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Sample records for aureus surface protein

  1. Adhesion, invasion and evasion: the many functions of the surface proteins of Staphylococcus aureus

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    Foster, Timothy J.; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Ganesh, Vannakambadi K.; Höök, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important opportunistic pathogen and persistently colonizes about 20% of the human population. Its surface is ‘decorated’ with proteins that are covalently anchored to the cell wall peptidoglycan. Structural and functional analysis has identified four distinct classes of surface proteins, of which microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) are the largest class. These surface proteins have numerous functions, including adhesion to and invasion of host cells and tissues, evasion of immune responses and biofilm formation. Thus, cell wall-anchored proteins are essential virulence factors for the survival of S. aureus in the commensal state and during invasive infections, and targeting them with vaccines could combat S. aureus infections. PMID:24336184

  2. Adhesion, invasion and evasion: the many functions of the surface proteins of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Timothy J; Geoghegan, Joan A; Ganesh, Vannakambadi K; Höök, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important opportunistic pathogen and persistently colonizes about 20% of the human population. Its surface is 'decorated' with proteins that are covalently anchored to the cell wall peptidoglycan. Structural and functional analysis has identified four distinct classes of surface proteins, of which microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) are the largest class. These surface proteins have numerous functions, including adhesion to and invasion of host cells and tissues, evasion of immune responses and biofilm formation. Thus, cell wall-anchored proteins are essential virulence factors for the survival of S. aureus in the commensal state and during invasive infections, and targeting them with vaccines could combat S. aureus infections.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus Protein A Mediates Interspecies Interactions at the Cell Surface of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Armbruster, Catherine R; Wolter, Daniel J; Mishra, Meenu; Hayden, Hillary S; Radey, Matthew C; Merrihew, Gennifer; MacCoss, Michael J; Burns, Jane; Wozniak, Daniel J; Parsek, Matthew R; Hoffman, Lucas R

    2016-05-24

    While considerable research has focused on the properties of individual bacteria, relatively little is known about how microbial interspecies interactions alter bacterial behaviors and pathogenesis. Staphylococcus aureus frequently coinfects with other pathogens in a range of different infectious diseases. For example, coinfection by S. aureus with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs commonly in people with cystic fibrosis and is associated with higher lung disease morbidity and mortality. S. aureus secretes numerous exoproducts that are known to interact with host tissues, influencing inflammatory responses. The abundantly secreted S. aureus staphylococcal protein A (SpA) binds a range of human glycoproteins, immunoglobulins, and other molecules, with diverse effects on the host, including inhibition of phagocytosis of S. aureus cells. However, the potential effects of SpA and other S. aureus exoproducts on coinfecting bacteria have not been explored. Here, we show that S. aureus-secreted products, including SpA, significantly alter two behaviors associated with persistent infection. We found that SpA inhibited biofilm formation by specific P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, and it also inhibited phagocytosis by neutrophils of all isolates tested. Our results indicate that these effects were mediated by binding to at least two P. aeruginosa cell surface structures-type IV pili and the exopolysaccharide Psl-that confer attachment to surfaces and to other bacterial cells. Thus, we found that the role of a well-studied S. aureus exoproduct, SpA, extends well beyond interactions with the host immune system. Secreted SpA alters multiple persistence-associated behaviors of another common microbial community member, likely influencing cocolonization and coinfection with other microbes. Bacteria rarely exist in isolation, whether on human tissues or in the environment, and they frequently coinfect with other microbes. However, relatively little is known about how

  4. Phagocytosis escape by a Staphylococcus aureus protein that connects complement and coagulation proteins at the bacterial surface.

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    Ya-Ping Ko

    Full Text Available Upon contact with human plasma, bacteria are rapidly recognized by the complement system that labels their surface for uptake and clearance by phagocytic cells. Staphylococcus aureus secretes the 16 kD Extracellular fibrinogen binding protein (Efb that binds two different plasma proteins using separate domains: the Efb N-terminus binds to fibrinogen, while the C-terminus binds complement C3. In this study, we show that Efb blocks phagocytosis of S. aureus by human neutrophils. In vitro, we demonstrate that Efb blocks phagocytosis in plasma and in human whole blood. Using a mouse peritonitis model we show that Efb effectively blocks phagocytosis in vivo, either as a purified protein or when produced endogenously by S. aureus. Mutational analysis revealed that Efb requires both its fibrinogen and complement binding residues for phagocytic escape. Using confocal and transmission electron microscopy we show that Efb attracts fibrinogen to the surface of complement-labeled S. aureus generating a 'capsule'-like shield. This thick layer of fibrinogen shields both surface-bound C3b and antibodies from recognition by phagocytic receptors. This information is critical for future vaccination attempts, since opsonizing antibodies may not function in the presence of Efb. Altogether we discover that Efb from S. aureus uniquely escapes phagocytosis by forming a bridge between a complement and coagulation protein.

  5. Silkworm Apolipophorin Protein Inhibits Hemolysin Gene Expression of Staphylococcus aureus via Binding to Cell Surface Lipoteichoic Acids*

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    Omae, Yosuke; Hanada, Yuichi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that a silkworm hemolymph protein, apolipophorin (ApoLp), binds to the cell surface of Staphylococcus aureus and inhibits expression of the saePQRS operon encoding a two-component system, SaeRS, and hemolysin genes. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory mechanism of ApoLp on S. aureus hemolysin gene expression. ApoLp bound to lipoteichoic acids (LTA), an S. aureus cell surface component. The addition of purified LTA to liquid medium abolished the inhibitory effect of ApoLp against S. aureus hemolysin production. In an S. aureus knockdown mutant of ltaS encoding LTA synthetase, the inhibitory effects of ApoLp on saeQ expression and hemolysin production were attenuated. Furthermore, the addition of anti-LTA monoclonal antibody to liquid medium decreased the expression of S. aureus saeQ and hemolysin genes. In S. aureus strains expressing SaeS mutant proteins with a shortened extracellular domain, ApoLp did not decrease saeQ expression. These findings suggest that ApoLp binds to LTA on the S. aureus cell surface and inhibits S. aureus hemolysin gene expression via a two-component regulatory system, SaeRS. PMID:23873929

  6. Silkworm apolipophorin protein inhibits hemolysin gene expression of Staphylococcus aureus via binding to cell surface lipoteichoic acids.

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    Omae, Yosuke; Hanada, Yuichi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2013-08-30

    We previously reported that a silkworm hemolymph protein, apolipophorin (ApoLp), binds to the cell surface of Staphylococcus aureus and inhibits expression of the saePQRS operon encoding a two-component system, SaeRS, and hemolysin genes. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory mechanism of ApoLp on S. aureus hemolysin gene expression. ApoLp bound to lipoteichoic acids (LTA), an S. aureus cell surface component. The addition of purified LTA to liquid medium abolished the inhibitory effect of ApoLp against S. aureus hemolysin production. In an S. aureus knockdown mutant of ltaS encoding LTA synthetase, the inhibitory effects of ApoLp on saeQ expression and hemolysin production were attenuated. Furthermore, the addition of anti-LTA monoclonal antibody to liquid medium decreased the expression of S. aureus saeQ and hemolysin genes. In S. aureus strains expressing SaeS mutant proteins with a shortened extracellular domain, ApoLp did not decrease saeQ expression. These findings suggest that ApoLp binds to LTA on the S. aureus cell surface and inhibits S. aureus hemolysin gene expression via a two-component regulatory system, SaeRS.

  7. Staphylococcus aureus surface protein SdrE binds complement regulator factor H as an immune evasion tactic.

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    Julia A Sharp

    Full Text Available Similar to other highly successful invasive bacterial pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus recruits the complement regulatory protein factor H (fH to its surface to inhibit the alternative pathway of complement. Here, we report the identification of the surface-associated protein SdrE as a fH-binding protein using purified fH overlay of S. aureus fractionated cell wall proteins and fH cross-linking to S. aureus followed by mass spectrometry. Studies using recombinant SdrE revealed that rSdrE bound significant fH whether from serum or as a purified form, in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, rSdrE-bound fH exhibited cofactor functionality for factor I (fI-mediated cleavage of C3b to iC3b which correlated positively with increasing amounts of fH. Expression of SdrE on the surface of the surrogate bacterium Lactococcus lactis enhanced recruitment of fH which resulted in increased iC3b generation. Moreover, surface expression of SdrE led to a reduction in C3-fragment deposition, less C5a generation, and reduced killing by polymorphonuclear cells. Thus, we report the first identification of a S. aureus protein associated with the staphylococcal surface that binds factor H as an immune evasion mechanism.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization of the Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract Is Modulated by Wall Teichoic Acid, Capsule, and Surface Proteins.

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    Yoshiki Misawa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the nose, throat, skin, and gastrointestinal (GI tract of humans. GI carriage of S. aureus is difficult to eradicate and has been shown to facilitate the transmission of the bacterium among individuals. Although staphylococcal colonization of the GI tract is asymptomatic, it increases the likelihood of infection, particularly skin and soft tissue infections caused by USA300 isolates. We established a mouse model of persistent S. aureus GI colonization and characterized the impact of selected surface antigens on colonization. In competition experiments, an acapsular mutant colonized better than the parental strain Newman, whereas mutants defective in sortase A and clumping factor A showed impaired ability to colonize the GI tract. Mutants lacking protein A, clumping factor B, poly-N-acetyl glucosamine, or SdrCDE showed no defect in colonization. An S. aureus wall teichoic acid (WTA mutant (ΔtagO failed to colonize the mouse nose or GI tract, and the tagO and clfA mutants showed reduced adherence in vitro to intestinal epithelial cells. The tagO mutant was recovered in lower numbers than the wild type strain in the murine stomach and duodenum 1 h after inoculation. This reduced fitness correlated with the in vitro susceptibility of the tagO mutant to bile salts, proteases, and a gut-associated defensin. Newman ΔtagO showed enhanced susceptibility to autolysis, and an autolysin (atl tagO double mutant abrogated this phenotype. However, the atl tagO mutant did not survive better in the mouse GI tract than the tagO mutant. Our results indicate that the failure of the tagO mutant to colonize the GI tract correlates with its poor adherence and susceptibility to bactericidal factors within the mouse gut, but not to enhanced activity of its major autolysin.

  9. The Staphylococcus aureus Global Regulator MgrA Modulates Clumping and Virulence by Controlling Surface Protein Expression.

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    Heidi A Crosby

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen that causes devastating infections in a wide range of locations within the body. One of the defining characteristics of S. aureus is its ability to form clumps in the presence of soluble fibrinogen, which likely has a protective benefit and facilitates adhesion to host tissue. We have previously shown that the ArlRS two-component regulatory system controls clumping, in part by repressing production of the large surface protein Ebh. In this work we show that ArlRS does not directly regulate Ebh, but instead ArlRS activates expression of the global regulator MgrA. Strains lacking mgrA fail to clump in the presence of fibrinogen, and clumping can be restored to an arlRS mutant by overexpressing either arlRS or mgrA, indicating that ArlRS and MgrA constitute a regulatory pathway. We used RNA-seq to show that MgrA represses ebh, as well as seven cell wall-associated proteins (SraP, Spa, FnbB, SasG, SasC, FmtB, and SdrD. EMSA analysis showed that MgrA directly represses expression of ebh and sraP. Clumping can be restored to an mgrA mutant by deleting the genes for Ebh, SraP and SasG, suggesting that increased expression of these proteins blocks clumping by steric hindrance. We show that mgrA mutants are less virulent in a rabbit model of endocarditis, and virulence can be partially restored by deleting the genes for the surface proteins ebh, sraP, and sasG. While mgrA mutants are unable to clump, they are known to have enhanced biofilm capacity. We demonstrate that this increase in biofilm formation is partially due to up-regulation of SasG, a surface protein known to promote intercellular interactions. These results confirm that ArlRS and MgrA constitute a regulatory cascade, and that they control expression of a number of genes important for virulence, including those for eight large surface proteins.

  10. [Protein toxins of Staphylococcus aureus].

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    Shamsutdinov, A F; Tiurin, Iu A

    2014-01-01

    Main scientific-research studies regarding protein bacterial toxins of the most widespread bacteria that belong to Staphylococcus spp. genus and in particular the most pathogenic species for humans--Staphylococcus aureus, are analyzed. Structural and biological properties of protein toxins that have received the name of staphylococcus pyrogenic toxins (PTSAg) are presented. Data regarding genetic regulation of secretion and synthesis of these toxins and 3 main regulatory genetic systems (agr--accessory gene regulator, xpr--extracellular protein regulator, sar--staphylococcal accessory regulator) that coordinate synthesis of the most important protein toxins and enzymes for virulence of S. aureus, are presented.

  11. Immobilization of Bioactive Protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (SpA) on the Surface of Bacillus subtilis Spores.

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    Ghaedmohammadi, Samira; Rigi, Garshasb; Zadmard, Reza; Ricca, Ezio; Ahmadian, Gholamreza

    2015-08-01

    Protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (SpA) is a 40-60 kDa cell-wall component, composed of five homologous immunoglobulin (Ig)-binding domains folded into a three-helix bundle. Each of these five domains is able to bind Igs from many different mammalian species. Recombinant SpA is widely used as a component of diagnostic kits for the detection and purification of IgGs from serum or other biological fluids. In this study, purified SpA was adsorbed and covalently linked to Bacillus subtilis spores. Spores are extremely stable cell forms and are considered as an attractive platform to display heterologous proteins. A sample containing about 36 μg of SpA was covalently immobilized on the surface of 4 × 10(10) spores. Spore-bound SpA retained its IgG-binding activity, even after seven consecutive binding and washing steps, suggesting that it can be recycled and utilized several times. FACS analysis revealed that spores with covalently attached SpA had significantly improved fluorescence intensities when compared to those of spores with adsorbed SpA, suggesting that the covalent approach is more efficient than sole adsorption regarding protein attachment to the spore surface.

  12. Surface shaving as a versatile tool to profile global interactions between human serum proteins and the Staphylococcus aureus cell surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreisbach, Annette; van der Kooi-Pol, Magdalena M.; Otto, Andreas; Gronau, Katrin; Bonarius, Hendrik P. J.; Westra, Hans; Groen, Herman; Becher, Doerte; Hecker, Michael; van Dijl, Jan M.

    The human commensal bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is renowned as a causative agent of severe invasive diseases. Upon entering the bloodstream, S. aureus can infect almost every tissue and organ system in the human body. To withstand insults from the immune system upon invasion, several

  13. Changes in the Expression of Biofilm-Associated Surface Proteins in Staphylococcus aureus Food-Environmental Isolates Subjected to Sublethal Concentrations of Disinfectants

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    Lenka Cincarova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sublethal concentrations (sub-MICs of certain disinfectants are no longer effective in removing biofilms from abiotic surfaces and can even promote the formation of biofilms. Bacterial cells can probably adapt to these low concentrations of disinfectants and defend themselves by way of biofilm formation. In this paper, we report on three Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formers (strong B+++, moderate B++, and weak B+ that were cultivated with sub-MICs of commonly used disinfectants, ethanol or chloramine T, and quantified using Syto9 green fluorogenic nucleic acid stain. We demonstrate that 1.25–2.5% ethanol and 2500 μg/mL chloramine T significantly enhanced S. aureus biofilm formation. To visualize differences in biofilm compactness between S. aureus biofilms in control medium, 1.25% ethanol, or 2500 μg/mL chloramine T, scanning electron microscopy was used. To describe changes in abundance of surface-exposed proteins in ethanol- or chloramine T-treated biofilms, surface proteins were prepared using a novel trypsin shaving approach and quantified after dimethyl labeling by LC-LTQ/Orbitrap MS. Our data show that some proteins with adhesive functions and others with cell maintenance functions and virulence factor EsxA were significantly upregulated by both treatments. In contrast, immunoglobulin-binding protein A was significantly downregulated for both disinfectants. Significant differences were observed in the effect of the two disinfectants on the expression of surface proteins including some adhesins, foldase protein PrsA, and two virulence factors.

  14. Silkworm Apolipophorin Protein Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Virulence*

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    Hanada, Yuichi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2011-01-01

    Silkworm hemolymph inhibits hemolysin production by Staphylococcus aureus. We purified a factor in the silkworm hemolymph responsible for this inhibitory activity. The final fraction with the greatest specific activity contained 220- and 74-kDa proteins. Determination of the N-terminal amino acid sequence revealed that the 220- and 74-kDa proteins were apolipophorin I and apolipophorin II, respectively, indicating that the factor was apolipophorin (ApoLp). The purified ApoLp fraction showed decreased expression of S. aureus hla encoding α-hemolysin, hlb encoding β-hemolysin, saeRS, and RNAIII, which activate the expression of these hemolysin genes. Injection of an anti-ApoLp antibody into the hemolymph increased the sensitivity of silkworms to the lethal effect of S. aureus. Hog gastric mucin, a mammalian homologue of ApoLp, decreased the expression of S. aureus hla and hlb. These findings suggest that ApoLp in the silkworm hemolymph inhibits S. aureus virulence and contributes to defense against S. aureus infection and that its activity is conserved in mammalian mucin. PMID:21937431

  15. Predictive characterization of hypothetical proteins in Staphylococcus aureus NCTC 8325.

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    School, Kuana; Marklevitz, Jessica; K Schram, William; K Harris, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common hospital acquired infections. It colonizes immunocompromised patients and with the number of antibiotic resistant strains increasing, medicine needs new treatment options. Understanding more about the proteins this organism uses would further this goal. Hypothetical proteins are sequences thought to encode a functional protein but for which little to no evidence of that function exists. About half of the genomic proteins in reference strain S. aureus NCTC 8325 are hypothetical. Since annotation of these proteins can lead to new therapeutic targets, a high demand to characterize hypothetical proteins is present. This work examines 35 hypothetical proteins from the chromosome of S. aureus NCTC 8325. Examination includes physiochemical characterization; sequence homology; structural homology; domain recognition; structure modeling; active site depiction; predicted protein-protein interactions; protein-chemical interactions; protein localization; protein stability; and protein solubility. The examination revealed some hypothetical proteins related to virulent domains and protein-protein interactions including superoxide dismutase, O-antigen, bacterial ferric iron reductase and siderophore synthesis. Yet other hypothetical proteins appear to be metabolic or transport proteins including ABC transporters, major facilitator superfamily, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, and GTPases. Progress evaluating some hypothetical proteins, particularly the smaller ones, was incomplete due to limited homology and structural information in public repositories. These data characterizing hypothetical proteins will contribute to the scientific understanding of S. aureus by identifying potential drug targets and aiding in future drug discovery.

  16. Immunisation With Immunodominant Linear B Cell Epitopes Vaccine of Manganese Transport Protein C Confers Protection against Staphylococcus aureus Infection

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    Yang, Hui-Jie; Zhang, Jin-Yong; Wei, Chao; Yang, Liu-Yang; Zuo, Qian-Fei; Zhuang, Yuan; Feng, You-Jun; Srinivas, Swaminath; Zeng, Hao; Zou, Quan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination strategies for Staphylococcus aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections have attracted much research attention. Recent efforts have been made to select manganese transport protein C, or manganese binding surface lipoprotein C (MntC), which is a metal ion associated with pathogen nutrition uptake, as potential candidates for an S. aureus vaccine. Although protective humoral immune responses to MntC are well-characterised, much less is known about detail...

  17. Radioimmunoassays for protein A of Staphylococcus aureus

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    Langone, J.J.; Das, C.; Bennett, D.; Terman, D.S. (Baylor Univ., Houston, TX (USA). Coll. of Medicine)

    1983-10-14

    Radioimmunoassays have been developed that can detect nanogram amounts of protein A (SpA), a product generated by Staphylococcus aureus that binds selectively to the Fc region of IgG from most mammalian species. Competition assays for fluid phase SpA utilize antibodies produced in chickens, /sup 125/I-labeled SpA as the tracer molecule, and either F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments of rabbit IgG anti-chicken IgG or 40% ammonium sulfate as the precipitating agent to separate antigen-antibody complexes from free antigen. The double antibody assay could be carried out in serum from species that form only soluble complexes with SpA (e.g., rabbit), that react poorly with SpA (e.g., rat) or under appropriate conditions in serum from species (e.g., dog) that show high reactivity with SpA and form precipitating complexes. Chicken antibodies prepared by affinity chromatography on SpA-Sepharose and labeled with /sup 125/I were used in a direct binding assay for SpA present either on the cell wall of Cowan strain I or Wood 46 bacteria, in insoluble complexes prepared from SpA and whole serum or purified IgG, or in C1q binding complexes that were formed by passage of serum from normal or tumor bearing humans or dogs over SpA-collodion charcoal. Since both types of assays could detect SpA even in the presence of serum or IgG, they offer advantages over other techniques in which the SpA-Fc interaction may interfere.

  18. Type I signal peptidase and protein secretion in Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Schallenberger, Mark A; Niessen, Sherry; Shao, Changxia; Fowler, Bruce J; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2012-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen whose virulence relies on the secretion of many different proteins. In general, the secretion of most proteins in S. aureus, as well as other bacteria, is dependent on the type I signal peptidase (SPase)-mediated cleavage of the N-terminal signal peptide that targets a protein to the general secretory pathway. The arylomycins are a class of natural product antibiotics that inhibit SPase, suggesting that they may be useful chemical biology tools for characterizing the secretome. While wild-type S. aureus (NCTC 8325) is naturally resistant to the arylomycins, sensitivity is conferred via a point mutation in its SPase. Here, we use a synthetic arylomycin along with a sensitized strain of S. aureus and multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) mass spectrometry to identify 46 proteins whose extracellular accumulation requires SPase activity. Forty-four possess identifiable Sec-type signal peptides and thus are likely canonically secreted proteins, while four also appear to possess cell wall retention signals. We also identified the soluble C-terminal domains of two transmembrane proteins, lipoteichoic acid synthase, LtaS, and O-acyteltransferase, OatA, both of which appear to have noncanonical, internal SPase cleavage sites. Lastly, we identified three proteins, HtrA, PrsA, and SAOUHSC_01761, whose secretion is induced by arylomycin treatment. In addition to elucidating fundamental aspects of the physiology and pathology of S. aureus, the data suggest that an arylomycin-based therapeutic would reduce virulence while simultaneously eradicating an infection.

  19. Survival of vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus on hospital surfaces.

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    Zarpellon, M N; Gales, A C; Sasaki, A L; Selhorst, G J; Menegucci, T C; Cardoso, C L; Garcia, L B; Tognim, M C B

    2015-08-01

    Contaminated surfaces play an important role in the transmission of certain pathogens that are responsible for healthcare-associated infections. Although previous studies have shown that meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can survive on dry surfaces at room temperature, no published data regarding vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) are available to date. To compare the survival time on different types of surfaces, cell-surface hydrophobicity, adherence to abiotic surfaces and biofilm formation of meticillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), MRSA and VISA. Survival of the S. aureus strains was tested on latex, cotton fabric, vinyl flooring and formica. Cell-surface hydrophobicity was determined using the hydrocarbon interaction affinity method. Adhesion to abiotic surfaces was tested on granite, latex (gloves), glass, vinyl flooring and formica. Biofilm formation was evaluated at 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. All of the samples survived on the vinyl flooring and formica for at least 40 days. VISA survived on both surfaces for more than 45 days. All of the strains were highly hydrophobic. VISA adhered to latex, vinyl flooring and formica. Biofilm formation increased for all of the tested strains within 6-24 h. VISA present high survival, adherence and cell-surface hydrophobicity. Therefore, as the treatment of patients with VISA is a significant challenge for clinicians, greater care with cleaning and disinfection of different types of surfaces in healthcare facilities is recommended because these may become important reservoirs of multi-resistant pathogens. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of the immunodominant regions of Staphylococcus aureus fibronectin-binding protein A.

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    Zuo, Qian-Fei; Cai, Chang-Zhi; Ding, Hong-Lei; Wu, Yi; Yang, Liu-Yang; Feng, Qiang; Yang, Hui-Jie; Wei, Zhen-Bo; Zeng, Hao; Zou, Quan-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen responsible for a diverse spectrum of human diseases and a leading cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections. Development of a vaccine against this pathogen is an important goal. The fibronectin binding protein A (FnBPA) of S. aureus is one of multifunctional 'microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules' (MSCRAMMs). It is one of the most important adhesin molecules involved in the initial adhesion steps of S. aureus infection. It has been studied as potential vaccine candidates. However, FnBPA is a high-molecular-weight protein of 106 kDa and difficulties in achieving its high-level expression in vitro limit its vaccine application in S. aureus infection diseases control. Therefore, mapping the immunodominant regions of FnBPA is important for developing polyvalent subunit fusion vaccines against S. aureus infections. In the present study, we cloned and expressed the N-terminal and C-terminal of FnBPA. We evaluated the immunogenicity of the two sections of FnBPA and the protective efficacy of the two truncated fragments vaccines in a murine model of systemic S. aureus infection. The results showed recombinant truncated fragment F130-500 had a strong immunogenicity property and survival rates significantly increased in the group of mice immunized with F130-500 than the control group. We futher identified the immunodominant regions of FnBPA. The mouse antisera reactions suggest that the region covering residues 110 to 263 (F1B110-263) is highly immunogenic and is the immunodominant regions of FnBPA. Moreover, vaccination with F1B110-263 can generate partial protection against lethal challenge with two different S. aureus strains and reduced bacterial burdens against non-lethal challenge as well as that immunization with F130-500. This information will be important for further developing anti- S. aureus polyvalent subunit fusion vaccines.

  1. Protective activity of the CnaBE3 domain conserved among Staphylococcus aureus Sdr proteins.

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    Becherelli, Marco; Prachi, Prachi; Viciani, Elisa; Biagini, Massimiliano; Fiaschi, Luigi; Chiarot, Emiliano; Nosari, Sarah; Brettoni, Cecilia; Marchi, Sara; Biancucci, Marco; Fontana, Maria Rita; Montagnani, Francesca; Bagnoli, Fabio; Barocchi, Michèle A; Manetti, Andrea G O

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen, commensal of the human skin and nares, but also responsible for invasive nosocomial as well as community acquired infections. Staphylococcus aureus adheres to the host tissues by means of surface adhesins, such as SdrC, SdrD, and SdrE proteins. The Sdr family of proteins together with a functional A domain, contain respectively two, three or five repeated sequences called B motifs which comprise the CnaB domains. SdrD and SdrE proteins were reported to be protective in animal models against invasive diseases or lethal challenge with human clinical S. aureus isolates. In this study we identified a 126 amino acid sequence containing a CnaB domain, conserved among the three Sdr proteins. The three fragments defined here as CnaBC2, D5 and E3 domains even though belonging to phylogenetically distinct strains, displayed high sequence similarity. Based on the sequence conservation data, we selected the CnaBE3 domain for further analysis and characterization. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the recombinant CnaBE3 domain recognized SdrE, SdrC and SdrD proteins of different S. aureus lineages. Moreover, we demonstrated that the CnaBE3 domain was expressed in vivo during S. aureus infections, and that immunization of this domain alone significantly reduces the bacterial load in mice challenged with S. aureus. Furthermore, we show that the reduction of bacteria by CnaBE3 vaccination is due to functional antibodies. Finally, we demonstrated that the region of the SdrE protein containing the CnaBE3 domain was resistant to trypsin digestion, a characteristic often associated with the presence of an isopeptide bond.

  2. Staphylococcus epidermidis Esp degrades specific proteins associated with Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation and host-pathogen interaction.

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    Sugimoto, Shinya; Iwamoto, Takeo; Takada, Koji; Okuda, Ken-Ichi; Tajima, Akiko; Iwase, Tadayuki; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu

    2013-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus exhibits a strong capacity to attach to abiotic or biotic surfaces and form biofilms, which lead to chronic infections. We have recently shown that Esp, a serine protease secreted by commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis, disassembles preformed biofilms of S. aureus and inhibits its colonization. Esp was expected to degrade protein determinants of the adhesive and cohesive strength of S. aureus biofilms. The aim of this study was to elucidate the substrate specificity and target proteins of Esp and thereby determine the mechanism by which Esp disassembles S. aureus biofilms. We used a mutant Esp protein (Esp(S235A)) with defective proteolytic activity; this protein did not disassemble the biofilm formed by a clinically isolated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain, thereby indicating that the proteolytic activity of Esp is essential for biofilm disassembly. Esp degraded specific proteins in the biofilm matrix and cell wall fractions, in contrast to proteinase K, which is frequently used for testing biofilm robustness and showed no preference for proteolysis. Proteomic and immunological analyses showed that Esp degrades at least 75 proteins, including 11 biofilm formation- and colonization-associated proteins, such as the extracellular adherence protein, the extracellular matrix protein-binding protein, fibronectin-binding protein A, and protein A. In addition, Esp selectively degraded several human receptor proteins of S. aureus (e.g., fibronectin, fibrinogen, and vitronectin) that are involved in its colonization or infection. These results suggest that Esp inhibits S. aureus colonization and biofilm formation by degrading specific proteins that are crucial for biofilm construction and host-pathogen interaction.

  3. Surface Mediated Protein Disaggregation

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    Radhakrishna, Mithun; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-03-01

    Preventing protein aggregation is of both biological and industrial importance. Biologically these aggregates are known to cause amyloid type diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Protein aggregation leads to reduced activity of the enzymes in industrial applications. Inter-protein interactions between the hydrophobic residues of the protein are known to be the major driving force for protein aggregation. In the current paper we show how surface chemistry and curvature can be tuned to mitigate these inter-protein interactions. Our results calculated in the framework of the Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) lattice model show that, inter-protein interactions can be drastically reduced by increasing the surface hydrophobicity to a critical value corresponding to the adsorption transition of the protein. At this value of surface hydrophobicity, proteins lose inter-protein contacts to gain surface contacts and thus the surface helps in reducing the inter-protein interactions. Further, we show that the adsorption of the proteins inside hydrophobic pores of optimal sizes are most efficient both in reducing inter-protein contacts and simultaneously retaining most of the native-contacts due to strong protein-surface interactions coupled with stabilization due to the confinement. Department of Energy (Grant No DE-FG02-11ER46811).

  4. Molecular characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from employees, children, and environmental surfaces in Iowa child daycare facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Erin D; Hanson, Blake M; Kates, Ashley E; Smith, Tara C

    2015-05-01

    Infectious agents have the potential to thrive in child daycare facilities. Asymptomatic Staphylococcus aureus carriage is a risk factor for developing infection and contributes to transmission. We collected swabs from 110 employees, 111 unexposed adults, 81 children, and 214 environmental surfaces at 11 Iowa daycare facilities. S aureus isolates were characterized using antibiotic resistance profiles and Staphylococcal protein A typing. Staphylococcal protein A types were grouped into cluster complexes using the Based Upon Repeat Pattern algorithm. All isolates (from 38 employees, 37 unexposed adults, 16 children, and 19 surfaces) were characterized. Daycare employees were more likely to carry erythromycin-resistant S aureus than unexposed adults (odds ratio, 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-12.7; P = .033). Isolates were genetically heterogeneous, although isolates from employees appeared more clonal than those from unexposed adults. Strains associated with ST8 were identified in 5 daycare facilities and 3 unexposed adults. S aureus isolates collected from employees, children, and surfaces of daycare facilities are genetically heterogeneous, but contain strains associated with community-associated methicillin-resistant S aureus. This suggests that daycare facilities can serve as reservoirs for community-associated methicillin-resistant S aureus and facilitate genetic exchange. Employees may be at increased risk of carrying antibiotic-resistant strains, indicating more research is necessary into this occupational group. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Improved accuracy of cell surface shaving proteomics in Staphylococcus aureus using a false-positive control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solis, Nestor; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2010-01-01

    Proteolytic treatment of intact bacterial cells is an ideal means for identifying surface-exposed peptide epitopes and has potential for the discovery of novel vaccine targets. Cell stability during such treatment, however, may become compromised and result in the release of intracellular proteins...... that complicate the final analysis. Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen, causing community and hospital-acquired infections, and is a serious healthcare concern due to the increasing prevalence of multiple antibiotic resistances amongst clinical isolates. We employed a cell surface "shaving" technique...

  6. Effect of Superhydrophobic Surface of Titanium on Staphylococcus aureus Adhesion

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    Peifu Tang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the systemic antibiotics prophylaxis, orthopedic implants still remain highly susceptible to bacterial adhesion and resulting in device-associated infection. Surface modification is an effective way to decrease bacterial adhesion. In this study, we prepared surfaces with different wettability on titanium surface based on TiO2 nanotube to examine the effect of bacterial adhesion. Firstly, titanium plates were calcined to form hydrophilic TiO2 nanotube films of anatase phase. Subsequently, the nanotube films and inoxidized titaniums were treated with 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorooctyl-triethoxysilane (PTES, forming superhydrophobic and hydrophobic surfaces. Observed by SEM and contact angle measurements, the different surfaces have different characteristics. Staphylococcus aureus (SA adhesion on different surfaces was evaluated. Our experiment results show that the superhydrophobic surface has contact angles of water greater than 150∘ and also shows high resistance to bacterial contamination. It is indicated that superhydrophobic surface may be a factor to reduce device-associated infection and could be used in clinical practice.

  7. Adhesion force of staphylococcus aureus on various biomaterial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Fahad; Balani, Kantesh

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus comprises of more than half of all pathogens in orthopedic implant infections and they can cause major bone infection which can result in destruction of joint and bone. In the current study, adhesion force of bacteria on the surface of various biomaterial surfaces is measured using atomic force microscope (AFM). Staphylococcus aureus was immobilized on an AFM tipless cantilever as a force probe to measure the adhesion force between bacteria and biomaterials (viz. ultra-high molecular weight poly ethylene (UHMWPE), stainless steel (SS), Ti-6Al-4V alloy, hydroxyapatite (HA)). At the contact time of 10s, UHMWPE shows weak adhesion force (~4nN) whereas SS showed strong adhesion force (~15nN) due to their surface energy and surface roughness. Bacterial retention and viability experiment (3M™ petrifilm test, agar plate) dictates that hydroxyapatite shows the lowest vaibility of bacteria, whereas lowest bacterial retention is observed on UHMWPE surface. Similar results were obtained from live/dead staining test, where HA shows 65% viability, whereas on UHMWPE, SS and Ti-6Al-4V, the bacterial viability is 78%, 94% and 97%, respectively. Lower adhesion forces, constrained pull-off distance (of bacterial) and high antibacterial resistance of bioactive-HA makes it a potential biomaterial for bone-replacement arthroplasty. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of CD4+ T-cell epitopes on iron-regulated surface determinant B of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Simiao; Zhang, Hua; Yao, Di; Liu, Wei; Wang, Xintong; Chen, Xiaoting; Wei, Yuhua; Zhang, Zhenghai; Wang, Jiannan; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Cui, Yudong

    2015-12-01

    Iron-regulated surface determinant B (IsdB) of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a highly conserved surface protein that can induce protective CD4(+) T-cell immune response. A pivotal role of CD4(+) T-cells in effective immunity against S. aureus infection has been proved, but CD4(+) T-cell epitopes on the S. aureus IsdB have not been well identified. In this study, MHC binding assay was firstly used to predict CD4(+) T-cell epitopes on S. aureus IsdB protein, and six peptides were synthesized to validate the probable epitopes. Two novel IsdB CD4(+) T-cell epitopes, P1 (residues 159-178) and P4 (residues 287-306), were for the first time identified using CD4(+) T-cells obtained from IsdB-immunized C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) and BALB/c (H-2(d)) mice spleen based on cell proliferation and cytokines response. The results showed that P1 and P4 emulsified in Freund's adjuvant (FA) induced much higher cell proliferation compared with PBS emulsified in FA. CD4(+) T-cells stimulated with peptides P1 and P4 secreted significantly higher levels of IFN-γ and IL-17A. However, the level of the cytokine IL-4 almost remained unchanged, suggesting that P1 and P4 preferentially elicited polarized Th1-type responses. In addition, BALB/c mice just respond to P4 not P1, while C57BL/6 mice respond to P1 not P4, implying that epitope P1 and P4 were determined as H-2(b) and H-2(d) restricted epitope, respectively. Taken together, our data may provide an explanation of the IsdB-induced protection against S. aureus and highlight the possibility of developing the epitope-based vaccine against the S. aureus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sequence diversity in the A domain of Staphylococcus aureus fibronectin-binding protein A

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    Speziale Pietro

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA mediates adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus to fibronectin, fibrinogen and elastin. We previously reported that S. aureus strain P1 encodes an FnBPA protein where the fibrinogen/elastin-binding domain (A domain is substantially divergent in amino acid sequence from the archetypal FnBPA of S. aureus NCTC8325, and that these variations created differences in antigenicity. In this study strains from multilocus sequence types (MLST that spanned the genetic diversity of S.aureus were examined to determine the extent of FnBPA A domain variation within the S. aureus population and its effect on ligand binding and immuno-crossreactivity. Results Seven different isotype forms (I – VII of the FnBPA A domain were identified which were between 66 to 76% identical in amino acid sequence in any pair-wise alignment. The fnbA allelic variants in strains of different multilocus sequence type were identified by DNA hybridization using probes specific for sequences encoding the highly divergent N3 sub-domain of different isotypes. Several isotypes were not restricted to specific clones or clonal complexes but were more widely distributed. It is highly likely that certain fnbA genes have been transferred horizontally. Residues lining the putative ligand-binding trench were conserved, which is consistent with the ability of each A domain isotype to bind immobilized fibrinogen and elastin by the dock-latch-lock mechanism. Variant amino acid residues were mapped on a three-dimensional model of the FnBPA A domain and were predicted to be surface-exposed. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the recombinant isotype I A domain bound that protein with a 4 – 7 fold higher apparent affinity compared to the A domains of isotypes II – VII, while some monoclonal antibodies generated against the isotype I A domain showed reduced or no binding to the other isotypes. Conclusion The FnBPA A domain occurs in at least 7

  10. Tolerance of Salmonella Enteritidis and Staphylococcus aureus to surface cleaning and household bleach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kusumaningrum, H.D.; Paltinaite, R.; Koomen, A.J.; Hazeleger, W.C.; Rombouts, F.M.; Beumer, R.R.

    2003-01-01

    Effective cleaning and sanitizing of food preparation sites is important because pathogens are readily spread to food contact surfaces after preparation of contaminated raw products. Tolerance of Salmonella Enteritidis and Staphylococcus aureus to surface cleaning by wiping with regular, microfiber,

  11. High Level Expression and Purification of Atl, the Major Autolytic Protein of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet K. Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major human and animal pathogen. Autolysins regulate the growth, turnover, cell lysis, biofilm formation, and the pathogenicity of S. aureus. Atl is the major autolysin in S. aureus. The biochemical and structural studies of staphylococcal Atl have been limited due to difficulty in cloning, high level overexpression, and purification of this protein. This study describes successful cloning, high level over-expression, and purification of two forms of fully functional Atl proteins. These pure proteins can be used to study the functional and structural properties of this important protein.

  12. Distinct Roles of Phenol-Soluble Modulins in Spreading of Staphylococcus aureus on Wet Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsompanidou, Eleni; Denham, Emma L.; Becher, Doerte; de Jong, Anne; Buist, Girbe; van Oosten, Marleen; Manson, Willem L.; Back, Jaap Willem; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Dreisbach, Annette

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is renowned for the rapid colonization of contaminated wounds, medical implants, and food products. Nevertheless, little is known about the mechanisms that allow S. aureus to colonize the respective wet surfaces. The present studies were therefore aimed at

  13. The carriage of the serine-aspartate repeat protein-encoding sdr genes among Staphylococcus aureus lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huanle; Lv, Jingnan; Qi, Xiuqin; Ding, Yu; Li, Dan; Hu, Longhua; Wang, Liangxing; Yu, Fangyou

    2015-01-01

    The serine-aspartate repeat proteins (Sdr) are members of a family of surface proteins and contribute to the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus. Among 288 S. aureus isolates including 158 and 130 associated with skin and soft tissue infections and bloodstream infection, respectively; 275 (95.5%) were positive for at least one of three sdr genes tested. The positivity rates for sdrC, sdrD, and sdrE among S. aureus isolates were 87.8% (253/288), 63.9% (184/288), and 68.1% (196/288), respectively. 224 (77.8%) of 288 isolates were concomitantly positive for two or three sdr genes. There was an association between carriage of sdrE and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates, while the carriage rates of sdrC and sdrD in MRSA isolates were similar to those in methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. The prevalence of co-existence of sdrC and sdrE among MRSA isolates was significantly higher than that among MSSA isolates (psdr genes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Colonization of epidermal tissue by Staphylococcus aureus produces localized hypoxia and stimulates secretion of antioxidant and caspase-14 proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lone , Abdul G.; Atci, Erhan; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk; Noh, S.; Fransson, B.; Abu-Lail, Nehal; Park, Jeong-Jin; Gang, David R.; Call, Douglas R.

    2015-08-31

    A partial-thickness epidermal explant model was colonized with GFP-expressing S. aureus and the pattern of S. aureus biofilm growth was characterized using electron and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Oxygen concentration in explants was quantified using microelectrodes. The relative effective diffusivity and porosity of the epidermis were determined using magnetic resonance imaging, while hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration in explant media was measured by using microelectrodes. Secreted proteins were identified and quantified using MSE mass spectrometry. We found that S. aureus biofilm grows predominantly in sebum-rich areas around hair follicles and associated skin folds. Dissolved oxygen was selectively depleted (2-3 fold) in these locations, but the relative effective diffusivity and porosity did not change between colonized and control epidermis. Histological analysis revealed keratinocyte damage across all the layers of colonized epidermis after four days of culture. The colonized explants released significantly (P< 0.01) more anti-oxidant proteins of both epidermal and S. aureus origin, consistent with elevated H2O2 concentration found in the media from the colonized explants (P< 0.001). Caspase-14 was also elevated significantly in media from infected explants. While H2O2 induces primary keratinocyte differentiation, caspase-14 is required for terminal keratinocyte differentiation and desquamation. These results are consistent with a localized biological impact from S. aureus in response to colonization of the skin surface.

  15. Heterologously expressed Staphylococcus aureus fibronectin-binding proteins are sufficient for invasion of host cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, B; Francois, P; Que, Y A; Hussain, M; Heilmann, C; Moreillon, P; Lew, D; Krause, K H; Peters, Georg; Herrmann, M

    2000-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus invasion of mammalian cells, including epithelial, endothelial, and fibroblastic cells, critically depends on fibronectin bridging between S. aureus fibronectin-binding proteins (FnBPs) and the host fibronectin receptor integrin alpha(5)beta(1) (B. Sinha et al., Cell.

  16. Specific capture and detection of Staphylococcus aureus with high-affinity modified aptamers to cell surface components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumstummler, A; Lehmann, D; Janjic, N; Ochsner, U A

    2014-10-01

    Slow off-rate modified aptamer (SOMAmer) reagents were generated to several Staphylococcus aureus cell surface-associated proteins via SELEX with multiple modified DNA libraries using purified recombinant or native proteins. High-affinity binding agents with sub-nanomolar Kd 's were obtained for staphylococcal protein A (SpA), clumping factors (ClfA, ClfB), fibronectin-binding proteins (FnbA, FnbB) and iron-regulated surface determinants (Isd). Further screening revealed several SOMAmers that specifically bound to Staph. aureus cells from all strains that were tested, but not to other staphylococci or other bacteria. SpA and ClfA SOMAmers proved useful for the selective capture and enrichment of Staph. aureus cells, as shown by culture and PCR, leading to improved limits of detection and efficient removal of PCR inhibitors. Detection of Staph. aureus cells was enhanced by several orders of magnitude when the bacterial cell surface was coated with SOMAmers followed by qPCR of the SOMAmers. Furthermore, fluorescence-labelled SpA SOMAmers demonstrated their utility as direct detection agents in flow cytometry. Significance and impact of the study: Monitoring for microbial contamination of food, water, nonsterile products or the environment is typically based on culture, PCR or antibodies. Aptamers that bind with high specificity and affinity to well-conserved cell surface epitopes represent a promising novel type of reagents to detect bacterial cells without the need for culture or cell lysis, including for the capture and enrichment of bacteria present at low cell densities and for the direct detection via qPCR or fluorescent staining. © 2014 Soma Logic, Inc. published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd On behalf of the society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Identification of a protective B-cell epitope of the Staphylococcus aureus GapC protein by screening a phage-displayed random peptide library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengyao; Zhai, Lu; Yu, Wei; Wei, Yuhua; Wang, Lizi; Liu, Shuo; Li, Wanyu; Li, Xiaoting; Yu, Simiao; Chen, Xiaoting; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Jing; Feng, Zhenyue; Yu, Liquan; Cui, Yudong

    2018-01-01

    The impact of epidemic Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) on public health is increasing. Because of the abuse of antibiotics, the antibiotic resistance of S. aureus is increasing. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop new immunotherapies and immunoprophylaxes. Previous studies showed that the GapC protein of S. aureus, which is a surface protein with high glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, transferrin binding activity, and other biological activities, is highly conserved. GapC induces an effective humoral immune response in vivo. However, the B-cell epitopes of S. aureus GapC have not been well identified. Here we used the bioinformatics tools to analyze the sequence of GapC, and we generated protective anti-GapC monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). A protective mAb (1F4) showed strong specificity to GapC and the ability to induce macrophages to phagocytose S. aureus. We screened the motif 272GYTEDEIVSSD282, which was recognized by mAb 1F4, using a phage display system. Then, we used site-directed mutagenesis to identify key amino acids in the motif. Residues G272 D276 E277 I278 and V279 formed the core of the 272GYTEDEIVSSD282 motif. In addition, we showed that this epitope peptide induced a protective humoral immune response against S. aureus infection in immunized mice. Our results will be useful for the further study of epitope-based vaccines against S. aureus infection.

  18. Biofilm Formation of Staphylococcus aureus on Various Surfaces and Their Resistance to Chlorine Sanitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Su; Bae, Young-Min; Lee, Sook-Young; Lee, Sun-Young

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of material types (polystyrene, polypropylene, glass, and stainless steel) and glucose addition on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation, and the relationship between biofilm formation measured by crystal violet (CV) staining and the number of biofilm cells determined by cell counts was studied. We also evaluated the efficacy of chlorine sanitizer on inhibiting various different types of S. aureus biofilms on the surface of stainless steel. Levels of biofilm formation of S. aureus were higher on hydrophilic surfaces (glass and stainless steel) than on hydrophobic surfaces (polypropylene and polystyrene). With the exception of biofilm formed on glass, the addition of glucose in broth significantly increased the biofilm formation of S. aureus on all surfaces and for all tested strains (P ≤ 0.05). The number of biofilm cells was not correlated with the biomass of the biofilms determined using the CV staining method. The efficacy of chlorine sanitizer against biofilm of S. aureus was not significantly different depending on types of biofilm (P > 0.05). Therefore, further studies are needed in order to determine an accurate method quantifying levels of bacterial biofilm and to evaluate the resistance of bacterial biofilm on the material surface. Biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus on the surface was different depending on the surface characteristics and S. aureus strains. There was low correlation between crystal violet staining method and viable counts technique for measuring levels of biofilm formation of S. aureus on the surfaces. These results could provide helpful information for finding and understanding the quantification method and resistance of bacterial biofilm on the surface. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Combining in vitro protein detection and in vivo antibody detection identifies potential vaccine targets against Staphylococcus aureus during osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Reijer, P Martijn; Sandker, Marjan; Snijders, Susan V; Tavakol, Mehri; Hendrickx, Antoni P A; van Wamel, Willem J B

    2017-02-01

    Currently, little is known about the in vivo human immune response against Staphylococcus aureus during a biofilm-associated infection, such as osteomyelitis, and how this relates to protein production in biofilms in vitro. Therefore, we characterized IgG responses in 10 patients with chronic osteomyelitis against 50 proteins of S. aureus, analyzed the presence of these proteins in biofilms of the infecting isolates on polystyrene (PS) and human bone in vitro, and explored the relation between in vivo and in vitro data. IgG levels against 15 different proteins were significantly increased in patients compared to healthy controls. Using a novel competitive Luminex-based assay, eight of these proteins [alpha toxin, Staphylococcus aureus formyl peptide receptor-like 1 inhibitor (FlipR), glucosaminidase, iron-responsive surface determinants A and H, the putative ABC transporter SACOL0688, staphylococcal complement inhibitor (SCIN), and serine-aspartate repeat-containing protein E (SdrE)] were also detected in a majority of the infecting isolates during biofilm formation in vitro. However, 4 other proteins were detected in only a minority of isolates in vitro while, vice versa, 7 proteins were detected in multiple isolates in vitro but not associated with significantly increased IgG levels in patients. Detection of proteins was largely confirmed using a transcriptomic approach. Our data provide further insights into potential therapeutic targets, such as for vaccination, to reduce S. aureus virulence and biofilm formation. At the same time, our data suggest that either in vitro or immunological in vivo data alone should be interpreted cautiously and that combined studies are necessary to identify potential targets.

  20. Inhibitory effects of flavonoids on biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus that overexpresses efflux protein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Laênia Angélica Andrade; Dos Santos Rodrigues, Jéssica Bezerra; Magnani, Marciane; de Souza, Evandro Leite; de Siqueira-Júnior, José P

    2017-06-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of glycone (myricitrin, hesperidin and phloridzin) and aglycone flavonoids (myricetin, hesperetin and phloretin) in inhibiting biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus RN4220 and S. aureus SA1199B that overexpress the msrA and norA efflux protein genes, respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC50 - defined as the lowest concentration that resulted in ≥50% inhibition of biofilm formation) of flavonoids were determined using microdilution in broth procedures. The flavonoids showed MIC >1024 μg/mL against S. aureus RN4220 and S. aureus SA1199B; however, these compounds at lower concentrations (1-256 μg/mL) showed inhibitory effects on biofilm formation by these strains. Aglycone flavonoids showed lower MBIC50 values than their respective glycone forms. The lowest MBIC50 values (1 and 4 μg/mL) were observed against S. aureus RN4220. Myricetin, hesperetin and phloretin exhibited biofilm formation inhibition >70% for S. aureus RN4220, and lower biofilm formation inhibition against S. aureus SA1199B. These results indicate that sub-MICs of the tested flavonoids inhibit biofilm formation by S. aureus strains that overexpress efflux protein genes. These effects are more strongly established by aglycone flavonoids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Protection of mice against Staphylococcus aureus infection by a recombinant protein ClfA-IsdB-Hlg as a vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfani, Somayeh; Mohabati Mobarez, Ashraf; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Amani, Jafar; Emaneini, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections. An effective vaccine to prevent S. aureus infections is urgently required due to the dramatic increase in the number of antibiotic-resistant strains. In this report, we evaluated a newly recombinant protein composed of selected antigenic regions of clumping factor A (ClfA), iron surface determinant B (IsdB) and gamma hemolysin B (HlgB) of S. aureus and sequence coding for hydrophobic linkers between three domains. The recombinant gene was constructed in pET-28a (+) and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. In addition, sequence coding for a His(6)-tag was added followed by a hybrid procedure of nickel chelate protein purification. Immunization of BALB/c mice with the recombinant protein ClfA-IsdB-Hlg evoked antigen-specific antibodies that could opsonize S. aureus cells, enhancing in vitro phagocytosis by macrophages. Vaccination with the recombinant protein also reduced the bacterial load recovered from mice spleen samples and increased survival following the intraperitoneal challenge with pathogenic S. aureus compared to the control mice. Our results showed that the recombinant protein ClfA-IsdB-Hlg is a promising vaccine candidate for the prevention of S. aureus bacteremia infections.

  2. Identification of a Staphylococcus aureus Efflux Pump Regulator Using a DNA-Protein Affinity Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Bolduc, Que Chi; Hooper, David C

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe the step-by-step identification of a putative regulator protein and demonstrate the function of this protein as a repressor of the expression of a specific efflux pump, causing resistance to quinolones in Staphylococcus aureus. We show that the knockout gene mutant has an increase in transcript levels of the target efflux pump when compared to that of the S. aureus parental strain RN6390. We provide a detailed protocol that includes the identification of the DNA-binding transcriptional regulatory protein from S. aureus cell extracts using DNA sequences linked to magnetic beads. In addition, we describe the real-time qRT-PCR assays and MIC testing to evaluate the effects of the regulator on S. aureus drug resistance phenotype.

  3. Involvement of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways in Staphylococcus aureus Invasion of Normal Osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, John K.; Elhofy, Adam; Bost, Kenneth L.; Hudson, Michael C.

    2001-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus invades osteoblasts and can persist in the intracellular environment. The present study examined the role of osteoblast mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in bacterial invasion. S. aureus infection of normal human and mouse osteoblasts resulted in an increase in the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK 1 and 2). This stimulation of ERK 1 and 2 correlated with the time course of S. aureus invasion, and bacterial adherence induced the MAPK pathway. ERK 1 and 2 phosphorylation was time and dose dependent and required active S. aureus gene expression for maximal induction. The nonpathogenic Staphylococcus carnosus was also able to induce ERK 1 and 2 phosphorylation, albeit at lower levels than S. aureus. Phosphorylation of the stress-activated protein kinases was increased in both infected human and mouse osteoblasts; however, the p38 MAPK pathway was not activated in response to S. aureus. Finally, the transcription factor c-Jun, but not Elk-1 or ATF-2, was phosphorylated in response to S. aureus infection. PMID:11500391

  4. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm removal by targeting biofilm-associated extracellular proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir K Shukla

    2017-01-01

    Methods: Biofilm assay was done in 96-well microtitre plate to evaluate the effect of proteinase K on biofilms of bovine mastitis S. Aureus isolates. Extracellular polymeric substances were extracted and evaluated for their composition (protein, polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, before and after the proteinase K treatment. Results: Biofilm assay showed that 2 μg/ml proteinase K significantly inhibited biofilm development in bap-positive S. aureus V329 as well as other S. aureus isolates (SA7, SA10, SA33, SA352, but not in bap-mutant M556 and SA392 (a weak biofilm-producing strain. Proteinase K treatment on S. aureus planktonic cells showed that there was no inhibition of planktonic growth up to 32 μg/ml of proteinase K. Proteinase K treatment on 24 h old preformed biofilms showed an enhanced dispersion of bap-positive V329 and SA7, SA10, SA33 and SA352 biofilms; however, proteinase K did not affect the bap-mutant S. aureus M556 and SA392 biofilms. Biofilm compositions study before and after proteinase K treatment indicated that Bap might also be involved in eDNA retention in the biofilm matrix that aids in biofilm stability. When proteinase K was used in combination with antibiotics, a synergistic effect in antibiotic efficacy was observed against all biofilm-forming S. aureus isolates. Interpretation & conclusions: Proteinase K inhibited biofilms growth in S. aureus bovine mastitis isolates but did not affect their planktonic growth. An enhanced dispersion of preformed S. aureus biofilms was observed on proteinase K treatment. Proteinase K treatment with antibiotics showed a synergistic effect against S. aureus biofilms. The study suggests that dispersing S. aureus by protease can be of use while devising strategies againstS. aureus biofilms.

  5. The Plasmin-Sensitive Protein Pls in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA Is a Glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Bleiziffer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Most bacterial glycoproteins identified to date are virulence factors of pathogenic bacteria, i.e. adhesins and invasins. However, the impact of protein glycosylation on the major human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus remains incompletely understood. To study protein glycosylation in staphylococci, we analyzed lysostaphin lysates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA strains by SDS-PAGE and subsequent periodic acid-Schiff's staining. We detected four (>300, ∼250, ∼165, and ∼120 kDa and two (>300 and ∼175 kDa glycosylated surface proteins with strain COL and strain 1061, respectively. The ∼250, ∼165, and ∼175 kDa proteins were identified as plasmin-sensitive protein (Pls by mass spectrometry. Previously, Pls has been demonstrated to be a virulence factor in a mouse septic arthritis model. The pls gene is encoded by the staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCCmec type I in MRSA that also encodes the methicillin resistance-conferring mecA and further genes. In a search for glycosyltransferases, we identified two open reading frames encoded downstream of pls on the SCCmec element, which we termed gtfC and gtfD. Expression and deletion analysis revealed that both gtfC and gtfD mediate glycosylation of Pls. Additionally, the recently reported glycosyltransferases SdgA and SdgB are involved in Pls glycosylation. Glycosylation occurs at serine residues in the Pls SD-repeat region and modifying carbohydrates are N-acetylhexosaminyl residues. Functional characterization revealed that Pls can confer increased biofilm formation, which seems to involve two distinct mechanisms. The first mechanism depends on glycosylation of the SD-repeat region by GtfC/GtfD and probably also involves eDNA, while the second seems to be independent of glycosylation as well as eDNA and may involve the centrally located G5 domains. Other previously known Pls properties are not related to the sugar modifications. In conclusion, Pls is a glycoprotein and

  6. The Plasmin-Sensitive Protein Pls in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Is a Glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleiziffer, Isabelle; Eikmeier, Julian; Pohlentz, Gottfried; McAulay, Kathryn; Xia, Guoqing; Hussain, Muzaffar; Peschel, Andreas; Foster, Simon; Peters, Georg; Heilmann, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Most bacterial glycoproteins identified to date are virulence factors of pathogenic bacteria, i.e. adhesins and invasins. However, the impact of protein glycosylation on the major human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus remains incompletely understood. To study protein glycosylation in staphylococci, we analyzed lysostaphin lysates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains by SDS-PAGE and subsequent periodic acid-Schiff's staining. We detected four (>300, ∼250, ∼165, and ∼120 kDa) and two (>300 and ∼175 kDa) glycosylated surface proteins with strain COL and strain 1061, respectively. The ∼250, ∼165, and ∼175 kDa proteins were identified as plasmin-sensitive protein (Pls) by mass spectrometry. Previously, Pls has been demonstrated to be a virulence factor in a mouse septic arthritis model. The pls gene is encoded by the staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC)mec type I in MRSA that also encodes the methicillin resistance-conferring mecA and further genes. In a search for glycosyltransferases, we identified two open reading frames encoded downstream of pls on the SCCmec element, which we termed gtfC and gtfD. Expression and deletion analysis revealed that both gtfC and gtfD mediate glycosylation of Pls. Additionally, the recently reported glycosyltransferases SdgA and SdgB are involved in Pls glycosylation. Glycosylation occurs at serine residues in the Pls SD-repeat region and modifying carbohydrates are N-acetylhexosaminyl residues. Functional characterization revealed that Pls can confer increased biofilm formation, which seems to involve two distinct mechanisms. The first mechanism depends on glycosylation of the SD-repeat region by GtfC/GtfD and probably also involves eDNA, while the second seems to be independent of glycosylation as well as eDNA and may involve the centrally located G5 domains. Other previously known Pls properties are not related to the sugar modifications. In conclusion, Pls is a glycoprotein and Pls glycosyl

  7. Non-spa-typeable clinical Staphylococcus aureus strains are naturally occurring protein A mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baum, Cathrin; Haslinger-Löffler, Bettina; Westh, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen responsible for increasing the prevalence of community- and hospital-acquired infections. Protein A (SpA) is a key virulence factor of S. aureus and is highly conserved. Sequencing of the variable-number tandem-repeat region of SpA (spa typing......) provides a rapid and reliable method for epidemiological studies. Rarely, non-spa-typeable S. aureus strains are encountered. The reason for this is not known. In this study, we characterized eight non-spa-typeable bacteremia isolates. Sequencing of the entire spa locus was successful for five strains...

  8. Structures of SdrD from Staphylococcus aureus reveal the molecular mechanism of how the cell surface receptors recognize their ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Ge, Jingpeng; Liu, Bao; Hu, Yulin; Yang, Maojun

    2013-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most important Gram-positive colonizer of human skin and nasal passage, causing high morbidity and mortality. SD-repeat containing protein D (SdrD), an MSCRAMM (Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules) family surface protein, plays an important role in S. aureus adhesion and pathogenesis, while its binding target and molecular mechanism remain largely unknown. Here we solved the crystal structures of SdrD N2-N3 domain and N2-N3-B1 domain. Through structural analysis and comparisons, we characterized the ligand binding site of SdrD, and proposed a featured sequence motif of its potential ligands. In addition, the structures revealed for the first time the interactions between B1 domain and N2-N3 domain among B domain-containing MSCRAMMs. Our results may help in understanding the roles SdrD plays in S. aureus adhesion and shed light on the development of novel antibiotics.

  9. Incidence of Staphylococcus aureus and Analysis of Associated Bacterial Communities on Food Industry Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Delgado, Susana; Vázquez-Sánchez, Daniel; Martínez, Beatriz; Cabo, Marta López; Rodríguez, Ana; Herrera, Juan J.

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are a common cause of food contamination with undesirable bacteria, such as pathogenic bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major bacteria causing food-borne diseases in humans. A study designed to determine the presence of S. aureus on food contact surfaces in dairy, meat, and seafood environments and to identify coexisting microbiota has therefore been carried out. A total of 442 samples were collected, and the presence of S. aureus was confirmed in 6.1% of samples. Sixty-three S. aureus isolates were recovered and typed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Profiles were clustered into four groups which were related to specific food environments. All isolates harbored some potential virulence factors such as enterotoxin production genes, biofilm formation-associated genes, antibiotic resistance, or lysogeny. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprints of bacterial communities coexisting with S. aureus revealed the presence of bacteria either involved in food spoilage or of concern for food safety in all food environments. Food industry surfaces could thus be a reservoir for S. aureus forming complex communities with undesirable bacteria in multispecies biofilms. Uneven microbiological conditions were found in each food sector, which indicates the need to improve hygienic conditions in food processing facilities, particularly the removal of bacterial biofilms, to enhance the safety of food products. PMID:23023749

  10. Incidence of Staphylococcus aureus and analysis of associated bacterial communities on food industry surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Delgado, Susana; Vázquez-Sánchez, Daniel; Martínez, Beatriz; Cabo, Marta López; Rodríguez, Ana; Herrera, Juan J; García, Pilar

    2012-12-01

    Biofilms are a common cause of food contamination with undesirable bacteria, such as pathogenic bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major bacteria causing food-borne diseases in humans. A study designed to determine the presence of S. aureus on food contact surfaces in dairy, meat, and seafood environments and to identify coexisting microbiota has therefore been carried out. A total of 442 samples were collected, and the presence of S. aureus was confirmed in 6.1% of samples. Sixty-three S. aureus isolates were recovered and typed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Profiles were clustered into four groups which were related to specific food environments. All isolates harbored some potential virulence factors such as enterotoxin production genes, biofilm formation-associated genes, antibiotic resistance, or lysogeny. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprints of bacterial communities coexisting with S. aureus revealed the presence of bacteria either involved in food spoilage or of concern for food safety in all food environments. Food industry surfaces could thus be a reservoir for S. aureus forming complex communities with undesirable bacteria in multispecies biofilms. Uneven microbiological conditions were found in each food sector, which indicates the need to improve hygienic conditions in food processing facilities, particularly the removal of bacterial biofilms, to enhance the safety of food products.

  11. Protein A Suppresses Immune Responses during Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection in Guinea Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Thomer, Lena; Missiakas, Dominique M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Staphylococcus aureus infection is not associated with the development of protective immunity, and disease relapses occur frequently. We hypothesize that protein A, a factor that binds immunoglobulin Fcγ and cross-links VH3 clan B cell receptors (IgM), is the staphylococcal determinant for host immune suppression. To test this, vertebrate IgM was examined for protein A cross-linking. High VH3 binding activity occurred with human and guinea immunoglobulin, whereas mouse and rabbit immunoglobulins displayed little and no binding, respectively. Establishing a guinea pig model of S. aureus bloodstream infection, we show that protein A functions as a virulence determinant and suppresses host B cell responses. Immunization with SpAKKAA, which cannot bind immunoglobulin, elicits neutralizing antibodies that enable guinea pigs to develop protective immunity. Importance  Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of soft tissue and bloodstream infections; however, a vaccine with clinical efficacy is not available. Using mice to model staphylococcal infection, earlier work identified protective antigens; however, corresponding human clinical trials did not reach their endpoints. We show that B cell receptor (IgM) cross-linking by protein A is an important immune evasion strategy of S. aureus that can be monitored in a guinea pig model of bloodstream infection. Further, immunization with nontoxigenic protein A enables infected guinea pigs to elicit antibody responses that are protective against S. aureus. Thus, the guinea pig model may support preclinical development of staphylococcal vaccines. PMID:25564466

  12. Inhibitory effect of totarol on exotoxin proteins hemolysin and enterotoxins secreted by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ce; Zhao, Xingchen; Li, Wenli; Meng, Rizeng; Liu, Zonghui; Liu, Mingyuan; Guo, Na; Yu, Lu

    2015-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) causes a wide variety of infections, which are of major concern worldwide. S. aureus produces multiple virulence factors, resulting in food infection and poisoning. These virulence factors include hyaluronidases, proteases, coagulases, lipases, deoxyribonucleases and enterotoxins. Among the extracellular proteins produced by S. aureus that contribute to pathogenicity, the exotoxins α-hemolysin, staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) are thought to be of major significance. Totarol, a plant extract, has been revealed to inhibit the proliferation of several pathogens effectively. However, there are no reports on the effects of totarol on the production of α-hemolysin, SEA or SEB secreted by S. aureus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of totarol on these three exotoxins. Hemolysis assay, western blotting and real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR assay were performed to identify the influence of graded subinhibitory concentrations of totarol on the production of α-hemolysin and the two major enterotoxins, SEA and SEB, by S. aureus in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay showed that the TNF-α production of RAW264.7 cells stimulated by S. aureus supernatants was inhibited by subinhibitory concentrations of totarol. Form the data, we propose that totarol could potentially be used as a promising natural compound in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  13. Transfer and Decontamination of S. aureus in Transmission Routes Regarding Hands and Contact Surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernilla Arinder

    Full Text Available Hand hygiene, cleaning and disinfection are pre-requirements for hygiene management in hospital settings and the food industry. In order to facilitate risk management, different contamination scenarios and interventions need to be evaluated. In the present study data on transfer rates and reductions of Staphylococcus aureus were provided in an experimental set-up using artificial skin. Using this methodology, test persons were not exposed with pathogenic bacteria. An exposure assessment model was developed and applied to evaluate different contamination routes and hygiene interventions. The transfer rates of S. aureus from inoculated VITRO-SKIN® to fomites were calculated from blotting series. The VITRO-SKIN® was more prone to spread bacteria than fomites. When different surfaces were cleaned, the reduction of S. aureus varied between <1 and 7 log CFU. It could not be concluded that a certain coupon material, cleaning agent, cleaning wipe, soiling or humidity consistently resulted in a high or low reduction of S. aureus. The reduction of S. aureus and E. coli during hand washing was evaluated on artificial skin, VITRO-SKIN®. The reduction of E. coli on VITRO-SKIN® was similar to the log reduction obtained when washing human hands. The S. aureus count on a human hand was both calculated in different scenarios describing different contamination routes starting from a contaminated hand using the exposure assessment model, and measured on an experimental setup using VITRO-SKIN® for validation. A linear relationship was obtained between the analysed level of S. aureus and the calculated level. However, the calculated levels of S. aureus on the VITRO-SKIN® in the scenarios were 1-1.5 log lower than the analysed level. One of the scenarios was used to study the effect of interventions like hand washing and cleaning of surfaces.

  14. [Investigation of the virulence genes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from biomaterial surfaces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudağidan, Mert; Cavuşoğlu, Cengiz; Bacakoğlu, Feza

    2008-01-01

    Staphylococci are the most important agents of nosocomial infections originating from biomaterials. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of virulence genes and their phenotypic expressions in 11 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from the surfaces of clinically used biomaterials of 48 thorasic intensive-care unit patients. By the use of specific primers, the presence of genes encoding the attachment and biofilm production (icaA, icaC, bap), methicillin resistance (mecA), enterotoxins A-E (sea, seb, sec, sed, see), toxic shock syndrome toxin (tst), exfoliative toxins A and B (eta and etb), alpha- and beta-hemolysins (hla and hlb), staphylococcal exotoxin-like protein-1 (set1), proteases (sspA, sspB, aur, serine proteaz gene), lipase (geh) and the regulatory genes (sarA and agrCA) were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The phenotypic properties of the isolates such as biofilm formation, antibiotic susceptibility, extracellular protease and lipase production were also evaluated. None of the isolates were found to be biofilm and/or slime producers, however, all strains were found to have icaA gene which is responsible for biofilm formation. Nevertheless the presence of icaC and bap genes that are also responsible for biofilm formation were not detected. All the strains have had mecA gene and were resistant to oxacillin, penicilin G and gentamicin, while 10 were also resistant to erythromycin and nine were also resistant to ofloxacin. The isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, teicoplanin and co-trimoxazole. Screening of toxin and regulatory genes revealed that all the strains harboured sea, set1, hla, hlb and sarA genes. The phenotypic tests for the determination of extracellular protease production revealed that all the strains formed very weak zones on skim milk and milk agar plates, and yielded negative results on casein agar plates. Furthermore, all strains were found to harbour sspA, sspB, aur and serine

  15. Human SAP is a novel peptidoglycan recognition protein that induces complement- independent phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jang-Hyun; Kurokawa, Kenji; Jung, Dong-Jun; Kim, Min-Jung; Kim, Chan-Hee; Fujimoto, Yukari; Fukase, Koichi; Coggeshall, K. Mark; Lee, Bok Luel

    2014-01-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for many community-acquired and hospital-associated infections and is associated with high mortality. Concern over the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains has renewed interest in the elucidation of host mechanisms that defend against S. aureus infection. We recently demonstrated that human serum mannose-binding lectin (MBL) binds to S. aureus wall teichoic acid (WTA), a cell wall glycopolymer, a discovery that prompted further screening to identify additional serum proteins that recognize S. aureus cell wall components. In this report, we incubated human serum with 10 different S. aureus mutants and determined that serum amyloid P component (SAP) bound specifically to a WTA-deficient S. aureus ΔtagO mutant, but not to tagO-complemented, WTA-expressing cells. Biochemical characterization revealed that SAP recognizes bacterial peptidoglycan as a ligand and that WTA inhibits this interaction. Although SAP binding to peptidoglycan was not observed to induce complement activation, SAP-bound ΔtagO cells were phagocytosed by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes in an Fcγ receptor-dependent manner. These results indicate that SAP functions as a host defense factor, similar to other peptidoglycan recognition proteins and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors. PMID:23966633

  16. Non-spa-typeable clinical Staphylococcus aureus strains are naturally occurring protein A mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baum, Cathrin; Haslinger-Löffler, Bettina; Westh, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen responsible for increasing the prevalence of community- and hospital-acquired infections. Protein A (SpA) is a key virulence factor of S. aureus and is highly conserved. Sequencing of the variable-number tandem-repeat region of SpA (spa typing......) provides a rapid and reliable method for epidemiological studies. Rarely, non-spa-typeable S. aureus strains are encountered. The reason for this is not known. In this study, we characterized eight non-spa-typeable bacteremia isolates. Sequencing of the entire spa locus was successful for five strains...... and revealed various mutations of spa, all of which included a deletion of immunoglobulin G binding domain C, in which the upper primer for spa typing is located, while two strains were truly spa negative. This is the first report demonstrating that nontypeability of S. aureus by spa sequencing is due either...

  17. Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus of Nano-Structured Fluorinated Surfaces, Formed by Different Methods of Ion-Plasma Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elinson, V M; Didenko, L V; Shevlyagina, N V; Avtandilov, G A; Gaidarova, A Kh; Lyamin, A N

    2016-11-01

    Colonization of fluorinated surfaces produced by ion-plasma technology by Staphylococcus aureus was studied by scanning electron microscopy and surface energy analysis. It was shown that the intensity of colonization was determined by the surface relief and fluorine content. Formation of nanostructured surfaces accompanied by a sharp decrease in the surface energy prevented adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus cells to the fluorine-containing surface.

  18. [Evaluation of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilm formation on the surface of polypropylene mesh].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reśliński, Adrian; Mikucka, Agnieszka; Kwiecińska-Piróg, Joanna; Głowacka, Katarzyna; Gospodarek, Eugenia; Dabrowiecki, Stanisław

    2011-01-01

    A serious complication of hernioplasty with the use of a biomaterial implant is deep surgical site infection (SSI) encompassing the implant. Among the most common etiological factors of deep SSI in patients after hernioplasty are Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli strains, which may create a biofilm on the surface of synthetic implants. The aim of this study was assessment of biofilm formation by S. aureus and E. coli on the surface ofpolypropylene mesh. The study included 108 strains (62 S. aureus and 46 E. coli) from the collection of Department of Microbiology Collegium Medicum im. L. Rydygier in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun (CM UMK). Evaluation of biofilm formation was performed using the method of reduction of 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) and a scanning electron microscope. In the group of S. aureus strains, 88.7% isolates formed biofilm very strongly, 1.6% strongly, and 9.7% poor. Among E. coli strains, 54.3% isolates were characterized by very strong biofilm formation, while 45.7% strong biofilm formation. Strains ofS. aureus strongly than E. coli form a biofilm on the surface of monofilament polypropylene mesh.

  19. Immunisation With Immunodominant Linear B Cell Epitopes Vaccine of Manganese Transport Protein C Confers Protection against Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jie Yang

    Full Text Available Vaccination strategies for Staphylococcus aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA infections have attracted much research attention. Recent efforts have been made to select manganese transport protein C, or manganese binding surface lipoprotein C (MntC, which is a metal ion associated with pathogen nutrition uptake, as potential candidates for an S. aureus vaccine. Although protective humoral immune responses to MntC are well-characterised, much less is known about detailed MntC-specific B cell epitope mapping and particularly epitope vaccines, which are less-time consuming and more convenient. In this study, we generated a recombinant protein rMntC which induced strong antibody response when used for immunisation with CFA/IFA adjuvant. On the basis of the results, linear B cell epitopes within MntC were finely mapped using a series of overlapping synthetic peptides. Further studies indicate that MntC113-136, MntC209-232, and MntC263-286 might be the original linear B-cell immune dominant epitope of MntC, furthermore, three-dimensional (3-d crystal structure results indicate that the three immunodominant epitopes were displayed on the surface of the MntC antigen. On the basis of immunodominant MntC113-136, MntC209-232, and MntC263-286 peptides, the epitope vaccine for S. aureus induces a high antibody level which is biased to TH2 and provides effective immune protection and strong opsonophagocytic killing activity in vitro against MRSA infection. In summary, the study provides strong proof of the optimisation of MRSA B cell epitope vaccine designs and their use, which was based on the MntC antigen in the development of an MRSA vaccine.

  20. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion to equine bone surfaces passivated with Plasmalyte and hyperimmune plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Sandra M; Santschi, Elizabeth M; Fialkowski, James; Clayton, Murray K; Proctor, Richard A

    2004-01-01

    To quantify the adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus to 4 equine bone surfaces passivated in a balanced polyionic solution (Plasmalyte) or hyperimmune equine plasma (Polymune plasma). In vitro comparative study. Third metacarpal bone (MC3) surface explants from 9 equine cadavers. Approximately 1 cm(2) sections of periosteum were removed from MC3 and stapled to sterile stainless steel screens. Three bone surface explants were cut using a surgical saw to present 1 cm(2) surfaces of subperiosteal bone, cut cortical bone, or endosteum. Duplicate explants of each surface were immersed for 1 hour in Plasmalyte or hyperimmune equine plasma. Each explant was then placed in a well of a 6-well sterile tissue culture plate with the surface of interest exposed. Each surface was inoculated with approximately 100 colony-forming units of S. aureus in 10 microL of Mueller Hinton broth and incubated for 6 hours at 37 degrees C. After gentle rinsing to remove non-adherent bacteria, samples were sonicated for 5 minutes at 60 kHz to loosen adhered bacteria. The number of adherent bacteria was determined by serial dilutions and incubation of the sonicate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed on samples identically treated from an additional horse to confirm bacterial removal by sonication from all surfaces and support quantitative culture results. Less S. aureus adhered to periosteum than to cortical bone, cut cortical bone, and endosteal surfaces, which were all similar. Exposure of all surfaces to hyperimmune plasma reduced S. aureus adherence compared with Plasmalyte exposure; SEM supported these conclusions. Less bacteria adhere to periosteum than other bone surfaces. Hyperimmune plasma reduces bacterial adhesion to all bone tissue surfaces. Understanding the factors that affect bacterial adhesion to bone will facilitate development of improved intraoperative lavage solutions to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with postoperative infection.

  1. Evaluation of IgY capture ELISA for sensitive detection of alpha hemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus without staphylococcal protein A interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Prakash Kudumala; Shekar, Aravind; Kingston, Joseph Jeyabalaji; Sripathy, Murali Harishchandra; Batra, Harshvardhan

    2013-05-31

    Staphylococcal protein A (Spa) secreted by all Staphylococcus aureus strains is the major hindrance in development of specific immunoassays for detecting S. aureus antigens, because of its characteristic feature of binding to Fc region of most mammalian immunoglobulins and also to Fab region of certain classes of mammalian immunoglobulins. Immunoglobulin Y (IgY) is the avian equivalent of mammalian IgG which does not have any affinity to Spa. In the present study we report that using chicken egg yolk IgY over mammalian IgG as capture antibody prevents both soluble and surface bound protein A from causing false positives quantified by chicken anti-protein A antibodies. This was demonstrated by development of sandwich ELISA for detection of alpha hemolysin toxin from culture supernatants of S. aureus strains with anti alpha hemolysin IgY as capture and rabbit anti alpha hemolysin IgG as revealing antibody. This indirect sandwich ELISA was evaluated onto a large number of S. aureus isolates recovered from clinical sources for alpha hemolysin secretion. Results of sandwich ELISA were compared with PCR and Western blot analysis. The immunoassay is highly specific and has high sensitivity of detecting less than 1 ng/ml. This procedure is highly effective in eliminating Spa interference and can be extended to detection of other important superantigen toxins of S. aureus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. YsxC, an essential protein in Staphylococcus aureus crucial for ribosome assembly/stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Lara Jorge

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial growth and division requires a core set of essential proteins, several of which are still of unknown function. They are also attractive targets for the development of new antibiotics. YsxC is a member of a family of GTPases highly conserved across eubacteria with a possible ribosome associated function. Results Here, we demonstrate by the creation of a conditional lethal mutant that ysxC is apparently essential for growth in S. aureus. To begin to elucidate YsxC function, a translational fusion of YsxC to the CBP-ProteinA tag in the staphylococcal chromosome was made, enabling Tandem Affinity Purification (TAP of YsxC-interacting partners. These included the ribosomal proteins S2, S10 and L17, as well as the β' subunit of the RNA polymerase. YsxC was then shown to copurify with ribosomes as an accessory protein specifically localizing to the 50 S subunit. YsxC depletion led to a decrease in the presence of mature ribosomes, indicating a role in ribosome assembly and/or stability in S. aureus. Conclusions In this study we demonstrate that YsxC of S. aureus localizes to the ribosomes, is crucial for ribosomal stability and is apparently essential for the life of S. aureus.

  3. G-quadruplex aptamer targeting Protein A and its capability to detect Staphylococcus aureus demonstrated by ELONA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltenburg, Regina; Krafčiková, Petra; Víglaský, Viktor; Strehlitz, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers for whole cell detection are selected mostly by the Cell-SELEX procedure. Alternatively, the use of specific cell surface epitopes as target during aptamer selections allows the development of aptamers with ability to bind whole cells. In this study, we integrated a formerly selected Protein A-binding aptamer PA#2/8 in an assay format called ELONA (Enzyme-Linked OligoNucleotide Assay) and evaluated the ability of the aptamer to recognise and bind to Staphylococcus aureus presenting Protein A on the cell surface. The full-length aptamer and one of its truncated variants could be demonstrated to specifically bind to Protein A-expressing intact cells of S. aureus, and thus have the potential to expand the portfolio of aptamers that can act as an analytical agent for the specific recognition and rapid detection of the bacterial pathogen. The functionality of the aptamer was found to be based on a very complex, but also highly variable structure. Two structural key elements were identified. The aptamer sequence contains several G-clusters allowing folding into a G-quadruplex structure with the potential of dimeric and multimeric assembly. An inverted repeat able to form an imperfect stem-loop at the 5′-end also contributes essentially to the aptameric function. PMID:27650576

  4. Staphylococcus aureus manganese transport protein C (MntC is an extracellular matrix- and plasminogen-binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Salazar

    Full Text Available Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus--particularly nosocomial infections--represent a great concern. Usually, the early stage of pathogenesis consists on asymptomatic nasopharynx colonization, which could result in dissemination to other mucosal niches or invasion of sterile sites, such as blood. This pathogenic route depends on scavenging of nutrients as well as binding to and disrupting extracellular matrix (ECM. Manganese transport protein C (MntC, a conserved manganese-binding protein, takes part in this infectious scenario as an ion-scavenging factor and surprisingly as an ECM and coagulation cascade binding protein, as revealed in this work. This study showed a marked ability of MntC to bind to several ECM and coagulation cascade components, including laminin, collagen type IV, cellular and plasma fibronectin, plasminogen and fibrinogen by ELISA. The MntC binding to plasminogen appears to be related to the presence of surface-exposed lysines, since previous incubation with an analogue of lysine residue, ε-aminocaproic acid, or increasing ionic strength affected the interaction between MntC and plasminogen. MntC-bound plasminogen was converted to active plasmin in the presence of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA. The newly released plasmin, in turn, acted in the cleavage of the α and β chains of fibrinogen. In conclusion, we describe a novel function for MntC that may help staphylococcal mucosal colonization and establishment of invasive disease, through the interaction with ECM and coagulation cascade host proteins. These data suggest that this potential virulence factor could be an adequate candidate to compose an anti-staphylococcal human vaccine formulation.

  5. Acute phase proteins in bovine milk in an experimental model of Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckersall, P D; Young, F J; Nolan, A M

    2006-01-01

    The objectives were to establish the origin of 2 acute phase proteins in milk during subclinical bovine mastitis and to characterize the relationship between those proteins in milk and blood. Haptoglobin (Hp) and mammary-associated serum amyloid A (M-SAA3) appear in milk during mastitis, whereas Hp...... and serum amyloid A increase in serum during mastitis. The concentrations of these proteins were determined in an experimental model using a field strain of Staphylococcus aureus to induce subclinical mastitis in dairy cows. The expression of mRNA coding for these proteins was assessed and the presence of M...

  6. Polymorphisms in fibronectin binding protein A of Staphylococcus aureus are associated with infection of cardiovascular devices

    OpenAIRE

    Lower, Steven K.; Lamlertthon, Supaporn; Casillas-Ituarte, Nadia N.; Lins, Roberto D.; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Taylor, Eric S.; DiBartola, Alex C.; Edmonson, Catherine; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Reller, L. Barth; Que, Yok-Ai; Ros, Robert; Lower, Brian H.; Fowler, Vance G.

    2011-01-01

    Medical implants, like cardiovascular devices, improve the quality of life for countless individuals but may become infected with bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus. Such infections take the form of a biofilm, a structured community of bacterial cells adherent to the surface of a solid substrate. Every biofilm begins with an attractive force or bond between bacterium and substratum. We used atomic force microscopy to probe experimentally forces between a fibronectin-coated surface (i.e., pro...

  7. Evaluation of a lysostaphin-fusion protein as a dry-cow therapy for Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in dairy cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a lysostaphin-fusion protein (Lyso-PTD) as a dry-cow therapy for the treatment of experimentally-induced chronic, subclinical Staphylococcus aureus mastitis. Twenty-two Holstein dairy cows were experimentally infected with Staph. aureus in a single pair of diago...

  8. Frequency of Fibronectin Binding Protein A and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Collected From Educational Hospitals in Qazvin, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taromian

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important organisms involved in nosocomial infection acquired by patients. In recent years, the appearance of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA has turned the treatment of these infections into a serious challenge. Surface proteins, such as fibronectin binding proteins (FnBP, and the ability to produce Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL are important factors in pathogenesis of this organism. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of disease-associated genes in the clinical isolates of S. aureus encoding FNB and PVL, collected from the educational hospitals of Qazvin, Iran. Patients and Methods This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study in which a total of 103 isolates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus were collected from hospitalized patients in teaching hospitals of Qazvin, during 2013 - 2014. Initially, the identification of isolates was performed according to the standard laboratory methods, followed by confirming the presence of the femA gene, a gene specific to S. aureus. Later, the prevalence of virulence genes (fnb and pvl was investigated by the PCR method, using specific primers. PCR products were sequenced to confirm the presence of the target genes. Results The results of this study showed that among 103 isolates of S. aureus resistant to methicillin, 88 isolates were positive for the presence of the pvl and fnb genes, with the fnb gene present in 86 (83.5% isolates and the pvl gene only in 2 (1.9% isolates. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate the presence of the pvl and fnb genes in the strains of S. aureus isolated from clinical specimens collected from the patients admitted to teaching hospitals in Qazvin. Considering the clinical significance of these organisms, and their potential in threatening public health systems, the identification, treatment, and infection control management of patients infected with these organisms is

  9. Isolation of a Membrane Protein Complex for Type VII Secretion in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Khaled A; Anderson, Mark; Ohr, Ryan Jay; Missiakas, Dominique

    2017-12-01

    The ESAT6-like secretion system (ESS) of Staphylococcus aureus promotes effector protein transport across the bacterial envelope. Genes in the ESS cluster are required for S. aureus establishment of persistent abscess lesions and the modulation of immune responses during bloodstream infections. However, the biochemical functions of most of the ESS gene products, specifically the identity of secretion machine components, are unknown. Earlier work demonstrated that deletion of essB, which encodes a membrane protein, abolishes S. aureus ESS secretion. Loss-of-function mutations truncating the essB gene product cause dominant-negative phenotypes on ESS secretion, suggesting that EssB is a central component of the secretion machinery. To test this prediction, we purified native and affinity-tagged EssB from staphylococcal membranes via dodecyl-maltoside extraction, identifying a complex assembled from five proteins, EsaA, EssA, EssB, EssD, and EsxA. All five proteins are essential for secretion, as knockout mutations in the corresponding genes abolish ESS transport. Biochemical and bacterial two-hybrid analyses revealed a direct interaction between EssB and EsaA that, by engaging a mobile machine component, EsxA, may also recruit EssA and EssD.IMPORTANCE Type VII secretion systems support the lifestyle of Gram-positive bacteria, including important human pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Staphylococcus aureus Genes encoding SpoIIIE-FtsK-like ATPases and WXG100-secreted products are conserved features of type VII secretion pathways; however, most of the genes in T7SS clusters are not conserved between different bacterial species. Here, we isolate a complex of proteins from the membranes of S. aureus that appears to represent the core secretion machinery, designated ESS. These results suggest that three membrane proteins, EsaA, EssB, and EssA, form a secretion complex that associates with EssC, the SpoIIIE-FtsK-like ATPase, and with Esx

  10. Bacillus anthracis Sortase A (SrtA) Anchors LPXTG Motif-Containing Surface Proteins to the Cell Wall Envelope

    OpenAIRE

    Gaspar, Andrew H.; Marraffini, Luciano A.; Glass, Elizabeth M.; DeBord, Kristin L.; Ton-That, Hung; Schneewind, Olaf

    2005-01-01

    Cell wall-anchored surface proteins of gram-positive pathogens play important roles during the establishment of many infectious diseases, but the contributions of surface proteins to the pathogenesis of anthrax have not yet been revealed. Cell wall anchoring in Staphylococcus aureus occurs by a transpeptidation mechanism requiring surface proteins with C-terminal sorting signals as well as sortase enzymes. The genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis encodes three sortase genes and eleven surfac...

  11. Karakterisasi Staphylococcus aureus Isolat Susu Sapi Perah Berdasar Keberadaan Protein-A pada Media Serum Soft Agar terhadap Aktivitas Fagositosis Secara In Vitro

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    Fajar Budi Lestari

    2017-02-01

    kompak dan 7 isolat (36,84% koloni berbentuk difus. Koloni kompak menunjukkan bakteri tersebut memiliki protein-A, koloni difus menunjukkan bakteri tersebut tidak memiliki protein-A atau memiliki protein-A tetapi tertutup oleh kapsul. Hasil uji fagositosis menunjukkan S. aureus yang memiliki protein-A lebih sedikit difagosit oleh leukosit polimorfonuklear (2,99 bakteri/sel dari pada S. aureus yang tidak memiliki protein-A, atau mempunyai protein-A tetapi tertutup oleh kapsul (3,85 bakteri/sel. Staphylococcus aureus yang memiliki protein-A lebih patogen daripada S. aureus yang tidak memiliki protein-A. Isolat S. aureus asal Jawa Tengah lebih virulen  dibandingkan isolat S. aureus asal Jawa Barat ditinjau dari sifat hemolisis, koagulase, dan  protein-A.

  12. Screening and characterization of Staphylococcus aureus from ophthalmology clinic surfaces: a proposed surveillance tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reem, Rachel E.; Van Balen, Joany; Hoet, Armando E.; Cebulla, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To screen environmental surfaces of an outpatient ophthalmic clinic for methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA); to identify the most commonly contaminated surfaces; and to phenotype and genotype all collected isolates Design A single institution, one-year prospective environmental study Methods Commonly touched surfaces from examination rooms and common areas were targeted and sampled on a quarterly basis for one year. Samples were collected using electrostatic cloths and swabs. S. aureus was isolated using non-selective and selective media. Morphological characteristics and standard biological testing were used to confirm staphylococcal species. S. aureus isolates were phenotypically (Kirby-Bauer method) and genotypically characterized (mecA confirmation, SCCmec typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis). Dendrogram analysis was used to establish genetic relatedness between the isolates. Results Of 112 total samples, 27 (24%) and 5 (4%) were MSSA- and MRSA-positive, respectively. Both community-associated (SCCmec IV, USA300) and hospital-associated (SCCmec II, USA100) MRSA isolates were found. No single surface remained consistently positive with the same isolate over time and molecular analysis demonstrated high levels of diversity among isolates. Doorknobs, slit-lamp head/chinrests, and computer keyboards were frequently contaminated. Conclusions The proposed surveillance protocol successfully allowed the detection of both MSSA and MRSA contaminating important high-touch surfaces in a representative ophthalmology clinic. Frequently contaminated surfaces must be targeted for routine cleaning and disinfection as a there is a constant introduction of clones over time. Hence, other clinics may consider implementing and adapting surveillance tools, as the one here described, to help them control these important nosocomial pathogens. PMID:24412125

  13. Staphylococcus aureus dry-surface biofilms are more resistant to heat treatment than traditional hydrated biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almatroudi, A; Tahir, S; Hu, H; Chowdhury, D; Gosbell, I B; Jensen, S O; Whiteley, G S; Deva, A K; Glasbey, T; Vickery, K

    2018-02-01

    The importance of biofilms to clinical practice is being increasingly realized. Biofilm tolerance to antibiotics is well described but limited work has been conducted on the efficacy of heat disinfection and sterilization against biofilms. To test the susceptibility of planktonic, hydrated biofilm and dry-surface biofilm forms of Staphylococcus aureus, to dry-heat and wet-heat treatments. S. aureus was grown as both hydrated biofilm and dry-surface biofilm in the CDC biofilm generator. Biofilm was subjected to a range of temperatures in a hot-air oven (dry heat), water bath or autoclave (wet heat). Dry-surface biofilms remained culture positive even when treated with the harshest dry-heat condition of 100°C for 60min. Following autoclaving samples were culture negative but 62-74% of bacteria in dry-surface biofilms remained alive as demonstrated by live/dead staining and confocal microscopy. Dry-surface biofilms subjected to autoclaving at 121°C for up to 30min recovered and released planktonic cells. Recovery did not occur following autoclaving for longer or at 134°C, at least during the time-period tested. Hydrated biofilm recovered following dry-heat treatment up to 100°C for 10min but failed to recover following autoclaving despite the presence of 43-60% live cells as demonstrated by live/dead staining. S. aureus dry-surface biofilms are less susceptible to killing by dry heat and steam autoclaving than hydrated biofilms, which are less susceptible to heat treatment than planktonic suspensions. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of the Structure of SaHPF Staphylococcus aureus Protein

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    R.Kh. Ayupov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available SaHPF (Staphylococcus aureus hibernation promoting factor is the ribosome inactivating protein of the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. The structure of this protein has been predicted using bioinformatics methods and represented by two domains and a hinge between them. The comparison of the primary sequence of SaHPF protein with the sequences of known structures of proteins determined by NMR and X-ray has revealed homology only for the first domain. At the same time, regions of homology to SaHPF protein entire sequence have been detected when it was compared to the Uniprot sequences. The search for homology for each individual domain has revealed 10 proteins homologous to the first domain and 3 homologs for the second domain; none of these homologous proteins have a hinge in their structure. The structural comparison of these homologues proteins with both domains of SaHPF has shown that the SaHPF first and second domain structures are accurately superimposed in the similar structural regions of homologous proteins. At least five of the identified proteins homologous to SaHPF are structurally related to the ribosome, which is an indirect indication of the quality of the SaHPF domain structure prediction and a sufficient background for the simulation of its behavior by equilibrium molecular dynamics. The analysis of SaHPF protein MD trajectories using principle components and normal modes methods has identified the characteristic collective motions of residues in the hinges regions between the β-sheet in both domains as well as in the hinge between the domains, which can be functionally important for SaHPF protein interaction with the ribosome.

  15. Relevant Role of Fibronectin-Binding Proteins in Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm-Associated Foreign-Body Infections▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Irigaray, Marta; Valle, Jaione; Merino, Nekane; Latasa, Cristina; García, Begoña; Ruiz de los Mozos, Igor; Solano, Cristina; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Penadés, José R.; Lasa, Iñigo

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can establish chronic infections on implanted medical devices due to its capacity to form biofilms. Analysis of the factors that assemble cells into a biofilm has revealed the occurrence of strains that produce either a polysaccharide intercellular adhesin/poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PIA/PNAG) exopolysaccharide- or a protein-dependent biofilm. Examination of the influence of matrix nature on the biofilm capacities of embedded bacteria has remained elusive, because a natural strain that readily converts between a polysaccharide- and a protein-based biofilm has not been studied. Here, we have investigated the clinical methicillin (meticillin)-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain 132, which is able to alternate between a proteinaceous and an exopolysaccharidic biofilm matrix, depending on environmental conditions. Systematic disruption of each member of the LPXTG surface protein family identified fibronectin-binding proteins (FnBPs) as components of a proteinaceous biofilm formed in Trypticase soy broth-glucose, whereas a PIA/PNAG-dependent biofilm was produced under osmotic stress conditions. The induction of FnBP levels due to a spontaneous agr deficiency present in strain 132 and the activation of a LexA-dependent SOS response or FnBP overexpression from a multicopy plasmid enhanced biofilm development, suggesting a direct relationship between the FnBP levels and the strength of the multicellular phenotype. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that cells growing in the FnBP-mediated biofilm formed highly dense aggregates without any detectable extracellular matrix, whereas cells in a PIA/PNAG-dependent biofilm were embedded in an abundant extracellular material. Finally, studies of the contribution of each type of biofilm matrix to subcutaneous catheter colonization revealed that an FnBP mutant displayed a significantly lower capacity to develop biofilm on implanted catheters than the isogenic PIA/PNAG-deficient mutant. PMID:19581398

  16. Proteome analyses of cellular proteins in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus treated with rhodomyrtone, a novel antibiotic candidate.

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    Wipawadee Sianglum

    Full Text Available The ethanolic extract from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa leaf exhibited good antibacterial activities against both methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and S. aureus ATCC 29213. Its minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC values ranged from 31.25-62.5 µg/ml, and the minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC was 250 µg/ml. Rhodomyrtone, an acylphloroglucinol derivative, was 62.5-125 times more potent at inhibiting the bacteria than the ethanolic extract, the MIC and MBC values were 0.5 µg/ml and 2 µg/ml, respectively. To provide insights into antibacterial mechanisms involved, the effects of rhodomyrtone on cellular protein expression of MRSA have been investigated using proteomic approaches. Proteome analyses revealed that rhodomyrtone at subinhibitory concentration (0.174 µg/ml affected the expression of several major functional classes of whole cell proteins in MRSA. The identified proteins involve in cell wall biosynthesis and cell division, protein degradation, stress response and oxidative stress, cell surface antigen and virulence factor, and various metabolic pathways such as amino acid, carbohydrate, energy, lipid, and nucleotide metabolism. Transmission electron micrographs confirmed the effects of rhodomyrtone on morphological and ultrastructural alterations in the treated bacterial cells. Biological processes in cell wall biosynthesis and cell division were interrupted. Prominent changes including alterations in cell wall, abnormal septum formation, cellular disintegration, and cell lysis were observed. Unusual size and shape of staphylococcal cells were obviously noted in the treated MRSA. These pioneer findings on proteomic profiling and phenotypic features of rhodomyrtone-treated MRSA may resolve its antimicrobial mechanisms which could lead to the development of a new effective regimen for the treatment of MRSA infections.

  17. Molecular typing of nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus strains associated to biofilm based on the coagulase and protein A gene polymorphisms

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    Ali Salehzadeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Staphylococcus aureus is an important bacterial pathogen responsible for a variety numbers of nosocomial and community acquired infections. Biofilm formation is regarded as an important factor in the establishment of S. aureus infection. The contribution of the genetic background of S. aureus to biofilm formation is poorly understood. The aim of the present work was to genotype S. aureus strains associated to biofilm based on the coagulase and protein A genes and to evaluate the association between the genetic background and the biofilm forming ability of clinical S. aureus isolates. Materials and Methods: A total number of 100 S. aureus were isolated from nosocomial infections and biofilm formation capability was investigated using phenotypic assay and molecular detection of biofilm associated genes. The strains were genotyped based on coagulase (coa and protein A (spa gene polymorphisms using restriction fragments length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR. Results: RFLP-PCR of coa gene generated two types and three subtypes. Amplification of spa gene resulted in two banding patterns and their restriction digestion generated three subtypes. The combined coa and spa RFLP patterns generated nine genotypes (G1-G9. The genotypes G4 and G1 were the most prevalent (32.1% and 24.3%, respectively. Conclusion: High clonal diversity of S. aureus strains able to produce biofilm was observed. Biofilm formation correlates with the spa and coa clonal lineage in our population and testing for multiple gene polymorphisms could be employed for local epidemiologic purposes.

  18. Antibacterial effect of silver nanoparticles along with protein synthesis-inhibiting antibiotics on Staphylococcus aureus isolated from cattle mastitis

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    Malahat Ahmadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen in dairy ruminants which is also found in healthy carriage and can be a major cause of mastitis. Various mastitis control programs have been used to combat the problem but have not always been efficient. In most countries, antibiotic resistance is extremely common. Silver nanoparticles have shown antimicrobial activity against S. aureus. In the present study the effect of silver nanoparticles on S. aureus isolated from cattle mastitis along with antibiotics of operative on protein bacterial synthesis investigated. Materials and methods: Three hundred eleven milk samples were collected from the cow farms. Each milk sample was cultured on mannitol salt agar and was incubated. A total of 72 isolates of S. aureus were isolated from the bovine mastitis milk samples. S. aureus DNA extracted by DNA purification kit according to the manufacturer protocol. 58 isolates were confirmed as S. aureus by biochemical tests as well as nuc gene detection. MIC and MBC determined for silver nanoparticles with antibiotics on 50 isolates. Results: The resistance of S. aureus isolates against erythromycin, gentamicin, streptomycin and doxycycline were 100, 22, 100 and 8%, respectively. 8 of all isolates were sensitive to 25 µg/ml concentration of silver nanoparticles. The 92% growth of the samples were inhibited at concentrations between 50-100 µg/ml. Discussion and conclusion: The present study suggests that antibiotics which can inhibit protein synthesis have significant synergistic effect along with silver nanoparticles.

  19. Changes in Holstein cow milk and serum proteins during intramammary infection with three different strains of Staphylococcus aureus

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    Robert Claude

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most prevalent pathogens to cause mastitis in dairy cattle. Intramammary infection of dairy cows with S. aureus is often subclinical, due to the pathogen's ability to evade the innate defense mechanisms, but this can lead to chronic infection. A sub-population of S. aureus, known as small colony variant (SCV, displays atypical phenotypic characteristics, causes persistent infections, and is more resistant to antibiotics than parent strains. Therefore, it was hypothesized that the host immune response will be different for SCV than its parental or typical strains of S. aureus. In this study, the local and systemic immune protein responses to intramammary infection with three strains of S. aureus, including a naturally occurring bovine SCV strain (SCV Heba3231, were characterized. Serum and casein-depleted milk cytokine levels (interleukin-8, interferon-γ, and transforming growth factor-β1, as well as serum haptoglobin concentrations were monitored over time after intramammary infection with each of the three S. aureus strains. Furthermore, comparative proteomics was used to evaluate milk proteome profiles during acute and chronic phases of S. aureus intramammary infection. Results Serum IL-8, IFN-γ, and TGF-β1 responses differed in dairy cows challenged with different strains of S. aureus. Changes in overall serum haptoglobin concentrations were observed for each S. aureus challenge group, but there were no significant differences observed between groups. In casein-depleted milk, strain-specific differences in the host IFN-γ response were observed, but inducible IL-8 and TGF-β1 concentrations were not different between groups. Proteomic analysis of the milk following intramammary infection revealed unique host protein expression profiles that were dependent on the infecting strain as well as phase of infection. Notably, the protein, component-3 of the proteose peptone (CPP3, was

  20. The Staphylococcus aureus extracellular matrix protein (Emp) has a fibrous structure and binds to different extracellular matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, Jennifer; Neubauer, Svetlana; Pöllath, Christine; Hansen, Uwe; Rizzo, Fabio; Krafft, Christoph; Westermann, Martin; Hussain, Muzaffar; Peters, Georg; Pletz, Mathias W; Löffler, Bettina; Makarewicz, Oliwia; Tuchscherr, Lorena

    2017-10-20

    The extracellular matrix protein Emp of Staphylococcus aureus is a secreted adhesin that mediates interactions between the bacterial surface and extracellular host structures. However, its structure and role in staphylococcal pathogenesis remain unknown. Using multidisciplinary approaches, including circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, transmission electron (TEM) and immunogold transmission electron microscopy, functional ELISA assays and in silico techniques, we characterized the Emp protein. We demonstrated that Emp and its truncated forms bind to suprastructures in human skin, cartilage or bone, among which binding activity seems to be higher for skin compounds. The binding domain is located in the C-terminal part of the protein. CD spectroscopy revealed high contents of β-sheets (39.58%) and natively disordered structures (41.2%), and TEM suggested a fibrous structure consisting of Emp polymers. The N-terminus seems to be essential for polymerization. Due to the uncommonly high histidine content, we suggest that Emp represents a novel type of histidine-rich protein sharing structural similarities to leucine-rich repeats proteins as predicted by the I-TASSER algorithm. These new findings suggest a role of Emp in infections of deeper tissue and open new possibilities for the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  1. Immunity to Staphylococcus aureus Secreted Proteins Protects Rabbits from Serious Illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Adam. R.; Lin, Ying-Chi; Merriman, Joseph A.; Brosnahan, Amanda J.; Peterson, Marnie L.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes significant illnesses throughout the world, including toxic shock syndrome (TSS), pneumonia, and infective endocarditis. Major contributors to S. aureus illnesses are secreted virulence factors it produces, including superantigens and cytolysins. This study investigates the use of superantigens and cytolysins as staphylococcal vaccine candidates. Importantly, 20% of humans and 50% of rabbits in our TSS model cannot generate antibody responses to native superantigens. We generated three TSST-1 mutants; G31S/S32P, H135A, and Q136A. All rabbits administered these TSST-1 toxoids generated strong antibody responses (titers>10,000) that neutralized native TSST-1 in TSS models, both in vitro and in vivo. These TSST-1 mutants lacked detectable residual toxicity. Additionally, the TSST-1 mutants exhibited intrinsic adjuvant activity, increasing antibody responses to a second staphylococcal antigen (β-toxin). This effect may be due to TSST-1 mutants binding to the immune co-stimulatory molecule CD40. The superantigens TSST-1 and SEC and the cytolysin α-toxin are known to contribute to staphylococcal pneumonia. Immunization of rabbits against these secreted toxins provided complete protection from highly lethal challenge with a USA200 S. aureus strain producing all three exotoxins; USA200 strains are common causes of staphylococcal infections. The same three exotoxins plus the cytolysins β-toxin and γ-toxin contribute to infective endocarditis and sepsis caused by USA200 strains. Immunization against these five exotoxins protected rabbits from infective endocarditis and lethal sepsis. These data suggest that immunization against toxoid proteins of S. aureus exotoxins protects from serious illnesses, and concurrently superantigen toxoid mutants provide endogenous adjuvant activity. PMID:22691432

  2. The carriage of the serine-aspartate repeat protein-encoding sdr genes among Staphylococcus aureus lineages

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    Huanle Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The serine-aspartate repeat proteins (Sdr are members of a family of surface proteins and contribute to the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus. Among 288 S. aureus isolates including 158 and 130 associated with skin and soft tissue infections and bloodstream infection, respectively; 275 (95.5% were positive for at least one of three sdr genes tested. The positivity rates for sdrC, sdrD, and sdrE among S. aureus isolates were 87.8% (253/288, 63.9% (184/288, and 68.1% (196/288, respectively. 224 (77.8% of 288 isolates were concomitantly positive for two or three sdr genes. There was an association between carriage of sdrE and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA isolates, while the carriage rates of sdrC and sdrD in MRSA isolates were similar to those in methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA isolates. The prevalence of co-existence of sdrC and sdrE among MRSA isolates was significantly higher than that among MSSA isolates (p < 0.05. All ST1, ST5, ST7, and ST25 isolates were positive for sdrD. While all ST121 and ST398 isolates were negative for sdrD. All ST59 and ST88 isolates were positive for sdrE. All ST1 isolates were concomitantly positive for sdrC and sdrD. Concomitant carriage of sdrC, sdrD, and sdrE was found among all ST5, 75.0% (9/12 of ST1, 69.2% (9/13 of ST6, 78.6% (11/14 of ST25, and 90.9% (20/22 of ST88 isolates. sdrD was linked to CC5, CC7 and CC88 isolates, especially CC88 isolates. There was a strong association between the presence of sdrE and CC59, CC88, and CC5 isolates. A significant correlation between concomitant carriage of sdrC, sdrD, and sdrE and CC88 isolates was found. sdrC-positive, sdrD-positive and sdrE-negative gene profile was significantly associated with CC7 clone. There was an association between sdrC-positive, sdrD-negative, and sdrE-positive gene profile and CC59 isolates. A correlation between sdrC-positive, sdrD-negative, and sdrE-negative gene profile and CC121 clone was found. More CC59 isolates

  3. Purification and activity testing of the full-length YycFGHI proteins of Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Michael Türck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The YycFG two-component regulatory system (TCS of Staphylococcus aureus represents the only essential TCS that is almost ubiquitously distributed in gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C-content. YycG (WalK/VicK is a sensor histidine-kinase and YycF (WalR/VicR is the cognate response regulator. Both proteins play an important role in the biosynthesis of the cell envelope and mutations in these proteins have been involved in development of vancomycin and daptomycin resistance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present high yield expression and purification of the full-length YycG and YycF proteins as well as of the auxiliary proteins YycH and YycI of Staphylococcus aureus. Activity tests of the YycG kinase and a mutated version, that harbours an Y306N exchange in its cytoplasmic PAS domain, in a detergent-micelle-model and a phosholipid-liposome-model showed kinase activity (autophosphorylation and phosphoryl group transfer to YycF only in the presence of elevated concentrations of alkali salts. A direct comparison of the activity of the kinases in the liposome-model indicated a higher activity of the mutated YycG kinase. Further experiments indicated that YycG responds to fluidity changes in its microenvironment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The combination of high yield expression, purification and activity testing of membrane and membrane-associated proteins provides an excellent experimental basis for further protein-protein interaction studies and for identification of all signals received by the YycFGHI system.

  4. Polymorphisms in Fibronectin Binding Proteins A and B among Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Isolates Are Not Associated with Arthroplasty Infection.

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    Emily M Eichenberger

    Full Text Available Nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in fibronectin binding protein A (fnbA of Staphylococcus aureus are associated with cardiac device infections. However, the role of fnbA SNPs in S. aureus arthroplasty infection is unknown.Bloodstream S. aureus isolates from a derivation cohort of patients at a single U.S. medical center with S. aureus bacteremia (SAB and prosthetic hip or knee arthroplasties that were infected (PJI, n = 27 or uninfected (PJU, n = 43 underwent sequencing of fnbA and fnbB. A validation cohort of S. aureus bloodstream PJI (n = 12 and PJU (n = 58 isolates from Germany also underwent fnbA and fnbB sequencing.Overall, none of the individual fnbA or fnbB SNPs were significantly associated with the PJI or PJU clinical groups within the derivation cohort. Similarly, none of the individual fnbA or fnbB SNPs were associated with PJI or PJU when the analysis was restricted to patients with either early SAB (i.e., bacteremia occurring 1 year after placement or manipulation of prostheses.In contrast to cardiac device infections, there is no association between nonsynonymous SNPs in fnbA or fnbB of bloodstream S. aureus isolates and arthroplasty infection. These results suggest that initial steps leading to S. aureus infection of cardiovascular and orthopedic prostheses may arise by distinct processes.

  5. Spread of Staphylococcus aureus between medical staff and high-frequency contact surfaces in a large metropolitan hospital

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    Li-sha Shi

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Cross-contamination of S. aureus or MRSA on medical workers' hands and contact surfaces was demonstrated within and between departments of a large metropolitan hospital. Improvements are needed in medical staff hygiene habits and in the cleaning of high-frequency contact surfaces to help prevent and control nosocomial infections.

  6. An electron microscopic study of the effect of clindamycin on adherence of Staphylococcus aureus to bone surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayberry-Carson, K J; Mayberry, W R; Tober-Meyer, B K; Costerton, J W; Lambe, D W

    1986-01-01

    Discs of rabbit tibia, 5 mm thick, were utilized to study the adherence of Staphylococcus aureus to the bone surface in the presence and absence of clindamycin. Bacteria were grown in broth media containing the bone slices and varying concentrations of clindamycin. In the absence of the antibiotic, S. aureus adhered extensively to bone surfaces and formed large microcolonies which were surrounded by an amorphous matrix. In the presence of 0.025 micrograms/ml of clindamycin (0.1 MIC), S. aureus adhered less to bone surfaces, forming smaller and fewer microcolonies. In the presence of 0.0625 micrograms/ml of clindamycin (0.25 MIC), S. aureus adhered to the bone surfaces only sparsely, forming small microcolonies with very little matrix holding them together, and leaving very large areas of the bone surface uncolonized. In the presence of 0.125 micrograms/ml of clindamycin (0.5 MIC), bone surfaces were basically clean, with only one or two cells (no microcolonies) found in crevices and indentations of the bone surface. In the presence of 0.25 micrograms/ml (1 MIC) no bacteria adhered to the bone surfaces.

  7. Solithromycin inhibition of protein synthesis and ribosome biogenesis in Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Ward; Frazier, Ashley D; Champney, W Scott

    2013-04-01

    The continuing increase in antibiotic-resistant microorganisms is driving the search for new antibiotic targets and improved antimicrobial agents. Ketolides are semisynthetic derivatives of macrolide antibiotics, which are effective against certain resistant organisms. Solithromycin (CEM-101) is a novel fluoroketolide with improved antimicrobial effectiveness. This compound binds to the large 50S subunit of the ribosome and inhibits protein biosynthesis. Like other ketolides, it should impair bacterial ribosomal subunit formation. This mechanism of action was examined in strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Haemophilus influenzae. The mean 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) for solithromycin inhibition of cell viability, protein synthesis, and growth rate were 7.5, 40, and 125 ng/ml for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Haemophilus influenzae, respectively. The net formation of the 50S subunit was reduced in all three organisms, with IC50s similar to those given above. The rates of 50S subunit formation measured by a pulse-chase labeling procedure were reduced by 75% in cells growing at the IC50 of solithromycin. Turnover of 23S rRNA was stimulated by solithromycin as well. Solithromycin was found to be a particularly effective antimicrobial agent, with IC50s comparable to those of telithromycin and significantly better than those of azithromycin and clarithromycin in these three microorganisms.

  8. ADHESION AND SURFACE GROWTH OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS AND LACTOBACILLUS PLANTARUM ON VARIOUS METALS

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    Tsveteslava V. Ignatova-Ivanova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the major drawbacks in the use of biomedical materials is the occurrence of biomaterial-centered infections. Adhesion of microorganisms to an implant is mediated by their physico-chemical surface properties and the properties of the biomaterial surface itself. Subsequent surface growth of the microorganisms will lead to a mature biofilm and infection, which is difficult to eradicate by antibiotics. Objective: The purpose of this research is to examine the adhesion in the combined cultivation of Staphylococcus aureus and the Lactobacillus plantarum probiotic bacterium on the surface of different metals (copper, aluminium, low-carbon steel, and zinc. Methods: The precise weighing (with an allowance of 0,0001 g of the metal plates before and after the treatment found a minimum negative change in their weight, which may be caused by reduction resulting from corrosion processes, on one hand, or growth because of the forming of a biofilm, on the other. The structure of the layer over the metal plates was analysed by SEM (scanning electron microscopy JSM 5510. Results: The thinnest biofilm for both bacteria was registered on the surface of the copper plate. When a combined culture is used on the surface of the aluminium and the steel plates, the pathogenic bacterium is adhered predominantly. On the zinc plate it is only the probiotic bacterium that adheres. Conclusion: This is an initial research on this problem of significance for the doctors and it is about to be further examined

  9. Femtosecond laser surface texturing of titanium as a method to reduce the adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and biofilm formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, Alexandre [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Bordeaux University, Institute of Chemistry & Biology of Membranes & Nanoobjects (CBMN UMR 5248, CNRS), European Institute of Chemistry and Biology, 2 Rue Robert Escarpit, 33607 Pessac (France); Elie, Anne-Marie [Bordeaux University, CBMN UMR 5248, CNRS, Bordeaux Science Agro, 1 Rue du G. de Gaulle, 33170 Gradignan (France); Plawinski, Laurent [Bordeaux University, Institute of Chemistry & Biology of Membranes & Nanoobjects (CBMN UMR 5248, CNRS), European Institute of Chemistry and Biology, 2 Rue Robert Escarpit, 33607 Pessac (France); Serro, Ana Paula [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, CQE-Centro de Química Estrutural, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Botelho do Rego, Ana Maria [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, CQFM-Centro de Química-Física Molecular and Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology - IN, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Almeida, Amélia [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Urdaci, Maria C. [Bordeaux University, CBMN UMR 5248, CNRS, Bordeaux Science Agro, 1 Rue du G. de Gaulle, 33170 Gradignan (France); Durrieu, Marie-Christine [Bordeaux University, Institute of Chemistry & Biology of Membranes & Nanoobjects (CBMN UMR 5248, CNRS), European Institute of Chemistry and Biology, 2 Rue Robert Escarpit, 33607 Pessac (France); Vilar, Rui, E-mail: rui.vilar@tecnico.ulisboa.pt [Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The short-term adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus onto femtosecond laser textured surfaces of titanium was investigated. • The laser textured surfaces consist of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and nanopillars. • The laser treatment enhances the hydrophilicity and the surface free energy of the material. • The laser treatment reduces significantly the adhesion of S. aureus and biofilm formation. • Femtosecond laser surface texturing of titanium is a simple and promising method for endowing dental and orthopedic implants with antibacterial properties. - Abstract: The aim of the present work was to investigate the possibility of using femtosecond laser surface texturing as a method to reduce the colonization of Grade 2 Titanium alloy surfaces by Staphylococcus aureus and the subsequent formation of biofilm. The laser treatments were carried out with a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system with a central wavelength of 1030 nm and a pulse duration of 500 fs. Two types of surface textures, consisting of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and nanopillars, were produced. The topography, chemical composition and phase constitution of these surfaces were investigated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was assessed by the sessile drop method using water and diiodomethane as testing liquids. The response of S. aureus put into contact with the laser treated surfaces in controlled conditions was investigated by epifluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy 48 h after cell seeding. The results achieved show that the laser treatment reduces significantly the bacterial adhesion to the surface as well as biofilm formation as compared to a reference polished surfaces and suggest that femtosecond laser texturing is a simple and promising method

  10. Molecular Cloning, Expression and Peroxidase Conjugation of Staphylococcus aureus Protein A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfi Abad Shapouri, Masoud Reza; Mahmoodi, Pezhman; Gharibi, Dariush; Ghorbanpoor, Masoud; Yaghoubi, Sara; Rezaei, Elham; Rashno, Mohammad; Mehravar, Neda

    2016-01-01

    Background Staphylococcal protein A (SPA) is a cell wall component of Staphylococcus aureus that binds to different IgG subclasses of human and several animal species. This bacterial protein can be used as an antibody detector in various immunological assays or as an isolation reagent for the purification of antibody molecules via immuno-chromatography procedures. Objectives Molecular cloning and expression of SPA followed by the purification and conjugation of the recombinant protein to peroxidase enzyme. Material and Methods Encoding DNA fragment of SPA was amplified and inserted into a prokaryotic plasmid vector for the expression of recombinant SPA fused to a maltose binding protein (MBP). The recombinant protein was purified using amylose resin column chromatography and conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme. Finally, the reactivity of the recombinant SPA was examined against human IgG molecules in ELISA. Results The results indicated that the recombinant peroxidase-conjugated SPA has a good recognition capacity for human IgG molecules and it was able to produce significant OD values after reacting with human IgG molecules at a concentration up to 0.06 μg.well-1. Conclusions This recombinant protein can be very useful in all research laboratories and may decrease some of the expenses, e.g. those for preparing conjugated anti-antibodies. PMID:28959340

  11. Identification of RNAIII-binding proteins in Staphylococcus aureus using tethered RNAs and streptavidin aptamers based pull-down assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Zhu, Qing; Tian, Tian; Zhao, Changlong; Zang, Jianye; Xue, Ting; Sun, Baolin

    2015-05-15

    It has been widely recognized that small RNAs (sRNAs) play important roles in physiology and virulence control in bacteria. In Staphylococcus aureus, many sRNAs have been identified and some of them have been functionally studied. Since it is difficult to identify RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), very little has been known about the RBPs in S. aureus, especially those associated with sRNAs. Here we adopted a tRNA scaffold streptavidin aptamer based pull-down assay to identify RBPs in S. aureus. The tethered RNA was successfully captured by the streptavidin magnetic beads, and proteins binding to RNAIII were isolated and analyzed by mass spectrometry. We have identified 81 proteins, and expressed heterologously 9 of them in Escherichia coli. The binding ability of the recombinant proteins with RNAIII was further analyzed by electrophoresis mobility shift assay, and the result indicates that proteins CshA, RNase J2, Era, Hu, WalR, Pyk, and FtsZ can bind to RNAIII. This study suggests that some proteins can bind to RNA III in S. aureus, and may be involved in RNA III function. And tRSA based pull-down assay is an effective method to search for RBPs in bacteria, which should facilitate the identification and functional study of RBPs in diverse bacterial species.

  12. LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins in Staphylococcus aureus display partial functional redundancy and the deletion of all three severely impairs septum placement and cell separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over, Benjamin; Heusser, Ronald; McCallum, Nadine; Schulthess, Bettina; Kupferschmied, Peter; Gaiani, Jessica M; Sifri, Costi D; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte; Stutzmann Meier, Patricia

    2011-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus contains three members of the LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP) family of membrane proteins: MsrR, SA0908 and SA2103. The characterization of single-, double- and triple-deletion mutants revealed distinct phenotypes for each of the three proteins. MsrR was involved in cell separation and septum formation and influenced β-lactam resistance; SA0908 protected cells from autolysis; and SA2103, although displaying no apparent phenotype by itself, enhanced the properties of msrR and sa0908 mutants when deleted. The deletion of sa0908 and sa2103 also further attenuated the virulence of msrR mutants in a nematode-killing assay. The severely defective growth phenotype of the triple mutant revealed that LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins are essential for optimal cell division in S. aureus. Growth could be rescued to varying degrees by any one of the three proteins, indicating some functional redundancy within members of this protein family. However, differing phenotypic characteristics of all single and double mutants and complemented triple mutants indicated that each protein played a distinct role(s) and contributed differently to phenotypes influencing cell separation, autolysis, cell surface properties and virulence. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of putative drug targets in Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) using computer aided protein data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md Anayet; Khan, Md Arif; Sharmin, Tahmina; Hasan Mazumder, Md Habibul; Chowdhury, Afrin Sultana

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) is a Gram-positive, facultative aerobic bacterium which is evolved from the extensive exposure of Vancomycin to Methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) that had become the most common cause of hospital and community-acquired infections. Due to the emergence of different antibiotic resistance strains, there is an exigency to develop novel drug targets to address the provocation of multidrug-resistant bacteria. In this study, in-silico genome subtraction methodology was used to design potential and pathogen specific drug targets against VRSA. Our study divulged 1987 proteins from the proteome of 34,549 proteins, which have no homologues in human genome after sequential analysis through CD-HIT and BLASTp. The high stringency analysis of the remaining proteins against database of essential genes (DEG) resulted in 169 proteins which are essential for S. aureus. Metabolic pathway analysis of human host and pathogen by KAAS at the KEGG server sorted out 19 proteins involved in unique metabolic pathways. 26 human non-homologous membrane-bound essential proteins including 4 which were also involved in unique metabolic pathway were deduced through PSORTb, CELLO v.2.5, ngLOC. Functional classification of uncharacterized proteins through SVMprot derived 7 human non-homologous membrane-bound hypothetical essential proteins. Study of potential drug target against Drug Bank revealed pbpA-penicillin-binding protein 1 and hypothetical protein MQW_01796 as the best drug target candidate. 2D structure was predicted by PRED-TMBB, 3D structure and functional analysis was also performed. Protein-protein interaction network of potential drug target proteins was analyzed by using STRING. The identified drug targets are expected to have great potential for designing novel drugs against VRSA infections and further screening of the compounds against these new targets may result in the discovery of novel therapeutic compounds that can be

  14. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus protein A (spa) mutants in the community and hospitals in Oxfordshire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votintseva, Antonina A; Fung, Rowena; Miller, Ruth R; Knox, Kyle; Godwin, Heather; Wyllie, David H; Bowden, Rory; Crook, Derrick W; Walker, A Sarah

    2014-03-12

    Staphylococcal protein A (spa) is an important virulence factor which enables Staphylococcus aureus to evade host immune responses. Genotypes known as "spa-types", based on highly variable Xr region sequences of the spa-gene, are frequently used to classify strains. A weakness of current spa-typing primers is that rearrangements in the IgG-binding region of the gene cause 1-2% of strains to be designated as "non-typeable". We developed an improved primer which enabled sequencing of all strains, containing any type of genetic rearrangement, in a large study among community carriers and hospital inpatients in Oxfordshire, UK (6110 isolates). We identified eight novel spa-gene variants, plus one previously described. Three of these rearrangements would be designated "non-typeable" using current spa-typing methods; they occurred in 1.8% (72/3905) asymptomatically carried and 0.6% (14/2205) inpatient S. aureus strains. Some individuals were simultaneously colonized by both formerly non-typeable and typeable strains; previously such patients would have been identified as carrying only currently typeable strains, underestimating mixed carriage prevalence and diversity. Formerly non-typeable strains were found in more spa-types associated with multilocus sequence type ST398 (35%), common among livestock, compared to other groups with any non-typeable strains (1-4%), suggesting particular spa-types may have been under-represented in previous human studies. This improved method allows us to spa-type previously non-typeable strains with rearrangements in the spa-gene and to resolve cases of mixed colonization with deletions in one or more strains, thus accounting for hidden diversity of S. aureus in both community and hospital environments.

  15. Action of peracetic acid on Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in suspension or settled on stainless steel surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunigk Leo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of a commercial peracetic acid sanitizer on destruction of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli was evaluated using two distinct methods. The first method is the AOAC suspension test and the second is a method proposed by one of the authors in which the microbial cells are settled on a stainless steel surface and then treated with the sanitizer. The results showed that when in suspension S. aureus was more resistant to the sanitizer than E. coli. When S. aureus was settled on the stainless steel surface, the contact time between the sanitizer and the microorganisms to attain a 6.5 log reduction in the number of viable cells was three times greater than when the cells were in suspension.

  16. Identification of nucleoid associated proteins (NAPs) under oxidative stress in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushijima, Yuri; Ohniwa, Ryosuke L; Morikawa, Kazuya

    2017-10-02

    Bacterial nucleoid consists of genome DNA, RNA, and hundreds of nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs). Escherichia coli nucleoid is compacted towards the stationary phase, replacing most log-phase NAPs with the major stationary-phase nucleoid protein, Dps. In contrast, Staphylococcus aureus nucleoid sustains the fiber structures throughout the growth. Instead, the Dps homologue, MrgA, expresses under oxidative stress conditions to clump the nucleoid, but the composition of the clumped nucleoid was elusive. The staphylococcal nucleoid under oxidative stress was isolated by sucrose gradient centrifugation, and the proteins were analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We identified 299 proteins in the nucleoid under oxidative stress, including 113 csNAPs (contaminant-subtracted NAPs). Comparison with the previously identified csNAPs in log- and stationary phase indicated that one fifth of the csNAPs under oxidative stress were the constitutive nucleoid components; importantly, several factors including HU, SarA, FabZ, and ribosomes were sustained under oxidative stress. Some factors (e.g. SA1663 and SA0092/SA0093) with unknown functions were included in the csNAPs list specifically under oxidative stress condition. Nucleoid constitutively holds Hu, SarA, FabG, and ribosomal proteins even under the oxidative stress, reflecting the active functions of the clumped nucleoid, unlikely to the dormant E. coli nucleoid compacted in the stationary phase or starvation.

  17. Real-Time Assessment of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Disruption by Phage-Derived Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Gutiérrez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A current focus of research is the development of new tools for removing bacterial biofilms in industrial settings. Bacteriophage-encoded proteins, such as endolysins, virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases, and exopolysaccharide depolymerases, have been shown to be efficient against these structures. However, the current screening techniques for the identification of antibiofilm properties of phage-derived proteins have important shortcomings. The aim of this work was to use the rapid, reproducible and accurate technology “real-time cell analyzer” for screening and comparing the antibiofilm ability of four phage-derived compounds, three lytic proteins (LysH5, CHAP-SH3b, and HydH5-SH3b and one exopolysaccharide depolymerase (Dpo7 against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, which have been associated with recurrent contamination of food products. The data generated after biofilm treatment allowed for the calculation of different antibiofilm parameters: (1 the minimum biofilm eradicating concentration that removes 50% of the biofilm (ranging from 3.5 ± 1.1 to 6.6 ± 0.5 μM, (2 the lowest concentration needed to observe an antibiofilm effect (∼1.5 μM for all the proteins, and (3 the specific antibiofilm activity and the percentage of biofilm removal that revealed LysH5 as the best antibiofilm compound. Overall, this technology might be used to quickly assess and compare by standardized parameters the disaggregating activity of phage antibiofilm proteins.

  18. The ClpXP protease is dispensable for degradation of unfolded proteins in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Steen G.; Alqarzaee, Abdulelah A.; Jensen, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    In living cells intracellular proteolysis is crucial for protein homeostasis, and ClpP proteases are conserved between eubacteria and the organelles of eukaryotic cells. In Staphylococcus aureus, ClpP associates to the substrate specificity factors, ClpX and ClpC forming two ClpP proteases, Clp......XP and ClpCP. To address how individual ClpP proteases impact cell physiology, we constructed a S. aureus mutant expressing ClpX with an I265E substitution in the ClpP recognition tripeptide of ClpX. This mutant cannot degrade established ClpXP substrates confirming that the introduced amino acid...... substitution abolishes ClpXP activity. Phenotypic characterization of this mutant showed that ClpXP activity controls cell size and is required for growth at low temperature. Cells expressing the ClpXI265E variant, in contrast to cells lacking ClpP, are not sensitive to heat-stress and do not accumulate...

  19. Competitive Protein Adsorption - Multilayer Adsorption and Surface Induced Protein Aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Hou, Xiaolin

    2009-01-01

    In this study, competitive adsorption of albumin and IgG (immunoglobulin G) from human serum solutions and protein mixtures onto polymer surfaces is studied by means of radioactive labeling. By using two different radiolabels (125I and 131I), albumin and IgG adsorption to polymer surfaces...... is monitored simultaneously and the influence from the presence of other human serum proteins on albumin and IgG adsorption, as well as their mutual influence during adsorption processes, is investigated. Exploring protein adsorption by combining analysis of competitive adsorption from complex solutions...... of high concentration with investigation of single protein adsorption and interdependent adsorption between two specific proteins enables us to map protein adsorption sequences during competitive protein adsorption. Our study shows that proteins can adsorb in a multilayer fashion onto the polymer surfaces...

  20. Construction of a New Fusion Protein Vector Associated to Fibronectin Binding Protein A and Clumping Factor A derived from Staphylococcus aureus NCTC8325

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Faghri

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of many nosocomial and community acquired infections. According to many reports, antibiotic therapy can not guarantee the eradication of S. aureus infections. Thus designing an adhesin based vaccine could restrain the S. aureus infections. This study designed for construction of a new fusion protein vaccine against S. aureus infections based on adhesin molecules fibronectin binding protein A (FnBPA and clumping factor A (ClfA. Materials and Methods Bioinformatic experiments were performed using Oligo analyzer and DNAMAN softwares. The fragments corresponding to fnbA binding domain and a C-terminal fragment from clfA were amplified from S. aureus NCTC8325 genomic DNA. Purified PCR products and the vector, pET15b, were digested with NcoI and BamHI. The digested PCR products were hybridized together and then ligated to digested vector. Finally incomplete construct was assembled by Taq DNA polymerase. To quick confirmation of cloning procedure the new construct designated pfnbA-clfA was digested with NcoI and BamHI. To further verification, the product was sent for sequencing. Results The data based on bioinformatic analysis showed no homology between fusion protein and human proteins. Digestion of new vector with NcoI and BamHI confirmed the ligation of fusion protein sequence into pET15b. Sequencing results verified the integrity of target sequences. Conclusion This study is the first effort to construct a new fusion protein vector based on S. aureus adhesins using a new design. This project is being continued to study the expression and biological activity of the fusion protein in a cell culture model.

  1. Identification and measurement of staphylococcal enterotoxin-like protein I (SEll) secretion from Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y; Zhu, A; Tang, J; Tang, C; Chen, J; Liu, J

    2016-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (Staph. aureus) produces a wide variety of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) and staphylococcal enterotoxin-like (SEl) proteins, which are the most causative agents of staphylococcal food poisoning. In contrast to classical SEs (SEA to SEE), the relationship between the novel SEs/SEls (SEG to SElX) and staphylococcal food poisoning is not elucidated. This study is aimed to establish a system to detect staphylococcal enterotoxin-like protein I (SElI) for analysis of staphylococcal food poisoning. SElI was characterized in a Staph. aureus clinical isolate associated with food poisoning; there was an amino acid substitution Thr145Ala compared to previously identified SEI from Staph. aureus 04-02981. Subsequently, SElI was expressed, purified, and the poly- and monoclonal antibodies against it were prepared. Using these antibodies, a highly sensitive sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that specifically detected and measured SElI secretion from the Staph. aureus clinical isolate in LB medium, milk and bloodstream was developed. The ELISA system has been successfully applied for analysing SElI secretion in vivo and in vitro. The highly sensitive ELISA should make it attractive for quantifying SElI in food hygiene supervision and clinical diagnosis in near future. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. The Staphylococcus aureus Membrane Protein SA2056 Interacts with Peptidoglycan Synthesis Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Berger-Bächi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The yet uncharacterized membrane protein SA2056 belongs to the ubiquitous RND (Resistance-Nodulation-cell Division family of transmembrane efflux transporters. The sa2056 gene is located downstream of femX, the gene encoding the essential, non-ribosomal peptidyl-transferase adding the first glycine in the staphylococcal cell wall pentaglycine interpeptide. Due to its proximity to and weak co-transcription with femX, we assumed that sa2056 may somehow be involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. Specific antibodies against SA2056 showed that this protein is expressed during growth and present in the membrane fraction of cell preparations. Using a bacterial two hybrid system, SA2056 was shown to interact (i with itself, (ii with FemB, which adds glycines 4 and 5 to the peptidoglycan interpeptide and (iii with the essential penicillin binding proteins, PBP1 and PBP2, required for cell division and incorporation of the peptidoglycan into the cell wall. Unexpectedly, deletion of sa2056 led to no phenotype regarding growth, antibiotic resistances or cell morphology; nor did sa2056 deletion in combination with femB inactivation alter b-lactam and lysostaphin sensitivity and resistance, respectively, pointing to possible redundancy in the cell wall synthesis pathway. These results suggest an accessory role of SA2056 in S. aureus peptidoglycan synthesis, broadening the range of biological functions of RND proteins.

  3. Bap, a biofilm matrix protein of Staphylococcus aureus prevents cellular internalization through binding to GP96 host receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaione Valle

    Full Text Available The biofilm matrix, composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids and lipids, plays a well-known role as a defence structure, protecting bacteria from the host immune system and antimicrobial therapy. However, little is known about its responsibility in the interaction of biofilm cells with host tissues. Staphylococcus aureus, a leading cause of biofilm-associated chronic infections, is able to develop a biofilm built on a proteinaceous Bap-mediated matrix. Here, we used the Bap protein as a model to investigate the role that components of the biofilm matrix play in the interaction of S. aureus with host cells. The results show that Bap promotes the adhesion but prevents the entry of S. aureus into epithelial cells. A broad analysis of potential interaction partners for Bap using ligand overlayer immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation with purified Bap and pull down with intact bacteria, identified a direct binding between Bap and Gp96/GRP94/Hsp90 protein. The interaction of Bap with Gp96 provokes a significant reduction in the capacity of S. aureus to invade epithelial cells by interfering with the fibronectin binding protein invasion pathway. Consistent with these results, Bap deficient bacteria displayed an enhanced capacity to invade mammary gland epithelial cells in a lactating mice mastitis model. Our observations begin to elucidate the mechanisms by which components of the biofilm matrix can facilitate the colonization of host tissues and the establishment of persistent infections.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus-Fibronectin Interactions with and without Fibronectin-Binding Proteins and Their Role in Adhesion and Desorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, C.P.; Boks, N.P.; Vries, de J.; Kaper, H.J.; Norde, W.; Busscher, H.J.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion and residence-time-dependent desorption of two Staphylococcus aureus strains with and without fibronectin (Fn) binding proteins (FnBPs) on Fn-coated glass were compared under flow conditions. To obtain a better understanding of the role of Fn-FnBP binding, the adsorption enthalpies of Fn

  5. The Staphylococcus aureus protein-coding gene gdpS modulates sarS expression via mRNA-mRNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan; Zhang, Xu; Shang, Fei; Sun, Haipeng; Sun, Baolin; Xue, Ting

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important Gram-positive pathogen responsible for numerous diseases ranging from localized skin infections to life-threatening systemic infections. The virulence of S. aureus is essentially determined by a wide spectrum of factors, including cell wall-associated proteins and secreted toxins that are precisely controlled in response to environmental changes. GGDEF domain protein from Staphylococcus (GdpS) is the only conserved staphylococcal GGDEF domain protein that is involved not in c-di-GMP synthesis but in the virulence regulation of S. aureus NCTC8325. Our previous study showed that the inactivation of gdpS generates an extensive change of virulence factors together with, in particular, a major Spa (protein A) surface protein. As reported, sarS is a direct positive regulator of spa. The decreased transcript levels of sarS in the gdpS mutant compared with the parental NCTC8325 strain suggest that gdpS affects spa through interaction with sarS. In this study, site mutation and complementary experiments showed that the translation product of gdpS was not involved in the regulation of transcript levels of sarS. We found that gdpS functioned through direct RNA-RNA base pairing with the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of sarS mRNA and that a putative 18-nucleotide region played a significant role in the regulatory process. Furthermore, the mRNA half-life analysis of sarS in the gdpS mutant showed that gdpS positively regulates the mRNA levels of sarS by contributing to the stabilization of sarS mRNA, suggesting that gdpS mRNA may regulate spa expression in an RNA-dependent pathway. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Bioaffinity sorbent based on immobilized protein A Staphylococcus aureus: development and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kordium V. A.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The obtaining of bioaffinity sorbent based on the immobilized protein A of S. aureus (SPA using two cellulose-binding domains (CBD, and its application for purification of antibodies. Methods. The DNA sequences encoding SPA and two CBD were genetically fused, expressed in the high-productive Escherichia coli system and the protein SPA-CBD2 was obtained in a soluble form. The SPA-CBD2 fusion protein was affinity immobilized on the microcrystalline cellulose. Results. Capacity of bioaffinity sorbent (1 mg SPA-CBD2/1 ml CC31-cellulose, dynamic capacity (3 mg mouse IgG/1 ml bioaffinity sorbent, efficiency and stability during prolonged storage were determined. The bioffinity sorbent was used for purification of antibodies. The purity of antibodies in eluted fractions was more than 95 %. The purified antibodies detected target antigens with a high sensitivity. Conclusions. The designed bioaffinity sorbent provides obtaining pure poly- and monoclonal antibodies in functionally active form and can be useful for the fractionation of mouse immunoglobulin G.

  7. Phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein participates in the autophagic elimination of Staphylococcus aureus infecting mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kae Harada-Hada

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an intrinsic host defense system that recognizes and eliminates invading bacterial pathogens. We have identified microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3, a hallmark of autophagy, as a binding partner of phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein (PRIP that was originally identified as an inositol trisphosphate-binding protein. Here, we investigated the involvement of PRIP in the autophagic elimination of Staphylococcus aureus in infected mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. We observed significantly more LC3-positive autophagosome-like vacuoles enclosing an increased number of S. aureus cells in PRIP-deficient MEFs than control MEFs, 3 h and 4.5 h post infection, suggesting that S. aureus proliferates in LC3-positive autophagosome-like vacuoles in PRIP-deficient MEFs. We performed autophagic flux analysis using an mRFP-GFP-tagged LC3 plasmid and found that autophagosome maturation is significantly inhibited in PRIP-deficient MEFs. Furthermore, acidification of autophagosomes was significantly inhibited in PRIP-deficient MEFs compared to the wild-type MEFs, as determined by LysoTracker staining and time-lapse image analysis performed using mRFP-GFP-tagged LC3. Taken together, our data show that PRIP is required for the fusion of S. aureus-containing autophagosome-like vacuoles with lysosomes, indicating that PRIP is a novel modulator in the regulation of the innate immune system in non-professional phagocytic host cells.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of apple cider vinegar against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans; downregulating cytokine and microbial protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagnik, Darshna; Serafin, Vlad; J Shah, Ajit

    2018-01-29

    The global escalation in antibiotic resistance cases means alternative antimicrobials are essential. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial capacity of apple cider vinegar (ACV) against E. coli, S. aureus and C. albicans. The minimum dilution of ACV required for growth inhibition varied for each microbial species. For C. albicans, a 1/2 ACV had the strongest effect, S. aureus, a 1/25 dilution ACV was required, whereas for E-coli cultures, a 1/50 ACV dilution was required (p < 0.05). Monocyte co-culture with microbes alongside ACV resulted in dose dependent downregulation of inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-6). Results are expressed as percentage decreases in cytokine secretion comparing ACV treated with non-ACV treated monocytes cultured with E-coli (TNFα, 99.2%; IL-6, 98%), S. aureus (TNFα, 90%; IL-6, 83%) and C. albicans (TNFα, 83.3%; IL-6, 90.1%) respectively. Proteomic analyses of microbes demonstrated that ACV impaired cell integrity, organelles and protein expression. ACV treatment resulted in an absence in expression of DNA starvation protein, citrate synthase, isocitrate and malate dehydrogenases in E-coli; chaperone protein DNak and ftsz in S. aureus and pyruvate kinase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, fructose bisphosphate were among the enzymes absent in C.albican cultures. The results demonstrate ACV has multiple antimicrobial potential with clinical therapeutic implications.

  9. Covalent attachment of proteins to solid supports and surfaces via Sortase-mediated ligation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilyan Chan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is growing interest in the attachment of proteins to solid supports for the development of supported catalysts, affinity matrices, and micro devices as well as for the development of planar and bead based protein arrays for multiplexed assays of protein concentration, interactions, and activity. A critical requirement for these applications is the generation of a stable linkage between the solid support and the immobilized, but still functional, protein. METHODOLOGY: Solid supports including crosslinked polymer beads, beaded agarose, and planar glass surfaces, were modified to present an oligoglycine motif to solution. A range of proteins were ligated to the various surfaces using the Sortase A enzyme of S. aureus. Reactions were carried out in aqueous buffer conditions at room temperature for times between one and twelve hours. CONCLUSIONS: The Sortase A transpeptidase of S. aureus provides a general, robust, and gentle approach to the selective covalent immobilization of proteins on three very different solid supports. The proteins remain functional and accessible to solution. Sortase mediated ligation is therefore a straightforward methodology for the preparation of solid supported enzymes and bead based assays, as well as the modification of planar surfaces for microanalytical devices and protein arrays.

  10. Identification of the ClpX Regulon in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Ingmer, Hanne

    Staphyloccous aureus is a major human pathogen capable of causing a wide spectrum of infections ranging from superficial wound infections to life-threatening endocarditis and toxic shock syndrome. Essential for S. aureus virulence is a large number of cell-surface-associated proteins and secreted...

  11. Evaluation of different methods to recover methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from hospital environmental surfaces.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dolan, A

    2011-11-01

    The environment is implicated as a source of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and there is a need for evidence-based approaches to environmental sampling to assess cleanliness and improve infection prevention and control. We assessed, in vitro, different approaches to sampling the environment for meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In a laboratory-based investigation, the recovery of MRSA from two common hospital environments using six different sampling methods was evaluated, with a wild-type strain of MRSA. A 100 cm(2) section of mattress and a laboratory bench surface were contaminated with known inocula of MRSA. Bacteria were recovered by sampling at 30 min after inoculation, using either saline-moistened cotton swabs, neutralising buffer swabs, eSwabs or macrofoam swabs, which were all enriched in tryptone soya broth, or by sampling with direct contact plates or chromogenic \\'sweep\\' plates. The sensitivity (i.e. the minimum number of bacteria inoculated on to a surface which subsequently produced a positive result) of each method was determined for each surface. The most sensitive methods were eSwabs and macrofoam swabs, requiring 6.1 × 10(-1) and 3.9 × 10(-1) MRSA\\/cm(2), respectively, to produce a positive result from the bench surface. The least sensitive swabbing method was saline-moistened cotton swabs, requiring 1.1 × 10(3) MRSA\\/cm(2) of mattress. The recovery of bacteria from environmental samples varies with the swabs and methodology used and negative culture results do not exclude a pathogen-free environment. Greater standardisation is required to facilitate the assessment of cleanliness of healthcare environments.

  12. Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus from food contact surfaces in a meat-based broth and sensitivity to sanitizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Leite de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the capacity of adhesion, the detachment kinetic and the biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus isolated from food services on stainless steel and polypropylene surfaces (2 x 2 cm when cultivated in a meat-based broth at 28 and 7 ºC. It was also to study the efficacy of the sanitizers sodium hypochlorite (250 mg/L and peracetic acid (30 mg/L in inactivating the bacterial cells in the preformed biofilm. S. aureus strains adhered in high numbers regardless the assayed surface kind and incubation temperature over 72 h. Cells detachment of surfaces revealed high persistence over the incubation period. Number of cells needed for biofilm formation was noted at all experimental systems already after 3 days. Peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite were not efficient in completely removing the cells of S. aureus adhered on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces. From these results, the assayed strains revealed high capacity to adhere and form biofilm on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces under different growth conditions. Moreover, the cells in biofilm matrix were resistant for total removal when submitted to the exposure to sanitizers.

  13. The Staphylococcus aureus protein Sbi acts as a complement inhibitor and forms a tripartite complex with host complement Factor H and C3b.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Haupt

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, similar to other pathogens, binds human complement regulators Factor H and Factor H related protein 1 (FHR-1 from human serum. Here we identify the secreted protein Sbi (Staphylococcus aureus binder of IgG as a ligand that interacts with Factor H by a-to our knowledge-new type of interaction. Factor H binds to Sbi in combination with C3b or C3d, and forms tripartite SbiratioC3ratioFactor H complexes. Apparently, the type of C3 influences the stability of the complex; surface plasmon resonance studies revealed a higher stability of C3d complexed to Sbi, as compared to C3b or C3. As part of this tripartite complex, Factor H is functionally active and displays complement regulatory activity. Sbi, by recruiting Factor H and C3b, acts as a potent complement inhibitor, and inhibits alternative pathway-mediated lyses of rabbit erythrocytes by human serum and sera of other species. Thus, Sbi is a multifunctional bacterial protein, which binds host complement components Factor H and C3 as well as IgG and beta(2-glycoprotein I and interferes with innate immune recognition.

  14. Femtosecond laser surface texturing of titanium as a method to reduce the adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Alexandre; Elie, Anne-Marie; Plawinski, Laurent; Serro, Ana Paula; Botelho do Rego, Ana Maria; Almeida, Amélia; Urdaci, Maria C.; Durrieu, Marie-Christine; Vilar, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the possibility of using femtosecond laser surface texturing as a method to reduce the colonization of Grade 2 Titanium alloy surfaces by Staphylococcus aureus and the subsequent formation of biofilm. The laser treatments were carried out with a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system with a central wavelength of 1030 nm and a pulse duration of 500 fs. Two types of surface textures, consisting of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and nanopillars, were produced. The topography, chemical composition and phase constitution of these surfaces were investigated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was assessed by the sessile drop method using water and diiodomethane as testing liquids. The response of S. aureus put into contact with the laser treated surfaces in controlled conditions was investigated by epifluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy 48 h after cell seeding. The results achieved show that the laser treatment reduces significantly the bacterial adhesion to the surface as well as biofilm formation as compared to a reference polished surfaces and suggest that femtosecond laser texturing is a simple and promising method for endowing dental and orthopedic titanium implants with antibacterial properties, reducing the risk of implant-associated infections without requiring immobilized antibacterial substances, nanoparticles or coatings.

  15. A positive interaction between inhibitors of protein synthesis and cefepime in the fight against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignard, B; Vouillamoz, J; Giddey, M; Moreillon, P

    2013-07-01

    Quinupristin-dalfopristin (Q-D) synergizes with cefepime for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Here, we studied whether the synergism was restricted to MRSA and if it extended to non-beta-lactam cell wall inhibitors or to other inhibitors of protein synthesis. Three MRSA and two methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strains were tested, including an isogenic pair of mecA (-)/mecA (+) S. aureus Newman. The drug interactions were determined by fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) indices and population analysis profiles. The antibacterial drugs that we used included beta-lactam (cefepime) and non-beta-lactam cell wall inhibitors (D-cycloserine, fosfomycin, vancomycin, teicoplanin), inhibitors of protein synthesis (Q-D, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, linezolid, fusidic acid), and polynucleotide inhibitors (cotrimoxazole, ciprofloxacin). The addition of each protein inhibitor to cefepime was synergistic (FIC ≤ 0.5) or additive (FIC > 0.5 but synergism was specific to beta-lactam antibiotics. Moreover, the synergism was not lost against fem mutants, indicating that it acted at another level. The restriction of the beneficial effect to MRSA suggests that the functionality of penicillin-binding protein 2A (PBP2A) was affected, either directly or indirectly. Further studies are necessary in order to provide a mechanism for this positive interaction.

  16. Adjuvant-dependent immunogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus Efb and Map proteins in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzywa, Renata; Walczak, Maciej; Łupicka-Słowik, Agnieszka; Bobrek, Kamila; Boivin, Stephane; Brown, Eric L; Gaweł, Andrzej; Stefaniak, Tadeusz; Oleksyszyn, Józef; Sieńczyk, Marcin

    2015-07-15

    The avian IgY antibodies generated in hens and isolated from egg yolk have gained in popularity as they present an alternative source of antibodies for diagnostic as well as therapeutic applications. One of the advantages of IgY technology are the large amounts of produced antibodies from a single animal combined with their high reactivity representing an attractive alternative for mammalian antibodies. Despite many known protocols for the immunization of chickens, the administration of new antigens often requires additional modification such as antigen dose or use of an adjuvant in order to elicit a significant immune response. We investigated the immunogenicity of three Staphylococcus aureus antigens including two extracellular proteins Map and Efb and one selected Efb105-124 epitope conjugated to KLH that were administered to the animals. Additionally, the immunization protocol included two adjuvant systems: Freund's complete adjuvant and Emulsigen-D. The results demonstrated a high immunostimulatory potency of Freund's complete adjuvant, especially in case of Efb compared to the immune response elicited by Emulsigen-D. However, after immunization with the KLH-Efb105-124 conjugate, the obtained antibodies showed similar reactivity regardless of adjuvant system used with the only exception being their avidity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Peptidoglycan Cross-Linking Preferences of Staphylococcus aureus Penicillin-Binding Proteins Have Implications for Treating MRSA Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisuknimit, Veerasak; Qiao, Yuan; Schaefer, Kaitlin; Kahne, Daniel; Walker, Suzanne

    2017-07-26

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are a global public health problem. MRSA strains have acquired a non-native penicillin-binding protein called PBP2a that cross-links peptidoglycan when the native S. aureus PBPs are inhibited by β-lactams. It has been proposed that the native S. aureus PBPs can use cell wall precursors having different glycine branch lengths (penta-, tri-, or monoglycine), while PBP2a can only cross-link peptidoglycan strands bearing a complete pentaglycine branch. This hypothesis has never been tested because the necessary substrates have not been available. Here, we compared the ability of PBP2a and two native S. aureus transpeptidases to cross-link peptidoglycan strands bearing different glycine branches. We show that purified PBP2a can cross-link glycan strands bearing penta- and triglycine, but not monoglycine, and experiments in cells provide support for these findings. Because PBP2a cannot cross-link peptidoglycan containing monoglycine, this study implicates the enzyme (FemA) that extends the monoglycine branch to triglycine on Lipid II as an ideal target for small molecules that restore sensitivity of MRSA to β-lactams.

  18. Evaluation of a lysostaphin-fusion protein as a dry-cow therapy for Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoernig, K J; Donovan, D M; Pithua, P; Williams, F; Middleton, J R

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a recombinant lysostaphin fused to a protein transduction domain (rLYS-PTD) as a dry-cow therapy for the treatment of experimentally induced chronic, subclinical Staphylococcus aureus mastitis. Twenty-two Holstein dairy cows were experimentally infected with Staph. aureus in a single pair of diagonal mammary quarters approximately 45d before dry off. Staphylococcus aureus-infected mammary quarters of cows were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups at dry off: (1) 279mg of rLYS-PTD in 50mL of vehicle (n=11 cows; 22 quarters) or (2) 50mL of vehicle solution (n=11 cows; 22 quarters) by intramammary infusion. All cows were followed for 30d postpartum to determine cure rates using bacteriologic culture, somatic cell counts, and clinical mastitis scores. No cures were recorded in either the treatment or control groups. Milk somatic cell count, bacterial colony counts, and mastitis scores did not significantly differ between treatment groups. In conclusion, rLYS-PTD was not an effective dry-cow therapeutic for chronic, subclinical Staph. aureus mastitis at the tested dose and formulation. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Affinity of ceftaroline and other beta-lactams for penicillin-binding proteins from Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosowska-Shick, K; McGhee, P L; Appelbaum, P C

    2010-05-01

    We compared the affinities of ceftaroline for all penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) with those of ceftriaxone and cefotaxime in 6 Staphylococcus aureus and 7 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates with various resistance phenotypes. Ceftaroline MICs were PBP1A, -1B, and -2A > PBP2B, and ceftaroline had >or=4-fold higher 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s) (0.1 to 4 microg/ml) for PBP2X, -2A, -2B, and -3 than those for the other cephalosporins tested. Among 3 penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae strains, ceftaroline had a high affinity for PBP2X (IC(50), 0.1 to 1 microg/ml), a primary target for cephalosporin PBP binding activity, and high affinities for PBP2B (IC(50), 0.5 to 4 microg/ml) and PBP1A (IC(50), 0.125 to 0.25 microg/ml) as well, both of which are also known as major targets for PBP binding activity of cephalosporins. Ceftaroline PBP affinities in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus strains were greater than or equal to those of the 3 other beta-lactams tested. Ceftaroline bound to PBP2a in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (IC(50), 0.01 to 1 microg/ml) with up to 256-fold-higher affinity than those of other agents. Ceftaroline demonstrated very good PBP affinity against all S. aureus and S. pneumoniae strains tested, including resistant isolates.

  20. The chaperone ClpX stimulates expression of Staphylococcus aureus protein A by rot dependent and independent pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Ingmer, Hanne; Valihrach, Lukás

    2010-01-01

    The Clp ATPases (Hsp100) constitute a family of closely related proteins that have protein reactivating and remodelling activities typical of molecular chaperones. In Staphylococcus aureus the ClpX chaperone is essential for virulence and for transcription of spa encoding Protein A. The present...... study was undertaken to elucidate the mechanism by which ClpX stimulates expression of Protein A. For this purpose, we prepared antibodies directed against Rot, an activator of spa transcription, and demonstrated that cells devoid of ClpX contain three-fold less Rot than wild-type cells. By varying Rot...... expression from an inducible promoter we showed that expression of Protein A requires a threshold level of Rot. In the absence of ClpX the Rot content is reduced below this threshold level, hence, explaining the substantially reduced Protein A expression in the clpX mutant. Experiments addressed...

  1. Three-Dimensional Structure and Biophysical Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Cell Surface Antigen-Manganese Transporter MntC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gribenko, Alexey; Mosyak, Lidia; Ghosh, Sharmistha; Parris, Kevin; Svenson, Kristine; Moran, Justin; Chu, Ling; Li, Sheng; Liu, Tong; Woods, Jr., Virgil L.; Jansen, Kathrin U.; Green, Bruce A.; Anderson, Annaliesa S.; Matsuka, Yury V. [Pfizer; (UCSD)

    2013-08-23

    MntC is a metal-binding protein component of the Mn2 +-specific mntABC transporter from the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. The protein is expressed during the early stages of infection and was proven to be effective at reducing both S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis infections in a murine animal model when used as a vaccine antigen. MntC is currently being tested in human clinical trials as a component of a multiantigen vaccine for the prevention of S. aureus infections. To better understand the biological function of MntC, we are providing structural and biophysical characterization of the protein in this work. The three-dimensional structure of the protein was solved by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 Å resolution and suggests two potential metal binding modes, which may lead to reversible as well as irreversible metal binding. Precise Mn2 +-binding affinity of the protein was determined from the isothermal titration calorimetry experiments using a competition approach. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments confirmed that divalent metals can indeed bind to MntC reversibly as well as irreversibly. Finally, Mn2 +-induced structural and dynamics changes have been characterized using spectroscopic methods and deuterium–hydrogen exchange mass spectroscopy. Results of the experiments show that these changes are minimal and are largely restricted to the structural elements involved in metal coordination. Therefore, it is unlikely that antibody binding to this antigen will be affected by the occupancy of the metal-binding site by Mn2 +.

  2. Mutations of the Transporter Proteins GlpT and UhpT Confer Fosfomycin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Xu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus worldwide, fosfomycin has begun to be used more often, either alone or in combination with other antibiotics, for treating methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections, resulting in the emergence of fosfomycin-resistant strains. Fosfomycin resistance is reported to be mediated by fosfomycin-modifying enzymes (FosA, FosB, FosC, and FosX and mutations of the target enzyme MurA or the membrane transporter proteins UhpT and GlpT. Our previous studies indicated that the fos genes might not the major fosfomycin resistance mechanism in S. aureus, whereas mutations of glpT and uhpT seemed to be more related to fosfomycin resistance. However, the precise role of these two genes in S. aureus fosfomycin resistance remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of glpT and uhpT in S. aureus fosfomycin resistance. Homologous recombination was used to knockout the uhpT and glpT genes in S. aureus Newman. Gene complementation was generated by the plasmid pRB473 carrying these two genes. The fosfomycin minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of the strains was measured by the E-test to observe the influence of gene deletion on antibiotic susceptibility. In addition, growth curves were constructed to determine whether the mutations have a significant influence on bacterial growth. Deletion of uhpT, glpT, and both of them led to increased fosfomycin MIC 0.5 μg/ml to 32 μg/ml, 4 μg/ml, and >1024 μg/ml, respectively. By complementing uhpT and glpT into the deletion mutants, the fosfomycin MIC decreased from 32 to 0.5 μg/ml and from 4 to 0.25 μg/ml, respectively. Moreover, the transporter gene-deleted strains showed no obvious difference in growth curves compared to the parental strain. In summary, our study strongly suggests that mutations of uhpT and glpT lead to fosfomycin resistance in S. aureus, and that uhpT mutation may play a more important role. The high

  3. [Evaluation of the effect of glucose on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilm formation on the surface of polypropylene mesh].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reśliński, Adrian; Dabrowiecki, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    One of the most serious complications associated with the use of implants in hernia surgery is deep surgical site infection involving an implanted biomaterial. Among the major etiological factors of this complication are Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli strains, which have the ability to form a biofilm on the surface of the mesh implant. This process is influenced by many factors, of which, according to current medical knowledge, the concentration of glucose may have a clinical significance. The aim of the presented study was to evaluate the effect of glucose on the formation of biofilm on the surface of monofilament polypropylene mesh. The study included 140 bacterial strains (70 S. aureus and 70 E. coli) from the collection of Department of Microbiology Collegium Medicum im. L. Rydygier in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun. Evaluation of the effect of two glucose concentrations (0.1% and 0.2%) on biofilm formation was performed using a qualitative (2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride reduction) and a quantitative ( serial 10-fold dilutions) methods. A qualitative analysis, performed after a period of incubation on substrates containing various concentrations of glucose, has revealed a statistically significant increase in the percentage of S. aureus strains with a very high potential for biofilm formation, while for E. coli an increase was observed in the percentage of strains with a low potential for biofilm formation. In a quantitative analysis of the biofilm of S. aureus forming after incubation on a substrate containing 0.1% and 0.2% glucose, significantly more colony forming units (CFUs) were isolated per one milliliter of the suspension (CFU/ml) than in the control group biofilm samples. On the other hand, the biofilm created by E. coli after a period of incubation on a substrate containing 0.2% glucose yielded significantly fewer CFUs per one milliliter than from the biofilm resulting from incubation on substrate with 0

  4. Cation specific binding with protein surface charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Berk; van der Vegt, Nico F A

    2009-08-11

    Biological organization depends on a sensitive balance of noncovalent interactions, in particular also those involving interactions between ions. Ion-pairing is qualitatively described by the law of "matching water affinities." This law predicts that cations and anions (with equal valence) form stable contact ion pairs if their sizes match. We show that this simple physical model fails to describe the interaction of cations with (molecular) anions of weak carboxylic acids, which are present on the surfaces of many intra- and extracellular proteins. We performed molecular simulations with quantitatively accurate models and observed that the order K(+) < Na(+) < Li(+) of increasing binding affinity with carboxylate ions is caused by a stronger preference for forming weak solvent-shared ion pairs. The relative insignificance of contact pair interactions with protein surfaces indicates that thermodynamic stability and interactions between proteins in alkali salt solutions is governed by interactions mediated through hydration water molecules.

  5. Understanding protein adsorption phenomena at solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabe, Michael; Verdes, Dorinel; Seeger, Stefan

    2011-02-17

    Protein adsorption at solid surfaces plays a key role in many natural processes and has therefore promoted a widespread interest in many research areas. Despite considerable progress in this field there are still widely differing and even contradictive opinions on how to explain the frequently observed phenomena such as structural rearrangements, cooperative adsorption, overshooting adsorption kinetics, or protein aggregation. In this review recent achievements and new perspectives on protein adsorption processes are comprehensively discussed. The main focus is put on commonly postulated mechanistic aspects and their translation into mathematical concepts and model descriptions. Relevant experimental and computational strategies to practically approach the field of protein adsorption mechanisms and their impact on current successes are outlined. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Protein-Protein Interactions: Structurally Conserved Residues Distinguish between Binding Sites and Exposed Protein Surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buyong Ma; Tal Elkayam; Haim Wolfson; Ruth Nussinov

    2003-01-01

    Polar residue hot spots have been observed at protein-protein binding sites. Here we show that hot spots occur predominantly at the interfaces of macromolecular complexes, distinguishing binding sites from the remainder of the surface...

  7. The Staphylococcus aureus Cell Wall-Anchored Protein Clumping Factor A Is an Important T Cell Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Keenan A; Leech, John M; Lalor, Stephen J; McCormack, Niamh; Geoghegan, Joan A; McLoughlin, Rachel M

    2017-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has become increasingly resistant to antibiotics, and vaccines offer a potential solution to this epidemic of antimicrobial resistance. Targeting of specific T cell subsets is now considered crucial for next-generation anti- S. aureus vaccines; however, there is a paucity of information regarding T cell antigens of S. aureus This study highlights the importance of cell wall-anchored proteins as human CD4 + T cell activators capable of driving antigen-specific Th1 and Th17 cell activation. Clumping factor A (ClfA), which contains N1, N2, and N3 binding domains, was found to be a potent human T cell activator. We further investigated which subdomains of ClfA were involved in T cell activation and found that the full-length ClfA N123 and N23 were potent Th1 and Th17 activators. Interestingly, the N1 subdomain was capable of exclusively activating Th1 cells. Furthermore, when these subdomains were used in a model vaccine, N23 and N1 offered Th1- and Th17-mediated systemic protection in mice upon intraperitoneal challenge. Overall, however, full-length ClfA N123 is required for maximal protection both locally and systemically. Copyright © 2017 Lacey et al.

  8. Distribution of mecA gene amongst Staphylococcus aureus isolates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    pathogenicity of S. aureus infections is associated with various bacterial surface components (e.g., capsular polysaccharide and protein A), including those recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (e.g., clumping factor and fibronectin binding protein), and to extracellular proteins (e.g., coagulase, hemolysins, enterotoxins ...

  9. Protein-mediated surface structuring in biomembranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggio B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The lipids and proteins of biomembranes exhibit highly dissimilar conformations, geometrical shapes, amphipathicity, and thermodynamic properties which constrain their two-dimensional molecular packing, electrostatics, and interaction preferences. This causes inevitable development of large local tensions that frequently relax into phase or compositional immiscibility along lateral and transverse planes of the membrane. On the other hand, these effects constitute the very codes that mediate molecular and structural changes determining and controlling the possibilities for enzymatic activity, apposition and recombination in biomembranes. The presence of proteins constitutes a major perturbing factor for the membrane sculpturing both in terms of its surface topography and dynamics. We will focus on some results from our group within this context and summarize some recent evidence for the active involvement of extrinsic (myelin basic protein, integral (Folch-Lees proteolipid protein and amphitropic (c-Fos and c-Jun proteins, as well as a membrane-active amphitropic phosphohydrolytic enzyme (neutral sphingomyelinase, in the process of lateral segregation and dynamics of phase domains, sculpturing of the surface topography, and the bi-directional modulation of the membrane biochemical reactivity.

  10. Impact of growth temperature and surface type on the resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms to disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Marwan; Khelissa, Oussama; Ibrahim, Ali; Benoliel, Corinne; Heliot, Laurent; Dhulster, Pascal; Chihib, Nour-Eddine

    2015-12-02

    Biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus on food-contact-surfaces represents a significant risk for the public health. In this context, the present study investigates the relationship between the environmental conditions of biofilm formation and the resistance to disinfectants. Therefore, a static biofilm reactor, called NEC-Biofilm System, was established in order to study the effect of growth temperature (20, 30 and 37°C), and of the surface type (stainless steel and polycarbonate), on biofilm resistance to disinfectants. These conditions were selected to mimic the biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces of food processing industries. The antibiofilm assays were performed on biofilms grown during 24 h. The results showed that the growth temperature influenced significantly the biofilm resistance to disinfectants. These data also revealed that the growth temperature has a significant effect on the biofilm structure of both bacteria. Furthermore, the increase of the biofilm growth temperature increased significantly the algD transcript level in sessile P. aeruginosa cells, whereas the icaA one was not affected in S. aureus cells. Overall, our findings show that the biofilm structure and matrix cannot fully explain the biofilm resistance to disinfectant agents. Nevertheless, it underlines the intimate link between environmental conditions, commonly met in food sectors, and the biofilm resistance to disinfectants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Electronic structure of bacterial surface protein layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslyuk, Volodymyr V.; Mertig, Ingrid; Bredow, Thomas; Mertig, Michael; Vyalikh, Denis V.; Molodtsov, Serguei L.

    2008-01-01

    We report an approach for the calculation of the electronic density of states of the dried two-dimensional crystalline surface protein layer ( S layer) of the bacterium Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602. The proposed model is based on the consideration of individual amino acids in the corresponding conformation of the peptide chain which additively contribute to the electronic structure of the entire protein complex. The derived results agree well with the experimental data obtained by means of photoemission (PE), resonant PE, and near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  12. Profiling the surfacome of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreisbach, Annette; Hempel, Kristina; Buist, Girbe; Hecker, Michael; Becher, Doerte; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    Staphylococcus aureus is a widespread opportunistic pathogen that can cause a wide variety of life-threatening diseases. Especially for the colonization of human tissues and the development of invasiveness, surface-exposed proteins are of major importance. In the present studies, we optimized a

  13. The anchorless adhesin Eap (extracellular adherence protein) from Staphylococcus aureus selectively recognizes extracellular matrix aggregates but binds promiscuously to monomeric matrix macromolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, Uwe; Hussain, Muzaffar; Villone, Daniela; Herrmann, Mathias; Robenek, Horst; Peters, Georg; Sinha, Bhanu; Bruckner, Peter

    Besides a number of cell wall-anchored adhesins, the majority of Staphylococcus aureus strains produce anchorless, cell wall-associated proteins, such as Eap (extracellular adherence protein). Eap contains four to six tandem repeat (EAP)-domains. Eap mediates diverse biological functions, including

  14. Etude de l’interaction des souches cliniques de Staphylococcus aureus avec une surface abiotique

    OpenAIRE

    Liesse Iyamba, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus est l’une des causes majeures des infections communautaires et nosocomiales. Ce germe est responsable des infections aiguës et chroniques dont la plupart sont dues à sa capacité à adhérer sur les implants médicaux et à former un biofilm. D’après le Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 65% des infections bactériennes sont dues à la présence des biofilms. En outre, les infections associées aux biofilms constituent un problème majeur en clinique et sont la cause...

  15. Identification and characterization of the surface proteins of Clostridium difficile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dailey, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    Several clostridial proteins were detected on the clostridial cell surface by sensitive radioiodination techniques. Two major proteins and six minor proteins comprised the radioiodinated proteins on the clostridial cell surface. Cellular fractionation of surface radiolabeled C. difficile determined that the radioiodinated proteins were found in the cell wall fraction of C. difficile and surprisingly were also present in the clostridial membrane. Furthermore, an interesting phenomenon of disulfide-crosslinking of the cell surface proteins of C. difficile was observed. Disulfide-linked protein complexes were found in both the membrane and cell wall fractions. In addition, the cell surface proteins of C. difficile were found to be released into the culture medium. In attempts to further characterize the clostridial proteins recombinant DNA techniques were employed. In addition, the role of the clostridial cell surface proteins in the interactions of C. difficile with human PMNs was also investigated.

  16. CvfA Protein and Polynucleotide Phosphorylase Act in an Opposing Manner to Regulate Staphylococcus aureus Virulence*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Shunsuke; Nagata, Makiko; Mao, Han; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified CvfA (SA1129) as a Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor using a silkworm infection model. S. aureus cvfA-deleted mutants exhibit decreased expression of the agr locus encoding a positive regulator of hemolysin genes and decreased hemolysin production. CvfA protein hydrolyzes a 2′,3′-cyclic phosphodiester bond at the RNA 3′ terminus, producing RNA with a 3′-phosphate (3′-phosphorylated RNA, RNA with a 3′-phosphate). Here, we report that the cvfA-deleted mutant phenotype (decreased agr expression and hemolysin production) was suppressed by disrupting pnpA-encoding polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) with 3′- to 5′-exonuclease activity. The suppression was blocked by introducing a pnpA-encoding PNPase with exonuclease activity but not by a pnpA-encoding mutant PNPase without exonuclease activity. Therefore, loss of PNPase exonuclease activity suppressed the cvfA-deleted mutant phenotype. Purified PNPase efficiently degraded RNA with 2′,3′-cyclic phosphate at the 3′ terminus (2′,3′-cyclic RNA), but it inefficiently degraded 3′-phosphorylated RNA. These findings indicate that 3′-phosphorylated RNA production from 2′,3′-cyclic RNA by CvfA prevents RNA degradation by PNPase and contributes to the expression of agr and hemolysin genes. We speculate that in the cvfA-deleted mutant, 2′,3′-cyclic RNA is not converted to the 3′-phosphorylated form and is efficiently degraded by PNPase, resulting in the loss of RNA essential for expressing agr and hemolysin genes, whereas in the cvfA/pnpA double-disrupted mutant, 2′,3′-cyclic RNA is not degraded by PNPase, leading to hemolysin production. These findings suggest that CvfA and PNPase competitively regulate RNA degradation essential for S. aureus virulence. PMID:24492613

  17. CvfA protein and polynucleotide phosphorylase act in an opposing manner to regulate Staphylococcus aureus virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Shunsuke; Nagata, Makiko; Mao, Han; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2014-03-21

    We previously identified CvfA (SA1129) as a Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor using a silkworm infection model. S. aureus cvfA-deleted mutants exhibit decreased expression of the agr locus encoding a positive regulator of hemolysin genes and decreased hemolysin production. CvfA protein hydrolyzes a 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiester bond at the RNA 3' terminus, producing RNA with a 3'-phosphate (3'-phosphorylated RNA, RNA with a 3'-phosphate). Here, we report that the cvfA-deleted mutant phenotype (decreased agr expression and hemolysin production) was suppressed by disrupting pnpA-encoding polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) with 3'- to 5'-exonuclease activity. The suppression was blocked by introducing a pnpA-encoding PNPase with exonuclease activity but not by a pnpA-encoding mutant PNPase without exonuclease activity. Therefore, loss of PNPase exonuclease activity suppressed the cvfA-deleted mutant phenotype. Purified PNPase efficiently degraded RNA with 2',3'-cyclic phosphate at the 3' terminus (2',3'-cyclic RNA), but it inefficiently degraded 3'-phosphorylated RNA. These findings indicate that 3'-phosphorylated RNA production from 2',3'-cyclic RNA by CvfA prevents RNA degradation by PNPase and contributes to the expression of agr and hemolysin genes. We speculate that in the cvfA-deleted mutant, 2',3'-cyclic RNA is not converted to the 3'-phosphorylated form and is efficiently degraded by PNPase, resulting in the loss of RNA essential for expressing agr and hemolysin genes, whereas in the cvfA/pnpA double-disrupted mutant, 2',3'-cyclic RNA is not degraded by PNPase, leading to hemolysin production. These findings suggest that CvfA and PNPase competitively regulate RNA degradation essential for S. aureus virulence.

  18. Applications of yeast surface display for protein engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherf, Gerald M.; Cochran, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    The method of displaying recombinant proteins on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae via genetic fusion to an abundant cell wall protein, a technology known as yeast surface display, or simply, yeast display, has become a valuable protein engineering tool for a broad spectrum of biotechnology and biomedical applications. This review focuses on the use of yeast display for engineering protein affinity, stability, and enzymatic activity. Strategies and examples for each protein engineering goal are discussed. Additional applications of yeast display are also briefly presented, including protein epitope mapping, identification of protein-protein interactions, and uses of displayed proteins in industry and medicine. PMID:26060074

  19. Trichomonas vaginalis surface proteins: a view from the genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirt, R. P.; Noel, C. J.; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Surface proteins of mucosal microbial pathogens play multiple and essential roles in initiating and sustaining the colonization of the heavily defended mucosa. The protist Trichomonas vaginalis is one of the most common human sexually transmitted pathogens that colonize the urogenital mucosa....... However, little is known about its surface proteins. The recently completed draft genome sequence of T. vaginalis provides an invaluable resource to guide molecular and cellular characterization of surface proteins and to investigate their role in pathogenicity. Here, we review the existing data on T....... vaginalis surface proteins and summarize some of the main findings from the recent in silico characterization of its candidate surface proteins....

  20. Protein S-Bacillithiolation Functions in Thiol Protection and Redox Regulation of the Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Gap in Staphylococcus aureus Under Hypochlorite Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imber, Marcel; Huyen, Nguyen Thi Thu; Pietrzyk-Brzezinska, Agnieszka J; Loi, Vu Van; Hillion, Melanie; Bernhardt, Jörg; Thärichen, Lena; Kolšek, Katra; Saleh, Malek; Hamilton, Chris J; Adrian, Lorenz; Gräter, Frauke; Wahl, Markus C; Antelmann, Haike

    2018-02-20

    Bacillithiol (BSH) is the major low-molecular-weight thiol of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. In this study, we used OxICAT and Voronoi redox treemaps to quantify hypochlorite-sensitive protein thiols in S. aureus USA300 and analyzed the role of BSH in protein S-bacillithiolation. The OxICAT analyses enabled the quantification of 228 Cys residues in the redox proteome of S. aureus USA300. Hypochlorite stress resulted in >10% increased oxidation of 58 Cys residues (25.4%) in the thiol redox proteome. Among the highly oxidized sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl)-sensitive proteins are five S-bacillithiolated proteins (Gap, AldA, GuaB, RpmJ, and PpaC). The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P) dehydrogenase Gap represents the most abundant S-bacillithiolated protein contributing 4% to the total Cys proteome. The active site Cys151 of Gap was very sensitive to overoxidation and irreversible inactivation by hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) or NaOCl in vitro. Treatment with H 2 O 2 or NaOCl in the presence of BSH resulted in reversible Gap inactivation due to S-bacillithiolation, which could be regenerated by the bacilliredoxin Brx (SAUSA300_1321) in vitro. Molecular docking was used to model the S-bacillithiolated Gap active site, suggesting that formation of the BSH mixed disulfide does not require major structural changes. Conclusion and Innovation: Using OxICAT analyses, we identified 58 novel NaOCl-sensitive proteins in the pathogen S. aureus that could play protective roles against the host immune defense and include the glycolytic Gap as major target for S-bacillithiolation. S-bacillithiolation of Gap did not require structural changes, but efficiently functions in redox regulation and protection of the active site against irreversible overoxidation in S. aureus. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 410-430.

  1. Biofilm-specific surface properties and protein expression in oral Streptococcus sanguis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Catherine; Allan, Iain; Ford, Susannah K; Wilson, Michael; McNab, Roderick

    2004-04-01

    Oral streptococci are primary colonisers of the tooth surface and are abundant in dental plaque biofilms. Bacteria growing in these relatively dense, surface-associated communities are phenotypically quite distinct from their planktonic counterparts. The purpose of the present study was to develop a method to investigate biofilm-specific surface protein expression by Streptococcus sanguis to help provide a better understanding of the critical events in plaque development. Biofilm cells were grown on the surface of glass beads in a biofilm device fed with mucin-containing artificial saliva. Planktonic cells were grown in continuous culture at approximately the same growth rate. Surface hydrophobicity of biofilm and planktonic cells was determined by hexadecane partitioning, and expression of streptococcal fibronectin adhesin CshA was determined in ELISA using specific antiserum. Antisera raised to glutaraldehyde-fixed whole biofilm or planktonic grown cells were used to screen an expression library of S. sanguis genomic DNA, and isolated clones were sequenced. Phenotypic analysis of biofilm and planktonic cells confirmed that mode of growth affected surface properties of S. sanguis. Thus, hydrophobicity and CshA expression was significantly elevated in biofilm cells. Library screening with biofilm antiserum yielded 32 recombinant clones representing 21 different S. sanguis proteins involved in adhesion and colonisation, carbohydrate utilisation or bacterial metabolism. In differential analysis of four selected Escherichia coli clones, biofilm antiserum reacted five times stronger than planktonic antiserum with cell-free extracts of clones encoding homologues of CshA and Cna collagen adhesin of Staphylococcus aureus, suggesting that these surface proteins are up-regulated in biofilm cells. In contrast, both antisera reacted equally strongly with cell-free extracts of the remaining two clones (encoding dihydrofolate synthase and an unknown protein). The method

  2. Protein nanotubes with an enzyme interior surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Teruyuki; Terada, Hiromi; Kobayashi, Nao

    2011-02-07

    This report describes the synthesis and enzyme activities of multilayered protein nanotubes with an α-glucosidase (αGluD) interior surface. The nanotubes were prepared by using an alternating layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of human serum albumin (HSA) and oppositely charged poly-L-arginine (PLA) into a track-etched polycarbonate (PC) membrane (pore size=400 nm) followed by addition of αGluD as the last layer of the wall. Subsequent dissolution of the PC template yielded (PLA/HSA)(2)PLA/αGluD nanotubes. SEM measurements revealed the formation of uniform hollow cylinders with (413±17) nm outer diameter and (52±3) nm wall thickness. In aqueous media, the nanotubes captured a fluorogenic glucopyranoside, 4-methyl-umbelliferyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (MUGlc), into their one-dimensional pore space and hydrolyzed the substrate efficiently to form α-D-glucose. We determined the enzyme parameters (Michaelis constant, K(M), and catalytic constant, k(cat), values) of the protein nanotubes. The several-micrometers-long cylinders were of sufficient length to be spun down by centrifugation at 4000 g, so the product could therefore be easily separated. Similar biocatalysts were prepared by complexation of biotinylated-αGluD into HSA-based nanotubes bearing a single avidin layer as an internal surface. The obtained hybrid nanotubes also exhibited the same enzyme activity for the MUGlc hydrolysis. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Inhibition of colony-spreading activity of Staphylococcus aureus by secretion of δ-hemolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omae, Yosuke; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2012-05-04

    Staphylococcus aureus spreads on the surface of soft agar, a phenomenon we termed "colony spreading." Here, we found that S. aureus culture supernatant inhibited colony spreading. We purified δ-hemolysin (Hld, δ-toxin), a major protein secreted from S. aureus, as a compound that inhibits colony spreading. The culture supernatants of hld-disrupted mutants had 30-fold lower colony-spreading inhibitory activity than those of the parent strain. Furthermore, hld-disrupted mutants had higher colony-spreading ability than the parent strain. These results suggest that S. aureus negatively regulates colony spreading by secreting δ-hemolysin.

  4. Inhibition of Colony-spreading Activity of Staphylococcus aureus by Secretion of δ-Hemolysin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omae, Yosuke; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus spreads on the surface of soft agar, a phenomenon we termed “colony spreading.” Here, we found that S. aureus culture supernatant inhibited colony spreading. We purified δ-hemolysin (Hld, δ-toxin), a major protein secreted from S. aureus, as a compound that inhibits colony spreading. The culture supernatants of hld-disrupted mutants had 30-fold lower colony-spreading inhibitory activity than those of the parent strain. Furthermore, hld-disrupted mutants had higher colony-spreading ability than the parent strain. These results suggest that S. aureus negatively regulates colony spreading by secreting δ-hemolysin. PMID:22411996

  5. Crustin protein Amk1 from black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon inhibits Vibrio harveyi and Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moltira Tonganunt1*

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A crustin gene (Amk1 was identified from a haemocyte library of the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon. The full-length cDNA consists of 411 bp encoding a deduced precursor of 136 amino acids with a signal peptide of 17 aminoacids. Amk1 contains a hydrophobic and a Gly-rich region at the N-terminus and a 12 conserved cysteine domain (6-DSC at the C-terminus. Transcripts of Amk1 are mainly detected in haemocytes and gills by RT-PCR analysis. A recombinant Amk1was overexpressed and purified from Escherichia coli. This has a molecular mass of 43.66 kDa with a predicted pI of 8.23. Antibacterial assays demonstrated that recombinant Amk1 exhibited antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gramnegativebacteria with strong inhibition against Staphylococcus aureus and Vibrio harveyi.

  6. Surface protein EF3314 contributes to virulence properties of Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creti, Roberta; Fabretti, Francesca; Koch, Stefanie; Huebner, Johannes; Garsin, Danielle A; Baldassarri, Lucilla; Montanaro, Lucio; Arciola, Carla Renata

    2009-09-01

    Identification of putative new virulence factors as additional targets for therapeutic approaches alternative to antibiotic treatment of multi-resistant enterococcal infections. The EF3314 gene, coding for a putative surface-exposed antigen, was identified by the analysis of the Enterococcus faecalis V583 genome for LPXTG-motif cell wall anchor surface protein genes. A non-polar EF3314 gene deletion mutant in the E. faecalis 12030 human clinical isolate was obtained. The wild type and the isogenic mutant strain were investigated for biofilm formation, adherence to Hela cells, survival in human macrophages and a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. The aminoterminal portion of the EF3314 protein was overexpressed in E. coli to obtain mouse polyclonal antibodies for use in Western blotting and immunolocalization experiments. The EF3314 gene has an unusually high GC content (46.88% vs. an average of 37.5% in the E. faecalis chromosome) and encodes a protein of 1744 amino acids that presents a series of 14 imperfect repeats of 90 amino acids covering almost the entire length of the protein. Its global organization is similar to the alpha-like protein family of group B streptococci, enterococcal surface protein Esp and biofilm associated protein Bap from S. aureus. The EF3314 gene was always present and specific for E. faecalis strains of human, food and animal origin. Differences in size depended on variable numbers of repeats in the repetitive region. EF3314 is a newly described, surface exposed protein that contributes to the virulence properties of E. faecalis.

  7. Expression of acute phase proteins and inflammatory cytokines in mouse mammary gland following Staphylococcus aureus challenge and in response to milk accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazemi, Sasan; Aalbæk, Bent; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    We used a mouse model of pathogenic (Staphylococcus aureus) and non-pathogenic (teat sealing) mammary inflammation to investigate mRNA expression of several inflammatory cytokines and acute phase proteins (APP) in mammary tissue and liver, and the appearance of some of these factors in plasma...... and milk. The expression levels of IL1β and TNFα were markedly up-regulated in Staph. aureus-inoculated mammary tissue at 72 h, whilst IL6 was up-regulated to a lesser extent in a way which was not confined to the inoculated glands. APP expression was up-regulated at 48 and 72 h in both Staph. aureus......-inoculated and teat-sealed mammary glands. These differences between cytokine and APP expression provide additional support for the contention that APPs are produced within the mammary tissue itself during inflammation, rather than in associated immune cells. We propose that measurement of cytokines and APP...

  8. The phage lytic proteins from the Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88 display multiple active catalytic domains and do not trigger staphylococcal resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Rodríguez-Rubio

    Full Text Available The increase in antibiotic resistance world-wide revitalized the interest in the use of phage lysins to combat pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we analyzed the specific cleavage sites on the staphylococcal peptidoglycan produced by three phage lytic proteins. The investigated cell wall lytic enzymes were the endolysin LysH5 derived from the S. aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phi-IPLA88 (phi-IPLA88 and two fusion proteins between lysostaphin and the virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolase HydH5 (HydH5SH3b and HydH5Lyso. We determined that all catalytic domains present in these proteins were active. Additionally, we tested for the emergence of resistant Staphylococcus aureus to any of the three phage lytic proteins constructs. Resistant S. aureus could not be identified after 10 cycles of bacterial exposure to phage lytic proteins either in liquid or plate cultures. However, a quick increase in lysostaphin resistance (up to 1000-fold in liquid culture was observed. The lack of resistant development supports the use of phage lytic proteins as future therapeutics to treat staphylococcal infections.

  9. ADAM10 Cell Surface Expression but Not Activity Is Critical for Staphylococcus aureus α-Hemolysin-Mediated Activation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human Monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezekwe, Ejiofor A D; Weng, Chengyu; Duncan, Joseph A

    2016-03-30

    The Staphylococcus aureus toxin, α-hemolysin, is an important and well-studied virulence factor in staphylococcal infection. It is a soluble monomeric protein that, once secreted by the bacterium, forms a heptameric pore in the membrane of a broad range of host cell types. Hemolysin was recently discovered to bind and activate a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10). In epithelial and endothelial cells, ADAM10 activation is required for the toxin's activity against these cells. In host monocytic cells, α-hemolysin activates the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing gene family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome leading to production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell death. We now show that ADAM10 is critical for α-hemolysin-mediated activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes as siRNA knockdown or chemical blockade of ADAM10-α-hemolysin interaction leads to diminished inflammasome activation and cell death by reducing the available ADAM10 on the cell surface. Unlike epithelial cell and endothelial cell damage, which requires α-hemolysin induced ADAM10 activation, ADAM10 protease activity was not required for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. This work confirms the importance of ADAM10 in immune activation by α-hemolysin, but indicates that host cell signal induction by the toxin is different between host cell types.

  10. Computational Protein Design with Explicit Consideration of Surface Hydrophobic Patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacak, Ron; Leaver-Fay, Andrew; Kuhlman, Brian

    2011-01-01

    De novo protein design requires the identification of amino-acid sequences that favor the target folded conformation and are soluble in water. One strategy for promoting solubility is to disallow hydrophobic residues on the protein surface during design. However, naturally occurring proteins often have hydrophobic amino acids on their surface that contribute to protein stability via the partial burial of hydrophobic surface area or play a key role in the formation of protein-protein interactions. A less restrictive approach for surface design that is used by the modeling program Rosetta is to parameterize the energy function so that the number of hydrophobic amino acids designed on the protein surface is similar to what is observed in naturally occurring monomeric proteins. Previous studies with Rosetta have shown that this limits surface hydrophobics to the naturally occurring frequency (~28%) but that it does not prevent the formation of hydrophobic patches that are considerably larger than those observed in naturally occurring proteins. Here, we describe a new score term that explicitly detects and penalizes the formation of hydrophobic patches during computational protein design. With the new term we are able to design protein surfaces that include hydrophobic amino acids at naturally occurring frequencies, but do not have large hydrophobic patches. By adjusting the strength of the new score term the emphasis of surface redesigns can be switched between maintaining solubility and maximizing folding free energy. PMID:22223219

  11. Identification of surface proteins in Enterococcus faecalis V583

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eijsink Vincent GH

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surface proteins are a key to a deeper understanding of the behaviour of Gram-positive bacteria interacting with the human gastro-intestinal tract. Such proteins contribute to cell wall synthesis and maintenance and are important for interactions between the bacterial cell and the human host. Since they are exposed and may play roles in pathogenicity, surface proteins are interesting targets for drug design. Results Using methods based on proteolytic "shaving" of bacterial cells and subsequent mass spectrometry-based protein identification, we have identified surface-located proteins in Enterococcus faecalis V583. In total 69 unique proteins were identified, few of which have been identified and characterized previously. 33 of these proteins are predicted to be cytoplasmic, whereas the other 36 are predicted to have surface locations (31 or to be secreted (5. Lipid-anchored proteins were the most dominant among the identified surface proteins. The seemingly most abundant surface proteins included a membrane protein with a potentially shedded extracellular sulfatase domain that could act on the sulfate groups in mucin and a lipid-anchored fumarate reductase that could contribute to generation of reactive oxygen species. Conclusions The present proteome analysis gives an experimental impression of the protein landscape on the cell surface of the pathogenic bacterium E. faecalis. The 36 identified secreted (5 and surface (31 proteins included several proteins involved in cell wall synthesis, pheromone-regulated processes, and transport of solutes, as well as proteins with unknown function. These proteins stand out as interesting targets for further investigation of the interaction between E. faecalis and its environment.

  12. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS MASTITIS VACCINES ON THE MILK YIELD, FAT, PROTEIN AND SOMATIC CELL COUNT IN BUFFALOES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. SHAKOOR, M. ATHAR, G. MUHAMMAD, S. U. RAHMAN1, A. A. BUTT2, I. HUSSAIN1 AND R. AHMAD3

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Four Staph. aureus mastitis vaccines were evaluated in five different groups of non-mastitic healthy pregnant buffaloes. These vaccines [live attenuated (Group B1, simple bacterin (Group B2, dextran sulphate adjuvanted (Group B3 and oil adjuvanted (Group B4] were administered to 20 non-mastitic healthy pregnant buffaloes, while the group 5 was kept as unvaccinated control. Each vaccine was administered twice @ 5 ml IM at 60 and 30 days pre-partum. The effect of these vaccines on milk yield, fat, protein, and somatic cell count was studied till 4th month post partum. There was a significant difference in the milk yield, fat and protein percentage between the vaccinated and non-vaccinated groups, while difference of these parameters among the vaccinated groups of buffaloes was non significant. All the vaccines reduced the somatic cell count significantly as compared to control group. Linear somatic cell count scouring method indicated the highest milk loss/lactation in the control group (1086 litres, followed by bacterin (703 litres, dextran sulphate (549 litres, live attenuated (526 litres and oil based (577 litres vaccines.

  13. The S. aureus polysaccharide capsule and Efb-dependent fibrinogen shield act in concert to protect against phagocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kuipers, Annemarie; Stapels, Daphne A.C.; Weerwind, Lleroy T.; Ko, Ya-Ping; Ruyken, Maartje; Lee, Jean C.; van Kessel, Kok P. M.; Rooijakkers, Suzan H. M.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has developed many mechanisms to escape from human immune responses. In order to resist phagocytic clearance, S. aureus expresses a polysaccharide capsule, which effectively masks the bacterial surface and surface-associated proteins, such as opsonins, from recognition by phagocytic cells. Additionally, secretion of the Extracellular fibrinogen binding protein (Efb) potently blocks phagocytic uptake of the pathogen. Efb creates a fibrinogen shield surrounding the bacteri...

  14. Structures of multidomain proteins adsorbed on hydrophobic interaction chromatography surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gospodarek, Adrian M; Sun, Weitong; O'Connell, John P; Fernandez, Erik J

    2014-12-05

    In hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), interactions between buried hydrophobic residues and HIC surfaces can cause conformational changes that interfere with separations and cause yield losses. This paper extends our previous investigations of protein unfolding in HIC chromatography by identifying protein structures on HIC surfaces under denaturing conditions and relating them to solution behavior. The thermal unfolding of three model multidomain proteins on three HIC surfaces of differing hydrophobicities was investigated with hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HXMS). The data were analyzed to obtain unfolding rates and Gibbs free energies for unfolding of adsorbed proteins. The melting temperatures of the proteins were lowered, but by different amounts, on the different surfaces. In addition, the structures of the proteins on the chromatographic surfaces were similar to the partially unfolded structures produced in the absence of a surface by temperature as well as by chemical denaturants. Finally, it was found that patterns of residue exposure to solvent on different surfaces at different temperatures can be largely superimposed. These findings suggest that protein unfolding on various HIC surfaces might be quantitatively related to protein unfolding in solution and that details of surface unfolding behavior might be generalized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Colonization of epidermal tissue by Staphylococcus aureus produces localized hypoxia and stimulates secretion of antioxidant and caspase-14 proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    A partial-thickness epidermal explant model was colonized with GFP-expressing S. aureus and the pattern of S. aureus biofilm growth was characterized using electron and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Oxygen concentration in explants and H2O2 in media was quantified using microelectrodes. The re...

  16. The effectiveness of three home products in cleaning and disinfection of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli on home environmental surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, N; Brouillette, N; Tenaglia, K; Gore, R; Marshall, J

    2015-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate three products for: (i) cleaning effectiveness on two common household surfaces, and (ii) disinfection effectiveness against two common bacteria. Products included conventional ('bleach'), environmentally preferable (EP), do-it-yourself (DIY: distilled white vinegar, club soda, tea tree oil), 24-h old DIY, and individual DIY components in dilution. For cleaning ceramic, no product was effective (≥85% removal of Hucker's soil), however, DIY performed better than EP and bleach. On stainless, only DIY failed to meet the standard. For disinfection, bleach and EP achieved ≥5·00 log10 reductions under all conditions. DIY and components were more active against Escherichia coli than Staphylococcus aureus but only fresh DIY and 50% vinegar achieved ≥5·00 log10 reductions. EP is an effective alternative to bleach. DIY may be an adequate alternative for cleaning ceramic and for household use, where complete elimination of micro-organisms is unnecessary; however, it must be freshly prepared each day. This is the first report of performance of purportedly safer alternatives for both cleaning and disinfection for use in home health care. The EP product and DIY are potential alternatives for some household uses. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Identification of Host Defense-Related Proteins Using Label-Free Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Milk Whey from Cows with Staphylococcus aureus Subclinical Mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmegid, Shaimaa; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Abo-Ismail, Mohamed; Caswell, Jeff L; Kelton, David; Kirby, Gordon M

    2017-12-28

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common contagious pathogen associated with bovine subclinical mastitis. Current diagnosis of S. aureus mastitis is based on bacteriological culture of milk samples and somatic cell counts, which lack either sensitivity or specificity. Identification of milk proteins that contribute to host defense and their variable responses to pathogenic stimuli would enable the characterization of putative biomarkers of subclinical mastitis. To accomplish this, milk whey samples from healthy and mastitic dairy cows were analyzed using a label-free quantitative proteomics approach. In total, 90 proteins were identified, of which 25 showed significant differential abundance between healthy and mastitic samples. In silico functional analyses indicated the involvement of the differentially abundant proteins in biological mechanisms and signaling pathways related to host defense including pathogen-recognition, direct antimicrobial function, and the acute-phase response. This proteomics and bioinformatics analysis not only facilitates the identification of putative biomarkers of S. aureus subclinical mastitis but also recapitulates previous findings demonstrating the abundance of host defense proteins in intramammary infection. All mass spectrometry data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD007516 .

  18. Identification of Host Defense-Related Proteins Using Label-Free Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Milk Whey from Cows with Staphylococcus aureus Subclinical Mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaimaa Abdelmegid

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is the most common contagious pathogen associated with bovine subclinical mastitis. Current diagnosis of S. aureus mastitis is based on bacteriological culture of milk samples and somatic cell counts, which lack either sensitivity or specificity. Identification of milk proteins that contribute to host defense and their variable responses to pathogenic stimuli would enable the characterization of putative biomarkers of subclinical mastitis. To accomplish this, milk whey samples from healthy and mastitic dairy cows were analyzed using a label-free quantitative proteomics approach. In total, 90 proteins were identified, of which 25 showed significant differential abundance between healthy and mastitic samples. In silico functional analyses indicated the involvement of the differentially abundant proteins in biological mechanisms and signaling pathways related to host defense including pathogen-recognition, direct antimicrobial function, and the acute-phase response. This proteomics and bioinformatics analysis not only facilitates the identification of putative biomarkers of S. aureus subclinical mastitis but also recapitulates previous findings demonstrating the abundance of host defense proteins in intramammary infection. All mass spectrometry data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD007516.

  19. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of GatD, a glutamine amidotransferase-like protein from Staphylococcus aureus peptidoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Diana; Figueiredo, Teresa A; Verma, Anil; Sobral, Rita G; Ludovice, Ana M; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Trincao, Jose

    2014-05-01

    Amidation of peptidoglycan is an essential feature in Staphylococcus aureus that is necessary for resistance to β-lactams and lysozyme. GatD, a 27 kDa type I glutamine amidotransferase-like protein, together with MurT ligase, catalyses the amidation reaction of the glutamic acid residues of the peptidoglycan of S. aureus. The native and the selenomethionine-derivative proteins were crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method with polyethylene glycol, sodium acetate and calcium acetate. The crystals obtained diffracted beyond 1.85 and 2.25 Å, respectively, and belonged to space group P212121. X-ray diffraction data sets were collected at Diamond Light Source (on beamlines I02 and I04) and were used to obtain initial phases.

  20. Computational design of protein interactions: designing proteins that neutralize influenza by inhibiting its hemagglutinin surface protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Sarel

    2012-02-01

    Molecular recognition underlies all life processes. Design of interactions not seen in nature is a test of our understanding of molecular recognition and could unlock the vast potential of subtle control over molecular interaction networks, allowing the design of novel diagnostics and therapeutics for basic and applied research. We developed the first general method for designing protein interactions. The method starts by computing a region of high affinity interactions between dismembered amino acid residues and the target surface and then identifying proteins that can harbor these residues. Designs are tested experimentally for binding the target surface and successful ones are affinity matured using yeast cell surface display. Applied to the conserved stem region of influenza hemagglutinin we designed two unrelated proteins that, following affinity maturation, bound hemagglutinin at subnanomolar dissociation constants. Co-crystal structures of hemagglutinin bound to the two designed binders were within 1Angstrom RMSd of their models, validating the accuracy of the design strategy. One of the designed proteins inhibits the conformational changes that underlie hemagglutinin's cell-invasion functions and blocks virus infectivity in cell culture, suggesting that such proteins may in future serve as diagnostics and antivirals against a wide range of pathogenic influenza strains. We have used this method to obtain experimentally validated binders of several other target proteins, demonstrating the generality of the approach. We discuss the combination of modeling and high-throughput characterization of design variants which has been key to the success of this approach, as well as how we have used the data obtained in this project to enhance our understanding of molecular recognition. References: Science 332:816 JMB, in press Protein Sci 20:753

  1. Competitive protein adsorption on polysaccharide and hyaluronate modified surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombelli, Michela; Costello, Lauren; Postle, Corinne; Anantharaman, Vinod; Meng, Qing Cheng; Composto, Russell J; Eckmann, David M

    2011-05-01

    Adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and fibrinogen (Fg) was measured on six distinct bare and dextran- and hyaluronate-modified silicon surfaces created using two dextran grafting densities and three hyaluronic acid (HA) sodium salts derived from human umbilical cord, rooster comb and Streptococcus zooepidemicus. Film thickness and surface morphology depended on the HA molecular weight and concentration. BSA coverage was enhanced on surfaces in competitive adsorption of BSA:Fg mixtures. Dextranization differentially reduced protein adsorption onto surfaces based on oxidation state. Hyaluronization was demonstrated to provide the greatest resistance to protein coverage, equivalent to that of the most resistant dextranized surface. Resistance to protein adsorption was independent of the type of HA utilized. With changing bulk protein concentration from 20 to 40 μg ml(-1) for each species, Fg coverage on silicon increased by 4x, whereas both BSA and Fg adsorption on dextran and HA were far less dependent on protein bulk concentration.

  2. Correlation of penicillin Binding protein 2a detection with oxacillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus and discovery of a novel penicillin binding protein 2a mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressler, Adam M; Williams, Teresa; Culler, Elizabeth E; Zhu, Wenming; Lonsway, David; Patel, Jean B; Nolte, Frederick S

    2005-09-01

    We compared a rapid slide latex agglutination test (LAT; Oxoid, Basingstoke, United Kingdom) that detects penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP2a) with MicroScan conventional panels (Dade Behring, West Sacramento, CA) for detection of oxacillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. The PBP2a LAT demonstrated 99% agreement with MicroScan oxacillin MIC results for 388 isolates of S. aureus. All 249 oxacillin-resistant isolates gave strong positive reactions in the LAT (100% sensitivity). Three of the 139 oxacillin-susceptible isolates were also strongly positive and one was weakly positive in the LAT (97.1% specificity). The three oxacillin-susceptible isolates with strongly positive reactions were further characterized. The mecA gene was detected in all three by PCR; one isolate was determined to be resistant to oxacillin by reference broth microdilution testing (MIC, 8 microg/ml), one isolate was inducibly resistant to oxacillin (MIC of 16 microg/ml after overnight induction), and one isolate remained susceptible regardless of the method used for testing. Sequence analysis of a 2.1-kb gene fragment of the mecA gene from the susceptible isolate revealed a one-base substitution at nucleotide position 1449 which results in a Met-to-Ile change for amino acid residue 483. This amino acid substitution has not been previously reported and may be associated with a change in the function of PBP2a resulting in oxacillin susceptibility. An additional 487 isolates were tested in parallel with the both the LAT and MicroScan panels using criteria in which only strong (3 to 4+) or repeatedly weak (1 to 2+) LAT reactions were considered positive, and the results showed 99.4% agreement. The PBP2a LAT provided rapid and reliable detection of oxacillin resistance and proved a useful adjunct to the phenotypic method. Both methods provided reliable detection of oxacillin-resistant S. aureus and facilitated the discovery of a novel, functionally impaired form of PBP2a.

  3. The effect of Virkon S fogging on survival of Salmonella enterica and Staphylococcus aureus on surfaces in a veterinary teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunowska, Magdalena; Morley, Paul S; Hyatt, Doreene R

    2005-02-25

    The objective of the study was to determine the disinfection efficacy of aerosolizing (cold fogging) Virkon S on survival of Stahpylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica on different surfaces. Two experiments were conducted in different locations. Salmonella enterica and S. aureus were grown in broth culture and then seeded into pre-marked areas in each location and allowed to dry. Virkon S (1%) was aerosolized into the rooms (approximately 1L of per 30 m(3)). Samples were collected pre- and post-fogging for quantitative cultures to evaluate the efficacy of aerial disinfection. The reduction of S. enterica or S. aureus counts ranged from 3.40 to 0.95 log(10) (Salmonella) or 4.92 to 0.02 log(10) (Staphylococcus). The greatest reduction was evident in samples collected from non-porous horizontal surfaces, which were not obstructed from the air flow. These results indicate that fogging with Virkon S could be beneficial in routine disinfection of pre-cleaned surfaces. The benefits of routine use of cold fogging with Virkon S in veterinary hospital settings would include its wide-range antimicrobial action and minimal working-men power required to disinfect large areas. Also, fogging would potentially minimize microbial contamination in the hard to reach areas.

  4. Extracellular adherence protein of Staphylococcus aureus suppresses disease by inhibiting T-cell recruitment in a mouse model of psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Honglin; von Rohrscheidt, Julia; Roehrbein, Jan; Peters, Thorsten; Sindrilaru, Anca; Kess, Daniel; Preissner, Klaus T; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin

    2010-03-01

    Psoriasis is a T-cell-mediated inflammatory disease. Previous studies focused on lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1)-expressing T cells as a molecular target for therapeutic intervention. By contrast, information on therapeutic effects and the underlying mechanism of blocking the LFA-1 counter receptor, ICAM-1 is scarce. Here, we used the CD18 (beta2-integrin) hypomorphic (CD18hypo) mouse model of psoriasis to investigate the therapeutic role of extracellular adherence protein (Eap) of Staphylococcus aureus, which exerts antiinflammatory activities by interacting with the ICAM-1 function. We show that ICAM-1 is predominantly upregulated on endothelial cells in lesional skin of CD18hypo mice. In vitro Eap was found to disrupt cell-cell contacts between T cells and dendritic cells, and inhibit T-cell proliferation. By contrast, in vivo Eap rather blocked transmigration of T cells from vessels to inflamed skin of CD18hypo mice, but did not inhibit their proliferation and activation. Most importantly, Eap successfully suppressed the disease by blocking T-cell extravasation into the inflamed skin. Together, these data indicate that interaction between LFA-1 and ICAM-1 is causally involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasiform skin inflammation, and targeting ICAM-1 to selectively block T-cell extravasation by Eap without immune suppression may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for psoriasis.

  5. VASCo: computation and visualization of annotated protein surface contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thallinger Gerhard G

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural data from crystallographic analyses contain a vast amount of information on protein-protein contacts. Knowledge on protein-protein interactions is essential for understanding many processes in living cells. The methods to investigate these interactions range from genetics to biophysics, crystallography, bioinformatics and computer modeling. Also crystal contact information can be useful to understand biologically relevant protein oligomerisation as they rely in principle on the same physico-chemical interaction forces. Visualization of crystal and biological contact data including different surface properties can help to analyse protein-protein interactions. Results VASCo is a program package for the calculation of protein surface properties and the visualization of annotated surfaces. Special emphasis is laid on protein-protein interactions, which are calculated based on surface point distances. The same approach is used to compare surfaces of two aligned molecules. Molecular properties such as electrostatic potential or hydrophobicity are mapped onto these surface points. Molecular surfaces and the corresponding properties are calculated using well established programs integrated into the package, as well as using custom developed programs. The modular package can easily be extended to include new properties for annotation. The output of the program is most conveniently displayed in PyMOL using a custom-made plug-in. Conclusion VASCo supplements other available protein contact visualisation tools and provides additional information on biological interactions as well as on crystal contacts. The tool provides a unique feature to compare surfaces of two aligned molecules based on point distances and thereby facilitates the visualization and analysis of surface differences.

  6. Directed Supramolecular Surface Assembly of SNAP-tag Fusion Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uhlenheuer, D.A.; Wasserberg, D.; Haase, C.; Nguyen, Hoang D.; Schenkel, J.H.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Ravoo, B.J.; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Brunsveld, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular assembly of proteins on surfaces and vesicles was investigated by site-selective incorporation of a supramolecular guest element on proteins. Fluorescent proteins were site-selectively labeled with bisadamantane by SNAP-tag technology. The assembly of the bisadamantane functionalized

  7. Hydrophobic patches on the surfaces of protein structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijnzaad, P.; Berendsen, H.J.C.; Argos, P.

    A survey of hydrophobic patches on the surface of 112 soluble, monomeric proteins is presented, The largest patch on each individual protein averages around 400 Angstrom(2) but can range from 200 to 1,200 Angstrom(2). These areas are not correlated to the sizes of the proteins and only weakly to

  8. Competitive protein adsorption to polymer surface from human serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Jensen, Karin Bagger Stibius; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2008-01-01

    Surface modification by "soft" plasma polymerisation to obtain a hydrophilic and non-fouling polymer surface has been validated using radioactive labelling. Adsorption to unmodified and modified polymer surfaces, from both single protein and human serum solutions, has been investigated. By using...

  9. Decorating microbes : surface display of proteins on Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bloois, Edwin; Winter, Remko T.; Kolmar, Harald; Fraaije, Marco W.

    Bacterial surface display entails the presentation of recombinant proteins or peptides on the surface of bacterial cells. Escherichia coil is the most frequently used bacterial host for surface display and, as such, a variety of E. coil display systems have been described that primarily promote the

  10. Interactions of proteins in gels, solutions and on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Radha Perumal

    2006-12-01

    The study of protein interaction, identification and separation has applications in various fields relating to Biotechnology. In this research these aspects were investigated. The proteins albumin, casein, poly-L-lysine were studied. FITC and TRITC were used to fluorescently tag the proteins. Confocal microscopy was used to image the interaction of proteins. The migration of fluorescently tagged protein-salt aggregates on solid surfaces during electrophoresis was investigated using Confocal microscopy. The secondary structural modifications of proteins in solutions were investigated using FTIR micro spectroscopic imaging. The size of the colloids formed due to protein-protein interactions as a function of the protein concentrations were studied using DLS and their charges were found using zeta potential measurements. Based on DL.S and zeta potential measurements, a model is proposed for interactions of oppositely charged proteins. The nature of interaction was found using UV - Visual spectroscopy. It was found that oppositely charged proteins formed ionic bonds. It was also found that FITC molecule influenced the surface charge of albumin more than TRITC molecule. The effects of the influence of cell geometries upon Electro Osmotic Flow (EOF) were studied using neutrally charged fluorescent Polystyrene beads. Results showed that tagging proteins with fluorescent molecules influenced their mobility and interactions with other proteins. However no secondary structural modifications of the proteins were observed when oppositely charged proteins interacted. It was also observed that electrostatic interactions made oppositely charged proteins form large aggregates. The EOF was found to be dependent upon the ionic strength of the buffer, conductivity of the solid surfaces, distance from the surface and position of the electrodes in the electrophoretic cell.

  11. Saliva and Serum Protein Exchange at the Tooth Enamel Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, D; Helmerhorst, E J; Oppenheim, F G

    2017-04-01

    The acquired enamel pellicle is an oral, fluid-derived protein layer that forms on the tooth surface. It is a biologically and clinically important integument that protects teeth against enamel demineralization, and abrasion. Tooth surfaces are exposed to different proteinaceous microenvironments depending on the enamel location. For instance, tooth surfaces close to the gingival sulcus contact serum proteins that emanate via this sulcus, which may impact pellicle composition locally. The aims of this study were to define the major salivary and serum components that adsorb to hydroxyapatite, to study competition among them, and to obtain preliminary evidence in an in vivo saliva/serum pellicle model. Hydroxyapatite powder was incubated with saliva and serum, and the proteins that adsorbed were identified by mass spectrometry. To study competition, saliva and serum proteins were labeled with CyDyes, mixed in various proportions, and incubated with hydroxyapatite. In vivo competition was assessed using a split-mouth design, with half the buccal tooth surfaces coated with serum and the other half with saliva. After exposure to the oral environment for 0 min, 30 min and 2 h, the pellicles were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. In pure saliva- or serum-derived pellicles, 82 and 84 proteins were identified, respectively. When present concomitantly, salivary protein adsorbers effectively competed with serum protein adsorbers for the hydroxyapatite surface. Specifically, acidic proline-rich protein, cystatin, statherin and protein S100-A9 proteins competed off apolipoproteins, complement C4-A, haptoglobin, transthyretin and serotransferrin. In vivo evidence further supported the replacement of serum proteins by salivary proteins. In conclusion, although significant numbers of serum proteins emanate from the gingival sulcus, their ability to participate in dental pellicle formation is likely reduced in the presence of strong salivary protein adsorbers. The functional properties of the

  12. The innate immune modulators staphylococcal complement inhibitor and chemotaxis inhibitory protein of Staphylococcus aureus are located on beta-hemolysin-converting bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wamel, Willem J B; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; Ruyken, Maartje; van Kessel, Kok P M; van Strijp, Jos A G

    2006-02-01

    Two newly discovered immune modulators, chemotaxis inhibitory protein of Staphylococcus aureus (CHIPS) and staphylococcal complement inhibitor (SCIN), cluster on the conserved 3' end of beta-hemolysin (hlb)-converting bacteriophages (betaC-phis). Since these betaC-phis also carry the genes for the immune evasion molecules staphylokinase (sak) and enterotoxin A (sea), this 8-kb region at the 3' end of betaC-phi represents an innate immune evasion cluster (IEC). By PCR and Southern analyses of 85 clinical Staphylococcus aureus strains and 5 classical laboratory strains, we show that 90% of S. aureus strains carry a betaC-phi with an IEC. Seven IEC variants were discovered, carrying different combinations of chp, sak, or sea (or sep), always in the same 5'-to-3' orientation and on the 3' end of a betaC-phi. From most IEC variants we could isolate active bacteriophages by mitomycin C treatment, of which lysogens were generated in S. aureus R5 (broad phage host). All IEC-carrying bacteriophages integrated into hlb, as was measured by Southern blotting of R5 lysogens. Large quantities of the different bacteriophages were obtained by mitomycin C treatment of the lysogens, and bacteriophages were collected and used to reinfect all lysogenic R5 strains. In total, five lytic families were found. Furthermore, phage DNA was isolated and digested with EcoR1, revealing that one IEC variant can be found on different betaI-phis. In conclusion, the four human-specific innate immune modulators SCIN, CHIPS, SAK, and SEA form an IEC that is easily transferred among S. aureus strains by a diverse group of beta-hemolysin-converting bacteriophages.

  13. Expression of the major heat shock proteins DnaK and GroEL in Streptococcus pyogenes: a comparison to Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laport, M S; de Castro, A C; Villardo, A; Lemos, J A; Bastos, M C; Giambiagi-deMarval, M

    2001-04-01

    One of the outstanding problems in the field of heat shock response has been to elucidate the mechanism underlying the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs). In this work, we initiate an analysis of the expression of heat shock groEL and dnaK genes and their promoters in S. pyogenes. The synthesis of total cellular proteins was studied upon transfer of a log-phase culture from 37 degrees C to 42 degrees C by performing 5-min pulse-labeling experiments with (35)S-Met. The heat shock responses in the pathogenic Gram-positive cocci, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus, were also analyzed.

  14. Activity of essential oil-based microemulsions against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms developed on stainless steel surface in different culture media and growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Raffaella; Casettari, Luca; Fagioli, Laura; Cespi, Marco; Bonacucina, Giulia; Baffone, Wally

    2017-01-16

    Food safety is a fundamental concern for both consumers and the food industry, especially as the numbers of reported cases of food-associated infections continue to increase. Industrial surfaces can provide a suitable substrate for the development and persistence of bacterial organized in biofilms that represent a potential source of food contamination. The negative consumer perception of chemical disinfectants has shifted the attention to natural substances, such as plant extracts. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using the essential oils (EOs) in the fight against S. aureus biofilms. First, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC), Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC), Minimum Biofilm Inhibitory Concentration (MBIC), Minimum Biofilm Eradication Concentration (MBEC) of eleven EOs against S. aureus were determined. Cinnamomum cassia and Salvia officinalis EOs showed the greatest antibacterial properties with 1.25% MIC and MBC, 1.25% MBIC and 2.5% MBEC respectively. Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry analysis revealed cinnamaldehyde (82.66%) and methoxy cinnamaldehyde (10.12%) as the most abundant substances of C. cassia, while cis-thujone (23.90%), camphor (19.22%) and 1.8-cineole (10.62%) of S. officinalis. Three different microemulsions, formulated with C. cassia, S. officinalis or both, were finally tested against S. aureus biofilms in different culture media and growth conditions, causing a >3 logarithmic reductions in S. aureus 24h-old biofilms and desiccated biofilms, and up to 68% of biofilm removal after 90min of exposure. The obtained data suggest the potential use of EOs, alone or in combination, for the formulation of sanitizers as alternative or in support in the disinfection of contaminated surfaces. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A script to highlight hydrophobicity and charge on protein surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique eHagemans

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The composition of protein surfaces determines both affinity and specificity of protein-protein interactions. Matching of hydrophobic contacts and charged groups on both sites of the interface are crucial to ensure specificity. Here, we propose a highlighting scheme, YRB, which highlights both hydrophobicity and charges in protein structures. YRB highlighting visualises hydrophobicity by highlighting all carbon atoms that are not bound to nitrogen and oxygen atoms. The charged oxygens of glutamate and aspartate are highlighted red and the charged nitrogens of arginine and lysine are highlighted blue. For a set of representative examples, we demonstrate that YRB highlighting intuitively visualises segments on protein surfaces that contribute to specificity in protein-protein interfaces, including Hsp90/co-chaperone complexes, SNARE complex and a transmembrane domain. We provide YRB highlighting in form of a script that runs using the software PyMOL.

  16. CRF-based models of protein surfaces improve protein-protein interaction site predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhijie; Wang, Keyu; Dang, Truong Khanh Linh; Gültas, Mehmet; Welter, Marlon; Wierschin, Torsten; Stanke, Mario; Waack, Stephan

    2014-08-13

    The identification of protein-protein interaction sites is a computationally challenging task and important for understanding the biology of protein complexes. There is a rich literature in this field. A broad class of approaches assign to each candidate residue a real-valued score that measures how likely it is that the residue belongs to the interface. The prediction is obtained by thresholding this score.Some probabilistic models classify the residues on the basis of the posterior probabilities. In this paper, we introduce pairwise conditional random fields (pCRFs) in which edges are not restricted to the backbone as in the case of linear-chain CRFs utilized by Li et al. (2007). In fact, any 3D-neighborhood relation can be modeled. On grounds of a generalized Viterbi inference algorithm and a piecewise training process for pCRFs, we demonstrate how to utilize pCRFs to enhance a given residue-wise score-based protein-protein interface predictor on the surface of the protein under study. The features of the pCRF are solely based on the interface predictions scores of the predictor the performance of which shall be improved. We performed three sets of experiments with synthetic scores assigned to the surface residues of proteins taken from the data set PlaneDimers compiled by Zellner et al. (2011), from the list published by Keskin et al. (2004) and from the very recent data set due to Cukuroglu et al. (2014). That way we demonstrated that our pCRF-based enhancer is effective given the interface residue score distribution and the non-interface residue score are unimodal.Moreover, the pCRF-based enhancer is also successfully applicable, if the distributions are only unimodal over a certain sub-domain. The improvement is then restricted to that domain. Thus we were able to improve the prediction of the PresCont server devised by Zellner et al. (2011) on PlaneDimers. Our results strongly suggest that pCRFs form a methodological framework to improve residue-wise score

  17. Enhanced microcontact printing of proteins on nanoporous silica surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blinka, Ellen; Hu Ye; Gopal, Ashwini; Hoshino, Kazunori; Lin, Kevin; Zhang, John X J [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78758 (United States); Loeffler, Kathryn; Liu Xuewu; Ferrari, Mauro, E-mail: John.Zhang@engr.utexas.edu [Department of Nanomedicine and Biomedical Engineering, University of Texas Health Science Service, Houston, TX 77031 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    We demonstrate porous silica surface modification, combined with microcontact printing, as an effective method for enhanced protein patterning and adsorption on arbitrary surfaces. Compared to conventional chemical treatments, this approach offers scalability and long-term device stability without requiring complex chemical activation. Two chemical surface treatments using functionalization with the commonly used 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and glutaraldehyde (GA) were compared with the nanoporous silica surface on the basis of protein adsorption. The deposited thickness and uniformity of porous silica films were evaluated for fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled rabbit immunoglobulin G (R-IgG) protein printed onto the substrates via patterned polydimethlysiloxane (PDMS) stamps. A more complete transfer of proteins was observed on porous silica substrates compared to chemically functionalized substrates. A comparison of different pore sizes (4-6 nm) and porous silica thicknesses (96-200 nm) indicates that porous silica with 4 nm diameter, 57% porosity and a thickness of 96 nm provided a suitable environment for complete transfer of R-IgG proteins. Both fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used for protein layer characterizations. A porous silica layer is biocompatible, providing a favorable transfer medium with minimal damage to the proteins. A patterned immunoassay microchip was developed to demonstrate the retained protein function after printing on nanoporous surfaces, which enables printable and robust immunoassay detection for point-of-care applications.

  18. Signatures of cytoplasmic proteins in the exoproteome distinguish community- and hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 lineages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mekonnen, Solomon A.; Palma Medina, Laura M.; Glasner, Corinna

    2017-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the common name for a heterogeneous group of highly drug-resistant staphylococci. Two major MRSA classes are distinguished based on epidemiology, namely community-associated (CA) and hospital-associated (HA) MRSA. Notably, the distinction of CA......- and HA-MRSA based on molecular traits remains difficult due to the high genomic plasticity of S. aureus. Here we sought to pinpoint global distinguishing features of CA- and HA-MRSA through a comparative genome and proteome analysis of the notorious MRSA lineage USA300. We show for the first time that CA......- and HA-MRSA isolates can be distinguished by 2 distinct extracellular protein abundance clusters that are predictive not only for epidemiologic behavior, but also for their growth and survival within epithelial cells. This ‘exoproteome profiling’ also groups more distantly related HA-MRSA isolates...

  19. Microtiter plate-based assay for inhibitors of penicillin-binding protein 2a from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobba, Sudheer; Ponnaluri, V K Chaithanya; Mukherji, Mridul; Gutheil, William G

    2011-06-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a), the molecular determinant for high-level β-lactam resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), is intrinsically resistant to most β-lactam antibiotics. The development and characterization of new inhibitors targeting PBP2a would benefit from an effective and convenient assay for inhibitor binding. This study was directed toward the development of a fluorescently detected β-lactam binding assay for PBP2a from MRSA. Biotinylated ampicillin and biotinylated cephalexin were tested as tagging reagents for fluorescence detection by using a streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase conjugate. Both bound surprisingly well to PBP2a, with binding constants of 1.6 ± 0.4 μM and 13.6 ± 0.8 μM, respectively. Two forms of the assay were developed, a one-step direct competition form of the assay and a two-step indirect competition form of the assay, and both forms of the assay gave comparable results. This assay was then used to characterize PBP2a binding to ceftobiprole, which gave results consistent with previous studies of ceftobiprole-PBP2a binding. This assay was also demonstrated for screening for PBP2a inhibitors by screening a set of 13 randomly selected β-lactams for PBP2a inhibition at 750 μM. Meropenem was observed to give substantial inhibition in this screen, and a follow-up titration experiment determined its apparent K(i) to be 480 ± 70 μM. The availability of convenient and sensitive microtiter-plate based assays for the screening and characterization of PBP2a inhibitors is expected to facilitate the discovery and development of new PBP2a inhibitors for use in combating the serious public health problem posed by MRSA.

  20. Electrostatic Control of Protein-Surface Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-21

    noncovalently -assembled superstructures from the controlled aggregation of β-strand peptides into fibrils and fibers. These structures are predicted to...interactions (such as hydrogen bonding ) with important small molecule nutrients This could be accomplished by synthesizing unnatural amino acids into the...in Figure 3, which demonstrates how the noncovalent interaction of peptides with various functional groups on the surface will impact the adsorption

  1. Protein and bacteria binding to exposed root surfaces and the adjacent enamel surfaces in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüdiger, Stefan G; Dahlén, Gunnar; Carlén, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of root surfaces due to inflammatory tissue breakdown is a clinical characteristic of periodontitis. The gingival margin may further recede during treatment. Pellicles and early dental plaque on enamel surfaces of periodontitis patients have previously been described. The binding properties of exposed root surfaces, which may affect the incorporation of proteins from especially the GCF into the enamel pellicle and thereby early dental plaque formation are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine if exposed root surfaces could affect pellicle and initial dental plaque formation on the enamel surface by the analysis of proteins and early adhering bacteria binding to the exposed root surfaces and to the adjacent, gingival enamel surface. Supragingival pellicle and plaque samples were taken from exposed root surfaces and the adjacent enamel surfaces in eleven surgically treated periodontitis patients. For comparison, samples were taken from enamel surfaces of teeth not in need of treatment. Additionally, subgingival bacterial samples were taken. Pellicle proteins were analysed by SDS-PAGE, immunoblotting and image analysis, and bacterial samples by culturing. Significantly more plasma proteins and bacteria were found on the exposed root surfaces than on the enamel. The depth of the gingival recessions was negatively correlated to the amount of plasma proteins in the enamel pellicle. Actinomyces spp. were most frequently found on the exposed root surfaces. The total viable counts and streptococci (%TVC) were positively correlated between subgingival samples and samples from the root surface and enamel of surgically treated teeth. A positive correlation was also found for the findings of Gram-negative anaerobes in subgingival samples and samples from the enamel surface. Our findings suggest that an exposed root surface has binding properties different from an enamel surface and could affect early biofilm formation on the adjacent enamel surface.

  2. Surface display of proteins by Gram-negative bacterial autotransporters

    OpenAIRE

    Rutherford, Nancy; Mourez, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Expressing proteins of interest as fusions to proteins of the bacterial envelope is a powerful technique with many biotechnological and medical applications. Autotransporters have recently emerged as a good tool for bacterial surface display. These proteins are composed of an N-terminal signal peptide, followed by a passenger domain and a translocator domain that mediates the outer membrane translocation of the passenger. The natural passenger domain of autotransporters can be replac...

  3. Competitive protein adsorption--multilayer adsorption and surface induced protein aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Maria; Hou, Xiaolin

    2009-02-17

    In this study, competitive adsorption of albumin and IgG (immunoglobulin G) from human serum solutions and protein mixtures onto polymer surfaces is studied by means of radioactive labeling. By using two different radiolabels (125I and 131I), albumin and IgG adsorption to polymer surfaces is monitored simultaneously and the influence from the presence of other human serum proteins on albumin and IgG adsorption, as well as their mutual influence during adsorption processes, is investigated. Exploring protein adsorption by combining analysis of competitive adsorption from complex solutions of high concentration with investigation of single protein adsorption and interdependent adsorption between two specific proteins enables us to map protein adsorption sequences during competitive protein adsorption. Our study shows that proteins can adsorb in a multilayer fashion onto the polymer surfaces and that the outcome of IgG adsorption is much more sensitive to surface characteristics than the outcome of albumin adsorption. Using high concentrations of protein solution and hydrophobic polymer surfaces during adsorption can induce IgG aggregation, which is observed as extremely high IgG adsorptions. Besides using a more hydrophilic substrate, surface-induced IgG aggregation can be inhibited by changing the adsorption sequence of albumin and IgG.

  4. The Role of Borrelia burgdorferi Outer Surface Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenedy, Melisha R.; Lenhart, Tiffany R.; Akins, Darrin R.

    2012-01-01

    Human pathogenic spirochetes causing Lyme disease belong to the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato complex. B. burgdorferi organisms are extracellular pathogens transmitted to humans through the bite of Ixodes spp. ticks. These spirochetes are unique in that they can cause chronic infection and persist in the infected human, even though a robust humoral and cellular immune response is produced by the infected host. How this extracellular pathogen is able to evade the host immune response for such long periods of time is currently unclear. To gain a better understanding of how this organism persists in the infected human, many laboratories have focused on identifying and characterizing outer surface proteins of B. burgdorferi. Since the interface between B. burgdorferi and its human host is its outer surface, proteins localized to the outer membrane must play an important role in dissemination, virulence, tissue tropism, and, immune evasion. Over the last two decades numerous outer surface proteins from B. burgdorferi have been identified and more recent studies have begun to elucidate the functional role(s) of many borrelial outer surface proteins. This review summarizes the outer surface proteins identified in B. burgdorferi to date and provides detailed insight into the functions of many of these proteins as they relate to the unique parasitic strategy of this spirochetal pathogen. PMID:22540535

  5. The DUF59 Containing Protein SufT Is Involved in the Maturation of Iron-Sulfur (FeS Proteins during Conditions of High FeS Cofactor Demand in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameya A Mashruwala

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Proteins containing DUF59 domains have roles in iron-sulfur (FeS cluster assembly and are widespread throughout Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea. However, the function(s of this domain is unknown. Staphylococcus aureus SufT is composed solely of a DUF59 domain. We noted that sufT is often co-localized with sufBC, which encode for the Suf FeS cluster biosynthetic machinery. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that sufT was recruited to the suf operon, suggesting a role for SufT in FeS cluster assembly. A S. aureus ΔsufT mutant was defective in the assembly of FeS proteins. The DUF59 protein Rv1466 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis partially corrected the phenotypes of a ΔsufT mutant, consistent with a widespread role for DUF59 in FeS protein maturation. SufT was dispensable for FeS protein maturation during conditions that imposed a low cellular demand for FeS cluster assembly. In contrast, the role of SufT was maximal during conditions imposing a high demand for FeS cluster assembly. SufT was not involved in the repair of FeS clusters damaged by reactive oxygen species or in the physical protection of FeS clusters from oxidants. Nfu is a FeS cluster carrier and nfu displayed synergy with sufT. Furthermore, introduction of nfu upon a multicopy plasmid partially corrected the phenotypes of the ΔsufT mutant. Biofilm formation and exoprotein production are critical for S. aureus pathogenesis and vancomycin is a drug of last-resort to treat staphylococcal infections. Defective FeS protein maturation resulted in increased biofilm formation, decreased production of exoproteins, increased resistance to vancomycin, and the appearance of phenotypes consistent with vancomycin-intermediate resistant S. aureus. We propose that SufT, and by extension the DUF59 domain, is an accessory factor that functions in the maturation of FeS proteins. In S. aureus, the involvement of SufT is maximal during conditions of high demand for FeS proteins.

  6. Protein adsorption to graphene surfaces controlled by chemical modification of the substrate surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Yasutaka; Yamazaki, Kenji; Ogino, Toshio

    2014-10-01

    We have investigated effects of the support substrate surfaces on properties of the attached graphene flakes by observing protein adsorption to the graphene surfaces on SiO2/Si substrates that are modified with self-assembled monolayers to control their hydrophilicity. Using atomic force microscopy operated in aqueous environment, we found that high-density clusters of agglomerated avidin molecules form on the graphene flakes in the areas supported by a hydrophobic substrate surface, whereas very low density of large avidin clusters form at the edge of graphene flakes in the area supported by a hydrophilic surface. These results demonstrate that hydrophilicity of the support surface affects hydrophilicity of the graphene surface also in aqueous environment and that surface modification of the support substrate is a useful technique to control protein adsorption phenomena on graphene surfaces for realization of high sensitive graphene biosensors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein-Protein Interaction Site Predictions with Three-Dimensional Probability Distributions of Interacting Atoms on Protein Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Tai; Peng, Hung-Pin; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Yang, Ei-Wen; Chen, Jun-Bo; Ho, Shinn-Ying; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Yang, An-Suei

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key to many biological processes. Computational methodologies devised to predict protein-protein interaction (PPI) sites on protein surfaces are important tools in providing insights into the biological functions of proteins and in developing therapeutics targeting the protein-protein interaction sites. One of the general features of PPI sites is that the core regions from the two interacting protein surfaces are complementary to each other, similar to the interior of proteins in packing density and in the physicochemical nature of the amino acid composition. In this work, we simulated the physicochemical complementarities by constructing three-dimensional probability density maps of non-covalent interacting atoms on the protein surfaces. The interacting probabilities were derived from the interior of known structures. Machine learning algorithms were applied to learn the characteristic patterns of the probability density maps specific to the PPI sites. The trained predictors for PPI sites were cross-validated with the training cases (consisting of 432 proteins) and were tested on an independent dataset (consisting of 142 proteins). The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient for the independent test set was 0.423; the accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity were 0.753, 0.519, 0.677, and 0.779 respectively. The benchmark results indicate that the optimized machine learning models are among the best predictors in identifying PPI sites on protein surfaces. In particular, the PPI site prediction accuracy increases with increasing size of the PPI site and with increasing hydrophobicity in amino acid composition of the PPI interface; the core interface regions are more likely to be recognized with high prediction confidence. The results indicate that the physicochemical complementarity patterns on protein surfaces are important determinants in PPIs, and a substantial portion of the PPI sites can be predicted correctly with

  8. Protein-protein interaction site predictions with three-dimensional probability distributions of interacting atoms on protein surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Tai Chen

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions are key to many biological processes. Computational methodologies devised to predict protein-protein interaction (PPI sites on protein surfaces are important tools in providing insights into the biological functions of proteins and in developing therapeutics targeting the protein-protein interaction sites. One of the general features of PPI sites is that the core regions from the two interacting protein surfaces are complementary to each other, similar to the interior of proteins in packing density and in the physicochemical nature of the amino acid composition. In this work, we simulated the physicochemical complementarities by constructing three-dimensional probability density maps of non-covalent interacting atoms on the protein surfaces. The interacting probabilities were derived from the interior of known structures. Machine learning algorithms were applied to learn the characteristic patterns of the probability density maps specific to the PPI sites. The trained predictors for PPI sites were cross-validated with the training cases (consisting of 432 proteins and were tested on an independent dataset (consisting of 142 proteins. The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient for the independent test set was 0.423; the accuracy, precision, sensitivity, specificity were 0.753, 0.519, 0.677, and 0.779 respectively. The benchmark results indicate that the optimized machine learning models are among the best predictors in identifying PPI sites on protein surfaces. In particular, the PPI site prediction accuracy increases with increasing size of the PPI site and with increasing hydrophobicity in amino acid composition of the PPI interface; the core interface regions are more likely to be recognized with high prediction confidence. The results indicate that the physicochemical complementarity patterns on protein surfaces are important determinants in PPIs, and a substantial portion of the PPI sites can be predicted

  9. Predictive Value of C-Reactive Protein (CRP in Identifying Fatal Outcome and Deep Infections in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia.

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    Tomi Mölkänen

    Full Text Available Clear cut-off levels could aid clinicians in identifying patients with a risk of fatal outcomes or complications such as deep infection foci in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB. Cut-off levels for widely used clinical follow-up parameters including serum C-reactive protein (CRP levels and white blood cell counts (WBC have not been previously studied.430 adult SAB patients in Finland took part in prospective multicentre study in which their CRP levels and WBC counts were measured on the day of the positive blood culture, every other day during the first week, twice a week during hospitalization and at 30 days. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis was used to evaluate the prognostic value of CRP and WBC on the day of the positive blood culture and at days 4, 7, and 14 in predicting mortality and the presence of deep infections at 30 days. Adjusted hazard ratios (HR for CRP level and WBC count cut-off values for mortality were calculated by the Cox regression analysis and adjusted odds ratios (OR for cut-off values to predict the presence of deep infection by the binary logistic regression analysis.The succumbing patients could be distinguished from the survivors, starting on day 4 after the positive blood culture, by higher CRP levels. Cut-off values of CRP for day 30 mortality in adjusted analysis, that significantly predicted fatal outcome were at day 4 CRP >103 mg/L with sensitivity of 77%, specificity of 55%, and HR of 3.5 (95% CI, 1.2-10.3; p = 0.024, at day 14 CRP >61 mg/L with a sensitivity of 82%, specificity of 80% and HR of 3.6 (95% CI, 1.1-10.3; p8.6 x109/L was prognostic with sensitivity of 77%, specificity of 78% and HR of 8.2 (95% CI, 2.9-23.1; p108 mg/L with sensitivity of 77%, specificity of 60%, and HR of 2.6 (95% CI, 1.3-4.9; p = 0.005 and at day 14 CRP >22 mg/L with sensitivity of 59%, specificity of 68%, and HR of 3.9 (95% CI, 1.6-9.5; p = 0.003. The lack of decline of CRP in 14 days or during the second week

  10. Adhesive Bond Stiffness of Staphylococcus aureus with and without Proteins That Bind to an Adsorbed Fibronectin Film

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsson, Adam L. J.; Sharma, Prashant K.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    Staphylococcus aureus is known to cause biomaterial-associated infections of implants and devices once it has breached the skin and mucosal barriers. Adhesion is the initial step in the development of a biomaterial-associated infection, and strategies to prevent staphylococcal adhesion and thus

  11. Immunization routes in cattle impact the levels and neutralizing capacity of antibodies induced against S. aureus immune evasion proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerhout, Eveline; Vrieling, Manouk; Benedictus, Lindert; Daemen, Ineke; Ravesloot, Lars; Rutten, Victor; Nuijten, Piet; van Strijp, Jos; Koets, Ad; Eisenberg, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines against S. aureus bovine mastitis are scarce and show limited protection only. All currently available vaccines are applied via the parenteral (usually intramuscular) route. It is unknown, however, whether this route is the most suitable to specifically increase intramammary immunity to

  12. Immunization routes in cattle impact the levels and neutralizing capacity of antibodies induced against S. aureus immune evasion proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerhout, Eveline; Vrieling, Manouk; Benedictus, Lindert; Daemen, Ineke; Ravesloot, Lars; Rutten, Victor; Nuijten, Piet; Strijp, Van Jos; Koets, Ad; Eisenberg, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines against S. aureus bovine mastitis are scarce and show limited protection only. All currently available vaccines are applied via the parenteral (usually intramuscular) route. It is unknown, however, whether this route is the most suitable to specifically increase intramammary immunity to

  13. Surface (S)-layer proteins of Deinococcus radiodurans and their utility as vehicles for surface localization of functional proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Chitra Seetharam; Basu, Bhakti; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The radiation resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans contains two major surface (S)-layer proteins, Hpi and SlpA. The Hpi protein was shown to (a) undergo specific in vivo cleavage, and (b) closely associate with the SlpA protein. Using a non-specific acid phosphatase from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, PhoN as a reporter, the Surface Layer Homology (SLH) domain of SlpA was shown to bind deinococcal peptidoglycan-containing cell wall sacculi. The association of SlpA with Hpi on one side and peptidoglycan on the other, localizes this protein in the 'interstitial' layer of the deinoccocal cell wall. Gene chimeras of hpi-phoN and slh-phoN were constructed to test efficacy of S-layer proteins, as vehicles for cell surface localization in D. radiodurans. The Hpi-PhoN protein localized exclusively in the membrane fraction, and displayed cell-based phosphatase activity in vivo. The SLH-PhoN, which localized to both cytosolic and membrane fractions, displayed in vitro activity but no cell-based in vivo activity. Hpi, therefore, emerged as an efficient surface localizing protein and can be exploited for suitable applications of this superbug. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Surface organization and cooperativity during nonspecific protein adsorption events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabe, Michael; Verdes, Dorinel; Zimmermann, Jan; Seeger, Stefan

    2008-11-06

    Despite many experimental studies on cooperative effects during protein adsorption events, this phenomenon is still poorly characterized and subject of much controversy. In this study, we address the topic of cooperativity using two distinct experimental approaches, namely, kinetic analysis and surface imaging, both based on supercritical angle fluorescence (SAF) microscopy. Several model systems comprising the two proteins BSA and fibrinogen, two different ionic strength conditions and varying pH environments were investigated. The combination of the experimental information obtained from kinetic analysis and from real-time in situ scan images unravel a clear correlation between cooperative adsorption and a heterogeneous protein layer build-up. We propose a mechanistic model of protein adsorption based on an overlap of classical Langmuir-type adsorption on unoccupied surface areas and an additional cooperative adsorption pathway near preadsorbed proteins which is consistent with the experimental observations. Moreover, the growth of two-dimensional surface clusters as an often assumed element of cooperativity could be excluded for the studied systems. The model includes the often observed phenomenon that the adsorption rate decelerates abruptly above a certain coverage limit. Furthermore, the observed evolution of the heterogeneous protein distribution on the surface is in good agreement with the proposed model.

  15. Crystal structure of YwpF from Staphylococcus aureus reveals its architecture comprised of a β-barrel core domain resembling type VI secretion system proteins and a two-helix pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Jae; Lee, Kyu-Yeon; Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kim, Soon-Jong; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2015-04-01

    The ywpF gene (SAV2097) of the Staphylococcus aureus strain Mu50 encodes the YwpF protein, which may play a role in antibiotic resistance. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the YwpF superfamily from S. aureus at 2.5-Å resolution. The YwpF structure consists of two regions: an N-terminal core β-barrel domain that shows structural similarity to type VI secretion system (T6SS) proteins (e.g., Hcp1, Hcp3, and EvpC) and a C-terminal two-helix pair. Although the monomer structure of S. aureus YwpF resembles those of T6SS proteins, the dimer/tetramer model of S. aureus YwpF is distinct from the functionally important hexameric ring of T6SS proteins. We therefore suggest that the S. aureus YwpF may have a different function compared to T6SS proteins. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Acacetin Protects Mice from Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection by Inhibiting the Activity of Sortase A

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    Chongwei Bi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is a major cause of infection in hospitals and communities. Widespread dissemination of multi-drug resistant S. aureus is a serious threat to the health of humans and animals. An anti-virulence strategy has been widely considered as an alternative therapeutic approach. Inhibitors of virulence factors are able to treat S. aureus infections without influencing the growth or viability of bacteria and rarely lead to bacterial resistance. Sortase A (SrtA is a membrane-associated cysteine transpeptidase that catalyzes up to 25 surface proteins that covalently bind to cell wall peptidoglycans. In S. aureus, most of these surface proteins have been identified as important virulence factors that are vital in bacterial pathogenesis. In the present study, we show that acacetin, a natural flavonoid compound, inhibits the activity of SrtA in S. aureus (IC50 = 36.46 ± 4.69 μg/mL, 128 μM which affects the assembly of protein A (SpA to cell walls and reduces the binding of S. aureus to fibrinogen (Fg. The mechanism of the interaction between acacetin and SrtA were preliminarily discussed using molecular dynamics simulations. The results suggested that acacetin adopted a compact conformation binding at the pocket of the SrtA via residues Arg-139 and Lys-140. By performing an animal infection model, we demonstrated that acacetin was able to protect mice from renal abscess formation induced by S. aureus and significantly increased survival rates. Taken together, these findings suggest that acacetin may be a promising candidate for the development of anti-S. aureus drugs.

  17. Heterologous protection against alpha toxins of Clostridium perfringens and Staphylococcus aureus induced by binding domain recombinant chimeric protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppalapati, Siva R; Kingston, Joseph J; Murali, Harishchandra S; Batra, Harsh V

    2014-05-23

    Clostridium perfringens and Staphylococcus aureus are the two important bacteria frequently associated with majority of the soft tissue infections. The severity and progression of the diseases caused by these pathogens are attributed primarily to the alpha toxins they produce. Previously, we synthesized a non-toxic chimeric molecule r-αCS encompassing the binding domains of C. perfringens and S. aureus alpha toxins and demonstrated that the r-αCS hyperimmune polysera reacts with both the native wild type toxins. In the present report, we evaluated efficacy of r-αCS in conferring protection against C. perfringens and S. aureus alpha toxin infections in murine model. Immunization of BALB/c with r-αCS was effective in inducing both high titers of serum anti-r-αCS antibodies after three administrations. Sub-typing the antibody pool revealed high proportions of IgG1 indicating a Th2-polarized immune response. The r-αCS stimulated the proliferation of splenocytes from the immunized mice upon re-induction by the antigen, in vitro. The levels of interleukin-10 increased while TNF-α was found to be downregulated in the r-αCS induced splenocytes. Mice immunized with r-αCS were protected against intramuscular challenge with 5×LD100 doses of C. perfringens and S. aureus alpha toxins with >80% survival, which killed control animals within 48-72h. Passive immunization of mice with anti-r-αCS serum resulted in 50-80% survival. Our results indicate that r-αCS is a remarkable antigen with protective efficacy against alpha toxin mediated C. perfringens and S. aureus soft tissue co-infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Induction of Staphylococcus aureus-specific IgA and agglutination potency in milk of cows by mucosal immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempelmans Plat-Sinnige, Marjan J; Verkaik, Nelianne J; van Wamel, Willem J B; de Groot, Nanda; Acton, Dennis S; van Belkum, Alex

    2009-06-19

    Lactating cows were immunized with inactivated Staphylococcus aureus strains and concentrated culture supernatants. Application of a repeated mucosal immunization scheme resulted in significant levels of S. aureus-specific IgA in milk of dairy cows. Average IgA titers against whole cell S. aureus increased during the first 10 weeks of immunization after which a plateau level was reached and maintained during lactation. Immune whey agglutinated both bovine and human S. aureus strains including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains and recognized extracted S. aureus proteins on Western blot. ELISAs to quantify milk IgA reactive with a number of S. aureus virulence proteins (e.g. enterotoxins, microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) and immune modulating proteins) and cell wall components, demonstrated the polyclonality of the IgA. Correlations observed between agglutination and specific IgA titers for whey and for purified IgA suggested functionality of the induced antibodies. Milk from immunized cows may provide a way of producing potentially therapeutic polyclonal antibodies against S. aureus colonization and infection.

  19. Interaction of Serum Proteins with Surface of Hemodialysis Fiber Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Rehana; Shirako, Yuji; Kishimoto, Kikuo; Ikai, Atsushi

    2012-08-01

    The poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)-covered hydrophilic surface of hollow-fiber membranes (fiber membrane, hereafter) for hemodialysis was mechanically probed using modified tips on an atomic force microscope (AFM) with covalent crosslinkers and several types of serum protein. The retraction part of many of the force extension (F-E) curves obtained with AFM tips coated with serum albumin had a long and smooth extension up to 200-300 nm indicating forced elongation of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) chains. When fibrinogen-coated tips were used, long extension F-E curves up to 500 nm with multiple peaks were obtained in addition to smooth curves most likely reflecting the unfolding of fibrinogen molecules. The results indicated that individual polymer chains had a significant affinity toward serum proteins. The adhesion frequency of tips coated with serum proteins was lower on the poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) surface than on the uncoated hydrophobic polysulfone surface.

  20. Humidified microcontact printing of proteins: universal patterning of proteins on both low and high energy surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricoult, Sébastien G; Nezhad, Amir Sanati; Knapp-Mohammady, Michaela; Kennedy, Timothy E; Juncker, David

    2014-10-14

    Microcontact printing (μCP) of proteins is widely used for biosensors and cell biology but is constrained to printing proteins adsorbed to a low free energy, hydrophobic surface to a high free energy, hydrophilic surface. This strongly limits μCP as harsh chemical treatments are required to form a high energy surface. Here, we introduce humidified μCP (HμCP) of proteins which enables universal printing of protein on any smooth surface. We found that by flowing water in proximity to proteins adsorbed on a hydrophilized stamp, the water vapor diffusing through the stamp enables the printing of proteins on both low and high energy surfaces. Indeed, when proteins are printed using stamps with increasing spacing between water-filled microchannels, only proteins adjacent to the channels are transferred. The vapor transport through the stamp was modeled, and by comparing the humidity profiles with the protein patterns, 88% relative humidity in the stamp was identified as the threshold for HμCP. The molecular forces occurring between PDMS, peptides, and glass during printing were modeled ab initio to confirm the critical role water plays in the transfer. Using HμCP, we introduce straightforward protocols to pattern multiple proteins side-by-side down to nanometer resolution without the need for expensive mask aligners, but instead exploiting self-alignment effects derived from the stamp geometry. Finally, we introduce vascularized HμCP stamps with embedded microchannels that allow printing proteins as arbitrary, large areas patterns with nanometer resolution. This work introduces the general concept of water-assisted μCP and opens new possibilities for "solvent-assisted" printing of proteins and of other nanoparticles.

  1. Triggering protein adsorption on tailored cationic cellulose surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Tamilselvan; Niegelhell, Katrin; Zarth, Cíntia Salomão Pinto; Kargl, Rupert; Köstler, Stefan; Ribitsch, Volker; Heinze, Thomas; Spirk, Stefan; Stana-Kleinschek, Karin

    2014-11-10

    The equipment of cellulose ultrathin films with BSA (bovine serum albumin) via cationization of the surface by tailor-made cationic celluloses is described. In this way, matrices for controlled protein deposition are created, whereas the extent of protein affinity to these surfaces is controlled by the charge density and solubility of the tailored cationic cellulose derivative. In order to understand the impact of the cationic cellulose derivatives on the protein affinity, their interaction capacity with fluorescently labeled BSA is investigated at different concentrations and pH values. The amount of deposited material is quantified using QCM-D (quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, wet mass) and MP-SPR (multi-parameter surface plasmon resonance, dry mass), and the mass of coupled water is evaluated by combination of QCM-D and SPR data. It turns out that adsorption can be tuned over a wide range (0.6-3.9 mg dry mass m(-2)) depending on the used conditions for adsorption and the type of employed cationic cellulose. After evaluation of protein adsorption, patterned cellulose thin films have been prepared and the cationic celluloses were adsorbed in a similar fashion as in the QCM-D and SPR experiments. Onto these cationic surfaces, fluorescently labeled BSA in different concentrations is deposited by an automatized spotting apparatus and a correlation between the amount of the deposited protein and the fluorescence intensity is established.

  2. Escherichia coli-derived and Staphylococcus aureus-derived extracellular vesicles induce MUC5AC expression via extracellular signal related kinase 1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chang Hoon; Choi, Yoon Seok; Song, Si-Youn; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kim, Yong-Dae

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) release extracellular vesicles (EVs). E. coli-derived and S. aureus-derived EVs are associated with neutrophilic respiratory inflammation. In neutrophilic respiratory inflammation of human, expression of mucin is increased in airway epithelial cells and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality of the affected patients. However, no study on the effects of EVs on expression of mucin genes has been reported in airway epithelial cells. Therefore, this study was conducted in order to examine the effects and the brief signaling pathways of E. coli-derived and S. aureus-derived EVs on MUC5AC expression in human airway epithelial cells. In mucin-producing human NCI-H292 airway epithelial cells and primary cultures of normal nasal epithelial cells, the effects and signaling pathways of E. coli-derived and S. aureus-derived EVs on MUC5AC expression were examined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), real-time PCR, enzyme immunoassay, and immunoblot analysis with several specific inhibitors and small interfering RNA (siRNA). E. coli-derived and S. aureus-derived EVs induced MUC5AC expression. E. coli-derived and S. aureus-derived EVs significantly activated phosphorylation of extracellular signal related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and p38 MAPK. ERK1/2 MAPK inhibitor, p38 MAPK inhibitor, ERK1/2 MAPK siRNA, and p38 MAPK siRNA significantly blocked E. coli-derived and S. aureus-derived EVs induced MUC5AC messenger RNA (mRNA) expression. The results of this study suggest that E. coli-derived and S. aureus-derived EVs induced MUC5AC expression via ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in human airway epithelial cells. © 2016 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  3. Targeting Staphylococcus aureus Toxins: A Potential form of Anti-Virulence Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Cin; Neoh, Hui-min; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen and the leading cause of a wide range of severe clinical infections. The range of diseases reflects the diversity of virulence factors produced by this pathogen. To establish an infection in the host, S. aureus expresses an inclusive set of virulence factors such as toxins, enzymes, adhesins, and other surface proteins that allow the pathogen to survive under extreme conditions and are essential for the bacteria’s ability to spread through tissues. Expression and secretion of this array of toxins and enzymes are tightly controlled by a number of regulatory systems. S. aureus is also notorious for its ability to resist the arsenal of currently available antibiotics and dissemination of various multidrug-resistant S. aureus clones limits therapeutic options for a S. aureus infection. Recently, the development of anti-virulence therapeutics that neutralize S. aureus toxins or block the pathways that regulate toxin production has shown potential in thwarting the bacteria’s acquisition of antibiotic resistance. In this review, we provide insights into the regulation of S. aureus toxin production and potential anti-virulence strategies that target S. aureus toxins. PMID:26999200

  4. Accurate prediction of peptide binding sites on protein surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Petsalaki

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Many important protein-protein interactions are mediated by the binding of a short peptide stretch in one protein to a large globular segment in another. Recent efforts have provided hundreds of examples of new peptides binding to proteins for which a three-dimensional structure is available (either known experimentally or readily modeled but where no structure of the protein-peptide complex is known. To address this gap, we present an approach that can accurately predict peptide binding sites on protein surfaces. For peptides known to bind a particular protein, the method predicts binding sites with great accuracy, and the specificity of the approach means that it can also be used to predict whether or not a putative or predicted peptide partner will bind. We used known protein-peptide complexes to derive preferences, in the form of spatial position specific scoring matrices, which describe the binding-site environment in globular proteins for each type of amino acid in bound peptides. We then scan the surface of a putative binding protein for sites for each of the amino acids present in a peptide partner and search for combinations of high-scoring amino acid sites that satisfy constraints deduced from the peptide sequence. The method performed well in a benchmark and largely agreed with experimental data mapping binding sites for several recently discovered interactions mediated by peptides, including RG-rich proteins with SMN domains, Epstein-Barr virus LMP1 with TRADD domains, DBC1 with Sir2, and the Ago hook with Argonaute PIWI domain. The method, and associated statistics, is an excellent tool for predicting and studying binding sites for newly discovered peptides mediating critical events in biology.

  5. Unique surface adsorption behaviors of serum proteins on chemically uniform and alternating surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sheng

    With increasing interests of studying proteins adsorption on the surfaces with nanoscale features in biomedical field, it is crucial to have fundamental understandings on how the proteins are adsorbed on such a surface and what factors contribute to the driving forces of adsorption. Besides, exploring more available nanoscale templates would greatly offer more possibilities one could design surface bio-detection methods with favorable protein-surface interactions. Thus, to fulfill the purpose, the work in this dissertation has been made into three major sections. First, to probe the intermediate states which possibly exist between stable and unstable phases described in mean-field theory diagram, a solvent vapor annealing method is chosen to slowly induce the copolymer polystyrene-block-polyvinylpyridine (PS-b-PVP)'s both blocks undergoing micro-phase separations from initial spherical nanodomains into terminal cylindrical nanodomains. During this process, real time atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been conducted to capture other six intermediate states with different morphologies on the polymeric film surfaces. Secondly, upon recognizing each intermediate state, the solution of immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) proteins has been deposited on the surface and been rinsed off with buffer solution before the protein-bounded surface is imaged by AFM. It has been found IgG showing a strong adsorption preference on PS over P4VP block. Among all the six intermediate states, the proteins are almost exclusively adsorbed on PS nanodomains regardless the concentration and deposition time. Thirdly, a trinodular shape protein fibrinogen (Fg) is selected for investigating how geometry and surface charge of proteins would interplay with cylindrical nanodomains on a surface developed from Polystyrene -block-Poly-(methyl methacrylate) PS-b-PMMA. Also, Fg adsorptions on chemically homogeneous surfaces are included here to have a better contrast of showing how much difference it can make

  6. Vaccine Protection of Leukopenic Mice against Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Sabine; Gough, Portia; Kim, Hwan Keun; Schneewind, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The risk for Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) is increased in immunocompromised individuals, including patients with hematologic malignancy and/or chemotherapy. Due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains, designated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), staphylococcal BSI in cancer patients is associated with high mortality; however, neither a protective vaccine nor pathogen-specific immunotherapy is currently available. Here, we modeled staphylococcal BSI in leukopenic CD-1 mice that had been treated with cyclophosphamide, a drug for leukemia and lymphoma patients. Cyclophosphamide-treated mice were highly sensitive to S. aureus BSI and developed infectious lesions lacking immune cell infiltrates. Virulence factors of S. aureus that are key for disease establishment in immunocompetent hosts—α-hemolysin (Hla), iron-regulated surface determinants (IsdA and IsdB), coagulase (Coa), and von Willebrand factor binding protein (vWbp)—are dispensable for the pathogenesis of BSI in leukopenic mice. In contrast, sortase A mutants, which cannot assemble surface proteins, display delayed time to death and increased survival in this model. A vaccine with four surface antigens (ClfA, FnBPB, SdrD, and SpAKKAA), which was identified by genetic vaccinology using sortase A mutants, raised antigen-specific immune responses that protected leukopenic mice against staphylococcal BSI. PMID:25183728

  7. Selectivity by small-molecule inhibitors of protein interactions can be driven by protein surface fluctuations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David K Johnson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Small-molecules that inhibit interactions between specific pairs of proteins have long represented a promising avenue for therapeutic intervention in a variety of settings. Structural studies have shown that in many cases, the inhibitor-bound protein adopts a conformation that is distinct from its unbound and its protein-bound conformations. This plasticity of the protein surface presents a major challenge in predicting which members of a protein family will be inhibited by a given ligand. Here, we use biased simulations of Bcl-2-family proteins to generate ensembles of low-energy conformations that contain surface pockets suitable for small molecule binding. We find that the resulting conformational ensembles include surface pockets that mimic those observed in inhibitor-bound crystal structures. Next, we find that the ensembles generated using different members of this protein family are overlapping but distinct, and that the activity of a given compound against a particular family member (ligand selectivity can be predicted from whether the corresponding ensemble samples a complementary surface pocket. Finally, we find that each ensemble includes certain surface pockets that are not shared by any other family member: while no inhibitors have yet been identified to take advantage of these pockets, we expect that chemical scaffolds complementing these "distinct" pockets will prove highly selective for their targets. The opportunity to achieve target selectivity within a protein family by exploiting differences in surface fluctuations represents a new paradigm that may facilitate design of family-selective small-molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  8. Protein synthesis inhibiting clindamycin improves outcome in a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis compared with the cell wall active ceftriaxone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeh, Ivo; Gerber, Joachim; Wellmer, Andreas; Wellhausen, Malte; Koenig, Brigitte; Eiffert, Helmut; Nau, Roland

    2002-07-01

    The release of proinflammatory components from bacteria depends on the mode of action of the antibacterial therapy used. We studied whether this influences mortality in experimental sepsis. In a lethal murine model of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis, animals were randomly assigned to receive the protein synthesis inhibitor clindamycin (CLI) or the beta-lactam ceftriaxone (CRO). Therapy was introduced subcutaneously 5 hrs after intraperitoneal injection of 10 colony forming units of S. aureus American Type Culture Collection 29213 and was continued every 8 hrs for 3 days. Survival was higher in mice receiving CLI (29/50 animals [58%]) than in mice receiving CRO (16/50 animals [32%]; p =.015). Mice treated with CRO died earlier than mice receiving CLI (p =.002). Eight hours after the first antibiotic dose, the motor performance of mice receiving CRO had deteriorated more than it did for mice receiving CLI (p =.009). Higher levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha were measured in serum (p =.027) and peritoneal fluid (p =.001) of CRO-treated mice. In vitro, CLI released smaller amounts of staphylococcal enterotoxin A than CRO. Antibiotic treatment of Gram-positive sepsis with a protein synthesis inhibitor decreases morbidity and mortality compared with a bacteriolytic compound. This may be caused by a reduction of the concentrations of proinflammatory/toxic bacterial components and cytokines.

  9. High-Level Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to β-Lactam Antibiotics Mediated by Penicillin-Binding Protein 4 (PBP4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Stephanie M; Alexander, J Andrew N; Choo, Eun Ju; Basuino, Li; da Costa, Thaina M; Severin, Anatoly; Chung, Marilyn; Aedo, Sandra; Strynadka, Natalie C J; Tomasz, Alexander; Chatterjee, Som S; Chambers, Henry F

    2017-06-01

    Penicillin-binding protein 4 (PBP4), a nonessential, low-molecular-weight penicillin-binding protein of Staphylococcus aureus, has been implicated in low-level resistance to β-lactam antibiotics, although the mechanism is unknown. Mutations in PBP4 and its promoter were identified in a laboratory-generated mutant strain, CRB, which expresses high-level resistance to β-lactams, including resistance to the new-generation cephalosporins active against methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus These mutations did not appreciably alter the β-lactam antibiotic binding affinity of purified recombinant mutant PBP4 compared to that of wild-type PBP4. Compared to the susceptible parent strain, COLnex, the CRB strain produces a highly cross-linked cell wall peptidoglycan, indicative of increased transpeptidase activity. The pbp4 promoter mutation of CRB was associated with greatly increased amounts of PBP4 in membranes compared to those in the COLnex parent. Replacement of the native promoter of COLnex with the mutant promoter of CRB resulted in increased amounts of PBP4 in membranes and a highly cross-linked cell wall. PBP4 can be repurposed to provide essential transpeptidase activity in vivo and confer high-level resistance to β-lactam antibiotics, such as ceftobiprole and ceftaroline. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Adsorption of plasma from tumor-bearing hosts over protein A--containing nonviable Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I: possible mechanism of antitumor reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, P K; McLaughlin, D; Allen, P; Bandyopadhyay, S; Idiculla, A; Clarke, L; Mark, R; Rhoads, J E; Bassett, J G; Cooper, D R

    1984-01-01

    Adsorption of autologous plasma over nonviable Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I (SAC) followed by reinfusion of the plasma causes regression of (a) chemically induced rat mammary adenocarcinomas (MA), and (b) canine transmissible venereal tumors (TVT) and spontaneously occurring dog tumors. Animal data are more impressive than that from trials in humans. Nine of 41 patients receiving perfusions of adsorbed plasma showed some partial objective response. Eight of these nine patients received multiple perfusions over a period of time. Twenty-one of 41 patients showed subjective responses. Adsorption of autologous plasma over non-protein A--containing S. aureus Wood 46 caused regression of MA. Adsorption of normal rat plasma with SAC, and infusion of this adsorbed plasma into mammary tumor--bearing rats, caused regression of MA. Intravenous infusion of purified protein A alone caused regression of both rat MA and canine TVT. Superimposed on this observation is the finding that, during plasma adsorption, bacterial moieties leach from SAC. It is possible that the immunostimulation observed in plasma-perfused hosts is due to the removal of plasma blocking agents on one hand, and introduction of the bacterial agents on the other.

  11. In silico analysis of large microbial surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Fátima; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the longest predicted proteins encoded in complete microbial genomes. They could be separated into two main classes: non-ribosomal peptide synthetases involved in secondary metabolism and surface proteins, many of them with a predicted or experimentally observed role in bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Such proteins, generally showing a repetitive structure, are widespread among prokaryotes and can be grouped into several different families based on sequence alignment, characteristics and predicted motifs. This classification may help in the characterization of newly described adhesins. The results of this study indicate that cell-cell interactions and biofilm formation are common events in the microbial world and take place via similar molecular mechanisms.

  12. Surface charge effects in protein adsorption on nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramesh, M.; Shimoni, O.; Ostrikov, K.; Prawer, S.; Cervenka, J.

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins (bovine serum albumin and lysozyme) of different properties (charge, molecular weight and rigidity), the main driving mechanism responsible for the protein binding to the charged nanoparticles was identified. Electrostatic interactions were found to dominate the protein adsorption dynamics, attachment and conformation. We developed a simple electrostatic model that can qualitatively explain the observed adsorption behaviour based on charge-induced pH modifications near the charged nanoparticle surfaces. Under neutral conditions, the local pH around the positively and negatively charged nanodiamonds becomes very high (11-12) and low (1-3) respectively, which has a profound impact on the protein charge, hydration and affinity to the nanodiamonds. Small proteins (lysozyme) were found to form multilayers with significant conformational changes to screen the surface charge, while larger proteins (albumin) formed monolayers with minor conformational changes. The findings of this study provide a step forward toward understanding and eventually predicting nanoparticle interactions with biofluids.Understanding the interaction of proteins with charged diamond nanoparticles is of fundamental importance for diverse biomedical applications. Here we present a thorough study of protein binding, adsorption kinetics and structure on strongly positively (hydrogen-terminated) and negatively (oxygen-terminated) charged nanodiamond particles using a quartz crystal microbalance by dissipation and infrared spectroscopy. By using two model proteins

  13. Quantifying protein-protein interactions in the ubiquitin pathway by surface plasmon resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Gordon, Colin

    2005-01-01

    The commercial availability of instruments, such as Biacore, that are capable of monitoring surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has greatly simplified the quantification of protein-protein interactions. Already, this technique has been used for some studies of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here we...

  14. Staphylococcus aureus surface contamination of mobile phones and presence of genetically identical strains on the hands of nursing personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuse Kanayama, Akiko; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Yoshizawa, Sadako; Tateda, Kazuhiro; Kaneko, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Intetsu

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the genetic relatedness of Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from mobile phones and palms and fingers of users. Genetically identical isolates were detected from mobile phones and their user and multiple users, which is consistent with mobile phones serving as reservoirs of infection in the health care environment. These findings reinforce the need for hand hygiene prior to patient contact as the most effective intervention for preventing health care-associated infection. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Antibacterial synergy between rosmarinic acid and antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekambaram, Sanmuga Priya; Perumal, Senthamil Selvan; Balakrishnan, Ajay; Marappan, Nathiya; Gajendran, Sabari Srinivasan; Viswanathan, Vinodhini

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants have ability to resist microorganisms by synthesizing secondary metabolites such as phenols. Rosmarinic acid (RA) is a phenylpropanoid widely distributed in plants and well known as therapeutic and cosmetic agent. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) which is resistant to all kinds of β-lactams, threatens even most potent antibiotics. To improve the efficiency of antibiotics against multi-drug resistant bacteria and to reduce the antibiotic dose, the antibacterial activity and the synergistic effect of RA with standard antibiotics against S. aureus and MRSA was investigated. Antibacterial activity of RA against S. aureus and a clinical isolate of MRSA was evaluated by agar well diffusion method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of RA was determined by broth dilution method. Synergism of RA with various antibiotics against S. aureus and MRSA was studied by broth checkerboard method and time-kill kinetic assay. Effect of RA on microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMM's) of S. aureus and MRSA was studied using sodium dodecyl sulfate - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. MIC of RA was found to be 0.8 and 10 mg/ml against S. aureus and MRSA, respectively. RA was synergistic with vancomycin, ofloxacin, and amoxicillin against S. aureus and only with vancomycin against MRSA. The time-kill analysis revealed that synergistic combinations were a more effective than individual antibiotics. MSCRAMM's protein expression of S. aureus and MRSA was markedly suppressed by RA + vancomycin combination rather than RA alone. The synergistic effects of RA with antibiotics were observed against S. aureus and MRSA. RA showed inhibitory effect on the surface proteins MSCRAMM's. Even though RA was shown to exhibit a synergistic effect with antibiotics, the MIC was found to be higher. Thus, further studies on increasing the efficacy of RA can develop it as an adjuvant for antibiotics.

  16. [Activity and quality comparison of the engineered protein Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin purified with gel filtration chromatography and Ni-NTA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiyan; Yang, Hongjun; Wang, Changfa; He, Hongbin; Ma, Weiming; Yang, Shaohua

    2009-02-01

    The alpha-hemolysin protein of Staphylococcus aureus, which was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) with recombinant pET32a(+)-alpha-HL plasmid, was purified with gel filtration chromatography (GFC) and Ni-NTA spin columns. The quality and biological characteristic were compared. First, the purified products were analyzed with SDS-PAGE, and the expected protein band was with a molecular mass of 53 kD. Second, protein concentration was determined by the method of Bradford, and the median hemolytic dose potency (HD50) was finally analyzed with rabbit erythrocyte. The protein purified with GFC was 0.337 mg/mL, its hemolysis activity was 1519 HU/mg, and hemolysin yield was 14.04%. Meanwhile, the protein purified with the Ni-NTA Spin Columns was 0.35 mg/mL, its hemolysis activity was 1463 HU/mg, and hemolysin yield was 17.5%, respectively. The results showed that there is no significant difference in the quality, hemolysis activity and yield of the recombinant proteins purified with Ni-NTA spin columns and GFC.

  17. Adsorption of intrinsically disordered barnacle adhesive proteins on silica surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Chao; Xu, Baomei; Wei, Junting; Xiao, Yang; Huang, Fang

    2018-01-01

    The adsorption of recombinant barnacle proteins Bacp19k and Mrcp19k on hydrophilic silica surface was characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry in artificial seawater (pH = 8.2). They are homologous adhesive proteins destined for underwater adhesion but bear opposite net charges in seawater. As assessed with their primary and secondary structures, both proteins are intrinsically disordered and thus distinct from globular proteins that have dominated research in the field. Different from Mrcp19k, higher initial rate and adsorbed amount were obtained via curve fitting for Bacp19k in kinetic studies, due to favorable charge interactions with silica surface. The good fitting with the same dynamic model also indicates the formation of monolayer coverage in both cases. The two adsorption isotherms of Bacp19k and Mrcp19k are different in the initial change and maximum adsorption level, indicating different protein-surface affinities and charge interactions. Each isotherm fits the Langmuir model well, which is commonly used to describe monolayer adsorption, thus consistent with the predication from kinetic fitting. To further examine the effect of electrostatic interaction on the adsorption, the isotherm of the 1:1 mixture of Bacp19k and Mrcp19k was also constructed, which showed a higher correlation fit for Jovanovic than for Langmuir model. The presence of electrostatic attraction between Bacp19k and Mrcp19k deviated from one of the required conditions for Langmuir behavior, which may also result in the highest coadsorption level but slowest initial change among the three isotherms. The surface state of the adhesive proteins and the change with adsorption time were also examined by atomic force microscopy. The results thus obtained are in good agreement with the corresponding ellipsometric measurement.

  18. Response surface methodology to design a selective co-enrichment broth of Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Staphylococcus aureus for simultaneous detection by multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiao Yan; Zhou, Wen Wu; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Xiao Fu; Xu, Jun Feng

    2012-07-25

    Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Staphylococcus aureus are frequent co-visitors of contaminated foods to cause food-borne diseases. To achieve rapid detection of three organisms by multiplex PCR, a selective co-enrichment broth was considered to design using response surface methodology (RSM) in this work. NaCl, LiCl and KSCN as selective bacterial inhibitors were selected to optimize their concentrations for a matched composition of bacterial biomass with uniform amplification of three targets. Central composite design was employed to collect the data and fit the responses. Three quadratic polynomial models were derived by computer simulation. A statistical analysis was carried out to explore the effects of the variables on the composition of bacterial biomass and PCR amplification yields. In the end, a novel broth (ESS-3 broth) of NaCl 1.60%, LiCl 0.70%, KSCN 0.10% was formulated to allow co-enrichment of the target pathogens and suppress growth of some non-target pathogens. The simultaneous detection of E. coli, Salmonella spp. and S. aureus was developed on a rapid, convenient and sensitive method consisting of selective co-enrichment in ESS-3 broth, DNA extraction with the boiling method and robust test by multiplex PCR. Our work provided broader application of RSM for the simultaneous detection of other combinations of multiple pathogens. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Proteomic inventory of "anchorless" proteins on the colon adenocarcinoma cell surface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjalsma, H.; Pluk, W.J.G.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Peters, W.H.M.; Roelofs, R.H.W.M.; Swinkels, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    Surface proteins play important pathophysiological roles in health and disease, and accumulating proteomics-based studies suggest that several "non-membrane" proteins are sorted to the cell surface by unconventional mechanisms. Importantly, these proteins may comprise attractive therapeutic targets

  20. The ability of S.aureus to form biofilm on the Ti-6Al-7Nb scaffolds produced by Selective Laser Melting and subjected to the different types of surface modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymczyk, Patrycja; Junka, Adam; Ziółkowski, Grzegorz; Smutnicka, Danuta; Bartoszewicz, Marzenna; Chlebus, Edward

    2013-01-01

    The Gram-positive coccus, Staphylococcus aureus, is the leading etiologic agent of limb and life-threatening biofilm-related infections in the patients following the orthopaedic implantations. The aim of the present paper is to estimate the ability of S. aureus to form biofilm on titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-7Nb) scaffolds produced by Selective Laser Melting (SLM) and subjected to the different types of surface modifications, including ultrasonic cleaning and chemical polishing. The results obtained indicate significantly the decreased ability of S.aureus to form biofilm on the surface of scaffolds subjected to the chemical polishing in comparison to the scaffolds cleaned ultrasonically. The data provided can be useful for future applications of the SLM technology in production of Ti-6Al-7Nb medical implants.

  1. Mode of action of Buddleja cordata verbascoside against Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, J G; de Liverant, J G; Martínez, A; Martínez, G; Muñoz, J L; Arciniegas, A; Romo de Vivar, A

    1999-07-01

    We evaluate the mode of action of verbascoside obtained from Buddleja cordata against Staphylococcus aureus by killing kinetics and incorporation of precursors methods. Verbascoside induced lethal effect on S. aureus, by affecting protein synthesis and inhibiting leucine incorporation.

  2. Contamination of environmental surfaces by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in rooms of inpatients with MRSA-positive body sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashige, E Jessica Ohashi; Oie, Shigeharu; Furukawa, H

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can contaminate environmental surfaces that are frequently touched by the hands of patients with MRSA colonization/infection. There have been many studies in which the presence or absence of MRSA contamination was determined but no studies in which MRSA contamination levels were also evaluated in detail. We evaluated MRSA contamination of environmental surfaces (overbed tables, bed side rails, and curtains) in the rooms of inpatients from whom MRSA was isolated via clinical specimens. We examined the curtains within 7-14 days after they had been newly hung. The environmental surfaces were wiped using gauze (molded gauze for wiping of surface bacteria; 100% cotton, 4cm×8cm) moistened with sterile physiological saline. The MRSA contamination rate and mean counts (range) were 25.0% (6/24 samples) and 30.6 (0-255)colony-forming units (cfu)/100cm(2), respectively, for the overbed tables and 31.6% (6/19 samples) and 159.5 (0-1620)cfu/100cm(2), respectively, for the bed side rails. No MRSA was detected in 24 curtain samples. The rate of MRSA contamination of environmental surfaces was high for the overbed tables and bed side rails but low for the curtains. Therefore, at least until the 14th day of use, frequent disinfection of curtains may be not necessary. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  3. Surface display of proteins by Gram-negative bacterial autotransporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mourez Michael

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Expressing proteins of interest as fusions to proteins of the bacterial envelope is a powerful technique with many biotechnological and medical applications. Autotransporters have recently emerged as a good tool for bacterial surface display. These proteins are composed of an N-terminal signal peptide, followed by a passenger domain and a translocator domain that mediates the outer membrane translocation of the passenger. The natural passenger domain of autotransporters can be replaced by heterologous proteins that become displayed at the bacterial surface by the translocator domain. The simplicity and versatility of this system has made it very attractive and it has been used to display functional enzymes, vaccine antigens as well as polypeptides libraries. The recent advances in the study of the translocation mechanism of autotransporters have raised several controversial issues with implications for their use as display systems. These issues include the requirement for the displayed polypeptides to remain in a translocation-competent state in the periplasm, the requirement for specific signal sequences and "autochaperone" domains, and the influence of the genetic background of the expression host strain. It is therefore important to better understand the mechanism of translocation of autotransporters in order to employ them to their full potential. This review will focus on the recent advances in the study of the translocation mechanism of autotransporters and describe practical considerations regarding their use for bacterial surface display.

  4. Protein structural perturbation and aggregation on homogeneous surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethuraman, Ananthakrishnan; Belfort, Georges

    2005-02-01

    We have demonstrated that globular proteins, such as hen egg lysozyme in phosphate buffered saline at room temperature, lose native structural stability and activity when adsorbed onto well-defined homogeneous solid surfaces. This structural loss is evident by alpha-helix to turns/random during the first 30 min and followed by a slow alpha-helix to beta-sheet transition. Increase in intramolecular and intermolecular beta-sheet content suggests conformational rearrangement and aggregation between different protein molecules, respectively. Amide I band attenuated total reflection/Fourier transformed infrared (ATR/FTIR) spectroscopy was used to quantify the secondary structure content of lysozyme adsorbed on six different self-assembled alkanethiol monolayer surfaces with -CH3, -OPh, -CF3, -CN, -OCH3, and -OH exposed functional end groups. Activity measurements of adsorbed lysozyme were in good agreement with the structural perturbations. Both surface chemistry (type of functional groups, wettability) and adsorbate concentration (i.e., lateral interactions) are responsible for the observed structural changes during adsorption. A kinetic model is proposed to describe secondary structural changes that occur in two dynamic phases. The results presented in this article demonstrate the utility of the ATR/FTIR spectroscopic technique for in situ characterization of protein secondary structures during adsorption on flat surfaces.

  5. Surface plasmon resonance-induced photoactivation of gold nanoparticles as bactericidal agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocan, Lucian; Ilie, Ioana; Matea, Cristian; Tabaran, Flaviu; Kalman, Ersjebet; Iancu, Cornel; Mocan, Teodora

    2014-01-01

    Systemic infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other bacteria are responsible for millions of deaths worldwide, and much of this mortality is due to the rise of antibiotic-resistant organisms as a result of natural selection. Gold nanoparticles synthesized using the standard wet chemical procedure were photoexcited using an 808 nm 2 W laser diode and further administered to MRSA bacteria. Flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy, contrast phase microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy combined with immunochemical staining were used to examine the interaction of the photoexcited gold nano-particles with MRSA bacteria. We show here that phonon-phonon interactions following laser photoexcitation of gold nanoparticles exhibit increased MRSA necrotic rates at low concentrations and short incubation times compared with MRSA treated with gold nanoparticles alone. These unique data may represent a step forward in the study of bactericidal effects of various nanomaterials, with applications in biology and medicine.

  6. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii on computer interface surfaces of hospital wards and association with clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Ling

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computer keyboards and mice are potential reservoirs of nosocomial pathogens, but routine disinfection for non-water-proof computer devices is a problem. With better hand hygiene compliance of health-care workers (HCWs, the impact of these potential sources of contamination on clinical infection needs to be clarified. Methods This study was conducted in a 1600-bed medical center of southern Taiwan with 47 wards and 282 computers. With education and monitoring program of hand hygiene for HCWs, the average compliance rate was 74% before our surveillance. We investigated the association of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, three leading hospital-acquired pathogens, from ward computer keyboards, mice and from clinical isolates in non-outbreak period by pulsed field gel electrophoresis and antibiogram. Results Our results revealed a 17.4% (49/282 contamination rate of these computer devices by S. aureus, Acinetobacter spp. or Pseudomonas spp. The contamination rates of MRSA and A. baumannii in the ward computers were 1.1% and 4.3%, respectively. No P. aeruginosa was isolated. All isolates from computers and clinical specimens at the same ward showed different pulsotypes. However, A. baumannii isolates on two ward computers had the same pulsotype. Conclusion With good hand hygiene compliance, we found relatively low contamination rates of MRSA, P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii on ward computer interface, and without further contribution to nosocomial infection. Our results suggested no necessity of routine culture surveillance in non-outbreak situation.

  7. Identification of Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin as a protein drug that is secreted by anticancer bacteria and rapidly kills cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swofford, Charles A; St Jean, Adam T; Panteli, Jan T; Brentzel, Zachary J; Forbes, Neil S

    2014-06-01

    Targeted bacterial delivery of anticancer proteins has the ability to overcome therapeutic resistance in tumors that limits the efficacy of chemotherapeutics. The ability of bacteria to specifically target tumors allows for delivery of aggressive proteins that directly kill cancer cells and cannot be administered systemically. However, few proteins have been tested for this purpose. To identify effective molecules, we systematically sorted proteins that have been shown to cause mammalian cell death. The genes for five proteins were selected and cloned into Escherichia coli and Salmonella. Supernatant from cultures of the transformed bacteria was applied to flasks of MCF-7 mammary carcinoma cells to identify proteins that (1) were expressed, (2) secreted, and (3) rapidly killed cancer cells. Time-lapse images were taken to visualize mammalian cell morphology. Of the investigated proteins, α-hemolysin from Staphylococcus aureus (SAH) was the most promising because it was secreted, caused trauma to cellular membranes, and induced oncosis in 18 min. After exposure for 6 h, SAH decreased cell viability by 90%. In comparison, the positive control, Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (PEA), required 11 days to achieve a similar effect, when administered at 3,000 times its LC50 . The maximum death rate induced by SAH was calculated to be a reduction in cell viability of 7.1% per min, which was 200-fold faster than the PEA control. Two proteins, Dermonecrotic Toxin and Phospholipase C were active when extracted from the bacterial cytoplasm but were not secreted. This investigation revealed for the first time SAH as a potent anticancer drug for delivery by bacteria because of its ability to be secreted in a fully functional form and aggressively kill cancer cells. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Energetics of protein nucleation on rough polymeric surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, Efrem; Curcio, Valerio; Di Profio, Gianluca; Fontananova, Enrica; Drioli, Enrico

    2010-11-04

    Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm of the two-dimensional Ising model is used to study the heterogeneous nucleation of protein crystals on rough polymeric surfaces. The theoretical findings are compared to those obtained from classical nucleation theory (CNT), and to experimental data from protein model hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) crystallized on poly(vinylidene fluoride) or PVDF, poly(dimethylsiloxane) or PDMS and Hyflon homemade membranes. The reduction of the activation energy for the nucleation process on polymeric membranes, predicted to occur at increasing surface roughness, results in a nucleation kinetics that is many orders of magnitude faster than in homogeneous phase. In general, MC stochastic dynamics offers the unique opportunity to investigate the effects of collective molecular aggregation at site level on the nucleation rate and, consequently, allows to identify optimal morphological and structural properties of polymeric membranes for a fine control of the crystallization kinetics.

  9. Protein antifouling and fouling-release in perfluoropolyether surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molena, Elena; Credi, Caterina; De Marco, Carmela; Levi, Marinella; Turri, Stefano; Simeone, Giovanni

    2014-08-01

    Perfluoropolyether polymers have been described as high performance fouling-release materials for marine coatings. Moreover, they have a good potential to be exploited in the biomedical field too. In this article several perfuoropolyether photopolymers were characterized in terms of surface and mechanical properties outlining the relationship between these properties and the polymer molecular structure. In particular the anti-fouling and fouling-release performances, evaluated using Bovine Serum Albumin as testing protein, was correlated to other material properties, like a parameter considering both surface tension components γ and elastic modulus E. A good correlation between the anti-fouling/fouling-release of perfluoropolyethers and (E*γpolar)1/2 can actually be established. Our results show that perfluoropolyether photopolymers are good protein anti-fouling/fouling-release materials.

  10. Site-specific electronic structure of bacterial surface protein layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyalikh, D. V.; Kummer, K.; Kade, A.; Blüher, A.; Katzschner, B.; Mertig, M.; Molodtsov, S. L.

    2009-03-01

    We applied resonant photoemission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy for a detailed characterization of the valence electronic structure of the regular two-dimensional bacterial surface protein layer of Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602. Using this approach, we detected valence electron emission from specific chemical sites. In particular, it was found that electrons from the π clouds of aromatic systems make large contributions to the highest occupied molecular orbitals.

  11. Cell Surface-associated Proteins of Gastrointestinal Strains of Lactobacilli

    OpenAIRE

    Chagnaud, P.; Jenkinson, H. F.; Tannock, G. W.

    2011-01-01

    Twenty-eight strains of gastrointestinal lactobacilli, comprising isolates classified as Lactobacillus reuteri, L. acidophilus, L. delbrueckii, L. fermentum, L. gasseri and L. salivarius, were examined for the presence of cell-surface polypeptides. Whole cells were radioactively labelled with 125I using lactoperoxidase or chloramine T as catalyst, proteins were extracted with sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) and separated by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. All lactobacilli tested had bet...

  12. An automatic method for identifying surface proteins in bacteria: SLEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrabino Danilo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial infections represent a global health challenge. The identification of novel antibacterial targets for both therapy and vaccination is needed on a constant basis because resistance continues to spread worldwide at an alarming rate. Even infections that were once easy to treat are becoming difficult or, in some cases, impossible to cure. Ideal targets for both therapy and vaccination are bacterial proteins exposed on the surface of the organism, which are often involved in host-pathogen interaction. Their identification can greatly benefit from technologies such as bioinformatics, proteomics and DNA microarrays. Results Here we describe a pipeline named SLEP (Surface Localization Extracellular Proteins, based on an automated optimal combination and sequence of usage of reliable available tools for the computational identification of the surfome, i.e. of the subset of proteins exposed on the surface of a bacterial cell. Conclusions The tool not only simplifies the usage of these methods, but it also improves the results by selecting the specifying order and combination of the instruments. The tool is freely available at http://www.caspur.it/slep.

  13. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  14. Adhesion and biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus from food processing plants as affected by growth medium, surface type and incubation temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloísa Maria Ângelo Jerônimo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the effect of different growth media [BHI broth, BHI broth plus glucose (10 g/100 mL and BHI broth plus NaCl (5 g/100 mL] and incubation temperatures (28 or 37 ºC on the adherence, detachment and biofilm formation on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces (2 x 2 cm coupons for a prolonged period (24-72 h by some strains of Staphylococcus aureus (S3, S28 and S54 from food processing plants. The efficacy of the sanitizers sodium hypochlorite (250 mg/mL and peracetic acid (30 mg/mL in reducing the number of viable bacterial cells in a preformed biofilm was also evaluated. S. aureus strains adhered in highest numbers in BHI broth, regardless of the type of surface or incubation temperature. Cell detachment from surfaces revealed high persistence over the incubation period. The number of cells needed for biofilm formation was noted in all experimental systems after 3 days. Peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite were not efficient in completely removing the cells of S. aureus adhered onto polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces. From these results, the assayed strains revealed high capacities to adhere and form biofilms on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces under the different growth conditions, and the cells in biofilm matrixes were resistant to total removal when exposed to the sanitizers sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid.Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar o efeito de diferentes meios de crescimento [caldo BHI, caldo BHI adicionado de glucose (10 g/100 mL e caldo BHI adicionado de NaCl (5 g/100 mL] e temperaturas de incubação (28 e 37 ºC sobre a adesão, separação e formação de biofilme sobre superfícies (2 x 2 cm de polipropileno e aço inoxidável durante longo tempo de incubação (24-72 h por parte de cepas de Staphylococcus aureus (S3, S58 e S54 isoladas de plantas de processamento de alimentos. Também foi avaliada a eficácia dos sanitizantes hipoclorito de sódio (250 mg/mL e ácido perac

  15. An update on cell surface proteins containing extensin-motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borassi, Cecilia; Sede, Ana R; Mecchia, Martin A; Salgado Salter, Juan D; Marzol, Eliana; Muschietti, Jorge P; Estevez, Jose M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that there are several molecular links that interconnect the plant cell surface continuum, which is highly important in many biological processes such as plant growth, development, and interaction with the environment. The plant cell surface continuum can be defined as the space that contains and interlinks the cell wall, plasma membrane and cytoskeleton compartments. In this review, we provide an updated view of cell surface proteins that include modular domains with an extensin (EXT)-motif followed by a cytoplasmic kinase-like domain, known as PERKs (for proline-rich extensin-like receptor kinases); with an EXT-motif and an actin binding domain, known as formins; and with extracellular hybrid-EXTs. We focus our attention on the EXT-motifs with the short sequence Ser-Pro(3-5), which is found in several different protein contexts within the same extracellular space, highlighting a putative conserved structural and functional role. A closer understanding of the dynamic regulation of plant cell surface continuum and its relationship with the downstream signalling cascade is a crucial forthcoming challenge. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Adsorption and diffusion of plasma proteins on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces: effect of trifluoroethanol on protein structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Euridice P; Rocha, Sandra; Carmo Pereira, M; Möhwald, Helmuth; Coelho, Manuel A N

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the conformational changes and diffusion of adsorbed proteins (immunoglobulin G (IgG), fibrinogen (Fib) and human serum albumin (HSA)) on hydrophilic quartz and hydrophobized quartz (octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS)) surfaces. Circular dichroism spectroscopy measurements have shown that IgG is the most stable protein after adsorption on hydrophilic quartz, whereas HSA and Fib unfold. The structural changes are dependent on adsorption time, initial protein concentration in bulk, and surface chemistry. The effect of trifluoroethanol (TFE) in recovering the original protein structure after adsorption was analyzed by total internal reflection fluorescence and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (TIRF-FRAP). TIRF-FRAP experiments revealed a strong dependence of the surface chemistry on protein diffusion coefficients: proteins diffuse 4 times slower on hydrophobic surfaces than on hydrophilic surfaces. The diffusion coefficient of TFE at hydrophobic surfaces is 2 orders magnitude higher than at hydrophilic surfaces. However, protein desorption occurs faster on hydrophilic quartz than on OTS, proving that the strength of protein-surface interaction is weaker at hydrophilic surfaces. This result shows that desorption is determined by surface/protein chemistry and not by mass transfer limitations. FTIR-ATR results demonstrated that TFE interaction with adsorbed proteins is stronger at hydrophilic surfaces than at hydrophobic surfaces.

  17. Sputter deposited bioceramic coatings: surface characterisation and initial protein adsorption studies using surface-MALDI-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, A. R.; Burke, G. A.; Duffy, H.

    2011-01-01

    Protein adsorption onto calcium phosphate (Ca–P) bioceramics utilised in hard tissue implant applications has been highlighted as one of the key events that influences the subsequent biological response, in vivo. This work reports on the use of surface-matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation...

  18. Immunopathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus pulmonary infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Dane; Prince, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common human pathogen highly evolved as both a component of the commensal flora and as a major cause of invasive infection. Severe respiratory infection due to staphylococci has been increasing due to the prevalence of more virulent USA300 CA-MRSA strains in the general population. The ability of S. aureus to adapt to the milieu of the respiratory tract has facilitated its emergence as a respiratory pathogen. Its metabolic versatility, the ability to scavenge iron, coordinate gene expression, and the horizontal acquisition of useful genetic elements have all contributed to its success as a component of the respiratory flora, in hospitalized patients, as a complication of influenza and in normal hosts. The expression of surface adhesins facilitates its persistence in the airways. In addition, the highly sophisticated interactions of the multiple S. aureus virulence factors, particularly the α-hemolysin and protein A, with diverse immune effectors in the lung such as ADAM10, TNFR1, EGFR, immunoglobulin, and complement all contribute to the pathogenesis of staphylococcal pneumonia. PMID:22037948

  19. Computational Modeling Studies of Peptides and Proteins on Inorganic Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Barry

    2013-03-01

    Biological moieties offer exquisite sensitivity and selectivity in their interactions with small molecules, offering considerable potential in applications as chemical sensors. To detect binding events between the peptide and the intended molecule, a transduction mechanism is needed. This often involves an association of the peptide with an inorganic surface, such as a metal nanoparticle, a carbon nanotube, or graphene. Understanding the nature of the association of the peptide with the surface and its effect on the conformational (and thus, binding) properties of the peptide are key to optimizing the sensing mechanism. We utilized computational approaches ranging from ab initio to molecular dynamics to bond-fluctuation Monte Carlo methods to study the adsorption of peptides and proteins on inorganic surfaces to develop an understanding of the role that composition and substrate character plays in the adsorption process, and in turn, the effects on the binding events with the molecules of interest.

  20. The Staphylococcus aureus Protein IsdH Inhibits Host Hemoglobin Scavenging to Promote Heme Acquisition by the Pathogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saederup, Kirstine Lindhardt; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Kristian; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov

    2016-01-01

    transporter domains, IsdH(N1), IsdH(N2), and IsdH(N3), revealed that Hb binding of IsdH(N1) and IsdH(N2) accounted for the high affinity for Hb-Hp complexes. The third near iron transporter domain, IsdH(N3), exhibited redox-dependent heme extraction, when Hb in the Hb-Hp complex was in the oxidized met form...... but not in the reduced oxy form. IsdB, the other S. aureus Hb receptor, failed to extract heme from Hb-Hp, and it was a poor competitor for Hb-Hp binding to CD163. This indicates that Hb recognition by IsdH, but not by IsdB, sterically inhibits the receptor recognition of Hb-Hp. This function of IsdH may have an overall...

  1. Modeling protein binding and elution over a chromatographic surface probed by surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Tiago; Mota, José P B; Peixoto, Cristina; Alves, Paula M; Carrondo, Manuel J T

    2010-03-26

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy is used as a scaled-down, analytical, pseudo-chromatography tool for analyzing protein binding and elution over an ion-exchange surface under cyclic sorption conditions. A micrometric-scale adsorption surface was produced by immobilizing a typical ion exchange ligand--diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)--onto commercially available planar gold sensor chip surfaces pre-derivatized with a self-assembled monolayer of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid with known density. An explicit mathematical formulation is provided for the deconvolution and interpretation of the SPR sensorgrams. An adsorption rate model is proposed to describe the SPR sensorgrams for bovine serum albumin, used here as model protein, when the DEAE surface is subjected to a cyclic series of binding and elution steps. Overall, we demonstrate that the adsorption rate model is capable of quantitatively describing BSA binding and elution for protein titers from dilute conditions up to overloaded conditions and a broad range of salt concentrations. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cell Surface-Associated Proteins in the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshimura, Hidehisa; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Ohomori, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    The cell surface senses environmental changes first and transfers signals into the cell. To understand the response to environmental changes, it is necessary to analyze cell surface components, particularly cell surface-associated proteins. We therefore investigated cell surface-associated proteins from the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120. The cell surface-associated proteins extracted by an acidic buffer were resolved by SDS-PAGE. Eighteen proteins were identified fro...

  3. Preventing protein adsorption from a range of surfaces using an aqueous fish protein extract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pillai, Saju; Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Meyer, Rikke L.

    2009-01-01

    We utilize an aqueous extract of fish proteins (FPs) as a coating for minimizing the adsorption of fibrinogen (Fg) and human serum albumin (HSA). The surfaces include stainless steel (SS), gold (Au), silicon dioxide (SiO2), and poly(styrene) (PS). The adsorption processes (kinetics and adsorbed...

  4. Identification of pathogenic factors potentially involved in Staphylococcus aureus keratitis using proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shamila; Cole, Nerida; Hume, Emma B H; Garthwaite, Linda L; Nguyen-Khuong, Terry; Walsh, Bradley J; Willcox, Mark D P

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus is a leading cause of microbial keratitis, characterized by destruction of the cornea by bacterial exoproteins and host-associated factors. The aim of this study was to compare extracellular and cell-associated proteins produced by two different isolates of S. aureus, a virulent clinical isolate (Staph 38) and a laboratory strain (Staphylococcus aureus 8325-4) of weaker virulence in the mouse keratitis model. Proteins were analyzed using 2D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified by subsequent mass spectrometry. Activity of staphylococcal adhesins was assessed by allowing strains to bind to various proteins adsorbed onto polymethylmethacrylate squares. Thirteen proteins in the extracellular fraction and eight proteins in the cell-associated fractions after bacterial growth were produced in increased amounts in the clinical isolate Staph 38. Four of these proteins were S. aureus virulence factor adhesins, fibronectin binding protein A, staphopain, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 2 and extracellular adherence protein. The clinical isolate Staph 38 adhered to a greater extent to all mammalian proteins tested, indicating the potential of the adhesins to be active on its surface. Other proteins with increased expression in Staph 38 included potential moonlighting proteins and proteins involved in transcription or translation. This is the first demonstration of the proteome of S. aureus isolates from keratitis. These results indicate that the virulent clinical isolate produces more potentially important virulence factors compared to the less virulent laboratory strain and these may be associated with the ability of a S. aureus strain to cause more severe keratitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Surface proteins of bacteria of the genus Bifidobacterium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dylus, Ewa; Buda, Barbara; Górska-Frączek, Sabina; Brzozowska, Ewa; Gamian, Andrzej

    2013-05-13

    Beneficial effects due to the presence of probiotic bacteria of the genus Bifidobacterium in the human intestinal tract are still an interesting object of study. So far activities have been confirmed of bifidobacteria in stimulation of the host immune system, stimulation of tumor cell apoptosis, improvement of bowel motility, alleviation of symptoms of lactose intolerance, cholesterol lowering capacity, prevention and treatment of diarrhea and irritable bowel syndrome, alleviation of allergy or atopic dermatitis, maintenance of homeostasis of the intestine, and stimulation of the development of normal intestinal microflora in infants. A multitude of therapeutic properties encourages researchers to investigate the possibility of using the potential of Bifidobacterium in the prevention and treatment of other conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and depression. Although it is known that the beneficial effects are due to intestinal mucosal colonization by these bacteria, the cell components responsible for the colonization are still not determined. In addition to the beneficial effects of probiotic administration, there were also negative effects including sepsis. Therefore research has been directed to identify specific components of Bifidobacterium responsible for probiotic effects. Currently researchers are focused on identifying, isolating and evaluating the properties of surface proteins that are probably involved in the adhesion of bacterial cells to the intestinal epithelium, improving colonization. This paper is an overview of current knowledge on Bifidobacterium surface proteins. The ways of transport and anchoring proteins in Gram-positive bacterial cells, the assembly of cell wall, and a description of the genus Bifidobacterium are presented.

  6. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm efficacy of self-cleaning surfaces functionalized by TiO2 photocatalytic nanoparticles against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalvo, Blanca; Faraldos, Marisol; Bahamonde, Ana; Rosal, Roberto

    2017-10-15

    A photocatalytic sol of TiO2 nanoparticles has been used for creating self-cleaning antimicrobial flat and porous glass surfaces. The substrates were irradiated to study their photocatalytic properties and behavior in the presence of biofilm-forming bacteria. Smooth glass surfaces and glass microfiber filters were covered with 1.98×10-3±1.5×10-4gcm-2 and 8.55×10-3±3.0×10-4gcm-2 densities, respectively. Self-cleaning properties were analyzed using the methylene blue 365nm UV-A photodegradation test. TiO2-coated filters achieved rapid and complete photodegradation of methylene blue because of the better TiO2 dispersion with respect to the glass slides. The effect of functionalized surfaces on the growth and viability of bacteria was studied using the strains Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas putida. After irradiation (2h, 11.2Wm-2, 290-400nm), the initially hydrophobic surface turned hydrophilic. The antibacterial effect led to extensive membrane damage and significant production of intracellular reactive oxygen species in all TiO2-loaded irradiated specimens. The reduction of cell viability was over 99.9% (>3-log) for TiO2 on glass surfaces. However, the polymeric extracellular matrix formed before the irradiation treatment was not removed. This study highlights the importance of bacterial colonization during dark periods and the difficulty of removing the structure of biofilms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Lack of Involvement of Fenton Chemistry in Death of Methicillin-Resistant and Methicillin-Sensitive Strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Destruction of Their Genomes on Wet or Dry Copper Alloy Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnes, Sarah L; Keevil, C William

    2016-01-29

    The pandemic of hospital-acquired infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has declined, but the evolution of strains with enhanced virulence and toxins and the increase of community-associated infections are still a threat. In previous studies, 10(7) MRSA bacteria applied as simulated droplet contamination were killed on copper and brass surfaces within 90 min. However, contamination of surfaces is often via finger tips and dries rapidly, and it may be overlooked by cleaning regimes (unlike visible droplets). In this new study, a 5-log reduction of a hardy epidemic strain of MRSA (epidemic methicillin-resistant S. aureus 16 [EMRSA-16]) was observed following 10 min of contact with copper, and a 4-log reduction was observed on copper nickel and cartridge brass alloys in 15 min. A methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strain from an osteomyelitis patient was killed on copper surfaces in 15 min, and 4-log and 3-log reductions occurred within 20 min of contact with copper nickel and cartridge brass, respectively. Bacterial respiration was compromised on copper surfaces, and superoxide was generated as part of the killing mechanism. In addition, destruction of genomic DNA occurs on copper and brass surfaces, allaying concerns about horizontal gene transfer and copper resistance. Incorporation of copper alloy biocidal surfaces may help to reduce the spread of this dangerous pathogen. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on surfaces of an Intensive Care Unit Staphylococcus aureus resistente a la meticilina en superfícies de una Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos Staphylococcus aureus resistente à meticilina em superfícies de uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Menis Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in areas close to patients in a General Intensive Care Unit. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study, in which microbiological samples were collected from five surfaces (left / right bed siderails, bed crank, table, buttons on the infusion pump, and cotton gowns from each of ten patient rooms, totaling 63 samples. To collect samples, the Petri FilmTM Staph Express Count System 3M TM was used to screen for methicillin resistance, with the Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with 4% sodium chloride and 6 µg / ml of oxacillin. Descriptive analysis was conducted to determine the frequency (n and percentage (% of contamination of environmental surfaces. RESULTS: Of 48 samples positive for Staphylococcus aureus, 29 (60.4% were resistant to methicillin. The incidence on the siderails and bed cranks, table, buttons on the infusion pumps and aprons were, respectively, 55.5%, 57.1%, 57.1%, 60.0% and 75.0%. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the surfaces around the patient constitute a major threat, as they represent secondary reservoirs of MRSA.OBJETIVO: Evaluar la presencia de Staphylococcus aureus resistente a la meticilina (MRSA en superficies cercanas a los pacientes internados en una Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos General. MÉTODOS: Se trata de un estudio transversal, en el cual se recolectaron muestras microbiológicas de cinco superficies (enrejados derecho/izquierdo, manivela de la cama, mesa, botones de la bomba de infusión y mandiles de algodón de cada diez unidades de pacientes, totalizando 63 muestras. Para la recolección, se utilizaron placas Petri FilmTM Staph Express Count System 3M TM y para el triaje de resistencia a la meticilina, el agar Mueller-Hinton adicionado del 4% de cloruro de sodio y 6 µg/ml oxacilina. Se emplearon análisis descriptivos para determinar la frecuencia (n y el porcentaje (% de contaminación de las superficies ambientales

  9. The Staphylococcus aureus group II biotin protein ligase BirA is an effective regulator of biotin operon transcription and requires the DNA binding domain for full enzymatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, Sarah K; Cronan, John E

    2016-11-01

    Group II biotin protein ligases (BPLs) are characterized by the presence of an N-terminal DNA binding domain that functions in transcriptional regulation of the genes of biotin biosynthesis and transport. The Staphylococcus aureus Group II BPL which is called BirA has been reported to bind an imperfect inverted repeat located upstream of the biotin synthesis operon. DNA binding by other Group II BPLs requires dimerization of the protein which is triggered by synthesis of biotinoyl-AMP (biotinoyl-adenylate), the intermediate in the ligation of biotin to its cognate target proteins. However, the S. aureus BirA was reported to dimerize and bind DNA in the absence of biotin or biotinoyl-AMP (Soares da Costa et al. (2014) Mol Microbiol 91: 110-120). These in vitro results argued that the protein would be unable to respond to the levels of biotin or acceptor proteins and thus would lack the regulatory properties of the other characterized BirA proteins. We tested the regulatory function of the protein using an in vivo model system and examined its DNA binding properties in vitro using electrophoretic mobility shift and fluorescence anisotropy analyses. We report that the S. aureus BirA is an effective regulator of biotin operon transcription and that the prior data can be attributed to artifacts of mobility shift analyses. We also report that deletion of the DNA binding domain of the S. aureus BirA results in loss of virtually all of its ligation activity. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Accessible surfaces of beta proteins increase with increasing protein molecular mass more rapidly than those of other proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V Glyakina

    Full Text Available Here we present a systematic analysis of accessible surface areas and hydrogen bonds of 2554 globular proteins from four structural classes (all-α, all-β, α/β and α+β proteins that is aimed to learn in which structural class the accessible surface area increases with increasing protein molecular mass more rapidly than in other classes, and what structural peculiarities are responsible for this effect. The beta structural class of proteins was found to be the leader, with the following possible explanations of this fact. First, in beta structural proteins, the fraction of residues not included in the regular secondary structure is the largest, and second, the accessible surface area of packaged elements of the beta-structure increases more rapidly with increasing molecular mass in comparison with the alpha-structure. Moreover, in the beta structure, the probability of formation of backbone hydrogen bonds is higher than that in the alpha helix for all residues of α+β proteins (the average probability is 0.73±0.01 for the beta-structure and 0.60±0.01 for the alpha-structure without proline and α/β proteins, except for asparagine, aspartic acid, glycine, threonine, and serine (0.70±0.01 for the beta-structure and 0.60±0.01 for the alpha-structure without the proline residue. There is a linear relationship between the number of hydrogen bonds and the number of amino acid residues in the protein (Number of hydrogen bonds=0.678·number of residues-3.350.

  11. Protein adsorption at nanopatterned surfaces studied by QCM-D and SPR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Stine; Pedersen, Gitte Albinus; Nejsum, Lene Niemann

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the use of the quartz microbalance with dissipation combined with surface plasmon resonance to probe protein adsorption at nanopatterned surfaces. Three different types of adsorbing materials, representing rigid discrete nanoparticles, dense protein films and soft low density...

  12. Structure of a conserved hypothetical protein SA1388 from S. aureus reveals a capped hexameric toroid with two PII domain lids and a dinuclear metal center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Zhang, Xuejun; Kinch, Lisa; Leybourne, Matthew; Grishin, Nick V.; Zhang, Hong (Texas-D); (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2009-01-26

    The protein encoded by the SA1388 gene from Staphylococcus aureus was chosen for structure determination to elucidate its domain organization and confirm our earlier remote homology based prediction that it housed a nitrogen regulatory PII protein-like domain. SA1388 was predicted to contain a central PII-like domain and two flanking regions, which together belong to the NIF3-like protein family. Proteins like SA1388 remain a poorly studied group and their structural characterization could guide future investigations aimed at understanding their function. The structure of SA1388 has been solved to 2.0{angstrom} resolution by single wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing method using selenium anomalous signals. It reveals a canonical NIF3-like fold containing two domains with a PII-like domain inserted in the middle of the polypeptide. The N and C terminal halves of the NIF3-like domains are involved in dimerization, while the PII domain forms trimeric contacts with symmetry related monomers. Overall, the NIF3-like domains of SA1388 are organized as a hexameric toroid similar to its homologs, E. coli ybgI and the hypothetical protein SP1609 from Streptococcus pneumoniae. The openings on either side of the toroid are partially covered by trimeric 'lids' formed by the PII domains. The junction of the two NIF3 domains has two zinc ions bound at what appears to be a histidine rich active site. A well-defined electron density corresponding to an endogenously bound ligand of unknown identity is observed in close proximity to the metal site. SA1388 is the third member of the NIF3-like family of proteins to be structurally characterized, the other two also being hypothetical proteins of unknown function. The structure of SA1388 confirms our earlier prediction that the inserted domain that separates the two NIF3 domains adopts a PII-like fold and reveals an overall capped toroidal arrangement for the protein hexamer. The six PII-like domains form two trimeric

  13. Surface peptide mapping of protein I and protein III of four strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, R.C.

    1982-08-01

    Whole cells and isolated outer membranes (OMs) of four strains of gonococci were surface radioiodinated with either lactoperoxidase or Iodogen (Pierce Chemical Co., Rockford, Ill.). These preparations were solubilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate and subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Surface-radioiodinated protein I (PI) and PIII bands were excised from the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels and digested with alpha-chymotrypsin, and the resultant /sup 125/I-peptide fragments were resolved by high-voltage electrophoresis and thin-layer chromatography (i.e., surface peptide mapping). Radioemitting peptidic fragments were visualized by autoradiography. Results demonstrated that the PI molecule of each gonococcal strain studied had unique iodinatable peptides exposed on the surface of whole cells and OMs, whereas PIIIs appeared to have the same portion of the molecule exposed on the surface of bacteria or OMs, regardless of the gonococcal strain from which they were isolated. Many more radiolabeled peptides were seen in surface peptide maps of PIs from radiolabeled OMs than in those from radioiodinated whole cells, whereas different peptidic fragments were seen in the surface peptide maps of PIIIs from radiolabeled OMs than were seen in those from radiolabeled whole cells. These data suggest that PI may contribute strain-specific antigenic determinants and PIII may contribute cross-reactive determinants and that the surface exposure of PI and PIII is different in isolated OMs than in the OM of intact gonococci.

  14. The effects of diode laser on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide adherent to titanium oxide surface of dental implants. An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannelli, Marco; Landini, Giulia; Materassi, Fabrizio; Chellini, Flaminia; Antonelli, Alberto; Tani, Alessia; Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Bani, Daniele

    2016-11-01

    Effective decontamination of biofilm and bacterial toxins from the surface of dental implants is a yet unresolved issue. This in vitro study aims at providing the experimental basis for possible use of diode laser (λ 808 nm) in the treatment of peri-implantitis. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm was grown for 48 h on titanium discs with porous surface corresponding to the bone-implant interface and then irradiated with a diode laser (λ 808 nm) in noncontact mode with airflow cooling for 1 min using a Ø 600-μm fiber. Setting parameters were 2 W (400 J/cm2) for continuous wave mode; 22 μJ, 20 kHz, 7 μs (88 J/cm2) for pulsed wave mode. Bactericidal effect was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy and counting the residual colony-forming units. Biofilm and titanium surface morphology were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In parallel experiments, the titanium discs were coated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), laser-irradiated and seeded with RAW 264.7 macrophages to quantify LPS-driven inflammatory cell activation by measuring the enhanced generation of nitric oxide (NO). Diode laser irradiation in both continuous and pulsed modes induced a statistically significant reduction of viable bacteria and nitrite levels. These results indicate that in addition to its bactericidal effect laser irradiation can also inhibit LPS-induced macrophage activation and thus blunt the inflammatory response. The λ 808-nm diode laser emerges as a valuable tool for decontamination/detoxification of the titanium implant surface and may be used in the treatment of peri-implantitis.

  15. Neutrophil surface adhesion molecule and toll like receptor dynamics in crossbred cows suffering from Staphylococcus aureus subclinical and clinical mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Kumar Swain

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: Host elicits stage specific expression of surface adhesion molecules and TLR2 and TLR4 as dynamic host innate immune response against Staphylococcal mastitis. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2016; 3(2.000: 99-105

  16. Antigenicity and immunogenicity of Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein-3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R Bitencourt

    Full Text Available A recent clinical trial in African children demonstrated the potential utility of merozoite surface protein (MSP-3 as a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The present study evaluated the use of Plasmodium vivax MSP-3 (PvMSP-3 as a target antigen in vaccine formulations against malaria caused by P. vivax. Recombinant proteins representing MSP-3α and MSP-3β of P. vivax were expressed as soluble histidine-tagged bacterial fusions. Antigenicity during natural infection was evaluated by detecting specific antibodies using sera from individuals living in endemic areas of Brazil. A large proportion of infected individuals presented IgG antibodies to PvMSP-3α (68.2% and at least 1 recombinant protein representing PvMSP-3β (79.1%. In spite of the large responder frequency, reactivity to both antigens was significantly lower than was observed for the immunodominant epitope present on the 19-kDa C-terminal region of PvMSP-1. Immunogenicity of the recombinant proteins was studied in mice in the absence or presence of different adjuvant formulations. PvMSP-3β, but not PvMSP-3α, induced a TLR4-independent humoral immune response in the absence of any adjuvant formulation. The immunogenicity of the recombinant antigens were also tested in formulations containing different adjuvants (Alum, Salmonella enterica flagellin, CpG, Quil A,TiterMax® and incomplete Freunds adjuvant and combinations of two adjuvants (Alum plus flagellin, and CpG plus flagellin. Recombinant PvMSP-3α and PvMSP-3β elicited higher antibody titers capable of recognizing P. vivax-infected erythrocytes harvested from malaria patients. Our results confirm that P. vivax MSP-3 antigens are immunogenic during natural infection, and the corresponding recombinant proteins may be useful in elucidating their vaccine potential.

  17. Solid phase radioimmunoassay for quantitation of antigen-specific IgG in human sera with /sup 125/I-protein A from Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, R.G.; Sobotka, A.K.; Adkinson, N.F. Jr.

    1979-03-01

    Radiolabeled protein A from Staphylococcus aureus (Staph A) has been used to develop a solid phase, noncompetitive radioimmunoassay for quantitation of specific IgG antibody. The assay involves two incubations: First, agarose-insolubilized antigen is mixed with serum samples for 1 to 4 h during which specific antibody is bound; second, after a washing procedure, the solid phase immune complexes are incubated for 4 to 18 h with /sup 125/I-Staph A, during which the radiolabeled detection protein binds to the insolubilized specific IgG antibody. In a comparative study of the IgG antiphospholipase A antibody content of 23 human sera drawn from honeybee venom-sensitive patients, results of the Staph A assay correlated highly (r = 0.981, p < 0.001, N = 23) with those obtained from a liquid phase, competitive radioimmunoprecipitation (double antibody) assay. The two assays demonstrated comparable precision, sensitivity, and reproducibility. In contrast, the use of /sup 125/I-Staph A in the solid phase radioimmunoassay was superior to /sup 125/I rabbit anti-human IgG because of lower negative serum (blank) values, shorter time required to reach equilibrium binding, and greater precision and reproducibility. In principle, the /sup 125/ Staph A assay may be applied to IgG quantitation for crude allergen extracts as well as purified antigens. Furthermore, the sera of a number of mammalian species may be studied without further modification.

  18. Prediction of antigenic epitopes on protein surfaces by consensus scoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Chi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of antigenic epitopes on protein surfaces is important for vaccine design. Most existing epitope prediction methods focus on protein sequences to predict continuous epitopes linear in sequence. Only a few structure-based epitope prediction algorithms are available and they have not yet shown satisfying performance. Results We present a new antigen Epitope Prediction method, which uses ConsEnsus Scoring (EPCES from six different scoring functions - residue epitope propensity, conservation score, side-chain energy score, contact number, surface planarity score, and secondary structure composition. Applied to unbounded antigen structures from an independent test set, EPCES was able to predict antigenic eptitopes with 47.8% sensitivity, 69.5% specificity and an AUC value of 0.632. The performance of the method is statistically similar to other published methods. The AUC value of EPCES is slightly higher compared to the best results of existing algorithms by about 0.034. Conclusion Our work shows consensus scoring of multiple features has a better performance than any single term. The successful prediction is also due to the new score of residue epitope propensity based on atomic solvent accessibility.

  19. Differential interactions of Streptococcus gordonii and Staphylococcus aureus with cultured osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui, C E; Mansell, J P; Jepson, M A; Jenkinson, H F

    2013-08-01

    The impedance of normal osteoblast function by microorganisms is at least in part responsible for the failure of dental or orthopedic implants. Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen of bone, and exhibits high levels of adhesion and invasion of osteoblasts. In this article we show that the commensal oral bacterium Streptococcus gordonii also adheres to and is internalized by osteoblasts. Entry of S. gordonii cells had typical features of phagocytosis, similar to S. aureus, with membrane protrusions characterizing initial uptake, and closure of the osteoblast membrane leading to engulfment. The sensitivities of S. gordonii internalization to inhibitors cytochalasin D, colchicine and monensin indicated uptake through endocytosis, with requirement for actin accumulation. Internalization levels of S. gordonii were enhanced by expression of S. aureus fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA) on the S. gordonii cell surface. Lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 phagosomal membrane marker accumulated with intracellular S. aureus and S. gordonii FnBPA, indicating trafficking of bacteria into the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment. Streptococcus gordonii cells did not survive intracellularly for more than 12 h, unless expressing FnBPA, whereas S. aureus showed extended survival times (>48 h). Both S. aureus and S. gordonii DL-1 elicited a rapid interleukin-8 response by osteoblasts, whereas S. gordonii FnBPA was slower. Only S. aureus elicited an interleukin-6 response. Hence, S. gordonii invades osteoblasts by a mechanism similar to that exhibited by S. aureus, and elicits a proinflammatory response that may promote bone resorption. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. G-Protein Coupled Receptors: Surface Display and Biosensor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurchie, Edward; Leifert, Wayne

    Signal transduction by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) underpins a multitude of physiological processes. Ligand recognition by the receptor leads to the activation of a generic molecular switch involving heterotrimeric G-proteins and guanine nucleotides. With growing interest and commercial investment in GPCRs in areas such as drug targets, orphan receptors, high-throughput screening of drugs and biosensors, greater attention will focus on assay development to allow for miniaturization, ultrahigh-throughput and, eventually, microarray/biochip assay formats that will require nanotechnology-based approaches. Stable, robust, cell-free signaling assemblies comprising receptor and appropriate molecular switching components will form the basis of future GPCR/G-protein platforms, which should be able to be adapted to such applications as microarrays and biosensors. This chapter focuses on cell-free GPCR assay nanotechnologies and describes some molecular biological approaches for the construction of more sophisticated, surface-immobilized, homogeneous, functional GPCR sensors. The latter points should greatly extend the range of applications to which technologies based on GPCRs could be applied.

  1. Surface proteins of bacteria of the genus Bifidobacterium 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Dylus

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Beneficial effects due to the presence of probiotic bacteria of the genus Bifidobacterium in the human intestinal tract are still an interesting object of study. So far activities have been confirmed of bifidobacteria in stimulation of the host immune system, stimulation of tumor cell apoptosis, improvement of bowel motility, alleviation of symptoms of lactose intolerance, cholesterol lowering capacity, prevention and treatment of diarrhea and irritable bowel syndrome, alleviation of allergy or atopic dermatitis, maintenance of homeostasis of the intestine, and stimulation of the development of normal intestinal microflora in infants. A multitude of therapeutic properties encourages researchers to investigate the possibility of using the potential of Bifidobacterium in the prevention and treatment of other conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and depression. Although it is known that the beneficial effects are due to intestinal mucosal colonization by these bacteria, the cell components responsible for the colonization are still not determined. In addition to the beneficial effects of probiotic administration, there were also negative effects including sepsis. Therefore research has been directed to identify specific components of Bifidobacterium responsible for probiotic effects. Currently researchers are focused on identifying, isolating and evaluating the properties of surface proteins that are probably involved in the adhesion of bacterial cells to the intestinal epithelium, improving colonization. This paper is an overview of current knowledge on Bifidobacterium surface proteins. The ways of transport and anchoring proteins in Gram-positive bacterial cells, the assembly of cell wall, and a description of the genus Bifidobacterium are presented.

  2. Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus Adhesion to the Surface of a Reticular Heavyweight Polypropylene Mesh Soaked in a Combination of Chlorhexidine and Allicin: An In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Köhler, Bárbara; García-Moreno, Francisca; Bayon, Yves; Pascual, Gemma; Bellón, Juan Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Presoaking meshes for hernia repair with antiseptics prior to implantation could decrease the adhesion of microorganisms to the material surface and reduce the risk of antibiotic resistances. In this work, we evaluate chlorhexidine and allicin (natural antiseptic not yet tested for these purposes) against vancomycin as antiseptics to be used in the pretreatment of a heavyweight polypropylene mesh using an in vitro model of bacterial contamination. Solutions of saline, vancomycin (40 µg/mL), allicin (1,000 µg/mL), chlorhexidine (2%-0.05%) and the combination allicin-chlorhexidine (900 µg/mL-0.05%) were analyzed with agar diffusion tests in the presence of 106 CFU Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923. Additionally, sterile fragments of Surgipro (1 cm2) were soaked with the solutions and cultured onto contaminated agar plates for 24/48/72 h. The antimicrobial material DualMesh Plus was utilized as positive control. At every time, the inhibition zones were measured and the bacterial adhesion to the mesh surface quantified (sonication, scanning electron microscopy). Cytotoxicity of the treatments was examined (alamarBlue) using rabbit skin fibroblasts. The largest zones of inhibition were created by allicin-chlorhexidine. Chlorhexidine was more effective than vancomycin, and allicin lost its effectiveness after 24 h. No bacteria adhered to the surface of the DualMesh Plus or the meshes soaked with vancomycin, chlorhexidine and allicin-chlorhexidine. On the contrary, saline and allicin allowed adherence of high loads of bacteria. Vancomycin had no toxic effects on fibroblasts, while allicin and chlorhexidine exerted high toxicity. Cytotoxicity was significantly reduced with the allicin-chlorhexidine combination. The use of antiseptics such as chlorhexidine, alone or combined with others like allicin, could represent an adequate prophylactic strategy to be used for hernia repair materials because soaking with these agents provides the mesh with similar antibacterial

  3. Attachment and colonization by Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus on stone fruit surfaces and Survival through a simulated commercial export chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collignon, Stacey; Korsten, Lise

    2010-07-01

    The ability of the foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus to attach, colonize, and survive on stone fruit surfaces was investigated. Fifty microliters of bacterial suspension was spot inoculated onto the sterile intact fructoplane of whole peaches and plums. Minimum time required for initial adhesion and attachment was recorded for different surface contact times. Surface colonization patterns of the four pathogens and survival under simulated commercial export conditions also were evaluated. L. monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium attached immediately to stone fruit surfaces. E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus were visibly attached after 30 s and 1 h, respectively, of direct exposure. Holding freshly harvested stone fruit at 0.5 degrees C to simulate cold storage conditions significantly lowered the titer of E. coli O157:H7 on plums and the titers of L. monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium on stone fruit. E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes at a low inoculum level and S. aureus and Salmonella Typhimurium at high and low levels did not survive the simulated export chain conditions at titers that exceeded the minimum infectious dose. However, E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes were able to survive on stone fruit surfaces when inoculated at an artificially high level. In this case, the final titer at the end of the supply chain was higher than the infectious dose. In this laboratory experiment, E. coli O157:H7, L. monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and S. aureus at potential natural contamination levels were unable to survive simulated export conditions.

  4. Distribution of the serine-aspartate repeat protein-encoding sdr genes among nasal-carriage and invasive Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabat, Artur; Melles, Damian C; Martirosian, Gayane; Grundmann, Hajo; Belkum, Alex van; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2006-01-01

    The sdr locus was found in all 497 investigated Staphylococcus aureus strains, although in 29 strains it contained only the sdrC gene (sdrD negative, sdrE negative). The sdrC-positive, sdrD-negative, sdrE-negative gene profile was exclusive to methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strains (Fisher's

  5. Characterization of the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7, a monoclonal antibody to Staphylococcus aureus iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory ePancari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported the development of a human monoclonal antibody (CS-D7, IgG1 with specificity and affinity for the iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB of Staphylococcus aureus. CS-D7 mediates opsonophagocytic killing in vitro and protection in a murine sepsis model. In light of recent data indicating that IsdB specific T cells (CD4+, Th17, not Ab, mediate protection after vaccination with IsdB, it is important to investigate the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7. The mAb was examined to determine if it blocked heme binding to IsdB in vitro. The mAb was not found to have heme blocking activity, nor did it prevent bacterial growth under in vivo conditions, in an implanted growth chamber. To assess the role of the mAb Fc a point mutation was introduced at aa 297 (CS-D7●N297A. This point mutation removes Fc effector functions. In vitro analysis of the mutein confirmed that it lacked measurable binding to FcγR, and that it did not fix complement. The mutein had dramatically reduced in vitro opsonic OP activity compared to CS-D7. Nonetheless, the mutein conferred protection equivalent to the wild type mAb in the murine sepsis model. Both wild type and mutein mAbs were efficacious in FcγR deletion mice (including both FcγRII-/- mice and FcγRIII-/- mice, indicating that these receptors were not essential for mAb mediated protection in vivo. Protection mediated by CS-D7 was lost in Balb/c mice depleted of C3 with cobra venom factor (CFV, was lost in mice depleted of superoxide dismutase (SOD in P47phox deletion mice, and was absent in SCID mice. Enhanced clearance of S. aureus in the liver of CS-D7 treated mice and enhanced production of INF-γ, but not of IL17, may play a role in the mechanism of protection mediated by the mAb. CS-D7 apparently mediates survival in challenged mice through a mechanism involving complement, phagocytes, and lymphocytes, but which does not depend on interaction with FcγR, or on blocking heme

  6. Active immunization with an octa-valent Staphylococcus aureus antigen mixture in models of S. aureus bacteremia and skin infection in mice.

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    Sanne van den Berg

    Full Text Available Proteomic studies with different Staphylococcus aureus isolates have shown that the cell surface-exposed and secreted proteins IsaA, LytM, Nuc, the propeptide of Atl (pro-Atl and four phenol-soluble modulins α (PSMα are invariantly produced by this pathogen. Therefore the present study was aimed at investigating whether these proteins can be used for active immunization against S. aureus infection in mouse models of bacteremia and skin infection. To this end, recombinant His-tagged fusions of IsaA, LytM, Nuc and pro-Atl were isolated from Lactococcus lactis or Escherichia coli, while the PSMα1-4 peptides were chemically synthesized. Importantly, patients colonized by S. aureus showed significant immunoglobulin G (IgG responses against all eight antigens. BALB/cBYJ mice were immunized subcutaneously with a mixture of the antigens at day one (5 μg each, and boosted twice (25 μg of each antigen with 28 days interval. This resulted in high IgG responses against all antigens although the response against pro-Atl was around one log lower compared to the other antigens. Compared to placebo-immunized mice, immunization with the octa-valent antigen mixture did not reduce the S. aureus isolate P load in blood, lungs, spleen, liver, and kidneys in a bacteremia model in which the animals were challenged for 14 days with a primary load of 3 × 10(5 CFU. Discomfort scores and animal survival rates over 14 days did not differ between immunized mice and placebo-immunized mice upon bacteremia with S. aureus USA300 (6 × 10(5 CFU. In addition, this immunization did not reduce the S. aureus isolate P load in mice with skin infection. These results show that the target antigens are immunogenic in both humans and mice, but in the used animal models do not result in protection against S. aureus infection.

  7. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Devin W; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Traore, Daouda A K; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C; Waldo, Geoffery S; Payne, Riley J; Rucker, Joseph B; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The Allosteric Site for the Nascent Cell Wall in Penicillin-Binding Protein 2a: An Achilles' Heel of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acebrón, Iván; Chang, Mayland; Mobashery, Shahriar; Hermoso, Juan A

    2015-01-01

    The ability to resist the effect of a wide range of antibiotics makes methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) a leading global human pathogen. A key determinant of resistance to β-lactam antibiotics in this organism is penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a), an enzyme that catalyzes the crosslinking reaction between two adjacent peptide stems during the peptidoglycan biosynthesis. The recently published crystal structure of the complex of PBP2a with ceftaroline, a cephalosporin antibiotic that shows efficacy against MRSA, has revealed the allosteric site at 60-Å distance from the transpeptidase domain. Binding of ceftaroline to the allosteric site of PBP2a triggers conformational changes that lead to the opening of the active site from a closed conformation, where a second molecule of ceftaroline binds to give inhibition of the enzyme. The discovery of allostery in MRSA remains the only known example of such regulation of cellwall biosynthesis and represents a new paradigm in fighting MRSA. This review summarizes the present knowledge of the allosteric mechanism, the conformational changes allowing PBP2a catalysis and the means by which some clinical strains have acquired resistance to ceftaroline by disrupting the allosteric mechanism.

  9. Development of a strategy for the identification of surface proteins in the pathogenic microsporidian Nosema bombycis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weixi; Hao, Youjin; Wang, Linglin; Zhou, Zeyang; Li, Zhi

    2015-06-01

    Parasite-host interactions mediated by cell surface proteins have been implicated as a critical step in infections caused by the microsporidian Nosema bombycis. Such cell surface proteins are considered as promising diagnostic markers and targets for drug development. However, little research has specifically addressed surface proteome identification in microsporidia due to technical barriers. Here, a combined strategy was developed to separate and identify the surface proteins of N. bombycis. Briefly, following (1) biotinylation of the spore surface, (2) extraction of total proteins with an optimized method and (3) streptavidin affinity purification of biotinylated proteins, 22 proteins were identified based on LC-MS/MS analysis. Among them, 5 proteins were confirmed to be localized on the surface of N. bombycis. A total of 8 proteins were identified as hypothetical extracellular proteins, whereas 7 other hypothetical proteins had no available function annotation. Furthermore, a protein with a molecular weight of 18·5 kDa was localized on the spore surface by western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis, even though it was predicted to be a nuclear protein by bioinformatics. Collectively, our work provides an effective strategy for isolating microsporidian surface protein components for both drug target identification and further diagnostic research on microsporidian disease control.

  10. Thermodynamics of interactions of urea and guanidinium salts with protein surface: Relationship between solute effects on protein processes and changes in water-accessible surface area

    OpenAIRE

    Courtenay, Elizabeth S.; Capp, Michael W.; Record, M. Thomas

    2001-01-01

    To interpret effects of urea and guanidinium (GuH+) salts on processes that involve large changes in protein water-accessible surface area (ASA), and to predict these effects from structural information, a thermodynamic characterization of the interactions of these solutes with different types of protein surface is required. In the present work we quantify the interactions of urea, GuHCl, GuHSCN, and, for comparison, KCl with native bovine serum albumin (BSA) surface, using vapor pressure osm...

  11. Detection of alpha-toxin and other virulence factors in biofilms of staphylococcus aureus on polystyrene and a human epidermalmodel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. den Reijer (Martijn); J.A. Haisma (Janneke); N. Lemmens-den Toom (Nicole); J. Willemse (José); R.A. Koning; J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); D.H. Dekkers (Dick); E.J. Rijkers; A. El Ghalbzouri (Abdoelwaheb); P.H. Nibbering (Peter); W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground & Aim: The ability of Staphylococcus aureus to successfully colonize (a)biotic surfaces may be explained by biofilm formation and the actions of virulence factors. The aim of the present study was to establish the presence of 52 proteins, including virulence factors such as

  12. Survey of surface proteins from the pathogenic Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae strain 7448 using a biotin cell surface labeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Antonio Reolon

    Full Text Available The characterization of the repertoire of proteins exposed on the cell surface by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae, the etiological agent of enzootic pneumonia in pigs, is critical to understand physiological processes associated with bacterial infection capacity, survival and pathogenesis. Previous in silico studies predicted that about a third of the genes in the M. hyopneumoniae genome code for surface proteins, but so far, just a few of them have experimental confirmation of their expression and surface localization. In this work, M. hyopneumoniae surface proteins were labeled in intact cells with biotin, and affinity-captured biotin-labeled proteins were identified by a gel-based liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach. A total of 20 gel slices were separately analyzed by mass spectrometry, resulting in 165 protein identifications corresponding to 59 different protein species. The identified surface exposed proteins better defined the set of M. hyopneumoniae proteins exposed to the host and added confidence to in silico predictions. Several proteins potentially related to pathogenesis, were identified, including known adhesins and also hypothetical proteins with adhesin-like topologies, consisting of a transmembrane helix and a large tail exposed at the cell surface. The results provided a better picture of the M. hyopneumoniae cell surface that will help in the understanding of processes important for bacterial pathogenesis. Considering the experimental demonstration of surface exposure, adhesion-like topology predictions and absence of orthologs in the closely related, non-pathogenic species Mycoplasma flocculare, several proteins could be proposed as potential targets for the development of drugs, vaccines and/or immunodiagnostic tests for enzootic pneumonia.

  13. Mapping Protein Surface Accessibility via an Electron Transfer Dissociation Selectively Cleavable Hydrazone Probe*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasicek, Lisa; O'Brien, John P.; Browning, Karen S.; Tao, Zhihua; Liu, Hung-Wen; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    A protein's surface influences its role in protein-protein interactions and protein-ligand binding. Mass spectrometry can be used to give low resolution structural information about protein surfaces and conformations when used in combination with derivatization methods that target surface accessible amino acid residues. However, pinpointing the resulting modified peptides upon enzymatic digestion of the surface-modified protein is challenging because of the complexity of the peptide mixture and low abundance of modified peptides. Here a novel hydrazone reagent (NN) is presented that allows facile identification of all modified surface residues through a preferential cleavage upon activation by electron transfer dissociation coupled with a collision activation scan to pinpoint the modified residue in the peptide sequence. Using this approach, the correlation between percent reactivity and surface accessibility is demonstrated for two biologically active proteins, wheat eIF4E and PARP-1 Domain C. PMID:22393264

  14. Cell surface hydrophobicity is conveyed by S-layer proteins - A study in recombinant lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, H.C. van der; Belt-Gritter, B. van de; Pouwels, P.H.; Martinez, B.; Busscher, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cell surface hydrophobicity is one of the most important factors controlling adhesion of microorganisms to surfaces. In this paper, cell surface properties of lactobacilli and recombinant lactobacilli with and without a surface layer protein (SLP) associated with cell surface hydrophobicity were

  15. Cell surface hydrophobicity is conveyed by S-layer proteins - a study in recombinant lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mei, HC; van de Belt-Gritter, B; Pouwels, PH; Martinez, B; Busscher, HJ

    2003-01-01

    Cell surface hydrophobicity is one of the most important factors controlling adhesion of microorganisms to surfaces. In this paper, cell surface properties of lactobacilli and recombinant lactobacilli with and without a surface layer protein (SLP) associated with cell surface hydrophobicity were

  16. Characterization of the surface of protein-adsorbed dental materials by wetting and streaming potential measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsumura, H.; Kawasaki, K.; Okumura, N.; Kambara, M.; Norde, W.

    2003-01-01

    In this study we have elucidated the water-wettability and the electrokinetic surface potential of protein-covered dental materials. The proteins used here as typical proteins were human serum albumin and lysozyme from hen*s egg. The wettability (hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity) and the surface

  17. Characterization of the surface of protein-adsorbed dental materials by wetting and streaming potential measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matsumura, H; Kawasaki, K; Okumura, N; Kambara, M; Norde, W

    2003-01-01

    In this study we have elucidated the water-wettability and the electrokinetic surface potential of protein-covered dental materials. The proteins used here as typical proteins were human serum albumin and lysozyme from hen's egg. The wettability (hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity) and the surface

  18. Protein-Nanoparticle Interactions: Improving Immobilized Lytic Enzyme Activity and Surface Energy Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Emily Elizabeth

    Protein-nanostructure conjugates, particularly particles, are a subject of significant interest due to changes in their fundamental behavior compared to bulk surfaces. As the size scale of nano-structured materials and proteins are on the same order of magnitude, nanomaterial properties can heavily influence how proteins adsorb and conform to the surface. Previous work has demonstrated the ability of nanoscale surfaces to modulate protein activity, conformation, and retention by modifying the particle surface curvature, morphology, and surface charge. This work has improved our understanding of the protein material interactions, but a complete understanding is still lacking. The goal of this thesis is to investigate two missing areas of understanding using two distinct systems. The first system utilizes a particle with controlled surface energy to observe the impact of surface energy on protein-particle interactions, while the second system uses a modified Listeria-specific protein to determine how protein structure and flexibility affects protein adsorption and activity on particles. Spherical, amorphous, and uniformly doped Zn-silica particles with tailored surface energies were synthesized to understand the impact of surface energy on protein adsorption behavior. Particle surface energy increased with a decrease in particle size and greater dopant concentrations. Protein adsorption and structural loss increased with both particle size and particle surface energy. Higher surface energies promoted protein-particle association and increased protein unfolding. Particle curvature and protein steric hindrance effects limited adsorption and structural loss on smaller particles. Protein surface charge heterogeneity was also found to be linked to both protein adsorption and unfolding behavior on larger particles. Greater surface charge heterogeneity led to higher adsorption concentrations and multilayer formation. These multilayers transitioned from protein

  19. Distinct pathogenesis and host responses during infection of C. elegans by P. aeruginosa and S. aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier E Irazoqui

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The genetically tractable model host Caenorhabditis elegans provides a valuable tool to dissect host-microbe interactions in vivo. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus utilize virulence factors involved in human disease to infect and kill C. elegans. Despite much progress, virtually nothing is known regarding the cytopathology of infection and the proximate causes of nematode death. Using light and electron microscopy, we found that P. aeruginosa infection entails intestinal distention, accumulation of an unidentified extracellular matrix and P. aeruginosa-synthesized outer membrane vesicles in the gut lumen and on the apical surface of intestinal cells, the appearance of abnormal autophagosomes inside intestinal cells, and P. aeruginosa intracellular invasion of C. elegans. Importantly, heat-killed P. aeruginosa fails to elicit a significant host response, suggesting that the C. elegans response to P. aeruginosa is activated either by heat-labile signals or pathogen-induced damage. In contrast, S. aureus infection causes enterocyte effacement, intestinal epithelium destruction, and complete degradation of internal organs. S. aureus activates a strong transcriptional response in C. elegans intestinal epithelial cells, which aids host survival during infection and shares elements with human innate responses. The C. elegans genes induced in response to S. aureus are mostly distinct from those induced by P. aeruginosa. In contrast to P. aeruginosa, heat-killed S. aureus activates a similar response as live S. aureus, which appears to be independent of the single C. elegans Toll-Like Receptor (TLR protein. These data suggest that the host response to S. aureus is possibly mediated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. Because our data suggest that neither the P. aeruginosa nor the S. aureus-triggered response requires canonical TLR signaling, they imply the existence of unidentified mechanisms for pathogen detection in C

  20. Distinct pathogenesis and host responses during infection of C. elegans by P. aeruginosa and S. aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irazoqui, Javier E; Troemel, Emily R; Feinbaum, Rhonda L; Luhachack, Lyly G; Cezairliyan, Brent O; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2010-07-01

    The genetically tractable model host Caenorhabditis elegans provides a valuable tool to dissect host-microbe interactions in vivo. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus utilize virulence factors involved in human disease to infect and kill C. elegans. Despite much progress, virtually nothing is known regarding the cytopathology of infection and the proximate causes of nematode death. Using light and electron microscopy, we found that P. aeruginosa infection entails intestinal distention, accumulation of an unidentified extracellular matrix and P. aeruginosa-synthesized outer membrane vesicles in the gut lumen and on the apical surface of intestinal cells, the appearance of abnormal autophagosomes inside intestinal cells, and P. aeruginosa intracellular invasion of C. elegans. Importantly, heat-killed P. aeruginosa fails to elicit a significant host response, suggesting that the C. elegans response to P. aeruginosa is activated either by heat-labile signals or pathogen-induced damage. In contrast, S. aureus infection causes enterocyte effacement, intestinal epithelium destruction, and complete degradation of internal organs. S. aureus activates a strong transcriptional response in C. elegans intestinal epithelial cells, which aids host survival during infection and shares elements with human innate responses. The C. elegans genes induced in response to S. aureus are mostly distinct from those induced by P. aeruginosa. In contrast to P. aeruginosa, heat-killed S. aureus activates a similar response as live S. aureus, which appears to be independent of the single C. elegans Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) protein. These data suggest that the host response to S. aureus is possibly mediated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Because our data suggest that neither the P. aeruginosa nor the S. aureus-triggered response requires canonical TLR signaling, they imply the existence of unidentified mechanisms for pathogen detection in C. elegans, with

  1. Enterococcus faecalis surface proteins determine its adhesion mechanism to bile drain materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waar, K; van der Mei, HC; Harmsen, HJM; Degener, JE; Busscher, HJ

    An important step in infections associated with biliary drains is adhesion of micro-organisms to the surface. In this study the role of three surface proteins of Enterococcus faecalis (enterococcal surface protein, aggregation substances 1 and 373) in the adhesion to silicone rubber,

  2. Integrin-mediated internalization of Staphylococcus aureus does not require vinculin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borisova Marina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disease manifestations of Staphylococcus aureus are connected to the fibronectin (Fn-binding capacity of these Gram-positive pathogens. Fn deposition on the surface of S. aureus allows engagement of α5β1 integrins and triggers uptake by host cells. For several integrin- and actin-associated cytoplasmic proteins, including FAK, Src, N-WASP, tensin and cortactin, a functional role during bacterial invasion has been demonstrated. As reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is critical for bacterial entry, we investigated whether vinculin, an essential protein linking integrins with the actin cytoskeleton, may contribute to the integrin-mediated internalization of S. aureus. Results Complementation of vinculin in vinculin -/- cells, vinculin overexpression, as well as shRNA-mediated vinculin knock-down in different eukaryotic cell types demonstrate, that vinculin does not have a functional role during the integrin-mediated uptake of S. aureus. Conclusions Our results suggest that vinculin is insignificant for the integrin-mediated uptake of S. aureus despite the critical role of vinculin as a linker between integrins and F-actin.

  3. On defining the dynamics of hydrophobic patches on protein surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijnzaad, Philip; Feenstra, K Anton; Heringa, Jaap; Holstege, Frank C P

    2008-07-01

    We present a simple and efficient method called PATCHTRACK, for studying the dynamics of hydrophobic surface patches. It tracks the patches on snapshot structures taken from a Molecular Dynamics simulation. They are connected into so-called patch runs, which are subsequently clustered into so-called recurrent patches. The method is applied to simulations of three different proteins. Protein motion causes addition and removal of one or more atoms to a patch, resulting in size fluctuations of around 25%. The fluctuations eventually lead to the break-up of a patch, and their average life span is therefore remarkably short at around 4 ps. However, some patch runs are much more stable, lasting hundreds of picoseconds. One such case is the largest patch in amicyanin that is known to be biologically relevant. Another case, previously not reported, is found in phospholipase A(2), where the functional significance of a large recurrent patch formed by Leu58 and Phe94 seems likely. This patch appears to have been overlooked as it is relatively small in the X-ray structure, demonstrating the utility of the current method. The most frequently occurring patch size is 40-60 A(2), but sizes of up to 500 A(2) are also observed. There is no clear relation between patch run durations and their average size. However, long-lasting patch runs tend not to have large fluctuations. The recurrent patches have alternating periods of "liveness" and "dormancy"; around 25% of them is predominantly in the live state. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus Adhesion to the Surface of a Reticular Heavyweight Polypropylene Mesh Soaked in a Combination of Chlorhexidine and Allicin: An In vitro Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Pérez-Köhler

    Full Text Available Presoaking meshes for hernia repair with antiseptics prior to implantation could decrease the adhesion of microorganisms to the material surface and reduce the risk of antibiotic resistances. In this work, we evaluate chlorhexidine and allicin (natural antiseptic not yet tested for these purposes against vancomycin as antiseptics to be used in the pretreatment of a heavyweight polypropylene mesh using an in vitro model of bacterial contamination.Solutions of saline, vancomycin (40 µg/mL, allicin (1,000 µg/mL, chlorhexidine (2%-0.05% and the combination allicin-chlorhexidine (900 µg/mL-0.05% were analyzed with agar diffusion tests in the presence of 106 CFU Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923. Additionally, sterile fragments of Surgipro (1 cm2 were soaked with the solutions and cultured onto contaminated agar plates for 24/48/72 h. The antimicrobial material DualMesh Plus was utilized as positive control. At every time, the inhibition zones were measured and the bacterial adhesion to the mesh surface quantified (sonication, scanning electron microscopy. Cytotoxicity of the treatments was examined (alamarBlue using rabbit skin fibroblasts.The largest zones of inhibition were created by allicin-chlorhexidine. Chlorhexidine was more effective than vancomycin, and allicin lost its effectiveness after 24 h. No bacteria adhered to the surface of the DualMesh Plus or the meshes soaked with vancomycin, chlorhexidine and allicin-chlorhexidine. On the contrary, saline and allicin allowed adherence of high loads of bacteria. Vancomycin had no toxic effects on fibroblasts, while allicin and chlorhexidine exerted high toxicity. Cytotoxicity was significantly reduced with the allicin-chlorhexidine combination.The use of antiseptics such as chlorhexidine, alone or combined with others like allicin, could represent an adequate prophylactic strategy to be used for hernia repair materials because soaking with these agents provides the mesh with similar

  5. Modulation of protein stability and aggregation properties by surface charge engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, Govindan; Sokalingam, Sriram; Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Madan, Bharat; Munussami, Ganapathiraman; Lee, Sun-Gu

    2013-09-01

    An attempt to alter protein surface charges through traditional protein engineering approaches often affects the native protein structure significantly and induces misfolding. This limitation is a major hindrance in modulating protein properties through surface charge variations. In this study, as a strategy to overcome such a limitation, we attempted to co-introduce stabilizing mutations that can neutralize the destabilizing effect of protein surface charge variation. Two sets of rational mutations were designed; one to increase the number of surface charged amino acids and the other to decrease the number of surface charged amino acids by mutating surface polar uncharged amino acids and charged amino acids, respectively. These two sets of mutations were introduced into Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) together with or without stabilizing mutations. The co-introduction of stabilizing mutations along with mutations for surface charge modification allowed us to obtain functionally active protein variants (s-GFP(+15-17) and s-GFP(+5-6)). When the protein properties such as fluorescent activity, folding rate and kinetic stability were assessed, we found the possibility that the protein stability can be modulated independently of activity and folding by engineering protein surface charges. The aggregation properties of GFP could also be altered through the surface charge engineering.

  6. Viability and virulence of pneumolysin, pneumococcal surface protein A, and pneumolysin/pneumococcal surface protein A mutants in the ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachern, Patricia A; Tsuprun, Vladimir; Goetz, Sarah; Cureoglu, Sebahattin; Juhn, Steven K; Briles, David E; Paparella, Michael M; Ferrieri, Patricia

    2013-09-01

    Understanding how pneumococcal proteins affect the pathology of the middle ear and inner ear is important for the development of new approaches to prevent otitis media and its complications. To determine the viability and virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae mutants deficient in pneumolysin (Ply-) and pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA-) in the chinchilla middle ear. Bullae of chinchillas were inoculated bilaterally with wild-type (Wt), Ply-, PspA-, and Ply-/PspA- strains. Bacterial colony-forming units (CFUs) in middle ear effusions were counted at 48 hours. The CFUs of the PspA- group were also counted at 6 to 36 hours after inoculation. Temporal bone histopathological results were compared. Twenty-seven chinchillas in an academic research laboratory. Chinchilla middle ears were inoculated with S pneumoniae to produce sufficient volumes of effusions and noticeable histopathological changes in the ears. The CFU counts in the middle ear effusions and histopathological changes were compared to determine the effect of pneumococcal protein mutations on chinchilla ears. At 48 hours, CFUs in middle ears were increased for the Wt and Ply-/PspA- strains, but Ply- remained near inoculum level. No bacteria were detected in the PspA- group. The CFUs of PspA- decreased over time to a low level at 30 to 36 hours. In vitro, PspA- in Todd-Hewitt broth showed an increase in bacterial growth of 2 logs at 43 hours, indicating PspA- susceptibility to host defenses in vivo. The PspA- and Ply- groups had fewer pathologic findings than the Wt or Ply-/PspA- groups. Histopathological analysis showed significant differences in the number of bacteria in the scala tympani in the Wt group compared with the Ply-, PspA-, and Ply-/PspA- groups. The PspA- strain was the least virulent. The PspA- mutant was much less viable and less virulent in the ear than the Wt, Ply-, and Ply-/PspA- strains. There was no significant attenuation in the viability and virulence of the Ply-/PspA- mutant

  7. Formation of biofilms by Staphylococcus aureus on stainless steel and glass surfaces and its resistance to some selected chemical sanitizers Formação de biofilme por Staphylococcus aureus na superfície de aço inoxidável e vidro e sua resistência a alguns sanificantes químicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Cristina Marques

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this work were to verify the capability of Staphylococcus aureus of forming bio-film on stainless steel and glass surfaces; to evaluate the efficiency of sodium dichloroisocyanurate, hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid in inactivating Staphylococcus aureus cells adhered onto these surfaces; and to visualize biofilm development by scanning electron microscopy before and after sanitizer treatment. The surfaces studied consisted of 10x20mm chips immersed in Petri dishes containing BHI broth inoculated with S. aureus ATCC 25923. Biofilm formation was observed after 15-day incubation, when the cells were removed using the swab technique, followed by Baird Parker agar plating. Also, the efficiency of the chemical sanitizers on the chip surfaces was tested and the non-removed cells were counted on the Baird-Parker agar. After biofilm formation and use of sanitizers, the chips were respectively observed by scanning electronic microscopy following a pre-existing protocol. The obtained results showed biofilm formation on both surfaces, with bacterial count in the order of 10(7 CFU/cm² on and 10(8 CFU/cm² on stainless steel and glass surfaces, respectively. Peracetic acid was the most efficient in removing adhered cells, presenting 5.26 and 4.5 decimal reduction for adhered cells on stainless steel and glass surfaces, respectively.Os objetivos deste trabalho foram verificar a capacidade de Staphylococcus aureus formar biofilme nas superfícies de aço inoxidável e vidro, avaliar a eficiência do dicloroisocianurato de sódio, peróxido de hidrogênio e ácido peracético na inativação de células de S. aureus aderidas e visualização por microscopia eletrônica de varredura, o desenvolvimento antes e depois do tratamento das superfícies com os sanificantes. As superfícies foram cupons 10x200mm imersos em placas de Petri contendo caldo BHI inoculado com cultura de Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. A formação de biofilme foi

  8. Lateral Protein-Protein Interactions at Hydrophobic and Charged Surfaces as a Function of pH and Salt Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladílková, Jana; Callisen, Thomas H; Lund, Mikael

    2016-04-07

    Surface adsorption of Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase (TLL)-a widely used industrial biocatalyst-is studied experimentally and theoretically at different pH and salt concentrations. The maximum achievable surface coverage on a hydrophobic surface occurs around the protein isoelectric point and adsorption is reduced when either increasing or decreasing pH, indicating that electrostatic protein-protein interactions in the adsorbed layer play an important role. Using Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, where proteins are coarse grained to the amino acid level, we estimate the protein isoelectric point in the vicinity of charged surfaces as well as the lateral osmotic pressure in the adsorbed monolayer. Good agreement with available experimental data is achieved and we further make predictions of the protein orientation at hydrophobic and charged surfaces. Finally, we present a perturbation theory for predicting shifts in the protein isoelectric point due to close proximity to charged surfaces. Although this approximate model requires only single protein properties (mean charge and its variance), excellent agreement is found with MC simulations.

  9. Genotyping of Staphylococcus aureus in bovine mastitis and correlation to phenotypic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artursson, Karin; Söderlund, Robert; Liu, Lihong; Monecke, Stefan; Schelin, Jenny

    2016-09-25

    Reducing the prevalence of mastitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is essential to improve animal health and reduce economic losses for farmers. The clinical outcome of acute mastitis and risk of progression to persistent mastitis can, at least to some extent, be related to genetic variants of the strain causing the infection. In the present study we have used microarrays to investigate the presence of virulence genes in S. aureus isolates from dairy cows with acute clinical mastitis (n=70) and correlated the findings to other genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. Among the most commonly found virulence factors were genes encoding several hemolysin types, leukocidins D and lukM/lukF-P83, clumping factors A and B, fibrinogen binding protein and fibronectin-binding protein A. Some virulence factors e.g. fibronectin-binding protein B and Staphylococcus aureus surface protein G were less common. Genes coding for several staphylococcal enterotoxins and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) were commonly found, especially in one major pulsotype. No beta-lactamase genes were found in any common pulsotype, while present in some rare pulsotypes, indicated to be of human origin. Production of TSST-1, enterotoxins, hemolysins and beta-lactamase could all be positively correlated to presence of the corresponding genes. This study reveals a number of genotypic differences and similarities among common and rare pulsotypes of S. aureus from cases of mastitis in Sweden. The results could help the design of diagnostic tools to guide on-farm interventions according to the expected impact on udder health from a specific S. aureus genotype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcus aureus (Staph Infection) In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby with ... from your health care provider. What is a staph infection? Staphylococcus aureus (staph) is a type of ...

  11. Wolbachia surface protein induces innate immune responses in mosquito cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Sofia B; Mariconti, Mara; Bazzocchi, Chiara; Bandi, Claudio; Sinkins, Steven P

    2012-01-18

    Wolbachia endosymbiotic bacteria are capable of inducing chronic upregulation of insect immune genes in some situations and this phenotype may influence the transmission of important insect-borne pathogens. However the molecules involved in these interactions have not been characterized. Here we show that recombinant Wolbachia Surface Protein (WSP) stimulates increased transcription of immune genes in mosquito cells derived from the mosquito Anopheles gambiae, which is naturally uninfected with Wolbachia; at least two of the upregulated genes, TEP1 and APL1, are known to be important in Plasmodium killing in this species. When cells from Aedes albopictus, which is naturally Wolbachia-infected, were challenged with WSP lower levels of upregulation were observed than for the An. gambiae cells. We have found that WSP is a strong immune elicitor in a naturally Wolbachia-uninfected mosquito species (Anopheles gambiae) while a milder elicitor in a naturally-infected species (Aedes albopictus). Since the WSP of a mosquito non-native (nematode) Wolbachia strain was used, these data suggest that there is a generalized tolerance to WSP in Ae. albopictus.

  12. Wolbachia surface protein induces innate immune responses in mosquito cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto Sofia B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wolbachia endosymbiotic bacteria are capable of inducing chronic upregulation of insect immune genes in some situations and this phenotype may influence the transmission of important insect-borne pathogens. However the molecules involved in these interactions have not been characterized. Results Here we show that recombinant Wolbachia Surface Protein (WSP stimulates increased transcription of immune genes in mosquito cells derived from the mosquito Anopheles gambiae, which is naturally uninfected with Wolbachia; at least two of the upregulated genes, TEP1 and APL1, are known to be important in Plasmodium killing in this species. When cells from Aedes albopictus, which is naturally Wolbachia-infected, were challenged with WSP lower levels of upregulation were observed than for the An. gambiae cells. Conclusions We have found that WSP is a strong immune elicitor in a naturally Wolbachia-uninfected mosquito species (Anopheles gambiae while a milder elicitor in a naturally-infected species (Aedes albopictus. Since the WSP of a mosquito non-native (nematode Wolbachia strain was used, these data suggest that there is a generalized tolerance to WSP in Ae. albopictus.

  13. Detection and relative quantification of proteins by surface enhanced Raman using isotopic labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Shirshendu K; Davis, Brandon; Knudsen, Giselle M; Gudihal, Ravindra; Ben-Amotz, Dor; Davisson, V Jo

    2008-07-30

    Accurate quantification of protein content and composition has been achieved using isotope-edited surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy. Synthesis of isotopomeric Rhodamine dye-linked bioconjugation reagents enabled direct labeling of surface lysines on a variety of proteins. When separated in polyacrylamide gels and stained with silver nanoparticles. The spectral signatures reflect the expected statistical distribution of isotopomeric labels on the labeled proteins in the gel matrix format without interference from protein features.

  14. Cell surface amyloid proteins of microorganisms: structure, properties and significance in medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Rekstina V.V.; Gorkovskii A.A.; Bezsonov E.E.; Kalebina T.S.

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes data which describe properties of microbial cell surface amyloids proteins. Definitions of amyloids and microbial functional amyloids are given. The review provides numerous examples of research in which the presence of amyloid-like properties in microbial cell surface proteins is demonstrated convincingly. Studies of the important role of pili, curli, tafi and some other bacterial fibrillar proteins in host colonization are reviewed. Data on amyloid proteins of yeast c...

  15. Heme Recognition By a Staphylococcus Aureus IsdE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, J.C.; Vermeiren, C.L.; Heinrichs, D.E.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-06-03

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen and a leading cause of hospital acquired infections. Because the free iron concentration in the human body is too low to support growth, S. aureus must acquire iron from host sources. Heme iron is the most prevalent iron reservoir in the human body and a predominant source of iron for S. aureus. The iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) system removes heme from host heme proteins and transfers it to IsdE, the cognate substrate-binding lipoprotein of an ATP-binding cassette transporter, for import and subsequent degradation. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the soluble portion of the IsdE lipoprotein in complex with heme. The structure reveals a bi-lobed topology formed by an N- and C-terminal domain bridged by a single {alpha}-helix. The structure places IsdE as a member of the helical backbone metal receptor superfamily. A six-coordinate heme molecule is bound in the groove established at the domain interface, and the heme iron is coordinated in a novel fashion for heme transporters by Met{sup 78} and His{sup 229}. Both heme propionate groups are secured by H-bonds to IsdE main chain and side chain groups. Of these residues, His{sup 299} is essential for IsdE-mediated heme uptake by S. aureus when growth on heme as a sole iron source is measured. Multiple sequence alignments of homologues from several other Gram-positive bacteria, including the human pathogens pyogenes, Bacillus anthracis, and Listeria monocytogenes, suggest that these other systems function equivalently to S. aureus IsdE with respect to heme binding and transport.

  16. Multilocus Sequence Typing and Staphylococcal Protein A Typing Revealed Novel and Diverse Clones of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Seafood and the Aquatic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugadas, V; Toms, C Joseph; Reethu, Sara A; Lalitha, K V

    2017-03-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been a global health concern since the 1960s, and isolation of this pathogen from food-producing animals has been increasing. However, little information is available on the prevalence of MRSA and its clonal characteristics in seafood and the aquatic environment. In this study, 267 seafood and aquatic environment samples were collected from three districts of Kerala, India. Staphylococcal protein A (spa) typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was performed for 65 MRSA strains isolated from 20 seafood and aquatic environment samples. The MRSA clonal profiles were t657-ST772, t002-ST5, t334-ST5, t311-ST5, t121-ST8, t186-ST88, t127-ST1, and two non-spa assignable strains. Whole spa gene sequence analysis along with MLST confirmed one strain as t711-ST6 and another as a novel MRSA clone identified for the first time in seafood and the aquatic environment with a t15669 spa type and a new MLST profile of ST420-256-236-66-82-411-477. The MRSA strains were clustered into five clonal complexes based on the goeBURST algorithm, indicating high diversity among MRSA strains in seafood and the aquatic environment. The novel clone formed a separate clonal complex with matches to three loci. This study recommends large-scale spa typing and MLST of MRSA isolates from seafood and the aquatic environment to determine the prevalence of new MRSA clones. This monitoring process can be useful for tracing local spread of MRSA isolates into the seafood production chain in a defined geographical area.

  17. Regulation of Macrophage Recognition through the Interplay of Nanoparticle Surface Functionality and Protein Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Krishnendu; Rahimi, Mehran; Yazdani, Mahdieh; Kim, Sung Tae; Moyano, Daniel F.; Hou, Singyuk; Das, Ridhha; Mout, Rubul; Rezaee, Farhad; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2017-01-01

    Using a family of cationic gold nanoparticles (NPs) with similar size and charge, we demonstrate that proper surface engineering can control the nature and identity of protein corona in physiological serum conditions. The protein coronas were highly dependent on the hydrophobicity and arrangement of chemical motifs on NP surface. The NPs were uptaken in macrophages in a corona-dependent manner, predominantly through recognition of specific complement proteins in the NP corona. Taken together, this study shows that surface functionality can be used to tune the protein corona formed on NP surface, dictating the interaction of NPs with macrophages. PMID:27040442

  18. Staphylococcus aureus CcpA affects biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Kati; Goerke, Christiane; Wolz, Christiane; Mack, Dietrich; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte; Bischoff, Markus

    2008-05-01

    Biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus under in vitro growth conditions is generally promoted by high concentrations of sugar and/or salts. The addition of glucose to routinely used complex growth media triggered biofilm formation in S. aureus strain SA113. Deletion of ccpA, coding for the catabolite control protein A (CcpA), which regulates gene expression in response to the carbon source, abolished the capacity of SA113 to form a biofilm under static and flow conditions, while still allowing primary attachment to polystyrene surfaces. This suggested that CcpA mainly affects biofilm accumulation and intercellular aggregation. trans-Complementation of the mutant with the wild-type ccpA allele fully restored the biofilm formation. The biofilm produced by SA113 was susceptible to sodium metaperiodate, DNase I, and proteinase K treatment, indicating the presence of polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA), protein factors, and extracellular DNA (eDNA). The investigation of several factors which were reported to influence biofilm formation in S. aureus (arlRS, mgrA, rbf, sarA, atl, ica, citZ, citB, and cidABC) showed that CcpA up-regulated the transcription of cidA, which was recently shown to contribute to eDNA production. Moreover, we showed that CcpA increased icaA expression and PIA production, presumably over the down-regulation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle genes citB and citZ.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus CcpA Affects Biofilm Formation▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidl, Kati; Goerke, Christiane; Wolz, Christiane; Mack, Dietrich; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte; Bischoff, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus under in vitro growth conditions is generally promoted by high concentrations of sugar and/or salts. The addition of glucose to routinely used complex growth media triggered biofilm formation in S. aureus strain SA113. Deletion of ccpA, coding for the catabolite control protein A (CcpA), which regulates gene expression in response to the carbon source, abolished the capacity of SA113 to form a biofilm under static and flow conditions, while still allowing primary attachment to polystyrene surfaces. This suggested that CcpA mainly affects biofilm accumulation and intercellular aggregation. trans-Complementation of the mutant with the wild-type ccpA allele fully restored the biofilm formation. The biofilm produced by SA113 was susceptible to sodium metaperiodate, DNase I, and proteinase K treatment, indicating the presence of polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA), protein factors, and extracellular DNA (eDNA). The investigation of several factors which were reported to influence biofilm formation in S. aureus (arlRS, mgrA, rbf, sarA, atl, ica, citZ, citB, and cidABC) showed that CcpA up-regulated the transcription of cidA, which was recently shown to contribute to eDNA production. Moreover, we showed that CcpA increased icaA expression and PIA production, presumably over the down-regulation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle genes citB and citZ. PMID:18347047

  20. Purification and identification of sperm surface proteins and changes during epididymal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belleannee, Clémence; Belghazi, Maya; Labas, Valérie; Teixeira-Gomes, Ana-Paula; Gatti, Jean Luc; Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Dacheux, Françoise

    2011-05-01

    Surface membrane proteins have a key role in the sequential interactions between spermatozoa and oocytes. The aim of this study was to characterize protein changes occurring during post-testicular differentiation using a new overall approach to study surface membrane proteins of spermatozoa. A dedicated protocol based on specific purification of surface membrane proteins labeled with sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin was developed for this purpose. Appropriate gel electrophoresis separation and purification methods combined with standard proteomic methods were then used to identify and quantify surface membrane proteins from immature and mature spermatozoa. Membrane-associated proteins were discriminated from integral membrane proteins by differential solubilization. Protein regionalization on the spermatozoon surface was achieved by comparative analysis of the surface protein extracts from the entire spermatozoa and from periacrosomal sperm plasma membranes. Identification of several known proteins and of new proteins related to the process of epididymal maturation showed the reliability of this protocol for specific purification of a subproteome and identification of new sperm membrane proteins. This approach opens up a new area in the search for male fertility markers. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Generation of Surface-bound Multicomponent Protein Gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Kechun; Sugawara, Ayae; Tirrell, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Spatial control of bioactive ligands is achieved by integrating microfluidics and protein engineering. The proteins of interest are mixed in a gradient generator and immobilized on artificial polypeptide scaffolds through the strong association of heterodimeric ZE/ZR leucine zipper pairs. Protein densities and gradient shapes are easily controlled and varied in this method.

  2. Modulating surface rheology by electrostatic protein/polysaccharide interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzevles, R.A.; Zinoviadou, K.; Vliet, T. van; Stuart, M.A.C.; Jongh, H.H.J. de

    2006-01-01

    There is a large interest in mixed protein/polysaccharide layers at air-water and oil-water interfaces because of their ability to stabilize foams and emulsions. Mixed protein/polysaccharide adsorbed layers at air-water interfaces can be prepared either by adsorption of soluble protein/

  3. SURF'S UP! – Protein classification by surface comparisons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    With an increasing number of experimentally uncharacterized protein sequences and structures produced by genome sequencing or structural genomic initiatives, we often encounter large protein families with only a few members of known function. Prediction of function for a protein by simple detection of homology to other ...

  4. Photoswitchable method for the ordered attachment of proteins to surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero, Julio A.; De Yoreo, James J.; Kwon, Youngeun

    2010-04-20

    Described herein is a method for the attachment of proteins to any solid support with control over the orientation of the attachment. The method is extremely efficient, not requiring the previous purification of the protein to be attached, and can be activated by UV-light. Spatially addressable arrays of multiple protein components can be generated by using standard photolithographic techniques.

  5. SpA, ClfA, and FnbA Genetic Variations Lead to Staphaurex Test-Negative Phenotypes in Bovine Mastitis Staphylococcus aureus Isolates▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, Katrin; Stephan, Roger; Tasara, Taurai

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus encodes many proteins that act as virulence factors, leading to a variety of diseases, including mastitis in cows. Among these virulence factors, SpA, ClfA, ClfB, FnbA, and FnbB are important for the ability of S. aureus to adhere to and invade host cells as well as to evade host immune responses. The interaction between these S. aureus surface proteins and human immunoglobulin G and fibrinogen that are coupled to latex particles is utilized to induce latex agglutination reactions, which are used widely in diagnostic kits for confirmation of presumptive S. aureus isolates. In this study, the Staphaurex latex agglutination test was performed on a collection of confirmed bovine mastitis S. aureus isolates. Notably, 54% (43/79 isolates) of these isolates exhibited latex agglutination-negative phenotypes (Staphaurex-negative result). To gain insights into the reasons for the high frequency of Staphaurex-negative bovine mastitis S. aureus isolates, the spa, clfA, clfB, fnbA, and fnbB genes were examined. Specific genetic changes in spa, clfA, and fnbA, as well as a loss of fnbB, which may impair SpA, ClfA, FnbA, and FnbB functions in latex agglutination reactions, were detected in Staphaurex-negative S. aureus isolates. The genetic changes included a premature stop codon in the spa gene, leading to a truncated SpA protein that is unable to participate in S. aureus cell-mediated agglutination of latex particles. In addition, clfA and fnbA genetic polymorphisms were detected that were linked to ClfA and FnbA amino acid changes that may significantly reduce fibrinogen-binding activity. The genetic variations in these S. aureus isolates might also have implications for their bovine mastitis virulence capacity. PMID:21147952

  6. Predicting the orientation of protein G B1 on hydrophobic surfaces using Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Elisa T; Weidner, Tobias; Castner, David G; Interlandi, Gianluca

    2016-12-06

    A Monte Carlo algorithm was developed to predict the most likely orientations of protein G B1, an immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody-binding domain of protein G, adsorbed onto a hydrophobic surface. At each Monte Carlo step, the protein was rotated and translated as a rigid body. The assumption about rigidity was supported by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring experiments, which indicated that protein G B1 adsorbed on a polystyrene surface with its native structure conserved and showed that its IgG antibody-binding activity was retained. The Monte Carlo simulations predicted that protein G B1 is likely adsorbed onto a hydrophobic surface in two different orientations, characterized as two mutually exclusive sets of amino acids contacting the surface. This was consistent with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy results. In fact, theoretical SFG spectra calculated from an equal combination of the two predicted orientations exhibited reasonable agreement with measured spectra of protein G B1 on polystyrene surfaces. Also, in explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations, protein G B1 maintained its predicted orientation in three out of four runs. This work shows that using a Monte Carlo approach can provide an accurate estimate of a protein orientation on a hydrophobic surface, which complements experimental surface analysis techniques and provides an initial system to study the interaction between a protein and a surface in molecular dynamics simulations.

  7. Inhibition of penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a) in methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by combination of ampicillin and a bioactive fraction from Duabanga grandiflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Carolina; Pang, Ee Leen; Lim, Kuan-Hon; Loh, Hwei-San; Ting, Kang Nee

    2015-06-10

    The inhibition of penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a) is a promising solution in overcoming resistance of methicillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A potential approach in achieving this is by combining natural product with currently available antibiotics to restore the activity as well as to amplify the therapeutic ability of the drugs. We studied inhibition effects of a bioactive fraction, F-10 (isolated from the leaves of Duabanga grandiflora) alone and in combination with a beta-lactam drug, ampicillin on MRSA growth and expression of PBP2a. Additionally, phytochemical analysis was conducted on F-10 to identify the classes of phytochemicals present. Fractionation of the ethyl acetate leaf extract was achieved by successive column chromatography which eventually led to isolation of an active fraction, F-10. Both extract and F-10 were analyzed for the presence of major classes of phytochemicals in addition to obtaining a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) profile to reveal the complexity of the fraction F-10. Broth microdilution method was employed to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the extract and fractions against MRSA. Evaluation of synergistic activity of the active fraction with ampicillin was determined using checkerboard methodand kinetic growth experiments. Effect of combination treatments on expression of PBP2a, a protein that confers resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, was elucidated with the Western blot assay. MIC of F-10 against MRSA was 750 mg/L which showed an improved activity by 4-fold compared to its crude extract (MIC = 3000 mg/L). Phytochemical analysis revealed occurrence of tannins, saponin, flavonoids, sterols, and glycosides in F10 fraction. In FIC index interpretation, the most synergistic activity was achieved for combinations of 1/64 × MIC ampicillin + 1/4 × MIC F-10. The combination also evidently inhibited MRSA growth in kinetic growth curve assay. As a result of this synergistic

  8. Sampling the conformation of protein surface residues for flexible protein docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amenta Nina

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The problem of determining the physical conformation of a protein dimer, given the structures of the two interacting proteins in their unbound state, is a difficult one. The location of the docking interface is determined largely by geometric complementarity, but finding complementary geometry is complicated by the flexibility of the backbone and side-chains of both proteins. We seek to generate candidates for docking that approximate the bound state well, even in cases where there is backbone and/or side-chain difference from unbound to bound states. Results We divide the surfaces of each protein into local patches and describe the effect of side-chain flexibility on each patch by sampling the space of conformations of its side-chains. Likely positions of individual side-chains are given by a rotamer library; this library is used to derive a sample of possible mutual conformations within the patch. We enforce broad coverage of torsion space. We control the size of the sample by using energy criteria to eliminate unlikely configurations, and by clustering similar configurations, resulting in 50 candidates for a patch, a manageable number for docking. Conclusions Using a database of protein dimers for which the bound and unbound structures of the monomers are known, we show that from the unbound patch we are able to generate candidates for docking that approximate the bound structure. In patches where backbone change is small (within 1 Å RMSD of bound, we are able to account for flexibility and generate candidates that are good approximations of the bound state (82% are within 1 Å and 98% are within 1.4 Å RMSD of the bound conformation. We also find that even in cases of moderate backbone flexibility our candidates are able to capture some of the overall shape change. Overall, in 650 of 700 test patches we produce a candidate that is either within 1 Å RMSD of the bound conformation or is closer to the bound state than the

  9. Staphylococcus aureus toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a dangerous pathogen that causes a variety of severe diseases. The virulence of S. aureus is defined by a large repertoire of virulence factors, among which secreted toxins play a preeminent role. Many S. aureus toxins damage biological membranes, leading to cell death. In particular, S. aureus produces potent hemolysins and leukotoxins. Among the latter, some were recently identified to lyse neutrophils after ingestion, representing an especially powerful weapon against bacterial elimination by innate host defense. Furthermore, S. aureus secretes many factors that inhibit the complement cascade or prevent recognition by host defenses. Several further toxins add to this multi-faceted program of S. aureus to evade elimination in the host. This review will give an overview over S. aureus toxins focusing on recent advances in our understanding of how leukotoxins work in receptor-mediated or receptor-independent fashions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. The staphylococcal accessory regulator, SarA, is an RNA-binding protein that modulates the mRNA turnover properties of late-exponential and stationary phase Staphylococcus aureus cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Morrison

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The modulation of mRNA turnover is gaining recognition as a mechanism by which Staphylococcus aureus regulates gene expression, but the factors that orchestrate alterations in transcript degradation are poorly understood. In that regard, we previously found that 138 mRNA species, including the virulence factors protein A (spa and collagen binding protein (cna, are stabilized in a sarA-dependent manner during exponential phase growth, suggesting that SarA protein may directly or indirectly effect the RNA turnover properties of these transcripts. Herein, we expanded our characterization of the effects of sarA on mRNA turnover during late exponential and stationary phases of growth. Results revealed that the locus affects the RNA degradation properties of cells during both growth phases. Further, using gel mobility shift assays and RIP-ChIP, it was found that SarA protein is capable of binding mRNA species that it stabilizes both in vitro and within bacterial cells. Taken together, these results suggest that SarA post-transcriptionally regulates S. aureus gene expression in a manner that involves binding to and consequently altering the mRNA turnover properties of target transcripts.

  11. Distribution of the serine-aspartate repeat protein-encoding sdr genes among nasal-carriage and invasive Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabat, Artur; Melles, Damian C; Martirosian, Gayane; Grundmann, Hajo; van Belkum, Alex; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2006-03-01

    The sdr locus was found in all 497 investigated Staphylococcus aureus strains, although in 29 strains it contained only the sdrC gene (sdrD negative, sdrE negative). The sdrC-positive, sdrD-negative, sdrE-negative gene profile was exclusive to methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strains (Fisher's exact test; P = 0.0005) and was not found in the strains collected from bone infections (P = 0.0019). We also found a strong association between the presence of the sdrD gene and methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains (P < 0.0001). Our findings suggest that MSSA strains with the newly uncovered sdrC-positive, sdrD-negative, sdrE-negative gene profile have a substantially decreased potential to establish bone infection.

  12. Nonlinear surface dilatational rheology and foaming behavior of protein and protein fibrillar aggregates in the presence of natural surfactant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wan, Zhili; Yang, Xiaoquan; Sagis, L.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    The surface and foaming properties of native soy glycinin (11S) and its heat-induced fibrillar aggregates, in the presence of natural surfactant steviol glycoside (STE), were investigated and compared at pH 7.0 to determine the impact of protein structure modification on protein?surfactant

  13. Anti-biofilm formation of a novel stainless steel against Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nan, Li; Yang, Ke [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Ren, Guogang, E-mail: g.g.ren@herts.ac.uk [University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium frequently found proliferating on metal surfaces such as stainless steels used in healthcare and food processing facilities. Past research has shown that a novel Cu-bearing 304 type stainless steel (304CuSS) exhibits excellent antibacterial ability (i.e. against S. aureus) in a short time period (24 h.). This work was dedicated to investigate the 304CuSS's inhibition ability towards the S. aureus biofilm formation for an extended period of 7 days after incubation. It was found that the antibacterial rate of the 304CuSS against sessile bacterial cells reached over 99.9% in comparison with the 304SS. The thickness and sizes of the biofilms on the 304SS surfaces increased markedly with period of contact, and thus expected higher risk of bio-contamination, indicated by the changes of surface free energy between biofilm and the steel surfaces. The results demonstrated that the 304CuSS exhibited strong inhibition on the growth and adherence of the biofilms. The surface free energy of the 304CuSS after contact with sessile bacterial cells was much lower than that of the 304SS towards the same culture times. The continuously dissolved Cu{sup 2+} ions well demonstrated the dissolution ability of Cu-rich precipitates after exposure to S. aureus solution, from 3.1 ppm (2 days) to 4.5 ppm (7 days). For this to occur, a hypothesis mechanism might be established for 304CuSS in which the Cu{sup 2+} ions were released from Cu-rich phases that bond with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of the microorganisms. And these inhibited the activities of cell protein/enzymes and effectively prevented planktonic bacterial cells attaching to the 304CuSS metal surface.

  14. Anti-biofilm formation of a novel stainless steel against Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Li; Yang, Ke; Ren, Guogang

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium frequently found proliferating on metal surfaces such as stainless steels used in healthcare and food processing facilities. Past research has shown that a novel Cu-bearing 304 type stainless steel (304CuSS) exhibits excellent antibacterial ability (i.e. against S. aureus) in a short time period (24h.). This work was dedicated to investigate the 304CuSS's inhibition ability towards the S. aureus biofilm formation for an extended period of 7days after incubation. It was found that the antibacterial rate of the 304CuSS against sessile bacterial cells reached over 99.9% in comparison with the 304SS. The thickness and sizes of the biofilms on the 304SS surfaces increased markedly with period of contact, and thus expected higher risk of bio-contamination, indicated by the changes of surface free energy between biofilm and the steel surfaces. The results demonstrated that the 304CuSS exhibited strong inhibition on the growth and adherence of the biofilms. The surface free energy of the 304CuSS after contact with sessile bacterial cells was much lower than that of the 304SS towards the same culture times. The continuously dissolved Cu(2+) ions well demonstrated the dissolution ability of Cu-rich precipitates after exposure to S. aureus solution, from 3.1ppm (2days) to 4.5ppm (7days). For this to occur, a hypothesis mechanism might be established for 304CuSS in which the Cu(2+) ions were released from Cu-rich phases that bond with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of the microorganisms. And these inhibited the activities of cell protein/enzymes and effectively prevented planktonic bacterial cells attaching to the 304CuSS metal surface. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Quercitrin, an Inhibitor of Sortase A, Interferes with the Adhesion of Staphylococcal aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingrun Liu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sortase A (SrtA is a cysteine transpeptidase of most Gram-positive bacteria that is responsible for the anchorage of many surface protein virulence factors to the cell wall layer. SrtA mutants are unable to display surface proteins and are defective in the establishment of infections without affecting microbial viability. In this study, we report that quercitrin (QEN, a natural compound that does not affect Staphylococcus aureus growth, can inhibit the catalytic activity of SrtA in fibrinogen (Fg cell-clumping and immobilized fibronectin (Fn adhesion assays. Molecular dynamics simulations and mutagenesis assays suggest that QEN binds to the binding sites of the SrtA G167A and V193A mutants. These findings indicate that QEN is a potential lead compound for the development of new anti-virulence agents against S. aureus infections.

  16. Antimicrobial Peptide P60.4Ac-Containing Creams and Gel for Eradication of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Cultured Skin and Airway Epithelial Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisma, Elisabeth M; Göblyös, Anikó; Ravensbergen, Bep; Adriaans, Alwin E; Cordfunke, Robert A; Schrumpf, Jasmijn; Limpens, Ronald W A L; Schimmel, Kirsten J M; den Hartigh, Jan; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Nibbering, Peter H

    2016-07-01

    We previously found the LL-37-derived peptide P60.4Ac to be effective against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on human epidermal models (EMs). The goal of this study was to identify the preferred carrier for this peptide for topical application on skin and mucosal surfaces. We prepared P60.4Ac in three formulations, i.e., a water-in-oil cream with lanolin (Softisan 649), an oil-in-water cream with polyethylene glycol hexadecyl ether (Cetomacrogol), and a hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (hypromellose) 4000 gel. We tested the antimicrobial efficacy of the peptide in these formulations against mupirocin-resistant and -sensitive MRSA strains on EMs and bronchial epithelial models (BEMs). The cytotoxic effects of formulated P60.4Ac on these models were determined using histology and WST-1 and lactate dehydrogenase assays. Moreover, we assessed the stability of the peptide in these formulations with storage for up to 3 months. Killing of MRSA by P60.4Ac in the two creams was less effective than that by P60.4Ac in the hypromellose gel. In agreement with those findings, P60.4Ac in the hypromellose gel was highly effective in eradicating the two MRSA strains from EMs. We found that even 0.1% (wt/wt) P60.4Ac in the hypromellose gel killed >99% of the viable planktonic bacteria and >85% of the biofilm-associated bacteria on EMs. Hypromellose gels containing 0.1% and 0.5% (wt/wt) P60.4Ac effectively reduced the numbers of viable MRSA cells from BEMs by >90%. No cytotoxic effects of P60.4Ac in the hypromellose gel with up to 2% (wt/wt) P60.4Ac on keratinocytes in EMs and in the hypromellose gel with up to 0.5% (wt/wt) P60.4Ac on epithelial cells in BEMs were observed. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that P60.4Ac was stable in the Softisan cream and the hypromellose gel but not in the Cetomacrogol cream. We conclude that P60.4Ac formulated in hypromellose gel is both stable and highly effective in eradicating MRSA from colonized EMs and

  17. Structural insights into the evolution of a non-biological protein: importance of surface residues in protein fold optimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Smith

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic profiling of amino acid substitution patterns in proteins has led many to conclude that most structural information is carried by interior core residues that are solvent inaccessible. This conclusion is based on the observation that buried residues generally tolerate only conserved sequence changes, while surface residues allow more diverse chemical substitutions. This notion is now changing as it has become apparent that both core and surface residues play important roles in protein folding and stability. Unfortunately, the ability to identify specific mutations that will lead to enhanced stability remains a challenging problem. Here we discuss two mutations that emerged from an in vitro selection experiment designed to improve the folding stability of a non-biological ATP binding protein. These mutations alter two solvent accessible residues, and dramatically enhance the expression, solubility, thermal stability, and ligand binding affinity of the protein. The significance of both mutations was investigated individually and together, and the X-ray crystal structures of the parent sequence and double mutant protein were solved to a resolution limit of 2.8 and 1.65 A, respectively. Comparative structural analysis of the evolved protein to proteins found in nature reveals that our non-biological protein evolved certain structural features shared by many thermophilic proteins. This experimental result suggests that protein fold optimization by in vitro selection offers a viable approach to generating stable variants of many naturally occurring proteins whose structures and functions are otherwise difficult to study.

  18. Pre-absorbed immunoproteomics: a novel method for the detection of Streptococcus suis surface proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2 is a zoonotic pathogen that can cause infections in pigs and humans. Bacterial surface proteins are often investigated as potential vaccine candidates and biomarkers of virulence. In this study, a novel method for identifying bacterial surface proteins is presented, which combines immunoproteomic and immunoserologic techniques. Critical to the success of this new method is an improved procedure for generating two-dimensional electrophoresis gel profiles of S. suis proteins. The S. suis surface proteins identified in this study include muramidase-released protein precursor (MRP and an ABC transporter protein, while MRP is thought to be one of the main virulence factors in SS2 located on the bacterial surface. Herein, we demonstrate that the ABC transporter protein can bind to HEp-2 cells, which strongly suggests that this protein is located on the bacterial cell surface and may be involved in pathogenesis. An immunofluorescence assay confirmed that the ABC transporter is localized to the bacterial outer surface. This new method may prove to be a useful tool for identifying surface proteins, and aid in the development of new vaccine subunits and disease diagnostics.

  19. Enhanced protein retention on poly(caprolactone) via surface initiated polymerization of acrylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Yuhao; Cai, Mengtan; He, Liu [College of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Luo, Xianglin, E-mail: luoxl@scu.edu.cn [College of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); State Key Laboratory of Polymer Material and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Dense package of poly(acrylamide) on poly(caprolactone) surface was achieved by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. • Poly(acrylamide) grafted surface exhibited high protein retention ability. • Loaded protein was resistant to detachment and maintained its structure without denaturation. - Abstract: To enhance the biocompatibility or extend the biomedical application of poly(caprolactone) (PCL), protein retention on PCL surface is often required. In this study, poly(acrylamide) (PAAm) brushes were grown from PCL surface via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) and served as a protein-capturing platform. Grafted PAAm was densely packed on surface and exhibited superior protein retention ability. Captured protein was found to be resistant to washing under detergent environment. Furthermore, protein structure after being captured was investigated by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and the CD spectra verified that secondary structure of captured proteins was maintained, indicating no denaturation of protein happened for retention process.

  20. Distribution of the Serine-Aspartate Repeat Protein-Encoding sdr Genes among Nasal-Carriage and Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Sabat, Artur; Melles, Damian C.; Martirosian, Gayane; Grundmann, Hajo; van Belkum, Alex; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2006-01-01

    The sdr locus was found in all 497 investigated Staphylococcus aureus strains, although in 29 strains it contained only the sdrC gene (sdrD negative, sdrE negative). The sdrC-positive, sdrD-negative, sdrE-negative gene profile was exclusive to methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strains (Fisher's exact test; P = 0.0005) and was not found in the strains collected from bone infections (P = 0.0019). We also found a strong association between the presence of the sdrD gene and methicillin-resis...

  1. Effect of mechanical denaturation on surface free energy of protein powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Mohammad Amin; Grimsey, Ian M; Forbes, Robert T; Blagbrough, Ian S; Conway, Barbara R

    2016-10-01

    Globular proteins are important both as therapeutic agents and excipients. However, their fragile native conformations can be denatured during pharmaceutical processing, which leads to modification of the surface energy of their powders and hence their performance. Lyophilized powders of hen egg-white lysozyme and β-galactosidase from Aspergillus oryzae were used as models to study the effects of mechanical denaturation on the surface energies of basic and acidic protein powders, respectively. Their mechanical denaturation upon milling was confirmed by the absence of their thermal unfolding transition phases and by the changes in their secondary and tertiary structures. Inverse gas chromatography detected differences between both unprocessed protein powders and the changes induced by their mechanical denaturation. The surfaces of the acidic and basic protein powders were relatively basic, however the surface acidity of β-galactosidase was higher than that of lysozyme. Also, the surface of β-galactosidase powder had a higher dispersive energy compared to lysozyme. The mechanical denaturation decreased the dispersive energy and the basicity of the surfaces of both protein powders. The amino acid composition and molecular conformation of the proteins explained the surface energy data measured by inverse gas chromatography. The biological activity of mechanically denatured protein powders can either be reversible (lysozyme) or irreversible (β-galactosidase) upon hydration. Our surface data can be exploited to understand and predict the performance of protein powders within pharmaceutical dosage forms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. How surface composition of high milk proteins powders is influenced by spray-drying temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaiani, C; Morand, M; Sanchez, C; Tehrany, E Arab; Jacquot, M; Schuck, P; Jeantet, R; Scher, J

    2010-01-01

    High milk proteins powders are common ingredients in many food products. The surface composition of these powders is expected to play an essential role during their storage, handling and/or final application. Therefore, an eventual control of the surface composition by modifying the spray-drying temperature could be very useful in the improvement of powder quality and the development of new applications. For this purpose, the influence of five spray-drying temperatures upon the surface composition of the powders was investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The major milk proteins were studied: native micellar casein and native whey, both more or less enriched in lactose. The results show a surface enrichment in lipids for all the powders and in proteins for many powders. Whatever the drying temperature, lipids and proteins are preferentially located near the surface whereas lactose is found in the core. This surface enrichment is also highly affected by the spray-drying temperature. More lipids, more proteins and less lactose are systematically observed at the surface of powders spray-dried at lower outlet air temperatures. The nature of proteins is also found essential; surface enrichment in lipids being much stronger for whey proteins containing powders than for casein containing powders. Additionally, we found a direct correlation between the lipids surface concentration and the wetting ability for the 25 powders studied.

  3. Coordinated Molecular Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus, Endothelial Cells and Platelets in Bloodstream Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina D. Garciarena

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen often carried asymptomatically on the human body. Upon entry to the otherwise sterile environment of the cardiovascular system, S. aureus can lead to serious complications resulting in organ failure and death. The success of S. aureus as a pathogen in the bloodstream is due to its ability to express a wide array of cell wall proteins on its surface that recognise host receptors, extracellular matrix proteins and plasma proteins. Endothelial cells and platelets are important cells in the cardiovascular system and are a major target of bloodstream infection. Endothelial cells form the inner lining of a blood vessel and provide an antithrombotic barrier between the vessel wall and blood. Platelets on the other hand travel throughout the cardiovascular system and respond by aggregating around the site of injury and initiating clot formation. Activation of either of these cells leads to functional dysregulation in the cardiovascular system. In this review, we will illustrate how S. aureus establish intimate interactions with both endothelial cells and platelets leading to cardiovascular dysregulation.

  4. Protein consensus-based surface engineering (ProCoS): a computer-assisted method for directed protein evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivange, Amol V; Hoeffken, Hans Wolfgang; Haefner, Stefan; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2016-12-01

    Protein consensus-based surface engineering (ProCoS) is a simple and efficient method for directed protein evolution combining computational analysis and molecular biology tools to engineer protein surfaces. ProCoS is based on the hypothesis that conserved residues originated from a common ancestor and that these residues are crucial for the function of a protein, whereas highly variable regions (situated on the surface of a protein) can be targeted for surface engineering to maximize performance. ProCoS comprises four main steps: (i) identification of conserved and highly variable regions; (ii) protein sequence design by substituting residues in the highly variable regions, and gene synthesis; (iii) in vitro DNA recombination of synthetic genes; and (iv) screening for active variants. ProCoS is a simple method for surface mutagenesis in which multiple sequence alignment is used for selection of surface residues based on a structural model. To demonstrate the technique's utility for directed evolution, the surface of a phytase enzyme from Yersinia mollaretii (Ymphytase) was subjected to ProCoS. Screening just 1050 clones from ProCoS engineering-guided mutant libraries yielded an enzyme with 34 amino acid substitutions. The surface-engineered Ymphytase exhibited 3.8-fold higher pH stability (at pH 2.8 for 3 h) and retained 40% of the enzyme's specific activity (400 U/mg) compared with the wild-type Ymphytase. The pH stability might be attributed to a significantly increased (20 percentage points; from 9% to 29%) number of negatively charged amino acids on the surface of the engineered phytase.

  5. Protein sequences bound to mineral surfaces persist into deep time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demarchi, Beatrice; Hall, Shaun; Roncal-Herrero, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Proteins persist longer in the fossil record than DNA, but the longevity, survival mechanisms and substrates remain contested. Here, we demonstrate the role of mineral binding in preserving the protein sequence in ostrich (Struthionidae) eggshell, including from the palaeontological sites of Laet...

  6. Role of Penicillin-Binding Protein 2 (PBP2) in the Antibiotic Susceptibility and Cell Wall Cross-Linking of Staphylococcus aureus: Evidence for the Cooperative Functioning of PBP2, PBP4, and PBP2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łęski, Tomasz A.; Tomasz, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Ceftizoxime, a beta-lactam antibiotic with high selective affinity for penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) of Staphylococcus aureus, was used to select a spontaneous resistant mutant of S. aureus strain 27s. The stable resistant mutant ZOX3 had an increased ceftizoxime MIC and a decreased affinity of its PBP2 for ceftizoxime and produced peptidoglycan in which the proportion of highly cross-linked muropeptides was reduced. The pbpB gene of ZOX3 carried a single C-to-T nucleotide substitution at nucleotide 1373, causing replacement of a proline with a leucine at amino acid residue 458 of the transpeptidase domain of the protein, close to the SFN conserved motif. Experimental proof that this point mutation was responsible for the drug-resistant phenotype, and also for the decreased PBP2 affinity and reduced cell wall cross-linking, was provided by allelic replacement experiments and site-directed mutagenesis. Disruption of pbpD, the structural gene of PBP4, in either the parental strain or the mutant caused a large decrease in the highly cross-linked muropeptide components of the cell wall and in the mutant caused a massive accumulation of muropeptide monomers as well. Disruption of pbpD also caused increased sensitivity to ceftizoxime in both the parental cells and the ZOX3 mutant, while introduction of the plasmid-borne mecA gene, the genetic determinant of the beta-lactam resistance protein PBP2A, had the opposite effects. The findings provide evidence for the cooperative functioning of two native S. aureus transpeptidases (PBP2 and PBP4) and an acquired transpeptidase (PBP2A) in staphylococcal cell wall biosynthesis and susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. PMID:15716453

  7. Solvent accessibility of protein surfaces by amide H/2H exchange MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhlar, Stephanie M E; Croy, Carrie H; Torpey, Justin W; Koeppe, Julia R; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2006-11-01

    One advantage of detecting amide H/2H exchange by mass spectrometry instead of NMR is that the more rapidly exchanging surface amides are still detectable. In this study, we present quench-flow amide H/2H exchange experiments to probe how rapidly the surfaces of two different proteins exchange. We compared the amide H/2H exchange behavior of thrombin, a globular protein, and IkappaBalpha, a nonglobular protein, to explore any differences in the determinants of amide H/2H exchange rates for each class of protein. The rates of exchange of only a few of the surface amides were as rapid as the "intrinsic" exchange rates measured for amides in unstructured peptides. Most of the surface amides exchanged at a slower rate, despite the fact that they were not seen to be hydrogen bonded to another protein group in the crystal structure. To elucidate the influence of the surface environment on amide H/2H exchange, we compared exchange data with the number of amides participating in hydrogen bonds with other protein groups and with the solvent accessible surface area. The best correlation with amide H/2H exchange was found with the total solvent accessible surface area, including side chains. In the case of the globular protein, the correlation was modest, whereas it was well correlated for the nonglobular protein. The nonglobular protein also showed a correlation between amide exchange and hydrogen bonding. These data suggest that other factors, such as complex dynamic behavior and surface burial, may alter the expected exchange rates in globular proteins more than in nonglobular proteins where all of the residues are near the surface.

  8. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danov, K.D.; Kralchevsky, P.A.; Radulova, G.M.; Basheva, E.S.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Pelan, E.G.

    2015-01-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, Esh and ¿sh,

  9. Regular arrangement of nanoparticles from the gas phase on bacterial surface-protein layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queitsch, Ute; Mohn, Elias; Schäffel, Franziska; Schultz, Ludwig; Rellinghaus, Bernd; Blüher, Anja; Mertig, Michael

    2007-03-01

    FePt nanoparticles from the gas phase are deposited onto the two-dimensional crystalline surface layer protein from the bacterium Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602. The potential of this protein layer to facilitate the ordered spatial arrangement of the otherwise statistically distributed nanoparticles on the substrate is studied. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the particles positions to be directed by the regular protein template.

  10. Regulation of Macrophage Recognition through the Interplay of Nanoparticle Surface Functionality and Protein Corona

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Krishnendu; Rahimi, Mehran; Yazdani, Mahdieh; Kim, Sung Tae; Moyano, Daniel F.; Hou, Singyuk; Das, Ridhha; Mout, Rubul; Rezaee, Farhad; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2016-01-01

    Using a family of cationic gold nanoparticles (NPs) with similar size and charge, we demonstrate that proper surface engineering can control the nature and identity of protein corona in physiological serum conditions. The protein coronas were highly dependent on the hydrophobicity and arrangement of chemical motifs on NP surface. The NPs were uptaken in macrophages in a corona-dependent manner, predominantly through recognition of specific complement proteins in the NP corona. Taken together,...

  11. Adsorption of DNA binding proteins to functionalized carbon nanotube surfaces with and without DNA wrapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Yu; Oura, Shusuke; Umemura, Kazuo

    2017-09-01

    We examined the adsorption of DNA binding proteins on functionalized, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). When SWNTs were functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG-SWNT), moderate adsorption of protein molecules was observed. In contrast, nanotubes functionalized with CONH 2 groups (CONH 2 -SWNT) exhibited very strong interactions between the CONH 2 -SWNT and DNA binding proteins. Instead, when these SWNT surfaces were wrapped with DNA molecules (thymine 30-mers), protein binding was a little decreased. Our results revealed that DNA wrapped PEG-SWNT was one of the most promising candidates to realize DNA nanodevices involving protein reactions on DNA-SWNT surfaces. In addition, the DNA binding protein RecA was more adhesive than single-stranded DNA binding proteins to the functionalized SWNT surfaces.

  12. QCM Biosensor Based on Polydopamine Surface for Real-Time Analysis of the Binding Kinetics of Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunli Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM biosensor based on polydopamine (PDA surface was developed for real-time analysis of the binding kinetics of protein-protein interactions. The biosensor was fabricated by simply immersing the gold sensor chip into an aqueous dopamine solution at pH 8.5 leading to a spontaneous deposition of PDA film onto the sensor chip surface, which was followed by incubation with the protein to immobilize it onto the PDA-coated sensor chip surface via Michael addition and/or Schiff base reactions. In this paper, the interaction between monoclonal anti-myoglobin 7005 antibody (IgG1 and its antigen human cardiac myoglobin was used as a model system for real-time analysis of biomolecule interactions on the biosensor surface. The kinetic parameters of the interaction between anti-myoglobin 7005 and myoglobin were studied on the biosensor surface, which were consistent with the results obtained via amine coupling. The biosensor based on PDA surface has excellent regenerability, reproducibility, and specificity. Compared with the most frequently/typically used amine coupling method for immobilization of proteins on carboxylated substrates, the modification methodology presented in this paper is simple, mild and is not subjected to the limitations of the isoelectric point (pI of the protein. In addition, the PDA biosensor chip can be easily reused, which makes QCM biosensor analysis more efficient and cost effective.

  13. Candida albicans shaving to profile human serum proteins on hyphal surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira eMarin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a human opportunistic fungus and it is responsible for a wide variety of infections, either superficial or systemic. C. albicans is a polymorphic fungus and its ability to switch between yeast and hyphae is essential for its virulence. Once C. albicans obtains access to the human body, the host serum constitutes a complex environment of interaction with C. albicans cell surface in bloodstream. To draw a comprehensive picture of this relevant step in host-pathogen interaction during invasive candidiasis, we have optimized a gel-free shaving proteomic strategy to identify both, human serum proteins coating C. albicans cells and fungi surface proteins simultaneously. This approach was carried out with normal serum (NS and heat inactivated serum (HIS. We identified 214 human and 372 C. albicans unique proteins. Proteins identified in C. albicans included 147 which were described as located at the cell surface and 52 that were described as immunogenic. Interestingly, among these C. albicans proteins, we identified 23 GPI-anchored proteins, Gpd2 and Pra1, which are involved in complement system evasion and 7 other proteins that are able to attach plasminogen to C. albicans surface (Adh1, Eno1, Fba1, Pgk1, Tdh3, Tef1 and Tsa1. Furthermore, 12 proteins identified at the C. albicans hyphae surface induced with 10% human serum were not detected in other hypha-induced conditions. The most abundant human proteins identified are involved in complement and coagulation pathways. Remarkably, with this strategy, all main proteins belonging to complement cascades were identified on the C. albicans surface. Moreover, we identified immunoglobulins, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic proteins such as apolipoproteins and others. Additionally, we identified more inhibitors of complement and coagulation pathways, some of them serpin proteins (serine protease inhibitors, in HIS versus NS. On the other hand, we detected a higher amount of C3 at the C

  14. SFG analysis of surface bound proteins: a route towards structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Tobias; Castner, David G

    2013-08-14

    The surface of a material is rapidly covered with proteins once that material is placed in a biological environment. The structure and function of these bound proteins play a key role in the interactions and communications of the material with the biological environment. Thus, it is crucial to gain a molecular level understanding of surface bound protein structure. While X-ray diffraction and solution phase NMR methods are well established for determining the structure of proteins in the crystalline or solution phase, there is not a corresponding single technique that can provide the same level of structural detail about proteins at surfaces or interfaces. However, recent advances in sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy have significantly increased our ability to obtain structural information about surface bound proteins and peptides. A multi-technique approach of combining SFG with (1) protein engineering methods to selectively introduce mutations and isotopic labels, (2) other experimental methods such as time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) to provide complementary information, and (3) molecular dynamic (MD) simulations to extend the molecular level experimental results is a particularly promising route for structural characterization of surface bound proteins and peptides. By using model peptides and small proteins with well-defined structures, methods have been developed to determine the orientation of both backbone and side chains to the surface.

  15. Photogenerated Carbohydrate Microarrays to Study Carbohydrate-Protein Interactions using Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Tyagi, Anuradha; Wang, Xin; Deng, Lingquan; Ramström, Olof; Yan, Mingdi

    2010-01-01

    A photochemical strategy to generate carbohydrate microarrays on flat sensor surfaces, and to study the protein-binding effects of these arrays by surface plasmon resonance imaging is described. The approach was validated using a panel of carbohydrate-binding proteins. The coupling agents, thiol-functionalized perfluorophenyl azides, allow the covalent attachment of underivatized carbohydrates to gold surfaces by a fast photochemical reaction. Carbohydrate microarrays composed of 3,6-di-O-(α-...

  16. Sweets for a bitter end: lung cancer cell-surface protein glycosylation mediates metastatic colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal-Estapé, Anna; Nguyen, Don X

    2015-02-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most predominant forms of cell-surface protein modifications, yet its deregulation in cancer and contribution to tumor microenvironment interactions remain poorly understood. In this issue of Cancer Discovery, Reticker-Flynn and Bhatia characterize an enzymatic switch in lung cancer cells that triggers aberrant surface protein glycosylation patterns, adhesion to lectins on the surface of inflammatory cells, and subsequent metastatic colonization of the liver. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Surface heterogeneity: a friend or foe of protein adsorption - insights from theoretical simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, Matthew; Ley, Kamron; Maclaughlin, Shane; Yarovsky, Irene

    2016-10-06

    A lack in the detailed understanding of mechanisms through which proteins adsorb or are repelled at various solid/liquid interfaces limits the capacity to rationally design and produce more sophisticated surfaces with controlled protein adsorption in both biomedical and industrial settings. To date there are three main approaches to achieve anti biofouling efficacy, namely chemically adjusting the surface hydrophobicity and introducing various degrees of surface roughness, or a combination of both. More recently, surface nanostructuring has been shown to have an effect on protein adsorption. However, the current resolution of experimental techniques makes it difficult to investigate these three phase systems at the molecular level. In this molecular dynamics study we explore in all-atom detail the adsorption process of one of the most surface active proteins, EAS hydrophobin, known for its versatile ability to self-assemble on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces forming stable monolayers that facilitate further biofilm growth. We model the adsorption of this protein on organic ligand protected silica surfaces with varying degrees of chemical heterogeneity and roughness, including fully homogenous hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces for comparison. We present a detailed characterisation of the functionalised surface structure and dynamics for each of these systems, and the effect the ligands have on interfacial water, the adsorption process and conformational rearrangements of the protein. Results suggest that the ligand arrangement that produces the highest hydrophilic chain mobility and the lack of significant hydrophobic patches shows the most promising anti-fouling efficacy toward hydrophobin. However, the presence on the protein surface of a flexible loop with amphipathic character (the Cys3-Cys4 loop) is seen to facilitate EAS adsorption on all surfaces by enabling the protein to match the surface pattern.

  18. Signatures of cytoplasmic proteins in the exoproteome distinguish community- and hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 lineages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mekonnen, Solomon A; Palma Medina, Laura M; Glasner, Corinna

    2017-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the common name for a heterogeneous group of highly drug-resistant staphylococci. Two major MRSA classes are distinguished based on epidemiology, namely community-associated (CA) and hospital-associated (HA) MRSA. Notably, the distinction of C...

  19. Evaluation of distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS) from different grain sources as dietary protein for hybrid tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus x O. Aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of distiller’s dried grains with solubles (DDGS) from different sources on growth performance, hematology, and immunity of hybrid tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus x O. aureus, were evaluated. Sex-reversed, all-male hybrid tilapia (3.72 ± 0.08 g initial weight) were fed diets in which 30% o...

  20. In Silico Study of Variable Surface Proteins in Plasmodium Species: Perspectives in Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Manoj Kumar; Swati, D

    2016-09-01

    The variable surface proteins expressed by P. falciparum and P. vivax are transported to the surface of infected erythrocyte and are exposed to the host immune system. The possibility of using variable surface proteins as a common drug target has been analyzed in both the Plasmodium species. Sequence analysis of variable surface proteins showed a low-level conservation within as well as between the species. Amino acid composition analysis revealed higher frequency of hydrophilic amino acids as compared with that of hydrophobic residues. In order to gain more insight into their diverse functional role, the three-dimensional structure was predicted using comparative modeling approach. These models were evaluated and validated by checking stereochemistry of underlying amino acids. Structural alignment of variable surface proteins by superimposing them shows less conservation. Due to differences at sequence as well as structural level, the variable surface proteins are expected to show difference in their degree of invasiveness. These differences were also cross-examined by evolutionary study, and the results obtained were in accordance with the aforesaid study. The existence of structural differences noticed in the present study showed that the variable surface proteins could not be used as a common drug target in both the malarial species. Therefore, species-specific strategy may be followed for drug targeting against variable surface proteins of P. falciparum and P. vivax.

  1. A Study of Surface Proteins, Other Adhesins and Iron Acquiring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Its stages of infection involve, first, colonization of columnar epithelial cells of mucosal surfaces; then an inflammatory response is elicited; and finally, the ... group of individuals for the infection and try to assess and recommend the possibility of getting important surface components to serve as vaccine candidates against ...

  2. Detection of Alpha-Toxin and Other Virulence Factors in Biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus on Polystyrene and a Human Epidermal Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P M den Reijer

    Full Text Available The ability of Staphylococcus aureus to successfully colonize (abiotic surfaces may be explained by biofilm formation and the actions of virulence factors. The aim of the present study was to establish the presence of 52 proteins, including virulence factors such as alpha-toxin, during biofilm formation of five different (methicillin resistant S. aureus strains on Leiden human epidermal models (LEMs and polystyrene surfaces (PS using a competitive Luminex-based assay.All five S. aureus strains formed biofilms on PS, whereas only three out of five strains formed biofilms on LEMs. Out of the 52 tested proteins, six functionally diverse proteins (ClfB, glucosaminidase, IsdA, IsaA, SACOL0688 and nuclease were detected in biofilms of all strains on both PS and LEMs. At the same time, four toxins (alpha-toxin, gamma-hemolysin B and leukocidins D and E, two immune modulators (formyl peptide receptor-like inhibitory protein and Staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 1, and two other proteins (lipase and LytM were detectable in biofilms by all five S. aureus strains on LEMs, but not on PS. In contrast, fibronectin-binding protein B (FnbpB was detectable in biofilms by all S. aureus biofilms on PS, but not on LEMs. These data were largely confirmed by the results from proteomic and transcriptomic analyses and in case of alpha-toxin additionally by GFP-reporter technology.Functionally diverse virulence factors of (methicillin-resistant S. aureus are present during biofilm formation on LEMs and PS. These results could aid in identifying novel targets for future treatment strategies against biofilm-associated infections.

  3. Detection of Alpha-Toxin and Other Virulence Factors in Biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus on Polystyrene and a Human Epidermal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Reijer, P M; Haisma, E M; Lemmens-den Toom, N A; Willemse, J; Koning, R I; Koning, R A; Demmers, J A A; Dekkers, D H W; Rijkers, E; El Ghalbzouri, A; Nibbering, P H; van Wamel, W

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Staphylococcus aureus to successfully colonize (a)biotic surfaces may be explained by biofilm formation and the actions of virulence factors. The aim of the present study was to establish the presence of 52 proteins, including virulence factors such as alpha-toxin, during biofilm formation of five different (methicillin resistant) S. aureus strains on Leiden human epidermal models (LEMs) and polystyrene surfaces (PS) using a competitive Luminex-based assay. All five S. aureus strains formed biofilms on PS, whereas only three out of five strains formed biofilms on LEMs. Out of the 52 tested proteins, six functionally diverse proteins (ClfB, glucosaminidase, IsdA, IsaA, SACOL0688 and nuclease) were detected in biofilms of all strains on both PS and LEMs. At the same time, four toxins (alpha-toxin, gamma-hemolysin B and leukocidins D and E), two immune modulators (formyl peptide receptor-like inhibitory protein and Staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 1), and two other proteins (lipase and LytM) were detectable in biofilms by all five S. aureus strains on LEMs, but not on PS. In contrast, fibronectin-binding protein B (FnbpB) was detectable in biofilms by all S. aureus biofilms on PS, but not on LEMs. These data were largely confirmed by the results from proteomic and transcriptomic analyses and in case of alpha-toxin additionally by GFP-reporter technology. Functionally diverse virulence factors of (methicillin-resistant) S. aureus are present during biofilm formation on LEMs and PS. These results could aid in identifying novel targets for future treatment strategies against biofilm-associated infections.

  4. Protein Structural Perturbation and Aggregation on Homogeneous Surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sethuraman, Ananthakrishnan; Belfort, Georges

    2005-01-01

    We have demonstrated that globular proteins, such as hen egg lysozyme in phosphate buffered saline at room temperature, lose native structural stability and activity when adsorbed onto well-defined...

  5. Adsorption of Milk Proteins (β-Casein and β-Lactoglobulin and BSA onto Hydrophobic Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Pérez-Fuentes

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Here, we study films of proteins over planar surfaces and protein-coated microspheres obtained from the adsorption of three different proteins ( β -casein, β -lactoglobulin and bovine serum albumin (BSA. The investigation of protein films in planar surfaces is performed by combining quartz crystal microbalance (QCM and atomic force microscopy (AFM measurements with all-atomic molecular dynamics (MD simulations. We found that BSA and β -lactoglobulin form compact monolayers, almost without interstices between the proteins. However, β -casein adsorbs forming multilayers. The study of the electrokinetic mobility of protein-coated latex microspheres shows substantial condensation of ions from the buffer over the complexes, as predicted from ion condensation theories. The electrokinetic behavior of the latex-protein complexes is dominated by the charge of the proteins and the phenomenon of ion condensation, whereas the charge of the latex colloids plays only a minor role.

  6. In-cell thermodynamics and a new role for protein surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Austin E; Zhou, Larry Z; Gorensek, Annelise H; Senske, Michael; Pielak, Gary J

    2016-02-16

    There is abundant, physiologically relevant knowledge about protein cores; they are hydrophobic, exquisitely well packed, and nearly all hydrogen bonds are satisfied. An equivalent understanding of protein surfaces has remained elusive because proteins are almost exclusively studied in vitro in simple aqueous solutions. Here, we establish the essential physiological roles played by protein surfaces by measuring the equilibrium thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding in the complex environment of living Escherichia coli cells, and under physiologically relevant in vitro conditions. Fluorine NMR data on the 7-kDa globular N-terminal SH3 domain of Drosophila signal transduction protein drk (SH3) show that charge-charge interactions are fundamental to protein stability and folding kinetics in cells. Our results contradict predictions from accepted theories of macromolecular crowding and show that cosolutes commonly used to mimic the cellular interior do not yield physiologically relevant information. As such, we provide the foundation for a complete picture of protein chemistry in cells.

  7. Thermodynamics of interactions of urea and guanidinium salts with protein surface: relationship between solute effects on protein processes and changes in water-accessible surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtenay, E S; Capp, M W; Record, M T

    2001-12-01

    To interpret effects of urea and guanidinium (GuH(+)) salts on processes that involve large changes in protein water-accessible surface area (ASA), and to predict these effects from structural information, a thermodynamic characterization of the interactions of these solutes with different types of protein surface is required. In the present work we quantify the interactions of urea, GuHCl, GuHSCN, and, for comparison, KCl with native bovine serum albumin (BSA) surface, using vapor pressure osmometry (VPO) to obtain preferential interaction coefficients (Gamma(mu3)) as functions of nondenaturing concentrations of these solutes (0-1 molal). From analysis of Gamma(mu3) using the local-bulk domain model, we obtain concentration-independent partition coefficients K(nat)(P) that characterize the accumulation of these solutes near native protein (BSA) surface: K(nat)(P,urea)= 1.10 +/- 0.04, K(nat)(P,SCN(-)) = 2.4 +/- 0.2, K(nat)(P,GuH(+)) = 1.60 +/- 0.08, relative to K(nat)(P,K(+)) identical with 1 and K(nat)(P,Cl(-)) = 1.0 +/- 0.08. The relative magnitudes of K(nat)(P) are consistent with the relative effectiveness of these solutes as perturbants of protein processes. From a comparison of partition coefficients for these solutes and native surface (K(nat)(P)) with those determined by us previously for unfolded protein and alanine-based peptide surface K(unf)(P), we dissect K(P) into contributions from polar peptide backbone and other types of protein surface. For globular protein-urea interactions, we find K(nat)(P,urea) = K(unf)(P,urea). We propose that this equality arises because polar peptide backbone is the same fraction (0.13) of total ASA for both classes of surface. The analysis presented here quantifies and provides a physical basis for understanding Hofmeister effects of salt ions and the effects of uncharged solutes on protein processes in terms of K(P) and the change in protein ASA.

  8. Effectiveness of cleaning and sanitizing procedures in controlling the adherence of Pseudomonas fluorescens, Salmonella Enteritidis, and Staphylococcus aureus to domestic kitchen surfaces Eficiência dos procedimentos de limpeza e de sanitização no controle da adesão de Pseudomonas fluorescens, Salmonella Enteritidis e Staphylococcus aureus em superfícies usadas em cozinhas domésticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iara Dias Silva

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of cleaning and sanitizing procedures in controlling Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Enteritidis, and Pseudomonasfluorescens adhered to granite and stainless steel was evaluated. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05 in the adherence of pure cultures of these microorganisms to stainless steel. The numbers of P. fluorescens and S. Enteritidis adhered to granite were greater (p 0.05 between the surfaces. However, a significant difference was observed (p A eficiência dos procedimentos de limpeza e sanitização no controle de Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella Enteritidis e Pseudomonasfluorescens aderidas em granito e aço inoxidável foi avaliada. Não houve diferença significativa (p > 0,05 na adesão destes microrganismos quando em cultura pura, em aço inoxidável. O número de células aderidas de P. fluorescens e S. Enteritidis foi maior (p 0,05 entre as superfícies. Entretanto, observou-se uma diferença (p < 0,05 entre as soluções sanitizantes utilizadas. Hipoclorito de sódio e ácido peracético apresentaram maior ação bactericida (p < 0,05 que o composto de amônia quaternária. Observou-se que S. aureus apresentou menor resistência à ação desses sanitizantes. Os resultados mostram a importância da adequada realização dos procedimentos de limpeza e sanitização para evitar a adesão bacteriana e formação de biofilme.

  9. Selective labelling of cell-surface proteins using CyDye DIGE Fluor minimal dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagner-McWhirter, Asa; Winkvist, Maria; Bourin, Stephanie; Marouga, Rita

    2008-11-26

    Surface proteins are central to the cell's ability to react to its environment and to interact with neighboring cells. They are known to be inducers of almost all intracellular signaling. Moreover, they play an important role in environmental adaptation and drug treatment, and are often involved in disease pathogenesis and pathology (1). Protein-protein interactions are intrinsic to signaling pathways, and to gain more insight in these complex biological processes, sensitive and reliable methods are needed for studying cell surface proteins. Two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis is used extensively for detection of biomarkers and other targets in complex protein samples to study differential changes. Cell surface proteins, partly due to their low abundance (1 2% of cellular proteins), are difficult to detect in a 2-D gel without fractionation or some other type of enrichment. They are also often poorly represented in 2-D gels due to their hydrophobic nature and high molecular weight (2). In this study, we present a new protocol for intact cells using CyDye DIGE Fluor minimal dyes for specific labeling and detection of this important group of proteins. The results showed specific labeling of a large number of cell surface proteins with minimal labeling of intracellular proteins. This protocol is rapid, simple to use, and all three CyDye DIGE Fluor minimal dyes (Cy 2, Cy 3 and Cy 5) can be used to label cell-surface proteins. These features allow for multiplexing using the 2-D Fluorescence Difference Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with Ettan DIGE technology and analysis of protein expression changes using DeCyder 2-D Differential Analysis Software. The level of cell-surface proteins was followed during serum starvation of CHO cells for various lengths of time (see Table 1). Small changes in abundance were detected with high accuracy, and results are supported by defined statistical methods.

  10. Adhesive polypeptides of Staphylococcus aureus identified using a novel secretion library technique in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holm Liisa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial adhesive proteins, called adhesins, are frequently the decisive factor in initiation of a bacterial infection. Characterization of such molecules is crucial for the understanding of bacterial pathogenesis, design of vaccines and development of antibacterial drugs. Because adhesins are frequently difficult to express, their characterization has often been hampered. Alternative expression methods developed for the analysis of adhesins, e.g. surface display techniques, suffer from various drawbacks and reports on high-level extracellular secretion of heterologous proteins in Gram-negative bacteria are scarce. These expression techniques are currently a field of active research. The purpose of the current study was to construct a convenient, new technique for identification of unknown bacterial adhesive polypeptides directly from the growth medium of the Escherichia coli host and to identify novel proteinaceous adhesins of the model organism Staphylococcus aureus. Results Randomly fragmented chromosomal DNA of S. aureus was cloned into a unique restriction site of our expression vector, which facilitates secretion of foreign FLAG-tagged polypeptides into the growth medium of E. coli ΔfliCΔfliD, to generate a library of 1663 clones expressing FLAG-tagged polypeptides. Sequence and bioinformatics analyses showed that in our example, the library covered approximately 32% of the S. aureus proteome. Polypeptides from the growth medium of the library clones were screened for binding to a selection of S. aureus target molecules and adhesive fragments of known staphylococcal adhesins (e.g coagulase and fibronectin-binding protein A as well as polypeptides of novel function (e.g. a universal stress protein and phosphoribosylamino-imidazole carboxylase ATPase subunit were detected. The results were further validated using purified His-tagged recombinant proteins of the corresponding fragments in enzyme-linked immunoassay and

  11. Antibiofilm Effect of Octenidine Hydrochloride on Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA and VRSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Anne Roshni Amalaradjou

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Millions of indwelling devices are implanted in patients every year, and staphylococci (S. aureus, MRSA and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA are responsible for a majority of infections associated with these devices, thereby leading to treatment failures. Once established, staphylococcal biofilms become resistant to antimicrobial treatment and host response, thereby serving as the etiological agent for recurrent infections. This study investigated the efficacy of octenidine hydrochloride (OH for inhibiting biofilm synthesis and inactivating fully-formed staphylococcal biofilm on different matrices in the presence and absence of serum protein. Polystyrene plates and stainless steel coupons inoculated with S. aureus, MRSA or VRSA were treated with OH (zero, 0.5, one, 2 mM at 37 °C for the prevention of biofilm formation. Additionally, the antibiofilm effect of OH (zero, 2.5, five, 10 mM on fully-formed staphylococcal biofilms on polystyrene plates, stainless steel coupons and urinary catheters was investigated. OH was effective in rapidly inactivating planktonic and biofilm cells of S. aureus, MRSA and VRSA on polystyrene plates, stainless steel coupons and urinary catheters in the presence and absence of serum proteins. The use of two and 10 mM OH completely inactivated S. aureus planktonic cells and biofilm (>6.0 log reduction on all matrices tested immediately upon exposure. Further, confocal imaging revealed the presence of dead cells and loss in biofilm architecture in the OH-treated samples when compared to intact live biofilm in the control. Results suggest that OH could be applied as an effective antimicrobial to control biofilms of S. aureus, MRSA and VRSA on appropriate hospital surfaces and indwelling devices.

  12. Chalcone Attenuates Staphylococcus aureus Virulence by Targeting Sortase A and Alpha-Hemolysin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus resistance, considered a dilemma for the clinical treatment of this bacterial infection, is becoming increasingly intractable. Novel anti-virulence strategies will undoubtedly provide a path forward in combating these resistant bacterial infections. Sortase A (SrtA, an enzyme responsible for anchoring virulence-related surface proteins, and alpha-hemolysin (Hla, a pore-forming cytotoxin, have aroused great scientific interest, as they have been regarded as targets for promising agents against S. aureus infection. In this study, we discovered that chalcone, a natural small compound with little anti-S. aureus activity, could significantly inhibit SrtA activity with an IC50 of 53.15 μM and Hla hemolysis activity with an IC50 of 17.63 μM using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET assay and a hemolysis assay, respectively. In addition, chalcone was proven to reduce protein A (SpA display in intact bacteria, binding to fibronectin, formation of biofilm and S. aureus invasion. Chalcone could down-regulate the transcriptional levels of the hla gene and the agrA gene, thus leading to a reduction in the expression of Hla and significant protection against Hla-mediated A549 cell injury; more importantly, chalcone could also reduce mortality in infected mice. Additionally, molecular dynamics simulations and mutagenesis assays were used to identify the mechanism of chalcone against SrtA, which implied that the inhibitory activity lies in the bond between chalcone and SrtA residues Val168, Ile182, and Arg197. Taken together, the in vivo and in vitro experiments suggest that chalcone is a potential novel therapeutic compound for S. aureus infection via targeting SrtA and Hla.

  13. Chalcone AttenuatesStaphylococcus aureusVirulence by Targeting Sortase A and Alpha-Hemolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Teng, Zihao; Li, Xianhe; Lu, Gejin; Deng, Xuming; Niu, Xiaodi; Wang, Jianfeng

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus ( S .aureus) resistance, considered a dilemma for the clinical treatment of this bacterial infection, is becoming increasingly intractable. Novel anti-virulence strategies will undoubtedly provide a path forward in combating these resistant bacterial infections. Sortase A (SrtA), an enzyme responsible for anchoring virulence-related surface proteins, and alpha-hemolysin (Hla), a pore-forming cytotoxin, have aroused great scientific interest, as they have been regarded as targets for promising agents against S. aureus infection. In this study, we discovered that chalcone, a natural small compound with little anti- S. aureus activity, could significantly inhibit SrtA activity with an IC 50 of 53.15 μM and Hla hemolysis activity with an IC 50 of 17.63 μM using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay and a hemolysis assay, respectively. In addition, chalcone was proven to reduce protein A (SpA) display in intact bacteria, binding to fibronectin, formation of biofilm and S. aureus invasion. Chalcone could down-regulate the transcriptional levels of the hla gene and the agrA gene, thus leading to a reduction in the expression of Hla and significant protection against Hla-mediated A549 cell injury; more importantly, chalcone could also reduce mortality in infected mice. Additionally, molecular dynamics simulations and mutagenesis assays were used to identify the mechanism of chalcone against SrtA, which implied that the inhibitory activity lies in the bond between chalcone and SrtA residues Val168, Ile182, and Arg197. Taken together, the in vivo and in vitro experiments suggest that chalcone is a potential novel therapeutic compound for S. aureus infection via targeting SrtA and Hla.

  14. Facile Photoimmobilization of Proteins onto Low-Binding PEG-Coated Polymer Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Mikkelsen, Morten Bo Lindholm; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization of proteins onto polymer surfaces usually requires specific reactive functional groups. Here, we show an easy one-step method to conjugate protein covalently onto almost any polymer surface, including low protein-binding poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), without the requirement...... for the presence of specific functional groups. Several types of proteins, including alkaline phosphatase, bovine serum albumin, and polyclonal antibodies, were photoimmobilized onto a PEG-coated polymer surface using a water-soluble benzophenone as photosensitizer. Protein functionality after immobilization...... was verified for both enzymes and antibodies, and their presence on the surface was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Conjugation of capture antibody onto the PEG coating was employed for a simplified ELISA protocol without the need for blocking uncoated...

  15. New developments for the site-specific attachment of protein to surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A

    2005-05-12

    Protein immobilization on surfaces is of great importance in numerous applications in biology and biophysics. The key for the success of all these applications relies on the immobilization technique employed to attach the protein to the corresponding surface. Protein immobilization can be based on covalent or noncovalent interaction of the molecule with the surface. Noncovalent interactions include hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bonding, van der Waals forces, electrostatic forces, or physical adsorption. However, since these interactions are weak, the molecules can get denatured or dislodged, thus causing loss of signal. They also result in random attachment of the protein to the surface. Site-specific covalent attachment of proteins onto surfaces, on the other hand, leads to molecules being arranged in a definite, orderly fashion and uses spacers and linkers to help minimize steric hindrances between the protein surface. This work reviews in detail some of the methods most commonly used as well as the latest developments for the site-specific covalent attachment of protein to solid surfaces.

  16. Surface derivatization strategy for combinatorial analysis of cell response to mixtures of protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chunyi; Karuri, Stella W; Kshatriya, Pradnya P; Schwartz, Jeffrey; Schwarzbauer, Jean E; Karuri, Nancy W

    2012-01-10

    We report a robust strategy for conjugating mixtures of two or more protein domains to nonfouling polyurethane surfaces. In our strategy, the carbamate groups of polyurethane are reacted with zirconium alkoxide from the vapor phase to give a surface-bound oxide that serves as a chemical layer that can be used to bond organics to the polymer substrate. A hydroxyalkylphosphonate monolayer was synthesized on this layer, which was then used to covalently bind primary amine groups in protein domains using chloroformate-derived cross-linking. The effectiveness of this synthesis strategy was gauged by using an ELISA to measure competitive, covalent bonding of cell-binding (III(9-10)) and fibronectin-binding (III(1-2)) domains of the cell adhesion protein fibronectin. Cell adhesion, spreading, and fibronectin matrix assembly were examined on surfaces conjugated with single domains, a 1:1 surface mixture of III(1-2) and III(9-10), and a recombinant protein "duplex" containing both domains in one fusion protein. The mixture performed as well as or better than the other surfaces in these assays. Our surface activation strategy is amenable to a wide range of polymer substrates and free amino group-containing protein fragments. As such, this technique may be used to create biologically specific materials through the immobilization of specific protein groups or mixtures thereof on a substrate surface.

  17. Molecular Characteristics and Biological Functions of Surface-Active and Surfactant Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunde, Margaret; Pham, Chi L L; Kwan, Ann H

    2017-06-20

    Many critical biological processes take place at hydrophobic:hydrophilic interfaces, and a wide range of organisms produce surface-active proteins and peptides that reduce surface and interfacial tension and mediate growth and development at these boundaries. Microorganisms produce both small lipid-associated peptides and amphipathic proteins that allow growth across water:air boundaries, attachment to surfaces, predation, and improved bioavailability of hydrophobic substrates. Higher-order organisms produce surface-active proteins with a wide variety of functions, including the provision of protective foam environments for vulnerable reproductive stages, evaporative cooling, and gas exchange across airway membranes. In general, the biological functions supported by these diverse polypeptides require them to have an amphipathic nature, and this is achieved by a diverse range of molecular structures, with some proteins undergoing significant conformational change or intermolecular association to generate the structures that are surface active.

  18. Silica as a Matrix for Encapsulating Proteins: Surface Effects on Protein Structure Assessed by Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabretta, Phillip J.; Chancellor, Mitchell C.; Torres, Carlos; Abel, Gary R.; Niehaus, Clayton; Birtwhistle, Nathan J.; Khouderchah, Nada M.; Zemede, Genet H.; Eggers, Daryl K.

    2012-01-01

    The encapsulation of biomolecules in solid materials that retain the native properties of the molecule is a desired feature for the development of biosensors and biocatalysts. In the current study, protein entrapment in silica-based materials is explored using the sol-gel technique. This work surveys the effects of silica confinement on the structure of several model polypeptides, including apomyoglobin, copper-zinc superoxide dismutase, polyglutamine, polylysine, and type I antifreeze protein. Changes in the secondary structure of each protein following encapsulation are monitored by circular dichroism spectroscopy. In many cases, silica confinement reduces the fraction of properly-folded protein relative to solution, but addition of a secondary solute or modification of the silica surface leads to an increase in structure. Refinement of the glass surface by addition of a monosubstituted alkoxysilane during sol-gel processing is shown to be a valuable tool for testing the effects of surface chemistry on protein structure. Because silica entrapment prevents protein aggregation by isolating individual protein molecules in the pores of the glass material, one may monitor aggregation-prone polypeptides under solvent conditions that are prohibited in solution, as demonstrated with polyglutamine and a disease-related variant of superoxide dismutase. PMID:24955630

  19. Silica as a Matrix for Encapsulating Proteins: Surface Effects on Protein Structure Assessed by Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genet H. Zemede

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The encapsulation of biomolecules in solid materials that retain the native properties of the molecule is a desired feature for the development of biosensors and biocatalysts. In the current study, protein entrapment in silica-based materials is explored using the sol-gel technique. This work surveys the effects of silica confinement on the structure of several model polypeptides, including apomyoglobin, copper-zinc superoxide dismutase, polyglutamine, polylysine, and type I antifreeze protein. Changes in the secondary structure of each protein following encapsulation are monitored by circular dichroism spectroscopy. In many cases, silica confinement reduces the fraction of properly-folded protein relative to solution, but addition of a secondary solute or modification of the silica surface leads to an increase in structure. Refinement of the glass surface by addition of a monosubstituted alkoxysilane during sol-gel processing is shown to be a valuable tool for testing the effects of surface chemistry on protein structure. Because silica entrapment prevents protein aggregation by isolating individual protein molecules in the pores of the glass material, one may monitor aggregation-prone polypeptides under solvent conditions that are prohibited in solution, as demonstrated with polyglutamine and a disease-related variant of superoxide dismutase.

  20. Determining Cell-surface Expression and Endocytic Rate of Proteins in Primary Astrocyte Cultures Using Biotinylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, Daniel Kai Long; Moukhles, Hakima

    2017-07-03

    Cell-surface proteins mediate a wide array of functions. In many cases, their activity is regulated by endocytic processes that modulate their levels at the plasma membrane. Here, we present detailed protocols for 2 methods that facilitate the study of such processes, both of which are based on the principle of the biotinylation of cell-surface proteins. The first is designed to allow for the semi-quantitative determination of the relative levels of a particular protein at the cell-surface. In it, the lysine residues of the plasma membrane proteins of cells are first labeled with a biotin moiety. Once the cells are lysed, these proteins may then be specifically precipitated via the use of agarose-immobilized streptavidin by exploiting the natural affinity of the latter for biotin. The proteins isolated in such a manner may then be analyzed via a standard western blotting approach. The second method provides a means of determining the endocytic rate of a particular cell-surface target over a period of time. Cell-surface proteins are first modified with a biotin derivative containing a cleavable disulfide bond. The cells are then shifted back to normal culture conditions, which causes the endocytic uptake of a proportion of biotinylated proteins. Next, the disulfide bonds of non-internalized biotin groups are reduced using the membrane-impermeable reducing agent glutathione. Via this approach, endocytosed proteins may thus be isolated and quantified with a high degree of specificity.

  1. A coverslip-based technique for evaluating Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on human plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer N Walker

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the opportunistic pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, to form biofilms is increasingly being viewed as an important contributor to chronic infections. In vitro methods for analyzing S. aureus biofilm formation have focused on bacterial attachment and accumulation on abiotic surfaces, such as in microtiter plate and flow cell assays. Microtiter plates provide a rapid measure of relative biomass levels, while flow cells have limited experimental throughput but are superior for confocal microscopy biofilm visualization. Although these assays have proven effective at identifying mechanisms involved in cell attachment and biofilm accumulation, the significance of these assays in vivo remains unclear. Studies have shown that when medical devices are implanted they are coated with host factors, such as matrix proteins, that facilitate S. aureus attachment and biofilm formation. To address the challenge of integrating existing biofilm assay features with a biotic surface, we have established an in vitro biofilm technique utilizing UV-sterilized coverslips coated with human plasma. The substratum more closely resembles the in vivo state and provides a platform for S. aureus to establish a robust biofilm. Importantly, these coverslips are amenable to confocal microscopy imaging to provide a visual reference of the biofilm growth stage, effectively merging the benefits of the microtiter and flow cell assays. We confirmed the approach using clinical S. aureus isolates and mutants with known biofilm phenotypes. Altogether, this new biofilm assay can be used to assess the function of S. aureus virulence factors associated with biofilm formation and for monitoring the efficacy of biofilm treatment modalities.

  2. Multidimensional profiling of cell surface proteins and nuclear markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Andarawewa, Kumari; Yaswen, Paul; Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Mary; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-01-30

    Cell membrane proteins play an important role in tissue architecture and cell-cell communication. We hypothesize that segmentation and multidimensional characterization of the distribution of cell membrane proteins, on a cell-by-cell basis, enable improved classification of treatment groups and identify important characteristics that can otherwise be hidden. We have developed a series of computational steps to (i) delineate cell membrane protein signals and associate them with a specific nucleus; (ii) compute a coupled representation of the multiplexed DNA content with membrane proteins; (iii) rank computed features associated with such a multidimensional representation; (iv) visualize selected features for comparative evaluation through heatmaps; and (v) discriminate between treatment groups in an optimal fashion. The novelty of our method is in the segmentation of the membrane signal and the multidimensional representation of phenotypic signature on a cell-by-cell basis. To test the utility of this method, the proposed computational steps were applied to images of cells that have been irradiated with different radiation qualities in the presence and absence of other small molecules. These samples are labeled for their DNA content and E-cadherin membrane proteins. We demonstrate that multidimensional representations of cell-by-cell phenotypes improve predictive and visualization capabilities among different treatment groups, and identify hidden variables.

  3. Water-wettable polypropylene fibers by facile surface treatment based on soy proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Carlos; Genzer, Jan; Lucia, Lucian A; Hubbe, Martin A; Rojas, Orlando J

    2013-07-24

    Modification of the wetting behavior of hydrophobic surfaces is essential in a variety of materials, including textiles and membranes that require control of fluid interactions, adhesion, transport processes, sensing, etc. This investigation examines the enhancement of wettability of an important class of textile materials, viz., polypropylene (PP) fibers, by surface adsorption of different proteins from soybeans, including soy flour, isolate,glycinin, and β-conglycinin. Detailed investigations of soy adsorption from aqueous solution (pH 7.4, 25 °C) on polypropylene thin films is carried out using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). A significant amount of protein adsorbs onto the PP surfaces primarily due to hydrophobic interactions. We establish that adsorption of a cationic surfactant, dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODA) onto PP surfaces prior to the protein deposition dramatically enhances its adsorption. The adsorption of proteins from native (PBS buffer, pH 7.4, 25 °C) and denatured conditions (PBS buffer, pH 7.4, 95 °C) onto DODA-treated PP leads to a high coverage of the proteins on the PP surface as confirmed by a significant improvement in water wettability. A shift in the contact angle from 128° to completely wettable surfaces (≈0°) is observed and confirmed by imaging experiments conducted with fluorescence tags. Furthermore, the results from wicking tests indicate that hydrophobic PP nonwovens absorb a significant amount of water after protein treatment, i.e., the PP-modified surfaces become completely hydrophilic.

  4. Competitive protein adsorption on biomaterial surface studied with reflectometric interference spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Lü, Xiaoying; Qian, Weiping; Tang, Zuming; Zhong, Yinping

    2010-06-01

    Reflectometry interference spectroscopy (RIfS) is known as a highly sensitive and robust technique for direct, label-free detection of the interaction of biomacromolecules in real time and in situ. The aim of the present study was to investigate the competitive protein adsorption on the surface of fluorocarbon end-capped poly(carbonate) urethane (PCUF) and polystyrene (PS) based on the RIfS method. The surface energy and microstructures of PCUF and PS were characterized by contact angle measurement and atomic force microscopy. Interfacial energies between these surfaces and the proteins were then calculated. The protein adsorption experiments were carried out with both single solution and ternary solutions composed of albumin, fibrinogen and immunoglobulin-G (IgG). The results of surface characterization showed that PCUF was more hydrophilic than PS with a smaller surface energy, and micro-phases separation of PCUF was observed. RIfS analysis results revealed that more albumins, less fibrinogen and IgG were detected on the PCUF surface compared with PS after simplex and competitive protein adsorption, which indicated that PCUF had a preferential adsorption for albumin. The special morphology, smaller surface energy and calculated interfacial energies between PCUF and proteins may be responsible for the better blood compatibility of PCUF compared to PS. The results suggest that RIfS could serve as a novel, effective method for studying the competitive protein adsorption on biomaterial surfaces. Copyright 2009 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Protein surface analysis for function annotation in high-throughput structural genomics pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkowski, T. Andrew; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Liang, Jie

    2005-01-01

    Structural genomics (SG) initiatives are expanding the universe of protein fold space by rapidly determining structures of proteins that were intentionally selected on the basis of low sequence similarity to proteins of known structure. Often these proteins have no associated biochemical or cellular functions. The SG success has resulted in an accelerated deposition of novel structures. In some cases the structural bioinformatics analysis applied to these novel structures has provided specific functional assignment. However, this approach has also uncovered limitations in the functional analysis of uncharacterized proteins using traditional sequence and backbone structure methodologies. A novel method, named pvSOAR (pocket and void Surface of Amino Acid Residues), of comparing the protein surfaces of geometrically defined pockets and voids was developed. pvSOAR was able to detect previously unrecognized and novel functional relationships between surface features of proteins. In this study, pvSOAR is applied to several structural genomics proteins. We examined the surfaces of YecM, BioH, and RpiB from Escherichia coli as well as the CBS domains from inosine-5′-monosphate dehydrogenase from Streptococcus pyogenes, conserved hypothetical protein Ta549 from Thermoplasm acidophilum, and CBS domain protein mt1622 from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum with the goal to infer information about their biochemical function. PMID:16322579

  6. The effect of Hofmeister anions on water structure at protein surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Euihyun; Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2017-08-02

    To understand the effects of specific ions on protein-water interactions and the thermodynamic stability of proteins in salt solutions, we use a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to examine the water structure, orientational distribution, and dynamics near the surface of ubiquitin. In particular, we consider NaCl, NaBF4, NaSCN, and NaClO4 salt solutions containing ubiquitin, where the anions of the latter three salts are well-known chaotropic ions in the Hofmiester anion series. The number of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) per water molecule is found to decrease significantly at the ubiquitin-water interface, indicating a significant disruption of the water H-bonding network. The distribution of the water H-bond numbers near the protein surface is modulated by dissolved ions, and the extent of the ion effect on the H-bonding network structure follows the order of the Hofmeister anion series, while there are no specific ion effects on water properties at distances larger than 5 Å from the protein surface. From detailed analyses of the surface area, volume, and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of ubiquitin, we show that changes in the properties of the protein could originate from the disruption of the water H-bond network induced by ions with a higher affinity for the protein surface instead of direct protein residue-ion interactions. An interesting observation made here is that the orientational distribution of water molecules at the protein-water interface is close to random, but there is a slight preference for interfacial water molecules with a straddle structure within 2.5 Å of the protein surface, where one of the two OH groups points away from the protein surface and the other points toward the surface. In addition, comparing the MD simulation results for ubiquitin solutions with dissolved NaSCN and KSCN, we show that Na+ affects the water H-bonding structure at the protein surface more than K+. It is clear that the H-bonding network structure of water more

  7. Surface modification of diamond-like carbon films with protein via polydopamine inspired coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao Caihong [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianshui Middle Road 18th, Lanzhou 730000 (China); China and Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Yang Shengrong [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianshui Middle Road 18th, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang Junyan, E-mail: zhangjunyan@lzb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianshui Middle Road 18th, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang Jinqing [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tianshui Middle Road 18th, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, we report a facile two-step approach to immobilize proteins onto DLC surfaces. The first step was a simple immersion of DLC in a solution of dopamine. Polydopamine was deposited on DLC as a stable anchor to present protein molecules. Then the protein ad-layer was deposited on it. The chemical components of the modified DLC surfaces were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectra and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The biocompatibility of it was evaluated in vitro by the tetrazolium salt method. And it was indicated that the BSA modified surface had good haemocompatibility properties, and was cytocompatible to PC-12 cells.

  8. Surface sieving coordinated IMAC material for purification of His-tagged proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Senwu; Yang, Kaiguang; Liu, Lukuan; Zhao, Baofeng; Chen, Yuanbo; Li, Xiao; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2018-01-02

    Tailor-made materials for the purification of proteins with His-tag was designed through synergizing the selectivity of surface sieving and metal ion affinity. By excluding impurity proteins out of the surface polymer network, such materials could purify His-tagged proteins from the crude cell lysis with purity up to 90%, improved by 14% compared to that obtained by the commercial metal chelating affinity materials. This study might promote the His-tagged protein purification to a new level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Specific and selective probes for Staphylococcus aureus from phage-displayed random peptide libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Plano, Laura M; Carnazza, Santina; Messina, Grazia M L; Rizzo, Maria Giovanna; Marletta, Giovanni; Guglielmino, Salvatore P P

    2017-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen causing health care-associated and community-associated infections. Early diagnosis is essential to prevent disease progression and to reduce complications that can be serious. In this study, we selected, from a 9-mer phage peptide library, a phage clone displaying peptide capable of specific binding to S. aureus cell surface, namely St.au9IVS5 (sequence peptide RVRSAPSSS).The ability of the isolated phage clone to interact specifically with S. aureus and the efficacy of its bacteria-binding properties were established by using enzyme linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA). We also demonstrated by Western blot analysis that the most reactive and selective phage peptide binds a 78KDa protein on the bacterial cell surface. Furthermore, we observed selectivity of phage-bacteria-binding allowing to identify clinical isolates of S. aureus in comparison with a panel of other bacterial species. In order to explore the possibility of realizing a selective bacteria biosensor device, based on immobilization of affinity-selected phage, we have studied the physisorbed phage deposition onto a mica surface. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the organization of phage on mica surface and then the binding performance of mica-physisorbed phage to bacterial target was evaluated during the time by fluorescent microscopy. The system is able to bind specifically about 50% of S. aureus cells after 15' and 90% after one hour. Due to specificity and rapidness, this biosensing strategy paves the way to the further development of new cheap biosensors to be used in developing countries, as lab-on-chip (LOC) to detect bacterial agents in clinical diagnostics applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Lysine N[superscript zeta]-Decarboxylation Switch and Activation of the [beta]-Lactam Sensor Domain of BlaR1 Protein of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borbulevych, Oleg; Kumarasiri, Malika; Wilson, Brian; Llarrull1, Leticia I.; Lee, Mijoon; Hesek, Dusan; Shi, Qicun; Peng, Jeffrey; Baker, Brian M.; Mobashery, Shahriar (Notre)

    2012-10-29

    The integral membrane protein BlaR1 of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus senses the presence of {beta}-lactam antibiotics in the milieu and transduces the information to the cytoplasm, where the biochemical events that unleash induction of antibiotic resistance mechanisms take place. We report herein by two-dimensional and three-dimensional NMR experiments of the sensor domain of BlaR1 in solution and by determination of an x-ray structure for the apo protein that Lys-392 of the antibiotic-binding site is posttranslationally modified by N{sup {zeta}}-carboxylation. Additional crystallographic and NMR data reveal that on acylation of Ser-389 by antibiotics, Lys-392 experiences N{sup {zeta}}-decarboxylation. This unique process, termed the lysine N{sup {zeta}}-decarboxylation switch, arrests the sensor domain in the activated ('on') state, necessary for signal transduction and all the subsequent biochemical processes. We present structural information on how this receptor activation process takes place, imparting longevity to the antibiotic-receptor complex that is needed for the induction of the antibiotic-resistant phenotype in methicillin-resistant S. aureus.

  11. Non-interacting surface solvation and dynamics in protein-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, Koen M.; Kastritis, Panagiotis L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315886668; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113691238

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions control a plethora of cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and signal transduction. Understanding how and why proteins interact will inevitably lead to novel structure-based drug design methods, as well as design of de novo

  12. Snorkel: an epitope tagging system for measuring the surface expression of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael; Stafford, Lewis J; Onisk, Dale; Joaquim, Tony; Tobb, Alhagie; Goldman, Larissa; Fancy, David; Stave, James; Chambers, Ross

    2013-01-01

    Tags are widely used to monitor a protein's expression level, interactions, protein trafficking, and localization. Membrane proteins are often tagged in their extracellular domains to allow discrimination between protein in the plasma membrane from that in internal pools. Multipass membrane proteins offer special challenges for inserting a tag since the extracellular regions are often composed of small loops and thus inserting an epitope tag risks perturbing the structure, function, or location of the membrane protein. We have developed a novel tagging system called snorkel where a transmembrane domain followed by a tag is appended to the cytoplasmic C-terminus of the membrane protein. In this way the tag is displayed extracellularly, but structurally separate from the membrane protein. We have tested the snorkel tag system on a diverse panel of membrane proteins including GPCRs and ion channels and demonstrated that it reliably allows for monitoring of the surface expression.

  13. Snorkel: an epitope tagging system for measuring the surface expression of membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Brown

    Full Text Available Tags are widely used to monitor a protein's expression level, interactions, protein trafficking, and localization. Membrane proteins are often tagged in their extracellular domains to allow discrimination between protein in the plasma membrane from that in internal pools. Multipass membrane proteins offer special challenges for inserting a tag since the extracellular regions are often composed of small loops and thus inserting an epitope tag risks perturbing the structure, function, or location of the membrane protein. We have developed a novel tagging system called snorkel where a transmembrane domain followed by a tag is appended to the cytoplasmic C-terminus of the membrane protein. In this way the tag is displayed extracellularly, but structurally separate from the membrane protein. We have tested the snorkel tag system on a diverse panel of membrane proteins including GPCRs and ion channels and demonstrated that it reliably allows for monitoring of the surface expression.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus aggregation and coagulation mechanisms, and their function in host-pathogen interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Heidi A.; Kwiecinski, Jakub; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2017-01-01

    The human commensal bacterium Staphylococcus aureus can cause a wide range of infections ranging from skin and soft tissue infections to invasive diseases like septicemia, endocarditis, and pneumonia. Muticellular organization almost certainly contributes to S. aureus pathogenesis mechanisms. While there has been considerable focus on biofilm formation and its role in colonizing prosthetic joints and indwelling devices, less attention has been paid to non-surface attached group behavior like aggregation and clumping. S. aureus is unique in its ability to coagulate blood, and it also produces multiple fibrinogen-binding proteins that facilitate clumping. Formation of clumps, which are large, tightly-packed groups of cells held together by fibrin(ogen), has been demonstrated to be important for S. aureus virulence and immune evasion. Clumps of cells are able to avoid detection by the host’s immune system due to a fibrin(ogen) coat that acts as a shield, and the size of the clumps facilitates evasion of phagocytosis. In addition, clumping could be an important early step in establishing infections that involve tight clusters of cells embedded in host matrix proteins, such as soft tissue abscesses and endocarditis. In this review we discuss clumping mechanisms and regulation, as well as what is known about how clumping contributes to immune evasion. PMID:27565579

  15. Interaction of bacterial surface layer proteins with lipid membranes: synergysm between surface charge density and chain packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmann, Axel; Delfederico, Lucrecia; De Antoni, Graciela; Semorile, Liliana; Disalvo, Edgardo Aníbal

    2010-08-01

    S-layer proteins from Lactobacillus kefir and Lactobacillus brevis are able to adsorb on the surface of positively charged liposomes composed by Soybean lecithin, cholesterol and stearylamine. The different K values for S-layer proteins isolated from L. kefir and L. brevis (4.22 x 10(-3) and 2.45 x 10(2) microM(-1) respectively) indicates that the affinity of the glycosylated protein isolated from L. kefir is higher than the non-glycosylated one. The attachment of S-layer proteins counteracts the electrostatic charge repulsion between stearylamine molecules in the membrane surface, producing an increase in the rigidity in the acyl chains as measured by DPH anisotropy. Laurdan generalized polarization (GP) shows that glycosylated causes a GP increase, attributed to a lowering in water penetration into the head groups of membrane phospholipids, with charge density reduction, while the non-glycosylated does not affect it. The octadecyl-rhodamine results indicate that S-layer coated liposomes do not show spontaneous dequenching in comparison with control liposomes without S-layer proteins, suggesting that S-layer protein avoid spontaneous liposomal fusion. It is concluded that the increase in stability of liposomes coated with S-layers proteins is due to the higher rigidity induced by the S-layer attachment by electrostatic forces. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Pneumococcal surface proteins: when the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Dorado, I; Galan-Bartual, S; Hermoso, J A

    2012-08-01

    Surface-exposed proteins of pathogenic bacteria are considered as potential virulence factors through their direct contribution to host-pathogen interactions. Four families of surface proteins decorate the cell surface of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. Besides lipoproteins and LPXTG proteins, also present in other gram-positive bacteria, the pneumococcus presents the choline-binding protein (CBP) family and the non-classical surface proteins (NCSPs). The CBPs present specific structural features that allow their anchorage to the cell envelope through non-covalent interaction with choline residues of lipoteichoic acid and teichoic acid. NCSP is an umbrella term for less characterized proteins displaying moonlighting functions on the pneumococcal surface that lack a leader peptide and membrane-anchor motif. Considering the unceasing evolution of microbial species under the selective pressure of antibiotic use, detailed understanding of the interaction between pathogen and the host cells is required for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to combat pneumococcal infections. This article reviews recent progress in the investigation of the three-dimensional structures of surface-exposed pneumococcal proteins. The modular nature of some of them produces a great versatility and sophistication of the virulence functions that, in most cases, cannot be deduced by the structural analysis of the isolated modules. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Shotgun proteomic analytical approach for studying proteins adsorbed onto liposome surface

    KAUST Repository

    Capriotti, Anna Laura

    2011-07-02

    The knowledge about the interaction between plasma proteins and nanocarriers employed for in vivo delivery is fundamental to understand their biodistribution. Protein adsorption onto nanoparticle surface (protein corona) is strongly affected by vector surface characteristics. In general, the primary interaction is thought to be electrostatic, thus surface charge of carrier is supposed to play a central role in protein adsorption. Because protein corona composition can be critical in modifying the interactive surface that is recognized by cells, characterizing its formation onto lipid particles may serve as a fundamental predictive model for the in vivo efficiency of a lipidic vector. In the present work, protein coronas adsorbed onto three differently charged cationic liposome formulations were compared by a shotgun proteomic approach based on nano-liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry. About 130 proteins were identified in each corona, with only small differences between the different cationic liposome formulations. However, this study could be useful for the future controlled design of colloidal drug carriers and possibly in the controlled creation of biocompatible surfaces of other devices that come into contact with proteins into body fluids. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  18. Engineering and Characterization of Peptides and Proteins at Surfaces and Interfaces: A Case Study in Surface-Sensitive Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bei; Jasensky, Joshua; Li, Yaoxin; Chen, Zhan

    2016-06-21

    Understanding molecular structures of interfacial peptides and proteins impacts many research fields by guiding the advancement of biocompatible materials, new and improved marine antifouling coatings, ultrasensitive and highly specific biosensors and biochips, therapies for diseases related to protein amyloid formation, and knowledge on mechanisms for various membrane proteins and their interactions with ligands. Developing methods for measuring such unique systems, as well as elucidating the structure and function relationship of such biomolecules, has been the goal of our lab at the University of Michigan. We have made substantial progress to develop sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy into a powerful technique to study interfacial peptides and proteins, which lays a foundation to obtain unique and valuable insights when using SFG to probe various biologically relevant systems at the solid/liquid interface in situ in real time. One highlighting feature of this Account is the demonstration of the power of combining SFG with other techniques and methods such as ATR-FTIR, surface engineering, MD simulation, liquid crystal sensing, and isotope labeling in order to study peptides and proteins at interfaces. It is necessary to emphasize that SFG plays a major role in these studies, while other techniques and methods are supplemental. The central role of SFG is to provide critical information on interfacial peptide and protein structure (e.g., conformation and orientation) in order to elucidate how surface engineering (e.g., to vary the structure) can ultimately affect surface function (e.g., to optimize the activity). This Account focuses on the most significant recent progress in research on interfacial peptides and proteins carried out by our group including (1) the development of SFG analysis methods to determine orientations of regular as well as disrupted secondary structures, and the successful demonstration and application of an isotope

  19. Modeling and simulation of protein-surface interactions: achievements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozboyaci, Musa; Kokh, Daria B; Corni, Stefano; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-01-01

    Understanding protein-inorganic surface interactions is central to the rational design of new tools in biomaterial sciences, nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine. Although a significant amount of experimental research on protein adsorption onto solid substrates has been reported, many aspects of the recognition and interaction mechanisms of biomolecules and inorganic surfaces are still unclear. Theoretical modeling and simulations provide complementary approaches for experimental studies, and they have been applied for exploring protein-surface binding mechanisms, the determinants of binding specificity towards different surfaces, as well as the thermodynamics and kinetics of adsorption. Although the general computational approaches employed to study the dynamics of proteins and materials are similar, the models and force-fields (FFs) used for describing the physical properties and interactions of material surfaces and biological molecules differ. In particular, FF and water models designed for use in biomolecular simulations are often not directly transferable to surface simulations and vice versa. The adsorption events span a wide range of time- and length-scales that vary from nanoseconds to days, and from nanometers to micrometers, respectively, rendering the use of multi-scale approaches unavoidable. Further, changes in the atomic structure of material surfaces that can lead to surface reconstruction, and in the structure of proteins that can result in complete denaturation of the adsorbed molecules, can create many intermediate structural and energetic states that complicate sampling. In this review, we address the challenges posed to theoretical and computational methods in achieving accurate descriptions of the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of protein-surface systems. In this context, we discuss the applicability of different modeling and simulation techniques ranging from quantum mechanics through all-atom molecular mechanics to coarse

  20. Plasmonic Thermal Decomposition/Digestion of Proteins: A Rapid On-Surface Protein Digestion Technique for Mass Spectrometry Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rong; Basile, Franco

    2017-09-05

    A method based on plasmon surface resonance absorption and heating was developed to perform a rapid on-surface protein thermal decomposition and digestion suitable for imaging mass spectrometry (MS) and/or profiling. This photothermal process or plasmonic thermal decomposition/digestion (plasmonic-TDD) method incorporates a continuous wave (CW) laser excitation and gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) to induce known thermal decomposition reactions that cleave peptides and proteins specifically at the C-terminus of aspartic acid and at the N-terminus of cysteine. These thermal decomposition reactions are induced by heating a solid protein sample to temperatures between 200 and 270 °C for a short period of time (10-50 s per 200 μm segment) and are reagentless and solventless, and thus are devoid of sample product delocalization. In the plasmonic-TDD setup the sample is coated with Au-NPs and irradiated with 532 nm laser radiation to induce thermoplasmonic heating and bring about site-specific thermal decomposition on solid peptide/protein samples. In this manner the Au-NPs act as nanoheaters that result in a highly localized thermal decomposition and digestion of the protein sample that is independent of the absorption properties of the protein, making the method universally applicable to all types of proteinaceous samples (e.g., tissues or protein arrays). Several experimental variables were optimized to maximize product yield, and they include heating time, laser intensity, size of Au-NPs, and surface coverage of Au-NPs. Using optimized parameters, proof-of-principle experiments confirmed the ability of the plasmonic-TDD method to induce both C-cleavage and D-cleavage on several peptide standards and the protein lysozyme by detecting their thermal decomposition products with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). The high spatial specificity of the plasmonic-TDD method was demonstrated by using a mask to digest designated sections of

  1. Oriented immobilization of proteins on hydroxyapatite surface using bifunctional bisphosphonates as linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yewle, Jivan N; Wei, Yinan; Puleo, David A; Daunert, Sylvia; Bachas, Leonidas G

    2012-06-11

    Oriented immobilization of proteins is an important step in creating protein-based functional materials. In this study, a method was developed to orient proteins on hydroxyapatite (HA) surfaces, a widely used bone implant material, to improve protein bioactivity by employing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and β-lactamase as model proteins. These proteins have a serine or threonine at their N-terminus that was oxidized with periodate to obtain a single aldehyde group at the same location, which can be used for the site-specific immobilization of the protein. The HA surface was modified with bifunctional hydrazine bisphosphonates (HBPs) of various length and lipophilicity. The number of functional groups on the HBP-modified HA surface, determined by a 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) assay, was found to be 2.8 × 10(-5) mol/mg of HA and unaffected by the length of HBPs. The oxidized proteins were immobilized on the HBP-modified HA surface in an oriented manner through formation of a hydrazone bond. The relative protein immobilization amounts through various HBPs were determined by fluorescence and bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay and showed no significant effect by length and lipophilicity of HBPs. The relative amount of HBP-immobilized EGFP was found to be 10-15 fold that of adsorbed EGFP, whereas the relative amount of β-lactamase immobilized through HBPs (2, 3, 4, 6, and 7) was not significantly different than adsorbed β-lactamase. The enzymatic activity of HBP-immobilized β-lactamase was measured with cefazolin as substrate, and it was found that the catalytic efficiency of HBP-immobilized β-lactamase improved 2-5 fold over adsorbed β-lactamase. The results obtained demonstrate the feasibility of our oriented immobilization approach and showed an increased activity of the oriented proteins in comparison with adsorbed proteins on the same hydroxyapatite surface matrix.

  2. Grafting zwitterionic polymer onto cryogel surface enhances protein retention in steric exclusion chromatography on cryogel monolith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shi-Peng; Zheng, Jie; Sun, Yan

    2015-04-10

    Cryogel monoliths with interconnected macropores (10-100μm) and hydrophilic surfaces can be employed as chromatography media for protein retention in steric exclusion chromatography (SXC). SXC is based on the principle that the exclusion of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on both a hydrophilic chromatography surface and a protein favors their association, leading to the protein retention on the chromatography surface. Elution of the retained protein can be achieved by reducing PEG concentration. In this work, the surface of polyacrylamide-based cryogel monolith was modified by grafting zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) (pCBMA), leading the increase in the surface hydrophilicity. Observation by scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of the grafted pCBMA chain clusters on the cryogel surface, but pCBMA grafting did not result in the changes of the physical properties of the monolith column, and the columns maintained good recyclability in SXC. The effect of the surface grafting on the SXC behavior of γ-globulin was investigated in a wide flow rate range (0.6-12cm/min). It was found that the dynamic retention capacity increased 1.4-1.8 times by the zwitterionic polymer grafting in the flow rate range of 1.5-12cm/min. The mechanism of enhanced protein retention on the zwitterionic polymer-grafted surface was proposed. The research proved that zwitterionic polymer modification was promising for the development of new materials for SXC applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Regulation of ADAM12 cell-surface expression by protein kinase C epsilon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundberg, Christina; Thodeti, Charles Kumar; Kveiborg, Marie

    2004-01-01

    The ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family consists of multidomain cell-surface proteins that have a major impact on cell behavior. These transmembrane-anchored proteins are synthesized as proforms that have (from the N terminus): a prodomain; a metalloprotease-, disintegrin...... as a constitutively active protein. However, little is known about the regulation of ADAM12 cell-surface translocation. Here, we used human RD rhabdomyosarcoma cells, which express ADAM12 at the cell surface, in a temporal pattern. We report that protein kinase C (PKC) epsilon induces ADAM12 translocation to the cell......-like-, cysteine-rich, epidermal growth factor-like, and transmembrane domain; and a cytoplasmic tail. The 90-kDa mature form of human ADAM12 is generated in the trans-Golgi through cleavage of the prodomain by a furin-peptidase and is stored intracellularly until translocation to the cell surface...

  4. Functionalization of SU-8 Photoresist Surfaces with IgG Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blagoi, Gabriela; Keller, Stephan Urs; Johansson, Alicia

    2008-01-01

    The negative epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 has a variety of applications within microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and lab-on-a-chip systems. Here, several methods to functionalize SU-8 surfaces with IgG proteins were investigated. Fluorescent labeled proteins and fluorescent sandwich immunoass......The negative epoxy-based photoresist SU-8 has a variety of applications within microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and lab-on-a-chip systems. Here, several methods to functionalize SU-8 surfaces with IgG proteins were investigated. Fluorescent labeled proteins and fluorescent sandwich...... SU-8 in a functional fluorescent sandwich immunoassay detecting C-reactive protein (CRP) gave twice as high signal as compared with the other two surfaces. Immunoassays performed on bare SU-8 and CAN treated SU-8 resulted in detection limits of CRP of 30 and 80 ng/ml respectively which is sufficient...

  5. Competitive protein adsorption of albumin and immunoglobulin G from human serum onto polymer surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Maria; Hou, Xiaolin

    2010-01-19

    Competitive protein adsorption from human serum onto unmodified polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surfaces and plasma-polymerized PET surfaces, using the monomer diethylene glycol vinyl ether (DEGVE), has been investigated using radioactive labeling. Albumin and immunoglobulin G (IgG) labeled with two different iodine isotopes have been added to human serum solutions of different concentrations, and adsorption has been performed using adsorption times from approximately 5 s to 24 h. DEGVE surfaces showed indications of being nonfouling regarding albumin and IgG adsorption during competitive protein adsorption from diluted human serum solutions with relatively low protein concentrations, but the nonfouling character was weakened when less diluted human serum solutions with higher protein concentrations were used. The observed adsorption trend is independent of adsorption time, indicating that the protein concentration has a stronger influence on observed adsorption characteristics of the material than the adsorption time has.

  6. Excitation energy migration in yellow fluorescent protein (citrine) layers adsorbed on modified gold surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusoff, Hanis Mohd, E-mail: hanismy@umt.edu.my [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578, Miyagi (Japan); Department of Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, 21030 Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu (Malaysia); Rzeźnicka, Izabela I. [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578, Miyagi (Japan); Institute for International Education, Tohoku University, Katahira, 2-chome, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Miyagi (Japan); Hoshi, Hirotaka [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kajimoto, Shinji; Horimoto, Noriko Nishizawa [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578, Miyagi (Japan); Sogawa, Kazuhiro [Department of Biomolecular Sciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Fukumura, Hiroshi, E-mail: fukumura@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Tohoku University, Aramaki Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578, Miyagi (Japan)

    2013-09-01

    The nature of functional proteins adsorbed on solid surfaces is interesting from the perspective of developing of bioelectronics and biomaterials. Here we present evidence that citrine (one of yellow fluorescent protein variants) adsorbed on modified gold surfaces would not undergo denaturation and energy transfer among the adsorbed citrine molecules would occur. Gold substrates were chemically modified with 3-mercaptopropionic acid and tert-butyl mercaptan for the preparation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces, respectively. A pure solution of citrine was dropped and dried on the modified gold substrates and their surface morphology was studied with scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). The obtained STM images showed multilayers of citrine adsorbed on the modified surfaces. On hydrophobic surfaces, citrine was adsorbed more randomly, formed various non-uniform aggregates, while on hydrophilic surfaces, citrine appeared more aligned and isolated uniform protein clusters were observed. Fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay of these dried citrine layers were also measured using the time correlated single photon counting method. Fluorescence anisotropy of citrine on the hydrophobic surface decayed faster than citrine on the hydrophilic surface. From these results we concluded that fluorescence energy migration occurred faster among citrine molecules which were randomly adsorbed on the hydrophobic surface to compare with the hydrophilic surface.

  7. Surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) to probe monolayers of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataka, Kenichi; Stripp, Sven Timo; Heberle, Joachim

    2013-10-01

    Surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) represents a variation of conventional infrared spectroscopy and exploits the signal enhancement exerted by the plasmon resonance of nano-structured metal thin films. The surface enhancement decays in about 10nm with the distance from the surface and is, thus, perfectly suited to selectively probe monolayers of biomembranes. Peculiar to membrane proteins is their vectorial functionality, the probing of which requires proper orientation within the membrane. To this end, the metal surface used in SEIRAS is chemically modified to generate an oriented membrane protein film. Monolayers of uniformly oriented membrane proteins are formed by tethering His-tagged proteins to a nickel nitrilo-triacetic acid (Ni-NTA) modified gold surface and SEIRAS commands molecular sensitivity to probe each step of surface modification. The solid surface used as plasmonic substrate for SEIRAS, can also be employed as an electrode to investigate systems where electron transfer reactions are relevant, like e.g. cytochrome c oxidase or plant-type photosystems. Furthermore, the interaction of these membrane proteins with water-soluble proteins, like cytochrome c or hydrogenase, is studied on the molecular level by SEIRAS. The impact of the membrane potential on protein functionality is verified by monitoring light-dark difference spectra of a monolayer of sensory rhodopsin (SRII) at different applied potentials. It is demonstrated that the interpretations of all of these experiments critically depend on the orientation of the solid-supported membrane protein. Finally, future directions of SEIRAS including cellular systems are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: FTIR in membrane proteins and peptide studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of mechanical denaturation on surface free energy of protein powders

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad, Mohammad Amin; Grimsey, Ian M.; Forbes, Robert T.; Blagbrough, Ian S.; Conway, Barbara R

    2016-01-01

    Globular proteins are important both as therapeutic agents and excipients. However, their fragile native\\ud conformations can be denatured during pharmaceutical processing, which leads to modification of\\ud the surface energy of their powders and hence their performance. Lyophilized powders of hen eggwhite\\ud lysozyme and �-galactosidase from Aspergillus oryzae were used as models to study the effects\\ud of mechanical denaturation on the surface energies of basic and acidic protein powders, r...

  9. A proteomic view of an important human pathogen--towards the quantification of the entire Staphylococcus aureus proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörte Becher

    Full Text Available The genome sequence is the "blue-print of life," but proteomics provides the link to the actual physiology of living cells. Because of their low complexity bacteria are excellent model systems to identify the entire protein assembly of a living organism. Here we show that the majority of proteins expressed in growing and non-growing cells of the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus can be identified and even quantified by a metabolic labeling proteomic approach. S. aureus has been selected as model for this proteomic study, because it poses a major risk to our health care system by combining high pathogenicity with an increasing frequency of multiple antibiotic resistance, thus requiring the development of new anti-staphylococcal therapy strategies. Since such strategies will likely have to target extracellular and surface-exposed virulence factors as well as staphylococcal survival and adaptation capabilities, we decided to combine four subproteomic fractions: cytosolic proteins, membrane-bound proteins, cell surface-associated and extracellular proteins, to comprehensively cover the entire proteome of S. aureus. This quantitative proteomics approach integrating data ranging from gene expression to subcellular localization in growing and non-growing cells is a proof of principle for whole-cell physiological proteomics that can now be extended to address physiological questions in infection-relevant settings. Importantly, with more than 1700 identified proteins (and 1450 quantified proteins corresponding to a coverage of about three-quarters of the expressed proteins, our model study represents the most comprehensive quantification of a bacterial proteome reported to date. It thus paves the way towards a new level in understanding of cell physiology and pathophysiology of S. aureus and related pathogenic bacteria, opening new avenues for infection-related research on this crucial pathogen.

  10. Antibody-protein A conjugated quantum dots for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Takashi; Tiwari, Dhermendra K; Tanaka, Shin-Ichi; Inouye, Yasushi; Yoshizawa, Keiko; Watanabe, Tomonobu M

    2010-11-01

    To use quantum dots (QDs) as fluorescent probes for receptor imaging, QD surface should be modified with biomolecules such as antibodies, peptides, carbohydrates, and small-molecule ligands for receptors. Among these QDs, antibody conjugated QDs are the most promising fluorescent probes. There are many kinds of coupling reactions that can be used for preparing antibody conjugated QDs. Most of the antibody coupling reactions, however, are non-selective and time-consuming. In this paper, we report a facile method for preparing antibody conjugated QDs for surface receptor imaging. We used ProteinA as an adaptor protein for binding of antibody to QDs. By using ProteinA conjugated QDs, various types of antibodies are easily attached to the surface of the QDs via non-covalent binding between the F(c) (fragment crystallization) region of antibody and ProteinA. To show the utility of ProteinA conjugated QDs, HER2 (anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) in KPL-4 human breast cancer cells were stained by using anti-HER2 antibody conjugated ProteinA-QDs. In addition, multiplexed imaging of HER2 and CXCR4 (chemokine receptor) in the KPL-4 cells was performed. The result showed that CXCR4 receptors coexist with HER2 receptors in the membrane surface of KPL-4 cells. ProteinA mediated antibody conjugation to QDs is very useful to prepare fluorescent probes for multiplexed imaging of surface receptors in living cells.

  11. Fungal surface protein mediated one-pot synthesis of stable and hemocompatible gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitching, Michael; Choudhary, Priyadarshani; Inguva, Saikumar; Guo, Yina; Ramani, Meghana; Das, Sujoy K; Marsili, Enrico

    2016-12-01

    Despite their large secretome and wide applications in bioprocesses, fungi remain underexplored in metal nanoparticles (MNP) biosynthesis. Previous studies have shown that cell surface proteins of Rhizopus oryzae play a crucial role in biomineralization of Au(III) to produce gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Therefore, it is hypothesized that purified cell surface protein may produce in vitro AuNPs with narrow size distribution for biomedical and biocatalytic applications. However, different protein extraction methods might affect protein stability and the AuNP biosynthesis process. Herein, we have explored the extraction of cell surface proteins from R. oryzae using common detergents and reducing agent (sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) Triton X-100, and 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT)) and their effect on the size and shape of the biosynthetic AuNPs. The surface proteins extracted with reducing agent (DTT) and non-ionic detergent (Triton X-100) produce spherical AuNPs with a mean particle size of 16±7nm, and 19±4nm, respectively, while the AuNPs produced by the surface protein extracted by ionic detergent (SDS) are flower-like AuNPs with broader size distribution of 43±19nm. This synthetic approach does not require use of any harsh chemicals, multistep preparation and separation process, favouring environmental sustainability. The biosynthetic AuNPs thus formed, are stable in different physiological buffers and hemocompatible, making them suitable for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence of clonal complexes and virulence genes among commensal and invasive Staphylococcus aureus isolates in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunlög Rasmussen

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus encodes a remarkable number of virulence factors which may contribute to its pathogenicity and ability to cause invasive disease. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the association between S. aureus invasiveness and bacterial genotype, in terms of the presence of virulence genes and affiliation to clonal complexes. Also, the significance of different virulence genes, mainly adhesins, for the development of infective endocarditis was investigated. DNA microarray technology was used to analyze 134 S. aureus isolates, all methicillin-susceptible, derived from three groups of clinically well-characterized patients: nasal carriers (n=46, bacteremia (n=55, and bacteremia with infective endocarditis (n=33. Invasive isolates were dominant in four of the major clonal complexes: 5, 8, 15, and 25. Of the 170 virulence genes examined, those encoding accessory gene regulator group II (agr II, capsule polysaccharide serotype 5 (cap5, and adhesins such as S. aureus surface protein G (sasG and fibronectin-binding protein B (fnbB were found to be associated with invasive disease. The same was shown for the leukocidin genes lukD/lukE, as well as the genes encoding serine protease A and B (splA/splB, staphylococcal complement inhibitor (scn and the staphylococcal exotoxin-like protein (setC or selX. In addition, there was a trend of higher prevalence of certain genes or gene clusters (sasG, agr II, cap5 among isolates causing infective endocarditis compared to other invasive isolates. In most cases, the presence of virulence genes was linked to clonal complex affiliation. In conclusion, certain S. aureus clonal lineages harboring specific sets of virulence genes seem to be more successful in causing invasive disease.

  13. Extraction of cell surface-associated proteins from living yeast cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klis, F.M.; de Jong, M.; Brul, S.; de Groot, P.W.J.

    2007-01-01

    To extract cell surface-associated proteins from living fungal cells, reducing agents such as beta-mercaptoethanol and dithiothreitol are often used. We show here that both compounds are moderately lipophilic and may perturb the plasma membrane, thus causing the release of cytosolic proteins,

  14. Regulation of Macrophage Recognition through the Interplay of Nanoparticle Surface Functionality and Protein Corona

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saha, Krishnendu; Rahimi, Mehran; Yazdani, Mandieh; Kim, Sung Tae; Moyano, Daniel F.; Hou, Singyuk; Das, Ridhha; Mout, Rubul; Rezaee, Farhad; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Rotello, Vincent M.

    Using a family of cationic gold nanoparticles (NPs) with similar size and charge, we demonstrate that proper surface engineering can control the nature and identity of protein corona in physiological serum conditions. The protein coronas were highly dependent on the hydrophobicity and arrangement of

  15. Adsorption of plasma proteins : adsorption behaviour on apolar surfaces and effect on colloid stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Scheer, Albert

    1978-01-01

    In this thesis the adsorption of some plasma proteins (human albumin (HSA) and fibrinogen (HFb)) on non polar surfaces is studied, together with the influence of these proteins on the stability of polystyrene latices. The aim of these investigations is a better understanding of the processes

  16. Surface-tethered polymers to influence protein adsorption and microbial adhesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norde, Willem

    2007-01-01

    In various applications it is desired that biological cells or protein molecules are immobilized at surfaces. Examples are enzymes or cells in bioreactors and biosensors, immuno-proteins in solid-state diagnostics and proteinaceous farmacons in drug delivery systems. In order to retain biological

  17. Synthetic LPETG-containing peptide incorporation in the Staphylococcus aureus cell-wall in a sortase A- and growth phase-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvie Hansenová Maňásková

    Full Text Available The majority of Staphylococcus aureus virulence- and colonization-associated surface proteins contain a pentapeptide recognition motif (LPXTG. This motif can be recognized and cleaved by sortase A (SrtA which is a membrane-bound transpeptidase. After cleavage these proteins are covalently incorporated into the peptidoglycan. Therefore, SrtA plays a key role in S. aureus virulence. We aimed to generate a substrate mimicking this SrtA recognition motif for several purposes: to incorporate this substrate into the S. aureus cell-wall in a SrtA-dependent manner, to characterize this incorporation and to determine the effect of substrate incorporation on the incorporation of native SrtA-dependent cell-surface-associated proteins. We synthesized substrate containing the specific LPXTG motif, LPETG. As a negative control we used a scrambled version of this substrate, EGTLP and a S. aureus srtA knockout strain. Both substrates contained a fluorescence label for detection by FACScan and fluorescence microscope. A spreading assay and a competitive Luminex assay were used to determine the effect of substrate treatment on native LPXTG containing proteins deposition in the bacterial cell-wall. We demonstrate a SrtA-dependent covalent incorporation of the LPETG-containing substrate in wild type S. aureus strains and several other Gram-positive bacterial species. LPETG-containing substrate incorporation in S. aureus was growth phase-dependent and peaked at the stationary phase. This incorporation negatively correlated with srtA mRNA expression. Exogenous addition of the artificial substrate did not result in a decreased expression of native SrtA substrates (e.g. clumping factor A/B and protein A nor induced a srtA knockout phenotype.

  18. Nitrate as a probe of cytochrome c surface : crystallographic identification of crucial "hot spots" for protein-protein recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De March, Matteo; Demitri, Nicola; De Zorzi, Rita; Casini, Angela; Gabbiani, Chiara; Guerri, Annalisa; Messori, Luigi; Geremia, Silvano

    The electrostatic surface of cytochrome c and its changes with the iron oxidation state are involved in the docking and undocking processes of this protein to its biological partners in the mitochondrial respiratory pathway. To investigate the subtle mechanisms of formation of productive

  19. Prevention of pneumococcal disease in mice immunized with conserved surface-accessible proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Josée; Charland, Nathalie; Pineau, Isabelle; Ouellet, Catherine; Rioux, Stéphane; Martin, Denis; Brodeur, Bernard R

    2004-05-01

    The development of a vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae has been complicated by the existence of at least 90 antigenically distinct capsular serotypes. Common protein-based vaccines could represent the best strategy to prevent pneumococcal infections, regardless of serotype. In the present study, the immunoscreening of an S. pneumoniae genomic library allowed the identification of a novel immune protein target, BVH-3. We demonstrate that immunization of mice with BVH-3 elicits protective immunity against experimental sepsis and pneumonia. Sequence analysis revealed that the bvh-3 gene is highly conserved within the species. Since the BVH-3 protein shows homology at its amino-terminal end with other pneumococcal proteins, it was of interest to determine if protection was due to the homologous or to the protein-specific regions. Immunoprotection studies using recombinant BVH-3 and BVH-3-related protein fragments as antigens allowed the localization of surface-exposed and protective epitopes at the protein-specific carboxyl termini, thus establishing that BVH-3 is distinct from other previously reported protective protein antigens. Immunization with a chimeric protein comprising the carboxyl-terminal regions of BVH-3 and of a BVH-3-related protein improved the protection by targeting two surface pneumococcal components. Thus, BVH-3 and the chimeric protein hold strong promise as vaccine components to control pneumococcal disease.

  20. Hydrophilic crosslinked-polymeric surface capable of effective suppression of protein adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamon, Yuri; Inoue, Naoko; Mihara, Erika; Kitayama, Yukiya; Ooya, Tooru; Takeuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: takeuchi@gold.kobe-u.ac.jp

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Three hydrophilic crosslinked polymers were examined for protein adsorption. • All polymers showed low nonspecific adsorption of negatively charged proteins. • Poly(MMPC) showed the lowest adsorption for positively charged proteins. • Poly(MMPC) is able to reduce nonspecific adsorption of a wide range of proteins. - Abstract: We investigated the nonspecific adsorption of proteins towards three hydrophilic crosslinked-polymeric thin layers prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization using N,N′-methylenebisacrylamide, 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl-[N-(2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl]phosphorylcholine (MMPC), or 6,6′-diacryloyl-trehalose crosslinkers. Protein binding experiments were performed by surface plasmon resonance with six proteins of different pI values including α-lactalbumin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), myoglobin, ribonuclease A, cytochrome C, and lysozyme in buffer solution at pH 7.4. All of the obtained crosslinked-polymeric thin layers showed low nonspecific adsorption of negatively charged proteins at pH 7.4 such as α-lactalbumin, BSA, and myoglobin. Nonspecific adsorption of positively charged proteins including ribonuclease A, cytochrome C, and lysozyme was the lowest for poly(MMPC). These results suggest poly(MMPC) can effectively reduce nonspecific adsorption of a wide range of proteins that are negatively or positively charged at pH 7.4. MMPC is a promising crosslinker for a wide range of polymeric materials requiring low nonspecific protein binding.

  1. Crystal structures reveal the multi-ligand binding mechanism of Staphylococcus aureus ClfB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Xiang

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus pathogenesis is a complex process involving a diverse array of extracellular and cell wall components. ClfB, an MSCRAMM (Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules family surface protein, described as a fibrinogen-binding clumping factor, is a key determinant of S. aureus nasal colonization, but the molecular basis for ClfB-ligand recognition remains unknown. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of apo-ClfB and its complexes with fibrinogen α (Fg α and cytokeratin 10 (CK10 peptides. Structural comparison revealed a conserved glycine-serine-rich (GSR ClfB binding motif (GSSGXGXXG within the ligands, which was also found in other human proteins such as Engrailed protein, TCF20 and Dermokine proteins. Interaction between Dermokine and ClfB was confirmed by subsequent binding assays. The crystal structure of ClfB complexed with a 15-residue peptide derived from Dermokine revealed the same peptide binding mode of ClfB as identified in the crystal structures of ClfB-Fg α and ClfB-CK10. The results presented here highlight the multi-ligand binding property of ClfB, which is very distinct from other characterized MSCRAMMs to-date. The adherence of multiple peptides carrying the GSR motif into the same pocket in ClfB is reminiscent of MHC molecules. Our results provide a template for the identification of other molecules targeted by S. aureus during its colonization and infection. We propose that other MSCRAMMs like ClfA and SdrG also possess multi-ligand binding properties.

  2. Prediction and Analysis of Surface Hydrophobic Residues in Tertiary Structure of Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malleshappa Gowder, Shambhu; Chaudhuri, Tanusree; Paul, Kusum

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of protein structures provides plenty of information about the factors governing the folding and stability of proteins, the preferred amino acids in the protein environment, the location of the residues in the interior/surface of a protein and so forth. In general, hydrophobic residues such as Val, Leu, Ile, Phe, and Met tend to be buried in the interior and polar side chains exposed to solvent. The present work depends on sequence as well as structural information of the protein and aims to understand nature of hydrophobic residues on the protein surfaces. It is based on the nonredundant data set of 218 monomeric proteins. Solvent accessibility of each protein was determined using NACCESS software and then obtained the homologous sequences to understand how well solvent exposed and buried hydrophobic residues are evolutionarily conserved and assigned the confidence scores to hydrophobic residues to be buried or solvent exposed based on the information obtained from conservation score and knowledge of flanking regions of hydrophobic residues. In the absence of a three-dimensional structure, the ability to predict surface accessibility of hydrophobic residues directly from the sequence is of great help in choosing the sites of chemical modification or specific mutations and in the studies of protein stability and molecular interactions. PMID:24672404

  3. Proteomic profiling of the surface-exposed cell envelope proteins of Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuan; Bazemore-Walker, Carthene R

    2014-01-31

    Biotinylation of intact cells, avidin enrichment of derivatized peptides, and shotgun proteomics were employed to reveal the composition of the surface-exposed proteome of the aquatic bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus. Ninety-one unique proteins were identified with the majority originating from the outer membrane, periplasm, and inner membrane, subcellular regions that comprise the Gram-negative bacterium cell envelope. Many of these proteins were described as 'conserved hypothetical protein' or 'hypothetical protein'; and so, the actual expression of these gene products was confirmed. Others did not have any known function or lacked annotation. However, this investigation of the Caulobacter surfaceome did reveal the unanticipated presence of a number of enzymes involved in protein degradation. The results presented here can provide a starting point for hypothesis-driven research projects focused on this bacterium in particular and centered on understanding Gram-negative cell architecture and outer membrane biogenesis broadly. The detected protein degradation enzymes anchored on or located within the outer membrane suggest that Caulobacter has nutrient sources larger than small molecules and/or further processes surface proteins once secreted to this location. Additionally, confirmation of outer membrane residency of those proteins predicted to be periplasmic or whose location prediction was not definitive could potentially elucidate the identities of Gram-negative specific anchorless surface proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Trends in Microbial Proteomics. © 2013.

  4. Microscopic Investigation of Reversible Nanoscale Surface Size Dependent Protein Conjugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Carpenter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Aβ1-40 coated 20 nm gold colloidal nanoparticles exhibit a reversible color change as pH is externally altered between pH 4 and 10. This reversible process may contain important information on the initial reversible step reported for the fibrillogenesis of Aβ (a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. We examined this reversible color change by microscopic investigations. AFM images on graphite surfaces revealed the morphology of Aβ aggregates with gold colloids. TEM images clearly demonstrate the correspondence between spectroscopic features and conformational changes of the gold colloid.

  5. Synergistic Photothermal and Antibiotic Killing of Biofilm-AssociatedStaphylococcus aureusUsing Targeted Antibiotic-Loaded Gold Nanoconstructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, Daniel G; Jenkins, Samir V; Miller, Emily K; Beenken, Karen E; Loughran, Allister J; Powless, Amy; Muldoon, Timothy J; Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Zharov, Vladimir P; Smeltzer, Mark S; Chen, Jingyi

    2016-04-08

    Resistance to conventional antibiotics is a growing public health concern that is quickly outpacing the development of new antibiotics. This has led the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) to designate Enterococcus faecium , Staphylococcus aureus , Klebsiella pneumoniae , Acinetobacter baumannii , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , and Enterobacter species as "ESKAPE pathogens" on the basis of the rapidly decreasing availability of useful antibiotics. This emphasizes the urgent need for alternative therapeutic strategies to combat infections caused by these and other bacterial pathogens. In this study, we used Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus ) as a proof-of-principle ESKAPE pathogen to demonstrate that an appropriate antibiotic (daptomycin) can be incorporated into polydopamine-coated gold nanocages (AuNC@PDA) and that daptomycin-loaded AuNC@PDA can be conjugated to antibodies targeting a species-specific surface protein (staphylococcal protein A; Spa) as a means of achieving selective delivery of the nanoconstructs directly to the bacterial cell surface. Targeting specificity was confirmed by demonstrating a lack of binding to mammalian cells, reduced photothermal and antibiotic killing of the Spa-negative species Staphylococcus epidermidis , and reduced killing of S. aureus in the presence of unconjugated anti-Spa antibodies. We demonstrate that laser irradiation at levels within the current safety standard for use in humans can be used to achieve both a lethal photothermal effect and controlled release of the antibiotic, thus resulting in a degree of therapeutic synergy capable of eradicating viable S. aureus cells. The system was validated using planktonic bacterial cultures of both methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains and subsequently shown to be effective in the context of an established biofilm, thus indicating that this approach could be used to facilitate the effective treatment of intrinsically resistant biofilm infections.

  6. Study of the interactions of proteins with a solid surface using complementary acoustic and optical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaconu, Gabriela; Schäfer, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Membrane water treatment processes suffer severely from (bio)fouling phenomena, defined as an undesired deposition and build-up of adsorbed materials, which alters the membrane performance. The control of membrane (bio)fouling is directly related to first the (bio)foulant agent-membrane surface interactions arising at a much earlier stage during the process. This study aims at real time characterization of interaction between proteins and polymeric membrane surface. The adsorbed organic mass, water content, and the corresponding viscoelastic properties of adsorbed proteins on the polymeric membrane surface were investigated by combining the acoustic quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring technique with the optical surface plasmon resonance technique. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and avidin were used as model protein, and a polysulfone (PSU) was included as reference polymeric membrane. The results showed that both proteins tested were irreversibly adsorbed on the spin-coated polysulfone surface. The "dry" amount of irreversible BSA and avidin adsorbed on the PSU surface was found to be 292 and 380 ng/cm(2), respectively, and the corresponding water contents were 50% and 58%. Consequently, BSA adsorption on the PSU surface yielded a thinner, flat, and more compact (rigid) layer while avidin adsorbed in a thicker layer with higher surface mass density, a more diffuse, viscoelastic layer, and in addition, it undergoes larger conformational/orientational changes.

  7. NMR characterizations of the ice binding surface of an antifreeze protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Hong

    Full Text Available Antifreeze protein (AFP has a unique function of reducing solution freezing temperature to protect organisms from ice damage. However, its functional mechanism is not well understood. An intriguing question concerning AFP function is how the high selectivity for ice ligand is achieved in the presence of free water of much higher concentration which likely imposes a large kinetic barrier for protein-ice recognition. In this study, we explore this question by investigating the property of the ice binding surface of an antifreeze protein using NMR spectroscopy. An investigation of the temperature gradient of amide proton chemical shift and its correlation with chemical shift deviation from random coil was performed for CfAFP-501, a hyperactive insect AFP. A good correlation between the two parameters was observed for one of the two Thr rows on the ice binding surface. A significant temperature-dependent protein-solvent interaction is found to be the most probable origin for this correlation, which is consistent with a scenario of hydrophobic hydration on the ice binding surface. In accordance with this finding, rotational correlation time analyses combined with relaxation dispersion measurements reveals a weak dimer formation through ice binding surface at room temperature and a population shift of dimer to monomer at low temperature, suggesting hydrophobic effect involved in dimer formation and hence hydrophobic hydration on the ice binding surface of the protein. Our finding of hydrophobic hydration on the ice binding surface provides a test for existing simulation studies. The occurrence of hydrophobic hydration on the ice binding surface is likely unnecessary for enhancing protein-ice binding affinity which is achieved by a tight H-bonding network. Subsequently, we speculate that the hydrophobic hydration occurring on the ice binding surface plays a role in facilitating protein-ice recognition by lowering the kinetic barrier as suggested by

  8. Proteomic analysis of cell surface-associated proteins from probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Hans Christian; Madsen, Søren M; Glenting, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we used a proteomic approach to identify surface-associated proteins from the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum 299v. Proteins were extracted from the cell surface using a mild wash in phosphate buffer and analysed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel...... electrophoresis. Gel bands were excised and in-gel digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were analysed by capillary-LC-ESI-MS/MS. The peptide sequences were used for a database search and allowed identification of a total of 29 proteins, many of which could potentially be involved in the action...

  9. IMMUNOBLOT ANALYSIS OF PROTEINS ASSOCIATED WITH SELF-ASSEMBLED MONOLAYER SURFACES OF DEFINED CHEMISTRIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Rena M.; Shankar, Sucharita P.; Brash, John L.; Babensee, Julia E.

    2011-01-01

    Intact and fragmented proteins, eluted from self assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces of alkanethiols of different chemistries (-CH3, -OH, -COOH, -NH2 ), following exposure to human plasma (HP) or human serum (HS), were examined using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting techniques. The SAM surfaces were incubated for 1 hour with 10% (v/v) sterile-filtered heat-inactivated (h.i.) HS or 1% (v/v) sterile-filtered h.i. HP preparations [both in phosphate buffered saline (PBS)]. Adsorbed proteins were eluted using 10% SDS/2.3% dithioerythritol for characterization of protein profiles. The type of incubating medium may be an important determinant of adsorbed protein profiles, since some variations were observed in eluates from filtered versus control unfiltered h.i. 10% HS or 1% HP. Albumin and apolipoprotein A1 were consistently detected in both filtered h.i 10% HS and 1% HP eluates from all SAM surfaces and from control tissue culture-treated polystyrene (TCPS). Interestingly, Factor H and Factor I, antithrombin, prothrombin, high molecular weight kininogen (HMWK) and IgG were present in eluates from OH, COOH and NH2 SAM surfaces and in eluates from TCPS, but not in eluates from CH3 SAM surfaces, following exposure to filtered h.i. 10% HS. These results suggest that CH3 SAM surfaces were the least pro-inflammatory of all SAM surfaces. Overall, similar trends were observed in the profiles of proteins eluted from surfaces exposed to filtered 10% HS or 1% HP. However the unique profiles of adsorbed proteins on different SAM surface chemistries may be related to their differential interactions with cells, including immune/inflammatory cells. PMID:21509932

  10. Characterizing and modeling protein-surface interactions in lab-on-chip devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katira, Parag

    Protein adsorption on surfaces determines the response of other biological species present in the surrounding solution. This phenomenon plays a major role in the design of biomedical and biotechnological devices. While specific protein adsorption is essential for device function, non-specific protein adsorption leads to the loss of device function. For example, non-specific protein adsorption on bioimplants triggers foreign body response, in biosensors it leads to reduced signal to noise ratios, and in hybrid bionanodevices it results in the loss of confinement and directionality of molecular shuttles. Novel surface coatings are being developed to reduce or completely prevent the non-specific adsorption of proteins to surfaces. A novel quantification technique for extremely low protein coverage on surfaces has been developed. This technique utilizes measurement of the landing rate of microtubule filaments on kinesin proteins adsorbed on a surface to determine the kinesin density. Ultra-low limits of detection, dynamic range, ease of detection and availability of a ready-made kinesin-microtubule kit makes this technique highly suitable for detecting protein adsorption below the detection limits of standard techniques. Secondly, a random sequential adsorption model is presented for protein adsorption to PEO-coated surfaces. The derived analytical expressions accurately predict the observed experimental results from various research groups, suggesting that PEO chains act as almost perfect steric barriers to protein adsorption. These expressions can be used to predict the performance of a variety of systems towards resisting protein adsorption and can help in the design of better non-fouling surface coatings. Finally, in biosensing systems, target analytes are captured and concentrated on specifically adsorbed proteins for detection. Non-specific adsorption of proteins results in the loss of signal, and an increase in the background. The use of nanoscale transducers as

  11. Displaying the protein of Mycoplasma gallisepticum agglutinin on the cell surface of Bacillus thuringiensis with the S-layer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei; Guo, Suxia; Hu, Sishun; Xiao, Yuncai; Xu, Qingrong; Li, Zili; Bi, Dingren; Sun, Ming

    2008-07-27

    The S-layer protein CTC surface-display system of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) was used to test the possibility of displaying the protein of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) agglutinin (pMGA) on the Bt cell surface. By fusing part of pmga1.2 (pmga1.2p) with the surface-anchoring motif of ctc, two recombinant plasmids, pCTC-PMGA1.2P and pCSPMGA1.2P, were constructed. They harboured the fusion genes ctc-pmga1.2p and csa-ctc-pmga1.2p (csa represents csaAB operon, important in anchoring the S-layer protein on the cell surface), respectively. Two recombinant Bt strains were constructed by electro-transferring recombinant plasmids to a Bt plasmid-free derivative strain BMB171. Strains obtained were BCCG (bearing pCTC-PMGA1.2P and the csaAB operon-carrying plasmid pMIL-CSA) and CG (pCSPMGA1.2P). The vegetative cells of both strains were used as antigens for haemagglutination (HA) and haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays. HA and HI assays showed that recombinant PMGA1.2P proteins were not only displayed on the cell surface of BCCG and CG, but also specific to MG-positive serum. After oral immunization of chickens with spores, both BCCG and CG elicited a humoral response to PMGA1.2P and exhibited immunogenicity, as indicated by serum plate agglutination (SPA) assays. This study suggests the possibility of generating heat-stable and oral vaccines against infectious diseases of fowl with Bt surface-display system.

  12. Surface modification and modulation in microstructures: controlling protein adsorption, monolayer desorption and micro-self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhringer, Karl F.

    2003-07-01

    The surface-to-volume ratio increases with decreasing scale, thus, controlling and changing the surface properties of microstructures can be a powerful tool in the design, fabrication and use of microsystems. This paper overviews several recent projects that utilize the modulation of surfaces from hydrophobic to hydrophilic and vice versa, or from protein adsorbing to non-fouling, with applications in biomedical microdevices and self-assembling microelectromechanical systems.

  13. A recombinant surface protein of Babesia bovis elicits bovine antibodies that react with live merozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reduker, D W; Jasmer, D P; Goff, W L; Perryman, L E; Davis, W C; McGuire, T C

    1989-07-01

    Ten monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) were generated against five surface-exposed proteins (16 kDa, 42 kDa, 44 kDa, 60 kDa, 225 kDa) on merozoites of Babesia bovis. A genomic library constructed in the lambda gt11 expression vector was screened with MoAbs in a plaque immunoassay for identification of clones expressing recombinant surface proteins. Two recombinant clones were identified (lambda Bo44-15 and lambda Bo44-16) that encoded a protein recognized by a MoAb specific for an epitope on the native 44-kDa surface protein. Southern blot analysis using radiolabeled Bo44-15 DNA (1.25 kb) against merozoite DNA and bovine leukocyte DNA confirmed the parasite-specificity of the cloned insert and revealed multiple bands of hybridization with merozoite DNA. Western blot analyses of lambda Bo44-15 lysogen preparations demonstrated that recombinant protein production in this clone was IPTG-induced and that the recombinant molecule was a beta-galactosidase fusion protein. Additionally, recombinant 44-kDa protein, purified by immunoaffinity chromatography, reacted with specific MoAb in Western blot assay indicating that the integrity of the epitope was retained during purification. Immune sera from calves immunized with purified recombinant Bo44-15 protein immunoprecipitated metabolically radiolabeled merozoite protein of 44 kDa indicating that antibody induced by recombinant Bo44-15 protein recognized native 44-kDa protein. Also, these sera reacted with the surface of live merozoites as evidenced by indirect immunofluorescence assay. Serum antibody titers determined by this assay had a wide range.

  14. The Regulatory Protein RosR Affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii Protein Profiles, Cell Surface Properties, and Symbiosis with Clover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachwał, Kamila; Boguszewska, Aleksandra; Kopcińska, Joanna; Karaś, Magdalena; Tchórzewski, Marek; Janczarek, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca(2+)-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA). In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants. Compared with

  15. The regulatory protein RosR affects Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles, cell surface properties, and symbiosis with clover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Rachwał

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii is capable of establishing a symbiotic relationship with plants from the genus Trifolium. Previously, a regulatory protein encoded by rosR was identified and characterized in this bacterium. RosR possesses a Cys2-His2-type zinc finger motif and belongs to Ros/MucR family of rhizobial transcriptional regulators. Transcriptome profiling of the rosR mutant revealed a role of this protein in several cellular processes, including the synthesis of cell-surface components and polysaccharides, motility, and bacterial metabolism. Here, we show that a mutation in rosR resulted in considerable changes in R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii protein profiles. Extracellular, membrane, and periplasmic protein profiles of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii wild type and the rosR mutant were examined, and proteins with substantially different abundances between these strains were identified. Compared with the wild type, extracellular fraction of the rosR mutant contained greater amounts of several proteins, including Ca2+-binding cadherin-like proteins, a RTX-like protein, autoaggregation protein RapA1, and flagellins FlaA and FlaB. In contrast, several proteins involved in the uptake of various substrates were less abundant in the mutant strain (DppA, BraC, and SfuA. In addition, differences were observed in membrane proteins of the mutant and wild-type strains, which mainly concerned various transport system components. Using atomic force microscopy imaging, we characterized the topography and surface properties of the rosR mutant and wild-type cells. We found that the mutation in rosR gene also affected surface properties of R. leguminosarum bv. trifolii. The mutant cells were significantly more hydrophobic than the wild-type cells, and their outer membrane was three times more permeable to the hydrophobic dye N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine. The mutation of rosR also caused defects in bacterial symbiotic interaction with clover plants

  16. Polyclonal antibodies production against Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-01

    Feb 1, 2010 ... The main aim of this project is to produce polyclonal antibodies directed against the Staphylococcus aureus protein A and their use to appreciate bacteriological analysis of milk quality. In this context, an immunization produce was set up to test and detect in a batch of animals the convenient responder to.

  17. Identification and characterization of the surface-layer protein of Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qazi, Omar; Brailsford, Alan; Wright, Anne; Faraar, Jeremy; Campbell, Jim; Fairweather, Neil

    2007-09-01

    Many bacterial species produce a paracrystalline layer, the surface layer, which completely surrounds the exterior of the cell. In some bacteria, the surface layer is implicated in pathogenesis. Two proteins present in cell wall extracts from Clostridium tetani have been investigated and identified one of these has been unambiguously as the surface-layer protein (SLP). The gene, slpA, has been located in the genome of C. tetani E88 that encodes the SLP. The molecular mass of the protein as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is considerably larger than that predicted from the gene; however the protein does not appear to be glycosylated. Furthermore, analysis of five C. tetani strains, including three recent clinical isolates, shows considerable variation in the sizes of the SLP.

  18. Competitive Protein Adsorption of Albumin and Immunoglobulin G from Human Serum onto Polymer Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmberg, Maria; Hou, Xiaolin

    2010-01-01

    Competitive protein adsorption from human serum onto unmodified polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surfaces and plasma-polymerized PET surfaces, using the monomer diethylene glycol vinyl ether (DEGVE), has been investigated using radioactive labeling. Albumin and immunoglobulin G (IgG) labeled...... with two different iodine isotopes have been added to human serum solutions of different concentrations, and adsorption has been performed using adsorption times from approximately 5 s to 24 h. DEGVE surfaces showed indications of being nonfouling regarding albumin and IgG adsorption during competitive...... protein adsorption from diluted human serum solutions with relatively low protein concentrations, but the nonfouling character was weakened when less diluted human serum solutions with higher protein concentrations were used. The observed adsorption trend is independent of adsorption time, indicating...

  19. Cell Surface Properties of Lactococcus lactis Reveal Milk Protein Binding Specifically Evolved in Dairy Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya Tarazanova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface properties of bacteria are determined by the molecular composition of the cell wall and they are important for interactions of cells with their environment. Well-known examples of bacterial interactions with surfaces are biofilm formation and the fermentation of solid materials like food and feed. Lactococcus lactis is broadly used for the fermentation of cheese and buttermilk and it is primarily isolated from either plant material or the dairy environment. In this study, we characterized surface hydrophobicity, charge, emulsification properties, and the attachment to milk proteins of 55 L. lactis strains in stationary and exponential growth phases. The attachment to milk protein was assessed through a newly developed flow cytometry-based protocol. Besides finding a high degree of biodiversity, phenotype-genotype matching allowed the identification of candidate genes involved in the modification of the cell surface. Overexpression and gene deletion analysis allowed to verify the predictions for three identified proteins that altered surface hydrophobicity and attachment of milk proteins. The data also showed that lactococci isolated from a dairy environment bind higher amounts of milk proteins when compared to plant isolates. It remains to be determined whether the alteration of surface properties also has potential to alter starter culture functionalities.

  20. Heterologous protein display on the cell surface of lactic acid bacteria mediated by the s-layer protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Lanlan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have revealed that the C-terminal region of the S-layer protein from Lactobacillus is responsible for the cell wall anchoring, which provide an approach for targeting heterologous proteins to the cell wall of lactic acid bacteria (LAB. In this study, we developed a new surface display system in lactic acid bacteria with the C-terminal region of S-layer protein SlpB of Lactobacillus crispatus K2-4-3 isolated from chicken intestine. Results Multiple sequence alignment revealed that the C-terminal region (LcsB of Lb. crispatus K2-4-3 SlpB had a high similarity with the cell wall binding domains SA and CbsA of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lb. crispatus. To evaluate the potential application as an anchoring protein, the green fluorescent protein (GFP or beta-galactosidase (Gal was fused to the N-terminus of the LcsB region, and the fused proteins were successfully produced in Escherichia coli, respectively. After mixing them with the non-genetically modified lactic acid bacteria cells, the fused GFP-LcsB and Gal-LcsB were functionally associated with the cell surface of various lactic acid bacteria tested. In addition, the binding capacity could be improved by SDS pretreatment. Moreover, both of the fused proteins could simultaneously bind to the surface of a single cell. Furthermore, when the fused DNA fragment of gfp:lcsB was inserted into the Lactococcus lactis expression vector pSec:Leiss:Nuc, the GFP could not be secreted into the medium under the control of the nisA promoter. Western blot, in-gel fluorescence assay, immunofluorescence microscopy and SDS sensitivity analysis confirmed that the GFP was successfully expressed onto the cell surface of L. lactis with the aid of the LcsB anchor. Conclusion The LcsB region can be used as a functional scaffold to target the heterologous proteins to the cell surfaces of lactic acid bacteria in vitro and in vivo, and has also the potential for biotechnological

  1. Heterologous protein display on the cell surface of lactic acid bacteria mediated by the s-layer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shumin; Kong, Jian; Sun, Zhilan; Han, Lanlan; Kong, Wentao; Yang, Pu

    2011-10-28

    Previous studies have revealed that the C-terminal region of the S-layer protein from Lactobacillus is responsible for the cell wall anchoring, which provide an approach for targeting heterologous proteins to the cell wall of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). In this study, we developed a new surface display system in lactic acid bacteria with the C-terminal region of S-layer protein SlpB of Lactobacillus crispatus K2-4-3 isolated from chicken intestine. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that the C-terminal region (LcsB) of Lb. crispatus K2-4-3 SlpB had a high similarity with the cell wall binding domains SA and CbsA of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lb. crispatus. To evaluate the potential application as an anchoring protein, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) or beta-galactosidase (Gal) was fused to the N-terminus of the LcsB region, and the fused proteins were successfully produced in Escherichia coli, respectively. After mixing them with the non-genetically modified lactic acid bacteria cells, the fused GFP-LcsB and Gal-LcsB were functionally associated with the cell surface of various lactic acid bacteria tested. In addition, the binding capacity could be improved by SDS pretreatment. Moreover, both of the fused proteins could simultaneously bind to the surface of a single cell. Furthermore, when the fused DNA fragment of gfp:lcsB was inserted into the Lactococcus lactis expression vector pSec:Leiss:Nuc, the GFP could not be secreted into the medium under the control of the nisA promoter. Western blot, in-gel fluorescence assay, immunofluorescence microscopy and SDS sensitivity analysis confirmed that the GFP was successfully expressed onto the cell surface of L. lactis with the aid of the LcsB anchor. The LcsB region can be used as a functional scaffold to target the heterologous proteins to the cell surfaces of lactic acid bacteria in vitro and in vivo, and has also the potential for biotechnological application.

  2. Influence of carvacrol and thymol on the physiological attributes, enterotoxin production and surface characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.L. Souza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of the phenolic compounds carvacrol (CAR and thymol (THY on some physiological characteristics and on the modulation of the secretion of some staphylococcal virulence factors, that is, coagulase and enterotoxin. This study also investigated possible mechanisms for the establishment of the anti-staphylococcal activity of these compounds. Sublethal concentrations (0.3 and 0.15 µL/mL of CAR and THY inhibited the activity of the enzymes coagulase and lipase and led to a decrease in salt tolerance. At the tested sublethal concentrations, both CAR and THY led to a total suppression of enterotoxin production. The loss of a 260-nm-absorbing material and an efflux of potassium ions occurred immediately after the addition of CAR and THY at 0.6 and 1.2 µL/mL and increased up to 120 min of exposure. Electron microscopy of cells exposed to CAR and THY (0.6 µL/mL revealed that individual cells appeared to be deformed, with projections of cellular material. The observations of leakage of cellular material and an altered cell surface suggest that gross damage to a cell's cytoplasmic membrane, which results in a disruption in protein secretion, could be responsible for the anti-staphylococcal properties of CAR and THY.

  3. Identification of conserved surface proteins as novel antigenic vaccine candidates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiabing; Xu, Zhuofei; Li, Lu; Chen, Huanchun; Zhou, Rui

    2012-12-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is an important swine respiratory pathogen causing great economic losses worldwide. Identification of conserved surface antigenic proteins is helpful for developing effective vaccines. In this study, a genome-wide strategy combined with bioinformatic and experimental approaches, was applied to discover and characterize surface-associated immunogenic proteins of A. pleuropneumoniae. Thirty nine genes encoding outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and lipoproteins were identified by comparative genomics and gene expression profiling as being-highly conserved and stably transcribed in the different serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae reference strains. Twelve of these conserved proteins were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli and their immunogenicity was estimated by homologous challenge in the mouse model, and then three of these proteins (APJL_0126, HbpA and OmpW) were further tested in the natural host (swine) by homologous and heterologous challenges. The results showed that these proteins could induce high titers of antibodies, but vaccination with each protein individually elicited low protective immunity against A. pleuropneumoniae. This study gives novel insights into immunogenicity of the conserved OMPs and lipoproteins of A. pleuropneumoniae. Although none of the surface proteins characterized in this study could individually induce effective protective immunity against A. pleuropneumoniae, they are potential candidates for subunit vaccines in combination with Apx toxins.

  4. Evaluation of protein adsorption onto a polyurethane nanofiber surface having different segment distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Yuko; Koizumi, Gaku [Frontier Fiber Technology and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui (Japan); Sakamoto, Hiroaki, E-mail: hi-saka@u-fukui.ac.jp [Tenure-Track Program for Innovative Research, University of Fukui (Japan); Suye, Shin-ichiro [Frontier Fiber Technology and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui (Japan)

    2017-02-01

    Electrospinning is well known to be an effective method for fabricating polymeric nanofibers with a diameter of several hundred nanometers. Recently, the molecular-level orientation within nanofibers has attracted particular attention. Previously, we used atomic force microscopy to visualize the phase separation between soft and hard segments of a polyurethane (PU) nanofiber surface prepared by electrospinning. The unstretched PU nanofibers exhibited irregularly distributed hard segments, whereas hard segments of stretched nanofibers prepared with a high-speed collector exhibited periodic structures along the long-axis direction. PU was originally used to inhibit protein adsorption, but because the surface segment distribution was changed in the stretched nanofiber, here, we hypothesized that the protein adsorption property on the stretched nanofiber might be affected. We investigated protein adsorption onto PU nanofibers to elucidate the effects of segment distribution on the surface properties of PU nanofibers. The amount of adsorbed protein on stretched PU nanofibers was increased compared with that of unstretched nanofibers. These results indicate that the hard segment alignment on stretched PU nanofibers mediated protein adsorption. It is therefore expected that the amount of protein adsorption can be controlled by rotation of the collector. - Highlights: • The hard segments of stretched PU nanofibers exhibit periodic structures. • The adsorbed protein on stretched PU nanofibers was increased compared with PU film. • The hard segment alignment on stretched PU nanofibers mediated protein adsorption.

  5. Isolation of two biologically active cell surface proteins from Brucella abortus by chromatofocusing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabatabai, L.B.; Deyoe, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    Brucella abortus contains a group of immunogenic cell surface proteins which have potential value as a vaccine or as a diagnostic reagent for the prevention and diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. Under nondenaturing conditions, these proteins range in molecular weight from 10,000-124,000, as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on TSK 3000sw. By analytical isoelectrofocusing, 6 major protein bands could be distinguished with pI's ranging from 4.0 to 6.0 and 3 additional major proteins with pI's of 7.5, 9.5, and 10. By chromatofocusing on Polybuffer Exchanger 94 with a pH gradient from 6-4, two of the six proteins from pI 4-6 were separated, a pI 4.9 and a pI 4.7 protein; a third fraction contained the high pI proteins. The former two proteins were homogeneous by analytical isoelectrofocusing, and a molecular weight of 54,000 daltons was found for both protein species by HPLC on TSK 3000sw. The pI 4-6 and not the pI 9.5 and 10 proteins, could be radiolabeled when intact cells were radioiodinated with diazotized (/sup 125/I)-iodosulfanilic acid. Biological activity of the proteins as assessed in lemmings indicated that immunization with the pI 4.7 and 4.9 proteins afforded better protection against experimental brucellosis than immunization with the high pI proteins. These results support our view that a single surface protein may be sufficient for the prevention of experimental brucellosis.

  6. Labeling Cell Surface GPIs and GPI-Anchored Proteins through Metabolic Engineering with Artificial Inositol Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lili; Gao, Jian; Guo, Zhongwu

    2015-08-10

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring of proteins to the cell surface is important for various biological processes, but GPI-anchored proteins are difficult to study. An effective strategy was developed for the metabolic engineering of cell-surface GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins by using inositol derivatives carrying an azido group. The azide-labeled GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins were then tagged with biotin on live cells through a click reaction, which allows further elaboration with streptavidin-conjugated dyes or other molecules. The strategy can be used to label GPI-anchored proteins with various tags for biological studies. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Mechanistic aspects of protein corona formation: insulin adsorption onto gold nanoparticle surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grass, Stefan; Treuel, Lennart

    2014-02-01

    In biological fluids, an adsorption layer of proteins, a "protein corona" forms around nanoparticles (NPs) largely determining their biological identity. In many interactions with NPs proteins can undergo structural changes. Here, we study the adsorption of insulin onto gold NPs (mean hydrodynamic particle diameter 80 ± 18 nm), focusing on the structural consequences of the adsorption process for the protein. We use surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy to study changes in the protein's secondary structure as well as the impact on integrity and conformations of disulfide bonds immediately on the NP surface. A detailed comparison to SERS spectra of cysteine and cystine provides first mechanistic insights into the causes for these conformational changes. Potential biological and toxicological implications of these findings are also discussed.

  8. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Radulova, Gergana M; Basheva, Elka S; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Pelan, Eddie G

    2015-08-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, E(sh) and η(sh), proportional to the fraction of the conventional protein. However, the experiments show that the effect of mixing can be rather different depending on the nature of the additive. If the additive is a globular protein, like β-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin, the surface rigidity is preserved, and even enhanced. The experiments with separate foam films indicate that this is due to the formation of a bilayer structure at the air/water interface. The more hydrophobic HFBII forms the upper layer adjacent to the air phase, whereas the conventional globular protein forms the lower layer that faces the water phase. Thus, the elastic network formed by the adsorbed hydrophobin remains intact, and even reinforced by the adjacent layer of globular protein. In contrast, the addition of the disordered protein β-casein leads to softening of the HFBII adsorption layer. Similar (an even stronger) effect is produced by the nonionic surfactant Tween 20. This can be explained with the penetration of the hydrophobic tails of β-casein and Tween 20 between the HFBII molecules at the interface, which breaks the integrity of the hydrophobin interfacial elastic network. The analyzed experimental data for the surface shear rheology of various protein adsorption layers comply with a viscoelastic thixotropic model, which allows one to determine E(sh) and η(sh) from the measured storage and loss moduli, G' and G″. The results could contribute for quantitative characterization and deeper understanding of the factors that control the surface rigidity of protein adsorption layers with potential application for the creation of stable foams and emulsions with fine bubbles or droplets. Copyright © 2014

  9. ECM protein nanofibers and nanostructures engineered using surface-initiated assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, John M; Jallerat, Quentin; Feinberg, Adam W

    2014-04-17

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) in tissues is synthesized and assembled by cells to form a 3D fibrillar, protein network with tightly regulated fiber diameter, composition and organization. In addition to providing structural support, the physical and chemical properties of the ECM play an important role in multiple cellular processes including adhesion, differentiation, and apoptosis. In vivo, the ECM is assembled by exposing cryptic self-assembly (fibrillogenesis) sites within proteins. This process varies for different proteins, but fibronectin (FN) fibrillogenesis is well-characterized and serves as a model system for cell-mediated ECM assembly. Specifically, cells use integrin receptors on the cell membrane to bind FN dimers and actomyosin-generated contractile forces to unfold and expose binding sites for assembly into insoluble fibers. This receptor-mediated process enables cells to assemble and organize the ECM from the cellular to tissue scales. Here, we present a method termed surface-initiated assembly (SIA), which recapitulates cell-mediated matrix assembly using protein-surface interactions to unfold ECM proteins and assemble them into insoluble fibers. First, ECM proteins are adsorbed onto a hydrophobic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface where they partially denature (unfold) and expose cryptic binding domains. The unfolded proteins are then transferred in well-defined micro- and nanopatterns through microcontact printing onto a thermally responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm) surface. Thermally-triggered dissolution of the PIPAAm leads to final assembly and release of insoluble ECM protein nanofibers and nanostructures with well-defined geometries. Complex architectures are possible by engineering defined patterns on the PDMS stamps used for microcontact printing. In addition to FN, the SIA process can be used with laminin, fibrinogen and collagens type I and IV to create multi-component ECM nanostructures. Thus, SIA can be used to engineer

  10. Cytokine and acute phase protein mRNA expression in liver tissue from pigs with severe sepsis caused by intravenous inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Lerberg; Olsen, Helle Gerda; Iburg, Tine

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to substantiate previous findings of hepatic dysfunction in a porcine model of Staphylococcus aureus induced severe sepsis. Nine pigs were inoculated intravenously once or twice with 108S. aureus per kilogram body weight and killed 12, 24 and 48 h later. Three pigs served as controls...... elevated at 36 and 48 h. Microabscesses were found in the livers from pigs killed at 12 h only. The livers from pigs killed at 48 h also showed light, diffuse fibrin exudation (vascular leakage). Real-time PCR showed a decreased hepatic expression of mRNA coding for albumin and increased hepatic expression...... of IL-6, IL-8, IL-1β, and CRP. N o increase could be detected in the IL-1α or TNFα liver-mRNA levels. IL-6, IL-8 and IL-1β expression peaked at 24 hours (2-5 fold compared to the control group). In conclusion, the increased liver cytokine mRNA levels indicate a local hepatic, non-infectious inflammatory...

  11. Functional display of proteins, mutant proteins, fragments of proteins and peptides on the surface of filamentous (bacterio) phages: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pannekoek, H.; van Meijer, M.; Gaardsvoll, H.; van Zonneveld, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    Cytoplasmic expression of complex eukaryotic proteins inEscherichia coli usually yields inactive protein preparations. In some cases, (part) of the biological activity can be recovered by rather inefficient denaturation-renaturation procedures. Recently, novel concepts have been developed for the

  12. Staphylococcus aureus Redirects Central Metabolism to Increase Iron Availability

    OpenAIRE

    Stauff, Devin L; Pishchany, Gleb; Whitwell, Corbin W; Torres, Victor J; Skaar, Eric P; Friedman, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis is significantly influenced by the iron status of the host. However, the regulatory impact of host iron sources on S. aureus gene expression remains unknown. In this study, we combine multivariable difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry with multivariate statistical analyses to systematically cluster cellular protein response across distinct iron-exposure conditions. Quadruplicate samples were simultaneously analyzed for alterations in protein ...

  13. Vaccine composition formulated with a novel TLR7-dependent adjuvant induces high and broad protection against Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnoli, Fabio; Fontana, Maria Rita; Soldaini, Elisabetta; Mishra, Ravi P. N.; Fiaschi, Luigi; Cartocci, Elena; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Ruggiero, Paolo; Nosari, Sarah; De Falco, Maria Grazia; Lofano, Giuseppe; Marchi, Sara; Galletti, Bruno; Mariotti, Paolo; Bacconi, Marta; Torre, Antonina; Maccari, Silvia; Scarselli, Maria; Rinaudo, C. Daniela; Inoshima, Naoko; Savino, Silvana; Mori, Elena; Rossi-Paccani, Silvia; Baudner, Barbara; Pallaoro, Michele; Swennen, Erwin; Petracca, Roberto; Brettoni, Cecilia; Liberatori, Sabrina; Norais, Nathalie; Monaci, Elisabetta; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane; Schneewind, Olaf; O’Hagan, Derek T.; Valiante, Nicholas M.; Bensi, Giuliano; Bertholet, Sylvie; De Gregorio, Ennio; Rappuoli, Rino; Grandi, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Both active and passive immunization strategies against Staphylococcus aureus have thus far failed to show efficacy in humans. With the attempt to develop an effective S. aureus vaccine, we selected five conserved antigens known to have different roles in S. aureus pathogenesis. They include the secreted factors α-hemolysin (Hla), ess extracellular A (EsxA), and ess extracellular B (EsxB) and the two surface proteins ferric hydroxamate uptake D2 and conserved staphylococcal antigen 1A. The combined vaccine antigens formulated with aluminum hydroxide induced antibodies with opsonophagocytic and functional activities and provided consistent protection in four mouse models when challenged with a panel of epidemiologically relevant S. aureus strains. The importance of antibodies in protection was demonstrated by passive transfer experiments. Furthermore, when formulated with a toll-like receptor 7-dependent (TLR7) agonist recently designed and developed in our laboratories (SMIP.7–10) adsorbed to alum, the five antigens provided close to 100% protection against four different staphylococcal strains. The new formulation induced not only high antibody titers but also a Th1 skewed immune response as judged by antibody isotype and cytokine profiles. In addition, low frequencies of IL-17–secreting T cells were also observed. Altogether, our data demonstrate that the rational selection of mixtures of conserved antigens combined with Th1/Th17 adjuvants can lead to promising vaccine formulations against S. aureus. PMID:25775551

  14. In vivo intravascular biotinylation of Schistosoma bovis adult worms and proteomic analysis of tegumental surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre-Escudero, Eduardo; Pérez-Sánchez, Ricardo; Manzano-Román, Raúl; Oleaga, Ana

    2013-12-06

    Schistosoma bovis is a blood-dwelling fluke of ruminants that lives for years inside the vasculature of their hosts. The parasite tegument covers the surface of the worms and plays a key role in the host-parasite relationship. The parasite molecules expressed at the tegument surface are potential targets for immune or drug intervention. The purpose of this work was the identification of the proteins expressed in vivo on the surface of the tegument of S. bovis adult worms. To accomplish this we used a method based on in vivo vascular perfusion of mice infected with S. bovis which allowed the labelling of the surface of the worms inside the blood vasculature. The biotinylation of parasite inside blood vessels prevents the handling of worms in vitro and hence possible damage to the tegument that could produce results that would be difficult to interpret. Trypsin digestion of biotinylated proteins and subsequent liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry analysis (LC-MS/MS) resulted in the identification on the S. bovis tegument of 80 parasite proteins and 28 host proteins. The proteins identified were compared with the findings from other proteomic studies of the schistosome surface. The experimental approach used in this work is a reliable method for selective investigation of the surface of the worms and provides valuable information about the exposed protein repertoire of the tegument of S. bovis in the environmental conditions that the parasite faces inside the blood vessels. To identify the proteins expressed on the surface of the tegument of S. bovis adult worms we used a method based on in vivo vascular perfusion, with biotin, of mice infected with S. bovis which allowed the labelling of the surface of the worms inside the blood vasculature. This methodology prevents the handling of worms in vitro and hence possible damage to the tegument that could produce results that would be difficult to interpret. This work is the first in which vascular perfusion

  15. Identification of Surface Protein Biomarkers of Listeria monocytogenes via Bioinformatics and Antibody-Based Protein Detection Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cathy X. Y.; Brooks, Brian W.; Huang, Hongsheng; Pagotto, Franco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes causes a significant percentage of the fatalities among foodborne illnesses in humans. Surface proteins specifically expressed in a wide range of L. monocytogenes serotypes under selective enrichment culture conditions could serve as potential biomarkers for detection and isolation of this pathogen via antibody-based methods. Our study aimed to identify such biomarkers. Interrogation of the L. monocytogenes serotype 4b strain F2365 genome identified 130 putative or known surface proteins. The homologues of four surface proteins, LMOf2365_0578, LMOf2365_0581, LMOf2365_0639, and LMOf2365_2117, were assessed as biomarkers due to the presence of conserved regions among strains of L. monocytogenes which are variable among other Listeria species. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies against the four recombinant proteins revealed the expression of only LMOf2365_0639 on the surface of serotype 4b strain LI0521 cells despite PCR detection of mRNA transcripts for all four proteins in the organism. Three of 35 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to LMOf2365_0639, MAbs M3643, M3644, and M3651, specifically recognized 42 (91.3%) of 46 L. monocytogenes lineage I and II isolates grown in nonselective brain heart infusion medium. While M3644 and M3651 reacted with 14 to 15 (82.4 to 88.2%) of 17 L. monocytogenes lineage I and II isolates, M3643 reacted with 22 (91.7%) of 24 lineage I, II, and III isolates grown in selective enrichment media (UVM1, modified Fraser, Palcam, and UVM2 media). The three MAbs exhibited only weak reactivities (the optical densities at 414 nm were close to the cutoff value) to some other Listeria species grown in selective enrichment media. Collectively, the data indicate the potential of LMOf2365_0639 as a surface biomarker of L. monocytogenes, with the aid of specific MAbs, for pathogen detection, identification, and isolation in clinical, environmental, and food samples. IMPORTANCE L. monocytogenes is

  16. Surface Density of the Hendra G Protein Modulates Hendra F Protein-Promoted Membrane Fusion: Role for Hendra G Protein Trafficking and Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Whitman, Shannon D.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2007-01-01

    Hendra virus, like most paramyxoviruses, requires both a fusion (F) and attachment (G) protein for promotion of cell-cell fusion. Recent studies determined that Hendra F is proteolytically processed by the cellular protease cathepsin L after endocytosis. This unique cathepsin L processing results in a small percentage of Hendra F on the cell surface. To determine how the surface densities of the two Hendra glycoproteins affect fusion promotion, we performed experiments that varied the levels ...

  17. Quantification of isotope encoded proteins in 2-D gels using surface enhanced resonance Raman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Giselle M; Davis, Brandon M; Deb, Shirshendu K; Loethen, Yvette; Gudihal, Ravindra; Perera, Pradeep; Ben-Amotz, Dor; Davisson, V Jo

    2008-11-19

    A strategy for quantification of multiple protein isoforms from a complex sample background is demonstrated, combining isotopomeric rhodamine 6G (R6G) labels and surface-enhanced Raman in polyacrylamide matrix. The procedure involves isotope-encoding by lysine-labeling with (R6G) active ester reagents, isoform separation by 2-DGE, fluorescence quantification using internal standardization to water, and silver nanoparticle deposition followed by surface-enhanced Raman detection. R6G sample encoding and standardization enabled the determination of total protein concentration and the distribution of specific isoforms using the combined detection approach of water-referenced fluorescence spectral imaging and ratiometric quantification. A detection limit of approximately 13.5 picomolar R6G-labeled protein was determined for the surface-enhanced Raman in a gel matrix (15-fold lower than fluorescence). High quantification accuracies for small differences in protein populations at low nanogram abundance were demonstrated for human GMP synthetase (hGMPS) either as purified protein samples in a single-point determination mode (3% relative standard deviation, RSD%) or as HCT116 human cancer cellular lysate in an imaging application (with 16% RSD%). These results represent a prototype for future applications of isotopic surface-enhanced resonance Raman scatter to quantification of protein distributions.

  18. Fluorescence microscopy evidence for quasi-permanent attachment of antifreeze proteins to ice surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertaya, Natalya; Marshall, Christopher B; DiPrinzio, Carlos L; Wilen, Larry; Thomson, Erik S; Wettlaufer, J S; Davies, Peter L; Braslavsky, Ido

    2007-05-15

    Many organisms are protected from freezing by the presence of extracellular antifreeze proteins (AFPs), which bind to ice, modify its morphology, and prevent its further growth. These proteins have a wide range of applications including cryopreservation, frost protection, and as models in biomineralization research. However, understanding their mechanism of action remains an outstanding challenge. While the prevailing adsorption-inhibition hypothesis argues that AFPs must bind irreversibly to ice to arrest its growth, other theories suggest that there is exchange between the bound surface proteins and the free proteins in solution. By conjugating green fluorescence protein (GFP) to a fish AFP (Type III), we observed the binding of the AFP to ice. This was accomplished by monitoring the presence of GFP-AFP on the surface of ice crystals several microns in diameter using fluorescence microscopy. The lack of recovery of fluorescence after photobleaching of the GFP component of the surface-bound GFP-AFP shows that there is no equilibrium surface-solution exchange of GFP-AFP and thus supports the adsorption-inhibition mechanism for this type of AFP. Moreover, our study establishes the utility of fluorescently labeled AFPs as a research tool for investigating the mechanisms underlying the activity of this diverse group of proteins.

  19. [Repair mechanism of frozen sublethally damaged Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhongmin; Lv, Haipeng; Ai, Zhilu; Wang, Na; Xie, Xinhua; Fan, Huiping; Pan, Zhili; Suo, Biao

    2015-11-04

    To study the repair mechanisms of frozen sublethally damaged Staphylococcus aurous cells. We resuscitated frozen sublethally damaged S. aureus at 37 degrees C for different time within 3 h. Meanwhile, we compared the morphological changes of the frozen sublethally damaged cells after 1 h of resuscitation using transmission electron microscopy assay (TEM). The expressions of the transcriptional attenuator MsrR (msrR), iron (Fe3+) ABC transporter ATP-binding protein (fhuC), and cytochrome b (cytB) genes were quantitatively analyzed by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (Real-time PCR) method. The content of cells outside leakage, active oxygen (ROS), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were also determined by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. More than 99% of the frozen sublethally damaged S. aureus repaired after 3 h. The resuscitated cells expressed an equal resistance to high concentration of NaCl. Real-time PCR results showed that the msrR and fhuC genes expressions were down-regulated, whereas the cytB gene expression was up-regulated significantly. The frozen sublethally damaged S. aureus cellar surface ultrastructure significant changed during resuscitation. The cell surface became compact and sturdy from smooth and transparent. The cell leakage rate of ultraviolet absorption material gradually decreased. Meanwhile, the intracellular ROS level declined along with the decrease of SOD activity. Frozen sublethally damaged cells may regain the capability of resistance to high salt stress by repairing cell membrane integrity, reducing the content of ROS through gene regulation, inhibiting the toxicity of active oxygen to the cells. Meanwhile, the regulation of metabolism related genes (cytB) provides the energy for the requirement of cells, therefore, the frozen sublethally damaged cells were repaired finally.

  20. Receptor mediated agglutination of human spermatozoa by spermagglutinating factor isolated from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Siftjit; Prabha, Vijay; Sarwal, Abha

    2010-12-01

    We examined spermagglutinating factor isolated from Staphylococcus aureus for evidence of receptor mediated agglutination of human spermatozoa. Binding to spermatozoa by spermagglutinating factor isolated from S. aureus with a high degree of specificity indicates receptor-ligand interaction. To examine this interaction we isolated and purified the ligand and the receptor. To assess receptor mediated agglutination of spermatozoa further we blocked spermagglutination induced by spermagglutinating factor in the presence of receptor. Spermagglutinating factor induced spermagglutination was competitively inhibited by adding purified receptor, indicating that sperm agglutinating factor isolated from S. aureus attaches to specific receptors on human spermatozoa. The spermagglutinating factor receptor was a protein with a molecular weight of approximately 57 kDa. Spermagglutinating factor induced spermagglutination and at higher concentrations had a spermicidal effect, which was inhibited by introducing the receptor. As observed on scanning electron microscopy studies, incubating spermatozoa with spermagglutinating factor showed profound morphological alterations. However, spermatozoa with normal morphology were noted when incubated with spermagglutinating factor in the presence of receptor, indicating that morphological alterations may account for spermatozoa agglutination by spermagglutinating factor. Results suggest that spermagglutinating factor isolated from S. aureus may bind specifically to sperm surface receptor sites before causing spermagglutination. Copyright © 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Compositional analysis of biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus isolated from food sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Alexandra Oniciuc

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sixteen Staphylococcus aureus isolates originating from foods (eight from dairy products, five from fish and fish products and three from meat and meat products were evaluated regarding their biofilms formation ability. Six strains (E2, E6, E8, E10, E16, and E23 distinguished as strong biofilm formers, either in standard Tryptic Soy Broth or in Tryptic Soy Broth supplemented with 0.4% glucose or with 4% NaCl. The composition of the biofilms formed by these S. aureus strains on polystyrene surfaces was first inferred using enzymatic and chemical treatments. Later on, biofilms were characterized by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM. Our experiments proved that protein-based matrices are of prime importance for the structure of biofilms formed by S. aureus strains isolated from food sources. These biofilm matrix compositions are similar to those put into evidence for coagulase negative staphylococci. This is a new finding having in view that scientific literature mentions exopolysaccharide abundance in biofilms produced by clinical isolates and food processing environment isolates of S. aureus.

  2. Cytolytic pore-forming protein associated with the surface membrane of Naegleria fowleri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowrey, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Whole cell homogenates of Naegleria fowleri were examined by hemolytic and /sup 51/Cr-release assays for the presence of cytolytic molecules which may participate in the cytopathogenic action of this amoeba. Two distinct cytolytic activities were found. A surface membrane cytolysin was identified which was found to be avidly associated with membranes possessing an equilibrium density of 1.135 g/cm/sup 3/ in isopycnic sucrose gradients. The activity of the surface membrane cytolysin was not affected by heating at 75/sup 0/C for 30 min. The second cytolytic activity was found in putative lysosomes possessing an equilibrium density of 1.162 g/cm/sup 3/ and was completely inactivated by heating at 75/sup 0/C for 30 min. Cytolysis produced in the presence of both cytolysins was consistently synergistic with respect to the activity of either cytolysin alone. The lesions produced on erythrocytes by this cooperative process were characterized by electron microscopy as transmembrane pores resembling a number of other cytolytic effector molecules including the ninth component of complement, perforins of cytolytic T lymphocytes, and the alphatoxin of Staphylococcus aureus.

  3. Insights into cellular signalling by G protein coupled receptor transactivation of cell surface protein kinase receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Rebecca; Thach, Lyna; Hollenberg, Morley D; Cao, Yingnan; Little, Peter J; Kamato, Danielle

    2017-06-01

    G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signalling is mediated by transactivation independent and transactivation dependent pathways. GPCRs transactivate protein tyrosine kinase receptors (PTKRs) and protein serine/threonine kinase receptors (PS/TKR). Since the initial observations of transactivation dependent signalling, there has been an effort to understand the mechanisms behind this phenomena. GPCR signalling has evolved to include biased signalling. Biased signalling, whereby selected ligands can activate the same GPCR that can generate multiple signals, but drive only a unique response. To date, there has been no focus on the ability of biased agonists to activate the PTKR and PS/TKR transactivation pathways differentially. As such, this represents a novel direction for future research. This review will discuss the main mechanisms of GPCR mediated receptor transactivation and the pathways involved in intracellular responses.

  4. Surface Curvature Relation to Protein Adsorption for Carbon-based Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zonglin; Yang, Zaixing; Chong, Yu; Ge, Cuicui; Weber, Jeffrey K; Bell, David R; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-06-04

    The adsorption of proteins onto carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) is dictated by hydrophobic and π-π interactions between aliphatic and aromatic residues and the conjugated CBN surface. Accordingly, protein adsorption is highly sensitive to topological constraints imposed by CBN surface structure; in particular, adsorption capacity is thought to increase as the incident surface curvature decreases. In this work, we couple Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations with fluorescence spectroscopy experiments to characterize this curvature dependence in detail for the model protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). By studying BSA adsorption onto carbon nanotubes of increasing radius (featuring descending local curvatures) and a flat graphene sheet, we confirm that adsorption capacity is indeed enhanced on flatter surfaces. Naïve fluorescence experiments featuring multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), however, conform to an opposing trend. To reconcile these observations, we conduct additional MD simulations with MWCNTs that match those prepared in experiments; such simulations indicate that increased mass to surface area ratios in multi-walled systems explain the observed discrepancies. In reduction, our work substantiates the inverse relationship between protein adsorption capacity and surface curvature and further demonstrates the need for subtle consideration in experimental and simulation design.

  5. Experimental and computational surface hydrophobicity analysis of a non-enveloped virus and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldt, Caryn L; Zahid, Amna; Vijayaragavan, K Saagar; Mi, Xue

    2017-05-01

    The physical characteristics of viruses needs to be understood in order to manipulate the interaction of viruses with host cells, as well as to create specific molecular recognition techniques to detect, purify, and remove viruses. Viruses are generally believed to be positively charged at physiological pH, but there are few other defining characteristics. Here, we have experimentally and computationally demonstrated that a non-enveloped virus is more hydrophobic than a panel of model proteins. Reverse-phase and hydrophobic interaction chromatography and ANS fluorescence determined the experimental hydrophobic strength of each entity. Computational surface hydrophobicity was calculated by the solvent exposed surface area of the protein weighted by the hydrophobicity of each amino acid. The results obtained indicate a strong correlation between the computational surface hydrophobicity and experimentally determined hydrophobicity using reverse-phase chromatography and ANS fluorescence. The surface hydrophobicity did not compare strongly to the weighted average of the amino acid sequence hydrophobicity. This demonstrates that our simple method of calculating the surface hydrophobicity gives general hydrophobicity information about proteins and viruses with crystal structures. In the process, this method demonstrated that porcine parvovirus (PPV) is more hydrophobic than the model proteins used in this study. This adds an additional dimension to currently known virus characteristics and can improve our manipulation of viruses for gene therapy targeting, surface adsorption and general understanding of virus interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. VP1 protein of Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) impairs baculovirus surface display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, A; Maroniche, G A; Alfonso, V; Molinari, P; Taboga, O

    2013-07-01

    The Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes important economical losses in livestock farming. In order to develop a novel subunit vaccine against FMDV, we constructed recombinant baculoviruses that display the protein VP1 of FMDV on their surface, with either polar (fused to gp64) or nonpolar (fused to anchor membrane from VSV-G protein) distribution. Insect cells infected with the different recombinant baculoviruses expressed VP1 fusion protein to high levels. However, the recombinant VP1 protein was not carried by budded virions. Subcellular localization of VP1 revealed that the trafficking of the fusion protein to the cell plasma membrane was impaired. Our results suggest that VP1 contains cryptic domains that interfere with protein secretion and subsequent incorporation into budded baculoviruses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Novel surface layer protein genes in Bacillus sphaericus associated with unusual insertion elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollmann, Katrin; Raff, Johannes; Schnorpfeil, Michaela; Radeva, Galina; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja

    2005-09-01

    The surface layer (S-layer) protein genes of the uranium mining waste pile isolate Bacillus sphaericus JG-A12 and of its relative B. sphaericus NCTC 9602 were analysed. The almost identical N-termini of the two S-layer proteins possess a unique structure, comprising three N-terminal S-layer homologous (SLH) domains. The central parts of the proteins share a high homology and are related to the S-layer proteins of B. sphaericus CCM 2177 and P-1. In contrast, the C-terminal parts of the S-layer proteins of JG-A12 and NCTC 9602 differ significantly between each other. Surprisingly, the C-terminal part of the S-layer protein of JG-A12 shares a high identity with that of the S-layer protein of B. sphaericus CCM 2177. In both JG-A12 and NCTC 9602 the chromosomal S-layer protein<