitation is found to play a relatively modest role in controlling dayside, and a

  3. Resolving the temporal-spatial ambiguity with the Auroral Spatial Structures Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Daniel

    The Auroral Spatial Structures Probe (ASSP) is a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sounding rocket mission to measure small scale temporal and spatial variations in the Earth's electric and magnetic fields during breakup aurora conditions. Multiple time-separated measurements of the same spatial location must be made in order to resolve the temporal-spatial ambiguity. ASSP achieves multipoint measurements by ejecting a constellation of six subpayloads from the main payload. This thesis develops a method for identifying the optimal ejection vector, propose an automated test plan for calibrating the seven payloads, and discuss several challenges relating to the interpretation of ASSP data.

  4. Wideband satellite phase coherent beacon observations at auroral and equatorial latitudes - A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a brief review of some of the principal results from the first two years of operation of the Wideband satellite which transmits phase-coherent signals from S-band to VHF. The auroral zone data show narrow regions of enhanced scintillation well equatorward of the discrete aurora. Such enhancements can be explained as a purely geometrical effect if the irregularities within the major precipitation regions have a sheet-like structure. Evidence of a localized irregularity source at the poleward boundary of the plasma trough is also found. Model computations are discussed and applied to the interpretation of equatorial data

  5. Search for auroral belt E-parallel fields with high-velocity barium ion injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, J. P.; Ledley, B. G.; Miller, M. L.; Marionni, P. A.; Pongratz, M. B.

    1989-01-01

    In April 1984, four high-velocity shaped-charge Ba(+) injections were conducted from two sounding rockets at 770-975 km over northern Alaska under conditions of active auroral and magnetic disturbance. Spatial ionization (brightness) profiles of high-velocity Ba(+) clouds from photometric scans following each release were found to be consistent with the 28-sec theoretical time constant for Ba photoionization determined by Carlsten (1975). These observations therefore revealed no evidence of anomalous fast ionization predicted by the Alfven critical velocity hypothesis.

  6. Observations of E region irregularities generated at auroral latitudes by a high-power radio wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuth, F. T.; Jost, R. J.; Noble, S. T.; Gordon, W. E.; Stubbe, P.

    1985-01-01

    The initial results of a series of observations made with the high-power HF heating facility near Tromso, Norway are reported. During these experiments, attention was focused on the production of artificial geomagnetic field-aligned irregularities (AFAIs) in the auroral E region by HF waves. A mobile 46.9-MHz radar was used to diagnose the formation of AFAIs having spatial scales of 3.2 across geomagnetic field lines. The dynamic characteristics of the AFAIs are discussed within the context of current theoretical work dealing with the natural production of AFAIs in the ionosphere.

  7. What high altitude observations tell us about the auroral acceleration: A Cluster/DMSP conjunction

    OpenAIRE

    A. Vaivads; ANDRE, M; S. Buchert; Eriksson, A.; Olsson, A; Wahlund, J. E.; Janhunen, P.; Marklund, G.; Kistler, L. M.; Mouikis, S.; Winningham, D.; Fazakerley, A.N.; Newell, P.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic conjugate observations by Cluster and DMSP F14 satellites are used to study the field lines of auroral arc. Cluster is well above the acceleration region and observes upward keV ion beams and bipolar electric structures. The integrated potential at Cluster altitudes shows a dip that is consistent with the keV electron acceleration energy at low altitude. The earthward Poynting flux at Cluster altitudes is comparable to the electron energy flux at low altitudes. Thus, for this event t...

  8. Ring current and auroral electrojets in connection with interplanetary medium parameters during magnetic storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Feldstein

    Full Text Available The relationship between the auroral electrojet indices (AE and the ring current magnetic field (DR was investigated by observations obtained during the magnetic storm on 1-3 April 1973. During the storm main phase the DR development is accompanied by a shift of the auroral electrojets toward the equator. As a result, the standard AE indices calculated on the basis of data from auroral observatories was substantially lower than the real values (AE'. To determine AE' during the course of a storm main phase data from subauroral magnetic observatories should be used. It is shown that the intensity of the indices (AE' which take into account the shift of the electrojets is increased substantially relative to the standard indices during the storm main phase. AE' values are closely correlated with geoeffective solar wind parameters. A high correlation was obtained between AE' and the energy flux into the ring current during the storm main phase. Analysis of magnetic field variations during intervals with intense southward IMF components demonstrates a decrease of the saturation effect of auroral electrojet currents if subauroral stations magnetic field variations are taken into account. This applies both to case studies and statistical data. The dynamics of the electrojets in connection with the development of the ring current and of magnetospheric substorms can be described by the presence (absence of saturation for minimum (maximum AE index values during a 1-h interval. The ring current magnetic field asymmetry (ASY was calculated as the difference between the maximum and minimum field values along a parallel of latitude at low latitudes. The ASY value is closely correlated with geoeffective solar wind parameters and simultaneously is a more sensitive indicator of IMF Bz variations than the symmetric ring current.

  9. Resonant generation of ion waves on auroral field lines by positive slopes in ion velocity space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simultaneous observations of wave spectra and particle velocity distributions obtained by the S3-3 satellite on auroral field lines, are studied. Emissions below the lower hybrid frequency occur just below multiples of the proton gyrofrequency. At higher frequencies the observed spectra show peaks just above such multiples. The ion and electron distributions are modeled, and numerical methods are used ot calculated the corresponding spatial wave growth rates. This theoretically obtained growth agrees rather well with the observed emissions. The major source of free energy is a positive slope perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field in the ion velocity distribution. (author)

  10. Identification of broad-band waves above the auroral acceleration region: Cluster observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Backrud

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate broad-band emissions at frequencies above the ion gyrofrequency on auroral field lines at geocentric distances of about 4.5 Earth radii. Observations by the Cluster satellites are used to study the wave characteristics and to determine the wave modes involved. All events include some bursts of broad-band emissions with a substantial component of the electric field parallel to the geomagnetic field. Studying the polarization of the emissions we find that linear waves in a homogeneous plasma can be used to theoretically describe the observations.

    The broad-band emissions include short bursts of ion acoustic waves, and longer periods of ion Bernstein and Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron (EIC waves. All waves occur during the same event within a few seconds, with EIC waves as the most common. Theoretically, there is no sharp limit between these wave modes and they can be described by the same dispersion surface. These emissions are closely associated with low-frequency Alfvén waves, indicating a possible generation mechanism.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; electric fields; plasma waves and instabilities

  11. Searching for Far-Ultraviolet Auroral/Dayglow Emission from HD209458b

    CERN Document Server

    France, Kevin; Yang, Hao; Linsky, Jeffrey L; Wolven, Brian C; Froning, Cynthia S; Green, James C; Osterman, Steven N

    2010-01-01

    We present recent observations from the HST-Cosmic Origins Spectrograph aimed at characterizing the auroral emission from the extrasolar planet HD209458b. We obtained medium-resolution (R~18-20,000) far-ultraviolet (1150-1700A) spectra at both the Phase 0.25 and Phase 0.75 quadrature positions as well as a stellar baseline measurement at secondary eclipse. This analysis includes a catalog of stellar emission lines and a star-subtracted spectrum of the planet. We present an emission model for planetary H2 emission, and compare this model to the planetary spectrum. No unambiguously identifiable atomic or molecular features are detected, and upper limits are presented for auroral/dayglow line strengths. An orbital velocity cross-correlation analysis finds a statistically significant (3.8 sigma) feature at +15 (+/- 20) km/s in the rest frame of the planet, at 1582 A. This feature is consistent with emission from H2 B-X (2-9) P(4) (lambda_{rest} = 1581.11 A), however the physical mechanism required to excite this ...

  12. Probing Io's putative global magma ocean through FUV auroral spot morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Lorenz

    2013-10-01

    Whether Io possesses a magma ocean or not is a central issue for understanding the most volcanically active body in our solar system and is a long standing question as well. Khurana et al., Science 2011, recently substantiated the existence of a highly conductive magma layer inside Io's interior based on Galileo magnetometer measurements and techniques similar to those used to probe the crusts of Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto for liquid water oceans. If a global magma ocean modifies Io's local magnetic field environment, it will also significantly alter the morphology of Io's UV aurora. The most prominent aurora features are two bright spots that rock around the equator roughly in correlation with the varying orientation of the tilted Jovian magnetic field. Magnetic induction in a magma ocean would strongly attenuate the rocking of these near-surface spots. Interestingly, in previous STIS FUV observations the measured spot locations disagree considerably from the locations theoretically predicted for the global magma ocean case, but are in reasonable agreement if there is no ocean. However, the temporal and orbital coverage of Io's rocking auroral spots for the STIS dataset is presently insufficient to conclusively exclude or further investigate the molten magma layer idea. We therefore propose two visits of five consecutive STIS orbits to trend the auroral spot feature locations over a full variation cycle of the Jovian magnetic field near western elongation. This investigation will decisively constrain the molten magma layer inside Io and tests the putative evidence for a global ocean by Khurana et al. {2011}.

  13. Magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling during periods of extended high auroral activity: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Liléo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Results are presented from a case study of a plasma boundary crossing by the Cluster spacecraft during an extended period of high auroral activity. The boundary between the magnetotail lobe region of the Southern Hemisphere and the plasma sheet boundary layer, was characterized by intense electric and magnetic field variations, structured upward accelerated ion beams, narrow-scale large field-aligned Poynting fluxes directed upward away from the ionosphere, and a relatively sharp plasma density gradient.

    The observations are shown to be consistent with the concept of a multi-layered boundary with temporal and/or spatial variations in the different layers. H+ and O+ ion beams are seen to be accelerated upwards both by means of a field-aligned electric field and by magnetic pumping caused by large-amplitude and low-frequency electric field fluctuations. The peak energy of the ion beams may here be used as a diagnostic tool for the temporal evolution of the spatial structures, since the temporal changes occur on a time-scale shorter than the times-of-flight of the detected ion species.

    The case study also shows the boundary region to be mainly characterized by a coupling of the detected potential structures to the low ionosphere during the extended period of high auroral activity, as indicated by the intense field-aligned Poynting fluxes directed upward away from the ionosphere.

  14. Dynamics of the auroral electrojets and their mapping to the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data of the EISCAT and IMAGE magnetic observatories chains in combination with data of three Russian observatories (St. Petersburg, Borok and Moscow) were used to determine the eastward and westward electrojet dynamics in the course of magnetic storms. During the storm main phase and maximum substorm intensity the eastward electrojet is located at latitudes lower than usual. During intervals between substorms the westward electrojet centre shifts equatorwards as Dst increases. At a substorm maximum the westward electrojet widens polewards. The spectrograms of precipitating electrons and ions of auroral energies obtained onboard the DMSP F8, F10 and F11 satellites allow to connect the regions of the electrojet location with characteristic plasma structures at ionospheric altitudes. The eastward electrojet in the evening sector is located in the region of diffuse electron precipitations. The electrojet centre coincides with the latitude of an energy flux maximum of auroral protons. In the course of substorms the westward electrojet at the nightside is located at latitudes of both diffuse and discrete electron precipitations. The electrojets and plasma region boundaries are mapped to the magnetosphere. The paraboloid model of the magnetosphere is used here. The influence of paraboloid model input parameters on the dayside cusp latitude, on the ionospheric boundaries between open and closed as well as dipole-like and tail-like field lines is considered. It is shown that tail currents influence magnetic field line configuration in the nightside magnetosphere stronger than the ring current

  15. In-situ observation of electron kappa distributions associated with discrete auroral arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Keiichi; Livadiotis, George; Samara, Marilia; Michell, Robert; Grubbs, Guy

    2016-04-01

    The Medium-energy Electron SPectrometer (MESP) sensor aboard a NASA sounding rocket was launched from Poker Flat Research Range on 3 March 2014 as a part of Ground-to-Rocket Electrodynamics-Electrons Correlative Experiment (GREECE) mission. GREECE targeted to discover convergent E-field structures at low altitude ionosphere to find their contribution to the rapid fluid-like structures of aurora, and MESP successfully measured the precipitating electrons from 2 to 200 keV within multiple discrete auroral arcs with the apogee of 350 km. MESP's unprecedented electron energy acceptance and high geometric factor made it possible to investigate precise populations of the suprathermal components measured in the inverted-V type electron energy distributions. The feature of these suprathermal electrons are explained by the kappa distribution functions with the parameters (densty, temperature, and kappa) consistent with the near-Earth tail plasma sheet, suggesting the source population of the auroral electrons. The kappa-values are different between each arc observed as a function of latitude, but are almost stable within one discrete arc. We suggest that this transition of kappa reflects the probagation history of source electrons through the plasma sheet by changing its state from non-equilibrium electron distributions to thermal ones.

  16. The far-ultraviolet main auroral emission at Jupiter. Pt. 2. Vertical emission profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfond, B.; Gustin, J.; Gerard, J.C.; Grodent, D.; Radioti, A. [Liege Univ. (Belgium). Lab. de Physique Atmospherique et Planetaire; Palmaerts, B. [Liege Univ. (Belgium). Lab. de Physique Atmospherique et Planetaire; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Goettingen (Germany); Badman, S.V. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Khurana, K.K. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tao, C. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Toulouse (France)

    2015-07-01

    The aurorae at Jupiter are made up of many different features associated with a variety of generation mechanisms. The main auroral emission, also known as the main oval, is the most prominent of them as it accounts for approximately half of the total power emitted by the aurorae in the ultraviolet range. The energy of the precipitating electrons is a crucial parameter to characterize the processes at play which give rise to these auroral emissions, and the altitude of the emissions directly depends on this energy. Here we make use of far-UV (FUV) images acquired with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope and spectra acquired with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph to measure the vertical profile of the main emissions. The altitude of the brightness peak as seen above the limb is ∝ 400 km, which is significantly higher than the 250 km measured in the post-dusk sector by Galileo in the visible domain. However, a detailed analysis of the effect of hydrocarbon absorption, including both simulations and FUV spectral observations, indicates that FUV apparent vertical profiles should be considered with caution, as these observations are not incompatible with an emission peak located at 250 km. The analysis also calls for spectral observations to be carried out with an optimized geometry in order to remove observational ambiguities.

  17. The far-ultraviolet main auroral emission at Jupiter. Pt. 2. Vertical emission profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aurorae at Jupiter are made up of many different features associated with a variety of generation mechanisms. The main auroral emission, also known as the main oval, is the most prominent of them as it accounts for approximately half of the total power emitted by the aurorae in the ultraviolet range. The energy of the precipitating electrons is a crucial parameter to characterize the processes at play which give rise to these auroral emissions, and the altitude of the emissions directly depends on this energy. Here we make use of far-UV (FUV) images acquired with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope and spectra acquired with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph to measure the vertical profile of the main emissions. The altitude of the brightness peak as seen above the limb is ∝ 400 km, which is significantly higher than the 250 km measured in the post-dusk sector by Galileo in the visible domain. However, a detailed analysis of the effect of hydrocarbon absorption, including both simulations and FUV spectral observations, indicates that FUV apparent vertical profiles should be considered with caution, as these observations are not incompatible with an emission peak located at 250 km. The analysis also calls for spectral observations to be carried out with an optimized geometry in order to remove observational ambiguities.

  18. Development and performance of a suprathermal electron spectrometer to study auroral precipitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Keiichi; Grubbs, Guy; Michell, Robert G.; Samara, Marilia; Stange, Jason L.; Trevino, John A.; Webster, James; Jahn, Jörg-Micha

    2016-05-01

    The design, development, and performance of Medium-energy Electron SPectrometer (MESP), dedicated to the in situ observation of suprathermal electrons in the auroral ionosphere, are summarized in this paper. MESP employs a permanent magnet filter with a light tight structure to select electrons with proper energies guided to the detectors. A combination of two avalanche photodiodes and a large area solid-state detector (SSD) provided 46 total energy bins (1 keV resolution for 3-20 keV range for APDs, and 7 keV resolution for >20 keV range for SSDs). Multi-channel ultra-low power application-specific integrated circuits are also verified for the flight operation to read-out and analyze the detector signals. MESP was launched from Poker Flat Research Range on 3 March 2014 as a part of ground-to-rocket electrodynamics-electrons correlative experiment (GREECE) mission. MESP successfully measured the precipitating electrons from 3 to 120 keV in 120-ms time resolution and characterized the features of suprathermal distributions associated with auroral arcs throughout the flight. The measured electrons were showing the inverted-V type spectra, consistent with the past measurements. In addition, investigations of the suprathermal electron population indicated the existence of the energetic non-thermal distribution corresponding to the brightest aurora.

  19. Coordinated data on auroral electrodynamics from ground based radar diagnostics and Aureol-3 satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coordinated ground-satellite measurements of VHF radar arcs, magnetic variations and all-sky auroral imagery were performed from Kola-peninsula and from Finland together with direct particle and field measurements from AUREOL-3 satellite. The detailed analysis of two satellite passes in the evening (midnight) MLT sector in the conditions of predominantly northward (westward) ionospheric electric field show that inverted V-associated electrodynamical pattern was the same in both events. Model calculations summarizing all the above ionosphere-satellite results within the limits of unified electrodynamical scheme show that a) meridional ionospheric (Hall+Pedersen) closing current direction is a decisive factor controlling the direction of currents in the meridional Birkeland current loop of the inverted V. A summarizing interpretative scheme is proposed of the hierarchy of meridional Birkeland current loops, larger one encircling single, or multiple, smaller ones: zone 2/zone 1 large-scale current loop, inverted V current loops, and auroral arc-associated current loops, all with the same direction of the ionospheric closing current, northward in the evening and southward in the morning

  20. Auroral and magnetic variations in the polar cusp and cleft. Signatures of magnetopause boundary layer dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By combining continous ground-based observations of polar cleft/cusp auroras and local magnetic variations with electromagnetic parameters obtained from satellites in polar orbit (low-altitude cleft/cusp) and in the magnetosheath/interplanetary space, different electrodynamic processes in the polar cleft/cusp have been investigated. One of the more controversial questions in this field is related to the observed shifts in latitude of cleft/cusp auroras and the relationships with the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation, local magnetic disturbances (DP2 and DPY modes) and magnetospheric substorms. A new approach which may contribute to clarifying these complicated relationships, simultaneous groundbased observations of the midday and evening-midnight sectors of the auroral oval, is illustrated. A related topic is the spatial relationship between the cleft/cusp auroras and the ionospheric convection currents. A characteristic feature of the polar cusp and cleft regions during negative IMF Bz is repeated occurrence of certain short-lived auroral structures moving in accordance with the local convection pattern. Satellite measurements of particle precipitation, magnetic field and ion drift components permit detailed investigations of the electrodynamics of these cusp/cleft structures. Information on electric field components, Birkeland currents, Poynting flux, height-integrated Pedersen conductivity and Joule heat dissipation rate has been derived. These observations are discussed in relation to existing models of temporal plasma injections from the magnetosheath

  1. Multiscale and cross entropy analysis of auroral and polar cap indices during geomagnetic storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Sumesh; Prince, P. R.

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve general monoscale information entropy methods like permutation and sample entropy in characterizing the irregularity of complex magnetospheric system, it is necessary to extend these entropy metrics to a multiscale paradigm. We propose novel multiscale and cross entropy method for the analysis of magnetospheric proxies such as auroral and polar cap indices during geomagnetic disturbance times. Such modified entropy metrics are certainly advantageous in classifying subsystems such as individual contributions of auroral electrojets and field aligned currents to high latitude magnetic perturbations during magnetic storm and polar substorm periods. We show that the multiscale entropy/cross entropy of geomagnetic indices vary with scale factor. These variations can be attributed to changes in multiscale dynamical complexity of non-equilibrium states present in the magnetospheric system. These types of features arise due to imbalance in injection and dissipation rates of energy with variations in magnetospheric response to solar wind. We also show that the multiscale entropy values of time series decrease during geomagnetic storm times which reveals an increase in temporal correlations as the system gradually shifts to a more orderly state. Such variations in entropy values can be interpreted as the signature of dynamical phase transitions which arise at the periods of geomagnetic storms and substorms that confirms several previously found results regarding emergence of cooperative dynamics, self-organization and non-Markovian nature of magnetosphere during disturbed periods.

  2. X-Ray Probes of Jupiter's Auroral Zones, Galilean Moons, and the Io Plasma Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.; Swartz, D. A.; Rehak, P.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Cooper, J. F.; Johnson, R. E.

    2005-01-01

    Remote observations from the Earth orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton Observatory have shown the the Jovian system is a rich and complex source of x-ray emission. The planet's auroral zones and its disk are powerful sources of x-ray emission, though with different origins. Chandra observations discovered x-ray emission from the Io plasma torus and from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from the moons is due to bombardment of their surfaces by highly energetic magnetospheric protons, and oxygen and sulfur ions, producing fluorescent x-ray emission lines from the elements in their surfaces against an intense background continuum. Although very faint when observed from Earth orbit, an imaging x-ray spectrometer in orbit around the icy Galilean moons would provide a detail mapping of the elemental composition in their surfaces. Here we review the results of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of the Jovian system and describe the characteristics of X-MIME, an imaging x-ray spectrometer undergoing study for possible application to future missions to Jupiter such as JIMO. X-MIME has the ultimate goal of providing detailed high-resolution maps of the elemental abundances of the surfaces of Jupiter's icy moons and Io, as well as detailed study of the x-ray mission from the Io plasma torus, Jupiter's auroral zones, and the planetary disk.

  3. Shape-Constrained Sparse and Low-Rank Decomposition for Auroral Substorm Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi; Gao, Xinbo; Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong; Han, Bing; Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    An auroral substorm is an important geophysical phenomenon that reflects the interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere. Detecting substorms is of practical significance in order to prevent disruption to communication and global positioning systems. However, existing detection methods can be inaccurate or require time-consuming manual analysis and are therefore impractical for large-scale data sets. In this paper, we propose an automatic auroral substorm detection method based on a shape-constrained sparse and low-rank decomposition (SCSLD) framework. Our method automatically detects real substorm onsets in large-scale aurora sequences, which overcomes the limitations of manual detection. To reduce noise interference inherent in current SLD methods, we introduce a shape constraint to force the noise to be assigned to the low-rank part (stationary background), thus ensuring the accuracy of the sparse part (moving object) and improving the performance. Experiments conducted on aurora sequences in solar cycle 23 (1996-2008) show that the proposed SCSLD method achieves good performance for motion analysis of aurora sequences. Moreover, the obtained results are highly consistent with manual analysis, suggesting that the proposed automatic method is useful and effective in practice. PMID:25826810

  4. Correlated low-frequency electric and magnetic noise along the auroral field lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Huff, R. L.; Menietti, J. D.; Burch, J. L.; Winningham, J. D.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    Dynamics Explorer 1 measurements of intense low-frequency electric and magnetic noise observed at low altitudes over the auroral zone are described. The intensity of both the electric and magnetic fields decreases rapidly with increasing frequency. Most of the energy is at frequencies below the O(+) cyclotron frequency, and some evidence is found for a cutoff or change in spectral slope near that frequency. The magnetic to electric field ratio decreases rapidly with increasing radial distance and also decreases with increasing frequency. The polarization of the electric field in a plane perpendicular to the earth's magnetic field is essentially random. The transverse electric and magnetic fields are closely correlated, with the average Poynting flux directed toward the earth. The total electromagnetic power flow associated with the noise is substantial. Two general models are discussed to interpret these observations, one based on static electric and magnetic fields imbedded in the ionosphere and the other based on Alfven waves propagating along the auroral field lines.

  5. Development and performance of a suprathermal electron spectrometer to study auroral precipitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Keiichi; Grubbs, Guy; Michell, Robert G; Samara, Marilia; Stange, Jason L; Trevino, John A; Webster, James; Jahn, Jörg-Micha

    2016-05-01

    The design, development, and performance of Medium-energy Electron SPectrometer (MESP), dedicated to the in situ observation of suprathermal electrons in the auroral ionosphere, are summarized in this paper. MESP employs a permanent magnet filter with a light tight structure to select electrons with proper energies guided to the detectors. A combination of two avalanche photodiodes and a large area solid-state detector (SSD) provided 46 total energy bins (1 keV resolution for 3-20 keV range for APDs, and 7 keV resolution for >20 keV range for SSDs). Multi-channel ultra-low power application-specific integrated circuits are also verified for the flight operation to read-out and analyze the detector signals. MESP was launched from Poker Flat Research Range on 3 March 2014 as a part of ground-to-rocket electrodynamics-electrons correlative experiment (GREECE) mission. MESP successfully measured the precipitating electrons from 3 to 120 keV in 120-ms time resolution and characterized the features of suprathermal distributions associated with auroral arcs throughout the flight. The measured electrons were showing the inverted-V type spectra, consistent with the past measurements. In addition, investigations of the suprathermal electron population indicated the existence of the energetic non-thermal distribution corresponding to the brightest aurora. PMID:27250414

  6. Low-energy ion precipitation structures associated with pulsating auroral patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jun; Donovan, E.; Nishimura, Y.; Yang, B.; Spanswick, E.; Asamura, K.; Sakanoi, T.; Evans, D.; Redmon, R.

    2015-07-01

    Pulsating auroras often appear in forms of geo-stable or slowly convecting "patches." These patches can maintain their rough shape and size over many sequences of luminosity pulsations, yet they slowly drift with ionospheric E × B convection. Because of these characteristics, there has long been a speculation that the pulsating auroral patch (PAP) is connected to flux tubes filled with enhanced cold plasma. In this study, we perform a survey on pulsating auroral events when the footprints of low-Earth-orbit satellites traversed the PAPs, with a focus on the low-energy particle signatures associated with the PAPs. As a result, we identified, in a majority (~2/3) of events, the existence of a low-energy ion precipitation structure that is collocated with the PAP, with core energies ranging from several tens of eV up to a few hundred eV. This result supports the hypothesis that a PAP connects to flux tubes filled with enhanced cold plasma. We further propose that the plasma outflows from the ionosphere are the origin of such cold plasma flux tubes. We suggest that the PAP is formed by a combination of high-energy electrons of a magnetospheric origin, the low-energy plasma structure of an ionospheric origin, and certain ELF/VLF waves that are intensified and modulated in interactions with both the hot and cold plasma populations.

  7. Auroral Current and Electrodynamics Structure (ACES) Observations of Ionospheric Feedback in the Alfven Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ian J.; Lessard, Marc; Lund, Eric J.; Bounds, Scott R.; Kletzing, Craig; Kaeppler, Stephen R.; Sigsbee, Kristine M.; Streltsov, Anatoly V.; Labelle, James W.; Dombrowski, Micah P.; Pfaff, Robert F.; Rowland, Doug; Jones, Sarah; Anderson, Brian Jay; Heinselman, Craig J.; Gjerloev, Jesper W.; Dudok de Wit, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    In 2009, the Auroral Current and Electrodynamics Structure (ACES) High and Low sounding rockets were launched from the Poker Flat Rocket Range (PFRR) in Alaska, with the science objective of gathering in-situ data to quantify current closure in a discrete auroral arc. As ACES High crossed through the return current of an arc (that was monitored using an all sky camera from the ground at Fort Yukon), its instruments recorded clear Alfv nic signatures both poleward and equatorward of the return current region, but not within the main region of the return current itself. These data provide an excellent opportunity to study ionospheric feedback and how it interacts with the Alfv n resonator. We compare the observations with predictions and new results from a model of ionospheric feedback in the ionospheric Alfv n resonator (IAR) and report the significance and impact of these new data for the Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling in the Alfv n Resonator (MICA) rocket mission to launch from PFRR this winter. MICA s primary science objectives specifically focus on better understanding the small-scale structure that the model predicts should exist within the return current region.

  8. EISCAT observations of plasma patches at sub-auroral cusp latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moen

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A sequence of 3 patches of high-density (1012 m−3 cold plasma on a horizontal scale-size of 300–700 km was observed near magnetic noon by the EISCAT VHF radar above Svalbard on 17 December 2001. The patches followed a trajectory towards the cusp inflow region. The combination of radar and all-sky observations demonstrates that the patches must have been segmented equatorward of the cusp/cleft auroral display, and hence their properties had not yet been influenced by cusp particle showers and electrodynamics on open flux tubes. The last patch in the sequence was intersected by radio tomography observations, and was found to be located adjacent to a broader region of the same high electron density further south. The patches occurred under moderately active conditions (Kp=3 and the total electron content (TEC of the high-density plasma was 45 TEC units. The train of patches appeared as a segmentation of the tongue of ionization. The sequence of patches occurred in association with a sequence of flow bursts in the dusk cell return flow. It is proposed that reconnection driven pulsed convection is able to create sub-auroral patches in the region where high density mid-latitude plasma is diverted poleward toward the cusp. It is the downward Birkeland current sheet located at the equatorward boundary of the flow disturbance that represents the actual cutting mechanism.

  9. Dependence of substorm occurrence probability on the interplanetary magnetic field and on the size of the auroral oval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dependence of substorm occurrence probability on the north--south component Bz of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and on the size of the auroral oval is examined on the basis of two independent data sets (Isis 1 and 2 low-energy electron data and all-sky camera data from the Alaska meridan). The occurrence of substorms is identified by the electron precipitation pattern (Isis data), the auroral features in the Alaskan sector, and available ground magnetic records. The substorm occurrence frequency increases as the oval expands and as the Bz component of the IMF decreases. It increases from approximately 25% to 100% for Bz values of the IMF ranging from +7 to -5 nT; here Bz values are averaged for 1 hour preceding the time of satellite passage and the onset of substorms observed by the all-sky cameras. The occurrence probability of quiet times increases with an increasing value of the northward IMF. It is interesting to note that there are almost no periods without substorms when the IMF has a large southward component, but substorms do occur even when the IMF has a large northward component. Since there is a close relationship between the direction of the IMF and the size of the auroral oval, our finding that the occurrence frequency of substorms increases with the expansion of the auroral oval suggests that the substorm probability may be related to the amount of energy stored in the magnetotail

  10. GPS phase scintillation associated with optical auroral emissions:first statistical results from the geographic South Pole

    OpenAIRE

    Kinrade, Joe; Mitchell, Cathryn N; Smith, Nathan D.; Ebihara, Yusuke; Weatherwax, Allan T.; Bust, Gary S.

    2013-01-01

    Ionospheric irregularities affect the propagation of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals, causing radio scintillation. Particle precipitation from the magnetosphere into the ionosphere, following solar activity, is an important production mechanism for ionospheric irregularities. Particle precipitation also causes the aurorae. However, the correlation of aurorae and GNSS scintillation events is not well established in literature. This study examines optical auroral events during...

  11. Combined ESR and EISCAT observations of the dayside polar cap and auroral oval during the May 15, 1997 storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Liu

    Full Text Available The high-latitude ionospheric response to a major magnetic storm on May 15, 1997 is studied and different responses in the polar cap and the auroral oval are highlighted. Depletion of the F2 region electron density occurred in both the polar cap and the auroral zone, but due to different physical processes. The increased recombination rate of O+ ions caused by a strong electric field played a crucial role in the auroral zone. The transport effect, however, especially the strong upward ion flow was also of great importance in the dayside polar cap. During the main phase and the beginning of the recovery phase soft particle precipitation in the polar cap showed a clear relation to the dynamic pressure of the solar wind, with a maximum cross-correlation coefficient of 0.63 at a time lag of 5 min.

    Key words: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; polar ionosphere - Magnetospheric physics (storms and substorms

  12. Ion shell distributions as free energy source for plasma waves on auroral field lines mapping to plasma sheet boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olsson

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Ion shell distributions are hollow spherical shells in velocity space that can be formed by many processes and occur in several regions of geospace. They are interesting because they have free energy that can, in principle, be transmitted to ions and electrons. Recently, a technique has been developed to estimate the original free energy available in shell distributions from in-situ data, where some of the energy has already been lost (or consumed. We report a systematic survey of three years of data from the Polar satellite. We present an estimate of the free energy available from ion shell distributions on auroral field lines sampled by the Polar satellite below 6 RE geocentric radius. At these altitudes the type of ion shells that we are especially interested in is most common on auroral field lines close to the polar cap (i.e. field lines mapping to the plasma sheet boundary layer, PSBL. Our analysis shows that ion shell distributions that have lost some of their free energy are commonly found not only in the PSBL, but also on auroral field lines mapping to the boundary plasma sheet (BPS, especially in the evening sector auroral field lines. We suggest that the PSBL ion shell distributions are formed during the so-called Velocity Dispersed Ion Signatures (VDIS events. Furthermore, we find that the partly consumed shells often occur in association with enhanced wave activity and middle-energy electron anisotropies. The maximum downward ion energy flux associated with a shell distribution is often 10mWm-2 and sometimes exceeds 40mWm-2 when mapped to the ionosphere and thus may be enough to power many auroral processes. Earlier simulation studies have shown that ion shell distributions can excite ion Bernstein waves which, in turn, energise electrons in the parallel direction. It is possible that ion shell distributions are the link between the X-line and the auroral wave activity and electron

  13. Thermal ion measurements on board Interball Auroral Probe by the Hyperboloid experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Dubouloz

    Full Text Available Hyperboloid is a multi-directional mass spectrometer measuring ion distribution functions in the auroral and polar magnetosphere of the Earth in the thermal and suprathermal energy range. The instrument encompasses two analyzers containing a total of 26 entrance windows, and viewing in two almost mutually perpendicular half-planes. The nominal angular resolution is defined by the field of view of individual windows ≈13° × 12.5°. Energy analysis is performed using spherical electrostatic analyzers providing differential measurements between 1 and 80 eV. An ion beam emitter (RON experiment and/or a potential bias applied to Hyperboloid entrance surface are used to counteract adverse effects of spacecraft potential and thus enable ion measurements down to very low energies. A magnetic analyzer focuses ions on one of four micro-channel plate (MCP detectors, depending on their mass/charge ratio. Normal modes of operation enable to measure H+, He+, O++, and O+ simultaneously. An automatic MCP gain control software is used to adapt the instrument to the great flux dynamics encountered between spacecraft perigee (700 km and apogee (20 000 km. Distribution functions in the main analyzer half-plane are obtained after a complete scan of windows and energies with temporal resolution between one and a few seconds. Three-dimensional (3D distributions are measured in one spacecraft spin period (120 s. The secondary analyzer has a much smaller geometrical factor, but offers partial access to the 3D dependence of the distributions with a few seconds temporal resolution. Preliminary results are presented. Simultaneous, local heating of both H+ and O+ ions resulting in conical distributions below 80 eV is observed up to 3 Earth's radii altitudes. The thermal ion signatures associated with large-scale nightside magnetospheric boundaries are investigated and a new ion outflow feature is

  14. On the current-voltage relationship in auroral breakups and westwards-travelling surges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olsson

    Full Text Available Auroral precipitating electrons pass through an acceleration region before entering the atmosphere. Regardless of what produces it, a parallel electric field is assumed to cause the acceleration. It is well known that from kinetic theory an expression for the corresponding upward field-aligned current can be calculated, which under certain assumptions can be linearized to j=KV. The K constant, referred to as the Lyons-Evans-Lundin constant, depends on the source density and thermal energy of the magnetospheric electrons; it is an important parameter in magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling models. However, the K parameter is still rather unknown, and values are found in a wide range of 10–8–10–10 S m–2. In this study, we investigated how the type of auroral structure affects the K values. We look at onset and westwards-travelling surge (WTS events and make comparisons with earlier results from observations of more stable auroral arcs. A new analysis technique for studying those magnetospheric parameters using ground-based measurements is introduced. Electron density measurements are taken with the EISCAT radar, and through an inversion technique the flux-energy spectra are calculated. Source densities, thermal energies and potential drops are estimated from fittings of accelerated Maxwellian distributions. With this radar technique we have the possibility to study the changes of the mentioned parameters during the development of onsets and the passage of surges over EISCAT. The study indicates that the linearization of the full Knight formulation holds even for the very high potential drops and thermal temperatures found in the dynamic onset and WTS events. The values of K are found to be very low, around 10–11 S m–2 in onset cases as well as WTS events. The results may establish a new technique where ionospheric

  15. 24/7 Solar Minimum Polar Cap and Auroral Ion Temperature Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Jan J.; Nicolls, Michael; van Eyken, Anthony; Heinselman, Craig; Bilitza, Dieter

    2011-01-01

    During the International Polar Year (IPY) two Incoherent Scatter Radars (ISRs) achieved close to 24/7 continuous observations. This presentation describes their data sets and specifically how they can provide the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) a fiduciary E- and F-region ionosphere description for solar minimum conditions in both the auroral and polar cap regions. The ionospheric description being electron density, ion temperature and electron temperature profiles from as low as 90 km extending to several scale heights above the F-layer peak. The auroral location is Poker Flat in Alaska at 65.1 N latitude, 212.5 E longitude where the NSF s new Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR) is located. This location during solar minimum conditions is in the auroral region for most of the day but is at midlatitudes, equator ward of the cusp, for about 4-8 h per day dependent upon geomagnetic activity. In contrast the polar location is Svalbard, at 78.2 N latitude, 16.0 E longitude where the EISCAT Svalbard Radar (ESR) is located. For most of the day the ESR is in the Northern Polar Cap with a noon sector passage often through the dayside cusp. Of unique relevance to IRI is that these extended observations have enabled the ionospheric morphology to be distinguished between quiet and disturbed geomagnetic conditions. During the IPY year, 1 March 2007 - 29 February 2008, about 50 solar wind Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) impacted geospace. Each CIR has a two to five day geomagnetic disturbance that is observed in the ESR and PFISR observations. Hence, this data set also enables the quiet-background ionospheric climatology to be established as a function of season and local time. These two separate climatologies for the ion temperature at an altitude of 300 km are presented and compared with IRI ion temperatures. The IRI ion temperatures are about 200-300 K hotter than the observed values. However, the MSIS neutral temperature at 300 km compares favorably

  16. Contributions of Q-machine experiments to understanding auroral particle acceleration processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments performed over the past 40 years on Q-machine plasma devices [N. Rynn and N. D'Angelo, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 31, 1326 (1960)] have contributed significantly to the basic understanding of plasma behavior. Many of these laboratory results are relevant to plasma processes in the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere. Here are reviewed examples in which Q-machine experiments contributed to understanding particle acceleration in the Earth's auroral energization region by discovering unexpected behavior, developing physical insight, benchmarking theoretical models, and establishing observational signatures relevant to space plasmas. Magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) electric fields, solitary structures, ion-cyclotron waves, ion-acoustic waves, Kelvin-Helmholtz waves, and lower-hybrid waves are discussed. The legacy of these contributions is a tribute to the Q-machine design

  17. Modulation of auroral electrojet currents using dual HF beams with ELF phase offset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkowski, M.; Cohen, M.; Moore, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    The modulation of naturally occuring ionospheric currents with high power radio waves in the high frequency (HF, 3-10 MHz) band is a well known technique for generation of extremely low frequency (ELF, 3-3000 Hz) and very low frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) waves. We use the heating facility of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) to investigate the effect of using dual HF beams with an ELF/VLF phase offset between the modulation waveforms. Experiments with offset HF beams confirm the model of independent ELF/VLF sources. Experiments with co-located HF beams exhibit interaction between the first and second harmonics of the modulated tones when square and sine wave modulation waveforms are employed. Using ELF/VLF phase offsets for co-loacted beams is also shown to be a potential diagnostic for the D-region ionospheric profile.

  18. The Ionospheric Model Adaptation to the Auroral Latitudes With UHF EISCAT Radar and Tromso Magnetometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaeva, Vera; Gordeev, Evgeny; Kotikov, Andrey

    E-layer Auroral Ionosphere Model (E-AIM) developed in Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute can provide temporal and spatial distribution of the main ionosphere parameters: ion and electron density distribution in the altitude range from 90 to 150 km. The statistical study of E-layer electron density dependence on substorm activity was made to improve model results in high latitudes. About fifty substorms were included to the data analysis. Particular attention was paid to the dynamics of magnetic disturbances and ionospheric parameters measured by the radar. Correlation of electron density values measured by the UHF EISCAT incoherent scattering radar with geomagnetic indices was determined. Applicability of geomagnetic indices as input parameters of the local E-AIM model was estimated.

  19. Artificial stimulation of auroral electron acceleration by intense field aligned currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cesium doped high explosion was detonated at 165 km altitude in the auroral ionosphere during quiet conditions. An Alfven wave pulse with a 200 mV/m electric field was observed with the peak occurring 135 ms after the explosion at a distance of about 1 km. The count rate of fixed energy 2 keV electron detectors abruptly increased at 140 ms, peaked at 415 ms and indicated a downward field aligned beam of accelerated electrons. An anomalously high field aligned beam of backscattered electrons was also detected. We interpret the acceleration as due to a production of an electrostatic shock or double layer between 300 and 800 km altitude. The structure was probably formed by an instability of the intense field aligned currents in the Alfven wave launched by the charge separation electric field due to the explosion

  20. Auroral electron fluxes induced by static magnetic field aligned electric field and plasma wave turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the formation of auroral electron fluxes induced by a field aligned dc electric field in the presence of plasma wave turbulence. The effect of the wave spectral shape on the production rate has been considered. This acceleration scheme was modelled by the weak turbulence approach. The electron fluxes for narrow and broad band spectra, in the case of low and high phase velocities, are calculated, and it is found as a general feature, for all modes, that their enhancement is larger the weaker the background electric field, while for its absolute enhancement it is just the opposite. The electron fluxes are enhanced by many orders of magnitude over that without turbulence. It is also shown that the modes enhance the runaway production rate via their Cherenkov dissipation, and that a synergetic effect occurs in the enhancement when more than one mode turbulent is present in the acceleration region. (author)

  1. Saturn's polar ionospheric flows and their relation to the main auroral oval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider the flows and currents in Saturn's polar ionosphere which are implied by a three-component picture of large-scale magnetospheric flow driven both by planetary rotation and the solar wind interaction. With increasing radial distance in the equatorial plane, these components consist of a region dominated by planetary rotation where planetary plasma sub-corotates on closed field lines, a surrounding region where planetary plasma is lost down the dusk tail by the stretching out of closed field lines followed by plasmoid formation and pinch-off, as first described for Jupiter by Vasyliunas, and an outer region driven by the interaction with the solar wind, specifically by reconnection at the dayside magnetopause and in the dawn tail, first discussed for Earth by Dungey. The sub-corotating flow on closed field lines in the dayside magnetosphere is constrained by Voyager plasma observations, showing that the plasma angular velocity falls to around half of rigid corotation in the outer magnetosphere, possibly increasing somewhat near the dayside magnetopause, while here we provide theoretical arguments which indicate that the flow should drop to considerably smaller values on open field lines in the polar cap. The implied ionospheric current system requires a four-ring pattern of field-aligned currents, with distributed downward currents on open field lines in the polar cap, a narrow ring of upward current near the boundary of open and closed field lines, and regions of distributed downward and upward current on closed field lines at lower latitudes associated with the transfer of angular momentum from the planetary atmosphere to the sub-corotating planetary magnetospheric plasma. Recent work has shown that the upward current associated with sub-corotation is not sufficiently intense to produce significant auroral acceleration and emission. Here we suggest that the observed auroral oval at Saturn instead corresponds to the ring of

  2. On the importance of doubly charged ions in the auroral ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration has been given to the auroral ionospheric O+ density dilemma as discussed by Donahue et al. (1970). If the temperature dependences of the reactions O++O2→O2++O and O++N2→NO++N are of the type found by Stubbe (1969) and Johnsen and Biondi (1973), the line of explanation invoking intense electric fields and high ion temperature faces serious trouble. This would make the O+ density problem all the more pathological. However, a simple explanation was possible in terms of O2++ and N2++ ion chemistry. The beauty of this explanation lay in the fact that neither high temperatures nor electric fields need be invoked. Physicochemical problems connected with the new explanation are discussed, and it is suggested that the properties of the doubly charged ions deserve a closer study in the laboratory

  3. Scintillation and loss of signal lock from poleward moving auroral forms in the cusp ionosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Oksavik, K; Lorentzen, D A; Baddeley, L J; Moen, J

    2016-01-01

    We present two examples from the cusp ionosphere over Svalbard,where poleward moving auroral forms (PMAFs) are causing significant phase scintillation in signals from navigation satellites. The data were obtained using a combination of ground-based optical instruments and a newly installed multiconstellation navigation signal receiver at Longyearbyen. Both events affected signals from GPS and Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS). When one intense PMAF appeared, the signal from one GPS spacecraft also experienced a temporary loss of signal lock. Although several polar cap patches were also observed in the area as enhancements in total electron content, the most severe scintillation and loss of signal lock appear to be attributed to very intense PMAF activity. This shows that PMAFs are locations of strong ionospheric irregularities, which at times may cause more severe disturbances in the cusp ionosphere for navigation signals than polar cap patches.

  4. Stellar wind-magnetosphere interaction at exoplanets: computations of auroral radio powers

    CERN Document Server

    Nichols, J D

    2016-01-01

    We present calculations of the auroral radio powers expected from exoplanets with magnetospheres driven by an Earth-like magnetospheric interaction with the solar wind. Specifically, we compute the twin cell-vortical ionospheric flows, currents, and resulting radio powers resulting from a Dungey cycle process driven by dayside and nightside magnetic reconnection, as a function of planetary orbital distance and magnetic field strength. We include saturation of the magnetospheric convection, as observed at the terrestrial magnetosphere, and we present power law approximations for the convection potentials, radio powers and spectral flux densities. We specifically consider a solar-age system and a young (1 Gyr) system. We show that the radio power increases with magnetic field strength for magnetospheres with saturated convection potential, and broadly decreases with increasing orbital distance. We show that the magnetospheric convection at hot Jupiters will be saturated, and thus unable to dissipate the full av...

  5. Kinetic model for an auroral double layer that spans many gravitational scale heights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Scott [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The electrostatic potential profile and the particle densities of a simplified auroral double layer are found using a relaxation method to solve Poisson's equation in one dimension. The electron and ion distribution functions for the ionosphere and magnetosphere are specified at the boundaries, and the particle densities are found from a collisionless kinetic model. The ion distribution function includes the gravitational potential energy; hence, the unperturbed ionospheric plasma has a density gradient. The plasma potential at the upper boundary is given a large negative value to accelerate electrons downward. The solutions for a wide range of dimensionless parameters show that the double layer forms just above a critical altitude that occurs approximately where the ionospheric density has fallen to the magnetospheric density. Below this altitude, the ionospheric ions are gravitationally confined and have the expected scale height for quasineutral plasma in gravity.

  6. Evidence for parallel electric field particle acceleration in the dayside auroral oval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron and ion energy spectra and electron pitch angle distributions are presented for two sounding rocket flights in the dayside auroral zone. At times, effect of dc electric fields parallel to the magnetic field are evident in that (1) within precipitation features, protons are decelerated by an amount of energy consistent with that which electrons gain and (2) electrons are sometimes aligned to within 3 0 (full width at half maximum) of the magnetic field. A maximum altitude for the accelerating region of several thousand kilometers is deduced from the narrow width of the pitch angle distribution and also from time-of-flight delays between the observation of accelerated electrons and decelerated protons

  7. Separating spatial and temporal variations in auroral electric and magnetic fields by Cluster multipoint measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Karlsson

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Cluster multipoint measurements of the electric and magnetic fields from a crossing of auroral field lines at an altitude of 4RE are used to show that it is possible to resolve the ambiguity of temporal versus spatial variations in the fields. We show that the largest electric fields (of the order of 300mV/m when mapped down to the ionosphere are of a quasi-static nature, unipolar, associated with upward electron beams, stable on a time scale of at least half a minute, and located in two regions of downward current. We conclude that they are the high-altitude analogues of the intense return current/black auroral electric field structures observed at lower altitudes by Freja and FAST. In between these structures there are temporal fluctuations, which are shown to likely be downward travelling Alfvén waves. The periods of these waves are 20-40s, which is not consistent with periods associated with either the Alfvénic ionospheric resonator, typical field line resonances or substorm onset related Pi2 oscillations. The multipoint measurements enable us to estimate a lower limit to the perpendicular wavelength of the Alfvén waves to be of the order of 120km, which suggests that the perpendicular wavelength is similar to the dimension of the region between the two quasi-static structures. This might indicate that the Alfvén waves are ducted within a wave guide, where the quasi-static structures are associated with the gradients making up this waveguide.

  8. The thermospheric auroral red line polarization: confirmation of detection and first quantitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moen Joran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermospheric atomic oxygen red line is among the brightest in the auroral spectrum. Previous observations in Longyearbyen, Svalbard, indicated that it may be intrinsically polarized, but a possible contamination by light pollution could not be ruled out. During the winter 2010/2011, the polarization of the red line was measured for the first time at the Polish Hornsund polar base without contamination. Two methods of data analysis are presented to compute the degree of linear polarization (DoLP and angle of linear polarization (AoLP: one is based on averaging and the other one on filtering. Results are compared and are in qualitative agreement. For solar zenith angles (SZA larger than 108° (with no contribution from Rayleigh scattering, the DoLP ranges between 2 and 7%. The AoLP is more or less aligned with the direction of the magnetic field line, in agreement with the theoretical predictions of Bommier et al. (2010. However, the AoLP values range between ±20° around this direction, depending on the auroral conditions. Correlations between the polarization parameters and the red line intensity I were considered. The DoLP decreases when I increases, confirming a trend observed during the observations in Longyearbyen. However, for small values of I, DoLP varies within a large range of values, while for large values of I, DoLP is always small. The AoLP also varies with the red line intensity, slightly rotating around the magnetic field line.

  9. Substorm related changes in precipitation in the dayside auroral zone – a multi instrument case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Kavanagh

    Full Text Available A period (08:10–14:40 MLT, 11 February 1997 of enhanced electron density in the D- and E-regions is investigated using EISCAT, IRIS and other complementary instruments. The precipitation is determined to be due to substorm processes occurring close to magnetic midnight. Energetic electrons drift eastward after substorm injection and precipitate in the morning sector. The precipitation is triggered by small pulses in the solar wind pressure, which drive wave particle interactions. The characteristic energy of precipitation is inferred from drift timing on different L-shells and apparently verified by EISCAT measurements. The IMF influence on the precipitation in the auroral zone is also briefly discussed. A large change in the precipitation spectrum is attributed to increased numbers of ions and much reduced electron fluxes. These are detected by a close passing DMSP satellite. The possibility that these ions are from the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL is discussed with reference to structured narrow band Pc1 waves observed by a search coil magnetometer, co-located with IRIS. The intensity of the waves grows with increased distance equatorward of the cusp position (determined by both satellite and HF radar, contrary to expectations if the precipitation is linked to the LLBL. It is suggested that the ion precipitation is, instead, due to the recovery phase of a small geomagnetic storm, following on from very active conditions. The movement of absorption in the later stages of the event is compared with observations of the ionospheric convection velocities. A good agreement is found to exist in this time interval suggesting that E × B drift has become the dominant drift mechanism over the gradient-curvature drift separation of the moving absorption patches observed at the beginning of the morning precipitation event.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; particle precipitation Magnetospheric physics (storms and substorms

  10. Multi-Instrumental Vector Magnetic Observations and Techniques for Investigating Auroral Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmon, Robert; Knipp, Delores; Kilcommons, Liam; Richmond, Art; Matsuo, Tomoko; Anderson, Brian; Korth, Haje; Slavin, James; Le, Guan; Wilson, Gordon; Rich, Fred; Denig, William

    2014-05-01

    Space based magnetometers in highly inclined low earth orbits are essential for characterizing the state of the auroral space environment and the dynamic processes within. This paper demonstrates the utility of data derived from multiple satellites including AMPERE (70 Iridium spacecraft), DMSP (4 spacecraft) and ST5 (3 spacecraft), and the AMIENext technique to investigate periods of interest in 2006 and 2010. A new satellite conjunction-finding technique magnetically maps in situ observations to a common altitude in the APEX coordinate system to assess the spatial and temporal stability and quality of vector magnetic measurements (Knipp et al., 2014). In March of 2006, the ST5 constellation was launched into a pearls-on-a-string configuration. Subsequent data processing produced superb, quality controlled magnetic observations from the 90-day mission (e.g. Slavin et al., 2008, Le et al., 2009; Wang et al., 2009). We present conjunction comparisons between the ST5 and DMSP spacecraft during the ST5 mission lifetime, which was dominated by a series of high-speed solar wind events. In May of 2010, a unipolar Magnetic Cloud passed Earth, providing an opportunity to investigate the magnetopshere-ionosphere coupling response to a slow moving transient followed by higher speed flow. This event included significant, long-lived disturbances in the asymmetric ring current and auroral electrojet (AE) index. Assimilation of space-based magnetic observations via the AMIENext procedure, reveal twisting in the dayside patterns, consistent with the sign changes in IMF By and a highly structured topology as IMF Bz turned northward. We present a detailed comparison between the magnetic observations from DMSP and AMPERE. To aid in investigating the local magnetic field and in providing data to assimilative models, we have also created new datasets in self-describing NASA CDF formats for the DMSP and ST5 vector magnetometers and for the DMSP precipitating ion and electron

  11. Reconstruction of three-dimensional auroral ionospheric conductivities via an assimilative technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGranaghan, R. M.; Knipp, D. J.; Matsuo, T.; Solomon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Energy redistribution in the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere (MIT) system is largely controlled by a complex system of field-aligned, Hall, and Pedersen currents, and the electrodynamics underlying their distributions. Application of Ohm's law to the auroral zone requires knowledge of the ionospheric conductivity, whose estimation has often been simplified by invoking Maxwellian behavior of the impacting particles and height independent conductance. Though these assumptions have allowed us to study height-integrated conductivities (conductances), they have also limited our ability to understand how the MIT system operates as a whole. We are now in a position to address conductivity variations, and thus energy redistribution, in three dimensions. We present an objective analysis of the fully three-dimensional (3-D) ionospheric Hall and Pedersen auroral conductivities for the November 30, 2011 coronal mass ejection event. We show: 1) a fundamental picture of ionospheric conductivity variability organized into empirical orthogonal functions [McGranaghan et al., 2015; accepted] and 2) an event reconstruction of the ionospheric conductivities. Figure 1 provides a proof of concept for part 1 by showing the first primary mode of variability (EOF1) of the Hall conductivity at four altitudes through the E- and lower F-regions. Our reconstruction relies on a data assimilation scheme that optimally combines Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite observations with an error covariance model created from the conductivity EOFs. We find significant 3-D structure in the ionospheric conductivities that can drastically modify the E- and lower F-region behavior. We suggest an exciting opportunity to extend these analyses to other data sets, such as the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC).

  12. Experimental investigation of auroral generator regions with conjugate Cluster and FAST data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Marghitu

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Here and in the companion paper, Hamrin et al. (2006, we present experimental evidence for the crossing of auroral generator regions, based on conjugate Cluster and FAST data. To our knowledge, this is the first investigation that concentrates on the evaluation of the power density, E·J, in auroral generator regions, by using in-situ measurements. The Cluster data we discuss were collected within the Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer (PSBL, during a quiet magnetospheric interval, as judged from the geophysical indices, and several minutes before the onset of a small substorm, as indicated by the FAST data. Even at quiet times, the PSBL is an active location: electric fields are associated with plasma motion, caused by the dynamics of the plasma-sheet/lobe interface, while electrical currents are induced by pressure gradients. In the example we show, these ingredients do indeed sustain the conversion of mechanical energy into electromagnetic energy, as proved by the negative power density, E·J<0. The plasma characteristics in the vicinity of the generator regions indicate a complicated 3-D wavy structure of the plasma sheet boundary. Consistent with this structure, we suggest that at least part of the generated electromagnetic energy is carried away by Alfvén waves, to be dissipated in the ionosphere, near the polar cap boundary. Such a scenario is supported by the FAST data, which show energetic electron precipitation conjugated with the generator regions crossed by Cluster. A careful examination of the conjunction timing contributes to the validation of the generator signatures.

  13. The relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter amplitude and Doppler velocity: a statistical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Shand

    Full Text Available A statistical investigation of the relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity has been undertaken with data collected from 8 years operation of the Wick site of the Sweden And Britain Radar-auroral Experiment (SABRE. The results indicate three different regimes within the statistical data set; firstly, for Doppler velocities <200 m s–1, the backscatter intensity (measured in decibels remains relatively constant. Secondly, a linear relationship is observed between the backscatter intensity (in decibels and Doppler velocity for velocities between 200 m s–1 and 700 m s–1. At velocities greater than 700 m s–1 the backscatter intensity saturates at a maximum value as the Doppler velocity increases. There are three possible geophysical mechanisms for the saturation in the backscatter intensity at high phase speeds: a saturation in the irregularity turbulence level, a maximisation of the scattering volume, and a modification of the local ambient electron density. There is also a difference in the dependence of the backscatter intensity on Doppler velocity for the flow towards and away from the radar. The results for flow towards the radar exhibit a consistent relationship between backscatter intensity and measured velocities throughout the solar cycle. For flow away from the radar, however, the relationship between backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity varies during the solar cycle. The geometry of the SABRE system ensures that flow towards the radar is predominantly associated with the eastward electrojet, and flow away is associated with the westward electrojet. The difference in the backscatter intensity variation as a function of Doppler velocity is attributed to asymmetries between the eastward and westward electrojets and the geophysical parameters controlling the backscatter amplitude.

  14. Inductive electric fields in the magnetotail and their relation to auroral and substorm phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews the importance of inductive electric fields in explaining different magnetospheric and auroral phenomena during moderately and highly distrubed conditions. Quiet-time particle energization and temporal development of the tail structure during the substorm growth phase are explained by the presence of a large-scale elctrostatic field directed from dawn to dusk over the magentotail. Conservation of the first adiabatic invariant in the neutral sheet with a small value of the gradient in the magnetic field implies that the longitudical energy increases at each crossing of the neutral sheet. At a certain moment, this may result in a rapid local growth of the current and in an instability that triggers the onset. During the growth phase energy is stored in the magnetic field, since the energy density in the electric field is negligible compared to that of the magnetic field. An analytical model is described in which the characteristic observations of a substorm onset are taken into account. One major feature is that the triggering is confined to a small local time sector. During moderate disturbances, the induction fields in the magnetotail are stronger by at least one order of magnitude than the average cross-tail field. Temporal development of the disturbed area results in X- and O-type neutral lines. Particles near to these neutral lines are energized to over 1 MeV energies within a few seconds, due to an effective combination of linear and betatron acceleration. The rotational property of the induction field promotes energization in a restricted area wiht dimensions equivalent to a few Earth's radii. The model also predicts the existence of highly localized cable-type field-aligned currents appearing on the eastern and western edges of the expanding auroral bulge

  15. Reconstruction of energetic electron spectra in the upper atmosphere: balloon observations of auroral X-rays coordinated with measurements from the EISCAT radar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energetic electron precipitation in the auroral zone has been studied using coordinated auroral X-ray measurements from balloons, altitude profiles of the ionospheric electron density measured by the EISCAT radar above the balloons, and cosmic noise absorption data from the Scandinavian riometer network. The data were obtained during the Coordinated EISCAT and Balloon Observations (CEBO) campaign in August 1984. The energy spectral variations of both the X-ray fluxes and the primary precipitating electrons were examined for two precipitation events in the morning sector. As far as reasonably can be concluded from observations of magnetic activity in the auroral zone, and from the temporal development of the energy spectra, the two precipitation events can be interpreted in the frame of present models of energetic electron precipitation on the mordning side of the auroral zone. 96 refs., 70 figs., 11 tabs

  16. A VIRTUAL SKY WITH EXTRAGALACTIC H I AND CO LINES FOR THE SQUARE KILOMETRE ARRAY AND THE ATACAMA LARGE MILLIMETER/SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a sky simulation of the atomic H I-emission line and the first 10 12C16O rotational emission lines of molecular gas in galaxies beyond the Milky Way. The simulated sky field has a comoving diameter of 500 h -1 Mpc; hence, the actual field of view depends on the (user-defined) maximal redshift z max; e.g., for z max = 10, the field of view yields ∼4 x 4 deg2. For all galaxies, we estimate the line fluxes, line profiles, and angular sizes of the H I and CO-emission lines. The galaxy sample is complete for galaxies with cold hydrogen masses above 108 M sun. This sky simulation builds on a semi-analytic model of the cosmic evolution of galaxies in a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology. The evolving CDM distribution was adopted from the Millennium Simulation, an N-body CDM simulation in a cubic box with a side length of 500 h -1 Mpc. This side length limits the coherence scale of our sky simulation: it is long enough to allow the extraction of the baryon acoustic oscillations in the galaxy power spectrum, yet the position and amplitude of the first acoustic peak will be imperfectly defined. This sky simulation is a tangible aid to the design and operation of future telescopes, such as the Square Kilometre Array, Large Millimeter Telescope, and Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array. The results presented in this paper have been restricted to a graphical representation of the simulated sky and fundamental dN/dz analyses for peak flux density limited and total flux limited surveys of H I and CO. A key prediction is that H I will be harder to detect at redshifts z ∼> 2 than predicted by a no-evolution model. The future verification or falsification of this prediction will allow us to qualify the semi-analytic models.

  17. Rotationally driven 'zebra stripes' in Earth's inner radiation belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhorskiy, A Y; Sitnov, M I; Mitchell, D G; Takahashi, K; Lanzerotti, L J; Mauk, B H

    2014-03-20

    Structured features on top of nominally smooth distributions of radiation-belt particles at Earth have been previously associated with particle acceleration and transport mechanisms powered exclusively by enhanced solar-wind activity. Although planetary rotation is considered to be important for particle acceleration at Jupiter and Saturn, the electric field produced in the inner magnetosphere by Earth's rotation can change the velocity of trapped particles by only about 1-2 kilometres per second, so rotation has been thought inconsequential for radiation-belt electrons with velocities of about 100,000 kilometres per second. Here we report that the distributions of energetic electrons across the entire spatial extent of Earth's inner radiation belt are organized in regular, highly structured and unexpected 'zebra stripes', even when the solar-wind activity is low. Modelling reveals that the patterns are produced by Earth's rotation. Radiation-belt electrons are trapped in Earth's dipole-like magnetic field, where they undergo slow longitudinal drift motion around the planet because of the gradient and curvature of the magnetic field. Earth's rotation induces global diurnal variations of magnetic and electric fields that resonantly interact with electrons whose drift period is close to 24 hours, modifying electron fluxes over a broad energy range into regular patterns composed of multiple stripes extending over the entire span of the inner radiation belt. PMID:24646996

  18. External control of planetary radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, H. O.; Desch, M. D.

    1983-01-01

    Recent studies using data from Voyagers 1 and 2 to correlate variations in the Saturn kilometric radiation (SKR) with changes in solar-wind properties are summarized and illustrated with graphs. Best SKR correlations have been obtained with the solar-wind ram pressure and the related kinetic energy flux. It is pointed out that the related phenomenon on earth, the auroral kilometric radiation, occurs mainly in the nightside auroral region (as opposed to the dayside cleft region for SKR) and is best correlated with solar-wind velocity and inverted-V electron-precipitation events, implying a different stimulation process. The evidence for solar-wind control of the non-Io-related decametric radiation of Jupiter is also reviewed.

  19. H3(+) fundamental band in Jupiter's auroral zones at high resolution from 2400 to 2900 inverse centimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the previous detection of H3(+) in the southern auroral zone of Jupiter from its 2nu2 band, a search was made for the fundamental at 4 microns. Up to 42 lines of this band were detected in emission, at high resolution, on the auroral spot of each hemisphere. A rotational temperature was derived for the southern and northern zones, respectively, of 1000 + or - 40K and 835 + or - 50 K. The intensity of the lines was on the average two times stronger in the south than in the north. The 2nu2 band, which was sought in the north only on this occasion, was not detectable. A purely thermal mechanism for the H3(+) production is implied. Spatial extension and temporal variability of the excitation is discussed. 20 refs

  20. Position of projections of the nightside auroral oval equatorward and poleward edges in the magnetosphere equatorial plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpichev, I. P.; Yagodkina, O. I.; Vorobjev, V. G.; Antonova, E. E.

    2016-07-01

    The position of the auroral oval poleward and equatorward boundary projections on the equatorial plane in the nightside MLT sector during magnetically quiet periods (| AL| balance of pressures during the nighttime have been taken into account. The morphological mapping method has been used to map the oval poleward and equatorward edges without the use of any magnetic field model on the assumption that the condition of magnetostatic equilibrium is valid. Ion pressures at ionospheric altitudes and in the equatorial plane have been compared. It has been shown that the auroral oval equatorward boundary in the midnight sector is localized at geocentric distances of ~7 R E , which is in good agreement with the position of the energetic particle injection boundary in the equatorial plane. The oval poleward edge is localized at the ~10 R E geocentric distance, which is in good agreement with the position of the equatorward boundary of the region with a high turbulence level in the Earth's magnetosphere plasma sheet.

  1. Effect of excess superthermal hot electrons on finite amplitude ion-acoustic solitons and supersolitons in a magnetized auroral plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rufai, O. R., E-mail: rrufai@csir.co.za [Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria (South Africa); Bharuthram, R., E-mail: rbharuthram@uwc.ac.za [University of the Western Cape, Bellville (South Africa); Singh, S. V., E-mail: satyavir@iigs.iigm.res.in; Lakhina, G. S., E-mail: lakhina@iigs.iigm.res.in [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel (W), Navi, Mumbai-410218 (India)

    2015-10-15

    The effect of excess superthermal electrons is investigated on finite amplitude nonlinear ion-acoustic waves in a magnetized auroral plasma. The plasma model consists of a cold ion fluid, Boltzmann distribution of cool electrons, and kappa distributed hot electron species. The model predicts the evolution of negative potential solitons and supersolitons at subsonic Mach numbers region, whereas, in the case of Cairn's nonthermal distribution model for the hot electron species studied earlier, they can exist both in the subsonic and supersonic Mach number regimes. For the dayside auroral parameters, the model generates the super-acoustic electric field amplitude, speed, width, and pulse duration of about 18 mV/m, 25.4 km/s, 663 m, and 26 ms, respectively, which is in the range of the Viking spacecraft measurements.

  2. GPS phase scintillation during the geomagnetic storm of March 17, 2015: The relation to auroral electrojet currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prikryl, Paul; Ghoddousi-Fard, Reza; Connors, Martin;

    -enhanced plasma density (SED) and in the auroral oval during energetic particle precipitation events, substorms and pseudo-breakups in particular. In this paper we examine the relation to auroral electrojet currents observed by arrays of ground-based magnetometers and energetic particle precipitation observed...... mass ejections compounded by high-speed plasma streams from coronal holes. Geomagnetic storm of March 17, 2015 was the largest in the current solar cycle. The high-latitude ionosphere dynamics is studied using arrays of ground-based instruments including GPS receivers, HF radars, ionosondes, riometers...... by DMSP satellites. Equivalent ionospheric currents (EICs) are obtained from ground magnetometer data using the spherical elementary currents systems (SECS) technique developed by Amm and Viljanen (1999) that has been applied over the entire North American ground magnetometer network by Weygand et al...

  3. Ion and electron injection in ionosphere and magnetosphere. Application to the parallel electric field measurement in auroral zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New methods of measuring parallel electric field in auroral zones are investigated in this thesis. In the studied methods, artificial injection of ions Li+ and electrons from a spacecraf is used. Measurements obtained during the ARAKS experiment are also presented. The behaviour of the ionospheric plasma located few hundred meters from a 0,5A electron beam injected in ionosphere from a rocket is studied, together with the behaviour of a Cs plasma artificially injected from the same spacecraft

  4. Enhanced E-layer ionization in the auroral zones observed by radio occultation measurements onboard CHAMP and Formosat-3/COSMIC

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, C.; Jakowski, N.

    2009-01-01

    Particle precipitation of magnetospheric origin causes additional ionization in the auroral zone at E-layer heights. During night-time, in particular at winter-night, the E-layer ionization may dominate over the F2-layer ionization level. To study the geophysical conditions and characteristics of the related ionospheric processes in more detail, we use GPS radio occultation electron density profile retrievals from CHAMP and Formosat-3/COSMIC to extract thos...

  5. Forecasting of DST index from auroral electrojet indices using time-delay neural network + particle swarm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzús, J. A.; López-Caraballo, C. H.; Rojas, P.; Salfate, I.; Rivera, M.; Palma-Chilla, L.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, an artificial neural network was optimized with particle swarm algorithm and trained to predict the geomagmetic DST index one hour ahead using the past values of DST and auroral electrojet indices. The results show that the proposed neural network model can be properly trained for predicting of DST(t + 1) with acceptable accuracy, and that the geomagnetic indices used have influential effects on the good training and predicting capabilities of the chosen network.

  6. The spatial structure and temporal variability of Ganymede’s auroral ovals from Hubble Space Telescope observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchio, Fabrizio; Saur, Joachim; Roth, Lorenz; Retherford, Kurt D.; McGrath, Melissa A.; Feldman, Paul D.; Strobel, Darrel F.

    2015-11-01

    We analyze spectrally and spatially resolved images of Ganymede’s FUV-auroral ovals obtained during the past two decades by Hubble’s Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS). We find both, spatial inhomogeneities of the brightness-distribution on the observed disk as well as temporal variation as a function of Ganymede’s position relative to the Jovian current sheet. The brightness of the ovals is not equally distributed along the ovals, i.e., the Jupiter-facing side is always brighter than the anti-Jupiter side at least by ~60%. When Ganymede moves from high elevated magnetic latitudes towards the center region of the Jovian current sheet, the brightness of the aurora on the leading side increases by over 30% from ~80 Rayleigh up to ~108 Rayleigh. Simultaneously, inside the current sheet center the auroral ovals are displaced by an average of ~6° of planetographic latitude, i.e., the ovals shift furthermore down towards the planetographic equator on the leading side, and up towards the poles on the trailing side. Both effects, the increase of brightness and the moving of the ovals, are correlated to increased plasma interaction inside the current sheet. Ganymede’s electron-impact-excited auroral emissions are thought to be driven by electron acceleration by strong field-aligned currents at the boundary area between open and closed magnetic field lines of Ganymede’s mini-magnetosphere. The change of the auroral morphology is a direct response to the changing plasma environment, i.e., changing ram and thermal pressures. Thus, the investigation of the aurora proves to be a suitable diagnostic tool of the various processes that contribute to Ganymede’s complex plasma and magnetic field environment.

  7. An interpretation for the bipolar electric field structures parallel to the magnetic field observed in the auroral ionosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Jiankui Shi; M. N. S. Qureshi; K. Torkar; Dunlop, M.; Zhenxing Liu; Zhang, T. L.

    2008-01-01

    A physical model for the existence of bipolar structures in the electric field that are parallel to the magnetic field and observed in the auroral ionosphere, is established by deriving the "Sagdeev potential" from the two-fluid equations in a cylindrical coordinate system. The model shows that the bipolar electric field structure can develop not only from an ion acoustic wave, but also from an ion cyclotron wave, when the Mach number and the initial electric field satisfy certain c...

  8. Axi-symmetric models of auroral current systems in Jupiter's magnetosphere with predictions for the Juno mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We develop two related models of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in the jovian system by combining previous models defined at ionospheric heights with magnetospheric magnetic models that allow system parameters to be extended appropriately into the magnetosphere. The key feature of the combined models is thus that they allow direct connection to be made between observations in the magnetosphere, particularly of the azimuthal field produced by the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling currents and the plasma angular velocity, and the auroral response in the ionosphere. The two models are intended to reflect typical steady-state sub-corotation conditions in the jovian magnetosphere, and transient super-corotation produced by sudden major solar wind-induced compressions, respectively. The key simplification of the models is that of axi-symmetry of the field, flow, and currents about the magnetic axis, limiting their validity to radial distances within ~30 RJ of the planet, though the magnetic axis is appropriately tilted relative to the planetary spin axis and rotates with the planet. The first exploration of the jovian polar magnetosphere is planned to be undertaken in 2016–2017 during the NASA New Frontiers Juno mission, with observations of the polar field, plasma, and UV emissions as a major goal. Evaluation of the models along Juno planning orbits thus produces predictive results that may aid in science mission planning. It is shown in particular that the low-altitude near-periapsis polar passes will generally occur underneath the corresponding auroral acceleration regions, thus allowing brief examination of the auroral primaries over intervals of ~1–3 min for the main oval and ~10 s for narrower polar arc structures, while the "lagging" field deflections produced by the auroral current systems on these passes will be ~0.1°, associated with azimuthal fields above the ionosphere of a few hundred nT.

  9. Effect of auroral substorms on the ionospheric range spread-F enhancements at high southern midlatitudes using real time vertical-sounding ionograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajkowicz, Lech A.

    2016-03-01

    A comprehensive study has been undertaken on the effect of magnetic substorm onsets (as deduced from the auroral hourly electrojet AE-index) on the occurrence of high midlatitude (or sub-auroral latitude) ionospheric range spread-F (Sr). Unlike the previous reports real-time ionograms were used in this analysis thus eliminating ambiguities stemming from the correlating secondary evidence of spread-F with auroral substorms. The Australian southernmost ionosonde station Hobart (51.6°S geom.) proved to be uniquely suitable for the task as being sufficiently close to the southern auroral zone. Sr was assigned in km to each hourly nighttime ionogram at two sounding frequencies: Sr1 (at 2 MHz) and Sr2 (at 6 MHz) for four months in 2002: January and June (representing southern summer and winter solstices), and March and September (representing autumn and vernal equinoxes). It is evident that the southern winter solstitial period (June) is associated with high endemic midlatitude spread-F activity. All other seasons are closely linked with temporal sequences of enhanced spread-F activity following substorm onsets. For the first time it was possible not only find a simultaneous occurrence pattern of these diverse phenomena but to deduce numerical characteristics of the response of midlatitude ionosphere to the global auroral stimulus. Excellent case events, hitherto unpublished, are shown illustrating the presence of the AE peaks (in nT) being ahead of Sr peaks (in km) by a time shift ∆t (in h). Sr1 magnitude showed a significant correlation with the magnitudes of the preceding AE with a correlation coefficient (r) of 0.51 (probability of the occurrence by chance less than 0.01). Sr2 peaks were more sensitive to auroral disturbances but were not correlated with the AE magnitude variations. The time shift (∆t) was on average 4 h with a standard deviation of 3 h. The general pattern in the occurrence of magnetic substorms and spread-F is very similar. A number of

  10. Magnetopause erosion during the 17 March 2015 magnetic storm: Combined field-aligned currents, auroral oval, and magnetopause observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, G.; Lühr, H.; Anderson, B. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Singer, H.; Slavin, J. A.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, T.; Bromund, K.; Chi, P. J.; Lu, G.; Fischer, D.; Kepko, E. L.; Leinweber, H. K.; Magnes, W.; Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Park, J.; Rauberg, J.; Stolle, C.; Torbert, R. B.

    2016-03-01

    We present multimission observations of field-aligned currents, auroral oval, and magnetopause crossings during the 17 March 2015 magnetic storm. Dayside reconnection is expected to transport magnetic flux, strengthen field-aligned currents, lead to polar cap expansion and magnetopause erosion. Our multimission observations assemble evidence for all these manifestations. After a prolonged period of strongly southward interplanetary magnetic field, Swarm and AMPERE observe significant intensification of field-aligned currents. The dayside auroral oval, as seen by DMSP, appears as a thin arc associated with ongoing dayside reconnection. Both the field-aligned currents and the auroral arc move equatorward reaching as low as ~60° magnetic latitude. Strong magnetopause erosion is evident in the in situ measurements of the magnetopause crossings by GOES 13/15 and MMS. The coordinated Swarm, AMPERE, DMSP, MMS and GOES observations, with both global and in situ coverage of the key regions, provide a clear demonstration of the effects of dayside reconnection on the entire magnetosphere.

  11. Current-voltage and kinetic energy flux relations for relativistic field-aligned acceleration of auroral electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent spectroscopic observations of Jupiter's "main oval" auroras indicate that the primary auroral electron beam is routinely accelerated to energies of ~100 keV, and sometimes to several hundred keV, thus approaching the relativistic regime. This suggests the need to re-examine the classic non-relativistic theory of auroral electron acceleration by field-aligned electric fields first derived by Knight (1973, and to extend it to cover relativistic situations. In this paper we examine this problem for the case in which the source population is an isotropic Maxwellian, as also assumed by Knight, and derive exact analytic expressions for the field-aligned current density (number flux and kinetic energy flux of the accelerated population, for arbitrary initial electron temperature, acceleration potential, and field strength beneath the acceleration region. We examine the limiting behaviours of these expressions, their regimes of validity, and their implications for auroral acceleration in planetary magnetospheres (and like astrophysical systems. In particular, we show that for relativistic accelerating potentials, the current density increases as the square of the minimum potential, rather than linearly as in the non-relativistic regime, while the kinetic energy flux then increases as the cube of the potential, rather than as the square.

  12. The APIS service : a tool for accessing value-added HST planetary auroral observations over 1997-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, L.; Henry, F.; Prangé, R.; Le Sidaner, P.

    2015-10-01

    The Auroral Planetary Imaging and Spectroscopy (APIS) service http://obspm.fr/apis/ provides an open and interactive access to processed auroral observations of the outer planets and their satellites. Such observations are of interest for a wide community at the interface between planetology, magnetospheric and heliospheric physics. APIS consists of (i) a high level database, built from planetary auroral observations acquired by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) since 1997 with its mostly used Far-Ultraviolet spectro- imagers, (ii) a dedicated search interface aimed at browsing efficiently this database through relevant conditional search criteria (Figure 1) and (iii) the ability to interactively work with the data online through plotting tools developed by the Virtual Observatory (VO) community, such as Aladin and Specview. This service is VO compliant and can therefore also been queried by external search tools of the VO community. The diversity of available data and the capability to sort them out by relevant physical criteria shall in particular facilitate statistical studies, on long-term scales and/or multi-instrumental multispectral combined analysis [1,2]. We will present the updated capabilities of APIS with several examples. Several tutorials are available online.

  13. The presence of large sunspots near the central solar meridian at the times of modern Japanese auroral observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Willis

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The validity of a technique developed by the authors to identify historical occurrences of intense geomagnetic storms, which is based on finding approximately coincident observations of sunspots and aurorae recorded in East Asian histories, is corroborated using more modern sunspot and auroral observations. Scientific observations of aurorae in Japan during the interval 1957–2004 are used to identify geomagnetic storms that are sufficiently intense to produce auroral displays at low geomagnetic latitudes. By examining white-light images of the Sun obtained by the Royal Greenwich Observatory, the Big Bear Solar Observatory, the Debrecen Heliophysical Observatory and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft, it is found that a sunspot large enough to be seen with the unaided eye by an "experienced" observer was located reasonably close to the central solar meridian immediately before all but one of the 30 distinct Japanese auroral events, which represents a 97% success rate. Even an "average" observer would probably have been able to see a sunspot with the unaided eye before 24 of these 30 events, which represents an 80% success rate. This corroboration of the validity of the technique used to identify historical occurences of intense geomagnetic storms is important because early unaided-eye observations of sunspots and aurorae provide the only possible means of identifying individual historical geomagnetic storms during the greater part of the past two millennia.

  14. Modes of high-latitude auroral conductance variability derived from DMSP energetic electron precipitation observations: Empirical orthogonal function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGranaghan, Ryan; Knipp, Delores J.; Matsuo, Tomoko; Godinez, Humberto; Redmon, Robert J.; Solomon, Stanley C.; Morley, Steven K.

    2015-12-01

    We provide the first ever characterization of the primary modes of ionospheric Hall and Pedersen conductance variability as empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). These are derived from six satellite years of Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) particle data acquired during the rise of solar cycles 22 and 24. The 60 million DMSP spectra were each processed through the Global Airlglow Model. Ours is the first large-scale analysis of ionospheric conductances completely free of assumption of the incident electron energy spectra. We show that the mean patterns and first four EOFs capture ˜50.1 and 52.9% of the total Pedersen and Hall conductance variabilities, respectively. The mean patterns and first EOFs are consistent with typical diffuse auroral oval structures and quiet time strengthening/weakening of the mean pattern. The second and third EOFs show major disturbance features of magnetosphere-ionosphere (MI) interactions: geomagnetically induced auroral zone expansion in EOF2 and the auroral substorm current wedge in EOF3. The fourth EOFs suggest diminished conductance associated with ionospheric substorm recovery mode. We identify the most important modes of ionospheric conductance variability. Our results will allow improved modeling of the background error covariance needed for ionospheric assimilative procedures and improved understanding of MI coupling processes.

  15. Possible evidence for partial demagnetization of electrons in the auroral E-region plasma during electron gas heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Haldoupis

    Full Text Available A previous study, based on incoherent and coherent radar measurements, suggested that during auroral E-region electron heating conditions, the electron flow in the auroral electrojet undergoes a systematic counterclockwise rotation of several degrees relative to the E×B direction. The observational evidence is re-examined here in the light of theoretical predictions concerning E-region electron demagnetization caused by enhanced anomalous cross-field diffusion during strongly-driven Farley-Buneman instability. It is shown that the observations are in good agreement with this theory. This apparently endorses the concept of wave-induced diffusion and anomalous electron collision frequency, and consequently electron demagnetization, under circumstances of strong heating of the electron gas in the auroral electrojet plasma. We recognize, however, that the evidence for electron demagnetization presented in this report cannot be regarded as definitive because it is based on a limited set of data. More experimental research in this direction is thus needed.

  16. Intensity asymmetries in the dusk sector of the poleward auroral oval due to IMF $\\mathit{B}_{x}$

    CERN Document Server

    Reistad, J P; Laundal, K M; Haaland, S; Tenfjord, P; Snekvik, K; Oksavik, K; Milan, S E

    2016-01-01

    In the exploration of global-scale features of the Earth's aurora, little attention has been given to the radial component of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). This study investigates the global auroral response in both hemispheres when the IMF is southward and lies in the $\\textit{xz}$ plane. We present a statistical study of the average auroral response in the 12-24 magnetic local time (MLT) sector to an $\\textit{x}$ component in the IMF. Maps of auroral intensity in both hemispheres for two IMF $\\mathit{B}_{x}$ dominated conditions($ \\pm $ IMF $\\mathit{B}_{x}$) are shown during periods of negative IMF $\\mathit{B}_{z}$, small IMF $\\mathit{B}_{y}$, and local winter. This is obtained by using global imaging from the Wideband Imaging Camera on the IMAGE satellite. The analysis indicates a significant asymmetry between the two IMF $\\mathit{B}_{x}$ dominated conditions in both hemispheres. In the Northern Hemisphere the aurora is brighter in the 15-19 MLT region during negative IMF $\\mathit{B}_{x}$. In th...

  17. Estimates of the field-aligned current density in current-carrying filaments using auroral zone ground-based observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Danielides

    Full Text Available We described the ground signatures of dynamic substorm features as observed by the imaging riometer, magnetometers and all-sky camera (ASC at Kilpisjärvi, Finland on 5 and 25 October 1999 during the late evening hours. The magnetometer data was consistent with the motion of up-ward field-aligned currents (FACs associated with absorption patches moving within the field of view of the riometer. We used riometer data in order to estimate the intensity of FACs associated with these local current-carrying filaments. It is shown that during these events, the estimated FAC intensity exceeds a threshold value that corresponds to the excitation of the low-frequency turbulence in the upper ionosphere. As a result, a quasi-oscillating regime of anomalous resistivity on the auroral field lines can give rise to the burst-like electron acceleration responsible for simultaneously observed auroral forms and bursts of Pi1B pulsations.

    Key words. Ionosphere (active experiments; auroral ionosphere; electric fields and currents

  18. Substorm processes in the geomagnetic tail and their effect in the nightside auroral zone ionosphere as observed by EISCAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current understanding of magnetospheric substorms is reviewed with special emphasis on the relation between space-based and ground-based observations. Traditional means of monitoring substorms from the ground (by using magnetometers, riometers and auroral observations) give only a selective picture of the whole phenomenon, related to the precipitation of electrons with energies above 1 keV. Measurements by incoherent scatter radar, such as the European incoherent scatter facility (EISCAT), give a more complete and continuous picture. The 'neutral line' model of substorms provides a natural, physical basis on which relevant data can be interpreted. In this picture, two sources of flow are anticipated in the nightside auroral zones, one 'directly driven' (with a delay of 15-20 min) by the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) Bz component and associated with dayside reconnection, and the other appearing typically an hour after southward turnings of the IMF and associated with rapid tail reconnection during substorms. Evidence for the influence of both sources of flow is found in nightside EISCAT data. These data also reveal that, overall, the nightside ionospheric flow and plasma parameters often vary in a quasi-periodic way with a period of ca. 1 h. In two cases in which concurrent interplanetary data are available it appears that the periodicity is inherent in IMF Bz, but this is not expressed unmodified in the auroral zone because of the presence of the two sources of flow which depend on IMF Bz in different ways. (author)

  19. Ion acoustic instability of HPT particles, FAC density, anomalous resistivity and parallel electric field in the auroral region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C S Jayasree; G Renuka; C Venugopal

    2003-12-01

    During the magnetic storm of 21st March 1990, the DE-1 spacecraft encountered the auroral region at high invariant latitude at altitudes ranging from a few thousand kilometers in the ionosphere to many earth radii in the magnetosphere. The magnetic field perturbations interpretable as field aligned current (FAC) layers and the electrostatic turbulence possibly due to electrostatic ion acoustic instability driven by these currents are shown. The critical drift velocity of Hot Plasma Torus (HPT) electrons and the growth rate of ion acoustic wave as a function of electron to ion temperature ratio (/) for low and high current densities and energy of HPT electrons are found out. The intense FAC destabilizes the ion acoustic wave and the resultant electrostatic turbulence creates an anomalous resistivity. The current driven resistivity produces parallel electric field and high power dissipation. The anomalous resistivity , potential differnece along the auroral field lines ∥, intensity of electric field turbulence ∥ and power produced per unit volume are computed. It is found that the change in westward magnetic perturbation increases ∥; ; ∥ ;∥ and . Hence HPT electrons are heated and accelerated due to power dissipation during magnetically active periods in the auroral region. Concerning, applications, such HPT electrons can be used in particle accelerators like electron ring accelerator, smokatron etc.

  20. Controlling Charging and Arcing on a Solar Powered Auroral Orbiting Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Dale C.; Rhee, Michael S.

    2008-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement satellite (GPM) will be launched into a high inclination (65 degree) orbit to monitor rainfall on a global scale. Satellites in high inclination orbits have been shown to charge to high negative potentials, with the possibility of arcing on the solar arrays, when three conditions are met: a drop in plasma density below approximately 10,000 cm(exp -3), an injection of energetic electrons of energy more that 7-10 keV, and passage through darkness. Since all of these conditions are expected to obtain for some of the GPM orbits, charging calculations were done using first the Space Environment and Effects (SEE) Program Interactive Spacecraft Charging Handbook, and secondly the NASA Air-force Spacecraft Charging Analyzer Program (NASCAP-2k). The object of the calculations was to determine if charging was likely for the GPM configuration and materials, and specifically to see if choosing a particular type of thermal white paint would help minimize charging. A detailed NASCAP-2k geometrical model of the GPM spacecraft was built, with such a large number of nodes that it challenged the capability of NASCAP-2k to do the calculations. The results of the calculations were that for worst-case auroral charging conditions, charging to levels on the order of -120 to -230 volts could occur on GPM during night-time, with differential voltages on the solar arrays that might lead to solar array arcing. In sunlit conditions, charging did not exceed -20 V under any conditions. The night-time results were sensitive to the spacecraft surface materials chosen. For non-conducting white paints, the charging was severe, and could continue unabated throughout the passage of GPM through the auroral zone. Somewhat conductive (dissipative) white paints minimized the night-time charging to levels of -120 V or less, and thus were recommended for GPM thermal control. It is shown that the choice of thermal control paints is important to prevent arcing on high

  1. Interferometric radar observations of filamented structures due to plasma instabilities and their relation to dynamic auroral rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Grydeland

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Several explanations have been proposed for Naturally Enhanced ion-acoustic Echoes observed at mid- and high-latitude Incoherent Scatter observatories. A decisive measure for distinguishing between these explanations is whether or not simultaneously observed up- and down-shifted enhancement occur simultaneously, or if they are the result of temporal and/or spatial averaging.

    The EISCAT Svalbard Radar has two antennas in the same radar system, which can be used as an interferometer when pointed parallel. In observations from 17 January 2002, between 06:46:10 and 06:46:30 UT, we used this possibility, in combination with direct sampling of the received signals, to yield measurements of "naturally enhanced ion-acoustic echoes" with sufficiently high resolution to resolve such averaging, if any. For the first time, radar interferometry has been employed to estimate the sizes of coherent structures. The observations were coordinated with an image intensified video camera with a narrow field of view. Together, this forms the initial study on the causal relationships between enhanced echoes and fine structure in the auroral activity on sub-kilometer, sub-second scales.

    The results confirm that the enhanced echoes originate from very localised regions (~300m perpendicular to the magnetic field at 500km altitude with varying range distribution, and with high time variability (≈200ms. The corresponding increase in scattering cross section, up to 50dB above incoherent scattering, eliminates theoretical explanations based on marginal stability. The simultaneously observed up- and down-shifted enhanced shoulders, when caused by sufficiently narrow structures to be detected by the interferometer technique, originate predominantly from the same volume. These results have significant impact on theories attempting to explain the enhancements, in particular it is found that the ion

  2. Branches of electrostatic turbulence inside solitary plasma structures in the auroral ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The excitation of electrostatic turbulence inside space-observed solitary structures is a central topic of this exposition. Three representative solitary structures observed in the topside auroral ionosphere as large-amplitude nonlinear signatures in the electric field and magnetic-field-aligned current on the transverse scales of ∼102–103 m are evaluated by the theories of electrostatic wave generation in inhomogeneous background configurations. A quantitative analysis shows that the structures are, in general, effective in destabilizing the inhomogeneous energy-density-driven (IEDD) waves, as well as of the ion acoustic waves modified by a shear in the parallel drift of ions. It is demonstrated that the dominating branch of the electrostatic turbulence is determined by the interplay of various driving sources inside a particular solitary structure. The sources do not generally act in unison, so that their common effect may be inhibiting for excitation of electrostatic waves of a certain type. In the presence of large magnetic-field-aligned current, which is not correlated to the inhomogeneous electric field inside the structure, the ion-acoustic branch becomes dominating. In other cases, the IEDD instability is more central

  3. Inhomogeneities of plasma density and electric field as sources of electrostatic turbulence in the auroral region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhomogeneities of plasma density and non-uniform electric fields are compared as possible sources of a sort of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves that can be identified with broadband extremely low frequency electrostatic turbulence in the topside auroral ionosphere. Such waves are excited by inhomogeneous energy-density-driven instability. To gain a deeper insight in generation of these waves, computational modeling is performed with various plasma parameters. It is demonstrated that inhomogeneities of plasma density can give rise to this instability even in the absence of electric fields. By using both satellite-observed and model spatial distributions of plasma density and electric field in our modeling, we show that specific details of the spatial distributions are of minor importance for the wave generation. The solutions of the nonlocal inhomogeneous energy-density-driven dispersion relation are investigated for various ion-to-electron temperature ratios and directions of wave propagation. The relevance of the solutions to the observed spectra of broadband extremely low frequency emissions is shown

  4. Upper atmospheric effects of the hf active auroral research program ionospheric research instrument (HAARP IRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eccles, V.; Armstrong, R.

    1993-05-01

    The earth's ozone layer occurs in the stratosphere, primarily between 10 and 30 miles altitude. The amount of ozone, O3, present is the result of a balance between production and destruction processes. Experiments have shown that natural processes such as auroras create molecules that destroy O. One family of such molecules is called odd nitrogen of which nitric oxide (NO) is an example. Because the HAARP (HF Active Auroral Research Program) facility is designed to mimic and investigate certain natural processes, a study of possible effects of HAARP on the ozone layer was conducted. The study used a detailed model of the thermal and chemical effects of the high power HF beam, which interacts with free electrons in the upper atmosphere above 50 miles altitude. It was found only a small fraction of the beam energy goes into the production of odd nitrogen molecules, whereas odd nitrogen is efficiently produced by auroras. Since the total energy emitted by HAARP in the year is some 200,000 times less than the energy deposited in the upper atmosphere by auroras, the study demonstrates that HAARP HF beam experiments will cause no measurable depletion of the earth's ozone layer.... Ozone, Ozone depletion, Ozone layer, Odd nitrogen, Nitric oxide, HAARP Emitter characteristics.

  5. Reconstruction of an Intense Auroral Z-Pinch from Instabilities Recorded in Antiquity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peratt, A. L.; van der Sluijs, M. A.; McGovern, J.; Bustamante, P.

    2006-10-01

    The GPS locations and survey field-of view data representing some three million rock carvings at petroglyph sites world-wide has been assembled. In addition to previous sites [1], logging has been completed at two major sites in Mongolia; some three-dozen sites in the Flinders Range, South Australia; and in central Chile. The data allows a visual reconstruction of a sub-gigaampere auroral Z-pinch column whose plasma flow was bent inward towards the south polar axis, subsequently flowing around the Earth. Analysis is by means of two and three dimensional satellite and aerial orthophotography with side looking radar sets allowing near ground level to vertical inspection of all-terrain views from each site. It is found that petroglyphs, shown to be depictions of synchrotron light from MHD instabilities, possess polar south preferred orientations and right-ascension-declination information. [1] A. L. Peratt, ``Characteristics for the occurrence of a high-current Z-pinch aurora as recorded in Antiquity,'' IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. V.31, 2003.

  6. Negative ions in the auroral mesosphere during a PCA event around sunset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. del Pozo

    Full Text Available This is a study of the negative ion chemistry in the mesosphere above Tromsø using a number of EISCAT observations of high energy proton precipitation events during the last solar maximum, and in particular around sunset on 23 October, 1989. In these conditions it is possible to look at the relative importance of the various photodetachment and photodissociation processes controlling the concentration of negative ions. The data analysed are from several UHF GEN11 determinations of the ion-plasma ACF together with the pseudo zero-lag estimate of the `raw' electron density, at heights between 55 km and 85 km, at less than 1 km resolution. The power profiles from the UHF are combined with the 55-ion Sodankylä model to obtain consistent estimates of the electron density, the negative ion concentrations, and the average ion mass with height. The neutral concentrations and ion temperature are given by the MSIS90 model. These parameters are then used to compare the calculated widths of the ion-line with the GEN11 determinations. The ion-line spectrum gives information on the effects of negative ions below 70 km where they are dominant; the spectral width is almost a direct measure of the relative abundance of negative ions.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ion chemistry and composition; particle precipitation.

  7. Dynamics of polar boundary of the auroral oval derived from the IMAGE satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukianova, R.; Kozlovsky, A.

    2013-01-01

    Based on a new database on positions of the auroral oval boundaries including measurements made by the IMAGE satellite in 2000-2002 with correct determination of the glow boundaries, statistical estimations of the latitudinal position of the polar cap boundary (PCB) are obtained depending on the IMF B y and B z , and the PCB evolution during a magnetic storm is analyzed. At zero IMF in the noon (midnight) sector, PCB is located approximately at 80° (76°) CGMLat. The PCB displacement along the noon-midnight meridian is controlled by the IMF B z , and in the noon (midnight) sector it is equal to 0.45° (0.15°) CGMLat when B z changes by 1 nT. The PCB displacement along the dawn-dusk meridian depends on the IMF B y , and it equals 0.1° CGMLat when B y changes by 1 nT. Accordingly, the north polar cap as a whole is shifted to the dawn (dusk) side at B y > 0 ( B y night boundary requires 25 h or more in order to be shifted to the pole to a latitude corresponding to B z > 0.

  8. Numerical study of the auroral particle transport in the polar upper atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Starting from the Boltzmann equation and with some reasonable assumptions, a one-dimensional transport equation of charged energetic particles is derived by taking account of major interactions with neutral species in the upper atmosphere, including the processes of elastic scattering, the excitation, the ionization and the secondary electron production. The transport equation is numerically solved, for a simplified atmosphere consisting only of nitrogen molecules (N2), to obtain the variations of incident electron fluxes as a function of altitude, energy and pitch angle. The model results can describe fairly the transport characteristics of pre-cipitating auroral electron spectra in the polar upper atmosphere; meanwhile the N2 ionization rates calculated from the modeled differential flux spectra also exhibit good agreements with existing empirical models in terms of several key parameters. Taking the energy flux spectra of precipitating electrons observed by FAST satellite flying over EISCAT site on May 15, 1997 as model inputs, the model-calculated ionization rate profile of neutral atmosphere consists reasonably with that recon-structed from electron density measurements by the radar.

  9. Nearly simultaneous measurements of radar auroral heights and Doppler velocities at 398 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nearly simultaneous measurements of radar auroral heights and Doppler velocities were obtained using the Homer, Alaska, 398-MHz phased-array radar over a total of 16 hours on four different days. The heights show a consistent variation with time, being highest near the time of electrojet current reversal, and lowest late in the morning. A variety of east-west height asymmetries were observed, different from those previously reported, which can be explained in terms of favorable flow angles preferentially favoring high-altitude primary two-stream waves to one side of the field of view. Low-velocity echoes, presumably due to secondary irregularities, are found to be more restricted in height range than echoes with ion acoustic velocities, which presumably come from primary two-stream instabilities. Echo power was examined as a function of velocity and height. For the westward electrojet it was found that echoes with ion acoustic velocities are relatively constant in strength over most of their height range, but for low-velocity echoes the power is a maximum between 100 and 105 km and falls off steadily at greater heights. Doppler speeds show a noticeable decrease at heights below 105 km, in agreement with the expected variation in ion acoustic velocity

  10. First Terrestrial Soft X-Ray Auroral Observation by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Gladstone, G. Randall; Elsner, Ronald F.; Oestgaard, Nikolai; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Cravens, Thomas E.; Chang, Shen-Wu; Majeed, Tariq; Metzger, Albert E.

    2007-01-01

    Northern auroral regions of Earth were imaged with energetic photons in the 0.1-10keV range using the High-Resolution Camera (HRC-I) aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory at 10 epochs (each approx.20 min duration) between mid- December 2003 and mid-April 2004. These observations aimed at searching for Earth's soft (X-ray aurora in a comparative study with Jupiter's X-ray aurora, where a pulsating X-ray "hot-spot" has been previously observed by Chandra. The first Chandra soft X-ray observations of Earth's aurora show that it is highly variable 0ntense arcs, multiple arcs, diffuse patches, at times absent). In at least one of the observations an isolated blob of emission is observed near the expected cusp location. A fortuitous overflight of DMSP satellite F13 provided SSJ/4 energetic particle measurements above a bright arc seen by Chandra on 24 January 2004, 20:01-20:22 UT. A model of the emissions expected strongly suggests that the observed soft X-ray signal is bremsstrahlung and characteristic K-shell line emissions of nitrogen and oxygen in the atmosphere produced by electrons.

  11. Sheared magnetospheric plasma flows and discrete auroral arcs: a quasi-static coupling model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Echim

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider sheared flows in magnetospheric boundary layers of tangential discontinuity type, forming a structure that is embedded in a large-scale convergent perpendicular electric field. We construct a kinetic model that couples the magnetospheric structure with the topside ionosphere. The contribution of magnetospheric electrons and ionospheric electrons and ions is taken into account into the current-voltage relationship derived for an electric potential monotonically decreasing with the altitude. The solution of the current continuity equation gives the distribution of the ionospheric potential consistent with the given magnetospheric electric potential. The model shows that a sheared magnetospheric flow generates current sheets corresponding to upward field-aligned currents, field-aligned potential drops and narrow bands of precipitating energy, as in discrete auroral arcs. Higher velocity magnetospheric sheared flows have the tendency to produce brighter and slightly broader arcs. An increase in arc luminosity is also associated with enhancements of magnetospheric plasma density, in which case the structures are narrower. Finally, the model predicts that an increase of the electron temperature of the magnetospheric flowing plasma corresponds to slightly wider arcs but does not modify their luminosity.

  12. Tests of Sunspot Number Sequences: 2. Using Geomagnetic and Auroral Data

    CERN Document Server

    Lockwood, Mike; Barnard, Luke A; Scott, Chris J; Usoskin, Ilya G; Nevanlinna, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    We compare four sunspot-number data sequences against geomagnetic and terrestrial auroral observations. The comparisons are made for the original SIDC composite of Wolf-Zurich-International sunspot number [$R_{ISNv1}$], the group sunspot number [$R_{G}$] by Hoyt and Schatten (Solar Phys., 1998), the new "backbone" group sunspot number [$R_{BB}$] by Svalgaard and Schatten (Solar Phys., 2016), and the "corrected" sunspot number [$R_{C}$] by Lockwood at al. (J.G.R., 2014). Each sunspot number is fitted with terrestrial observations, or parameters derived from terrestrial observations to be linearly proportional to sunspot number, over a 30-year calibration interval of 1982-2012. The fits are then used to compute test sequences, which extend further back in time and which are compared to $R_{ISNv1}$, $R_{G}$, $R_{BB}$, and $R_{C}$. To study the long-term trends, comparisons are made using averages over whole solar cycles (minimum-to-minimum). The test variations are generated in four ways: i) using the IDV(1d) an...

  13. HiT&MIS: Instrumentation for Auroral and Ionospheric Airglow Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewawasam, K.; Maguire, R.; Chakrabarti, S.; Cook, T.; Baumgardner, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a high-throughput imaging spectrograph that uses an echelle grating operating at a high dispersion order to observe extended sources such as atmospheric airglow and auroral emissions at high spectral resolution. Instead of the conventional single slit this instrument uses four with appropriate foreoptics to image a long, narrow field of view of approximately 0.1 × 50 deg. By using interference filters for order sorting, this instrument can simultaneously observe multiple spectral features located anywhere in the visible band (approximately 300 to 1000 nm) at high resolution. The current implementation images the scene at 6 wavelengths (427.8, 486.1, 557.7, 630.0, 656.3 and 777.4 nm), but the flexibility of the design of the instrument allows varying the wavelengths of interest with minimal modifications. We have constructed two spectrographs to be located at different geomagnetic locations. This will enable tomography of atmospheric phenomena for full 3-D rendering of the volume emission. We will combine HiT&MIS data with data from LITES, GROUP-C (on ISS) and other ground based sources such as GIRO, HiTIES, HIRISE and CHIMES along with the 13 all-sky imagers operated by Boston University to form a more complete picture of the ionosphere.This work is supported by the NSF grant AGS1315354

  14. Backward mapping solutions of the Boltzmann equation in cylindrically symmetric, uniformly charged auroral ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, John Z. G.; St.-Maurice, J.-P.

    2015-06-01

    By applying a backward mapping technique, we solve the Boltzmann equation to investigate the effects of ion-neutral collisions on the ion velocity distribution and related transport properties in cylindrically symmetric, uniformly charged auroral ionosphere. Such a charge geometry introduces a radial electric field which increases linearly with distance from the axis of symmetry. In order to obtain complete analytical solutions for gaining physical insights into more complicated problems, we have substituted a relaxation collision model for the Boltzmann collision integral in the Boltzmann equation. Our calculations show that collisions drive the velocity distribution to a "horseshoe" shape after a few collision times. This feature extends to all radial positions as long as the electric field keeps increasing linearly versus radius. If the electric field is introduced suddenly, there is a transition from the collision-free pulsating Maxwellian distributions obtained in previous work (Ma and St.-Maurice, J. Geophys. Res., 113:A05312, 2008) to the "horseshoe" shapes on a time scale of within the few collision times. We also show how the transport properties evolve in a similar fashion, from oscillating to a non-oscillating features over the same time interval.

  15. Climatology of the Ionospheric Scintillations over the Auroral and Cusp European Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spogli, L.; Alfonsi, L.; de Franceschi, G.; Romano, V.; Aquino, M.; Dodson, A.

    2009-04-01

    Under perturbed conditions coming from the outer space, the ionosphere may become highly turbulent and small scale (from centimeters to meters) irregularities, typically enhancements or depletions of the electron density embedded in the ambient ionosphere, can form causing diffraction effects on the satellites signals passing through them. Such effect can abruptly corrupt the performance of the positioning systems affecting, in turn, the awareness and safety of the modern devices. In this paper we analyze data of ionospheric scintillation in the latitudinal range 57°- 88° N during the period October, November and December 2003 as a first step to develop a "scintillation climatology" over the Northern Europe. The behavior of the scintillation occurrence as function of the magnetic local time and of the corrected magnetic latitude is investigated to characterize the scintillation conditions. The Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) and the Institute of Engineering Surveying and Space Geodesy (IESSG) of the University of Nottingham manage the same kind of GISTM (GPS Ionospheric Scintillation and TEC monitor) receivers over the European middle and high latitude regions. The results here shown and obtained merging observations from three GISTM, highlight also the possibility to investigate the dynamics of irregularities causing scintillation by combining the information coming from auroral to cusp latitudes. The findings, even if at a very preliminary stage, are here presented also in the frame of possible Space Weather implications.

  16. Pitch angle diffusion in morningside aurorae 2. The formation of repetitive auroral pulsations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filling of the loss cone by pitch angle diffusion will quench the growth of VLF waves that interact with substorm-injected electrons in the morningside auroral region. This occurs for any wave mode whose growth rate is sensitive to the anisotropy of the electron distribution near the loss cone. A pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations is developed to describe the coupling between the growth of waves and the pitch angle diffusion of electrons. The equations differ from those previously used to model repetitive precipitation pulsations (Davidson, 1979) in that the wave growth in the earlier model was assumed to be sensitive mainly to the total electron flux. The earlier model therefore was limited by the strong diffusion lifetime. The pulsation periods in the earlier model were too long and strongly damped. The new model predicts cyclic or repetitive precipitation pulsations for a wide range of conditions, with periods of 3--30 s, and negligible damping. The model agrees well with an extensive body of observational data

  17. Magnetic Storm Effects in the Auroral Ionosphere Observed with EISCAT Radar -Two Case Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Storm-time changes of main plasma parameters in the auroral ionosphere are analyzed for two intense storms occurring on May 15, 1997 and Sept. 25, 1998, with emphasis on their relationship to the solar wind dynamic pressure and the IMF Bz component. Strong hard particle precipitation occurred in the initial phase for both storma,associated with high solar wind dynamical pressure. During the recovery phase of the storms, some strong particle precipitation was neither concerned with high solar wind pressure nor southward IMF Bz. Severe negative storm effects depicted by electron density depletion appeared in theF-region during the main and recovery phase of both storms, caused by intensive electric field-related strong Joule/frictional heating when IMF was largely southward. The ion temperature behaved similarly in E- and F-region, but the electron temperature did quite different, with a strong increase in the lower E-region relating to plasma instability excited by strong electric field and a slight decrease in the F-region probably concerning with a cooling process. The field-aligned ion velocity was high and apparently anticorrelated with the northward component of the ion convection velocity.

  18. ''Electron Conic'' Signatures observed in the nightside auroral zone and over the polar cap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary search of the Dynamics Explorer 1 high-altitude plasma instrument data base has yielded examples of ''electron conic'' signatures. The three example passes show an association with regions of downward electron acceleration and upward ion beams, but this is not true of all the electron conic events. The electron conic signatures are clearly discernible on energy-flux-versus-time color spectrograms as pairs of discrete vertical bands which are symmetric about a pitch angle of approximately 1800. One of the examples is a polar cap pass with electron conic signatures observed at invariant latitudes from 840 to 750. The other two cases are nightside auroral zone passes in which the regions of detectable electron conics are spatially more confined, covering only about 10 in invariant latitude. The conic signatures have been found at energies that range from 50 eV0 is larger than expected for a loss cone feature. If the electrons conserve the first adiabatic invariant in a dipole magnetic field, and in some cases a parallel electric field, the mirroring altitude varies between about 500 km and 8000 km, which is above the atmospheric loss region. For this reason, and in analogy with the formation of ion conics, we suggest that the conic signatures are produced by heating of the electrons perpendicular to the magnetic field

  19. Inhomogeneities of plasma density and electric field as sources of electrostatic turbulence in the auroral region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilyasov, Askar A., E-mail: asjosik@mail.ru [Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Science, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region 141700 (Russian Federation); Chernyshov, Alexander A., E-mail: achernyshov@iki.rssi.ru; Mogilevsky, Mikhail M., E-mail: mogilevsky@romance.iki.rssi.ru [Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Science, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Golovchanskaya, Irina V., E-mail: golovchanskaya@pgia.ru; Kozelov, Boris V., E-mail: boris.kozelov@gmail.com [Polar Geophysical Institute of the Russian Academy of Science, Apatity, Murmansk region 184209 (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Inhomogeneities of plasma density and non-uniform electric fields are compared as possible sources of a sort of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves that can be identified with broadband extremely low frequency electrostatic turbulence in the topside auroral ionosphere. Such waves are excited by inhomogeneous energy-density-driven instability. To gain a deeper insight in generation of these waves, computational modeling is performed with various plasma parameters. It is demonstrated that inhomogeneities of plasma density can give rise to this instability even in the absence of electric fields. By using both satellite-observed and model spatial distributions of plasma density and electric field in our modeling, we show that specific details of the spatial distributions are of minor importance for the wave generation. The solutions of the nonlocal inhomogeneous energy-density-driven dispersion relation are investigated for various ion-to-electron temperature ratios and directions of wave propagation. The relevance of the solutions to the observed spectra of broadband extremely low frequency emissions is shown.

  20. Branches of electrostatic turbulence inside solitary plasma structures in the auroral ionosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovchanskaya, Irina V.; Kozelov, Boris V. [Polar Geophysical Institute, Apatity 184209 (Russian Federation); Chernyshov, Alexander A.; Mogilevsky, Mikhail M. [Space research Institute, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Ilyasov, Askar A. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Moscow 141700 (Russian Federation); Space research Institute, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-15

    The excitation of electrostatic turbulence inside space-observed solitary structures is a central topic of this exposition. Three representative solitary structures observed in the topside auroral ionosphere as large-amplitude nonlinear signatures in the electric field and magnetic-field-aligned current on the transverse scales of ∼10{sup 2}–10{sup 3} m are evaluated by the theories of electrostatic wave generation in inhomogeneous background configurations. A quantitative analysis shows that the structures are, in general, effective in destabilizing the inhomogeneous energy-density-driven (IEDD) waves, as well as of the ion acoustic waves modified by a shear in the parallel drift of ions. It is demonstrated that the dominating branch of the electrostatic turbulence is determined by the interplay of various driving sources inside a particular solitary structure. The sources do not generally act in unison, so that their common effect may be inhibiting for excitation of electrostatic waves of a certain type. In the presence of large magnetic-field-aligned current, which is not correlated to the inhomogeneous electric field inside the structure, the ion-acoustic branch becomes dominating. In other cases, the IEDD instability is more central.

  1. A localized swarm of low-resource CubeSat-class spacecraft for auroral ionospheric science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, R.; Lynch, K. A.; Gayetsky, L.; Guinther, J.; Slagle, A.; Currey, S.

    2012-12-01

    In interesting and dynamic auroral ionospheric plasmas, single-point in situ measurements are insufficient. Changes in measurements recorded from a single probe can be ascribed to either changes in position or to changes over time, and gradient scales can only be inferred. A localized array of sensors deployed as a low-resource swarm from a main deployer, can address these issues. We consider two aspects of designing such a swarm: (a) maintaining the localization in a low-cost manner, and (b) creating an extremely low-resource spacecraft by taking advantage of commercially available technologies. For a few-week low-altitude mission, STK (SatelliteToolKit) studies show that with proper deployment, an array of CubeSat-class spacecraft near 350 km altitude can regroup once per orbit to within a few 10s of km. Kepler's laws and Hill's equations allow us to put constraints on the capability of the deployer needed, in order to deploy the array with a minimal component of the ejection velocity along the orbital track. In order to keep the cost of each spacecraft low, we are exploring commercially available technologies such as Arduino controllers and video-game sensors. The Arduino on each payload will take in information from the sensors on the payload, and will send the information to a DNT-900MHz local area communications system. We show an example experiment measuring river flows on the Connecticut river, and discuss the design of our payload swarm.

  2. Rocket and satellite observations of electric fields and ion convection in the dayside auroral ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electric field observations from two high-altitude rocket flights in the polar cusp have been combined with satellite observations of ion drifts to infer details of the electric field and convection pattern of the dayside auroral ionosphere. A region of shear flow reversal can be inferred from the electric field observations on one flight near 15.30 MLT 20 minutes after the Dynamics Explorer 2 satellite crossed through the same region. The drift patterns observed by the two spacecrafts were very similar although shifted by 0.5 degrees, a shift which is expected from the observed change in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B(sub)Z component during this time. A region of rotational flow reversal was covered by the other flight shortly after magnetic noon, at the same time the DE-2 satellite travelled along roughly the dawn-dusk meridian. By joining points of equal potential, integrated from the two datasets and assuming the reversal boundary to be an equipotential, the instantaneous convection pattern could be drawn showing crescent-shaped convection contours in the dusk cell and more circular shaped contours in the dawn cell. (author)

  3. Electrostatic shock properties inferred from AKR fine structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pottelette

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The auroral kilometric radiation (AKR consists of a large number of fast drifting elementary radiation events that have been interpreted as travelling electron holes resulting from the nonlinear evolution of electron-acoustic waves. The elementary radiation structures sometimes become reflected or trapped in slowly drifting larger structures where the parallel electric fields are located. These latter features have spectral frequency drifts which can be interpreted in terms of the propagation of shock-like disturbances along the auroral field line at velocities near the ion-acoustic speed. The amplitude, speed, and shock width of such localized ion-acoustic shocks are determined here in the fluid approximation from the Sagdeev potential, assuming realistic plasma parameters. It is emphasized that the electrostatic potentials of such nonlinear structures contribute to auroral acceleration.

  4. The search for a subsurface ocean in Ganymede with Hubble Space Telescope observations of its auroral ovals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saur, Joachim; Duling, Stefan; Roth, Lorenz; Jia, Xianzhe; Strobel, Darrell F.; Feldman, Paul D.; Christensen, Ulrich R.; Retherford, Kurt D.; McGrath, Melissa A.; Musacchio, Fabrizio; Wennmacher, Alexandre; Neubauer, Fritz M.; Simon, Sven; Hartkorn, Oliver

    2015-03-01

    We present a new approach to search for a subsurface ocean within Ganymede through observations and modeling of the dynamics of its auroral ovals. The locations of the auroral ovals oscillate due to Jupiter's time-varying magnetospheric field seen in the rest frame of Ganymede. If an electrically conductive ocean is present, the external time-varying magnetic field is reduced due to induction within the ocean and the oscillation amplitude of the ovals decreases. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations show that the locations of the ovals oscillate on average by 2.0° ±1.3°. Our model calculations predict a significantly stronger oscillation by 5.8° ± 1.3° without ocean compared to 2.2°±1.3° if an ocean is present. Because the ocean and the no-ocean hypotheses cannot be separated by simple visual inspection of individual HST images, we apply a statistical analysis including a Monte Carlo test to also address the uncertainty caused by the patchiness of observed emissions. The observations require a minimum electrical conductivity of 0.09 S/m for an ocean assumed to be located between 150 km and 250 km depth or alternatively a maximum depth of the top of the ocean at 330 km. Our analysis implies that Ganymede's dynamo possesses an outstandingly low quadrupole-to-dipole moment ratio. The new technique applied here is suited to probe the interior of other planetary bodies by monitoring their auroral response to time-varying magnetic fields.

  5. An interhemispheric comparison of GPS phase scintillation with auroral emission observed at the South Pole and from the DMSP satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Prikryl

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The global positioning system (GPS phase scintillation caused by high-latitude ionospheric irregularities during an intense high-speed stream (HSS of the solar wind from April 29 to May 5, 2011, was observed using arrays of GPS ionospheric scintillation and total electron content monitors in the Arctic and Antarctica. The one-minute phase-scintillation index derived from the data sampled at 50 Hz was complemented by a proxy index (delta phase rate obtained from 1-Hz GPS data. The scintillation occurrence coincided with the aurora borealis and aurora australis observed by an all-sky imager at the South Pole, and by special sensor ultraviolet scanning imagers on board satellites of the Defense Meteorological Satellites Program. The South Pole (SP station is approximately conjugate with two Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network stations on Baffin Island, Canada, which provided the opportunity to study magnetic conjugacy of scintillation with support of riometers and magnetometers. The GPS ionospheric pierce points were mapped at their actual or conjugate locations, along with the auroral emission over the South Pole, assuming an altitude of 120 km. As the aurora brightened and/or drifted across the field of view of the all-sky imager, sequences of scintillation events were observed that indicated conjugate auroras as a locator of simultaneous or delayed bipolar scintillation events. In spite of the greater scintillation intensity in the auroral oval, where phase scintillation sometimes exceeded 1 radian during the auroral break-up and substorms, the percentage occurrence of moderate scintillation was highest in the cusp. Interhemispheric comparisons of bipolar scintillation maps show that the scintillation occurrence is significantly higher in the southern cusp and polar cap.

  6. Equivalent currents associated with morning-sector geomagnetic Pc5 pulsations during auroral substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauristie, K.; Uspensky, M. V.; Kleimenova, N. G.; Kozyreva, O. V.; Van De Kamp, M. M. J. L.; Dubyagin, S. V.; Massetti, S.

    2016-04-01

    Space and time variations of equivalent currents during morning-sector Pc5 pulsations (T ˜ 2-8 min) on 2 days (18 January and 19 February 2008) are studied in the context of substorm activity with THEMIS and MIRACLE ground-based instruments and THEMIS P3, P5, and P2 probes. These instruments covered the 22:00-07:00 magnetic local time during the analyzed events. In these cases abrupt changes in the Pc5 amplitudes, intensifications and/or weakenings, were recorded some minutes after auroral breakups in the midnight sector. We analyze three examples of Pc5 changes with the goal to resolve whether substorm activity can have an effect on Pc5 amplitude or not. In two cases (on 19 February) the most likely explanation for Pc5 amplitude changes comes from the solar wind (changes in the sign of interplanetary magnetic field Bz). In the third case (on 18 January) equivalent current patterns in the morning sector show an antisunward-propagating vortex which replaced the Pc5-related smaller vortices and consequently the pulsations weakened. We associate the large vortex with a field-aligned current system due to a sudden, although small, drop in solar wind pressure (from 1 to 0.2 nPa). However, the potential impact of midnight substorm activity cannot be totally excluded in this case, because enhanced fluxes of electrons with high enough energies (˜ 280 keV) to reach the region of Pc5 within the observed delay were observed by THEMIS P2 at longitudes between the midnight and morning-sector instrumentation.

  7. Stellar wind-magnetosphere interaction at exoplanets: computations of auroral radio powers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J. D.; Milan, S. E.

    2016-09-01

    We present calculations of the auroral radio powers expected from exoplanets with magnetospheres driven by an Earth-like magnetospheric interaction with the solar wind. Specifically, we compute the twin cell-vortical ionospheric flows, currents, and resulting radio powers resulting from a Dungey cycle process driven by dayside and nightside magnetic reconnection, as a function of planetary orbital distance and magnetic field strength. We include saturation of the magnetospheric convection, as observed at the terrestrial magnetosphere, and we present power-law approximations for the convection potentials, radio powers and spectral flux densities. We specifically consider a solar-age system and a young (1 Gyr) system. We show that the radio power increases with magnetic field strength for magnetospheres with saturated convection potential, and broadly decreases with increasing orbital distance. We show that the magnetospheric convection at hot Jupiters will be saturated, and thus unable to dissipate the full available incident Poynting flux, such that the magnetic Radiometric Bode's Law (RBL) presents a substantial overestimation of the radio powers for hot Jupiters. Our radio powers for hot Jupiters are ˜5-1300 TW for hot Jupiters with field strengths of 0.1-10 BJ orbiting a Sun-like star, while we find that competing effects yield essentially identical powers for hot Jupiters orbiting a young Sun-like star. However, in particular, for planets with weaker magnetic fields, our powers are higher at larger orbital distances than given by the RBL, and there are many configurations of planet that are expected to be detectable using SKA.

  8. Two types of ion energy dispersions observed in the nightside auroral regions during geomagnetically disturbed periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirahara, M.; Mukai, T.; Nagai, T.; Kaya, N.; Hayakawa, H.; Fukunishi, H.

    1996-04-01

    The Akebono satellite has observed two types of energy dispersion signatures of discrete ion precipitation event in the nightside auroral regions during active geomagnetic conditions. The charged particle experiments and electric and magnetic field detectors on board Akebono provide us with essential clues to characterize the source regions and acceleration and/or injection processes associated with these two types of ion signatures. The magnetic field data obtained simultaneously by the geosynchronous GOES 6 and 7 satellites and the ground magnetograms are useful to examine their relationships with geomagnetic activity. Mass composition data and pitch angle distributions show that different sources and processes should be attributed to two types (Types I and II) of energy dispersion phenomena. Type I consists of multiple bouncing ion clusters constituted by H+. These H+ clusters tend to be detected at the expansion phase of substorms and have characteristic multiple energy-dispersed signatures. Type II consists of O+ energy dispersion(s), which is often observed at the recovery phase. It is reasonable to consider that the H+ clusters of Type I are accelerated by dipolarization at the equator, are injected in the field-aligned direction, and bounce on closed field lines after the substorm onset. We interpret these multiple energy dispersion events as mainly due to the time-of-flight (TOF) effect, although the convection may influence the energy-dispersed traces. Based of the TOF model, we estimate the source distance to be 20-30 RE along the field lines. On the other hand, the O+ energy dispersion of Type II is a consequence of reprecipitation of terrestrial ions ejected as an upward flowing ion (UFI) beam from the upper ionosphere by a parallel electrostatic potential difference. The O+ energy dispersion is induced by the E×B drift during the field-aligned transport from the source region to the observation point.

  9. EuroPlaNet VO use case: Giant planet HST auroral emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, N.

    2012-09-01

    The field of planetary sciences has greatly expanded in recent years with space missions orbiting around most of the planets of our Solar System. The growing amount and wealth of data available make it difficult for scientists to exploit data coming from many sources that can initially be heterogeneous in their organization, description and format. It is an important objective of the Europlanet-RI and IMPEx projects (supported by EU within FP7) to add value to space missions by significantly contributing to the effective scientific exploitation of collected data; to enable space researchers to take full advantage of the potential value of data sets. To this end and to enhance the science return from space missions, innovative tools have to be developed and offered to the community. AMDA (Automated Multi-Dataset Analysis, http://cdpp-amda.cesr.fr/) is a web-based facility developed at CDPP Toulouse in France (http://cdpp.cesr.fr) for on line analysis of space physics data (heliosphere, magnetospheres, planetary environments) coming from either its local database or distant ones. AMDA has been recently integrated as a service to the scientific community for the Plasma Physics thematic node of the Europlanet-RI IDIS (Integrated and Distributed Information Service, http://www.europlanet-idis.fi/) activities, in close cooperation with IWF Graz (http://europlanetplasmanode. oeaw.ac.at/index.php?id=9). We will present our prototype Virtual Observatory activities to connect the AMDA tool to the IVOA Aladin astrophysical tool to enable pluridisciplinary studies of giant planet auroral emissions.

  10. On the collocation between dayside auroral activity and coherent HF radar backscatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moen

    Full Text Available The 2D morphology of coherent HF radar and optical cusp aurora has been studied for conditions of predominantly southward IMF conditions, which favours low-latitude boundary layer reconnection. Despite the variability in shape of radar cusp Doppler spectra, the spectral width criterion of > 220 m s–1 proves to be a robust cusp discriminator. For extended periods of well-developed radar backscatter echoes, the equatorward boundary of the > 220 m s–1 spectral width enhancement lines up remarkably well with the equatorward boundary of the optical cusp aurora. The spectral width boundary is however poorly determined during development and fading of radar cusp backscatter. Closer inspection of radar Doppler profile characteristics suggests that a combination of spectral width and shape may advance boundary layer identification by HF radar. For the two December days studied the onset of radar cusp backscatter occurred within pre-existing 630.0 nm cusp auroral activity and appear to be initiated by sunrise, i.e. favourable radio wave propagation conditions had to develop. Better methods are put forward for analysing optical data, and for physical interpretation of HF radar data, and for combining these data, as applied to detection, tracking, and better understanding of dayside aurora. The broader motivation of this work is to develop wider use by the scientific community, of results of these techniques, to accelerate understanding of dynamic high-latitude boundary-processes. The contributions in this work are: (1 improved techniques of analysis of observational data, yielding meaningfully enhanced accuracy for deduced cusp locations; (2 a correspondingly more pronounced validation of correlation of boundary locations derived from the observational data set; and (3 a firmer physical rationale as to why the good correlation observed should theoretically be expected.

    Key words: Ionosphere (ionospheric

  11. Rocketborne observations of ion convection and electric fields in dayside and nightside visual auroral arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present ionospheric ion convection measurements in a series of four rocket payloads in and near dayside and nightside auroral arcs: one at Cape Parry (75.40N invariant latitude) near 1300 MLT and three at Churchill (70.00N invariant latitude) between 1900 and 2200 MLT. Direct measurements were made of the ionospheric ion velocity distribution function, and the observed ion convection velocities and equivalent convective electric fields were correlated with the energetic particle precipitation, the optical morphology of the aurora, and the topology of the geomagnetic field. Both in the postnoon and premidnight sectors it was observed that (1) equatorward of the region(s) of precipitation the ion flow was predominantly westward, with velocity of about 1 km/s; (2) poleward of the region(s) the flow was predominantly westward, with velocity of about 1 km/s; (2) poleward of the region(s) the flow was predominantly eastward: (3) the change in the flow direction, where observed, occurred near though not exactly at the edges of the precipitation region; (4) the flow inside the precipitation region was lower; (5) the reversal of the ion flow, where observed, occurred on closed magnetic field lines; and (6) the convective electric field typically dropped from 40 to 80 mV/m outside the precipitation region to 10 to 30 mV/m within. In the dayside Cape Perry flight, where quantitative photometric measurements were available, detailed anticorrelation between the ion convection speed and the green line emission intensity was also observed

  12. Combined optical, EISCAT and magnetic observations of the omega bands/Ps6 pulsations and an auroral torch in the late morning hours: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Safargaleev

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We present here the results of multi-instrument observations of auroral torch and Ps6 magnetic pulsations, which are assumed to be the magnetic signature of the spatially periodic optical auroras known as omega bands. Data from TV and ASC cameras in Barentsburg and Ny Ålesund, EISCAT radars in Longyearbyen and Tromsø, as well as IMAGE network were used in this study. The auroral phenomenon which was considered differed from that previously discussed, as it occurred both in an unusual place (high latitudes and at an unusual time (late morning hours. We show that this might occur due to specific conditions in the interplanetary medium, causing the appropriate deformation of the magnetosphere. In such a case, the IMF turned out to be an additional factor in driving the regime of Ps6/omega bands, namely, only by acting together could a substorm onset in the night sector and Bz variations result in their generation. Since the presumable source of Ps6/omega bands does not co-locate with convection reversal boundaries, we suggest the interpretation of the phenomena in the frame of the interchange instability instead of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability that is widely discussed in the literature in connection with omega auroras. Some numerical characteristics of the auroral torch were obtained. We also emphasize to the dark hole in the background luminosity and the short-lived azimuthally-restricted auroral arc, since their appearance could initiate the auroral torch development.

    Keywords. Magnetospheric physics (Auroral phenomena; Plasma convection; Solar wind-magnetosphere interaction

  13. Temporal evolution of pump beam self-focusing at the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program

    OpenAIRE

    Kosch, Mike J.; Pedersen, T.; Mishin, E.; Starks, M; Gerken-Kendall, E.; D. Sentman; Oyama, S.; Watkins, B.

    2007-01-01

    On 4 February 2005 the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility was operated at 2.85 MHz to produce artificial optical emissions in the ionosphere while passing through the second electron gyroharmonic. All-sky optical recordings were performed with 15 s integration, alternating between 557.7 and 630 nm. We report the first optical observations showing the temporal evolution of large-scale pump wave self-focusing in the magnetic zenith, observed in the 557.7 nm images. ...

  14. Crowd-sourcing, Communicating, and Improving Auroral Science at the Speed of Social Media through Aurorasaurus.org

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, K.; MacDonald, E.; Case, N.; Hall, M.; Clayton, J.; Heavner, M.; Tapia, A.; Lalone, N.; McCloat, S.

    2015-12-01

    On March 17, 2015, a geomagnetic storm—the largest of the solar cycle to date— hit Earth and gave many sky watchers around the world a beautiful auroral display. People made thousands of aurora-related tweets and direct reports to Aurorasaurus.org, an interdisciplinary citizen science project that tracks auroras worldwide in real-time through social media and the project's apps and website. Through Aurorasaurus, researchers are converting these crowdsourced observations into valuable data points to help improve models of where aurora can be seen. In this presentation, we will highlight how the team communicates with the public during these global, sporadic events to help drive and retain participation for Aurorasaurus. We will highlight some of the co-produced scientific results and increased media interest following this event. Aurorasaurus uses mobile apps, blogging, and a volunteer scientist network to reach out to aurora enthusiasts to engage in the project. Real-time tweets are voted on by other users to verify their accuracy and are pinned on a map located on aurorasaurus.org to help show the instantaneous, global auroral visibility. Since the project launched in October 2014, hundreds of users have documented the two largest geomagnetic storms of this solar cycle. In some cases, like for the St. Patrick's Day storm, users even reported seeing aurora in areas different than aurora models suggested. Online analytics indicate these events drive users to our page and many also share images with various interest groups on social media. While citizen scientists provide observations, Aurorasaurus gives back by providing tools to help the public see and understand the aurora. When people verify auroral sightings in a specific area, the project sends out alerts to nearby users of possible auroral visibility. Aurorasaurus team members around the world also help the public understand the intricacies of space weather and aurora science through blog articles

  15. Influence of inhomogeneities of the plasma density and electric field on the generation of electrostatic noise in the auroral zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyshov, A. A., E-mail: achernyshov@iki.rssi.ru; Ilyasov, A. A., E-mail: asjosik@mail.ru; Mogilevskii, M. M., E-mail: mogilevsky@romance.iki.rssi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation); Golovchanskaya, I. V., E-mail: golovchanskaya@pgia.ru; Kozelov, B. V., E-mail: boris.kozelov@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Polar Geophysical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    In order to study instabilities caused by inhomogeneities of the electric field and plasma density in the auroral zone, numerical algorithms are developed and numerical simulations are performed for different conditions in the background plasma. To this end, a nonlocal dispersion relation for a given type of wave is analyzed. It is shown that the dispersion relation has unstable solutions in a wide range of frequencies and wavenumbers. These solutions manifest themselves in satellite observations as a broadband spectrum of electrostatic perturbations. Two mechanisms of broadband noise generation related to the gradients of the density and electric field are compared.

  16. Ionospheric feedback effects on the quasi-stationary coupling between LLBL and postnoon/evening discrete auroral arcs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Echim

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a model for the quasi-stationary coupling between magnetospheric sheared flows in the dusk sector and discrete auroral arcs, previously analyzed for the case of a uniform height-integrated Pedersen conductivity (ΣP. Here we introduce an ionospheric feedback as the variation of ΣP with the energy flux of precipitating magnetospheric electrons (εem. One key-component of the model is the kinetic description of the interface between the duskward LLBL and the plasma sheet that gives the profile of Φm, the magnetospheric electrostatic potential. The velocity shear in the dusk LLBL plays the role of a generator for the auroral circuit closing through Pedersen currents in the auroral ionosphere. The field-aligned current density, j||, and the energy flux of precipitating electrons are given by analytic functions of the field-aligned potential drop, ΔΦ, derived from standard kinetic models of the adiabatic motion of particles. The ionospheric electrostatic potential, Φi (and implicitely ΔΦ is determined from the current continuity equation in the ionosphere. We obtain values of ΔΦ of the order of kilovolt and of j|| of the order of tens of μA/m2 in thin regions of the order of several kilometers at 200 km altitude. The spatial scale is significantly smaller and the peak values of ΔΦ, j|| and εem are higher than in the case of a uniform ΣP. Effects on the postnoon/evening auroral arc electrodynamics due to variations of dusk LLBL and solar wind dynamic and kinetic pressure are discussed. In thin regions (of the order of kilometer embedding the maximum of ΔΦ we evidence a non-linear regime of the current-voltage relationship. The model predicts also that visible arcs form when the velocity shear in LLBL is above a threshold value depending on the generator and

  17. Tomography-like retrieval of auroral volume emission ratios for the 31 January 2008 Hotel Payload 2 event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enell, C.-F.; Gustavsson, B.; Brändström, B. U. E.; Sergienko, T. I.; Verronen, P. T.; Rydesäter, P.; Sandahl, I.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative tomography-like volume estimates of the N2+(1N) emission at 427.8 nm, the O(1S) emission at 557.7 nm and the O(1D) emission at 630.0 nm can be retrieved from data from the Auroral Large Imaging System (ALIS) remote-controlled spectral imagers operated at field stations in northern Sweden and Norway. This paper presents a case study of a quiet auroral arc passing over the common volume of the imagers in the evening of 31 January 2008, before the launch of the Hotel Payload 2 (HotPay 2) rocket from Andøya Rocket Range. The reconstructed spectroscopic ratios at the lower altitudes close to the mesopause region can be used as indicators of the NO and O profiles, as the atomic oxygen O(1S) and O(1D) states are excited partly through chemical reactions. The profiles of the ratios of the volume emission rates ɛ557.7 and ɛ427.8 observed by ALIS over northern Norway show nothing unambiguously unusual within the accuracy of the calibration and retrieval, whereas HotPay 2 indicated subsidence of lower thermospheric air, with higher NO concentrations. This is consistent with observations of NO and CO by satellite instruments, which indicate subsidence in vortex filaments only in the NW as seen from the Scandinavian mainland.

  18. Auroral radio emission from late L and T dwarfs: A new constraint on dynamo theory in the substellar regime

    CERN Document Server

    Kao, Melodie M; Pineda, J Sebastian; Escala, Ivanna; Burgasser, Adam; Bourke, Stephen; Stevenson, David

    2015-01-01

    We have observed 6 late-L and T dwarfs with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to investigate the presence of highly circularly polarized radio emission, associated with large-scale auroral currents. Previous surveys encompassing ~60 L6 or later targets in this spectral range have yielded only one detection. Our sample includes the previously detected T6.5 dwarf 2MASS 10475385+2124234 as well as 5 new targets selected for the presence of H-alpha emission or optical/infrared photometric variability, which are possible manifestations of auroral activity. We detect 2MASS 10475385+2124234, as well as 4 of the 5 targets in our biased sample, including the strong IR variable SIMP J01365662+0933473 and bright H-alpha emitter 2MASS 12373919+6526148, reinforcing the possibility that activity at these disparate wavelengths is related. The radio emission frequency corresponds to a precise determination of the lower-bound magnetic field strength near the surface of each dwarf and this new sample provides robust co...

  19. Electrostatic solitary structures in presence of non-thermal electrons and a warm electron beam on the auroral field lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S. V. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai (India); School of Physics, University of Kwazulu-Natal, Durban (South Africa); Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai (India); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Bellville (South Africa); Pillay, S. R. [School of Physics, University of Kwazulu-Natal, Durban (South Africa)

    2011-12-15

    Electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) have been observed by satellites in the auroral region of the Earth's magnetosphere. These ESWs are found to be having both positive and negative electrostatic potentials. Using the Sagdeeev psuedo-potential technique, arbitrary amplitude electron-acoustic solitary waves/double layers are studied in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of non-thermally distributed hot electrons, fluid cold electrons, a warm electron beam, and ions. The inertia of the warm electrons, and not the beam speed, is essential for the existence of positive potential solitary structures. Existence domains for positive as well as negative potential electrostatic solitons/double layers are obtained. For the typical auroral region parameters, the electric field amplitude of the negative potential solitons is found to be in the range {approx}(3-30) mV/m and {approx}(5-80) mV/m for the positive potential solitons. For the negative potential solitons/double layers, the amplitudes are higher when their widths are smaller. On the other hand, the amplitude of the positive potential structures increase with their widths.

  20. Auroral Radio Emission from Late L and T Dwarfs: A New Constraint on Dynamo Theory in the Substellar Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Melodie M.; Hallinan, Gregg; Pineda, J. Sebastian; Escala, Ivanna; Burgasser, Adam; Bourke, Stephen; Stevenson, David

    2016-02-01

    We have observed six late L and T dwarfs with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to investigate the presence of highly circularly polarized radio emission, associated with large-scale auroral currents. Previous surveys encompassing ∼60 L6 or later targets have yielded only one detection. Our sample includes the previously detected T6.5 dwarf 2MASS 10475385+2124234, as well as five new targets selected for the presence of Hα emission and/or optical infrared photometric variability, which are possible manifestations of auroral activity. We detect 2MASS 10475385+2124234, as well as four of the five targets in our biased sample, including the strong IR-variable source SIMP J01365662+0933473 and bright Hα emitter 2MASS 12373919+6526148, reinforcing the possibility that activity at these disparate wavelengths is related. The radio emission frequency corresponds to a precise determination of the lower-bound magnetic field strength near the surface of each dwarf, and this new sample provides robust constraints on dynamo theory in the low-mass brown dwarf regime. Magnetic fields ≳ 2.5 kG are confirmed for five of six targets. Our results provide tentative evidence that the dynamo operating in this mass regime may be inconsistent with predicted values from a recently proposed model. Further observations at higher radio frequencies are essential for verifying this assertion.

  1. The location of the open-closed magnetic field line boundary in the dawn sector auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Wild

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available As a measure of the degree of coupling between the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere systems, the rate at which the size of the polar cap (the region corresponding to ionospheric termini of open magnetic flux tubes varies is of prime importance. However, a reliable technique by which the extent of the polar cap might be routinely monitored has yet to be developed. Current techniques provide particularly ambiguous indications of the polar cap boundary in the dawn sector. We present a case study of space- and ground-based observations of the dawn-sector auroral zone and attempt to determine the location of the polar cap boundary using multi-wavelength observations of the ultraviolet aurora (made by the IMAGE FUV imager, precipitating particle measurements (recorded by the FAST, DMSP, and Cluster 1 and 3 satellites, and SuperDARN HF radar observations of the ionospheric Doppler spectral width boundary. We conclude that in the dawn sector, during the interval presented, neither the poleward edge of the wideband auroral UV emission (140-180nm nor the Doppler spectral width boundary were trustworthy indicators of the polar cap boundary location, while narrow band UV emissions in the range 130-140nm appear to be much more reliable.

  2. On the relationship between auroral absorption, electrojet currents and plasma convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Kellerman

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the relationship between auroral absorption, electrojet currents, and ionospheric plasma convection velocity is investigated using a series of new methods where temporal correlations are calculated and analysed for different events and MLT sectors. We employ cosmic noise absorption (CNA observations obtained by the Imaging Riometer for Ionospheric Studies (IRIS system in Kilpisjärvi, Finland, plasma convection measurements by the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT radar, and estimates of the electrojet currents derived from the Tromsø magnetometer data. The IRIS absorption and EISCAT plasma convection measurements are used as a proxy for the particle precipitation component of the Hall conductance and ionospheric electric field, respectively. It is shown that the electrojet currents are affected by both enhanced conductance and electric field but with the relative importance of these two factors varying with magnetic local time (MLT. The correlation between the current and electric field (absorption is the highest at 12:00–15:00 MLT (00:00–03:00 MLT. It is demonstrated that the electric-field-dominant region is asymmetric with respect to magnetic-noon-midnight meridian extending from 09:00 to 21:00 MLT. This may be related to the recently reported absence of mirror-symmetry between the effects of positive and negative IMF By on the high-latitude plasma convection pattern. The conductivity-dominant region is somewhat wider than previously thought extending from 21:00 to 09:00 MLT with correlation slowly declining from midnight towards the morning, which is interpreted as being in part due to high-energy electron clouds gradually depleting and drifting from midnight towards the morning sector. The conductivity-dominant region is further investigated using the extensive IRIS riometer and Tromsø magnetometer datasets with results showing a distinct seasonal dependence. The region of high current

  3. Origin of type-2 thermal-ion upflows in the auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Kagan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The origin of thermal ion outflows exceeding 1km/s in the high-latitude F-region has been a subject of considerable debate. For cases with strong convection electric fields, the "evaporation" of the ions due to frictional heating below 400-500km has been shown to provide some satisfactory answers. By contrast, in the more frequent subclass of outflow events observed over auroral arcs, called type-2, there is no observational evidence for ion frictional heating. Instead, an electron temperature increase of up to 6000° K is observed over the outflow region. In this case, field-aligned electric fields have long been suspected to be involved, but this explanation did not seem to agree with expectations from the ion momentum balance. In the present work we provide a consistent scenario for the type-2 ion upflows based on our case study of an event that occurred on 20 February 1990. We introduce, for the first time, the electron energy balance in the analysis. We couple this equation with the ion momentum balance to study the salient features of the observations and conclude that type-2 ion outflows and the accompanying electron heating events are indeed consistent with the existence of a field-aligned electric field. However, for our explanation to work, we have to require that an allowance be made for electron scattering by high frequency turbulence. This turbulence could be generated at first by the very fast response of the electrons themselves to a newly imposed electric field that would be partly aligned with the geomagnetic field. The high frequencies of the waves would make it impossible for the ions to react to the waves. We have found the electron collision frequency associated with scattering from the waves to be rather modest, i.e. comparable to the ambient electron-ion collision frequency. The field-aligned electric field inferred from the observations is likewise of the same order of magnitude as the normal ambipolar field, at least for

  4. The dynamics and relationships of precipitation, temperature and convection boundaries in the dayside auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moen

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A continuous band of high ion temperature, which persisted for about 8h and zigzagged north-south across more than five degrees in latitude in the dayside (07:00-15:00MLT auroral ionosphere, was observed by the EISCAT VHF radar on 23 November 1999. Latitudinal gradients in the temperature of the F-region electron and ion gases (Te and Ti, respectively have been compared with concurrent observations of particle precipitation and field-perpendicular convection by DMSP satellites, in order to reveal a physical explanation for the persistent band of high Ti, and to test the potential role of Ti and Te gradients as possible markers for the open-closed field line boundary. The north/south movement of the equatorward Ti boundary was found to be consistent with the contraction/expansion of the polar cap due to an unbalanced dayside and nightside reconnection. Sporadic intensifications in Ti, recurring on ~10-min time scales, indicate that frictional heating was modulated by time-varying reconnection, and the band of high Ti was located on open flux. However, the equatorward Ti boundary was not found to be a close proxy of the open-closed boundary. The closest definable proxy of the open-closed boundary is the magnetosheath electron edge observed by DMSP. Although Te appears to be sensitive to magnetosheath electron fluxes, it is not found to be a suitable parameter for routine tracking of the open-closed boundary, as it involves case dependent analysis of the thermal balance. Finally, we have documented a region of newly-opened sunward convecting flux. This region is situated between the convection reversal boundary and the magnetosheath electron edge defining the open-closed boundary. This is consistent with a delay of several minutes between the arrival of the first (super-Alfvénic magnetosheath electrons and the response in the ionospheric

  5. Tests of Sunspot Number Sequences: 2. Using Geomagnetic and Auroral Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, M.; Owens, M. J.; Barnard, L.; Scott, C. J.; Usoskin, I. G.; Nevanlinna, H.

    2016-06-01

    We compare four sunspot-number data sequences against geomagnetic and terrestrial auroral observations. The comparisons are made for the original Solar Influences Data Center (SIDC) composite of Wolf/Zürich/International sunspot number [ R_{ISNv1}], the group sunspot number [ RG] by Hoyt and Schatten (Solar Phys. 181, 491, 1998), the new "backbone" group sunspot number [ R_{BB}] by Svalgaard and Schatten (Solar Phys., DOI 10.1007/s11207-015-0815-8, 2016), and the "corrected" sunspot number [ RC] by Lockwood, Owens, and Barnard (J. Geophys. Res. 119, 5172, 2014a). Each sunspot number is fitted with terrestrial observations, or parameters derived from terrestrial observations to be linearly proportional to sunspot number, over a 30-year calibration interval of 1982 - 2012. The fits are then used to compute test sequences, which extend further back in time and which are compared to R_{ISNv1}, RG, R_{BB}, and RC. To study the long-term trends, comparisons are made using averages over whole solar cycles (minimum-to-minimum). The test variations are generated in four ways: i) using the IDV(1d) and IDV geomagnetic indices (for 1845 - 2013) fitted over the calibration interval using the various sunspot numbers and the phase of the solar cycle; ii) from the open solar flux (OSF) generated for 1845 - 2013 from four pairings of geomagnetic indices by Lockwood et al. (Ann. Geophys. 32, 383, 2014a) and analysed using the OSF continuity model of Solanki, Schüssler, and Fligge (Nature, 408, 445, 2000), which employs a constant fractional OSF loss rate; iii) the same OSF data analysed using the OSF continuity model of Owens and Lockwood (J. Geophys. Res. 117, A04102, 2012), in which the fractional loss rate varies with the tilt of the heliospheric current sheet and hence with the phase of the solar cycle; iv) the occurrence frequency of low-latitude aurora for 1780 - 1980 from the survey of Legrand and Simon (Ann. Geophys. 5, 161, 1987). For all cases, R_{BB} exceeds the test

  6. Reconstruction of energetic electron spectra in the upper atmosphere: balloon observations of auroral X-rays coordinated with measurements from the Eiscat radar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energetic electron precipitation in the auroral zone has been studied using coordinated auroral X-ray measurements from balloons, altitude profiles of the ionospheric electron density measured by the EISCAT radar above the balloons, and cosmic noise absorption data from the Scandinavian riometer network. The data were obtained during the coordinated EISCAT and balloon observation campaign in August 1984. A method by which an estimate of the energy spectrum of precipitating energetic electrons can be obtained from balloon measurements of bremsstrahlung X-rays is described. The energy spectral variation of both the X-ray fluxes and the primary precipitating electrons were examined for two precipitation events in the morning sector. As far as reasonably can be concluded from observations of magnetic activity in the auroral zone, and from the temporal development of the energy spectra, the two precipitation events can be interpreted in the frame of present models of energetic electron precipitation on the morning side of the auroral zone. 96 refs

  7. LOFAR's Potential to Characterize Jupiter's Radiation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pater, I.

    2008-09-01

    Jupiter is a strong source of radio emissions, as discovered in the early 1950s (Burke and Franklin, 1955). These first detections revealed emissions that were sporadic in character, and confined to frequencies less than 40 MHz. This component of the planet's radio emission is commonly referred to as decametric (DAM) radiation, and is attributed to electron cyclotron maser emission, emitted by keV electrons in Jupiter's auroral regions. All four giant planets and the Earth emit such radiation. To date these emissions have been studied in the timefrequency domain, since it has not been possible to image at these low frequencies. A new Low Frequency Array, LOFAR, is momentarily being build in the Netherlands. It consists of a low (~30-80 MHz) and high (~120-240 MHz) frequency band, with baselines between 100 m up to 100 km. By connecting (VLBI) with the Nancay radio telescope, baselines of 700 km can be achieved. This telescope complements the VLA (Very large Array) and ATA (Allen Telescope Array) in frequency coverage, and using the combined arrays (quasi)- simultaneously, Jupiter's radiation environment can be mapped from about 20 MHz (the low LOFAR band is still sensitive below 30 MHz, but with reduced through-put) up to 20 GHz. Jupiter emits both synchrotron and coherent cyclotron radiation at low frequencies (e.g., de Pater 2004; Zarka, 2004). Synchrotron radiation is emitted by relativistic electrons (MeV) trapped in Jupiter's radiation belts; this component of the emission has been imaged regularly at higher (> 300 MHz) frequencies. Simultaneous high resolution imaging at low frequencies will help identify the origin and mode of transport of the synchrotron radiating electrons, including their source and loss terms. At frequencies below 40 MHz LOFAR could, for the first time ever, image Jupiter's decametric (DAM) emissions. These emissions have been observed since the early 1950's, and are characterized by complex, highly organized structures in the frequency

  8. Auroral current systems in Saturn's magnetosphere: comparison of theoretical models with Cassini and HST observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The first simultaneous observations of fields and plasmas in Saturn's high-latitude magnetosphere and UV images of the conjugate auroral oval were obtained by the Cassini spacecraft and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST in January 2007. These data have shown that the southern auroral oval near noon maps to the dayside cusp boundary between open and closed field lines, associated with a major layer of upward-directed field-aligned current (Bunce et al., 2008. The results thus support earlier theoretical discussion and quantitative modelling of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling at Saturn (Cowley et al., 2004, that suggests the oval is produced by electron acceleration in the field-aligned current layer required by rotational flow shear between strongly sub-corotating flow on open field lines and near-corotating flow on closed field lines. Here we quantitatively compare these modelling results (the "CBO" model with the Cassini-HST data set. The comparison shows good qualitative agreement between model and data, the principal difference being that the model currents are too small by factors of about five, as determined from the magnetic perturbations observed by Cassini. This is suggested to be principally indicative of a more highly conducting summer southern ionosphere than was assumed in the CBO model. A revised model is therefore proposed in which the height-integrated ionospheric Pedersen conductivity is increased by a factor of four from 1 to 4 mho, together with more minor adjustments to the co-latitude of the boundary, the flow shear across it, the width of the current layer, and the properties of the source electrons. It is shown that the revised model agrees well with the combined Cassini-HST data, requiring downward acceleration of outer magnetosphere electrons through a ~10 kV potential in the current layer at the open-closed field line boundary to produce an auroral oval of ~1° width with UV emission intensities of a few tens of kR.

  9. FAST auroral DC electric field studies using ion data and fields data to provide the full DC E vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, K.; Lynch, K. A.; Carlson, C. W.; Peria, W. J.

    2004-12-01

    We present an analysis of auroral FAST perpendicular E data using ion distributions in return current regions to study the full DC E vector and potential structures. While the axial boom measurement is available, its interpretation requires careful use and some assumptions. Our new technique provides an independent measure of this axial component. Our new tool extracts two perpendicular components of electric field, using the electric field data from the field instrument for the spin-plane component of E, and the ion drift measurements for the axial DC E. This allows studies of the full perpendicular DC E vector for the first time with FAST data. In addition the new tool transforms from velocity-based coordinates to north-south, east-west coordinates for analyzing the morphology and structure of the auroral return current region more effectively. With more than fifteen return current region crossings collected at FAST altitudes above 3000 km in either the pre-noon dayside or near midnight sector, three quarters of our data show linearly polarized diverging electric field structures. A significant fraction (almost one quarter) show rotational polarity during large field events. For these rotational events, it is probable that the spacecraft was passing through the edge of elongated quasi-static potential structures. They can also be interpreted as a temporal variation. Generally in many orbits, linear and rotational polarity appear together, one followed by the other, which means the potential structure has a wiggled or droopy shape. Statistical comparison shows several differences between these two different polarizations. (1) When a rotational polarity appears, the correspondence between electron characteristic energy and the potential obtained by integrating E weakens. (2) For linear polarization the electric field vector is likely to be almost perpendicular to the magnetic disturbance, while for rotational polarization the E is not perpendicular to delta-B. (3

  10. The relationship between auroral hiss at high altitudes over the polar caps and the substorm dynamics of aurora

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Titova, E. E.; Yahnin, A. G.; Santolík, Ondřej; Gurnett, D. A.; Jiříček, František; Rauch, J. L.; Lefeuvre, F.; Frank, L. A.; Sigwarth, J. B.; Mogilevsky, M. M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 23, - (2005), s. 2117-2128. ISSN 0992-7689 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3042201; GA ČR GA205/03/0953; GA MŠk ME 650; GA ČR GA202/03/0832; GA MŠk 1P05ME811 Grant ostatní: ESA PECS(XE) 98025; INTAS(RU) 03-51-4132; NATO(XE) PST .GLG980041; NASA(US) NAG5-7943 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Magnetospheric physics (Auroral phenomena, Plasma waves and instabilities, Storms and substorms) Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.450, year: 2005

  11. Stable Auroral Red arc occurrences detected by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory photometer network: A decade of observations, 1978--1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, D.W.; Kleckner, E.W.

    1989-11-01

    Using data obtained from a network of all-sky scanning photometers designed to operate routinely for long periods of time, a comprehensive inspection of observations covering the time period 1978--1988 has revealed features that we interpret to be Stable Auroral Red (SAR) arcs during 250 nighttime observing periods. These arcs result from high temperature within the ionospheric electron gas that is maintained by slow leakage of energy from the earth's magnetosphere. A listing of these events, the most complete available for this time interval, is presented for the purpose of complementing observations reported for earlier dates. This listing is composed of location of the observing photometer, date, time, photometric intensity, and location (as defined by the earth's magnetic coordinate system). The intent is to make these observations available to a broad range of researchers and thereby initiate further investigations of these features. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. On the formation and origin of substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs inferred from conjugate space-ground observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoba, T.; Ohtani, S.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Shiokawa, K.; Connors, M. G.; Kletzing, C.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetotail processes and structures related to substorm growth phase/onset auroral arcs remain poorly understood mostly due to the lack of adequate observations. In this study we make a comparison between ground-based optical measurements of the premidnight growth phase/onset arcs at subauroral latitudes and magnetically conjugate measurements made by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) at ~780 km in altitude and by the Van Allen Probe-B spacecraft crossing L values of ~5.0-5.6 in the premidnight inner tail region. The conjugate observations offer a unique opportunity to examine the detailed features of the arc location relative to large-scale Birkeland currents and of the magnetospheric counterpart. The observations strongly suggest that the premidnight arc is connected to highly localized pressure gradients embedded in the near-tail R2 source region via a local upward FAC.

  13. On the lifetime and extent of an auroral westward flow channel (AWFC observed during a magnetospheric substorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    Full Text Available A -190-nT negative bay in the geomagnetic X component measured at Macquarie Island ( -65° L showed that an ionospheric substorm occurred during 09:58 to 11:10 UT on 27 February 2000. Signatures of an auroral westward flow channel (AWFC were observed nearly simultaneously in the backscatter power, LOS Doppler velocity, and Doppler spectral width measured using the Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER, a Southern Hemisphere HF SuperDARN radar. Many of the characteristics of the AWFC were similar to those occurring during a polarisation jet (PJ, or subauroral ion drift (SAID event, and suggest that it may have been a pre-cursor to a fully developed, intense westward flow channel satisfying all of the criteria defining a PJ/SAID. A beam-swinging analysis showed that the westward drifts (poleward electric field associated with the flow channel were very structured in time and space, but the smoothed velocities grew to ~ 800 ms-1 (47 mVm-1 during the 22-min substorm onset interval 09:56 to 10:18 UT. Maximum west-ward drifts of >1.3 km s-1 (>77 mVm-1 occurred during a ~ 5-min velocity spike, peaking at 10:40 UT during the expansion phase. The drifts decayed rapidly to ~ 300 ms-1 (18 mVm-1 during the 6-min recovery phase interval, 11:04 to 11:10 UT. Overall, the AWFC had a lifetime of 74 min, and was located near -65° L in the evening sector west of the Harang discontinuity. The large westward drifts were confined to a geographic zonal channel of longitudinal ex-tent >20° (>1.3 h magnetic local time, and latitudinal width ~2° L. Using a half-width of ~ 100 km in latitude, the peak electric potential was >7.7 kV. However, a transient velocity of >3.1 km s-1 with potential >18.4 kV was observed further poleward at the end of the recovery phase. Auroral oval boundaries determined

  14. E and F region study of the evening sector auroral oval: A Chatanika/Dynamics Explorer 2/NOAA 6 comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simultaneous data obtained with the Chatanika incoherent scatter radar and the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) and NOAA 6 satellites are used to relate the locations of the precipitating particles, field-aligned currents, and E and F region ionization structures in the evening-sector auroral oval. The auroral E layer observed by the radar extends about 2 degree equatorward of the electron precipitation region, and its equatorward edge coincides with the equatorward edges of the region 2 field-aligned current and intense convection region (E ≅ 50 mV/m). It is shown that precipitating protons are responsible for part of the E region ionization within the electron precipitation region as well as south of it. E region density profiles calculated from ion spectra measured by the DE 2 and NOAA 5 satellites are in fairly good agreement with the Chatanika data. in the F region, a channel of enhanced ionization density, elongated along the east-west direction and having a width of about 100 km, marks the poleward edge of the main trough. it is colocated with the equatorward boundary of the electron precipitation from the central plasma sheet. Although enhanced fluxes of soft electrons are observed at this boundary, the energy input to the ionospheric electron gas, calculated from the radar data, shows that this ionization channel is not locally produced by this soft precipitation, but that it is rather a convected feature. In fact, both the trough and the ionization channel are located in a region where the plasma flows sunward at high speed, but the flux tubes associated with theses two features have different convective time histories. Keeping in mind that several processes operate together in the F region, the data set is consistent with the included trough and ionization channel formation mechanisms

  15. X-ray Probes of Magnetospheric Interactions with Jupiter's Auroral zones, the Galilean Satellites, and the Io Plasma Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Rehak, P.; Johnson, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Swartz, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Remote observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton Observatory have shown that the Jovian system is a source of x-rays with a rich and complicated structure. The planet's polar auroral zones and its disk are powerful sources of x-ray emission. Chandra observations revealed x-ray emission from the Io Plasma Torus and from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from these moons is certainly due to bombardment of their surfaces of highly energetic protons, oxygen and sulfur ions from the region near the Torus exciting atoms in their surfaces and leading to fluorescent x-ray emission lines. Although the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons is faint when observed fiom Earth orbit, an imaging x-ray spectrometer in orbit around these moons, operating at 200 eV and above with 150 eV energy resolution, would provide a detailed mapping (down to 40 m spatial resolution) of the elemental composition in their surfaces. Here we describe the physical processes leading to x-ray emission fiom the surfaces of Jupiter's moons and the instrumental properties, as well as energetic ion flux models or measurements, required to map the elemental composition of their surfaces. We discuss the proposed scenarios leading to possible surface compositions. For Europa, the two most extreme are (1) a patina produced by exogenic processes such as meteoroid bombardment and ion implantation, and (2) upwelling of material fiom the subsurface ocean. We also describe the characteristics of X - m , an imaging x-ray spectrometer under going a feasibility study for the JIM0 mission, with the ultimate goal of providing unprecedented x-ray studies of the elemental composition of the surfaces of Jupiter's icy moons and Io, as well as of Jupiter's auroral x-ray emission.

  16. Engaging the Athabascan Native American students of Venetie, Alaska in the auroral research occurring over their village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michell, R. G.; Powell, D.; Samara, M.; Jahn, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Ibarra, S.; Hampton, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    During February 2012, an optical auroral obversing campaign was conducted from the remote village of Venetie, located in North-central Alaska. The approximately 200 people in the village of are mostly Gwich'in Athabaskan. Venetie is in a unique location in that it is one of the only villages that has sounding rockets launched directly over it. While there for the research campaign of approximately one week, I spent several days meeting with and talking to the students about the auroral research that occurs literaly over their village. The John Fredson School in Venetie is a K-12 school and I was able to talk with all of the classes. They were very receptive and interested in science, but have very limited connectivity with the rest of the world, even with a slow internet connection at the school. Their perspective about the aurora is completely different, for them, the aurora is a nearly everyday experience in the winter and therefore they do not think much of it, much like students in the lower 48 would think of clouds. Using the internet, we were able to connect the 4th and 5th grade students in Venetie (through Skype) with a group of 4th and 5th grade students at Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children in San Antonio, TX. This was very successful on both ends and resulted in many ideas for future activities. We will discuss the experiences from this trip and the lessons learned for conducting K-12 outreach in such remote schools.; Dr. Michell presenting to the students in Venetie, AK. ; Tribal office building in Venetie, AK, with the aurora overhead.

  17. 3D model of small-scale density cavities in the auroral magnetosphere with field-aligned current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespalov, P. A.; Misonova, V. G.; Savina, O. N.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a 3D model of small-scale density cavities stimulated by an auroral field-aligned current and an oscillating field-aligned current of kinetic Alfvén waves. It is shown that when the field-aligned current increases so that the electron drift velocity exceeds a value of the order of the electron thermal velocity, the plasma becomes unstable to the formation of cavities with low density and strong electric field. The condition of instability is associated with the value of the background magnetic field. In the case of a relatively weak magnetic field (where the electron gyro-radius is greater than the ion acoustic wavelength), the current instability can lead to the formation of one-dimensional cavities along the magnetic field. In the case of a stronger magnetic field (where the ion acoustic wavelength is greater than the electron gyro-radius, but still is less than the ion gyro-radius), the instability can lead to the formation of 3D density cavities. In this case, the spatial scales of the cavity, both along and across the background magnetic field, can be comparable, and at the earlier stage of the cavity formation they are of the order of the ion acoustic wavelength. Rarefactions of the cavity density are accompanied by an increase in the electric field and are limited by the pressure of bipolar electric fields that occur within them. The estimates of typical density cavity characteristics and the results of numerical solutions agree with known experimental data: small-scale structures with a sufficiently strong electric field are observed in the auroral regions with strong field-aligned current.

  18. Britain's delegation to CERN, the European Centre for Nuclear Research near Geneva, voted in favour of a project which take seven years to build, involve a 27 kilometre long tunnel, and cost 230 million pounds. Now LEP receives the go-ahead later this month

    CERN Multimedia

    Llewellyn Smith, Christopher Hubert

    1981-01-01

    Britain's delegation to CERN, the European Centre for Nuclear Research near Geneva, voted in favour of a project which take seven years to build, involve a 27 kilometre long tunnel, and cost 230 million pounds. Now LEP receives the go-ahead later this month

  19. Radiation dosimetry.

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, J.

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists.

  20. Characteristics of solar wind control on Jovian UV auroral activity deciphered by long-term Hisaki EXCEED observations: Evidence of preconditioning of the magnetosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Hajime; Kimura, Tomoki; Tao, Chihiro; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Misawa, Hiroaki; Sakanoi, Takeshi; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Murakami, Go; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Fujimoto, Masaki

    2016-07-01

    While the Jovian magnetosphere is known to have the internal source for its activity, it is reported to be under the influence of the solar wind as well. Here we report the statistical relationship between the total power of the Jovian ultraviolet aurora and the solar wind properties found from long-term monitoring by the spectrometer EXCEED (Extreme Ultraviolet Spectroscope for Exospheric Dynamics) on board the Hisaki satellite. Superposed epoch analysis indicates that auroral total power increases when an enhanced solar wind dynamic pressure hits the magnetosphere. Furthermore, the auroral total power shows a positive correlation with the duration of a quiescent interval of the solar wind that is present before a rise in the dynamic pressure, more than with the amplitude of dynamic pressure increase. These statistical characteristics define the next step to unveil the physical mechanism of the solar wind control on the Jovian magnetospheric dynamics.

  1. The aurora as a source of planetary-scale waves in the middle atmosphere. [atmospheric turbulence caused by auroral energy absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Y. T.; Straus, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Photographs of global scale auroral forms taken by scanning radiometers onboard weather satellites in 1972 show that auroral bands exhibit well organized wave motion with typical zonal wave number of 5 or so. The scale size of these waves is in agreement with that of well organized neutral wind fields in the 150- to 200-km region during the geomagnetic storm of May 27, 1967. Further, the horizontal scale size revealed by these observations are in agreement with that of high altitude traveling ionospheric disturbances. It is conjectured that the geomagnetic storm is a source of planetary and synoptic scale neutral atmospheric waves in the middle atmosphere. Although there is, at present, no observation of substorm related waves of this scale size at mesospheric and stratospheric altitudes, the possible existence of a new source of waves of the proper scale size to trigger instabilities in middle atmospheric circulation systems may be significant in the study of lower atmospheric response to geomagnetic activity.

  2. Plasma structure within poleward-moving cusp/cleft auroral transients: EISCAT Svalbard radar observations and an explanation in terms of large local time extent of events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    Full Text Available We report high-resolution observations of the southward-IMF cusp/cleft ionosphere made on December 16th 1998 by the EISCAT (European incoherent scatter Svalbard radar (ESR, and compare them with observations of dayside auroral luminosity, as seen at a wavelength of 630 nm by a meridian scanning photometer at Ny Ålesund, and of plasma flows, as seen by the CUTLASS (co-operative UK twin location auroral sounding system Finland HF radar. The optical data reveal a series of poleward-moving transient red-line (630 nm enhancements, events that have been associated with bursts in the rate of magnetopause reconnection generating new open flux. The combined observations at this time have strong similarities to predictions of the effects of soft electron precipitation modulated by pulsed reconnection, as made by Davis and Lockwood (1996; however, the effects of rapid zonal flow in the ionosphere, caused by the magnetic curvature force on the newly opened field lines, are found to be a significant additional factor. In particular, it is shown how enhanced plasma loss rates induced by the rapid convection can explain two outstanding anomalies of the 630 nm transients, namely how minima in luminosity form between the poleward-moving events and how events can re-brighten as they move poleward. The observations show how cusp/cleft aurora and transient poleward-moving auroral forms appear in the ESR data and the conditions which cause enhanced 630 nm emission in the transients: they are an important first step in enabling the ESR to identify these features away from the winter solstice when supporting auroral observations are not available.

    Key words: Ionosphere (polar ionosphere - Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause; cusp and boundary layers; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  3. Spectro-imaging observations of Jupiter's 2-μm auroral emission. I. H 3+ distribution and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, E.; Lellouch, E.; Maillard, J.-P.; Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Bézard, B.; Drossart, P.; Fouchet, T.

    2004-09-01

    We report on spectro-imaging infrared observations of Jupiter's auroral zones, acquired in October 1999 and October 2000 with the FTS/BEAR instrument at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The use of narrow-band filters at 2.09 and 2.12 μm, combined with high spectral resolution (0.2 cm -1), allowed us to map emission from the H 2S1(1) quadrupole line and from several H 3+ lines. The H 2 and H 3+ emission appears to be morphologically different, especially in the north, where the latter notably exhibits a "hot spot" near 150°-170° System III longitude. This hot spot coincides in position with the region of increased and variable hydrocarbon, FUV and X-ray emission, but is not seen in the more uniform H 2S1(1) emission. We also present the first images of the H 2 emission in the southern polar region. The spectra include a total of 14 H 3+ lines, including two hot lines from the 3 ν2- ν2 band, detected on Jupiter for the first time. They can be used to determine H 3+ column densities, rotational ( Trot) and vibrational ( Tvib) temperatures. We find the mean Tvib of the v2=3 state to be lower (960±50 K) than the mean Trot in v2=2 (1170±75 K), indicating an underpopulation of the v2=3 level with respect to local thermodynamical equilibrium. Rotational temperatures and associated column densities are generally higher and lower, respectively, than inferred previously from ν2 observations. This is a likely consequence of a large positive temperature gradient in the sub-microbar auroral atmosphere. While the signal-to-noise is not sufficient to take full advantage of the 2-D capabilities of the observations, the search for correlations between line intensities, Tvib and column densities, indicates that variations in line intensities are mostly due to correlated variations in the H 3+ column densities. The thermostatic role played by H 3+ at ionospheric levels may provide an explanation. The exception is the northern "hot spot," which exhibits a Tvib about 250 K

  4. The influence of solar wind on extratropical cyclones – Part 2: A link mediated by auroral atmospheric gravity waves?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Sofko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cases of mesoscale cloud bands in extratropical cyclones are observed a few hours after atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs are launched from the auroral ionosphere. It is suggested that the solar-wind-generated auroral AGWs contribute to processes that release instabilities and initiate slantwise convection thus leading to cloud bands and growth of extratropical cyclones. Also, if the AGWs are ducted to low latitudes, they could influence the development of tropical cyclones. The gravity-wave-induced vertical lift may modulate the slantwise convection by releasing the moist symmetric instability at near-threshold conditions in the warm frontal zone of extratropical cyclones. Latent heat release associated with the mesoscale slantwise convection has been linked to explosive cyclogenesis and severe weather. The circumstantial and statistical evidence of the solar wind influence on extratropical cyclones is further supported by a statistical analysis of high-level clouds (<440 mb extracted from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP D1 dataset. A statistically significant response of the high-level cloud area index (HCAI to fast solar wind from coronal holes is found in mid-to-high latitudes during autumn-winter and in low latitudes during spring-summer. In the extratropics, this response of the HCAI to solar wind forcing is consistent with the effect on tropospheric vorticity found by Wilcox et al. (1974 and verified by Prikryl et al. (2009. In the tropics, the observed HCAI response, namely a decrease in HCAI at the arrival of solar wind stream followed by an increase a few days later, is similar to that in the northern and southern mid-to-high latitudes. The amplitude of the response nearly doubles for stream interfaces associated with the interplanetary magnetic field BZ component shifting southward. When the IMF BZ after the stream interface shifts northward, the autumn-winter effect weakens or shifts to lower (mid latitudes

  5. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work define procedures and controls about ionizing radiations. Between some definitions it found the following topics: radiation dose, risk, biological effects, international radioprotection bodies, workers exposure, accidental exposure, emergencies and radiation protection

  6. Isotropic Radiators

    CERN Document Server

    Matzner, H; Matzner, Haim; Donald, Kirk T. Mc

    2003-01-01

    We give two examples of antennas with isotropic radiation patterns. Because these involve elliptically polarized radiation, they evade the "hairy-ball theorem" that suggests isotropic radiation would be impossible.

  7. Radiation induced conductivity of polycarbonate doped with different concentrations of aromatic hydrazone DEH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimir, Saenko; Novikov, Lev; Tyutnev, Andrey

    Radiation induced conductivity (RIC) of polymers widely used on present-day spacecraft plays is an important factor affecting their charging by the hot plasma of the Earth’s magnetosphere. As a result, researchers pay special attention to laboratory investigations of RIC in polymers excited by 10 -100 keV electrons prevailing in the hot magnetospheric plasma, including auroral radiation. Due to fluctuating fluxes of plasma electrons and especially of auroral electrons, it is very important to know how RIC depends on time. In our report we present RIC results observed in polycarbonate (PC) molecularly doped with aromatic hydrazone DEH (10 to 30 mas. percent) under continuous irradiation with 50 keV electrons. It has been found that RIC behavior in this material differs markedly from what we observed earlier in most of the polymers. After beginning of the stepwise irradiation, the RIC of PC+DEH rises fast to the quasistationary level but unlike common polymers, does not fall by an order of magnitude, instead it starts to increase further thus causing the accumulating space charge to decrease. This fact combined with the confirmed high radiation and temperature tolerance allows us to recommend this material for application on the spacecraft outer surface and specifically, as a thermal blanket.

  8. Radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  9. Simulations of resonant Alfvén waves generated by artificial HF heating of the auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pokhotelov

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical two-dimensional two-fluid MHD simulations of dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere (MI coupling have been performed to model the effects imposed on the auroral ionosphere by a powerful HF radio wave transmitter. The simulations demonstrate that modifications of the ionospheric plasma temperature and recombination due to artificial heating may trigger the ionospheric feedback instability when the coupled MI system is close to the state of marginal stability. The linear dispersion analysis of MI coupling has been performed to find the favorable conditions for marginal stability of the system. The development of the ionospheric feedback instability leads to the generation of shear waves which resonate in the magnetosphere between the heated ionospheric E-region and the strong gradient in the speed at altitudes of 1-2 RE. The application of the numerical results for the explanation of observations performed by low-orbiting satellites above the high-latitude ionosphere heated with a high power ground-based HF transmitter is discussed.

  10. D- and E-region effects in the auroral zone during a moderately active 24-h period in July 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Hargreaves

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of energetic electron precipitation into the auroral region at a time of enhanced solar wind have been investigated during a continuous period of 24 h, using the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT radar, an imaging riometer, and particle measurements on an orbiting satellite. The relative effects in the E region (120 km and D region (90 km are found to vary during the day, consistent with a gradual hardening of the incoming electron spectrum from pre-midnight to morning. Whereas the night spectra are single peaked, the daytime spectra are found to be double peaked, suggesting the presence of two distinct populations.

    A comparison between the radiowave absorption observed with the riometer and values estimated from the radar data shows generally good agreement, but with some discrepancies suggesting the occurrence of some small-scale features. The height and thickness of the absorbing region are estimated. Two periods of enhanced precipitation and the related radio absorption, one near magnetic midnight and one in the early morning, are studied in detail, including their horizontal structure and movement of the absorption patches.

    A sharp reduction of electron flux recorded on a POES satellite is related to the edge of an absorption region delineated by the imaging riometer. The observed particle flux is compared with a value deduced from the radar data during the overpass, and found to be in general agreement.

  11. Eastward-expanding auroral surges observed in the post-midnight sector during a multiple-onset substorm

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Kadokura, Akira; Partamies, Noora; Whiter, Daniel; Enell, Carl-Fredrik; Brändström, Urban; Sergienko, Tima; Gustavsson, Björn; Kozlovsky, Alexander; Miyaoka, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Akimasa

    2016-01-01

    We present three eastward-expanding auroral surge (EEAS) events that were observed intermittently at intervals of about 15 min in the post-midnight sector (01:55-02:40 MLT) by all-sky imagers and magnetometers in northern Europe. It was deduced that each surge occurred just after each onset of a multiple-onset substorm, which was small-scale and did not clearly expand westward, because they were observed almost simultaneously with Pi 2 pulsations at the magnetic equator and magnetic bay variations at middle-to-high latitudes associated with the DP-1 current system. The EEASs showed similar properties to omega bands or torches reported in previous studies, such as recurrence intervals of about 15 min, concurrence with magnetic pulsations with amplitudes of several tens of nanotesla, horizontal scales of 300-400 km, and occurrence of a pulsating aurora in a diffuse aurora after the passage of the EEASs. Furthermore, the EEASs showed similar temporal evolution to the omega bands, during which eastward-propagatin...

  12. A Simulation Study of Ionization Depletion in the Auroral Ionospheric F-Region Caused by Strong Convection Electric Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effects of strong convection electric field on the electron density in the auroral ionospheric F region have been simulated numerically by means of a physical model. It is found that an enhancement of electric field directed west-northward in post-noon or west-southward in pre-noon results in an ionization de pletion with its maximum at altitudes 40-50 km higher than that of the F2 peak. When the enhanced electric field lasts for 45 min and has a maximum about 32 mV/m, the resulted ionization depletions reach their max imum at the time just ~ 10 min behind the time when the convection electric field and ion temperature en hancements reach their maximum. This is consistent well with EISCAT observations. The magnitudes of thepercentage ionization depletions and their recovery time are dependent not only on the intensity of the electric field, but also on the diurnal variation phase of the background electron density.

  13. Transport of thermal plasma above the auroral ionosphere in the presence of electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Zakharov

    Full Text Available The electron component of intensive electric currents flowing along the geomagnetic field lines excites turbulence in the thermal magnetospheric plasma. The protons are then scattered by the excited electromagnetic waves, and as a result the plasma is stable. As the electron and ion temperatures of the background plasma are approximately equal each other, here electrostatic ion-cyclotron (EIC turbulence is considered. In the nonisothermal plasma the ion-acoustic turbulence may occur additionally. The anomalous resistivity of the plasma causes large-scale differences of the electrostatic potential along the magnetic field lines. The presence of these differences provides heating and acceleration of the thermal and energetic auroral plasma. The investigation of the energy and momentum balance of the plasma and waves in the turbulent region is performed numerically, taking the magnetospheric convection and thermal conductivity of the plasma into account. As shown for the quasi-steady state, EIC turbulence may provide differences of the electric potential of ΔV≈1–10 kV at altitudes of 500 < h < 10 000 km above the Earth's surface. In the turbulent region, the temperatures of the electrons and protons increase only a few times in comparison with the background values.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (electric fields; plasma waves and instabilities

     

  14. Effect of upflowing field-aligned electron beams on the electron cyclotron waves in the auroral magnetosphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sushil Kumar; S K Singh; A K Gwal

    2007-04-01

    The role of low density upflowing field-aligned electron beams (FEBs) on the growth rate of the electron cyclotron waves at the frequencies r < ­e, propagating downward in the direction of the Earth's magnetic field, has been analysed in the auroral region at e/e < 1 where e is the plasma frequency and ­e is the gyrofrequency. The FEBs with low to high energy (b) but with low temperature (∥b) have no effect on these waves. The FEBs with b < 1 keV and ∥b (> 1.5 keV) have been found to have significant effect on the growth rate. Analysis has revealed that it is mainly the ∥b which inhibits the growth rate (magnitude) and the range of frequency (bandwidth) of the instability mainly in the higher frequency spectrum. The inhibition in the growth rate and bandwidth increases with increase in ∥b. The FEBs with less b (giving drift velocity) reduce growth rate more than the beams with larger b. The inhibition of growth rate increases with the increase in the ratio e/e indicating that the beams are more effective at higher altitudes.

  15. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalas, Dimitri

    Basic Radiation Theory Specific Intensity Photon Number Density Photon Distribution Function Mean Intensity Radiation Energy Density Radiation Energy Flux Radiation Momentum Density Radiation Stress Tensor (Radiation Pressure Tensor) Thermal Radiation Thermodynamics of Thermal Radiation and a Perfect Gas The Transfer Equation Absorption, Emission, and Scattering The Equation of Transfer Moments of the Transfer Equation Lorentz Transformation of the Transfer Equation Lorentz Transformation of the Photon 4-Momentum Lorentz Transformation of the Specific Intensity, Opacity, and - Emissivity Lorentz Transformation of the Radiation Stress Energy Tensor The Radiation 4-Force Density Vector Covariant Form of the Transfer Equation Inertial-Frame Equations of Radiation Hydrodynamics Inertial-Frame Radiation Equations Inertial-Frame Equations of Radiation Hydrodynamics Comoving-Frame Equation of Transfer Special Relativistic Derivation (D. Mihalas) Consistency Between Comoving-Frame and Inertial-Frame Equations Noninertial Frame Derivation (J. I. Castor) Analysis of O (v/c) Terms Lagrangian Equations of Radiation Hydrodynamics Momentum Equation Gas Energy Equation First Law of Thermodynamics for the Radiation Field First Law of Thermodynamics for the Radiating Fluid Mechanical Energy Equation Total Energy Equation Consistency of Different Forms of the Radiating-Fluid Energy - and Momentum Equations Consistency of Inertial-Frame and Comoving-Frame Radiation Energy - and Momentum Equations Radiation Diffusion Radiation Diffusion Nonequilibrium Diffusion The Problem of Flux Limiting Shock Propagation: Numerical Methods Acoustic Waves Numerical Stability Systems of Equations Implications of Shock Development Implications of Diffusive Energy Transport Illustrative Example Numerical Radiation Hydrodynamics Radiating Fluid Energy and Momentum Equations Computational Strategy Energy Conservation Formal Solution Multigroup Equations An Astrophysical Example Adaptive-Grid Radiation

  16. The problem of the acceleration of electrons of the outer radiation belt and magnetospheric substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, E. E.; Stepanova, M. V.

    2015-09-01

    Predicting of the location of the maximum in high-energy electron fluxes filling a new radiation belt is an endeavor being carried out by physicists studying the magnetosphere. We analyzed the data from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites and ground-based magnetometers obtained during geomagnetic storm on 8-9 October 2012. The minimum value of the disturbance storm time (Dst) was -111 nT, and the maximum in high-energy electron fluxes that appeared during the recovery phase was observed at L = 4 Re. At the same time, we analyzed the motion of the auroral oval toward lower latitudes and related substorm activity using the data of the low-orbiting DMSP satellites and the IMAGE magnetic meridian network. It was found from the DMSP satellites' measurements that the maximum of the energy density of precipitating ions, the maximum of the plasma pressure, and the most equatorial part of the westward auroral electrojet are all located at the 60° geomagnetic latitude. This value corresponds to L = 4 Re, i.e., it coincides with the location of the maximum in high-energy electron fluxes. This L-value also agrees with the predictions of the Tverskaya relation between the minimum in Dst variation and the location of the maximum of the energetic electron fluxes, filling a new radiation belt. The obtained results show that the location of this maximum could be predicted solely from the data of the auroral particle precipitations and/or ground-based magnetic observations.

  17. Detection of H3+ auroral emission in Jupiter's 5-micron window

    CERN Document Server

    Giles, Rohini S; Irwin, Patrick G J; Melin, Henrik; Stallard, Tom S

    2016-01-01

    We use high-resolution ground-based observations from the VLT CRIRES instrument in December 2012 to identify sixteen previously undetected H3+ emission lines from Jupiter's ionosphere. These emission lines are located in Jupiter's 5-micron window (4.5-5.2 {\\mu}m), an optically-thin region of the planet's spectrum where the radiation mostly originates from the deep troposphere. The H3+ emission lines are so strong that they are visible even against this bright background. We measure the Doppler broadening of the H3+ emission lines in order to evaluate the kinetic temperature of the molecules, and we obtain a value of 1390$\\pm$160 K. We also measure the relative intensities of lines in the {\

  18. The Alfvén Mission: A possible ESA M4 Mission Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazakerley, Andrew; Berthomier, Matthieu; Pottelette, Raymond; Forsyth, Colin

    2014-05-01

    The Alfvén mission was proposed to the ESA M3 call for missions in 2010. Its scientific objective was to study the Auroral Acceleration Region (AAR), the most accessible laboratory for investigating plasmas at an interface where ideal magneto-hydrodynamics does not apply. Alfvén was designed to teach us where and how the particles that create the aurorae are accelerated, how and why they emit auroral kilometric radiation, what creates and maintains large scale electric fields aligned with the magnetic field, and to elucidate the ion outflow processes which are slowly removing the Earth's atmosphere. The auroral regions are the interface connecting the solar wind-driven collisionless magnetosphere to the collisional ionosphere at the top of Earth's atmosphere. Solar wind energy, transmitted via the magnetosphere, is dissipated in this interface, often explosively during magnetic substorms. The plasma organizes itself on a hierarchy of spatial and temporal scales, manifesting as auroral structures ranging from huge long-lived arcs to tiny flickering filaments. The only way to make substantial further progress in auroral plasma science and to elucidate the fundamental physics of the acceleration processes at the heart of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling is to combine the advantages of high-time resolution in situ measurements (as pioneered by the FAST mission), with the advantages of multi-point measurements (as pioneered by Cluster) in one mission. The mission concept also envisages continuous auroral imaging from the spacecraft, guaranteeing an understanding of the context (auroral morphology and motion) within which the in situ plasma measurements are made, and strong coordination with the existing dense network of ground based observatories, for more detailed ionospheric and auroral information when Alfvén overflights occur. We will review the ESA M3 Alfvén concept, consider recent scientific progress in this area, and discuss possible developments of the

  19. Effects of kilometre pricing on the GDP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    What are the effects of road pricing on the gross domestic product? Despite the many studies that have been carried out on the subject of road pricing in recent years, this question is still not fully answered. This study tries to answer the question and connects closely to previous research on the welfare effects of road pricing.

  20. A twenty-seven kilometre film

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    For the past two weeks, Bram Conjaerts, a Belgian filmmaker, has been touring the CERN sites and surrounding countryside conducting research for his new documentary. The film will follow the entire 27 Km length of the LHC ring, but unlike most documentaries about the LHC, it will take place mostly above ground! Bram Conjaerts during his visit to CERN.While working towards his film degree in 2008, Bram Conjaerts won an award at the International Documentary Festival for his documentary "Henri and the Islands", an anthropological documentary about the smallest village in Belgium. In an unlikely change of subject matter he decided to use the prize money to make a film about the LHC. "With the money granted by the Flemish government, I wanted to create a documentary about something adventurous and something that I did not know about, " explains Conjaerts. "I started doing research about the LHC and CERN and I came across the fantasy of...