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Sample records for aureus surgical site

  1. Temporal trends and epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus surgical site infection in the Swiss surveillance network: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M; Aghayev, E; Troillet, N; Eisenring, M-C; Kuster, S P; Widmer, A F; Harbarth, S

    2018-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the leading pathogen in surgical site infections (SSI). To explore trends and risk factors associated with S. aureus SSI. Risk factors for monomicrobial S. aureus SSI were identified from the Swiss multi-centre SSI surveillance system using multi-variate logistic regression. Both in-hospital and postdischarge SSI were identified using standardized definitions. Over a six-year period, data were collected on 229,765 surgical patients, of whom 499 (0.22%) developed monomicrobial S. aureus SSI; 459 (92.0%) and 40 (8.0%) were due to meticillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), respectively. There was a significant decrease in the rate of MSSA SSI (P = 0.007), but not in the rate of MRSA SSI (P = 0.70). Independent protective factors for S. aureus SSI were older age [≥75 years vs <50 years: odds ratio (OR) 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.44-0.83], laparoscopy/minimally invasive surgery (OR 0.68, 95% CI 0.50-0.92), non-clean surgery [OR 0.78 (per increase in wound contamination class), 95% CI 0.64-0.94] and correct timing of pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.65-0.98). Independent risk factors were male sex (OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.14-1.66), higher American Society of Anesthesiologists' score (per one-point increment: OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.13-1.51), re-operation for non-infectious reasons (OR 4.59, 95% CI 3.59-5.87) and procedure type: cardiac surgery, laminectomy, and hip or knee arthroplasty had two-to nine-fold increased odds of S. aureus SSI compared with other procedures. SSI due to S. aureus are decreasing and becoming rare events in Switzerland. High-risk procedures that may benefit from specific preventive measures were identified. Unfortunately, many of the independent risk factors are not easily modifiable. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Viable adhered Staphylococcus aureus highly reduced on novel antimicrobial sutures using chlorhexidine and octenidine to avoid surgical site infection (SSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jochen; Harrasser, Norbert; Tübel, Jutta; Mühlhofer, Heinrich; Pförringer, Dominik; von Deimling, Constantin; Foehr, Peter; Kiefel, Barbara; Krämer, Christina; Stemberger, Axel; Schieker, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    coated sutures with higher roughness for palmitate coatings and sustaining integrity of coated sutures. Adherent S. aureus were found via SEM on all types of investigated sutures. The novel antimicrobial sutures showed significantly less viable adhered S. aureus bacteria (up to 6.1 log) compared to Vicryl® Plus (0.5 log). Within 11 μg/cm drug-containing sutures, octenidine-palmitate (OL11) showed the highest number of viable adhered S. aureus (0.5 log), similar to Vicryl® Plus. Chlorhexidine-laurate (CL11) showed the lowest number of S. aureus on sutures (1.7 log), a 1.2 log greater reduction. In addition, planktonic S. aureus in suspensions were highly inhibited by CL11 (0.9 log) represents a 0.6 log greater reduction compared to Vicryl® Plus (0.3 log). Conclusions Novel antimicrobial sutures can potentially limit surgical site infections caused by multiple pathogenic bacterial species. Therefore, a potential inhibition of multispecies biofilm formation is assumed. In detail tested with S. aureus, the chlorhexidine-laurate coating (CL11) best meets the medical requirements for a fast bacterial eradication. This suture coating shows the lowest survival rate of adhering as well as planktonic bacteria, a high drug release during the first–clinically most relevant– 48 hours, as well as biocompatibility. Thus, CL11 coatings should be recommended for prophylactic antimicrobial sutures as an optimal surgical supplement to reduce wound infections. However, animal and clinical investigations are important to prove safety and efficacy for future applications. PMID:29315313

  3. The Current State of Screening and Decolonization for the Prevention of Staphylococcus aureus Surgical Site Infection After Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Mitchell C; Moucha, Calin S

    2015-09-02

    The most common pathogens in surgical site infections after total hip and knee arthroplasty are methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and coagulase-negative staphylococci. Patients colonized with MSSA or MRSA have an increased risk for a staphylococcal infection at the site of a total hip or knee arthroplasty. Most colonized individuals who develop a staphylococcal infection at the site of a total hip or total knee arthroplasty have molecularly identical S. aureus isolates in their nares and wounds. Screening and nasal decolonization of S. aureus can potentially reduce the rates of staphylococcal surgical site infection after total hip and total knee arthroplasty. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  4. Pre-operative antiseptic shower and bath policy decreases the rate of S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus surgical site infections in patients undergoing joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colling, Kristin; Statz, Catherine; Glover, James; Banton, Kaysie; Beilman, Greg

    2015-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) following joint arthroplasty increases length of stay, hospital cost, and leads to patient and healthcare provider dissatisfaction. Due to the presence of non-biologic implants (the prosthetic joint) in these procedures, infection is often devastating and treatment of the infection is more difficult. For this reason, prevention of SSI is of crucial importance in this population. Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the nares of approximately 30-40% of the population, is the most common pathogen causing SSI, and is associated with high morbidity and mortality rate. A pre-operative shower or bath with an antiseptic is an inexpensive and effective method of removal of these transient skin pathogens prior to the procedure and may be used to decrease SSI. We hypothesize that a preoperative antiseptic shower or bath will decrease the rate of SSI. A retrospective review was performed at two affiliated hospitals within the same system, one with a hospital-wide policy enforcing pre-operative antiseptic shower or bath and the other with no policy, with cases included from January 2010 to June 2012. International Classification of Disease-Ninth Revision-Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes and chart review were used to identify patients undergoing joint arthroplasty and to identify those with SSI. Two thousand three-hundred forty-nine arthroplasties were performed at the University of Minnesota Medical Center, a tertiary-care hospital with a pre-operative antiseptic shower or bath policy in place. An additional 1,693 procedures were performed at Fairview Ridges Hospital, a community hospital with no pre-operative policy. There was no difference in the rate of SSI between the two hospitals (1.96% vs. 1.95%; p=1.0). However, the rate of SSI caused by S. aureus was significantly decreased by pre-operative antiseptic shower/bath (17% vs. 61%; p=0.03), as was the rate of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections (2% vs. 24% p=0.002). A pre

  5. Surgical site infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a worldwide problem that has ... deep tissue is found on clinical examination, re-opening, histopathological or radiological investigation ..... Esposito S, Immune system and SSI, Journal of Chemotherapy, 2001.

  6. SURGICAL SITE INFECTION: REVIEW

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    P. H. M. Bonai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infection or nosocomial infection (NI is one of the factors that increase the cost of maintaining patients in the health system, even in processes that should safely occur, such as hospital patients and performing simple and routine surgical procedures surgical centers and clinics leading to complications resulting from these infections that prolong hospital stay and promote pain and suffering to the patient, resulting in the defense of the quality of services and influencing negatively the hospitals. Therefore, the aim of this study was to review the factors that result in surgical site infection, with the purpose of better understanding of the subject and the possibility of preventive actions to better treatment outcome of the patient.

  7. Surgical site infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Decrease the inflammatory response Vasodilatation leads to better perfusion and ... Must NOT be allowed to come in contact with brain, meninges, eyes or .... project (SCIP): Evolution of National Quality Measure. Surgical. Infection 2008 ...

  8. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections: A Comprehensive Review and a Plastic Surgeon's Approach to the Occult Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Cedric; Rosenfield, Lorne; Silverstein, Elena; Petrou-Zeniou, Panayiota

    2016-08-01

    Up to 20 percent of the general population is persistently colonized with Staphylococcus aureus, and 1 to 3 percent of the population is colonized with community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Currently, the knowledge of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage sites other than the nose, and their effect on surgical site infections in cosmetic surgery, is lacking. A comprehensive literature review using the PubMed database to analyze prevalence, anatomical carrier sites, current screening and decontamination protocols and guidelines, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus in cosmetic surgery was performed. The senior author's (L.R.) methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection experience and prevention protocols were also reviewed. Nasal swabs detect only 50.5 percent of methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization, and broad screening has noted the presence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in the ear canal and umbilicus. Decolonization protocols within the orthopedic and cardiothoracic surgery literature have reduced rates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus surgical-site infections. There are no decolonization guidelines for plastic surgeons. Since instituting their decolonization protocol, the authors have had no cases of methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection in nearly 1000 cosmetic surgery procedures. There are very limited, if any, Level I or II data regarding methicillin-resistant S. aureus screening and decolonization. As the sequelae of a surgical-site infection can be disastrous, expert opinions recommend that plastic surgeons vigorously address methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization and infection. The authors have developed and recommend a simple decolonization protocol that includes treatment of the umbilicus, ear canal, and nares to limit surgical-site infection and improve surgical outcomes.

  9. Preventing surgical site infection. Where now?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphreys, H

    2009-12-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is increasingly recognised as a measure of the quality of patient care by surgeons, infection control practitioners, health planners and the public. There is increasing pressure to compare SSI rates between surgeons, institutions and countries. For this to be meaningful, data must be standardised and must include post-discharge surveillance (PDS) as many superficial SSIs do not present to the original institution. Further work is required to determine the best method of conducting PDS. In 2008 two important documents on SSI were published from the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America\\/The Infectious Disease Society of America and the National Institute for Health and Clincal Excellence, UK. Both emphasise key aspects during the preoperative, operative and postoperative phases of patient care. In addition to effective interventions known to be important for some time, e.g. not shaving the surgical site until the day of the procedure, there is increasing emphasis on physiological parameters, e.g. blood glucose concentrations, oxygen tensions and body temperature. Laparoscopic procedures are increasingly associated with reduced SSI rates, and the screening and decontamination of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriers is effective for certain surgical procedures but has to be balanced by cost and the risk of mupirocin resistance. Finally, there is a need to convert theory into practice by the rigorous application of SSI healthcare bundles. Recent studies suggest that, with a multidisciplinary approach, simple measures can be effective in reducing SSI rates.

  10. Fighting surgical site infections in small animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verwilghen, Denis; Singh, Ameet

    2015-01-01

    A diverse array of pathogen-related, patient-related, and caretaker-related issues influence risk and prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs). The entire surgical team involved in health care settings in which surgical procedures are performed play a pivotal role in the prevention of SSIs. ...

  11. Surgical site infection among patients undergone orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical site infection among patients undergone orthopaedic surgery at Muhimbili Orthopaedic Institute, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. ... of surgical site infection at Muhimbili Orthopedic Institute was high. This was associated with more than 2 hours length of surgery, lack of prophylaxis use, and pre-operative hospital stay.

  12. Surgical Site Infection among Patients Undergone Orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    with surgical site infection at Muhimbili Orthopedic Institute. ... Determination of the relationship between outcome and exposure variables ... determined by more than 2 hours length of surgical procedure (AOR= 1.4; 95%CI 1.14-6.69; ... hospital, those with metastatic fractures, back, spine were not included as they fall under.

  13. ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERN OF ORGANISMS CAUSING SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS (SSI

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    Rohini Murlidhar Gajbhiye

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND CDC defines surgical site infection as ‘Infections related to operative procedure that occurs at or near surgical incision within 30 days of operative procedure or within one year if the implant is left in situ’. Surgical site infection (SSI is 3 rd most frequently reported nosocomial infection (12%-16% as per National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of organisms causing SSI. MATERIALS AND METHODS During a two year study period in a tertiary care hospital, 19,127 patients underwent surgeries in various surgical departments. Of these 517 (2.7% developed surgical site infection. The surgical wounds were classified by CDC & NNIS criteria into 4 classes. Two wound swabs were taken and processed by standard microbiological techniques. Antimicrobial susceptibility along with testing of ESBLs, MBLs, AmpCβ lactamases was done for all isolates causing SSI. RESULTS Among 19,127 patients, 517 (2.7% developed SSI. It was highest in patients of perforation peritonitis (11.99%.Among 517 specimens, 340 (65.76% showed growth and 177 (34.23% were culture negative. E.coli (23.33% was the commonest organism isolated followed by Acinetobacter spp. (16%, Klebsiella spp. (15.66%, Pseudomonas spp. (15.33%, S. aureus (10.33%, S. epidermidis(7.3%, Proteus spp. (6.00% and Citrobacter spp. (2.66%.Staphylococcus spp. were 100 % sensitive to Vancomycin & Linezolid. (27.5% S. aureus were MRSA and (17.5% were Inducible Clindamycin resistant (ICR. Enterobacteriaceae isolates showed maximum sensitivity towards Imipenem, Piperacillin-Tazobactam and Amikacin. Klebsiella spp. (40.62%, E.coli (35.89%, Citrobacter spp. (33.33%, Proteus spp. (26.08% were ESBL producers. Klebsiella spp. (17.18%, E.coli (10.25%, Proteus spp. (11.11% and Citrobacter spp. (8.69% were AmpC producers. Acinetobacter spp. (28.57% was commonest MBL producer followed by Klebsiella spp. (20

  14. [Surgical site infections: antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are very common, and represent more than 20% of all hospital-acquired infections. SSIs are associated with a higher mortality, as well as to an extended hospital stay and costs, depending on the surgical procedure and type of SSI. Advances in control practices for these infections include improvement in operating room ventilation, sterilization methods, barriers, and surgical techniques, as well as in surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis. For the latter, the antimicrobial agent should: be active against the most common pathogens, be administered in an appropriate dosage and in a time frame to ensure serum and tissue concentrations over the period of potential contamination, be safe, and be administered over the shortest effective time period to minimize adverse events, development of resistances, and cost. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Pelvic Surgical Site Infections in Gynecologic Surgery

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    Mark P. Lachiewicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of surgical site infection (SSI remains the most common complication of gynecologic surgical procedures and results in significant patient morbidity. Gynecologic procedures pose a unique challenge in that potential pathogenic microorganisms from the skin or vagina and endocervix may migrate to operative sites and can result in vaginal cuff cellulitis, pelvic cellulitis, and pelvic abscesses. Multiple host and surgical risk factors have been identified as risks that increase infectious sequelae after pelvic surgery. This paper will review these risk factors as many are modifiable and care should be taken to address such factors in order to decrease the chance of infection. We will also review the definitions, microbiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of pelvic SSIs after gynecologic surgery.

  16. Mycobacterium fortuitum causing surgical site wound infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaleem, F.; Usman, J.; Omair, M.; Din, R.U.; Hassan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum, a rapidly growing mycobacterium, is ubiquitous in nature. The organism was considered to be a harmless saprophyte but now there have been several reports from different parts of the world wherein it has been incriminated in a variety of human infections. We report a culture positive case of surgical site infection caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum, who responded well to the treatment. (author)

  17. Characterization of colonizing Staphylococcus aureus isolated from surgical wards' patients in a Nigerian university hospital.

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    Deboye O Kolawole

    Full Text Available In contrast to developed countries, only limited data on the prevalence, resistance and clonal structure of Staphylococcus aureus are available for African countries. Since S. aureus carriage is a risk factor for postoperative wound infection, patients who had been hospitalized in surgical wards in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital were screened for S. aureus carriage. All S. aureus isolates were genotyped (spa, agr and assigned to multilocus sequence types (MLST. Species affiliation, methicillin-resistance, and the possession of pyrogenic toxin superantigens (PTSAg, exfoliative toxins (ETs and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL were analyzed. Of 192 patients screened, the S. aureus carrier rate was 31.8 % (n = 61. Of these isolates, 7 (11.5% were methicillin-resistant (MRSA. The isolates comprised 24 spa types. The most frequent spa types were t064, t084, t311, and t1931, while the most prevalent MLST clonal complexes were CC5 and CC15. The most frequent PTSAg genes detected were seg/sei (41.0% followed by seb (29.5%, sea (19.7%, seh (14.7% and sec (11.5. The difference between the possession of classical and newly described PTSAg genes was not significant (63.9% versus 59.0% respectively; P = 0.602. PVL encoding genes were found in 39.3% isolates. All MRSA isolates were PVL negative, SCCmec types I and VI in MLST CC 5 and CC 30, respectively. Typing of the accessory gene regulator (agr showed the following distribution: agr group 1 (n = 20, group II (n = 17, group III (n = 14 and group IV (n = 10. Compared to European data, enterotoxin gene seb and PVL-encoding genes were more prevalent in Nigerian methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates, which may therefore act as potential reservoir for PVL and PTSAg genes.

  18. Surgical Site Infection Rate and Risk Factors among Obstetric Cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-04-01

    Among surgical patients in obstetrics, Surgical Site Infections were the most ... for delivery from April 1, 2009 to March 31, 2010 in obstetric ward of the Hospital. ... applying improved surgical techniques and improving infection prevention ...

  19. Surgical Site Infections and Associated Operative Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, Paul K; Zuckerbraun, Brian S

    Surgical site infection (SSI) contributes significantly to surgical morbidity. Patient factors and operative factors contribute to the risk of development of SSI. This review focuses on understanding operative characteristics that are associated with an increased risk of SSI. Much attention has been given to protocol care to reduce SSI, such as hair removal, skin preparation, and pre-operative antibiotic agents. Even with this, the appropriate antibiotic and re-dosing regimens often remain a challenge. Other operative factors such as blood loss/transfusion, emergency/urgent cases, duration of the operation, type of anesthesia, and resident involvement are also potentially modifiable to reduce the risk of SSI. Data are reviewed to highlight the increased risk associated with such factors. Strategies to reduce risk, such as operative care bundles, have significant promise to reduce the incidence of SSI for any given procedure.

  20. Risk factors for surgical site infections following clean orthopaedic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk factors for surgical site infections following clean orthopaedic operations. ... the host and environmental risk factors for surgical site infections following clean ... Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients who satisfied the inclusion ...

  1. Surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shishui; Mauffrey, Cyril; Hammerberg, E Mark; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for surgical site infections and to quantify the contribution of independent risk factors to the probability of developing infection after definitive fixation of tibial plateau fractures in adult patients. A retrospective analysis was performed at a level I trauma center between January 2004 and December 2010. Data were collected from a review of the patient's electronic medical records. A total of 251 consecutive patients (256 cases) were divided into two groups, those with surgical site infections and those without surgical site infections. Preoperative and perioperative variables were compared between these groups, and risk factors were determined by univariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression. Variables analyzed included age, gender, smoking history, diabetes, presence of an open fracture, presence of compartment syndrome, Schatzker classification, polytrauma status, ICU stay, time from injury to surgery, use of temporary external fixation, surgical approach, surgical fixation, operative time, and use of a drain. The overall rate of surgical site infection after ORIF of tibial plateau fractures during the 7 years of this study was 7.8% (20 of 256). The most common causative pathogens was Staphylococcus aureus (n=15, 75%). Independent predictors of surgical site infection identified by multivariate analyses were open tibial plateau fracture (odds ratio=3.9; 95% CI=1.3-11.6; p=0.015) and operative time (odds ratio=2.7; 95% CI=1.6-4.4; psite infection. Both open fracture and operative time are independent risks factors for postoperative infection.

  2. Local antimicrobial administration for prophylaxis of surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huiras, Paul; Logan, Jill K; Papadopoulos, Stella; Whitney, Dana

    2012-11-01

    Despite a lack of consensus guidelines, local antibiotic administration for prophylaxis of surgical site infections is used during many surgical procedures. The rationale behind this practice is to provide high antibiotic concentrations at the site of surgery while minimizing systemic exposure and adverse effects. Local antibiotic administration for surgical site prophylaxis has inherent limitations in that antibiotics are applied after the incision is made, rather than the current standard for surgical site prophylaxis that recommends providing adequate antibiotic concentrations at the site before the incision. The efficacy and safety of local application of antibiotics for surgical site prophylaxis have been assessed in different types of surgery with a variety of antibiotic agents and methods of application. We identified 22 prospective, randomized, controlled trials that evaluated local application of antibiotics for surgical site prophylaxis. These trials were subsequently divided and analyzed based on the type of surgical procedure: dermatologic, orthopedic, abdominal, colorectal, and cardiothoracic. Methods of local application analyzed included irrigations, powders, ointments, pastes, beads, sponges, and fleeces. Overall, there is a significant lack of level I evidence supporting this practice for any of the surgical genres evaluated. In addition, the literature spans several decades, and changes in surgical procedures, systemic antibiotic prophylaxis, and microbial flora make conclusions difficult to determine. Based on available data, the efficacy of local antibiotic administration for the prophylaxis of surgical site infections remains uncertain, and recommendations supporting this practice for surgical site prophylaxis cannot be made. © 2012 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  3. Evolving issues in the prevention of surgical site infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, A

    2009-06-01

    Surgical site infection is one of the more common causes of post-operative morbidity. Such infections contribute to prolonged recovery, delayed discharge and increasing costs to both patients and the health service. In the current climate increased emphasis is being placed on minimising the risks of acquiring or transmitting these nosocomial infections. This article reviews the current literature obtained from a Pubmed database search in relation to three specific aspects of surgical site infection: compliance with prophylactic antibiotics, post-discharge surveillance and novel methods for preventing surgical site infections. These topics represent areas where many institutions will find room for improvement in the prevention of surgical site infections. Tight adherence to prophylactic antibiotic guidelines, close followup of surgical wounds during and after hospital discharge, and attention to oxygenation status and the body temperature of patients may all prove to be useful adjuncts in significantly decreasing surgical site infections.

  4. Nasal Carriage of Staphylococcus Aureus and Cross-Contamination in a Surgical Intensive Care Unit: Efficacy of Mupirocin Ointment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Talon; C. Rouget; V. Cailleaux; P. Bailly; M. Thouverez; F. Barale; Y. Michel-Briand

    1995-01-01

    textabstractA six month prospective study was carried out in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU) of a university hospital to assess the incidence and routes of exogenous colonization by Staphylococcus aureus. A total of 157 patients were included in the study. One thousand one hundred and eleven

  5. Surgical site infection rates following laparoscopic urological procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Arvin K; Srinivasan, Arun K; Cho, Jane; Sadek, Mostafa A; Kavoussi, Louis R

    2011-04-01

    Surgical site infections have been categorized by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as "never events". The incidence of surgical site infection following laparoscopic urological surgery and its risk factors are poorly defined. We evaluated surgical site infection following urological laparoscopic surgery and identified possible factors that may influence occurrence. Patients who underwent transperitoneal laparoscopic procedures during a 4-year period by a single laparoscopic surgeon were retrospectively reviewed. Surgical site infections were identified postoperatively and defined using the Centers for Disease Control criteria. Clinical parameters, comorbidities, smoking history, preoperative urinalysis and culture results as well as operative data were analyzed. Nonparametric testing using the Mann-Whitney U test, multivariable logistic regression and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient were used for data analysis. In 556 patients undergoing urological laparoscopic procedures 14 surgical site infections (2.5%) were identified at mean postoperative day 21.5. Of the 14 surgical site infections 10 (71.4%) were located at a specimen extraction site. Operative time, procedure type and increasing body mass index were significantly associated with the occurrence of surgical site infections (p = 0.007, p = 0.019, p = 0.038, respectively), whereas history of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.071) and intraoperative transfusion (p = 0.053) were found to trend toward significance. Age, gender, positive urine culture, steroid use, procedure type and smoking history were not significantly associated with surgical site infection. Body mass index and operative time remained significant predictors of surgical site infection on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Surgical site infection is an infrequent complication following laparoscopic surgery with the majority occurring at the specimen extraction site. Infection is associated with prolonged operative time and

  6. Harvest surgical site infection following coronary artery bypass grafting: risk factors, microbiology, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mamta; Fakih, Mohamad G; Berriel-Cass, Dorine; Meisner, Susan; Saravolatz, Louis; Khatib, Riad

    2009-10-01

    Our goals were to evaluate the risk factors predisposing to saphenous vein harvest surgical site infection (HSSI), the microbiology implicated, associated outcomes including 30-day mortality, and identify opportunities for prevention of infection. All patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) procedures from January 2000 through September 2004 were included. Data were collected on preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors, in addition to microbiology and outcomes. Eighty-six of 3578 (2.4%) patients developed HSSI; 28 (32.6%) of them were classified as deep. The median time to detection was 17 (range, 4-51) days. An organism was identified in 64 (74.4%) cases; of them, a single pathogen was implicated in 50 (78%) cases. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently isolated pathogen: 19 (38% [methicillin-susceptible S aureus (MSSA) = 12, methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) = 7]). Gram-negative organisms were recovered in 50% of cases, with Pseudomonas aeruginosa predominating in 11 (22%) because of a single pathogen. Multiple pathogens were identified in 14 (22%) cases. The 30-day mortality was not significantly different in patients with or without HSSI. Multivariate analysis showed age, diabetes mellitus, obesity, congestive heart failure, renal insufficiency, and duration of surgery to be associated with increased risk. Diabetes mellitus, obesity, congestive heart failure, renal insufficiency, and duration of surgery were associated with increased risk for HSSI. S aureus was the most frequently isolated pathogen.

  7. Surgical Site Infection Following Fixation of Acetabular Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Faizan; Younus, Sajid; Asmatullah; Zia, Osama Bin; Khan, Naveed

    2017-09-01

    Acetabular fractures are mainly caused by high energy trauma. Surgical fixation of these fractures requires extensive surgical exposure which increases the length of operation and blood loss as well. This may increase the risk of surgical site infection. Our aim is to evaluate the prevalence of surgical site infections and the risk factors associated with it so as to minimize its chances. A total of 261 patients who underwent acetabular fracture surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into 2 groups, with or without surgical site infection. Factors examined include patients' gender, age, body mass index (BMI), time between injury and surgery, operative time, estimated blood loss, number of packed red blood cell transfused, length of total intensive care unit (ICU) stay, fracture type, surgical approach, smoking status, patients' comorbids and associated injuries. Fourteen patients (5.4%) developed surgical site infection. Out of 14 infections, 4 were superficial and 10 were deep. The factors that were found to be associated with surgical site infection following acetabular fracture fixation were prolonged operation time, increased BMI, prolonged ICU stay, larger amount of packed red blood cell transfused and associated genitourinary and abdominal trauma. In our study, we conclude that measures should be undertaken to attenuate the chances of surgical site infection in this major surgery by considering the risk factors significantly associated with it.

  8. Mupirocin prophylaxis against nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus infections in nonsurgical patients: a randomized study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Vos (Margreet); A. Ott (Alewijn); A. Voss (Andreas); J.A.J.W. Kluytmans (Jan); C.M.J.E. Vandenbroucke-Grauls (Christina); M.H.M. Meester (Marlene); P.H.J. van Keulen (Peter); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); H.F.L. Wertheim (Heiman)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage is a major risk factor for nosocomial S. aureus infection. Studies show that intranasal mupirocin can prevent nosocomial surgical site infections. No data are available on the efficacy of mupirocin in nonsurgical

  9. Rapid control of a methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak in a medical surgical intensive care unit (ICU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Anjum; Lampitoc, Marianita; Salaripour, Maryam; McKernan, Patricia; Devlin, Roslyn; Muller, Matthew P

    2009-01-01

    Outbreaks of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the intensive care unit setting can be prolonged and difficult to control. This report describes the rapid control of an outbreak of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a 24-bed open-concept medical surgical intensive care unit with a baseline methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus acquisition rate of 1.5 cases per 1000 patient days. This institution's infection control policy mandates an outbreak investigation if two cases of hospital-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization or infection are identified in an intensive care unit within a four-week period. In July 2007, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was identified in the sputum of two patients within a one-week period. Screening of all patients in the intensive care unit identified one additional case and a fourth case was identified from a clinical specimen before control measures were implemented. Initial control measures included healthcare worker education, enhanced surveillance, patient cohorting, and enhanced environmental cleaning. Despite these measures, three more cases occurred. All patients were then placed in contact isolation, healthcare workers were screened, and the nursing staff was cohorted. After two weeks without a case, two additional cases were identified. Decolonization of all positive patients was initiated. No further cases occurred over a five-week period and the outbreak was declared over. The outbreak resulted in nine cases of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization (n = 8) or infection (n = 1) over an 11-week period. Only one of 175 healthcare workers was colonized and it was not the outbreak strain. Early detection and the stepwise addition of infection control measures resulted in the rapid control of an outbreak of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a medical surgical intensive care unit without unit closure. A low threshold of suspicion and

  10. What Factors are Associated With a Surgical Site Infection After Operative Treatment of an Elbow Fracture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessen, Femke M A P; Braun, Yvonne; van Leeuwen, Wouter F; Dyer, George S; van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Ring, David

    2016-02-01

    Surgical site infections are one of the more common major complications of elbow fracture surgery and can contribute to other adverse outcomes, prolonged hospital stays, and increased healthcare costs. We asked: (1) What are the factors associated with a surgical site infection after elbow fracture surgery? (2) When taking the subset of closed elbow fractures only, what are the factors associated with a surgical site infection? (3) What are the common organisms isolated from an elbow infection after open treatment? One thousand three hundred twenty adult patients underwent surgery for an elbow fracture between January 2002 and July 2014 and were included in our study. Forty-eight of 1320 patients (4%) had a surgical site infection develop. Thirty-four of 1113 patients with a closed fracture (3%) had a surgical site infection develop. For all elbow fractures, use of plate and screw fixation (adjusted odds ratio [OR]= 2.2; 95% CI, 1.0-4.5; p = 0.041) and use of external fixation before surgery (adjusted OR = 4.7; 95% CI, 1.1-21; p = 0.035) were associated with higher infection rates. When subset analysis was performed for closed fractures, only smoking (adjusted OR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1-4.5; p = 0.023) was associated with higher infection rates. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common bacteria cultured (59%). The only modifiable risk factor for a surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation was cigarette smoking. Plate fixation and temporary external fixation are likely surrogates for more complex injuries, therefore no recommendations should be inferred from this association. Surgeons should counsel patients who smoke. Level IV, prognostic study.

  11. Surgical site infection in orthopedic implants and its common bacteria with their sensitivities to antibiotics, in open reduction internal fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, M.Q.; Zardad, M.S.; Khan, A.; Ahmed, S.; Awan, A. S.; Mohammad, T.

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infection in orthopaedic implants is a major problem, causing long hospital stay, cost to the patient and is a burden on health care facilities. It increases rate of non-union, osteomyelitis, implant failure, sepsis, multiorgan dysfunction and even death. Surgical site infection is defined as pain, erythema, swelling and discharge from wound site. Surgical site infection in orthopaedic implants is more challenging to the treating orthopaedic surgeon as the causative organism is protected by a biofilm over the implant's surface. Antibiotics cannot cross this film to reach the bacteria's, causing infection. Method: This descriptive case series study includes 132 patients of both genders with ages between 13 years to 60 years conducted at Orthopaedic Unit, Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad from 1st October 2015 to 31st March 2016. Patients with close fractures of long bones were included in the study to determine the frequency of surgical site infection in orthopaedic implants and the type of bacteria involved and their sensitivity to various antibiotics. All implants were of stainless steel. The implants used were Dynamic hip screws, Dynamic compression screws, plates, k-wires, Interlocking nails, SIGN nails, Austin Moore prosthesis and tension band wires. Pre-op and post-op antibiotics used were combination of Sulbactum and Cefoperazone which was given 1 hour before surgery and continued for 72 hours after surgery. Patients were followed up to 4 weeks. Pus was taken on culture stick, from those who developed infection. Results were entered in the pro forma. Results: A total of 132 patients of long bone fractures, who were treated with open reduction and internal fixation, were studied. Only 7 patients developed infection. Staphylococcus Aureus was isolated from all 7 patients. Staphylococcus aureus was sensitive to Linezolid, Fusidic Acid, and vancomycin. Cotrimoxazole, tetracycline, Gentamycin and Clindamycin were partially effective. Conclusion

  12. Early and late surgical site infections in ear surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastier, P L; Leroyer, C; Lashéras, A; Rogues, A-M; Darrouzet, V; Franco-Vidal, V

    2016-04-01

    A retroauricular approach is routinely used for treating chronic otitis media. The incidence of surgical site infections after ear surgery is around 10% in contaminated or dirty procedures. This observational prospective study describes surgical site infections after chronic otitis media surgery with the retroauricular approach and investigated their potential predictive factors. This observational prospective study included patients suffering from chronic otitis media and eligible for therapeutic surgery with a retroauricular approach. During follow-up, surgical site infections were defined as "early" if occurring within 30 days after surgery or as "late" if occurring thereafter. The data of 102 patients were analysed. Concerning early surgical site infections, four cases were diagnosed (3.9%) and a significant association was found with preoperative antibiotic therapy, wet ear at pre-operative examination, class III (contaminated) in the surgical wound classification, NNIS (National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance) index > 1, and oral post-operative antibiotic use. Seven late surgical site infections were diagnosed (7.1%) between 90 and 160 days after surgery and were significantly correlated to otorrhoea during the 6 months before surgery, surgery duration ≤60 minutes, canal wall down technique and use of fibrin glue. Surgical site infections after chronic otitis media surgery seem to be associated with factors related to the inflammatory state of the middle ear at the time of surgery in early infections and with chronic inflammation in late infections. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  13. Outcome and treatment of postoperative spine surgical site infections: predictors of treatment success and failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Keishi; Berven, Sigurd H

    2014-05-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is an important complication after spine surgery. The management of SSI is characterized by significant variability, and there is little guidance regarding an evidence-based approach. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors associated with treatment failure of SSI after spine surgery. A total of 225 consecutive patients with SSI after spine surgery between July 2005 and July 2010 were studied retrospectively. Patients were treated with aggressive surgical debridement and prolonged antibiotic therapy. Outcome and risk factors were analyzed in 197 patients having 1 year of follow-up. Treatment success was defined as resolution within 90 days. A total of 126 (76 %) cases were treated with retention of implants. Forty-three (22 %) cases had treatment failure with five (2.5 %) cases resulting in death. Lower rates of treatment success were observed with late infection (38 %), fusion with fixation to the ilium (67 %), Propionibacterium acnes (43 %), poly microbial infection (68 %), >6 operated spinal levels (67 %), and instrumented cases (73 %). Higher rates of early resolution were observed with superficial infection (93 %), methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (95 %), and failure. Superficial infection and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus were predictors of early resolution. Postoperative spine infections were treated with aggressive surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy. High rates of treatment failure occurred in cases with late infection, long instrumented fusions, polymicrobial infections, and Propionibacterium acnes. Removal of implants and direct or staged re-implantation may be a useful strategy in cases with high risk of treatment failure.

  14. Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Aerobic and Anaerobic Bacteria Isolated From Surgical Site Infection of Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghotaslou, Reza; Beheshtirouy, Samad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad; Pirzadeh, Tahereh; Asghari, Babak; Alizadeh, Naser; Toloue Ostadgavahi, Ali; Sorayaei Somesaraei, Vida; Memar, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-07-01

    Surgical Site Infections (SSIs) are infections of incision or deep tissue at operation sites. These infections prolong hospitalization, delay wound healing, and increase the overall cost and morbidity. This study aimed to investigate anaerobic and aerobic bacteria prevalence in surgical site infections and determinate antibiotic susceptibility pattern in these isolates. One hundred SSIs specimens were obtained by needle aspiration from purulent material in depth of infected site. These specimens were cultured and incubated in both aerobic and anaerobic condition. For detection of antibiotic susceptibility pattern in aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, we used disk diffusion, agar dilution, and E-test methods. A total of 194 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 samples of surgical sites. Predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria isolated from these specimens were the members of Enterobacteriaceae family (66, 34.03%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26, 13.4%), Staphylococcus aureus (24, 12.37%), Acinetobacter spp. (18, 9.28%), Enterococcus spp. (16, 8.24%), coagulase negative Staphylococcus spp. (14, 7.22%) and nonhemolytic streptococci (2, 1.03%). Bacteroides fragilis (26, 13.4%), and Clostridium perfringens (2, 1.03%) were isolated as anaerobic bacteria. The most resistant bacteria among anaerobic isolates were B. fragilis. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid while most of Enterobacteriaceae showed sensitivity to imipenem. Most SSIs specimens were polymicrobial and predominant anaerobic isolate was B. fragilis. Isolated aerobic and anaerobic strains showed high level of resistance to antibiotics.

  15. Magnitude and factors associated with post-cesarean surgical site ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Magnitude and factors associated with post-cesarean surgical site infection at Hawassa University Teaching and referral hospital, southern Ethiopia: a ... the hospital. Thus, it should be averted by implementing infection prevention techniques.

  16. Post-operative Salmonella surgical site infection in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Marc; Boozer, Lindsay; Glass, Eric N; Sanchez, Susan; Platt, Simon R; Freeman, Lisa M

    2017-09-01

    Following decompressive surgery for degenerative lumbosacral stenosis, a 6-year-old German shepherd dog developed a subcutaneous infection at the surgical site and discospondylitis at the lumbosacral intervertebral disc. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica, serotype Dublin was recovered from the surgical site. Salmonella of a different serovar was isolated from a sample of the raw meat-based diet that the owner fed the dog.

  17. Surgical site infection and timing of prophylactic antibiotics for appendectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wan-Ting; Tai, Feng-Chuan; Wang, Pa-Chun; Tsai, Ming-Lin

    2014-12-01

    Pre-operative prophylactic antibiotics may decrease the frequency of surgical site infection after appendectomy. However, the optimal timing for administration of pre-operative prophylactic antibiotics is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of timing of prophylactic antibiotics on the frequency of surgical site infection after appendectomy. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively for 577 consecutive patients who had appendectomy for acute appendicitis from 2006 to 2009. Quality assurance guidelines for timing of prophylactic antibiotics before the skin incision were changed from 0 to 30 min before the skin incision (before June 2008) to 30 to 60 min before the skin incision (after June 2008). Surgical site infection occurred in 28 patients (4.9%). There was no difference in frequency of surgical site infection with different timing of pre-operative prophylactic antibiotic (pre-operative time 0 to 30 min: 9 infections [3.6%]; 31 to 60 min: 13 infections [5.4%]; 61 to 120 min: 5 infections [7.0%]; >120 min: 1 infection [6.6%]). Multivariable analysis showed that surgical site infection was associated significantly with medical comorbidity but not perforated appendicitis. The frequency of surgical site infection was independent of timing of preoperative prophylactic antibiotics but was associated with the presence of medical comorbidity.

  18. Surveillance, Auditing, and Feedback Can Reduce Surgical Site Infection Dramatically: Toward Zero Surgical Site Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, Bhavani; Gowda, Deepak; Bulagonda, Pradeep; Rao, Abhishek; Raman, Sai Suguna; Natarajan, Shanmuga Vadivoo

    2018-04-01

    We evaluated the Surveillance of Surgical Site Infection (SSI), Auditing, and Feedback (SAF) effect on the rate of compliance with an SSI care bundle and measured its effectiveness in reducing the SSI rate. A prospective cohort study from January 2014 to December 2016 was classified into three phases: pre-SAF, early-SAF, and late-SAF. Pre-operative baseline characteristics of 24,677 patients who underwent orthopedic, cardiovascular thoracic surgery (CTVS) or urologic operations were recorded. Univariable analyses of the SSI rates in the pre-SAF and post-SAF phases were performed. Percentage compliance and non-compliance with each care component were calculated. Correlation between reduction in the SSI rate and increase in compliance with the pre-operative, peri-operative, and post-operative care-bundle components was performed using the Spearman test. There was a significant decrease in the SSI rate in orthopedic procedures that involved surgical implantation and in mitral valve/aortic valve (MVR/AVR) cardiac operations, with a relative risk (RR) ratio of 0.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.12-0.31) and 0.08 (95% CI 0.03-0.22), respectively. The SSI rate was inversely correlated with the rate of compliance with pre-operative (r = -0.738; p = 0.037), peri-operative (r = - 0.802; p = 0.017), and post-operative (r = -0.762; p = 0.028) care bundles. Implementation of the Surveillance of SSI, Auditing, and Feedback bundle had a profound beneficial effect on the SSI rate, thereby reducing healthcare costs and improving patient quality of life.

  19. Scalp flora in Indian patients undergoing craniotomy for brain tumors - Implications for pre-surgical site preparation and surgical site infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasgar V Moiyadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Causation of surgical site infection (SSI following craniotomy is multifactorial. Most preventive strategies (including site preparation and antibiotic prophylaxis revolve around reducing preoperative contamination of the local site. There is little evidence, however, linking site contamination with postoperative infections. This is important given the preference for performing non-shaved cranial surgery. We undertook a prospective study to document the scalp flora in neurosurgical patients in an Indian setting and to assess possible association with SSI. Materials and Methods: A prospective study recruited 45 patients undergoing non-shaved clean craniotomies for various brain tumors. Standard perioperative procedures and antibiotic policy were employed. Prior to and immediately following the pre-surgical scrubbing, we collected swabs and evaluated their growth qualitatively. SSI was documented adhering to CDC guidelines. The association of swab-positivity with various parameters (including SSI was evaluated. Results: Pre-scrub positivity was seen in 18 of 44 patients, three of them developed subsequent SSI. Most were known skin contaminants. Five patients had swab positivity after scrubbing, though none of these developed any SSI. Four of these five had pre-scrub positivity. In three the same organisms persisted (two being Staphylococcus aureus, and one had different growth post-scrub, whereas one patient developed new growth (contaminant mycelial fungus in the post-scrub swab. We did not find any association between swab positivity and SSI. Swab positivity was also not related to hair-length or hygiene. Conclusion: Scalp flora in Indian patients is similar to that described. Pre-surgical preparation does not always eliminate this contamination (especially staphylococcus. However, this does not necessarily translate into increased SSI. Moreover, the results also provide objective evidence to support the performance of non

  20. Current Microbiology of Surgical Site Infections in Patients with Cancer: A Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolston, Kenneth V I; Nesher, Lior; Tarrand, Jeffrey T

    2014-12-01

    Patients with solid tumors frequently undergo surgical procedures and develop procedure-related infections. We sought to describe the current microbiologic spectrum of infections at various sites following common surgical procedures. This was a retrospective review of microbiologic data between January 2011 and February 2012. The sites studied were those associated with breast cancer surgery, thoracotomy, craniotomy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube insertion, and abdominal/pelvic surgery. Only patients with solid tumors were included. A total of 368 surgical site infections (SSIs) were identified (68 breast cancer related; 91 thoracotomy related; 45 craniotomy related; 75 PEG-tube insertion related; and 89 abdominal/pelvic surgery related). Of these, 58% were monomicrobial and 42% were polymicrobial. Overall, 85% of the 215 monomicrobial infections were caused by Gram-positive organisms and 13% by Gram-negative bacilli (GNB). Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant pathogen in monomicrobial infections (150 of 215, 70%). Sixty (40%) of these staphylococcal isolates were methicillin resistant (MRSA), and 65% had a vancomycin minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) ≥1.0 µg/ml. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the predominant GNB pathogen (19 of 27, 70%). Staphylococci were also the predominant pathogens in polymicrobial infections, while P. aeruginosa and Escherichia coli were the predominant GNB. Overall, 35% of isolates from polymicrobial infections were GNB. Cephalosporins (e.g., cefazolin) or amoxicillin/clavulanate was used most often for surgical prophylaxis, and 47% of organisms from monomicrobial infections (MRSA, P. aeruginosa) were resistant to them. A similar resistance pattern was observed in polymicrobial infections. Staphylococcus species were isolated most often from the sites studied. Polymicrobial infections (42%) and GNB monomicrobial infections (13%) were relatively frequent causes of SSIs. Many of these infections were caused by

  1. Comprehensive review of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: screening and preventive recommendations for plastic surgeons and other surgical health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Eamon B; Johnson, Mark D; Rohrich, Rod J

    2014-11-01

    Up to 2.3 million people are colonized with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the United States, causing well-documented morbidity and mortality. Although the association of clinical outcomes with community and hospital carriage rates is increasingly defined, less is reported about asymptomatic colonization prevalence among physicians, and specifically plastic surgeons and the subsequent association with the incidence of patient surgical-site infection. A review of the literature using the PubMed and Cochrane databases analyzing provider screening, transmission, and prevalence was undertaken. In addition, a search was completed for current screening and decontamination guidelines and outcomes. The methicillin-resistant S. aureus carriage prevalence of surgical staff is 4.5 percent. No prospective data exist regarding transmission and interventions for plastic surgeons. No studies were found specifically looking at prevalence or treatment of plastic surgeons. Current recommendations by national organizations focus on patient-oriented point-of-care testing and intervention, largely ignoring the role of the health care provider. Excellent guidelines exist regarding screening, transmission prevention, and treatment both in the workplace and in the community. No current such guidelines exist for plastic surgeons. No Level I or II evidence was found regarding physician screening, treatment, or transmission. Current expert opinion, however, indicates that plastic surgeons and their staff should be vigilant for methicillin-resistant S. aureus transmission, and once a sentinel cluster of skin and soft-tissue infections is identified, systematic screening and decontamination should be considered. If positive, topical decolonization therapy should be offered. In refractory cases, oral antibiotic therapy may be required, but this should not be used as a first-line strategy.

  2. Preventing surgical site infections: a surgeon's perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    Nichols, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    Wound site infections are a major source of postoperative illness, accounting for approximately a quarter of all nosocomial infections. National studies have defined the patients at highest risk for infection in general and in many specific operative procedures. Advances in risk assessment comparison may involve use of the standardized infection ratio, procedure-specific risk factor collection, and logistic regression models. Adherence to recommendations in the 1999 Centers for Disease Contro...

  3. Wrong-Site Surgery, Retained Surgical Items, and Surgical Fires : A Systematic Review of Surgical Never Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, Susanne; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda; Nguyen, David K; Dawes, Aaron J; Miake-Lye, Isomi; Beroes, Jessica M; Booth, Marika J; Miles, Jeremy N V; Shanman, Roberta; Shekelle, Paul G

    2015-08-01

    Serious, preventable surgical events, termed never events, continue to occur despite considerable patient safety efforts. To examine the incidence and root causes of and interventions to prevent wrong-site surgery, retained surgical items, and surgical fires in the era after the implementation of the Universal Protocol in 2004. We searched 9 electronic databases for entries from 2004 through June 30, 2014, screened references, and consulted experts. Two independent reviewers identified relevant publications in June 2014. One reviewer used a standardized form to extract data and a second reviewer checked the data. Strength of evidence was established by the review team. Data extraction was completed in January 2015. Incidence of wrong-site surgery, retained surgical items, and surgical fires. We found 138 empirical studies that met our inclusion criteria. Incidence estimates for wrong-site surgery in US settings varied by data source and procedure (median estimate, 0.09 events per 10,000 surgical procedures). The median estimate for retained surgical items was 1.32 events per 10,000 procedures, but estimates varied by item and procedure. The per-procedure surgical fire incidence is unknown. A frequently reported root cause was inadequate communication. Methodologic challenges associated with investigating changes in rare events limit the conclusions of 78 intervention evaluations. Limited evidence supported the Universal Protocol (5 studies), education (4 studies), and team training (4 studies) interventions to prevent wrong-site surgery. Limited evidence exists to prevent retained surgical items by using data-matrix-coded sponge-counting systems (5 pertinent studies). Evidence for preventing surgical fires was insufficient, and intervention effects were not estimable. Current estimates for wrong-site surgery and retained surgical items are 1 event per 100,000 and 1 event per 10,000 procedures, respectively, but the precision is uncertain, and the per

  4. Evaluation of two surveillance methods for surgical site infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haji Abdolbaghi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical wound infection surveillance is an important facet of hospital infection control processes. There are several surveillance methods for surgical site infections. The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of two different surgical site infection surveillance methods. Methods: In this prospective cross sectional study 3020 undergoing surgey in general surgical wards of Imam Khomeini hospital were included. Surveillance methods consisted of review of medical records for postoperative fever and review of nursing daily note for prescription of antibiotics postoperatively and during patient’s discharge. Review of patient’s history and daily records and interview with patient’s surgeon and the head-nurse of the ward considered as a gold standard for surveillance. Results: The postoperative antibiotic consumption especially when considering its duration is a proper method for surgical wound infection surveillance. Accomplishments of a prospective study with postdischarge follow up until 30 days after surgery is recommended. Conclusion: The result of this study showed that postoperative antibiotic surveillance method specially with consideration of the antibiotic usage duration is a proper method for surgical site infection surveillance in general surgery wards. Accomplishments of a prospective study with post discharge follow up until 30 days after surgery is recommended.

  5. Antibiotic therapy for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in non surgical wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Koti, Rahul; Toon, Clare D; Wilson, Peter; Davidson, Brian R

    2013-11-18

    Non surgical wounds include chronic ulcers (pressure or decubitus ulcers, venous ulcers, diabetic ulcers, ischaemic ulcers), burns and traumatic wounds. The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonisation (i.e. presence of MRSA in the absence of clinical features of infection such as redness or pus discharge) or infection in chronic ulcers varies between 7% and 30%. MRSA colonisation or infection of non surgical wounds can result in MRSA bacteraemia (infection of the blood) which is associated with a 30-day mortality of about 28% to 38% and a one-year mortality of about 55%. People with non surgical wounds colonised or infected with MRSA may be reservoirs of MRSA, so it is important to treat them, however, we do not know the optimal antibiotic regimen to use in these cases. To compare the benefits (such as decreased mortality and improved quality of life) and harms (such as adverse events related to antibiotic use) of all antibiotic treatments in people with non surgical wounds with established colonisation or infection caused by MRSA. We searched the following databases: The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 13 March 2013); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (2013, Issue 2); NHS Economic Evaluation Database (2013, Issue 2); Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to February Week 4 2013); Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, March 12, 2013); Ovid EMBASE (1974 to 2013 Week 10); EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to 8 March 2013). We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing antibiotic treatment with no antibiotic treatment or with another antibiotic regimen for the treatment of MRSA-infected non surgical wounds. We included all relevant RCTs in the analysis, irrespective of language, publication status, publication year, or sample size. Two review authors independently identified the trials, and extracted data from the trial reports. We

  6. Timing of surgical site infection and pulmonary complications after laparotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundel, Ossian; Gundersen, Sofie Kirchhoff; Dahl, Rikke Maria

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surgical site infection (SSI) and other postoperative complications are associated with high costs, morbidity, secondary surgery, and mortality. Many studies have identified factors that may prevent SSI and pulmonary complications, but it is important to know when they in fact occur....... The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic timing of surgical site infections and pulmonary complications after laparotomy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of the PROXI trial which was a randomized clinical trial conducted in 1400 patients undergoing elective or emergent...... laparotomy. Patients were randomly allocated to either 80% or 30% perioperative inspiratory oxygen fraction. RESULTS: SSI or pulmonary complications were diagnosed in 24.2% (95% CI: 22.0%-26.5%) of the patients at a median of 9 days [IQR: 5-15] after surgery. Most common was surgical site infection (19...

  7. [Risk factors related to surgical site infection in elective surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeles-Garay, Ulises; Morales-Márquez, Lucy Isabel; Sandoval-Balanzarios, Miguel Antonio; Velázquez-García, José Arturo; Maldonado-Torres, Lulia; Méndez-Cano, Andrea Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    The risk factors for surgical site infections in surgery should be measured and monitored from admission to 30 days after the surgical procedure, because 30% of Surgical Site Infection is detected when the patient was discharged. Calculate the Relative Risk of associated factors to surgical site infections in adult with elective surgery. Patients were classified according to the surgery contamination degree; patient with surgery clean was defined as no exposed and patient with clean-contaminated or contaminated surgery was defined exposed. Risk factors for infection were classified as: inherent to the patient, pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative. Statistical analysis; we realized Student t or Mann-Whitney U, chi square for Relative Risk (RR) and multivariate analysis by Cox proportional hazards. Were monitored up to 30 days after surgery 403 patients (59.8% women), 35 (8.7%) developed surgical site infections. The factors associated in multivariate analysis were: smoking, RR of 3.21, underweight 3.4 hand washing unsuitable techniques 4.61, transfusion during the procedure 3.22, contaminated surgery 60, and intensive care stay 8 to 14 days 11.64, permanence of 1 to 3 days 2.4 and use of catheter 1 to 3 days 2.27. To avoid all risk factors is almost impossible; therefore close monitoring of elective surgery patients can prevent infectious complications.

  8. Teamwork and Collaboration for Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, E Patchen

    2016-04-01

    The surgeon has been regarded as the "captain of the ship" in the operating room (OR) for many years, but cannot accomplish successful operative intervention without the rest of the team. Review of the pertinent English-language literature. Many reports demonstrate very different impressions of teamwork and communication in the OR held by different members of the surgical team. Objective measures of teamwork and communication demonstrate a reduction in complications including surgical site infections with improved teamwork and communication, with fewer distractions such as noise, and with effective use of checklists. Efforts to improve teamwork and communication and promote the effective use of checklists promote patient safety and improved outcomes for patients with reduction in surgical site infections.

  9. Surgical site infection and pattern of antibiotic use in a tertiary care hospital in Peshawar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, W.A.; Khan, M.; Jehanzeb, M.

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is most common complication following surgical procedures. The objective of the study was to collect information on SSI regarding the most frequent pathogen in cases operated in casualty of Lady Read ing Hospital (LRH) Peshawar, and sensitivity of the isolated pathogens to different antibiotics used. Methods: The study was carried out at surgical 'B' unit (SBU) LRH from Jan 1, 2009 till Dec 31, 2009. A total of 100 patients who developed SSI after being operated for peritonitis following traumatic gut perforations, perforated appendix and enteric perforation. The patients included presented to casualty, operated in casualty OT and were shifted to the SBU, LRH. Children and patients operated on the elective list were excluded. Data was collected on specially designed proforma. Demographic details, details of SSI, culture/sensitivity reports and antibiotic used for prophylaxis and after C/S report were recorded. Results: Out of a total of 100, 72 had superficial, 20 had organ/space and 8 had deep SSI. Organisms were isolated in 77 cases (77%). E. coli being most common pathogen (46%), followed by Pseudomonas (23%), mixed growth of Staph. Aureus or MRSA (13%), MRSA (5%) and Staph aureus (4%) in descending order. No growth was reported in 23% of cases. Conclusion: E.coli was the most common organism involved in SSI in SBU LRH. The incidence of infection with MRSA in our unit is high. Combination of antibiotics like pipreacillin/Tazobactam, Cefoperazone/Sulbactam, were most effective against the isolated organisms, except MRSA where Linezolid, vancomycin and Tiecoplanin were effective. (author)

  10. Risk control of surgical site infection after cardiothoracic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, P.; de Jong, A. P.; Kloek, J. J.; Spanjaard, L.; de Mol, B. A. J. M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to investigate whether a risk control programme based on risk assessment, new treatment modalities and the presence of a surveillance programme reduces the incidence of surgical site infections (SSI). Between January 2001 and December 2003, 167 patients were

  11. Surgical-site Infection Following Cesarean Section in Kano, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence, risk factors and common bacterial pathogens for surgical site infection (SSI), following cesarean section (CS). Materials and Methods: A retrospective case-control study of patients delivered by CS in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria. The cases were the patients whose ...

  12. AzaSite® inhibits Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus biofilm formation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Eric C; Kowalski, Regis P; Romanowski, Eric G; Mah, Francis S; Gordon, Y Jerold; Shanks, Robert M Q

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of azithromycin (AZM) 1% ophthalmic solution in DuraSite® (AzaSite®) on biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci in vitro. Susceptible and resistant clinical strains (n = 8) of S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci were challenged with serial dilutions of AzaSite® and its components: AZM, benzalkonium chloride (BAK), and the DuraSite drug delivery vehicle. After 20 h of incubation, bacterial growth was quantified using a spectrophotometer (A = 600 nm). Plates were stained with crystal violet and biofilm formation was quantified spectrophotometrically at A = 590 nm. AzaSite® and AZM inhibited bacterial growth (P reduction in biofilm formation (P reduction in biofilm formation at concentrations from 1.25 to 10 mg/mL in most strains. DuraSite® inhibited biofilm formation at concentrations between 10% and 2.5% in all studied strains (P < 0.05), without affecting bacterial growth. BAK inhibited bacterial growth and biofilm formation in all strains between concentrations of 0.042 and 0.375 mg/mL (P < 0.05). AzaSite®, AZM, or BAK prevented biofilm formation by inhibiting growth of AZM-susceptible strains. AzaSite®, AZM, and DuraSite® also reduced biofilm formation at subinhibitory concentrations for growth. Our data indicate that AZM has a moderate inhibitory effect on biofilm formation, whereas DuraSite® appears to play a greater role in the inhibition of staphylococcal biofilm formation by AzaSite®.

  13. The efficacy of normal saline irrigation to prevent surgical site infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, V.; Awan, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of normal saline irrigation to prevent surgical site Infection The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of normal saline irrigations to prevent surgical site infection (SSI). Study Design: A comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at surgery and gynecology Dept CMH Chunian from 1st Jan 2012 to 1st Nov 2012. Patients and Methods: Two hundred clean surgical and gynecological cases were included in the study. Hundred cases which were randomly selected had their wound washed with warm normal saline for 60 sec and then mopped dry with clean swabs. Subcuticular Stitches were applied to all the 200 cases. The surgical wounds were examined on 3rd post operative day and then finally on 15th post operative day. Patients with wound infection developed pain at the operation site and fever on third post operative day. Wounds were examined for swelling, redness, discharge and stitch abscess. Routine investigations were done as per protocol. Wound swabs were taken for culture and sensitivity. Results: The study was carried out on 200 clean cases (general and gynecological). They were 130 females and 70 males. The 100 cases whose wounds were washed with normal saline only 1 patient developed wound infection while in the other group who did not had saline irrigations 8 patients out of 100 developed wound infection. The commonest infective organisms were staphylococcus aureus and the other organisms were streptococcus pyogenes, proteus, Klaebsiella, E coli and pseudomonas. No MRSA was detected. Conclusion: In our study washing the wound with warm normal saline for 60 seconds resulted in the wound being infection free. Wound infection is associated with delayed wound healing, prolonged hospital stay and increased economic pressure on the patient and on the state. (author)

  14. STUDY ON SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS CAUSED BY ESBL PRODUCING GRAM NEGATIVE BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rambabu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections have been a major problem, because of the emergence of drug resistant bacteria, in particular B - lactamase producing bacteria. Extended spectrum beta lactamase producing gram negative organisms pose a great challenge in treatment o f SSI present study is aimed at determining multiple drug resistance in gram negative bacteria & to find out ESBL producers, in correlation with treatment outcome. A total of 120 wound infected cases were studied. Staphylococcus aureus was predominant bact erium - 20.Among gram negative bacteria, Pseudomonas species is predominant (14 followed by Escherichia coli (13 , Klebsiella species (12 , Proteus (9 Citrobacter (4 Providencia (2 & Acinetobacter species (2 . Out of 56 gramnegative bacteria isolated, 20 were i dentified as ESBL producers, which was statistically significant. Delay in wound healing correlated with infection by ESBL producers, which alarms the need of abstinence from antibiotic abuse

  15. Executive Summary of the American College of Surgeons/Surgical Infection Society Surgical Site Infection Guidelines-2016 Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Kristen A; Minei, Joseph P; Laronga, Christine; Harbrecht, Brian G; Jensen, Eric H; Fry, Donald E; Itani, Kamal M F; Dellinger, E Patchen; Ko, Clifford Y; Duane, Therese M

    Guidelines regarding the prevention, detection, and management of surgical site infections (SSIs) have been published previously by a variety of organizations. The American College of Surgeons (ACS)/Surgical Infection Society (SIS) Surgical Site Infection (SSI) Guidelines 2016 Update is intended to update these guidelines based on the current literature and to provide a concise summary of relevant topics.

  16. Implementation of surgical quality improvement: auditing tool for surgical site infection prevention practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechenbleikner, Elizabeth M; Hobson, Deborah B; Bennett, Jennifer L; Wick, Elizabeth C

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infections are a potentially preventable patient harm. Emerging evidence suggests that the implementation of evidence-based process measures for infection reduction is highly variable. The purpose of this work was to develop an auditing tool to assess compliance with infection-related process measures and establish a system for identifying and addressing defects in measure implementation. This was a retrospective cohort study using electronic medical records. We used the auditing tool to assess compliance with 10 process measures in a sample of colorectal surgery patients with and without postoperative infections at an academic medical center (January 2012 to March 2013). We investigated 59 patients with surgical site infections and 49 patients without surgical site infections. First, overall compliance rates for the 10 process measures were compared between patients with infection vs patients without infection to assess if compliance was lower among patients with surgical site infections. Then, because of the burden of data collection, the tool was used exclusively to evaluate quarterly compliance rates among patients with infection. The results were reviewed, and the key factors contributing to noncompliance were identified and addressed. Ninety percent of process measures had lower compliance rates among patients with infection. Detailed review of infection cases identified many defects that improved following the implementation of system-level changes: correct cefotetan redosing (education of anesthesia personnel), temperature at surgical incision >36.0°C (flags used to identify patients for preoperative warming), and the use of preoperative mechanical bowel preparation with oral antibiotics (laxative solutions and antibiotics distributed in clinic before surgery). Quarterly compliance improved for 80% of process measures by the end of the study period. This study was conducted on a small surgical cohort within a select subspecialty. The

  17. Effectiveness of local vancomycin powder to decrease surgical site infections: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsiu-Yin; Herwaldt, Loreen A; Blevins, Amy E; Cho, Edward; Schweizer, Marin L

    2014-03-01

    Some surgeons use systemic vancomycin to prevent surgical site infections (SSIs), but patients who do not carry methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus have an increased risk of SSIs when given vancomycin alone for intravenous prophylaxis. Applying vancomycin powder to the wound before closure could increase the local tissue vancomycin level without significant systemic levels. However, the effectiveness of local vancomycin powder application for preventing SSIs has not been established. Our objective was to systematically review and evaluate studies on the effectiveness of local vancomycin powder for decreasing SSIs. Meta-analysis. We included observational studies, quasi-experimental studies, and randomized controlled trials of patients undergoing surgical procedures that involved vancomycin powder application to surgical wounds, reported SSI rates, and had a comparison group that did not use local vancomycin powder. The primary outcome was postoperative SSIs. The secondary outcomes included deep incisional SSIs and S. aureus SSIs. We performed systematic literature searches in PubMed, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials via Wiley, Scopus (including EMBASE abstracts), Web of Science, ClinicalTrials.gov, BMC Proceedings, ProQuest Dissertation, and Thesis in Health and Medicine, and conference abstracts from IDWeek, the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, and the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons annual meetings, and also the Scoliosis Research Society Annual Meeting and Course. We ran the searches from inception on May 9, 2013 with no limits on date or language. After reviewing 373 titles or abstracts and 22 articles in detail, we included 10 independent studies and used a random-effects model when pooling risk estimates to assess the effectiveness of local

  18. The Impact of Bile Duct Cultures on Surgical Site Infections in Pancreatic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Torsten; Belyaev, Orlin; Akkuzu, Rehsan; Hölling, Janine; Uhl, Waldemar; Chromik, Ansgar M

    2015-08-01

    In pancreatic surgery pre-operative biliary drainage (PBD) is associated with bacteribilia, which increases the risk for surgical site infections (SSIs). This study is a retrospective observational cohort design that compared micro-organisms of intra-operative bile duct cultures with micro-organisms of SSIs after pancreaticoduodenectomy. From January 2004 until December 2010, 887 patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy or hepaticojejunostomy for benign and malignant peri-ampullary lesions. Surgical site infections occurred in 10% (87/887). Cultures of SSIs with corresponding intra-operative bile duct cultures were available for 59 patients. Sixty-four percent (38/59) had undergone PBD. Pre-operative biliary drainage was associated with positive intra-operative bile duct cultures in 95% (36/38), versus 48% (10/21; p≤0.001). The correlation of SSIs with intra-operative bile duct cultures was 59% (35/59). There was a significant association between the micro-organisms cultured from SSIs and the corresponding bile duct cultures for Enterococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Enterobacteriaceae with extended spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL), and Candida spp. After pancreaticoduodenectomy, SSIs are often caused by the same micro-organisms that are present on intra-operative bile duct cultures, especially after PBD. Therefore, intra-operative bile duct cultures should be performed routinely to adjust the antibiotic prophylaxis according to the local hospital surveillance data.

  19. Association of Safety Culture with Surgical Site Infection Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Caleb J; Pawlik, Timothy M; Daniels, Tania; Vernon, Nora; Banks, Katie; Westby, Peggy; Wick, Elizabeth C; Sexton, J Bryan; Makary, Martin A

    2016-02-01

    Hospital workplace culture may have an impact on surgical outcomes; however, this association has not been established. We designed a study to evaluate the association between safety culture and surgical site infection (SSI). Using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture and National Healthcare Safety Network definitions, we measured 12 dimensions of safety culture and colon SSI rates, respectively, in the surgical units of Minnesota community hospitals. A Pearson's r correlation was calculated for each of 12 dimensions of surgical unit safety culture and SSI rate and then adjusted for surgical volume and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification. Seven hospitals participated in the study, with a mean survey response rate of 43%. The SSI rates ranged from 0% to 30%, and surgical unit safety culture scores ranged from 16 to 92 on a scale of 0 to 100. Ten dimensions of surgical unit safety culture were associated with colon SSI rates: teamwork across units (r = -0.96; 95% CI [-0.76, -0.99]), organizational learning (r = -0.95; 95% CI [-0.71, -0.99]), feedback and communication about error (r = -0.92; 95% CI [-0.56, -0.99]), overall perceptions of safety (r = -0.90; 95% CI [-0.45, -0.99]), management support for patient safety (r = -0.90; 95% CI [-0.44, -0.98]), teamwork within units (r = -0.88; 95% CI [-0.38, -0.98]), communication openness (r = -0.85; 95% CI [-0.26, -0.98]), supervisor/manager expectations and actions promoting safety (r = -0.85; 95% CI [-0.25, -0.98]), non-punitive response to error (r = -0.78; 95% CI [-0.07, -0.97]), and frequency of events reported (r = -0.76; 95% CI [-0.01, -0.96]). After adjusting for surgical volume and ASA classification, 9 of 12 dimensions of surgical unit safety culture were significantly associated with lower colon SSI rates. These data suggest an important role for positive safety and teamwork culture and engaged hospital management in producing high-quality surgical

  20. Evaluation of adherence to measures for the prevention of surgical site infections by the surgical team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cristina de Oliveira

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOBJECTIVEEvaluate pre- and intraoperative practices adopted by medical and nursing teams for the prevention of surgical infections.METHODA prospective study carried out in the period of April to May 2013, in a surgical center of a university hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais.RESULTS18 surgeries were followed and 214 surgical gloves were analyzed, of which 23 (10.7% had postoperative glove perforation detected, with 52.2% being perceived by users. Hair removal was performed on 27.7% of patients in the operating room, with the use of blades in 80% of the cases. Antibiotic prophylaxis was administered to 81.8% of patients up to 60 minutes prior to surgical incision. An average of nine professionals were present during surgery and the surgery room door remained open in 94.4% of the procedures.CONCLUSIONPartial adhesion to the recommended measures was identified, reaffirming a need for greater attention to these critical steps/actions in order to prevent surgical site infection.

  1. The Surgical Site Infection Risk Score (SSIRS: A Model to Predict the Risk of Surgical Site Infections.

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    Carl van Walraven

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections (SSI are an important cause of peri-surgical morbidity with risks that vary extensively between patients and surgeries. Quantifying SSI risk would help identify candidates most likely to benefit from interventions to decrease the risk of SSI.We randomly divided all surgeries recorded in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program from 2010 into a derivation and validation population. We used multivariate logistic regression to determine the independent association of patient and surgical covariates with the risk of any SSI (including superficial, deep, and organ space SSI within 30 days of surgery. To capture factors particular to specific surgeries, we developed a surgical risk score specific to all surgeries having a common first 3 numbers of their CPT code.Derivation (n = 181 894 and validation (n = 181 146 patients were similar for all demographics, past medical history, and surgical factors. Overall SSI risk was 3.9%. The SSI Risk Score (SSIRS found that risk increased with patient factors (smoking, increased body mass index, certain comorbidities (peripheral vascular disease, metastatic cancer, chronic steroid use, recent sepsis, and operative characteristics (surgical urgency; increased ASA class; longer operation duration; infected wounds; general anaesthesia; performance of more than one procedure; and CPT score. In the validation population, the SSIRS had good discrimination (c-statistic 0.800, 95% CI 0.795-0.805 and calibration.SSIRS can be calculated using patient and surgery information to estimate individual risk of SSI for a broad range of surgery types.

  2. Surgical site infections in paediatric otolaryngology operative procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifeacho, S N; Bajaj, Y; Jephson, C G; Albert, D M

    2012-07-01

    An assessment of the rate of surgical site infections associated with elective paediatric otolaryngology surgical procedures. Prospective data was collected for a 3-week period for all children undergoing surgery where either mucosa or skin was breached. The parents of the children were requested to complete a questionnaire at 30 days after the operation. Data was collected on 80 consecutive cases. The majority of cases were admitted on the day of the procedure. The procedures included adenotonsillectomy (24), grommets (12), cochlear implantation (6), bone-anchored hearing aid (2), submandibular gland excision (1), branchial sinus excision (1), cystic hygroma excision (3), nasal glioma excision (1), microlaryngobronchoscopy (13), tracheostomy (3) and other procedures (14). Nearly half the cases had more than one operation done at the same time. 26/80 (32.5%) patients had a temporary or permanent implant inserted at the time of operation (grommet, bone-anchored hearing aid, cochlear implant). 25/80 (31%) operative fields were classed as clean and 55/80 (68.7%) as clean contaminated operations. The duration of the operation varied from 6 min to 142 min. Hospital antibiotic protocol was adhered to in 69/80 (86.3%) cases but not in 11/80 cases. In our series, 3/80 (3.7%) patients had an infection in the postoperative period. Surgical site infections do occur at an appreciable rate in paediatric otolaryngology. With the potential for serious consequences, reduction in the risk of surgical site infections is important. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Preoperative Site Marking: Are We Adhering to Good Surgical Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathla, Sonia; Chadwick, Michael; Nevins, Edward J; Seward, Joanna

    2017-06-29

    Wrong-site surgery is a never event and a serious, preventable patient safety incident. Within the United Kingdom, national guidance has been issued to minimize the risk of such events. The mandate includes preoperative marking of all surgical patients. This study aimed to quantify regional variation in practice within general surgery and opinions of the surgeons, to help guide the formulation and implementation of a regional general surgery preoperative marking protocol. A SurveyMonkey questionnaire was designed and distributed to 120 surgeons within the Mersey region, United Kingdom. This included all surgical trainees in Mersey (47 registrars, 56 core trainees), 15 consultants, and 2 surgical care practitioners. This sought to ascertain their routine practice and how they would choose to mark for 12 index procedures in general surgery, if mandated to do so. A total of 72 responses (60%) were obtained to the SurveyMonkey questionnaire. Only 26 (36.1%) said that they routinely marked all of their patients preoperatively. The operating surgeon marked the patient in 69% of responses, with the remainder delegating this task. Markings were visible after draping in only 55.6% of marked cases. Based on our findings, surgeons may not be adhering to "Good Surgical Practice"; practice is widely variable and surgeons are largely opposed and resistant to marking patients unless laterality is involved. We suggest that all surgeons need to be actively engaged in the design of local marking protocols to gain support, change practice, and reduce errors.

  4. Surgical site infections following transcatheter apical aortic valve implantation: incidence and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baillot Richard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The present study was undertaken to examine the incidence and management of surgical site infection (SSI in patients submitted to transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TA-TAVI. Methods From April 2007 to December 2011, 154 patients underwent TA-TAVI with an Edwards Sapien bioprosthesis (ES at the Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et Pneumologie de Québec (IUCPQ as part of a multidisciplinary program to prospectively evaluate percutaneous aortic valve implantation. Patient demographics, perioperative variables, and postoperative complications were recorded in a prospective registry. Results Five (3.2% patients in the cohort presented with an SSI during the study period. The infections were all hospital-acquired (HAI and were considered as organ/space SSI’s based on Center for Disease Control criteria (CDC. Within the first few weeks of the initial procedure, these patients presented with an abscess or chronic draining sinus in the left thoracotomy incision and were re-operated. The infection spread to the apex of the left ventricle in all cases where pledgeted mattress sutures could be seen during debridement. Patients received multiple antibiotic regimens without success until the wound was surgically debrided and covered with viable tissue. The greater omentum was used in three patients and the pectoralis major muscle in the other two. None of the patients died or had a recurrent infection. Three of the patients were infected with Staphylococcus epidermidis, one with Staphylococcus aureus, and one with Enterobacter cloacae. Patients with surgical site infections were significantly more obese with higher BMI (31.4±3.1 vs 26.2±4.4 p=0.0099 than the other patients in the cohort. Conclusions While TA-TAVI is a minimally invasive technique, SSIs, which are associated with obesity, remain a concern. Debridement and rib resection followed by wound coverage with the greater omentum and/or the pectoralis major

  5. Surgical site infections following transcatheter apical aortic valve implantation: incidence and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillot, Richard; Fréchette, Éric; Cloutier, Daniel; Rodès-Cabau, Josep; Doyle, Daniel; Charbonneau, Éric; Mohammadi, Siamak; Dumont, Éric

    2012-11-13

    The present study was undertaken to examine the incidence and management of surgical site infection (SSI) in patients submitted to transapical transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TA-TAVI). From April 2007 to December 2011, 154 patients underwent TA-TAVI with an Edwards Sapien bioprosthesis (ES) at the Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et Pneumologie de Québec (IUCPQ) as part of a multidisciplinary program to prospectively evaluate percutaneous aortic valve implantation. Patient demographics, perioperative variables, and postoperative complications were recorded in a prospective registry. Five (3.2%) patients in the cohort presented with an SSI during the study period. The infections were all hospital-acquired (HAI) and were considered as organ/space SSI's based on Center for Disease Control criteria (CDC). Within the first few weeks of the initial procedure, these patients presented with an abscess or chronic draining sinus in the left thoracotomy incision and were re-operated. The infection spread to the apex of the left ventricle in all cases where pledgeted mattress sutures could be seen during debridement. Patients received multiple antibiotic regimens without success until the wound was surgically debrided and covered with viable tissue. The greater omentum was used in three patients and the pectoralis major muscle in the other two. None of the patients died or had a recurrent infection. Three of the patients were infected with Staphylococcus epidermidis, one with Staphylococcus aureus, and one with Enterobacter cloacae. Patients with surgical site infections were significantly more obese with higher BMI (31.4±3.1 vs 26.2±4.4 p=0.0099) than the other patients in the cohort. While TA-TAVI is a minimally invasive technique, SSIs, which are associated with obesity, remain a concern. Debridement and rib resection followed by wound coverage with the greater omentum and/or the pectoralis major muscle were used successfully in these patients.

  6. Surveillance and epidemiology of surgical site infections after cardiothoracic surgery in The Netherlands, 2002-2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manniën, Judith; Wille, Jan C.; Kloek, Jaap J.; van Benthem, Birgit H. B.

    2011-01-01

    Surgical site infections after cardiothoracic surgery substantially increase the risk for illness, mortality, and costs. Surveillance of surgical site infections might assist in the prevention of these infections. This study describes the Dutch surveillance methods and results of data collected

  7. Chasing zero: the drive to eliminate surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kristine M; Oldenburg, W Andrew; Deschamps, Claude; Rupp, William C; Smith, C Daniel

    2011-09-01

    It is estimated that healthcare associated infections (HAI) account for 1.7 million infections and 99,000 associated deaths each year, with annual direct medical costs of up to $45 billion. Surgical Site Infections (SSI) account for 17% of HAIs, an estimated annual cost of $3.5 to 10 billion for our country alone. This project was designed to pursue elimination of SSIs and document results. Starting in 2009 a program to eliminate SSIs was undertaken at a nationally recognized academic health center. Interventions already outlined by CMS and IHI were utilized, along with additional interventions based on literature showing relationships with SSI reduction and best practices. Rapid deployment of multiple interventions (SSI Bundle) was undertaken. Tactics included standardized order sets, a centralized preoperative evaluation (POE) clinic, high compliance with intraoperative interventions, and widespread monthly reporting of compliance and results. Data from 2008 to 2010 were collected and analyzed. Between May 1, 2008 and June 30, 2010, all patients with Class I and Class II wounds were tracked for SSIs. Baseline data (May-June 2008) was obtained showing a Class I surgical site infection rate of 1.78%, Class II of 2.82% (total surgical volume: 4160 cases). As of the second quarter 2010, those rates have dropped to 0.51% and 1.44%, respectively (P cost savings of nearly $1 million during the study period. Committed leadership, aggressive assurance of high compliance with multiple known interventions (SSI Bundle), transparency to achieve high levels of staff engagement, and centralization of critical surgical activities result in significant declines in SSIs with resulting substantial cost savings.

  8. Predicting surgical site infection after spine surgery: a validated model using a prospective surgical registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael J; Cizik, Amy M; Hamilton, Deven; Chapman, Jens R

    2014-09-01

    The impact of surgical site infection (SSI) is substantial. Although previous study has determined relative risk and odds ratio (OR) values to quantify risk factors, these values may be difficult to translate to the patient during counseling of surgical options. Ideally, a model that predicts absolute risk of SSI, rather than relative risk or OR values, would greatly enhance the discussion of safety of spine surgery. To date, there is no risk stratification model that specifically predicts the risk of medical complication. The purpose of this study was to create and validate a predictive model for the risk of SSI after spine surgery. This study performs a multivariate analysis of SSI after spine surgery using a large prospective surgical registry. Using the results of this analysis, this study will then create and validate a predictive model for SSI after spine surgery. The patient sample is from a high-quality surgical registry from our two institutions with prospectively collected, detailed demographic, comorbidity, and complication data. An SSI that required return to the operating room for surgical debridement. Using a prospectively collected surgical registry of more than 1,532 patients with extensive demographic, comorbidity, surgical, and complication details recorded for 2 years after the surgery, we identified several risk factors for SSI after multivariate analysis. Using the beta coefficients from those regression analyses, we created a model to predict the occurrence of SSI after spine surgery. We split our data into two subsets for internal and cross-validation of our model. We created a predictive model based on our beta coefficients from our multivariate analysis. The final predictive model for SSI had a receiver-operator curve characteristic of 0.72, considered to be a fair measure. The final model has been uploaded for use on SpineSage.com. We present a validated model for predicting SSI after spine surgery. The value in this model is that it gives

  9. Surgical site infections following instrumented stabilization of the spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dapunt U

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ulrike Dapunt,1 Caroline Bürkle,1 Frank Günther,2 Wojciech Pepke,1 Stefan Hemmer,1 Michael Akbar1 1Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Center for Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, 2Department for Infectious Diseases, Medical Microbiology and Hygiene, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany Background: Implant-associated infections are still a feared complication in the field of orthopedics. Bacteria attach to the implant surface and form so-called biofilm colonies that are often difficult to diagnose and treat. Since the majority of studies focus on prosthetic joint infections (PJIs of the hip and knee, current treatment options (eg, antibiotic prophylaxis of implant-associated infections have mostly been adapted according to these results. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate patients with surgical site infections following instrumented stabilization of the spine with regard to detected bacteria species and the course of the disease. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective single-center analysis of implant-associated infections of the spine from 2010 to 2014. A total of 138 patients were included in the study. The following parameters were evaluated: C-reactive protein serum concentration, microbiological evaluation of tissue samples, the time course of the disease, indication for instrumented stabilization of the spine, localization of the infection, and the number of revision surgeries required until cessation of symptoms. Results: Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. were most commonly detected (n=69, 50%, followed by fecal bacteria (n=46, 33.3%. In 23.2% of cases, no bacteria were detected despite clinical suspicion of an infection. Most patients suffered from degenerative spine disorders (44.9%, followed by spinal fractures (23.9%, non-degenerative scoliosis (20.3%, and spinal tumors (10.1%. Surgical site infections occurred predominantly within 3

  10. Structural Basis for Linezolid Binding Site Rearrangement in the Staphylococcus aureus Ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousoff, Matthew J; Eyal, Zohar; Radjainia, Mazdak; Ahmed, Tofayel; Bamert, Rebecca S; Matzov, Donna; Bashan, Anat; Zimmerman, Ella; Mishra, Satabdi; Cameron, David; Elmlund, Hans; Peleg, Anton Y; Bhushan, Shashi; Lithgow, Trevor; Yonath, Ada

    2017-05-09

    An unorthodox, surprising mechanism of resistance to the antibiotic linezolid was revealed by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) in the 70S ribosomes from a clinical isolate of Staphylococcus aureus This high-resolution structural information demonstrated that a single amino acid deletion in ribosomal protein uL3 confers linezolid resistance despite being located 24 Å away from the linezolid binding pocket in the peptidyl-transferase center. The mutation induces a cascade of allosteric structural rearrangements of the rRNA that ultimately results in the alteration of the antibiotic binding site. IMPORTANCE The growing burden on human health caused by various antibiotic resistance mutations now includes prevalent Staphylococcus aureus resistance to last-line antimicrobial drugs such as linezolid and daptomycin. Structure-informed drug modification represents a frontier with respect to designing advanced clinical therapies, but success in this strategy requires rapid, facile means to shed light on the structural basis for drug resistance (D. Brown, Nat Rev Drug Discov 14:821-832, 2015, https://doi.org/10.1038/nrd4675). Here, detailed structural information demonstrates that a common mechanism is at play in linezolid resistance and provides a step toward the redesign of oxazolidinone antibiotics, a strategy that could thwart known mechanisms of linezolid resistance. Copyright © 2017 Belousoff et al.

  11. The surgical care improvement project and prevention of post-operative infection, including surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Laura H; Politano, Amani D; Sawyer, Robert G

    2011-06-01

    In response to inconsistent compliance with infection prevention measures, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services collaborated with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the Surgical Infection Prevention (SIP) project, introduced in 2002. Quality improvement measures were developed to standardize processes to increase compliance. In 2006, the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) developed out of the SIP project and its process measures. These initiatives, published in the Specifications Manual for National Inpatient Quality Measures, outline process and outcome measures. This continually evolving manual is intended to provide standard quality measures to unify documentation and track standards of care. Seven of the SCIP initiatives apply to the peri-operative period: Prophylactic antibiotics should be received within 1 h prior to surgical incision (1), be selected for activity against the most probable antimicrobial contaminants (2), and be discontinued within 24 h after the surgery end-time (3); (4) euglycemia should be maintained, with well-controlled morning blood glucose concentrations on the first two post-operative days, especially in cardiac surgery patients; (6) hair at the surgical site should be removed with clippers or by depilatory methods, not with a blade; (9) urinary catheters are to be removed within the first two post-operative days; and (10) normothermia should be maintained peri-operatively. There is strong evidence that implementation of protocols that standardize practices reduce the risk of surgical infection. The SCIP initiative targets complications that account for a significant portion of preventable morbidity as well as cost. One of the goals of the SCIP guidelines was a 25% reduction in the incidence of surgical site infections from implementation through 2010. Process measures are becoming routine, and as we practice more evidence-based medicine, it falls to us, the surgeons and scientists, to be active

  12. Patients at High-Risk for Surgical Site Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueck, Krislynn M; Kao, Lillian S

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a significant healthcare quality issue, resulting in increased morbidity, disability, length of stay, resource utilization, and costs. Identification of high-risk patients may improve pre-operative counseling, inform resource utilization, and allow modifications in peri-operative management to optimize outcomes. Review of the pertinent English-language literature. High-risk surgical patients may be identified on the basis of individual risk factors or combinations of factors. In particular, statistical models and risk calculators may be useful in predicting infectious risks, both in general and for SSIs. These models differ in the number of variables; inclusion of pre-operative, intra-operative, or post-operative variables; ease of calculation; and specificity for particular procedures. Furthermore, the models differ in their accuracy in stratifying risk. Biomarkers may be a promising way to identify patients at high risk of infectious complications. Although multiple strategies exist for identifying surgical patients at high risk for SSIs, no one strategy is superior for all patients. Further efforts are necessary to determine if risk stratification in combination with risk modification can reduce SSIs in these patient populations.

  13. Horizontal infection control strategy decreases methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection and eliminates bacteremia in a surgical ICU without active surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traa, Maria X; Barboza, Lorena; Doron, Shira; Snydman, David R; Noubary, Farzad; Nasraway, Stanley A

    2014-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection is a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients worldwide. Numerous healthcare bodies in Europe and the United States have championed active surveillance per the "search and destroy" model. However, this strategy is associated with significant economic, logistical, and patient costs without any impact on other hospital-acquired pathogens. We evaluated whether horizontal infection control strategies could decrease the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection in the ICU, without the need for active surveillance. Retrospective, observational study in the surgical ICU of a tertiary care medical center in Boston, MA, from 2005 to 2012. A total of 6,697 patients in the surgical ICU. Evidence-based infection prevention strategies were implemented in an iterative fashion, including 1) hand hygiene program with refresher education campaign, 2) chlorhexidine oral hygiene program, 3) chlorhexidine bathing, 4) catheter-associated bloodstream infection program, and 5) daily goals sheets. The prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection fell from 2.66 to 0.69 per 1,000 patient days from 2005 to 2012, an average decrease of 21% per year. The biggest decline in rate of infection was detected in 2008, which may suggest that the catheter-associated bloodstream infection prevention program was particularly effective. Among 4,478 surgical ICU admissions over the last 5 years, not a single case of methicillin-resistant S. aureus bacteremia was observed. Aggressive multifaceted horizontal infection control is an effective strategy for reducing the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection and eliminating methicillin-resistant S. aureus bacteremia in the ICU without the need for active surveillance and decontamination.

  14. Surgical site infections in an abdominal surgical ward at Kosovo Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raka, Lul; Krasniqi, Avdyl; Hoxha, Faton; Musa, Ruustem; Mulliqi, Gjyle; Krasniqi, Selvete; Kurti, Arsim; Dervishaj, Antigona; Nuhiu, Beqir; Kelmendi, Baton; Limani, Dalip; Tolaj, Ilir

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal surgical site infections (SSI) cause substantial morbidity and mortality for patients undergoing operative procedures. We determined the incidence of and risk factors for SSI after abdominal surgery in the Department of Abdominal Surgery at the University Clinical Centre of Kosovo (UCCK). Prospective surveillance of patients undergoing abdominal surgery was performed between December 2005 and June 2006. CDC definitions were followed to detect SSI and study forms were based on Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance (HELICS) protocol. A total of 253 surgical interventions in 225 patients were evaluated. The median age of patients was 42 years and 55.1% of them were male. The overall incidence rate of SSI was 12%. Follow-up was achieved for 84.1% of the procedures. For patients with an SSI, the median duration of hospitalization was 9 days compared with 4 days for those without an SSI (p 2, use of antibiotic prophylaxis and NNIS class of > 2 were all significant at p < .001. The SSI rates for the NNIS System risk classes 0, 1 and 2-3 were 4.2%, 46.7% and 100%, respectively. SSI caused considerable morbidity among surgical patients in UCCK. Appropriate active surveillance and infection control measures should be introduced during preoperative, intra-operative, and postoperative care to reduce infection rates.

  15. Non-observance of guidelines for surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis and surgical-site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallemand, S; Thouverez, M; Bailly, P; Bertrand, X; Talon, D

    2002-06-01

    A prospective multicentre study was conducted to assess major aspects of surgical prophylaxis and to determine whether inappropriate antimicrobial prophylaxis was a factor associated (risk or protective factor) with surgical site infection (SSI). Surgical prophylaxis practices were assessed by analysing four variables: indication, antimicrobial agent, timing and duration. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out to identify predictors of SSI among patient-specific, operation-specific and antimicrobial prophylaxis-specific factors. The frequency of SSI was 2.7% (13 SSI in 474 observations). Total compliance of the prescription with guidelines was observed in 41.1% of cases (195 prescriptions). Of the 139 patients who received an inappropriate drug, 126 (90.6%) received a drug with a broader spectrum than the recommended drug. Prophylaxis was prolonged in 71 (87.7%) of the 81 patients who received prophylaxis for inappropriate lengths of time and 43 (61.4%) of the 70 patients who did not receive prophylaxis at the optimal moment were treated too late. Multivariate analysis clearly demonstrated that SSI was associated with multiple procedures (relative risk 8.5), short duration of prophylaxis (relative risk 12.7) and long-term therapy with antimicrobial agents during the previous year (relative risk 8.8). The ecological risk of the emergence of resistance associated with the frequent use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and prophylaxis for longer periods was not offset by individual benefit to the patients who received inappropriate prophylaxis.

  16. Molecular characterization of non-aureus Staphylococcus spp. from heifer intramammary infections and body sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, P R F; Dufour, S; Spain, J N; Calcutt, M J; Reilly, T J; Stewart, G C; Middleton, J R

    2018-03-07

    The purpose of this study was to investigate non-aureus Staphylococcus spp. intramammary infections (IMI) in periparturient heifers and determine the relationship of precalving body site isolation with precalving IMI and postcalving IMI using molecular speciation and strain-typing methods. Primiparous heifers were enrolled at approximately 14 d before expected calving date. Precalving mammary quarter secretions and body site swabbing samples (teat skin, inguinal skin, muzzle, and perineum) were collected. Postcalving, mammary quarter milk samples were collected for culture and somatic cell counting. Precalving body site samples were cultured, and up to 10 staphylococcal colonies were saved for characterization. Staphylococcal isolates were speciated using matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry or sequencing of rpoB or tuf. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to strain type a subset of isolates. Overall, Staphylococcus chromogenes, Staphylococcus agnetis, and Staphylococcus simulans were the most common species identified in precalving mammary secretions, whereas S. chromogenes, Staphylococcus xylosus, and S. agnetis were the most common species found in postcalving milk samples. The most common species identified from body site samples were S. chromogenes, S. xylosus, and Staphylococcus haemolyticus. Mammary quarters that had a precalving mammary secretion that was culture positive for S. agnetis, S. chromogenes, or Staphylococcus devriesei had increased odds of having an IMI with the same species postcalving. A S. chromogenes IMI postcalving was associated with higher somatic cell count when compared with postcalving culture-negative quarters. Among heifers identified with a non-aureus Staphylococcus spp. IMI either precalving or postcalving, heifers that had S. agnetis or S. chromogenes isolated from their teat skin had increased odds of having the same species found in their precalving mammary secretions, and heifers

  17. Operative Duration and Risk of Surgical Site Infection in Neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Coy, Shannon; Simmons, Nathan

    2016-10-01

    The association of surgical duration with the risk of surgical site infection (SSI) has not been quantified in neurosurgery. We investigated the association of operative duration in neurosurgical procedures with the incidence of SSI. We performed a retrospective cohort study involving patients who underwent neurosurgical procedures from 2005 to 2012 and were registered in the American College of Surgeons National Quality Improvement Project registry. To control for confounding, we used multivariable regression models and propensity score conditioning. During the study period there were 94,744 patients who underwent a neurosurgical procedure and met the inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 4.1% developed a postoperative SSI within 30 days. Multivariable logistic regression showed an association between longer operative duration with higher incidence of SSI (odds ratio [OR], 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16-1.20). Compared with procedures of moderate duration (third quintile, 40th-60th percentile), patients undergoing the longest procedures (>80th percentile) had higher odds (OR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.86-2.31) of developing SSI. The shortest procedures (operative duration was associated with increased incidence of SSI for neurosurgical procedures. These results can be used by neurosurgeons to inform operative management and to stratify patients with regard to SSI risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Selection of egg attachment sites by the Indian Golden Gecko Calodactylodes aureus (Beddome, 1870 (Reptilia: Gekkonidae in Andhra Pradesh, India

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    R. Sreekar

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Some geckos lay eggs at communal egg deposition sites with as many as 300 eggs per site. Selection of egg deposition sites is important to avoid egg damage and predation. We investigated survival rates of communal egg clutches of the Indian Golden Gecko Calodactylodes aureus (Reptilia: Gekkonidae. Our results show that communal clutches have a higher survival rate in sites with water bodies and without anthropogenic activities, in comparison to sites having the opposite combination. These findings are discussed in the context of the status of this gecko.

  19. Improving Surveillance and Prevention of Surgical Site Infection in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Melissa; Hersey, Diane; Harrison, Sheilah; Joy, Brian; Naguib, Aymen; Galantowicz, Mark; Simsic, Janet

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative cardiovascular surgical site infections are preventable events that may lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. To improve surgical wound surveillance and reduce the incidence of surgical site infections. An institutional review of surgical site infections led to implementation of 8 surveillance and process measures: appropriate preparation the night before surgery and the day of surgery, use of appropriate preparation solution in the operating room, appropriate timing of preoperative antibiotic administration, placement of a photograph of the surgical site in the patient's chart at discharge, sending a photograph of the surgical site to the patient's primary care physician, 30-day follow-up of the surgical site by an advanced nurse practitioner, and placing a photograph of the surgical site obtained on postoperative day 30 in the patient's chart. Mean overall compliance with the 8 measures from March 2013 through February 2014 was 88%. Infections occurred in 10 of 417 total operative cases (2%) in 2012, in 8 of 437 total operative cases (2%) in 2013, and in 7 of 452 total operative cases (1.5%) in 2014. Institution of the surveillance process has resulted in improved identification of suspected surgical site infections via direct rather than indirect measures, accurate identification of all surgical site infections based on definitions of the National Healthcare Safety Network, collaboration with all persons involved, and enhanced communication with patients' family members and referring physicians. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  20. Antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) related complications in surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Koti, Rahul; Wilson, Peter; Davidson, Brian R

    2013-08-19

    Risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection after surgery is generally low, but affects up to 33% of patients after certain types of surgery. Postoperative MRSA infection can occur as surgical site infections (SSIs), chest infections, or bloodstream infections (bacteraemia). The incidence of MRSA SSIs varies from 1% to 33% depending upon the type of surgery performed and the carrier status of the individuals concerned. The optimal prophylactic antibiotic regimen for the prevention of MRSA after surgery is not known. To compare the benefits and harms of all methods of antibiotic prophylaxis in the prevention of postoperative MRSA infection and related complications in people undergoing surgery. In March 2013 we searched the following databases: The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) (The Cochrane Library); NHS Economic Evaluation Database (The Cochrane Library); Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database (The Cochrane Library); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE; and EBSCO CINAHL. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared one antibiotic regimen used as prophylaxis for SSIs (and other postoperative infections) with another antibiotic regimen or with no antibiotic, and that reported the methicillin resistance status of the cultured organisms. We did not limit our search for RCTs by language, publication status, publication year, or sample size. Two review authors independently identified the trials for inclusion in the review, and extracted data. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for comparing binary outcomes between the groups and planned to calculated the mean difference (MD) with 95% CI for comparing continuous outcomes. We planned to perform meta-analysis using both a fixed-effect model and a random-effects model

  1. Surgical Site Infections Following Spine Surgery: Eliminating the Controversies in the Diagnosis

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    Jad eChahoud

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infection (SSI following spine surgery is a dreaded complication with significant morbidity and economic burden. SSIs following spine surgery can be superficial, characterized by obvious wound drainage, or deep-seated with a healed wound. Staphylococcus aureus remains the principal causal agent. There are certain pre-operative risk factors that increase the risk of SSI, mainly diabetes, smoking, steroids, and peri-operative transfusions. Additionally, intra-operative risk factors include surgical invasiveness, type of fusion, implant use, and traditional instead of minimally invasive approach. A high level of suspicion is crucial to attaining an early definitive diagnosis and initiating appropriate management. The most common presenting symptom is back pain, usually manifesting 2 to 4 weeks and up to 3 months after a spinal procedure. Scheduling a follow-up visit between weeks 2 to 4 after surgery is therefore necessary for early detection. Inflammatory markers are important diagnostic tools, and comparing pre-operative with post-operative levels should be done when suspecting SSIs following spine surgery. Particularly, Serum Amyloid A (SAA is a novel inflammatory marker that can expedite the diagnosis of SSIs. Magnetic resonance imaging remains the diagnostic modality of choice when suspecting a SSI following spine surgery. While 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography is not widely used, it may be useful in challenging cases. Despite their low yield, blood cultures should be collected before initiating antibiotic therapy. Samples from wound drainage should be sent for Gram stain and cultures. When there is a high clinical suspicion of SSI and in the absence of superficial wound drainage, CT guided aspiration of paraspinal collections is warranted. Unless the patient is hemodynamically compromised, antibiotics should be deferred until proper specimens for culture are secured.

  2. Postoperative Surgical Site Infections: Understanding the Discordance Between Surveillance Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali-Mucheru, Mariam N; Seville, Maria T; Miller, Vickie; Sampathkumar, Priya; Etzioni, David A

    2018-04-18

    To characterize agreement in the ascertainment of surgical site infections (SSIs) between the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP), National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN), and administrative data. The NSQIP, NHSN, and administrative data are the primary systems used to monitor and report SSIs for the purpose of quality control and benchmarking of hospitals and surgeons. These systems have different methods for identifying SSIs. We queried the NHSN, NSQIP, and administrative data systems for patients who had an operation at 1 of 4 hospitals within a single health system between January 2013 and September 2015. The detection of an SSI during a postoperative hospitalization was the outcome of analysis. Any SSI detected by one (or more) of these systems was analyzed by 2 reviewers to determine the presence of discrete elements of documentation constituting evidence of SSI. Concordance between the 3 systems (NHSN, NSQIP, and administrative data) was analyzed using Cohen's kappa. After application of appropriate exclusion criteria, a cohort of 9447 inpatient operations was analyzed. In total, 130 SSIs were detected by 1 or more of the 3 systems, with reported SSI rates of 0.5% (NHSN), 0.7% (administrative data), and 1.0% (NSQIP). Of these 130 SSIs, only 17 SSIs were reported by all 3 systems. The concordance between these 3 systems was moderate (kappa values NSQIP-NHSN = 0.50 [0.40-0.60], administrative-NHSN = 0.36 [0.24-0.47], and administrative-NSQIP = 0.47 [0.38-0.57]). Chart review found that reasons for discordance were related to issues of different criteria as well as inaccuracies. There is significant discordance in the determination of SSIs reported by the NHSN, NSQIP, and administrative data. The differences and limitations of each of these systems have to be recognized, especially when using these data for quality reports and pay for performance.

  3. Occurrence of nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as a marker for transmission in a surgical intensive care unit in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Yong; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Hui; Song, Qing; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Jingya; Zheng, Dongyu; Han, Xuelin; Hu, Xiaohua; Grundmann, Hajo; Han, Li

    In 2008, an intensive care unit (ICU) in a large Chinese hospital was moved from a 6-bed old ward to a 20-bed new ward. After the move, the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in patients and environmental sites decreased significantly, but the number of ICU-acquired

  4. Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections in Dermatological Surgery

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    Xiaomeng Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Current literature on risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI in dermatological surgery in the absence of antibiotic prophylaxis is limited. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate patients presenting for dermatological surgery. A total of 1,977 procedures were reviewed. SSI was clinically suspected in 79 (4.0% patients and confirmed by culture in 38 (1.9%. Using the strictest definition of SSI (clinical symptoms with positive culture significantly higher risk of SSI was found for location on the ear (odds ratio (OR 6.03, 95% confidence interval (95% CI 2.12–17.15, larger defects (OR 1.08 per cm2 increase, 95% CI 1.03–1.14, closure with flaps (OR 6.35, 95% CI 1.33–30.28 and secondary intention (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.11–8.13. These characteristics were also associated with higher risk of clinically suspected SSI regardless of culture results with slightly lower ORs. In conclusion, the risk of acquiring a SSI is increased in surgeries performed on the ear, in larger wounds and in defects closed with flaps or healed by secondary intention.

  5. Preoperative oral antibiotics reduce surgical site infection following elective colorectal resections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Jamie A; Altom, Laura K; Deierhoi, Rhiannon J; Morris, Melanie; Richman, Joshua S; Vick, Catherine C; Itani, Kamal M F; Hawn, Mary T

    2012-11-01

    Surgical site infection is a major cause of morbidity after colorectal resections. Despite evidence that preoperative oral antibiotics with mechanical bowel preparation reduce surgical site infection rates, the use of oral antibiotics is decreasing. Currently, the administration of oral antibiotics is controversial and considered ineffective without mechanical bowel preparation. The aim of this study is to examine the use of mechanical bowel preparation and oral antibiotics and their relationship to surgical site infection rates in a colorectal Surgical Care Improvement Project cohort. This retrospective study used Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program preoperative risk and surgical site infection outcome data linked to Veterans Affairs Surgical Care Improvement Project and Pharmacy Benefits Management data. Univariate and multivariable models were performed to identify factors associated with surgical site infection within 30 days of surgery. This study was conducted in 112 Veterans Affairs hospitals. Included were 9940 patients who underwent elective colorectal resections from 2005 to 2009. The primary outcome measured was the incidence of surgical site infection. Patients receiving oral antibiotics had significantly lower surgical site infection rates. Those receiving no bowel preparation had similar surgical site infection rates to those who had mechanical bowel preparation only (18.1% vs 20%). Those receiving oral antibiotics alone had an surgical site infection rate of 8.3%, and those receiving oral antibiotics plus mechanical bowel preparation had a rate of 9.2%. In adjusted analysis, the use of oral antibiotics alone was associated with a 67% decrease in surgical site infection occurrence (OR=0.33, 95% CI 0.21-0.50). Oral antibiotics plus mechanical bowel preparation was associated with a 57% decrease in surgical site infection occurrence (OR=0.43, 95% CI 0.34-0.55). Timely administration of parenteral antibiotics (Surgical Care Improvement

  6. Surgical site infection in patients submitted to heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jussara Aparecida Souza do Nascimento; Ferretti-Rebustini, Renata Eloah de Lucena; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2016-08-29

    to analyze the occurrence and predisposing factors for surgical site infection in patients submitted to heart transplantation, evaluating the relationship between cases of infections and the variables related to the patient and the surgical procedure. retrospective cohort study, with review of the medical records of patients older than 18 years submitted to heart transplantation. The correlation between variables was evaluated by using Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test. the sample consisted of 86 patients, predominantly men, with severe systemic disease, submitted to extensive preoperative hospitalizations. Signs of surgical site infection were observed in 9.3% of transplanted patients, with five (62.5%) superficial incisional, two (25%) deep and one (12.5%) case of organ/space infection. There was no statistically significant association between the variables related to the patient and the surgery. there was no association between the studied variables and the cases of surgical site infection, possibly due to the small number of cases of infection observed in the sample investigated. analisar a ocorrência e os fatores predisponentes para infecção de sítio cirúrgico em pacientes submetidos a transplante cardíaco e verificar a relação entre os casos de infecção e as variáveis referentes ao paciente e ao procedimento cirúrgico. estudo de coorte retrospectivo, com exame dos prontuários médicos de pacientes maiores de 18 anos, submetidos a transplante cardíaco. A correlação entre variáveis foi realizada por meio dos testes exato de Fischer e de Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon. a amostra foi constituída por 86 pacientes, predominantemente homens, com doença sistêmica grave, submetidos a internações pré-operatórias extensas. Apresentaram sinais de infecção do sítio cirúrgico 9,3% dos transplantados, sendo cinco (62,5%) incisionais superficiais, duas (25%) profundas e um (12,5%) caso de infecção de órgão/espaço. Não houve associa

  7. Patient Self-Assessment of Surgical Site Infection is Inaccurate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Vered; Cohen, Matan J; Benenson, Shmuel; Almogy, Gideon; Brezis, Mayer

    2017-08-01

    Availability of surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance rates challenges clinicians, healthcare administrators and leaders and the public. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate the consequences patient self-assessment strategies have on SSI reporting rates. We performed SSI surveillance among patients undergoing general surgery procedures, including telephone follow-up 30 days after surgery. Additionally we undertook a separate validation study in which we compared patient self-assessments of SSI with surgeon assessment. Finally, we performed a meta-analysis of similar validation studies of patient self-assessment strategies. There were 22/266 in-hospital SSIs diagnosed (8.3%), and additional 16 cases were detected through the 30-day follow-up. In total, the SSI rate was 16.8% (95% CI 10.1-18.5). In the validation survey, we found patient telephone surveillance to have a sensitivity of 66% (95% CI 40-93%) and a specificity of 90% (95% CI 86-94%). The meta-analysis included five additional studies. The overall sensitivity was 83.3% (95% CI 79-88%), and the overall specificity was 97.4% (95% CI 97-98%). Simulation of the meta-analysis results divulged that when the true infection rate is 1%, reported rates would be 4%; a true rate of 50%, the reported rates would be 43%. Patient self-assessment strategies in order to fulfill 30-day SSI surveillance misestimate SSI rates and lead to an erroneous overall appreciation of inter-institutional variation. Self-assessment strategies overestimate SSIs rate of institutions with high-quality performance and underestimate rates of poor performance. We propose such strategies be abandoned. Alternative strategies of patient follow-up strategies should be evaluated in order to provide valid and reliable information regarding institutional performance in preventing patient harm.

  8. Quality improvement initiative: Preventative Surgical Site Infection Protocol in Vascular Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parizh, David; Ascher, Enrico; Raza Rizvi, Syed Ali; Hingorani, Anil; Amaturo, Michael; Johnson, Eric

    2018-02-01

    Objective A quality improvement initiative was employed to decrease single institution surgical site infection rate in open lower extremity revascularization procedures. In an attempt to lower patient morbidity, we developed and implemented the Preventative Surgical Site Infection Protocol in Vascular Surgery. Surgical site infections lead to prolonged hospital stays, adjunctive procedure, and additive costs. We employed targeted interventions to address the common risk factors that predispose patients to post-operative complications. Methods Retrospective review was performed between 2012 and 2016 for all surgical site infections after revascularization procedures of the lower extremity. A quality improvement protocol was initiated in January 2015. Primary outcome was the assessment of surgical site infection rate reduction in the pre-protocol vs. post-protocol era. Secondary outcomes evaluated patient demographics, closure method, perioperative antibiotic coverage, and management outcomes. Results Implementation of the protocol decreased the surgical site infection rate from 6.4% to 1.6% p = 0.0137). Patient demographics and comorbidities were assessed and failed to demonstrate a statistically significant difference among the infection and no-infection groups. Wound closure with monocryl suture vs. staple proved to be associated with decreased surgical site infection rate ( p site infections in the vascular surgery population are effective and necessary. Our data suggest that there may be benefit in the incorporation of MRSA and Gram-negative coverage as part of the Surgical Care Improvement Project perioperative guidelines.

  9. The feasibility of surgical site tagging with CT virtual reality of the paranasal sinuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, K D; Iyriboz, A T; Wise, S W; Fornadley, J A

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of tagging (highlighting) surgical sites using volumetric CT virtual reality of the paranasal sinuses in the planning for endoscopic sinus surgery. Twenty-five patients with significant paranasal sinus disease had a planned surgical site marked on 2D coronal images. This planned surgical site was then tagged and included on CT volumetric virtual reality imaging. Each case was evaluated as to the ability of the CT virtual reality to demonstrate the planned surgical site and its orientation with respect to adjacent superficial anatomy. For all 25 planned surgeries, the virtual images showed the entire surgical site marked on the 2D coronal images. In all 25 cases, the orientation of the planned surgical site to adjacent normal anatomy was well demonstrated. For surgery into the maxillary sinuses, tagging and electronic removal of the middle turbinates and uncinate processes mimicked the actual surgery and allowed complete visualization of the infundibulum and the planned surgical site. Planned endoscopic paranasal sinus surgical sites can be easily and reliably highlighted using CT virtual reality techniques with respect to the patient's normal endoscopic anatomy.

  10. Predictors of surgical site infections among patients undergoing major surgery at Bugando Medical Centre in Northwestern Tanzania

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    Imirzalioglu Can

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infection (SSI continues to be a major source of morbidity and mortality in developing countries despite recent advances in aseptic techniques. There is no baseline information regarding SSI in our setting therefore it was necessary to conduct this study to establish the prevalence, pattern and predictors of surgical site infection at Bugando Medical Centre Mwanza (BMC, Tanzania. Methods This was a cross-sectional prospective study involving all patients who underwent major surgery in surgical wards between July 2009 and March 2010. After informed written consent for the study and HIV testing, all patients who met inclusion criteria were consecutively enrolled into the study. Pre-operative, intra-operative and post operative data were collected using standardized data collection form. Wound specimens were collected and processed as per standard operative procedures; and susceptibility testing was done using disc diffusion technique. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 15 and STATA. Results Surgical site infection (SSI was detected in 65 (26.0% patients, of whom 56 (86.2% and 9 (13.8% had superficial and deep SSI respectively. Among 65 patients with clinical SSI, 56(86.2% had positive aerobic culture. Staphylococcus aureus was the predominant organism 16/56 (28.6%; of which 3/16 (18.8% were MRSA. This was followed by Escherichia coli 14/56 (25% and Klebsiella pneumoniae 10/56 (17.9%. Among the Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates 9(64.3% and 8(80% were ESBL producers respectively. A total of 37/250 (14.8% patients were HIV positive with a mean CD4 count of 296 cells/ml. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, presence of pre-morbid illness (OR = 6.1, use of drain (OR = 15.3, use of iodine alone in skin preparation (OR = 17.6, duration of operation ≥ 3 hours (OR = 3.2 and cigarette smoking (OR = 9.6 significantly predicted surgical site infection (SSI Conclusion SSI is common

  11. Structure of S. aureus HPPK and the discovery of a new substrate site inhibitor.

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    Sandeep Chhabra

    Full Text Available The first structural and biophysical data on the folate biosynthesis pathway enzyme and drug target, 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin pyrophosphokinase (SaHPPK, from the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is presented. HPPK is the second essential enzyme in the pathway catalysing the pyrophosphoryl transfer from cofactor (ATP to the substrate (6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin, HMDP. In-silico screening identified 8-mercaptoguanine which was shown to bind with an equilibrium dissociation constant, K(d, of ∼13 µM as measured by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC and surface plasmon resonance (SPR. An IC(50 of ∼41 µM was determined by means of a luminescent kinase assay. In contrast to the biological substrate, the inhibitor has no requirement for magnesium or the ATP cofactor for competitive binding to the substrate site. The 1.65 Å resolution crystal structure of the inhibited complex showed that it binds in the pterin site and shares many of the key intermolecular interactions of the substrate. Chemical shift and (15N heteronuclear NMR measurements reveal that the fast motion of the pterin-binding loop (L2 is partially dampened in the SaHPPK/HMDP/α,β-methylene adenosine 5'-triphosphate (AMPCPP ternary complex, but the ATP loop (L3 remains mobile on the µs-ms timescale. In contrast, for the SaHPPK/8-mercaptoguanine/AMPCPP ternary complex, the loop L2 becomes rigid on the fast timescale and the L3 loop also becomes more ordered--an observation that correlates with the large entropic penalty associated with inhibitor binding as revealed by ITC. NMR data, including (15N-(1H residual dipolar coupling measurements, indicate that the sulfur atom in the inhibitor is important for stabilizing and restricting important motions of the L2 and L3 catalytic loops in the inhibited ternary complex. This work describes a comprehensive analysis of a new HPPK inhibitor, and may provide a foundation for the development of novel antimicrobials targeting

  12. Surgical site infections in Italian Hospitals: a prospective multicenter study

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    Ippolito Giuseppe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infections (SSI remain a major clinical problem in terms of morbidity, mortality, and hospital costs. Nearly 60% of SSI diagnosis occur in the postdischarge period. However, literature provides little information on risk factors associated to in-hospital and postdischarge SSI occurrence. A national prospective multicenter study was conducted with the aim of assessing the incidence of both in-hospital and postdisharge SSI, and the associated risk factors. Methods In 2002, a one-month, prospective national multicenter surveillance study was conducted in General and Gynecological units of 48 Italian hospitals. Case ascertainment of SSI was carried out using standardized surveillance methodology. To assess potential risk factors for SSI we used a conditional logistic regression model. We also reported the odds ratios of in-hospital and postdischarge SSI. Results SSI occurred in 241 (5.2% of 4,665 patients, of which 148 (61.4% during in-hospital, and 93 (38.6% during postdischarge period. Of 93 postdischarge SSI, sixty-two (66.7% and 31 (33.3% were detected through telephone interview and questionnaire survey, respectively. Higher SSI incidence rates were observed in colon surgery (18.9%, gastric surgery (13.6%, and appendectomy (8.6%. If considering risk factors for SSI, at multivariate analysis we found that emergency interventions, NNIS risk score, pre-operative hospital stay, and use of drains were significantly associated with SSI occurrence. Moreover, risk factors for total SSI were also associated to in-hospital SSI. Additionally, only NNIS, pre-operative hospital stay, use of drains, and antibiotic prophylaxis were associated with postdischarge SSI. Conclusion Our study provided information on risk factors for SSI in a large population in general surgery setting in Italy. Standardized postdischarge surveillance detected 38.6% of all SSI. We also compared risk factors for in-hospital and postdischarge SSI

  13. Prophylactic Antibiotic Choice and Risk of Surgical Site Infection After Hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Shitanshu; Harris, John; Al-Niaimi, Ahmed; Swenson, Carolyn W; Pearlman, Mark D; Reynolds, R Kevin; Kamdar, Neil; Bazzi, Ali; Campbell, Darrell A; Morgan, Daniel M

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate associations between prophylactic preoperative antibiotic choice and surgical site infection rates after hysterectomy. A retrospective cohort study was performed of patients in the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative undergoing hysterectomy from July 2012 to February 2015. The primary outcome was a composite outcome of any surgical site infection (superficial surgical site infections or combined deep organ space surgical site infections). Preoperative antibiotics were categorized based on the recommendations set forth by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the Surgical Care Improvement Project. Patients receiving a recommended antibiotic regimen were categorized into those receiving β-lactam antibiotics and those receiving alternatives to β-lactam antibiotics. Patients receiving nonrecommended antibiotics were categorized into those receiving overtreatment (excluded from further analysis) and those receiving nonstandard antibiotics. Multivariable logistic regression models were developed to estimate the independent effect of antibiotic choice. Propensity score matching analysis was performed to validate the results. The study included 21,358 hysterectomies. The overall rate of any surgical site infection was 2.06% (n=441). Unadjusted rates of "any surgical site infection" were 1.8%, 3.1%, and 3.7% for β-lactam, β-lactam alternatives, and nonstandard groups, respectively. After adjusting for patient and operative factors within clusters of hospitals, compared with the β-lactam antibiotics (reference group), the risk of "any surgical site infection" was higher for the group receiving β-lactam alternatives (odds ratio [OR] 1.7, confidence interval [CI] 1.27-2.07) or the nonstandard antibiotics (OR 2.0, CI 1.31-3.1). Compared with women receiving β-lactam antibiotic regimens, there is a higher risk of surgical site infection after hysterectomy among those receiving a recommended β-lactam alternative or nonstandard regimen.

  14. Risk factors for acute surgical site infections after lumbar surgery: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Qi; Song, Quanwei; Guo, Runsheng; Bi, Haidi; Liu, Xuqiang; Yu, Xiaolong; Zhu, Jianghao; Dai, Min; Zhang, Bin

    2017-07-19

    Currently, many scholars are concerned about the treatment of postoperative infection; however, few have completed multivariate analyses to determine factors that contribute to the risk of infection. Therefore, we conducted a multivariate analysis of a retrospectively collected database to analyze the risk factors for acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery, including fracture fixation, lumbar fusion, and minimally invasive lumbar surgery. We retrospectively reviewed data from patients who underwent lumbar surgery between 2014 and 2016, including lumbar fusion, internal fracture fixation, and minimally invasive surgery in our hospital's spinal surgery unit. Patient demographics, procedures, and wound infection rates were analyzed using descriptive statistics, and risk factors were analyzed using logistic regression analyses. Twenty-six patients (2.81%) experienced acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery in our study. The patients' mean body mass index, smoking history, operative time, blood loss, draining time, and drainage volume in the acute surgical site infection group were significantly different from those in the non-acute surgical site infection group (p operative type in the acute surgical site infection group were significantly different than those in the non-acute surgical site infection group (p operative type, operative time, blood loss, and drainage time were independent predictors of acute surgical site infection following lumbar surgery. In order to reduce the risk of infection following lumbar surgery, patients should be evaluated for the risk factors noted above.

  15. Development of a surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance system, calculation of SSI rates and specification of important factors affecting SSI in a digestive organ surgical department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Koji; Sawa, Akihiro; Akagi, Shinji; Kihira, Kenji

    2007-06-01

    We have developed an original system to conduct surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance. This system accumulates SSI surveillance information based on the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) System and the Japanese Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (JNIS) System. The features of this system are as follows: easy input of data, high generality, data accuracy, SSI rate by operative procedure and risk index category (RIC) can be promptly calculated and compared with the current NNIS SSI rate, and the SSI rates and accumulated data can be exported electronically. Using this system, we monitored 798 patients in 24 operative procedure categories in the Digestive Organs Surgery Department of Mazda Hospital, Mazda Motor Corporation, from January 2004 through December 2005. The total number and rate of SSI were 47 and 5.89%, respectively. The SSI rates of 777 patients were calculated based on 15 operative procedure categories and Risk Index Categories (RIC). The highest SSI rate was observed in the rectum surgery of RIC 1 (30%), followed by the colon surgery of RIC3 (28.57%). About 30% of the isolated infecting bacteria were Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli. Using quantification theory type 2, the American Society of Anesthesiology score (4.531), volume of hemorrhage under operation (3.075), wound classification (1.76), operation time (1.352), and history of diabetes (0.989) increased to higher ranks as factors for SSI. Therefore, we evaluated this system as a useful tool in safety control for operative procedures.

  16. Advance pre-operative chlorhexidine reduces the incidence of surgical site infections in knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zywiel, Michael G; Daley, Jacqueline A; Delanois, Ronald E; Naziri, Qais; Johnson, Aaron J; Mont, Michael A

    2011-07-01

    Surgical site infections following elective knee arthroplasties occur most commonly as a result of colonisation by the patient's native skin flora. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of deep surgical site infections in knee arthroplasty patients who used an advance cutaneous disinfection protocol and who were compared to patients who had peri-operative preparation only. All adult reconstruction surgeons at a single institution were approached to voluntarily provide patients with chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated cloths and a printed sheet instructing their use the night before and morning of surgery. Records for all knee arthroplasties performed between January 2007 and December 2008 were reviewed to determine the incidence of deep incisional and periprosthetic surgical site infections. Overall, the advance pre-operative protocol was used in 136 of 912 total knee arthroplasties (15%). A lower incidence of surgical site infection was found in patients who used the advance cutaneous preparation protocol as compared to patients who used the in-hospital protocol alone. These findings were maintained when patients were stratified by surgical infection risk category. No surgical site infections occurred in the 136 patients who completed the protocol as compared to 21 infections in 711 procedures (3.0%) performed in patients who did not. Patient-directed skin disinfection using chlorhexidine gluconate-impregnated cloths the evening before, and the morning of, elective knee arthroplasty appeared to effectively reduce the incidence of surgical site infection when compared to patients who underwent in-hospital skin preparation only.

  17. Role of Antibiotics on Surgical Site Infection in Cases of Open and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical site infection (SSI) comes as third most common healthcare related infection which produces morbidity and deaths at large.[1] There are evidence of postoperative morbidity due to SSI. So it is needed to improve the outcome of surgical procedures and hence advised to give antibiotic prophylaxis. The incidence.

  18. A prospective randomised trial of isolated pathogens of surgical site infections (SSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Alexiou

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: In conclusion, surgical site infections are important complications affecting the healthcare services, the cost of hospitalization and the patient himself. Future thorough studies are expected to reveal much more data, regarding predisposing and precautionary patient and hospital characteristics.

  19. The presentation, incidence, etiology, and treatment of surgical site infections after spinal surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Mohamed, A.S.; Skolasky, R.L.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive, retrospective cohort analysis. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the presentation, etiology, and treatment of surgical site infections (SSI) after spinal surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: SSI after spine surgery is frequently seen. Small case control studies have been published

  20. Pre-operative antibiotic use reduces surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Asad Ali; Farooka, Muhammad Waris; Ayyaz, Mahmood; Sarwar, Hassan; Malik, Awais Amjad; Shabbir, Faisal

    2015-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of World Health Organisation Surgical Safety Checklist as a simple, reliable and effective tool to ensure appropriate administration of intravenous antibiotics. The prospective interventional study was conducted in three phases at Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from May 2011 to January 2012. The first phase comprised baseline data collection, followed by implementation of World Health Organisation Surgical Safety Checklist, and finally post-implementation data collection. The duration of each phase was 3 months. Primary end points were discharge from hospital, 30 days or death of the patient. Of the 613 patients in the study, 303(49.4%) were in the pre-implementation phase and 310(50.5%) in post-implementation phase. Adherence of optimal administration of antibiotic increased from 114(37.6%) to 282(91%) (poperative infection fell from 99(32.7%) to 47(15.2%) (psite infection by more than half. Hospital stay was shortened by 1.3 days on average which results in considerable reduction in morbidity, mortality and costs.

  1. Surgical Site Infections in Pediatric Spine Surgery: Comparative Microbiology of Patients with Idiopathic and Nonidiopathic Etiologies of Spine Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesani, Matthieu; Doit, Catherine; Lorrot, Mathie; Vitoux, Christine; Hilly, Julie; Michelet, Daphné; Vidal, Christophe; Julien-Marsollier, Florence; Ilharreborde, Brice; Mazda, Keyvan; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Dahmani, Souhayl

    2016-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a concern in pediatric spine surgery with unusually high rates for a clean surgery and especially for patients with deformity of nonidiopathic etiology. Microbiologic differences between etiologies of spine deformities have been poorly investigated. We reviewed all cases of SSI in spinal surgery between 2007 and 2011. Characteristics of cases and of bacteria according to the etiology of the spine disease were investigated. Of 496 surgeries, we identified 51 SSIs (10.3%) in 49 patients. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent pathogen whatever the etiology (n = 31, 61% of infection cases). The second most frequent pathogens vary according to the etiology of the spine deformity. It was Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) in nonidiopathic cases (n = 19, 45% of cases) and anaerobe in idiopathic cases (n = 8, 38% of cases), particularly Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (n = 5, 24% of cases). Infection rate was 6.8% in cases with idiopathic spine disease (n = 21) and 15.9% in cases with nonidiopathic spine disease (n = 30). Nonidiopathic cases were more frequently male with lower weight. American Society of Anesthesiologists score was more often greater than 2, they had more frequently sacral implants and postoperative intensive care unit stay. GNB were significantly associated with a nonidiopathic etiology, low weight, younger age and sacral fusion. SSIs were polymicrobial in 31% of cases with a mean of 1.4 species per infection cases. S. aureus is the first cause of SSI in pediatric spine surgery. However, Gram-positive anaerobic cocci should be taken into account in idiopathic patients and GNB in nonidiopathic patients when considering antibiotic prophylaxis and curative treatment.

  2. Intraoperative technique as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2012-02-01

    Approximately five percent of patients who undergo surgery develop surgical site infections (SSIs) which are associated with an extra seven days as an inpatient and with increased postoperative mortality. The competence and technique of the surgeon is considered important in preventing SSI. We have reviewed the evidence on different aspects of surgical technique and its role in preventing SSI. The most recent guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK recommend avoiding diathermy for skin incision even though this reduces incision time and blood loss, both associated with lower infection rates. Studies comparing different closure techniques, i.e. continuous versus interrupted sutures, have not found a statistically significant difference in the SSI rate, but using continuous sutures is quicker. For contaminated wounds, the surgical site should be left open for four days to allow for treatment of local infection before subsequent healing by primary intention. Surgical drains should be placed through separate incisions, closed suction drains are preferable to open drains, and all drains should be removed as soon as possible. There are relatively few large studies on the impact of surgical techniques on SSI rates. Larger multicentre prospective studies are required to define what aspects of surgical technique impact on SSI, to better inform surgical practice and support education programmes for surgical trainees.

  3. Intraoperative technique as a factor in the prevention of surgical site infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-02-28

    Approximately five percent of patients who undergo surgery develop surgical site infections (SSIs) which are associated with an extra seven days as an inpatient and with increased postoperative mortality. The competence and technique of the surgeon is considered important in preventing SSI. We have reviewed the evidence on different aspects of surgical technique and its role in preventing SSI. The most recent guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK recommend avoiding diathermy for skin incision even though this reduces incision time and blood loss, both associated with lower infection rates. Studies comparing different closure techniques, i.e. continuous versus interrupted sutures, have not found a statistically significant difference in the SSI rate, but using continuous sutures is quicker. For contaminated wounds, the surgical site should be left open for four days to allow for treatment of local infection before subsequent healing by primary intention. Surgical drains should be placed through separate incisions, closed suction drains are preferable to open drains, and all drains should be removed as soon as possible. There are relatively few large studies on the impact of surgical techniques on SSI rates. Larger multicentre prospective studies are required to define what aspects of surgical technique impact on SSI, to better inform surgical practice and support education programmes for surgical trainees.

  4. Cyanoacrylate Skin Microsealant for Preventing Surgical Site Infection after Vascular Surgery : A Discontinued Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vierhout, Bastiaan P.; Ott, Alewijn; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.; Oskam, Jacques; Ott, Alewijn; van den Dungen, Jan J. A. M.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) after vascular surgery are related to substantial morbidity. Restriction of bacterial access to the site of surgery with a cyanoacrylate sealant is a new concept. We performed a randomized clinical trial to assess the effect of the sealing of skin with a

  5. Fluid Overload and Cumulative Thoracostomy Output Are Associated With Surgical Site Infection After Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sochet, Anthony A; Nyhan, Aoibhinn; Spaeder, Michael C; Cartron, Alexander M; Song, Xiaoyan; Klugman, Darren; Brown, Anna T

    2017-08-01

    To determine the impact of cumulative, postoperative thoracostomy output, amount of bolus IV fluids and peak fluid overload on the incidence and odds of developing a deep surgical site infection following pediatric cardiothoracic surgery. A single-center, nested, retrospective, matched case-control study. A 26-bed cardiac ICU in a 303-bed tertiary care pediatric hospital. Cases with deep surgical site infection following cardiothoracic surgery were identified retrospectively from January 2010 through December 2013 and individually matched to controls at a ratio of 1:2 by age, gender, Risk Adjustment for Congenital Heart Surgery score, Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardiothoracic Surgery category, primary cardiac diagnosis, and procedure. None. Twelve cases with deep surgical site infection were identified and matched to 24 controls without detectable differences in perioperative clinical characteristics. Deep surgical site infection cases had larger thoracostomy output and bolus IV fluid volumes at 6, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively compared with controls. For every 1 mL/kg of thoracostomy output, the odds of developing a deep surgical site infection increase by 13%. By receiver operative characteristic curve analysis, a cutoff of 49 mL/kg of thoracostomy output at 48 hours best discriminates the development of deep surgical site infection (sensitivity 83%, specificity 83%). Peak fluid overload was greater in cases than matched controls (12.5% vs 6%; p operative characteristic curve analysis, a threshold value of 10% peak fluid overload was observed to identify deep surgical site infection (sensitivity 67%, specificity 79%). Conditional logistic regression of peak fluid overload greater than 10% on the development of deep surgical site infection yielded an odds ratio of 9.4 (95% CI, 2-46.2). Increased postoperative peak fluid overload and cumulative thoracostomy output were associated with deep surgical site infection after pediatric

  6. Do Arthroscopic Fluid Pumps Display True Surgical Site Pressure During Hip Arthroscopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jeremy A; Marland, Jennifer D; Payne, Brayden; Whiting, Daniel R; West, Hugh S

    2018-01-01

    To report on the accuracy of 5 commercially available arthroscopic fluid pumps to measure fluid pressure at the surgical site during hip arthroscopy. Patients undergoing hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement were block randomized to the use of 1 of 5 arthroscopic fluid pumps. A spinal needle inserted into the operative field was used to measure surgical site pressure. Displayed pump pressures and surgical site pressures were recorded at 30-second intervals for the duration of the case. Mean differences between displayed pump pressures and surgical site pressures were obtained for each pump group. Of the 5 pumps studied, 3 (Crossflow, 24K, and Continuous Wave III) reflected the operative field fluid pressure within 11 mm Hg of the pressure readout. In contrast, 2 of the 5 pumps (Double Pump RF and FMS/DUO+) showed a difference of greater than 59 mm Hg between the operative field fluid pressure and the pressure readout. Joint-calibrated pumps more closely reflect true surgical site pressure than gravity-equivalent pumps. With a basic understanding of pump design, either type of pump can be used safely and efficiently. The risk of unfamiliarity with these differences is, on one end, the possibility of pump underperformance and, on the other, potentially dangerously high operating pressures. Level II, prospective block-randomized study. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The role of topical antibiotics used as prophylaxis in surgical site infection prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-04-01

    Compared with systemic antibiotic therapy, the topical or local delivery of an antibiotic has many potential advantages. However, local antibiotics at the surgical site have received very limited approval in any of the surgical prophylaxis consensus guidelines that we are aware of. A review of the literature was carried out through searches of peer-reviewed publications in PubMed in the English language over a 30 year period between January 1980 and May 2010. Both retrospective and prospective studies were included, as well as meta-analyses. With regard to defining \\'topical\\' or \\'local\\' antibiotic application, the application of an antibiotic solution to the surgical site intraoperatively or immediately post-operatively was included. A number of surgical procedures have been shown to significantly benefit from perioperative topical prophylaxis, e.g. joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. The selective use of topical antibiotics as surgical prophylaxis is justified for specific procedures, such as joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In selective cases, such as obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. Apart from these specific indications, the evidence for use of topical antibiotics in surgery is lacking in conclusive randomized controlled trials.

  8. The role of topical antibiotics used as prophylaxis in surgical site infection prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2012-02-01

    Compared with systemic antibiotic therapy, the topical or local delivery of an antibiotic has many potential advantages. However, local antibiotics at the surgical site have received very limited approval in any of the surgical prophylaxis consensus guidelines that we are aware of. A review of the literature was carried out through searches of peer-reviewed publications in PubMed in the English language over a 30 year period between January 1980 and May 2010. Both retrospective and prospective studies were included, as well as meta-analyses. With regard to defining \\'topical\\' or \\'local\\' antibiotic application, the application of an antibiotic solution to the surgical site intraoperatively or immediately post-operatively was included. A number of surgical procedures have been shown to significantly benefit from perioperative topical prophylaxis, e.g. joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. The selective use of topical antibiotics as surgical prophylaxis is justified for specific procedures, such as joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In selective cases, such as obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. Apart from these specific indications, the evidence for use of topical antibiotics in surgery is lacking in conclusive randomized controlled trials.

  9. The relationship of hospital charges and volume to surgical site infection after total hip replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, Rebecca; Ensor, Kelsey; Qian, Edward; Hutzler, Lorraine; Slover, James; Bosco, Joseph

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of hospital volume and charges on the rate of surgical site infections for total hip replacements (THRs) in New York State (NYS). In NYS, higher volume hospitals have higher charges after THR. The study team analyzed 93,620 hip replacements performed in NYS between 2008 and 2011. Hospital charges increased significantly from $43,713 in 2008 to $50,652 in 2011 (P<.01). Compared with lower volume hospitals, patients who underwent THR at the highest volume hospitals had significantly lower surgical site infection rates (P=.003) and higher total hospital charges (P<.0001). The study team found that in the highest volume hospitals, preventing one surgical site infection was associated with $1.6 million dollars in increased charges. © 2014 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  10. Demonstrating success in reducing adult cardiac surgical site infections and the economic impact of using multidisciplinary collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiwera, Lilian; Wigglesworth, Neil; McCoskery, Carol; Lucchese, Gianluca; Newsholme, William

    2018-03-28

    Cardiac surgical site infections (SSIs) have devastating consequences and present several challenges for patients and healthcare providers. Adult cardiac SSI surveillance commenced in 2009 at our hospitals, Guy's & St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, as a patient safety initiative amid reported increased incidence of SSIs. Before this time, infection incidence was unclear because data collection was not standardised. Our aim was to standardise SSI data collection and establish baseline SSI rates to facilitate deployment of evidence based targeted interventions within clinical governance structures to improve quality, safety and efficiency in line with our organisational targets. We standardised local data collection protocols in line with Public Health England recommendations and identified local champions. We undertook prospective SSI surveillance collaboratively to enable us to identify potential practice concerns and address them more effectively through a series of initiatives. Clinical staff completed dedicated surveillance forms intraoperatively and post operatively. Overall adult cardiac SSI rates fell from 5.4% in 2009 to 1.2% in 2016 and Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) rates from 6.5% in 2009 to 1.7% in 2016, psuccessfully implemented comprehensive, evidence-based infection control practices through a multidisciplinary collaborative approach; an approach we consider to have great potential to reduce Gram negative, Staphylococcus aureus, polymicrobial and overall SSI burden and/or associated costs. We now investigate all SSIs using an established SSI detailed investigation protocol to promote continual quality improvement that aligns us perfectly with global efforts to fight antimicrobial resistance. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Active prospective surveillance study with post-discharge surveillance of surgical site infections in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Guerra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Barriers to the implementation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC guidelines for surgical site infection (SSI surveillance have been described in resource-limited settings. This study aimed to estimate the SSI incidence rate in a Cambodian hospital and to compare different modalities of SSI surveillance. We performed an active prospective study with post-discharge surveillance. During the hospital stay, trained surveyors collected the CDC criteria to identify SSI by direct examination of the surgical site. After discharge, a card was given to each included patient to be presented to all practitioners examining the surgical site. Among 167 patients, direct examination of the surgical site identified a cumulative incidence rate of 14 infections per 100 patients. An independent review of medical charts presented a sensitivity of 16%. The sensitivity of the purulent drainage criterion to detect SSIs was 83%. After hospital discharge, 87% of the patients provided follow-up data, and nine purulent drainages were reported by a practitioner (cumulative incidence rate: 20%. Overall, the incidence rate was dependent on the surveillance modalities. The review of medical charts to identify SSIs during hospitalization was not effective; the use of a follow-up card with phone calls for post-discharge surveillance was effective. Keywords: Surgical wound infection, Cambodia, Infection control, Developing countries, Follow-up studies, Feasibility studies

  12. Surgical Site Infection in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, U. I.; Khan, A.; Nawaz, A.; Mansoor, R.; Malik, A. A.; Sher, F.; Ayyaz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the frequency of surgical site infections in patients with type II diabetes undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy as compared with non-diabetic patients. Study Design: Cohort study. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical Unit 2, Services Hospital, Lahore, from May to October 2012. Methodology: Patients were divided into two groups of 60 each, undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Group A comprised non-diabetic patients and group B comprised type II diabetic patients. Patients were followed postoperatively upto one month for the development of SSIs. Proportion of patients with surgical site infections or otherwise was compared between the groups using chi-square test with significance of p < 0.05. Results: In group A, 35 patients were above the age of 40 years. In group B, 38 patients were above the age of 40 years. Four patients in group A developed a surgical site infection. Seven patients in group B developed SSIs (p = 0.07). Conclusion: Presence of diabetes mellitus did not significantly affect the onset of surgical site infection in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. (author)

  13. Incidence of and risk factors for surgical site infections in women undergoing hysterectomy for endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuomi, Taru; Pasanen, Annukka; Leminen, Arto; Bützow, Ralf; Loukovaara, Mikko

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of, and risk factors for, surgical site infections in a contemporary cohort of women with endometrial carcinoma. We retrospectively studied 1164 women treated for endometrial carcinoma by hysterectomy at a single institution in 2007-2013. In all, 912 women (78.4%) had minimally invasive hysterectomy. Data on surgical site infections were collected from medical records. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify risk factors for incisional and organ/space infections. Ninety-four women (8.1%) were diagnosed with a surgical site infection. Twenty women (1.7%) had an incisional infection and 74 (6.4%) had an organ/space infection. The associations of 17 clinico-pathologic and surgical variables were tested by univariate analyses. Those variables that were identified as potential risk factors in univariate analyses (p infections as dependent variables. Obesity (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), diabetes, and long operative time (>80th centile) were independently associated with a higher risk of incisional infection, whereas minimally invasive surgery was associated with a smaller risk. Smoking, conversion to laparotomy, and lymphadenectomy were associated with a higher risk of organ/space infection. Organ/space infections comprised the majority of surgical site infections. Risk factors for incisional and organ/space infections differed. Minimally invasive hysterectomy was associated with a smaller risk of incisional infections but not of organ/space infections. © 2015 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  14. Sodium Mercaptoethane Sulfonate Reduces Collagenolytic Degradation and Synergistically Enhances Antimicrobial Durability in an Antibiotic-Loaded Biopolymer Film for Prevention of Surgical-Site Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Rosenblatt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Implant-associated surgical-site infections can have significant clinical consequences. Previously we reported a method for prophylactically disinfecting implant surfaces in surgical pockets, where an antibiotic solution containing minocycline (M and rifampin (R was applied as a solid film in a crosslinked biopolymer matrix that partially liquefied in situ to provide extended prophylaxis. Here we studied the effect of adding sodium 2-mercaptoethane sulfonate (MeSNA on durability of prophylaxis in an in vitro model of implant-associated surgical-site infection. Adding MeSNA to the M/R biopolymer, antimicrobial film extended the duration for which biofilm formation by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDR-PA was prevented on silicone surfaces in the model. M/R films with and without MeSNA were effective in preventing colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Independent experiments revealed that MeSNA directly inhibited proteolytic digestion of the biopolymer film and synergistically enhanced antimicrobial potency of M/R against MDR-PA. Incubation of the MeSNA containing films with L929 fibroblasts revealed no impairment of cellular metabolic activity or viability.

  15. Incidence and predictors of surgical site infection in Ethiopia: prospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legesse Laloto, Tamrat; Hiko Gemeda, Desta; Abdella, Sadikalmahdi Hussen

    2017-02-03

    Surgical site infections are commonest nosocomial infections and responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality as well as increased hospitalizations and treatment cost related to surgical operations. The aim of this study was to determine incidence and predictors of surgical site infections at surgical ward of Hawassa University Referral Hospital, Southern Ethiopia. We performed prospective study involving 105 patients that undergone major surgical procedure at Hawassa University Referral Hospital from March 2 to May 2, 2015. Data were extracted from paper based medical charts, operational and anesthesia note, by direct observation and patients' interview. All patients were followed daily before, during and after operation for 30 days starting from the date of operation. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) for window version 20.0 software. Predictors of Surgical site infections were identified using multivariable logistic regression model. P-value less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. We studied 105 patients. Sixty four patients (61%) were males. The mean age of the patients was 30.85 ± 17.72 years. The mean Body Mass Index (BMI) was 21.6 ± 4 kg/m 2 . Twenty patients (19.1%) developed surgical site infections. Age greater than 40 years, AOR = 7.7(95% CI [1.610-40.810 p = 0.016,]), preoperative hospital stay more than 7 days, AOR = 22.4(95% CI [4.544-110.780, p = 0.001]), duration of operation more than 1 hour, AOR = 8.01(95% CI [1.562-41.099, p = 0.013]) and administering antimicrobial prophylaxis before 1 hour of operation, AOR = 11.1 (95% CI [1.269-75.639, p = 0.014]) were independent predictors for surgical site infections. Surgical site infection is relatively high.

  16. Comparison of postoperative surgical site infection after preoperative marking done with non-sterile stationary grade markers versus sterile surgical markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mir, Z.A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the frequencies of post- operative surgical site infection after preoperative marking done with non-sterile stationary. grade markers versus sterile surgical markers in the same patient. Design: Randomized control trial. Place and Duration of Study: The department of Plastic surgery, Mayo hospital, Lahore from August 2013 to August 2014. Methods: This study was conducted after taking approval from the departmental ethical committee. Forty consecutive patients were included. A sterile surgical marker was used to mark one incision site while an alcohol based stationary grade marker was used to mark another incision site on the same patient. A standard preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative protocol was followed. Cultures were performed on swabs taken from the incision sites and surgical site infection was assessed for 30 days. Results: The study included 40 patients; 17 males and 23 females. The mean age of subjects was 25.32 ± 19.69 years with the minimum age being 2 years and the maximum being 63 years. No growth was seen in cultures taken from all the incision sites after skin preparation in the non sterile stationary grade marker group as well as the sterile surgical grade marker group. Also no surgical site infection appeared during the 30 day postoperative observation period in the non sterile stationary grade marker group as well as the sterile surgical grade marker group. (author)

  17. The Importance of Perioperative Prophylaxis with Cefuroxime or Ceftriaxone in the Surgical Site Infections Prevention after Cranial and Spinal Neurosurgical Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimovska-Gavrilovska, Aleksandra; Chaparoski, Aleksandar; Gavrilovski, Andreja; Milenkovikj, Zvonko

    2017-09-01

    Introduction Surgical site infections pose a significant problem in the treatment of neurosurgical procedures, regardless of the application of perioperative prophylaxis with systemic antibiotics. The infection rate in these procedures ranges from less than 1% to above 15%. Different antibiotics and administration regimes have been used in the perioperative prophylaxis so far, and there are numerous comparative studies regarding their efficiency, however, it is generally indicated that the choice thereof should be based on information and local specifics connected to the most probable bacterial causers, which would possibly contaminate the surgical site and cause infection, and moreover, the mandatory compliance with the principles of providing adequate concentration of the drug at the time of the anticipated contamination. Objective Comparing the protective effect of two perioperative prophylactic antibiotic regimes using cefuroxime (second generation cephalosporin) and ceftriaxone (third generation cephalosporin) in the prevention of postoperative surgical site infections after elective and urgent cranial and spinal neurosurgical procedures at the University Clinic for Neurosurgery in Skopje in the period of the first three months of 2016. Design of the study Prospective randomized comparative study. Outcome measures Establishing the clinical outcome represented as prevalence of superficial and deep incision and organ/space postoperative surgical site infections. Material and method We analyzed prospectively 40 patients who received parenteral antibiotic prophylaxis with two antibiotic regimes one hour before the routine neurosurgical cranial and spinal surgical procedures; the patients were randomized in two groups, according to the order of admission and participation in the study, alternately, non-selectively, those persons who fulfilled inclusion criteria were placed in one of the two programmed regimes with cefuroxime in the first, and cefotaxime in the

  18. Consensus Bundle on Prevention of Surgical Site Infections After Major Gynecologic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Joseph E; Toledo, Paloma; Soper, David E; Bradford, William C; Cruz, Deborah A; Levy, Barbara S; Lemieux, Lauren A

    Surgical site infections are the most common complications of surgery in the United States. Of surgeries in women of reproductive age, hysterectomy is one of the most frequently performed, second only to cesarean birth. Therefore, prevention of surgical site infections in women undergoing gynecologic surgery is an ideal topic for a patient safety bundle. The primary purpose of this safety bundle is to provide recommendations that can be implemented into any surgical environment in an effort to reduce the incidence of surgical site infection. This bundle was developed by a multidisciplinary team convened by the Council on Patient Safety in Women's Health Care. The bundle is organized into four domains: Readiness, Recognition and Prevention, Response, and Reporting and Systems Learning. In addition to recommendations for practice, each of the domains stresses communication and teamwork between all members of the surgical team. Although the bundle components are designed to be adaptable to work in a variety of clinical settings, standardization within institutions is encouraged. Copyright © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Chronic swelling from entrapment of acrylic resin in a surgical extraction site

    OpenAIRE

    Weiting Ho; Pin-Chuang Lai; John D Walters

    2010-01-01

    When acrylic resin is inadvertently embedded in oral tissue, it can result in a pronounced chronic inflammatory response. This report describes a case in which temporary crown and bridge resin was forced into a surgical extraction site after the two adjacent teeth were prepared for a bridge immediately following extraction of a maxillary premolar. The patient experienced swelling at the extraction site over a ten month period despite treatment with antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs. Aft...

  20. Reduced risk of surgical site infections through surveillance in a network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geubbels, Eveline L. P. E.; Nagelkerke, Nico J. D.; Mintjes-de Groot, A. Joke; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; de Boer, Annette S.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the effect of multicentre surveillance for nosocomial infections on patients' risk of surgical site infection (SSI). DESIGN: Prospective multi-centre cohort study, from January 1996 to December 2000. SETTING: Acute care hospitals in The Netherlands. STUDY PARTICIPANTS: All 50

  1. Randomized clinical trial comparing two options for postoperative incisional care to prevent poststernotomy surgical site infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, Patrique; de Jong, Antonius P.; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; Ubbink, Dirk T.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) remains an important complication of cardiac surgery. Prevention is important, as SSI is associated with high mortality and morbidity rates. Incisional care is an important daily issue for surgeons. However, there is still scant scientific evidence on which guidelines

  2. Aetiological agents of surgical site infection in a specialist hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the advances made in asepsis, antimicrobial drugs, sterilization and operative techniques, surgical site infections (SSI) continue to be a major problem in all branches of surgery in the hospitals. The objective of this study was to establish the incidence of SSI, the type and frequency of various pathogens and their ...

  3. In vitro results of flexible light-emitting antimicrobial bandage designed for prevention of surgical site infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Mitchell; Sharan, Riti; Galbadage, Thushara; Sule, Preeti; Smith, Robert; Lovelady, April; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Glowczwski, Alan; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2018-02-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and a significant expense to the healthcare system and hospitals. The majority of these infections are preventable; however, increasing bacterial resistance, biofilm persistence, and human error contribute to the occurrence of these healthcare-associated infections. We present a flexible antimicrobial blue-light emitting bandage designed for use on postoperative incisions and wounds. The photonic device is designed to inactivate bacteria present on the skin and prevent bacterial colonization of the site, thus reducing the occurrence of SSIs. This antimicrobial light emitting bandage uses blue light's proven abilities to inactivate a wide range of clinical pathogens regardless of their resistance to antibiotics, inactivate bacteria without harming mammalian cells, improve wound healing, and inactivate bacteria in biofilms. The antimicrobial bandage consists of a thin 2"x2" silicone sheet with an array of 77 LEDs embedded in multiple layers of the material for thermal management. The 405 nm center wavelength LED array is designed to be a wearable device that integrates with standard hospital infection prevention protocols. The device was characterized for irradiance of 44.5 mW/cm2. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus seeded in a petri dish was used to evaluate bacterial inactivation in vitro. Starting with a concentration of 2.16 x 107 colony forming units (CFU)/mL, 45% of the bacteria was inactivated within 15 minutes, 65% had been inactivated by 30 minutes, 99% was inactivated by 60 minutes, and a 7 log reduction and complete sterilization was achieved within 120 minutes.

  4. Reducing surgical site infections after hysterectomy: metronidazole plus cefazolin compared with cephalosporin alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Sara R; Morgan, Daniel M; Bazzi, Ali A; Pearlman, Mark D; Abdelsattar, Zaid; Campbell, Darrell A; Uppal, Shitanshu

    2017-08-01

    Organisms that are isolated from vaginal cuff infections and pelvic abscesses after hysterectomy frequently include anaerobic vaginal flora. Metronidazole has outstanding coverage against nearly all anaerobic species, which is superior to both cefazolin and second-generation cephalosporins. Cefazolin plus metronidazole has been demonstrated to reduce infectious morbidity compared with either cefazolin or second-generation cephalosporins in other clean-contaminated procedures, which include both as colorectal surgery and cesarean delivery. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the combination of cefazolin plus metronidazole before hysterectomy was more effective in the prevention of surgical site infection than existing recommendations of cefazolin or second-generation cephalosporin. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients in the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative from July 2012 through February 2015. The primary outcome was surgical site infection. Patients who were >18 years old and who underwent abdominal, vaginal, laparoscopic, or robotic hysterectomy for benign or malignant indications were included if they received 1 of the following prophylactic antibiotic regimens: cefazolin, second-generation cephalosporin, or cefazolin plus metronidazole. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was performed to evaluate the independent effect of an antibiotic regimen, and propensity score matching was used to validate the findings. The study included 18,255 hysterectomies. The overall rate of surgical site infection was 1.8% (n=329). The unadjusted rate of surgical site infection was 1.8% (n=267) for cefazolin, 2.1% (n=49) for second-generation cephalosporin, and 1.4% (n=13) for cefazolin plus metronidazole. After adjustment for differences in patient and operative factors among the antibiotic cohorts, compared with cefazolin plus metronidazole, we found the risk of surgical site infection was significantly higher for patients who received

  5. A Journey to Zero: Reduction of Post-Operative Cesarean Surgical Site Infections over a Five-Year Period

    OpenAIRE

    Hickson, Evelyn; Harris, Jeanette; Brett, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) are a substantial concern for cesarean deliveries in which a surgical site complication is most unwelcome for a mother with a new infant. Steps taken pre- and post-operatively to reduce the number of complications may be of substantial benefit clinically, economically, and psychologically.

  6. Infection-free surgery: how to improve hand-hygiene compliance and eradicate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from surgical wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C R

    2010-05-01

    Healthcare-associated infections cost the UK National Health Service 1 billion UK pounds per annum. Poor hand hygiene is the main route of transmission for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), leading to increased mortality and morbidity for infected patients. This study aims to quantify MRSA infection rates and compliance of alcohol gel application at the entrance to a surgical ward and assess how a simple intervention affects compliance. Compliance was assessed via a discretely positioned close-surveillance camera at the ward entrance. Footage was reviewed to monitor compliance of all persons entering the ward over a 12-month period. For the initial 6 months, mean alcohol gel compliance was 24% for all persons entering the ward. After this period, a conspicuous strip of bright red tape was positioned along the corridor approaching the ward entrance. The red line continued up the wall to an arrow head pointing to the two alcohol gel dispensers on the wall. Mean compliance over the subsequent 6 months significantly improved to 62% (P porters (21% - 67%, P 0.05). There were two cases of MRSA bacteraemia in the initial 6 months and no cases in the following 6 months with the red line in situ. This study demonstrates how a simple intervention significantly improves hand-hygiene compliance with associated eradication of MRSA.

  7. Post-Caesarean Section Surgical Site Infection Surveillance Using an Online Database and Mobile Phone Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Eliana; McIsaac, Corrine; MacDougall, Bhreagh; Wilson, Douglas; Kohr, Rosemary

    2017-08-01

    Obstetric surgical site infections (SSIs) are common and expensive to the health care system but remain under reported given shorter postoperative hospital stays and suboptimal post-discharge surveillance systems. SSIs, for the purpose of this paper, are defined according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (1999) as infection incurring within 30 days of the operative procedure (in this case, Caesarean section [CS]). Demonstrate the feasibility of real-life use of a patient driven SSIs post-discharge surveillance system consisting of an online database and mobile phone technology (surgical mobile app - how2trak) among women undergoing CS in a Canadian urban centre. Estimate the rate of SSIs and associated predisposing factors. Prospective cohort of consecutive women delivering by CS at one urban Canadian hospital. Using surgical mobile app-how2trak-predetermined demographics, comorbidities, procedure characteristics, and self-reported symptoms and signs of infection were collected and linked to patients' incision self-portraits (photos) on postpartum days 3, 7, 10, and 30. A total of 105 patients were enrolled over a 5-month period. Mean age was 31 years, 13% were diabetic, and most were at low risk of surgical complications. Forty-six percent of surgeries were emergency CSs, and 104/105 received antibiotic prophylaxis. Forty-five percent of patients (47/105) submitted at least one photo, and among those, one surgical site infection was detected by photo appearance and self-reported symptoms by postpartum day 10. The majority of patients whom uploaded photos did so multiple times and 43% of them submitted photos up to day 30. Patients with either a diagnosis of diabetes or self-reported Asian ethnicity were less likely to submit photos. Post-discharge surveillance for CS-related SSIs using surgical mobile app how2trak is feasible and deserves further study in the post-discharge setting. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Optimum Operating Room Environment for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Sara; Luo, James N; Gilbert, Jack; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C

    Surgical site infections (SSI), whether they be incisional or deep, can entail major morbidity and death to patients and additional cost to the healthcare system. A significant amount of effort has gone into optimizing the surgical patient and the operating room environment to reduce SSI. Relevant guidelines and literature were reviewed. The modern practice of surgical antisepsis involves the employment of strict sterile techniques inside the operating room. Extensive guidelines are available regarding the proper operating room antisepsis as well as pre-operative preparation. The use of pre-operative antimicrobial prophylaxis has become increasingly prevalent, which also presents the challenge of opportunistic and nosocomial infections. Ongoing investigative efforts have brought about a greater appreciation of the surgical patient's endogenous microflora, use of non-bactericidal small molecules, and pre-operative microbial screening. Systematic protocols exist for optimizing the surgical sterility of the operating room to prevent SSIs. Ongoing research efforts aim to improve the precision of peri-operative antisepsis measures and personalize these measures to tailor the patient's unique microbial environment.

  9. Risk Factors and Predictive Model Development of Thirty-Day Post-Operative Surgical Site Infection in the Veterans Administration Surgical Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinli; Nylander, William; Smith, Tracy; Han, Soonhee; Gunnar, William

    2018-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) complicates approximately 2% of surgeries in the Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals. Surgical site infections are responsible for increased morbidity, length of hospital stay, cost, and mortality. Surgical site infection can be minimized by modifying risk factors. In this study, we identified risk factors and developed accurate predictive surgical specialty-specific SSI risk prediction models for the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) surgery population. In a retrospective observation study, surgical patients who underwent surgery from October 2013 to September 2016 from 136 VA hospitals were included. The Veteran Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP) database was used for the pre-operative demographic and clinical characteristics, intra-operative characteristics, and 30-day post-operative outcomes. The study population represents 11 surgical specialties: neurosurgery, urology, podiatry, otolaryngology, general, orthopedic, plastic, thoracic, vascular, cardiac coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), and cardiac valve/other surgery. Multivariable logistic regression models were developed for the 30-day post-operative SSIs. Among 354,528 surgical procedures, 6,538 (1.8%) had SSIs within 30 days. Surgical site infection rates varied among surgical specialty (0.7%-3.0%). Surgical site infection rates were higher in emergency procedures, procedures with long operative duration, greater complexity, and higher relative value units. Other factors associated with increased SSI risk were high level of American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification (level 4 and 5), dyspnea, open wound/infection, wound classification, ascites, bleeding disorder, chemotherapy, smoking, history of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), radiotherapy, steroid use for chronic conditions, and weight loss. Each surgical specialty had a distinct combination of risk factors. Accurate SSI risk-predictive surgery specialty

  10. Reducing the risk of surgical site infection: a case controlled study of contamination of theatre clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivanandan, Indu; Bowker, Karen E; Bannister, Gordon C; Soar, Jasmeet

    2011-02-01

    Surgical site infections are one of the most important causes of healthcare associated infections (HCAI), accounting for 20% of all HCAIs. Surgical site infections affect 1% of joint replacement operations. This study was designed to assess whether theatre clothing is contaminated more inside or outside the theatre suite. Petri dishes filled with horse blood agar were pressed on theatre clothes at 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 hours to sample bacterial contamination in 20 doctors whilst working in and outside the theatre suite. The results showed that there was greater bacterial contamination when outside the theatre suite at 2 hours. There were no differences in the amount of contamination at 4, 6 and 8 hours. This study suggests that the level of contamination of theatre clothes is similar both inside and outside the theatre setting.

  11. Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals: 2014 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Deverick J.; Podgorny, Kelly; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I.; Bratzler, Dale W.; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Greene, Linda; Nyquist, Ann-Christine; Saiman, Lisa; Yokoe, Deborah S.; Maragakis, Lisa L.; Kaye, Keith S.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Previously published guidelines are available that provide comprehensive recommendations for detecting and preventing healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The intent of this document is to highlight practical recommendations in a concise format designed to assist acute care hospitals in implementing and prioritizing their surgical site infection (SSI) prevention efforts. This document updates “Strategies to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Acute Care Hospitals,”1 published in 2008. This expert guidance document is sponsored by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and is the product of a collaborative effort led by SHEA, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the American Hospital Association (AHA), the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), and The Joint Commission, with major contributions from representatives of a number of organizations and societies with content expertise. The list of endorsing and supporting organizations is presented in the introduction to the 2014 updates.2 PMID:24799638

  12. Risk factors for surgical site infection following operative ankle fracture fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, E G; Cashman, J P; Groarke, P J; Morris, S F

    2013-09-01

    Ankle fracture is a common injury and there is an increasingly greater emphasis on operative fixation. The purpose of the study was to determine the complication rate in this cohort of patients and, in doing so, determine risk factors which predispose to surgical site infection. A prospective cohort study was performed at a tertiary referral trauma center examining risk factors for surgical site infection in operatively treated ankle fractures. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed. Female gender and advancing age were determined to be the risk factors in univariate analysis. Drain usage and peri-operative pyrexia were found to be significant for infection in multivariate analysis. This study allows surgeons to identify those at increased risk of infection and counsel them appropriately. It also allows for a high level of vigilance with regard to soft tissue handling intra-operatively in this higher risk group.

  13. Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen to Reduce Surgical Site Infection after High Energy Fracture Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0588 TITLE: Supplemental Perioperative Oxygen to Reduce Surgical Site Infection after High- Energy Fracture Surgery...High- Energy Fracture Surgery 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0588 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Robert V. O’Toole, MD...14 4 1. INTRODUCTION: The overall scope of this project is to address the treatment of high- energy military fractures, which has

  14. Antibiotic prophylaxis for surgical site infection in people undergoing liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Ricardo A M B; Hasimoto, Claudia N; Kim, Anna; Hasimoto, Erica N; El Dib, Regina

    2015-12-05

    Surgical site infection is more frequent in liver transplantation than in other types of solid organ transplantation with different antibiotics. Studies have shown that the rate of surgical site infection varies from 8.8% to 37.5% after liver transplantation. Therefore, antimicrobial prophylaxis is likely an essential tool for reducing these infections. However, the literature lacks evidence indicating the best prophylactic antibiotic regimen that can be used for liver transplantation. To assess the benefits and harms of antibiotic prophylactic regimens for surgical site infection in people undergoing liver transplantation. We searched the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded and Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS). The most recent search was performed on 11 September 2015. All eligible randomised clinical trials comparing any antibiotic regimen versus placebo, versus no intervention or versus another antibiotic regimen for surgical site infection in liver transplant recipients, regardless of age, sex and reason for transplantation. Quasi-randomised studies and other observational studies were considered for data on harm if retrieved with search results for randomised clinical trials. Two review authors selected relevant trials, assessed risk of bias of studies and extracted data. The electronic search identified 786 publications after removal of duplicates. From this search, only one seemingly randomised clinical trial, published in abstract form, fulfilled the inclusion criteria of this review. This trial was conducted at Shiraz Transplant Centre, Shiraz, Iran, where investigators randomly assigned a total of 180 consecutive liver transplant recipients. We judged the overall risk of bias of the trial published in abstract form as high. Researchers reported no numerical data but mentioned that 163 participants

  15. Risk of surgical site infection in paediatric herniotomies without any prophylactic antibiotics: A preliminary experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay Vaze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different studies underline the use of pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis in clean surgeries like herniotomy and inguinal orchiopexy. But, the meta-analyses do not recommend nor discard the use of prophylactic pre-operative antibiotics. The scarcity of controlled clinical trials in paediatric population further vitiates the matter. This study assessed the difference in the rate of early post-operative wound infection cases in children who received single dose of pre-operative antibiotics and children who did not receive antibiotics after inguinal herniotomy and orchiopexy. Materials and Methods: This randomised prospective study was conducted in Paediatric Surgery department of PGIMER Chandigarh. Out of 251 patients, 112 patients were randomised to the case group and 139 were ascribed to the control group. The patients in control group were given a standard regimen of single dose of intravenous antibiotic at the time of induction followed by 3-4 days of oral antibiotic. Case group patients underwent the surgical procedure in similar manner with no antibiotic either at the time of induction or post-operatively. Results: The incidence of surgical site infection in case group was 3.73 % and that in control group was 2.22%. The observed difference in the incidence of surgical site infection was statistically insignificant (P value = 0.7027. The overall infection rate in case and control group was 2.89%. Conclusions: Our preliminary experience suggests that there is no statistically significant difference in the proportion of early post-operative wound infection between the patients who received single dose of pre-operative antibiotics and the patients who received no antibiotics after inguinal herniotomy and orchiopexy. The risk of surgical site infection in paediatric heriotomies does not increase even if the child′s weight is less than his/her expected weight for age.

  16. [Vacuum-assisted closure as a treatment modality for surgical site infection in cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simek, M; Nemec, P; Zálesák, B; Hájek, R; Kaláb, M; Fluger, I; Kolár, M; Jecmínková, L; Gráfová, P

    2007-08-01

    The vacuum-asssited closure has represented an encouraging treatment modality in treatment of surgical site infection in cardiac surgery, providing superior results compared with conventional treatment strategies, particularly in the treatment of deep sternal wound infection. From November 2004 to January 2007, 40 patients, undergoing VAC therapy (VAC system, KCI, Austria, Hartmann-Rico Inc., Czech Republic) for surgical site infection following cardiac surgery, were prospectively evaluated. Four patients (10%) were treated for extensive leg-wound infection, 10 (25%) were treated for superficial sternal wound infection and 26 (65%) for deep sternal wound infection. The median age was 69.9 +/- 9.7 years and the median BMI was 33.2 +/- 5.0 kg/m2. Twenty-three patients (57%) were women and diabetes was present in 22 patients (55%). The VAC was employed after the previous failure of the conventional treatment strategy in 7 patients (18%). Thirty-eight patients (95%) were successfully healed. Two patients (5%) died, both of deep sternal infetion consequences. The overall length of hospitalization was 36.4 +/- 22.6 days. The median number of dressing changes was 4.6 +/- 1.8. The median VAC treatment time until surgical closure was 9.7 +/- 3.9 days. The VAC therapy was solely used as a bridge to the definite wound closure. Four patients (10%) with a chronic fistula were re-admitted with the range of 1 to 12 months after the VAC therapy. The VAC therapy is a safe and reliable option in the treatment of surgical site infection in the field of cardiac surgery. The VAC therapy can be considered as an effective adjunct to convetional treatment modalities for the therapy of extensive and life-threatening wound infection following cardiac surgery, particurlarly in the group of high-risk patients.

  17. Protective or deleterious role of scavenger receptors SR-A and CD36 on host resistance to Staphylococcus aureus depends on the site of infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlène Blanchet

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major human opportunistic pathogen responsible for a broad spectrum of infections ranging from benign skin infection to more severe life threatening disorders (e.g. pneumonia, sepsis, particularly in intensive care patients. Scavenger receptors (SR-A and CD36 are known to be involved in S. aureus recognition by immune cells in addition to MARCO, TLR2, NOD2 and α5β1 integrin. In the present study, we further deciphered the contribution of SR-A and CD36 scavenger receptors in the control of infection of mice by S. aureus. Using double SR-A/CD36 knockout mice (S/C-KO and S. aureus strain HG001, a clinically relevant non-mutagenized strain, we showed that the absence of these two scavenger receptors was protective in peritoneal infection. In contrast, the deletion of these two receptors was detrimental in pulmonary infection following intranasal instillation. For pulmonary infection, susceptible mice (S/C-KO had more colony-forming units (CFU in their broncho-alveolar lavages fluids, associated with increased recruitment of macrophages and neutrophils. For peritoneal infection, susceptible mice (wild-type had more CFU in their blood, but recruited less macrophages and neutrophils in the peritoneal cavity than resistant mice. Exacerbated cytokine levels were often observed in the susceptible mice in the infected compartment as well as in the plasma. The exception was the enhanced compartmentalized expression of IL-1β for the resistant mice (S/C-KO after peritoneal infection. A similar mirrored susceptibility to S. aureus infection was also observed for MARCO and TLR2. Marco and tlr2 -/- mice were more resistant to peritoneal infection but more susceptible to pulmonary infection than wild type mice. In conclusion, our results show that innate immune receptors can play distinct and opposite roles depending on the site of infection. Their presence is protective for local pulmonary infection, whereas it becomes detrimental

  18. Impact of a surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance program in orthopedics and traumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabit, C; Marcheix, P S; Mounier, M; Dijoux, P; Pestourie, N; Bonnevialle, P; Bonnomet, F

    2012-10-01

    Surveillance of surgical site infections (SSI) is a priority. One of the fundamental principles for the surveillance of SSI is based on receiving effective field feedback (retro-information). The aim of this study was to report the results of a program of SSI surveillance and validate the hypothesis that there is a correlation between creating a SSI surveillance program and a reduction in SSI. The protocol was based on the weekly collection of surveillance data obtained directly from the different information systems in different departments. A delay of 3 months was established before extraction and analysis of data and information from the surgical teams. The NNIS index (National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System) developed by the American surveillance system and the reduction of length of hospital stay index Journées d'hospitalisation évitées (JHE). Since the end of 2009, 7156 surgical procedures were evaluated (rate of inclusion 97.3%), and 84 SSI were registered with a significant decrease over time from 1.86% to 0.66%. A total of 418 days of hospitalization have been saved since the beginning of the surveillance system. Our surveillance system has three strong points: follow-up is continuous, specifically adapted to orthopedic traumatology and nearly exhaustive. The extraction of data directly from hospital information systems effectively improves the collection of data on surgical procedures. The implementation of a SSI surveillance protocol reduces SSI. Level III. Prospective study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Compact teleoperated laparoendoscopic single-site robotic surgical system: Kinematics, control, and operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac-Lowry, Oran Jacob; Okamoto, Steele; Pedram, Sahba Aghajani; Woo, Russell; Berkelman, Peter

    2017-12-01

    To date a variety of teleoperated surgical robotic systems have been developed to improve a surgeon's ability to perform demanding single-port procedures. However typical large systems are bulky, expensive, and afford limited angular motion, while smaller designs suffer complications arising from limited motion range, speed, and force generation. This work was to develop and validate a simple, compact, low cost single site teleoperated laparoendoscopic surgical robotic system, with demonstrated capability to carry out basic surgical procedures. This system builds upon previous work done at the University of Hawaii at Manoa and includes instrument and endoscope manipulators as well as compact articulated instruments designed to overcome single incision geometry complications. A robotic endoscope holder was used for the base, with an added support frame for teleoperated manipulators and instruments fabricated mostly from 3D printed parts. Kinematics and control methods were formulated for the novel manipulator configuration. Trajectory following results from an optical motion tracker and sample task performance results are presented. Results indicate that the system has successfully met the goal of basic surgical functionality while minimizing physical size, complexity, and cost. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. ‘This wound has spoilt everything’: emotional capital and the experience of surgical site infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Brian; Tanner, Judith; Padley, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In this article we explore the experience of suffering from a surgical site infection, a common complication of surgery affecting around 5 per cent of surgical patients, via an interview study of 17 patients in the Midlands in the UK. Despite their prevalence, the experience of surgical site infections has received little attention so far. In spite of the impairment resulting from these iatrogenic problems, participants expressed considerable stoicism and we interpret this via the notion of emotional capital. This idea derives from the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Helga Nowotny and Diane Reay and helps us conceptualise the emotional resources accumulated and expended in managing illness and in gaining the most from healthcare services. Participants were frequently at pains not to blame healthcare personnel or hospitals, often discounting the infection's severity, and attributing it to chance, to ‘germs’ or to their own failure to buy and apply wound care products. The participants' stoicism was thus partly afforded by their refusal to blame healthcare institutions or personnel. Where anger was described, this was either defused or expressed on behalf of another person. Emotional capital is associated with deflecting the possibility of complaint and sustaining a deferential and grateful position in relation to the healthcare system. PMID:25470322

  1. 'This wound has spoilt everything': emotional capital and the experience of surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Brian; Tanner, Judith; Padley, Wendy

    2014-11-01

    In this article we explore the experience of suffering from a surgical site infection, a common complication of surgery affecting around 5 per cent of surgical patients, via an interview study of 17 patients in the Midlands in the UK. Despite their prevalence, the experience of surgical site infections has received little attention so far. In spite of the impairment resulting from these iatrogenic problems, participants expressed considerable stoicism and we interpret this via the notion of emotional capital. This idea derives from the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Helga Nowotny and Diane Reay and helps us conceptualise the emotional resources accumulated and expended in managing illness and in gaining the most from healthcare services. Participants were frequently at pains not to blame healthcare personnel or hospitals, often discounting the infection's severity, and attributing it to chance, to 'germs' or to their own failure to buy and apply wound care products. The participants' stoicism was thus partly afforded by their refusal to blame healthcare institutions or personnel. Where anger was described, this was either defused or expressed on behalf of another person. Emotional capital is associated with deflecting the possibility of complaint and sustaining a deferential and grateful position in relation to the healthcare system. © 2014 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2014 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Truth in Reporting: How Data Capture Methods Obfuscate Actual Surgical Site Infection Rates within a Health Care Network System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeianou, Liliana; Cauley, Christy E; Antonelli, Donna; Bird, Sarah; Rattner, David; Hutter, Matthew; Mahmood, Sadiqa; Schnipper, Deborah; Rubin, Marc; Bleday, Ronald; Kenney, Pardon; Berger, David

    2017-01-01

    Two systems measure surgical site infection rates following colorectal surgeries: the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Healthcare Safety Network. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services pay-for-performance initiatives use National Healthcare Safety Network data for hospital comparisons. This study aimed to compare database concordance. This is a multi-institution cohort study of systemwide Colorectal Surgery Collaborative. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program requires rigorous, standardized data capture techniques; National Healthcare Safety Network allows 5 data capture techniques. Standardized surgical site infection rates were compared between databases. The Cohen κ-coefficient was calculated. This study was conducted at Boston-area hospitals. National Healthcare Safety Network or National Surgical Quality Improvement Program patients undergoing colorectal surgery were included. Standardized surgical site infection rates were the primary outcomes of interest. Thirty-day surgical site infection rates of 3547 (National Surgical Quality Improvement Program) vs 5179 (National Healthcare Safety Network) colorectal procedures (2012-2014). Discrepancies appeared: National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database of hospital 1 (N = 1480 patients) routinely found surgical site infection rates of approximately 10%, routinely deemed rate "exemplary" or "as expected" (100%). National Healthcare Safety Network data from the same hospital and time period (N = 1881) revealed a similar overall surgical site infection rate (10%), but standardized rates were deemed "worse than national average" 80% of the time. Overall, hospitals using less rigorous capture methods had improved surgical site infection rates for National Healthcare Safety Network compared with standardized National Surgical Quality Improvement Program reports. The correlation coefficient

  3. Towards optical fibre based Raman spectroscopy for the detection of surgical site infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Alex J.; Koziej, Lukasz; Williams, Huw D.; Elson, Daniel S.; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2016-03-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are common post-surgical complications that remain significant clinical problems, as they are associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. As such, there is significant interest in the development of minimally invasive techniques that permit early detection of SSIs. To this end, we are applying a compact, clinically deployable Raman spectrometer coupled to an optical fibre probe to the study of bacteria, with the long term goal of using Raman spectroscopy to detect infection in vivo. Our system comprises a 785 nm laser diode for excitation and a commercial (Ocean Optics, Inc.) Raman spectrometer for detection. Here we discuss the design, optimisation and validation of this system, and describe our first experiences interrogating bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) in vitro.

  4. Improving surgical site infection prevention practices through a multifaceted educational intervention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Owens, P

    2015-03-01

    As part of the National Clinical Programme on healthcare-associated infection prevention, a Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) and Royal College of Physicians of Ireland (RCPI) working group developed a quality improvement tool for prevention of surgical site infection (SS). We aimed to validate the effectiveness of an educational campaign, which utilises this quality improvement tool to prevent SSI in a tertiary hospital. Prior to the SSI educational campaign, surgical patients were prospectively audited and details of antibiotic administration recorded. Prophylactic antibiotic administration recommendations were delivered via poster and educational presentations. Post-intervention, the audit was repeated. 50 patients were audited pre-intervention, 45 post-intervention. Post-intervention, prophylaxis within 60 minutes prior to incision increased from 54% to 68% (p = 0.266). Appropriate postoperative prescribing improved from 71% to 92% (p = 0.075). A multifaceted educational program may be effective in changing SSI prevention practices.

  5. Increased Total Anesthetic Time Leads to Higher Rates of Surgical Site Infections in Spinal Fusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puffer, Ross C; Murphy, Meghan; Maloney, Patrick; Kor, Daryl; Nassr, Ahmad; Freedman, Brett; Fogelson, Jeremy; Bydon, Mohamad

    2017-06-01

    A retrospective review of a consecutive series of spinal fusions comparing patient and procedural characteristics of patients who developed surgical site infections (SSIs) after spinal fusion. It is known that increased surgical time (incision to closure) is associated with a higher rate of postoperative SSIs. We sought to determine whether increased total anesthetic time (intubation to extubation) is a factor in the development of SSIs as well. In spine surgery for deformity and degenerative disease, SSI has been associated with operative time, revealing a nearly 10-fold increase in SSI rates in prolonged surgery. Surgical time is associated with infections in other surgical disciplines as well. No studies have reported whether total anesthetic time (intubation to extubation) has an association with SSIs. Surgical records were searched in a retrospective fashion to identify all spine fusion procedures performed between January 2010 and July 2012. All SSIs during that timeframe were recorded and compared with the list of cases performed between 2010 and 2012 in a case-control design. There were 20 (1.7%) SSIs in this fusion cohort. On univariate analyses of operative factors, there was a significant association between total anesthetic time (Infection 7.6 ± 0.5 hrs vs. no infection -6.0 ± 0.1 hrs, P operative time (infection 5.5 ± 0.4 hrs vs. no infection - 4.4 ± 0.06 hrs, P infections, whereas level of pathology and emergent surgery were not significant. On multivariate logistic analysis, BMI and total anesthetic time remained independent predictors of SSI whereas ASA status and operative time did not. Increasing BMI and total anesthetic time were independent predictors of SSIs in this cohort of over 1000 consecutive spinal fusions. 3.

  6. Comparison of primary and delayed primary closure in dirty abdominal wounds in terms of frequency of surgical site infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, O.B.A.; Ahmed, N.; Butt, M.W.U.D.; Saleem, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Objective of this study was to compare primary and delayed primary wound closure for dirty abdominal wounds in terms of frequency of surgical site infection. Study Design: Randomized Controlled Trial. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital, Multan. From 16 Sep 2010 to 15 Mar 2011. Patients and Methods: A total of 110 patients were randomly divided into two groups of 55 patients each using random numbers table. Abdominal wounds of one group were closed primarily and of other group were subjected to delayed primary wound closure. The wounds were then checked for surgical site infection for seven post operative days. Results: A higher frequency of surgical site infection was observed in primary closure group (27.3%) as compared to delayed primary closure group (9.1%) which was statistically significant (p=0.013). Conclusion: Delayed primary closure is superior to primary closure in dirty abdominal wounds in terms of frequency of surgical site infection. (author)

  7. Colorectal surgery and surgical site infection: is a change of attitude necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia-Guedea, Manuela; Cordoba-Diaz de Laspra, Elena; Echazarreta-Gallego, Estibaliz; Valero-Lazaro, María Isabel; Ramirez-Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Aguilella-Diago, Vicente

    2017-07-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) can be as high as 30% in patients undergoing colorectal surgery and is associated with an increase in morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a set of simple preventive measures that have resulted in a reduction in surgical site infection in colorectal surgery. Prospective study with two groups of patients treated in the colorectal unit of the "Clinico Universitario Lozano Blesa" hospital in Zaragoza. One group was subject to our measures from February to May 2015. The control group was given conventional treatment within a time period of 3 months before the set of measures were implemented. One hundred forty-nine patients underwent a major colorectal surgical procedure. Seventy (47%) belonged to the control group and were compared to the remaining 79 patients (53% of the total), who were subject to our treatment bundle in the period tested. Comparing the two groups revealed that our set of measures led to a general reduction in SSI (31.4 vs. 13.6%, p = 0.010) and in superficial site infection (17.1 vs. 2.5%, p = 0.002). As a consequence, the postoperative hospital stay was shortened (10.0 vs. 8.0 days, p = 0.048). However, it did not, the number of readmissions nor the re-operation rate. SSI was clearly related to open surgery. The preventive set of measures applied in colorectal surgery led to a significant reduction of the SSI and of the length of hospital stay.

  8. Wound management with vacuum assisted closure in surgical site infection after ankle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Ya-Ke; Chen, Hong-Lin; Liu, Fan

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) with standard moist wound care (SMWC) in surgical site infection after ankle surgery. A prospective cohort was performed among patients with surgical site infection after ankle surgery between 2012 and 2013. The follow-up period was three month, and the efficacy end point was complete wound closure rate. Ninety-four patients were analyzed, with 61 patients in the VAC group and 33 in the SMWC group. The complete wound closure rate in the VAC group was higher than that in the SMWC group at 3 month follow up (90.2% Vs. 72.7%, p = 0.028). The median time to complete wound closure was 31 days (95% CI 20.2-41.8) for VAC, and 63 days (95% CI 46.9-79.1) for SMWC (χ(2) = 4.023, p = 0.045). In the superficial infection subgroup, the median times to complete wound closure were 20 days (95% CI 14.2-35.1) in the VAC group and 42 days (95% CI 35.4-69.4) in SMWC group (χ(2) = 4.331, p = 0.041). In the deep subgroup, the median times to complete wound closure were 46 days (95% CI 28.2-65.9) in the VAC group and 75 days (95% CI 43.2-79.6) in SMWC group (χ(2) = 6.475, p = 0.026). Our result showed that vacuum assisted closure was more effective than standard moist wound care in surgical site infection after ankle surgery. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Surgical-site infection following lymph node excision indicates susceptibility for lymphedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mads Gustaf; Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Thomsen, Jørn Bo

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Cancer-related lymphedema is a common complication following lymph node excision. Prevention of lymphedema is essential, as treatment options are limited. Known risk factors are firmly anchored to the cancer treatment itself; however potentially preventable factors...... such as seroma and surgical-site infection (SSI) have yet to be asserted. METHODS: All malignant melanoma patients treated with sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNB) and/or complete lymph node dissection (CLND) in the axilla or groin between January 2008 and December 2014 were retrospectively identified. Identified...

  10. Infirmity and injury complexity are risk factors for surgical-site infection after operative fracture care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachoura, Abdo; Guitton, Thierry G; Smith, R Malcolm; Vrahas, Mark S; Zurakowski, David; Ring, David

    2011-09-01

    Orthopaedic surgical-site infections prolong hospital stays, double rehospitalization rates, and increase healthcare costs. Additionally, patients with orthopaedic surgical-site infections (SSI) have substantially greater physical limitations and reductions in their health-related quality of life. However, the risk factors for SSI after operative fracture care are unclear. We determined the incidence and quantified modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors for SSIs in patients with orthopaedic trauma undergoing surgery. We retrospectively indentified, from our prospective trauma database and billing records, 1611 patients who underwent 1783 trauma-related procedures between 2006 and 2008. Medical records were reviewed and demographics, surgery-specific data, and whether the patients had an SSI were recorded. We determined which if any variables predicted SSI. Six factors independently predicted SSI: (1) the use of a drain, OR 2.3, 95% CI (1.3-3.8); (2) number of operations OR 3.4, 95% CI (2.0-6.0); (3) diabetes, OR 2.1, 95% CI (1.2-3.8); (4) congestive heart failure (CHF), OR 2.8, 95% CI (1.3-6.5); (5) site of injury tibial shaft/plateau, OR 2.3, 95% CI (1.3-4.2); and (6) site of injury, elbow, OR 2.2, 95% CI (1.1-4.7). The risk factors for SSIs after skeletal trauma are most strongly determined by nonmodifiable factors: patient infirmity (diabetes and heart failure) and injury complexity (site of injury, number of operations, use of a drain). Level II, prognostic study. See the Guideline for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  11. [Effect of compliance with an antibiotic prophylaxis protocol in surgical site infections in appendectomies. Prospective cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Santana, Tomás; Del-Moral-Luque, Juan Antonio; Gil-Yonte, Pablo; Bañuelos-Andrío, Luis; Durán-Poveda, Manuel; Rodríguez-Caravaca, Gil

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is the most suitable tool for preventing surgical site infection. This study assessed compliance with antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery for acute appendicitis, and the effect of this compliance on surgical site infection. Prospective cohort study to evaluate compliance with antibiotic prophylaxis protocol in appendectomies. An assessment was made of the level of compliance with prophylaxis, as well as the causes of non-compliance. The incidence of surgical site infection was studied after a maximum incubation period of 30 days. The relative risk adjusted with a logistic regression model was used to assess the effect of non-compliance of prophylaxis on surgical site infection. The study included a total of 930 patients. Antibiotic prophylaxis was indicated in all patients, and administered in 71.3% of cases, with an overall protocol compliance of 86.1%. The principal cause of non-compliance was time of initiation. Cumulative incidence of surgical site infection was 4.6%. No relationship was found between inadequate prophylaxis compliance and infection (relative risk=0.5; 95% CI: 0.1-1.9) (P>.05). Compliance of antibiotic prophylaxis was high, but could be improved. No relationship was found between prophylaxis compliance and surgical site infection rate. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Toward the rational use of standardized infection ratios to benchmark surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Haruhisa; Morikane, Keita; Kuroki, Manabu; Taniguchi, Shinichiro; Shinzato, Takashi; Sakamoto, Fumie; Okada, Kunihiko; Matsukawa, Hiroshi; Ieiri, Yuko; Hayashi, Kouji; Kawai, Shin

    2013-09-01

    The National Healthcare Safety Network transitioned from surgical site infection (SSI) rates to the standardized infection ratio (SIR) calculated by statistical models that included perioperative factors (surgical approach and surgery duration). Rationally, however, only patient-related variables should be included in the SIR model. Logistic regression was performed to predict expected SSI rate in 2 models that included or excluded perioperative factors. Observed and expected SSI rates were used to calculate the SIR for each participating hospital. The difference of SIR in each model was then evaluated. Surveillance data were collected from a total of 1,530 colon surgery patients and 185 SSIs. C-index in the model with perioperative factors was statistically greater than that in the model including patient-related factors only (0.701 vs 0.621, respectively, P operative process or the competence of surgical teams, these factors should not be considered predictive variables. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prolonged Operative Duration Increases Risk of Surgical Site Infections: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hang; Chen, Brian Po-Han; Soleas, Ireena M; Ferko, Nicole C; Cameron, Chris G; Hinoul, Piet

    The incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) across surgical procedures, specialties, and conditions is reported to vary from 0.1% to 50%. Operative duration is often cited as an independent and potentially modifiable risk factor for SSI. The objective of this systematic review was to provide an in-depth understanding of the relation between operating time and SSI. This review included 81 prospective and retrospective studies. Along with study design, likelihood of SSI, mean operative times, time thresholds, effect measures, confidence intervals, and p values were extracted. Three meta-analyses were conducted, whereby odds ratios were pooled by hourly operative time thresholds, increments of increasing operative time, and surgical specialty. Pooled analyses demonstrated that the association between extended operative time and SSI typically remained statistically significant, with close to twice the likelihood of SSI observed across various time thresholds. The likelihood of SSI increased with increasing time increments; for example, a 13%, 17%, and 37% increased likelihood for every 15 min, 30 min, and 60 min of surgery, respectively. On average, across various procedures, the mean operative time was approximately 30 min longer in patients with SSIs compared with those patients without. Prolonged operative time can increase the risk of SSI. Given the importance of SSIs on patient outcomes and health care economics, hospitals should focus efforts to reduce operative time.

  14. Patient engagement with surgical site infection prevention: an expert panel perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tartari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite remarkable developments in the use of surgical techniques, ergonomic advancements in the operating room, and implementation of bundles, surgical site infections (SSIs remain a substantial burden, associated with increased morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. National and international recommendations to prevent SSIs have been published, including recent guidelines by the World Health Organization, but implementation into clinical practice remains an unresolved issue. SSI improvement programs require an integrative approach with measures taken during the pre-, intra- and postoperative care from the numerous stakeholders involved. The current SSI prevention strategies have focused mainly on the role of healthcare workers (HCWs and procedure related risk factors. The importance and influence of patient participation is becoming an increasingly important concept and advocated as a means to improve patient safety. Novel interventions supporting an active participative role within SSI prevention programs have not been assessed. Empowering patients with information they require to engage in the process of SSI prevention could play a major role for the implementation of recommendations. Based on available scientific evidence, a panel of experts evaluated options for patient involvement in order to provide pragmatic recommendations for pre-, intra- and postoperative activities for the prevention of SSIs. Recommendations were based on existing guidelines and expert opinion. As a result, 9 recommendations for the surgical patient are presented here, including a practice brief in the form of a patient information leaflet. HCWs can use this information to educate patients and allow patient engagement.

  15. Patient engagement with surgical site infection prevention: an expert panel perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartari, E; Weterings, V; Gastmeier, P; Rodríguez Baño, J; Widmer, A; Kluytmans, J; Voss, A

    2017-01-01

    Despite remarkable developments in the use of surgical techniques, ergonomic advancements in the operating room, and implementation of bundles, surgical site infections (SSIs) remain a substantial burden, associated with increased morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs. National and international recommendations to prevent SSIs have been published, including recent guidelines by the World Health Organization, but implementation into clinical practice remains an unresolved issue. SSI improvement programs require an integrative approach with measures taken during the pre-, intra- and postoperative care from the numerous stakeholders involved. The current SSI prevention strategies have focused mainly on the role of healthcare workers (HCWs) and procedure related risk factors. The importance and influence of patient participation is becoming an increasingly important concept and advocated as a means to improve patient safety. Novel interventions supporting an active participative role within SSI prevention programs have not been assessed. Empowering patients with information they require to engage in the process of SSI prevention could play a major role for the implementation of recommendations. Based on available scientific evidence, a panel of experts evaluated options for patient involvement in order to provide pragmatic recommendations for pre-, intra- and postoperative activities for the prevention of SSIs. Recommendations were based on existing guidelines and expert opinion. As a result, 9 recommendations for the surgical patient are presented here, including a practice brief in the form of a patient information leaflet. HCWs can use this information to educate patients and allow patient engagement.

  16. Association between Pre-Operative Cefazolin Dose and Surgical Site Infection in Obese Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppard, William J; Eberle, David G; Kugler, Nathan W; Mabrey, Danielle M; Weigelt, John A

    A fixed dose of cefazolin results in serum concentrations that decrease as body mass increases. Current national guidelines suggest a pre-operative cefazolin dose of two grams may be insufficient for patients ≥120 kg; thus a three gram dose is recommended. These recommendations, however, are based on pharmacokinetic rather than outcome data. We evaluate the efficacy of pre-operative cefazolin two gram and three gram doses as measured by the rate of surgical site infection (SSI). We conducted a retrospective review of adult patients ≥100 kg who were prescribed cefazolin as surgical prophylaxis between September 1, 2012 and May 31, 2013 at an academic medical center. Patients were excluded if cefazolin was prescribed but not administered, had a known infection at the site of surgery, or inappropriately received cefazolin prophylaxis based on surgical indication. The SSIs were identified by documentation of SSI in the medical record or findings consistent with the standard Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition. Inpatient and outpatient records up to 90 days post-operative were reviewed for delayed SSI. Four hundred eighty-three surgical cases were identified in which pre-operative cefazolin was prescribed. Forty-seven patients were excluded leaving a total of 436 patients for final analysis: 152 in the cefazolin two gram group and 284 in the three gram group. Baseline demographics were similar between groups with a mean follow-up duration of 77 days for both groups. Unadjusted SSI rates were 7.2% and 7.4% (odds ratio [OR] 0.98, p = 0.95), for the two gram and three gram groups, respectively. When differences in follow-up between groups were considered and logistic regression was adjusted with propensity score, there remained no difference in SSI rates (OR 0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.36-2.06, p = 0.77). In otherwise similar obese surgical patients weighing ≥100 kg, the administration of a pre-operative cefazolin two gram dose is

  17. The impact of recent hospitalization on surgical site infection after a pancreatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Dominic E; Strasberg, Steven M; Hawkins, William G; Fields, Ryan C

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSI) are a major cause of increased morbidity and cost after a pancreatectomy. Patients undergoing a pancreatectomy frequently have had recent inpatient hospital admissions prior to their surgical admission (recent pre-surgical admission, RPSA), which could increase the risk of SSI. Methods The 2009–2011 Healthcare Cost Utilization Project California State Inpatient Database was used. Chi-square tests, Student's t-tests and multivariable logistic regression were used. Results Three thousand three hundred and seventy-six patients underwent a pancreatectomy, and 444 (13.2%) had RPSA. One hundred and eighty (40.5%) RPSAs were to different hospitals other than where patients' pancreatectomy took place. In univariate analysis, patients with RPSA had a significantly higher rate of post-operative SSIs, and this was associated with a longer length of post-operative stay, higher post-operative hospital costs and increased postoperative 30-day readmission rates (Table 1). In Multivariate analysis, RPSA was an independent predictor of post-operative SSI [odds ratio (OR) = 1.68, P = 0.013], and the risk of SSI increased with increasing RPSA length of stay (OR = 1.07 per day, P = 0.001). Conclusions Recent pre-surgical admission is an important risk factor for SSI after a pancreatectomy. Many patients with RPSA are not admitted pre-operatively to the same hospital where the pancreatectomy occurs; in such circumstances, SSI rates may not be a sole reflection of the care provided by operating hospitals. PMID:26221859

  18. Surgical site infection: an observer-blind, randomized trial comparing electrocautery and conventional scalpel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongetti, Regiane Ladislau; Oliveira e Castro, Paulo de Tarso; Vieira, Renê Aloisio da Costa; Serrano, Sérgio Vicente; Mengatto, Mariana Fabro; Fregnani, José Humberto Tavares Guerreiro

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) based on the type of scalpel used for incisions in the skin and in subcutaneous tissues. Observer-blind, randomized equivalence clinical trial with two arms (electrocautery versus conventional scalpel) which evaluated 133 women undergoing elective abdominal gynecologic oncology surgery. A simple randomization stratified by body mass index (BMI: 30 kg/m(2)) was carried out. Women were evaluated at 14 and 30 days following the operation. A multivariate analysis was performed in order to check whether the type of scalpel would be a risk factor for SSI. Group arms were balanced for all variables, excepted for surgical time, which was significantly higher in the electrocautery group (mean: 161.1 versus 203.5 min, P = 0.029). The rates of SSI were 7.4% and 9.7%, respectively, for the conventional scalpel and electrocautery groups (P = 0.756). The exploratory multivariate model identified body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) (OR = 24.2, 95% CI: 2.8-212.1) and transverse surgical incision (OR = 8.1, 95% CI: 1.5-42.6) as independent risk factors for SSI. The type of scalpel used in surgery, when adjusted for these variables and the surgery time, was not a risk factor for SSI. This study showed that the SSI rates for conventional scalpel and electrocautery were not significantly different. These results were consistent with others reported in the literature and would not allow a surgeon to justify scalpel choice based on SSI. NCT01410175 (Clinical Trials - NIH). Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chronic swelling from entrapment of acrylic resin in a surgical extraction site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiting Ho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available When acrylic resin is inadvertently embedded in oral tissue, it can result in a pronounced chronic inflammatory response. This report describes a case in which temporary crown and bridge resin was forced into a surgical extraction site after the two adjacent teeth were prepared for a bridge immediately following extraction of a maxillary premolar. The patient experienced swelling at the extraction site over a ten month period despite treatment with antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs. After detection and removal of the foreign body, the symptoms resolved. The episode contributed to periodontal bone loss around an adjacent tooth. While morbidity of this nature is rare, this case reinforces the need to investigate persistent signs of inflammation and account for dental materials that are lost during the course of treatment.

  20. Glycemic control strategies and the occurrence of surgical site infection: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Caroline Maria Herrero; Iida, Luciana Inaba Senyer; Poveda, Vanessa de Brito

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the evidence available in the scientific literature regarding the relationship between the glycemic control strategies used and the occurrence of surgical site infection in adult patients undergoing surgery. This is a systematic review performed through search on the databases of CINAHL, MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and EMBASE. Eight randomized controlled trials were selected. Despite the diversity of tested interventions, studies agree that glycemic control is essential to reduce rates of surgical site infection, and should be maintained between 80 and 120 mg/dL during the perioperative period. Compared to other strategies, insulin continuous infusion during surgery was the most tested and seems to get better results in reducing rates of surgical site infection and achieving success in glycemic control. Tight glycemic control during the perioperative period benefits the recovery of surgical patients, and the role of the nursing team is key for the successful implementation of the measure. Analisar as evidências disponíveis na literatura científica sobre a relação entre as estratégias de controle glicêmico efetuadas e a ocorrência de infecção do sítio cirúrgico em pacientes adultos submetidos à cirurgia. Trata-se de revisão sistemática, por meio das bases de dados CINAHL, MEDLINE, LILACS, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews e EMBASE. Foram selecionados oito ensaios clínicos randomizados. Apesar da diversidade de intervenções testadas, os estudos concordam que o controle glicêmico é essencial para a redução das taxas de infecção do sítio cirúrgico e deve ser mantido entre 80 e 120 mg/dL durante o perioperatório. A infusão contínua de insulina no transoperatório foi a mais testada e parece obter melhores resultados na redução das taxas de infecção do sítio cirúrgico e sucesso no controle glicêmico comparada às demais estratégias. O controle glicêmico rigoroso durante o perioperat

  1. Effects of surgical side and site on psychological symptoms following epilepsy surgery in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayson, Brigid E; Floden, Darlene P; Ferguson, Lisa; Kim, Kevin H; Jehi, Lara; Busch, Robyn M

    2017-03-01

    This retrospective study examined the potential role of side and site of surgery in psychological symptom change after epilepsy surgery and determined the base rate of psychological change at the individual level. Two-hundred twenty-eight adults completed the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) before and after temporal (TLR; n=190) or frontal lobe resection (FLR; n=38). Repeated measures ANOVAs with bootstrapping examined differences in psychological outcome as a function of surgical site separately in patients who underwent left- versus right-sided resections. Individual's PAI score changes were then used to determine the prevalence of clinically meaningful postoperative symptom change. Following left-sided resections, there were significant group-by-time interactions on Somatic Complaints, Anxiety, and Anxiety Related Disorders. There was also a trend in this direction on the Depression scale. TLR patients endorsed greater preoperative symptoms than FLR patients on all of these scales, except the Somatic Complaints scale. After surgery, TLR patients reported symptom improvement on all four scales, while scores of FLR patients remained relatively stable over time. Endorsement of Mania-related symptoms increased in both TLR and FLR groups from pre-to post-surgical testing. Following right-sided resections, both groups endorsed symptom improvements on Somatic Complaints, Anxiety, and Depression scales following surgery. In addition, the TLR group endorsed more Mania-related symptoms than the FLR group regardless of time. Patterns of meaningful change in individual patients were generally consistent with group findings, with the most frequent improvements observed following TLR. However, there were a small subset of patients who reported symptom exacerbation after surgery. Our results suggest that surgical lateralization and localization are important factors in postoperative psychological outcome and highlight the importance of considering psychological change

  2. Risk factors for surgical site infection and urinary tract infection after spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Hiroyuki; Setoguchi, Takao; Ishidou, Yasuhiro; Nagano, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Komiya, Setsuro

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to identify and compare risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) and non-surgical site infections (non-SSIs), particularly urinary tract infection (UTI), after spine surgery. We retrospectively reviewed 825 patients (median age 59.0 years (range 33-70 years); 442 males) who underwent spine surgery at Kagoshima University Hospital from January 2009 to December 2014. Patient parameters were compared using the Mann-Whitney U and Fisher's exact tests. Risk factors associated with SSI and UTI were analyzed via the multiple logistic regression analysis. P operation time (P = 0.0019 and 0.0162, respectively) and ASA classification 3 (P = 0.0132 and 0.0356, respectively). The 1 week post-operative C-reactive protein (CRP) level was a risk factor for UTI (P = 0.0299), but not for SSI (P = 0.4996). There was no relationship between SSI and symptomatic UTI after spine surgery. Risk factors for post-operative SSI and UTI were operative time and ASA classification 3; 1 week post-operative CRP was a risk factor for UTI only.

  3. Surgical site infections due to rapidly growing mycobacteria in puducherry, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannaiyan, Kavitha; Ragunathan, Latha; Sakthivel, Sulochana; Sasidar, A R; Muralidaran; Venkatachalam, G K

    2015-03-01

    Rapidly growing Mycobacteria are increasingly recognized, nowadays as an important pathogen that can cause wide range of clinical syndromes in humans. We herein describe unrelated cases of surgical site infection caused by Rapidly growing Mycobacteria (RGM), seen during a period of 12 months. Nineteen patients underwent operations by different surgical teams located in diverse sections of Tamil Nadu, Pondicherry, Karnataka, India. All patients presented with painful, draining subcutaneous nodules at the infection sites. Purulent material specimens were sent to the microbiology laboratory. Gram stain and Ziehl-Neelsen staining methods were used for direct examination. Culture media included blood agar, chocolate agar, MacConkey agar, Sabourauds agar and Lowenstein-Jensen medium for Mycobacteria. Isolated microorganisms were identified and further tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by standard microbiologic procedures. Mycobacterium fortuitum and M.chelonae were isolated from the purulent drainage obtained from wounds by routine microbiological techniques from all the specimens. All isolates analyzed for antimicrobial susceptibility pattern were sensitive to clarithromycin, linezolid and amikacin but were variable to ciprofloxacin, rifampicin and tobramycin. Our case series highlights that a high level of clinical suspicion should be maintained for patients presenting with protracted soft tissue lesions with a history of trauma or surgery as these infections not only cause physical but also emotional distress that affects both the patients and the surgeon.

  4. Assessment of surgical and obstetrical care at 10 district hospitals in Ghana using on-site interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Fizan; Choo, Shelly; Hesse, Afua A J; Abantanga, Francis; Sory, Elias; Osen, Hayley; Ng, Julie; McCord, Colin W; Cherian, Meena; Fleischer-Djoleto, Charles; Perry, Henry

    2011-12-01

    For most of the population in Africa, district hospitals represent the first level of access for emergency and essential surgical services. The present study documents the number and availability of surgical and obstetrical care providers as well as the types of surgical and obstetrical procedures being performed at 10 first-referral district hospitals in Ghana. After institutional review board and governmental approval, a study team composed of Ghanaian and American surgeons performed on-site surveys at 10 district hospitals in 10 different regions of Ghana in August 2009. Face-to-face interviews were conducted documenting the numbers and availability of surgical and obstetrical personnel as well as gathering data relating to the number and types of procedures being performed at the facilities. A total of 68 surgical and obstetrical providers were interviewed. Surgical and obstetrical care providers consisted of Medical Officers (8.5%), nurse anesthetists (6%), theatre nurses (33%), midwives (50.7%), and others (4.5%). Major surgical cases represented 37% of overall case volumes with cesarean section as the most common type of major surgical procedure performed. The most common minor surgical procedures performed were suturing of lacerations or episiotomies. The present study demonstrates that there is a substantial shortage of adequately trained surgeons who can perform surgical and obstetrical procedures at first-referral facilities. Addressing human resource needs and further defining practice constraints at the district hospital level are important facets of future planning and policy implementation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C®) system for surgical site infection with involved vascular grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saziye, Karaca; Afksendiyos, Kalangos

    2015-04-01

    In vascular surgery, surgical site infection is the most common postoperative morbidity, occurring in 5-10% of vascular patients. The optimal management of surgical site infection with involved lower limb vascular grafts remains controversial. We present our 6-year results of using the V.A.C.® system in surgical site infection with involved vascular grafts. A retrospective 6-year review of patient who underwent a VAC® therapy for postoperative surgical site infection in lower limb with involved vascular grafts in our department between January 2006 and December 2011. V.A.C therapy was used in 40 patients. All patients underwent surgical wound revision with VAC® therapy and antibiotics. The mean time of use of the V.A.C. system was 14.2 days. After mean of 12 days in 34 of 40 patients, in whom the use of VAC® therapy resulted in delayed primary closure or healing by secondary intention. The mean postoperative follow-up time was 61.67 months, during which 3 patients died. We showed that the V.A.C.® system is valuable for managing specifically surgical site infection with involved vascular grafts. Using the V.A.C.® system, reoperation rates are reduced; 85% of patients avoided graft replacement. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. Effect of a preoperative decontamination protocol on surgical site infections in patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery with hardware implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebko, Serge P; Green, David M; Awad, Samir S

    2015-05-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs), commonly caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, specifically when hardware is implanted in the patient. Previously, we have demonstrated that a preoperative decontamination protocol using chlorhexidine gluconate washcloths and intranasal antiseptic ointment is effective in eradicating MRSA in the nose and on the skin of patients. To examine the effect of a decontamination protocol on SSIs in patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery with hardware implantation. A prospective database of patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery with hardware implantation at the Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Houston, Texas, was analyzed from October 1, 2012, to December 31, 2013. Cohort groups before and after the intervention were compared. Starting in May 2013, during their preoperative visit, all of the patients watched an educational video about MRSA decontamination and were given chlorhexidine washcloths and oral rinse and nasal povidone-iodine solution to be used the night before and the morning of scheduled surgery. Thirty-day SSI rates were collected according to the definitions of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance. Data on demographics, comorbidities such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and coronary artery disease, tobacco use, alcohol use, and body mass index were also collected. Univariate analysis was performed between the 2 groups of patients. Multivariate analysis was used to identify independent predictors of SSI. A total of 709 patients were analyzed (344 controls and 365 patients who were decolonized). Both groups were well matched with no significant differences in age, body mass index, sex, or comorbidities. All of the patients (100%) completed the MRSA decontamination protocol. The SSI rate in the intervention group was significantly lower (1.1%; 4 of

  7. Da Vinci single site© surgical platform in clinical practice: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Luca; Guadagni, Simone; Di Franco, Gregorio; Palmeri, Matteo; Di Candio, Giulio; Mosca, Franco

    2016-12-01

    The Da Vinci single-site© surgical platform (DVSSP) is a set of single-site instruments and accessories specifically dedicated to robot-assisted single-site surgery. The PubMed database from inception to June 2015 was searched for English literature on the clinical use of DVSSP in general surgery, urology and gynecology. Twenty-nine articles involving the clinical application of DVSSP were identified; 15 articles on general surgery (561 procedures), four articles on urology (48 procedures) and 10 articles on gynecology (212 procedures). All studies have proven the safety and feasibility of the use of DVSSP. The principal reported advantage is the restoration of intra-abdominal triangulation, while the main reported limitation is the lack of the endowrist. Da Vinci systems have proven to be valuable assets in single-site surgery, owing to the combination of robot use with the dedicated single-incision platform. However, case-control or prospective trials are warranted to draw more definitive conc lusions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Predictors of surgical site infection in laparoscopic and open ventral incisional herniorrhaphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaafarani, Haytham M A; Kaufman, Derrick; Reda, Domenic; Itani, Kamal M F

    2010-10-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after ventral incisional hernia repair (VIH) can result in serious consequences. We sought to identify patient, procedure, and/or hernia characteristics that are associated with SSI in VIH. Between 2004 and 2006, patients were randomized in four Veteran Affairs (VA) hospitals to undergo laparoscopic or open VIH. Patients who developed SSI within eight weeks postoperatively were compared to those who did not. A bivariate analysis for each factor and a multiple logistic regression analysis were performed to determine factors associated with SSI. The variables studied included patient characteristics and co-morbidities (e.g., age, gender, race, ethnicity, body mass index, ASA classification, diabetes, steroid use), hernia characteristics (e.g., size, duration, number of previous incisions), procedure characteristics (e.g., open versus laparoscopic, blood loss, use of postoperative drains, operating room temperature) and surgeons' experience (resident training level, number of open VIH previously performed by the attending surgeon). Antibiotic prophylaxis, anticoagulation protocols, preparation of the skin, draping of the wound, body temperature control, and closure of the surgical site were all standardized and monitored throughout the study period. Out of 145 patients who underwent VIH, 21 developed a SSI (14.5%). Patients who underwent open VIH had significantly more SSIs than those who underwent laparoscopic VIH (22.1% versus 3.4%; P = 0.002). Among patients who underwent open VIH, those who developed SSI had a recorded intraoperative blood loss greater than 25 mL (68.4% versus 40.3%; P = 0.030), were more likely to have a drain placed (79.0% versus 49.3%; P = 0.021) and were more likey to be operated on by surgeons with less than 75 open VIH case experience (52.6% versus 28.4%; P = 0.048). Patient and hernia characteristics were similar between the two groups. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, the open surgical technique was

  9. Surgical site infection following hernia repair in the day care setting of a developing country: a retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardhan, A.; Mazahir, S.; Alvi, A.R.; Murtaza, G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence proportion of surgical site infection following hernia repair in a daycare setting at a tertiary care hospital of a low-income country. Methods: The retrospective audit was done at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from June 1, 2008 to May 30, 2009. Patients with age >15 years who underwent Lichenstein's open mesh repair in daycare were included. Surgical Site Infection was labelled if the records revealed any of the following: opening of the wound by the primary surgeon; pain, tenderness and raised temperature of skin; purulent discharge from the wound; if the surgeon had documented it as a surgical site infection. SPSS 16 was used for data analysis. Results: After reviewing the retrieved files, 104 patients were found eligible. Of them, 102 (98%) were males. Overall wound-related complications were found in 13 (12.5%), whereas surgical site infection was found in 8 (7.7%) patients. The mean age of those with infections was 38.7+-18 year, while that of those with no surgical site infection was 47.8+-18 years. Smoking was found significantly associated with surgical site infection with 5.8 times higher incidence as compared to the non-smokers (OR with 95% CI: 5.6 (1.2, 25.3)). Conclusions: The incidence of surgical site infection after hernia repair with mesh in a daycare setting at a tertiary care hospital of a low-income country was higher than internationally reported incidence. Smoking was found to be a significant risk factor. (author)

  10. Structure, Process, and Outcome Quality of Surgical Site Infection Surveillance in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Stefan P; Eisenring, Marie-Christine; Sax, Hugo; Troillet, Nicolas

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the structure and quality of surveillance activities and to validate outcome detection in the Swiss national surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance program. DESIGN Countrywide survey of SSI surveillance quality. SETTING 147 hospitals or hospital units with surgical activities in Switzerland. METHODS Site visits were conducted with on-site structured interviews and review of a random sample of 15 patient records per hospital: 10 from the entire data set and 5 from a subset of patients with originally reported infection. Process and structure were rated in 9 domains with a weighted overall validation score, and sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated for the identification of SSI. RESULTS Of 50 possible points, the median validation score was 35.5 (range, 16.25-48.5). Public hospitals (PSwitzerland (P=.021), and hospitals with longer participation in the surveillance (P=.018) had higher scores than others. Domains that contributed most to lower scores were quality of chart review and quality of data extraction. Of 49 infections, 15 (30.6%) had been overlooked in a random sample of 1,110 patient records, accounting for a sensitivity of 69.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 54.6%-81.7%), a specificity of 99.9% (95% CI, 99.5%-100%), a positive predictive value of 97.1% (95% CI, 85.1%-99.9%), and a negative predictive value of 98.6% (95% CI, 97.7%-99.2%). CONCLUSIONS Irrespective of a well-defined surveillance methodology, there is a wide variation of SSI surveillance quality. The quality of chart review and the accuracy of data collection are the main areas for improvement. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:1172-1181.

  11. Fibrinogen binding sites P336 and Y338 of clumping factor A are crucial for Staphylococcus aureus virulence.

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    Elisabet Josefsson

    Full Text Available We have earlier shown that clumping factor A (ClfA, a fibrinogen binding surface protein of Staphylococcus aureus, is an important virulence factor in septic arthritis. When two amino acids in the ClfA molecule, P(336 and Y(338, were changed to serine and alanine, respectively, the fibrinogen binding property was lost. ClfAP(336Y(338 mutants have been constructed in two virulent S. aureus strains Newman and LS-1. The aim of this study was to analyze if these two amino acids which are vital for the fibrinogen binding of ClfA are of importance for the ability of S. aureus to generate disease. Septic arthritis or sepsis were induced in mice by intravenous inoculation of bacteria. The clfAP(336Y(338 mutant induced significantly less arthritis than the wild type strain, both with respect to severity and frequency. The mutant infected mice developed also a much milder systemic inflammation, measured as lower mortality, weight loss, bacterial growth in kidneys and lower IL-6 levels. The data were verified with a second mutant where clfAP(336 and Y(338 were changed to alanine and serine respectively. When sepsis was induced by a larger bacterial inoculum, the clfAP(336Y(338 mutants induced significantly less septic death. Importantly, immunization with the recombinant A domain of ClfAP(336SY(338A mutant but not with recombinant ClfA, protected against septic death. Our data strongly suggest that the fibrinogen binding activity of ClfA is crucial for the ability of S. aureus to provoke disease manifestations, and that the vaccine potential of recombinant ClfA is improved by removing its ability to bind fibrinogen.

  12. Fibrinogen binding sites P336 and Y338 of clumping factor A are crucial for Staphylococcus aureus virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefsson, Elisabet; Higgins, Judy; Foster, Timothy J; Tarkowski, Andrej

    2008-05-21

    We have earlier shown that clumping factor A (ClfA), a fibrinogen binding surface protein of Staphylococcus aureus, is an important virulence factor in septic arthritis. When two amino acids in the ClfA molecule, P(336) and Y(338), were changed to serine and alanine, respectively, the fibrinogen binding property was lost. ClfAP(336)Y(338) mutants have been constructed in two virulent S. aureus strains Newman and LS-1. The aim of this study was to analyze if these two amino acids which are vital for the fibrinogen binding of ClfA are of importance for the ability of S. aureus to generate disease. Septic arthritis or sepsis were induced in mice by intravenous inoculation of bacteria. The clfAP(336)Y(338) mutant induced significantly less arthritis than the wild type strain, both with respect to severity and frequency. The mutant infected mice developed also a much milder systemic inflammation, measured as lower mortality, weight loss, bacterial growth in kidneys and lower IL-6 levels. The data were verified with a second mutant where clfAP(336) and Y(338) were changed to alanine and serine respectively. When sepsis was induced by a larger bacterial inoculum, the clfAP(336)Y(338) mutants induced significantly less septic death. Importantly, immunization with the recombinant A domain of ClfAP(336)SY(338)A mutant but not with recombinant ClfA, protected against septic death. Our data strongly suggest that the fibrinogen binding activity of ClfA is crucial for the ability of S. aureus to provoke disease manifestations, and that the vaccine potential of recombinant ClfA is improved by removing its ability to bind fibrinogen.

  13. Tuning of the Lethal Response to Multiple Stressors with a Single-Site Mutation during Clinical Infection by Staphylococcus aureus

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    Krishan Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The agr system of Staphylococcus aureus promotes invasion of host tissues, and as expected, agents that block agr quorum sensing have anti-infective properties. Paradoxically, agr-defective mutants are frequently recovered from patients, especially those persistently infected with S. aureus. We found that an agr deficiency increased survival of cultured bacteria during severe stress, such as treatment with gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, heat, or low pH. With daptomycin, deletion of agr decreased survival. Therefore, agr activity can be either detrimental or protective, depending on the type of lethal stress. Deletion of agr had no effect on the ability of the antimicrobials to block bacterial growth, indicating that agr effects are limited to lethal action. Thus, the effect of an agr deletion is on bacterial tolerance, not resistance. For gentamicin and daptomycin, activity can be altered by agr-regulated secreted factors. For ciprofloxacin, a detrimental function was downregulation of glutathione peroxidase (bsaA, an enzyme responsible for defense against oxidative stress. Deficiencies in agr and bsaA were epistatic for survival, consistent with agr having a destructive role mediated by reactive oxygen species. Enhanced susceptibility to lethal stress by wild-type agr, particularly antimicrobial stress, helps explain why inactivating mutations in S. aureus agr commonly occur in hospitalized patients during infection. Moreover, the agr quorum-sensing system of S. aureus provides a clinically relevant example in which a single-step change in the response to severe stress alters the evolutionary path of a pathogen during infection.

  14. Strain Specific Phage Treatment for Staphylococcus aureus Infection Is Influenced by Host Immunity and Site of Infection.

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    Nathan B Pincus

    Full Text Available The response to multi-drug resistant bacterial infections must be a global priority. While mounting resistance threatens to create what the World Health Organization has termed a "post-antibiotic era", the recent discovery that antibiotic use may adversely impact the microbiome adds further urgency to the need for new developmental approaches for anti-pathogen treatments. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, in particular, has declared itself a serious threat within the United States and abroad. A potential solution to the problem of antibiotic resistance may not entail looking to the future for completely novel treatments, but instead looking into our history of bacteriophage therapy. This study aimed to test the efficacy, safety, and commercial viability of the use of phages to treat Staphylococcus aureus infections using the commercially available phage SATA-8505. We found that SATA-8505 effectively controls S. aureus growth and reduces bacterial viability both in vitro and in a skin infection mouse model. However, this killing effect was not observed when phage was cultured in the presence of human whole blood. SATA-8505 did not induce inflammatory responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cultures. However, phage did induce IFN gamma production in primary human keratinocyte cultures and induced inflammatory responses in our mouse models, particularly in a mouse model of chronic granulomatous disease. Our findings support the potential efficacy of phage therapy, although regulatory and market factors may limit its wider investigation and use.

  15. Strain Specific Phage Treatment for Staphylococcus aureus Infection Is Influenced by Host Immunity and Site of Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, Nathan B; Reckhow, Jensen D; Saleem, Danial; Jammeh, Momodou L; Datta, Sandip K; Myles, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    The response to multi-drug resistant bacterial infections must be a global priority. While mounting resistance threatens to create what the World Health Organization has termed a "post-antibiotic era", the recent discovery that antibiotic use may adversely impact the microbiome adds further urgency to the need for new developmental approaches for anti-pathogen treatments. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), in particular, has declared itself a serious threat within the United States and abroad. A potential solution to the problem of antibiotic resistance may not entail looking to the future for completely novel treatments, but instead looking into our history of bacteriophage therapy. This study aimed to test the efficacy, safety, and commercial viability of the use of phages to treat Staphylococcus aureus infections using the commercially available phage SATA-8505. We found that SATA-8505 effectively controls S. aureus growth and reduces bacterial viability both in vitro and in a skin infection mouse model. However, this killing effect was not observed when phage was cultured in the presence of human whole blood. SATA-8505 did not induce inflammatory responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cultures. However, phage did induce IFN gamma production in primary human keratinocyte cultures and induced inflammatory responses in our mouse models, particularly in a mouse model of chronic granulomatous disease. Our findings support the potential efficacy of phage therapy, although regulatory and market factors may limit its wider investigation and use.

  16. Risk factors for deep surgical site infection following operative treatment of ankle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovaska, Mikko T; Mäkinen, Tatu J; Madanat, Rami; Huotari, Kaisa; Vahlberg, Tero; Hirvensalo, Eero; Lindahl, Jan

    2013-02-20

    Surgical site infection is one of the most common complications following ankle fracture surgery. These infections are associated with substantial morbidity and lead to increased resource utilization. Identification of risk factors is crucial for developing strategies to prevent these complications. We performed an age and sex-matched case-control study to identify patient and surgery-related risk factors for deep surgical site infection following operative ankle fracture treatment. We identified 1923 ankle fracture operations performed in 1915 patients from 2006 through 2009. A total of 131 patients with deep infection were identified and compared with an equal number of uninfected control patients. Risk factors for infection were determined with use of conditional logistic regression analysis. The incidence of deep infection was 6.8%. Univariate analysis showed diabetes (odds ratio [OR] = 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0, 4.9), alcohol abuse (OR = 3.8, 95% CI = 1.6, 9.4), fracture-dislocation (OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.2, 3.5), and soft-tissue injury (a Tscherne grade of ≥1) (OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.3, 5.3) to be significant patient-related risk factors for infection. Surgery-related risk factors were suboptimal timing of prophylactic antibiotics (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0, 3.4), difficulties encountered during surgery, (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.1, 4.0), wound complications (OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.6, 14.0), and fracture malreduction (OR = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.3, 9.2). Independent risk factors for infection identified by multivariable analyses were tobacco use (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.6, 8.5) and a duration of surgery of more than ninety minutes (OR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.1, 5.7). Cast application in the operating room was independently associated with a decreased infection rate (OR = 0.4, 95% CI = 0.2, 0.8). We identified several modifiable risk factors for deep surgical site infection following operative treatment of ankle fractures.

  17. A socio-technical, probabilistic risk assessment model for surgical site infections in ambulatory surgery centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, Ebru K; El-Amine, Hadi; Steighner, Laura A; Slonim, Anthony D

    2014-10-01

    To understand how structural and process elements may affect the risk for surgical site infections (SSIs) in the ambulatory surgery center (ASC) environment, the researchers employed a tool known as socio-technical probabilistic risk assessment (ST-PRA). ST-PRA is particularly helpful for estimating risks in outcomes that are very rare, such as the risk of SSI in ASCs. Study objectives were to (1) identify the risk factors associated with SSIs resulting from procedures performed at ASCs and (2) design an intervention to mitigate the likelihood of SSIs for the most common risk factors that were identified by the ST-PRA for a particular surgical procedure. ST-PRA was used to study the SSI risk in the ASC setting. Both quantitative and qualitative data sources were utilized, and sensitivity analysis was performed to ensure the robustness of the results. The event entitled "fail to protect the patient effectively" accounted for 51.9% of SSIs in the ambulatory care setting. Critical components of this event included several failure risk points related to skin preparation, antibiotic administration, staff training, proper response to glove punctures during surgery, and adherence to surgical preparation rules related to the wearing of jewelry, watches, and artificial nails. Assuming a 75% reduction in noncompliance on any combination of 2 of these 5 components, the risk for an SSI decreased from 0.0044 to between 0.0027 and 0.0035. An intervention that targeted the 5 major components of the major risk point was proposed, and its implications were discussed.

  18. Surgical site infections in women and their association with clinical conditions

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    Maria Zélia de Araújo Madeira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Surgical site infections (SSIs can affect body tissues, cavities, or organs manipulated in surgery and constitute 14% to 16% of all infections. This study aimed to determine the incidence of SSIs in women following their discharge from a gynecology outpatient clinic, to survey different types of SSIs among women, and to verify the association of SSIs with comorbidities and clinical conditions. Methods Data were collected via analytical observation with a cross-sectional design, and the study was conducted in 1,026 women who underwent gynecological surgery in a teaching hospital in the municipality of Teresina, in the northeast Brazilian State of Piauí, from June 2011 to March 2013. Results The incidence of SSIs after discharge was 5.8% among the women in the outpatient clinic. The most prevalent surgery among the patients was hysterectomy, while the most prevalent type of SSI was superficial incisional. Comorbidities in women with SSIs included cancer, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Conclusions Surveillance of SSIs during the post-discharge period is critical for infection prevention and control. It is worth reflecting on the planning of surgical procedures for patients who have risk factors for the development of SSIs.

  19. Surgical Site Infection by Corynebacterium macginleyi in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

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    Bruno Cacopardo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium (C. macginleyi is a gram positive, lipophilic rod, usually considered a colonizer of skin and mucosal surfaces. Several reports have associated C. macginleyi with ocular infections, such as conjunctivitis and endophthalmitis. However, even if rare, extraocular infections from C. macginleyi may occur, especially among immunocompromised patients and patients with indwelling medical devices. We report herein the first case of surgical site infection by C. macginleyi after orthopaedic surgery for the correction of kyphoscoliosis in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1. Our patient developed a nodular granulomatous lesion of about two centimetres along the surgical scar, at the level of C4-C5, with purulent discharge and formation of a fistulous tract. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging showed the presence of a two-centimetre fluid pocket in the subcutaneous tissue. Several swabs were collected from the borders of the lesion as well as from the exudate, with isolation of C. macginleyi. The isolate was susceptible to beta-lactams, cotrimoxazole, linezolid, and glycopeptides but resistant to quinolones, third-generation cephalosporins, and erythromycin. Two 30-day courses of antibiotic therapy with amoxicillin/clavulanate (1 g three times/day and cotrimoxazole (800/160 mg twice a day were administered, obtaining a complete healing of the lesion.

  20. Functional outcomes following surgical-site infections after operative fixation of closed ankle fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Markus G; Sigurdsen, Ulf; Utvåg, Stein Erik; Stavem, Knut

    2017-12-01

    To compare the functional outcomes between patients with and without postoperative surgical-site infection (SSI) after surgical treatment in closed ankle fractures. Retrospective cohort study with prospective follow-up. Of 1011 treated patients, 959 were eligible for inclusion in a postal survey. Functional outcomes were assessed using three self-reported questionnaires. In total 567 patients responded a median of 4.3 years (range 3.1-6.2 years) after surgery. In total 29/567 had an SSI. The mean Olerud and Molander Ankle Score was 19.8 points lower for patients with a deep SSI (p=0.02), the Lower Extremity Functional Scale score was 10.2 points lower (p<0.01) and the Self-Reported Foot & Ankle Questionnaire score was 5.0 points higher (p=0.10) than for those without an SSI, after adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, diabetes, physical status, fracture classification and duration of surgery. Patients with a deep SSI had worse long-term functional outcomes than those without an SSI. Copyright © 2016 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hospital costs associated with surgical site infections in general and vascular surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Melissa M; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Julian, Kathleen G; Ortenzi, Gail; Dillon, Peter W

    2011-11-01

    Although much has been written about excess cost and duration of stay (DOS) associated with surgical site infections (SSIs) after cardiothoracic surgery, less has been reported after vascular and general surgery. We used data from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) to estimate the total cost and DOS associated with SSIs in patients undergoing general and vascular surgery. Using standard NSQIP practices, data were collected on patients undergoing general and vascular surgery at a single academic center between 2007 and 2009 and were merged with fully loaded operating costs obtained from the hospital accounting database. Logistic regression was used to determine which patient and preoperative variables influenced the occurrence of SSIs. After adjusting for patient characteristics, costs and DOS were fit to linear regression models to determine the effect of SSIs. Of the 2,250 general and vascular surgery patients sampled, SSIs were observed in 186 inpatients. Predisposing factors of SSIs were male sex, insulin-dependent diabetes, steroid use, wound classification, and operative time (P surgery. Although the excess costs and DOS associated with SSIs after general and vascular surgery are somewhat less, they still represent substantial financial and opportunity costs to hospitals and suggest, along with the implications for patient care, a continuing need for cost-effective quality improvement and programs of infection prevention. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Using a change model to reduce the risk of surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Mel

    2016-09-22

    A surgical site infection (SSI) surveillance module completed in 2014 highlighted that infection rates for breast surgery inpatients and readmissions at an acute trust had increased to 2.2%, from 0.5% in 2012. The national benchmark for 2014 established by Public Health England (PHE) was 1.0%. This demonstrated a greater than fourfold absolute increase in SSI for breast surgery during these periods. The infection rate could have been due to chance, but warranted investigation. The results were presented to the breast team and used to drive practice transformation through audit and observation, identifying areas of change to improve patient safety. The project used a recognised 8-step model for leading change developed by John Kotter, a professor at Harvard Business School and world-renowned change expert. The project presented opportunities to promote infection prevention while implementing care improvement strategies and behaviour change in partnership with the breast team.

  3. Post V-P shunt surgical site EDH an uncommon complication: case report

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    Garg Manish

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available ventriculoparitoneal shunt is well established modality of treatment for hydrocephalous. Complication of v-p shunt are also mentioned in literature like shunt infection shunt migration etc [8]. Here we are describing a rare complication of vp shunt which barely mentioned in literature. A 22 yr male admitted with complain of headache & vomiting patient was diagnosed to have tubercular meningities with hydrocephalous. Patient planned for ventriculoparietoneal shunt surgery and vp shunt was done. On 3rd post-surgery day patient develop weakness in Left side of body. Urgent ncct head done which showed EDH at surgical site. Immediate craniotomy and evacuation of hematoma was done patient improved and discharged. Thus we are discussing the importance of meticulous surgery for v-p shunt, post op ct scan and treatment.

  4. Post liposuction Mycobacterium abscessus surgical site infection in a returned medical tourist complicated by a paradoxical reaction during treatment

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    Siong H. Hui

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly growing mycobacterial skin and soft tissue infections are known to complicate cosmetic surgical procedures. Treatment consists of more surgery and prolonged antibiotic therapy guided by drug susceptibility testing. Paradoxical reactions occurring during antibiotic therapy can further complicate treatment of non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections. We report a case of post liposuction Mycobacterium abscessus surgical site infection in a returned medical tourist and occurrence of paradox during treatment.

  5. A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED STUDY OF RISK FACTORS AND ROLE OF PROPHYLACTIC ANTIBIOTICS IN PREVENTION OF SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS

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    Avijeet Mukherjee, Naveen N

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Surgical site infection (SSI is the most common nosocomial infection encountered in post operative surgical wards. The use of prophylactic antibiotic in clean elective surgical cases is still a subject of controversy to surgeons. The objective of the study is to identify the need for using prophylactic antibiotics in clean surgeries, prevalence of organisms in patients who are not given prophylactic antibiotics and to study whether the presence of risk factors increase the incidence of surgical site infection. Methodology: The comparative study consists of 100 cases admitted under two groups of 50 each: Group A was given prophylactic antibiotic and Group B didn’t receive any. All surgeries other than clean surgical cases were excluded from the study. Results: Out of 50 patients in group B who were not given prophylactic antibiotic, 2 patients had more than one risk factor for development of SSI and both of them developed SSI. Of the 50 patients who received prophylactic antibiotic, none developed SSI. The rate of infection in group A was nil and in Group B was 4%. Conclusion: Prophylactic antibiotics are not recommended for clean elective surgical cases as there is no statistically significant change in the infection rate seen in patients not receiving prophylactic antibiotic(P=0.4952. Meticulous surgical technique and correcting risk factors prior to surgery is a must for reducing incidence of SSI.

  6. Daptomycin as a possible new treatment option for surgical management of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery

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    Emmert Alexander

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of a 77-year old female who had undergone a coronary artery bypass grafting with an aortic valve replacement and developed three month later a Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA sternal wound infection which was successful treated with Daptomycin combined with vacuum-assisted closure (VAC.

  7. Surgical-site infections and postoperative complications: agreement between the Danish Gynecological Cancer Database and a randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Sofie L; Meyhoff, Christian Sylvest; Lundvall, Lene

    2011-01-01

    between November 2006 and October 2008 and data from the DGCD. METHODS: Outcomes within 30 days from the trial and the database were compared and levels of agreements were calculated with kappa-statistics. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome was surgical-site infection. Other outcomes included re-operation...... registered in the PROXI trial, but not in the DGCD. Agreements between secondary outcomes were very varying (kappa-value 0.77 for re-operation, 0.37 for urinary tract infections, 0.19 for sepsis and 0.18 for pneumonia). CONCLUSIONS: The randomized trial reported significantly more surgical-site infections......OBJECTIVE: Surgical-site infections are serious complications and thorough follow-up is important for accurate surveillance. We aimed to compare the frequency of complications recorded in a clinical quality database with those noted in a randomized clinical trial with follow-up visits. DESIGN...

  8. Efficacy of Negative Pressure Wound Treatment in Preventing Surgical Site Infections after Whipple Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ryan; Darby, Geoffrey C; Imagawa, David K

    2017-10-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) occur at an average rate of 21.1 per cent after Whipple procedures per NSQIP data. In the setting of adherence to standard National Surgery Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) Hepatopancreatobiliary recommendations including wound protector use and glove change before closing, this study seeks to evaluate the efficacy of using negative pressure wound treatment (NPWT) over closed incision sites after a Whipple procedure to prevent SSI formation. We retrospectively examined consecutive patients from January 2014 to July 2016 who met criteria of completing Whipple procedures with full primary incision closure performed by a single surgeon at a single institution. Sixty-one patients were included in the study between two cohorts: traditional dressing (TD) (n = 36) and NPWT dressing (n = 25). There was a statistically significant difference (P = 0.01) in SSI formation between the TD cohort (n = 15, SSI rate = 0.41) and the NPWT cohort (n = 3, SSI rate = 0.12). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) of SSI formation was significant for NPWT use [OR = 0.15, P = 0.036] and for hospital length of stay [OR = 1.21, P = 0.024]. Operative length, operative blood loss, units of perioperative blood transfusion, intraoperative gastrojejunal tube placement, preoperative stent placement, and postoperative antibiotic duration did not significantly impact SSI formation (P > 0.05).

  9. Liposomal bupivacaine infiltration at the surgical site for the management of postoperative pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Thomas W; Athanassoglou, Vassilis; Mellon, Stephen; Strickland, Louise H; Trivella, Marialena; Murray, David; Pandit, Hemant G

    2017-02-01

    Despite multi-modal analgesic techniques, acute postoperative pain remains an unmet health need, with up to three quarters of people undergoing surgery reporting significant pain. Liposomal bupivacaine is an analgesic consisting of bupivacaine hydrochloride encapsulated within multiple, non-concentric lipid bi-layers offering a novel method of sustained-release analgesia. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse effects of liposomal bupivacaine infiltration at the surgical site for the management of postoperative pain. On 13 January 2016 we searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, Embase, ISI Web of Science and reference lists of retrieved articles. We obtained clinical trial reports and synopses of published and unpublished studies from Internet sources, and searched clinical trials databases for ongoing trials. Randomised, double-blind, placebo- or active-controlled clinical trials in people aged 18 years or over undergoing elective surgery, at any surgical site, were included if they compared liposomal bupivacaine infiltration at the surgical site with placebo or other type of analgesia. Two review authors independently considered trials for inclusion, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data. We performed data analysis using standard statistical techniques as described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, using Review Manager 5.3. We planned to perform a meta-analysis and produce a 'Summary of findings' table for each comparison however there were insufficient data to ensure a clinically meaningful answer. As such we have produced two 'Summary of findings' tables in a narrative format. Where possible we assessed the quality of evidence using GRADE. We identified nine studies (10 reports, 1377 participants) that met inclusion criteria. Four Phase II dose-escalating/de-escalating trials, designed to evaluate and demonstrate efficacy and safety, presented pooled data that we could not use. Of the remaining five parallel

  10. Surgical site infections after elective neurosurgery: a survey of 1747 patients.

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    Valentini, Laura G; Casali, Cecilia; Chatenoud, Liliane; Chiaffarino, Francesca; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina; Broggi, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence and risk factors of postsurgical site infections (SSIs) in elective neurosurgical procedures in patients treated with an ultrashort antibiotic protocol. In this consecutive series of 1747 patients treated with elective neurosurgery and ultrashort prophylactic antibiotic therapy at the Fondazione Istituto Nazionale Neurologico "Carlo Besta" in Milan, the rate of SSIs was 0.7% (13 patients). When only clean neurosurgery was considered, there were 11 such SSIs (1.52%) in 726 craniotomies and one SSI (0.15) in 663 spinal operations. The antibiotic protocol was prolonged in every case of external communication as cerebrospinal fluid leaks or external drainages. The infection rate of the whole series was low (0.72%), and a risk factor identified for SSIs in clean neurosurgery was longer surgery duration. The relative risk estimate was 12.6 for surgeries lasting 2 hours and 24.3 for surgeries lasting 3 or more hours. Patients aged older than 50 years had a lower risk of developing SSI with a relative risk of 0.23 when compared with patients aged younger than 50 years. The present series reports a low incidence of SSIs for elective neurosurgery, even for high-risk complex craniotomies performed for tumor removal. Given that an antibiotic protocol prolongation was used to pretreat any early signs of infection and external communication, the protocol was appropriate for the case mix. The two identified risk factors (surgical duration > 2 hours and middle-aged patients [16-50 yr]) may be indicators of other factors, such as the level of surgical complexity and poor neurological outcome.

  11. Prophylaxis of surgical site infection in adult spine surgery: A systematic review.

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    Yao, Reina; Tan, Terence; Tee, Jin Wee; Street, John

    2018-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) remains a significant source of morbidity in spine surgery, with reported rates varying from 0.7 to 16%. To systematically review and evaluate the evidence for strategies for prophylaxis of SSI in adult spine surgery in the last twenty years. Two independent systematic searches were conducted, at two international spine centers, encompassing PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov, Cochrane Database, EBSCO Medline, ScienceDirect, Ovid Medline, EMBASE (Ovid), and MEDLINE. References were combined and screened, then distilled to 69 independent studies for final review. 11 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), 51 case-controlled studies (CCS), and 7 case series were identified. Wide variation exists in surgical indications, approaches, procedures, and even definitions of SSI. Intra-wound vancomycin powder was the most widely studied intervention (19 studies, 1 RCT). Multiple studies examined perioperative antibiotic protocols, closed-suction drainage, povidone-iodine solution irrigation, and 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate skin closure. 18 interventions were examined by a single study only. There is limited evidence for the efficacy of intra-wound vancomycin. There is strong evidence that closed-suction drainage does not affect SSI rates, while there is moderate evidence for the efficacy of povidone-iodine irrigation and that single-dose preoperative antibiotics is as effective as multiple doses. Few conclusions can be drawn about other interventions given the paucity and poor quality of studies. While a small body of evidence underscores a select few interventions for SSI prophylaxis in adult spine surgery, most proposed measures have not been investigated beyond a single study. Further high level evidence is required to justify SSI preventative treatments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Morbidity associated with 30-day surgical site infection following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Brandon A.; Rocque, Brandon G.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Morbidity associated with surgical site infection (SSI) following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgical procedures is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to analyze acute morbidity and mortality associated with SSI after nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery using a nationwide cohort. Methods The authors reviewed data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Pediatric (NSQIP-P) 2012–2014 database, including all neurosurgical procedures performed on pediatric patients. Procedures were categorized by Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes. CSF shunts were excluded. Deep and superficial SSIs occurring within 30 days of an index procedure were identified. Deep SSIs included deep wound infections, intracranial abscesses, meningitis, osteomyelitis, and ventriculitis. The following outcomes occurring within 30 days of an index procedure were analyzed, along with postoperative time to complication development: sepsis, wound disruption, length of postoperative stay, readmission, reoperation, and death. Results A total of 251 procedures associated with a 30-day SSI were identified (2.7% of 9296 procedures). Superficial SSIs were more common than deep SSIs (57.4% versus 42.6%). Deep SSIs occurred more frequently after epilepsy or intracranial tumor procedures. Superficial SSIs occurred more frequently after skin lesion, spine, Chiari decompression, craniofacial, and myelomeningocele closure procedures. The mean (± SD) postoperative length of stay for patients with any SSI was 9.6 ± 14.8 days (median 4 days). Post-SSI outcomes significantly associated with previous SSI included wound disruption (12.4%), sepsis (15.5%), readmission (36.7%), and reoperation (43.4%) (p neurosurgery. Rates of SSI-associated complications are significantly lower in patients with superficial infection than in those with deep infection. There were no cases of SSI-related mortality within 30 days of the index procedure. PMID:28186474

  13. Prevention and treatment of surgical site infection in HIV-infected patients

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    Zhang Lei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infection (SSI are the third most frequently reported nosocomial infection, and the most common on surgical wards. HIV-infected patients may increase the possibility of developing SSI after surgery. There are few reported date on incidence and the preventive measures of SSI in HIV-infected patients. This study was to determine the incidence and the associated risk factors for SSI in HIV-infected patients. And we also explored the preventive measures. Methods A retrospective study of SSI was conducted in 242 HIV-infected patients including 17 patients who combined with hemophilia from October 2008 to September 2011 in Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center. SSI were classified according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC criteria and identified by bedside surveillance and post-discharge follow-up. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 statistical software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL. Results The SSI incidence rate was 47.5% (115 of 242; 38.4% incisional SSIs, 5.4% deep incisional SSIs and 3.7% organ/space SSIs. The SSI incidence rate was 37.9% in HIV-infected patients undergoing abdominal operation. Patients undergoing abdominal surgery with lower preoperative CD4 counts were more likely to develop SSIs. The incidence increased from 2.6% in clean wounds to 100% in dirty wounds. In the HIV-infected patients combined with hemophilia, the mean preoperative albumin and postoperative hemoglobin were found significantly lower than those in no-SSIs group (P Conclusions SSI is frequent in HIV-infected patients. And suitable perioperative management may decrease the SSIs incidence rate of HIV-infected patients.

  14. Failure to Redose Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Long Surgery Increases Risk of Surgical Site Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasatpibal, Nongyao; Whitney, Joanne D; Dellinger, E Patchen; Nair, Bala G; Pike, Kenneth C

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is a key component of the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI). Failure to manage antibiotic prophylaxis effectively may increase the risk of SSI. This study aimed to examine the effects of antibiotic prophylaxis on SSI risk. A retrospective cohort study was conducted among patients having general surgery between May 2012 and June 2015 at the University of Washington Medical Center. Peri-operative data extracted from hospital databases included patient and operation characteristics, intra-operative medication and fluid administration, and survival outcome. The effects of antibiotic prophylaxis and potential factors on SSI risk were estimated using multiple logistic regression and were expressed as risk ratios (RRs). A total of 4,078 patients were eligible for analysis. Of these, 180 had an SSI. Mortality rates within and after 30 days were 0.8% and 0.3%, respectively. Improper antibiotic redosing increased the risk of SSI (RR 4.61; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.33-15.91). Other risk factors were in-patient status (RR 4.05; 95% CI 1.69-9.66), smoking (RR 1.63; 95% CI 1.03-2.55), emergency surgery (RR 1.97; 95% CI 1.26-3.08), colectomy (RR 3.31; 95% CI 1.19-9.23), pancreatectomy (RR 4.52; 95% CI 1.53-13.39), proctectomy (RR 5.02; 95% CI 1.72-14.67), small bowel surgery (RR 6.16; 95% CI 2.13-17.79), intra-operative blood transfusion >500 mL (RR 2.76; 95% CI 1.45-5.26), and multiple procedures (RR 1.40; 95% CI 1.01-1.95). These data demonstrate that failure to redose prophylactic antibiotic during long operations increases the risk of SSI. Strengthening a collaborative surgical quality improvement program may help to eradicate this risk.

  15. Stratification of surgical site infection by operative factors and comparison of infection rates after hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Margaret A; Nickel, Katelin B; Wallace, Anna E; Mines, Daniel; Fraser, Victoria J; Warren, David K

    2015-03-01

    To investigate whether operative factors are associated with risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after hernia repair. Retrospective cohort study. Patients Commercially insured enrollees aged 6 months-64 years with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure or Current Procedural Terminology, fourth edition, codes for inguinal/femoral, umbilical, and incisional/ventral hernia repair procedures from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2010. SSIs within 90 days after hernia repair were identified by diagnosis codes. The χ2 and Fisher exact tests were used to compare SSI incidence by operative factors. A total of 119,973 hernia repair procedures were analyzed. The incidence of SSI differed significantly by anatomic site, with rates of 0.45% (352/77,666) for inguinal/femoral, 1.16% (288/24,917) for umbilical, and 4.11% (715/17,390) for incisional/ventral hernia repair. Within anatomic sites, the incidence of SSI was significantly higher for open versus laparoscopic inguinal/femoral (0.48% [295/61,142] vs 0.34% [57/16,524], P=.020) and incisional/ventral (4.20% [701/16,699] vs 2.03% [14/691], P=.005) hernia repairs. The rate of SSI was higher following procedures with bowel obstruction/necrosis than procedures without obstruction/necrosis for open inguinal/femoral (0.89% [48/5,422] vs 0.44% [247/55,720], Poperative factors may facilitate accurate comparison of SSI rates between facilities.

  16. Surgical site infection in lumbar surgeries, pre and postoperative antibiotics and length of stay: a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, I.U.; Janjua, M.B.; Hasan, S.; Shah, S.

    2009-01-01

    Postoperative wound infection also called as surgical site infection (SSI), is a trouble some complication of lumbar spine surgeries and they can be associated with serious morbidities, mortalities and increase resource utilization. With the improvement in diagnostic modalities, proper surgical techniques, antibiotic therapy and postoperative care, infectious complications can result in various compromises afterwards. The objective was to study the relation of surgical site infection in clean lumbar surgeries with the doses of antibiotics. This Retrospective study was conducted at Shifa International Hospital, from January 2006 to March 2008. Methods: Hundred post operated cases of lumber disc prolapse, lumbar stenosis or both studied retrospectively by tracing their operated data from hospital record section for the development of surgical site infection (SSI). The patients were divided into three groups depending upon whether they received single, three or more than three doses of antibiotics respectively. Complete data analyses and cross tabulation done with SPSS version 16. Result: Of 100 cases, only 6% had superficial surgical site infection; only 1 case with co morbidity of hypertension was detected. Twenty-one cases had single dose of antibiotic (Group-I), 59 cases had 3 doses (Group-II) and 20 cases received multiple doses (Group-III). There was no infection in Group-I. Only one patient in Group-II and 5 patients in Group-III developed superficial SSI. While 4 in Group-II, 3 in Group-III, and none of Group-I had >6 days length of stay (LOS). Conclusion The dose of antibiotic directly correlates with the surgical site infection in clean lumbar surgeries. When compared with multiple doses of antibiotics a single preoperative shot of antibiotic is equally effective for patients with SSI. (author)

  17. Peri-operative glycaemic control regimens for preventing surgical site infections in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Lillian S; Meeks, Derek; Moyer, Virginia A; Lally, Kevin P

    2009-07-08

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and resource utilization and are potentially preventable. Peri-operative hyperglycaemia has been associated with increased SSIs and previous recommendations have been to treat glucose levels above 200 mg/dL. However, recent studies have questioned the optimal glycaemic control regimen to prevent SSIs. Whether the benefits of strict or intensive glycaemic control with insulin infusion as compared to conventional management outweigh the risks remains controversial. To summarise the evidence for the impact of glycaemic control in the peri-operative period on the incidence of surgical site infections, hypoglycaemia, level of glycaemic control, all-cause and infection-related mortality, and hospital length of stay and to investigate for differences of effect between different levels of glycaemic control. A search strategy was developed to search the following databases: Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 25 March 2009), The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 1; Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to March Week 2 2009); Ovid EMBASE (1980 to 2009 Week 12) and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to March Week 3 2009). The search was not limited by language or publication status. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were eligible for inclusion if they evaluated two (or more) glycaemic control regimens in the peri-operative period (within one week pre-, intra-, and/or post-operative) and reported surgical site infections as an outcome. The standard method for conducting a systematic review in accordance with the Cochrane Wounds Group was used. Two review authors independently reviewed the results from the database searches and identified relevant studies. Two review authors extracted study data and outcomes from each study and reviewed each study for methodological quality. Any disagreement was resolved by discussion or by referral to a third review author. Five

  18. Abdominal surgical site infections: incidence and risk factors at an Iranian teaching hospital

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    Sabouri Kashani Ahmad

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal surgical site infections are among the most common complications of inpatient admissions and have serious consequences for outcomes and costs. Different risk factors may be involved, including age, sex, nutrition and immunity, prophylactic antibiotics, operation type and duration, type of shaving, and secondary infections. This study aimed to determine the risk factors affecting abdominal surgical site infections and their incidence at Imam Khomeini, a major referral teaching hospital in Iran. Methods Patients (n = 802 who had undergone abdominal surgery were studied and the relationships among variables were analyzed by Student's t and Chi-square tests. The subjects were followed for 30 days and by a 20-item questionnaire. Data were collected through pre- and post-operative examinations and telephone follow-ups. Results Of the 802 patients, 139 suffered from SSI (17.4%. In 40.8% of the cases, the wound was dirty infected. The average age for the patients was 46.7 years. The operations were elective in 75.7% of the cases and 24.7% were urgent. The average duration of the operation was 2.24 hours, the average duration of pre-operative hospital stay 4.31 days and the average length of (pre- and post-operation hospital stay 11.2 days. Three quarters of the cases were shaved 12 hours before the operation. The increased operation time, increased bed stay, electivity of the operation, septicity of the wound, type of incision, the administration of prophylactic antibiotic, type of operation, background disease, and the increased time lapse between shaving and operation all significantly associated with SSI with a p-value less than 0.001. Conclusion In view of the high rate of SSI reported here (17.4% compared with the 14% quoted in literature, this study suggests that by reducing the average operation time to less than 2 hours, the average preoperative stay to 4 days and the overall stay to less than 11 days, and

  19. Do Prolonged Prophylactic Antibiotics Reduce the Incidence of Surgical-Site Infections in Immediate Prosthetic Breast Reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Frederick; Chin, Robin; Piper, Merisa; Esserman, Laura; Sbitany, Hani

    2016-12-01

    Approximately 50,000 women in the United States undergo mastectomy and immediate prosthetic breast reconstruction annually, and most receive postoperative prophylactic antibiotics. The effect of these antibiotics on the risk of surgical-site infections remains unclear. The authors searched the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases for studies that compared less than 24 hours and greater than 24 hours of antibiotics following immediate prosthetic breast reconstruction. Primary outcomes were surgical-site infections and implant loss. Conservative random effects models were used to obtain pooled relative risk estimates. The authors identified 927 studies, but only four cohort studies and one randomized controlled trial met their inclusion criteria. Unadjusted incidences of surgical-site infections were 14 percent with more than 24 hours of antibiotics, 19 percent with less than 24 hours of antibiotics, and 16 percent overall. Unadjusted incidences of implant loss were 8 percent with more than 24 hours of antibiotics, 10 percent with less than 24 hours of antibiotics, and 9 percent overall. The pooled relative risk of implant loss was 1.17 (95 percent CI, 0.39 to 3.6) with less than 24 hours of antibiotics, which was not statistically significant. Prolonged antibiotic use did not have a statistically significant effect on reducing surgical-site infections or implant loss. There was significant heterogeneity between studies, and prolonged antibiotics may have increased the risk of implant loss in the randomized controlled trial. Definitive evidence may only be obtained with data from more prospective randomized controlled trials.

  20. Intracavity lavage and wound irrigation for prevention of surgical site infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Gill; Atkinson, Ross A; Smith, Tanya A; Rowlands, Ceri; Rithalia, Amber D; Crosbie, Emma J; Dumville, Jo C

    2017-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSIs) are wound infections that occur after an operative procedure. A preventable complication, they are costly and associated with poorer patient outcomes, increased mortality, morbidity and reoperation rates. Surgical wound irrigation is an intraoperative technique, which may reduce the rate of SSIs through removal of dead or damaged tissue, metabolic waste, and wound exudate. Irrigation can be undertaken prior to wound closure or postoperatively. Intracavity lavage is a similar technique used in operations that expose a bodily cavity; such as procedures on the abdominal cavity and during joint replacement surgery. Objectives To assess the effects of wound irrigation and intracavity lavage on the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI). Search methods In February 2017 we searched the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid Embase and EBSCO CINAHL Plus. We also searched three clinical trials registries and references of included studies and relevant systematic reviews. There were no restrictions on language, date of publication or study setting. Selection criteria We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of participants undergoing surgical procedures in which the use of a particular type of intraoperative washout (irrigation or lavage) was the only systematic difference between groups, and in which wounds underwent primary closure. The primary outcomes were SSI and wound dehiscence. Secondary outcomes were mortality, use of systemic antibiotics, antibiotic resistance, adverse events, re-intervention, length of hospital stay, and readmissions. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion at each stage. Two review authors also undertook data extraction, assessment of risk of bias and GRADE assessment. We calculated risk ratios or differences in means with 95% confidence intervals where

  1. Desleucyl-Oritavancin with a Damaged d-Ala-d-Ala Binding Site Inhibits the Transpeptidation Step of Cell-Wall Biosynthesis in Whole Cells of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Joon; Singh, Manmilan; Sharif, Shasad; Schaefer, Jacob

    2017-03-14

    We have used solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance to characterize the exact nature of the dual mode of action of oritavancin in preventing cell-wall assembly in Staphylococcus aureus. Measurements performed on whole cells labeled selectively in vivo have established that des-N-methylleucyl-N-4-(4-fluorophenyl)benzyl-chloroeremomycin, an Edman degradation product of [ 19 F]oritavancin, which has a damaged d-Ala-d-Ala binding aglycon, is a potent inhibitor of the transpeptidase activity of cell-wall biosynthesis. The desleucyl drug binds to partially cross-linked peptidoglycan by a cleft formed between the drug aglycon and its biphenyl hydrophobic side chain. This type of binding site is present in other oritavancin-like glycopeptides, which suggests that for these drugs a similar transpeptidase inhibition occurs.

  2. AQUACEL® Ag Surgical Dressing Reduces Surgical Site Infection and Improves Patient Satisfaction in Minimally Invasive Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Chih Kuo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of modern surgical dressings to prevent wound complications and surgical site infection (SSI after minimally invasive total knee arthroplasty (MIS-TKA is lacking. In a prospective, randomized, controlled study, 240 patients were randomized to receive either AQUACEL Ag Surgical dressing (study group or a standard dressing (control group after MIS-TKA. The primary outcome was wound complication (SSI and blister. The secondary outcomes were wear time and number of dressing changes in the hospital and patient satisfaction (pain, comfort, and ease of use. In the intention-to-treat analysis, there was a significant reduction in the incidence of superficial SSI (0.8%, 95% CI∶ 0.00–2.48 in the study group compared to 8.3% (95% CI∶ 3.32–13.3 in the control group (p=0.01. There were no differences in blister and deep/organ-space SSIs between the two groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that AQUACEL Ag Surgical dressing was an independent risk factor for reduction of SSI (odds ratio: 0.07, 95% CI: 0.01–0.58, p=0.01. The study group had longer wear time (5.2±0.7 versus 1.7±0.4 days, p<0.0001 and lower number of dressing changes (1.0±0.2 versus 3.6±1.3 times, p<0.0001. Increased patient satisfaction (p<0.0001 was also noted in the study group. AQUACEL Ag Surgical dressing is an ideal dressing to provide wound care efficacy, patient satisfaction, reduction of SSI, and cost-effectiveness following MIS-TKA.

  3. Intra-Operative Inspired Fraction of Oxygen and the Risk of Surgical Site Infections in Patients with Type 1 Surgical Incisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanta, Brendan T; Hanson, Kristine T; Hyder, Joseph A; Stewart, Thomas M; Curry, Timothy B; Berbari, Elie F; Habermann, Elizabeth B; Kor, Daryl J; Brown, Michael J

    2018-04-02

    Whether the fraction of inspired oxygen (F I O 2 ) influences the risk of surgical site infection (SSI) is controversial. The World Health Organization and the World Federation of Societies of Anesthesiologists offer conflicting recommendations. In this study, we evaluate simultaneously three different definitions of F I O 2 exposure and the risk of SSI in a large surgical population. Patients with clean (type 1) surgical incisions who developed superficial and deep organ/space SSI within 30 days after surgery from January 2003 through December 2012 in five surgical specialties were matched to specialty-specific controls. Fraction of inspired oxygen exposure was defined as (1) nadir F I O 2 , (2) percentage of operative time with F I O 2 greater than 50%, and (3) cumulative hyperoxia exposure, calculated as the area under the curve (AUC) of F I O 2 by time for the duration in which F I O 2 greater than 50%. Stratified univariable and multivariable logistic regression models tested associations between F I O 2 and SSI. One thousand two hundred fifty cases of SSI were matched to 3,248 controls. Increased oxygen exposure, by any of the three measures, was not associated with the outcome of any SSI in a multivariable logistic regression model. Elevated body mass index (BMI; 35+ vs. operative oxygen exposure was associated with higher odds of SSI in the neurosurgical and spine populations. Increased intra-operative inspired fraction of oxygen was not associated with a reduction in SSI. These findings do not support the practice of increasing F I O 2 for the purpose of SSI reduction in patients with clean surgical incisions.

  4. Drainage Systems Effect on Surgical Site Infection in Children with Perforated Appendicitis

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    Seref Kilic

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Effect of replacing open drainage system to closed drainage system on surgical site infection (SSI in children operated for perforated appendicitis was evaluated. Material and Method: Hospital files and computer records of perforated appendicitis cases operated in 2004-2010 were evaluated retrospectively. Open drainage systems were used for 70 in cases (group I and closed systems were used in the others (group II. Results: Eleven of SSI cases had superficial infection and 3 had the organ/space infection. SSI rate was 15.7% for group I and 7.5% for the group II. The antibiotic treatment length was 7.5 ± 3.4 days for group I and 6.4 ± 2.2 days for group II and the difference between groups was not statistically significant. Hospitalization length for group I was 8.2 ± 3.1 days and 6.8 ± 1.9 days for group II and the difference was statistically significant. Discussion: SSI is an important problem increasing morbidity and treatment costs through increasing hospitalization and antibiotic treatment length. Open drainage system used in operation in patients with perforated appendicitis leads an increased frequency of SSI when compared to the closed drainage system. Thus, closed drainage systems should be preferred in when drainage is necessary in operations for perforated appendicitis in children.

  5. [Implementation of a post-discharge surgical site infection system in herniorrhaphy and mastectomy procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Juan Sanz, Isabel; Díaz-Agero-Pérez, Cristina; Robustillo-Rodela, Ana; Pita López, María José; Oliva Iñiguez, Lourdes; Monge-Jodrá, Vicente

    2014-10-01

    Monitoring surgical site infection (SSI) performed during hospitalization can underestimate its rates due to the shortening in hospital stay. The aim of this study was to determine the actual rates of SSI using a post-discharge monitoring system. All patients who underwent herniorraphy or mastectomy in the Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal from 1 January 2011 to 31 December 2011 were included. SSI data were collected prospectively according to the continuous quality improvement indicators (Indicadores Clinicos de Mejora Continua de la Calidad [INCLIMECC]) monitoring system. Post-discharge follow-up was conducted by telephone survey. A total of 409patients were included in the study, of whom 299 underwent a herniorraphy procedure, and 110 underwent a mastectomy procedure. For herniorrhaphy, the SSI rate increased from 6.02% to 7.6% (the post-discharge survey detected 21.7% of SSI). For mastectomy, the SSI rate increased from 1.8% to 3.6% (the post-discharge survey detected 50% of SSI). Post-discharge monitoring showed an increased detection of SSI incidence. Post-discharge monitoring is useful to analyze the real trend of SSI, and evaluate improvement actions. Post-discharge follow-up methods need to standardised. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  6. [Incidence of surgical site infections in sub-Saharan Africa: systematic review and meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngaroua; Ngah, Joseph Eloundou; Bénet, Thomas; Djibrilla, Yaouba

    2016-01-01

    Surgical Site Infections (SSI) cause morbi-mortality and additional healthcare expenditures. Developing countries are the most affected. The objective was to estimate the pooled incidence of SSI in Sub-Saharan Africa and describe its major risk factors. Systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted using the databases of the World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa, PubMed and standard search to select electronic articles published between 2006 and 2015. Only articles investigating SSI impact and risk factors in Sub-Saharan African countries were retained. Out of 95 articles found, 11 met the inclusion criteria. Only 9 countries out of 45 have contributed, with a huge amount of information coming from Nigeria (5 articles out of 11). The impact of SSI ranged from 6.8% to 26% with predominance in general surgery. The pooled incidence of SSI was 14.8% (95% CI: 15,5-16,2%) with significant heterogeneity according to the specialty and the method of monitoring. Most cited risk factors were long procedure length and categories 3 and 4 of Altemeier contamination class. Other factors included hospital environment, inadequate care practices and underlying pathologies. SSI incidence is high in Sub-Saharan Africa. Studies in this area could improve knowledge, prevention and control of these multiple risk factors.

  7. Analysis of Surgical Site Infection after Musculoskeletal Tumor Surgery: Risk Assessment Using a New Scoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Nagano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infection (SSI has not been extensively studied in musculoskeletal tumors (MST owing to the rarity of the disease. We analyzed incidence and risk factors of SSI in MST. SSI incidence was evaluated in consecutive 457 MST cases (benign, 310 cases and malignant, 147 cases treated at our institution. A detailed analysis of the clinical background of the patients, pre- and postoperative hematological data, and other factors that might be associated with SSI incidence was performed for malignant MST cases. SSI occurred in 0.32% and 12.2% of benign and malignant MST cases, respectively. The duration of the surgery (P=0.0002 and intraoperative blood loss (P=0.0005 was significantly more in the SSI group than in the non-SSI group. We established the musculoskeletal oncological surgery invasiveness (MOSI index by combining 4 risk factors (blood loss, operation duration, preoperative chemotherapy, and the use of artificial materials. The MOSI index (0–4 points score significantly correlated with the risk of SSI, as demonstrated by an SSI incidence of 38.5% in the group with a high score (3-4 points. The MOSI index score and laboratory data at 1 week after surgery could facilitate risk evaluation and prompt diagnosis of SSI.

  8. Full-text automated detection of surgical site infections secondary to neurosurgery in Rennes, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campillo-Gimenez, Boris; Garcelon, Nicolas; Jarno, Pascal; Chapplain, Jean Marc; Cuggia, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The surveillance of Surgical Site Infections (SSI) contributes to the management of risk in French hospitals. Manual identification of infections is costly, time-consuming and limits the promotion of preventive procedures by the dedicated teams. The introduction of alternative methods using automated detection strategies is promising to improve this surveillance. The present study describes an automated detection strategy for SSI in neurosurgery, based on textual analysis of medical reports stored in a clinical data warehouse. The method consists firstly, of enrichment and concept extraction from full-text reports using NOMINDEX, and secondly, text similarity measurement using a vector space model. The text detection was compared to the conventional strategy based on self-declaration and to the automated detection using the diagnosis-related group database. The text-mining approach showed the best detection accuracy, with recall and precision equal to 92% and 40% respectively, and confirmed the interest of reusing full-text medical reports to perform automated detection of SSI.

  9. Preoperative skin antiseptic preparations for preventing surgical site infections: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Chris; McGahan, Lynda; Polisena, Julie; Mierzwinski-Urban, Monika; Embil, John M

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of preoperative skin antiseptic preparations and application techniques for the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs). Systematic review of the literature using Medline, EMBASE, and other databases, for the period January 2001 to June 2011. Comparative studies (including randomized and nonrandomized trials) of preoperative skin antisepsis preparations and application techniques were included. Two researchers reviewed each study and extracted data using standardized tables developed before the study. Studies were reviewed for their methodological quality and clinical findings. Twenty studies (n = 9,520 patients) were included in the review. The results indicated that presurgical antiseptic showering is effective for reducing skin flora and may reduce SSI rates. Given the heterogeneity of the studies and the results, conclusions about which antiseptic is more effective at reducing SSIs cannot be drawn. The evidence suggests that preoperative antiseptic showers reduce bacterial colonization and may be effective at preventing SSIs. The antiseptic application method is inconsequential, and data are lacking to suggest which antiseptic solution is the most effective. Disinfectant products are often mixed with alcohol or water, which makes it difficult to form overall conclusions regarding an active ingredient. Large, well-conducted randomized controlled trials with consistent protocols comparing agents in the same bases are needed to provide unequivocal evidence on the effectiveness of one antiseptic preparation over another for the prevention of SSIs.

  10. Umbilical Microflora, Antiseptic Skin Preparation, and Surgical Site Infection in Abdominal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeff, Jörg; Erkan, Mert; Jäger, Carsten; Menacher, Maximilian; Gebhardt, Friedemann; Hartel, Mark

    2015-08-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) following abdominal surgery are frequent and a major cause of postoperative morbidity and prolonged hospital stay. Besides antibiotic prophylaxis, antiseptic skin preparation is an important measure to prevent SSI. Here we prospectively analyzed the effectiveness of antiseptic skin preparation in a cohort of 93 patients undergoing laparotomy, with special emphasis on the umbilical region. The microflora of the umbilicus contained a large number of resident (mostly staphylococci species and corynebacteria) and transient germs (including enterococci species). Following antiseptic skin preparation, bacteria could still be cultured from 24.7% of the patients' umbilici. In case of postoperative SSI, only one of seven SSI was caused by the microorganism that was present in the umbilicus before and after skin preparation. Antiseptic skin preparation fails to completely eradicate the microflora of the umbilical region in one quarter of the patients. However, at least in abdominal surgery, the vast majority of SSI are caused by intra-abdominal contamination rather than the skin microflora.

  11. The role of oral antibiotics prophylaxis in prevention of surgical site infection in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koullouros, Michalis; Khan, Nadir; Aly, Emad H

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) continues to be a challenge in colorectal surgery. Over the years, various modalities have been used in an attempt to reduce SSI risk in elective colorectal surgery, which include mechanical bowel preparation before surgery, oral antibiotics and intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis at induction of surgery. Even though IV antibiotics have become standard practice, there has been a debate on the exact role of oral antibiotics. The primary aim was to identify the role of oral antibiotics in reduction of SSI in elective colorectal surgery. The secondary aim was to explore any potential benefit in the use of mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) in relation to SSI in elective colorectal surgery. Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched. Any randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or cohort studies after 1980, which investigated the effectiveness of oral antibiotic prophylaxis and/or MBP in preventing SSIs in elective colorectal surgery were included. Twenty-three RCTs and eight cohorts were included. The results indicate a statistically significant advantage in preventing SSIs with the combined usage of oral and systemic antibiotic prophylaxis. Furthermore, our analysis of the cohort studies shows no benefits in the use of MBP in prevention of SSIs. The addition of oral antibiotics to systemic antibiotics could potentially reduce the risk of SSIs in elective colorectal surgery. Additionally, MBP does not seem to provide a clear benefit with regard to SSI prevention.

  12. Detection of staphylococcus aureus and streptococcus pyogenes in the personnel of the department of surgery and surgical rooms at the San Jose Universitary Hospital Popayan, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Caldas

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To detect Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes in health personnel of the surgical and surgery services at Hospital San José. Methodology. Descriptive, Prospective cross-sectional study. The techniques used were surveys and sampling nasal and pharyngeal microbiological cultures. Results. It was found that from 29 persons under study, 10 (34.40yo were S. aureus carriers, and it was not found S. pyogenes carriers. From the positives, 8 (80% were S. aureus nasal carriers, and 2 (20% pharyngeal carriers. From 8 people (80%, 4 (40% belonged to the department ofsurgery and another 4 (40% to the surgical services; 2 (20% from the pharyngeal positives worked at the surgery services. From the carriers, 5 people (50% were nursing assistants, followed by 4 (40%, who belong to doctors and 1 person (10% belonged to nursing.

  13. Influence of Peri-Operative Hypothermia on Surgical Site Infection in Prolonged Gastroenterological Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Toshie; Takesue, Yoshio; Ichiki, Kaoru; Uede, Takashi; Nakajima, Kazuhiko; Ikeuchi, Hiroki; Uchino, Motoi

    2016-10-01

    There have been several recent studies on the correlation between intra-operative hypothermia and the occurrence of surgical site infection (SSI). Differences in the depth and timing of hypothermia and the surgical procedure may have led to conflicting results. Patients undergoing gastroenterologic surgery with a duration of >3 h were analyzed. Hypothermia was defined as a core temperature <36°C and was classified as mild (35.5-35.9°C), moderate (35.0-35.4°C), or severe (<35.0°C). Hypothermia also was classified as early-nadir (<36°C within two h of anesthesia induction) and late-nadir (after that time). Risk factors for SSIs were analyzed according to these classifications. Among 1,409 patients, 528 (37.5%) had hypothermia, which was classified as mild in 358, moderate in 137, and severe in 33. Early-nadir and late-nadir hypothermia was found in 23.7% and 13.8%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the incidence of SSIs between patients with and without hypothermia (relative risk 1.00; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.80-1.25; p = 0.997). However, there was a significantly greater incidence of SSIs in patients with severe hypothermia (33.3%) than in those with normothermia (19.2%; p = 0.045) or mild hypothermia (17.0%; p = 0.021). The incidence of SSIs also was significantly greater in patients with late-nadir than in those with early-nadir hypothermia (23.7% vs. 16.5%; p = 0.041). The incidence of organ/space SSIs was significantly greater in patients with late-nadir hypothermia (19.6%) than in patients with normothermia (12.7%; p = 0.012). In multivariable analysis, neither severe hypothermia (odds ratio 1.24; 95% CI 0.56-2.77] nor late-nadir hypothermia (OR 0.71; 95% CI 0.46-1.01) was an independent risk factor for SSIs. Severe and late-nadir hypothermia were associated with a greater incidence of SSIs and organ/space SSIs. However, neither of these patterns was identified as an independent risk factor for SSIs, possibly

  14. Port-site metastasis after laparoscopic surgical staging of endometrial cancer: a systematic review of the published and unpublished data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, Stefano; Falbo, Angela; Russo, Tiziana; La Sala, Giovanni Battista

    2012-01-01

    Port-site metastases, also called trocar-site metastasis, have been described after laparoscopic surgery for non-gynecological and gynecological cancers. The aim of this review was to obtain evidence for port-site metastases after laparoscopic surgical staging of endometrial cancer. A systematic search of published and unpublished cases of port-site metastases after laparoscopic staging of endometrial cancer was conducted. All the authors responsible for correspondence were contacted to obtain any missing data. The patients' characteristics and oncologic, surgical, and safety data were recorded and analyzed. Twelve cases of port-site metastases were identified and examined. In 4 cases they were "isolated," that is, recurrence without association with peritoneal carcinomatosis, whereas in 8 cases they were "nonisolated." The port-site metastases did not occur as a result of trocar site localization or dimension. No univocal strategy to prevent port-site metastases was adopted. Among patients with nonisolated port-site metastases, an aggressive histologic condition and a high grade were found in 3 of 6 patients and in 3 of 5 patients, respectively. Among patients with isolated port-site metastases, an early-stage endometrioid adenocarcinoma G2 endometrial cancer and a stage IIB G2 endometrioid adenocarcinoma were described in 3 of 4 patients and in only 1 case, respectively. All the patients with nonisolated port-site metastases died of disease. Similarly, among patients with isolated port-site metastases, only 1 was alive and free of disease after 10 months from recurrence diagnosis. Port-site metastases of endometrial cancer are an entity rarely reported but probably the expression of an aggressive disease. The available data do not allow us to draw conclusions or suggestions for their prevention and the treatment. Copyright © 2012 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Surgical and Antimicrobial Treatment of Prosthetic Vascular Graft Infections at Different Surgical Sites: A Retrospective Study of Treatment Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzi, Luigia; Gurke, Lorenz; Battegay, Manuel; Widmer, Andreas F.; Weisser, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Objective Little is known about optimal management of prosthetic vascular graft infections, which are a rare but serious complication associated with graft implants. The goal of this study was to compare and characterize these infections with respect to the location of the graft and to identify factors associated with outcome. Methods This was a retrospective study over more than a decade at a tertiary care university hospital that has an established multidisciplinary approach to treating graft infections. Cases of possible prosthetic vascular graft infection were identified from the hospital's infectious diseases database and evaluated against strict diagnostic criteria. Patients were divided into groups according to the locations of their grafts: thoracic-aortic, abdominal-aortic, or peripheral-arterial. Statistical analyses included evaluation of patient and infection characteristics, time to treatment failure, and factors associated specifically with cure rates in aortic graft infections. The primary endpoint was cure at one year after diagnosis of the infection. Results Characterization of graft infections according to the graft location did show that these infections differ in terms of their characteristics and that the prognosis for treatment seems to be influenced by the location of the infection. Cure rate and all-cause mortality at one year were 87.5% and 12.5% in 24 patients with thoracic-aortic graft infections, 37.0% and 55.6% in 27 patients with abdominal-aortic graft infections, and 70.0% and 30.0% in 10 patients with peripheral-arterial graft infections. In uni- and multivariate analysis, the type of surgical intervention used in managing infections (graft retention versus graft replacement) did not affect primary outcome, whereas a rifampicin-based antimicrobial regimen was associated with a higher cure rate. Conclusions We recommend that future prospective studies differentiate prosthetic vascular graft infections according to the location of the

  16. Organizational requirements of the SaeR binding sites for a functional P1 promoter of the sae operon in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hoonsik; Jeong, Do-Won; Li, Chunling; Bae, Taeok

    2012-06-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus, the SaeRS two-component system controls the expression of multiple virulence factors. Of the two promoters in the sae operon, P1 is autoinduced and has two binding sites for the response regulator SaeR. In this study, we examined the organizational requirements of the SaeR binding sites in P1 for transcription activation. Mutational studies showed that both binding sites are essential for binding to phosphorylated SaeR (P-SaeR) and transcription activation. When the 21-bp distance between the centers of the two SaeR binding sites was altered to 26 bp, 31 bp, 36 bp, or 41 bp, only the 31-bp mutant retained approximately 40% of the original promoter activity. When the -1-bp spacing (i.e.,1-bp overlap) between the primary SaeR binding site and the -35 promoter region was altered, all mutant P1 promoters failed to initiate transcription; however, when the first nucleotide of the -35 region was changed from A to T, the mutants with 0-bp or 22-bp spacing showed detectable promoter activity. Although P-SaeR was essential for the binding of RNA polymerase to P1, it was not essential for the binding of the enzyme to the alpha-hemolysin promoter. When the nonoptimal spacing between promoter elements in P1 or the coagulase promoter was altered to the optimal spacing of 17 bp, both promoters failed to initiate transcription. These results suggest that SaeR binding sites are under rather strict organizational restrictions and provide clues for understanding the molecular mechanism of sae-mediated transcription activation.

  17. The Role of Pre-Operative and Post-Operative Glucose Control in Surgical-Site Infections and Mortality

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Christie Y.; Furuya, E. Yoko; Berman, Mitchell F.; Larson, Elaine L.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective The impact of glucose control on surgical-site infection (SSI) and death remains unclear. We examined how pre- and post-operative glucose levels and their variability are associated with the risk of SSI or in-hospital death. Methods This retrospective cohort study employed data on 13,800 hospitalized patients who underwent a surgical procedure at a large referral hospital in New York between 2006 and 2008. Over 20 different sources of electronic data were used to anal...

  18. Incidence of surgical-site infections and the validity of the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System risk index in a general surgical ward in Santa Cruz, Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleto, Lorena; Pirard, Marianne; Boelaert, Marleen; Peredo, Remberto; Vargas, Reinerio; Gianella, Alberto; Van der Stuyft, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the frequency of and risk factors for surgical-site infections (SSIs) in Bolivia, and to study the performance of the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) System risk index in a developing country. A prospective study with patient follow-up until the 30th postoperative day. A general surgical ward of a public hospital in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Patients admitted to the ward between July 1998 and June 1999 on whom surgical procedures were performed. Follow-up was complete for 91.5% of 376 surgical procedures. The overall SSI rate was 12%. Thirty-four (75.6%) of the 45 SSIs were culture positive. A logistic regression model retained an American Society of Anesthesiologists score of more than 1 (odds ratio [OR], 1.87), a not-clean wound class (OR, 2.28), a procedure duration of more than 1 hour (OR, 1.81), and drain (OR, 1.98) as independent risk factors for SSI. There was no significant association between the NNIS System risk index and SSI rates. However, a "local" risk index constructed with the above cutoff points showed a linear trend with SSI (P < .001) and a relative risk of 3.18 for risk class 3 versus a class of less than 3. SSIs cause considerable morbidity in Santa Cruz. Appropriate nosocomial infection surveillance and control should be introduced. The NNIS System risk index did not discriminate between patients at low and high risk for SSI in this hospital setting, but a risk score based on local cutoff points performed substantially better.

  19. Vancomycin Powder Regimen for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection in Complex Spine Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hal, Michael; Lee, Joon; Laudermilch, Dann; Nwasike, Chinedu; Kang, James

    2017-10-01

    In total, 496 patients of a single surgeon cohort examining the surgical-site infection (SSI) rates with the addition of vancomycin powder in both diabetic and revision spine surgery cases. A historical control group of 652 patients were compared from the same surgeon over an earlier time period before the inception of using vancomycin powder prophylaxis. The objective of this study was to describe and compare the rates of infection in high-risk patient populations while using vancomycin powder. Vancomycin powder may not decrease an already low rate of infection. Therefore, use of vancomycin powder in high-risk patients with a higher rate of infection would potentially show benefit of vancomycin powder. In total, 496 patient charts were collected from a database of cases. Patients were included in the cohort if they had revision spinal operation or if they were diabetic. Patients in the time period July 2010 to August 2013 were included in the vancomycin protocol where 1 g of vancomycin powder was added to the wound before wound closure. Cases were considered positive if there was a positive culture or if there was sufficient clinical suspicion to treat. As a control to this cohort, 692 charts were reviewed from a earlier time period of the same surgeon and institution. In total, 28 patients of 496 (5.6%) patients in the cohort returned to the operating room for seroma, hematoma, draining wound, or infection. Sixteen of these patients (16/496, 3.2%) had a culture positive infection or were treated as an infection. This rate was significantly lower than the historical rate before the protocol. Although vancomycin does seem to be useful in decreasing SSIs, it is not a panacea. SSIs in high-risk patients were not completely eliminated by the vancomycin protocol.

  20. Impact of Postoperative Antibiotic Prophylaxis Duration on Surgical Site Infections in Autologous Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Kerry E; Lanier, Steven T; Khavanin, Nima; Hume, Keith M; Gutowski, Karol A; Thornton, Brian P; Hansen, Nora M; Murphy, Robert X; Fine, Neil A; Kim, John Y S

    2016-02-01

    Although some surgeons prescribe prolonged postoperative antibiotics after autologous breast reconstruction, evidence is lacking to support this practice. We used the Tracking Operations and Outcomes for Plastic Surgeons database to evaluate the association between postoperative antibiotic duration and the rate of surgical site infection (SSI) in autologous breast reconstruction. The intervention of interest for this study was postoperative duration of antibiotic prophylaxis: either discontinued 24 hours after surgery or continued beyond 24 hours. The primary outcome variable of interest for this study was the presence of SSI within 30 days of autologous breast reconstruction. Cohort characteristics and 30-day outcomes were compared using χ² and Fischer exact tests for categorical variables and Student t tests for continuous variables. Multivariate logistic regression was used to control for confounders. A total of 1036 patients met inclusion criteria for our study. Six hundred fifty-nine patients (63.6%) received antibiotics for 24 hours postoperatively, and 377 patients (36.4%) received antibiotics for greater than 24 hours. The rate of SSI did not differ significantly between patients given antibiotics for only 24 hours and those continued on antibiotics beyond the 24-hour postoperative time period (5.01% vs 2.92%, P = 0.109). Furthermore, antibiotic duration was not predictive of SSI in multivariate regression modeling. We did not find a statistically significant difference in the rate of SSI in patients who received 24 hours of postoperative antibiotics compared to those that received antibiotics for greater than 24 hours. These findings held for both purely autologous reconstruction as well as latissimus dorsi reconstruction in conjunction with an implant. Thus, our study does not support continuation of postoperative antibiotics beyond 24 hours after autologous breast reconstruction.

  1. Short Operative Duration and Surgical Site Infection Risk in Hip and Knee Arthroplasty Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicks, Kristen V; Baker, Arthur W; Durkin, Michael J; Anderson, Deverick J; Moehring, Rebekah W; Chen, Luke F; Sexton, Daniel J; Weber, David J; Lewis, Sarah S

    2015-12-01

    To determine the association (1) between shorter operative duration and surgical site infection (SSI) and (2) between surgeon median operative duration and SSI risk among first-time hip and knee arthroplasties. Retrospective cohort study A total of 43 community hospitals located in the southeastern United States. Adults who developed SSIs according to National Healthcare Safety Network criteria within 365 days of first-time knee or hip arthroplasties performed between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012. Log-binomial regression models estimated the association (1) between operative duration and SSI outcome and (2) between surgeon median operative duration and SSI outcome. Hip and knee arthroplasties were evaluated in separate models. Each model was adjusted for American Society of Anesthesiology score and patient age. A total of 25,531 hip arthroplasties and 42,187 knee arthroplasties were included in the study. The risk of SSI in knee arthroplasties with an operative duration shorter than the 25th percentile was 0.40 times the risk of SSI in knee arthroplasties with an operative duration between the 25th and 75th percentile (risk ratio [RR], 0.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38-0.56; Poperative duration did not demonstrate significant association with SSI for hip arthroplasties (RR, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.79-1.37; P=.36). Knee arthroplasty surgeons with shorter median operative durations had a lower risk of SSI than surgeons with typical median operative durations (RR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.43-0.64; Poperative durations were not associated with a higher SSI risk for knee or hip arthroplasty procedures in our analysis.

  2. Risk factors for surgical site infection after transvaginal mesh placement in a nationwide Japanese cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamei, Jun; Yazawa, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Shingo; Kaburaki, Naoto; Takahashi, Satoru; Takeyama, Masami; Koyama, Masayasu; Homma, Yukio; Arakawa, Soichi; Kiyota, Hiroshi

    2018-03-01

    We conducted a nationwide survey on perioperative management and antimicrobial prophylaxis of transvaginal mesh surgeries for pelvic organ prolapse in Japan to understand the practice and risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI). Health records of women undergoing tension-free vaginal mesh (TVM) surgeries from 2010 to 2012 were obtained from 135 medical centers belonging to the Japanese Society of Pelvic Organ Prolapse Surgery. The questionnaire addressed hospital volume, perioperative management, and SSI. Risk factors for SSI were investigated by comparing cases with and without SSI. The hospital volume among institutions varied from 0 to 248 per year (median 16.7). Preoperative hair removal, bowel preparation, and urine culture were routinely performed at 74 (55%), 66 (49%), and 24 (18%) hospitals, respectively. Prophylactic antimicrobials used were mostly first-generation (43%) or second-generation (42%) cephalosporin. SSI was reported in 86 of 9323 patients (0.92%). A multivariate analysis indicated lower hospital volume (odds ratio [OR], 0.995 [by 1-point increase]; P < 0.001), preoperative bowel preparation (OR, 2.08; P = 0.013), non-routine urine culture (OR, 3.00; P = 0.0006), and the use of antibiotics other than first-generation cephalosporin (OR, 5.29; P = 0.0011) as significant risk factors for SSI. In contrast, the cut-off points of hospital volume for preventing SSI was 116.7 cases (area under curve: 0.61). The prevalence of SSI in TVM surgeries was 0.92% in Japan. Lower hospital volume, bowel preparation, non-routine preoperative urine culture, and prophylactic antibiotics other than first-generation cephalosporin significantly elevated the incidence of SSI. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A Prognostic Scoring Tool for Cesarean Organ/Space Surgical Site Infections: Derivation and Internal Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assawapalanggool, Srisuda; Kasatpibal, Nongyao; Sirichotiyakul, Supatra; Arora, Rajin; Suntornlimsiri, Watcharin

    Organ/space surgical site infections (SSIs) are serious complications after cesarean delivery. However, no scoring tool to predict these complications has yet been developed. This study sought to develop and validate a prognostic scoring tool for cesarean organ/space SSIs. Data for case and non-case of cesarean organ/space SSI between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2012 from a tertiary care hospital in Thailand were analyzed. Stepwise multivariable logistic regression was used to select the best predictor combination and their coefficients were transformed to a risk scoring tool. The likelihood ratio of positive for each risk category and the area under receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curves were analyzed on total scores. Internal validation using bootstrap re-sampling was tested for reproducibility. The predictors of 243 organ/space SSIs from 4,988 eligible cesarean delivery cases comprised the presence of foul-smelling amniotic fluid (four points), vaginal examination five or more times before incision (two points), wound class III or greater (two points), being referred from local setting (two points), hemoglobin less than 11 g/dL (one point), and ethnic minorities (one point). The likelihood ratio of cesarean organ/space SSIs with 95% confidence interval among low (total score of 0-1 point), medium (total score of 2-5 points), and high risk (total score of ≥6 points) categories were 0.11 (0.07-0.19), 1.03 (0.89-1.18), and 13.25 (10.87-16.14), respectively. Both AUROCs of the derivation and validation data were comparable (87.57% versus 86.08%; p = 0.418). This scoring tool showed a high predictive ability regarding cesarean organ/space SSIs on the derivation data and reproducibility was demonstrated on internal validation. It could assist practitioners prioritize patient care and management depending on risk category and decrease SSI rates in cesarean deliveries.

  4. 207-nm UV light - a promising tool for safe low-cost reduction of surgical site infections. I: in vitro studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Buonanno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: 0.5% to 10% of clean surgeries result in surgical-site infections, and attempts to reduce this rate have had limited success. Germicidal UV lamps, with a broad wavelength spectrum from 200 to 400 nm are an effective bactericidal option against drug-resistant and drug-sensitive bacteria, but represent a health hazard to patient and staff. By contrast, because of its limited penetration, ~200 nm far-UVC light is predicted to be effective in killing bacteria, but without the human health hazards to skin and eyes associated with conventional germicidal UV exposure. AIMS: The aim of this work was to test the biophysically-based hypothesis that ~200 nm UV light is significantly cytotoxic to bacteria, but minimally cytotoxic or mutagenic to human cells either isolated or within tissues. METHODS: A Kr-Br excimer lamp was used, which produces 207-nm UV light, with a filter to remove higher-wavelength components. Comparisons were made with results from a conventional broad spectrum 254-nm UV germicidal lamp. First, cell inactivation vs. UV fluence data were generated for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA bacteria and also for normal human fibroblasts. Second, yields of the main UV-associated pre-mutagenic DNA lesions (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts were measured, for both UV radiations incident on 3-D human skin tissue. RESULTS: We found that 207-nm UV light kills MRSA efficiently but, unlike conventional germicidal UV lamps, produces little cell killing in human cells. In a 3-D human skin model, 207-nm UV light produced almost no pre-mutagenic UV-associated DNA lesions, in contrast to significant yields induced by a conventional germicidal UV lamp. CONCLUSIONS: As predicted based on biophysical considerations, 207-nm light kills bacteria efficiently but does not appear to be significantly cytotoxic or mutagenic to human cells. Used appropriately, 207-nm light may have the potential for safely and inexpensively

  5. 207-nm UV light - a promising tool for safe low-cost reduction of surgical site infections. I: in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonanno, Manuela; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Bigelow, Alan W; Trivedi, Sheetal; Lowy, Franklin D; Spotnitz, Henry M; Hammer, Scott M; Brenner, David J

    2013-01-01

    0.5% to 10% of clean surgeries result in surgical-site infections, and attempts to reduce this rate have had limited success. Germicidal UV lamps, with a broad wavelength spectrum from 200 to 400 nm are an effective bactericidal option against drug-resistant and drug-sensitive bacteria, but represent a health hazard to patient and staff. By contrast, because of its limited penetration, ~200 nm far-UVC light is predicted to be effective in killing bacteria, but without the human health hazards to skin and eyes associated with conventional germicidal UV exposure. The aim of this work was to test the biophysically-based hypothesis that ~200 nm UV light is significantly cytotoxic to bacteria, but minimally cytotoxic or mutagenic to human cells either isolated or within tissues. A Kr-Br excimer lamp was used, which produces 207-nm UV light, with a filter to remove higher-wavelength components. Comparisons were made with results from a conventional broad spectrum 254-nm UV germicidal lamp. First, cell inactivation vs. UV fluence data were generated for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) bacteria and also for normal human fibroblasts. Second, yields of the main UV-associated pre-mutagenic DNA lesions (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 6-4 photoproducts) were measured, for both UV radiations incident on 3-D human skin tissue. We found that 207-nm UV light kills MRSA efficiently but, unlike conventional germicidal UV lamps, produces little cell killing in human cells. In a 3-D human skin model, 207-nm UV light produced almost no pre-mutagenic UV-associated DNA lesions, in contrast to significant yields induced by a conventional germicidal UV lamp. As predicted based on biophysical considerations, 207-nm light kills bacteria efficiently but does not appear to be significantly cytotoxic or mutagenic to human cells. Used appropriately, 207-nm light may have the potential for safely and inexpensively reducing surgical-site infection rates, including those of drug

  6. Pattern of pathogens and their sensitivity isolated from superficial surgical site infections in a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.A.; Tahir, S.M.; Shaikh, N.A.

    2009-01-01

    Infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in surgical patients. Rapidly emerging nosocomial pathogens and the problem of multi-drug resistance necessitates periodic review of isolation patterns and sensitivity in surgical practice. Surgical site infections (SSI) are defined as an infections that occurs at the incision site within thirty days after surgery. Objectives of the study were to determine the pattern of pathogens involved and their antibiotic sensitivity isolated from superficial surgical site infections in a teaching hospital. This observational study was conducted for 1 year from January 2008 to December 2008 in all 4 surgical units of Liaquat University Hospital Hyderabad which caters to patients from low socioeconomic status. Pus culture and sensitivity reports were collected prospectively from hospitalised patients who developed postoperative wound infection. The patients who developed fecal/biliary/urinary fistula or operated for malignancies, and with negative cultures were excluded from the study. Analysis was carried out using SPSS 10. During the study period 112 pus culture and sensitivity reports were analyzed. E. coli 68 (60.7%) was the most common organism isolated followed by Klebsiella 23 (20.5%). The least frequent organism was staph. Epidermidis 1 (0.9%). All isolates were sensitive to penicillin derivatives and carbapenem. Quinolones, Aminoglycosides and Monobactum were also showing some promise in our study. However, Cephalosporins were ineffective against most of the important isolates in our study. E. coli and klebsiella were the most important isolates form SSI in our study, and penicillin derivatives and carbapenem were showing 100% antibiotic sensitivity to all of the isolates. (author)

  7. is there an increased risk of post-operative surgical site infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-06

    Sep 6, 2012 ... requiring implant orthopaedic surgery are at an increased risk for post-operative surgical ... further studies should determine the effect of reduced CD4 counts, viral load .... Language not Enlish, French, Ducth or German (n=2).

  8. Effect of laminar airflow ventilation on surgical site infections: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Peter; Kubilay, N Zeynep; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Egger, Matthias; Gastmeier, Petra

    2017-05-01

    The role of the operating room's ventilation system in the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs) is widely discussed, and existing guidelines do not reflect current evidence. In this context, laminar airflow ventilation was compared with conventional ventilation to assess their effectiveness in reducing the risk of SSIs. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and WHO regional medical databases from Jan 1, 1990, to Jan 31, 2014. We updated the search for MEDLINE for the period between Feb 1, 2014, and May 25, 2016. We included studies most relevant to our predefined question: is the use of laminar airflow in the operating room associated with the reduction of overall or deep SSI as outcomes in patients of any age undergoing surgical operations? We excluded studies not relevant to the study question, studies not in the selected languages, studies published before Jan 1, 1990, or after May 25, 2016, meeting or conference abstracts, and studies of which the full text was not available. Data were extracted by two independent investigators, with disagreements resolved through further discussion. Authors were contacted if the full-text article was not available, or if important data or information on the paper's content was absent. Studies were assessed for publication bias. Grading of recommendations assessment, development, and evaluation was used to assess the quality of the identified evidence. Meta-analyses were done with RevMan (version 5.3). We identified 1947 records of which 12 observational studies were comparing laminar airflow ventilation with conventional turbulent ventilation in orthopaedic, abdominal, and vascular surgery. The meta-analysis of eight cohort studies showed no difference in risk for deep SSIs following total hip arthroplasty (330 146 procedures, odds ratio [OR] 1·29, 95% CI 0·98-1·71; p=0·07, I 2 =83%). For total knee arthroplasty, the meta-analysis of six cohort studies showed no difference

  9. The sensitivity status of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community acquired Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from various infectious sites in two private laboratories in Kano-city, Nigeria. A total of 247 (11%) Staphylococcu aureus isolates were recovered from all infectious sites except cerebro-spinal fluid. The least Staphylococcus aureus isolates were found in urine ...

  10. A journey to zero: reduction of post-operative cesarean surgical site infections over a five-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, Evelyn; Harris, Jeanette; Brett, David

    2015-04-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are a substantial concern for cesarean deliveries in which a surgical site complication is most unwelcome for a mother with a new infant. Steps taken pre- and post-operatively to reduce the number of complications may be of substantial benefit clinically, economically, and psychologically. A risk-based approach to incision management was developed and implemented for all cesarean deliveries at our institution. A number of incremental interventions for low-risk and high-risk patients including pre-operative skin preparations, standardized pre- and post-operative protocols, post-operative nanocrystalline silver anti-microbial barrier dressings, and incisional negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) were implemented sequentially over a 5-y period. A systematic clinical chart review of 4,942 patients spanning all cesarean deliveries between 2007-2012 was performed to determine what effects the interventions had on the rate of SSI for cesarean deliveries. The percentage of SSI was reduced from 2.13% (2007) to 0.10% (2012) (poperative SSIs were avoided: A total cost saving of nearly $5,000,000. Applying a clinical algorithm for assessing the risk of surgical site complication and making recommendations on pre-operative and post-operative incision management can result in a substantial and sustainable reduction in cesarean SSI.

  11. Wound edge protectors in open abdominal surgery to reduce surgical site infections: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André L Mihaljevic

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections remain one of the most frequent complications following abdominal surgery and cause substantial costs, morbidity and mortality.To assess the effectiveness of wound edge protectors in open abdominal surgery in reducing surgical site infections.A systematic literature search was conducted according to a prespecified review protocol in a variety of data-bases combined with hand-searches for randomized controlled trials on wound edge protectors in patients undergoing laparotomy. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of included trials was conducted.We identified 16 randomized controlled trials including 3695 patients investigating wound edge protectors published between 1972 and 2014. Critical appraisal uncovered a number of methodological flaws, predominantly in the older trials. Wound edge protectors significantly reduced the rate of surgical site infections (risk ratio 0.65; 95%CI, 0.51-0.83; p = 0.0007; I2 = 52%. The results were robust in a number of sensitivity analyses. A similar effect size was found in the subgroup of patients undergoing colorectal surgery (risk ratio 0.65; 95%CI, 0.44-0.97; p = 0.04; I2 = 56%. Of the two common types of wound protectors double ring devices were found to exhibit a greater protective effect (risk ratio 0.29; 95%CI, 0.15-0.55 than single-ring devices (risk ratio 0.71; 95%CI, 0.54-0.92, but this might largely be due to the lower quality of available data for double-ring devices. Exploratory subgroup analyses for the degree of contamination showed a larger protective effect in contaminated cases (0.44; 95%CI, 0.28-0.67; p = 0.0002, I2 = 23% than in clean-contaminated surgeries (0.72, 95%CI, 0.57-0.91; p = 0.005; I2 = 46% and a strong effect on the reduction of superficial surgical site infections (risk ratio 0.45; 95%CI, 0.24-0.82; p = 0.001; I2 = 72%.Wound edge protectors significantly reduce the rate of surgical site infections in open abdominal surgery. Further trials are needed to

  12. Prospective multicenter surveillance and risk factor analysis of deep surgical site infection after posterior thoracic and/or lumbar spinal surgery in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, Satoshi; Yamazaki, Takashi; Maruyama, Toru; Oka, Hiroyuki; Miyoshi, Kota; Azuma, Seiichi; Yamada, Takashi; Murakami, Motoaki; Kawamura, Naohiro; Hara, Nobuhiro; Terayama, Sei; Morii, Jiro; Kato, So; Tanaka, Sakae

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infection is a serious and significant complication after spinal surgery and is associated with high morbidity rates, high healthcare costs and poor patient outcomes. Accurate identification of risk factors is essential for developing strategies to prevent devastating infections. The purpose of this study was to identify independent risk factors for surgical site infection among posterior thoracic and/or lumbar spinal surgery in adult patients using a prospective multicenter surveillance research method. From July 2010 to June 2012, we performed a prospective surveillance study in adult patients who had developed surgical site infection after undergoing thoracic and/or lumbar posterior spinal surgery at 11 participating hospitals. Detailed preoperative and operative patient characteristics were prospectively recorded using a standardized data collection format. Surgical site infection was based on the definition established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A total of 2,736 consecutive adult patients were enrolled, of which 24 (0.9%) developed postoperative deep surgical site infection. Multivariate regression analysis indicated four independent risk factors. Preoperative steroid therapy (P = 0.001), spinal trauma (P = 0.048) and gender (male) (P = 0.02) were statistically significant independent patient-related risk factors, whereas an operating time ≥3 h (P operating time ≥3 h were independent risk factors for deep surgical site infection after thoracic and/or lumbar spinal surgery in adult patients. Identification of these risk factors can be used to develop protocols aimed at decreasing the risk of surgical site infection.

  13. Clinical relevance of surgical site infection as defined by the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, N A; Meyhoff, C S; Wetterslev, J

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after abdominal surgery and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria are commonly used for diagnosis and surveillance. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether SSI diagnosed according to CDC is clinically relevant...... diagnosed with SSI and a matched control group (N=46) without SSI according to the CDC criteria after laparotomy. Two blinded experienced surgeons evaluated the hospital records and determined whether patients had CRSSI, based on the following criteria: antibiotic treatment, surgical intervention, prolonged...... hospital stay or referral to an intensive care unit for SSI. The rate of CRSSI was 38 of 54 (70%) in patients with CDC-diagnosed SSI and none in patients without a CDC-diagnosed SSI. Sixty-one percent of the CDC-diagnosed SSIs were superficial, of which 48% were considered clinically relevant...

  14. Economic and clinical contributions of an antimicrobial barrier dressing: a strategy for the reduction of surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaper, David; Nazir, Jameel; Roberts, Chris; Searle, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In patients at risk of surgical site infection (SSI), there is evidence that an antimicrobial barrier dressing (Acticoat* ) applied immediately post-procedure is effective in reducing the incidence of infection. The objective of this study was to assess when it is appropriate to use an antimicrobial barrier dressing rather than a post-operative film dressing, by evaluating the net cost and budget impact of the two strategies. An economic model was developed, which estimates expected expenditure on dressings and the expected costs of surgical site infection during the initial inpatient episode, based on published literature on the pre-discharge costs of surgical infection and the efficacy of an antimicrobial barrier dressing in preventing SSI. At an SSI risk of 10%, an antimicrobial barrier dressing strategy is cost neutral if the incidence of infection is reduced by at least 9% compared with a post-operative film dressing. At 35% efficacy, expenditure on dressings would be higher by £30,760 per 1000 patients, and the cost of treating infection would be lower by £111,650, resulting in a net cost saving of £80,890. The break-even infection risk for cost neutrality is 2.6%. Although this cost analysis is based on published data, there are limitations in methodology: the model is dependent on and subject to the limitations of the data used to populate it. Further studies would be useful to increase the robustness of the conclusions, particularly in a broader range of surgical specialties. A strategy involving the use of an antimicrobial barrier dressing in patients at moderate (5-10%) or high (>10%) risk of infection appears reasonable and cost saving in light of the available clinical evidence.

  15. Early Surgical Site Infection Following Tissue Expander Breast Reconstruction with or without Acellular Dermal Matrix: National Benchmarking Using National Surgical Quality Improvement Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Winocour

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSurgical site infections (SSIs result in significant patient morbidity following immediate tissue expander breast reconstruction (ITEBR. This study determined a single institution's 30-day SSI rate and benchmarked it against that among national institutions participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP.MethodsWomen who underwent ITEBR with/without acellular dermal matrix (ADM were identified using the ACS-NSQIP database between 2005 and 2011. Patient characteristics associated with the 30-day SSI rate were determined, and differences in rates between our institution and the national database were assessed.Results12,163 patients underwent ITEBR, including 263 at our institution. SSIs occurred in 416 (3.4% patients nationwide excluding our institution, with lower rates observed at our institution (1.9%. Nationwide, SSIs were significantly more common in ITEBR patients with ADM (4.5% compared to non-ADM patients (3.2%, P=0.005, and this trend was observed at our institution (2.1% vs. 1.6%, P=1.00. A multivariable analysis of all institutions identified age ≥50 years (odds ratio [OR], 1.4; confidence interval [CI], 1.1-1.7, body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 vs. 4.25 hours (OR, 1.9; CI, 1.5-2.4 as risk factors for SSIs. Our institutional SSI rate was lower than the nationwide rate (OR, 0.4; CI, 0.2-1.1, although this difference was not statistically significant (P=0.07.ConclusionsThe 30-day SSI rate at our institution in patients who underwent ITEBR was lower than the nation. SSIs occurred more frequently in procedures involving ADM both nationally and at our institution.

  16. Comparative effectiveness of skin antiseptic agents in reducing surgical site infections: a report from the Washington State Surgical Care and Outcomes Assessment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Timo W; Dellinger, E Patchen; Evans, Heather L; Farjah, Farhood; Farrokhi, Ellen; Steele, Scott R; Thirlby, Richard; Flum, David R

    2014-03-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are an important source of morbidity and mortality. Chlorhexidine in isopropyl alcohol is effective in preventing central venous-catheter associated infections, but its effectiveness in reducing SSI in clean-contaminated procedures is uncertain. Surgical studies to date have had contradictory results. We aimed to further evaluate the relationship of commonly used antiseptic agents and SSI, and to determine if isopropyl alcohol has a unique effect. We performed a prospective cohort analysis to evaluate the relationship of commonly used skin antiseptic agents and SSI for patients undergoing mostly clean-contaminated surgery from January 2011 through June 2012. Multivariate regression modeling predicted expected rates of SSI. Risk adjusted event rates (RAERs) of SSI were compared across groups using proportionality testing. Among 7,669 patients, the rate of SSI was 4.6%. The RAERs were 0.85 (p = 0.28) for chlorhexidine (CHG), 1.10 (p = 0.06) for chlorhexidine in isopropyl alcohol (CHG+IPA), 0.98 (p = 0.96) for povidone-iodine (PVI), and 0.93 (p = 0.51) for iodine-povacrylex in isopropyl alcohol (IPC+IPA). The RAERs were 0.91 (p = 0.39) for the non-IPA group and 1.10 (p = 0.07) for the IPA group. Among elective colorectal patients, the RAERs were 0.90 (p = 0.48) for CHG, 1.04 (p = 0.67) for CHG+IPA, 1.04 (p = 0.85) for PVI, and 1.00 (p = 0.99) for IPC+IPA. For clean-contaminated surgical cases, this large-scale state cohort study did not demonstrate superiority of any commonly used skin antiseptic agent in reducing the risk of SSI, nor did it find any unique effect of isopropyl alcohol. These results do not support the use of more expensive skin preparation agents. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prospective Randomized Evaluation of Intraoperative Application of Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma on Surgical Site Infection or Delayed Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanGiovanni, Thomas P; Kiebzak, Gary M

    2016-05-01

    Prevention of surgical site infections and the reduction of wound-related complication rates have become increasingly emphasized by hospital task groups and government agencies given the degree of economic burden it places on the health care system. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains growth factors and other biomolecules that promote endogenous microbicidal activity. We hypothesized that PRP would help prevent postoperative infection and delayed wound healing (DWH). We randomized patients having foot or ankle surgery to the treatment group receiving intraoperative PRP (applied to operative field) and platelet-poor plasma at closing (PPP, on the sutured skin) or the control group (no PRP/PPP). The incidence of deep surgical site infection and DWH (collectively called endpoints) was compared between groups (n = 250/group). PRP had a mean 5.3-fold platelet concentration compared to whole blood, with concentrated white blood cells. Mean age (±SD) of patients was 52 years (±15), 65% were women. Minor and major operative procedures were included. Patients were followed for 60 days. Seventy controls had PRP prepared for assay of growth factors. Procedure mix, ASA scores, mean operative times, and comorbidity mix were similar between groups. The primary result was no difference in number of endpoints between groups: 19 patients in the PRP group (7.6%) versus 18 controls (7.2%). Endpoints were deep surgical site infections in 2 PRP/PPP patients and 1 control, and DWH in 17 PRP/PPP patients and 17 controls. Analysis of PRP samples revealed a large variation in growth factor concentrations between patients. Intraoperative application of PRP/PPP did not reduce the incidence of postoperative infection or DWH. Growth factor profiles varied greatly between patients, suggesting that the potentially therapeutic treatment delivered was not consistent from patient-to-patient. Level I, prospective randomized trial. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Standard abdominal wound edge protection with surgical dressings vs coverage with a sterile circular polyethylene drape for prevention of surgical site infections (BaFO: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaljevic André L

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postoperative surgical site infections cause substantial morbidity, prolonged hospitalization, costs and even mortality and remain one of the most frequent surgical complications. Approximately 14% to 30% of all patients undergoing elective open abdominal surgery are affected and methods to reduce surgical site infection rates warrant further investigation and evaluation in randomized controlled trials. Methods/design To investigate whether the application of a circular plastic wound protector reduces the rate of surgical site infections in general and visceral surgical patients that undergo midline or transverse laparotomy by 50%. BaFO is a randomized, controlled, patient-blinded and observer-blinded multicenter clinical trial with two parallel surgical groups. The primary outcome measure will be the rate of surgical site infections within 45 days postoperative assessed according to the definition of the Center for Disease Control. Statistical analysis of the primary endpoint will be based on the intention-to-treat population. The global level of significance is set at 5% (2 sided and sample size (n = 258 per group is determined to assure a power of 80% with a planned interim analysis for the primary endpoint after the inclusion of 340 patients. Discussion The BaFO trial will explore if the rate of surgical site infections can be reduced by a single, simple, inexpensive intervention in patients undergoing open elective abdominal surgery. Its pragmatic design guarantees high external validity and clinical relevance. Trial registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT01181206. Date of registration: 11 August 2010; date of first patient randomized: 8 September 2010

  19. Incidence and risk factors for surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jiashen; Chang, Hengrui; Zhu, Yanbin; Chen, Wei; Zheng, Zhanle; Zhang, Huixin; Zhang, Yingze

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to quantitatively summarize the risk factors associated with surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture. Medline, Embase, CNKI, Wanfang database and Cochrane central database were searched for relevant original studies from database inception to October 2016. Eligible studies had to meet quality assessment criteria according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale, and had to evaluate the risk factors for surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture. Stata 11.0 software was used for this meta-analysis. Eight studies involving 2214 cases of tibial plateau fracture treated by open reduction and internal fixation and 219 cases of surgical site infection were included in this meta-analysis. The following parameters were identified as significant risk factors for surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture (p operative time (OR 2.15; 95% CI 1.53-3.02), tobacco use (OR 2.13; 95% CI 1.13-3.99), and external fixation (OR 2.07; 95% CI 1.05-4.09). Other factors, including male sex, were not identified as risk factors for surgical site infection. Patients with the abovementioned medical conditions are at risk of surgical site infection after open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau fracture. Surgeons should be cognizant of these risks and give relevant preoperative advice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Surgical Site Infection after Sternotomy in Low- and Middle-Human Development Index Countries: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Joseph D; Cai, Lawrence Z; Zeigler, Sanford; Weiser, Thomas G

    2017-10-01

    The burden of cardiovascular disease is increasing in low- and middle-human development index (LMHDI) countries, and cardiac operations are an important component of a comprehensive cardiovascular care package. Little is known about the baseline incidence of surgical site infections (SSIs) among patients undergoing sternotomy in LMHDI countries. A prospectively registered, systematic literature review of articles in the PubMed, Ovid, and Web of Science databases describing the epidemiology and management of SSIs among persons undergoing sternotomy in LMHDI countries was performed. We performed a quantitative synthesis of patients undergoing sternotomy for CABG to estimate published sternotomy SSI rates. Of the 423 abstracts identified after applying search criteria, 14 studies were reviewed in detail. The pooled SSI rate after sternotomy among reviewed studies was 4.3 infections per 100 sternotomies (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-6.0 infections per 100 sternotomies), which is comparable to infection rates in high-human development index countries. As the burden of cardiovascular disease in LMHDI settings increases, the ability to provide safe cardiac surgical care is paramount. Describing the baseline SSI rate after sternotomy in LMHDI countries is an important first step in creating baseline expectations for SSI rates in cardiac surgical programs in these settings.

  1. 73. Surgical site infection after CABG: Root cause analysis and quality measures recommendation SSI quality improvement project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arifi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infection (SSI, is a preventable and devastating complication with significant morbidity after cardiac surgery. The reported SSI rate at our center, ranging from 3.4% to 11.2% (2007–2013. This rate is considered to be above the standardized rate recommended by the NHSN. Quality improvement project team to address the issue of SSI, (SCIP, where formed by the medical administration late 2014. The aim of the study was to identify SSI risk factors at our cardiac surgical unit, using evidence based practices while taking a local approach to problem solving. We performed Root Cause Analysis (RCA, and we applied other quality improvement tools to identify the area for potential improvement. Data include a Process Map of the pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative factors that might contribute to SSI risk. We prospectively used the RCA form to investigate all the stages of the patient process map (pre, intra op, and post operatively. The data included the Patient related factors, the sterilization and the hygiene practice in the operating room, and the operating room traffic, and the compliance to the bundle of care. Figure represent the “Fishbone” diagram of the possible causes of SSI after cardiac surgery in our unit. Demographic features of patients with SSI were as follows: mean age-65 years; female 83%; time to infection (mean 101 days; range 1–36 days;. The root cause analysis identified a significant weakness in the compliance to the bundle of care to prevent SSI. Furthermore, the patient flow, the operating theatre cleaning and traffic was also identified as a contributing factor to SSI. Surgical site infection after cardiac surgery is a preventable complication. The application of the evidence based practice and structured way of thinking in problem solving, will help identify the potential risk factors. Focusing on solving the right patient process and visually represents the problem will help identifying the

  2. Pre-operative and early post-operative factors associated with surgical site infection after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Tovar, Jaime; Oller, Inmaculada; Llavero, Carolina; Arroyo, Antonio; Muñoz, Jose Luis; Calero, Alicia; Diez, María; Zubiaga, Lorea; Calpena, Rafael

    2013-08-01

    Surgical procedures on obese patients are expected to have a high incidence of surgical site infection (SSI). The identification of pre-operative or early post-operative risk factors for SSI may help the surgeon to identify subjects in risk and adequately optimize their status. We conducted a study of the association of comorbidities and pre- and post-operative analytical variables with SSI following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for the treatment of morbid obesity. We performed a prospective study of all morbidly obese patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy as a bariatric procedure between 2007 and 2011. An association of clinical and analytical variables with SSI was investigated. The study included 40 patients with a mean pre-operative body mass index (BMI) of 51.2±7.9 kg/m(2). Surgical site infections appeared in three patients (7.5%), of whom two had an intra-abdominal abscess located in the left hypochondrium and the third had a superficial incisional SSI. Pre-operatively, a BMI >45 kg/m(2) (OR 8.7; p=0.008), restrictive disorders identified by pulmonary function tests (OR 10.0; p=0.012), a serum total protein concentration 30 mcg/dL (OR 13.0; p=0.003), and a mean corpuscular volume (MCV) operative SSI. Post-operatively, a serum glucose >128 mg/dL (OR 4.7; p=0.012) and hemoglobin operative anemia and hyperglycemia as risk factors for SSI. In these situations, the surgeon must be aware of and seek to control these risk factors.

  3. Clinical relevance of surgical site infection as defined by the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, N A; Meyhoff, C S; Wetterslev, J

    2010-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after abdominal surgery and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria are commonly used for diagnosis and surveillance. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether SSI diagnosed according to CDC is clinically relevant (C...... a suitable standard definition for monitoring and identifying SSI, even if some cases of less clinically significant superficial SSI are included.......Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after abdominal surgery and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria are commonly used for diagnosis and surveillance. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether SSI diagnosed according to CDC is clinically relevant...... hospital stay or referral to an intensive care unit for SSI. The rate of CRSSI was 38 of 54 (70%) in patients with CDC-diagnosed SSI and none in patients without a CDC-diagnosed SSI. Sixty-one percent of the CDC-diagnosed SSIs were superficial, of which 48% were considered clinically relevant...

  4. Comparison of laparoscopic and open appendectomy in terms of operative time, hospital stay and frequency of surgical site infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, T.; Saleem, M.R.; Aziz, O.B.; Arshad, A.

    2014-01-01

    To compare laparoscopic and conventional open appendectomy in terms of operative time, hospital stay and frequency of surgical site infection (SSI). Patient and Methods: A total of 417 patients underwent appendectomy during this period. 137 patients underwent laparoscopic appendectomy (group A) while 280 patient had open appendectomy (group B). The samples include all patients who were operated open between the time span of june 2010 to september 2011. A chi square-test was performed to compare the data for statistical significance. Result: Mean operative time for group A was 79.21+-23.42 minitues where as in group B, the mean operative time was 41.49+-20.86 minitues. Group A patients had a shorter hospital 1 stay (3.6+-1 day) but in group B it was (5.2+-3 days). Seven patients (5.1 %) developed surgical site infection (SSI) in group A and 34 patients (12.14 %)developed postoperative SSI in group B. Conclusion: Laparoscopic appendectomy is superior to open appendectomy because of shorter hospital stay and laser-operative SSI, but requires longer operative time. (author)

  5. Pattern of Bacterial Pathogens and Their Susceptibility Isolated from Surgical Site Infections at Selected Referral Hospitals, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walelign Dessie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The emergence of multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens in hospitals is becoming a challenge for surgeons to treat hospital acquired infections. Objective. To determine bacterial pathogens and drug susceptibility isolated from surgical site infections at St. Paul Specialized Hospital Millennium Medical College and Yekatit 12 Referral Hospital Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted between October 2013 and March 2014 on 107 surgical site infected patients. Wound specimens were collected using sterile cotton swab and processed as per standard operative procedures in appropriate culture media; and susceptibility testing was done using Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique. The data were analyzed by using SPSS version 20. Result. From a total of 107 swabs collected, 90 (84.1% were culture positive and 104 organisms were isolated. E. coli (24 (23.1% was the most common organism isolated followed by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter species (23 (22.1%. More than 58 (75% of the Gram negative isolates showed multiple antibiotic resistance (resistance ≥ 5 drugs. Pan-antibiotic resistance was noted among 8 (34.8% Acinetobacter species and 3 (12.5% E. coli. This calls for abstinence from antibiotic abuse. Conclusion. Gram negative bacteria were the most important isolates accounting for 76 (73.1%. Ampicillin, amoxicillin, penicillin, cephazoline, and tetracycline showed resistance while gentamicin and ciprofloxacin were relatively effective antimicrobials.

  6. Initial investigation of 18F-NaF PET/CT for identification of vertebral sites amenable to surgical revision after spinal fusion surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quon, Andrew; Iagaru, Andrei; Dodd, Robert; Abreu, Marcelo Rodrigues de; Sprinz, Clarice; Hennemann, Sergio; Alves Neto, Jose Maria

    2012-01-01

    A pilot study was performed in patients with recurrent back pain after spinal fusion surgery to evaluate the ability of 18 F-NaF PET/CT imaging to correctly identify those requiring surgical intervention and to locate a site amenable to surgical intervention. In this prospective study 22 patients with recurrent back pain after spinal surgery and with equivocal findings on physical examination and CT were enrolled for evaluation with 18 F-NaF PET/CT. All PET/CT images were prospectively reviewed with the primary objective of identifying or ruling out the presence of lesions amenable to surgical intervention. The PET/CT results were then validated during surgical exploration or clinical follow-up of at least 15 months. Abnormal 18 F-NaF foci were found in 16 of the 22 patients, and surgical intervention was recommended. These foci were located at various sites: screws, cages, rods, fixation hardware, and bone grafts. In 6 of the 22 patients no foci requiring surgical intervention were found. Validation of the results by surgery (15 patients) or on clinical follow-up (7 patients) showed that 18 F-NaF PET/CT correctly predicted the presence of an abnormality requiring surgical intervention in 15 of 16 patients and was falsely positive in 1 of 16. In this initial investigation, 18 F-NaF PET/CT imaging showed potential utility for evaluation of recurrent symptoms after spinal fusion surgery by identifying those patients requiring surgical management. (orig.)

  7. Robotic Laparoendoscopic Single-site Retroperitioneal Renal Surgery: Initial Investigation of a Purpose-built Single-port Surgical System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Matthew J; Ramirez, Daniel; Kaouk, Jihad H

    2017-04-01

    Robotic single-site retroperitoneal renal surgery has the potential to minimize the morbidity of standard transperitoneal and multiport approaches. Traditionally, technological limitations of non-purpose-built robotic platforms have hindered the application of this approach. To assess the feasibility of retroperitoneal renal surgery using a new purpose-built robotic single-port surgical system. This was a preclinical study using three male cadavers to assess the feasibility of the da Vinci SP1098 surgical system for robotic laparoendoscopic single-site (R-LESS) retroperitoneal renal surgery. We used the SP1098 to perform retroperitoneal R-LESS radical nephrectomy (n=1) and bilateral partial nephrectomy (n=4) on the anterior and posterior surfaces of the kidney. Improvements unique to this system include enhanced optics and intelligent instrument arm control. Access was obtained 2cm anterior and inferior to the tip of the 12th rib using a novel 2.5-cm robotic single-port system that accommodates three double-jointed articulating robotic instruments, an articulating camera, and an assistant port. The primary outcome was the technical feasibility of the procedures, as measured by the need for conversion to standard techniques, intraoperative complications, and operative times. All cases were completed without the need for conversion. There were no intraoperative complications. The operative time was 100min for radical nephrectomy, and the mean operative time was 91.8±18.5min for partial nephrectomy. Limitations include the preclinical model, the small sample size, and the lack of a control group. Single-site retroperitoneal renal surgery is feasible using the latest-generation SP1098 robotic platform. While the potential of the SP1098 appears promising, further study is needed for clinical evaluation of this investigational technology. In an experimental model, we used a new robotic system to successfully perform major surgery on the kidney through a single small

  8. Reliability of a CAD/CAM Surgical Guide for Implant Placement: An In Vitro Comparison of Surgeons' Experience Levels and Implant Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Su-Jung; Leesungbok, Richard; Cui, Taixing; Lee, Suk Won; Ahn, Su-Jin

    This in vitro study evaluated the reliability of a surgical guide with regard to different levels of operator surgical experience and implant site. A stereolithographic surgical guide for epoxy resin mandibles with three edentulous molar sites was produced using a computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) system. Two surgeons with and two surgeons without implant surgery experience placed implants in a model either using or not using the CAD/CAM surgical guide. Four groups were created: inexperienced surgeon without the guide (group 1); experienced surgeon without the guide (group 2); inexperienced surgeon with the guide (group 3); and experienced surgeon with the guide (group 4). Planned implants and placed implants were superimposed using digital software, and deviation parameters were calculated. There were no significant differences in any of the deviation parameters between the groups when using the surgical guide. With respect to the implant sites, there were no significant differences among the groups in any parameter. Use of the CAD/CAM surgical guide reduced discrepancies among operators performing implant surgery regardless of their level of experience. Whether or not the guide was used, differences in the anterior-posterior implant site in the molar area did not affect the accuracy of implant placement.

  9. Implementation of a referral to discharge glycemic control initiative for reduction of surgical site infections in gynecologic oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Laura; Brown-Broderick, Jennifer; Hearn, James; Malcolm, Janine; Chan, James; Hicks-Boucher, Wendy; De Sousa, Filomena; Walker, Mark C; Gagné, Sylvain

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the frequency of surgical site infections before and after implementation of a comprehensive, multidisciplinary perioperative glycemic control initiative. As part of a CUSP (Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program) initiative, between January 5 and December 18, 2015, we implemented comprehensive, multidisciplinary glycemic control initiative to reduce SSI rates in patients undergoing major pelvic surgery for a gynecologic malignancy ('Group II'). Key components of this quality of care initiative included pre-operative HbA1c measurement with special triage for patients meeting criteria for diabetes or pre-diabetes, standardization of available intraoperative insulin choices, rigorous pre-op/intra-op/post-op glucose monitoring with control targets set to maintain BG ≤10mmol/L (180mg/dL) and communication/notification with primary care providers. Effectiveness was evaluated against a similar control group of patients ('Group I') undergoing surgery in 2014 prior to implementation of this initiative. We studied a total of 462 patients. Subjects in the screened (Group II) and comparison (Group I) groups were of similar age (avg. 61.0, 60.0years; p=0.422) and BMI (avg. 31.1, 32.3kg/m 2 ; p=0.257). Descriptive statistics served to compare surgical site infection (SSI) rates and other characteristics across groups. Women undergoing surgery prior to implementation of this algorithm (n=165) had an infection rate of 14.6%. Group II (n=297) showed an over 2-fold reduction in SSI compared to Group I [5.7%; p=0.001, adjRR: 0.45, 95% CI: (0.25, 0.81)]. Additionally, approximately 19% of Group II patients were newly diagnosed with either prediabetes (HbA1C 6.0-6.4) or diabetes (HbA1C≥6.5) and were referred to family or internal medicine for appropriate management. Implementation of a comprehensive multidisciplinary glycemic control initiative can lead to a significant reduction in surgical site infections in addition to early identification of an important health

  10. Effects of surgical side and site on mood and behavior outcome in children with pharmacoresistant epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth N Andresen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Children with epilepsy have a high rate of mood and behavior problems yet few studies consider the emotional and behavioral impact of surgery. No study to date has been sufficiently powered to investigate effects of both side (left/right and site (temporal/frontal of surgery. One hundred patients (aged 6-16 and their families completed measures of depression, anxiety and behavioral function as part of neuropsychological evaluations before and after surgery for pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Among children who had left-sided surgeries (frontal=16; temporal=38, there were significant interactions between time (pre to postoperative neuropsychological assessment and resection site (frontal/temporal on Anhedonia, Social Anxiety, and Withdrawn/Depressed scales. Patients with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE endorsed greater presurgical anhedonia and social anxiety than patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE, with scores normalizing following surgery. While scores on the Withdrawn/Depressed scale were similar between groups before surgery, the FLE group showed greater symptom improvement after surgery. In children who underwent right-sided surgeries (FLE=20; TLE=26 main effects of time (patients in both groups improved and resection site (caregivers of FLE patients endorsed greater symptoms than those with TLE were observed primarily on behavior scales. Individual data revealed that a greater proportion of children with left FLE demonstrated clinically significant improvements in Anhedonia, Social Anxiety, and Aggressive Behavior than children with TLE. This is the first study to demonstrate differential effects of both side and site of surgery in children with epilepsy at group and individual levels. Results suggest that children with FLE have greater emotional and behavioral dysfunction before surgery, but show marked improvement after surgery. Overall, most children had good emotional and behavioral outcomes, with most scores remaining stable or improving.

  11. Surveillance of surgical site infections at a tertiary care hospital in Greece: incidence, risk factors, microbiology, and impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumbelaki, Maria; Kritsotakis, Evangelos I; Tsioutis, Constantinos; Tzilepi, Penelope; Gikas, Achilleas

    2008-12-01

    In this first attempt to implement a standardized surveillance system of surgical site infections (SSI) in a Greek hospital, our objective was to identify areas for improvement by comparing main epidemiologic and microbiologic features of SSI with international data. The National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) system protocols were employed to prospectively collect data for patients in 8 surgical wards who underwent surgery during a 9-month period. SSI rates were benchmarked with international data using standardized infection ratios. Risk factors were evaluated by multivariate logistic regression. A total of 129 SSI was identified in 2420 operations (5.3%), of which 47.3% developed after discharge. SSI rates were higher for 2 of 20 operation categories compared with Spanish and Italian data and for 12 of 20 categories compared with NNIS data. Gram-positive microorganisms accounted for 52.1% of SSI isolates, and Enterococci were predominant. Alarming resistance patterns for Enterococcus faecium and Acinetobacter baumannii were recorded. Potentially modifiable risk factors for SSI included multiple procedures, extended duration of operation, and antibiotic prophylaxis. SSI was associated with prolongation of postoperative stay but not with mortality. Comparisons of surveillance data in our hospital with international benchmarks provided useful information for infection control interventions to reduce the incidence of SSI.

  12. Developing algorithms for healthcare insurers to systematically monitor surgical site infection rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livingston James M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Claims data provide rapid indicators of SSIs for coronary artery bypass surgery and have been shown to successfully rank hospitals by SSI rates. We now operationalize this method for use by payers without transfer of protected health information, or any insurer data, to external analytic centers. Results We performed a descriptive study testing the operationalization of software for payers to routinely assess surgical infection rates among hospitals where enrollees receive cardiac procedures. We developed five SAS programs and a user manual for direct use by health plans and payers. The manual and programs were refined following provision to two national insurers who applied the programs to claims databases, following instructions on data preparation, data validation, analysis, and verification and interpretation of program output. A final set of programs and user manual successfully guided health plan programmer analysts to apply SSI algorithms to claims databases. Validation steps identified common problems such as incomplete preparation of data, missing data, insufficient sample size, and other issues that might result in program failure. Several user prompts enabled health plans to select time windows, strata such as insurance type, and the threshold number of procedures performed by a hospital before inclusion in regression models assessing relative SSI rates among hospitals. No health plan data was transferred to outside entities. Programs, on default settings, provided descriptive tables of SSI indicators stratified by hospital, insurer type, SSI indicator (inpatient, outpatient, antibiotic, and six-month period. Regression models provided rankings of hospital SSI indicator rates by quartiles, adjusted for comorbidities. Programs are publicly available without charge. Conclusion We describe a free, user-friendly software package that enables payers to routinely assess and identify hospitals with potentially high SSI

  13. Isolated port-site metastasis after surgical staging for low-risk endometrioid endometrial cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mautone, Daniele; Dall'asta, Andrea; Monica, Michela; Galli, Letizia; Capozzi, Vito Andrea; Marchesi, Federico; Giordano, Giovanna; Berretta, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    Port-site metastases (PSMs) are well-known potential complications of laparoscopic surgery for gynaecologic malignancies. The present case study reports PSM following laparoscopic surgery for Stage IA Grade 1 endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC). The recurrence developed within 7 months following primary surgery and required surgical excision followed by adjuvant chemo-radio therapy. After 9 months, the patient remains disease-free. PSMs are rare complications following laparoscopic surgery. Amongst the 23 cases of endometrial cancer PSMs reported so far, only 4 followed EEC Stage IA Grade 1-2. The present study reports a rare case of PSM after Stage IA Grade 1 EEC. The clinical and prognostic relevance of PSMs has not been identified so far; and it is not known whether PSMs represent a local recurrence or a systemic recurrence. Surgeons should be aware that even low-risk EEC may be followed by PSMs and should take steps to prevent these rare recurrences.

  14. A Quality Improvement Approach to Reducing the Caesarean section Surgical Site Infection Rate in a Regional Hospital

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’ Hanlon, M

    2016-09-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) rates are used extensively by hospitals as a basis for quality improvement. A 30-day post-discharge SSI programme for Caesarean section operations has been implemented in Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital since 2011. It has been shown that skin antisepsis and antibiotic prophylaxis are key factors in the prevention of SSI. Using quality improvement methodology, an infection prevention bundle was introduced to address these two factors. Skin antisepsis was changed from povidone-iodine to chlorhexidine-alcohol. Compliance with choice of antibiotic prophylaxis increased from 89.6% in 2014 to 98.5% in 2015. Compliance with timing also improved. The SSI rate of 7.5% was the lowest recorded to date, with the majority of SSIs (64%) diagnosed after hospital discharge. The level of variation was also reduced. However, the continued presence of variation and possibility of lower infection rates from the literature imply that further improvements are required.

  15. A classification system of intraocular lens dislocation sites under operating microscopy, and the surgical techniques and outcomes of exchange surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ken; Ogawa, Soichiro; Manabe, Shin-Ichi; Hirata, Akira; Yoshimura, Koichi

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the recent status of intraocular lens (IOL) dislocation according to a classification system based on vertical dislocation position, as well as the surgical techniques and outcomes of IOL exchange surgery. The medical records of 230 eyes from 214 consecutive patients who experienced IOL dislocation and underwent exchange surgery between 2006 and 2014 were reviewed. Vertical dislocation sites observed preoperatively under operating microscopy were examined, along with the surgical techniques and outcomes of IOL exchange. Dislocation sites included (1) the anterior chamber (12.2 %), (2) pseudophakodonesis (19.1 %), (3) the anterior vitreous cavity (47.4 %), (4) trap door-like dislocation (dangling in the peripheral vitreous cavity; 16.1 %), and (5) the retinal surface (5.2 %). The IOL retained in the anterior segment was moved onto the iris by pulling it up through the limbal side ports with an anterior vitrectomy (67.8 %), or by pushing it up from the pars plana with an anterior vitrectomy (26.5 %), while the IOL dropped on the retina was lifting it up from the retina after pars plana vitrectomy (5.7 %). Mean uncorrected and distance-corrected visual acuity significantly improved postoperatively (p system, approximately 95 % of dislocated IOLs were retained in the anterior segment, and these IOLs were exchanged using an anterior approach through limbal incisions with an anterior vitrectomy. Visual acuity improved significantly, and serious complications were uncommon, probably because the IOL exchange techniques were standardized and simplified without pars plana vitrectomy.

  16. Economic and organizational sustainability of a negative-pressure portable device for the prevention of surgical-site complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foglia E

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Emanuela Foglia,1 Lucrezia Ferrario,1 Elisabetta Garagiola,1 Giuseppe Signoriello,2 Gianluca Pellino,3 Davide Croce,1,4 Silvestro Canonico3 1Centre for Health Economics, Social and Health Care Management - LIUC University, Castellanza, Italy; 2Department of Mental Health and Preventive Medicine, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy; 3School of Medicine, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Naples, Italy; 4School of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South \tAfrica Purpose: Surgical-site complications (SSCs affect patients’ clinical pathway, prolonging their hospitalization and incrementing their management costs. The present study aimed to assess the economic and organizational implications of a portable device for negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT implementation, compared with the administration of pharmacological therapies alone for preventing surgical complications in patients undergoing general, cardiac, obstetrical–gynecological, or orthopedic surgical procedures.Patients and methods: A total of 8,566 hospital procedures, related to the year 2015 from one hospital, were evaluated considering infection risk index, occurrence rates of SSCs, drug therapies, and surgical, diagnostic, and specialist procedures and hematological exams. Activity-based costing and budget impact analyses were implemented for the economic assessment.Results: Patients developing an SSC absorbed i 64.27% more economic resources considering the length of stay (€ 8,269±2,096 versus € 5,034±2,901, p<0.05 and ii 42.43% more economic resources related to hematological and diagnostic procedures (€ 639±117 versus € 449±72, p<0.05. If the innovative device had been used over the 12-month time period, it would have decreased the risk of developing SSCs; the hospital would have realized an average reduction in health care expenditure equal to −0.69% (−€ 483

  17. Incidence and risk factors for surgical site infections in obstetric and gynecological surgeries from a teaching hospital in rural India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Pathak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infections (SSI are one of the most common healthcare associated infections in the low-middle income countries. Data on incidence and risk factors for SSI following surgeries in general and Obstetric and Gynecological surgeries in particular are scare. This study set out to identify risk factors for SSI in patients undergoing Obstetric and Gynecological surgeries in an Indian rural hospital. Methods Patients who underwent a surgical procedure between September 2010 to February 2013 in the 60-bedded ward of Obstetric and Gynecology department were included. Surveillance for SSI was based on the Centre for Disease Control (CDC definition and methodology. Incidence and risk factors for SSI, including those for specific procedure, were calculated from data collected on daily ward rounds. Results A total of 1173 patients underwent a surgical procedure during the study period. The incidence of SSI in the cohort was 7.84% (95% CI 6.30–9.38. Majority of SSI were superficial. Obstetric surgeries had a lower SSI incidence compared to gynecological surgeries (1.2% versus 10.3% respectively. The risk factors for SSI identified in the multivariate logistic regression model were age (OR 1.03, vaginal examination (OR 1.31; presence of vaginal discharge (OR 4.04; medical disease (OR 5.76; American Society of Anesthesia score greater than 3 (OR 12.8; concurrent surgical procedure (OR 3.26; each increase in hour of surgery, after the first hour, doubled the risk of SSI; inappropriate antibiotic prophylaxis increased the risk of SSI by nearly 5 times. Each day increase in stay in the hospital after the surgery increased the risk of contacting an SSI by 5%. Conclusions Incidence and risk factors from prospective SSI surveillance can be reported simultaneously for the Obstetric and Gynecological surgeries and can be part of routine practice in resource-constrained settings. The incidence of SSI was lower for Obstetric surgeries

  18. The incidence of surgical site dehiscence following full-thickness gastrointestinal biopsy in dogs and cats and associated risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinbourne, F; Jeffery, N; Tivers, M S; Artingstall, R; Bird, F; Charlesworth, T; Doran, I; Freeman, A; Hall, J; Hattersley, R; Henken, J; Hughes, J; de la Puerta, B; Rutherford, L; Ryan, T; Williams, H; Woods, S; Nicholson, I

    2017-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) document the incidence of surgical site dehiscence after full-thickness gastrointestinal biopsy in dogs and cats and (2) identify potential risk factors. Data relating to dogs and cats undergoing full-thickness gastrointestinal biopsy were reviewed retrospectively following submission of a completed questionnaire by 12 referral institutions. Outcome measures were definite dehiscence, possible dehiscence (clinical records suggestive of dehiscence but not confirmed), suspected dehiscence (definite and possible combined) and death within 14 days. Logistic regression was planned for analysis of association of dehiscence with low preoperative serum albumin, biopsy through neoplastic tissue, biopsy alongside another major abdominal surgical procedure and biopsy of the colon. Of 172 cats, two (1·2%) had definite dehiscence, and four (2·3%) had possible dehiscence. Low preoperative serum albumin was significantly associated with definite dehiscence in univariable analysis and with suspected dehiscence and death within 14 days in univariable analysis, but all odds ratios had wide 95% confidence intervals. A histopathological diagnosis of neoplasia was significantly associated with death within 14 days in univariable analysis. Of 195 dogs, two (1·0%) had definite dehiscence, and three (1·5%) had possible dehiscence. In dogs, there was no association between any outcome measure and the putative risk factors. Incidence of dehiscence following full-thickness gastrointestinal biopsy was low in this study. When determining the appropriateness of biopsy in individual cases, this information should be balanced against the potentially life-threatening consequences of dehiscence. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  19. Perioperative antibiotics for surgical site infection in pancreaticoduodenectomy: does the SCIP-approved regimen provide adequate coverage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Graham W; Sunjaya, Dharma; Lu, Xuyang; Chen, Formosa; Clerkin, Barbara; Eibl, Guido; Li, Gang; Tomlinson, James S; Donahue, Timothy R; Reber, Howard A; Hines, Oscar J

    2013-08-01

    The Joint Commission Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) includes performance measures aimed at reducing surgical site infections (SSI). One measure defines approved perioperative antibiotics for general operative procedures. However, there may be a subset of procedures not adequately covered with the use of approved antibiotics. We hypothesized that piperacillin-tazobactam is a more appropriate perioperative antibiotic for pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). In collaboration with hospital epidemiology and the Division of Infectious Diseases, we retrospectively reviewed records of 34 patients undergoing PD between March and May 2008 who received SCIP-approved perioperative antibiotics and calculated the SSI rate. After changing our perioperative antibiotic to piperacillin-tazobactam, we prospectively reviewed PDs performed between June 2008 and March 2009 and compared the SSI rates before and after the change. For 34 patients from March through May 2008, the SSI rate for PD was 32.4 per 100 cases. Common organisms from wound cultures were Enterobacter and Enterococcus (50.0% and 41.7%, respectively), and these were cefoxitin resistant. From June 2008 through March 2009, 106 PDs were performed. During this period, the SSI rate was 6.6 per 100 surgeries, 80% lower than during March through May 2008 (relative risk, 0.204; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.086-0.485; P = .0004). Use of piperacillin-tazobactam as a perioperative antibiotic in PD may reduce SSI compared with the use of SCIP-approved antibiotics. Continued evaluation of SCIP performance measures in relationship to patient outcomes is integral to sustained quality improvement. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of pre-operative and post-operative glucose control in surgical-site infections and mortality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christie Y Jeon

    Full Text Available The impact of glucose control on surgical-site infection (SSI and death remains unclear. We examined how pre- and post-operative glucose levels and their variability are associated with the risk of SSI or in-hospital death.This retrospective cohort study employed data on 13,800 hospitalized patients who underwent a surgical procedure at a large referral hospital in New York between 2006 and 2008. Over 20 different sources of electronic data were used to analyze how thirty-day risk of SSI and in-hospital death varies by glucose levels and variability. Maximum pre- and post-operative glucose levels were determined for 72 hours before and after the operation and glucose variability was defined as the coefficient of variation of the glucose measurements. We employed logistic regression to model the risk of SSI or death against glucose variables and the following potential confounders: age, sex, body mass index, duration of operation, diabetes status, procedure classification, physical status, emergency status, and blood transfusion.While association of pre- and post-operative hyperglycemia with SSI were apparent in the crude analysis, multivariate results showed that SSI risk did not vary significantly with glucose levels. On the other hand, in-hospital deaths were associated with pre-operative hypoglycemia (OR = 5.09, 95% CI (1.80, 14.4 and glucose variability (OR = 1.14, 95% CI (1.03, 1.27 for 10% increase in coefficient of variation.In-hospital deaths occurred more often among those with pre-operative hypoglycemia and higher glucose variability. These findings warrant further investigation to determine whether stabilization of glucose and prevention of hypoglycemia could reduce post-operative deaths.

  1. Reporting surgical site infections following total hip and knee arthroplasty: impact of limiting surveillance to the operative hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Avery, Taliser R; Platt, Richard; Huang, Susan S

    2013-11-01

    Public reporting of surgical site infections (SSIs) by hospitals is largely limited to infections detected during surgical hospitalizations or readmissions to the same facility. SSI rates may be underestimated if patients with SSIs are readmitted to other hospitals. We assessed the impact of readmissions to other facilities on hospitals' SSI rates following primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients who underwent primary THA or TKA at California hospitals between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2009. SSIs were identified using ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes predictive of SSI assigned at any California hospital within 365 days of surgery using a statewide repository of hospital data that allowed tracking of patients between facilities. We used statewide data to estimate the fraction of each hospital's THA and TKA SSIs identified at the operative hospital versus other hospitals. A total of 91 121 THA and 121 640 TKA procedures were identified. Based on diagnosis codes, SSIs developed following 2214 (2.3%) THAs and 2465 (2.0%) TKAs. Seventeen percent of SSIs would have been missed by operative hospital surveillance alone. The proportion of hospitals' SSIs detected at nonoperative hospitals ranged from 0% to 100%. Including SSIs detected at nonoperative hospitals resulted in better relative ranking for 61% of THA hospitals and 61% of TKA hospitals. Limiting SSI surveillance to the operative hospital caused varying degrees of SSI underestimation and substantially impacted hospitals' relative rankings, suggesting that alternative methods for comprehensive postdischarge surveillance are needed for accurate benchmarking.

  2. Effect of a Standardized Protocol of Antibiotic Therapy on Surgical Site Infection after Laparoscopic Surgery for Complicated Appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyoung-Chul; Kim, Min Jeong; Lee, Bong Hwa

    Although it is accepted that complicated appendicitis requires antibiotic therapy to prevent post-operative surgical infections, consensus protocols on the duration and regimens of treatment are not well established. This study aimed to compare the outcome of post-operative infectious complications in patients receiving old non-standardized and new standard antibiotic protocols, involving either 5 or 10 days of treatment, respectively. We enrolled 1,343 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery for complicated appendicitis between January 2009 and December 2014. At the beginning of the new protocol, the patients were divided into two groups; 10 days of various antibiotic regimens (between January 2009 and June 2012, called the non-standardized protocol; n = 730) and five days of cefuroxime and metronidazole regimen (between July 2012 and December 2014; standardized protocol; n = 613). We compared the clinical outcomes, including surgical site infection (SSI) (superficial and deep organ/space infections) in the two groups. The standardized protocol group had a slightly shorter operative time (67 vs. 69 min), a shorter hospital stay (5 vs. 5.4 d), and lower medical cost (US$1,564 vs. US$1,654). Otherwise, there was no difference between the groups. No differences were found in the non-standardized and standard protocol groups with regard to the rate of superficial infection (10.3% vs. 12.7%; p = 0.488) or deep organ/space infection (2.3% vs. 2.1%; p = 0.797). In patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery for complicated appendicitis, five days of cefuroxime and metronidazole did not lead to more SSIs, and it decreased the medical costs compared with non-standardized antibiotic regimens.

  3. The role of pre-operative and post-operative glucose control in surgical-site infections and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Christie Y; Furuya, E Yoko; Berman, Mitchell F; Larson, Elaine L

    2012-01-01

    The impact of glucose control on surgical-site infection (SSI) and death remains unclear. We examined how pre- and post-operative glucose levels and their variability are associated with the risk of SSI or in-hospital death. This retrospective cohort study employed data on 13,800 hospitalized patients who underwent a surgical procedure at a large referral hospital in New York between 2006 and 2008. Over 20 different sources of electronic data were used to analyze how thirty-day risk of SSI and in-hospital death varies by glucose levels and variability. Maximum pre- and post-operative glucose levels were determined for 72 hours before and after the operation and glucose variability was defined as the coefficient of variation of the glucose measurements. We employed logistic regression to model the risk of SSI or death against glucose variables and the following potential confounders: age, sex, body mass index, duration of operation, diabetes status, procedure classification, physical status, emergency status, and blood transfusion. While association of pre- and post-operative hyperglycemia with SSI were apparent in the crude analysis, multivariate results showed that SSI risk did not vary significantly with glucose levels. On the other hand, in-hospital deaths were associated with pre-operative hypoglycemia (OR = 5.09, 95% CI (1.80, 14.4)) and glucose variability (OR = 1.14, 95% CI (1.03, 1.27) for 10% increase in coefficient of variation). In-hospital deaths occurred more often among those with pre-operative hypoglycemia and higher glucose variability. These findings warrant further investigation to determine whether stabilization of glucose and prevention of hypoglycemia could reduce post-operative deaths.

  4. Impact of the Antibiotic Stewardship Program on Prevention and Control of Surgical Site Infection during Peri-Operative Clean Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juyuan; Li, Na; Hao, Jinjuan; Li, Yanming; Liu, Anlei; Wu, Yinghong; Cai, Meng

    2018-04-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections and are associated with substantial healthcare costs, with increased morbidity and mortality. To investigate the effects of the antibiotic stewardship program on prevention and control of SSI during clean surgery, we investigated this situation in our institution. We performed a quasi-experimental study to compare the effect before and after the antibiotic stewardship program intervention. During the pre-intervention stage (January 1, 2010 through December 31, 2011), comprehensive surveillance was performed to determine the SSI baseline data. In the second stage (January 1, 2012 through December 31, 2016), an infectious diseases physician and an infection control practitioner identified the surgical patients daily and followed up on the duration of antimicrobial prophylaxis. From January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2016, 41,426 patients underwent clean surgeries in a grade III, class A hospital. The rate of prophylactic antibiotic use in the 41,426 clean surgeries was reduced from 82.9% to 28.0% after the interventions. The rate of antibiotic agents administered within 120 minutes of the first incision increased from 20.8% to 85.1%. The rate at which prophylactic antimicrobial agents were discontinued in the first 24 hours after surgery increased from 22.1% to 60.4%. Appropriate antibiotic selection increased from 37.0% to 93.6%. Prophylactic antibiotic re-dosing increased from 3.8% to 64.8%. The SSI rate decreased from 0.7% to 0.5% (p < 0.05). The pathogen detection rate increased from 16.7% up to 41.8% after intervention. The intensity of antibiotic consumption reduced from 74.9 defined daily doses (DDDs) per 100 bed-days to 34.2 DDDs per 100 bed-days after the interventions. Long-term and continuous antibiotic stewardship programs have important effects on the prevention and control of SSI during clean surgery.

  5. A retrospective analysis of surgical site infections after chlorhexidine-alcohol versus iodine-alcohol for pre-operative antisepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charehbili, Ayoub; Swijnenburg, Rutger-Jan; van de Velde, Cornelis; van den Bremer, Jephta; van Gijn, Willem

    2014-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is the most common hospital-acquired infection in the Netherlands. There is little evidence in regard to differences in the efficacy of pre-operative topical antisepsis with iodine-alcohol as compared with chlorhexidine-alcohol for preventing SSI. We conducted a retrospective analysis at a single center, involving all patients who underwent breast, colon, or vascular surgery in 2010 and 2011, in which pre-operative disinfection of the skin was done with iodine-alcohol in 2010 and with chlorhexidine-alcohol in 2011. Demographic characteristics, surgical parameters, and rates of SSI were compared in the two groups of patients. Subgroup analyses were done for wound classification, wound type, and type of surgery performed. Associations of patient characteristics with SSI were also investigated. Data were analyzed with χ(2) tests, Student t-tests, and logistic regression analysis. No statistically significant difference was found in the rates of SSI in the two study groups, at 6.1% for the patients who underwent antisepsis with iodine-alcohol and 3.8% for those who underwent disinfection with chlorhexidine-alcohol (p=0.20). After multivariable analysis, an odds ratio (OR) of 0.68 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.30-1.47) in favor of chlorhexidine-alcohol was found. Male gender, acute surgery, absence of antibiotic prophylaxis, and longer hospital length of stay (LOS) were all associated with SSI after pre-operative topical antisepsis. In this single-center study conducted over a course of one year with each of the preparations investigated, no difference in the rate of SSI was found after an instantaneous protocol change from iodine-alcohol to chlorhexidine-alcohol for pre-operative topical antisepsis.

  6. Effect of Pre-Operative Use of Medications on the Risk of Surgical Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eton, Vic; Sinyavskaya, Liliya; Langlois, Yves; Morin, Jean François; Suissa, Samy; Brassard, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Median sternotomy, the most common means of accessing the heart for cardiac procedures, is associated with higher risk of surgical site infections (SSIs). A limited number of studies reporting the impact of medication use prior to cardiac surgery on the subsequent risk of SSIs usually focused on antibacterial prophylaxis. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effect of medications prescribed commonly to cardiac patients on the risk of incident SSIs. The study analyzed data on consecutive cardiac surgery patients undergoing median sternotomy at a McGill University teaching hospital between April 1, 2011 and October 31, 2013. Exposure of interest was use of medications for heart disease and cardiovascular conditions in the seven days prior to surgery and those for comorbid conditions. The main outcome was SSIs occurring within 90 d after surgery. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]) was used to evaluate the effect. The cohort included 1,077 cardiac surgery patients, 79 of whom experienced SSIs within 90 d of surgery. The rates for sternal site infections and harvest site infections were 5.8 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.4-7.3) and 2.5 (95% CI: 1.4-3.7) per 100 procedures, respectively. The risk of SSI was increased with the pre-operative use of immunosuppressors/steroids (AOR 3.47, 95% CI: 1.27-9.52) and α-blockers (AOR 3.74, 95% CI: 1.21-1.47). Our findings support the effect of immunosuppressors/steroids on the risk of SSIs and add evidence to the previously reported association between the use of anti-hypertensive medications and subsequent development of infection/sepsis.

  7. Pre-operative urinary tract infection: is it a risk factor for early surgical site infection with hip fracture surgery? A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassa, Rafik Rd; Khalfaoui, Mahdi Y; Veravalli, Karunakar; Evans, D Alun

    2017-03-01

    The aims of the current study were to determine whether pre-operative urinary tract infections in patients presenting acutely with neck of femur fractures resulted in a delay to surgery and whether such patients were at increased risk of developing post-operative surgical site infections. A retrospective review of all patients presenting with a neck of femur fracture, at a single centre over a one-year period. The hospital hip fracture database was used as the main source of data. UK University Teaching Hospital. All patients ( n  = 460) presenting across a single year study period with a confirmed hip fracture. The presence of pre-operative urinary tract infection, the timing of surgical intervention, the occurrence of post-operative surgical site infection and the pathogens identified. A total of 367 patients were operated upon within 24 hours of admission. Urinary infections were the least common cause of delay. A total of 99 patients (21.5%) had pre-operative urinary tract infection. Post-operatively, a total of 57 (12.4%) patients developed a surgical site infection. Among the latter, 31 (54.4%) did not have a pre-operative urinary infection, 23 (40.4%) patients had a pre-operative urinary tract infection, 2 had chronic leg ulcers and one patient had a pre-operative chest infection. Statistically, there was a strong relationship between pre-operative urinary tract infection and the development of post-operative surgical site infection ( p -value: 0.0005). The results of our study indicate that pre-operative urinary tract infection has a high prevalence amongst those presenting with neck of femur fractures, and this is a risk factor for the later development of post-operative surgical site infection.

  8. Risk factors and outcomes of organ-space surgical site infections after elective colon and rectal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aina Gomila

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Organ-space surgical site infections (SSI are the most serious and costly infections after colorectal surgery. Most previous studies of risk factors for SSI have analysed colon and rectal procedures together. The aim of the study was to determine whether colon and rectal procedures have different risk factors and outcomes for organ-space SSI. Methods A multicentre observational prospective cohort study of adults undergoing elective colon and rectal procedures at 10 Spanish hospitals from 2011 to 2014. Patients were followed up until 30 days post-surgery. Surgical site infection was defined according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. Oral antibiotic prophylaxis (OAP was considered as the administration of oral antibiotics the day before surgery combined with systemic intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis. Results Of 3,701 patients, 2,518 (68% underwent colon surgery and 1,183 (32% rectal surgery. In colon surgery, the overall SSI rate was 16.4% and the organ-space SSI rate was 7.9%, while in rectal surgery the rates were 21.6% and 11.5% respectively (p < 0.001. Independent risk factors for organ-space SSI in colon surgery were male sex (Odds ratio -OR-: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.14–2.15 and ostomy creation (OR: 2.65, 95% CI: 1.8–3.92 while laparoscopy (OR: 0.5, 95% CI: 0.38–0.69 and OAP combined with intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis (OR: 0.7, 95% CI: 0.51–0.97 were protective factors. In rectal surgery, independent risk factors for organ-space SSI were male sex (OR: 2.11, 95% CI: 1.34–3.31 and longer surgery (OR: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.03–2.15, whereas OAP with intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis (OR: 0.49, 95% CI: 0.32–0.73 was a protective factor. Among patients with organ-space SSI, we found a significant difference in the overall 30-day mortality, being higher in colon surgery than in rectal surgery (11.5% vs 5.1%, p = 0.04. Conclusions Organ-space SSI in colon and rectal surgery has some

  9. Waterless Hand Rub Versus Traditional Hand Scrub Methods for Preventing the Surgical Site Infection in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakiri, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Akio; Seki, Masahiko; Ando, Yoshiyuki; Tsujio, Tadao; Hoshino, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2017-11-15

    MINI: Fourteen hundred consecutive patients were investigated for evaluating the utility of waterless hand rub before orthopaedic surgery. The risk in the surgical site infection incidence was the same, but costs of liquids used for hand hygiene were cheaper and the hand hygiene time was shorter for waterless protocol, compared with traditional hand scrub. A retrospective cohort study with prospectively collected data. The aim of this study was to compare SSI incidences, the cost of hand hygiene agents, and hand hygiene time between the traditional hand scrub and the waterless hand rub protocols before orthopedic surgery. Surgical site infections (SSI) prolong hospitalization and are a leading nosocomial cause of morbidity and a source of excess cost. Recently, a waterless hand rub protocol comprising alcohol based chlorhexidine gluconate for use before surgery was developed, but no studies have yet examined its utility in orthopedic surgery. Fourteen hundred consecutive patients who underwent orthopedic surgery (spine, joint replacement, hand, and trauma surgeries) in our hospital since April 1, 2012 were included. A total of 712 cases underwent following traditional hand scrub between April 1, 2012 and April 30, 2013 and 688 cases underwent following waterless hand rub between June 1, 2013 and April 30, 2014. We compared SSI incidences within all and each subcategory between two hand hygiene protocols. All patients were screened for SSI within 1 year after surgery. We compared the cost of hand hygiene agents and hand hygiene time between two groups. The SSI incidences were 1.3% (9 of 712) following the traditional protocol (2 deep and 7 superficial infections) and 1.1% (8 of 688) following the waterless protocol (all superficial infections). There were no significant differences between the two groups. The costs of liquids used for one hand hygiene were about $2 for traditional hand scrub and less than $1 for waterless hand rub. The mean hand hygiene time was 264

  10. Incidence of surgical site infection with pre-operative skin preparation using 10% polyvidone-iodine and 0.5% chlorhexidine-alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Ana Luzia; Simões, Maria de Lourdes Pessole Biondo

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the incidence of surgical site infection when the preoperative skin preparation was performed with 10% povidone-iodine and 0.5% chlorhexidine-alcohol. We conducted a randomized, longitudinal study based on variables obtained from patients undergoing clean and potentially contaminated operations. Those involved were divided into two groups. In group 1 (G1) we included 102 patients with skin prepared with povidone-iodine, and in group 2 (G2), 103, whose skin was prepared with chlorhexidine. In the third, seventh and 30th postoperative days we evaluated the surgical site, searching for signs of infection. Data related to clinical profile, such as diabetes mellitus, smoking, alcoholism, haematological data (Hb, VG and leukocytes), age and gender, and the related variables, such as number of days of preoperative hospitalization, shaving, topography of incision, antibiotic prophylaxis and resident participation in the operation were not predisposing factors for surgical site infection. Two patients in G1 and eight in G2 undergoing clean operations had some type of infection (p = 0.1789), five in G1 and three in G2 undergoing potentially contaminated operations had some type of infection (p = 0.7205). The incidence of surgical site infection in operations classified as clean and as potentially contaminated for which skin preparation was done with 10% povidone-iodine and 0.5% chlorhexidine-alcohol was similar.

  11. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Prophylactic Intra-Operative Wound Irrigation for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Stijn W.; Boldingh, Quirine J. J.; Solomkin, Joseph S.; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Egger, Matthias; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are one of the most common hospital-acquired infections. To reduce SSIs, prophylactic intra-operative wound irrigation (pIOWI) has been advocated, although the results to date are equivocal. To develop recommendations for the new World Health Organization (WHO) SSI

  12. Effect of high perioperative oxygen fraction on surgical site infection and pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery: the PROXI randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyhoff, Christian S; Wetterslev, Jørn; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2009-01-01

    Control and Prevention. Secondary outcomes included atelectasis, pneumonia, respiratory failure, and mortality. RESULTS: Surgical site infection occurred in 131 of 685 patients (19.1%) assigned to receive 80% oxygen vs 141 of 701 (20.1%) assigned to receive 30% oxygen (odds ratio [OR], 0.94; 95...

  13. NP108, an Antimicrobial Polymer with Activity against Methicillin- and Mupirocin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katvars, Laura K.; Hewitt, Fiona; Smith, Daniel W.; Robertson, Jennifer; O'Neil, Deborah A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus is a clinically significant human pathogen that causes infectious diseases ranging from skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) and health care-associated infections (HAI) to potentially fatal bacteremia and endocarditis. Nasal carriage of S. aureus, especially for persistent carriage, is associated with an increased risk of subsequent infection, particularly nosocomial and surgical site infections (SSI), usually via autoinfection. NP108 is a cationic antimicrobial polymer composed of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) amino acid building blocks. NP108 is broad spectrum and rapidly bactericidal (3-log kill in ≤3 h), killing bacteria by membrane disruption and cell lysis. NP108, contrary to many antibiotics, shows equally effective antimicrobial activity against a variety of S. aureus (MIC100 = 8 to 500 mg/liter) and S. epidermidis (MIC100 = 4 to 8 mg/liter) isolates, whether exponentially growing or in stationary phase. NP108 is antimicrobially active under nutrient-limiting conditions similar to those found in the anterior nares (MIC100 = 8 mg/liter) and kills antibiotic-resilient small colony variants (MIC100 = 32 mg/liter) and S. aureus biofilms (prevention, MIC100 = 1 to 4 mg/liter; eradication, MIC100 ≥ 31.25 mg/liter). NP108 is active against isolates of S. aureus resistant to the current standard-of-care decolonization agent, mupirocin, with no significant increase in the MIC100. NP108 is water soluble and has been formulated into compatible aqueous gel vehicles for human use in which antimicrobial efficacy is retained (2.0% [wt/vol]). NP108 is a potential nonantibiotic antimicrobial alternative to antibiotics for the nasal decolonization of S. aureus, with clear advantages in its mechanism of action over the existing gold standard, mupirocin. PMID:28607014

  14. Surveillance of surgical site infection after cholecystectomy using the hospital in Europe link for infection control through surveillance protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanic, Branko; Bosnjak, Zrinka; Budimir, Ana; Augustin, Goran; Milosevic, Milan; Plecko, Vanda; Kalenic, Smilja; Fiolic, Zlatko; Vanek, Maja

    2013-06-01

    The third most common healthcare-associated infection is surgical site infection (SSI), accounting for 14%-16% of infections. These SSIs are associated with high morbidity, numerous deaths, and greater cost. A prospective study was conducted to assess the incidence of SSI in a single university hospital in Croatia. We used the Hospital in Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance (HELICS) protocol for surveillance. The SSIs were classified using the standard definition of the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) system. The overall incidence of SSI was 1.44%. The incidence of infection in the open cholecystectomy group was 6.06%, whereas in the laparoscopic group, it was only 0.60%. The incidence density of in-hospital SSIs per 1,000 post-operative days was 5.76. Patients who underwent a laparoscopic cholecystectomy were significantly younger (53.65±14.65 vs. 64.42±14.17 years; pconcept for the monitoring of SSI, but in the case of cholecystectomy, additional factors such as antibiotic appropriateness, gallbladder entry, empyema of the gallbladder, and obstructive jaundice must be considered.

  15. A standardized perioperative surgical site infection care process among children with stoma closure: a before-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras-Hernandez, Juan; Bracho-Blanchet, Eduardo; Tovilla-Mercado, Jose; Vilar-Compte, Diana; Nieto-Zermeño, Jaime; Davila-Perez, Roberto; Teyssier-Morales, Gustavo; Lule-Dominguez, Martha

    2008-10-01

    We report on the effectiveness of a standardized perioperative care process for lowering surgical site infection (SSI) rates among children with stoma closure at a tertiary-care public pediatric teaching hospital in Mexico City. All consecutive children with stoma closure operated on between November 2003 and October 2005 were prospectively followed for 30 days postoperatively. We conducted a before-after study to evaluate standardized perioperative bowel- and abdominal-wall care process results on SSI rates. Seventy-one patients were operated on, and all completed follow-up. SSI rates declined from 42.8% (12/28) before to 13.9% (6/43) after the standardization procedure (relative risk (RR) = 3.1; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.3-7.2; p = 0.006). SSI independently associated risk factors comprised peristomal skin inflammation >3 mm (odds ratio (OR) = 9.6; 95% CI = 1.8-49.6; p = 0.007) and intraoperative complications (OR = 13.3; 95% CI = 1.4-127.2; p = 0.02). Being operated on during the after-study period was shown to be a protective factor against SSI (OR = 0.2; 95% CI = 0.4-0.97; p = 0.04). Standardization was able to reduce SSI rates threefold in children with stoma closure in a short period of time.

  16. The New World Health Organization Recommendations on Perioperative Administration of Oxygen to Prevent Surgical Site Infections: A Dangerous Reductionist Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenk, Manuel; Van Aken, Hugo; Zarbock, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    In October 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) published recommendations for preventing surgical site infections (SSIs). Among those measures is a recommendation to administer oxygen at an inspired fraction of 80% intra- and postoperatively for up to 6 hours. SSIs have been identified as a global health problem, and the WHO should be commended for their efforts. However, this recommendation focuses only on the patient's "wound," ignores other organ systems potentially affected by hyperoxia, and may ultimately worsen patient outcomes.The WHO advances a "strong recommendation" for the use of a high inspired oxygen fraction even though the quality of evidence is only moderate. However, achieving this goal by disregarding other potentially lethal complications seems inappropriate, particularly in light of the weak evidence underpinning the use of high fractions of oxygen to prevent SSI. Use of such a strategy thus should be intensely discussed by anesthesiologists and perioperative physicians.Normovolemia, normotension, normoglycemia, normothermia, and normoventilation can clearly be safely applied to most patients in most clinical scenarios. But the liberal application of hyperoxemia intraoperatively and up to 6 hours postoperatively, as suggested by the WHO, is questionable from the viewpoint of anesthesia and perioperative medicine, and its effects will be discussed in this article.

  17. Surgical site infection prevention: a survey to identify the gap between evidence and practice in University of Toronto teaching hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskicioglu, Cagla; Gagliardi, Anna R; Fenech, Darlene S; Forbes, Shawn S; McKenzie, Marg; McLeod, Robin S; Nathens, Avery B

    2012-08-01

    A gap exists between the best evidence and practice with regards to surgical site infection (SSI) prevention. Awareness of evidence is the first step in knowledge translation. A web-based survey was distributed to 59 general surgeons and 68 residents at University of Toronto teaching hospitals. Five domains pertaining to SSI prevention with questions addressing knowledge of prevention strategies, efficacy of antibiotics, strategies for changing practice and barriers to implementation of SSI prevention strategies were investigated. Seventy-six individuals (60%) responded. More than 90% of respondents stated there was evidence for antibiotic prophylaxis and perioperative normothermia and reported use of these strategies. There was a discrepancy in the perceived evidence for and the self-reported use of perioperative hyperoxia, omission of hair removal and bowel preparation. Eighty-three percent of respondents felt that consulting published guidelines is important in making decisions regarding antibiotics. There was also a discrepancy between what respondents felt were important strategies to ensure timely administration of antibiotics and what strategies were in place. Checklists, standardized orders, protocols and formal surveillance programs were rated most highly by 75%-90% of respondents, but less than 50% stated that these strategies were in place at their institutions. Broad-reaching initiatives that increase surgeon and trainee awareness and implementation of multifaceted hospital strategies that engage residents and attending surgeons are needed to change practice.

  18. Does Pre-Operative Multiple Immunosuppressive Therapy Associate with Surgical Site Infection in Surgery for Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Motoi; Ikeuchi, Hiroki; Bando, Toshihiro; Hirose, Kei; Hirata, Akihiro; Chohno, Teruhiro; Sasaki, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Takesue, Yoshio; Hida, Nobuyuki; Hori, Kazutoshi; Nakamura, Shiro

    2015-01-01

    Almost all surgeries for ulcerative colitis (UC) are performed under immunosuppressive conditions. Immunomodulators or biologics, with the exception of corticosteroids, do not appear to be risk factors for post-operative infectious complications. However, many patients are on multiagent immunosuppressive therapy at the time of surgery. Therefore, we evaluated the influence of pre-operative multiple immunosuppressives on the occurrence of surgical site infection (SSI) in UC. We reviewed surveillance data from 181 patients who underwent restorative proctocolectomy between January 2012 and March 2014. The incidences of SSI and the possible risk factors among patients receiving different immunosuppressive therapies were compared and analyzed. The incidence of incisional (INC) SSI was 13.3% and that of organ/space (O/S) SSI was 7.2%. The number of immunosuppressives did not significantly correlate with each incidence. Total prednisolone administration ≥12,000 mg (OR 2.6) and an American Society of Anesthesiologists score ≥3 (OR 2.8) were shown to be independent risk factors for overall SSI, whereas corticosteroid use in INC SSI (OR 17.4) and severe disease (OR 5.2) and a large amount of blood loss (OR 3.9) in O/S SSI were identified as risk factors. Although a correlation between multiple immunosuppressive therapy and SSIs was not found, it is not recommended that all patients be treated with multiple immunosuppressive therapy. Treatment strategy should be applied based on the patient's condition. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Surgical site infections following craniotomy focusing on possible post-operative acquisition of infection: prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneh-Arbib, O; Shiferstein, A; Dagan, N; Fein, S; Telem, L; Muchtar, E; Eliakim-Raz, N; Rubinovitch, B; Rubin, G; Rappaport, Z H; Paul, M

    2013-12-01

    Neurosurgery is characterized by a prolonged risk period for surgical site infection (SSI), mainly related to the presence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains. We aimed to examine factors associated with post-neurosurgical SSIs, focusing on post-operative factors. A prospective cohort study was conducted in a single center over a period of 18 months in Israel. Included were adult patients undergoing clean or clean-contaminated craniotomy, including craniotomies with external CSF drainage or shunts. SSIs were defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria for healthcare-associated infections. All patients were followed up for 90 days and those with foreign body insertion for 1 year. We compared patients with and without SSI. A multivariable regression analysis for SSI was conducted including uncorrelated variables significantly associated with SSI. A total of 502 patients were included, with 138 (27.5%) undergoing emergent or urgent craniotomy. The overall SSI rate was 5.6% (28 patients), of which 3.2% (16 patients) were intracerebral. Non-elective surgery, external CSF drainage/monitoring devices, re-operation, and post-operative respiratory failure were independently associated with subsequent SSI. External CSF devices was the only significant risk factor for intracerebral SSIs (p operative infection acquisition through external CSF devices. Standard operating procedures for their maintenance are necessary.

  20. Perioperative Allogeneic Red Blood-Cell Transfusion Associated with Surgical Site Infection After Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everhart, Joshua S; Sojka, John H; Mayerson, Joel L; Glassman, Andrew H; Scharschmidt, Thomas J

    2018-02-21

    Perioperative allogeneic red blood-cell transfusion is a suspected risk factor for surgical site infection (SSI) after total joint arthroplasty (TJA), but the interrelationships among SSI risk, transfusion dose, preoperative anemia, and the presence of coagulopathies have not been well described. Data on SSI within 1 year after surgery as well as on transfusion with blood products within 30 days after surgery were obtained for 6,788 patients who had undergone primary or revision total hip or knee arthroplasty from 2000 to 2011 in a single hospital system. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was used to determine the independent association between allogeneic red blood-cell transfusion and SSI. There was a dose-dependent association between allogeneic red blood-cell transfusion and SSI, with the infection rate increasing as the transfusion dose increased from 1 unit (odds ratio [OR] = 1.97; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.38, 2.79; p 3 units (OR = 7.40; CI = 4.91, 11.03; p conservation strategies. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  1. Antiinfective therapy with a small molecule inhibitor of Staphylococcus aureus sortase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Hongchuan; Zhu, Kongkai; Gong, Shouzhe; Dramsi, Shaynoor; Wang, Ya-Ting; Li, Jiafei; Chen, Feifei; Zhang, Ruihan; Zhou, Lu; Lan, Lefu; Jiang, Hualiang; Schneewind, Olaf; Luo, Cheng; Yang, Cai-Guang

    2014-09-16

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most frequent cause of hospital-acquired infection, which manifests as surgical site infections, bacteremia, and sepsis. Due to drug-resistance, prophylaxis of MRSA infection with antibiotics frequently fails or incites nosocomial diseases such as Clostridium difficile infection. Sortase A is a transpeptidase that anchors surface proteins in the envelope of S. aureus, and sortase mutants are unable to cause bacteremia or sepsis in mice. Here we used virtual screening and optimization of inhibitor structure to identify 3-(4-pyridinyl)-6-(2-sodiumsulfonatephenyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[3,4-b][1,3,4]thiadiazole and related compounds, which block sortase activity in vitro and in vivo. Sortase inhibitors do not affect in vitro staphylococcal growth yet protect mice against lethal S. aureus bacteremia. Thus, sortase inhibitors may be useful as antiinfective therapy to prevent hospital-acquired S. aureus infection in high-risk patients without the side effects of antibiotics.

  2. Does Categorization Method Matter in Exploring Volume-Outcome Relation? A Multiple Categorization Methods Comparison in Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery Surgical Site Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tsung-Hsien; Tung, Yu-Chi; Chung, Kuo-Piao

    2015-08-01

    Volume-infection relation studies have been published for high-risk surgical procedures, although the conclusions remain controversial. Inconsistent results may be caused by inconsistent categorization methods, the definitions of service volume, and different statistical approaches. The purpose of this study was to examine whether a relation exists between provider volume and coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgical site infection (SSI) using different categorization methods. A population-based cross-sectional multi-level study was conducted. A total of 10,405 patients who received CABG surgery between 2006 and 2008 in Taiwan were recruited. The outcome of interest was surgical site infection for CABG surgery. The associations among several patient, surgeon, and hospital characteristics was examined. The definition of surgeons' and hospitals' service volume was the cumulative CABG service volumes in the previous year for each CABG operation and categorized by three types of approaches: Continuous, quartile, and k-means clustering. The results of multi-level mixed effects modeling showed that hospital volume had no association with SSI. Although the relation between surgeon volume and surgical site infection was negative, it was inconsistent among the different categorization methods. Categorization of service volume is an important issue in volume-infection study. The findings of the current study suggest that different categorization methods might influence the relation between volume and SSI. The selection of an optimal cutoff point should be taken into account for future research.

  3. Does Fine Needle Aspiration Microbiology Offer Any Benefit Over Wound Swab in Detecting the Causative Organisms in Surgical Site Infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudharsanan, Sundaramurthi; Gs, Sreenath; Sureshkumar, Sathasivam; Vijayakumar, Chellappa; Sujatha, Sistla; Kate, Vikram

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the role of ne needle aspiration microbiology (FNAM) in detecting the causative organisms of postoperative surgical site infections (SSIs) in comparison with the standard technique of surface swabbing. Ma- terials and Methods. In this study, 150 patients with SSIs following elective and emergency operations were included. In all patients, FNAM was performed along with conventional surface swabbing to identify the causative microorganism. Sensitivity of surface swab and FNAM was calculated as the number of samples collected from the diagnosed case of SSI. A total of 115 positive cultures were obtained from the 150 patients with SSIs; surface swab was positive in 110 cases and FNAM was positive in 94 cases. The mean number of organisms isolated by surface swab, and FNAM was 0.95 and 0.8, respectively. The sensitivity of surface swab was 94.3% in elective cases and 96.25% in emergency cases. The sensitivity of FNAM was 82.8% in elective cases and 82.5% in emergency cases. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of FNAM and surface swab did not signi cantly differ in clean elective cases. The overall sensitivity of surface swab and FNAM was 95.65% and 81.7%, respectively. Comparing the antibiotic suscep- tibility pattern, no difference was observed when the same organ- ism was isolated by both methods, indicating that FNAM does not offer bene t over the conventional wound surface swab in detecting microorganisms in SSI in both elective and emergency surgeries. In certain cases with unexplained wound infections, FNAM can be used as an investigation to identify speci c pathogens not detected by conventional surface swab.

  4. Differences in risk factors associated with surgical site infections following two types of cardiac surgery in Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikane, K; Honda, H; Yamagishi, T; Suzuki, S

    2015-05-01

    Differences in the risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) following open heart surgery and coronary artery bypass graft surgery are not well described. To identify and compare risk factors for SSI following open heart surgery and coronary artery bypass graft surgery. SSI surveillance data on open heart surgery (CARD) and coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CBGB) submitted to the Japan Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (JANIS) system between 2008 and 2010 were analysed. Factors associated with SSI were analysed using univariate modelling analysis followed by multi-variate logistic regression analysis. Non-binary variables were analysed initially to determine the most appropriate category. The cumulative incidence rates of SSI for CARD and CBGB were 2.6% (151/5895) and 4.1% (160/3884), respectively. In both groups, the duration of the operation and a high American Society of Anesthesiologists' (ASA) score were significant in predicting SSI risk in the model. Wound class was independently associated with SSI in CARD but not in CBGB. Implants, multiple procedures and emergency operations predicted SSI in CARD, but none of these factors predicted SSI in CBGB. There was a remarkable difference in the prediction of risk for SSI between the two types of cardiac surgery. Risk stratification in CARD could be improved by incorporating variables currently available in the existing surveillance systems. Risk index stratification in CBGB could be enhanced by collecting additional variables, because only two of the current variables were found to be significant for the prediction of SSI. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Performance of statistical process control methods for regional surgical site infection surveillance: a 10-year multicentre pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Arthur W; Haridy, Salah; Salem, Joseph; Ilieş, Iulian; Ergai, Awatef O; Samareh, Aven; Andrianas, Nicholas; Benneyan, James C; Sexton, Daniel J; Anderson, Deverick J

    2017-11-24

    Traditional strategies for surveillance of surgical site infections (SSI) have multiple limitations, including delayed and incomplete outbreak detection. Statistical process control (SPC) methods address these deficiencies by combining longitudinal analysis with graphical presentation of data. We performed a pilot study within a large network of community hospitals to evaluate performance of SPC methods for detecting SSI outbreaks. We applied conventional Shewhart and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) SPC charts to 10 previously investigated SSI outbreaks that occurred from 2003 to 2013. We compared the results of SPC surveillance to the results of traditional SSI surveillance methods. Then, we analysed the performance of modified SPC charts constructed with different outbreak detection rules, EWMA smoothing factors and baseline SSI rate calculations. Conventional Shewhart and EWMA SPC charts both detected 8 of the 10 SSI outbreaks analysed, in each case prior to the date of traditional detection. Among detected outbreaks, conventional Shewhart chart detection occurred a median of 12 months prior to outbreak onset and 22 months prior to traditional detection. Conventional EWMA chart detection occurred a median of 7 months prior to outbreak onset and 14 months prior to traditional detection. Modified Shewhart and EWMA charts additionally detected several outbreaks earlier than conventional SPC charts. Shewhart and SPC charts had low false-positive rates when used to analyse separate control hospital SSI data. Our findings illustrate the potential usefulness and feasibility of real-time SPC surveillance of SSI to rapidly identify outbreaks and improve patient safety. Further study is needed to optimise SPC chart selection and calculation, statistical outbreak detection rules and the process for reacting to signals of potential outbreaks. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights

  6. Secondary surgical-site infection after coronary artery bypass grafting: A multi-institutional prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulack, Brian C; Kirkwood, Katherine A; Shi, Wei; Smith, Peter K; Alexander, John H; Burks, Sandra G; Gelijns, Annetine C; Thourani, Vinod H; Bell, Daniel; Greenberg, Ann; Goldfarb, Seth D; Mayer, Mary Lou; Bowdish, Michael E

    2018-04-01

    To analyze patient risk factors and processes of care associated with secondary surgical-site infection (SSI) after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Data were collected prospectively between February and October 2010 for consenting adult patients undergoing CABG with saphenous vein graft (SVG) conduits. Patients who developed a deep or superficial SSI of the leg or groin within 65 days of CABG were compared with those who did not develop a secondary SSI. Among 2174 patients identified, 65 (3.0%) developed a secondary SSI. Median time to diagnosis was 16 days (interquartile range 11-29) with the majority (86%) diagnosed after discharge. Gram-positive bacteria were most common. Readmission was more common in patients with a secondary SSI (34% vs 17%, P < .01). After adjustment, an open SVG harvest approach was associated with an increased risk of secondary SSI (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 2.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28-3.48). Increased body mass index (adjusted HR, 1.08, 95% CI, 1.04-1.12) and packed red blood cell transfusions (adjusted HR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.05-1.22) were associated with a greater risk of secondary SSI. Antibiotic type, antibiotic duration, and postoperative hyperglycemia were not associated with risk of secondary SSI. Secondary SSI after CABG continues to be an important source of morbidity. This serious complication often occurs after discharge and is associated with open SVG harvesting, larger body mass, and blood transfusions. Patients with a secondary SSI have longer lengths of stay and are readmitted more frequently. Copyright © 2017 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Surgical site infection after central venous catheter-related infection in cardiac surgery. Analysis of a cohort of 7557 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guillou, V; Tavolacci, M-P; Baste, J-M; Hubscher, C; Bedoit, E; Bessou, J-P; Litzler, P-Y

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the relationship between the occurrence of a surgical site infection (SSI) and the presence of a central venous catheter-related infection (CVCRI). The Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University Hospital, Rouen, has carried out a prospective epidemiological survey of all nosocomial infections (pneumonia, SSI and CVCRI) since 1997. The study group included all consecutive patients who underwent cardiac surgery over a 10-year period from 1997 to 2007. A nested case-control study was conducted to identify the risk factors for SSI after CVCRI. Cases were patients with SSI after CVCRI and controls were randomized from patients who presented with CVCRI not followed by SSI. In total, 7557 patients were included and 133 SSIs (1.7%) were identified. The rate of superficial SSI was 0.7% [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.5-0.9] and of mediastinitis was 1.0% (95% CI: 0.8-1.2). Among the 133 cases of SSI, 12 (9.0%; 95% CI: 5.0-14.8) occurred after a CVCRI with identical micro-organisms. CVCRI [adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 5.2; 95% CI: 3.2-8.5], coronary artery bypass grafting (aOR: 2.9; 95% CI: 1.6-5.2), and obesity (aOR: 11.4; 95% CI: 1.0-130.1) were independent factors associated with SSI. The new finding of this study is that patients with CVCRI were 5.2 times more likely to develop SSI compared to patients without CVCRI. Copyright © 2011 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy on organ/space surgical site infection in patients with gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Duan, X; Xu, J; Jin, Q; Chen, F; Wang, P; Yang, Y; Tang, X

    2015-11-01

    Various risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) have been identified such as age, overweight, duration of surgery, blood loss, etc. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy during surgery is a common procedure in patients with gastric cancer, yet its impact on SSI has not been evaluated. To evaluate whether intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy is a key risk factor for organ/space SSI in patients with gastric cancer. All patients with gastric cancer who underwent surgery at the Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery between January 2008 and December 2013 were studied. The organ/space SSI rates were compared between patients who received intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy and patients who did not receive intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy, and the risk factors for organ/space SSI were analysed by univariate and multi-variate regression analyses. The microbial causes of organ/space SSI were also identified. Of the eligible 845 patients, 356 received intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy, and the organ/space SSI rate was higher in these patients compared with patients who did not receive intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy (9.01% vs 3.88%; P = 0.002). Univariate analysis confirmed the significance of this finding (odds ratio 2.443; P = 0.003). As a result, hospital stay was increased in patients who received intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy {mean 20.91 days [95% confidence interval (CI) 19.76-22.06] vs 29.72 days (95% CI 25.46-33.99); P = 0.000}. The results also suggested that intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy may be associated with more Gram-negative bacterial infections. Intra-operative intraperitoneal chemotherapy is a significant risk factor for organ/space SSI in patients with gastric cancer. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Peri-operative antibiotic treatment of bacteriuria reduces early deep surgical site infections in geriatric patients with proximal femur fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenhan, Ronny; Bushuven, Stefanie; Reimers, Niklas; Probst, Axel

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a re-evaluation of current strategies for peri-operative prophylaxis of infections in orthopaedic surgery of geriatric patients (≥65 years) with proximal femoral fractures (PFF). Between 01/2010 and 08/2014 all post-operative infections after stabilization of PFF of 1,089 geriatric patients were recorded retrospectively. All patients pre-operatively received a single dose of 1.5 g cefuroxime (group 1). These were compared to prospectively determined post-operative rates of surgical site infection (SSI) of 441 geriatric patients, which were operated on between 09/2014 and 03/2017 due to PFF. In this second group we investigated the urinary tract on admission. Bacteriuria was treated with the pre-operative single dose of 1.5 g cefuroxime along with ciprofloxacin for five days, beginning on admission. Level of significance was set to p infection. Multi-resistant pathogens were found in 15 patients and pathogens were cefuroxime-resistant in 37. The differences of SSI after at least three months were 2.1% in group 1 and 0.45% in group 2 for all patients with surgery of PFF (p < 0.02) and for those with arthroplasty (p < 0.037) significant. The immediate antibiotic therapy of a prevalent bacteriuria for five days decreases the risk of SSI after surgery of PFF. Our single-centre study can only point out the problem of prevalent reservoirs of pathogens and the need for treatment. Evidence-based therapy concepts (indications of antibiotics, classes, duration) have to be developed in multi-centric and prospective studies.

  10. Intra-operative wound irrigation to reduce surgical site infections after abdominal surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Tara C; Loos, Martin; Haller, Bernhard; Mihaljevic, André L; Nitsche, Ulrich; Wilhelm, Dirk; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg; Bader, Franz G

    2015-02-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) remains to be one of the most frequent infectious complications following abdominal surgery. Prophylactic intra-operative wound irrigation (IOWI) before skin closure has been proposed to reduce bacterial wound contamination and the risk of SSI. However, current recommendations on its use are conflicting especially concerning antibiotic and antiseptic solutions because of their potential tissue toxicity and enhancement of bacterial drug resistances. To analyze the existing evidence for the effect of IOWI with topical antibiotics, povidone-iodine (PVP-I) solutions or saline on the incidence of SSI following open abdominal surgery, a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was carried out according to the recommendations of the Cochrane Collaboration. Forty-one RCTs reporting primary data of over 9000 patients were analyzed. Meta-analysis on the effect of IOWI with any solution compared to no irrigation revealed a significant benefit in the reduction of SSI rates (OR = 0.54, 95 % confidence Interval (CI) [0.42; 0.69], p < 0.0001). Subgroup analyses showed that this effect was strongest in colorectal surgery and that IOWI with antibiotic solutions had a stronger effect than irrigation with PVP-I or saline. However, all of the included trials were at considerable risk of bias according to the quality assessment. These results suggest that IOWI before skin closure represents a pragmatic and economical approach to reduce postoperative SSI after abdominal surgery and that antibiotic solutions seem to be more effective than PVP-I solutions or simple saline, and it might be worth to re-evaluate their use for specific indications.

  11. Agreement among healthcare professionals in ten European countries in diagnosing case-vignettes of surgical-site infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Birgand

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Although surgical-site infection (SSI rates are advocated as a major evaluation criterion, the reproducibility of SSI diagnosis is unknown. We assessed agreement in diagnosing SSI among specialists involved in SSI surveillance in Europe. METHODS: Twelve case-vignettes based on suspected SSI were submitted to 100 infection-control physicians (ICPs and 86 surgeons in 10 European countries. Each participant scored eight randomly-assigned case-vignettes on a secure online relational database. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC was used to assess agreement for SSI diagnosis on a 7-point Likert scale and the kappa coefficient to assess agreement for SSI depth on a three-point scale. RESULTS: Intra-specialty agreement for SSI diagnosis ranged across countries and specialties from 0.00 (95%CI, 0.00-0.35 to 0.65 (0.45-0.82. Inter-specialty agreement varied from 0.04 (0.00-0.62 in to 0.55 (0.37-0.74 in Germany. For all countries pooled, intra-specialty agreement was poor for surgeons (0.24, 0.14-0.42 and good for ICPs (0.41, 0.28-0.61. Reading SSI definitions improved agreement among ICPs (0.57 but not surgeons (0.09. Intra-specialty agreement for SSI depth ranged across countries and specialties from 0.05 (0.00-0.10 to 0.50 (0.45-0.55 and was not improved by reading SSI definition. CONCLUSION: Among ICPs and surgeons evaluating case-vignettes of suspected SSI, considerable disagreement occurred regarding the diagnosis, with variations across specialties and countries.

  12. Efficacy of vacuum-assisted closure therapy on rehabilitation during the treatment for surgical site infection after cardiovascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Akihiro; Inoue, Takafumi; Fujisaki, Masayuki; Morizumi, Sei; Suematsu, Yoshihiro

    2016-08-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after cardiovascular procedures is a severe complication, potentially leading to high morbidity and mortality. In addition, during the treatment of SSI, rehabilitation is delayed, which can severely impair postoperative recovery. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy on rehabilitation during the treatment of SSI after cardiovascular surgery. From January 2008 to March 2015, 10 patients underwent VAC therapy for SSI after cardiovascular operations. The patient characteristics, duration of VAC therapy, time interval from the implementation of VAC to physical therapy (PT) (T1), ambulation (T2) and walking (T3), functional independent measure (FIM), and maximum consecutive walking capacity (MCWC) were retrospectively analyzed. Nine patients underwent mid-sternal incision and one patient underwent thoraco-abdominal incision. The mean time interval from the beginning of VAC therapy to PT, ambulation, and walking was 0.38 ± 0.50, 0.63 ± 0.71, and 1.38 ± 1.86 days, respectively. The average FIM was 84.5 ± 14.0 at the beginning of VAC therapy and 106.7 ± 18.5 at the end of VAC therapy (P = 0.000494). On average, MCWC was 52.3 ± 54.6 m at the installation of VAC therapy and 189.7 ± 152.8 m at the completion of VAC therapy (P = 0.0169). FIM and MCWC improvement rate was better in VAC group than non-VAC group although these data are not suitable for statistical analysis because of a small sample size. Although further studies are warranted, VAC therapy may have a role in facilitating rehabilitation and improving the prognosis of SSI cases after major cardiovascular operations.

  13. Introduction to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomkin, Joseph S; Mazuski, John; Blanchard, Joan C; Itani, Kamal M F; Ricks, Philip; Dellinger, E Patchen; Allen, George; Kelz, Rachel; Reinke, Caroline E; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common type of health-care-associated infection (HAI) and adds considerably to the individual, social, and economic costs of surgical treatment. This document serves to introduce the updated Guideline for the Prevention of SSI from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC). The Core section of the guideline addresses issues relevant to multiple surgical specialties and procedures. The second procedure-specific section focuses on a high-volume, high-burden procedure: Prosthetic joint arthroplasty. While many elements of the 1999 guideline remain current, others warrant updating to incorporate new knowledge and changes in the patient population, operative techniques, emerging pathogens, and guideline development methodology.

  14. Effectiveness of triclosan-coated PDS Plus versus uncoated PDS II sutures for prevention of surgical site infection after abdominal wall closure: the randomised controlled PROUD trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Markus K; Knebel, Phillip; Kieser, Meinhard; Schüler, Philipp; Schiergens, Tobias S; Atanassov, Vladimir; Neudecker, Jens; Stein, Erwin; Thielemann, Henryk; Kunz, Reiner; von Frankenberg, Moritz; Schernikau, Utz; Bunse, Jörg; Jansen-Winkeln, Boris; Partecke, Lars I; Prechtl, Gerald; Pochhammer, Julius; Bouchard, Ralf; Hodina, René; Beckurts, K Tobias E; Leißner, Lothar; Lemmens, Hans-Peter; Kallinowski, Friedrich; Thomusch, Oliver; Seehofer, Daniel; Simon, Thomas; Hyhlik-Dürr, Alexander; Seiler, Christoph M; Hackert, Thilo; Reissfelder, Christoph; Hennig, René; Doerr-Harim, Colette; Klose, Christina; Ulrich, Alexis; Büchler, Markus W

    2014-07-12

    Postoperative surgical site infections are one of the most frequent complications after open abdominal surgery, and triclosan-coated sutures were developed to reduce their occurrence. The aim of the PROUD trial was to obtain reliable data for the effectiveness of triclosan-coated PDS Plus sutures for abdominal wall closure, compared with non-coated PDS II sutures, in the prevention of surgical site infections. This multicentre, randomised controlled group-sequential superiority trial was done in 24 German hospitals. Adult patients (aged ≥18 years) who underwent elective midline abdominal laparotomy for any reason were eligible for inclusion. Exclusion criteria were impaired mental state, language problems, and participation in another intervention trial that interfered with the intervention or outcome of this trial. A central web-based randomisation tool was used to randomly assign eligible participants by permuted block randomisation with a 1:1 allocation ratio and block size 4 before mass closure to either triclosan-coated sutures (PDS Plus) or uncoated sutures (PDS II) for abdominal fascia closure. The primary endpoint was the occurrence of superficial or deep surgical site infection according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria within 30 days after the operation. Patients, surgeons, and the outcome assessors were masked to group assignment. Interim and final analyses were by modified intention to treat. This trial is registered with the German Clinical Trials Register, number DRKS00000390. Between April 7, 2010, and Oct 19, 2012, 1224 patients were randomly assigned to intervention groups (607 to PDS Plus, and 617 to PDS II), of whom 1185 (587 PDS Plus and 598 PDS II) were analysed by intention to treat. The study groups were well balanced in terms of patient and procedure characteristics. The occurrence of surgical site infections did not differ between the PDS Plus group (87 [14·8%] of 587) and the PDS II group (96 [16·1%] of 598

  15. Surgical Scar Site Recurrence in Patients With Cervical Cancer on 18F-FDG PET-CT: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhull, Varun S; Khangembam, Bangkim C; Sharma, Punit; Rana, Neelima; Verma, Satyavrat; Sharma, Dayanand; Shamim, Shamim A; Kumar, Sunesh; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the role of fluorine 18 ((18)F)-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography ((18)F-FDG PET-CT) in evaluating various parameters in patients with surgical scar site recurrence in cervical carcinoma. Data of all patients with cervical cancer (n = 329) who underwent PET-CT at our institute between 2005 and 2013 was reviewed. Of these 329 patients, 132 patients who were surgically treated and underwent restaging/follow-up PET-CT were included in the present study for final analysis. Tumor recurrence at the abdominal surgical scar site was looked for. Abnormal uptakes suggestive of active disease at other sites were also noted. Maximum standardized uptake value was measured for all the lesions. Patients with scar site recurrence were taken as cases (n = 6), whereas the remaining patients served as controls (n = 126). Comparison with conventional imaging modalities was made wherever available. Histopathological examination was always sought for. The incidence of scar site recurrence after surgery was found to be 4.5% (6/117). A total of 56 of 132 patients had recurrent disease, including 6 patients with scar site recurrence. All of the patients with scar site recurrence also had recurrent disease at other sites (local, nodal, or distant). Conventional imaging modalities were available in 4 of these 6 patients and detected scar site recurrence in 3 of those 4 patients. In patients with scar site recurrence, the mean ± SD time to scar site recurrence was 14.0 ± 10.9 months (median, 10 months; range, 7-36 months). Significant difference was seen between cases and control for International Federation of Genecology and Oncology stage (P = 0.001) and nodal recurrence (P = 0.007). Additionally, age, nodal recurrence, distant recurrence, and scar site recurrence were significantly associated with death. Scar site recurrence carries a poor prognosis, and the incidence is much higher than previously known when PET

  16. Face, content, and construct validity of four, inanimate training exercises using the da Vinci ® Si surgical system configured with Single-Site ™ instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarc, Anthony M; Curet, Myriam

    2015-08-01

    Validated training exercises are essential tools for surgeons as they develop technical skills to use robot-assisted minimally invasive surgical systems. The purpose of this study was to show face, content, and construct validity of four, inanimate training exercises using the da Vinci (®) Si surgical system configured with Single-Site (™) instrumentation. New (N = 21) and experienced (N = 6) surgeons participated in the study. New surgeons (11 Gynecology [GYN] and 10 General Surgery [GEN]) had not completed any da Vinci Single-Site cases but may have completed multiport cases using the da Vinci system. They participated in this study prior to attending a certification course focused on da Vinci Single-Site instrumentation. Experienced surgeons (5 GYN and 1 GEN) had completed at least 25 da Vinci Single-Site cases. The surgeons completed four inanimate training exercises and then rated them with a questionnaire. Raw metrics and overall normalized scores were computed using both video recordings and kinematic data collected from the surgical system. The experienced surgeons significantly outperformed new surgeons for many raw metrics and the overall normalized scores derived from video review (p da Vinci Single-Site surgery and actually testing the technical skills used during da Vinci Single-Site surgery. In summary, the four training exercises showed face, content, and construct validity. Improved overall scores could be developed using additional metrics not included in this study. The results suggest that the training exercises could be used in an overall training curriculum aimed at developing proficiency in technical skills for surgeons new to da Vinci Single-Site instrumentation.

  17. The extent of environmental and body contamination through aerosols by hydro-surgical debridement in the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzer, David; Lechner, Ricarda; Coraca-Huber, Debora; Mayr, Astrid; Nogler, Michael; Thaler, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Surgical site infections occur in 1-6% of spinal surgeries. Effective treatment includes early diagnosis, parenteral antibiotics and early surgical debridement of the wound surface. On a human cadaver, we executed a complete hydro-surgery debridement including a full surgical setup such as draping. The irrigation fluid was artificially contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538). Surveillance cultures were used to detect environmental and body contamination of the surgical team. For both test setups, environmental contamination was observed in an area of 6 × 8 m. Both test setups caused contamination of all personnel present during the procedure and of the whole operating theatre. However, the concentration of contamination for the surgical staff and the environment was lower when an additional disposable draping device was used. The study showed that during hydro-surgery debridement, contaminated aerosols spread over the whole surgical room and contaminate the theatre and all personnel.

  18. Introduction to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee Guideline for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection: Prosthetic Joint Arthroplasty Section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segreti, John; Parvizi, Javad; Berbari, Elie; Ricks, Philip; Berríos-Torres, Sandra I

    Peri-prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a severe complication of total joint arthroplasty that appears to be increasing as more of these procedures are performed. Numerous risk factors for incisional (superficial and deep) and organ/space (e.g., PJI) surgical site infections (SSIs) have been identified. A better understanding and reversal of modifiable risk factors may lead to a reduction in the incidence of incisional SSI and PJI. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) recently updated the national Guideline for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection. The updated guideline applies evidence-based methodology, presents recommendations for potential strategies to reduce the risk of SSI, and includes an arthroplasty-specific section. This article serves to introduce the guideline development process and to complement the Prosthetic Joint Arthroplasty section with background information on PJI-specific economic burden, epidemiology, pathogenesis and microbiology, and risk factor information.

  19. Recurrent surgical site infection of the spine diagnosed by dual 18F-NaF-bone PET/CT with early-phase scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Jai-Joon; Lee, Jeong Won; Jeon, Min Hyok; Lee, Sang Mi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 31-year-old man who showed recurrently elevated level of the serum inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) after spinal operation. He underwent 18 F-flurodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and dual 18 F-sodium-fluoride ( 18 F-NaF) PET/CT with an additional early-phase scan to find a hidden inflammation focus. Only mildly increased 18 F-FDG was found at the surgical site of T11 spine on 18 F-FDG PET/CT. In contrast, dual 18 F-NaF bone PET/CT with early-phase scan demonstrated focal active inflammation at the surgical site of T11 spine. After a revision operation of the T11 spine, serum CRP level decreased to the normal range without any symptom or sign of inflammation. Inflammatory focus in the surgical site of the spine can be detected with using dual 18 F-NaF bone PET/CT scan with early-phase scan. (orig.)

  20. Community health workers and smartphones for the detection of surgical site infections in rural Haiti: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matousek, Alexi; Paik, Ken; Winkler, Eric; Denike, Jennifer; Addington, Stephen R; Exe, Chauvet; Louis, Rodolphe R E Jean; Riviello, Robert

    2015-04-27

    Absence of outcome data is a barrier to quality improvement in resource poor settings. To address this challenge, we set out to determine whether follow up for surgical site infections (SSIs) using community health workers (CHWs) and smartphones is feasible in rural Haiti. In this pilot study, all patients from a specific mountain region who received an operation between March 10, and July 1, 2014, at Hôpital Albert Schweitzer in rural Haiti were eligible for inclusion. Patients or guardians of minors were approached for consent. We designed a smartphone application to enable CHWs to screen for SSIs during home visits by administering a questionnaire, obtaining GPS data, and submitting a photograph of an incision. We selected and trained CHWs to use the smartphone application and compensated them based on performance. CHWs completed home visits for 30 days after an operation for all participants. Surgeons examined all participants within 24 h after the second CHW home visit. Primary outcomes included the number of participants completing 30-day follow-up and home visits made on time. Secondary outcomes included the quality of the photographs and the agreement between surgeons and CHWs on the diagnosis of SSI. The Partners Healthcare institutional review board and the Ethics Committee at Hôpital Albert Schweitzer approved the study protocol. Five CHWs completed 30-day follow up for 37 of 39 participants (94·9%) and completed 107 of 117 home visits on time (91·5%). High quality photographs were submitted for 101 of 117 visits (86·3%). Surgeons and CHWs agreed on the diagnosis of SSI in 28 of 33 cases (84·8%). Outpatient follow up for SSIs with CHWs and smartphones is feasible in rural Haiti. Further validation of the programme needs to be done before widespread adoption or advocating for task shifting post-operative follow up to CHWs. Partners Healthcare, Children's Hospital Boston, and Swiss Bündner Partnerschaft Hôpital Albert Schweitzer Haiti. Copyright

  1. PRE-OPERATIVE HAIR REMOVAL WITH TRIMMERS AND RAZORS AND ITS IMPACT ON SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS IN ELECTIVE INGUINAL HERNIA REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Kurien

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Despite major advances in infection control interventions, health care-associated infections (HAI remain a major public health problem and patient safety threat worldwide. The global data suggests that the SSI incidence rate varies from 0.5 to 20% depending upon the type of operation and underlying patient status. Several factors preoperative, intraoperative & postoperative, determine the occurrence of surgical site infections, Preoperative hair removal is considered as a risk for the development of surgical site infections. The objective of the study is to find out the difference in the incidence of surgical site infections in patients undergoing pre-operative hair removal by shaving with Razor blades and hair trimmers prior to elective inguinal hernia surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS Written informed consent from 160 patients with no significant comorbidities planning to undergo elective inguinal hernia surgery at the general surgery wards in Government Medical College Kottayam and who were willing to participate in the study were to be obtained. 80 of them to undergo pre-operative hair removal with hair trimmers and 80 to undergo preoperative hair removal by shaving with razor blades on the day prior to the surgery randomised into two groups. During their stay in the postoperative ward the surgical wounds of the patients were examined daily for the development of erythema, pain, discharge, induration and gaping of the wound. The daily findings were noted down till the patient was discharged from the ward. The patients were again reassessed 2 weeks later, when they came for review in the Surgery OPD after their discharge from the ward; finally the patients were examined on the 30th day post-surgery to look for the clinical features of surgical site infections. RESULTS Out of the total 160 patients who were studied, 29 (18.1% of them had post-operative infection within 30 days, in the form of erythema, induration, discharge and gaping

  2. Staphylococcus aureus and the ecology of the nasal microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Cindy M; Price, Lance B; Hungate, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    The human microbiome can play a key role in host susceptibility to pathogens, including in the nasal cavity, a site favored by Staphylococcus aureus. However, what determines our resident nasal microbiota-the host or the environment-and can interactions among nasal bacteria determine S. aureus...

  3. Contamination of environmental surfaces by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in rooms of inpatients with MRSA-positive body sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashige, E Jessica Ohashi; Oie, Shigeharu; Furukawa, H

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can contaminate environmental surfaces that are frequently touched by the hands of patients with MRSA colonization/infection. There have been many studies in which the presence or absence of MRSA contamination was determined but no studies in which MRSA contamination levels were also evaluated in detail. We evaluated MRSA contamination of environmental surfaces (overbed tables, bed side rails, and curtains) in the rooms of inpatients from whom MRSA was isolated via clinical specimens. We examined the curtains within 7-14 days after they had been newly hung. The environmental surfaces were wiped using gauze (molded gauze for wiping of surface bacteria; 100% cotton, 4cm×8cm) moistened with sterile physiological saline. The MRSA contamination rate and mean counts (range) were 25.0% (6/24 samples) and 30.6 (0-255)colony-forming units (cfu)/100cm(2), respectively, for the overbed tables and 31.6% (6/19 samples) and 159.5 (0-1620)cfu/100cm(2), respectively, for the bed side rails. No MRSA was detected in 24 curtain samples. The rate of MRSA contamination of environmental surfaces was high for the overbed tables and bed side rails but low for the curtains. Therefore, at least until the 14th day of use, frequent disinfection of curtains may be not necessary. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  4. Surgical site infections following operative management of cervical spondylotic myelopathy: prevalence, predictors of occurence, and influence on peri-operative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalai, C M; Worley, N; Poorman, G W; Cruz, D L; Vira, S; Passias, P G

    2016-06-01

    Studies have examined infection rates following spine surgery and their relationship to post-operative complications and increased length of stay. Few studies, however, have investigated predictors of infection, specifically in the setting of operative intervention for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). This study aims to identify the incidence and factors predictive of infection amongst this cohort. This study performed a retrospective review of the prospectively collected American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database. Patients included those treated surgically for CSM (ICD-9 code 721.1) from 2010 to 2012. Patient demographics and surgical data were collected with outcome variables including the occurrence of one of the following surgical site infections (SSIs) within 30 days of index operation: superficial SSI, deep incisional SSI, and organ/space SSI. 3057 patients were included in this analysis. Overall infection rate was 1.15 % (35/3057), of which 54.3 % (19/35) were superficial SSIs, 28.6 % (10/35) were deep incisional SSI, and 20 % (7/35) were peri-spinal SSI. Logistic regression revealed factors associated with SSI included: higher BMI [OR 1.162 (CI 1.269-1.064), p = 0.001] and operative time ≥208 min [OR 4.769 (CI 20.220-1.125), p = 0.034]. The overall SSI rate for the examined CSM cohort was 1.15 %. This study identified increased BMI and operative time ≥208 min as predictors of infection in surgical CSM patients. This information should be carefully considered in delivering patient education and future efforts to optimize risk in CSM patients indicated for surgical intervention.

  5. Identifying the Infection Control Areas Requiring Modifications in Thoracic Surgery Units: Results of a Two-Year Surveillance of Surgical Site Infections in Hospitals in Southern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubiel, Grzegorz; Rogoziński, Paweł; Żaloudik, Elżbieta; Bruliński, Krzysztof; Różańska, Anna; Wójkowska-Mach, Jadwiga

    2017-10-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is considered to be a priority in infection control. The objective of this study is the analysis of results of active targeted surveillance conducted over a two-year period in the Department of Thoracic Surgery at the Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery Center in Bystra, in southern Poland. The retrospective analysis was carried out on the basis of results of active monitoring of SSI in the 45-bed Department of Thoracic Surgery at the Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery Center in Bystra between April 1, 2014 and April 30, 2016. Surgical site infections were identified based on the definitions of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) taking into account the time of symptom onset, specifically, whether the symptoms occurred within 30 d after the surgical procedure. Detection of SSI relied on daily inspection of incisions by a trained nurse, analysis of medical and nursing entries in the computer system, and analysis of all results of microbiologic tests taken in the unit and in the operating room. In the study period, data were collected regarding 1,387 treatment procedures meeting the registration criteria. Forty cases of SSI were detected yielding an incidence rate of 3%. Most cases (55%) were found in the course of hospitalization and 45% were detected after the patient's discharge. The SSIs were classified as follows: superficial, 37.5%; deep infections, 7.5%; and organ/space infection, 55%. Among patients who were diagnosed with SSI, most were male (77.5%). For patients with an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score I-II the incidence rate was 2%; ASA score III or more, 3.7%. The incidence rate varied from 0.3% in clean surgical site to 6.5% in clean-contaminated site. The study validated the usefulness of targeted surveillance in monitoring SSIs in patients hospitalized in thoracic surgery departments. Surgical site infection surveillance identified areas of care requiring modifications, namely

  6. Does intraoperative low arterial partial pressure of oxygen increase the risk of surgical site infection following emergency exploratory laparotomy in horses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Farré, Cristina; Prades, Marta; Ribera, Thaïs; Valero, Oliver; Taurà, Pilar

    2014-04-01

    Decreased tissue oxygenation is a critical factor in the development of wound infection as neutrophil mediated oxidative killing is an essential mechanism against surgical pathogens. The objective of this prospective case series was to assess the impact of intraoperative arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) on surgical site infection (SSI) in horses undergoing emergency exploratory laparotomy for acute gastrointestinal disease. The anaesthetic and antibiotic protocol was standardised. Demographic data, surgical potential risk factors and PaO2, obtained 1h after induction of anaesthesia were recorded. Surgical wounds were assessed daily for infection during hospitalisation and follow up information was obtained after discharge. A total of 84 adult horses were included. SSI developed in 34 (40.4%) horses. Multivariate logistic regression showed that PaO2, anaesthetic time and subcutaneous suture material were predictors of SSI (AUC=0.76, sensitivity=71%, specificity=65%). The use of polyglycolic acid sutures increased the risk and horses with a PaO2 value 2h had the highest risk of developing SSI (OR=9.01; 95% CI 2.28-35.64). The results of this study confirm the hypothesis that low intraoperative PaO2 contributes to the development of SSI following colic surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A gratuitous β-Lactamase inducer uncovers hidden active site dynamics of the Staphylococcus aureus BlaR1 sensor domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Thomas E; Peng, Jeffrey W

    2018-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that active sites of proteins have non-trivial conformational dynamics. These dynamics include active site residues sampling different local conformations that allow for multiple, and possibly novel, inhibitor binding poses. Yet, active site dynamics garner only marginal attention in most inhibitor design efforts and exert little influence on synthesis strategies. This is partly because synthesis requires a level of atomic structural detail that is frequently missing in current characterizations of conformational dynamics. In particular, while the identity of the mobile protein residues may be clear, the specific conformations they sample remain obscure. Here, we show how an appropriate choice of ligand can significantly sharpen our abilities to describe the interconverting binding poses (conformations) of protein active sites. Specifically, we show how 2-(2'-carboxyphenyl)-benzoyl-6-aminopenicillanic acid (CBAP) exposes otherwise hidden dynamics of a protein active site that binds β-lactam antibiotics. When CBAP acylates (binds) the active site serine of the β-lactam sensor domain of BlaR1 (BlaRS), it shifts the time scale of the active site dynamics to the slow exchange regime. Slow exchange enables direct characterization of inter-converting protein and bound ligand conformations using NMR methods. These methods include chemical shift analysis, 2-d exchange spectroscopy, off-resonance ROESY of the bound ligand, and reduced spectral density mapping. The active site architecture of BlaRS is shared by many β-lactamases of therapeutic interest, suggesting CBAP could expose functional motions in other β-lactam binding proteins. More broadly, CBAP highlights the utility of identifying chemical probes common to structurally homologous proteins to better expose functional motions of active sites.

  8. Development of the Biopen: a handheld device for surgical printing of adipose stem cells at a chondral wound site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Connell, Cathal D; Thompson, Fletcher; Beirne, Stephen; Cornock, Rhys; Richards, Christopher J; Chung, Johnson; Gambhir, Sanjeev; Yue, Zhilian; Zhang, Binbin; Taylor, Adam; Quigley, Anita; Kapsa, Robert; Wallace, Gordon G; Di Bella, Claudia; Choong, Peter; Augustine, Cheryl; Bourke, Justin

    2016-01-01

    We present a new approach which aims to translate freeform biofabrication into the surgical field, while staying true to the practical constraints of the operating theatre. Herein we describe the development of a handheld biofabrication tool, dubbed the ‘biopen’, which enables the deposition of living cells and biomaterials in a manual, direct-write fashion. A gelatin–methacrylamide/hyaluronic acid–methacrylate (GelMa/HAMa) hydrogel was printed and UV crosslinked during the deposition process to generate surgically sculpted 3D structures. Custom titanium nozzles were fabricated to allow printing of multiple ink formulations in a collinear (side-by-side) geometry. Independently applied extrusion pressure for both chambers allows for geometric control of the printed structure and for the creation of compositional gradients. In vitro experiments demonstrated that human adipose stem cells maintain high viability (>97%) one week after biopen printing in GelMa/HAMa hydrogels. The biopen described in this study paves the way for the use of 3D bioprinting during the surgical process. The ability to directly control the deposition of regenerative scaffolds with or without the presence of live cells during the surgical process presents an exciting advance not only in the fields of cartilage and bone regeneration but also in other fields where tissue regeneration and replacement are critical. (paper)

  9. Evaluating the use of antibiotic prophylaxis during open reduction and internal fixation surgery in patients at low risk of surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Sheng-Gen; Mao, Zhao-Guang; Liu, Bin-Sheng; Zhu, Hui-Hua; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Widespread overuse and inappropriate use of antibiotics contribute to increasingly antibiotic-resistant pathogens and higher health care costs. It is not clear whether routine antibiotic prophylaxis can reduce the rate of surgical site infection (SSI) in low-risk patients undergoing orthopaedic surgery. We designed a simple scorecard to grade SSI risk factors and determined whether routine antibiotic prophylaxis affects SSI occurrence during open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) orthopaedic surgeries in trauma patients at low risk of developing SSI. The SSI risk scorecard (possible total points ranged from 5 to 25) was designed to take into account a patient's general health status, the primary cause of fractures, surgical site tissue condition or wound class, types of devices implanted, and surgical duration. Patients with a low SSI risk score (≤8 points) who were undergoing clean ORIF surgery were divided into control (routine antibiotic treatment, cefuroxime) and evaluation (no antibiotic treatment) groups and followed up for 13-17 months after surgery. The infection rate was much higher in patients with high SSI risk scores (≥9 points) than in patients with low risk scores assigned to the control group (10.7% vs. 2.2%, Prisk score. Implementation of this scoring system could guide the rational use of perioperative antibiotics and ultimately reduce antibiotic resistance, health care costs, and adverse reactions to antibiotics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A case-control study of surgical site infection following operative fixation of fractures of the ankle in a large U.K. trauma unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korim, M T; Payne, R; Bhatia, M

    2014-05-01

    Most of the literature on surgical site infections following the surgical treatment of fractures of the ankle is based on small series of patients, focusing on diabetics or the elderly. None have described post-operative functional scores in those patients who develop an infection. We performed an age- and gender-matched case-control study to identify patient- and surgery-related risk factors for surgical site infection following open reduction and internal fixation of a fracture of the ankle. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify significant risk factors for infection and to calculate odds ratios (OR). Function was assessed using the Olerud and Molander Ankle Score. The incidence of infection was 4% (29/717) and 1.1% (8/717) were deep infections. The median ankle score was significantly lower in the infection group compared with the control group (60 vs 90, Mann-Whitney test p fractures (OR = 4, p = 0.048) were significant risk factors for infection. A low incidence of infection following open reduction and internal fixation of fractures of the ankle was observed. Both superficial and deep infections result in lower functional scores.

  11. Effect of surgical drill guide and irrigans temperature on thermal bone changes during drilling implant sites - thermographic analysis on bovine ribs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Aleksa; Lazić, Zoran; Mišić, Tijana; Šćepanović, Miodrag; Todorović, Aleksandar; Thakare, Kaustubh; Janjić, Bojan; Vlahović, Zoran; Glišić, Mirko

    2016-08-01

    During drilling implant sites, mechanical energy is converted into thermal one resulting in transient rise in temperature of surrounding bone. The temperature of 47°C exeeding one minute impairs osseointegration, compromises mechanical properties of the local bone and could cause early implant failure. This in vitro study aimed to assess the effect of surgical drill guide and temperature of irrigans on thermal changes of the local bone during drilling implant sites, and to test the influence of irrigans temperature on the temperature of surgical drill guide. A total of 48 specimens obtained from bovine ribs were randomly allocated to four experimental conditions according to the 2 x 2 factorial design: drill guide (with or without) and saline (at 25°C or 5°C). Real-time infrared thermography was used as a method for temperature measurement. The primary outcome was bone temperature change during drilling implant sites measured at 3 osteotomy depths, whereas the second one was change in the temperature of the drill guide. Data were analyzed by Brunner and Langer nonparametric analysis and Wilcoxon test. The effect of drill guide on the changes of bone temperature was significant at the entrance of osteotomy, whereas the effect of saline temperature was significant at all osteotomy levels (p 0.05). Guided surgery and irrigation with saline at 25°C were associated with the highest bone temperature increase. Increase in drill guide temperature was significantly higher when saline at 25°C was used (p < 0.001). Guided implant site preparation generates higher temperature of the local bone than conventional drilling, not exceeding the threshold for thermal bone necrosis. Although saline at room temperature provides sufficient heat control during drilling, cooled saline is more effective regardless the use of surgical drill guide.

  12. Effect of surgical drill guide and irrigans temperature on thermal bone changes during drilling implant sites - thermographic analysis on bovine ribs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Aleksa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. During drilling implant sites, mechanical energy is converted into thermal one resulting in transient rise in temperature of surrounding bone. The temperature of 47°C exeeding one minute impairs osseointegration, compromises mechanical properties of the local bone and could cause early implant failure. This in vitro study aimed to assess the effect of surgical drill guide and temperature of irrigans on thermal changes of the local bone during drilling implant sites, and to test the influence of irrigans temperature on the temperature of surgical drill guide. Methods. A total of 48 specimens obtained from bovine ribs were randomly allocated to four experimental conditions according to the 2 x 2 factorial design: drill guide (with or without and saline (at 25°C or 5°C. Real-time infrared thermography was used as a method for temperature measurement. The primary outcome was bone temperature change during drilling implant sites measured at 3 osteotomy depths, whereas the second one was change in the temperature of the drill guide. Data were analyzed by Brunner and Langer nonparametric analysis and Wilcoxon test. Results. The effect of drill guide on the changes of bone temperature was significant at the entrance of osteotomy, whereas the effect of saline temperature was significant at all osteotomy levels (p 0.05. Guided surgery and irrigation with saline at 25°C were associated with the highest bone temperature increase. Increase in drill guide temperature was significantly higher when saline at 25°C was used (p < 0.001. Conclusion. Guided implant site preparation generates higher temperature of the local bone than conventional drilling, not exceeding the threshold for thermal bone necrosis. Although saline at room temperature provides sufficient heat control during drilling, cooled saline is more effective regardless the use of surgical drill guide.

  13. Rapid orthodontic treatment after the ridge-splitting technique--a combined surgical-orthodontic approach for implant site development: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Francesco; Mirabella, A Davide; Borlizzi, Diego

    2012-08-01

    This article presents a clinical case of bilateral partial edentulism in the posterior mandible with severe horizontal and moderate vertical bone atrophy. A new technique using rapid orthodontics after ridge splitting is presented. The split-crest technique was carried out using piezosurgical instruments in the first molar and second premolar areas to widen the bone crest and open a channel for tooth movement. Immediately after, orthodontic appliances were used to move the first premolars distally and the second molars mesially into the surgical site. The rationale was to facilitate and accelerate orthodontic movement of the teeth, which is otherwise difficult in a cortical knife-edged ridge. The bone defect was filled with the alveolar bone of the adjacent teeth that were moved into the surgically opened path. Adequate bone volume for implant placement was generated in the first premolar area. Implants were then inserted, and the patient was rehabilitated.

  14. Vigilancia de las infecciones de herida quirúrgica. Experiencia de 18 meses en el Instituto Nacional de Cancerología Surgical site infection surveillance at the National Cancer Institute in Mexico. An 18 months experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Vilar-Compte

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO. Conocer la frecuencia de infecciones quirúrgicas con un programa prospectivo de vigilancia de cirugías y seguimiento postegreso, en el Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, que es un hospital de tercer nivel de la Ciudad de México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Durante 18 meses se captaron y se vigilaron todas las cirugías efectuadas en el hospital. Se calcularon las razones (por 100 cirugías de infecciones de herida quirúrgica (IHQX por servicio y por el grado de contaminación bacteriana. Se utilizaron las definiciones de IHQX del Centro para la Prevención y el Control de las Enfermedades de Estados Unidos de América (1992. RESULTADOS. Se vigilaron 3 372 cirugías. Trescientos trece casos se infectaron: 140 (44.7% fueron incisionales superficiales; 137 (43.7%, incisionales profundas, y 36 (11.5%, de órganos y espacios. La frecuencia de IHQX fue de 9.28%; para las cirugías limpias, limpias-contaminadas, contaminadas y sucias fue de 7.35, 10.5, 17.3 y 21.5%, respectivamente. La frecuencia de infecciones por servicio fue: gastroenterología, 14.13%; tumores de mama, 11.08%; piel y partes blandas, 10.98%; ginecología, 9.06%; urología, 7.38%; cabeza y cuello, 7.13%, y neumología, 1.81%. La IHQX ocurrió en promedio a los 11.6±6.23 días; 85 casos (27.16% se diagnosticaron mientras el paciente estaba hospitalizado, y 228 (72.84%, después del egreso del paciente. Se obtuvo algún cultivo en 134 (42.8% casos. Los gérmenes más comunes fueron: E. coli, 38 (22.5%; estafilococo coagulasa negativo, 23 (13.6%; Pseudomonas sp., 22 (13%; S. aureus, 16 (9.4%, y enterococos,13 (7.7%. CONCLUSIONES. La vigilancia prospectiva de las cirugías con un seguimiento por 30 días aumentó hasta en 400% la posibilidad de detectar una IHQX. La frecuencia de IHQX en las cirugías limpias y limpias-contaminadas se encuentra por arriba de lo informado.OBJECTIVES. To calculate the surgical site infection (SSI rates with a surgical prospective surveillance

  15. Review of MRSA screening and antibiotics prophylaxis in orthopaedic trauma patients; The risk of surgical site infection with inadequate antibiotic prophylaxis in patients colonized with MRSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, H J; Ponniah, N; Long, S; Rath, N; Kent, M

    2017-07-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine whether orthopaedic trauma patients receive appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis keeping in view the results of their MRSA screening. The secondary aim was to analyse the risk of developing MRSA surgical site infection with and without appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis in those colonized with MRSA. We reviewed 400 consecutive orthopaedic trauma patient episodes. Preoperative MRSA screening results, operative procedures, prophylactic antibiotics and postoperative course were explored. In addition to these consecutive patients, the hospital MRSA database over the previous 5 years identified 27 MRSA colonized acute trauma patients requiring surgery. Of the 400 consecutive patient episodes, 395(98.7%) had MRSA screening performed on admission. However, in 236 (59.0%) cases, the results were not available before the surgery. Seven patient episodes (1.8%) had positive MRSA colonization. Analysis of 27 MRSA colonized patients revealed that 20(74%) patients did not have the screening results available before the surgery. Only 5(18.5%) received Teicoplanin and 22(81.4%) received cefuroxime for antibiotic prophylaxis before their surgery. Of those receiving cefuroxime, five (22.73%) patients developed postoperative MRSA surgical site infection (SSI) but none of those (0%) receiving Teicoplanin had MRSA SSI. The absolute risk reduction for SSI with Teicoplanin as antibiotic prophylaxis was 22.73% (CI=5.22%-40.24%) and NNT (Number Needed to Treat) was 5 (CI=2.5-19.2) CONCLUSION: Lack of available screening results before the surgery may lead to inadequate antibiotic prophylaxis increasing the risk of MRSA surgical site infection. Glycopeptide (e.g.Teicoplanin) prophylaxis should be considered when there is history of MRSA colonization or MRSA screening results are not available before the surgery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Can the surgical checklist reduce the risk of wrong site surgery in orthopaedics? - can the checklist help? Supporting evidence from analysis of a national patient incident reporting system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleary Kevin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical procedures are now very common, with estimates ranging from 4% of the general population having an operation per annum in economically-developing countries; this rising to 8% in economically-developed countries. Whilst these surgical procedures typically result in considerable improvements to health outcomes, it is increasingly appreciated that surgery is a high risk industry. Tools developed in the aviation industry are beginning to be used to minimise the risk of errors in surgery. One such tool is the World Health Organization's (WHO surgery checklist. The National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA manages the largest database of patient safety incidents (PSIs in the world, already having received over three million reports of episodes of care that could or did result in iatrogenic harm. The aim of this study was to estimate how many incidents of wrong site surgery in orthopaedics that have been reported to the NPSA could have been prevented by the WHO surgical checklist. Methods The National Reporting and Learning Service (NRLS database was searched between 1st January 2008- 31st December 2008 to identify all incidents classified as wrong site surgery in orthopaedics. These incidents were broken down into the different types of wrong site surgery. A Likert-scale from 1-5 was used to assess the preventability of these cases if the checklist was used. Results 133/316 (42% incidents satisfied the inclusion criteria. A large proportion of cases, 183/316 were misclassified. Furthermore, there were fewer cases of actual harm [9% (12/133] versus 'near-misses' [121/133 (91%]. Subsequent analysis revealed a smaller proportion of 'near-misses' being prevented by the checklist than the proportion of incidents that resulted in actual harm; 18/121 [14.9% (95% CI 8.5 - 21.2%] versus 10/12 [83.3% (95%CI 62.2 - 104.4%] respectively. Summatively, the checklist could have been prevented 28/133 [21.1% (95%CI 14.1 - 28.0%] patient safety

  17. Low skeletal muscle radiation attenuation and visceral adiposity are associated with overall survival and surgical site infections in patients with pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, David P J; Bakens, Maikel J A M; Coolsen, Mariëlle M E; Rensen, Sander S; van Dam, Ronald M; Bours, Martijn J L; Weijenberg, Matty P; Dejong, Cornelis H C; Olde Damink, Steven W M

    2017-04-01

    Cancer cachexia and skeletal muscle wasting are related to poor survival. In this study, quantitative body composition measurements using computed tomography (CT) were investigated in relation to survival, post-operative complications, and surgical site infections in surgical patients with cancer of the head of the pancreas. A prospective cohort of 199 patients with cancer of the head of the pancreas was analysed by CT imaging at the L3 level to determine (i) muscle radiation attenuation (average Hounsfield units of total L3 skeletal muscle); (ii) visceral adipose tissue area; (iii) subcutaneous adipose tissue area; (iv) intermuscular adipose tissue area; and (v) skeletal muscle area. Sex-specific cut-offs were determined at the lower tertile for muscle radiation attenuation and skeletal muscle area and the higher tertile for adipose tissues. These variables of body composition were related to overall survival, severe post-operative complications (Dindo-Clavien ≥ 3), and surgical site infections (wounds inspected daily by an independent trial nurse) using Cox-regression analysis and multivariable logistic regression analysis, respectively. Low muscle radiation attenuation was associated with shorter survival in comparison with moderate and high muscle radiation attenuation [median survival 10.8 (95% CI: 8.8-12.8) vs. 17.4 (95% CI: 14.7-20.1), and 18.5 (95% CI: 9.2-27.8) months, respectively; P site infection rate, OR: 2.4 (95% CI: 1.1-5.3; P = 0.027). Low muscle radiation attenuation was associated with reduced survival, and high visceral adiposity was associated with an increase in surgical site infections. The strong correlation between muscle radiation attenuation and intermuscular adipose tissue suggests the presence of ectopic fat in muscle, warranting further investigation. CT image analysis could be implemented in pre-operative risk assessment to assist in treatment decision-making. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle

  18. Pre-operative urinary tract infection: is it a risk factor for early surgical site infection with hip fracture surgery? A retrospective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yassa, Rafik RD; Khalfaoui, Mahdi Y; Veravalli, Karunakar; Evans, D Alun

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aims of the current study were to determine whether pre-operative urinary tract infections in patients presenting acutely with neck of femur fractures resulted in a delay to surgery and whether such patients were at increased risk of developing post-operative surgical site infections. Design A retrospective review of all patients presenting with a neck of femur fracture, at a single centre over a one-year period. The hospital hip fracture database was used as the main source of ...

  19. Environment of care: Is it time to reassess microbial contamination of the operating room air as a risk factor for surgical site infection in total joint arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Javad; Barnes, Sue; Shohat, Noam; Edmiston, Charles E

    2017-11-01

    In the modern operating room (OR), traditional surgical mask, frequent air exchanges, and architectural barriers are viewed as effective in reducing airborne microbial populations. Intraoperative sampling of airborne particulates is rarely performed in the OR because of technical difficulties associated with sampling methodologies and a common belief that airborne contamination is infrequently associated with surgical site infections (SSIs). Recent studies suggest that viable airborne particulates are readily disseminated throughout the OR, placing patients at risk for postoperative SSI. In 2017, virtually all surgical disciplines are engaged in the implantation of selective biomedical devices, and these implants have been documented to be at high risk for intraoperative contamination. Approximately 1.2 million arthroplasties are performed annually in the United States, and that number is expected to increase to 3.8 million by the year 2030. The incidence of periprosthetic joint infection is perceived to be low (<2.5%); however, the personal and fiscal morbidity is significant. Although the pharmaceutic and computer industries enforce stringent air quality standards on their manufacturing processes, there is currently no U.S. standard for acceptable air quality within the OR environment. This review documents the contribution of air contamination to the etiology of periprosthetic joint infection, and evidence for selective innovative strategies to reduce the risk of intraoperative microbial aerosols. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Surgical Assisting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... instruction, including: Microbiology Pathophysiology Pharmacology Anatomy and physiology Medical terminology Curriculum . Course content includes: Advanced surgical anatomy Surgical microbiology Surgical pharmacology Anesthesia methods and agents Bioscience Ethical ...

  1. Use of Quantile Regression to Determine the Impact on Total Health Care Costs of Surgical Site Infections Following Common Ambulatory Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Margaret A; Tian, Fang; Wallace, Anna E; Nickel, Katelin B; Warren, David K; Fraser, Victoria J; Selvam, Nandini; Hamilton, Barton H

    2017-02-01

    To determine the impact of surgical site infections (SSIs) on health care costs following common ambulatory surgical procedures throughout the cost distribution. Data on costs of SSIs following ambulatory surgery are sparse, particularly variation beyond just mean costs. We performed a retrospective cohort study of persons undergoing cholecystectomy, breast-conserving surgery, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and hernia repair from December 31, 2004 to December 31, 2010 using commercial insurer claims data. SSIs within 90 days post-procedure were identified; infections during a hospitalization or requiring surgery were considered serious. We used quantile regression, controlling for patient, operative, and postoperative factors to examine the impact of SSIs on 180-day health care costs throughout the cost distribution. The incidence of serious and nonserious SSIs was 0.8% and 0.2%, respectively, after 21,062 anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, 0.5% and 0.3% after 57,750 cholecystectomy, 0.6% and 0.5% after 60,681 hernia, and 0.8% and 0.8% after 42,489 breast-conserving surgery procedures. Serious SSIs were associated with significantly higher costs than nonserious SSIs for all 4 procedures throughout the cost distribution. The attributable cost of serious SSIs increased for both cholecystectomy and hernia repair as the quantile of total costs increased ($38,410 for cholecystectomy with serious SSI vs no SSI at the 70th percentile of costs, up to $89,371 at the 90th percentile). SSIs, particularly serious infections resulting in hospitalization or surgical treatment, were associated with significantly increased health care costs after 4 common surgical procedures. Quantile regression illustrated the differential effect of serious SSIs on health care costs at the upper end of the cost distribution.

  2. Three-Dimensional Implant Positioning with a Piezosurgery Implant Site Preparation Technique and an Intraoral Surgical Navigation System: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Gerardo; Taraschi, Valerio; Vercellotti, Tomaso; Ben-Nissan, Besim; Marchetti, Claudio

    This case report describes new implant site preparation techniques joining the benefits of using an intraoral navigation system to optimize three-dimensional implant site positioning in combination with an ultrasonic osteotomy. A report of five patients is presented, and the implant positions as planned in the navigation software with the postoperative scan image were compared. The preliminary results are useful, although further clinical studies with larger populations are needed to confirm these findings.

  3. Is hospital information system relevant to detect surgical site infection? Findings from a prospective surveillance study in posterior instrumented spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boetto, J; Chan-Seng, E; Lonjon, G; Pech, J; Lotthé, A; Lonjon, N

    2015-11-01

    Spinal instrumentation has a high rate of surgical site infection (SSI), but results greatly vary depending on surveillance methodology, surgical procedures, or quality of follow-up. Our aim was to study true incidence of SSI in spinal surgery by significant data collection, and to compare it with the results obtained through the hospital information system. This work is a single center prospective cohort study that included all patients consecutively operated on for spinal instrumentation by posterior approach over a six-month period regardless the etiology. For all patients, a "high definition" prospective method of surveillance was performed by the infection control (IC) department during at least 12 months after surgery. Results were then compared with findings from automatic surveillance though the hospital information system (HIS). One hundred and fifty-four patients were included. We found no hardly difference between "high definition" and automatic surveillance through the HIS, even if HIS tended to under-estimate the infection rate: rate of surgical site infection was 2.60% and gross SSI incidence rate via the hospital information system was 1.95%. Smoking and alcohol consumption were significantly related to a SSI. Our SSI rates to reflect the true incidence of infectious complications in posterior instrumented adult spinal surgery in our hospital and these results were consistent with the lower levels of published infection rate. In-house surveillance by surgeons only is insufficiently sensitive. Further studies with more patients and a longer inclusion time are needed to conclude if SSI case detection through the HIS could be a relevant and effective alternative method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of Pre-Operative Blood Transfusion and Subcutaneous Fat Thickness as Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infection after Posterior Thoracic Spine Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhoff, Georg; Burla, Laurin; Werner, Clément M L; Jentzsch, Thorsten; Wanner, Guido A; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Sprengel, Kai

    2015-06-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) increase morbidity and mortality rates and generate additional cost for the healthcare system. Pre-operative blood transfusion and the subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT) have been described as risk factors for SSI in other surgical areas. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of pre-operative blood transfusion and the SFT on the occurrence of SSI in posterior thoracic spine surgery. In total, 244 patients (median age 55 y; 97 female) who underwent posterior thoracic spine fusions from 2008 to 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Patient-specific characteristics, pre-operative hemoglobin concentration/hematocrit values, the amount of blood transfused, and the occurrence of a post-operative SSI were documented. The SFT was measured on pre-operative computed tomography scans. Surgical site infection was observed in 26 patients (11%). The SFT was 13 mm in patients without SSI and 14 mm in those with infection (p=0.195). The odds ratio for patients with pre-operative blood transfusion to present with SSI was 3.1 (confidence interval [CI] 1.4-7.2) and 2.7 (CI 1.1-6.4) when adjusted for age. There was no difference between the groups with regard to pre-operative hemoglobin concentration (p=0.519) or hematocrit (p=0.908). The SFT did not differ in the two groups. Allogeneic red blood cell transfusion within 48 h prior to surgery was an independent risk factor for SSI after posterior fusion for the fixation of thoracic spine instabilities. Pre-operative blood transfusion tripled the risk, whereas SFT had no influence on the occurrence of SSI.

  5. Multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To study the prevalence of resistant strains of S. aureus isolated from surfaces, beds and various equipment of an Iranian hospital emergency ward. Methods: Two hundred swab samples were collected from the surfaces, beds, trolleys, surgical equipment and diagnostic medical devices in emergency ward.

  6. Abortion - surgical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... Surgical abortion involves dilating the opening to the uterus (cervix) and placing a small suction tube into the uterus. ...

  7. Risk Assessment of Abdominal Wall Thickness Measured on Pre-Operative Computerized Tomography for Incisional Surgical Site Infection after Abdominal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongyoo, Assanee; Chatthamrak, Putipan; Sriussadaporn, Ekkapak; Limpavitayaporn, Palin; Mingmalairak, Chatchai

    2015-07-01

    The surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication of abdominal operation. It relates to increased hospital stay, increased healthcare cost, and decreased patient's quality of life. Obesity, usually defined by BMI, is known as one of the risks of SSI. However, the thickness of subcutaneous layers of abdominal wall might be an important local factor affecting the rate of SSI after the abdominal operations. The objective of this study is to assess the importance of the abdominal wall thickness on incisional SSI rate. The subjects of the present study were patients who had undergone major abdominal operations at Thammasat University Hospital between June 2013 and May 2014, and had been investigated with CT scans before their operations. The demographic data and clinical information of these patients were recorded. The thickness ofsubcutaneous fatty tissue from skin down to the most superficial layer of abdominal wall muscle at the surgical site was measured on CT images. The wound infectious complication was reviewed and categorized as superficial and deep incisional SSIfollowing the definition from Centersfor Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines. The significance ofeach potentialfactors on SSI rates was determined separately with student t-test for quantitative data and χ2-test for categorical data. Then all factors, which had p operative CTscans. Post-operative SSI was 25.2% (35/139), superficial and deep types in 27 and 8 patients, respectively. The comparison of abdominal wall thickness between patients with and without infection was significantly different (20.0 ± 8.4 mm and 16.0 ± 7.2 mm, respectively). When the thickness at 20 mm was used as the cut-off value, 43 of 139 patients had abdominal wall thickness ≥ 20 mm. The incidence of SSI of the thickness ±20 mm group was 37.2% (16/43) and of the less thickness group was 19.8% (19/96), with p operation. However, only abdominal wall thickness and wound classification were still significant

  8. Clinical relevance and effect of surgical wound classification in appendicitis: Retrospective evaluation of wound classification discrepancies between surgeons, Swissnoso-trained infection control nurse, and histology as well as surgical site infection rates by wound class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang-Chan, Anastasija; Gingert, Christian; Angst, Eliane; Hetzer, Franc Heinrich

    2017-07-01

    Surgical wound classification (SWC) is used for risk stratification of surgical site infection (SSI) and serves as the basis for measuring quality of care. The objective was to examine the accuracy and reliability of SWC. This study was purposed to evaluate the discrepancies in SWC as assessed by three groups: surgeons, an infection control nurse, and histopathologic evaluation. The secondary aim was to compare the risk-stratified SSI rates using the different SWC methods for 30 d postoperatively. An analysis was performed of the appendectomies from January 2013 to June 2014 in the Cantonal Hospital of Schaffhausen. SWC was assigned by the operating surgeon at the end of the procedure and retrospectively reviewed by a Swissnoso-trained infection control nurse after reading the operative and pathology report. The level of agreement among the three different SWC assessment groups was determined using kappa statistic. SSI rates were analyzed using a chi-square test. In 246 evaluated cases, the kappa scores for interrater reliability among the SWC assessments across the three groups ranged from 0.05 to 0.2 signifying slight agreement between the groups. SSIs were more frequently associated with trained infection control nurse-assigned SWC than with surgeons based SWC. Our study demonstrated a considerable discordance in the SWC assessments performed by the three groups. Unfortunately, the currently practiced SWC system suffers from ambiguity in definition and/or implementation of these definitions is not clearly stated. This lack of reliability is problematic and may lead to inappropriate comparisons within and between hospitals and surgeons. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cemaran Staphylococcus aureus dan Pseudomonas aerogenosa Pada Stetoskop dirumah Sakit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    leka lutpiatina

    2017-10-01

    The result of the research was found contamination of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aerogenosa on steteskop. The site home condition of the research data was 66.7% cleaned daily, the storage method was placed on the table 70% and the duration of using the set home more than 1 year as much as 70%. The conclusion of stethoscope at Banjarbaru Hospital was contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus by 70% and Pseudomonas aerogenosa by 17%. The suggestion of research can be continued by knowing the existence of Staphylococcus aureus resistant antibiotic and Pseudomonas aerogenous antibiotic resistant at steteskop at Hospital.

  10. The need for unique risk adjustment for surgical site infections at a high-volume, tertiary care center with inherent high-risk colorectal procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgun, E; Benlice, C; Hammel, J; Hull, T; Stocchi, L

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to create a unique risk adjustment model for surgical site infection (SSI) in patients who underwent colorectal surgery (CRS) at the Cleveland Clinic (CC) with inherent high risk factors by using a nationwide database. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was queried to identify patients who underwent CRS between 2005 and 2010. Initially, CC cases were identified from all NSQIP data according to case identifier and separated from the other NSQIP centers. Demographics, comorbidities, and outcomes were compared. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association between SSI and center-related factors. A total of 70,536 patients met the inclusion criteria and underwent CRS, 1090 patients (1.5%) at the CC and 69,446 patients (98.5%) at other centers. Male gender, work-relative value unit, diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease, pouch formation, open surgery, steroid use, and preoperative radiotherapy rates were significantly higher in the CC cases. Overall morbidity and individual postoperative complication rates were found to be similar in the CC and other centers except for the following: organ-space SSI and sepsis rates (higher in the CC cases); and pneumonia and ventilator dependency rates (higher in the other centers). After covariate adjustment, the estimated degree of difference between the CC and other institutions with respect to organ-space SSI was reduced (OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.08-1.77). The unique risk adjustment strategy may provide center-specific comprehensive analysis, especially for hospitals that perform inherently high-risk procedures. Higher surgical complexity may be the reason for increased SSI rates in the NSQIP at tertiary care centers.

  11. Close association between oropharyngeal and rhinopharyngeal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus - clues to new insight of MRSA colonization of the oropharynx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, I S; Larsen, P L; Brandelev, B L

    2013-01-01

    This study provides data on prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in oropharynx, rhinopharynx and vestibulum nasi. Specimens were taken from these three pharyngeal sites in 346 patients and analysed for S. aureus. Abnormal pharyngeal findings and patient histories were recorded. S. aureus was found...

  12. Staphylococcus aureus Transcriptome Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäder, Ulrike; Nicolas, Pierre; Depke, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen that colonizes about 20% of the human population. Intriguingly, this Gram-positive bacterium can survive and thrive under a wide range of different conditions, both inside and outside the human body. Here, we investigated the transcriptional adaptation of...

  13. Using the Electronic Health Record Data in Real Time and Predictive Analytics to Prevent Hospital-Acquired Postoperative/Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falen, Thomas; Noblin, Alice M; Russell, O Lucia; Santiago, Nonica

    Of critical concern to hospitals today is the prevention of postoperative (surgical site) infections that often result in increased lengths of stays for patients, increased resource demands and costs, loss of public trust and lawsuits, and needless pain and suffering for patients and their families. While all surgical patients have the potential to develop a postoperative infection, the main challenge is to identify key risk factors (both patient centered and operational) through an electronic early-warning system to reduce the likelihood of a postoperative infection from occurring. Currently, most postoperative infection risk prevention practices encompass limited use of informatics technologies or do not maximize the potential benefits. In addition, from a research perspective, there has been more focus on extrapolating electronically housed data (eg, from progress notes, operative notes, laboratory, pharmacy, radiology) retrospectively to describe poor patient outcomes for benchmarking purposes (revealing poor results and opportunities for improvement) rather than using similar sources of real-time data to prevent poor patient outcomes from occurring. This article proposes that standardized indicators, both patient centered and operational, linked to the patient's electronic health record could allow for implementation of 24/7, "real-time" monitoring/surveillance to implement well-timed preventive interventions scaled to each patient and facility to assist caregivers in reducing the numbers of postoperative infections and improve the overall quality and costs of patient care.

  14. Vacuum-assisted closure versus closure without vacuum assistance for preventing surgical site infections and infections of chronic wounds: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansarli, Giannoula S; Vardakas, Konstantinos Z; Stratoulias, Constantinos; Peppas, George; Kapaskelis, Anastasios; Falagas, Matthew E

    2014-08-01

    We sought to examine whether vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is associated with fewer surgical site infections (SSIs) or infections of chronic wounds than other management procedures for surgical wounds. The PubMed and Scopus databases were searched systematically. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the development of SSIs or infections of chronic wounds between patients treated with VAC for acute or chronic wounds and those whose wounds were treated without VAC were considered eligible for inclusion in the study. Eight RCTs met the inclusion criteria for the study. Four of the studies included chronic or diabetic lower extremity wounds and four included fractures. In three of four studies reporting on fractures, the wounds were not closed post-operatively, whereas in one study primary closure of the wound was performed. With regard to wounds left open after the stabilization of fractures, patients whose wounds were treated with VAC developed fewer SSIs than those whose wounds were treated without VAC ([367 patients (196 with VAC; 171 without VAC) relative risk [RR], 0.47; 95% CI 0.28-0.81]). On the contrary, no difference in the development of SSIs occurred among patients with chronic or diabetic lower-extremity wounds treated with VAC and those whose wounds were treated without VAC ([638 patients (320 with VAC; 318 without VAC) RR 1.67; 95% CI: 0.71-3.94]). The available evidence suggests that the development of infections in wounds treated with VAC depends on the type of wound being treated.

  15. Contributing factors of elective surgical case cancellation: a retrospective cross-sectional study at a single-site hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kaiye; Xie, Xiaolei; Luo, Li; Gong, Renrong

    2017-09-11

    Case cancellation (CC) has significant impact on the efficiency of operating room (OR) management, which can be mitigated by taking preventive measures. In this study, using the data of the West China Hospital (WCH), we identified the effect of contributing factors and recommended hospital interventions to facilitate CC prevention. We conducted a retrospective review of 11,331 elective surgical cases from January 1 to December 31, 2014. CC reasons were grouped into six categories. The methods of descriptive statistics and hypothesis test were used to identify the effect of factors. CC reasons (746) were divided into six broad categories: workup related (preoperative diagnostic assessment issues or sudden medical condition changes) (25.8%), non-specified reasons (25.8%), coordination issues (15.1%), patient related (13.0%), support system issues (11.8%), and doctor related (8.5%). The types of the most frequently performed operations are identified, as well as their CRs. The cancellation rate (CR) of males was lower than that of females (16.7% to 18.3%). A large difference in the CRs existed among doctors. The CR on Monday was significantly higher than the other four weekdays. Workup related issues, the types of procedures, the menstrual cycle of females, highly imbalanced CRs among doctors, and tendency of cancellation on Monday are the major identified factors, which account for a significant amount of preventable cancellations. It is suggested that corresponding hospital interventions can reduce CR and improve OR efficiency, including maintaining effective coordination, good communication and well-designed preoperative assessment processes, focusing on the type of procedures which are more time-consuming and complex, paying special attention to the physiology of females during surgery planning, taking measures to reduce CR of top eight doctors, and improving surgery scheduling on Monday.

  16. The impact of pre-operative weight loss on incidence of surgical site infection and readmission rates after total joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inacio, Maria C S; Kritz-Silverstein, Donna; Raman, Rema; Macera, Caroline A; Nichols, Jeanne F; Shaffer, Richard A; Fithian, Donald C

    2014-03-01

    This study characterized a cohort of obese total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients (1/1/2008-12/31/2010) and evaluated whether a clinically significant amount of pre-operative weight loss (5% decrease in body weight) is associated with a decreased risk of surgical site infections (SSI) and readmissions post-surgery. 10,718 TKAs and 4066 THAs were identified. During the one year pre-TKA 7.6% of patients gained weight, 12.4% lost weight, and 79.9% remained the same. In the one year pre-THA, 6.3% of patients gained weight, 18.0% lost weight, and 75.7% remained the same. In TKAs and THAs, after adjusting for covariates, the risk of SSI and readmission was not significantly different in the patients who gained or lost weight pre-operatively compared to those who remained the same. © 2013.

  17. Use and Effectiveness of Peri-Operative Cefotetan versus Cefazolin Plus Metronidazole for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection in Abdominal Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danan, Eleanor; Smith, Janessa; Kruer, Rachel M; Avdic, Edina; Lipsett, Pamela; Curless, Melanie S; Jarrell, Andrew S

    2018-04-24

    Current practice guidelines for antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery recommend a cephamycin or cefazolin plus metronidazole for various abdominal surgeries. In February 2016, cephamycin drug shortages resulted in a change in The Johns Hopkins Hospital's (JHH) recommendation for peri-operative antibiotic prophylaxis in abdominal surgeries from cefotetan to cefazolin plus metronidazole. The primary objective of this study was to quantify the percentage of abdominal surgeries adherent to JHH peri-operative antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines. A sub-group analysis investigated whether prophylaxis with cefazolin plus metronidazole was associated with a lower rate of surgical site infections (SSIs) versus cefotetan. This retrospective cohort study included adult inpatients who underwent an abdominal surgery at JHH in September 2015 (Study Period I: cefotetan) or February to March 2016 (Study Period II: cefazolin plus metronidazole). Two hundred abdominal surgery cases were included in the primary analysis. A subset of 156 surgical cases were included in the sub-group analysis. The overall adherence rate to JHH guidelines was 75% in Study Period I versus 17% in Study Period II (p operative administration time (87% vs. 23%, p site infections occurred in 14% (12/83) of surgeries with cefotetan versus 8.2% (6/73) with cefazolin plus metronidazole for prophylaxis (p = 0.19). Adherence to an institution-specific peri-operative antibiotic prophylaxis guideline for abdominal surgeries was limited primarily by the longer infusion time required for pre-operative metronidazole. A higher percentage of SSIs occurred among abdominal surgeries with cefotetan versus cefazolin plus metronidazole for prophylaxis.

  18. In Vivo Assessment of Phage and Linezolid Based Implant Coatings for Treatment of Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA Mediated Orthopaedic Device Related Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kaur

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus comprises up to two-thirds of all pathogens in orthopaedic implant infections with two species respectively Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, being the predominate etiological agents isolated. Further, with the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, treatment of S. aureus implant infections has become more difficult, thus representing a devastating complication. Use of local delivery system consisting of S.aureus specific phage along with linezolid (incorporated in biopolymer allowing gradual release of the two agents at the implant site represents a new, still unexplored treatment option (against orthopaedic implant infections that has been studied in an animal model of prosthetic joint infection. Naked wire, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC coated wire and phage and /or linezolid coated K-wire were surgically implanted into the intra-medullary canal of mouse femur bone of respective groups followed by inoculation of S.aureus ATCC 43300(MRSA. Mice implanted with K-wire coated with both the agents i.e phage as well as linezolid (dual coated wires showed maximum reduction in bacterial adherence, associated inflammation of the joint as well as faster resumption of locomotion and motor function of the limb. Also, all the coating treatments showed no emergence of resistant mutants. Use of dual coated implants incorporating lytic phage (capable of self-multiplication as well as linezolid presents an attractive and aggressive early approach in preventing as well as treating implant associated infections caused by methicillin resistant S. aureus strains as assessed in a murine model of experimental joint infection.

  19. Study of nosocomial isolates of Staphylococcus aureus with special reference to methicillin resistant S. aureus in a tertiary care hospital in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, B; Pokhrel, B; Mohapatra, T

    2009-06-01

    To find out the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus nosocomial infection and methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA), clinical samples from nosocomially infected patients were processed by following standard methodology in microbiology laboratory, Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal. Of 149 S. aureus isolates, skin infection isolates contributed a major part 72.5% making nosocomial infection by S. aureus most prevalent in skin infection followed by lower respiratory tract infection 11.41% and urinary tract infection 8.7%. Overall MRSA prevalence was 45.0%. MRSA prevalence was 42.6% in skin infection, 82.3% in lower respiratory tract infection and 30.8% in urinary tract infection. MRSA infection was found associated with lower respiratory tract infection only. Highest occurrence of nosocomial infection was observed in female surgical ward, surgical out patient department, orthopedic ward, male surgical ward and maternity ward. MRSA isolation was high from lower respiratory tract of patients admitted in intensive care unit, coronary care unit, Sub-acute intensive care unit, intermediate coronary care unit, neurology ward and post-operative ward. Whereas methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) occurrence was higher in patients admitted in orthopedic, Surgical out patient department, and female surgical ward. The occurrence of MRSA did not differ with age but MRSA was found associated with male patients and MSSA was associated with female patients. Since MRSA prevalence was high, regular surveillance of MRSA and nosocomial infections should be done and universal precautions to control nosocomial infections should be followed.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus colonization in atopic eczema and its association with filaggrin gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M. L.; Edslev, S. M.; Andersen, P. S.

    2017-01-01

    was to assess differences in S. aureus colonization in patients with AD with and without filaggrin gene mutations. The secondary aim was to assess disease severity in relation to S. aureus colonization. Exploratory analyses were performed to investigate S. aureus genetic lineages in relation to filaggrin gene...... were characterized with respect to disease severity (Scoring Atopic Dermatitis) and FLG mutations (n = 88). Fisher's exact test was used to analyse differences in S. aureus colonization in relation to FLG mutations. Results: Of the 101 patients included, 74 (73%) were colonized with S. aureus....... Of the colonized patients, 70 (95%) carried only one CC type in all three different sampling sites. In lesional skin, S. aureus was found in 24 of 31 patients with FLG mutations vs. 24 of 54 wild-type patients (P = 0·0004). Staphylococcus aureusCC1 clonal lineage was more prevalent in patients with FLG mutations...

  1. Comparison of different sets of instruments for laparoendoscopic single-site surgery in a surgical simulator with novices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Shi, Long-Qing; Wang, Jing-Min; Jiang, Xiao-Hua; Ji, Zhen-Ling

    2016-04-01

    Given the parallel entry of working instruments through a single incision in laparoendoscopic single-site surgery, loss of triangulation in the abdominal cavity and counteracting movements of the instruments are inevitable obstacles. Some specially designed devices have emerged to ameliorate these challenges. Twenty-four novice participants were randomized into four groups using assigned instruments, conventional straight instruments, single-curved instruments, double-curved instruments and articulating instruments, respectively, to perform two basic tasks (peg transferring and pattern cutting) 14 times in a modified simulator. A test of the tasks and a resection of the intestine segment of a rat were performed. The task scores and evaluation of intraoperative skills during the resection of the intestine segment were recorded. The instrument of modified National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) was completed. The task scores of the groups using single-curved instruments and articulating instruments were better than the other two groups on the simulator tasks, consistent with the evaluation of intraoperative skills during the resection of intestine segment. As the proficiency with the instruments increased, the task scores improved, as demonstrated by the learning curve. The workload measured by the modified NASA-TLX tool demonstrated that the groups using articulating instruments and double-curved instruments had a heavier workload in most of the categories compared with the other two groups. Single-curved and articulating instruments are more effective than conventional straight and double-curved devices, and are favourable in laparoendoscopic single-site surgery for novice learners. © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  2. Infección de los sitios quirúrgicos: estudio de 1 año Infection of the surgical sites: a one-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Vialat Soto

    2008-03-01

    sitios quirúrgicos en el niño continúa siendo un problema de salud, al elevar la morbilidad operatoria y aumentar la duración de la estadía hospitalaria y los costes de esta.INTRODUCTION. The patient that undergoes surgery is exposed to diverse complications during the postoperative period. The Center for Disease Control (CDC, Atlanta, U.S.A. redifined the problem of postoperative infections and proposed the term "infection of the surgical sites" to refer to the third most reported cause of nosocomial infection. The objective of this study was to identify the behaviour of the infections of the surgical sites and their interrelation to the risk factors in children operated on in our surgery service during 2006. METHODS. A study on the incidence of infection of the surgical sites and the influence of the risk factors on children that were operated on at the surgery service of the Pediatric Teaching Hospital of Centro Habana in 2006 was conducted. The study group was composed of the 44 patients that presented postoperative infection of the total of 1158 patients that underwent surgery in this period. Different variables were studied and the data obtained from them were analyzed. RESULTS. The 44 patients with infection of the surgical sites accounted for an infection rate of 3.79 %. The sepsis of the surgical wound was the most frequent complication (93.2 %. In 25.0 % of the infected cases, perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis had been used. The infection predominated in the patients that underwent emergency surgery (75.0 % and in the dirty surgeries (43.2 %. The highest number of postoperative infections (31; 70.5 % was registered in the patients operated on of acute appendicitis. Only 7 infected patients had a hospital stay of more than 9 days (15.9 %, and there were only 6 readmissions: 4 patients with sepsis of deep wounds and 3 children with intraperitoneal abscesses secondary to acute appendicitis with generalized peritonitis. CONCLUSIONS. The infection of the

  3. Evaluating the cost of adult voluntary medical male circumcision in a mixed (surgical and PrePex site compared to a hypothetical PrePex-only site in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Young Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several circumcision devices have been evaluated for a safe and simplified male circumcision among adults. The PrePex device was prequalified for voluntary male medical circumcision (VMMC in May 2013 by the World Health Organization and is expected to simplify the procedure safely while reducing cost. South Africa is scaling up VMMC. Objective: To evaluate the overall unit cost of VMMC at a mixed site vs. a hypothetical PrePex-only site in South Africa. Design: We evaluated the overall unit cost of VMMC at a mixed site where PrePex VMMC procedure was added to routine forceps-guided scalpel-based VMMC in Soweto, South Africa. We abstracted costs and then modeled these costs for a hypothetical PrePex-only site, at which 9,600 PrePex circumcisions per year could be done. We examined cost drivers and modeled costs, varying the price of the PrePex device. The healthcare system perspective was used. Results: In both sites, the main contributors of cost were personnel and consumables. If 10% of all VMMC were by PrePex at the mixed site, the overall costs of the surgical method and PrePex were similar – US$59.62 and $59.53, respectively. At the hypothetical PrePex-only site, the unit cost was US$51.10 with PrePex circumcisions having markedly lower personnel and biohazardous waste management costs. In sensitivity analysis with the cost of PrePex kit reduced to US$10 and $2, the cost of VMMC was further reduced. Conclusions: Adding PrePex to an existing site did not necessarily reduce the overall costs of VMMC. However, starting a new PrePex-only site is feasible and may significantly reduce the overall cost by lowering both personnel and capital costs, thus being cost-effective in the long term. Achieving a lower cost for PrePex will be an important contributor to the scale-up of VMMC.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus CC398

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Lance B.; Stegger, Marc; Hasman, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Since its discovery in the early 2000s, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 398 (CC398) has become a rapidly emerging cause of human infections, most often associated with livestock exposure. We applied whole-genome sequence typing to characterize a diverse collection...... of CC398 isolates (n = 89), including MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) from animals and humans spanning 19 countries and four continents. We identified 4,238 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among the 89 core genomes. Minimal homoplasy (consistency index = 0.9591) was detected...... among parsimony-informative SNPs, allowing for the generation of a highly accurate phylogenetic reconstruction of the CC398 clonal lineage. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that MSSA from humans formed the most ancestral clades. The most derived lineages were composed predominantly of livestock...

  5. Update to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection (2017): A summary, review, and strategies for implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Lyndsay M; Thom, Kerri A; Preas, Michael Anne

    2018-03-07

    Surgical site infections remain a common cause of morbidity, mortality, and increased length of stay and cost amongst hospitalized patients in the United States. This article summarizes the evidence used to inform the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection (2017), and highlights key updates and new recommendations. We also present specific suggestions for how infection preventionists can play a central role in guideline implementation by translating these recommendations into evidence-based policies and practices in their facility. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Glycopeptides versus β-lactams for the prevention of surgical site infections in cardiovascular and orthopedic surgery: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Anas; Khanna, Ashish; Chagin, Kevin M; Klika, Alison K; Johnston, Douglas; Barsoum, Wael K

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of glycopeptides and β-lactams in preventing surgical site infections (SSIs) in cardiac, vascular, and orthopedic surgery. The cost-effectiveness of switching from β-lactams to glycopeptides for preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis has been controversial. β-Lactams are generally recommended in clean surgical procedures, but they are ineffective against resistant gram-positive bacteria. PubMed, International Pharmaceuticals Abstracts, Scopus, and Cochrane were searched for randomized clinical trials comparing glycopeptides and β-lactams for prophylaxis in adults undergoing cardiac, vascular, or orthopedic surgery. Abstracts and conference proceedings were included. Two independent reviewers performed study selection, data extraction, and assessment of risk of bias. Fourteen studies with a total of 8952 patients were analyzed. No difference was detected in overall SSIs between antibiotic types. However, compared with β-lactams, glycopeptides reduced the risk of resistant staphylococcal SSIs by 48% (relative risk, 0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.29-0.93; P = 0.03) and enterococcal SSIs by 64% (relative risk, 0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.16-0.80; P = 0.01), but increased respiratory tract infections by 54% (relative risk, 1.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-2.01; P ≤ 0.01). Subgroup analysis of cardiac procedures showed superiority of β-lactams in preventing superficial and deep chest SSIs, susceptible staphylococcal SSIs, and respiratory tract infections. Glycopeptides reduce the risk of resistant staphylococcal SSIs and enterococcal SSIs, but increase the risk of respiratory tract infections. Additional high-quality randomized clinical trials are needed as these results are limited by high risk of bias.

  7. Surgical site infections among high-risk patients in clean-contaminated head and neck reconstructive surgery: concordance with preoperative oral flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching-Hsiang; Chew, Khong-Yik; Solomkin, Joseph S; Lin, Pao-Yuan; Chiang, Yuan-Cheng; Kuo, Yur-Ren

    2013-12-01

    Salivary contamination of surgical wounds in clean-contaminated head and neck surgery with free flap reconstruction remains a major cause of infection and leads to significant morbidity. This study investigates the correlation between intraoral flora and surgical site infections (SSIs) among high-risk head and neck cancer patients undergoing resection and free flap reconstruction. One hundred twenty-nine patients were identified as being at high risk for infective complications based on cancer stage, tumor size, comorbid factors, and extent of reconstruction. All patients had intraoral swab cultures before surgery. Patients with culture-confirmed SSI after surgery were chosen for analysis, using the κ index and its 95% confidence interval for concordance analysis. All patients received clindamycin and gentamicin for antibiotic prophylaxis for 5 days. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of all isolates was obtained and analyzed. Thirty-seven patients experienced SSI, or an infection rate of 28.3%, occurring at a mean of 9.3 postoperative days. The overall concordance between oral flora and SSI was fair to moderate (κ index of 0.25), but detailed analysis shows a higher concordance for known and opportunistic pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis, compared to typical oral commensals. Antibiotic susceptibility tests show rapid and significant increases in resistance to clindamycin, indicating a need for a more effective alternative. Predicting pathogens in SSI using preoperative oral swabs did not demonstrate a good concordance in general for patients undergoing clean-contaminated head and neck surgery, although concordance for certain pathogenic species seem to be higher than for typical intraoral commensals. The rapid development of resistance to clindamycin precludes its use as a prophylactic agent.

  8. Is there an increased risk of post-operative surgical site infection after orthopaedic surgery in HIV patients? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigera, James W M; Straetemans, Masja; Vuhaka, Simplice K; Nagel, Ingeborg M; Naddumba, Edward K; Boer, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    There is dilemma as to whether patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) requiring implant orthopaedic surgery are at an increased risk for post-operative surgical site infection (SSI). We conducted a systematic review to determine the effect of HIV on the risk of post-operative SSI and sought to determine if this risk is altered by antibiotic use beyond 24 hours. We searched electronic databases, manually searched citations from relevant articles, and reviewed conference proceedings. The risk of postoperative SSI was pooled using Mantel-Haenszel method. We identified 18 cohort studies with 16 mainly small studies, addressing the subject. The pooled risk ratio of infection in the HIV patients when compared to non-HIV patients was 1.8 (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.3-2.4), in studies in Africa this was 2.3 (95% CI 1.5-3.5). In a sensitivity analysis the risk ratio was reduced to 1.4 (95% CI 0.5-3.8). The risk ratio of infection in patients receiving prolonged antibiotics compared to patients receiving antibiotics for up to 24 hours was 0.7 (95% CI 0.1-4.2). The results may indicate an increased risk in HIV infected patients but these results are not robust and inconclusive after conducting the sensitivity analysis removing poor quality studies. There is need for larger good quality studies to provide conclusive evidence. To better develop surgical protocols, further studies should determine the effect of reduced CD4 counts, viral load suppression and prolonged antibiotics on the risk for infection.

  9. Ranking Hospitals Based on Colon Surgery and Abdominal Hysterectomy Surgical Site Infection Outcomes: Impact of Limiting Surveillance to the Operative Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoe, Deborah S; Avery, Taliser R; Platt, Richard; Kleinman, Ken; Huang, Susan S

    2018-03-16

    Hospital-specific surgical site infection (SSI) performance following colon surgery and abdominal hysterectomies can impact hospitals' relative rankings around quality metrics used to determine financial penalties. Current SSI surveillance largely focuses on SSI detected at the operative hospital. Retrospective cohort study to assess the impact on hospitals' relative SSI performance rankings when SSI detected at non-operative hospitals are included. We utilized data from a California statewide hospital registry to assess for evidence of SSI following colon surgery or abdominal hysterectomies performed 3/1/2011-11/30/2013 using previously validated claims-based SSI surveillance methods. Risk-adjusted hospital-specific rankings based on SSI detected at operative hospitals versus any California hospital were generated. Among 60,059 colon surgeries at 285 hospitals and 64,918 abdominal hysterectomies at 270 hospitals, 5,921 (9.9%) colon surgeries and 1,481 (2.3%) abdominal hysterectomies received a diagnosis code for SSI within the 30 days following surgery. 7.2% of colon surgery and 13.4% of abdominal hysterectomy SSI would have been missed by operative hospital surveillance alone. The proportion of individual hospital's SSI detected during hospitalizations at other hospitals varied widely. Including non-operative hospital SSI resulted in improved relative ranking of 11 (3.9%) colon surgery and 13 (4.8%) hysterectomy hospitals so that they were no longer in the worst performing quartile, mainly among hospitals with relatively high surgical volumes. Standard SSI surveillance that mainly focuses on infections detected at the operative hospital causes varying degrees of SSI under-estimation, leading to inaccurate assignment or avoidance of financial penalties for approximately one in eleven to sixteen hospitals.

  10. Five-year decreased incidence of surgical site infections following gastrectomy and prosthetic joint replacement surgery through active surveillance by the Korean Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H J; Adiyani, L; Sung, J; Choi, J Y; Kim, H B; Kim, Y K; Kwak, Y G; Yoo, H; Lee, Sang-Oh; Han, S H; Kim, S R; Kim, T H; Lee, H M; Chun, H K; Kim, J-S; Yoo, J D; Koo, H-S; Cho, E H; Lee, K W

    2016-08-01

    Surveillance of healthcare-associated infection has been associated with a reduction in surgical site infection (SSI). To evaluate the Korean Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System (KONIS) in order to assess its effects on SSI since it was introduced. SSI data after gastrectomy, total hip arthroplasty (THA), and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) between 2008 and 2012 were analysed. The pooled incidence of SSI was calculated for each year; the same analyses were also conducted from hospitals that had participated in KONIS for at least three consecutive years. Standardized SSI rates for each year were calculated by adjusting for SSI risk factors. SSI trends were analysed using the Cochran-Armitage test. The SSI rate following gastrectomy was 3.12% (522/16,918). There was a significant trend of decreased crude SSI rates over five years. This trend was also evident in analysis of hospitals that had participated for more than three years. The SSI rate for THA was 2.05% (157/7656), which decreased significantly from 2008 to 2012. The risk factors for SSI after THA included the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance risk index, trauma, reoperation, and age (60-69 years). The SSI rate for TKA was 1.90% (152/7648), which also decreased significantly during a period of five years. However, the risk-adjusted analysis of SSI did not show a significant decrease for all surgical procedures. The SSI incidence of gastrectomy and prosthetic joint replacement declined over five years as a result of active surveillance by KONIS. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of pre-operative octenidine nasal ointment and showering on surgical site infections in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, M; Scherag, A; Forstner, C; Brunkhorst, F M; Harbarth, S; Doenst, T; Pletz, M W; Hagel, S

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of pre-operative octenidine (OCT) decolonization on surgical site infection (SSI) rates. Before-and-after cohort study. Patients undergoing an elective isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) procedure: control group (1 st January to 31 st December 2013), N=475; intervention group (1 st January to 31 st December 2014), N=428. The intervention consisted of nasal application of OCT ointment three times daily, beginning on the day before surgery, and showering the night before and on the day of surgery with OCT soap. A median sternotomy was performed in 805 (89.1%) patients and a minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass procedure was performed in 98 (10.9%) patients. Overall, there was no difference in SSI rates between the control and intervention groups (15.4% vs 13.3%, P=0.39). The rate of harvest site SSIs was significantly lower in patients in the intervention group (2.5% vs 0.5%, P=0.01). Patients who had undergone a median sternotomy in the intervention group had a significantly lower rate of organ/space sternal SSIs (1.9% vs 0.3%, P=0.04). However, there was a trend towards an increased rate of deep incisional sternal SSIs (1.2% vs 2.9%, P=0.08). Multi-variate analysis did not identify a significant protective effect of the intervention (odds ratio 0.79, 95% confidence interval 0.53-1.15, P=0.27). Pre-operative decolonization with OCT did not reduce overall SSI rates in patients undergoing an elective isolated CABG procedure, but significantly decreased harvest site and organ/space sternal SSIs. Randomized controlled trials, including controlled patient adherence to the intervention, are required to confirm these observations and to determine the clinical utility of OCT in pre-operative decolonization. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevention of Surgical Site Infection After Ankle Surgery Using Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy in High-Risk Patients With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Ya-Ke; Chen, Hong-Lin; Liu, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Patients with diabetes have a high risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after ankle surgery. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) in the prevention of SSI after ankle surgery compared with the efficacy of standard moist wound care (SMWC). A retrospective study was performed of unstable ankle fractures for surgical fixation in patients with diabetes from January 2012 to December 2014. VAC and SMWC were used for surgical incision coverage. The primary outcome was the incidence of SSI, and the secondary outcomes were the length of hospital stay and crude hospital costs. The data from 76 patients were analyzed, with 22 (28.95%) in the VAC group and 54 (71.05%) in the SMWC group. The incidence of SSI was 4.6% in the VAC group compared with 27.8% in the SMWC group (chi-square 5.076; p = .024), and the crude odds ratio for SSI in the VAC group was 0.124 (95% confidence interval 0.002 to 0.938). The length of hospital stay was lower in the VAC group than in the SMWC group (12.6 ± 2.7 days and 15.2 ± 3.5 days, respectively; t = 3.122, p = .003). The crude hospital costs were also lower in the VAC group than in the SMWC group (Chinese yuan 8643.2 ± 1195.3 and 9456.2 ± 1106.3, respectively; t = 2.839, p = .006). After logistic regression analysis, the adjusted odds ratio for the total SSI rate comparing VAC and SMWC was 0.324 (95% confidence interval 0.092 to 0.804; p = .021). Compared with SMWC, VAC can decrease the SSI rate after ankle surgery in patients with diabetes. This finding should be confirmed by prospective, randomized controlled clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Risk of surgical site infection, acute kidney injury, and Clostridium difficile infection following antibiotic prophylaxis with vancomycin plus a beta-lactam versus either drug alone: A national propensity-score-adjusted retrospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westyn Branch-Elliman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The optimal regimen for perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis is controversial. Use of combination prophylaxis with a beta-lactam plus vancomycin is increasing; however, the relative risks and benefits associated with this strategy are unknown. Thus, we sought to compare postoperative outcomes following administration of 2 antimicrobials versus a single agent for the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs. Potential harms associated with combination regimens, including acute kidney injury (AKI and Clostridium difficile infection (CDI, were also considered.Using a multicenter, national Veterans Affairs (VA cohort, all patients who underwent cardiac, orthopedic joint replacement, vascular, colorectal, and hysterectomy procedures during the period from 1 October 2008 to 30 September 2013 and who received planned manual review of perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis regimen and manual review for the 30-day incidence of SSI were included. Using a propensity-adjusted log-binomial regression model stratified by type of surgical procedure, the association between receipt of 2 antimicrobials (vancomycin plus a beta-lactam versus either single agent alone (vancomycin or a beta-lactam and SSI was evaluated. Measures of association were adjusted for age, diabetes, smoking, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, preoperative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA status, and receipt of mupirocin. The 7-day incidence of postoperative AKI and 90-day incidence of CDI were also measured. In all, 70,101 procedures (52,504 beta-lactam only, 5,089 vancomycin only, and 12,508 combination with 2,466 (3.5% SSIs from 109 medical centers were included. Among cardiac surgery patients, combination prophylaxis was associated with a lower incidence of SSI (66/6,953, 0.95% than single-agent prophylaxis (190/12,834, 1.48%; crude risk ratio [RR] 0.64, 95% CI 0.49, 0.85; adjusted RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.46, 0.83. After adjusting for SSI risk, no

  14. Risk of surgical site infection, acute kidney injury, and Clostridium difficile infection following antibiotic prophylaxis with vancomycin plus a beta-lactam versus either drug alone: A national propensity-score-adjusted retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch-Elliman, Westyn; Ripollone, John E; O'Brien, William J; Itani, Kamal M F; Schweizer, Marin L; Perencevich, Eli; Strymish, Judith; Gupta, Kalpana

    2017-07-01

    The optimal regimen for perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis is controversial. Use of combination prophylaxis with a beta-lactam plus vancomycin is increasing; however, the relative risks and benefits associated with this strategy are unknown. Thus, we sought to compare postoperative outcomes following administration of 2 antimicrobials versus a single agent for the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs). Potential harms associated with combination regimens, including acute kidney injury (AKI) and Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), were also considered. Using a multicenter, national Veterans Affairs (VA) cohort, all patients who underwent cardiac, orthopedic joint replacement, vascular, colorectal, and hysterectomy procedures during the period from 1 October 2008 to 30 September 2013 and who received planned manual review of perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis regimen and manual review for the 30-day incidence of SSI were included. Using a propensity-adjusted log-binomial regression model stratified by type of surgical procedure, the association between receipt of 2 antimicrobials (vancomycin plus a beta-lactam) versus either single agent alone (vancomycin or a beta-lactam) and SSI was evaluated. Measures of association were adjusted for age, diabetes, smoking, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, preoperative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) status, and receipt of mupirocin. The 7-day incidence of postoperative AKI and 90-day incidence of CDI were also measured. In all, 70,101 procedures (52,504 beta-lactam only, 5,089 vancomycin only, and 12,508 combination) with 2,466 (3.5%) SSIs from 109 medical centers were included. Among cardiac surgery patients, combination prophylaxis was associated with a lower incidence of SSI (66/6,953, 0.95%) than single-agent prophylaxis (190/12,834, 1.48%; crude risk ratio [RR] 0.64, 95% CI 0.49, 0.85; adjusted RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.46, 0.83). After adjusting for SSI risk, no association

  15. Risk factors for surgical site infection following laparotomy: Effect of season and perioperative variables and reporting of bacterial isolates in 287 horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isgren, C M; Salem, S E; Archer, D C; Worsman, F C F; Townsend, N B

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is an important cause of post operative morbidity following laparotomy. To investigate risk factors for SSI, including effect of season and surgery performed outside normal working hours, and to report bacterial isolates and antimicrobial resistance patterns. Retrospective cohort study. Data were obtained from horses that had undergone exploratory laparotomy over a 3-year period (2010-2013) in a UK hospital population. SSI was defined as any purulent or serous discharge from the laparotomy incision of >24 h duration that developed during hospitalisation. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify associations between pre-, intra- and post operative variables and altered likelihood of SSI. Surgical site infection developed in 73/287 (25.4%) horses during hospitalisation. Horses of greater bodyweight (odds ratio [OR] 1.002, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0002-1.005, P = 0.03), increased packed cell volume (≥48%) on admission (OR 3.03, 95% CI 1.32-6.94, P = 0.01), small intestinal resection (OR 2.27, 95% CI 1.15-4.46, P = 0.02) and post operative colic (OR 2.86, 95% CI 1.41-5.79, P = 0.003) were significantly associated with increased likelihood of SSI in a multivariable model. SSI was also significantly more likely to occur during winter (OR 3.84, 95% CI 1.38-10.70, P = 0.01) and summer (OR 5.63, 95% CI 2.07-15.3, P = 0.001) months in the model. Three-layer closure of the incision was protective (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.16-0.58, P<0.001) compared to 2-layer closure. There was no effect of surgery being performed outside normal working hours (P = 0.5). The most common bacterial isolates were Escherichia coli (59.5%), Enterococcus spp. (42.4%) and Staphylococcus spp. (25.4%). Penicillin resistant isolates accounted for 92% (96/104) of isolates while 18% (21/119) of isolates were gentamicin resistant. Laparotomy during winter and summer months was associated with increased likelihood of SSI but there was no effect of surgery

  16. Surgical lighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knulst, A.J.

    2017-01-01

    The surgical light is an important tool for surgeons to create and maintain good visibility on the surgical task. Chapter 1 gives background to the field of (surgical) lighting and related terminology. Although the surgical light has been developed strongly since its introduction a long time ago,

  17. In the Absence of a Mechanical Bowel Prep, Does the Addition of Pre-Operative Oral Antibiotics to Parental Antibiotics Decrease the Incidence of Surgical Site Infection after Elective Segmental Colectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Sarah J; Swenson, Brian R; Hanseman, Dennis J; Midura, Emily F; Davis, Bradley R; Rafferty, Janice F; Abbott, Daniel E; Shah, Shimul A; Paquette, Ian M

    2015-12-01

    Pre-operative oral antibiotics administered the day prior to elective colectomy have been shown to decrease the incidence of surgical site infections (SSI) if a mechanical bowel prep (MBP) is used. Recently, the role for mechanical bowel prep has been challenged as being unnecessary and potentially harmful. We hypothesize that if MBP is omitted, oral antibiotics do not alter the incidence of SSI following colectomy. We selected patients who underwent an elective segmental colectomy from the 2012 and 2013 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program colectomy procedure targeted database. Indications for surgery included colon cancer, diverticulitis, inflammatory bowel disease, or benign polyp. Patients who received mechanical bowel prep were excluded. The primary outcome measured was surgical site infection, defined as the presence of superficial, deep or, organ space infection within 30 d from surgery. A total of 6,399 patients underwent elective segmental colectomy without MBP. The incidence of SSI differed substantially between patients who received oral antibiotics, versus those who did not (9.7% vs. 13.7%, p=0.01). Multivariate analysis indicated that age, smoking status, operative time, perioperative transfusions, oral antibiotics, and surgical approach were associated with post-operative SSI. When controlling for confounding factors, the use of pre-operative oral antibiotics decreased the incidence of surgical site infection (odds ratio=0.66, 95% confidence interval=0.48-0.90, p=0.01). Even in the absence of mechanical bowel prep, pre-operative oral antibiotics appear to reduce the incidence of surgical site infection following elective colectomy.

  18. Molecular typing of Staphylococcus aureus based on coagulase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javid, Faizan; Taku, Anil; Bhat, Mohd Altaf; Badroo, Gulzar Ahmad; Mudasir, Mir; Sofi, Tanveer Ahmad

    2018-04-01

    to only one farm, yielded different RFLP patterns as observed from different sampling sites, which indicates that different S . aureus coagulase typeshave a site-specific predilection. Two coa patterns were observed in mastitic milk indicating multiple origins of infection, with 595 bp coa genotype being predominant in mastitic milk. The coa genotypes and their restriction patterns observed in the present study are novel, not published earlier. 514 and 595 coa variants of S. aureus are genetically most related.

  19. Association of the Addition of Oral Antibiotics to Mechanical Bowel Preparation for Left Colon and Rectal Cancer Resections With Reduction of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Elaine; Massarweh, Nader N; Chai, Christy Y; Tran Cao, Hop S; Zamani, Nader; Abraham, Sherry; Adigun, Kafayat; Awad, Samir S

    2018-02-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) after colorectal surgery remain a significant complication, particularly for patients with cancer, because they can delay the administration of adjuvant therapy. A combination of oral antibiotics and mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) is a potential, yet controversial, SSI prevention strategy. To determine the association of the addition of oral antibiotics to MBP with preventing SSIs in left colon and rectal cancer resections and its association with the timely administration of adjuvant therapy. A retrospective review was performed of 89 patients undergoing left colon and rectal cancer resections from October 1, 2013, to December 31, 2016, at a single institution. A bowel regimen of oral antibiotics and MBP (neomycin sulfate, metronidazole hydrochloride, and magnesium citrate) was implemented August 1, 2015. Patients receiving MBP and oral antibiotics and those undergoing MBP without oral antibiotics were compared using univariate analysis. Multivariable logistic regression controlling for factors that may affect SSIs was used to evaluate the association between use of oral antibiotics and MBP and the occurrence of SSIs. Surgical site infections within 30 days of the index procedure and time to adjuvant therapy. Of the 89 patients (5 women and 84 men; mean [SD] age, 65.3 [9.2] years) in the study, 49 underwent surgery with MBP but without oral antibiotics and 40 underwent surgery with MBP and oral antibiotics. The patients who received oral antibiotics and MBP were younger than those who received only MBP (mean [SD] age, 62.6 [9.1] vs 67.5 [8.8] years; P = .01), but these 2 cohorts of patients were otherwise similar in baseline demographic, clinical, and cancer characteristics. Surgical approach (minimally invasive vs open) and case type were similarly distributed; however, the median operative time of patients who received oral antibiotics and MBP was longer than that of patients who received MBP only (391 minutes

  20. Allograft versus autograft in cervical and lumbar spinal fusions: an examination of operative time, length of stay, surgical site infection, and blood transfusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan E; McCutcheon, Brandon A; Grauberger, Jennifer; Shepherd, Daniel; Maloney, Patrick R; Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Fogelson, Jeremy L; Nassr, Ahmad; Bydon, Mohamad

    2016-11-23

    Autograft harvesting for spine arthrodesis has been associated with longer operative times and increased blood loss. Allograft compared to autograft in spinal fusions has not been studied in a multicenter cohort. Patients enrolled in the ACS-NSQIP registry between 2012 and 2013 who underwent cervical or lumbar spinal fusion with either allograft or autograft through a separate incision were included for analysis. The primary outcomes of interest were operative time, length of stay, blood transfusion, and surgical site infection (SSI). A total of 6,790 and 6,718 patients received a cervical or lumbar spinal fusion, respectively. On unadjusted analysis in both cervical and lumbar cohorts, autograft was associated with increased rates of blood transfusion (cervical: 2.9% vs 1.0%, poperative time (cervical: 167 vs 128 minutes, poperative times (cervical: 27.8 minutes, 95% CI 20.7-35.0; and lumbar: 25.4 minutes, 95% CI 17.7-33.1) relative to allograft. Autograft was not associated with either length of stay or SSI. In a multicenter cohort of patients undergoing cervical or lumbar spinal fusion, autograft was associated with increased rates of blood transfusion and increased operative time relative to allograft.

  1. Effects of Fermented Sumach on the Formation of Slime Layer of Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Kırmusaoğlu, Sahra; Yurdugül, Seyhun; Koçoğlu, Esra

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the most commonly isolated bacterial pathogens in hospitals, and the most frequent cause of nosocomial infections. Nosocomial staphylococcal foreign-body infections related to biofilm formation are a serious threat, demanding new therapeutic and preventive strategies. Implantation of intravenous catheters and surgical implantation of prosthetic implants carry a risk of infection. In order to prevent all these effects of biofilms, a study ...

  2. Elastic light scattering for clinical pathogens identification: application to early screening of Staphylococcus aureus on specific medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, E.; Genuer, V.; Marcoux, P.; Gal, O.; Belafdil, C.; Decq, D.; Maurin, Max; Morales, S.

    2018-02-01

    Elastic Light Scattering (ELS) is an innovative technique to identify bacterial pathogens directly on culture plates. Compelling results have already been reported for agri-food applications. Here, we have developed ELS for clinical diagnosis, starting with Staphylococcus aureus early screening. Our goal is to bring a result (positive/negative) after only 6 h of growth to fight surgical-site infections. The method starts with the acquisition of the scattering pattern arising from the interaction between a laser beam and a single bacterial colony growing on a culture medium. Then, the resulting image, considered as the bacterial species signature, is analyzed using statistical learning techniques. We present a custom optical setup able to target bacterial colonies with various sizes (30-500 microns). This system was used to collect a reference dataset of 38 strains of S. aureus and other Staphyloccocus species (5459 images) on ChromIDSAID/ MRSA bi-plates. A validation set from 20 patients has then been acquired and clinically-validated according to chromogenic enzymatic tests. The best correct-identification rate between S. aureus and S. non-aureus (94.7%) has been obtained using a support vector machine classifier trained on a combination of Fourier-Bessel moments and Local- Binary-Patterns extracted features. This statistical model applied to the validation set provided a sensitivity and a specificity of 90.0% and 56.9%, or alternatively, a positive predictive value of 47% and a negative predictive value of 93%. From a clinical point of view, the results head in the right direction and pave the way toward the WHO's requirements for rapid, low-cost, and automated diagnosis tools.

  3. Diabetic mouse model of orthopaedic implant-related Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovati, Arianna B; Drago, Lorenzo; Monti, Lorenzo; De Vecchi, Elena; Previdi, Sara; Banfi, Giuseppe; Romanò, Carlo L

    2013-01-01

    Periprosthetic bacterial infections represent one of the most challenging orthopaedic complications that often require implant removal and surgical debridement and carry high social and economical costs. Diabetes is one of the most relevant risk factors of implant-related infection and its clinical occurrence is growing worldwide. The aim of the present study was to test a model of implant-related infection in the diabetic mouse, with a view to allow further investigation on the relative efficacy of prevention and treatment options in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals. A cohort of diabetic NOD/ShiLtJ mice was compared with non-diabetic CD1 mice as an in vivo model of S. aureus orthopaedic infection of bone and soft tissues after femur intramedullary pin implantation. We tested control and infected groups with 1×10(3) colony-forming units of S. aureus ATCC 25923 strain injected in the implant site. At 4 weeks post-inoculation, host response to infection, microbial biofilm formation, and bone damage were assessed by traditional diagnostic parameters (bacterial culture, C-reactive protein and white blood cell count), histological analysis and imaging techniques (micro computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy). Unlike the controls and the CD1 mice, all the diabetic mice challenged with a single inoculum of S. aureus displayed severe osteomyelitic changes around the implant. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that the diabetic mouse can be successfully used in a model of orthopaedic implant-related infection. Furthermore, the same bacteria inoculum induced periprosthetic infection in all the diabetic mice but not in the controls. This animal model of implant-related infection in diabetes may be a useful tool to test in vivo treatments in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals.

  4. Diabetic mouse model of orthopaedic implant-related Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna B Lovati

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Periprosthetic bacterial infections represent one of the most challenging orthopaedic complications that often require implant removal and surgical debridement and carry high social and economical costs. Diabetes is one of the most relevant risk factors of implant-related infection and its clinical occurrence is growing worldwide. The aim of the present study was to test a model of implant-related infection in the diabetic mouse, with a view to allow further investigation on the relative efficacy of prevention and treatment options in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals. METHODOLOGY: A cohort of diabetic NOD/ShiLtJ mice was compared with non-diabetic CD1 mice as an in vivo model of S. aureus orthopaedic infection of bone and soft tissues after femur intramedullary pin implantation. We tested control and infected groups with 1×10(3 colony-forming units of S. aureus ATCC 25923 strain injected in the implant site. At 4 weeks post-inoculation, host response to infection, microbial biofilm formation, and bone damage were assessed by traditional diagnostic parameters (bacterial culture, C-reactive protein and white blood cell count, histological analysis and imaging techniques (micro computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: Unlike the controls and the CD1 mice, all the diabetic mice challenged with a single inoculum of S. aureus displayed severe osteomyelitic changes around the implant. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate for the first time that the diabetic mouse can be successfully used in a model of orthopaedic implant-related infection. Furthermore, the same bacteria inoculum induced periprosthetic infection in all the diabetic mice but not in the controls. This animal model of implant-related infection in diabetes may be a useful tool to test in vivo treatments in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals.

  5. Colonization With Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Upon Intensive Care Unit Admission: Incidence and Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Since earlier identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA-colonized patients could be helpful for reducing the overall frequency of S. aureus infections, the investigation of persons colonized with MRSA is considered to be a key component of MRSA infection prevention programs, particularly among ICU patients. Objectives The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of nasal and extra-nasal carriers of MRSA and risk factors associated with MRSA colonization among adult patients admitted to the ICU. Methods In a cross-sectional study, 164 adult patients who were admitted to the ICU of a teaching hospital were screened for nasal and extra-nasal carriage of MRSA. In addition, the ICU-hospitalized patients were evaluated for MRSA acquisition during their ICU stay. Results Out of the 164 patients admitted to the ICU, 12 (7.3% patients were methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA carriers, and 12 (7.3% patients carried MRSA. Four (16.6% patients were colonized at single or multiple extra-nasal sites based on negative nares screening. Of the 15 remaining patients hospitalized at the ICU, one (6.7% patient acquired MRSA. The patients colonized with MRSA had more advanced ages (P = 0.008, longer hospital stays before being transferred to the ICU (P > 0.001, more underlying diseases with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (P = 0.028, and had undergone surgery (P = 0.003. Patients transferred from the surgical wards to the ICU were found to have significantly higher carriage rates of MRSA (P = 0.041. Conclusions The prevalence of MRSA colonization upon ICU admission at our hospital was relatively high, and routine MRSA screening is suggested, especially for patients who have certain risk factors. In addition, extra-nasal MRSA screenings upon ICU admission will help in the early detection of MRSA.

  6. Systematic Review and Cost Analysis Comparing Use of Chlorhexidine with Use of Iodine for Preoperative Skin Antisepsis to Prevent Surgical Site Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ingi; Agarwal, Rajender K.; Lee, Bruce Y.; Fishman, Neil O.; Umscheid, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare use of chlorhexidine with use of iodine for preoperative skin antisepsis with respect to effectiveness in preventing surgical site infections (SSIs) and cost. Methods We searched the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality website, the Cochrane Library, Medline, and EMBASE up to January 2010 for eligible studies. Included studies were systematic reviews, meta-analyses, or randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing preoperative skin antisepsis with chlorhexidine and with iodine and assessing for the outcomes of SSI or positive skin culture result after application. One reviewer extracted data and assessed individual study quality, quality of evidence for each outcome, and publication bias. Meta-analyses were performed using a fixed-effects model. Using results from the meta-analysis and cost data from the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, we developed a decision analytic cost-benefit model to compare the economic value, from the hospital perspective, of antisepsis with iodine versus antisepsis with 2 preparations of chlorhexidine (ie, 4% chlorhexidine bottle and single-use applicators of a 2% chlorhexidine gluconate [CHG] and 70% isopropyl alcohol [IPA] solution), and also performed sensitivity analyses. Results Nine RCTs with a total of 3,614 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis revealed that chlorhexidine antisepsis was associated with significantly fewer SSIs (adjusted risk ratio, 0.64 [95% confidence interval, [0.51–0.80]) and positive skin culture results (adjusted risk ratio, 0.44 [95% confidence interval, 0.35–0.56]) than was iodine antisepsis. In the cost-benefit model baseline scenario, switching from iodine to chlorhexidine resulted in a net cost savings of $16–$26 per surgical case and $349,904–$568,594 per year for the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Sensitivity analyses showed that net cost savings persisted under most circumstances. Conclusions Preoperative skin antisepsis

  7. Modification of TiO(2) nanotube surfaces by electro-spray deposition of amoxicillin combined with PLGA for bactericidal effects at surgical implantation sites.

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    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Moon, Seung-Kyun; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2013-01-01

    To fabricate the antibiotic-releasing coatings on TiO(2) nanotube surfaces for wide applications of implant and bone plate in medical and dental surgery, the optimal deposition time of amoxicillin/PLGA solution simultaneously performing non-toxicity and a high bactericidal effect for preventing early implant failures was found. FE-SEM, ESD and FT-IR were used for confirming deposition of amoxicillin/PLGA on the TiO(2) surface. Also, the elution of amoxicillin/PLGA in a TiO(2) nanotube surface was measured by a UV-VIS spectrophotometer. The bactericidal effect of amoxicillin on the TiO(2) nanotube surface was evaluated by using Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The cytotoxicity and cell proliferation were observed by WST assay using MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. The results indicated that the TiO(2) nanotube surface controlled by electro-spray deposition time with amoxicillin/PLGA solution could provide a high bactericidal effect against S. aureus by the bactericidal effect of amoxicillin, as well as good osteoblast cell proliferation at the TiO(2) nanotube surface without toxicity. This study used electro-spray deposition (ESD) methodology to obtain amoxicillin deposition in nanotube structures of TiO(2) and found the optimal deposition time of amoxicillin/PLGA solution simultaneously performing non-toxicity and a high bactericidal effect for preventing early implant failures.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus in the community: colonization versus infection.

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    Maureen Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections have increased dramatically in the community, yet S. aureus nasal colonization has remained stable. The objectives of this study were to determine if S. aureus colonization is a useful proxy measure to study disease transmission and infection in community settings, and to identify potential community reservoirs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Randomly selected households in Northern Manhattan, completed a structured social network questionnaire and provided nasal swabs that were typed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis to identify S. aureus colonizing strains. The main outcome measures were: 1 colonization with S. aureus; and 2 recent serious skin infection. Risk factor analyses were conducted at both the individual and the household levels; logistic regression models identified independent risks for household colonization and infection. RESULTS: 321 surveyed households contained 914 members. The S. aureus prevalence was 25% and MRSA was 0.4%. More than 40% of households were colonized. Recent antibiotic use was the only significant correlate for household colonization (p = .002. Seventy-eight (24% households reported serious skin infection. In contrast with colonization, five of the six risk factors that increased the risk of skin infection in the household at the univariate level remained independently significant in multivariable analysis: international travel, sports participation, surgery, antibiotic use and towel sharing. S. aureus colonization was not significantly associated with serious skin infection in any analysis. Among multiperson households with more than one person colonized, 50% carried the same strain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The lack of association between S. aureus nasal colonization and serious skin infection underscores the need to explore alternative venues or body sites that may be crucial to transmission. Moreover, the magnitude of colonization and

  9. Surgical smoke.

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    Fan, Joe King-Man; Chan, Fion Siu-Yin; Chu, Kent-Man

    2009-10-01

    Surgical smoke is the gaseous by-product formed during surgical procedures. Most surgeons, operating theatre staff and administrators are unaware of its potential health risks. Surgical smoke is produced by various surgical instruments including those used in electrocautery, lasers, ultrasonic scalpels, high speed drills, burrs and saws. The potential risks include carbon monoxide toxicity to the patient undergoing a laparoscopic operation, pulmonary fibrosis induced by non-viable particles, and transmission of infectious diseases like human papilloma virus. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity are other concerns. Minimisation of the production of surgical smoke and modification of any evacuation systems are possible solutions. In general, a surgical mask can provide more than 90% protection to exposure to surgical smoke; however, in most circumstances it cannot provide air-tight protection to the user. An at least N95 grade or equivalent respirator offers the best protection against surgical smoke, but whether such protection is necessary is currently unknown.

  10. Surgical infections: a microbiological study

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    Santosh Saini

    Full Text Available Surgical infections are mostly polymicrobial, involving both aerobes and anaerobes. One hundred seventeen cases comprised of abscesses (n=51, secondary peritonitis (n=25, necrotizing fascitis (n=22 and wounds with devitalized tissues (n=19 were studied. The number of microorganisms isolated per lesion was highest in secondary peritonitis (2.32. The aerobe/ anaerobe ratio was 0.81 in secondary peritonitis and 1.8 in necrotizing fascitis. Most secondary peritonitis (80%, necrotizing fascitis (75% and wounds with devitalized tissues (66.7% were polymicrobial. Common microorganisms isolated in our study were E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacteroides fragilis and Peptostreptococcus spp. The most effective antibiotics for S. aureus were clindamycin (79.1% and cefuroxime (70.8%. For Gram-negatives (Klebsiella spp., E. coli and Proteus spp., the most effective antibiotics were cefotaxime, ceftizoxime, amikacin and ciprofloxacin. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was maximally sensitive to amikacin (35.2% and ciprofloxacin (35.2%. The greatest degree of multidrug resistance to all the drugs was found in P. aeruginosa (52.9%, followed by Klebsiella spp. (33.3%, Proteus spp. (33.3%, E. coli (22.2%, and S. aureus (12.5%. All the anaerobes that we isolated were 100% sensitive to metronidazole and chloramphenicol, followed by clindamycin (95% to 100%. Apart from antibiotic therapy, non-antimicrobial methods, such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy and debridement also play an important role in the treatment of surgical infections.

  11. Seasonal Variations in the Risk of Reoperation for Surgical Site Infection Following Elective Spinal Fusion Surgery: A Retrospective Study Using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination Database.

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    Ohya, Junichi; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Oichi, Takeshi; Kato, So; Matsui, Hiroki; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Sakae; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2017-07-15

    A retrospective study of data abstracted from the Diagnosis Procedure Combination (DPC) database, a national representative database in Japan. The aim of this study was to examine seasonal variations in the risk of reoperation for surgical site infection (SSI) following spinal fusion surgery. Although higher rates of infection in the summer than in other seasons were thought to be caused by increasing inexperience of new staff, high temperature, and high humidity, no studies have examined seasonal variations in the risk of SSI following spinal fusion surgery in the country where medical staff rotation timing is not in summer season. In Japan, medical staff rotation starts in April. We retrospectively extracted the data of patients who were admitted between July 2010 and March 2013 from the DPC database. Patients were included if they were aged 20 years or older and underwent elective spinal fusion surgery. The primary outcome was reoperation for SSI during hospitalization. We performed multivariate analysis to clarify the risk factors of primary outcome with adjustment for patient background characteristics. We identified 47,252 eligible patients (23,659 male, 23,593 female). The mean age of the patients was 65.4 years (range, 20-101 yrs). Overall, reoperation for SSI occurred in 0.93% of the patients during hospitalization. The risk of reoperation for SSI was significantly higher in April (vs. February; odds ratio, 1.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-3.43, P = 0.03) as well as other known risk factors. In subgroup analysis with stratification for type of hospital, month of surgery was identified as an independent risk factor of reoperation for SSI among cases in an academic hospital, although there was no seasonal variation among those in a nonacademic hospital. This study showed that month of surgery is a risk factor of reoperation for SSI following elective spinal fusion surgery, nevertheless, in the country where medical staff rotation timing is not in

  12. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours of stomach: Robot-assisted excision with the da Vinci Surgical System regardless of size and location site.

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    Furbetta, Niccolo; Palmeri, Matteo; Guadagni, Simone; Di Franco, Gregorio; Gianardi, Desirée; Latteri, Saverio; Marciano, Emanuele; Moglia, Andrea; Cuschieri, Alfred; Di Candio, Giulio; Mosca, Franco; Morelli, Luca

    2018-03-23

    The role of minimally invasive surgery of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) of the stomach remains uncertain especially for large and/or difficult located tumours. We are hereby presenting a single-centre series of robot-assisted resections using the da Vinci Surgical System (Si or Xi). Data of patients undergoing robot-assisted treatment of gastric GIST were retrieved from the prospectively collected institutional database and a retrospective analysis was performed. Patients were stratified according to size and location of the tumour. Difficult cases (DCs) were considered for size if tumour was> 50 mm and/or for location if the tumour was Type II, III or IV sec. Privette/Al-Thani classification. Between May 2010 and February 2017, 12 consecutive patients underwent robot-assisted treatment of GIST at our institution. DCs were 10/12 cases (83.3%), of which 6/10 (50%) for location, 2/10 (25%) for size and 2/10 (25%) for both. The da Vinci Si was used in 8 patients, of which 6 (75%) were DC, and the da Vinci Xi in 4, all of which (100%) were DC. In all patients, excision was by wedge resection. All lesions had microscopically negative resection margins. There was no conversion to open surgery, no tumour ruptures or spillage and no intraoperative complications. Our experience suggests a positive role of the robot da Vinci in getting gastric GIST removal with a conservative approach, regardless of size and location site. Comparative studies with a greater number of patients are necessary for a more robust assessment.

  13. Delayed wound healing and postoperative surgical site infections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with or without biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

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    Tada, Masahiro; Inui, Kentaro; Sugioka, Yuko; Mamoto, Kenji; Okano, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Takuya; Hidaka, Noriaki; Koike, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    Biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) have become more popular for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Whether or not bDMARDs increase the postoperative risk of surgical site infection (SSI) has remained controversial. We aimed to clarify the effects of bDMARDs on the outcomes of elective orthopedic surgery. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to analyze risk factors for SSI and delayed wound healing among 227 patients with RA (mean age, 65.0 years; disease duration, 16.9 years) after 332 elective orthopedic surgeries. We also attempted to evaluate the effects of individual medications on infection. Rates of bDMARD and conventional synthetic DMARD (csDMARD) administration were 30.4 and 91.0 %, respectively. Risk factors for SSI were advanced age (odds ratio [OR], 1.11; P = 0.045), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.03), and preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 3.66; P = 0.003). Those for delayed wound healing were advanced age (OR, 1.16; P = 0.001), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.007), preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 4.56; P = 0.02), and foot surgery (OR, 6.60; P = 0.001). Risk factors for SSI and medications did not significantly differ. No DMARDs were risk factors for any outcome examined. Biological DMARDs were not risk factors for postoperative SSI. Foot surgery was a risk factor for delayed wound healing.

  14. Artificial neural network approach to predict surgical site infection after free-flap reconstruction in patients receiving surgery for head and neck cancer.

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    Kuo, Pao-Jen; Wu, Shao-Chun; Chien, Peng-Chen; Chang, Shu-Shya; Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Tai, Hsueh-Ling; Peng, Shu-Hui; Lin, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2018-03-02

    The aim of this study was to develop an effective surgical site infection (SSI) prediction model in patients receiving free-flap reconstruction after surgery for head and neck cancer using artificial neural network (ANN), and to compare its predictive power with that of conventional logistic regression (LR). There were 1,836 patients with 1,854 free-flap reconstructions and 438 postoperative SSIs in the dataset for analysis. They were randomly assigned tin ratio of 7:3 into a training set and a test set. Based on comprehensive characteristics of patients and diseases in the absence or presence of operative data, prediction of SSI was performed at two time points (pre-operatively and post-operatively) with a feed-forward ANN and the LR models. In addition to the calculated accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity, the predictive performance of ANN and LR were assessed based on area under the curve (AUC) measures of receiver operator characteristic curves and Brier score. ANN had a significantly higher AUC (0.892) of post-operative prediction and AUC (0.808) of pre-operative prediction than LR (both P <0.0001). In addition, there was significant higher AUC of post-operative prediction than pre-operative prediction by ANN (p<0.0001). With the highest AUC and the lowest Brier score (0.090), the post-operative prediction by ANN had the highest overall predictive performance. The post-operative prediction by ANN had the highest overall performance in predicting SSI after free-flap reconstruction in patients receiving surgery for head and neck cancer.

  15. Effect of intra-operative high inspired oxygen fraction on surgical site infection: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

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    Yang, W; Liu, Y; Zhang, Y; Zhao, Q-H; He, S-F

    2016-08-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) causes significant mortality and morbidity. Administration of a high inspired oxygen fraction (FiO2) to patients undergoing surgery may represent a potential preventive strategy. To conduct a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials in which high FiO2 was compared with normal FiO2 in patients undergoing surgery to estimate the effect on the development of SSI. A comprehensive search was undertaken for randomized controlled trials (until December 2015) that compared high FiO2 with normal FiO2 in adults undergoing surgery with general anaesthesia and reported on SSI. This study included 17 randomized controlled trials with 8093 patients. Infection rates were 13.11% in the control group and 11.53% in the hyperoxic group, while the overall risk ratio was 0.893 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.794-1.003; P = 0.057]. Subgroup analyses stratified by country, definition of SSI, and type of surgery were also performed, and showed similar results. However, high FiO2 was found to be of significant benefit in patients undergoing colorectal surgery, with a risk ratio of 0.735 (95% CI 0.573-0.944; P=0.016). There is moderate evidence to suggest that administration of high FiO2 to patients undergoing surgery, especially colorectal surgery, reduces the risk of SSI. Further studies with better adherence to the intervention may affect the results of this meta-analysis. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Reliability and validity of using telephone calls for post-discharge surveillance of surgical site infection following caesarean section at a tertiary hospital in Tanzania

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    Boniface Nguhuni

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infection (SSI is a common post-operative complication causing significant morbidity and mortality. Many SSI occur after discharge from hospital. Post-discharge SSI surveillance in low and middle income countries needs to be improved. Methodology We conducted an observational cohort study in Dodoma, Tanzania to examine the sensitivity and specificity of telephone calls to detect SSI after discharge from hospital in comparison to a gold standard of clinician review. Women undergoing caesarean section were enrolled and followed up for 30 days. Women providing a telephone number were interviewed using a structured questionnaire at approximately days 5, 12 and 28 post-surgery. Women were then invited for out-patient review by a clinician blinded to the findings of telephone interview. Results A total of 374 women were enrolled and an overall SSI rate of 12% (n = 45 was observed. Three hundred and sixteen (84% women provided a telephone number, of which 202 had at least one telephone interview followed by a clinical review within 48 h, generating a total of 484 paired observations. From the clinical reviews, 25 SSI were diagnosed, of which telephone interview had correctly identified 18 infections; telephone calls did not incorrectly identify SSI in any patients. The overall sensitivity and specificity of telephone interviews as compared to clinician evaluation was 72 and 100%, respectively. Conclusion The use of telephone interview as a diagnostic tool for post-discharge surveillance of SSI had moderate sensitivity and high specificity in Tanzania. Telephone-based detection may be a useful method for SSI surveillance in low-income settings with high penetration of mobile telephones.

  17. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Prophylactic Intra-Operative Wound Irrigation for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Stijn W; Boldingh, Quirine J J; Solomkin, Joseph S; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Egger, Matthias; Dellinger, E Patchen; Boermeester, Marja A

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are one of the most common hospital-acquired infections. To reduce SSIs, prophylactic intra-operative wound irrigation (pIOWI) has been advocated, although the results to date are equivocal. To develop recommendations for the new World Health Organization (WHO) SSI prevention guidelines, a systematic literature review and a meta-analysis were conducted on the effectiveness of pIOWI using different agents as a means of reducing SSI. The PUBMED, Embase, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and WHO databases were searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing either pIOWI with no pIOWI or with pIOWI using different solutions and techniques were retrieved with SSI as the primary outcome. Meta-analyses were performed, and odds ratios (OR) and the mean difference with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were extracted and pooled with a random effects model. Twenty-one studies were suitable for analysis, and a distinction was made between intra-peritoneal, mediastinal, and incisional wound irrigation. A low quality of evidence demonstrated a statistically significant benefit for incisional wound irrigation with an aqueous povidone-iodine (PVP-I) solution in clean and clean contaminated wounds (OR 0.31; 95% CI 0.13-0.73; p = 0.007); 50 fewer SSIs per 1,000 procedures (from 19 fewer to 64 fewer)). Antibiotic irrigation had no significant effect in reducing SSIs (OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.64-2.12; p = 0.63). Low-quality evidence suggests considering the use of prophylactic incisional wound irrigation to prevent SSI with an aqueous povidone-iodine solution. Antibiotic irrigation does not show a benefit and therefore is discouraged.

  18. Meta-analysis of randomized and quasi-randomized clinical trials of topical antibiotics after primary closure for the prevention of surgical-site infection.

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    Heal, C F; Banks, J L; Lepper, P; Kontopantelis, E; van Driel, M L

    2017-08-01

    Surgical-site infections (SSIs) increase patient morbidity and costs. The aim was to identify and synthesize all RCTs evaluating the effect of topical antibiotics on SSI in wounds healing by primary intention. The search included Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, the Cochrane Wounds Specialized Register, Central Register of Controlled Trials and EBSCO CINAHL from inception to May 2016. There was no restriction of language, date or setting. Two authors independently selected studies, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. When sufficient numbers of comparable trials were available, data were pooled in meta-analysis. Fourteen RCTs with 6466 participants met the inclusion criteria. Pooling of eight trials (5427 participants) showed that topical antibiotics probably reduced the risk of SSI compared with no topical antibiotic (risk ratio (RR) 0·61, 95 per cent c.i. 0·42 to 0·87; moderate-quality evidence), equating to 20 fewer SSIs per 1000 patients treated. Pooling of three trials (3012 participants) for risk of allergic contact dermatitis found no clear difference between antibiotics and no antibiotic (RR 3·94, 0·46 to 34·00; very low-quality evidence). Pooling of five trials (1299 participants) indicated that topical antibiotics probably reduce the risk of SSI compared with topical antiseptics (RR 0·49, 0·30 to 0·80; moderate-quality evidence); 43 fewer SSIs per 1000 patients treated. Pooling of two trials (541 participants) showed no clear difference in the risk of allergic contact dermatitis with antibiotics or antiseptic agents (RR 0·97, 0·52 to 1·82; very low-quality evidence). Topical antibiotics probably prevent SSI compared with no topical antibiotic or antiseptic. No conclusion can be drawn regarding whether they cause allergic contact dermatitis. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Does surgical site infection after Caesarean section in Polish hospitals reflect high-quality patient care or poor postdischarge surveillance? Results from a 3-year multicenter study.

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    Różańska, Anna; Jarynowski, Andrzej; Kopeć-Godlewska, Katarzyna; Wójkowska-Mach, Jadwiga; Misiewska-Kaczur, Agnieszka; Lech, Marzena; Rozwadowska, Małgorzata; Karwacka, Marlena; Liberda, Joanna; Domańska, Joanna

    2018-01-01

    Caesarean sections (CSs) are associated with a high infection risk. Surgical site infection (SSI) incidence is among the markers of effectiveness of infection prevention efforts. The aim of this study was to analyze risk factors for SSI, incidence, and microbiology in patients who underwent CS. The study was conducted during 2013-2015 using active infection surveillance in 5 Polish hospitals according to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control surveillance network known as HAI-Net. For each procedure, the following data were registered: age, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, procedure time, elective or emergency procedure, use of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis, microbiology, the treatment used, and other information. SSI incidence was 0.5% and significant differences were noted among hospitals (between 0.1% and 1.8%), for different American Society of Anesthesiologists scales (between 0.2% and 4.8%) and different values of standardized SSI risk index (between 0.0% and 0.8%). In 3.1% of procedures, with no antibiotic prophylaxis, SSI risk was significantly higher. Deep infections dominated: 61.5% with superficial infections in only approximately 30% of cases and 2.6% of infections were detected postdischarge without readmissions. Results showed high incidence of SSI in Poland without perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis, and secondly, ineffective surveillance according to CS status, considering outpatient obstetric care. Without postdischarge surveillance, it is not possible to recognize the epidemiologic situation, and further, to set priorities and needs when it comes to infection prophylaxis, especially because such low incidence may indicate no need for improvement in infection control. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus: methicillin-susceptible S. aureus to methicillin-resistant S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus.

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    Rehm, Susan J; Tice, Alan

    2010-09-15

    The evolution of methicillin-resistant and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has demanded serious review of antimicrobial use and development of new agents and revised approaches to prevent and overcome drug resistance. Depending on local conditions and patient risk factors, empirical therapy of suspected S. aureus infection may require coverage of drug-resistant organisms with newer agents and novel antibiotic combinations. The question of treatment with inappropriate antibiotics raises grave concerns with regard to methicillin-resistant S. aureus selection, overgrowth, and increased virulence. Several strategies to reduce the nosocomial burden of resistance are suggested, including shortened hospital stays and outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy of the most serious infections.

  1. Antimicrobial Analysis of an Antiseptic Made from Ethanol Crude Extracts of P. granatum and E. uniflora in Wistar Rats against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis

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    Thaís Honório Lins Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Surgical site infection remains a challenge for hospital infection control, especially when it relates to skin antisepsis in the surgical site. Objective. To analyze the antimicrobial activity in vivo of an antiseptic from ethanol crude extracts of P. granatum and E. uniflora against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Methods. Agar drilling and minimal inhibitory tests were conducted for in vitro evaluation. In the in vivo bioassay were used Wistar rats and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923 and Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 14990. Statistical analysis was performed through variance analysis and Scott-Knott cluster test at 5% probability and significance level. Results. In the in vitro, ethanolic extracts of Punica granatum and Eugenia uniflora and their combination showed the best antimicrobial potential against S. epidermidis and S. aureus. In the in vivo bioassay against S. epidermidis, there was no statistically significant difference between the tested product and the patterns used after five minutes of applying the product. Conclusion. The results indicate that the originated product is an antiseptic alternative source against S. epidermidis compared to chlorhexidine gluconate. It is suggested that further researches are to be conducted in different concentrations of the test product, evaluating its effectiveness and operational costs.

  2. Antimicrobial Analysis of an Antiseptic Made from Ethanol Crude Extracts of P. granatum and E. uniflora in Wistar Rats against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Thaís Honório Lins; Sales Santos Veríssimo, Regina Célia; Alvino, Valter; Silva Araujo, Maria Gabriella; Evangelista Pires dos Santos, Raíssa Fernanda; Maurício Viana, Max Denisson; de Assis Bastos, Maria Lysete; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna Suzana; de Araújo-Júnior, João Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infection remains a challenge for hospital infection control, especially when it relates to skin antisepsis in the surgical site. To analyze the antimicrobial activity in vivo of an antiseptic from ethanol crude extracts of P. granatum and E. uniflora against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Agar drilling and minimal inhibitory tests were conducted for in vitro evaluation. In the in vivo bioassay were used Wistar rats and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 14990). Statistical analysis was performed through variance analysis and Scott-Knott cluster test at 5% probability and significance level. In the in vitro, ethanolic extracts of Punica granatum and Eugenia uniflora and their combination showed the best antimicrobial potential against S. epidermidis and S. aureus. In the in vivo bioassay against S. epidermidis, there was no statistically significant difference between the tested product and the patterns used after five minutes of applying the product. The results indicate that the originated product is an antiseptic alternative source against S. epidermidis compared to chlorhexidine gluconate. It is suggested that further researches are to be conducted in different concentrations of the test product, evaluating its effectiveness and operational costs.

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of bacterial isolates from surgical wound infections in Tertiary Care Hospital in Allahabad, India

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    A K Kapoor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study to analyze the occurrence and in-vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial pathogens isolated from surgical wound infections. Specimens from a total of 129 patients undergoing either emergency or elective surgery were collected from infected sites or stitch lines and inoculated onto appropriate media. The bacterial cultures were identified utilizing standard microbiological and biochemical methods. Isolates were tested for susceptibility to antimicrobials using the Kirby Bauer disk diffusion method. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test. Of 129 patients investigated (62 emergency and 67 elective surgery cases, bacterial isolates were isolated with almost equal frequency both from emergency and elective surgery cases. Of 108 (83.72% culture positive samples, 62 (57.41% were Gram negative, 39 (36.11% Gram positive, and 7 (6.48% showed multiple organisms. Of total 115 bacteria isolated (101 single and 7 double organisms culture positive, 33 (28.69% were Escherichia coli and were also the commonest; followed by Staphylococcus aureus, 30 (26.09% cases. S. aureus and Streptococcus spp. showed maximum susceptibility (100% to linezolid and vancomycin. Maximum susceptibility of E. coli was observed to ciprofloxacin (75.7%, followed by gentamicin (54.5%; of Klebsiella spp. to ceftriaxone and gentamicin (66.6% each, of Proteus spp. to gentamicin (70% followed by ciprofloxacin (60%, and of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to piperacillin (100% and tobramycin (71.4%. E. coli and S. aureus were the most common and Salmonella spp. and Acinetobacter spp. were the least common organism causing surgical site infections. The definitive therapy included ciprofloxacin and gentamicin for E. coli; linezolid and vancomycin for S. aureus and Streptococcus spp; ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin for Klebsiella spp., Citrobacter spp., acinetobacter spp and Salmonella spp.

  4. Risk factors for surgical site infection following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery: a review of 9296 procedures from a national database and comparison with a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Brandon A; Arynchyna, Anastasia A; Johnston, James M; Rozzelle, Curtis J; Blount, Jeffrey P; Oakes, W Jerry; Rocque, Brandon G

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgical site infection (SSI) following CSF shunt operations has been well studied, yet risk factors for nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery are less well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine SSI rates and risk factors following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery using a nationwide patient cohort and an institutional data set specifically for better understanding SSI. METHODS The authors reviewed the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatric (ACS NSQIP-P) database for the years 2012-2014, including all neurosurgical procedures performed on pediatric patients except CSF shunts and hematoma evacuations. SSI included deep (intracranial abscesses, meningitis, osteomyelitis, and ventriculitis) and superficial wound infections. The authors performed univariate analyses of SSI association with procedure, demographic, comorbidity, operative, and hospital variables, with subsequent multivariate logistic regression analysis to determine independent risk factors for SSI within 30 days of the index procedure. A similar analysis was performed using a detailed institutional infection database from Children's of Alabama (COA). RESULTS A total of 9296 nonshunt procedures were identified in NSQIP-P with an overall 30-day SSI rate of 2.7%. The 30-day SSI rate in the COA institutional database was similar (3.3% of 1103 procedures, p = 0.325). Postoperative time to SSI in NSQIP-P and COA was 14.6 ± 6.8 days and 14.8 ± 7.3 days, respectively (mean ± SD). Myelomeningocele (4.3% in NSQIP-P, 6.3% in COA), spine (3.5%, 4.9%), and epilepsy (3.4%, 3.1%) procedure categories had the highest SSI rates by procedure category in both NSQIP-P and COA. Independent SSI risk factors in NSQIP-P included postoperative pneumonia (OR 4.761, 95% CI 1.269-17.857, p = 0.021), immune disease/immunosuppressant use (OR 3.671, 95% CI 1.371-9.827, p = 0.010), cerebral palsy (OR 2.835, 95% CI 1.463-5.494, p = 0.002), emergency operation (OR 1

  5. Risk factors for surgical site infection following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery: a review of 9296 procedures from a national database and comparison with a single-center experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, Brandon A.; Arynchyna, Anastasia A.; Johnston, James M.; Rozzelle, Curtis J.; Blount, Jeffrey P.; Oakes, W. Jerry; Rocque, Brandon G.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Surgical site infection (SSI) following CSF shunt operations has been well studied, yet risk factors for nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery are less well understood. The purpose of this study was to determine SSI rates and risk factors following nonshunt pediatric neurosurgery using a nationwide patient cohort and an institutional dataset specifically for better understanding SSI. Methods The authors reviewed the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Pediatric (ACS NSQIP-P) database for the years 2012–2014, including all neurosurgical procedures performed on pediatric patients except CSF shunts and hematoma evacuations. SSI included deep (intracranial abscesses, meningitis, osteomyelitis, and ventriculitis) and superficial wound infections. The authors performed univariate analyses of SSI association with procedure, demographic, comorbidity, operative, and hospital variables, with subsequent multivariate logistic regression analysis to determine independent risk factors for SSI within 30 days of the index procedure. A similar analysis was performed using a detailed institutional infection database from Children’s Hospital of Alabama (COA). Results A total of 9296 nonshunt procedures were identified in NSQIP-P with an overall 30-day SSI rate of 2.7%. The 30-day SSI rate in the COA institutional database was similar (3.3% of 1103 procedures, p = 0.325). Postoperative time to SSI in NSQIP-P and COA was 14.6 ± 6.8 days and 14.8 ± 7.3 days, respectively (mean ± SD). Myelomeningocele (4.3% in NSQIP-P, 6.3% in COA), spine (3.5%, 4.9%), and epilepsy (3.4%, 3.1%) procedure categoriess had the highest SSI rates by procedure category in both NSQIP-P and COA. Independent SSI risk factors in NSQIP-P included postoperative pneumonia (OR 4.761, 95% CI 1.269–17.857, p = 0.021), immune disease/immunosuppressant use (OR 3.671, 95% CI 1.371–9.827, p = 0.010), cerebral palsy (OR 2.835, 95% CI 1.463–5.494, p = 0.002), emergency

  6. [Nosocomial urinary tract and surgical site infection rates in the Maternity Ward at the General Referral Hospital in Katuba, Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukuke, Hendrick Mbutshu; Kasamba, Eric; Mahuridi, Abdulu; Nlandu, Roger Ngatu; Narufumi, Suganuma; Mukengeshayi, Abel Ntambue; Malou, Vicky; Makoutode, Michel; Kaj, Françoise Malonga

    2017-01-01

    In Intertropical Africa hospitalized patients are exposed to a risk of nosocomial infections. The dearth of published data on this subject limits the descriptive analysis of the situation. This study aimed to determine the incidence, the germs responsible for these infections and the risk factors of nosocomial infections in the Maternity Ward at the General Referral Hospital in Katuba, Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo. We conducted a descriptive, longitudinal study from 1 October 2014 to 1 January 2015. Our study population consisted of 207 women who had been hospitalized in the Maternity Ward at the General Referral Hospital in Katuba. We carried out a comprehensive data collection. Nosocomial infection rate accounted for 15.5%. Parturient women who had been hospitalized for more than three days were three times more likely to develop a nosocomial infection (p=0.003), while those who had had a complicated delivery were four times more likely to be at risk of developing nosocomial infection (p = 0.000). Escherichia coli was the most isolated causative agent (38.1%), followed by Citrobacter freundi (23.8%), Acinobacter baumani (.18, 2%), Staphylococcus aureus (18.2%), Enterococcus aureus (14.3%) and Pseudomonas aeroginosa (9.1%). Ampicillin was the most prescribed antibiotic, to which isolated microbes were resistant. It is necessary to improve hospital hygiene and to conduct further study to examine the similarity between germs strains in the environment and those in biological fluids.

  7. Does Nasal Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus Increase the Risk of Postoperative Infections After Elective Spine Surgery: Do Most Infections Occur in Carriers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adogwa, Owoicho; Vuong, Victoria D; Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Lilly, Daniel T; Desai, Shyam A; Khalid, Syed; Cheng, Joseph; Bagley, Carlos A

    2018-05-14

    Wound infections after adult spinal deformity surgery place a high toll on patients, providers, and the healthcare system. Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of postoperative wound infections, and nasal colonization by this organism may be an important factor in the development of surgical site infections (SSIs). The aim is to investigate whether post-operative surgical site infections after elective spine surgery occur at a higher rate in patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) nasal colonization. Consecutive patients undergoing adult spinal deformity surgery between 2011-2013 were enrolled. Enrolled patients were followed up for a minimum of 3 months after surgery and received similar peri-operative infection prophylaxis. Baseline characteristics, operative details, rates of wound infection, and microbiologic data for each case of post-operative infection were gathered by direct medical record review. Local vancomycin powder was used in all patients and sub-fascial drains were used in the majority (88%) of patients. 1200 operative spine cases were performed for deformity between 2011 and 2013. The mean ± standard deviation age and body mass index were 62.08 ± 14.76 years and 30.86 ± 7.15 kg/m 2 , respectively. 29.41% had a history of diabetes. All SSIs occurred within 30 days of surgery, with deep wound infections accounting for 50% of all SSIs. Of the 34 (2.83%) cases of SSIs that were identified, only 1 case occurred in a patient colonized with MRSA. Our study suggests that the preponderance of SSIs occurred in patients without nasal colonization by methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Future prospective multi-institutional studies are needed to corroborate our findings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms: recent developments in biofilm dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Jessica L; Horswill, Alexander R

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections and represents a significant burden on the healthcare system. S. aureus attachment to medical implants and host tissue, and the establishment of a mature biofilm, play an important role in the persistence of chronic infections. The formation of a biofilm, and encasement of cells in a polymer-based matrix, decreases the susceptibility to antimicrobials and immune defenses, making these infections difficult to eradicate. During infection, dispersal of cells from the biofilm can result in spread to secondary sites and worsening of the infection. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the pathways behind biofilm dispersal in S. aureus, with a focus on enzymatic and newly described broad-spectrum dispersal mechanisms. Additionally, we explore potential applications of dispersal in the treatment of biofilm-mediated infections.

  9. Indoor air bacterial load and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of isolates in operating rooms and surgical wards at jimma university specialized hospital, southwest ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Chalachew; Kibru, Gebre; Tsegaye, Wondewosen

    2011-03-01

    Surgical site infection is the second most common health care associated infection. One of the risk factors for such infection is bacterial contamination of operating rooms' and surgical wards' indoor air. In view of that, the microbiological quality of air can be considered as a mirror of the hygienic condition of these rooms. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the bacterial load and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of isolates in operating rooms' and surgical wards' indoor air of Jimma University Specialized Hospital. A cross sectional study was conducted to measure indoor air microbial quality of operating rooms and surgical wards from October to January 2009/2010 on 108 indoor air samples collected in twelve rounds using purposive sampling technique by Settle Plate Method (Passive Air Sampling following 1/1/1 Schedule). Sample processing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were done following standard bacteriological techniques. The data was analyzed using SPSS version 16 and interpreted according to scientifically determined baseline values initially suggested by Fisher. The mean aerobic colony counts obtained in OR-1(46cfu/hr) and OR-2(28cfu/hr) was far beyond the set 5-8cfu/hr acceptable standards for passive room. Similarly the highest mean aerobic colony counts of 465cfu/hr and 461cfu/hr were observed in Female room-1 and room-2 respectively when compared to the acceptable range of 250-450cfu/hr. In this study only 3 isolates of S. pyogenes and 48 isolates of S. aureus were identified. Over 66% of S. aureus was identified in Critical Zone of Operating rooms. All isolates of S. aureus showed 100% and 82.8% resistance to methicillin and ampicillin respectively. Higher degree of aerobic bacterial load was measured from operating rooms' and surgical wards' indoor air. Reducing foot trafficking, improving the ventilation system and routine cleaning has to be made to maintain the aerobic bacteria load with in optimal level.

  10. Surgical orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohl, Alexis M; Vitkus, Lauren

    2017-08-01

    The article reviews some commonly used orthodontic treatments as well as new strategies to assist in the correction of malocclusion. Many techniques are used in conjunction with surgical intervention and are a necessary compliment to orthognathic surgery. Basic knowledge of these practices will aid in the surgeon's ability to adequately treat the patient. Many orthodontists and surgeons are eliminating presurgical orthodontics to adopt a strategy of 'surgery first' orthodontics in orthognathic surgery. This has the benefit of immediate improvement in facial aesthetics and shorter treatment times. The advent of virtual surgical planning has helped facilitate the development of this new paradigm by making surgical planning faster and easier. Furthermore, using intraoperative surgical navigation is improving overall precision and outcomes. A variety of surgical and nonsurgical treatments may be employed in the treatment of malocclusion. It is important to be familiar with all options available and tailor the patient's treatment plan accordingly. Surgery-first orthodontics, intraoperative surgical navigation, virtual surgical planning, and 3D printing are evolving new techniques that are producing shorter treatment times and subsequently improving patient satisfaction without sacrificing long-term stability.

  11. The therapeutic effect of Chlorogenic acid against Staphylococcus aureus infection through Sortase A inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin eWang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and wide spread of multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus requires the development of new therapeutic agents with alternative modes of action. Anti-virulence strategies are hoped to meet that need. Sortase A (SrtA has attracted great interest as a potential drug target to treat infections caused by S. aureus, as many of the surface proteins displayed by SrtA function as virulence factors by mediating bacterial adhesion to specific organ tissues, invasion of host cells, and evasion of the host-immune responses. It has been suggested that inhibitors of SrtA might be promising candidates for the treatment and/or prevention of S. aureus infections. In this study, we report that Chlorogenic acid (CHA, a natural compound that lacks significant anti–S. aureus activity, inhibit the activity of SrtA in vitro (IC50=33.86±5.55μg/ml and the binding of S. aureus to fibrinogen (Fg. Using molecular dynamics simulations and mutagenesis assays, we further demonstrate that CHA binds to the binding sites of C184 and G192 in the SrtA. In vivo studies demonstrated that CHA prevent mice from S. aureus-induced renal abscess, resulting in a significant survival advantage. These findings indicate that CHA is a promising therapeutic compound against SrtA during S. aureus infections.

  12. Antimicrobial resistant coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    S. aureus is associated with many clinical syndromes including tenosynovitis, omphalitis, femoral head necrosis, .... Markey, 2008) where occurrence of multidrug ... Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis in. Denmark. Veterinary.

  13. Human factor in Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L. Nouwen (Jan); H.A.M. Boelens (Hélène); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractPersistent nasal carriers and noncarriers of Staphylococcus aureus were inoculated with a mixture of different S. aureus strains. The majority of noncarriers and nearly all persistent carriers returned to their original carrier state after artificial inoculation. Furthermore, the

  14. Antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus in suppurative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1299, p<0.05) and Methicillin resistance was confirmed by PCR. Conclusion: Staphylococcus aureus is highly prevalent and more resistant in inpatients. There is a higher risk of acquiring drug resistant staphylococcus aureus infection in ...

  15. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; Hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA); Staph - MRSA; Staphylococcal - MRSA ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). www.cdc.gov/mrsa/index.html . Updated ...

  16. A Case of Childhood Lichen Aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Min Ji; Kim, Byung Yoon; Park, Kyung Chan; Youn, Sang Woong

    2009-01-01

    Lichen aureus is a rare type of chronic pigmented purpuric dermatosis. The eruptions consist of discrete or confluent golden to brownish lichenoid macules and papules, and are usually asymptomatic. Lichen aureus commonly occurs in young adults, but less frequently in children. We report the first case of multiple lichen aureus occurring in a Korean child.

  17. ESCHERICHIA COLI AND STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The bio-effects of the ethanol extracts from the leaf and stem of Momordica charantia were studied with the view to ascertain the medical usefulness ascribed to the plant by the locals. The plant parts, stem and leaf, revealed remarkable activity against Escherichia coli and Staphlococcus aureus. The leaves ...

  18. Surgical site infection incidence after a clean-contaminated surgery in Yasuj Shahid Beheshti hospital, Iran Incidencia de infección de herida por cirugía limpia contaminada en el hospital Yasuj Shahid Beheshti, Irán Incidência de infecção de ferida depois de cirurgia limpa-contaminada em hospital Yasuj Shahid Beheshti, Irã

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohebbi Nobandegani Zinat

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the incidence rate of infection after a clean-contaminated surgery and its relationship with some risk factors. Methodology. Cross sectional study, in a convenience sample of 300 patients who underwent surgery classified as clean-contaminated in a hospital of Yasuj, Iran. Samples were taken directly from the wound at the first dressing change to all the patients. They were studied to determine bacteria growth. Results. The rate of infection after a clean-contaminated surgery was 53%. The most common gram positive microorganism was Staphylococcus aureus (22%, and among gram negative: Escherichia coli (26%, Klebsiella sp (26% and Pseudomonas sp (25%. Significant correlation between the type of surgery and surgical site infection was found, it was not seen with the variables sex and surgical procedure. Conclusion. This study shows important problems regarding patient’s safety. Protocols should be reviewed to control infections.Objetivo. Determinar la tasa de incidencia por infección de herida por cirugía limpia-contaminada y su relación con algunos factores de riesgo. Metodología. Estudio de corte transversal en una muestra por conveniencia de 300 pacientes sometidos a cirugía clasificada como limpia-contaminada. A todos los pacientes les tomaron una muestra para cultivo directamente de la herida en el primer cambio del apósito, la cual se estudió para determinar el crecimiento de bacterias. Resultados. La tasa de infección en heridas quirúrgicas limpias-contaminadas fue del 53%. El microorganismo gram positivo más frecuente fue Staphylococcus aureus (22%, y dentro de los gram negatives fueron: Escherichia coli (26%, Klebsiella sp (26% y Pseudomonas sp (25%. Se encontró asociación significativa entre el tipo de cirugía y la infección de la herida quirúrgica, lo que no se observó con las variables sexo y el procedimiento quirúrgico. Conclusión. Este estudio muestra problemas importantes en el aseguramiento

  19. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with hyperproduction of alpha-toxin in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Liang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The virulence factor α-toxin (hla is needed by Staphylococcus aureus in order to cause infections in both animals and humans. Although the complicated regulation of hla expression has been well studied in human S. aureus isolates, the mechanisms of of hla regulation in bovine S. aureus isolates remain undefined. In this study, we found that many bovine S. aureus isolates, including the RF122 strain, generate dramatic amounts of α-toxin in vitro compared with human clinical S. aureus isolates, including MRSA WCUH29 and MRSA USA300. To elucidate potential regulatory mechanisms, we analyzed the hla promoter regions and identified predominant single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs at positions -376, -483, and -484 from the start codon in α-toxin hyper-producing isolates. Using site-directed mutagenesis and hla promoter-gfp-luxABCDE dual reporter approaches, we demonstrated that the SNPs contribute to the differential control of hla expression among bovine and human S. aureus isolates. Using a DNA affinity assay, gel-shift assays and a null mutant, we identified and revealed that an hla positive regulator, SarZ, contributes to the involvement of the SNPs in mediating hla expression. In addition, we found that the bovine S. aureus isolate RF122 exhibits higher transcription levels of hla positive regulators, including agrA, saeR, arlR and sarZ, but a lower expression level of hla repressor rot compared to the human S. aureus isolate WCUH29. Our results indicate α-toxin hyperproduction in bovine S. aureus is a multifactorial process, influenced at both the genomic and transcriptional levels. Moreover, the identification of predominant SNPs in the hla promoter region may provide a novel method for genotyping the S. aureus isolates.

  20. Computational structural and functional analysis of hypothetical proteins of Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, Ramadevi; Venugopal, Subhashree

    2012-01-01

    Genome sequencing projects has led to an explosion of large amount of gene products in which many are of hypothetical proteins with unknown function. Analyzing and annotating the functions of hypothetical proteins is important in Staphylococcus aureus which is a pathogenic bacterium that cause multiple types of diseases by infecting various sites in humans and animals. In this study, ten hypothetical proteins of Staphylococcus aureus were retrieved from NCBI and analyzed for their structural ...

  1. A Prospective, Single Arm, Multi-site, Clinical Evaluation of a Nonradioactive Surgical Guidance Technology for the Location of Nonpalpable Breast Lesions during Excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Charles E; Russell, Scott; Prowler, Vanessa; Carter, Ebonie; Beard, Abby; Mehindru, Ankur; Blumencranz, Peter; Allen, Kathleen; Portillo, Michael; Whitworth, Pat; Funk, Kristi; Barone, Julie; Norton, Denise; Schroeder, Jerome; Police, Alice; Lin, Erin; Combs, Freddie; Schnabel, Freya; Toth, Hildegard; Lee, Jiyon; Anglin, Beth; Nguyen, Minh; Canavan, Lynn; Laidley, Alison; Warden, Mary Jane; Prati, Ronald; King, Jeff; Shivers, Steven C

    2016-10-01

    This study was a multicenter evaluation of the SAVI SCOUT(®) breast localization and surgical guidance system using micro-impulse radar technology for the removal of nonpalpable breast lesions. The study was designed to validate the results of a recent 50-patient pilot study in a larger multi-institution trial. The primary endpoints were the rates of successful reflector placement, localization, and removal. This multicenter, prospective trial enrolled patients scheduled to have excisional biopsy or breast-conserving surgery of a nonpalpable breast lesion. From March to November 2015, 154 patients were consented and evaluated by 20 radiologists and 16 surgeons at 11 participating centers. Patients had SCOUT(®) reflectors placed up to 7 days before surgery, and placement was confirmed by mammography or ultrasonography. Implanted reflectors were detected by the SCOUT(®) handpiece and console. Presence of the reflector in the excised surgical specimen was confirmed radiographically, and specimens were sent for routine pathology. SCOUT(®) reflectors were successfully placed in 153 of 154 patients. In one case, the reflector was placed at a distance from the target that required a wire to be placed. All 154 lesions and reflectors were successfully removed during surgery. For 101 patients with a preoperative diagnosis of cancer, 86 (85.1 %) had clear margins, and 17 (16.8 %) patients required margin reexcision. SCOUT(®) provides a reliable and effective alternative method for the localization and surgical excision of nonpalpable breast lesions using no wires or radioactive materials, with excellent patient, radiologist, and surgeon acceptance.

  2. Effects of Fermented Sumach on the Formation of Slime Layer of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahra Kırmusaoğlu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is one of the most commonly isolated bacterial pathogens in hospitals, and the most frequent cause of nosocomial infections. Nosocomial staphylococcal foreign-body infections related to biofilm formation are a serious threat, demanding new therapeutic and preventive strategies. Implantation of intravenous catheters and surgical implantation of prosthetic implants carry a risk of infection. In order to prevent all these effects of biofilms, a study was designed to observe the possible antibacterial effect of sumach (Rhus coriaria on the biofilm formation of S. aureus. Material and Methods: The influence of varying concentrations of sumach on the formation of biofilms by 13 strains of Staphylococcus aureus was tested by a microelisa assay. Results: The significant differences between varying concentrations of sumach (0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 µl/ml were observed in four methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and nine methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA (p<0.05. In bacteria, a dose-related decrease in the formation of slime, which is a major virulence factor of staphylococcal infections, was observed. Conclusion: In our study, using 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 µl/ml of sumach, thirteen strains lost, 17%, 22%, 28% and 48% respectively of their capacity to produce biofilms. Sumach, which is a herbal product, can decrease the formation of biofilm, which is a major virulence factor in staphylococcal infections.

  3. Comparison of serum markers for muscle damage, surgical blood loss, postoperative recovery, and surgical site pain after extreme lateral interbody fusion with percutaneous pedicle screws or traditional open posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Tetsuro; Ebata, Shigeto; Haro, Hirotaka

    2017-10-16

    The benefits of extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) as a minimally invasive lumbar spinal fusion treatment for lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis have been unclear. We sought to evaluate the invasiveness and tolerability of XLIF with percutaneous pedicle screws (PPS) compared with traditional open posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). Fifty-six consecutive patients underwent open PLIF and 46 consecutive patients underwent single-staged treatment with XLIF with posterior PPS fixation for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis, and were followed up for a minimum of 1 year. We analyzed postoperative serum makers for muscle damage and inflammation, postoperative surgical pain, and performance status. A Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were obtained at the time of hospital admission and 1 year after surgery. Intraoperative blood loss (51 ± 41 ml in the XLIF/PPS group and 206 ± 191 ml in the PLIF group), postoperative WBC counts and serum CRP levels in the XLIF/PPS group were significantly lower than in the PLIF group. Postoperative serum CK levels were significantly lower in the XLIF/PPS group on postoperative days 4 and 7. Postoperative recovery of performance was significantly greater in the XLIF/PPS group than in the PLIF group from postoperative days 2 to 7. ODI and visual analog scale (VAS) score (lumbar) 1 year after surgery were significantly lower in the XLIF/PPS group compared with the PLIF group. The XLIF/PPS procedure is advantageous to minimize blood loss and muscle damage, with consequent earlier recovery of daily activities and reduced incidence of low back pain after surgery than with the open PLIF procedure.

  4. Surgical competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Nivritti G; Cheng, Stephen W K; Wong, John

    2003-08-01

    Recent high-profile cases have heightened the need for a formal structure to monitor achievement and maintenance of surgical competence. Logbooks, morbidity and mortality meetings, videos and direct observation of operations using a checklist, motion analysis devices, and virtual reality simulators are effective tools for teaching and evaluating surgical skills. As the operating theater is also a place for training, there must be protocols and guidelines, including mandatory standards for supervision, to ensure that patient care is not compromised. Patients appreciate frank communication and honesty from surgeons regarding their expertise and level of competence. To ensure that surgical competence is maintained and keeps pace with technologic advances, professional registration bodies have been promoting programs for recertification. They evaluate performance in practice, professional standing, and commitment to ongoing education.

  5. Human Staphylococcus aureus lineages among Zoological Park residents in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Drougka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a part of the microbiota flora in many animal species. The clonal spread of S. aureus among animals and personnel in a Zoological Park was investigated. Samples were collected from colonized and infected sites among 32 mammals, 11 birds and eight humans. The genes mecA, mecC, lukF/lukS-PV (encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin, PVL and tst (toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 were investigated by PCR. Clones were defined by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST, spa type and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE. Seven S. aureus isolates were recovered from four animals and one from an employee. All were mecA, mecC and tst–negative, whereas, one carried the PVL genes and was isolated from an infected Squirrel monkey. Clonal analysis revealed the occurrence of seven STs, eight PFGE and five spa types including ones of human origin. Even though a variety of genotypes were identified among S. aureus strains colonizing zoo park residents, our results indicate that colonization with human lineages has indeed occurred.

  6. Surgical Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azarmehr, Iman; Stokbro, Kasper; Bell, R. Bryan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This systematic review investigates the most common indications, treatments, and outcomes of surgical navigation (SN) published from 2010 to 2015. The evolution of SN and its application in oral and maxillofacial surgery have rapidly developed over recent years, and therapeutic indicatio...

  7. Surgical Instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dankelman, J.; Horeman, T.

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a surgical instrument for minimall-invasive surgery, comprising a handle, a shaft and an actuating part, characterised by a gastight cover surrounding the shaft, wherein the cover is provided with a coupler that has a feed- through opening with a loskable seal,

  8. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in North-east Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajana Pastuović

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this 5-year study was to determine the frequency and antibiotic susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA-related infections at Osijek Clinical Hospital. Materials and methods. A total of 1987 staphylococci-infected clinical isolates were collected and analysed at the Microbiology Department of the Public Health Institute of Osijek-Baranja County. Results. Between 2008 and 2012, the average rate of MRSA-related infections in staphylococci-infected patients was 27.4%. The proportion of MRSArelated infections on all Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus isolates from clinical specimens showed a decreasing trend, from 32.6% in 2008 to 25.5% in 2012. MRSA-related infections were mostly detected in wound swabs (50.6% and aspirates (28.8% of patients hospitalized in the surgical (49.8% and intensive care units (27.9%. MRSA-related infection showed an increase compared to S. aureus-infections in samples of wounds and aspirates in 2011 and 2012 (57.9%/34.9% and 35.2%/16.3%, respectively. The majority of strains of MRSA-related infections were resistant to several antibiotics, including erythromycin and clindamycin, where susceptibility were less than 10%. All MRSA isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid. Therefore, antibiotic therapies for MRSA infections include vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid, but microbiological diagnostics need to be performed in order to know when the use of glycopeptides and oxazolidinones is indicated. Conclusion. Our results suggest that appropriate prevention measures, combined with the more rational use of antibiotics are crucial to reduce the spread of MRSA-related infection in healthcare settings. Further monitoring is necessary of the incidence and antibiotic susceptibility of MRSA-related infections in our community.

  9. Distally based sural neuro-fasciocutaneous perforator flap for foot and ankle reconstruction: Surgical modifications for flap pedicle and donor site closure without skin graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zhenglin; Chen, Yiheng; Chu, Tinggang; Gao, Weiyang; Li, Zhijie; Yan, Hede; Song, Yonghuan

    2018-02-01

    The conventional procedure of the sural neuro-fasciocutaneous flap enables the supply of blood and venous drainage by increasing the width of the adipofascial tissue and preserving tiny venous return routes. Moreover, skin graft is a common method for donor site closure, which may lead to some complications and influence the aesthetic appearance. We report modifications for a distally based sural neuro-fasciocutaneous perforator flap and a relaying flap for donor site closure without skin graft. Twelve patients undergoing the modified flap for foot and ankle reconstruction were included in this study between 2014 and 2016. A peroneal-based perforator, a superficial vein, and the vascular axis of the sural nerve were included in the pedicle. A Z-shape skin incision was performed to explore the perforator vessels and a relaying island perforator flap was used to close the donor site. All flaps survived completely without necrosis. The area of the flaps ranged from 16 × 8 cm to 30 × 15 cm. The diameter width of the pedicle ranged from 1.0 to 2.0 cm. A relaying perforator island flap was used in 10 cases for donor site closure and no skin graft was performed. There were no serious donor site complications. All patients were satisfied with the aesthetic outcome postoperatively at the final follow-up. The distally based sural neuro-fasciocutaneous perforator flap is considered a reliable method for foot and ankle reconstruction. The modification for flap pedicle and donor site closure method without skin graft should be recommended. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Incidence of early symptomatic port-site hernia: a case series from a department where laparoscopy is the preferred surgical approach.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, D C

    2012-12-01

    Potential benefits of laparoscopic surgery include decreased post-operative pain, improved cosmesis and a shorter hospital stay. However as the volume and complexity of laparoscopic procedures increase, there appears to be a simultaneous increase in complications relating to laparoscopic access. Development of a port-site hernia is one such complication.

  11. Population structure of Staphylococcus aureus in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    The present PhD research was aimed at analysing the population structure of Staphylococcus aureus in China. Between 2000 and 2005 we found that patients from a single Chinese hospital showed increasing trends in antimicrobial resistance. Among methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), resistance against rifampicin doubled to 68%. Staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) is frequent in China. Two predominant S. aureus lineages, ST6 and ST943, were identified causing outbreaks of SFP in Southern China...

  12. Prevalence of nasal carriage and diversity of Staphylococcus aureus among inpatients and hospital staff at Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egyir, Beverly; Guardabassi, Luca; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2013-01-01

    %) was more common than for other agents (resistant S. aureus carriage was observed among IP compared with HS (P = 0.01). High genetic diversity was shown by spa typing, with 55 spa types found among 105 isolates; the predominant spa types were t355 (10%) and t084 (10......There is a paucity of data on Staphylococcus aureus epidemiology in Africa. Prevalence of nasal carriage and genetic diversity of S. aureus were determined among hospital staff (HS) and inpatients (IP) at the largest hospital in Ghana. In total, 632 nasal swabs were obtained from 452 IP and 180 HS...... in the Child Health Department (CHD) and Surgical Department (SD). S. aureus carriage prevalences were 13.9% in IP and 23.3% in HS. The chance of being a carrier was higher in HS (P = 0.005) and IP staying ≤7 days in hospital (P = 0.007). Resistance to penicillin (93%), tetracycline (28%) and fusidic acid (12...

  13. Relationship and susceptibility profile of Staphylococcus aureus infection diabetic foot ulcers with Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Aza Bahadeen

    2013-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the main cause of diabetic foot infection with the patient's endogenous flora as the principal source. Nasal carriage of S. aureus has been identified as an important risk factor for the acquisition of diabetic foot infections. The study assessment the associations of S. aureus with methicillin resistant S. aureus were isolation from diabetic foot infection and nasal carriage of the same patients and their antibiotic susceptibility profile. Diagnosis of S. aureus and methicillin resistant S. aureus were carried out by using standard procedures. Antibiotic sensitivity profiles were determent by breakpoint dilution method. Out of 222 S. aureus isolation, 139 (62.61%) were isolated from the diabetic foot and 83 (37.39%) from the nasal carriage. Seventy one (30.87%) of the patients were S. aureus infection diabetic foot with nasal carriage. Among diabetic foot infection and nasal carriage patients, 40.85% of S. aureus were considered as methicillin resistant S. aureus. Rifampicin (96.40%) and Levofloxacin (91.44%) were active against S. aureus. Patients at strong risk for methicillin resistant S. aureus nasal carriage and subsequent diabetic foot infection with high resistance to antibiotics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Mild Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection Improves the Course of Subsequent Endogenous S. aureus Bacteremia in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne van den Berg

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus carriers with S. aureus bacteremia may have a reduced mortality risk compared to non-carriers. A role for the immune system is suggested. Here, we study in mice the effect of mild S. aureus skin infection prior to endogenous or exogenous S. aureus bacteremia, and evaluate protection in relation to anti-staphylococcal antibody levels. Skin infections once or twice by a clinical S. aureus isolate (isolate P or S. aureus strain 8325-4 were induced in mice free of S. aureus and anti-staphylococcal antibodies. Five weeks later, immunoglobulin G (IgG levels in blood against 25 S. aureus antigens were determined, and LD50 or LD100 bacteremia caused by S. aureus isolate P was induced. S. aureus skin infections led to elevated levels of anti-staphylococcal IgG in blood. One skin infection improved the course of subsequent severe endogenous bacteremia only. A second skin infection further improved animal survival rate, which was associated with increased pre-bacteremia IgG levels against Efb, IsaA, LukD, LukE, Nuc, PrsA and WTA. In conclusion, S. aureus isolate P skin infection in mice reduces the severity of subsequent endogenous S. aureus bacteremia only. Although cellular immune effects cannot be rules out, anti-staphylococcal IgG against specified antigens may contribute to this effect.

  15. Twenty Percent of Patients May Remain Colonized With Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Despite a Decolonization Protocol in Patients Undergoing Elective Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baratz, Michael D; Hallmark, Ruth; Odum, Susan M; Springer, Bryan D

    2015-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most commonly isolated organism in periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). Resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) are on the rise, and many programs have instituted decolonization protocols. There are limited data on the success of S aureus nasal decolonization programs and their impact on PJI. The purposes of this study were to (1) determine the proportion of patients successfully decolonized using a 2-week protocol; (2) compare infection risks between our surveillance and decolonization protocol group against a historical control cohort to evaluate changes in proportions of S aureus infections; and (3) assess infection risk based on carrier type, comparing S aureus carriers with noncarrier controls. We retrospectively evaluated a group of 3434 patients who underwent elective primary and revision hip and knee arthroplasty over a 2-year period; each patient in the treatment group underwent a surveillance protocol, and a therapeutic regimen of mupurocin and chlorhexidine was instituted when colonization criteria were met. A 2009 to 2010 comparative historical cohort was chosen as the control group. We compared risks of infection between our treatment group and the historical control cohort. Furthermore, in patients who developed surgical site infections (SSIs), we compared the proportions of each S aureus type between the two cohorts. Finally, we compared infection rates based on carrier status. Surveillance for infection was carried out by the hospital infection control coordinator using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria. During the time period of this study, the CDC defined hospital-acquired infection related to a surgical procedure as any infection diagnosed within 1 year of the procedure. With the numbers available, we had 41% power to detect a difference of 0.3% in infection rate between the treatment and control groups. To achieve 80% power, a total of 72,033 patients would be

  16. Surface proteins and the formation of biofilms by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Joon; Chang, James; Rimal, Binayak; Yang, Hao; Schaefer, Jacob

    2018-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilms pose a serious clinical threat as reservoirs for persistent infections. Despite this clinical significance, the composition and mechanism of formation of S. aureus biofilms are unknown. To address these problems, we used solid-state NMR to examine S. aureus (SA113), a strong biofilm-forming strain. We labeled whole cells and cell walls of planktonic cells, young biofilms formed for 12-24h after stationary phase, and more mature biofilms formed for up to 60h after stationary phase. All samples were labeled either by (i) [ 15 N]glycine and l-[1- 13 C]threonine, or in separate experiments, by (ii) l-[2- 13 C, 15 N]leucine. We then measured 13 C- 15 N direct bonds by C{N} rotational-echo double resonance (REDOR). The increase in peptidoglycan stems that have bridges connected to a surface protein was determined directly by a cell-wall double difference (biofilm REDOR difference minus planktonic REDOR difference). This procedure eliminates errors arising from differences in 15 N isotopic enrichments and from the routing of 13 C label from threonine degradation to glycine. For both planktonic cells and the mature biofilm, 20% of pentaglycyl bridges are not cross-linked and are potential surface-protein attachment sites. None of these sites has a surface protein attached in the planktonic cells, but one-fourth have a surface protein attached in the mature biofilm. Moreover, the leucine-label shows that the concentration of β-strands in leucine-rich regions doubles in the mature biofilm. Thus, a primary event in establishing a S. aureus biofilm is extensive decoration of the cell surface with surface proteins that are linked covalently to the cell wall and promote cell-cell adhesion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Glycerol monolaurate and dodecylglycerol effects on Staphylococcus aureus and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Chi Lin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Glycerol monolaurate (GML, a 12 carbon fatty acid monoester, inhibits Staphylococcus aureus growth and exotoxin production, but is degraded by S. aureus lipase. Therefore, dodecylglycerol (DDG, a 12 carbon fatty acid monoether, was compared in vitro and in vivo to GML for its effects on S. aureus growth, exotoxin production, and stability.Antimicrobial effects of GML and DDG (0 to 500 microg/ml on 54 clinical isolates of S. aureus, including pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE types USA200, USA300, and USA400, were determined in vitro. A rabbit Wiffle ball infection model assessed GML and DDG (1 mg/ml instilled into the Wiffle ball every other day effects on S. aureus (MN8 growth (inoculum 3x10(8 CFU/ml, toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1 production, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha concentrations and mortality over 7 days. DDG (50 and 100 microg/ml inhibited S. aureus growth in vitro more effectively than GML (p<0.01 and was stable to lipase degradation. Unlike GML, DDG inhibition of TSST-1 was dependent on S. aureus growth. GML-treated (4 of 5; 80% and DDG-treated rabbits (2 of 5; 40% survived after 7 days. Control rabbits (5 of 5; 100% succumbed by day 4. GML suppressed TNF-alpha at the infection site on day 7; however, DDG did not (<10 ng/ml versus 80 ng/ml, respectively.These data suggest that DDG was stable to S. aureus lipase and inhibited S. aureus growth at lower concentrations than GML in vitro. However, in vivo GML was more effective than DDG by reducing mortality, and suppressing TNF-alpha, S. aureus growth and exotoxin production, which may reduce toxic shock syndrome. GML is proposed as a more effective anti-staphylococcal topical anti-infective candidate than DDG, despite its potential degradation by S. aureus lipase.

  18. Dermoscopy of lichen aureus Dermatoscopia do liquen aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliana Santin Portela

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lichen aureus (also called "lichen purpuricus" is an uncommon subtype of pigmented purpuric dermatosis. Clinically characterized by rust macules, papules or plaques, it is a chronic disease which more often affects young adults and is localized mainly on the lower extremities. The diagnosis is made on the basis of clinical and histopathological features. Dermoscopy findings are useful to confirm clinical diagnosis.O líquen aureus (também denominado "liquen purpuricus" é um subtipo pouco comum entre as dermatoses purpúricas pigmentadas. Clinicamente caracterizado por máculas, pápulas ou placas de coloração ferruginosa, é doença crônica, que acomete mais frequentemente adultos jovens e localiza-se principalmente nos membros inferiores. O diagnóstico pode ser feito a partir das características clínicas e histopatológicas, sendo os achados dermatoscópicos úteis para corroborar o diagnóstico clínico.

  19. Intracellular persisting Staphylococcus aureus is the major pathogen in recurrent tonsillitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas E Zautner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The two major indications for tonsillectomy are recurrent tonsillitis (RT and peritonsillar abscess (PTA. Unlike PTAs, which are primarily treated surgically, RT is often cured by tonsillectomy only after a series of failed drug therapy attempts. Although the bacteriological background of RT has been studied, the reason for the lack of success of conservative therapeutic approaches is not well understood. METHODS: In a prospective study, tonsil specimens from 130 RT patients and 124 PTA patients were examined for the presence of extra- and intracellular bacteria using antibiotic protection assays. Staphylococcus aureus isolates from RT patients were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, spa-typing and MSCRAMM-gene-PCR. Their ability for biofilm formation was tested and their cell invasiveness was confirmed by a flow cytometric invasion assay (FACS, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and immunohistochemistry. FINDINGS: S. aureus was the predominant species (57.7% in RT patients, whereas Streptococcus pyogenes was most prevalent (20.2% in PTA patients. Three different assays (FACS, FISH, antibiotic protection assay showed that nearly all RT-associated S. aureus strains were located inside tonsillar cells. Correspondingly, the results of the MSCRAMM-gene-PCRs confirmed that 87% of these S. aureus isolates were invasive strains and not mere colonizers. Based upon PFGE analyses of genomic DNA and on spa-gene typing the vast majority of the S. aureus isolates belonged to different clonal lineages. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that intracellular residing S. aureus is the most common cause of RT and indicate that S. aureus uses this location to survive the effects of antibiotics and the host immune response. A German translation of the Abstract is provided as supplementary material (Abstract S1.

  20. Can Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Silently Travel From the Gut to the Wound and Cause Postoperative Infection? Modeling the "Trojan Horse Hypothesis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezalek, Monika A; Hyoju, Sanjiv; Zaborin, Alexander; Okafor, Emeka; Chandrasekar, Laxmi; Bindokas, Vitas; Guyton, Kristina; Montgomery, Christopher P; Daum, Robert S; Zaborina, Olga; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Alverdy, John C

    2018-04-01

    To determine whether intestinal colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can be the source of surgical site infections (SSIs). We hypothesized that gut-derived MRSA may cause SSIs via mechanisms in which circulating immune cells scavenge MRSA from the gut, home to surgical wounds, and cause infection (Trojan Horse Hypothesis). MRSA gut colonization was achieved by disrupting the microbiota with antibiotics, imposing a period of starvation and introducing MRSA via gavage. Next, mice were subjected to a surgical injury (30% hepatectomy) and rectus muscle injury and ischemia before skin closure. All wounds were cultured before skin closure. To control for postoperative wound contamination, reiterative experiments were performed in mice in which the closed wound was painted with live MRSA for 2 consecutive postoperative days. To rule out extracellular bacteremia as a cause of wound infection, MRSA was injected intravenously in mice subjected to rectus muscle ischemia and injury. All wound cultures were negative before skin closure, ruling out intraoperative contamination. Out of 40 mice, 4 (10%) developed visible abscesses. Nine mice (22.5%) had MRSA positive cultures of the rectus muscle without visible abscesses. No SSIs were observed in mice injected intravenously with MRSA. Wounds painted with MRSA after closure did not develop infections. Circulating neutrophils from mice captured by flow cytometry demonstrated MRSA in their cytoplasm. Immune cells as Trojan horses carrying gut-derived MRSA may be a plausible mechanism of SSIs in the absence of direct contamination.

  1. Anti-infective properties of Lactobacillus fermentum against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Parvathi; Nisha, N; Dinesh, Kavitha R; Kumar, Anil V; Biswas, Raja

    2011-01-01

    Surgical wounds and implant-associated Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are often difficult to treat because of limited susceptibility of several of these strains to conventional antibiotics. As a result, there is a constant need for new alternative drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial properties of Lactobacillus fermentum, a probiotic bacterium, which we have isolated from colonic biopsies. The inhibition of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa growth was evaluated by coincubating with L. fermentum strains. Growth inhibition was tested for several of their clinical isolates using agar well diffusion assays. For biofilm assay S. aureus and P. aeruginosa were grown on the glass slides and in 96-well plates in presence of 2.5 μg/ml culture filtrate of L. fermentum. Biofilms were photographed using confocal microscope or stained with 0.1% crystal violet. Reduction in the cytotoxicity of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa was observed in presence of 2.5 μg/ml L. fermentum-spent media. Using in vitroexperiments, we showed that L. fermentum-secreted compound(s) inhibits the growth, cytotoxicity and biofilm formation of several S. aureus and P. aeruginosa strains. Compound(s) present in the culture supernatant of L. fermentum may have promising applications in treating hospital-acquired infections. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Phosphorylation of Staphylococcus aureus Protein-Tyrosine Kinase Affects the Function of Glucokinase and Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasu, Dudipeta; Kumar, Pasupuleti Santhosh; Prasad, Uppu Venkateswara; Swarupa, Vimjam; Yeswanth, Sthanikam; Srikanth, Lokanathan; Sunitha, Manne Mudhu; Choudhary, Abhijith; Sarma, Potukuchi Venkata Gurunadha Krishna

    2017-03-01

    When Staphylococcus aureus is grown in the presence of high concentration of external glucose, this sugar is phosphorylated by glucokinase (glkA) to form glucose-6-phosphate. This product subsequently enters into anabolic phase, which favors biofilm formation. The presence of ROK (repressor protein, open reading frame, sugar kinase) motif, phosphate-1 and -2 sites, and tyrosine kinase sites in glkA of S. aureus indicates that phosphorylation must regulate the glkA activity. The aim of the present study was to identify the effect of phosphorylation on the function of S. aureus glkA and biofilm formation. Pure glkA and protein-tyrosine kinase (BYK) of S. aureus ATCC 12600 were obtained by fractionating the cytosolic fractions of glkA1 and BYK-1 expressing recombinant clones through nickel metal chelate column. The pure glkA was used as a substrate for BYK and the phosphorylation of glkA was confirmed by treating with reagent A and resolving in SDS-PAGE, as well as staining with reagent A. The kinetic parameters of glkA and phosphorylated glkA were determined spectrophotometrically, and in silico tools were used for validation. S. aureus was grown in brain heart infusion broth, which was supplemented with glucose, and then biofilm units were calculated. Fourfold elevated glkA activity was observed upon the phosphorylation by BYK. Protein-protein docking analysis revealed that glkA structure docked close to the adenosine triphosphate-binding site of BYK structure corroborating the kinetic results. Further, S. aureus grown in the presence of elevated glucose concentration exhibited an increase in the rate of biofilm formation. The elevated function of glkA is an essential requirement for increased biofilm units in S. aureus, a key pathogenic factor that helps its survival and spread the infection.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus and healthcare-associated infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekkelenkamp, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    Many medical procedures breach or suppress patients’ natural defences, leaving them vulnerable to infections which would not occur in healthy humans: “healthcare-associated infections”. Healthcare-associated infections caused by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) are probably the most

  4. Population structure of Staphylococcus aureus in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    The present PhD research was aimed at analysing the population structure of Staphylococcus aureus in China. Between 2000 and 2005 we found that patients from a single Chinese hospital showed increasing trends in antimicrobial resistance. Among methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), resistance

  5. METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS (MRSA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nosocomial infections caused by methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus often pose therapeutic dilemma to the clinicians because of the multi resistant nature of these strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Outbreaks of both nosocomial and community acquired infections are also frequent and difficult to control.

  6. Wounds, Functional Disability, and Indwelling Devices Are Associated With Cocolonization by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci in Southeast Michigan

    OpenAIRE

    Flannery, Erika L.; Wang, Linda; Zöllner, Sebastian; Foxman, Betsy; Mobley, Harry L. T.; Mody, Lona

    2011-01-01

    Cocolonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) is a precursor to vancomycin-resistant S. aureus emergence. MRSA/VRE cocolonization incidence is higher among skilled nursing facility residents with functional disability and indwelling devices and occurs more frequently in wounds than other anatomical sites.

  7. Staphylococcus aureus and hand eczema severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haslund, P; Bangsgaard, N; Jarløv, J O

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of bacterial infections in hand eczema (HE) remains to be assessed. OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with HE compared with controls, and to relate presence of S. aureus, subtypes and toxin production to severity of HE. METHODS......: Bacterial swabs were taken at three different visits from the hand and nose in 50 patients with HE and 50 controls. Staphylococcus aureus was subtyped by spa typing and assigned to clonal complexes (CCs), and isolates were tested for exotoxin-producing S. aureus strains. The Hand Eczema Severity Index...... and in the nose in all cases, and between visits in 90% of cases. Ten different CC types were identified, no association with severity was found, and toxin-producing strains were not found more frequently in patients with HE than in controls. CONCLUSIONS: Staphylococcus aureus was present on hands in almost half...

  8. Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob; Penadés, José R; Ingmer, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a serious human pathogen with remarkable adaptive powers. Antibiotic-resistant clones rapidly emerge mainly by acquisition of antibiotic-resistance genes from other S. aureus strains or even from other genera. Transfer is mediated by a diverse complement of mobile genetic...... of plasmids that can be transferred by conjugation and the efficiency with which transduction occurs. Here, we review the main routes of antibiotic resistance gene transfer in S. aureus in the context of its biology as a human commensal and a life-threatening pathogen. Staphylococcus aureus cells...... are effective in exchanging mobile genetic elements, including antibiotic-resistance genes.During colonization or infection of host organisms, the exchange appears to be particularly effective.Bacteriophage-mediated transfer involves both transduction and autotransduction, which may enable lysogenic S. aureus...

  9. Dialysis catheter-related septicaemia--focus on Staphylococcus aureus septicaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J; Ladefoged, S D; Kolmos, H J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dialysis catheters are a common cause of nosocomial septicaemia in haemodialysis units usually due to staphylococci, of which Staphylococcus aureus is the most pathogenic. In this study, the epidemiology and pathogenesis of dialysis catheter-related infections were studied, and methods...... to infection were measured. After catheter insertion, all patients were screened for nasal carriage of S. aureus, and a culture was taken from the skin overlying the catheter insertion site. Once a week, cultures were taken from the insertion site and from the hub, and aerobic and anaerobic blood cultures were...... drawn from the catheter. If clinical signs of septicaemia occurred, peripheral blood cultures were also performed, when it was possible. RESULTS: The incidence of septicaemia was 49% (21/43) in patients, and 56% of all cases were caused by S. aureus. The mortality was 14% (3/21) and the incidence...

  10. Investigations of the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis in an experimental footpad infection model in broiler breeders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoefner, Ida; Olsen, Rikke Heidemann; Poulsen, Louise Ladefoged

    2016-01-01

    in the central foot pad. Birds underwent full post mortem and bacteriological investigation 3, 7 and 14 days after infection. Inoculation of the S. aureus resulted in systemic lesions (sepsis, endocarditis and arthritis) as well as injection site abscesses. The lesions and bacterial re-isolation in the birds...... receiving the S. aureus originating from bumble foot were restricted to the footpad only. Similar to the S. aureus the E. faecalis infected birds contracted both systemic and local lesions. Bacterial re-isolation was demonstrated in a pattern similar to the pathological findings. Both systemic and local...

  11. Staphylococcus aureus resistente a vancomicina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Andrés Rodríguez

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Revisar la evolución y mecanismos moleculares de la resistencia de Staphylococcus aureus a vancomicina. Fuente de los datos. Se consultó la base de datos MEDLINE y se seleccionaron artículos tipo reportes de caso, estudios bioquímicos, de microscopía electrónica y biología molecular pertinentes. Síntesis. Después de casi 40 años de eficacia ininterrumpida de la vancomicina, en 1997 se reportaron los primeros casos de fracaso terapéutico debido a cepas de Staphylococcus aureus con resistencia intermedia, denominadas VISA (concentración inhibitoria mínima, CIM, 8 a 16 ?g/ml, así como a cepas con resistencia heterogénea hVISA (CIM global = 4 ?g/ml, pero con subpoblaciones VISA, en las cuales la resistencia está mediada por engrosamiento de la pared celular y disminución de su entrecruzamiento, lo que afecta la llegada del antibiótico al blanco principal, los monómeros del peptidoglicano en la membrana plasmática. En 2002 se aisló la primera de las 3 cepas reportadas hasta la fecha con resistencia total al antibiótico, denominadas VRSA (CIM>32 ?g/ml, en las que se encontró el transposón Tn1546 proveniente de Enterococcus spp, responsable del reemplazo de la terminación D-Ala-D-Ala por D-Ala-Dlactato en los precursores de la pared celular con pérdida de la afinidad por el glicopéptido. Conclusiones. La resistencia a vancomicina es una realidad en S. aureus, mediada en el caso de VISA por alteraciones en la pared celular que atrapan el antibiótico antes de llegar al sitio de acción, y en el caso de VRSA, por transferencia desde Enterococcus spp. de genes que llevan a la modificación del blanco molecular.

  12. Preclinical Efficacy of Clumping Factor A in Prevention of Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections has become increasingly difficult because of the emergence of multidrug-resistant isolates. Development of a vaccine to prevent staphylococcal infections remains a priority. To determine whether clumping factor A (ClfA is a good target protein for inclusion in a multivalent vaccine, we evaluated its efficacy in a variety of relevant staphylococcal infection models, challenging with different S. aureus strains. ClfA adsorbed to Alhydrogel and mixed with Sigma Adjuvant System was more immunogenic and stimulated a more robust Th17 response than ClfA administered with alum alone. ClfA immunization induced the production of functional antibodies in rabbits and mice that blocked S. aureus binding to fibrinogen and were opsonic for S. aureus strains that produced little or no capsular polysaccharide. Mice immunized with ClfA showed a modest reduction in the bacterial burden recovered from subcutaneous abscesses provoked by S. aureus USA300 strain LAC. In addition, the ClfA vaccine reduced lethality in a sepsis model following challenge with strain Newman, but not ST80. Vaccination with ClfA did not protect against surgical wound infection, renal abscess formation, or bacteremia. Passive immunization with antibodies to ClfA did not protect against staphylococcal bacteremia in mice or catheter-induced endocarditis in rats. Some enhancement of bacteremia was observed by ClfA immunization or passive administration of ClfA antibodies when mice were challenged by the intraperitoneal route. Although rodent models of staphylococcal infection have their limitations, our data do not support the inclusion of ClfA in an S. aureus multivalent vaccine.

  13. Preclinical Efficacy of Clumping Factor A in Prevention of Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue; Wang, Xiaogang; Thompson, Christopher D.; Park, Saeyoung; Park, Wan Beom

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections has become increasingly difficult because of the emergence of multidrug-resistant isolates. Development of a vaccine to prevent staphylococcal infections remains a priority. To determine whether clumping factor A (ClfA) is a good target protein for inclusion in a multivalent vaccine, we evaluated its efficacy in a variety of relevant staphylococcal infection models, challenging with different S. aureus strains. ClfA adsorbed to Alhydrogel and mixed with Sigma Adjuvant System was more immunogenic and stimulated a more robust Th17 response than ClfA administered with alum alone. ClfA immunization induced the production of functional antibodies in rabbits and mice that blocked S. aureus binding to fibrinogen and were opsonic for S. aureus strains that produced little or no capsular polysaccharide. Mice immunized with ClfA showed a modest reduction in the bacterial burden recovered from subcutaneous abscesses provoked by S. aureus USA300 strain LAC. In addition, the ClfA vaccine reduced lethality in a sepsis model following challenge with strain Newman, but not ST80. Vaccination with ClfA did not protect against surgical wound infection, renal abscess formation, or bacteremia. Passive immunization with antibodies to ClfA did not protect against staphylococcal bacteremia in mice or catheter-induced endocarditis in rats. Some enhancement of bacteremia was observed by ClfA immunization or passive administration of ClfA antibodies when mice were challenged by the intraperitoneal route. Although rodent models of staphylococcal infection have their limitations, our data do not support the inclusion of ClfA in an S. aureus multivalent vaccine. PMID:26838725

  14. Bacteriophage Therapy for Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm-Infected Wounds: A New Approach to Chronic Wound Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    lidocaine and 1:100,000 epineph- rine at the planned wound sites. Six full-thickness dermal wounds, 6 mm in diameter, were created on the ventral ear...action were ineffective against S. aureus biofilm, as was seen with P. aeruginosa biofilm.22 Given the durability of biofilm in the face of a harsh

  15. Antimicrobial resistant coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Staphylococcus aureus is an Important agent of food poisoning. In many countries, it ... humans and animals (Casey et al., 2007). ... of widespread use of antibiotics in animals for ... Laboratory Standards Institute methods (CLSI, 2010). Briefly ...

  16. OCCURRENCE AND ANTIBIOGRAM OF Staphylococcus aureus IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    1Federal College of Agricultural Produce Technology, Kano. 2Department of ... The presence of S.aureus and resistance to commonly used antibiotics by the isolates posses .... mastitic animals or human sources (Akram et al.,. 2013; Oliver et ...

  17. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Is Required for Mast Cell-Mediated Host Immunity Against Cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Ouyang, Wei; Xia, Jingyan; Sun, Xiaoru; Zhao, Liying; Xu, Feng

    2018-05-08

    Mast cells (MCs) play a key role in immune process response to invading pathogens. This study assessed the involvement of MCs in controlling Staphylococcus aureus infection in a cutaneous infection model of MC-deficient (KitW-sh/W-sh) mice. KitW-sh/W-sh mice developed significantly larger skin lesions after the cutaneous S. aureus challenge, when compared to wild-type (WT) mice, while MC dysfunction reduced the inflammation response to S. aureus. The levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in skin tissues were significantly decreased in KitW-sh/W-sh mice upon infection. Moreover, the exogenous administration of MCs or recombinant TNF-α effectively restored the immune response against S. aureus in KitW-sh/W-sh mice via the recruitment of neutrophils to the infected site. These results indicate that the effects of MC deficiency are largely attributed to the decrease in production of TNF-α in cutaneous S. aureus infection. In addition, S. aureus-induced MC activation was dependent on the c-kit receptor-activated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/P65-nuclear factor (NF-κB) pathway, which was confirmed by treatment with Masitinib (a c-kit receptor inhibitor), Wortmannin (a PI3K inhibitor), and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (a NF-κB inhibitor), respectively. The present study identifies the critical role of MCs in the host defense against S. aureus infection.

  18. The potential of the endolysin Lysdb from Lactobacillus delbrueckii phage for combating Staphylococcus aureus during cheese manufacture from raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tingting; Xin, YongPing; Zhang, Chenchen; Ouyang, Xudong; Kong, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Phage endolysins have received increased attention in recent times as potential antibacterial agents and the biopreservatives in food production processes. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common pathogens in bacterial food poisoning outbreaks. In this study, the endolysin Lysdb, one of the two-component cell lysis cassette of Lactobacillus delbrueckii phage phiLdb, was shown to possess a muramidase domain and catalytic sites with homology to Chalaropsis-type lysozymes. Peptidoglycan hydrolytic bond specificity determination revealed that Lysdb was able to cleave the 6-O-acetylated peptidoglycans present in the cell walls of S. aureus. Turbidity reduction assays demonstrated that Lysdb could effectively lyse the S. aureus live cells under acidic and mesothermal conditions. To further evaluate the ability of Lysdb as a potential antibacterial agent against S. aureus in cheese manufacture, Lactobacillus casei BL23 was engineered to constitutively deliver active Lysdb to challenge S. aureus in lab-scale cheese making from raw milk. Compared with the raw milk, the viable counts of S. aureus were reduced by 10(5)-fold in the cheese inoculated with the engineered L. casei strain during the fermentation process, and the pathogenic bacterial numbers remained at a low level (10(4) CFU/g) after 6 weeks of ripening at 10 °C. Taken together, all results indicated that the Lysdb has the function as an effective tool for combating S. aureus during cheese manufacture from raw milk.

  19. Surgical site infection in posterior spine surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-20

    Mar 20, 2016 ... Methodology: All consecutive patients who had posterior spine surgeries between January 2012 ... However, spinal instrumentation, surgery on cervical region and wound inspection on or ... While advances have been made in infection control ... costs, due to loss of productivity, patient dissatisfaction and.

  20. Frequently Asked Questions about Surgical Site Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... follow CDC infection prevention guidelines including: Clean their hands and arms up to their elbows with an antiseptic agent ... Resistance Antibiotic Prescribing and Use Blood Safety Dialysis Safety Hand Hygiene HICPAC Injection Safety Infection Control Medication Safety ...

  1. Hydrogel delivery of lysostaphin eliminates orthopedic implant infection by Staphylococcus aureus and supports fracture healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher T; Wroe, James A; Agarwal, Rachit; Martin, Karen E; Guldberg, Robert E; Donlan, Rodney M; Westblade, Lars F; García, Andrés J

    2018-05-29

    Orthopedic implant infections are a significant clinical problem, with current therapies limited to surgical debridement and systemic antibiotic regimens. Lysostaphin is a bacteriolytic enzyme with high antistaphylococcal activity. We engineered a lysostaphin-delivering injectable PEG hydrogel to treat Staphylococcus aureus infections in bone fractures. The injectable hydrogel formulation adheres to exposed tissue and fracture surfaces, ensuring efficient, local delivery of lysostaphin. Lysostaphin encapsulation within this synthetic hydrogel maintained enzyme stability and activity. Lysostaphin-delivering hydrogels exhibited enhanced antibiofilm activity compared with soluble lysostaphin. Lysostaphin-delivering hydrogels eradicated S. aureus infection and outperformed prophylactic antibiotic and soluble lysostaphin therapy in a murine model of femur fracture. Analysis of the local inflammatory response to infections treated with lysostaphin-delivering hydrogels revealed indistinguishable differences in cytokine secretion profiles compared with uninfected fractures, demonstrating clearance of bacteria and associated inflammation. Importantly, infected fractures treated with lysostaphin-delivering hydrogels fully healed by 5 wk with bone formation and mechanical properties equivalent to those of uninfected fractures, whereas fractures treated without the hydrogel carrier were equivalent to untreated infections. Finally, lysostaphin-delivering hydrogels eliminate methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections, supporting this therapy as an alternative to antibiotics. These results indicate that lysostaphin-delivering hydrogels effectively eliminate orthopedic S. aureus infections while simultaneously supporting fracture repair. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  2. Oligopeptide Targeting Sortase A as Potential Anti-infective Therapy for Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Sortase A (SrtA-catalyzed anchorage of surface proteins in most Gram-positive bacteria is indispensable for their virulence, suggesting that this transpeptidase is a promising target for antivirulence therapy. Here, an oligopeptide, LPRDA, was identified as an effective inhibitor of SrtA via virtual screening based on the LPXTG substrate sequence, and it was found to inhibit SrtA activity in vitro and in vivo (IC50 = 10.61 μM by competitively occupying the active site of SrtA. Further, the oligopeptide treatment had no anti-Staphylococcus aureus activity, but it provided protection against S. aureus-induced mastitis in a mouse model. These findings indicate that the oligopeptide could be used as an effective anti-infective agent for the treatment of infection caused by S. aureus or other Gram-positive bacteria via the targeting of SrtA.