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Sample records for aureus peptidoglycan tertiary

  1. Staphylococcus aureus Peptidoglycan Tertiary Structure from Carbon-13 Spin Diffusion

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    Sharif, Shasad; Singh, Manmilan; Kim, Sung Joon; Schaefer,Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The cell-wall peptidoglycan of Staphylococcus aureus is a heterogeneous, highly cross-linked polymer of unknown tertiary structure. We have partially characterized this structure by measuring spin diffusion from 13C labels in pentaglycyl cross-linking segments to natural-abundance 13C in the surrounding intact cell walls. The measurements were performed using a version of centerband-only detection of exchange (CODEX). The cell walls were isolated from S. aureus grown in media containing [1-13...

  2. Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus luteus peptidoglycan transglycosylases that are not penicillin-binding proteins.

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    Park, W; Matsuhashi, M

    1984-01-01

    Major peptidoglycan transglycosylase activities, which synthesize uncross-linked peptidoglycan from lipid-linked precursors, were solubilized from the membranes of Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus luteus and were partially purified. The transglycosylase activities were separated from penicillin-binding proteins by solubilization and by purification steps. Therefore, we concluded that these activities were not activities of the penicillin-binding proteins, which are the presumptive peptid...

  3. Study of the interactions between endolysin and bacterial peptidoglycan on S. aureus by dynamic force spectroscopy

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    Liu, Jianli; Zhang, Xuejie; Yang, Hang; Yuan, Jinghe; Wei, Hongping; Yu, Junping; Fang, Xiaohong

    2015-09-01

    The cell wall binding domain (CBD) of bacteriophage lysins can recognize target bacteria with extraordinary specificity through binding to bacterial peptidoglycan, thus it is a promising new probe to identify the corresponding bacterial pathogen. In this work, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single-molecule force spectroscopy to investigate the interaction between the CBD of lysin PlyV12 (PlyV12C) and pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The binding forces of PlyV12C with S. aureus have been measured, and the dissociation process of their binding complex has been characterized. Furthermore, we compared the interactions of PlyV12C-S. aureus and antibody-S. aureus. It is revealed that PlyV12C has a comparable affinity to bacterial peptidoglycans as that of the S. aureus antibody. The results provide new information on the binding properties of lysin CBD with bacterium, and the application of lysin CBD in bacterium detection.

  4. Nonviable Staphylococcus aureus and its peptidoglycan stimulate macrophage recruitment, angiogenesis, fibroplasia, and collagen accumulation in wounded rats.

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    Kilcullen, J K; Ly, Q P; Chang, T H; Levenson, S M; Steinberg, J J

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that local application at the time of operation of Staphylococcus aureus, nonviable S. aureus, its cell wall, or S. aureus peptidoglycan accelerates wound healing. We hypothesized that this effect is due to both direct and indirect mechanisms, among which is an increase in the inflammatory response to wounding, resulting in an increase in macrophages, angiogenesis, and fibroblasts. Twenty-seven Sprague-Dawley male rats were anesthetized, and two 7-cm paravertebral skin incisions were made. Four polyvinyl alcohol sponges, two on each side, containing either 100 microliter of isotonic saline or 0.5 mg of nonviable S. aureus or S. aureus peptidoglycan in 100-microliter saline were implanted subcutaneously. Nonviable S. aureus or S. aureus peptidoglycan (860 microgram/cm incision) in 200-microliter saline were inoculated into the incisions at closure. The rats ate a commercial rat chow and drank tap water ad libitum throughout. After days 3 and 7 postwounding, rats were euthanized, and tissues were examined for immunohistochemical features of reparative tissue using ED-1, Factor VIII, and vimentin antibodies, markers for monocyte/macrophages, endothelial cells, and mesenchymal cells (including fibroblasts), respectively. Incisions treated with nonviable S. aureus or S. aureus peptidoglycan showed more macrophages along and deep in the wound tract 7 days postoperatively. Nonviable S. aureus or S. aureus peptidoglycan-treated sponges were surrounded and penetrated by much larger capsules of reparative tissue than saline-treated sponges at both 3 and 7 days. Neutrophil influx was much greater in nonviable S. aureus or S. aureus peptidoglycan-treated sponges, especially in central regions, and there were many more ED-1-stained macrophages in distinct geographic locations, specifically, the more peripheral-cortical areas. Some clustering of macrophages occurred around areas of invasion by reparative tissue into the surrounding subcutaneous fat and

  5. Peptidoglycan-linked protein A promotes T cell-dependent antibody expansion during Staphylococcus aureus infection.

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    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Missiakas, Dominique M; Schneewind, Olaf

    2016-05-17

    A hallmark of Staphylococcus aureus disease in humans is persistent infections without development of protective immune responses. Infected patients generate VH3 plasmablast expansions and increased VH3 idiotype Ig; however, the mechanisms for staphylococcal modification of immune responses are not known. We report here that S. aureus-infected mice generate VH3 antibody expansions via a mechanism requiring MHC-restricted antigen presentation to CD4(+) T cells and staphylococcal protein A (SpA), a cell wall-anchored surface molecule that binds Fcγ and VH3 variant heavy chains of Ig. VH3 expansion occurred with peptidoglycan-linked SpA from the bacterial envelope but not with recombinant SpA, and optimally required five tandem repeats of its Ig-binding domains. Signaling via receptor-interacting serine/threonine protein kinase 2 (RIPK2) was essential for implementing peptidoglycan-linked SpA superantigen activity. VH3 clan IgG from S. aureus-infected or SpA-treated animals was not pathogen-specific, suggesting that SpA cross-linking of VH3 idiotype B-cell receptors and activation via attached peptidoglycan are the determinants of staphylococcal escape from adaptive immune responses. PMID:27140614

  6. Solid-state NMR characterization of amphomycin effects on peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acid biosyntheses in Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Singh, Manmilan; Chang, James; Coffman, Lauryn; Kim, Sung Joon

    2016-01-01

    Amphomycin and MX-2401 are cyclic lipopeptides exhibiting bactericidal activities against Gram-positive pathogens. Amphomycin and MX-2401 share structural similarities with daptomycin, but unlike daptomycin they do not target bacterial membrane. In this study, we investigate in vivo modes of action for amphomycin and MX-2401 in intact whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus by measuring the changes of peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acid compositions using solid-state NMR. S. aureus were grown in a defined media containing isotope labels [1-(13)C]glycine and L-[ε-(15)N]lysin, L-[1-(13)C]lysine and D-[(15)N]alanine, or D-[1-(13)C]alanine and [(15)N]glycine, to selectively (13)C-(15)N pair label peptidoglycan bridge-link, stem-link, and cross-link, respectively. (13)C{(15)N} and (15)N{(13)C} rotational-echo double resonance NMR measurements determined that cyclic lipopeptide-treated S. aureus exhibited thinning of the cell wall, accumulation of Park's nucleotide, inhibition of glycine utilization for purine biosynthesis, reduction of ester-linked D-Ala in teichoic acids, and reduction of peptidoglycan cross-linking. Whole cell NMR analysis also revealed that S. aureus, in presence of amphomycin and MX-2401, maintained the incorporation of D-Ala during peptidoglycan biosynthesis while the incorporation of D-Ala into teichoic acids was inhibited. These effects are consistent with amphomycin's dual inhibition of both peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acid biosyntheses in S. aureus. PMID:27538449

  7. Triple-acting Peptidoglycan hydrolase treatment for drug-resistant and intracellular Staphylococcus aureus

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    Multi-drug resistant bacteria are a persistent problem in modern health care, food safety and animal health. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over-used conventional antibiotics. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a notorious pathogen for both animal and human health with multi-d...

  8. Enhanced staphylolytic activity of the Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88 HydH5 virion associated peptidoglycan hydrolase: fusions, deletions and synergy with LysH5

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    Virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases have a potential as antimicrobial agents due to their ability to lyse Gram positive bacteria on contact. In this work, our aim was to improve the lytic activity of HydH5, a virion associated peptidoglycan hydrolase from the Staphylococcus aureus bacteriopha...

  9. Lytic activity of the virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolase HydH5 of Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88

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    Donovan David M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is a food-borne pathogen and the most common cause of infections in hospitalized patients. The increase in the resistance of this pathogen to antibacterials has made necessary the development of new anti-staphylococcal agents. In this context, bacteriophage lytic enzymes such as endolysins and structural peptidoglycan (PG hydrolases have received considerable attention as possible antimicrobials against gram-positive bacteria. Results S. aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88 (phiIPLA88 contains a virion-associated muralytic enzyme (HydH5 encoded by orf58, which is located in the morphogenetic module. Comparative bioinformatic analysis revealed that HydH5 significantly resembled other peptidoglycan hydrolases encoded by staphylococcal phages. The protein consists of 634 amino acid residues. Two putative lytic domains were identified: an N-terminal CHAP (cysteine, histidine-dependent amidohydrolase/peptidase domain (135 amino acid residues, and a C-terminal LYZ2 (lysozyme subfamily 2 domain (147 amino acid residues. These domains were also found when a predicted three-dimensional structure of HydH5 was made which provided the basis for deletion analysis. The complete HydH5 protein and truncated proteins containing only each catalytic domain were overproduced in E. coli and purified from inclusion bodies by subsequent refolding. Truncated and full-length HydH5 proteins were all able to bind and lyse S. aureus Sa9 cells as shown by binding assays, zymogram analyses and CFU reduction analysis. HydH5 demonstrated high antibiotic activity against early exponential cells, at 45°C and in the absence of divalent cations (Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+. Thermostability assays showed that HydH5 retained 72% of its activity after 5 min at 100°C. Conclusions The virion-associated PG hydrolase HydH5 has lytic activity against S. aureus, which makes it attractive as antimicrobial for food biopreservation and anti

  10. Prevalence and genotypic relatedness of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a tertiary care hospital

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    B A Fomda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is the most common multidrug-resistant pathogen causing nosocomial infections across the world. MRSA is not only associated with significant mortality and morbidity but also places a large economic strain on our health care system. MRSA isolates are also typically resistant to multiple, non-β-lactam antibiotics. We conducted a prospective study in a tertiary care hospital, to determine the prevalence of MRSA and to establish the clonal distribution of MRSA isolates recovered from various clinical specimens. Materials and Methods: Clinical samples were cultured and S. aureus was identified as per standard microbiological procedures. Susceptibility testing was done by agar disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC method as recommended by CLSI. Methicillin resistance was detected by phenotypic methods namely, oxacillin disc diffusion (ODD, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of oxacillin, cefoxitin disk diffusion (CDD, and MIC of cefoxitin. Amplification of mecA gene by PCR was used as gold standard for detection of methicillin resistance. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE typing was performed for MRSA isolates. Results: Out of 390 S. aureus isolates, 154 (39.48% isolates were MRSA and 236 (60.51% isolates were MSSA. Penicillin was the least effective antibacterial drug against the hospital associated S. aureus isolates with 85.64% resistance rate. All the isolates were susceptible to vancomycin. The MRSA showed a high level of resistance to all antimicrobials in general in comparison to the MSSA and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05. Multiplex PCR performed for all strains showed amplification of both the mecA and nucA genes in MRSA strains whereas MSSA strains showed amplification of only nucA gene. PFGE of these isolates showed 10 different patterns. Conclusion: Prevalence of MRSA in our hospital was 39.48%. Most of these isolates were

  11. Clinical failure of vancomycin treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infection in a tertiary care hospital in southern Brazil

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    Larissa Lutz

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of clinical failure of vancomycin treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infection and the laboratory characteristics of the organism in a tertiary referral university hospital in southern Brazil. An 11-month-old male patient presented with pneumonia and S. aureus was isolated from his respiratory tract. Initial treatment with oxacillin and gentamicin was ineffective. Vancomycin was added to the regimen as the patient worsened, but after the 30th day of vancomycin treatment S. aureus was isolated from the blood. This isolate had a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC for vancomycin of 4 µg/mL. After pre-incubation with vancomycin the isolate displayed an increase in the expression of vancomycin resistance and colonies grew in the presence of up to 12 µg/mL vancomycin. Based on these results, and considering that the patient had not responded to vancomycin, the isolate was considered to be S. aureus heteroresistant to vancomycin (SAHV. The SAHV proved to be similar, based on DNA macrorestriction analysis, to methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA isolates from other patients in the hospital who had responded to vancomycin treatment. Our findings underline the need to improve methods in the clinical laboratory to detect the emergence of S. aureus clinically resistant to vancomycin . The fact that the isolate emerged in the blood 30 days after vancomycin treatment was initiated suggests that the organism was originally an MRSA that had acquired the ability to circumvent the mechanism of action of vancomycin.

  12. PREVALENCE AND ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERN OF METHICILLIN RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS (MRSA ISOLATES IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN PUNJAB

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    Satish

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is an important cause of nosocomial infections worldwide. This prospective study was undertaken to know the prevalence of MRSA, to study antimicrobial susceptibility pattern and inducible clindamycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus isolates obtained from the indoor patients of a tertiary care hospital in Punjab. MATERIALS AND METHODS : All the iso lates of Staphylococcus aureus obtained from various clinical specimens were identified by standard methods. MRSA was detected using 30ug cefoxitin disc by disc diffusion method as per CLSI guidelines, 2007. Each isolate was tested for other anti - staphyloc occal antibiotics by Kirby - Bauer disc diffusion method. Additionally, inducible clindamycin resistance was studied by disc induction test (D test. RESULTS : During a period of one year, a total of 252 isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were obtained. Eighty six (34.1% isolates were methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and the remaining 166 (65.8% isolates were methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA. MRSA isolates were significantly less sensitive to common anti - staphylococcal anti biotics as compared to MSSA isolates. However, MRSA isolates showed relatively better sensitivity to some of the antibiotics like netilmicin, levofloxacin, tetracycline and clindamycin. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was low in both MSSA (19.8% and MRSA (9.3%. None of the isolate of Staphylococcus aureus was resistant to vancomycin, linezolid and teicoplanin. Inducible clindamycin resistance was present in 17 (19.7% MRSA isolates as against 8 (4.8% MSSA isolates. CONCLUSION : Robust antimicrobial stewa rdship and strengthened infection control measures are required to prevent spread and reduce emergence of resistance

  13. Characterization of HydH5 lytic activity, the virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolase of Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-philPLA88

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    Rodríguez, Lorena; Martínez Fernández, Beatriz; Zhou, Yuan; Rodríguez González, Ana; David M. Donovan; García Suárez, María Pilar

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen able to produce heat stable enterotoxins and is also a frequent cause of subclinical intramammary infections in dairy cows and, consequently, a source of contamination of milk and dairy products.

  14. Characterization of Resistance to Aminoglycosides in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated From a Tertiary Care Hospital in Tehran, Iran

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    Rahimi, Fateh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most common nosocomial pathogens which can cause a broad spectrum of infections. Objectives: The current study aimed to describe the frequency and antibiotic susceptibility patterns of clonal groups of gentamicin-resistant strains of MRSA isolated from a tertiary care hospital in Tehran, Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 301 S. aureus isolates were collected during January to November 2012. All of the isolates ...

  15. Antibiotic Resistance Profiling of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Clinical Specimens in a Tertiary Hospital from 2010 to 2012

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    Alain C. Juayang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MRSA infection can affect a wide array of individuals that may lead to treatment failure. Also, the infection has the potential to spread from one area to another particularly health care facilities or communities eventually causing minor outbreaks. With this premise, the study aimed to describe MRSA infections using the hospital-based data of a tertiary hospital in Bacolod City, Philippines, from 2010 to 2012. Specifically, this study aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus isolated from clinical specimens and to put emphasis on the prevalence of MRSA and Inducible Clindamycin Resistance. A total of 94 cases from 2010 to 2012 were diagnosed to have S. aureus infection using conventional bacteriologic methods. From these cases, 38 (40.6% were identified as MRSA and 37 (39.4% were inducible clindamycin resistant. Wounds and abscesses were considered to be the most common specimens with MRSA infections having 71.05% while blood was the least with 5.3%. For drug susceptibility, out of the 94 S. aureus cases, including MRSA, 100% were susceptible to linezolid making it the drug of choice for this study. It was then followed by tetracycline having a mean susceptibility of 95%;, while penicillin G was ineffective with 94 cases having 0% susceptibility.

  16. Evaluation of constitutive and inducible resistance to clindamycin in clinical samples of Staphylococcus aureus from a tertiary hospital

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    Angelita Bottega

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA have become common in hospitals and the community environment, and this wide resistance has limited patient treatment. Clindamycin (CL represents an important alternative therapy for infections caused by S. aureus. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing using standard methods may not detect inducible CL resistance. This study was performed to detect the phenotypes of resistance to macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B (MLSB antibiotics, including CL, in clinical samples of S. aureus from patients at a tertiary hospital in Santa Maria, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Methods One hundred and forty clinical isolates were submitted to the disk diffusion induction test (D-test with an erythromycin (ER disk positioned at a distance of 20mm from a CL disk. The results were interpreted according to the recommendations of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI. Results In this study, 29 (20.7% of the 140 S. aureus samples were resistant to methicillin (MRSA, and 111 (79.3% were susceptible to methicillin (MSSA. The constitutive resistance phenotype (cMLSB was observed in 20 (14.3% MRSA samples and in 5 (3.6% MSSA samples, whereas the inducible resistance phenotype (iMLSB was observed in 3 (2.1% MRSA samples and in 8 (5.8% MSSA samples. Conclusions The D-test is essential for detecting the iMLSB phenotype because the early identification of this phenotype allows clinicians to choose an appropriate treatment for patients. Furthermore, this test is simple, easy to perform and inexpensive.

  17. Current Antibiotic Resistance Trend in Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus from a Tertiary Care Hospital

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    Zahra Ravesh-Barakzai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus has remained always an important pathogen of common infections acquired in community and as  well as serious nosocomial infections. With advent of penicillins and cephalosporins, infections could be effectively treated, but with the global emergence of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains (MRSA physicians were  again left  with limited treatment options. This scenario of increasing resistance is even more intense and challenging for developing countries like Pakistan. Hence with this background the study was carried out to establish the frequency of MRSA in clinical specimens and look into the available antibiotic treatment options.Methods: Samples of  pus, blood, urine, body fluids and catheter tips submitted for culture  in  Microbiology department between  August  to  September  2012,  from outdoor and indoor adult patients of Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences Islamabad, yielding growth of S. aureus were included in the study. After identification by  standard  methods, antibiotic susceptibility of  the  isolates  was performed by Kirby Baeur disc diffusion method. The study was retrospective descriptive and observational.Results: Total  106  S.  aureus  were  isolated. 45.3%  of  them  were  MRSA  and majorities were from pus samples of hospitalized patients. All MRSA were 100% sensitive to vancomycin, whereas 87.5% to chloramphenicol. To rest of the non – beta lactam drugs, resistance of 80% or more was noted.Conclusion: S. aureus is a common clinical isolate from patients in this region ofPakistan and significant number were MRSA especially from hospitalized patients. Treatment options are limited to vancomycin and chloramphenicol.

  18. Peptidoglycan from Staphylococcus aureus induces the overexpression of TRLs 1-8 mRNA in corneal fibroblasts, but its lipoteichoic acid and muramyl dipeptide only induced the overexpression of TLR5 or TRL9

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    Sandra Rodríguez-Martínez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide induces TLR-1-8 mRNAs over-expression in corneal fibroblast. Analyzing if other TLR-ligands can do the same, we found that peptidoglycan does, but not muramyldipeptide, lipoteichoic acid and polyI:C. This suggests that the recognition of lipopolysaccharide and peptidoglycan is enough to alert these cells against microorganisms through the over-expression of the majority TLRs.

  19. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Malaysian tertiary centre.

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    Rashid, Zetti Zainol; Bahari, Norazlah; Othman, Amizah; Jaafar, Roslinda; Mohamed, Nurul Azmawati; Jabbari, Idimaz; Sulong, Anita; Hashim, Rohaidah; Ahmad, Norazah

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is a pathogen recognized to be distinct in both phenotype and genotype from hospital-acquired MRSA. We have identified CA-MRSA cases in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, including their antibiotic susceptibility patterns and genotypic characteristics. Cases were identified during January to December 2009 from routine clinical specimens, where culture and antibiotic susceptibility results yielded pauci-resistant MRSA isolates suspected as being CA-MRSA. The patients' clinical data were collected and their specimens were sent for molecular confirmation and analysis. Five cases of CA-MRSA were identified, which had a multi-sensitive pattern on antibiotic susceptibility tests and were resistant to only penicillin and oxacillin. All cases were skin and soft-tissue infections, including diabetic foot with gangrene, infected scalp hematoma, philtrum abscess in a healthcare worker, thrombophlebitis complicated with abscess and infected bedsore. All five cases were confirmed MRSA by detection of mecA. SCCmec typing (ccr and mec complex) revealed SCCmec type IV for all cases except the infected bedsore case. Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene was positive in all isolates. As clinical features among methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, CA-MRSA and "nosocomial CA-MRSA" are indistinct, early recognition is necessary in order to initiate appropriate antibiotics and infection control measures. Continual surveillance of pauci-resistant MRSA and molecular analysis are necessary in order to identify emerging strains as well as their epidemiology and transmission, both in the community and in healthcare setting. PMID:23682444

  20. Evolutionarily distinct bacteriophage endolysins featuring conserved peptidoglycan cleavage sites protect mice from MRSA infection

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    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogen relevant for both human and animal health. With multi-drug resistant S. aureus strains becoming increasingly prevalent, alternative therapeutics are urgently needed. Bacteriophage endolysins (peptidoglycan hydrolases, PGH) are capable of killing Gra...

  1. Antibiotic sensitivity pattern of Staphylococcus aureus from clinical isolates in a tertiary health institution in Kano, Northwestern Nigeria

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    Nwankwo Emmanuel Onwubiko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The importance of Staphylococcus aureus as a persistent nosocomial and community acquired pathogen has become a global health concern. It has a remarkable capability of evolving different mechanisms of resistance to most antimicrobial agents. The aim of the present study is to establish the incidence of S. aureus in clinical specimens and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern to various antibiotics in this locality. METHODS: One hundred and fifty consecutive isolates of S. aureus obtained from various clinical specimens between January and December 2009 sent to the Medical Microbiology Laboratory Department of Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital (AKTH were confirmed by standard bacteriological procedures. Antibiotic sensitivity pattern was carried out by disc diffusion method. RESULTS: The age group with the highest number of isolates was (0-10yrs while wound infection had the highest frequency of S. aureus isolates (30.7% in the study. Males (62.0% were more infected than females (38.0%. The sensitivity pattern of S. aureus to the following antibiotics; Gentamicin, Amoxycillin/clavulanate, Streptomycin, Cloxacillin, Erythromycin, Chloramphenicol, Cotrimoxazole, Tetracycline, Penicillin, Ciprofloxacin, Ofloxacin, Levofloxacin, Ceftriaxone, Amoxycillin and vancomycin were 92.4%, 63.0%, 44.2%, 35.8%, 52.4%, 61.9%, 15.5%, 31.2%, 7.1%, 78.9%, 76.6%, 100%, 71.4%, 30.7% and 100% respectively. Methicillin resistant isolates were sensitive to Levofloxacin 93.7% and Ofloxacin 68.7%. CONCLUSION: The results of the present study show that the fluoroquinolones are effective in the management of Staphylococcus aureus infections including methicillin resistant strains in this environment.

  2. Mupirocin resistance in nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus among healthcare workers of a tertiary care rural hospital

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    Dardi Charan Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mupirocin (pseudomonic acid A is a topical antimicrobial agent with excellent antistaphylococcal and antistreptococcal activity. A nasal formulation is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for eradicating nasal carriage in adult patients as well as in health care personnel. Resistance to mupirocin has already been reported worldwide. The increasing prevalence of mupirocin resistance among Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS species could be an important threat to the future use of mupirocin against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. Thus, this study was carried out to find the prevalence of mupirocin resistance in S. aureus and CoNS by disc diffusion and to determine the rates of high-level and low-level mupirocin resistance in S. aureus and CoNS by disc diffusion. Materials and Methods: A total of 140 healthcare workers (HCWs (doctor, nursing staff, housekeeping staff were randomly selected. S. aureus and CoNS isolates were tested for mupirocin resistance by the disk diffusion method using 5 μg and 200 μg mupirocin discs. MRSA isolates were tested for antibiotics by Kirby-Bauer disc-diffusion method as per Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Results: Out of 140 nasal swabs collected from HCWs, S. aureus was isolated in 38 (27.14%, and CoNS was isolated in 73 (52.14%. MRSA was isolated in 20 (14.28% and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci (MRCoNS in 34 (24.29%. Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA and MSCoNS isolates were 100% sensitive to mupirocin, but two isolates from MRSA (1.43% and five from MRCoNS (3.57% were mupirocin resistant. Conclusion: The presence of mupirocin resistance in MRSA and MRCoNS is a cause for concern. It could be limited by regular surveillance and effective infection control initiatives so to inform health care facilities to guide therapeutic and prophylactic use of mupirocin.

  3. Nine years′ review on preseptal and orbital cellulitis and emergence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococus aureus in a tertiary hospital in India

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    Datta G Pandian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Preseptal cellulitis is the commonest orbital disease which frequently needs to be differentiated from orbital cellulitis. Prompt diagnosis and treatment with appropriate antibiotics can prevent vision loss and life-threatening complications of orbital cellulitis. Aims: To describe the clinical profile of cases with preseptal and orbital cellulitis admitted to a tertiary care hospital during a period of nine years. The causative organisms and the clinical outcome were analyzed. Settings and Design : Retrospective descriptive case study done in a tertiary care hospital in South India. Material and Methods: The in-patient records of patients with preseptal and orbital cellulitis were reviewed from 1998 to 2006. The factors reviewed included ocular findings aiding in the distinction of the two clinical conditions, the duration of symptoms, the duration of hospital stay, microbiological culture report of pus or wound swab, blood culture, drugs used for treatment, the response to therapy and complications. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive analysis. Results: One hundred and ten cases, 77 patients with preseptal cellulitis and 33 patients with orbital cellulitis were reviewed. Five percent of children and 21% of adults presented with cutaneous anthrax contributing to preseptal cellulitis. Thirty-nine percent cases with orbital cellulitis were caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Conclusions: This study has helped in identifying organisms which cause orbital infections, especially community-acquired MRSA. It indicates the need for modifying our empirical antimicrobial therapy, especially in orbital cellulitis.

  4. CURRENT SENSITIVITY PATTERN OF MRSA (METHICILLIN RESISTANT STAPH AUREUS IN A TERTIARY CARE ORTHOPAEDIC HOSPITAL IN KASHMIR (J&K

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    Shaika

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In view of the reported emergence of vancomycin resistance in MRSA from the state and the country as a whole we evaluated the pattern of culture and sensitivity on 160 samples from Orthopaedic Department over a period of one year between Nov 2014 and Nov 2015. These belonged to 111 males and 49 females with different aetiologies. Using standard protocols for the culture, 84 (52% samples grew no organisms while Staph aureus was grown in 43 samples (26.8% and gram negative organism in 28 and 5 samples grew mixed organism. Out of these 43 isolates of Staph aureus, MRSA was grown in 32 (74.4% and MSSA in 11 (25.6%. These belonged to 23 (71.8% males and 9 (28.1% females. Majority of MRSA were grown from the patients of acute osteomyelitis and operated fractures (63.3%. Linezolid showed highest sensitivity (100% followed by Vancomycin (96.8%, Clindamycin (37.5%, erythromycin (21%, Amikacin (21%, Levofloxacin (9.3%, cotrimoxazole (9.3% and ciprofloxacin (3.1%. By diffusion method 6 positive cultures depicted doubtful sensitivity pattern for vancomycin (18.75%. However, on further analysis using MIC only one isolate (3.3% showed intermediate resistance to vancomycin; 12 cultures (37.5% were sensitive to vancomycin and linezolid only. The presence of vancomycin resistance calls for a watchful approach towards these infections and an extensive study to better define the problem.

  5. Modified PAP method to detect heteroresistance to vancomycin among methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates at a tertiary care hospital

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    Iyer R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was an attempt at developing, establishing, validating and comparing the modified PAP method for detection of hetero-vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (h-VRSA with the routine antimicrobial susceptibility testing (using the BSAC standardized disc diffusion method, minimum inhibitory concentrations of vancomycin using standard E-test methodology and the Hiramatsu′s screening method. A total of 50 methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus obtained from various clinical specimens, along with the Mu 3 and Mu 50 strains as controls, were studied. No VRSA isolates were obtained. However, four of the test strains were positive by the Hiramatsu′s screening method, of which only one isolate could be confirmed by the modified PAP analysis method. This isolate was a coloniser from the drain fluid of a liver transplant recipient. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and the overall efficiency of the Hiramatsu′s screening method with the modified PAP analysis as the gold standard were found to be 100, 93.8, 25 and 94%, respectively. It is very essential for clinical laboratories to screen for h-VRSA, given the increasing use of glycopeptide antibiotics in therapy and the potential for failed therapy in patients infected with these strains.

  6. Correlation of mupirocin resistance with biofilm production in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from surgical site infections in a tertiary centre, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Ghada I; Nabil, Yasmin M

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to detect mupirocin-resistant isolates from pus/wound swabs taken postoperatively in a tertiary centre in Egypt and to determine their ability to form biofilm in order to establish its correlation with mupirocin resistance. This was a prospective study including 513pus/wound swabs from patients suffering from postoperative surgical site infections over the period July 2013-January 2015. Samples were cultured and isolates were identified by coagulase activity, DNase test, mannitol fermentation by mannitol salt agar followed by API Staph 32. Oxacillin agar screen test, agar dilution test for mupirocin, and mupA gene detection by PCR were performed for all methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates. Biofilm detection was carried out by the microtitre plate and Congo red agar methods. Of the 161 S. aureus isolates identified, 73 (45.3%) were MRSA, among which 82.2% were mupirocin-susceptible and 17.8% were mupirocin-resistant. Among the resistant isolates, 38.5% showed low-level resistance and 61.5% were high-level mupirocin-resistant. The mupA gene was detected in 75.0% of high-level mupirocin-resistant strains and in none of the low-level mupirocin-resistant strains. Among the mupirocin-susceptible isolates, 95.0% were biofilm-producers and 5.0% did not produce biofilm. All mupirocin-resistant isolates produced biofilm. Moreover, 15.3% of high-level mupirocin-resistant strains were negative for the mupA gene but showed evidence of biofilm formation. In conclusion, biofilm formation may be suggested to play a role in mupirocin resistance besides the presence of a genetic element encoding abnormal isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase, however further studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27436387

  7. Regulation of Bacterial Peptidoglycan Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Michel

    2016-07-01

    How bacterial cells control the activity of peptidoglycan polymerases has remained mysterious. Biochemical characterization of derivatives of penicillin-binding protein PBP1b that are functional in the absence of lipoprotein LpoB provides evidence for allosteric control of PBP1b glycosyltransferase activity via binding of LpoB to the PBP1b UBH1 domain. PMID:27236859

  8. Medical and household characteristics associated with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage among patients admitted to a rural tertiary care hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Schinasi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA poses a threat to patient safety and public health. Understanding how MRSA is acquired is important for prevention efforts. This study investigates risk factors for MRSA nasal carriage among patients at an eastern North Carolina hospital in 2011. METHODS: Using a case-control design, hospitalized patients ages 18 - 65 years were enrolled between July 25, 2011 and December 15, 2011 at Vidant Medical Center, a tertiary care hospital that screens all admitted patients for nasal MRSA carriage. Cases, defined as MRSA nasal carriers, were age and gender matched to controls, non-MRSA carriers. In-hospital interviews were conducted, and medical records were reviewed to obtain information on medical and household exposures. Multivariable conditional logistic regression was used to derive odds ratio (OR estimates of association between MRSA carriage and medical and household exposures. RESULTS: In total, 117 cases and 119 controls were recruited to participate. Risk factors for MRSA carriage included having household members who took antibiotics or were hospitalized (OR: 3.27; 95% Confidence Interval (CI: 1.24-8.57 and prior hospitalization with a positive MRSA screen (OR: 3.21; 95% CI: 1.12-9.23. A lower proportion of cases than controls were previously hospitalized without a past positive MRSA screen (OR: 0.40; 95% CI: 0.19-0.87. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that household exposures are important determinants of MRSA nasal carriage in hospitalized patients screened at admission.

  9. The Prevalence of Nasal Carriage of Staphylococcus Aureus Among Healthcare Workers at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Assam with Special Reference to MRSA

    OpenAIRE

    Rongpharpi, Sharon Rainy; Hazarika, Naba Kumar; Kalita, Hitesh

    2013-01-01

    Background: The recent years have witnessed the increasing resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to many antimicrobial agents. The most notable example is the emergence of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which was reported just one year after the launch of methicillin. The ecological niches of the S. aureus strains are the anterior nares. The identification of Staphylococcus aureus by using a proper antibiogram and the detection of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus...

  10. Prevalence and clinical prognosis of heteroresistant vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus in a tertiary care center in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan; HU Yun-jian; AI Xiao-man; XU Hong-tao; SUN Tie-ying

    2013-01-01

    Background The emergence of heteroresistant vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (hVISA) is increasingly challenging the methods for detection in diagnostic microbiology laboratories.However,the report of hVISA is rare in China.This study summarizes the prevalence and clinical features associated with hVlSA infections at our institution and the local impact they have on clinical outcome.Methods A total of 122 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates which were of the causative pathogens were collected.One hundred and two patients for whom we had full information of MRSA pneumonia were included.Isolates of MRSA were collected using PCR to detect the mecA gene.Both Etest and macro Etest were performed to screen for hVISA.The Staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) types were determined by multiplex PCR strategy.Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the risk factors.Results Among the 122 MRSA isolates collected,25 (20.5%) strains were identified as hVISA.There were 119 (97.5%)SCCmec Ⅲ isolates,two (1.6%) SCCmec Ⅱ isolates,and one (0.8%) SCCmec V isolate.The 30-day mortality of MRSA-hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP) was 37.3%,and 62.5% for hVISA-HAP.Vancomycin treatment was the independent risk factor of hVlSA.Factors independently associated with 30-day mortality in all patients were acute physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) Ⅱ score >20,multiple lobe lesions,and creatinine clearance rate (CCR) <15 ml/min.Conclusions The prevalence of hVISA is 20.5% at our institution.hVISA-HAP patients had a poor clinical outcome.Vancomycin treatment was the independent predictors for hVISA infection.Factors independently associated with 30-day mortality in all patients were APACHE Ⅱ score >20,multiple lobe lesions and CCR <15 ml/min.

  11. Cefazolin versus Nafcillin for Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection in a California Tertiary Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollett, S; Baxi, S M; Rutherford, G W; Doernberg, S B; Bacchetti, P; Chambers, H F

    2016-08-01

    Recent observational studies have suggested possible reductions in mortality in patients receiving cefazolin versus antistaphylococcal penicillins. We examined 90-day mortality in patients receiving cefazolin compared to nafcillin for methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bloodstream infection (BSI). We identified persons with MSSA BSI admitted to San Francisco General Hospital from January 2008 to July 2013 through a hospital-wide infection surveillance system and confirmed 90-day mortality using U.S. national vital registries. We included persons receiving cefazolin or nafcillin as the predominant intravenous antimicrobial agent; all participants received inpatient Infectious Diseases service consultation. We estimated the association between receipt of cefazolin and 90-day risk of death by multivariate logistic regression, including a propensity score for receiving cefazolin as the second predictor. Of 230 MSSA BSI cases, 30 received nafcillin and 70 received cefazolin as the predominant antimicrobial; 10 died within 90 days, 5 from each group. Unadjusted analysis showed substantial but not statistically significant reduced odds of death in those receiving cefazolin (odds ratio, 0.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.10 to 1.44). Multivariate analysis with propensity scores found a similar adjusted odds ratio (0.40; 95% CI, 0.09 to 1.74; P = 0.22). We found a large reduction in 90-day mortality in those receiving cefazolin compared to nafcillin for MSSA BSI, but this finding was not statistically significant. The magnitude of effect seen in this and other studies justifies further study. PMID:27216053

  12. A case report of Small Colony variant of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from a patient with chronic oesteomyelitis in a tertiary care hospital of eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalidas Rit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Small colony variants (SCVs of Staphylococcus aureus often cause persistant and relapsing infections. SCVs are characterized by a strong reduction in growth rate, atypical colony morphology and unusual biochemical characteristics. We here report a case of chronic oesteomyelitis caused by SCV of Staphyloccous aureus in a middle aged male patient.

  13. Living with an imperfect cell wall : compensation of femAB inactivation in Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hübscher, Judith; Jansen, Andrea; Kotte, Oliver; Schäfer, Juliane; Majcherczyk, Paul A.; Harris, Llinos G.; Bierbaum, Gabriele; Heinemann, Matthias; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte

    2007-01-01

    Background: Synthesis of the Staphylococcus aureus peptidoglycan pentaglycine interpeptide bridge is catalyzed by the nonribosomal peptidyl transferases FemX, FemA and FemB. Inactivation of the femAB operon reduces the interpeptide to a monoglycine, leading to a poorly crosslinked peptidoglycan. fem

  14. Study of the cell wall of Staphylococcus aureus and its sensitivity to enzybiotics

    OpenAIRE

    Čmelík, R. (Richard); Melková, K.; Kobzová, Š.; Janda, L

    2015-01-01

    The endolysin resistant and sensitive strains of Staphylococcus aureus were compared by means of LC-MS based structural analysis of peptidoglycan isolated from their cell walls. The structural explanation of the resistance was suggested.

  15. Is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus involved in community acquired skin and soft tissue infections?: Experience from a tertiary care centre in Mumbai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Phakade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To improve the empiric antimicrobial therapy of community-acquired (CA skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs, it is necessary to generate data on the current spectrum and susceptibility profile of associated bacteria. CA methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA MRSA is increasingly being reported in SSTIs in India and globally. Aims: The present study was undertaken to determine the bacterial profile of CA-SSTIs, to know the contribution of MRSA in these infections, to determine inducible clindamycin resistance in S. aureus and to compare the resistance patterns of isolates from hospital-acquired (HA SSTIs. Materials and Methods: Eight hundred and twenty patients with CA SSTIs were prospectively studied. Pus samples were cultured and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern determined. Inducible clindamycin resistance was detected by D-test. Laboratory records were analyzed retrospectively to generate data on HA SSTIs. Results: 619 isolates were recovered in CA-SSTIs, of which S. aureus (73% and Streptococci (12% were the most common. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (28% and Acinetobacter spp (18% were the predominant HA-SSTI pathogens. Susceptibility of CA S. aureus to antibiotics tested was, penicillin (6%, co-trimoxazole (20%, ciprofloxacin (37%, cefazolin (100%, erythromycin (84%, clindamycin (97%, gentamicin (94% and fusidic acid (95%. No MRSA was found in CA SSTIs whereas 45% of HA S. aureus strains were methicillin-resistant. HA strains demonstrated significantly higher resistance as compared to their CA counterparts (P<0.001. D test was positive in 22% of CA S. aureus tested. Conclusions: In CA SSTIs, methicillin-susceptible S. aureus is the predominant pathogen. Penicillinase-resistant penicillins, clindamycin and erythromycin in that order can be used as suitable antimicrobials for empiric therapy. D test should be carried out routinely. No CA MRSA was detected in the present series.

  16. A retrospective analysis of practice patterns in the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infections at three Canadian tertiary care centres

    OpenAIRE

    John M Conly; Stiver, H. Grant; Weiss, Karl A.; Becker, Debbie L; Rosner, Andrew J; Miller, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are increasingly being encountered and pose an increasing burden to the health care system in Canada.OBJECTIVE: To elucidate and characterize the factors influencing the current MRSA treatment patterns in patients with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) before linezolid became available on the Canadian market.METHODS: A retrospective study collected demographic, treatment and resource use data on patients hospitali...

  17. Evaluation of Genotypic and Phenotypic Methods for Detection of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Tertiary Care Hospital of Eastern Odisha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Rakesh Kumar; Mallick, Bandana; Chayani, Nirupama

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus has emerged as an important pathogen in nosocomial and community acquired infections. Accurate and rapid identification of MRSA in clinical specimens is essential for timely decision of effective antimicrobial chemotherapy. Aim The present study was conducted to compare efficacy of four conventional phenotypic methods, with mec- A based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for MRSA identification. Materials and Methods Methicillin resistance was determined in 200 S.aureus isolates by oxacillin disc diffusion, cefoxitin disc diffusion, Oxacillin Resistance Screening Agar and E-test. The results were compared with mec-A based PCR. Results Among 200 S.aureus isolates 62 (31%) were positive for mec-A gene by PCR. Cefoxitin disc diffusion, Oxacillin Resistance Screening Agar and E-test showed 100% specificity. Oxacillin disc diffusion had lowest sensitivity (82.5%) and specificity (98.5%) among all. The conventional methods take more time than PCR for diagnosing MRSA. Linezolid, Vancomycin & Dalfopristin were the highly sensitive drugs against MRSA isolates. Conclusion Cefoxitin disc diffusion, is rapid, simple and cheaper, hence can be used routinely as an alternative to PCR for detection of MRSA in resource constraint laboratories. PMID:27042463

  18. Activities and regulation of peptidoglycan synthases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egan, Alexander J F; Biboy, Jacob; van 't Veer, Inge; Breukink, Eefjan; Vollmer, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    Peptidoglycan (PG) is an essential component in the cell wall of nearly all bacteria, forming a continuous, mesh-like structure, called the sacculus, around the cytoplasmic membrane to protect the cell from bursting by its turgor. Although PG synthases, the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), have b

  19. Screening for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriers among patients and health care workers of a tertiary care hospital in south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathanraj S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 200 subjects were screened for carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA at different sites using oxacillin blood agar and mannitol salt agar with oxacillin. Overall carriage rate was 8.5%, with the highest rate in inpatients (15.6% while the lowest was seen in health care workers (1.8%. The commonest site of colonization was the anterior nares. Oxacillin blood agar was found to be superior to mannitol salt agar with oxacillin for the isolation of MRSA. Male sex and prolonged hospital stay were found to be the major risk factors for MRSA colonization.

  20. Living with an imperfect cell wall: compensation of femAB inactivation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Bierbaum Gabriele; Harris Llinos G; Majcherczyk Paul A; Schäfer Juliane; Kotte Oliver; Jansen Andrea; Hübscher Judith; Heinemann Matthias; Berger-Bächi Brigitte

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Synthesis of the Staphylococcus aureus peptidoglycan pentaglycine interpeptide bridge is catalyzed by the nonribosomal peptidyl transferases FemX, FemA and FemB. Inactivation of the femAB operon reduces the interpeptide to a monoglycine, leading to a poorly crosslinked peptidoglycan. femAB mutants show a reduced growth rate and are hypersusceptible to virtually all antibiotics, including methicillin, making FemAB a potential target to restore β-lactam susceptibility in met...

  1. Evaluation of prevalence of low and high level mupirocin resistance in methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus isolates at a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the trend of mupirocin resistance in MRSA, isolated at the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory of a tertiary care hospital. Methods: A total of 200 MRSA strains recovered over a 2 year period from various body sites were tested using the 5 and 200 mu g discs of mupirocin to detect its resistance. Results: High level and low level mupirocin resistance were detected in zero and 1 % of MRSA strains, respectively. Resistance to other non beta lactam antibiotics was also high. No MRSA strains were found to be resistant to vancomycin and tegicycline. Conclusion: Mupirocin resistance was found to be very low among local clinical isolates of MRSA. Its judicious use to decolonize nasal carriers should be promoted among hospitalized patients to avoid further transmission and infections due to prevalent endemic MRSA strains in any health care setting. Concomitantly, regular surveillance and effective infection control initiatives are desirable to reduce the incidence of health care associated infections due to MRSA and also of mupirocin resistance. (author)

  2. Worrisome trends in rising minimum inhibitory concentration values of antibiotics against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus - Insights from a tertiary care center, South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagasundaram Niveditha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Appearance of isolated reports of resistance to anti-methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA drugs is worrisome underscoring the need to continuously monitor the susceptibility of clinical MRSA isolates to these drugs. Hence, the present study is conducted to determine the susceptibility of MRSA isolates to various classes of anti-MRSA drugs such as vancomycin (glycopeptide, daptomycin (lipopeptide, tigecycline (glycylcycline, and linezolid (oxazolidinone to determine the MIC50 and MIC90 values, and to observe MIC creep over a three year period, if any, with respect to these drugs. METHODS: A total of 200 isolates of MRSA obtained from clinical specimens were included. MIC was determined by E-test for anti-MRSA antibiotics vancomycin, linezolid, daptomycin, and tigecycline. Non-parametric methods (Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-square test were used to assess MIC trends over time. In addition, MIC50 and MIC90 values were also calculated. RESULTS: No isolate was found resistant to vancomycin, daptomycin, or linezolid; five isolates were resistant to tigecycline. Seven VISA isolates were encountered with the MIC value for vancomycin of 4 µg/mL. MIC values for vancomycin, tigecycline, linezolid showed a definite increase over a 3-year period which was statistically significant with p-values <0.0001, 0.0032, 0.0242, respectively. When the percentage of isolates with a median MIC value less than or equal to that of the index year was calculated, the change was most striking with vancomycin. The proportion of isolates with higher MIC values was greater in 2014 than 2012 and 2013. CONCLUSION: MIC creep was notably observed with vancomycin, and to some extent with tigecycline and linezolid. Selection pressure may result in creeping MICs, which may herald the emergence of resistant organisms.

  3. Analysis of Peptidoglycan Structure from Vegetative Cells of Bacillus subtilis 168 and Role of PBP 5 in Peptidoglycan Maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Atrih, Abdelmadjid; Bacher, Gerold; Allmaier, Günter; Williamson, Michael P; Foster, Simon J.

    1999-01-01

    The composition and fine structure of the vegetative cell wall peptidoglycan from Bacillus subtilis were determined by analysis of its constituent muropeptides. The structures of 39 muropeptides, representing 97% of the total peptidoglycan, were elucidated. About 99% analyzed muropeptides in B. subtilis vegetative cell peptidoglycan have the free carboxylic group of diaminopimelic acid amidated. Anhydromuropeptides and products missing a glucosamine at the nonreducing terminus account for 0.4...

  4. Peptidoglycan in atherosclerotic plaque formation and vulnerability

    OpenAIRE

    Oude Nijhuis, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    The studies described in this thesis suggest that peptidoglycan (PG) is involved in initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. PG is an antigen that can be found in large amounts in the Gram-positive bacterial wall and only in small amounts in the Gram-negative bacterial wall. PG is able to stimulate the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), a receptor that plays an important role in the innate immune system. In the normal situation PG is present in the intestinal mucosal flora, but under certain ...

  5. Regulation of heme oxygenase-1 gene by peptidoglycan involves the interaction of Elk-1 and C/EBPα to increase expression

    OpenAIRE

    Hung, Chi-Chih; Liu, Xiaoli; Kwon, Min-Young; Kang, Young-Ho; Chung, Su Wol; Perrella, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is a cytoprotective enzyme with anti-inflammatory properties. HO-1 is induced during a systemic inflammatory response, and expression of HO-1 is beneficial during sepsis of a Gram-positive source. Systemic infection from Gram-positive organisms has emerged as an important cause of sepsis, with Staphylococcus aureus as a common etiology. An important mediator of Gram-positive infections is peptidoglycan (PGN), a cell wall component of these organisms. Here, we demonstrate...

  6. Peptidoglycan Hydrolases for Control of Mastitis Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine mastitis results in annual losses between $1.7 billion and $2 billion in the United States alone. Among the most relevant causative agents of this disease are Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B; GBS) and Streptococcus dysgalactiae (Group C; GCS) streptococci as well as Staphylococcus aureus. ...

  7. Tertiary relics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spudil, J.; Kvaček, Z.; Pešek, J.; Sýkorová, Ivana; Teodoridis, V.

    Prague: Czech Geological Survey, 2014, s. 242-246 ISBN 978-80-7075-862-5 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA105/06/0653 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : Tertiary basins * Czech Republic * Cenomanian and Tertiary lignite * geology * stratigraphy Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  8. Studies towards a Solution Structure of the Peptidoglycan Glycosyltransferases

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yihui

    2012-01-01

    Peptidoglycan glycosyltransferases (PGTs) are highly conserved bacterial enzymes that catalyze the polymerization of the lipidic disaccharide, Lipid II, to form individual peptidoglycan (PG) strands which are subsequently cross-linked to form mature PG, the major skeletal component of the bacterial cell wall. Recent advances in the preparation of well-defined PGT substrates have enabled the biochemical characterization of Lipid II polymerization by the PGTs. In the course of these studie...

  9. Identification of key peptidoglycan hydrolases for morphogenesis, autolysis, and peptidoglycan composition of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolain Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactobacillus plantarum is commonly used in industrial fermentation processes. Selected strains are also marketed as probiotics for their health beneficial effects. Although the functional role of peptidoglycan-degrading enzymes is increasingly documented to be important for a range of bacterial processes and host-microbe interactions, little is known about their functional roles in lactobacilli. This knowledge holds important potential for developing more robust strains resistant to autolysis under stress conditions as well as peptidoglycan engineering for a better understanding of the contribution of released muramyl-peptides as probiotic immunomodulators. Results Here, we explored the functional role of the predicted peptidoglycan hydrolase (PGH complement encoded in the genome of L. plantarum by systematic gene deletion. From twelve predicted PGH-encoding genes, nine could be individually inactivated and their corresponding mutant strains were characterized regarding their cell morphology, growth, and autolysis under various conditions. From this analysis, we identified two PGHs, the predicted N-acetylglucosaminidase Acm2 and NplC/P60 D,L-endopeptidase LytA, as key determinants in the morphology of L. plantarum. Acm2 was demonstrated to be required for the ultimate step of cell separation of daughter cells, whereas LytA appeared to be required for cell shape maintenance and cell-wall integrity. We also showed by autolysis experiments that both PGHs are involved in the global autolytic process with a dominant role for Acm2 in all tested conditions, identifying Acm2 as the major autolysin of L. plantarum WCFS1. In addition, Acm2 and the putative N-acetylmuramidase Lys2 were shown to play redundant roles in both cell separation and autolysis under stress conditions. Finally, the analysis of the peptidoglycan composition of Acm2- and LytA-deficient derivatives revealed their potential hydrolytic activities by the

  10. Cell wall monoglycine cross-bridges and methicillin hypersusceptibility in a femAB null mutant of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Strandén, A M; Ehlert, K; Labischinski, H.; Berger-Bächi, B.

    1997-01-01

    The femAB operon is involved in the formation of the characteristic pentaglycine side chain of the staphylococcal peptidoglycan. Allele replacement of the femAB operon with the tetracycline resistance determinant tetK in a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain resulted in impaired growth, methicillin hypersusceptibility, and lysostaphin resistance. The usual pentaglycine cross-bridges were replaced by monoglycine bridges exclusively, and cross-linking of the peptidoglycan strands...

  11. Peptidoglycan: a post-genomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cayrou Caroline

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To derive post-genomic, neutral insight into the peptidoglycan (PG distribution among organisms, we mined 1,644 genomes listed in the Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes database for the presence of a minimal 3-gene set that is necessary for PG metabolism. This gene set consists of one gene from the glycosyltransferase family GT28, one from family GT51 and at least one gene belonging to one of five glycoside hydrolase families (GH23, GH73, GH102, GH103 and GH104. Results None of the 103 Viruses or 101 Archaea examined possessed the minimal 3-gene set, but this set was detected in 1/42 of the Eukarya members (Micromonas sp., coding for GT28, GT51 and GH103 and in 1,260/1,398 (90.1% of Bacteria, with a 100% positive predictive value for the presence of PG. Pearson correlation test showed that GT51 family genes were significantly associated with PG with a value of 0.963 and a p value less than 10-3. This result was confirmed by a phylogenetic comparative analysis showing that the GT51-encoding gene was significantly associated with PG with a Pagel’s score of 60 and 51 (percentage of error close to 0%. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the GT51 gene history comprised eight loss and one gain events, and suggested a dynamic on-going process. Conclusions Genome analysis is a neutral approach to explore prospectively the presence of PG in uncultured, sequenced organisms with high predictive values.

  12. Structural analysis of the contacts anchoring moenomycin to peptidoglycan glycosyltransferases and implications for antibiotic design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Y.; Fuse, S.; Ostash, B.; Sliz, P.; Kahne, D.; Walker, S. (Harvard-Med); (Harvard)

    2008-08-20

    Peptidoglycan glycosyltransferases (PGTs), enzymes that catalyze the formation of the glycan chains of the bacterial cell wall, have tremendous potential as antibiotic targets. The moenomycins, a potent family of natural product antibiotics, are the only known active site inhibitors of the PGTs and serve as blueprints for the structure-based design of new antibacterials. A 2.8 {angstrom} structure of a Staphylococcus aureus PGT with moenomycin A bound in the active site appeared recently, potentially providing insight into substrate binding; however, the protein-ligand contacts were not analyzed in detail and the implications of the structure for inhibitor design were not addressed. We report here the 2.3 {angstrom} structure of a complex of neryl-moenomycin A bound to the PGT domain of Aquifex aeolicus PBP1A. The structure allows us to examine protein-ligand contacts in detail and implies that six conserved active site residues contact the centrally located F-ring phosphoglycerate portion of neryl-moenomycin A. A mutational analysis shows that all six residues play important roles in enzymatic activity. We suggest that small scaffolds that maintain these key contacts will serve as effective PGT inhibitors. To test this hypothesis, we have prepared, via heterologous expression of a subset of moenomycin biosynthetic genes, a novel moenomycin intermediate that maintains these six contacts but does not contain the putative minimal pharmacophore. This compound has comparable biological activity to the previously proposed minimal pharmacophore. The results reported here may facilitate the design of antibiotics targeted against peptidoglycan glycosyltransferases.

  13. DMPD: Peptidoglycan signaling in innate immunity and inflammatory disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15802263 Peptidoglycan signaling in innate immunity and inflammatory disease. McDon...) (.csml) Show Peptidoglycan signaling in innate immunity and inflammatory disease. PubmedID 15802263 Title ...Peptidoglycan signaling in innate immunity and inflammatory disease. Authors McDo

  14. Correlation between intracellular accumulation of peptidoglycan precursors and streptomycin formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the mycelium of Streptomyces HUT 6037 was suspended in 0.5% NaCl solution containing 14C-glucosamine, peptidoglycan precursors accumulated in the cells. While UDP-N-acetylglucosamine accumulated in the largest amount among the precursors, extracellularly added and intracellularly accumulated UDP-N-acetylglucosamine were not used to synthesize streptomycin and were probably used for peptidoglycan formation. On the other hand, correlation was recognized between accumulation of glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN-6P) and streptomycin formation. Addition of an inhibitor of peptidoglycan synthesis such as enduracidin, vancomycin or cycloserine to a mycelium-suspended culture changed the ratio of accumulated peptidoglycan precursors. When streptomycin formation was stimulated by addition of enduracidin or vancomycin, intracellular GlcN-6P remarkably increased and then decreased rapidly. On the contrary, when cycloserine was added to the culture, no increase of GlcN-6P was observed and streptomycin formation was not stimulated. These results suggest that an increase in the intracellular concentration of GlcN-6P is required for activation or induction of the system for utilizing GlcN-6P for streptomycin formation. (author)

  15. Transmembrane transport of peptidoglycan precursors across model and bacterial membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, V.; Sijbrandi, R.; Kol, M.A.; Swiezewska, E.; de Kruijff, B.; Breukink, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Translocation of the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is a key step in bacterial cell wall synthesis, but hardly understood. Using NBD-labelled Lipid II, we showed by fluorescence and TLC assays that Lipid II transport does not occur spontaneously and is not induced b

  16. Molecular investigations of peptidoglycan-binding proteins in Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Machata, Silke

    2008-01-01

    The peptidoglycan layer of gram-positive bacteria contains various components that are crucial for interactions with the environment and for host invasion. In this study, the gram-positive pathogen Listeria monocytogenes was used to study the importance of three cell wall constituents for viability and virulence: the cell-wall degrading murein hydrolases (autolysins), teichoic acids and lipoproteins. The first section of this study addresses cell wall hydrolases and their role in deter-min...

  17. Arrangement of peptidoglycan in the cell wall of Staphylococcus spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Amako, K; Umeda, A.; Murata, K

    1982-01-01

    The arrangement of peptidoglycan in the cell wall of Staphylococcus was observed with the newly developed freeze-fracture technique, using n-octanol instead of water as the freezing medium. The replica of the trichloroacetic acid-extracted cell wall (TCA-wall) showed two areas. One of them has a concentric circular structure, a characteristic surface structure of the staphylococcal cell wall, and the other showed an irregular and rough surface. The chemical analysis of the wall revealed that ...

  18. Hydrophobic Side-Chain Length Determines Activity and Conformational Heterogeneity of a Vancomycin Derivative Bound to the Cell Wall of Staphylococcus aureus§

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sung Joon; Schaefer, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Disaccharide modified glycopeptides with hydrophobic sidechains are active against vancomycin-resistant enterococci and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus. The activity depends on the length of the sidechain. The benzyl sidechain of N-(4-fluorobenzyl)vancomycin (FBV) has the minimal length sufficient for enhancement in activity against vancomycin-resistant pathogens. The conformation of FBV bound to the peptidoglycan in whole cells of S. aureus has been determined using rotational-echo double res...

  19. Functional and Morphological Adaptation to Peptidoglycan Precursor Alteration in Lactococcus lactis*

    OpenAIRE

    Deghorain, Marie; Fontaine, Laetitia; David, Blandine; Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Courtin, Pascal; Daniel, Richard; Errington, Jeff; Sorokin, Alexei; Bolotin, Alexander; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Hallet, Bernard; Hols, Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Cell wall peptidoglycan assembly is a tightly regulated process requiring the combined action of multienzyme complexes. In this study we provide direct evidence showing that substrate transformations occurring at the different stages of this process play a crucial role in the spatial and temporal coordination of the cell wall synthesis machinery. Peptidoglycan substrate alteration was investigated in the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis by substituting the peptidoglycan precursor bi...

  20. The potential of the endolysin Lysdb from Lactobacillus delbrueckii phage for combating Staphylococcus aureus during cheese manufacture from raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tingting; Xin, YongPing; Zhang, Chenchen; Ouyang, Xudong; Kong, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Phage endolysins have received increased attention in recent times as potential antibacterial agents and the biopreservatives in food production processes. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common pathogens in bacterial food poisoning outbreaks. In this study, the endolysin Lysdb, one of the two-component cell lysis cassette of Lactobacillus delbrueckii phage phiLdb, was shown to possess a muramidase domain and catalytic sites with homology to Chalaropsis-type lysozymes. Peptidoglycan hydrolytic bond specificity determination revealed that Lysdb was able to cleave the 6-O-acetylated peptidoglycans present in the cell walls of S. aureus. Turbidity reduction assays demonstrated that Lysdb could effectively lyse the S. aureus live cells under acidic and mesothermal conditions. To further evaluate the ability of Lysdb as a potential antibacterial agent against S. aureus in cheese manufacture, Lactobacillus casei BL23 was engineered to constitutively deliver active Lysdb to challenge S. aureus in lab-scale cheese making from raw milk. Compared with the raw milk, the viable counts of S. aureus were reduced by 10(5)-fold in the cheese inoculated with the engineered L. casei strain during the fermentation process, and the pathogenic bacterial numbers remained at a low level (10(4) CFU/g) after 6 weeks of ripening at 10 °C. Taken together, all results indicated that the Lysdb has the function as an effective tool for combating S. aureus during cheese manufacture from raw milk. PMID:26621799

  1. One-year mortality in coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Snygg-Martin, Ulrika; Olaison, Lars;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate in-hospital mortality and 12-month mortality in patients with coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) compared to Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infective endocarditis (IE). We used a prospective cohort study of 66 consecutive CoNS and 170 S. aureus IE...... patients, collected at 2 tertiary university hospitals in Copenhagen (Denmark) and at 1 tertiary university hospital in Gothenburg (Sweden). Median (range) C-reactive protein at admission was higher in patients with S. aureus IE (150 mg/l (1-521) vs 94 mg/l (6-303); p...% of patients with S. aureus IE (p =0.05). In conclusion, CoNS IE was associated with a long diagnostic delay and high in-hospital mortality, whereas post-discharge prognosis was better in this group of patients compared to patients with IE due to S. aureus....

  2. A Comparative Analysis of Community Acquired and Hospital Acquired Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus

    OpenAIRE

    P R, Vysakh; M, Jeya

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Staphylococcus aureus has developed resistance against most of the therapeutic agents. The most notable example of this phenomenon was the emergence of Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We are reporting the prevalence and the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of the MRSA isolates from a tertiary care hospital.

  3. Potential of the virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolase HydH5 and its derivative fusion proteins in milk biopreservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Rodríguez-Rubio

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage lytic enzymes have recently attracted considerable interest as novel antimicrobials against Gram-positive bacteria. In this work, antimicrobial activity in milk of HydH5 [a virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolase (VAPGH encoded by the Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88], and three different fusion proteins created between HydH5 and lysostaphin has been assessed. The lytic activity of the five proteins (HydH5, HydH5Lyso, HydH5SH3b, CHAPSH3b and lysostaphin was confirmed using commercial whole extended shelf-life milk (ESL in challenge assays with 10(4 CFU/mL of the strain S. aureus Sa9. HydH5, HydH5Lyso and HydH5SH3b (3.5 µM kept the staphylococcal viable counts below the control cultures for 6 h at 37°C. The effect is apparent just 15 minutes after the addition of the lytic enzyme. Of note, lysostaphin and CHAPSH3b showed the highest staphylolytic protection as they were able to eradicate the initial staphylococcal challenge immediately or 15 min after addition, respectively, at lower concentration (1 µM at 37°C. CHAPSH3b showed the same antistaphyloccal effect at room temperature (1.65 µM. No re-growth was observed for the remainder of the experiment (up to 6 h. CHAPSH3b activity (1.65 µM was also assayed in raw (whole and skim and pasteurized (whole and skim milk. Pasteurization of milk clearly enhanced CHAPSH3b staphylolytic activity in both whole and skim milk at both temperatures. This effect was most dramatic at room temperature as this protein was able to reduce S. aureus viable counts to undetectable levels immediately after addition with no re-growth detected for the duration of the experiment (360 min. Furthermore, CHAPSH3b protein is known to be heat tolerant and retained some lytic activity after pasteurization treatment and after storage at 4°C for 3 days. These results might facilitate the use of the peptidoglycan hydrolase HydH5 and its derivative fusions, particularly CHAPSH3b, as

  4. Analysis of peptidoglycan precursors in vancomycin-resistant enterococci.

    OpenAIRE

    Billot-Klein, D; Gutmann, L; Collatz, E; van Heijenoort, J

    1992-01-01

    Analysis by high-pressure liquid chromatography of the cytoplasmic peptidoglycan precursors of a high- and a low-level vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus spp. was performed before and after induction of resistance. This analysis showed a decrease of the D-Ala-D-Ala and UDP-MurNac-pentapeptide pools, an increase of the UDP-MurNac-tripeptide pool, and the appearance of new UDP-MurNac-containing material. These results lead us to suggest that the vancomycin-induced carboxypeptidase activity cleav...

  5. Inflammatory cytokine response to Bacillus anthracis peptidoglycan requires phagocytosis and lysosomal trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Janaki K; Khurana, Taruna; Langer, Marybeth; West, Christopher M; Ballard, Jimmy D; Metcalf, Jordan P; Merkel, Tod J; Coggeshall, K Mark

    2010-06-01

    During advanced stages of inhalation anthrax, Bacillus anthracis accumulates at high levels in the bloodstream of the infected host. This bacteremia leads to sepsis during late-stage anthrax; however, the mechanisms through which B. anthracis-derived factors contribute to the pathology of infected hosts are poorly defined. Peptidoglycan, a major component of the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria, can provoke symptoms of sepsis in animal models. We have previously shown that peptidoglycan of B. anthracis can induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines by cells in human blood. Here, we show that biologically active peptidoglycan is shed from an active culture of encapsulated B. anthracis strain Ames in blood. Peptidoglycan is able to bind to surfaces of responding cells, and internalization of peptidoglycan is required for the production of inflammatory cytokines. We also show that the peptidoglycan traffics to lysosomes, and lysosomal function is required for cytokine production. We conclude that peptidoglycan of B. anthracis is initially bound by an unknown extracellular receptor, is phagocytosed, and traffics to lysosomes, where it is degraded to a product recognized by an intracellular receptor. Binding of the peptidoglycan product to the intracellular receptor causes a proinflammatory response. These findings provide new insight into the mechanism by which B. anthracis triggers sepsis during a critical stage of anthrax disease. PMID:20308305

  6. ermA, ermC , tetM and tetK are essential for erythromycin and tetracycline resistance among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from a tertiary hospital in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K T Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the expression and transferability of tetracycline and erythromycin resistance among 188 MRSA strains from a Malaysian tertiary hospital. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs for oxacillin, erythromycin, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin ranged from 4 to 512 μg/ml, 0.25 to 256 μg/ml, 0.5 to 256 μg/ml and 0.5 to 512 μg/ml, respectively. Tetracycline-resistant strains showed co-resistance towards ciprofloxacin and erythromycin. There was a significant increase (P<0.05 of high-level tetracycline (≥MIC 256 μg/ml and erythromycin (≥MIC 128 μg/ml resistant strains in between the years 2003 and 2008. All erythromycin-resistant strains harboured ermA or ermC gene and all tetracycline-resistant strains harboured tetM or tetK gene. The blaZ was detected in all MRSA strains, whereas ermA, tetM, ermC, tetK and msrA genes were detected in 157 (84%, 92 (49%, 40 (21%, 39 (21% and 4 (2% MRSA strains, respectively. The blaZ, tetM, ermC and tetK genes were plasmid-encoded, with ermC gene being easily transmissible. Tn5801-like transposon was present in 78 tetM-positive strains. ermA and tetM genes were the most prevalent erythromycin and tetracycline resistance determinants, respectively, in MRSA strains. The association of resistance genes with mobile genetic elements possibly enhances the spread of resistant traits in MRSA.

  7. Role of the Group B antigen of Streptococcus agalactiae: a peptidoglycan-anchored polysaccharide involved in cell wall biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Élise Caliot

    Full Text Available Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS is a leading cause of infections in neonates and an emerging pathogen in adults. The Lancefield Group B carbohydrate (GBC is a peptidoglycan-anchored antigen that defines this species as a Group B Streptococcus. Despite earlier immunological and biochemical characterizations, the function of this abundant glycopolymer has never been addressed experimentally. Here, we inactivated the gene gbcO encoding a putative UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate:lipid phosphate transferase thought to catalyze the first step of GBC synthesis. Indeed, the gbcO mutant was unable to synthesize the GBC polymer, and displayed an important growth defect in vitro. Electron microscopy study of the GBC-depleted strain of S. agalactiae revealed a series of growth-related abnormalities: random placement of septa, defective cell division and separation processes, and aberrant cell morphology. Furthermore, vancomycin labeling and peptidoglycan structure analysis demonstrated that, in the absence of GBC, cells failed to initiate normal PG synthesis and cannot complete polymerization of the murein sacculus. Finally, the subcellular localization of the PG hydrolase PcsB, which has a critical role in cell division of streptococci, was altered in the gbcO mutant. Collectively, these findings show that GBC is an essential component of the cell wall of S. agalactiae whose function is reminiscent of that of conventional wall teichoic acids found in Staphylococcus aureus or Bacillus subtilis. Furthermore, our findings raise the possibility that GBC-like molecules play a major role in the growth of most if not all beta-hemolytic streptococci.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcus aureus and Pregnancy In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to staphylococcus aureus may increase the risk for birth defects ...

  9. Staphylococcus aureus toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Otto, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a dangerous pathogen that causes a variety of severe diseases. The virulence of S. aureus is defined by a large repertoire of virulence factors, among which secreted toxins play a preeminent role. Many S. aureus toxins damage biological membranes, leading to cell death. In particular, S. aureus produces potent hemolysins and leukotoxins. Among the latter, some were recently identified to lyse neutrophils after ingestion, representing an especially powerful weapon agai...

  10. A Novel Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Phenotype Mediated by the Fibronectin-Binding Proteins, FnBPA and FnBPB▿

    OpenAIRE

    O'Neill, Eoghan; Pozzi, Clarissa; Houston, Patrick; Humphreys, Hilary; Robinson, D. Ashley; Loughman, Anthony; Foster, Timothy J.; O'Gara, James P.

    2008-01-01

    Device-associated infections involving biofilm remain a persistent clinical problem. We recently reported that four methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains formed biofilm independently of the icaADBC-encoded exopolysaccharide. Here, we report that MRSA biofilm development was promoted under mildly acidic growth conditions triggered by the addition of glucose to the growth medium. Loss of sortase, which anchors LPXTG-containing proteins to peptidoglycan, reduced the MRSA bio...

  11. Uniformity of Glycyl Bridge Lengths in the Mature Cell Walls of Fem Mutants of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Sharif, Shasad; Kim, Sung Joon; Labischinski, Harald; Chen, Jiawei; Schaefer, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Peptidoglycan (PG) composition in intact cells of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and its isogenic Fem mutants has been characterized by measuring the glycine content of PG bridge structures by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The glycine content estimated from integrated intensities (rather than peak heights) in the cell walls of whole cells was increased by approximately 30% for the FemA mutant and was reduced by 25% for the FemB mutant relative to expected v...

  12. Incorporation of bacterial peptidoglycan constituents into macrophage lipids during phagocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacillus subtilis radiolabeled cell walls were incubated with the macrophage cell line RAW264 in order to determine whether a peptidoglycan fragment were subsequently maintained on a macrophage lipid. Specifically, cell walls were radiolabeled in their glucosamine, muramic acid and alanine residues with D-[1-3H] glucosamine and L[U-14C]alanine. Following encounter with these radiolabeled cell walls, macrophages were collected and subjected to lipid extraction procedures. Further fractionation produced a phosphatidylethanolamine co-migrating lipid which upon hydrolysis and amino acid analysis revealed radiolabeled muramic acid, glucosamine, and alanine residues. These residues were shown to form a common fragment since the aqueous soluble material obtained after saponification of the crude lipid extract eluted as a single peak following gel permeation chromatography. Saponification destroyed the TLC mobility of the lipid showing that the fragment was covalently attached to the lipid

  13. High-resolution subtyping of Staphylococcus aureus strains by means of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johler, Sophia; Stephan, Roger; Althaus, Denise; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Grunert, Tom

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes a variety of serious illnesses in humans and animals. Subtyping of S. aureus isolates plays a crucial role in epidemiological investigations. Metabolic fingerprinting by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is commonly used to identify microbes at species as well as subspecies level. In this study, we aimed to assess the suitability of FTIR spectroscopy as a tool for S. aureus subtyping. To this end, we compared the subtyping performance of FTIR spectroscopy to other subtyping methods such as pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and spa typing in a blinded experimental setup and investigated the ability of FTIR spectroscopy for identifying S. aureus clonal complexes (CC). A total of 70 S. aureus strains from human, animal, and food sources were selected, for which clonal complexes and a unique virulence and resistance gene pattern had been determined by DNA microarray analysis. FTIR spectral analysis resulted in high discriminatory power similar as obtained by spa typing and PFGE. High directional concordance was found between FTIR spectroscopy based subtypes and capsular polysaccharide expression detected by FTIR spectroscopy and the cap specific locus, reflecting strain specific expression of capsular polysaccharides and/or other surface glycopolymers, such as wall teichoic acid, peptidoglycane, and lipoteichoic acid. Supervised chemometrics showed only limited possibilities for differentiation of S. aureus CC by FTIR spectroscopy with the exception of CC45 and CC705. In conclusion, FTIR spectroscopy represents a valuable tool for S. aureus subtyping, which complements current molecular and proteomic strain typing. PMID:27021524

  14. Preparation and Immunomodulatory Properties of Modified Peptidoglycan Fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomić, S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunostimulators, known also as adjuvants, are added to vaccines to accelerate, extend or amplify the specific immune reaction to a specific antigen. One well known class of immuno- modulating compounds is based on muramylpeptides which are fragments of peptidoglycans, natural polymers that build up the cell wall of bacteria. Muramyldipeptide, N-acetyl- muramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP, Fig. 1 is the smallest structural unit of the peptidoglycan monomer (PGM, Fig. 2 which shows immunostimulating activity. PGM isolated from Brevibacterium divaricatum, acts in itself as an effective adjuvant, and several derivatives were prepared to study the possible influence of different substituents on the immunomodulatory activity. Thus, lipophilic derivativestert-butyloxycarbonyl-L-tyrosyl-PGM and (adamant- 1-ylacetyl-PGM (Fig. 3 were prepared and their activities studied. They were also shown to be good substrates for N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine amidase from human serum (Scheme 1 which specifically hydrolyzes the lactylamide bond. MDP which is an integral part of PGM and proven to be an effective adjuvant was further synthetically modified and obtained derivatives tested as possible immunomodulators. Romutide (MDP-Lys(L18, approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA, and mifamurtide (L-MTP-PE, approved by European Medicines Agency (EMA, highlight among many other MDP derivatives (Fig. 4. Since N-acetylglucosamine in the structure of MDP is not essential for the immunostimulating effect, desmuramyldipeptides (Fig. 5 with different acyl groups at N-terminus of L-Ala-D-isoGln dipeptide were prepared. In ada mantyl desmuramyldipeptides such as adamantylamide dipeptide (Fig 6, adamantyl tripeptides (Fig. 7 and desmuramylpeptides with (adamant-1-ylcarboxyamido group (Fig. 8, lipophilic adamantane moiety is bound to the dipeptide part. Binding of some specific sugars to immune active substances may help their targeted delivery. An example is mannose which

  15. Airborne peptidoglycans as a supporting indicator of bacterial contamination in a metal processing plant

    OpenAIRE

    Marcin Cyprowski; Anna Ławniczek-Wałczyk; Górny, Rafał L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess exposure to airborne endotoxins and peptidoglycans (PGs) as well as possibility of using PGs as a surrogate measure of bacterial exposure in workplaces in a metal processing plant. Material and Methods: Personal dosimetry (N = 11) was used to obtain data on concentrations of viable bacteria, total number of bioaerosol particles, endotoxins and peptidoglycans. To investigate the size distributions of aerosol particles responsible for transport of...

  16. Peptidoglycan Synthesis in the Absence of Class A Penicillin-Binding Proteins in Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    McPherson, Derrell C.; Popham, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) catalyze the final, essential reactions of peptidoglycan synthesis. Three classes of PBPs catalyze either trans-, endo-, or carboxypeptidase activities on the peptidoglycan peptide side chains. Only the class A high-molecular-weight PBPs have clearly demonstrated glycosyltransferase activities that polymerize the glycan strands, and in some species these proteins have been shown to be essential. The Bacillus subtilis genome sequence contains four genes encod...

  17. Production and characterization of a monoclonal antibody to the O-acetylated peptidoglycan of Proteus mirabilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Gyorffy, S; Clarke, A J

    1992-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (PmPG5-3) specific for the O-acetylated peptidoglycan of Proteus mirabilis 19 was produced by an NS-1 myeloma cell line and purified from ascites fluid by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and affinity chromatography. The monoclonal antibody (an immunoglobulin M) was characterized by a competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to be equally specific for both insoluble and soluble O-acetylated peptidoglycan but weakly recognized chemically de-O-acetylate...

  18. Inflammatory Cytokine Response to Bacillus anthracis Peptidoglycan Requires Phagocytosis and Lysosomal Trafficking▿

    OpenAIRE

    Iyer, Janaki K.; Khurana, Taruna; Langer, Marybeth; West, Christopher M.; Ballard, Jimmy D.; Metcalf, Jordan P.; Merkel, Tod J.; Coggeshall, K. Mark

    2010-01-01

    During advanced stages of inhalation anthrax, Bacillus anthracis accumulates at high levels in the bloodstream of the infected host. This bacteremia leads to sepsis during late-stage anthrax; however, the mechanisms through which B. anthracis-derived factors contribute to the pathology of infected hosts are poorly defined. Peptidoglycan, a major component of the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria, can provoke symptoms of sepsis in animal models. We have previously shown that peptidoglycan of...

  19. Peptidoglycans in cutting fluids – a good indicator of bacterial contamination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Cyprowski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available objective. The aim of this study was to estimate the content of peptidoglycans in cutting fluids (CFs and to assess the possibility of using them as a marker of bacterial contamination in this type of occupational environment. materials and methods. A total of 11 samples of CFs were collected: 8 were taken from the working machine systems and 3 were unused CF samples. The peptidoglycans were determinated with the kinetic version of the Silkworm Larvae Plasma (SLP test. results. The average concentration of bacteria was 5.58×10 5 CFU/mL, and peptidoglycans – 28.2 ng/mL. The variability for peptidoglycans concentration was less pronounced than that for bacteria (GSD 6 and 13.3, respectively. Taking into consideration the National Research and Safety Institute (INRS –[i] Institut National de Recherche et de Sécurité[/i] limit value the concentrations of bacteria and peptidoglycans, as well as the usage of the fluids, the analysis showed that peptidoglycans reflect the differences between the studied factors much more accurately than bacteria. The correlation analysis, however, showed that the levels of peptidoglycans in the examined CFs strongly correlated with the concentrations of viable bacteria (R 2 = 0.50, p<0.05. conclusions. The study confirmed that the CFs may contain immunologically active substances of bacterial origin even though they did not show any bacterial growth. Moreover, it showed that the concentrations of peptidoglycans in CFs precisely reflect the exposure to bacteria, and as a structural component of the cell wall can be treated as their marker.

  20. Proposed docking interface between peptidoglycan and the target recognition domain of zoocin A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yinghua [Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Simmonds, Robin S. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Otago, Dunedin (New Zealand); Timkovich, Russell, E-mail: rtimkovi@bama.ua.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Peptidoglycan added to zoocin rTRD perturbs NMR resonances around W115. •Simulations predict docking to a shallow surface groove near W115. •The docking interface is similar to mammalian antibody–antigen sites. •EDTA binds to a distinct surface site. -- Abstract: A docking model is proposed for the target recognition domain of the lytic exoenzyme zoocin A with the peptidoglycan on the outer cell surface of sensitive bacterial strains. Solubilized fragments from such peptidoglycans perturb specific backbone and side chain amide resonances in the recombinant form of the domain designated rTRD as detected in two-dimensional {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N correlation NMR spectra. The affected residues comprise a shallow surface cleft on the protein surface near W115, N53, N117, and Q105 among others, which interacts with the peptide portion of the peptidoglycan. Calculations with AutoDock Vina provide models of the docking interface. There is approximate homology between the rTDR-peptidoglycan docking site and the antigen binding site of Fab antibodies with the immunoglobin fold. EDTA was also found to bind to rTRD, but at a site distinct from the proposed peptidoglycan docking site.

  1. Transmembrane transport of peptidoglycan precursors across model and bacterial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Vincent; Sijbrandi, Robert; Kol, Matthijs; Swiezewska, Ewa; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2007-05-01

    Translocation of the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II across the cytoplasmic membrane is a key step in bacterial cell wall synthesis, but hardly understood. Using NBD-labelled Lipid II, we showed by fluorescence and TLC assays that Lipid II transport does not occur spontaneously and is not induced by the presence of single spanning helical transmembrane peptides that facilitate transbilayer movement of membrane phospholipids. MurG catalysed synthesis of Lipid II from Lipid I in lipid vesicles also did not result in membrane translocation of Lipid II. These findings demonstrate that a specialized protein machinery is needed for transmembrane movement of Lipid II. In line with this, we could demonstrate Lipid II translocation in isolated Escherichia coli inner membrane vesicles and this transport could be uncoupled from the synthesis of Lipid II at low temperatures. The transport process appeared to be independent from an energy source (ATP or proton motive force). Additionally, our studies indicate that translocation of Lipid II is coupled to transglycosylation activity on the periplasmic side of the inner membrane. PMID:17501931

  2. Tertiary Education in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2004-01-01

    The polish tertiary education report was undertaken by the World Bank and the European Investment Bank in consultation with the Ministry of National Education and Sports of Poland (MoNES). The modernization of higher education and other tertiary education services has become an increasing focus of public concern in Poland. A major purpose of the report is to discuss important issues in Pol...

  3. A novel in vivo cell-wall labeling approach sheds new light on peptidoglycan synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olrichs, Nick K; Aarsman, Mirjam E G; Verheul, Jolanda; Arnusch, Christopher J; Martin, Nathaniel I; Hervé, Mireille; Vollmer, Waldemar; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2011-05-01

    Peptidoglycan synthesis and turnover in relation to cell growth and division has been studied by using a new labeling method. This method involves the incorporation of fluorescently labeled peptidoglycan precursors into the cell wall by means of the cell-wall recycling pathway. We show that Escherichia coli is able to import exogenous added murein tripeptide labeled with N-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl (AeK-NBD) into the cytoplasm where it enters the peptidoglycan biosynthesis route, resulting in fluorescent labels specifically located in the cell wall. When wild-type cells were grown in the presence of the fluorescent peptide, peptidoglycan was uniformly labeled in cells undergoing elongation. Cells in the process of division displayed a lack of labeled peptidoglycan at mid-cell. Analysis of labeling patterns in cell division mutants showed that the occurrence of unlabeled peptidoglycan is dependent on the presence of FtsZ, but independent of FtsQ and FtsI. Accumulation of fluorescence at the division sites of a triple amidase mutant (ΔamiABC) revealed that AeK-NBD is incorporated into septal peptidoglycan. AmiC was shown to be involved in the rapid removal of labeled peptidoglycan side chains at division sites in wild-type cells. Because septal localization of AmiC is dependent on FtsQ and FtsI, this points to the presence of another peptidoglycan hydrolase activity directly dependent on FtsZ. PMID:21472954

  4. The high-affinity peptidoglycan binding domain of Pseudomonas phage endolysin KZ144

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding affinity of the N-terminal peptidoglycan binding domain of endolysin KZ144 (PBDKZ), originating from Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage φKZ, has been examined using a fusion protein of PBDKZ and green fluorescent protein (PBDKZ-GFP). A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis of bound PBDKZ-GFP molecules showed less than 10% fluorescence recovery in the bleached area within 15 min. Surface plasmon resonance analysis confirmed this apparent high binding affinity revealing an equilibrium affinity constant of 2.95 x 107 M-1 for the PBDKZ-peptidoglycan interaction. This unique domain, which binds to the peptidoglycan of all tested Gram-negative species, was harnessed to improve the specific activity of the peptidoglycan hydrolase domain KMV36C. The chimeric peptidoglycan hydrolase (PBDKZ-KMV36C) exhibits a threefold higher specific activity than the native catalytic domain (KMV36C). These results demonstrate that the modular assembly of functional domains is a rational approach to improve the specific activity of endolysins from phages infecting Gram-negatives.

  5. Frequency of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization among patients suffering from methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Nadia; Izhar, Mateen; Mehdi, Naima

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine rate of nasal colonization in Patients suffering from bacteraemia caused by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Methods: This descriptive cross sectional study was carried out in a tertiary ca re, University Teaching Hospital (Shaikh Zayed Hospital, Lahore) from October 2010 to August 2011. Nasal swabs were taken from patients suffering from MRSA bacteraemia and were plated on mannitol salt agar plates to isolate Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) which were then tested for oxacillin susceptibility. Results: Nasal colonization was present in 52.5% of patients suffering from MRSA bacteraemia. Conclusion: Nasal colonization rates with MRSA were high among patients suffering from MRSA bacteraemia especially in those undergoing dialysis or surgical procedures. Therefore, screening and nasal decolonization should be practiced in hospitals. PMID:24550968

  6. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of peptidoglycan hydrolases of Lactobacillus sakei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afef Najjari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus sakei, a lactic acid bacterium naturally found in fresh meat and sea products, is considered to be one of the most important bacterial species involved in meat fermentation and bio-preservation. Several enzymes of Lb. sakei species contributing to microbial safeguarding and organoleptic properties of fermented-meat were studied. However, the specific autolytic mechanisms and associated enzymes involved in Lb. sakei are not well understood. The autolytic phenotype of 22 Lb. sakei strains isolated from Tunisian meat and seafood products was evaluated under starvation conditions, at pH 6.5 and 8.5, and in the presence of different carbon sources. A higher autolytic rate was observed when cells were grown in the presence of glucose and incubated at pH 6.5. Almost all strains showed high resistance to mutanolysin, indicating a minor role of muramidases in Lb. sakei cell lysis. Using Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells as a substrate in activity gels zymogram, peptidoglycan hydrolase (PGH patterns for all strains was characterized by two lytic bands of ∼80 (B1 and ∼70 kDa (B2, except for strain BMG.167 which harbored two activity signals at a lower MW. Lytic activity was retained in high salt and in acid/basic conditions and was active toward cells of Lb. sakei, Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria ivanovii and Listeria innocua. Analysis of five putative PGH genes found in the Lb. sakei 23 K model strain genome, indicated that one gene, lsa1437, could encode a PGH (N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase containing B1 and B2 as isoforms. According to this hypothesis, strain BMG.167 showed an allelic version of lsa1437 gene deleted of one of the five LysM domains, leading to a reduction in the MW of lytic bands and the high autolytic rate of this strain. Characterization of autolytic phenotype of Lb. sakei should expand the knowledge of their role in fermentation processes where they represent the dominant species.

  7. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of peptidoglycan hydrolases of Lactobacillus sakei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjari, Afef; Amairi, Houda; Chaillou, Stéphane; Mora, Diego; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Zagorec, Monique; Ouzari, Hadda

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacillus sakei, a lactic acid bacterium naturally found in fresh meat and sea products, is considered to be one of the most important bacterial species involved in meat fermentation and bio-preservation. Several enzymes of Lb. sakei species contributing to microbial safeguarding and organoleptic properties of fermented-meat were studied. However, the specific autolytic mechanisms and associated enzymes involved in Lb. sakei are not well understood. The autolytic phenotype of 22 Lb. sakei strains isolated from Tunisian meat and seafood products was evaluated under starvation conditions, at pH 6.5 and 8.5, and in the presence of different carbon sources. A higher autolytic rate was observed when cells were grown in the presence of glucose and incubated at pH 6.5. Almost all strains showed high resistance to mutanolysin, indicating a minor role of muramidases in Lb. sakei cell lysis. Using Micrococcus lysodeikticus cells as a substrate in activity gels zymogram, peptidoglycan hydrolase (PGH) patterns for all strains was characterized by two lytic bands of ∼80 (B1) and ∼70 kDa (B2), except for strain BMG.167 which harbored two activity signals at a lower MW. Lytic activity was retained in high salt and in acid/basic conditions and was active toward cells of Lb. sakei, Listeria monocytogenes, Listeria ivanovii and Listeria innocua. Analysis of five putative PGH genes found in the Lb. sakei 23 K model strain genome, indicated that one gene, lsa1437, could encode a PGH (N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase) containing B1 and B2 as isoforms. According to this hypothesis, strain BMG.167 showed an allelic version of lsa1437 gene deleted of one of the five LysM domains, leading to a reduction in the MW of lytic bands and the high autolytic rate of this strain. Characterization of autolytic phenotype of Lb. sakei should expand the knowledge of their role in fermentation processes where they represent the dominant species. PMID:26843981

  8. A novel in vivo cell-wall labeling approach sheds new light on peptidoglycan synthesis in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.K. Olrichs; M.E.G. Aarsman; J. Verheul; C.J. Arnusch; N.I. Martin; M. Hervé; W. Vollmer; B. de Kruijff; E. Breukink; T. den Blaauwen

    2011-01-01

    Peptidoglycan synthesis and turnover in relation to cell growth and division has been studied by using a new labeling method. This method involves the incorporation of fluorescently labeled peptidoglycan precursors into the cell wall by means of the cell-wall recycling pathway. We show that Escheric

  9. Induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity by the T cell line specific to bacterial peptidoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A T cell line specific for the chemically well-defined peptidoglycan of bacterial cell wall, disaccharide tetrapeptide, was established from Lewis rats immunized with the antigen covalently linked to the autologous rat serum albumin. The antigen specificity was examined with various analogues or derivatives of the peptidoglycan. The cell line was reactive to analogues with the COOH-terminal D-amino acid, but least reactive to those with L-amino acid as COOH terminus. Transferring of the T cell line into X-irradiated normal Lewis rats induced delayed-type hypersensitivity in an antigen specific manner

  10. A Peptidoglycan-Remodeling Enzyme Is Critical for Bacteroid Differentiation in Bradyrhizobium spp. During Legume Symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gully, Djamel; Gargani, Daniel; Bonaldi, Katia; Grangeteau, Cédric; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Fardoux, Joël; Nguyen, Phuong; Marchetti, Roberta; Nouwen, Nico; Molinaro, Antonio; Mergaert, Peter; Giraud, Eric

    2016-06-01

    In response to the presence of compatible rhizobium bacteria, legumes form symbiotic organs called nodules on their roots. These nodules house nitrogen-fixing bacteroids that are a differentiated form of the rhizobium bacteria. In some legumes, the bacteroid differentiation comprises a dramatic cell enlargement, polyploidization, and other morphological changes. Here, we demonstrate that a peptidoglycan-modifying enzyme in Bradyrhizobium strains, a DD-carboxypeptidase that contains a peptidoglycan-binding SPOR domain, is essential for normal bacteroid differentiation in Aeschynomene species. The corresponding mutants formed bacteroids that are malformed and hypertrophied. However, in soybean, a plant that does not induce morphological differentiation of its symbiont, the mutation does not affect the bacteroids. Remarkably, the mutation also leads to necrosis in a large fraction of the Aeschynomene nodules, indicating that a normally formed peptidoglycan layer is essential for avoiding the induction of plant immune responses by the invading bacteria. In addition to exopolysaccharides, capsular polysaccharides, and lipopolysaccharides, whose role during symbiosis is well defined, our work demonstrates an essential role in symbiosis for yet another rhizobial envelope component, the peptidoglycan layer. PMID:26959836

  11. Peptidoglycan synthesis in Escherichia coli from a PBP1b perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Veer, I.L.

    2016-01-01

    An essential and unique component of the bacterial cell envelope is the peptidoglycan layer. This layer, formed by glycan chains that are interlinked by peptide bridges, is essential for the maintenance of the specific cell shape of the bacterium, and protects it from rupture by osmotic pressure. Be

  12. SpxB regulates O-acetylation-dependent resistance of Lactococcus lactis peptidoglycan to hydrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veiga, Patrick; Bulbarela-Sampieri, Carmen; Furlan, Sylviane; Maisons, Aurelie; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre; Erkelenz, Michael; Mervelet, Peggy; Noirot, Philippe; Frees, Dorte; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kok, Jan; Gruss, Alexandra; Buist, Girbe; Kulakauskas, Saulius

    2007-01-01

    Endogenous peptidoglycan (PG)-hydrolyzing enzymes, the autolysins, are needed to relax the rigid PG sacculus to allow bacterial cell growth and separation. PGs of pathogens and commensal bacteria may also be degraded by hydrolases of animal origin (lysozymes), which act as antimicrobials. The geneti

  13. Regulation of Polar Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis by Wag31 Phosphorylation in Mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensing and responding to environmental changes is a central aspect of cell division regulation. Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains eleven Ser/Thr kinases, two of which, PknA and PknB, are key signaling molecules that regulate cell division/morphology. One substrate of these kinases is Wag31, and we previously showed that partial depletion of Wag31 caused morphological changes indicative of cell wall defects, and that the phosphorylation state of Wag31 affected cell growth in mycobacteria. In the present study, we further characterized the role of the Wag31 phosphorylation in polar peptidoglycan biosynthesis. Results We demonstrate that the differential growth among cells expressing different wag31 alleles (wild-type, phosphoablative, or phosphomimetic is caused by, at least in part, dissimilar nascent peptidoglycan biosynthesis. The phosphorylation state of Wag31 is found to be important for protein-protein interactions between the Wag31 molecules, and thus, for its polar localization. Consistent with these results, cells expressing a phosphomimetic wag31 allele have a higher enzymatic activity in the peptidoglycan biosynthetic pathway. Conclusions The Wag31Mtb phosphorylation is a novel molecular mechanism by which Wag31Mtb regulates peptidoglycan synthesis and thus, optimal growth in mycobacteria.

  14. Augmentation of NKT and NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity by peptidoglycan monomer linked with zinc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Mrakovcic-Šutic

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peptidoglycan monomer (PGM, which was originally prepared by biosynthesis from culture fluids of penicillin-treated Brevibacterium divaricatum, is an immunostimulator, the activities of which might be improved by addition of zinc (Zn to the basic molecule.

  15. Specific labeling of peptidoglycan precursors as a tool for bacterial cell wall studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, V.; Olrichs, N.K.; Breukink, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Wall chart: The predominant component of the bacterial cell wall, peptidoglycan, consists of long alternating stretches of aminosugar subunits interlinked in a large three-dimensional network and is formed from precursors through several cytosolic and membrane-bound steps. The high tolerance of the

  16. Potentiating activity of luteolin on membrane permeabilizing agent and ATPase inhibitor against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dae-Ki Joung; Dong-Won Shin; Dong-Yeul Kwon; Young-Seob Lee; Sin-Hee Han; Sang-Won Lee; Seon-Woo Cha; Su-Hyun Mun; Ryong Kong; Ok-Hwa Kang; Ho-Jun Song

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of antibacterial activity of luteolin (LUT) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Methods: The mechanism of anti-MRSA activity of LUT was analyzed by the viability assay in membrane permeabilizing agent, ATPase inhibitors, and peptidoglycan (PGN) derived from Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Also, transmission electron microscopy was used to monitor survival characteristics and changes in S. aureus morphology. Results: Compared to the LUT alone, the optical density of suspensions treated with the combination of 125 μg/mL Tris and 250 μg/mL DCCD were reduced to 60%and 46%, respectively. PGN (15.6 μg/mL) gradually impeded the activity of LUT, and PGN (62.5 μg/mL) completely blocked the activity of LUT on S. aureus. Conclusions: Increased susceptibility to LUT with the Tris and DCCD combinations is evident in all tested MRSA isolates. The results indicate LUT synergy in increasing cytoplasmic membrane permeability and inhibiting ATPase. S. aureus PGN directly blocks the antibacterial activity of LUT, suggesting the direct binding of LUT with PGN. These findings may be validated for the development of antibacterial agent for low MRSA resistance.

  17. Transcriptional profiles of the response of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to pentacyclic triterpenoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooi Yin Chung

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen in both hospital and the community that has demonstrated resistance to all currently available antibiotics over the last two decades. Multidrug-resistant isolates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA exhibiting decreased susceptibilities to glycopeptides has also emerged, representing a crucial challenge for antimicrobial therapy and infection control. The availability of complete whole-genome nucleotide sequence data of various strains of S. aureus presents an opportunity to explore novel compounds and their targets to address the challenges presented by antimicrobial drug resistance in this organism. Study compounds α-amyrin [3β-hydroxy-urs-12-en-3-ol (AM], betulinic acid [3β-hydroxy-20(29-lupaene-28-oic acid (BA] and betulinaldehyde [3β-hydroxy-20(29-lupen-28-al (BE] belong to pentacyclic triterpenoids and were reported to exhibit antimicrobial activities against bacteria and fungi, including S. aureus. The MIC values of these compounds against a reference strain of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA (ATCC 43300 ranged from 64 µg/ml to 512 µg/ml. However, the response mechanisms of S. aureus to these compounds are still poorly understood. The transcription profile of reference strain of MRSA treated with sub-inhibitory concentrations of the three compounds was determined using Affymetrix GeneChips. The findings showed that these compounds regulate multiple desirable targets in cell division, two-component system, ABC transporters, fatty acid biosynthesis, peptidoglycan biosynthesis, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase, ribosome and β-lactam resistance pathways which could be further explored in the development of therapeutic agents for the treatment of S. aureus infections.

  18. Specialized peptidoglycan hydrolases sculpt the intra-bacterial niche of predatory Bdellovibrio and increase population fitness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Lerner

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Bdellovibrio are predatory bacteria that have evolved to invade virtually all gram-negative bacteria, including many prominent pathogens. Upon invasion, prey bacteria become rounded up into an osmotically stable niche for the Bdellovibrio, preventing further superinfection and allowing Bdellovibrio to replicate inside without competition, killing the prey bacterium and degrading its contents. Historically, prey rounding was hypothesized to be associated with peptidoglycan (PG metabolism; we found two Bdellovibrio genes, bd0816 and bd3459, expressed at prey entry and encoding proteins with limited homologies to conventional dacB/PBP4 DD-endo/carboxypeptidases (responsible for peptidoglycan maintenance during growth and division. We tested possible links between Bd0816/3459 activity and predation. Bd3459, but not an active site serine mutant protein, bound β-lactam, exhibited DD-endo/carboxypeptidase activity against purified peptidoglycan and, importantly, rounded up E. coli cells upon periplasmic expression. A ΔBd0816 ΔBd3459 double mutant invaded prey more slowly than the wild type (with negligible prey cell rounding and double invasions of single prey by more than one Bdellovibrio became more frequent. We solved the crystal structure of Bd3459 to 1.45 Å and this revealed predation-associated domain differences to conventional PBP4 housekeeping enzymes (loss of the regulatory domain III, alteration of domain II and a more exposed active site. The Bd3459 active site (and by similarity the Bd0816 active site can thus accommodate and remodel the various bacterial PGs that Bdellovibrio may encounter across its diverse prey range, compared to the more closed active site that "regular" PBP4s have for self cell wall maintenance. Therefore, during evolution, Bdellovibrio peptidoglycan endopeptidases have adapted into secreted predation-specific proteins, preventing wasteful double invasion, and allowing activity upon the diverse prey peptidoglycan

  19. Knowledge, Attitude and Practice among food handlers on food borne diseases: A hospital based study in tertiary care hospital.

    OpenAIRE

    Anuradha, Mavilla; Dandekar, Rahul Hanumant

    2014-01-01

    Title: Knowledge, Attitude and Practice among food handlers on food borne diseases: A hospital based study in tertiary care hospital.Running title: KAP study among food handlers in a Hospital at Perambalur.Background: Food handlers play an important role in ensuring food safety throughout the chain of production, processing, storage and preparation.Staphylococcus aureus infections used to respond to ß-lactam and related group of antibiotics but the emergence of Methicillin-resistant S. Aureus...

  20. Staphylococcus aureus Transcriptome Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäder, Ulrike; Nicolas, Pierre; Depke, Maren;

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen that colonizes about 20% of the human population. Intriguingly, this Gram-positive bacterium can survive and thrive under a wide range of different conditions, both inside and outside the human body. Here, we investigated the transcriptional adaptation of S...... to their dependence on the RNA polymerase sigma factors SigA or SigB, and allow identification of new potential targets for several known transcription factors. In particular, this study revealed a relatively low abundance of antisense RNAs in S. aureus, where they overlap only 6% of the coding genes, and only 19...... antisense RNAs not co-transcribed with other genes were found. Promoter analysis and comparison with Bacillus subtilis links the small number of antisense RNAs to a less profound impact of alternative sigma factors in S. aureus. Furthermore, we revealed that Rho-dependent transcription termination...

  1. Staphylococcus aureus CC398

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Lance B.; Stegger, Marc; Hasman, Henrik;

    2012-01-01

    Since its discovery in the early 2000s, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 398 (CC398) has become a rapidly emerging cause of human infections, most often associated with livestock exposure. We applied whole-genome sequence typing to characterize a diverse collection...... of CC398 isolates (n = 89), including MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) from animals and humans spanning 19 countries and four continents. We identified 4,238 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among the 89 core genomes. Minimal homoplasy (consistency index = 0.9591) was detected...

  2. Structure of the ectodomain of Drosophila peptidoglycan-recognition protein LCa suggests a molecular mechanism for pattern recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Chung-I; Ihara, Kentaro; Chelliah, Yogarany; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Deisenhofer, Johann

    2005-01-01

    The peptidoglycan-recognition protein LCa (PGRP-LCa) is a transmembrane receptor required for activation of the Drosophila immune deficiency pathway by monomeric Gram-negative peptidoglycan. We have determined the crystal structure of the ectodomain of PGRP-LCa at 2.5-Å resolution and found two unique helical insertions in the LCa ectodomain that disrupt an otherwise L-shaped peptidoglycan-docking groove present in all other known PGRP structures. The deficient binding of PGRP-LCa to monomeri...

  3. Tertiary Education in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2008

    2008-01-01

    Portugal's tertiary education sector has expanded significantly over the last 20 years, but participation and overall educational attainment levels remain below European standards and enrolment rates have begun to decline. The OECD review recommends that Portugal's national government should focus on strategic direction and leave higher education…

  4. The mechanism of antimicrobial activity of sophoraflavanone B against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Su-Hyun; Joung, Dae-Ki; Kim, Sung-Bae; Park, Sung-Joo; Seo, Yun-Soo; Gong, Ryong; Choi, Jang-Gi; Shin, Dong-Won; Rho, Jung-Rae; Kang, Ok-Hwa; Kwon, Dong-Yeul

    2014-03-01

    Sophoraflavanone B (SPF-B), a prenylated flavonoid, can be isolated from the roots of Desmodium caudatum. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism of SPF-B's antimicrobial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a multidrug-resistant pathogen and the main cause of hospital- and community-acquired infections. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of SPF-B was assessed using the broth microdilution method. The mechanism of action of SPF-B on S. aureus was analyzed in combination assays incorporating detergents, ATPase inhibitors, and peptidoglycan (PGN) derived from S. aureus. Furthermore, morphological changes in the SPF-B-treated MRSA strains were investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The MIC of SPF-B for MRSA was in the range of 15.6-31.25 μg/mL. The mechanism of action of SPF-B on MRSA was investigated using combination assays with detergent and ATPase inhibitors. The optical density at 600 nm of MRSA suspensions treated with a combination of detergent and SPF-B reduced the MRSA by 63%-73%. In the SPF-B and PGN combination assay, direct binding of SPF-B with PGN from S. aureus was evident. These data may be validated for the development of new antibacterial drugs for low MRSA resistance. PMID:24601672

  5. The Elucidation of the Structure of Thermotoga maritima Peptidoglycan Reveals Two Novel Types of Cross-link*

    OpenAIRE

    Boniface, Audrey; Parquet, Claudine; Arthur, Michel; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Blanot, Didier

    2009-01-01

    Thermotoga maritima is a Gram-negative, hyperthermophilic bacterium whose peptidoglycan contains comparable amounts of l- and d-lysine. We have determined the fine structure of this cell-wall polymer. The muropeptides resulting from the digestion of peptidoglycan by mutanolysin were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography and identified by amino acid analysis after acid hydrolysis, dinitrophenylation, enzymatic determination of the configuration of the chiral amino acids, and mass...

  6. Living with an imperfect cell wall: compensation of femAB inactivation in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bierbaum Gabriele

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synthesis of the Staphylococcus aureus peptidoglycan pentaglycine interpeptide bridge is catalyzed by the nonribosomal peptidyl transferases FemX, FemA and FemB. Inactivation of the femAB operon reduces the interpeptide to a monoglycine, leading to a poorly crosslinked peptidoglycan. femAB mutants show a reduced growth rate and are hypersusceptible to virtually all antibiotics, including methicillin, making FemAB a potential target to restore β-lactam susceptibility in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. Cis-complementation with wild type femAB only restores synthesis of the pentaglycine interpeptide and methicillin resistance, but the growth rate remains low. This study characterizes the adaptations that ensured survival of the cells after femAB inactivation. Results In addition to slow growth, the cis-complemented femAB mutant showed temperature sensitivity and a higher methicillin resistance than the wild type. Transcriptional profiling paired with reporter metabolite analysis revealed multiple changes in the global transcriptome. A number of transporters for sugars, glycerol, and glycine betaine, some of which could serve as osmoprotectants, were upregulated. Striking differences were found in the transcription of several genes involved in nitrogen metabolism and the arginine-deiminase pathway, an alternative for ATP production. In addition, microarray data indicated enhanced expression of virulence factors that correlated with premature expression of the global regulators sae, sarA, and agr. Conclusion Survival under conditions preventing normal cell wall formation triggered complex adaptations that incurred a fitness cost, showing the remarkable flexibility of S. aureus to circumvent cell wall damage. Potential FemAB inhibitors would have to be used in combination with other antibiotics to prevent selection of resistant survivors.

  7. NlpC/P60 domain-containing proteins of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis that differentially bind and hydrolyze peptidoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannantine, John P; Lingle, Cari K; Adam, Philip R; Ramyar, Kasra X; McWhorter, William J; Stabel, Judith R; Picking, William D; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2016-04-01

    A subset of proteins containing NlpC/P60 domains are bacterial peptidoglycan hydrolases that cleave noncanonical peptide linkages and contribute to cell wall remodeling as well as cell separation during late stages of division. Some of these proteins have been shown to cleave peptidoglycan in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and play a role in Mycobacterium marinum virulence of zebra fish; however, there are still significant knowledge gaps concerning the molecular function of these proteins in Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). The MAP genome sequence encodes five NlpC/P60 domain-containing proteins. We describe atomic resolution crystal structures of two such MAP proteins, MAP_1272c and MAP_1204. These crystal structures, combined with functional assays to measure peptidoglycan cleavage activity, led to the observation that MAP_1272c does not have a functional catalytic core for peptidoglycan hydrolysis. Furthermore, the structure and sequence of MAP_1272c demonstrate that the catalytic residues normally required for hydrolysis are absent, and the protein does not bind peptidoglycan as efficiently as MAP_1204. While the NlpC/P60 catalytic triad is present in MAP_1204, changing the catalytic cysteine-155 residue to a serine significantly diminished catalytic activity, but did not affect binding to peptidoglycan. Collectively, these findings suggest a broader functional repertoire for NlpC/P60 domain-containing proteins than simply hydrolases. PMID:26799947

  8. Peptidoglycan biosynthesis in Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains sensitive and intrinsically resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics.

    OpenAIRE

    Dougherty, T J

    1983-01-01

    Treatment of penicillin-sensitive and intrinsically resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains with their respective inhibitory concentrations of penicillin caused rapid cell death. When the peptidoglycan syntheses of these two strains were examined in the presence of penicillin, the sensitive strain continued to make this cell wall polymer for an extended time, whereas the resistant strain underwent a rapid and marked depression in synthesis. Examination of the labeled sodium dodecyl sulfate-in...

  9. The ABC's of Cell Division: Regulation of Peptidoglycan Amidase Activity during Cytokinesis in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Desiree Choy

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial cell wall, composed of peptidoglycan (PG), is an essential component of the cell envelope. This macromolecular structure fortifies the cell membrane, determines cell shape, and helps prevent osmotic lysis. The synthesis and remodeling/recycling of this polymer is mediated by PG synthases and hydrolases, respectively. Proper control of the PG hydrolases is particularly important since misregulation of these enzymes can lead to lethal breaches in the cell wall. Surprisingly, howev...

  10. Structural characteristics of peptidoglycan fragments required to prime mice for induction of anaphylactoid reactions by lipopolysaccharides.

    OpenAIRE

    Takada, H.; Kawabata, Y.; Kawata, S; Kusumoto, S

    1996-01-01

    Structural characteristics of peptidoglycan fragments required to prime mice for the induction of anaphylactoid reactions by Salmonella abortusequi lipopolysaccharide were examined in endotoxin-resistant C3H/HeJ mice, with special focus on the disaccharide-pentapeptide [N-acetylglucosaminyl-beta(1-4)-N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D -isoglutaminyl-meso-2,6-diaminopimelyl (DAP)-D-alanyl-D -alanine] and its smaller partial derivatives. The bacterial and synthetic muramyl tripeptides (DAP- and lysine ...

  11. Peptidoglycan Glycosyltransferase Substrate Mimics as Templates for the Design of New Antibacterial Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Derouaux, Adeline; Sauvage, Eric; Terrak, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Peptidoglycan (PG) is an essential net-like macromolecule that surrounds bacteria, gives them their shape, and protects them against their own high osmotic pressure. PG synthesis inhibition leads to bacterial cell lysis, making it an important target for many antibiotics. The final two reactions in PG synthesis are performed by penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). Their glycosyltransferase (GT) activity uses the lipid II precursor to synthesize glycan chains and their transpeptidase (TP) activ...

  12. Biosynthesis of peptidoglycan in Gaffkya homari: processing of nascent glycan by reactivated membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Bardin, C.; Sinha, R. K.; Kalomiris, E; Neuhaus, F C

    1984-01-01

    Membranes from Gaffkya homari reactivated by freezing and thawing were used to study the processing events involved in the assembly of both sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-insoluble peptidoglycan (PG) and SDS-soluble PG. The ability to reactivate membranes for the synthesis of these polymers provided an opportunity to monitor those events that are not influenced by wall-linked PG. In G. homari, processing for the formation of cross-links requires the selective actions of DD-carboxypeptidase, LD-...

  13. Changes of lipid domains in Bacillus subtilis cells with disrupted cell wall peptidoglycan

    OpenAIRE

    Muchová, Katarína; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Barák, Imrich

    2011-01-01

    The cell wall is responsible for cell integrity and the maintenance of cell shape in bacteria. The Gram-positive bacterial cell wall consists of a thick peptidoglycan layer located on the outside of the cytoplasmic membrane. Bacterial cell membranes, like eukaryotic cell membranes, are known to contain domains of specific lipid and protein composition. Recently, using the membrane-binding fluorescent dye FM4-64, helix-like lipid structures extending along the long axis of the cell and consist...

  14. Proteolytic activation of human pancreatitis associated protein is required for peptidoglycan binding and bacterial aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    Medveczky, Péter; Szmola, Richárd; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatitis associated protein (PAP) is a 16 kDa lectin-like protein, which becomes robustly upregulated in the pancreatic juice during acute pancreatitis. Trypsin cleaves the N terminus of PAP, which in turn forms insoluble fibrils. PAP and its paralog the pancreatic stone protein induce bacterial aggregation and, more recently, PAP was shown to bind to the peptidoglycan of Gram positive bacteria and exert a direct bactericidal effect. However, the role of N-terminal processing in the antib...

  15. Detection of antibodies to bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan in human sera. [/sup 125/I tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heymer, B.; Schleifer, K.H.; Read, S.; Zabriskie, J.B.; Krause, R.M.

    1976-07-01

    A radioimmunoassay has been developed for the measurement of antibodies to peptidoglycan in human sera including patients with rheumatic feaver and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The assay is based on the percentage of binding of the hapten /sup 125/I-L-Ala-..gamma..-D-Glu-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala, the major peptide determinant of peptidoglycan. Because of differences in the avidity of the antibodies in different sera, the amount of antibody was expressed as pentapeptide hapten-binding capacity (pentapeptide-HBC in ng/ml of serum). Fourteen out of 105 normal blood donors had a pentapeptide-HBC value greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml serum. Values in healthy children 5 to 18 years of age were less than or equal to 50 ng/ml. Sixty-eight percent of the individuals with rheumatic fever had values greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml, an indication that streptococcal infections can stimulate an immune response to peptidoglycan. Thirty-five percent of the patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis had values greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml. Such a finding points to a possible association between bacterial infections and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. Detection of antibodies to bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan in human sera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioimmunoassay has been developed for the measurement of antibodies to peptidoglycan in human sera including patients with rheumatic feaver and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The assay is based on the percentage of binding of the hapten 125I-L-Ala-γ-D-Glu-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala, the major peptide determinant of peptidoglycan. Because of differences in the avidity of the antibodies in different sera, the amount of antibody was expressed as pentapeptide hapten-binding capacity (pentapeptide-HBC in ng/ml of serum). Fourteen out of 105 normal blood donors had a pentapeptide-HBC value greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml serum. Values in healthy children 5 to 18 years of age were less than or equal to 50 ng/ml. Sixty-eight percent of the individuals with rheumatic fever had values greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml, an indication that streptococcal infections can stimulate an immune response to peptidoglycan. Thirty-five percent of the patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis had values greater than or equal to 75 ng/ml. Such a finding points to a possible association between bacterial infections and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

  17. Crystal structure of the glycosidase family 73 peptidoglycan hydrolase FlgJ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glycoside hydrolase (GH) categorized into family 73 plays an important role in degrading bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan. The flagellar protein FlgJ contains N- and C-terminal domains responsible for flagellar rod assembly and peptidoglycan hydrolysis, respectively. A member of family GH-73, the C-terminal domain (SPH1045-C) of FlgJ from Sphingomonas sp. strain A1 was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. SPH1045-C exhibited bacterial cell lytic activity most efficiently at pH 6.0 and 37 deg. C. The X-ray crystallographic structure of SPH1045-C was determined at 1.74 A resolution by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. The enzyme consists of two lobes, α and β. A deep cleft located between the two lobes can accommodate polymer molecules, suggesting that the active site is located in the cleft. Although SPH1045-C shows a structural homology with family GH-22 and GH-23 lysozymes, the arrangement of the nucleophile/base residue in the active site is specific to each peptidoglycan hydrolase.

  18. Isolation and characterization of peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 from antler base of sika deer (Cervus nippon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Yin, Yongguang; Zhou, Yajun; He, Guidan; Qi, Yue

    2014-03-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) are secreted innate immunity pattern recognition molecules. In this study, a new peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 named cnPGRP1 was isolated from an antler base of sika deer Cervus nippon. The antler base antimicrobial proteins (AAP) were subjected to consecutive chromatographic methods connected to Sephadex G-25 gel filtration column (CM) anion-exchange column, and RP-HPLC. The molecular weight of cnPGRP1 was 17.2 kDa under SDS-PAGE, and peptide mass fingerprint analysis by MALDI-TOF-MS as peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 matched to Dasypus novemcinctus. The matched amino acids sequences were RLYEIIQKWPHYRA. Both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria can be killed by cnPGRP1 in the 50-250 μg/mL range through in vitro. Furthermore, cnPGRP1 has been found to bind Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, and even fungus. PMID:24360898

  19. Crystallographic Study of Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis Enzyme MurD: Domain Movement Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zega, Anamarija; Barreteau, Hélène; Gobec, Stanislav; Blanot, Didier; Dessen, Andréa; Contreras-Martel, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathway of peptidoglycan, an essential component of bacterial cell wall, is a well-recognized target for antibiotic development. Peptidoglycan precursors are synthesized in the bacterial cytosol by various enzymes including the ATP-hydrolyzing Mur ligases, which catalyze the stepwise addition of amino acids to a UDP-MurNAc precursor to yield UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide. MurD catalyzes the addition of D-glutamic acid to UDP-MurNAc-L-Ala in the presence of ATP; structural and biochemical studies have suggested the binding of the substrates with an ordered kinetic mechanism in which ligand binding inevitably closes the active site. In this work, we challenge this assumption by reporting the crystal structures of intermediate forms of MurD either in the absence of ligands or in the presence of small molecules. A detailed analysis provides insight into the events that lead to the closure of MurD and reveals that minor structural modifications contribute to major overall conformation alterations. These novel insights will be instrumental in the development of new potential antibiotics designed to target the peptidoglycan biosynthetic pathway. PMID:27031227

  20. Teichuronic acid reducing terminal N-acetylglucosamine residue linked by phosphodiester to peptidoglycan of Micrococcus luteus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teichuronic acid-peptidoglycan complex isolated from Micrococcus luteus cells by lysozyme digestion in osmotically stabilized medium was treated with mild acid to cleave the linkage joining teichuronic acid to peptidoglycan. This labile linkage was shown to be the phosphodiester which joins N-acetylglucosamine, the residue located at the reducing end of the teichuronic acid, through its anomeric hydroxyl group to a 6-phosphomuramic acid, a residue of the glycan strand of peptidoglycan. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the lysozyme digest of cell walls demonstrated the presence of a phosphodiester which was converted to a phosphomonoester by the conditions which released teichuronic acid from cell walls. Reduction of acid-liberated reducing end groups by NaB3H4 followed by complete acid hydrolysis yielded [3H] glucosaminitol from the true reducing end residue of teichuronic acid and [3H]glucitol from the sites of fragmentation of teichuronic acid. The amount of N-acetylglucosamine detected was approximately stoichiometric with the amount of phosphate in the complex. Partial fragmentation of teichuronic acid provides an explanation of the previous erroneous identification of the reducing end residue

  1. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in ocular infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eugenia Vola

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To study the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among S. aureus ocular infections in a tertiary health center in Brazil and compare antibiotic susceptibility patterns between MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates. METHODS: Electronic records from the ocular microbiology laboratory of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo were retrospectively reviewed. During a 10-year period (between January 2000 and December 2009 all conjunctivitis, keratitis, and endophthalmitis cases with a positive culture for S. aureus were identified. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. RESULTS: Five hundred sixty-six S. aureus isolates were identified; of those, 56 (9.9% were resistant to methicillin. Throughout the 10-year period, Staphylococcus aureus showed a significant increasing trend from 7.55% to 16.18% among overall S. aurues infections (p=0.001 and from 3.7% to 13.16% in conjunctivitis (p=0.001. Conversely, we did not observe the same trend among those with keratitis (p=0.38. Staphylococcus aureus isolates showed higher resistance rates to tobramycin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, and moxifloxacin when compared with S. aureus isolates (p< 0.001. All cases were susceptible to vancomycin. CONCLUSION: We observed an increasing trend in the overall prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus ocular infections and statistically significant higher resistance rates to commonly used antibiotics compared to Staphylococcus aureus. Our data supports the need for constant bacterial surveillance and should be taken into consideration before initiating empiric treatment of ocular infections.

  2. Inhibition of Peptidoglycan, Ribonucleic Acid, and Protein Synthesis in Tolerant Strains of Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mychajlonka, Myron; McDowell, Thomas D.; Shockman, Gerald D.

    1980-01-01

    Exposure of exponentially growing cultures of Streptococcus mutans strains FA-1 and GS-5 to various concentrations of benzylpenicillin (Pen G) resulted in inhibition of turbidity increases at low concentrations (0.02 to 0.04 μg/ml). However, in contrast to some other streptococcal species, growth inhibition was not accompanied by cellular lysis or by a rapid loss of viability. In both strains, synthesis of insoluble cell wall peptidoglycan was very sensitive to Pen G inhibition and responded in a dose-dependent manner to concentrations of about 0.2 and 0.5 μg/ml for strains GS-5 and FA-1, respectively. Higher Pen G concentrations failed to inhibit further either growth or insoluble peptidoglycan assembly. Somewhat surprisingly, Pen G also inhibited both ribonucleic acid (RNA) and protein syntheses, each in a dose-dependent manner. Compared with inhibition of peptidoglycan synthesis, inhibition of RNA and protein syntheses by Pen G was less rapid and less extensive. Maximum amounts of radiolabeled Pen G were specifically bound to intact cells upon exposure to about 0.2 and 0.5 μg/ml of Pen G for strains GS-5 and FA-1, respectively, concentrations consistent with those that resulted in maximum or near-maximum inhibitions of the synthesis of cellular peptidoglycan, RNA, and protein. Five polypeptide bands that had a very high affinity for [14C]Pen G were detected in a crude cell envelope preparation of strain FA-1. After exposure of cultures of strain FA-1 to the effects of saturating concentrations of the drug for up to 3 h, addition of penicillinase was followed by recovery of growth after a lag. The length of the lag before regrowth depended on both Pen G concentration and time of exposure. On the basis of these and other observations, it is proposed that the secondary inhibitions of cellular RNA or protein synthesis, or both, are involved in the tolerance of these organisms to lysis and killing by Pen G and other inhibitors of insoluble peptidoglycan assembly

  3. The staphylococcal surface-glycopolymer wall teichoic acid (WTA) is crucial for complement activation and immunological defense against Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Kenji; Takahashi, Kazue; Lee, Bok Luel

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen that is decorated by glycopolymers, including wall teichoic acid (WTA), peptidoglycan, lipoteichoic acid, and capsular polysaccharides. These bacterial surface glycopolymers are recognized by serum antibodies and a variety of pattern recognition molecules, including mannose-binding lectin (MBL). Recently, we demonstrated that human serum MBL senses staphylococcal WTA. Whereas MBL in infants who have not yet fully developed adaptive immunity binds to S. aureus WTA and activates complement serum, MBL in adults who have fully developed adaptive immunity cannot bind to WTA because of an inhibitory effect of serum anti-WTA IgG. Furthermore, we showed that human anti-WTA IgGs purified from pooled adult serum IgGs triggered activation of classical complement-dependent opsonophagocytosis against S. aureus. Because the epitopes of WTA that are recognized by anti-WTA IgG and MBL have not been determined, we constructed several S. aureus mutants with altered WTA glycosylation. Our intensive biochemical studies provide evidence that the β-GlcNAc residues of WTA are required for the induction of anti-WTA IgG-mediated opsonophagocytosis and that both β- and α-GlcNAc residues are required for MBL-mediated complement activation. The molecular interactions of other S. aureus cell wall components and host recognition proteins are also discussed. In summary, in this review, we discuss the biological importance of S. aureus cell surface glycopolymers in complement activation and host defense responses. PMID:27424796

  4. The Antibacterial Assay of Tectorigenin with Detergents or ATPase Inhibitors against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Ki Joung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tectorigenin (TTR is an O-methylated isoflavone derived from the rhizome of Belamacanda chinensis (L. DC. It is known to perform a wide spectrum of biological activities such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor. The aim of this study is to examine the mechanism of antibacterial activity of TTR against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. The anti-MRSA activity of TTR was analyzed in combination assays with detergent, ATPase inhibitors, and peptidoglycan (PGN derived from S. aureus. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM was used to monitor survival characteristics and changes in S. aureus morphology. The MIC values of TTR against all the tested strains were 125 μg/mL. The OD(600 of each suspension treated with a combination of Triton X-100, DCCD, and NaN3 with TTR (1/10 × MIC had been reduced from 68% to 80%, compared to the TTR alone. At a concentration of 125 μg/mL, PGN blocked antibacterial activity of TTR. This study indicates that anti-MRSA action of TTR is closely related to cytoplasmic membrane permeability and ABC transporter, and PGN at 125 μg/mL directly bind to and inhibit TTR at 62.5 μg/mL. These results can be important indication in study on antimicrobial activity mechanism against multidrug resistant strains.

  5. Bacterial Pathogens of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia in a Tertiary Referral Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Su Young; Kim, Tae Ok; Park, Chan Woo; Yu, Jin Yeong; Lee, Boram; Lee, Ho Sung; Kim, Yu Il; Lim, Sung Chul; Kwon, Yong Soo

    2012-01-01

    Background This study evaluates the bacterial pathogens of Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in a tertiary referral hospital. Methods A total of 109 bacterial pathogens from 91 adult patients with VAP, who were admitted to the medical intensive care unit from January 2008 to December 2009, were examined. Clinical characteristics, bacterial pathogens, and resistance profiles were analyzed. Results Staphylococcus aureus (44%) was the most frequently isolated. Acinetobacter baumanii (30%), P...

  6. Effect of acetylation on arthropathic activity of group A streptococcal peptidoglycan-polysaccharide fragments.

    OpenAIRE

    Stimpson, S. A.; Lerch, R A; Cleland, D R; Yarnall, D P; Clark, R L; Cromartie, W. J.; Schwab, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    Purified group A streptococcal peptidoglycan-polysaccharide (PG-PS) fragments were either de-O-acylated, or acetylated and then de-O-acylated to yield N-acetylated PG-PS. Native PG-PS was poorly degraded, N-acetylated PG-PS was extensively degraded, and de-O-acylated PG-PS was only slightly degraded by hen egg white lysozyme. N-acetylated PG-PS was also extensively degraded by human lysozyme and partially degraded by rat serum or rat liver extract. After a single intraperitoneal injection of ...

  7. Identification and characterization of peptidoglycan-associated proteins in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, S. A.; Judd, R C

    1989-01-01

    The principal proteins associated with Neisseria gonorrhoeae peptidoglycan (PG), as identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, are the following: two proteins at approximately 90 kilodaltons (kDa), single major species at both 60 and 44 kDa, a 34- to 36-kDa protein, and three proteins between 28 and 32 kDa. A protein analogous to Escherichia coli Braun lipoprotein was not detected with gonococcal cell wall preparations. The identity of the PG-associated proteins ...

  8. Changes to Its Peptidoglycan-Remodeling Enzyme Repertoire Modulate β-Lactam Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Cavallari, Joseph F.; Lamers, Ryan P.; Scheurwater, Edie M.; Matos, Andrea L.; Burrows, Lori L.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of hospital-acquired infections and is resistant to many antibiotics. Among its primary mechanisms of resistance is expression of a chromosomally encoded AmpC β-lactamase that inactivates β-lactams. The mechanisms leading to AmpC expression in P. aeruginosa remain incompletely understood but are intricately linked to cell wall metabolism. To better understand the roles of peptidoglycan-active enzymes in AmpC expression—and consequent β-lactam resistan...

  9. Predictive Value of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Nasal Swab PCR Assay for MRSA Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Dangerfield, Benjamin; Chung, Andrew; Webb, Brandon; Seville, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Pneumonia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is associated with poor outcomes and frequently merits empirical antibiotic consideration despite its relatively low incidence. Nasal colonization with MRSA is associated with clinical MRSA infection and can be reliably detected using the nasal swab PCR assay. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the nasal swab MRSA PCR in predicting MRSA pneumonia. A retrospective cohort study was performed in a tertiary care cente...

  10. Nosocomial bloodstream infection in patients caused by Staphylococcus aureus: drug susceptibility, outcome, and risk factors for hospital mortality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Rong; YAN Zhong-qiang; FENG Dan; LUO Yan-ping; WANG Lei-li; SHEN Ding-xia

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have different viewpoints about the clinical impact of methicillin resistance on mortality of hospital-acquired bloodstream infection (BSI) patients with Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus).The objective of this study was to investigate the mortality of hospital-acquired BSI with S.aureus in a military hospital and analyze the risk factors for the hospital mortality.Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed in patients admitted to the biggest military tertiary teaching hospital in China between January 2006 and May 2011.All included patients had clinically significant nosocomial BSI with S.aureus.Multivariate Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors for hospital mortality of patients with S.aureus BSI.Results One hundred and eighteen patients of more than one year old were identified as clinically and microbiologically confirmed nosocomial bacteraemia due to S.aureus,and 75 out of 118 patients were infected with methicillin-resistant S.aureus (MRSA).The overall mortality of nosocomial S.aureus BSI was 28.0%.Methicillin resistance in S.aureus bacteremia was associated with significant increase in the length of hospitalization and high proportion of inappropriate empirical antibiotic treatment.After Logistic regression analysis,the severity of clinical manifestations (APACHE Ⅱ score) (odds ratio (OR) 1.22,95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-1.34) and inadequacy of empirical antimicrobial therapy (OR 0.25,95% CI 0.09-0.69) remained as risk factors for hospital mortality.Conclusions Nosocomial S.aureus BSI was associated with high in-hospital mortality.Methicillin resistance in S.aureus has no significant impact on the outcome of patients with staphylococcal bacteremia.Proper empirical antimicrobial therapy is very important to the prognosis.

  11. Linezolid resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavani Gandham

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Linezolid is the only antibiotic available as an oral formulation for resistant staphylococcal infections. It is effective in skin and soft tissue infections, nosocomial pneumonias including VAP, infective endocarditis and MRSA meningitis. It is also effective in the eradication of both nasal and throat colonization of MRSA. Its high bioavailability and post antibiotic effect, ease of switching to oral therapy during its use and the fact that it can be used in patients of all ages, also in patients with liver disease and poor kidney function and its increased effectiveness over glycopeptides makes this drug a precious drug in the treatment of resistant staphylococcal infections. Linezolid resistance in staphylococcus is defined as a linezolid MIC of and #8805;8 mg/L. Reported Linezolid resistance in India and elsewhere is 2-20%. There is clonal dissemination of Linezolid Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LRSA within or across health care settings which demands continuous surveillance to determine the emergent risk of resistance strains and to establish guidelines for appropriate use. Clinical laboratories should confirm any LRSA preferably by a second method, prior to using linezolid for serious infections. Effective surveillance, more judicious use of this antibiotic, avoiding linezolid usage for empiric therapy in hospital acquired staphylococcus infections, optimization of the pharmacological parameters of the antibiotics in specific clinical situation, decreasing bacterial load by timely surgical debridement or drainage of collections, use of combination therapies would prevent the emergence of resistance to linezolid in staphylococcus aureus. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1253-1256

  12. D-amino carboxamide-based recruitment of dinitrophenol antibodies to bacterial surfaces via peptidoglycan remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fura, Jonathan M; Pires, Marcos M

    2015-07-01

    During the past few decades there has been a rapid emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria afflicting human patients. At the same time, reduced output from pharmaceutical industry in this area precipitated a sharp decrease in the approval of new antibiotics. The combination of these factors potentially compromises the ability to effectively combat bacterial infections. While traditional drug discovery efforts continue in the pursuit of small molecule agents that disrupt bacterial growth, non-traditional efforts could serve to complement antimicrobial strategies. We recently demonstrated our ability to remodel the surface of bacterial cells using unnatural D-amino acids displaying the antigenic dinitrophenyl (DNP) handle. These immune stimulant D-amino acids derivatives were metabolically incorporated onto the peptidoglycan of bacteria via a promiscuous surface-anchored transpeptidase. The covalent modification of DNP moieties onto the peptidoglycan led to the anti-DNP antibody opsonization of the bacterial cell surface. Herein, we show that the amidation of the C-terminus to generate DNP-displaying D-amino carboxamide drastically improves antibody recruitment. Antibody opsonization using the D-amino carboxamide agent is observed at lower concentrations than the D-amino acid counterpart. In addition, the recruitment of endogenous antibodies in pooled human serum to the DNP-modified bacterial cell surface is demonstrated for the first time. We envision that the C-terminus amidation of DNP-conjugated D-amino acids could potentially facilitate translation of these results to in vivo animal disease models. PMID:25653048

  13. An Endogenous Nanomineral Chaperones Luminal Antigen and Peptidoglycan to Intestinal Immune Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jonathan J; Thomas-McKay, Emma; Thoree, Vinay; Robertson, Jack; Hewitt, Rachel E; Skepper, Jeremy N; Brown, Andy; Hernandez-Garrido, Juan Carlos; Midgley, Paul A; Gomez-Morilla, Inmaculada; Grime, Geoffrey W; Kirkby, Karen J; Mabbott, Neil A; Donaldson, David S; Williams, Ifor R; Rios, Daniel; Girardin, Stephen E; Haas, Carolin T; Bruggraber, Sylvaine FA; Laman, Jon D; Tanriver, Yakup; Lombardi, Giovanna; Lechler, Robert; Thompson, Richard P H; Pele, Laetitia C

    2015-01-01

    In humans and other mammals, it is known that calcium and phosphate ions are secreted from the distal small intestine into the lumen. However, why this secretion occurs is unclear. Here, we show that the process leads to the formation of amorphous magnesium-substituted calcium phosphate nanoparticles that trap soluble macromolecules, such as bacterial peptidoglycan and orally-fed protein antigens, in the lumen and transport them to immune cells of the intestinal tissue. The macromolecule-containing nanoparticles utilize epithelial M cells to enter Peyer’s patches - small areas of the intestine concentrated with particle-scavenging immune cells. In wild type mice, intestinal immune cells containing these naturally-formed nanoparticles expressed the immune tolerance-associated molecule ‘programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1)’, whereas in NOD1/2 double knock-out mice, which cannot recognize peptidoglycan, PD-L1 was undetected. Our results explain a role for constitutively formed calcium phosphate nanoparticles in the gut lumen and how this helps to shape intestinal immune homeostasis. PMID:25751305

  14. Targeting Bacterial Cell Wall Peptidoglycan Synthesis by Inhibition of Glycosyltransferase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesleh, Michael F; Rajaratnam, Premraj; Conrad, Mary; Chandrasekaran, Vasu; Liu, Christopher M; Pandya, Bhaumik A; Hwang, You Seok; Rye, Peter T; Muldoon, Craig; Becker, Bernd; Zuegg, Johannes; Meutermans, Wim; Moy, Terence I

    2016-02-01

    Synthesis of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan requires glycosyltransferase enzymes that transfer the disaccharide-peptide from lipid II onto the growing glycan chain. The polymerization of the glycan chain precedes cross-linking by penicillin-binding proteins and is essential for growth for key bacterial pathogens. As such, bacterial cell wall glycosyltransferases are an attractive target for antibiotic drug discovery. However, significant challenges to the development of inhibitors for these targets include the development of suitable assays and chemical matter that is suited to the nature of the binding site. We developed glycosyltransferase enzymatic activity and binding assays using the natural products moenomycin and vancomycin as model inhibitors. In addition, we designed a library of disaccharide compounds based on the minimum moenomycin fragment with peptidoglycan glycosyltransferase inhibitory activity and based on a more drug-like and synthetically versatile disaccharide building block. A subset of these disaccharide compounds bound and inhibited the glycosyltransferase enzymes, and these compounds could serve as chemical entry points for antibiotic development. PMID:26358369

  15. Staphylococcus aureus triggered reactive arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Siam, A R; M. Hammoudeh

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To report two patients who developed reactive arthritis in association with Staphylococcus aureus infection. METHODS--A review of the case notes of two patients. RESULTS--Two adult female patients have developed sterile arthritis in association with Staph aureus infection. The first patient has had two episodes of arthritis; the first followed olecranon bursitis, the second followed infection of a central venous catheter used for dialysis. The second patient developed sterile arth...

  16. Staphylococcus aureus and sore nipples.

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone, V. H.; Willis, C. E.; Berkowitz, J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To correlate clinical symptoms and signs of sore nipples with the presence of Staphylococcus aureus and to determine the probability of mothers having S aureus-infected nipples when these local symptoms and signs are found. DESIGN: Two cohorts of consecutive patients were enrolled regardless of presenting complaint. A questionnaire was administered to determine the presence and severity of sore nipples. Objective findings on breast examination were documented. A nipple swab was tak...

  17. IgM antibody level against proinflammatory bacterial peptidoglycan is inversely correlated with extent of atherosclerotic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.O. Nijhuis; Y. van der Graaf (Yolanda); M.J. Melief; A.H. Schoneveld (Arjan); D.P.V. de Kleijn (Dominique); J.D. Laman (Jon); G. Pasterkamp (Gerard)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Atherosclerosis may lead to acute clinical events by rupture of a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque. Previously, we demonstrated that peptidoglycan (PGN), a major cell wall component of gram-positive bacteria that induces production of proinflammatory cytokines through TLR2 an

  18. Airborne peptidoglycans as a supporting indicator of bacterial contamination in a metal processing plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Cyprowski

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess exposure to airborne endotoxins and peptidoglycans (PGs as well as possibility of using PGs as a surrogate measure of bacterial exposure in workplaces in a metal processing plant. Material and Methods: Personal dosimetry (N = 11 was used to obtain data on concentrations of viable bacteria, total number of bioaerosol particles, endotoxins and peptidoglycans. To investigate the size distributions of aerosol particles responsible for transport of endotoxins and PGs, air samples (N = 5 were additionally collected using the 8-stage cascade impactor. Endotoxins and PGs were assayed with the Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL test and a kinetic version of the silkworm larvae plasma (SLP test, respectively. Results: Median concentrations of airborne PGs (14.6 ng/m3, endotoxins (0.2 ng/m3, viable bacteria (1.16×103 CFU/m3 and the total number of bioaerosol particles (1.81×106 cells/m3 were determined. Qualitative analysis revealed presence of 19 bacterial species belonging to 14 genera. The calculations showed strong, significant correlations (p < 0.05 between endotoxins, viable bacteria (r = 0.75 and the total number of bioaerosol particle concentrations (r = 0.76 as well as between PGs and the total number of bioaerosol particle concentrations (r = 0.72. Size distribution analysis showed that the highest concentrations of bacterial aerosols occurred in the range of 2.1–3.3 μm. In the case of endotoxins, an increase of concentrations in 2 ranges of aerodynamic diameters: 1.1–3.3 μm and 5.8–9 μm was shown. For PGs there was a visible gradual increase of their concentrations in the range 2.1–9 μm. Conclusions: Peptidoglycans can be treated as a supporting indicator of bacterial contamination in metal processing plants, particularly when an assessment of an immunotoxic potential of microbiological hazards needs to be performed. However, to be extrapolated to other occupational and non

  19. Complete Reconstitution of the Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus Phenotype of Strain Mu50 in Vancomycin-Susceptible S. aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Yuki; Sekine, Miwa; Hishinuma, Tomomi; Aiba, Yoshifumi; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2016-06-01

    Complete reconstitution of the vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) phenotype of strain Mu50 was achieved by sequentially introducing mutations into six genes of vancomycin-susceptible S. aureus (VSSA) strain N315ΔIP. The six mutated genes were detected in VISA strain Mu50 but not in N315ΔIP. Introduction of the mutation Ser329Leu into vraS, encoding the sensor histidine kinase of the vraSR two-component regulatory (TCR) system, and another mutation, Glu146Lys, into msrR, belonging to the LytR-CpsA-Psr (LCP) family, increased the level of vancomycin resistance to that detected in heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA) strain Mu3. Introduction of two more mutations, Asn197Ser into graR of the graSR TCR system and His481Tyr into rpoB, encoding the β subunit of RNA polymerase, converted the hVISA strain into a VISA strain with the same level of vancomycin resistance as Mu50. Surprisingly, however, the constructed quadruple mutant strain ΔIP4 did not have a thickened cell wall, a cardinal feature of the VISA phenotype. Subsequent study showed that cell wall thickening was an inducible phenotype in the mutant strain, whereas it was a constitutive one in Mu50. Finally, introduction of the Ala297Val mutation into fdh2, which encodes a putative formate dehydrogenase, or a 67-amino-acid sequence deletion into sle1 [sle1(Δ67aa)], encoding the hydrolase of N-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase in the peptidoglycan, converted inducible cell wall thickening into constitutive cell wall thickening. sle1(Δ67aa) was found to cause a drastic decrease in autolysis activity. Thus, all six mutated genes required for acquisition of the VISA phenotype were directly or indirectly involved in the regulation of cell physiology. The VISA phenotype seemed to be achieved through multiple genetic events accompanying drastic changes in cell physiology. PMID:27067329

  20. Lyme disease and relapsing fever Borrelia elongate through zones of peptidoglycan synthesis that mark division sites of daughter cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutras, Brandon Lyon; Scott, Molly; Parry, Bradley; Biboy, Jacob; Gray, Joe; Vollmer, Waldemar; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2016-08-16

    Agents that cause Lyme disease, relapsing fever, leptospirosis, and syphilis belong to the phylum Spirochaetae-a unique lineage of bacteria most known for their long, spiral morphology. Despite the relevance to human health, little is known about the most fundamental aspects of spirochete growth. Here, using quantitative microscopy to track peptidoglycan cell-wall synthesis, we found that the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi displays a complex pattern of growth. B. burgdorferi elongates from discrete zones that are both spatially and temporally regulated. In addition, some peptidoglycan incorporation occurs along the cell body, with the notable exception of a large region at the poles. Newborn cells inherit a highly active zone of peptidoglycan synthesis at midcell that contributes to elongation for most of the cell cycle. Concomitant with the initiation of nucleoid separation and cell constriction, second and third zones of elongation are established at the 1/4 and 3/4 cellular positions, marking future sites of division for the subsequent generation. Positioning of elongation zones along the cell is robust to cell length variations and is relatively precise over long distances (>30 µm), suggesting that cells ‟sense" relative, as opposed to absolute, cell length to establish zones of peptidoglycan synthesis. The transition from one to three zones of peptidoglycan growth during the cell cycle is also observed in relapsing fever Borrelia. However, this mode of growth does not extend to representative species from other spirochetal genera, suggesting that this distinctive growth mode represents an evolutionary divide in the spirochete phylum. PMID:27506799

  1. The Absence of a Mature Cell Wall Sacculus in Stable Listeria monocytogenes L-Form Cells Is Independent of Peptidoglycan Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer, Patrick; Borisova, Marina; Schneider, Alexander; Ayala, Juan A.; Mayer, Christoph; Schuppler, Markus; Loessner, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    L-forms are cell wall-deficient variants of otherwise walled bacteria that maintain the ability to survive and proliferate in absence of the surrounding peptidoglycan sacculus. While transient or unstable L-forms can revert to the walled state and may still rely on residual peptidoglycan synthesis for multiplication, stable L-forms cannot revert to the walled form and are believed to propagate in the complete absence of peptidoglycan. L-forms are increasingly studied as a fundamental biological model system for cell wall synthesis. Here, we show that a stable L-form of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes features a surprisingly intact peptidoglycan synthesis pathway including glycosyl transfer, in spite of the accumulation of multiple mutations during prolonged passage in the cell wall-deficient state. Microscopic and biochemical analysis revealed the presence of peptidoglycan precursors and functional glycosyl transferases, resulting in the formation of peptidoglycan polymers but without the synthesis of a mature cell wall sacculus. In conclusion, we found that stable, non-reverting L-forms, which do not require active PG synthesis for proliferation, may still continue to produce aberrant peptidoglycan. PMID:27149671

  2. Evolutionary origin of peptidoglycan recognition proteins in vertebrate innate immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsujino Fumi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Innate immunity is the ancient defense system of multicellular organisms against microbial infection. The basis of this first line of defense resides in the recognition of unique motifs conserved in microorganisms, and absent in the host. Peptidoglycans, structural components of bacterial cell walls, are recognized by Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins (PGRPs. PGRPs are present in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Although some evidence for similarities and differences in function and structure between them has been found, their evolutionary history and phylogenetic relationship have remained unclear. Such studies have been severely hampered by the great extent of sequence divergence among vertebrate and invertebrate PGRPs. Here we investigate the birth and death processes of PGRPs to elucidate their origin and diversity. Results We found that (i four rounds of gene duplication and a single domain duplication have generated the major variety of present vertebrate PGRPs, while in invertebrates more than ten times the number of duplications are required to explain the repertoire of present PGRPs, and (ii the death of genes in vertebrates appears to be almost null whereas in invertebrates it is frequent. Conclusion These results suggest that the emergence of new PGRP genes may have an impact on the availability of the repertoire and its function against pathogens. These striking differences in PGRP evolution of vertebrates and invertebrates should reflect the differences in the role of their innate immunity. Insights on the origin of PGRP genes will pave the way to understand the evolution of the interaction between host and pathogens and to lead to the development of new treatments for immune diseases that involve proteins related to the recognition of self and non-self.

  3. Peptidoglycan Hydrolases of Local Lactic Acid Bacteria from Kazakh Traditional Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serik Shaikhin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peptidoglycan (PG is a major component of the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria and is essential for maintaining the integrity of the bacterial cell and its shape. The bacteria synthesize PG hydrolases, which are capable of cleaving the covalent bonds of PG. They also play an important role in modeling PG, which is required for bacterial growth and division. In an era of increasing antibiotic-resistant pathogens, PG hydrolases that destroy these important structures of the cell wall act as a potential source of new antimicrobials. The aim of this study is to identify the main PG hydrolases of local lactic acid bacteria isolated from traditional foods that enhance probiotic activity of a biological preparation. Methods. Lactococcus lactis 17А and Lactococcus garvieae 19А were isolated from the traditional sausage-like meat product called kazy. They were isolated according to standards methods of microbiology. Genetic identification of the isolates were tested by determining the nucleotide sequences of 16S rDNA. The Republican collection of microorganisms took strains of Lactobacillus casei subsp. Rhamnosus 13-P, L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis CG-1 B-RKM 0044 from cheese, Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei B-RKM 0202 from homemade butter. They used the standard technique of renaturating polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to detect PG hydrolases activity. Results. According to the profiles of PG hydrolase activity on zymograms, the enzymes of Lactococci 17A and 19A in kazy are similar in electrophoretic mobility to major autolysin AcmA, while the lactobacilli of industrial and home-made dairy products have enzymes similar to extracellular proteins p40 and p75, which have probiotic activity. Conclusions. Use of peptidoglycan hydrolases seems to be an interesting approach in the fight against multi-drug resistant strains of bacteria and could be a valuable tool for the treatment of diseases caused by these microorganisms in Kazakhstan.

  4. Triple-acting Lytic Enzyme Treatment of Drug-Resistant and Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Stephen C; Roach, Dwayne R; Chauhan, Vinita S; Shen, Yang; Foster-Frey, Juli; Powell, Anne M; Bauchan, Gary; Lease, Richard A; Mohammadi, Homan; Harty, William J; Simmons, Chad; Schmelcher, Mathias; Camp, Mary; Dong, Shengli; Baker, John R; Sheen, Tamsin R; Doran, Kelly S; Pritchard, David G; Almeida, Raul A; Nelson, Daniel C; Marriott, Ian; Lee, Jean C; Donovan, David M

    2016-01-01

    Multi-drug resistant bacteria are a persistent problem in modern health care, food safety and animal health. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over used conventional antibiotics. Here we describe engineered triple-acting staphylolytic peptidoglycan hydrolases wherein three unique antimicrobial activities from two parental proteins are combined into a single fusion protein. This effectively reduces the incidence of resistant strain development. The fusion protein reduced colonization by Staphylococcus aureus in a rat nasal colonization model, surpassing the efficacy of either parental protein. Modification of a triple-acting lytic construct with a protein transduction domain significantly enhanced both biofilm eradication and the ability to kill intracellular S. aureus as demonstrated in cultured mammary epithelial cells and in a mouse model of staphylococcal mastitis. Interestingly, the protein transduction domain was not necessary for reducing the intracellular pathogens in cultured osteoblasts or in two mouse models of osteomyelitis, highlighting the vagaries of exactly how protein transduction domains facilitate protein uptake. Bacterial cell wall degrading enzyme antimicrobials can be engineered to enhance their value as potent therapeutics. PMID:27121552

  5. Triple-acting Lytic Enzyme Treatment of Drug-Resistant and Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Stephen C.; Roach, Dwayne R.; Chauhan, Vinita S.; Shen, Yang; Foster-Frey, Juli; Powell, Anne M.; Bauchan, Gary; Lease, Richard A.; Mohammadi, Homan; Harty, William J.; Simmons, Chad; Schmelcher, Mathias; Camp, Mary; Dong, Shengli; Baker, John R.; Sheen, Tamsin R.; Doran, Kelly S.; Pritchard, David G.; Almeida, Raul A.; Nelson, Daniel C.; Marriott, Ian; Lee, Jean C.; Donovan, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-drug resistant bacteria are a persistent problem in modern health care, food safety and animal health. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over used conventional antibiotics. Here we describe engineered triple-acting staphylolytic peptidoglycan hydrolases wherein three unique antimicrobial activities from two parental proteins are combined into a single fusion protein. This effectively reduces the incidence of resistant strain development. The fusion protein reduced colonization by Staphylococcus aureus in a rat nasal colonization model, surpassing the efficacy of either parental protein. Modification of a triple-acting lytic construct with a protein transduction domain significantly enhanced both biofilm eradication and the ability to kill intracellular S. aureus as demonstrated in cultured mammary epithelial cells and in a mouse model of staphylococcal mastitis. Interestingly, the protein transduction domain was not necessary for reducing the intracellular pathogens in cultured osteoblasts or in two mouse models of osteomyelitis, highlighting the vagaries of exactly how protein transduction domains facilitate protein uptake. Bacterial cell wall degrading enzyme antimicrobials can be engineered to enhance their value as potent therapeutics. PMID:27121552

  6. Revealing fosfomycin primary effect on Staphylococcus aureus transcriptome: modulation of cell envelope biosynthesis and phosphoenolpyruvate induced starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruden Kristina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is a highly adaptable human pathogen and there is a constant search for effective antibiotics. Fosfomycin is a potent irreversible inhibitor of MurA, an enolpyruvyl transferase that uses phosphoenolpyruvate as substrate. The goal of this study was to identify the pathways and processes primarily affected by fosfomycin at the genome-wide transcriptome level to aid development of new drugs. Results S. aureus ATCC 29213 cells were treated with sub-MIC concentrations of fosfomycin and harvested at 10, 20 and 40 minutes after treatment. S. aureus GeneChip statistical data analysis was complemented by gene set enrichment analysis. A visualization tool for mapping gene expression data into biological pathways was developed in order to identify the metabolic processes affected by fosfomycin. We have shown that the number of significantly differentially expressed genes in treated cultures increased with time and with increasing fosfomycin concentration. The target pathway - peptidoglycan biosynthesis - was upregulated following fosfomycin treatment. Modulation of transport processes, cofactor biosynthesis, energy metabolism and nucleic acid biosynthesis was also observed. Conclusions Several pathways and genes downregulated by fosfomycin have been identified, in contrast to previously described cell wall active antibiotics, and was explained by starvation response induced by phosphoenolpyruvate accumulation. Transcriptomic profiling, in combination with meta-analysis, has been shown to be a valuable tool in determining bacterial response to a specific antibiotic.

  7. Bugging the cell wall of bacteria : novel insights into the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan and its inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olrichs, N.K.

    2010-01-01

    The last few decades saw an alarming rise of resistance against antibiotics, including the infamous methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) that is resistant to the large group of antibiotics. This has turned the development of new antimicrobial compounds into a crucial necessity. The bac

  8. Collagen binding to Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staphylococcus aureus can bind soluble collagen in a specific, saturable manner. We have previously shown that some variability exists in the degree of collagen binding between different strains of heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed S. aureus which are commercially available as immunologic reagents. The present study demonstrates that live S. aureus of the Cowan 1 strain binds amounts of collagen per organism equivalent to those demonstrated previously in heat-killed, formaldehyde-fixed bacteria but has an affinity over 100 times greater, with Kd values of 9.7 X 10(-11) M and 4.3 X 10(-8) M for live and heat-killed organisms, respectively. Studies were also carried out with S. aureus killed by ionizing radiation, since this method of killing the organism seemed less likely to alter the binding moieties on the surface than did heat killing. Bacteria killed by exposure to gamma radiation bound collagen in a manner essentially indistinguishable from that of live organisms. Binding of collagen to irradiated cells of the Cowan 1 strain was rapid, with equilibrium reached by 30 min at 22 degrees C, and was fully reversible. The binding was not inhibited by fibronectin, fibrinogen, C1q, or immunoglobulin G, suggesting a binding site for collagen distinct from those for these proteins. Collagen binding was virtually eliminated in trypsin-treated organisms, indicating that the binding site has a protein component. Of four strains examined, Cowan 1 and S. aureus ATCC 25923 showed saturable, specific binding, while strains Woods and S4 showed a complete lack of binding. These results suggest that some strains of S. aureus contain high-affinity binding sites for collagen. While the number of binding sites per bacterium varied sixfold in the two collagen-binding strains, the apparent affinity was similar

  9. Host-adaptive evolution of Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Lowder, Bethan Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a notorious human pathogen associated with severe nosocomial and community-acquired infections. In addition, S. aureus is a major cause of animal diseases including skeletal infections of poultry and bovine and ovine mastitis, which are a large economic burden on the broiler chicken and dairy farming industries. The population structure of S. aureus associated with humans has been well studied. However, despite the prevalence of S. aureus infections in ...

  10. Genome Sequence of the Clinical Isolate Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus Strain UAMS-1

    OpenAIRE

    Sassi, Mohamed; Sharma, Deepak; Brinsmade, Shaun ,; Felden, Brice; Augagneur, Yoann

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus strain UAMS-1. UAMS-1 is a virulent oxacillin-susceptible clinical isolate. Its genome is composed of 2,763,963 bp and will be useful for further gene expression analysis using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) technology. S taphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic human bacterial pathogen responsible for nosocomial and community-associated infections. S. aureus subsp. aureus strain UAMS-1 was originally isolated from the ...

  11. Role of the group B antigen of Streptococcus agalactiae a peptidoglycan-anchored polysaccharide involved in cell wall biogenesis : a Peptidoglycan-Anchored Polysaccharide involved in cell wall biogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Élise Caliot; Shaynoor Dramsi; Marie-Pierre Chapot-Chartier; Pascal Courtin; Saulius Kulakauskas; Christine Péchoux; Patrick Trieu-Cuot; Michel-Yves Mistou

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS) is a leading cause of infections in neonates and an emerging pathogen in adults. The Lancefield Group B carbohydrate (GBC) is a peptidoglycan-anchored antigen that defines this species as a Group B Streptococcus. Despite earlier immunological and biochemical characterizations, the function of this abundant glycopolymer has never been addressed experimentally. Here, we inactivated the gene gbcO encoding a putative UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-1-...

  12. Buckets and Fire: Metaphors in Tertiary Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Lisa; Mansvelt, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines New Zealand tertiary teachers' use of metaphor and their attitudes to the consumer metaphor in relation to teaching. Based on interviews with 16 tertiary teachers, this study shows that although teachers believe the consumer metaphor is accepted by students, tertiary institutions and policy makers, and that it has affected…

  13. A 12-year review of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections in haemodialysis patients: more work to be done.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, S F

    2012-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections (BSI) are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in haemodialysis patients. This study describes a 12-year retrospective review of S. aureus BSI in a large haemodialysis centre in a tertiary referral hospital. The overall rate of S. aureus BSI was 17.9 per 100 patient-years (range 9.7-36.8). The rate of meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) BSI was 5.6 per 100 patient-years (range 0.9-13.8). Infective complications occurred in 11% of episodes, the most common being infective endocarditis (7.6%). Ten percent of patients died within 30 days of S. aureus being isolated from blood. Most cases of S. aureus BSI (83%) were related to vascular catheters. The provision of lower-risk vascular access, such as arteriovenous fistulae, and reduced use of intravascular catheters should be priorities in all haemodialysis units. Where alternative vascular access cannot be established, interventions to reduce the risk of catheter-related infections should be implemented to reduce morbidity and mortality in this vulnerable patient group.

  14. Rethinking the Tertiary Mathematics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petocz, Peter; Reid, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Mathematics curriculum at the tertiary level is located within a range of social and cultural theories, and is often constructed by academics seeking to promulgate a particular view of mathematics. We argue that such a curriculum should incorporate a real acknowledgement of the different ways in which students understand the nature of mathematics…

  15. Healthcare-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Jyoti; Shenoy, Shalini M.; Baliga, Shrikala; Chakrapani, M.; Bhat, Gopalkrishna K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common pathogen worldwide and its multidrug resistance is a major concern. This study aimed to determine the clinical characteristics and antibiotic susceptibility profile of healthcare-associated MRSA with emphasis on resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) phenotypes and vancomycin. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out between February 2014 and February 2015 across four tertiary care hospitals in Mangalore, South India. Healthcare-associated infections among 291 inpatients at these hospitals were identified according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. Clinical specimens were collected based on infection type. S. aureus and MRSA isolates were identified and antibiotic susceptibility tests performed using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration of vancomycin was determined using the Agar dilution method and inducible clindamycin resistance was detected with a double-disk diffusion test (D-test). Results: Out of 291 healthcare-associated S. aureus cases, 88 were MRSA (30.2%). Of these, 54.6% were skin and soft tissue infections. All of the isolates were susceptible to teicoplanin and linezolid. Four MRSA isolates exhibited intermediate resistance to vancomycin (4.6%). Of the MRSA strains, 10 (11.4%) were constitutive MLSB phenotypes, 31 (35.2%) were inducible MLSB phenotypes and 14 (15.9%) were macrolide-streptogramin B phenotypes. Conclusion: Healthcare-associated MRSA multidrug resistance was alarmingly high. In routine antibiotic susceptibility testing, a D-test should always be performed if an isolate is resistant to erythromycin but susceptible to clindamycin. Determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration of vancomycin is necessary when treating patients with MRSA infections. PMID:27226908

  16. Staphylococcus aureus and hand eczema severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haslund, P; Bangsgaard, N; Jarløv, J O;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of bacterial infections in hand eczema (HE) remains to be assessed. OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with HE compared with controls, and to relate presence of S. aureus, subtypes and toxin production to severity of HE. METHODS......: Bacterial swabs were taken at three different visits from the hand and nose in 50 patients with HE and 50 controls. Staphylococcus aureus was subtyped by spa typing and assigned to clonal complexes (CCs), and isolates were tested for exotoxin-producing S. aureus strains. The Hand Eczema Severity Index...... was used for severity assessment. RESULTS: Staphylococcus aureus was found on the hands in 24 patients with HE and four controls (P aureus was found to be related to increased severity of the eczema (P aureus types on the hands...

  17. Ca2+-dependent functions in peptidoglycan-stimulated mouse dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Nguyen T; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Matzner, Nicole; Zemtsova, Irina M; Biedermann, Tilo; Goetz, Friedrich; Lang, Florian

    2009-01-01

    Peptidoglycans (PGN) from bacterial cell walls may modify the course of an infection with bacterial pathogens. The present study explored the effect of PGN on cytosolic Ca2+ activity, cytokine production and phagocytosis of mouse dendritic cells (DCs), essential cells in the initiation and direction of antigen-specific T cell responses. Exposure of DCs to PGN was followed by a rapid increase in cytosolic Ca2+ activity ([Ca2+]i), which was due to Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and influx of extracellular Ca2+ across the cell membrane. In DCs isolated from Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) deficient mice the effect of PGN on [Ca2+]i was dramatically impaired. The PGN-induced increase of [Ca2+]i was dependent on voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channel activity. PGN-induced increase of [Ca2+]i was significantly blunted by margatoxin (MgTx) and perhexiline maleate (PM), inhibitors of Kv1.3 and Kv1.5, respectively. PGN further stimulated the release of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin-12 (IL-12) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), an effect significantly blunted by PM and the specific blocker of store-operated Ca2+ channels SKF-96365. Moreover, phagocytic capacity was dramatically increased in PGN-stimulated DCs in the presence of either Kv channel inhibitors or SKF-96365. The observations disclose Ca2+ and Kv channel-dependent cytokine production and phagocytosis in PGN-stimulated DCs. PMID:19710531

  18. Discovery of chlamydial peptidoglycan reveals bacteria with murein sacculi but without FtsZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilhofer, Martin; Aistleitner, Karin; Biboy, Jacob; Gray, Joe; Kuru, Erkin; Hall, Edward; Brun, Yves V.; Vannieuwenhze, Michael S.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Horn, Matthias; Jensen, Grant J.

    2013-12-01

    Chlamydiae are important pathogens and symbionts with unique cell biological features. They lack the cell-division protein FtsZ, and the existence of peptidoglycan (PG) in their cell wall has been highly controversial. FtsZ and PG together function in orchestrating cell division and maintaining cell shape in almost all other bacteria. Using electron cryotomography, mass spectrometry and fluorescent labelling dyes, here we show that some environmental chlamydiae have cell wall sacculi consisting of a novel PG type. Treatment with fosfomycin (a PG synthesis inhibitor) leads to lower infection rates and aberrant cell shapes, suggesting that PG synthesis is crucial for the chlamydial life cycle. Our findings demonstrate for the first time the presence of PG in a member of the Chlamydiae. They also present a unique example of a bacterium with a PG sacculus but without FtsZ, challenging the current hypothesis that it is the absence of a cell wall that renders FtsZ non-essential.

  19. Treatment with antibiotics that interfere with peptidoglycan biosynthesis inhibits chloroplast division in the desmid Closterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Matsumoto

    Full Text Available Charophytes is a green algal group closely related to land plants. We investigated the effects of antibiotics that interfere with peptidoglycan biosynthesis on chloroplast division in the desmid Closterium peracerosum-strigosum-littorale complex. To detect cells just after division, we used colchicine, which inhibits Closterium cell elongation after division. Although normal Closterium cells had two chloroplasts before and after cell division, cells treated with ampicillin, D-cycloserine, or fosfomycin had only one chloroplast after cell division, suggesting that the cells divided without chloroplast division. The antibiotics bacitracin and vancomycin showed no obvious effect. Electron microscopic observation showed that irregular-shaped chloroplasts existed in ampicillin-treated Closterium cells. Because antibiotic treatments resulted in the appearance of long cells with irregular chloroplasts and cell death, we counted cell types in the culture. The results suggested that cells with one chloroplast appeared first and then a huge chloroplast was generated that inhibited cell division, causing elongation followed by cell death.

  20. The Staphylococcus aureus response to unsaturated long chain free fatty acids: survival mechanisms and virulence implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G Kenny

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important human commensal and opportunistic pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections. Long chain unsaturated free fatty acids represent a barrier to colonisation and infection by S. aureus and act as an antimicrobial component of the innate immune system where they are found on epithelial surfaces and in abscesses. Despite many contradictory reports, the precise anti-staphylococcal mode of action of free fatty acids remains undetermined. In this study, transcriptional (microarrays and qRT-PCR and translational (proteomics analyses were applied to ascertain the response of S. aureus to a range of free fatty acids. An increase in expression of the sigma(B and CtsR stress response regulons was observed. This included increased expression of genes associated with staphyloxanthin synthesis, which has been linked to membrane stabilisation. Similarly, up-regulation of genes involved in capsule formation was recorded as were significant changes in the expression of genes associated with peptidoglycan synthesis and regulation. Overall, alterations were recorded predominantly in pathways involved in cellular energetics. In addition, sensitivity to linoleic acid of a range of defined (sigB, arcA, sasF, sarA, agr, crtM and transposon-derived mutants (vraE, SAR2632 was determined. Taken together, these data indicate a common mode of action for long chain unsaturated fatty acids that involves disruption of the cell membrane, leading to interference with energy production within the bacterial cell. Contrary to data reported for other strains, the clinically important EMRSA-16 strain MRSA252 used in this study showed an increase in expression of the important virulence regulator RNAIII following all of the treatment conditions tested. An adaptive response by S. aureus of reducing cell surface hydrophobicity was also observed. Two fatty acid sensitive mutants created during this study were also shown to diplay altered

  1. Genome sequence of type strain of Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Bong-Soo; Yi, Hana; Chun, Jongsik; Cha, Chang-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is a pathogen that causes food poisoning and community-associated infection with antibiotic resistance. This species is an indigenous intestinal microbe found in infants and not found in adult intestine. The relatively small genome size and rapid evolution of antibiotic resistance genes in the species have been drawing an increasing attention in public health. To extend our understanding of the species and use the genome data for comparative genomic studies, w...

  2. Evasion of Neutrophil Killing by Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will A. McGuinness

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus causes many types of infections, ranging from self-resolving skin infections to severe or fatal pneumonia. Human innate immune cells, called polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs or neutrophils, are essential for defense against S. aureus infections. Neutrophils are the most prominent cell type of the innate immune system and are capable of producing non-specific antimicrobial molecules that are effective at eliminating bacteria. Although significant progress has been made over the past few decades, our knowledge of S. aureus-host innate immune system interactions is incomplete. Most notably, S. aureus has the capacity to produce numerous molecules that are directed to protect the bacterium from neutrophils. Here we review in brief the role played by neutrophils in defense against S. aureus infection, and correspondingly, highlight selected S. aureus molecules that target key neutrophil functions.

  3. Effects of different enzymatic hydrolysis methods on the bioactivity of peptidoglycan in Litopenaeus vannamei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoling; Zhang, Yue; Wei, Song; Huang, Jie

    2013-03-01

    The effects of different hydrolysis methods on peptidoglycan (PG) were assessed in terms of their impact on the innate immunity and disease resistance of Pacific white shrimp, Litop enaeus vannamei. PG derived from Bifidobacterium thermophilum was prepared in the laboratory and processed with lysozyme and protease under varying conditions to produce several different PG preparations. A standard shrimp feed was mixed with 0.05% PG preparations to produce a number of experimental diets for shrimp. The composition, concentration, and molecular weight ranges of the soluble PG were analyzed. Serum phenoloxidase and acid phosphatase activity in the shrimp were determined on Days 6—31 of the experiment. The protective activity of the PG preparations was evaluated by exposing shrimp to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Data on the composition of the PG preparations indicated that preparations hydrolyzed with lysozyme for 72 h had more low-molecular-weight PG than those treated for 24 h, and hydrolysis by protease enhanced efficiency of hydrolysis compared to lysozyme. SDS-PAGE showed changes in the molecular weight of the soluble PG produced by the different hydrolysis methods. Measurements of serum phenoloxidase and acid phosphatase activity levels in the shrimp indicated that the PG preparations processed with enzymes were superior to the preparation which had not undergone hydrolysis in enhancing the activity of the two serum enzymes. In addition, the preparation containing more low-molecular-weight PG enhanced the resistance of the shrimp to WSSV, whereas no increased resistance was observed for preparations containing less low-molecular-weight PG. These findings suggest that the immunity-enhancing activity of PG is related to its molecular weight and that increasing the quantity of low-molecular-weight PG can fortify the effect of immunity enhancement.

  4. Complex structure of type VI peptidoglycan muramidase effector and a cognate immunity protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 complex associated with the bacterial type VI secretion system of P. aeruginosa has been solved and refined at 1.9 Å resolution. The structural basis of the recognition of the muramidase effector and its inactivation by its cognate immunity protein is revealed. The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a bacterial protein-export machine that is capable of delivering virulence effectors between Gram-negative bacteria. The T6SS of Pseudomonas aeruginosa transports two lytic enzymes, Tse1 and Tse3, to degrade cell-wall peptidoglycan in the periplasm of rival bacteria that are competing for niches via amidase and muramidase activities, respectively. Two cognate immunity proteins, Tsi1 and Tsi3, are produced by the bacterium to inactivate the two antibacterial effectors, thereby protecting its siblings from self-intoxication. Recently, Tse1–Tsi1 has been structurally characterized. Here, the structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 complex is reported at 1.9 Å resolution. The results reveal that Tse3 contains a C-terminal catalytic domain that adopts a soluble lytic transglycosylase (SLT) fold in which three calcium-binding sites were surprisingly observed close to the catalytic Glu residue. The electrostatic properties of the substrate-binding groove are also distinctive from those of known structures with a similar fold. All of these features imply that a unique catalytic mechanism is utilized by Tse3 in cleaving glycosidic bonds. Tsi3 comprises a single domain showing a β-sandwich architecture that is reminiscent of the immunoglobulin fold. Three loops of Tsi3 insert deeply into the groove of Tse3 and completely occlude its active site, which forms the structural basis of Tse3 inactivation. This work is the first crystallographic report describing the three-dimensional structure of the Tse3–Tsi3 effector–immunity pair

  5. Effects of different enzymatic hydrolysis methods on the bioactivity of peptidoglycan in Litopenaeus vannamei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Xiaoling; ZHANG Yue; WEI Song; HUANG Jie

    2013-01-01

    The effects of different hydrolysis methods on peptidoglycan (PG) were assessed in terms of their impact on the innate immunity and disease resistance of Pacific white shrimp,Litopenaeus vannamei.PG derived from Bifidobacterium thermophilum was prepared in the laboratory and processed with lysozyme and protease under varying conditions to produce several different PG preparations.A standard shrimp feed was mixed with 0.05% PG preparations to produce a number of experimental diets for shrimp.The composition,concentration,and molecular weight ranges of the soluble PG were analyzed.Serum phenoloxidase and acid phosphatase activity in the shrimp were determined on Days 6-31 of the experiment.The protective activity of the PG preparations was evaluated by exposing shrimp to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV).Data on the composition of the PG preparations indicated that preparations hydrolyzed with lysozyme for 72 h had more low-molecular-weight PG than those treated for 24 h,and hydrolysis by protease enhanced efficiency of hydrolysis compared to lysozyme.SDS-PAGE showed changes in the molecular weight of the soluble PG produced by the different hydrolysis methods.Measurements of serum phenoloxidase and acid phosphatase activity levels in the shrimp indicated that the PG preparations processed with enzymes were superior to the preparation which had not undergone hydrolysis in enhancing the activity of the two serum enzymes.In addition,the preparation containing more low-molecular-weight PG enhanced the resistance of the shrimp to WSSV,whereas no increased resistance was observed for preparations containing less low-molecular-weight PG.These findings suggest that the immunity-enhancing activity of PG is related to its molecular weight and that increasing the quantity of low-molecular-weight PG can fortify the effect of immunity enhancement.

  6. Characterization of a major 31-kilodalton peptidoglycan-bound protein of Legionella pneumophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 31-kilodalton (kDa) protein was solubilized from the peptidoglycan (PG) fraction of Legionella pneumophila after treatment with either N-acetylmuramidase from the fungus Chalaropsis sp. or with mutanolysin from Streptomyces globisporus. The protein exhibited a ladderlike banding pattern by autoradiography when radiolabeled [(35S]cysteine or [35S]methionine) PG material was extensively treated with hen lysozyme. The banding patterns ranging between 31 and 45 kDa and between 55 and 60 kDa resolved as a single 31-kDa protein when the material was subsequently treated with N-acetylmuramidase. Analysis of the purified 31-kDa protein for diaminopimelic acid by gas chromatography revealed 1 mol of diaminopimelic acid per mol of protein. When outer membrane PG material containing the major outer membrane porin protein was treated with N-acetylmuramidase or mutanolysin, both the 28.5-kDa major outer membrane protein and the 31-kDa protein were solubilized from the PG material under reducing conditions. In the absence of 2-mercaptoethanol, a high-molecular-mass complex (100 kDa) was resolved. The results of this study indicate that a 31-kDa PG-bound protein is a major component of the cell wall of L. pneumophila whose function may be to anchor the major outer membrane protein to PG. Finally, a survey of other Legionella species and other serogroups of L. pneumophila suggested that PG-bound proteins may be a common feature of this genus

  7. Population structure of Staphylococcus aureus in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    The present PhD research was aimed at analysing the population structure of Staphylococcus aureus in China. Between 2000 and 2005 we found that patients from a single Chinese hospital showed increasing trends in antimicrobial resistance. Among methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), resistance against rifampicin doubled to 68%. Staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) is frequent in China. Two predominant S. aureus lineages, ST6 and ST943, were identified causing outbreaks of SFP in Southern China...

  8. Immunomodulation and Disease Tolerance to Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Zhigang Li; Peres, Adam G.; Andreea C. Damian; Joaquín Madrenas

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most frequent pathogens that causes severe morbidity and mortality throughout the world. S. aureus can infect skin and soft tissues or become invasive leading to diseases such as pneumonia, endocarditis, sepsis or toxic shock syndrome. In contrast, S. aureus is also a common commensal microbe and is often part of the human nasal microbiome without causing any apparent disease. In this review, we explore the immunomodulation and d...

  9. Mastite com lesões sistêmicas por Staphylococus aureus subesp. aureus em coelhos Mastitis with systemic lesions due to Staphylococus aureus subesp. aureus in rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Davi Traverso; Leonardo da Cunha; Joaquim César Teixeira Fernandes; Alexandre Paulino Loretti; Adriana Rhoden; Elsio Wunder Jr.; David Driemeier

    2003-01-01

    Em uma criação composta por 1800 coelhos, 33% das matrizes apresentaram mastite e lesões cutâneas crostosas e purulentas. Estes animais apresentavam-se entre 10 a- 12 meses de idade e em segunda parição. Quinze coelhos afetados foram sacrificados e necropsiados. Na necropsia, além das lesões cutâneas haviam microabscessos em diversos órgãos. Das amostras coletadas isolou-se Staphylococcus aureus subesp. aureus. S. aureus subesp. aureus também foi isolado de "swab" nasal coletado do tratador e...

  10. Immunomodulation and Disease Tolerance to Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most frequent pathogens that causes severe morbidity and mortality throughout the world. S. aureus can infect skin and soft tissues or become invasive leading to diseases such as pneumonia, endocarditis, sepsis or toxic shock syndrome. In contrast, S. aureus is also a common commensal microbe and is often part of the human nasal microbiome without causing any apparent disease. In this review, we explore the immunomodulation and disease tolerance mechanisms that promote commensalism to S. aureus.

  11. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Laboratory of Bacteriology Network on Antimicrobial Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus (NARSA) Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group (ARLG) NIAID Antimicrobial Resistance Funding Information ...

  12. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Laboratory of Bacteriology Network on Antimicrobial Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus (NARSA) Antibacterial Resistance Leadership Group (ARLG) NIAID Antimicrobial Resistance Funding Information ...

  13. Cooperative tertiary interaction network guides RNA folding

    OpenAIRE

    Behrouzi, Reza; Roh, Joon Ho; Kilburn, Duncan; Briber, Robert M.; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2012-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs form unique three-dimensional structures, which perform many biochemical and regulatory functions. To understand how RNAs fold uniquely despite a small number of tertiary interaction motifs, we mutated the major tertiary interactions in a group I ribozyme. The resulting perturbations to the folding energy landscape were measured using SAXS, ribozyme activity, hydroxyl radical footprinting and native PAGE. Double and triple mutant cycles show that most tertiary interactions hav...

  14. Tertiary education in Latvia today and tomorrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Panina

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The market economy principles are deeply implemented in the system of tertiary education in Latvia. The share of private sector and private funding is significantly big, as well as the variety of study programs. Nevertheless it is only one side of supply-demand dimension that might be seriously changed by economic crisis. The author draws tertiary sector development scenarios considering probable demographic, economical and political trends. The more efficient and effective interaction of tertiary and business sectors, the development oriented decentralisation of state macro economical and regional policy are the decisive success factors for sustainability both of the state and tertiary sector.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in diabetic foot infections

    OpenAIRE

    Cervante-García, Estrella; García-Gonzalez, Rafael; Reyes-Torres, Angélica; Resendiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Salazar-Schettino, Paz María

    2015-01-01

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the major pathogens causing chronic infections. The ability of S. aureus to acquire resistance to a diverse range of antimicrobial compounds results in limited treatment options, particularly in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). A mechanism by which S. aureus develops reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials is through the formation of small colony variants (SCVs). Infections by SCVs of S. aureus are an upcoming problem due to diff...

  16. Evaluation of Two New Chromogenic Media, CHROMagar MRSA and S. aureus ID, for Identifying Staphylococcus aureus and Screening Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Hedin, Göran; Fang, Hong

    2005-01-01

    Thirty-nine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates with diverse genetic backgrounds and two reference strains were correctly identified as S. aureus on CHROMagar MRSA and S. aureus ID media. Growth inhibition on CHROMagar MRSA was noted. A combination of cefoxitin disk and S. aureus ID was found suitable for rapid MRSA screening.

  17. An introduction of Tertiary Peritonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Prakash Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraperitoneal infection known as peritonitis is a major killer in the practice of clinical surgery. Tertiary peritonitis (TP may be defined as intra-abdominal infection that persists or recurs ³48 h following successful and adequate surgical source control. A planned or on-demand relaparotomy after an initial operation is probably most frequent way to diagnose TP, but is a late event to occur. Hence it is desirable to have timely and nonoperative diagnosis of TP after the initial operation and subsequent initiation of an appropriate therapy to reduce the complications and to improve the outcome.

  18. Evaluation of the antimicrobial activity of chitosan and its quaternized derivative on E. coli and S. aureus growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane C. Goy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chitosan is largely known for its activity against a wide range of microorganisms, in which the most acceptable antimicrobial mechanism is found to include the presence of charged groups in the polymer backbone and their ionic interactions with bacteria wall constituents. This interaction suggests the occurrence of a hydrolysis of the peptidoglycans in the microorganism wall, provoking the leakage of intracellular electrolytes, leading the microorganism to death. The charges present in chitosan chains are generated by protonation of amino groups when in acid medium or they may be introduced via structural modification. This latter can be achieved by a methylation reaction resulting in a quaternized derivative with a higher polymeric charge density. Since the charges in this derivative are permanents, it is expected a most efficient antimicrobial activity. Hence, in the present study, commercial chitosan underwent quaternization processes and both (mother polymer and derivative were evaluated, in gel form, against Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive and Escherichia coli (Gram-negative, as model bacteria. The results, as acquired from turbidity measurements, differ between materials with an expressive reduction on the Gram-positive microorganism (S. aureus growth, while E. coli (Gram-negative strain was less sensitive to both polymers. Additionally, the antibacterial effectiveness of chitosan was strongly dependent on the concentration, what is discussed in terms of spatial polymer conformation.

  19. Cefotaxime-heparin lock prophylaxis against hemodialysis catheter-related sepsis among Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Saxena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriers undergoing hemodialysis (HD through tunneled cuffed catheters (TCCs form a high-risk group for the development of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI and ensuing morbidity. The efficacy of antibiotic-locks on the outcomes of TCCs among S. aureus nasal carriers has not been studied earlier. Persistent nasal carriage was defined by two or more positive cultures for methicillin-susceptible (MSSA or methicillin-resistant (MRSA S. aureus of five standardized nasal swabs taken from all the participants dialyzed at a large out-patient HD center affiliated to a tertiary care hospital. Of 218 participants, 82 S. aureus nasal carriers dialyzed through TCCs (n = 88 were identified through April 2005 to March 2006 and randomized to two groups. Group I comprised of 39 nasal carriers who had TCCs (n = 41 "locked" with cefotaxime/heparin while group II included 43 patients with TCCs (n = 47 filled with standard heparin. The CRBSI incidence and TCC survival at 365 days were statistically compared between the two groups. A significantly lower CRBSI incidence (1.47 vs. 3.44/1000 catheter-days, P <0.001 and higher infection-free TCC survival rates at 365 days (80.5 vs. 40.4%, P <0.0001 were observed in the cefotaxime group compared with the stan-dard heparin group. However, no significant difference in MRSA-associated CRBSI incidence was observed between the two groups. Cefotaxime-heparin "locks" effectively reduced CRBSI-incidence associated with gram-positive cocci, including MSSA, among S. aureus nasal carriers. There remains a compelling requirement for antibiotic-locks effective against MRSA.

  20. The cell surface proteome of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreisbach, Annette; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Buist, Girbe

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is a wide spread opportunistic pathogen that can cause a range of life-threatening diseases. To obtain a better understanding of the global mechanisms for pathogenesis and to identify novel targets for therapeutic interventions, the S. aureus proteom

  1. Population structure of Staphylococcus aureus in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    The present PhD research was aimed at analysing the population structure of Staphylococcus aureus in China. Between 2000 and 2005 we found that patients from a single Chinese hospital showed increasing trends in antimicrobial resistance. Among methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), resistance again

  2. Bologna Process – reform of tertiary education

    OpenAIRE

    Chuguryan Simona

    2011-01-01

    The Bologna process is the most widely reform in tertiary education area. In this time it includes 47 countries from around the world, which illustrates its importance. The main goal is to improve the quality of tertiary education in higher education institutions, with the focus on harmonization of the systems of higher education in the signatory countries.

  3. Mixed-Sector Tertiary Education. Research Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodie, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    This research overview provides the key messages arising from two related projects investigating tertiary education institutions that have recently begun to offer tertiary programs outside the sector of their initial establishment and the sector of the majority of their enrolments. These are TAFE institutes offering higher education programs,…

  4. Tertiary Education and Training in Australia, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2012

    2012-01-01

    This publication presents information on tertiary education and training during 2010, including statistics on participation and outcomes. The definition of tertiary education and training adopted for this publication is formal study in vocational education and training (VET) and higher education, including enrolments in Australian Qualifications…

  5. Nodular tertiary syphilis in an immunocompetent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Maraya de Jesus Semblano; Brito, Arival Cardoso de; Nascimento, Bianca Angelina Macêdodo; Carvalho, Alessandra Haber; Drago, Marion Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Acquired syphilis can be divided into primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary stages. About 25% of patients with untreated primary syphilis will develop late signs that generally occur after three to five years, with involvement of several organs. The authors present an immunocompetent female who developed a tertiary stage syphilis presenting with long-standing nodular plaques. PMID:27579755

  6. Bacteraemia in sickle cell anaemia is associated with low haemoglobin: a report of 890 admissions to a tertiary hospital in Tanzania.

    OpenAIRE

    Makani, J; Mgaya, J; Balandya, E; Msami, K; Soka, D.; Cox, SE; Komba, AN; Rwezaula, S; Meda, E; Muturi, D; Kitundu, J.; Fegan, G.; Kirkham, FJ; Newton, CR; Snow, RW

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacteraemia is a leading cause of morbidity in sickle cell anaemia (SCA), but information from studies in Africa is limited. We evaluated 890 admissions from 648 SCA patients at a tertiary hospital in Tanzania. Bacteraemia was present in 43 admissions (4·8%); isolates included Staphylococcus aureus (12/43; 28%), non‐Typhi Salmonella (9/43; 21%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (3/43; 7%) and Salmonella Typhi (2/43; 5%). Compared to SCA patients without bacteraemia, SCA patients with bacterae...

  7. A short-type peptidoglycan recognition protein from the silkworm: expression, characterization and involvement in the prophenoloxidase activation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kangkang; Liu, Chen; He, Yan; Jiang, Haobo; Lu, Zhiqiang

    2014-07-01

    Recognition of invading microbes as non-self is the first step of immune responses. In insects, peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) detect peptidoglycans (PGs) of bacterial cell wall, leading to the activation of defense responses. Twelve PGRPs have been identified in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, through bioinformatics analysis. However, their biochemical functions are mostly uncharacterized. In this study, we found PGRP-S5 transcript levels were up-regulated in fat body and midgut after bacterial infection. Using recombinant protein isolated from Escherichia coli, we showed that PGRP-S5 binds to PGs from certain bacterial strains and induces bacteria agglutination. Enzyme activity assay confirmed PGRP-S5 is an amidase; we also showed it is an antibacterial protein effective against both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. Additionally, we demonstrated that specific recognition of PGs by PGRP-S5 is involved in the prophenoloxidase activation pathway. Together, these data suggest the silkworm PGRP-S5 functions as a pattern recognition receptor for the prophenoloxidase pathway initiation and as an effecter to inhibit bacterial growth as well. We finally discussed possible roles of PGRP-S5 as a receptor for antimicrobial peptide gene induction and as an immune modulator in the midgut. PMID:24508981

  8. Staphylococcus aureus Sortase A-Mediated Incorporation of Peptides: Effect of Peptide Modification on Incorporation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvie Hansenová Maňásková

    Full Text Available The endogenous Staphylococcus aureus sortase A (SrtA transpeptidase covalently anchors cell wall-anchored (CWA proteins equipped with a specific recognition motif (LPXTG into the peptidoglycan layer of the staphylococcal cell wall. Previous in situ experiments have shown that SrtA is also able to incorporate exogenous, fluorescently labelled, synthetic substrates equipped with the LPXTG motif (K(FITCLPETG-amide into the bacterial cell wall, albeit at high concentrations of 500 μM to 1 mM. In the present study, we have evaluated the effect of substrate modification on the incorporation efficiency. This revealed that (i by elongation of LPETG-amide with a sequence of positively charged amino acids, derived from the C-terminal domain of physiological SrtA substrates, the incorporation efficiency was increased by 20-fold at 10 μM, 100 μM and 250 μM; (ii Substituting aspartic acid (E for methionine increased the incorporation of the resulting K(FITCLPMTG-amide approximately three times at all concentrations tested; (iii conjugation of the lipid II binding antibiotic vancomycin to K(FITCLPMTG-amide resulted in the same incorporation levels as K(FITCLPETG-amide, but much more efficient at an impressive 500-fold lower substrate concentration. These newly developed synthetic substrates can potentially find broad applications in for example the in situ imaging of bacteria; the incorporation of antibody recruiting moieties; the targeted delivery and covalent incorporation of antimicrobial compounds into the bacterial cell wall.

  9. BACTERIAL SPECTRUM AND PATTERN OF ANTIMICROBIAL SENSITIVITY AMONG OUTPATIENTS WITH PNEUMONIA IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To outline the spectrum of bacteria causing pneumonia and the pattern of antimicrobial sensitivity in outpatients with pneumonia in a tertiary care hospital in Himachal Pradesh. METHODS: Sputum of 108 immuno competent pneumonia patients attending outpatient departments of Medicine and Pulmonary medicine of Dr. R. P. Government Medical College , Kangra at Tanda was sent for Gram staining and culture and sensitivity testing. RESULTS: Commensals were detected in most of the cases (32 , 29.6% followed by Staphylococcus aureus in 17(15.7% and Streptococcus pneumoniae in 16(14.8%. This was followed by three Gram negative organisms namely E Coli (11 , 10.2% , Pseudomonas (10 , 9.2% and Klebsiella (8 , 7.2%. No growth was obtained in 7(6.5% and other organisms were isolated in 7(6.5% specimens. Staphylococcus aureus was sensitive to vancomycin , clindamycin , cefoxitin , azithromycin and cotrimoxazole. Streptococcus pneumoniae was found to be sensitive to vancomycin , clindamycin , gentamicin , azithromycin , penicillin , cotrimoxazole , amoxicillin +clavulanic acid. Klebsiella was found to be sensitive to imipenem , azithromycin , ciprofloxacin , gentamicin and amoxicillin +clavulanic acid. E coli was sensitive to imipenem , gentamicin and amoxicillin +clavulanic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found to be sensitive to gentamicin , cefta zidime , imipenem , ticarcillin and piperacillin. CONCLUSION: Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae are the commonest organism causing pneumonia. Streptococcus pneumoniae is resistant to many antibiotics. Azithromycin can be the first line therapy for pneumonia.

  10. Genomic Analysis of Companion Rabbit Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Mark A.; Harrison, Ewan M.; Fisher, Elizabeth A.; Graham, Elizabeth M.; Parkhill, Julian; Foster, Geoffrey; Paterson, Gavin K.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being an important human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus is able to cause a variety of infections in numerous other host species. While the S. aureus strains causing infection in several of these hosts have been well characterised, this is not the case for companion rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), where little data are available on S. aureus strains from this host. To address this deficiency we have performed antimicrobial susceptibility testing and genome sequencing on a collection of S. aureus isolates from companion rabbits. The findings show a diverse S. aureus population is able to cause infection in this host, and while antimicrobial resistance was uncommon, the isolates possess a range of known and putative virulence factors consistent with a diverse clinical presentation in companion rabbits including severe abscesses. We additionally show that companion rabbit isolates carry polymorphisms within dltB as described as underlying host-adaption of S. aureus to farmed rabbits. The availability of S. aureus genome sequences from companion rabbits provides an important aid to understanding the pathogenesis of disease in this host and in the clinical management and surveillance of these infections. PMID:26963381

  11. [Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancak, Banu

    2011-07-01

    After the report of first case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in 1961, MRSA become a major problem worldwide. Over the last decade MRSA strains have emerged as serious pathogens in nosocomial and community settings. Glycopeptides (vancomycin and teicoplanin) are still the current mainstay of therapy for infections caused by MRSA. In the last decade dramatic changes have occurred in the epidemiology of MRSA infections. The isolates with reduced susceptibility and in vitro resistance to vancomycin have emerged. Recently, therapeutic alternatives such as quinupristin/dalfopristin, linezolid, tigecycline and daptomycin have been introduced into clinical practice for treating MRSA infections. Nevertheless, these drugs are only approved for certain indication and resistance has already been reported. In this review, the new information on novel drugs for treating MRSA infections and the resistance mechanisms of these drugs were discussed. PMID:21935792

  12. Exfoliative Toxins of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Bukowski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen of humans and livestock. It causes a diverse array of diseases, ranging from relatively harmless localized skin infections to life-threatening systemic conditions. Among multiple virulence factors, staphylococci secrete several exotoxins directly associated with particular disease symptoms. These include toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1, enterotoxins, and exfoliative toxins (ETs. The latter are particularly interesting as the sole agents responsible for staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS, a disease predominantly affecting infants and characterized by the loss of superficial skin layers, dehydration, and secondary infections. The molecular basis of the clinical symptoms of SSSS is well understood. ETs are serine proteases with high substrate specificity, which selectively recognize and hydrolyze desmosomal proteins in the skin. The fascinating road leading to the discovery of ETs as the agents responsible for SSSS and the characterization of the molecular mechanism of their action, including recent advances in the field, are reviewed in this article.

  13. The Heme Sensor System of Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Stauff, Devin L; Skaar, Eric P.

    2009-01-01

    The important human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is able to satisfy its nutrient iron requirement by acquiring heme from host hemoglobin in the context of infection. However, heme acquisition exposes S. aureus to heme toxicity. In order to detect the presence of toxic levels of exogenous heme, S. aureus is able to sense heme through the heme sensing system (HssRS) two-component system. Upon sensing heme, HssRS directly regulates the expression of the heme-regulated ABC transporter HrtAB, wh...

  14. Staphylococcus aureus infections in psittacine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, K; Devriese, L A; De Herdt, P; Godard, C; Haesebrouck, F

    2000-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from internal organs of 13 different psittacine birds submitted for necropsy over a period of 6 years. The birds all had lesions consistent with septicaemia. S. aureus isolates included three different phage types. In seven of the 13 birds, concurrent infections with Chlamydophila species, Enterococcus hirae, Candida species, unidentified streptococci and coagulasenegative staphylococci were detected. One bird also had lesions of lymphoid leucosis. Few indications were found that staphylococcosis associated problems may spread epidemically. The present studies suggest that S. aureus is pathogenic for psittacine birds, although it does not seem to be a frequent cause of disease. PMID:19184832

  15. Laboratory Maintenance of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas P Vitko; Richardson, Anthony R.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important bacterial pathogen in the hospital and community settings, especially Staphylococcus aureus clones that exhibit methicillin-resistance (MRSA). Many strains of S. aureus are utilized in the laboratory, underscoring the genetic differences inherent in clinical isolates. S. aureus grows quickly at 37°C with aeration in rich media (e.g. BHI) and exhibits a preference for glycolytic carbon sources. Furthermore, S. aureus has a gold pigmentation, exhibits β-hem...

  16. Intravascular catheter related infections and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of isolated bacteria in a tertiary care hospital of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F J Mansur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the rate of bacterial colonisation and catheter related blood stream infections (CRBSI together with the antibiotic susceptibility patterns in a tertiary care hospital. CRBSI was detected with semi-quantitative and quantitative methods. The antimicrobial susceptible patterns of the isolated organisms were performed by Kirby Bauer disk diffusion method. The rate of catheter colonisation and CRBSI were 42.1% and 14% (16.1/1000 catheter days respectively. The most common causative pathogens were Pseudomonas sp. (23.7%, Acinetobacter sp. (18.4%, Staphylococcus aureus (13.2% and Enterobacteriaceae (10.5%. The rate of isolation of methicillin resistance S. aureus, imipenem resistant Pseudomonas sp. and extended spectrum β lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae were 60%, 44.0% and 100%. The result of this study would be useful for control and treatment of CRBSI.

  17. The Heme Sensor System of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauff, Devin L.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    The important human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is able to satisfy its nutrient iron requirement by acquiring heme from host hemoglobin in the context of infection. However, heme acquisition exposes S. aureus to heme toxicity. In order to detect the presence of toxic levels of exogenous heme, S. aureus is able to sense heme through the heme sensing system (HssRS) two-component system. Upon sensing heme, HssRS directly regulates the expression of the heme-regulated ABC transporter HrtAB, which alleviates heme toxicity. Importantly, the inability to sense or respond to heme alters the virulence of S. aureus, highlighting the importance of heme sensing and detoxification to staphylococcal pathogenesis. Furthermore, potential orthologues of the Hss and Hrt systems are found in many species of Gram-positive bacteria, a possible indication that heme stress is a challenge faced by bacteria whose habitats include host tissues rich in heme. PMID:19494582

  18. Peptidoglycan metabolism is controlled by the WalRK (YycFG) and PhoPR two-component systems in phosphate-limited Bacillus subtilis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisicchia, Paola; Lioliou, Efthimia; Noone, David; Salzberg, Letal I; Botella, Eric; Hübner, Sebastian; Devine, Kevin M

    2010-02-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, the WalRK (YycFG) two-component system controls peptidoglycan metabolism in exponentially growing cells while PhoPR controls the response to phosphate limitation. Here we examine the roles of WalRK and PhoPR in peptidoglycan metabolism in phosphate-limited cells. We show that B. subtilis cells remain viable in a phosphate-limited state for an extended period and resume growth rapidly upon phosphate addition, even in the absence of a PhoPR-mediated response. Peptidoglycan synthesis occurs in phosphate-limited wild-type cells at approximately 27% the rate of exponentially growing cells, and at approximately 18% the rate of exponentially growing cells in the absence of PhoPR. In phosphate-limited cells, the WalRK regulon genes yocH, cwlO(yvcE), lytE and ydjM are expressed in a manner that is dependent on the WalR recognition sequence and deleting these genes individually reduces the rate of peptidoglycan synthesis. We show that ydjM expression can be activated by PhoP approximately P in vitro and that PhoP occupies its promoter in phosphate-limited cells. However, iseA(yoeB) expression cannot be repressed by PhoP approximately P in vitro, but can be repressed by non-phosphorylated WalR in vitro. Therefore, we conclude that peptidoglycan metabolism is controlled by both WalRK and PhoPR in phosphate-limited B. subtilis cells. PMID:20487291

  19. Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates causing skin and soft tissue infections in patients from Malakand, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzgalla, S; Syed, M A; Khan, M A; Rehman, S S; Müller, E; Reissig, A; Ehricht, R; Monecke, S

    2016-09-01

    Comparatively few studies have been published describing Staphylococcus aureus/MRSA epidemiology in Central Asia including Pakistan. Here, we report the genotyping of Staphylococcus aureus strains (that include both methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) from community- and hospital-acquired skin and soft-tissue infections in a tertiary care hospital in the Malakand district of the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province of Pakistan. Forty-five isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were characterized by microarray hybridization. Twenty isolates (44 %) were MRSA, whereas 22 (49 %) were PVL-positive. Fourteen isolates (31 %) harboured both mecA and PVL genes. The dominant clones were CC121-MSSA (n = 15, 33 %) and the PVL-positive "Bengal Bay Clone" (ST772-MRSA-V; n = 13, 29 %). The PVL-positive CC8-MRSA-IV strain "USA300" was found once. The pandemic ST239-MRSA-III strain was absent, although it has previously been observed in Pakistan. These observations require a re-assessment of schemes for initial antibiotic therapy to cover MRSA and they emphasise the need for a rapid and non-molecular test for PVL. PMID:27262852

  20. Binding of heparan sulfate to Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, O D; Ascencio, F; Fransson, L A; Wadström, T

    1992-01-01

    Heparan sulfate binds to proteins present on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus cells. Binding of 125I-heparan sulfate to S. aureus was time dependent, saturable, and influenced by pH and ionic strength, and cell-bound 125I-heparan sulfate was displaced by unlabelled heparan sulfate or heparin. Other glycosaminoglycans of comparable size (chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate), highly glycosylated glycoprotein (hog gastric mucin), and some anionic polysaccharides (dextran sulfate and RNA...

  1. The Staphylococcus aureus “superbug”

    OpenAIRE

    FOSTER, TIMOTHY JAMES

    2004-01-01

    PUBLISHED There has been some debate about the disease-invoking potential of Staphylococcus aureus strains and whether invasive disease is associated with particularly virulent genotypes, or "superbugs." A study in this issue of the JCI describes the genotyping of a large collection of nonclinical, commensal S. aureus strains from healthy individuals in a Dutch population. Extensive study of their genetic relatedness by amplified restriction fragment typing and comparison with strains that...

  2. Transmissible mupirocin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, M.; Noble, W. C.; Cookson, B

    1989-01-01

    The spread of two strains of Staphylococcus aureus with high level resistance to mupirocin is described. The resistance proved to be easily transferred to other S. aureus strains by filter mating experiments and on the skin of mice. No plasmid band corresponding to the resistance could be demonstrated by agarose gel electrophoresis or by caesium chloride gradient centrifugation but cleavage of 'chromosomal' DNA from resistant recipients showed bright bands of DNA absent from sensitive controls.

  3. Triclosan Promotes Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Colonization

    OpenAIRE

    Syed, Adnan K.; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Love, Nancy G.; Boles, Blaise R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The biocide triclosan is used in many personal care products, including toothpastes, soaps, clothing, and medical equipment. Consequently, it is present as a contaminant in the environment and has been detected in some human fluids, including serum, urine, and milk. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the noses and throats of approximately 30% of the population. Colonization with S. aureus is known to be a risk factor for several types of infection. Here...

  4. Photothermal killing of Staphylococcus aureus using antibody-targeted gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millenbaugh NJ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nancy J Millenbaugh,1 Jonathan B Baskin,1 Mauris N DeSilva,1 W Rowe Elliott,1 Randolph D Glickman2 1Maxillofacial Injury and Disease Department, Naval Medical Research Unit San Antonio, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA; 2Department of Ophthalmology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USAPurpose: The continued emergence of multidrug resistant bacterial infections and the decline in discovery of new antibiotics are major challenges for health care throughout the world. This situation has heightened the need for novel antimicrobial therapies as alternatives to traditional antibiotics. The combination of metallic nanoparticles and laser exposure has been proposed as a strategy to induce physical damage to bacteria, regardless of antibiotic sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to test the antibacterial effect of antibody-targeted gold nanoparticles combined with pulsed laser irradiation.Methods: Gold nanoparticles conjugated to antibodies specific to Staphylococcus aureus peptidoglycan were incubated with suspensions of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MRSA and MSSA. Bacterial suspensions were then exposed to 8 ns pulsed laser irradiation at a wavelength of 532 nm and fluences ranging from 1 to 5 J/cm2. Viability of the bacteria following laser exposure was determined using colony forming unit assays. Scanning electron microscopy was used to confirm the binding of nanoparticles to bacteria and the presence of cellular damage.Results: The laser-activated nanoparticle treatment reduced the surviving population to 31% of control in the MSSA population, while the survival in the MRSA population was reduced to 58% of control. Significant decreases in bacterial viability occurred when the laser fluence exceeded 1 J/cm2, and this effect was linear from 0 to 5 J/cm2 (r2=0.97. Significantly less bactericidal effect was observed for nonfunctionalized nanoparticles or

  5. Mechanism of action of peptidoglycan O-acetyltransferase B involves a Ser-His-Asp catalytic triad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Patrick J; Clarke, Anthony J

    2014-10-01

    The O-acetylation of the essential cell wall polymer peptidoglycan is essential in many bacteria for their integrity and survival, and it is catalyzed by peptidoglycan O-acetlytransferase B (PatB). Using PatB from Neisseria gonorrhoeae as the model, we have shown previously that the enzyme has specificity for polymeric muropeptides that possess tri- and tetrapeptide stems and that rates of reaction increase with increasing degrees of polymerization. Here, we present the catalytic mechanism of action of PatB, the first to be described for an O-acetyltransferase of any bacterial exopolysaccharide. The influence of pH on PatB activity was investigated, and pKa values of 6.4-6.45 and 6.25-6.35 for the enzyme-substrate complex (kcat vs pH) and the free enzyme (kcat·KM(-1) vs pH), respectively, were determined for the respective cosubstrates. The enzyme is partially inactivated by sulfonyl fluorides but not by EDTA, suggesting the participation of a serine residue in its catalytic mechanism. Alignment of the known and hypothetical PatB amino acid sequences identified Ser133, Asp302, and His305 as three invariant amino acid residues that could potentially serve as a catalytic triad. Replacement of Asp302 with Ala resulted in an enzyme with less than 20% residual activity, whereas activity was barely detectable with (His305 → Ala)PatB and (Ser133 → Ala)PatB was totally inactive. The reaction intermediate of the transferase reaction involving acetyl- and propionyl-acyl donors was trapped on both the wild-type and (Asp302 → Ala) enzymes and LC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides identified Ser133 as the catalytic nucleophile. A transacetylase mechanism is proposed based on the mechanism of action of serine esterases. PMID:25215566

  6. Tertiary education in Latvia today and tomorrow

    OpenAIRE

    Ludmila Panina; Janis Eglitis

    2010-01-01

    The market economy principles are deeply implemented in the system of tertiary education in Latvia. The share of private sector and private funding is significantly big, as well as the variety of study programs. Nevertheless it is only one side of supply-demand dimension that might be seriously changed by economic crisis. The author draws tertiary sector development scenarios considering probable demographic, economical and political trends. The more efficient and effective interaction of ter...

  7. Benchmarking the Governance of Tertiary Education Systems

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a benchmarking approach for analyzing and comparing governance in tertiary education as a critical determinant of system and institutional performance. This methodology is tested through a pilot survey in East Asia and Central America. The paper is structured in the following way: (i) the first part highlights the link between good governance practices and the performance of tertiary institutions (ii) the second part introduces the analytical approach underpinning the gove...

  8. Tertiary oil recovery: potential application and constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geffen, C. A.

    1978-06-01

    The technology of tertiary oil recovery methods is described and potential economic and environmental constraints to future commercial application are identified. Oil recoverable by tertiary techniques represents a domestic resource of between 11- and 42-billion barrels. Estimates of additional oil supplies from tertiary methods by the year 2000 range from 1 to 8 million barrels per day, depending on the price of oil and the rate of technological development. The principal constraints to large-scale application of tertiary methods at the present time include environmental, economic and technological concerns. Regulatory action associated with the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977 currently delay the expansion of thermal recovery operations in California and may discourage future projects. The high production costs of tertiary projects also hamper process implementation. Further testing and research is necessary to develop the technology of tertiary recovery methods and prove these techniques successful on a field-wide scale. To enable tertiary oil recovery to play a significant role in augmenting domestic energy supplies, further research and development is necessary. More accurate methods of determining reservoir structure and residual oil saturations are required, as well as means for assuring the technical feasibility and success of a tertiary method in different reservoir types. Technical process limitations must also be resolved. The severity of potential environmental impacts and constraints identified in this report should be determined. These concerns include the air pollutant emissions from steam generation in thermal processes; acceptable methods of brine disposal; damage due to runoff or accidental discharge of oil-rich chemicals into surface waters; the impacts of fluid injection on deep aquifers and the prevailing geological structure; and an adequate supply of high quality fresh water.

  9. The Policy Determinants of Investment in Tertiary Education

    OpenAIRE

    Joaquim Oliveira Martins; Romina Boarini; Hubert Strauss; Christine de la Maisonneuve; Clarice Saadi

    2007-01-01

    This paper assesses how policies and institutions affect private returns to invest in tertiary human capital, the ability of individuals to finance this investment and the institutional characteristics of tertiary education systems. Focusing on core tertiary education services, the paper presents new measures of private returns to tertiary education, the institutional setting for supplying tertiary education and the availability of individual financing in OECD countries. Using a panel of 19 c...

  10. Tertiary Logistics in the Focus of All Logistics

    OpenAIRE

    Ratko Zelenika; Mirjana Grèiæ; Helga Pavliæ Skender

    2008-01-01

    Trade logistics, traffic logistics, transport logistics and warehouse logistics are just some of the tertiary logistics which enables production processes of all economic sector products and services. Tertiary logistics representing the tertiary economic sector is the most sofisticated and the most important logistics due to the characteristics of the tertiary sector as a service sector that promotes business conditions in all economic sectors. Accordingly, tertiary logistics has a crucial ro...

  11. Tertiary education and prosperity: Catholic missionaries to luminosity in India

    OpenAIRE

    Castelló-Climent, Amparo; Chaudhary, Latika; Mukhopadhyay, Abhiroop

    2015-01-01

    This paper estimates the causal impact of tertiary education on luminosity across Indian districts. We address the potential endogeneity of tertiary education using the location of Catholic missionaries in 1911 as an instrument for current tertiary education. We find Catholic missionaries have a large and positive impact on tertiary education. Catholics were not at the forefront of tertiary education in colonial India, but they established many high quality colleges following Indian independ...

  12. A Surfactant-Induced Functional Modulation of a Global Virulence Regulator from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhendu Mandal

    Full Text Available Triton X-100 (TX-100, a useful non-ionic surfactant, reduced the methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus significantly. Many S. aureus proteins were expressed in the presence of TX-100. SarA, one of the TX-100-induced proteins, acts as a global virulence regulator in S. aureus. To understand the effects of TX-100 on the structure, and function of SarA, a recombinant S. aureus SarA (rSarA and its derivative (C9W have been investigated in the presence of varying concentrations of this surfactant using various probes. Our data have revealed that both rSarA and C9W bind to the cognate DNA with nearly similar affinity in the absence of TX-100. Interestingly, their DNA binding activities have been significantly increased in the presence of pre-micellar concentration of TX-100. The increase of TX-100 concentrations to micellar or post-micellar concentration did not greatly enhance their activities further. TX-100 molecules have altered the secondary and tertiary structures of both proteins to some extents. Size of the rSarA-TX-100 complex appears to be intermediate to those of rSarA and TX-100. Additional analyses show a relatively moderate interaction between C9W and TX-100. Binding of TX-100 to C9W has, however, occurred by a cooperative pathway particularly at micellar and higher concentrations of this surfactant. Taken together, TX-100-induced structural alteration of rSarA and C9W might be responsible for their increased DNA binding activity. As TX-100 has stabilized the somewhat weaker SarA-DNA complex effectively, it could be used to study its structure in the future.

  13. Cretaceous-tertiary boundary event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In badlands along Morgan Creek, southern Saskatchewan, The Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary is at the contact of the Frenchman and Ravenscrag Formations. Three sites have been investigated. Evidence of a catastrophic event at the end of the Cretaceous includes data from palynology, geochemistry, and mineralogy; it supports the hypothesis that the K-T boundary event involved the impact of an extraterrestrial object and consequent regional devastation of biotic communities. Palynologic evidence is the abrupt disappearance of many characteristic late Maestrichtian palynomorph (especially angiosperm) taxa and subsequent temporary dominance of assemblages by fern spores. These changes are interpreted, respectively, as (1) destruction of plant communities accompanied by selective extinctions and (2) repopulation of the land surface by opportunistic species prior to development of the typical regional early Paleocene flora. Geochemical analyses (neutron activation and radiochemical separations) revealed iridium abundance anomalies of 3.0, 3.3, and 4.8 ng/g in a 1-3 cm-thick, kaolinitic boundary interval at the three sites. Mineralogic evidence of the probable impact origin of boundary interval components is presence of detrital quartz and feldspar grains as large as 0.40 mm that exhibit shock metamorphic features known only from meteorite impacts or chemical and nuclear explosions

  14. Potassium Uptake Modulates Staphylococcus aureus Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gries, Casey M; Sadykov, Marat R; Bulock, Logan L; Chaudhari, Sujata S; Thomas, Vinai C; Bose, Jeffrey L; Bayles, Kenneth W

    2016-01-01

    As a leading cause of community-associated and nosocomial infections, Staphylococcus aureus requires sophisticated mechanisms that function to maintain cellular homeostasis in response to its exposure to changing environmental conditions. The adaptation to stress and maintenance of homeostasis depend largely on membrane activity, including supporting electrochemical gradients and synthesis of ATP. This is largely achieved through potassium (K(+)) transport, which plays an essential role in maintaining chemiosmotic homeostasis, affects antimicrobial resistance, and contributes to fitness in vivo. Here, we report that S. aureus Ktr-mediated K(+) uptake is necessary for maintaining cytoplasmic pH and the establishment of a proton motive force. Metabolite analyses revealed that K(+) deficiency affects both metabolic and energy states of S. aureus by impairing oxidative phosphorylation and directing carbon flux toward substrate-level phosphorylation. Taken together, these results underline the importance of K(+) uptake in maintaining essential components of S. aureus metabolism. IMPORTANCE Previous studies describing mechanisms for K(+) uptake in S. aureus revealed that the Ktr-mediated K(+) transport system was required for normal growth under alkaline conditions but not under neutral or acidic conditions. This work focuses on the effect of K(+) uptake on S. aureus metabolism, including intracellular pH and carbon flux, and is the first to utilize a pH-dependent green fluorescent protein (GFP) to measure S. aureus cytoplasmic pH. These studies highlight the role of K(+) uptake in supporting proton efflux under alkaline conditions and uncover a critical role for K(+) uptake in establishing efficient carbon utilization. PMID:27340697

  15. Intra-cellular Staphylococcus aureus alone causes infection in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Hamza

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic and recurrent bone infections occur frequently but have not been explained. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is often found among chronic and recurrent infections and may be responsible for such infections. One possible reason is that S. aureus can internalize and survive within host cells and by doing so, S. aureus can evade both host defense mechanisms and most conventional antibiotic treatments. In this study, we hypothesized that intra-cellular S. aureus could induce infections in vivo. Osteoblasts were infected with S. aureus and, after eliminating extra-cellular S. aureus, inoculated into an open fracture rat model. Bacterial cultures and radiographic observations at post-operative day 21 confirmed local bone infections in animals inoculated with intra-cellular S. aureus within osteoblasts alone. We present direct in vivo evidence that intra-cellular S. aureus could be sufficient to induce bone infection in animals; we found that intra-cellular S. aureus inoculation of as low as 102 colony forming units could induce severe bone infections. Our data may suggest that intra-cellular S. aureus can “hide” in host cells during symptom-free periods and, under certain conditions, they may escape and lead to infection recurrence. Intra-cellular S. aureus therefore could play an important role in the pathogenesis of S. aureus infections, especially those chronic and recurrent infections in which disease episodes may be separated by weeks, months, or even years.

  16. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy study of the interaction of silver ions with Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovenkamp, Gudrun Lisa; Zanzen, Ulrike; Krishna, Katla Sai; Hormes, Josef; Prange, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    Silver ions are widely used as antibacterial agents, but the basic molecular mechanism of this effect is still poorly understood. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the Ag LIII, S K, and P K edges reveals the chemical forms of silver in Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli (Ag(+) treated). The Ag LIII-edge XANES spectra of the bacteria are all slightly different and very different from the spectra of silver ions (silver nitrate and silver acetate), which confirms that a reaction occurs. Death or inactivation of bacteria was observed by plate counting and light microscopy. Silver bonding to sulfhydryl groups (Ag-S) in cysteine and Ag-N or Ag-O bonding in histidine, alanine, and DL-aspartic acid was detected by using synthesized silver-amino acids. Significantly lower silver-cysteine content, coupled with higher silver-histidine content, in Gram-positive S. aureus and Listeria monocytogenes cells indicates that the peptidoglycan multilayer could be buffering the biocidal effect of silver on Gram-positive bacteria, at least in part. Bonding of silver to phosphate groups was not detected. Interaction with DNA or proteins can occur through Ag-N bonding. The formation of silver-cysteine can be confirmed for both bacterial cell types, which supports the hypothesis that enzyme-catalyzed reactions and the electron transport chain within the cell are disrupted. PMID:23934494

  17. Drug resistance and genetic characteristics of clinical isolates of staphylococci in Myanmar: high prevalence of PVL among methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus belonging to various sequence types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Aung

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence, drug resistance and genetic characteristics were analysed for a total of 128 clinical isolates of staphylococci obtained from a tertiary hospital in Myanmar. The dominant species were S. aureus (39% and S. haemolyticus (35%, followed by S. epidermidis (6% and S. saprophyticus (5%. The majority of S. haemolyticus isolates (71.1% harboured mecA, showing high resistance rates to ampicillin, cephalosporins, erythromycin and levofloxacin, while methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA was only 8% (four isolates among S. aureus with type IV SCCmec. Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL genes were detected in 20 isolates of S. aureus (40%, among which only one isolate was MRSA belonging to sequence type (ST 88/agr-III/coa-IIIa, and the other 19 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA isolates were classified into six STs (ST88, ST121, ST1153, ST1155, ST1930, ST3206. An ST1153 MSSA isolate with PVL was revealed to belong to a novel coa type, XIIIa. ST121 S. aureus was the most common in the PVL-positive MSSA (47%, 9/19, harbouring genes of bone sialoprotein and variant of elastin binding protein as a distinctive feature. Although PVL-positive MSSA was susceptible to most of the antimicrobial agents examined, ST1930 isolates were resistant to erythromycin and levofloxacin. ST59 PVL-negative MRSA and MSSA had more resistance genes than other MRSA and PVL-positive MSSA, showing resistance to more antimicrobial agents. This study indicated higher prevalence of mecA associated with multiple drug resistance in S. haemolyticus than in S. aureus, and dissemination of PVL genes to multiple clones of MSSA, with ST121 being dominant, among hospital isolates in Myanmar.

  18. Drug resistance and genetic characteristics of clinical isolates of staphylococci in Myanmar: high prevalence of PVL among methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus belonging to various sequence types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, M S; Zi, H; Nwe, K M; Maw, W W; Aung, M T; Min, W W; Nyein, N; Kawaguchiya, M; Urushibara, N; Sumi, A; Kobayashi, N

    2016-03-01

    Prevalence, drug resistance and genetic characteristics were analysed for a total of 128 clinical isolates of staphylococci obtained from a tertiary hospital in Myanmar. The dominant species were S. aureus (39%) and S. haemolyticus (35%), followed by S. epidermidis (6%) and S. saprophyticus (5%). The majority of S. haemolyticus isolates (71.1%) harboured mecA, showing high resistance rates to ampicillin, cephalosporins, erythromycin and levofloxacin, while methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was only 8% (four isolates) among S. aureus with type IV SCCmec. Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes were detected in 20 isolates of S. aureus (40%), among which only one isolate was MRSA belonging to sequence type (ST) 88/agr-III/coa-IIIa, and the other 19 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates were classified into six STs (ST88, ST121, ST1153, ST1155, ST1930, ST3206). An ST1153 MSSA isolate with PVL was revealed to belong to a novel coa type, XIIIa. ST121 S. aureus was the most common in the PVL-positive MSSA (47%, 9/19), harbouring genes of bone sialoprotein and variant of elastin binding protein as a distinctive feature. Although PVL-positive MSSA was susceptible to most of the antimicrobial agents examined, ST1930 isolates were resistant to erythromycin and levofloxacin. ST59 PVL-negative MRSA and MSSA had more resistance genes than other MRSA and PVL-positive MSSA, showing resistance to more antimicrobial agents. This study indicated higher prevalence of mecA associated with multiple drug resistance in S. haemolyticus than in S. aureus, and dissemination of PVL genes to multiple clones of MSSA, with ST121 being dominant, among hospital isolates in Myanmar. PMID:27257489

  19. Antimicrobial (Drug) Resistance: Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) During the past four decades, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , or MRSA, has evolved from a controllable ...

  20. Evolution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus towards increasing resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strommenger, Birgit; Bartels, Mette Damkjær; Kurt, Kevin;

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate the evolutionary history of Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex (CC) 8, which encompasses several globally distributed epidemic lineages, including hospital-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and the highly prevalent community-associated MRSA clone USA300....

  1. Classification of Healthcare-Associated Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Jesper; Søgaard, Mette; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Nielsen, Henrik; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether different definitions of healthcare-associated infection influenced the prevalence, characteristics, and mortality of patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. With different definitions, the proportion of patients classified as having healthcare-associated S. aureus...

  2. Comparative Efficacy of Ceftaroline with Linezolid against Staphylococcus Aureus and Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective:To compare the in vitro antimicrobial efficacy of ceftaroline with linezolid against Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Study Design: Quasi-experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Microbiology Department, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, from January to December 2013. Methodology: Clinical samples from respiratory tract, blood, pus and various catheter tips routinely received in the Department of Microbiology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi were innoculated on blood and MacConkey agar. Staphylococcus aureus was identified by colony morphology, Gram reaction, catalase test and coagulase test. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus detection was done by modified Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method using cefoxitin disc (30g) and the isolates were considered methicillin resistant if the zone of inhibition around cefoxitin disc was /sup 2/ 21 mm. Bacterial suspensions of 56 Staphylococcus aureus isolates and 50 MRSA isolates were prepared, which were standardized equal to 0.5 McFarland's turbidity standard and inoculated on Mueller-Hinton agar plates followed by application of ceftaroline and linezolid disc (Oxoid, UK), according to manufacturer's instructions. The plates were then incubated at 37 Degree C aerobically for 18 - 24 hours. Diameters of inhibition zone were measured and interpretated as per Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Results: Out of 106 isolates all of the 56 Staphylococcus aureus (100%) were sensitive to ceftaroline and linezolid. However, out of 50 methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, 48 (96%) were sensitive to ceftaroline whereas, 49 (98%) were sensitive to linezolid. Conclusion: Ceftaroline is equally effective as linezolid against Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. (author)

  3. Structural basis for type VI secreted peptidoglycan dl-endopeptidase function, specificity and neutralization in Serratia marcescens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal structures of type VI secretion system-associated immunity proteins, a peptidoglycan endopeptidase and a complex of the endopeptidase and its cognate immunity protein are reported together with assays of endopeptidase activity and functional assessment. Some Gram-negative bacteria target their competitors by exploiting the type VI secretion system to extrude toxic effector proteins. To prevent self-harm, these bacteria also produce highly specific immunity proteins that neutralize these antagonistic effectors. Here, the peptidoglycan endopeptidase specificity of two type VI secretion-system-associated effectors from Serratia marcescens is characterized. These small secreted proteins, Ssp1 and Ssp2, cleave between γ-d-glutamic acid and l-meso-diaminopimelic acid with different specificities. Ssp2 degrades the acceptor part of cross-linked tetratetrapeptides. Ssp1 displays greater promiscuity and cleaves monomeric tripeptides, tetrapeptides and pentapeptides and dimeric tetratetra and tetrapenta muropeptides on both the acceptor and donor strands. Functional assays confirm the identity of a catalytic cysteine in these endopeptidases and crystal structures provide information on the structure–activity relationships of Ssp1 and, by comparison, of related effectors. Functional assays also reveal that neutralization of these effectors by their cognate immunity proteins, which are called resistance-associated proteins (Raps), contributes an essential role to cell fitness. The structures of two immunity proteins, Rap1a and Rap2a, responsible for the neutralization of Ssp1 and Ssp2-like endopeptidases, respectively, revealed two distinct folds, with that of Rap1a not having previously been observed. The structure of the Ssp1–Rap1a complex revealed a tightly bound heteromeric assembly with two effector molecules flanking a Rap1a dimer. A highly effective steric block of the Ssp1 active site forms the basis of effector neutralization. Comparisons with Ssp2–Rap2

  4. A rapid in situ procedure for determination of bacterial susceptibility or resistance to antibiotics that inhibit peptidoglycan biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bou Germán

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotics which inhibit bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis are the most widely used in current clinical practice. Nevertheless, resistant strains increase dramatically, with serious economic impact and effects on public health, and are responsible for thousands of deaths each year. Critical clinical situations should benefit from a rapid procedure to evaluate the sensitivity or resistance to antibiotics that act at the cell wall. We have adapted a kit for rapid determination of bacterial DNA fragmentation, to assess cell wall integrity. Results Cells incubated with the antibiotic were embedded in an agarose microgel on a slide, incubated in an adapted lysis buffer, stained with a DNA fluorochrome, SYBR Gold and observed under fluorescence microscopy. The lysis affects the cells differentially, depending on the integrity of the wall. If the bacterium is susceptible to the antibiotic, the weakened cell wall is affected by the lysing solution so the nucleoid of DNA contained inside the bacterium is released and spread. Alternatively, if the bacterium is resistant to the antibiotic, it is practically unaffected by the lysis solution and does not liberate the nucleoid, retaining its normal morphological appearance. In an initial approach, the procedure accurately discriminates susceptible, intermediate and resistant strains of Escherichia coli to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid. When the bacteria came from an exponentially growing liquid culture, the effect on the cell wall of the β-lactam was evident much earlier that when they came from an agar plate. A dose-response experiment with an E. coli strain susceptible to ampicillin demonstrated a weak effect before the MIC dose. The cell wall damage was not homogenous among the different cells, but the level of damage increased as dose increased with a predominant degree of effect for each dose. A microgranular-fibrilar extracellular background was evident in gram

  5. Structural basis for type VI secreted peptidoglycan dl-endopeptidase function, specificity and neutralization in Serratia marcescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srikannathasan, Velupillai; English, Grant [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Bui, Nhat Khai [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Trunk, Katharina; O’Rourke, Patrick E. F.; Rao, Vincenzo A. [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Vollmer, Waldemar [Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH (United Kingdom); Coulthurst, Sarah J., E-mail: s.j.coulthurst@dundee.ac.uk; Hunter, William N., E-mail: s.j.coulthurst@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-01

    Crystal structures of type VI secretion system-associated immunity proteins, a peptidoglycan endopeptidase and a complex of the endopeptidase and its cognate immunity protein are reported together with assays of endopeptidase activity and functional assessment. Some Gram-negative bacteria target their competitors by exploiting the type VI secretion system to extrude toxic effector proteins. To prevent self-harm, these bacteria also produce highly specific immunity proteins that neutralize these antagonistic effectors. Here, the peptidoglycan endopeptidase specificity of two type VI secretion-system-associated effectors from Serratia marcescens is characterized. These small secreted proteins, Ssp1 and Ssp2, cleave between γ-d-glutamic acid and l-meso-diaminopimelic acid with different specificities. Ssp2 degrades the acceptor part of cross-linked tetratetrapeptides. Ssp1 displays greater promiscuity and cleaves monomeric tripeptides, tetrapeptides and pentapeptides and dimeric tetratetra and tetrapenta muropeptides on both the acceptor and donor strands. Functional assays confirm the identity of a catalytic cysteine in these endopeptidases and crystal structures provide information on the structure–activity relationships of Ssp1 and, by comparison, of related effectors. Functional assays also reveal that neutralization of these effectors by their cognate immunity proteins, which are called resistance-associated proteins (Raps), contributes an essential role to cell fitness. The structures of two immunity proteins, Rap1a and Rap2a, responsible for the neutralization of Ssp1 and Ssp2-like endopeptidases, respectively, revealed two distinct folds, with that of Rap1a not having previously been observed. The structure of the Ssp1–Rap1a complex revealed a tightly bound heteromeric assembly with two effector molecules flanking a Rap1a dimer. A highly effective steric block of the Ssp1 active site forms the basis of effector neutralization. Comparisons with Ssp2–Rap2

  6. Cooperative Tertiary Interaction Network Guides RNA Folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrouzi, Reza; Roh, Joon Ho; Kilburn, Duncan; Briber, R.M.; Woodson, Sarah A. (JHU); (Maryland)

    2013-04-08

    Noncoding RNAs form unique 3D structures, which perform many regulatory functions. To understand how RNAs fold uniquely despite a small number of tertiary interaction motifs, we mutated the major tertiary interactions in a group I ribozyme by single-base substitutions. The resulting perturbations to the folding energy landscape were measured using SAXS, ribozyme activity, hydroxyl radical footprinting, and native PAGE. Double- and triple-mutant cycles show that most tertiary interactions have a small effect on the stability of the native state. Instead, the formation of core and peripheral structural motifs is cooperatively linked in near-native folding intermediates, and this cooperativity depends on the native helix orientation. The emergence of a cooperative interaction network at an early stage of folding suppresses nonnative structures and guides the search for the native state. We suggest that cooperativity in noncoding RNAs arose from natural selection of architectures conducive to forming a unique, stable fold.

  7. Correlation of tertiary formations of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, F.S.; Wolfe, J.A.; Miller, D.J.; Hopkins, D.M.

    1961-01-01

    Recent stratigraphic and paleontologic studies have resulted in substantial revision of the age assignments and inter-basin correlations of the Tertiary formations of Alaska as given in both an earlier compilation by P. S. Smith (1939) and a tentative chart prepared for distribution at the First International Symposium on Arctic Geology at Calgary, Alberta (Miller, MacNeil, and Wahrhaftig, 1960). Current work in Alaska by the U. S. Geological Survey and several oil companies is furnishing new information at a rapid rate and further revisions may be expected. The correlation chart (Fig. 1), the first published chart to deal exclusively with the Tertiary of Alaska, had the benefit of a considerable amount of stratigraphic data and fossil collections from some oil companies, but recent surface mapping and drilling by other oil companies in several Tertiary basins undoubtedly must have produced much more information. Nevertheless, the extent of available data justifies the publication of a revised correlation chart at this time.

  8. Effects of beta-lactam antibiotics on peptidoglycan synthesis in growing Neisseria gonorrhoeae, including changes in the degree of O-acetylation.

    OpenAIRE

    Blundell, J K; Perkins, H. R.

    1981-01-01

    Low concentrations of beta-lactam antibiotics caused an increased uptake of radioactive glucosamine into the sodium dodecyl sulfate-insoluble peptidoglycan of growing Neisseria gonorrhoeae. There was no appreciable change in the (small) amount of sodium dodecyl sulfate-soluble polymer present in the cultures. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-insoluble product in control cells was only partially dissolved by egg-white lysozyme (about 40%), but could all be released by the Chalaropsis B muramidase. I...

  9. Peptidoglycan Recognition Protein Pglyrp1 Enhances Experimental Asthma by Promoting Th2 and Th17 and Limiting Regulatory T Cell and Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Shin Yong; Jing, Xuefang; Gupta, Dipika; Dziarski, Roman

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a common inflammatory disease involving crosstalk between innate and adaptive immunity. We reveal that antibacterial innate immunity protein, peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 (Pglyrp1), is involved in the development of allergic asthma. Pglyrp1−/− mice developed less severe asthma than wild type (WT) mice following sensitization with house dust mite (HDM) allergen. HDM-sensitized Pglyrp1−/− mice, compared with WT mice, had diminished: bronchial hyper-responsiveness (lung airway r...

  10. Recognition of peptidoglycan and beta-lactam antibiotics by the extracellular domain of the Ser/Thr protein kinase StkP from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maestro, B.; Nováková, Linda; Hesek, D.; Lee, M.; Leyva, E.; Mobashery, S.; Sanz, J.M.; Branny, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 585, č. 2 (2011), s. 357-363. ISSN 0014-5793 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/07/P082; GA ČR GA204/08/0783; GA AV ČR IAA600200801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Signal transduction * Penicillin-binding protein and Ser/Thr protein kinase-associated domain * Peptidoglycan Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.538, year: 2011

  11. Characterization of a Mouse-Adapted Staphylococcus aureus Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Holtfreter, Silva; Fiona J Radcliff; Grumann, Dorothee; Read, Hannah; Johnson, Sarah; Monecke, Stefan; Ritchie, Stephen; Clow, Fiona; Goerke, Christiane; Bröker, Barbara M.; Fraser, John D.; Wiles, Siouxsie

    2013-01-01

    More effective antibiotics and a protective vaccine are desperately needed to combat the ‘superbug’ Staphylococcus aureus. While in vivo pathogenicity studies routinely involve infection of mice with human S. aureus isolates, recent genetic studies have demonstrated that S. aureus lineages are largely host-specific. The use of such animal-adapted S. aureus strains may therefore be a promising approach for developing more clinically relevant animal infection models. We have isolated a mouse-ad...

  12. Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Stefania; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Lindsay, Jodi A;

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews recent findings on the global epidemiology of healthcare-acquired/associated (HA), community-acquired/associated (CA) and livestock-associated (LA) meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and aims to reach a consensus regarding the harmonisation of typing methods...... health. Continuous efforts to understand the changing epidemiology of S. aureus infection in humans and animals are therefore necessary, not only for appropriate antimicrobial treatment and effective infection control but also to monitor the evolution of the species. The group made several consensus...

  13. A sensitive assay for Staphylococcus aureus nucleases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive assay for staphylococcal nuclease involving incubation of the enzyme sample with heat-denatured [3H] thymidine labelled DNA from E.coli, precipitation with trichloroacetic acid and measurement of the radioactivity of acid-soluble nucleotides released has been developed. The assay is sensitive enough to be used for comparing the levels of nucleases elaborated by different strains of S. aureus as well as for determining the extent of contamination of S. aureus in food and water samples even at levels at which the conventional spectrophotometric and toluidine blue-DNA methods are totally inadequate. (author). 26 refs., 3 figs ., 3 tabs

  14. Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latos, D L; Stone, W J; Alford, R H

    1977-01-01

    Fifteen male hemodialysis patients developed 21 episodes of S. aureus bacteremia. Infections involving vascular access were responsible for 65% of initial bacteremias. The arteriovenous fistula was the most prevalent type of access used, and thus was responsible for the majority of these illnesses. Phage typing indicated that recurrent episodes were due to reinfection rather than relapse. Complications included endocarditis, osteomyelitis, septic embolism, and pericarditis. One patient died of infectious complications. It is recommended that hemodialysis patients developing bacteremia due to S. aureus receive at least 6 weeks of beta lactamase-resistant antimicrobial therapy. PMID:608860

  15. Characterisation of the antibacterial properties of a bacterial derived peptidoglycan hydrolase (LysCs4), active against C. sakazakii and other Gram-negative food-related pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endersen, Lorraine; Coffey, Aidan; Ross, R Paul; McAuliffe, Olivia; Hill, Colin; O'Mahony, Jim

    2015-12-23

    Illness caused by the consumption of contaminated food products continues to represent one of the main challenges facing food manufacturers worldwide. Even with current intervention technologies and increased hygiene measures, foodborne illness remains a significant threat to public health. This coupled with the increasing emergence of multidrug resistant pathogens has increased the need for the development of novel technologies for pathogen control. Bacterial derived peptidoglycan hydrolases represent a vast and highly diverse group of enzymes with potential for biocontrol of a range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative foodborne pathogens. In this study, we describe the identification, cloning, expression and purification of a peptidoglycan hydrolase (LysCs4) derived from Cronobacter sakazakii for biocontrol of the aforementioned infant formula pathogen itself. In silico analysis of LysCs4 revealed the gene to display greatest sequence similarity to a putative lysozyme encoded by the lytic Cronobacter phage ES2. Conserved domain analysis of LysCs4 revealed the presence of a single catalytic domain predicted to display O-Glycosyl hydrolase activity and to be a member of the GH24 family. The ability of this enzyme to hydrolyse the peptidoglycan of 25 Gram-negative strains, across 4 different genera, highlights its potential as a novel candidate for biocontrol of C. sakazakii and other Gram-negative food related pathogens. PMID:26342306

  16. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866... Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents are... diagnosis of disease caused by this bacterium belonging to the genus Staphylococcus and...

  17. 9 CFR 113.115 - Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterin-Toxoid... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.115 Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterin-Toxoid. Staphylococcus... Staphylococcus aureus which has been inactivated and is nontoxic. Each serial of biological product...

  18. A pig model of acute Staphylococcus aureus induced pyemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O. L.; Iburg, T.; Aalbæk, B.;

    2009-01-01

    Background: Sepsis caused by Staphylococcus aureus constitutes an important cause of morbidity and mortality in humans, and the incidence of this disease-entity is increasing. In this paper we describe the initial microbial dynamics and lesions in pigs experimentally infected with S. aureus....... aureus isolated from man and an extension of the timeframe aiming at inducing sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock....

  19. Multidrug-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in US Meat and Poultry

    OpenAIRE

    Waters, Andrew E.; Contente-Cuomo, Tania; Buchhagen, Jordan; Liu, Cindy M.; Watson, Lindsey; Pearce, Kimberly; Foster, Jeffrey T.; Bowers, Jolene; Driebe, Elizabeth M; Engelthaler, David M.; Keim, Paul S; Lance B Price

    2011-01-01

    We characterized the prevalence, antibiotic susceptibility profiles, and genotypes of Staphylococcus aureus among US meat and poultry samples (n = 136). S. aureus contaminated 47% of samples, and multidrug resistance was common among isolates (52%). S. aureus genotypes and resistance profiles differed significantly among sample types, suggesting food animal–specific contamination.

  20. Risk factors for Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S aureus colonization among health care workers in pediatrics departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Ivete Martins; Marlow, Mariel Asbury; Pinheiro, Marcos Gabriel; de Freitas, Maria de Fátima Nogueira; Fonseca, Fernanda Fernandes; Cardoso, Claudete Aparecida Araújo; Aguiar-Alves, Fábio

    2014-08-01

    Risk factors for Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) were evaluated for 178 health care workers from a public hospital pediatrics department in Brazil. Colonization rates were 33.1% for S aureus and 5.1% for MRSA. Risk factors for S aureus colonization differed from those for MRSA. Results suggest nurses with prolonged pediatric patient contact in inpatient units are at higher risk for MRSA colonization. PMID:25087145

  1. Antibacterial Activity and Antibiotic-Enhancing Effects of Honeybee Venom against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Mi; Kim, Joung Min; Hong, In Pyo; Woo, Soon Ok; Kim, Se Gun; Jang, He Rye; Pak, Sok Cheon

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), along with other antibiotic resistant bacteria, has become a significant social and clinical problem. There is thus an urgent need to develop naturally bioactive compounds as alternatives to the few antibiotics that remain effective. Here we assessed the in vitro activities of bee venom (BV), alone or in combination with ampicillin, penicillin, gentamicin or vancomycin, on growth of MRSA strains. The antimicrobial activity of BV against MRSA strains was investigated using minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) and a time-kill assay. Expression of atl which encodes murein hydrolase, a peptidoglycan-degrading enzyme involved in cell separation, was measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The MICs of BV were 0.085 µg/mL and 0.11 µg/mL against MRSA CCARM 3366 and MRSA CCARM 3708, respectively. The MBC of BV against MRSA 3366 was 0.106 µg/mL and that against MRSA 3708 was 0.14 µg/mL. The bactericidal activity of BV corresponded to a decrease of at least 3 log CFU/g cells. The combination of BV with ampicillin or penicillin yielded an inhibitory concentration index ranging from 0.631 to 1.002, indicating a partial and indifferent synergistic effect. Compared to ampicillin or penicillin, both MRSA strains were more susceptible to the combination of BV with gentamicin or vancomycin. The expression of atl gene was increased in MRSA 3366 treated with BV. These results suggest that BV exhibited antibacterial activity and antibiotic-enhancing effects against MRSA strains. The atl gene was increased in MRSA exposed to BV, suggesting that cell division was interrupted. BV warrants further investigation as a natural antimicrobial agent and synergist of antibiotic activity. PMID:26771592

  2. Antibacterial Activity and Antibiotic-Enhancing Effects of Honeybee Venom against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Mi Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, along with other antibiotic resistant bacteria, has become a significant social and clinical problem. There is thus an urgent need to develop naturally bioactive compounds as alternatives to the few antibiotics that remain effective. Here we assessed the in vitro activities of bee venom (BV, alone or in combination with ampicillin, penicillin, gentamicin or vancomycin, on growth of MRSA strains. The antimicrobial activity of BV against MRSA strains was investigated using minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC, minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC and a time-kill assay. Expression of atl which encodes murein hydrolase, a peptidoglycan-degrading enzyme involved in cell separation, was measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The MICs of BV were 0.085 µg/mL and 0.11 µg/mL against MRSA CCARM 3366 and MRSA CCARM 3708, respectively. The MBC of BV against MRSA 3366 was 0.106 µg/mL and that against MRSA 3708 was 0.14 µg/mL. The bactericidal activity of BV corresponded to a decrease of at least 3 log CFU/g cells. The combination of BV with ampicillin or penicillin yielded an inhibitory concentration index ranging from 0.631 to 1.002, indicating a partial and indifferent synergistic effect. Compared to ampicillin or penicillin, both MRSA strains were more susceptible to the combination of BV with gentamicin or vancomycin. The expression of atl gene was increased in MRSA 3366 treated with BV. These results suggest that BV exhibited antibacterial activity and antibiotic-enhancing effects against MRSA strains. The atl gene was increased in MRSA exposed to BV, suggesting that cell division was interrupted. BV warrants further investigation as a natural antimicrobial agent and synergist of antibiotic activity.

  3. Emergence of quinupristin/dalfopristin resistance among livestock-associated Staphylococcus aureus ST9 clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fangyou; Lu, Chaohui; Liu, Yunling; Sun, He; Shang, Yongpeng; Ding, Yu; Li, Dan; Qin, Zhiqiang; Parsons, Chris; Huang, Xiaoying; Li, Yuping; Hu, Longhua; Wang, Liangxing

    2014-11-01

    Quinupristin/dalfopristin (Q/D) is a valuable alternative to vancomycin for the treatment of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. However, not long after Q/D was approved, bacteria with resistance to this newer antimicrobial agent were reported. To investigate the prevalence of Q/D resistance, a total of 1476 non-duplicate S. aureus isolates, including 775 MRSA, from a Chinese tertiary hospital were selected randomly from 2003 to 2013. Of the 775 MRSA, 3 (0.4%) were resistant to Q/D. All meticillin-susceptible S. aureus were susceptible to Q/D. The prevalence of Q/D resistance among S. aureus was 0.2% (3/1476). The three isolates with Q/D resistance had the same antimicrobial resistance profile, except for cefaclor and chloramphenicol. All three Q/D-resistant MRSA were positive for five streptogramin B resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC, msrA and msrB) and two streptogramin A resistance genes (vatC and vgaA) as determined by PCR and DNA sequencing. MRSA WZ1031 belonged to ST9-MRSA-SCCmecV-t899, whilst MRSA WZ414 and WZ480 belonged to ST9-MRSA-SCCmecNT(non-typeable)-t899. ST9 has been reported predominantly in livestock-associated (LA) MRSA in some Asian countries. The three patients with these MRSA isolates were not livestock handlers and did not keep close contact with livestock. The origin of these important LA-MRSA isolates causing human infections is not known. Taken together, Q/D resistance, which was caused by a combination of ermA-ermB-ermC-msrA-msrB-vatC-vgaA, was first found among S. aureus clinical isolates in China. The present study is the first report of the emergence of human infections caused by ST9 LA-MRSA isolates with Q/D resistance. PMID:25218154

  4. Hyperglycemic conditions inhibit C3-mediated immunologic control of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hair Pamela S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetic patients are at increased risk for bacterial infections; these studies provide new insight into the role of the host defense complement system in controlling bacterial pathogens in hyperglycemic environments. Methods The interactions of complement C3 with bacteria in elevated glucose were assayed for complement activation to opsonic forms, phagocytosis and bacterial killing. C3 was analyzed in euglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions by mass spectrometry to measure glycation and structural differences. Results Elevated glucose inhibited S. aureus activation of C3 and deposition of C3b and iC3b on the bacterial surface. S. aureus-generated C5a and serum-mediated phagocytosis by neutrophils were both decreased in elevated glucose conditions. Interestingly, elevated glucose increased the binding of unactivated C3 to S. aureus, which was reversible on return to normal glucose concentrations. In a model of polymicrobial infection, S. aureus in elevated glucose conditions depleted C3 from serum resulting in decreased complement-mediated killing of E. coli. To investigate the effect of differing glucose concentration on C3 structure and glycation, purified C3 incubated with varying glucose concentrations was analyzed by mass spectrometry. Glycation was limited to the same three lysine residues in both euglycemic and hyperglycemic conditions over one hour, thus glycation could not account for observed changes between glucose conditions. However, surface labeling of C3 with sulfo-NHS-biotin showed significant changes in the surface availability of seven lysine residues in response to increasing glucose concentrations. These results suggest that the tertiary structure of C3 changes in response to hyperglycemic conditions leading to an altered interaction of C3 with bacterial pathogens. Conclusions These results demonstrate that hyperglycemic conditions inhibit C3-mediated complement effectors important in the immunological

  5. Disinfection of stethoscopes: Gap between knowledge and practice in an Indian tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshu Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Stethoscopes are used primarily to assess the health of patients and are one of the most commonly used medical devices. Thus, are the prominent tools for the spread of health-care associated infections (HAIs. Aims: The study was conducted to assess the knowledge and awareness about handling of the stethoscope and cleaning practices followed among the healthcare workers (HCWs. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 participants were included during a 4-month study period at a tertiary care hospital in Ujjain. A semi-structured questionnaire was distributed to HCWs and the surface of the diaphragm of their stethoscopes were swabbed for bacteriological analysis using standard techniques. Results: Out of total 80 stethoscopes, 69 (86% were found to be contaminated with at least one type of microorganism. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most predominant bacterial species found on 58 stethoscopes, followed by Bacillus subtilis (n = 21 and Staphylococcus spp. (n = 16. Out of total 10 S. aureus isolated, 3 were methicillin-resistant S. aureus ( MRSA. Majority (97% of the HCWs had good knowledge about the topic, but only 22 (27% reported to apply it in the practice. Conclusions: Our study confirmed that majority of the stethoscopes were contaminated with microorganisms. Besides having knowledge about the importance of cleaning the stethoscopes, lower percentage of HCWs reported to follow it in practice. Thus, the authors recommend regularization of reminders such as circulars, motivating posters for the HCWs to clean the diaphragm of the stethoscopes.

  6. INVOLVEMENT OF PEPTIDOGLYCAN RECOGNITION PROTEIN L6 IN ACTIVATION OF IMMUNE DEFICIENCY PATHWAY IN THE IMMUNE RESPONSIVE SILKWORM CELLS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromitsu; Sagisaka, Aki

    2016-06-01

    The immune deficiency (Imd) signaling pathway is activated by Gram-negative bacteria for producing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In Drosophila melanogaster, the activation of this pathway is initiated by the recognition of Gram-negative bacteria by peptidoglycan (PGN) recognition proteins (PGRPs), PGRP-LC and PGRP-LE. In this study, we found that the Imd pathway is involved in enhancing the promoter activity of AMP gene in response to Gram-negative bacteria or diaminopimelic (DAP) type PGNs derived from Gram-negative bacteria in an immune responsive silkworm cell line, Bm-NIAS-aff3. Using gene knockdown experiments, we further demonstrated that silkworm PGRP L6 (BmPGRP-L6) is involved in the activation of E. coli or E. coli-PGN mediated AMP promoter activation. Domain analysis revealed that BmPGRP-L6 contained a conserved PGRP domain, transmembrane domain, and RIP homotypic interaction motif like motif but lacked signal peptide sequences. BmPGRP-L6 overexpression enhances AMP promoter activity through the Imd pathway. BmPGRP-L6 binds to DAP-type PGNs, although it also binds to lysine-type PGNs that activate another immune signal pathway, the Toll pathway in Drosophila. These results indicate that BmPGRP-L6 is a key PGRP for activating the Imd pathway in immune responsive silkworm cells. PMID:26991439

  7. A critical role for peptidoglycan N-deacetylation in Listeria evasion from the host innate immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boneca, Ivo G.; Dussurget, Olivier; Cabanes, Didier; Nahori, Marie-Anne; Sousa, Sandra; Lecuit, Marc; Psylinakis, Emmanuel; Bouriotis, Vassilis; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Giovannini, Marco; Coyle, Anthony; Bertin, John; Namane, Abdelkader; Rousselle, Jean-Claude; Cayet, Nadège; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Balloy, Viviane; Chignard, Michel; Philpott, Dana J.; Cossart, Pascale; Girardin, Stephen E.

    2007-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a human intracellular pathogen that is able to survive in the gastrointestinal environment and replicate in macrophages, thus bypassing the early innate immune defenses. Peptidoglycan (PG) is an essential component of the bacterial cell wall readily exposed to the host and, thus, an important target for the innate immune system. Characterization of the PG from L. monocytogenes demonstrated deacetylation of N-acetylglucosamine residues. We identified a PG N-deacetylase gene, pgdA, in L. monocytogenes genome sequence. Inactivation of pgdA revealed the key role of this PG modification in bacterial virulence because the mutant was extremely sensitive to the bacteriolytic activity of lysozyme, and growth was severely impaired after oral and i.v. inoculations. Within macrophage vacuoles, the mutant was rapidly destroyed and induced a massive IFN-β response in a TLR2 and Nod1-dependent manner. Together, these results reveal that PG N-deacetylation is a highly efficient mechanism used by Listeria to evade innate host defenses. The presence of deacetylase genes in other pathogenic bacteria indicates that PG N-deacetylation could be a general mechanism used by bacteria to evade the host innate immune system. PMID:17215377

  8. Common R-plasmids in Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis during a nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus outbreak.

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, M. L.; Wong, E. S.; Falkow, S

    1982-01-01

    During a 7-month period in 1978 to 1979, 31 patients and personnel at a Kentucky hospital were colonized or infected with a Staphylococcus aureus strain resistant to clindamycin, erythromycin, gentamicin, methicillin, penicillin, and tetracycline. S. epidermidis with similar antibiotic resistance patterns had been isolated in this hospital in the year before the S. aureus outbreak. A 32-megadalton R-plasmid, pUW3626, mediating resistance to penicillin and gentamicin, was present in these isol...

  9. Tertiary Education in the Czech Republic: The Pathway to Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesik, Richard; Gounko, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes recent policy proposals to reform Czech tertiary education. A brief overview of the evolution of Czech tertiary education presents the background against which emerging policy trends in education are examined. We relate the changes in tertiary education to the policy framework and recommendations of the OECD, underpinned by…

  10. Diversification Management at Tertiary Education Level: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takwate, Kwaji Tizhe

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the concept of management of diversification at tertiary education level in view of the growth of national secondary education system which vested high scramble for tertiary education was made in relation to question of access and expansion. This paper examines management of diversification at tertiary education level as a…

  11. Constructing Knowledge Societies : New Challenges for Tertiary Education

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2002-01-01

    This report describes how tertiary education contributes to building up a country's capacity for participation in an increasingly knowledge-based world economy and investigates policy options for tertiary education that have the potential to enhance economic growth and reduce poverty. It examines the following questions: What is the importance of tertiary education for economic and social ...

  12. Staphylococcus aureus resistente a la meticilina (SARM)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-10-22

    Datos importantes sobre las infecciones por SARM en Estados Unidos, en las escuelas y los entornos médicos. (Title: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)Created: 10/2007).  Created: 10/22/2007 by National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 11/9/2007.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins A- and B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H; Karlsdóttir, Edda

    2013-01-01

    Enterotoxins of Staphylococcus aureus are among the most common causes of food poisoning. Acting as superantigens they intoxicate the organism by causing a massive uncontrolled T cell activation that ultimately may lead to toxic shock and death. In contrast to our detailed knowledge regarding...

  14. Staphylococcus aureus vaccines: Deviating from the carol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missiakas, Dominique; Schneewind, Olaf

    2016-08-22

    Staphylococcus aureus, a commensal of the human nasopharynx and skin, also causes invasive disease, most frequently skin and soft tissue infections. Invasive disease caused by drug-resistant strains, designated MRSA (methicillin-resistant S. aureus), is associated with failure of antibiotic therapy and elevated mortality. Here we review polysaccharide-conjugate and subunit vaccines that were designed to prevent S. aureus infection in patients at risk of bacteremia or surgical wound infection but failed to reach their clinical endpoints. We also discuss vaccines with ongoing trials for combinations of polysaccharide-conjugates and subunits. S. aureus colonization and invasive disease are not associated with the development of protective immune responses, which is attributable to a large spectrum of immune evasion factors. Two evasive strategies, assembly of protective fibrin shields via coagulases and protein A-mediated B cell superantigen activity, are discussed as possible vaccine targets. Although correlates for protective immunity are not yet known, opsonophagocytic killing of staphylococci by phagocytic cells offers opportunities to establish such criteria. PMID:27526714

  15. Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. M. Parnaby; G. O'Dwyer; H. A. Monsey; M. S. Shafi

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe point prevalence and incidence of Staphylococcus aureus (methicillin-sensitive and -resistant) carriage by inpatients on acute elderly care wards was estimated. The relationship to body site and to previous admissions to hospital or other institutions was determined. Fifty-five patie

  16. Increasing resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to ciprofloxacin.

    OpenAIRE

    Daum, T E; Schaberg, D R; Terpenning, M S; Sottile, W S; Kauffman, C A

    1990-01-01

    We demonstrated the marked emergence of resistance to ciprofloxacin among Staphylococcus arueus strains isolated at the Ann Arbor Veterans Administration Medical Center. All S. aureus isolates tested from 1984 to 1985 were susceptible, whereas 55.1% of methicillin-resistant and 2.5% of methicillin-susceptible strains from 1989 had high-level resistance to ciprofloxacin.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus spa type t437

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glasner, C; Pluister, G; Westh, H;

    2015-01-01

    large epidemiological studies in Europe. Nevertheless, the overall numbers identified in some Northern European reference laboratories have increased during the past decade. To determine whether the S. aureus t437 clone is present in other European countries, and to assess its genetic diversity across...

  18. Libraries and Resource Centres for Tertiary Education

    OpenAIRE

    OECD

    1998-01-01

    PEB, in co-operation with the Programme on Institutional Management in Higher Education (IMHE), hosted an experts meeting to determine how existing libraries for tertiary education may be adapted and new ones conceived to meet the future needs of the students, institutions and communities concerned.

  19. American Tertiary mollusks of the genus Clementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodring, W.P.

    1927-01-01

    Aside from its value as an aid in determining the age of Tertiary beds, the chief interest of the genus Clementia lies in the anomalous features of its present and former distribution. An attempt is made in this paper to trace its geologic history, to point out its paleobiologic significance, and to describe all the known American Tertiary species. The fossils from Colombia used in preparing this report were collected during explorations made under the direction of Dr. 0. B. Hopkins, chief geologist of the Imperial Oil Co. (Ltd.), who kindly donated them to the United States National Museum. Dr. T. Wayland Vaughan, of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, furnished information relating to specimens collected by him in Mexico. Dr. Bruce L. Clark, of the University of California; Dr. G. Dallas Hanna, of the California Academy of Sciences; Dr. H. A. Pilsbry, of the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences; and Dr. W. D. Matthew, of the American Museum of Natural History, generously loaned type specimens and other material. Doctor Clark and Doctor Hanna also gave information concerning the Tertiary species from California. Mr. Ralph B. Stewart, of the University of California, read the manuscript, and I have taken advantage of his suggestions. I am also indebted to Mr. L. R. Cox, of the British Museum, for information relating to the fossil species from Persia, Zanzibar, and Burma, and to Dr. Axel A. Olsson, of the International Petroleum Co., for data concerning undescribed Tertiary species from Peru.

  20. Incorporating Online Tools in Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamp, Leon P.; Rudman, Riaan J.

    2013-01-01

    Students currently studying at tertiary institutions have developed a set of attitudes and aptitudes as a result of growing up in an IT and media-rich environment. These attitudes and aptitudes influence how they learn and in order to be effective, lecturers must adapt to address their learning preferences and use the online teaching tools that…

  1. Tertiary Education and Training in Australia, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Sourcing data from the National VET Provider Collection and the Higher Education Statistics Collection, this publication provides a summary of participation in tertiary education and training in Australia. It covers participation in Australian Qualifications Framework certificate I qualifications through to doctorates by research, as well as…

  2. Understanding Australian Aboriginal Tertiary Student Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Rhonda; Rochecouste, Judith; Bennell, Debra; Anderson, Roz; Cooper, Inala; Forrest, Simon; Exell, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Drawing from a study of the experiences of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander university students, this paper presents an overview of the specific needs of these students as they enter and progress through their tertiary education. Extracts from a set of case studies developed from both staff and student interviews and an online…

  3. GCTE: a national certificate in tertiary education

    OpenAIRE

    Vale, Deborah; Tynan, Belinda; Smyth, Robyn

    2009-01-01

    The project intended to promote shared conceptual frameworks about teaching and learning and support strategic change in how graduate certificates of tertiary education (GCTE) contribute to the professional development of academic staff within a fast changing higher education context. It was intended to investigate and negotiate the core content and approach for Australian higher education award programs across the eight universities.

  4. Indigenous Students in the Tertiary Education Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandias, Susan; Fuller, Don; Larkin, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Important recent objectives of indigenous education policy in Australia have been aimed at redressing indigenous economic and social disadvantage through increasing student retention, progression and completion rates in both compulsory and post-compulsory education. The two sectors of the tertiary education system, vocational education and…

  5. Prevalence of Methicillin-resistant Staphyloccocus Aureus and associated risk factors on admission to a specialist care eye hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staphyloccocus aureus is known to be a frequent pathogen in hospital settings, with its well-known and resistant forms to the anti-staphylococcal penicillins. Reports on community carriage outside hospital settings have been feared to be on the increase due to the due to the frequency of reported cases on admission to hospitals. We undertook this study to determine the prevalence of and to establish predictors for, nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant S.aureus (MRSA) at the time of admission to a specialist care eye hospital. A prospective survey was conducted at King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital (KKESH), Riyadh during the three differing weeks randomly selected from the year 1999. The first 100 patients admitted during those three weeks were selected according to inclusion criteria. The hospital is a 220-bed tertiary ophthalmic care facility, with an average 7,500admission per year. Nasal bacterial swabs were taken within 48 hours of admission and tested for all strains of S.aureus and sensitivity to methicillin. Detailed interviews were conducted about medical history and habitual environment. Of 306 nasal cultures tested, none was isolated for MRSA and 102 (33%) were sensitive to methicillin (MSSA).We found 0% nasal carriage rate for MRSA. Respondents have difficulty with questions related to antibiotic administration. No identifiable medical or environmental risk factors could be found. Nasal swabs of patients admitted to KKESH did not reveal MRSA colonization, indicating that MRSA may not be prevalent in the community at present. (author)

  6. Relationship between Vancomycin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Vancomycin-Intermediate S. aureus, High Vancomycin MIC, and Outcome in Serious S. aureus Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Natasha E.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Howden, Benjamin P.

    2012-01-01

    Vancomycin has been used successfully for over 50 years for the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections, particularly those involving methicillin-resistant S. aureus. It has proven remarkably reliable, but its efficacy is now being questioned with the emergence of strains of S. aureus that display heteroresistance, intermediate resistance, and, occasionally, complete vancomycin resistance. More recently, an association has been established between poor outcome and infections with strain...

  7. Staphylococcus aureus methicillin-resistance mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović-Jeremić Ljiljana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. In many hospitals in the world and in our country, the spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is so wide that nowdays vancomycin is recommended for empiric treatment of staphylococcal life threatening infections (sepsis, pneumonia instead of beta-lactam antibiotics. The aim of this study was to determine the production of beta-lactamases in hospital and community isolates of staphyloococus aureus, i. e. hospital associated MRSA (HA-MRSA and community associated MRSA (CA-MRSA, the presence of homogeneous and heterogeneous type of methicillin resistance, and border-line resistance in Staphylococcus aureus (BORSA. The aim of this study was also to determine if there was a statistically significant difference between mechanisms of resistance in HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA. Methods. A total 216 clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates from the General Hospital in the town of Cuprija and 186 ambulance Staphylococcus aureus isolates from the community were examined for the presence of methicillin-resistance using disk-diffusion test with penicillin disk (10 ij, oxacillin disk (1 μg and cefoxitin disk (30 μg. Betalactamases production was detected by nitrocefin disk and betalactamase tablets. Determination of oxacillin minimum inhibitory concentracion (MIC was done by agar-dilution method. Results. The prevalence of HA-MRSA was 57.4%, and CA-MRSA was 17.7% (p < 0.05. There was a higher rate of heterogeneous type of resistance among clinical MRSA isolates (11.1% compared with ambulance ones (3.8% (p < 0.05. The rates of beta-lactamases production were similar among hospital associated isolates (97.5%, as well as in the community associated isolates (95.5% (p > 0.05. There were 4.6 % of BORSA hospital isolates and 3.3 % of BORSA ambulance isolates (p > 0.05. Conclusion. The frequency of MRSA isolates in hospital was significantly higher than in community, as well as the heterogeneous type of resistance. The frequency of BORSA

  8. Erosive arthritis and hepatic granuloma formation induced by peptidoglycan polysaccharide in rats is aggravated by prasugrel treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analia E Garcia

    Full Text Available Administration of the thienopyridine P2Y12 receptor antagonist, clopidogrel, increased the erosive arthritis induced by peptidoglycan polysaccharide (PG-PS in rats or by injection of the arthritogenic K/BxN serum in mice. To determine if the detrimental effects are caused exclusively by clopidogrel, we evaluated prasugrel, a third-generation thienopyridine pro-drug, that contrary to clopidogrel is mostly metabolized into its active metabolite in the intestine. Prasugrel effects were examined on the PG-PS-induced arthritis rat model. Erosive arthritis was induced in Lewis rats followed by treatment with prasugrel for 21 days. Prasugrel treated arthritic animals showed a significant increase in the inflammatory response, compared with untreated arthritic rats, in terms of augmented macroscopic joint diameter associated with significant signs of inflammation, histomorphometric measurements of the hind joints and elevated platelet number. Moreover, fibrosis at the pannus, assessed by immunofluorescence of connective tissue growth factor, was increased in arthritic rats treated with prasugrel. In addition to the arthritic manifestations, hepatomegaly, liver granulomas and giant cell formation were observed after PG-PS induction and even more after prasugrel exposure. Cytokine plasma levels of IL-1 beta, IL-6, MIP1 alpha, MCP1, IL-17 and RANTES were increased in arthritis-induced animals. IL-10 plasma levels were significantly decreased in animals treated with prasugrel. Overall, prasugrel enhances inflammation in joints and liver of this animal model. Since prasugrel metabolites inhibit neutrophil function ex-vivo and the effects of both clopidogrel and prasugrel metabolites on platelets are identical, we conclude that the thienopyridines metabolites might exert non-platelet effects on other immune cells to aggravate inflammation.

  9. Phosphorylation of the Peptidoglycan Synthase PonA1 Governs the Rate of Polar Elongation in Mycobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen J Kieser

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cell growth and division are required for the progression of bacterial infections. Most rod-shaped bacteria grow by inserting new cell wall along their mid-section. However, mycobacteria, including the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, produce new cell wall material at their poles. How mycobacteria control this different mode of growth is incompletely understood. Here we find that PonA1, a penicillin binding protein (PBP capable of transglycosylation and transpeptidation of cell wall peptidoglycan (PG, is a major governor of polar growth in mycobacteria. PonA1 is required for growth of Mycobacterium smegmatis and is critical for M. tuberculosis during infection. In both cases, PonA1's catalytic activities are both required for normal cell length, though loss of transglycosylase activity has a more pronounced effect than transpeptidation. Mutations that alter the amount or the activity of PonA1 result in abnormal formation of cell poles and changes in cell length. Moreover, altered PonA1 activity results in dramatic differences in antibiotic susceptibility, suggesting that a balance between the two enzymatic activities of PonA1 is critical for survival. We also find that phosphorylation of a cytoplasmic region of PonA1 is required for normal activity. Mutations in a critical phosphorylated residue affect transglycosylase activity and result in abnormal rates of cell elongation. Together, our data indicate that PonA1 is a central determinant of polar growth in mycobacteria, and its governance of cell elongation is required for robust cell fitness during both host-induced and antibiotic stress.

  10. Bidirectional cell-surface anchoring function of C-terminal repeat region of peptidoglycan hydrolase of Lactococcus lactis IL1403.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarahomjoo, Shirin; Katakura, Yoshio; Satoh, Eiichi; Shioya, Suteaki

    2008-02-01

    With the aim of constructing an efficient protein display system for lactic acid bacteria (LABs), the effect of fusion direction on the cell-surface binding activity of the C-terminal region of the peptidoglycan hydrolase (CPH) of Lactococcus lactis IL1403 was studied. CPH fused to the alpha-amylase (AMY) of Streptococcus bovis 148 either at its C-terminus (CPH-AMY) or at its N-terminus (AMY-CPH) was expressed intracellularly in Escherichia coli. This domain was able to direct binding of AMY to the surface of L. lactis ATCC 19435 in both constructs. However, the number of bound molecules per cell and the specific activity for starch digestion in the case of CPH-AMY were 3 and 14 times greater than those in the case of AMY-CPH, respectively. Of the LABs tested, L. lactis ATCC 19435 showed the highest binding capability for CPH-AMY, up to 6 x 10(4) molecules per cell, with a dissociation rate constant of 5.00 x 10(-5) s(-1). The binding of CPH-AMY to the surface of Lactobacillus delbrueckii ATCC 9649 cells was very stable with a dissociation rate constant of 6.96 x 10(-6) s(-1). The production of CPH-AMY in the soluble form increased 3-fold as a result of coexpression with a molecular chaperone, trigger factor. The results of this study suggest the usefulness of CPH as a bidirectional anchor protein for the production of cell-surface adhesive enzymes in E. coli. Furthermore, the importance of the fusion direction of CPH in determining cell-surface binding and enzymatic activities was shown. PMID:18343337

  11. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: the superbug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Giuseppe; Leone, Sebastiano; Lauria, Francesco N; Nicastri, Emanuele; Wenzel, Richard P

    2010-10-01

    Over the last decade, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains have emerged as serious pathogens in the nosocomial and community setting. Hospitalization costs associated with MRSA infections are substantially greater than those associated with methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) infections, and MRSA has wider economic effects that involve indirect costs to the patient and to society. In addition, there is some evidence suggesting that MRSA infections increase morbidity and the risk of mortality. Glycopeptides are the backbone antibiotics for the treatment of MRSA infections. However, several recent reports have highlighted the limitations of vancomycin, and its role in the management of serious infections is now being reconsidered. Several new antimicrobials demonstrate in vitro activity against MRSA and other Gram-positive bacteria. Data from large surveys indicate that linezolid, daptomycin, and tigecycline are almost universally active against MRSA. This review will briefly discuss the epidemiology, costs, outcome, and therapeutic options for the management of MRSA infections. PMID:20851011

  12. Tertiary Treatment Process of Preserved Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qingyu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the composite coagulants on coagulation sedimentation for the preserved wastewater was investigated by changing the composite coagulant dosages, and the coagulant was composed of polymeric ferric sulfate (PFS, polyaluminium chloride (PAC, and polyaluminum ferric silicate (PAFSC, while the effect of the tertiary treatment process on the preserved wastewater was tested, which was exceeded the standard seriously. The results showed that 400 mg/L was the optimum composite coagulant dosage. The removal rates of salt and sugar were as high as 99.1% and 99.5% respectively, and the removal rates of CODCr and SS were 99.3% and 96.0%, respectively after the preserved wastewater was treated by the tertiary treatment technology, which both reached the primary standard of “The Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard” (GB8978-1996.

  13. Tertiary fatty amides as diesel fuel substitutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serdari, Aikaterini; Lois, Euripides; Stournas, Stamoulis [National Technical Univ. of Athens, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Athens (Greece)

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents experimental results regarding the impact of adding different tertiary amides of fatty acids to mineral diesel fuel; an assessment of the behaviour of these compounds as possible diesel fuel extenders is also included. Measurements of cetane number, cold flow properties (cloud point, pour point and CFPP), density, kinematic viscosity, flash point and distillation temperatures are reported, while initial experiments concerning the effects on particulate emissions are also described. Most of the examined tertiary fatty amides esters have very good performance and they can be easily prepared from fatty acids (biomass). Such compounds or their blends could be used as mineral diesel fuel or even fatty acid methylesters (FAME, biodiesel) substitutes or extenders. (Author)

  14. The Stealthy Superbug: the Role of Asymptomatic Enteric Carriage in Maintaining a Long-Term Hospital Outbreak of ST228 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Senn, Laurence; Clerc, Olivier; Zanetti, Giorgio; Basset, Patrick; Prod’Hom, Guy; Gordon, Nicola C.; Sheppard, Anna E.; Crook, Derrick W; James, Richard; Thorpe, Harry A.; Feil, Edward J.; Blanc, Dominique S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of 228 isolates was used to elucidate the origin and dynamics of a long-term outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) sequence type 228 (ST228) SCCmec I that involved 1,600 patients in a tertiary care hospital between 2008 and 2012. Combining of the sequence data with detailed metadata on patient admission and movement confirmed that the outbreak was due to the transmission of a single clonal variant of ST228, rather than repeated i...

  15. The Stealthy Superbug: The role of asymptomatic enteric carriage in maintaining a long-term hospital outbreak of ST228 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Senn, L; Clerc, O; Zanetti, G; Basset, P.; Prod'hom, G.; Gordon, NC; Sheppard, AE; Crook, DW; JAMES, R; Thorpe, HA; Feil, EJ; Blanc, DS

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of 228 isolates was used to elucidate the origin and dynamics of a long-term outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) sequence type 228 (ST228) SCCmec I that involved 1,600 patients in a tertiary care hospital between 2008 and 2012. Combining of the sequence data with detailed metadata on patient admission and movement confirmed that the outbreak was due to the transmission of a single clonal variant of ST228, rather than repeated introductio...

  16. Curcumin Reverse Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Su-Hyun Mun; Sung-Bae Kim; Ryong Kong; Jang-Gi Choi; Youn-Chul Kim; Dong-Won Shin; Ok-Hwa Kang; Dong-Yeul Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic flavonoid extracted from the rhizome of Curcuma longa L., was shown to possess superior potency to resensitize methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to antibiotics. Previous studies have shown the synergistic activity of curcumin with β-lactam and quinolone antibiotics. Further, to understand the anti-MRSA mechanism of curcumin, we investigated the potentiated effect of curcumin by its interaction in diverse conditions. The mechanism of anti-MRSA ...

  17. Xanthgranulomatous pyelonephritis associated with Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hwiesh, Abdulla K

    2007-11-01

    A 44-year old man with xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis presented with abdominal distention, left lumber pain, fever, loss of appetite, and loss of weight. He had been known to have diabetes mellitus type II for 20 years, and he was diagnosed to have a left renal stone three months prior to this presentation. The patient's urine and the left psous abscess grew staphylococcus aureus. PMID:17951953

  18. Xanthgranulomatous pyelonephritis associated with staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 44-year-old man with xanthgranulomatous pyelonephritis presented with abdominal distention, left lumber pain, fever, loss of appetite and loss of weight. He had been known to have diabetes mellitus type II for 20 years and he was diagnosed to have a left renal stone three months prior to this presentation. The patient's urine and the left psous abscess grew staphylococcus aureus. (author)

  19. Unionism and Productivity in Nigerian Tertiary Institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Sunday I. Efanga; Mrs Mfon Aniedi Okon; Mrs. Caroline O. Ifejiagwa

    2014-01-01

    This concept paper examined Unionism and productivity in Nigeria Tertiary institutions. The author(s) have attempted to explore an issue, which through could be obvious to some, have significantly failed to capture scholarly attention. The paper explore the linkage between Trade Unions and productivity in higher education in Nigeria. The author observed that were there is agreement the productivity of staff are high; but where there is an infringement of rights, the disputes that ...

  20. Carbon Activation Diagnostic for Tertiary Neutron Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glebov, V.Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T.C.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Radha, P.B.; Padalino, S.; Baumgart, L.; Fuschino, J.

    2003-03-28

    OAK B202 The yield of tertiary neutrons with energies greater than 20 MeV has been proposed to determine the high rho R of inertial confinement fusion targets. The activation of carbon is a valuable measurement technique because of its high reaction threshold, the availability of high-purity samples, and relatively low cost. The 12C(n,2n)11C reaction has a Q value of 18.7 MeV, well above the 14.1 MeV primary DT neutron energy. The isotope 11C decays with a half-life of 20.3 min and emits a positron, resulting in the production of two back-to-back, 511 keV gamma rays upon annihilation. The positron decay of 11C is nearly identical to the copper decay used in the activation measurements of 14.1 MeV primary DT yields; therefore, the present copper activation gamma-detection system can be used to detect the tertiary-produced carbon activation. Because the tertiary neutron yield is more than six orders of magnitude lower than primary neutron yield, the carbon activation diagnostic requires ultrapure carbon samples, free from any positron-emitting contamination. In recent years we have developed carbon purification, packaging, and handling procedures that minimize the contamination signal to a level low enough to use carbon activation for tertiary neutron measurements in direct-drive implosion experiments with DT cryogenic targets on OMEGA. Experimental results of contamination measurements in carbon samples performed on high-neutron-yield shots on OMEGA in 2001-2002 will be presented. A concept for implementing a carbon activation system on the National Ignition Facility (NIF)will be discussed.

  1. Aspartate inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hang; Wang, Mengyue; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation renders Staphylococcus aureus highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and host defenses. Four D-amino acids (D-Leu, D-Met, D-Trp and D-Tyr) have been reported to be able to inhibit biofilm formation and disassemble established S. aureus biofilms. We report here for the first time that both D- and L-isoforms of aspartate (Asp) inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation on tissue culture plates. Similar biofilm inhibition effects were also observed against other staphylococcal strains, including S. saprophyticus, S. equorum, S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus. It was found that Asp at high concentrations (>10 mM) inhibited the growth of planktonic N315 cells, but at subinhibitory concentrations decreased the cellular metabolic activity without influencing cell growth. The decreased cellular metabolic activity might be the reason for the production of less protein and DNA in the matrix of the biofilms formed in the presence of Asp. However, varied inhibition efficacies of Asp were observed for biofilms formed by clinical staphylococcal isolates. There might be mechanisms other than decreasing the metabolic activity, e.g. the biofilm phenotypes, affecting biofilm formation in the presence of Asp. PMID:25687923

  2. Whole-Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus aureus Strain LCT-SA112

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Junfeng; Liu, Yanhong; Wan, Daiwei; Fang, Xiangqun; Li, Tianzhi; Guo, Yinghua; Chang, De; Su, Longxiang; Wang, Yajuan; Zhao, Jiao; Liu, Changting

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a facultative anaerobic Gram-positive coccal bacterium. S. aureus is the most common species of Staphylococcus to cause staphylococcal infections, which are very common in clinical medicine. Here we report the genome sequence of S. aureus strain LCT-SA112, which was isolated from S. aureus subsp. aureus CGMCC 1.230.

  3. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of a gene from Campylobacter jejuni encoding a protein (Omp18) with similarity to peptidoglycan-associated lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkel, M E; Mead, D J; Cieplak, W

    1996-01-01

    A Campylobacter jejuni genomic plasmid library was screened with antiserum generated against whole C. jejuni, revealing two immunoreactive clones. Sequence analysis of the recombinant plasmids revealed a common open reading frame of 498 nucleotides encoding a protein of 165 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 18,018 Da. The recombinant product partitioned to the outer membrane fractions of Escherichia coli transformants and has been designated Omp18. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cloned C. jejuni gene exhibits considerable similarity to peptidoglycan-associated lipoproteins from other gram-negative bacteria. PMID:8613402

  4. [Raw milk-associated Staphylococcus aureus intoxication in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giezendanner, N; Meyer, B; Gort, M; Müller, P; Zweifel, C

    2009-07-01

    Four hours after the consumption of raw goat milk, three Swiss children came down with emesis and diarrhea in July 2008. First investigations showed that the milk originated from a goat suffering from clinical mastitis (Staphylococcus aureus). In the milk sample from the untreated left udder, Staphylococcus aureus counts reached 5.0 x 10(7) CFU ml(-1). By PCR, the gene for the staphylococcal enterotoxin D was found in isolated strains. The consumption of raw milk is rarely associated with Staphylococcus aureus intoxications. Due to the flora naturally present in raw milk, Staphylococcus aureus normally cannot multiply sufficiently. However, in the present case, high Staphylococcus aureus counts were already present in the milk due to the mastitis of the goat. This amount sufficed to cause a Staphylococcus aureus intoxication in the children. PMID:19565455

  5. Antibody responses in patients with invasive Staphylococcus aureus infections

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobsson, G; Colque-Navarro, P.; Gustafsson, E.; Andersson, R.; Möllby, R

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Correlation between antibody response and clinical outcome in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia has yielded conflicting results. Immunization schedules have failed in clinical trials. Is the humoral response toward S. aureus of protective nature? A prospective study was performed in patients with invasive S. aureus (ISA) infections during the period 2003?2005. The antibody levels were determined at the beginning and at the end of treatment and one month later (n?=?96, n?=?7...

  6. Vitamin D sufficiency and Staphylococcus aureus infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jeffrey W; Hogan, Patrick G; Hunstad, David A; Fritz, Stephanie A

    2015-05-01

    Vitamin D promotes epithelial immunity by upregulating antimicrobial peptides, including LL-37, which have bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus. We found that children with vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency [25-hydroxyvitamin D recurrent, rather than primary, S. aureus skin or soft tissue infection. Vitamin D sufficiency may be one of a myriad of host and environmental factors that can be directly impacted to reduce the frequency of S. aureus skin and soft tissue infection. PMID:25860535

  7. Mapping the Distribution of Invasive Staphylococcus aureus across Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Grundmann, Hajo; Aanensen, David M.; van den Wijngaard, Cees C.; Brian G Spratt; Harmsen, Dag; Friedrich, Alexander W.; ,

    2010-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus lives on the skin and in the nose of about a third of healthy people. Although S. aureus usually coexists peacefully with its human carriers, it is also an important disease-causing organism or pathogen. If it enters the body through a cut or during a surgical procedure, S. aureus can cause minor infections such as pimples and boils or more serious, life-threatening infections such as blood poisoning and pneumonia. Minor S. aureu...

  8. Infection control of Staphylococcus aureus : spa typing to elucidate transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Mernelius, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal of the human flora, primarily colonizing the anterior nares and throat, but it may also cause infections ranging from mild skin and soft tissue infections to severe diseases such as endocarditis and septicemia. S. aureus is also a major nosocomial problem increasing with the worldwide dissemination of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The main vector for bacterial cross-transmission in healthcare settings is the hands of healthcare workers (HCWs). No...

  9. Staphylococcus aureus atsparumas antibiotikams ir fagotipų paplitimas

    OpenAIRE

    Kareivienė, Violeta; Pavilonis, Alvydas; Sinkutė, Gintarė; Liegiūtė, Sigutė; Gailienė, Greta

    2006-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to identify the phage groups of Staphylococcus aureus strains, their prevalence, and resistance of different phage groups to antibiotics. Materials and methods. A total of 294 Staphylococcus aureus strains in Kaunas hospitals were obtained; they were phage typed and their resistance to antibiotics was determined. We used the method of routine dilution to test 17 antibiotics against the isolates. Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus to studied antibio...

  10. Threat of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus to health in Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, Shamshul; Nepal, Hari Prasad; Gautam, Rajendra; Rayamajhi, Nabin; Shrestha, Sony; Upadhyay, Goma; Acharya, Anju; Chapagain, Moti Lal

    2014-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is the most commonly isolated organism from the different clinical samples in hospital. The emergence and dissemination of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and growing resistance to non-beta-lactam antibiotics is making treatment of infections due to this organism increasingly difficult. Methods This study was conducted to determine the frequency of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from different clinical samples, rates of MRSA and full antibio...

  11. Epicutaneous Model of Community-Acquired Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhakara, Ranjani; Foreman, Oded; De Pascalis, Roberto; Lee, Gloria M.; Plaut, Roger D.; Kim, Stanley Y.; Stibitz, Scott; Elkins, Karen L.; Merkel, Tod J.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common etiological agents of community-acquired skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI). Although the majority of S. aureus community-acquired SSTIs are uncomplicated and self-clearing in nature, some percentage of these cases progress into life-threatening invasive infections. Current animal models of S. aureus SSTI suffer from two drawbacks: these models are a better representation of hospital-acquired SSTI than community-acquired SSTI, and they involv...

  12. Radioprotector WR-2721 and mitigating peptidoglycan synergistically promote mouse survival through the amelioration of intestinal and bone marrow damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The identification of an agent effective for the treatment of intestinal and bone marrow injury following radiation exposure remains a major issue in radiological medicine. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic impact of single agent or combination treatments with 2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylsulphanyl phosphonic acid (WR-2721) and peptidoglycan (PGN, a toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) agonist) on radiation-induced injury of the intestine and bone marrow in lethally irradiated male C57BL/6 mice. A dose of 3 mg of WR-2721 per mouse (167 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was given 30 min before irradiation, and 30 μg of PGN per mouse (1.7 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 24 h after 10 Gy irradiation. Bone marrow cluster of differentiation (CD)45+ and CD34+ markers of multiple haematopoietic lineages, number of granulocyte-erythroid-macrophage-megakaryocyte (GEMM) progenitor colonies, bone marrow histopathology, leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) expression in the intestines, xylose absorption and intestinal histopathology were all assessed at various time-points after irradiation. Furthermore, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 protein in the ileum was stained by immunofluorescent labelling. PGN-treated irradiated mice showed an increase in CD45+CD34+ cells compared with untreated mice 1.25 days after 10 Gy ionizing radiation (IR) (P < 0.05). Furthermore, combined PGN and WR-2721 treatment had an obviously synergistic radio-protective effect in nucleated cells in the bone marrow, including GEMM progenitors and CD45+CD34+ cells 4 days after 10 Gy IR. Single agent PGN or WR-2721 treatment after 10 Gy IR clearly increased Lgr5-positive pit cells (P < 0.05) and xylose absorption (P < 0.05). However only PGN and WR-2721 combination treatment markedly increased villus height (P < 0.05), number of crypts (P < 0.05) and whole-body weights after 10 Gy whole-body irradiation (WBI). The NF-κB p65 subunit was translocated to the nucleus, and

  13. Equity and Access to Tertiary Education: The Case of Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    VU HOANG LINH; LE VIET THUY; GIANG THANH LONG

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this case study of equity and access to tertiary education in Vietnam are to (i) document the significance and consequences of disparities in tertiary education opportunities, particularly in specific instances and areas of Vietnam, (ii) investigate the results and lessons of efforts to expand access to tertiary education, and (iii) offer concrete recommendations for effective policies directed toward the ideas of widening participation. To pursue these research objectives, ...

  14. Information Technologies and Tertiary Education in New Zealand

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Peter; Peters, Michael

    1998-01-01

    This article considers the extent to which, and ways in which, information technology issues have been addressed in recent tertiary education policy documents in New Zealand. By comparison with other reviews of tertiary education - notably the Dearing Report in the United Kingdom - these documents have little of substance to say about such issues. It is possible to speculate, nonetheless, about what might happen should current trends in the reform of tertiary education continue. It is argued ...

  15. Tertiary Treatment for Textile Waste Water-A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Manali Desai*1, Mehali Mehta2

    2014-01-01

    Tertiary treatment is the Industrial waste water treatment process which removes stubborn contaminants that have not been removed in secondary treatment. Effluent becomes even cleaner by Tertiary treatment through the use of stronger and more advanced treatment systems. The present work is an attempt to review all possible tertiary treatment methods for removal of dyestuff from textile effluent. Conventional method for treatment of textile effluent has own certain limitations ...

  16. VISA/VRSA (Vancomycin-Intermediate/Resistant Staphylococcus aureus) in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to vancomycin and other antimicrobial agents. What is Staphylococcus aureus? Staphylococcus aureus is a bacterium commonly found on the ... control personnel. Investigation and Control of Vancomycin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) [PDF - 300 KB] - This document is ...

  17. Extraction of Peptidoglycan from L. paracasei subp. Paracasei X12 and Its Preliminary Mechanisms of Inducing Immunogenic Cell Death in HT-29 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Jun Tian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available L. paracasei subp. paracasei X12 was previously isolated from a Chinese traditional fermented cheese with anticancer activities and probiotic potential. Herein, the integral peptidoglycan (X12-PG was extracted by a modified trichloroacetic acid (TCA method. X12-PG contained the four representative amino acids Asp, Glu, Ala and Lys, and displayed the similar lysozyme sensitivity, UV-visible scanning spectrum and molecular weight as the peptidoglycan standard. X12-PG could induce the production of apoptotic bodies observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. X12-PG could significantly induced the translocation of calreticulin (CRT and the release of high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1, the two notable hallmarks of immunogenic cell death (ICD, with the endoplastic reticulum (ER damaged and subsequently intracellular [Ca2+] elevated. Our findings implied that X12-PG could induce the ICD of HT-29 cells through targeting at the ER. The present results may enlighten the prospect of probiotics in the prevention of colon cancer.

  18. Characterization and expression analysis of a peptidoglycan recognition protein gene, SmPGRP2 in mucosal tissues of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) following bacterial challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linan; Gao, Chengbin; Liu, Fengqiao; Song, Lin; Su, Baofeng; Li, Chao

    2016-09-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition receptor proteins (PGRPs), a group of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), can recognize peptidoglycan (PGN) of the bacteria cell wall and play an important role in host immune defense against pathogen infection. They are highly structurally conserved through evolution, but with different function in innate immunity between invertebrates and vertebrates. In teleost fish, several PGRPs have been characterized recently. They have both amidase activity and bactericidal activity and are involved in indirectly killing bacteria and regulating multiple signaling pathways. However, the knowledge of PGRPs in mucosal immunity of teleost fish is still limited. In this study, we identified a PGRPs gene (SmPGRP2) of turbot and investigated its expression patterns in mucosal tissues after challenge with Gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus iniae and Gram-negative bacteria Vibrio anguillarum. Phylogenetic analysis showed the strongest relationship of turbot PGRP to halibut, which was consistent with their phylogenetic relationships. In addition, SmPGRP2 was ubiquitously expressed in turbot tissues, and constitutive expression levels were higher in classical immune tissues (including liver, spleen, and head-kidney) than mucosal tissues (intestine, gill and skin). After bacterial challenge, the expression of SmPGRP2 was induced and showed a general trend of up-regulation in mucosal tissues, except in intestine following V. anguillarum infection. These different expression patterns varied depending on both pathogen and tissue type, suggesting its distinct roles in the host immune response to bacterial pathogen. PMID:27461422

  19. Peptidoglycan recognition protein-S5 functions as a negative regulator of the antimicrobial peptide pathway in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kangkang; Zhou, Lin; Chen, Feng; Peng, Yachun; Lu, Zhiqiang

    2016-08-01

    Prophenoloxidase (proPO), immune deficiency (IMD), and Toll are the major signaling pathways leading to melanization and antimicrobial peptide production in insect hemolymph. Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) act as receptors and negative regulators in these pathways, and some PGRPs exhibit antimicrobial activity. Previously, we demonstrated that silkworm PGRP-S5 recognizes peptidoglycans (PGs) and triggers activation of the proPO pathway. It also acts as a bactericide, via its amidase activity (Chen et al., 2014). Here, we generated a C177S site-mutated silkworm PGRP-S5 protein that lacked amidase activity but retained its PG-binding capacity. Functional studies showed that the mutation caused loss of its receptor function for activation of the proPO pathway, suggesting that processing of PG by PGRP-S5 is necessary for formation of the pathway initiation complex. Further, we found that PGRP-S5 negatively regulates antimicrobial peptides generation in an amidase-dependent manner, likely through the IMD pathway. Thus, silkworm PGRP-S5 acts as a sensor, a modulator, and an effector in the silkworm humoral immune system. PMID:27012996

  20. Staphylococcus aureus: resistance pattern and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Naghavi-Behzad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has emerged as a nosocomial pathogen of major worldwide importance and is an increasingly frequent cause of community-acquired infections. In this study, different risk factors and MRSA resistance pattern were investigated. Methods: In a 24 months period, all of the patients who were confined to bed in the surgery ward were included in the study. Then they were assessed to find out as if they had MRSA infection when hospitalized and once when they were discharged. Almost 48 h after admission, when patients were discharged, social and medical histories were acquired. Acquired samples were examined. Results: During the present study of 475 patients, 108 patients (22.8% had S. aureus. About frequency of antibiotic resistance among collected S. aureus colonies, erythromycin resistance, was the most frequent antibiotic resistance, also resistance to vancomycin was 0.4% that was the least. Only hospitalization duration had statistically significant correlation with antibiotic resistance, also resistance to erythromycin had statistically significant relation with history of surgery and alcohol consumption. Of all 34 MRSA species, 22 (64.7% samples were resistant to erythromycin, 17 (50.0% resistant to cefoxitin, 5 (14.7% resistant to mupirocin, 1 (2.9% resistant to vancomycin and 1 (2.9% resistant to linezolid. Conclusion: The results of the current study show that among hospitalized patients, there is resistance against methicillin. Since based on results of the study there is resistance against oxacillin and erythromycin in most cases, administering appropriate antibiotics have an important role in minimizing the resistance burden among bacterial species.

  1. SABER - Tertiary Education Governance : Data Collection and Assessment Tool on Governance in Tertiary Education

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    Systems Assessment for Better Education Results (SABER) is designed to assess existing education policies of participating countries in order to enable comparisons between them and learning of best practices. The purpose of this background paper is to present SABER-Tertiary Education Governance, a tool for facilitating comparisons of both system-wide policies and practical implementation o...

  2. Unionism and Productivity in Nigerian Tertiary Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sunday I. Efanga

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This concept paper examined Unionism and productivity in Nigeria Tertiary institutions. The author(s have attempted to explore an issue, which through could be obvious to some, have significantly failed to capture scholarly attention. The paper explore the linkage between Trade Unions and productivity in higher education in Nigeria. The author observed that were there is agreement the productivity of staff are high; but where there is an infringement of rights, the disputes that result lead to academic disruptions and poor implementations of programmes. It was therefore, recommended that governments in Nigeria should acknowledge the important of collective bargaining as the central principle of industrial relations.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus bacteriuria as a prognosticator for outcome of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinstein Robert A

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When Staphylococcus aureus is isolated in urine, it is thought to usually represent hematogenous spread. Because such spread might have special clinical significance, we evaluated predictors and outcomes of S. aureus bacteriuria among patients with S. aureus bacteremia. Methods A case-control study was performed at John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County among adult inpatients during January 2002-December 2006. Cases and controls had positive and negative urine cultures, respectively, for S. aureus, within 72 hours of positive blood culture for S. aureus. Controls were sampled randomly in a 1:4 ratio. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were done. Results Overall, 59% of patients were African-American, 12% died, 56% of infections had community-onset infections, and 58% were infected with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA. Among 61 cases and 247 controls, predictors of S. aureus bacteriuria on multivariate analysis were urological surgery (OR = 3.4, p = 0.06 and genitourinary infection (OR = 9.2, p = 0.002. Among patients who died, there were significantly more patients with bacteriuria than among patients who survived (39% vs. 17%; p = 0.002. In multiple Cox regression analysis, death risks in bacteremic patients were bacteriuria (hazard ratio 2.9, CI 1.4-5.9, p = 0.004, bladder catheter use (2.0, 1.0-4.0, p = 0.06, and Charlson score (1.1, 1.1-1.3, p = 0.02. Neither length of stay nor methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection was a predictor of S. aureus bacteriuria or death. Conclusions Among patients with S. aureus bacteremia, those with S. aureus bacteriuria had 3-fold higher mortality than those without bacteriuria, even after adjustment for comorbidities. Bacteriuria may identify patients with more severe bacteremia, who are at risk of worse outcomes.

  4. Intracellular proliferation of S. aureus in osteoblasts and effects of rifampicin and gentamicin on S. aureus intracellular proliferation and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Mohamed

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is the most clinically relevant pathogen regarding implant-associated bone infection and its capability to invade osteoblasts is well known. The aim of this study was to investigate firstly whether S. aureus is not only able to invade but also to proliferate within osteoblasts, secondly to delineate the mechanism of invasion and thirdly to clarify whether rifampicin or gentamicin can inhibit intracellular proliferation and survival of S. aureus. The SAOS-2 osteoblast-like cell line and human primary osteoblasts were infected with S. aureus EDCC5055 and S. aureus Rosenbach 1884. Both S. aureus strains were able to invade efficiently and to proliferate within human osteoblasts. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed intracellular invasion of S. aureus and transmission electron microscopy images could demonstrate bacterial division as a sign of intracellular proliferation as well as cytosolic bacterial persistence. Cytochalasin D, the major actin depolymerisation agent, was able to significantly reduce S. aureus invasion, suggesting that invasion was enabled by promoting actin rearrangement at the cell surface. 7.5 μg/mL of rifampicin was able to inhibit bacterial survival in SAOS-2 cells with almost complete elimination of bacteria after 4 h. Gentamicin could also kill intracellular S. aureus in a dose-dependent manner, an effect that was significantly lower than that observed using rifampicin. In conclusion, S. aureus is not only able to invade but also to proliferate in osteoblasts. Invasion seems to be associated with actin rearrangement at the cell surface. Rifampicin is effective in intracellular eradication of S. aureus whereas gentamicin only poorly eliminates intracellularly replicating bacteria.

  5. Duplex Identification of Staphylococcus aureus by Aptamer and Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tianjun; Wang, Libo; Zhao, Kexu; Ge, Yu; He, Meng; Li, Gang

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the top common pathogen causing infections and food poisoning. Identification of S. aureus is crucial for the disease diagnosis and regulation of food hygiene. Herein, we report an aptamer-AuNPs based method for duplex identification of S. aureus. Using AuNPs as an indicator, SA23, an aptamer against S. aureus, can well identify its target from Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Furthermore, we find citrate-coated AuNPs can strongly bind to S. aureus, but not bind to Salmonella enterica and Proteus mirabilis, which leads to different color changes in salt solution. This colorimetric response is capable of distinguishing S. aureus from S. enteritidis and P. mirabilis. Thus, using the aptasensor and AuNPs together, S. aureus can be accurately identified from the common pathogens. This duplex identification system is a promising platform for simple visual identification of S. aureus. Additionally, in the aptasensing process, bacteria are incubated with aptamers and then be removed before the aptamers adding to AuNPs, which may avoid the interactions between bacteria and AuNPs. This strategy can be potentially applied in principle to detect other cells by AuNPs-based aptasensors. PMID:27427591

  6. Lysostaphin in treatment of neonatal Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluola, Okunola; Kong, Lingkun; Fein, Mindy; Weisman, Leonard E

    2007-06-01

    This study describes lysostaphin's effect against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus in suckling rats. Standard techniques determined minimal inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy. The numbers of surviving rats after vancomycin, oxacillin, and lysostaphin treatment were comparable and were different from that of controls (P < 0.00001). Lysostaphin appears effective in the treatment of neonatal S. aureus infection. PMID:17420212

  7. Susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to lysostaphin.

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, M M; Huber, T. W.

    1989-01-01

    One hundred and eleven isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus recovered from patients at the Olin E. Teague Veterans Center from March 1983 to April 1987 were as susceptible to lysis by lysostaphin as methicillin-susceptible S. aureus controls were.

  8. Mechanism of resistance to some cephalosporins in Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Kono, M; Sasatsu, M; O'Hara, K; Shiomi, Y.; HAYASAKA, T.

    1983-01-01

    The mechanism of resistance to some cephalosporins in Staphylococcus aureus strains was investigated with high-pressure liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Drug inactivation by penicillinase was found to be the main mechanism of resistance to cefazolin, cephaloridine, and cephalothin in S. aureus.

  9. Activity of and Resistance to Moxifloxacin in Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Ince, Dilek; Zhang, Xiamei; Hooper, David C.

    2003-01-01

    Moxifloxacin has enhanced potency against Staphylococcus aureus, lower propensity to select for resistant mutants, and higher bactericidal activity against highly resistant strains than ciprofloxacin. Despite similar activity against purified S. aureus topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase, it selects for topoisomerase IV mutants, making topoisomerase IV the preferred target in vivo.

  10. Changing Trends in Resistance Pattern of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Kali, Arunava; Stephen, Selvaraj; Umadevi, Sivaraman; Kumar, Shailesh; Joseph, Noyal Mariya; Srirangaraj, Sreenivasan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is associated with multidrug resistance, an aggressive course, increased mortality and morbidity in both community and health care facilities. Monitoring of newly emerging and prevalent Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains for their resistance patterns to conventional as well as novel drugs, are essential for infection control.

  11. Effect of Mupirocin on Nasal Carriage of Staphylococcus Aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Bulanda; M. Gruszka; B. Heczko

    1989-01-01

    textabstractMupirocin eliminates nasal carriage of staphylococcal aureus among medical and surgical personnel for periode varying from several weeks upto one year. In persons recolonized after therapy densites of S. aureus population in nares were much lower than in the same persons before therapy.

  12. Tertiary companions to close spectroscopic binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Tokovinin, A; Thomas, S; Udry, S

    2006-01-01

    We have surveyed a sample of 165 solar-type spectroscopic binaries (SB) with periods from 1 to 30 days for higher-order multiplicity. 62 targets have been observed with the NACO adaptive optics system and 13 new physical tertiary companions were detected. Another 12 new wide companions (5 still tentative) were retrieved from the 2MASS sky survey. Our binaries belong to 161 stellar systems; of these 64 are triple, 11 quadruple and 7 quintuple. After correction for incomplete detection, the fraction of SBs with additional companions is 63% +- 5%. We find that this fraction is a strong function of the SB period P, reaching 96% for P12d. Period distributions of SBs with and without tertiaries are significantly different, but their mass ratio distributions are identical. New statistical data on the multiplicity of close SBs indicate that their periods and mass ratios were established very early, but periods of SBs within triples were further shortened by angular momentum exchange with companions.

  13. A porcine model of haematogenous brain infectionwith staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Lærke Boye; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Nielsen, Ole Lerberg;

    2012-01-01

    A PORCINE MODEL OF HAEMATOGENOUS BRAIN INFECTION WITH STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS Astrup Lærke1, Agerholm Jørgen1, Nielsen Ole1, Jensen Henrik1, Leifsson Páll1, Iburg Tine2. 1: Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark boye@life.ku.dk 2: National Veterinary Institute......, Uppsala, Sweden Introduction Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) is a common cause of sepsis and brain abscesses in man and a frequent cause of porcine pyaemia. Here we present a porcine model of haematogenous S. aureus-induced brain infection. Materials and Methods Four pigs had two intravenous catheters...... inserted surgically, one in a. carotis communis and one in v. jugularis externa. All pigs received 106 CFU/kg body weight S. aureus through the arterial catheter. Bacteria were either suspended in isotonic saline infused at constant flow for 60 minutes (two pigs) or given as a bolus injection of autologoue...

  14. Antimicrobial drug resistance ofStaphylococcus aureus in dairy products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sasidharan S; Prema B; Yoga Latha L

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the prevalence of multidrug resistantStaphylococcus aureus(S. aureus) in dairy products.Methods:Isolation and identification ofS. aureus were performed in3 dairy-based food products. The isolates were tested for their susceptibility to5 different common antimicrobial drugs.Results:Of50 samples examined,5 (10%) were contaminated with S. aureus. Subsequently, the5 isolates were subjected to antimicrobial resistance pattern using five antibiotic discs (methicillin, vancomycin, kanamycin, chloramphenicol and tetracycline). Sample 29 showed resistance to methicillin and vancomycin. Sample18 showed intermediate response to tetracycline. The other samples were susceptible to all the antibiotics tested.Conclusions:The results provide preliminary data on sources of food contamination which may act as vehicles for the transmission of antimicrobial-resistantStaphylococcus.Therefore, it enables us to develop preventive strategies to avoid the emergence of new strains of resistantS. aureus.

  15. Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Sequence Type 398

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mette Theilgaard

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the nares and skin surfaces of several animal species, including man. S. aureus can cause a wide variety of infections ranging from superficial soft tissue and skin infections to severe and deadly systemic infections. Traditionally S...... for LA-MRSA ST398 survival on porcine skin and nasal epithelium ex vivo were identified. These genes could represent targets for de-colonization, which could help prevent further spread and adaption of LA-MRSA ST398. Manuscript III describes the construction of the S. aureus VirulenceFinder database....... The database can be applied for identification of virulence genes in S. aureus using whole genome 5 sequence data. The S. aureus VirulenceFinder will be part of the tool package generated for the Centre for Genomic Epidemiology (CGE) (www.genomicepidemiology.org)....

  16. Where does a Staphylococcus aureus vaccine stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, V G; Proctor, R A

    2014-05-01

    In this review, we examine the current status of Staphylococcus aureus vaccine development and the prospects for future vaccines. Examination of the clinical trials to date show that murine models have not predicted success in humans for active or passive immunization. A key factor in the failure to develop a vaccine to prevent S. aureus infections comes from our relatively limited knowledge of human protective immunity. More recent reports on the elements of the human immune response to staphylococci are analysed. In addition, there is some controversy concerning the role of antibodies for protecting humans, and these data are reviewed. From a review of the current state of understanding of staphylococcal immunity, a working model is proposed. Some new work has provided some initial candidate biomarker(s) to predict outcomes of invasive infections and to predict the efficacy of antibiotic therapy in humans. We conclude by looking to the future through the perspective of lessons gleaned from the clinical vaccine trials. PMID:24476315

  17. Comparison of Two Commercial PCR Methods for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Screening in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Aylin Aydiner; Jessica Lüsebrink; Verena Schildgen; Ingo Winterfeld; Oliver Knüver; Katja Schwarz; Sabine Messler; Oliver Schildgen; Frauke Mattner

    2012-01-01

    Nose/throat-swabs from 1049 patients were screened for MRSA using CHROMagar MRSA, LightCycler Advanced MRSA, and Detect-Ready MRSA. Results were compared to the CHROMagar MRSA results, which was set as reference system. MRSA was detected in 3.05% of the patients with CHROMagar MRSA. LightCycler MRSA Advanced showed a higher clinical sensitivity (84.38%) than Detect-Ready MRSA (57.69%).The negative predictive values were high for both tests (>98%). The specificity and the positive predictive v...

  18. Reporting of meticillin-resistant and -susceptible Staphylococcus aureus on death certificates in Irish hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, C J

    2011-02-01

    The documentation of infection with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on death certificates has been the subject of considerable public discussion. Using data from five tertiary referral hospitals in Ireland, we compared the documentation of MRSA and meticillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) on death certificates in those patients who died in hospital within 30 days of having MRSA or MSSA isolated from blood cultures. A total of 133 patients had MRSA or MSSA isolated from blood cultures within 30 days of death during the study period. One patient was excluded as the death certificate information was not available; the other 132 patients were eligible for inclusion. MRSA and MSSA were isolated from blood cultures in 59 (44.4%) and 74 (55.6%) cases respectively. One patient was included as a case in both categories as both MRSA and MSSA were isolated from a blood culture. In 15 (25.4%) of the 59 MRSA cases, MRSA was documented on the death certificate. In nine (12.2%) of the 74 patients with MSSA cases, MSSA was documented on the death certificate. MRSA was more likely to be documented on the death certificate than MSSA (odds ratio: 2.46; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-6.01; P < 0.05). These findings indicate that there may be inconsistencies in the way organisms and infections are documented on death certificates in Ireland and that death certification data may underestimate the mortality related to certain organisms. In particular, there appears to be an overemphasis by certifiers on the documentation of MRSA compared with MSSA.

  19. Isolation of MRSA, ESBL and AmpC – β -lactamases from Neonatal Sepsis at a Tertiary Care Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagarajan, Ravinder; Katragadda, Radhika; Leela, K.V.; Babu, R. Narayana

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The emergence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and extended spectrum β–lactamases (ESBLs) in neonatal intensive care unit patients is increasing. This study aims to find out the bacteriological profile in neonatal sepsis and study their antimicrobial susceptibility pattern including detection of MRSA and ESBLs. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted for a period of one and a half years from January 2010 to June 2011 in a tertiary care hospital in Chennai. A total of 182 blood samples were collected using sterile precautions. They were processed following standard laboratory protocol. Antibiogram was done using appropriate antibiotics by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Isolated Staphylococcus aureus were tested for methicillin resistance using Cefoxitin disc (30μg), ESBL was detected using combined disc method, MIC reduction and Polymerase chain reaction, metallobetalactamases using EDTA and Amp-C beta lactamases using AmpC disc test. C-reactive protein (CRP) was estimated for all the cases. Results: Out of the 182 cases, 110 (60.4%) were culture positive. Fifty five (63.9 %) of early onset sepsis cases had Gram negative bacteria (GNB) and 19 (79.1%) of late onset sepsis cases had Gram positive bacteria. Out of the total pathogens, 31 (28.1%) were Klebsiella pneumoniae and 30 (27%) were Staphylococcus aureus. 17 (56.6 %) of Staphylococcus aureus were found to be MRSA and they were 100% sensitive to Vancomycin. 33 (67.3%) of Enterobacteriaceae were ESBL producers. ESBL isolates were 100% sensitive to Imipenem. Three (6.1%) of Enterobacteriaceae were AmpC producers and 3 (27.2%) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were MBL producers. CRP was positive in 99 (54.3%) cases, out of which 94 (94.9%) were culture positive. Conclusion: Klebsiella spp. and Staphylococcus aureus were the commonest bacteria causing neonatal sepsis in this centre. Multidrug resistance among the isolates was common. Early diagnosis and

  20. Cross-border Tertiary Education : A Way towards Capacity Development

    OpenAIRE

    OECD; World Bank

    2007-01-01

    This report emphasizes that cross-border tertiary education refers to the movement of people, programs, providers, curricula, projects, research and services in tertiary (or higher) education across national jurisdictional borders. Cross-border education is a subset of educational internationalization and can be part of development cooperation projects, academic exchange programs and comme...

  1. Structural Diversity in Tertiary Education. Go8 Backgrounder 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    Projections of future population and tertiary education participation indicate that Australia needs soon to start planning for another surge in school leavers entering tertiary education from 2015, together with increased demand for greater skills deepening by adult workers. Hence it is necessary to find cost-effective supply solutions that…

  2. Tertiary Education in Sri Lanka: Issues and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    N. Tharmaseelan

    2007-01-01

    The paper reviews the contemporary issues and challenges faced by the Sri Lankan higher educational institutions and justify the need for immediate changes needed in the system. Based on survey conducted among the past graduates of Sri Lankan tertiary institution, it highlights the areas need improvement and suggests different models for various areas to enhance the quality in tertiary education.

  3. 10 CFR 212.78 - Tertiary incentive crude oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tertiary incentive crude oil. 212.78 Section 212.78 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL MANDATORY PETROLEUM PRICE REGULATIONS Producers of Crude Oil § 212.78 Tertiary incentive crude oil. Annual prepaid expenses report. By January 31 of each year after 1980, the...

  4. Crime and Crime Management in Nigeria Tertiary Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebanjo, Margaret Adewunmi

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines crime and its management in Nigerian tertiary institutions. Tertiary institutions today have become arenas for crime activities such as rape, cultism, murder, theft, internet fraud, drug abuse, and examination malpractices. This paper delves into what crime is, and its causes; and the positions of the law on crime management.…

  5. Efektivitas Ekstrak Daun Jambu Biji Buah Putih Terhadap Pertumbuhan Staphylococcus aureus Dari Abses Dan Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC® 29213™)

    OpenAIRE

    Sinurat, Jojor

    2016-01-01

    Daun jambu biji mengandung senyawa aktif seperti tanin, triterpenoid, flavonoid, saponin yang mempunyai efek antibakteri. Mekanisme tanin sebagai antibakteri dengan mengkerutkan dinding sel dan membran sel, inaktivasi enzim, inaktivasi fungsi materi genetik bakteri. Flavonoid merusak sel bakteri, denaturasi protein, inaktivasi enzim dan menyebabkan lisis. Triterpenoid dan saponin menghambat pertumbuhan Staphylococcus aureus dengan cara merusak struktur membran sel. Staphylococcus aureus adala...

  6. The Staphylococcus aureus Chaperone PrsA Is a New Auxiliary Factor of Oxacillin Resistance Affecting Penicillin-Binding Protein 2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousselin, Ambre; Manzano, Caroline; Biette, Alexandra; Reed, Patricia; Pinho, Mariana G; Rosato, Adriana E; Kelley, William L; Renzoni, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Expression of the methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) phenotype results from the expression of the extra penicillin-binding protein 2A (PBP2A), which is encoded by mecA and acquired horizontally on part of the SCCmec cassette. PBP2A can catalyze dd-transpeptidation of peptidoglycan (PG) because of its low affinity for β-lactam antibiotics and can functionally cooperate with the PBP2 transglycosylase in the biosynthesis of PG. Here, we focus upon the role of the membrane-bound PrsA foldase protein as a regulator of β-lactam resistance expression. Deletion of prsA altered oxacillin resistance in three different SCCmec backgrounds and, more importantly, caused a decrease in PBP2A membrane amounts without affecting mecA mRNA levels. The N- and C-terminal domains of PrsA were found to be critical features for PBP2A protein membrane levels and oxacillin resistance. We propose that PrsA has a role in posttranscriptional maturation of PBP2A, possibly in the export and/or folding of newly synthesized PBP2A. This additional level of control in the expression of the mecA-dependent MRSA phenotype constitutes an opportunity to expand the strategies to design anti-infective agents. PMID:26711778

  7. Spectrum of Microbial Flora in Diabetic Foot Ulcer and Its Antibiotic Sensitivity Pattern in Tertiary Care Hospital in Ahmedabad, Gujarat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Jain

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A Prospective study “Spectrum of Microbial flora in diabetic foot ulcer and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern” was carried out in a tertiary care hospital, Ahmedabad on 125 patients in which 85 were male patients and 40 were female patients. Material and Methods: Swabs samples were collected from the edge and margins of ulcers and organism were identified by gram staining culture and biochemical reactions. Results: Out of 125 specimens 108 specimens showed growth of organisms. Total 157 aerobic organisms were isolated from culture positive specimens. It represents an average of 1.25 organisms per case. Among these organisms, 130 gram negative and 27 gram positive organisms were isolated. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.57% was predominant organism followed by Klebsiella spp. (22.29%. Staphylococcus aureus were 12.74% in which Methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA was 55%. Conclusion: incidence of growth was 86.4% in which Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.57% is most common isolate. Organisms in mixed infections showed multidrug resistance as compared to single isolated strain. Diabetic foot infections are polymicrobial in nature. As the Wagner’s grade increased, the prevalence of isolates also increased. [National J of Med Res 2012; 2(3.000: 354-357

  8. CHANGING TRENDS OF ANTIBIOGRAM PROFILE IN PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY ACQUIRED CHRONIC OTITIS MEDIA IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipasa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available : INTRODUCTION: Chronic otitis media (COM is one among the commonest otological diseases encountered in otorhinolaryngological practice and attending ENT OPD especially among the lower socio-economic strata of society. AIMS: This study was carried out to know about the aerobic bacterial flora causing COM and in-vitro antibiotic susceptibility pattern in order to scientifically guide patient management instead of relying on empirical therapy alone. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study included 100 patients of community acquired COM attending ENT OPD of a tertiary care level hospital. After proper sample collection by sterile aural swabs, they were immediately sent to the microbiology laboratory for processing by aerobic culture, isolation and identification following standard recommended methods and antibiotic susceptibility tests were done by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion methods as per Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. RESULTS: Out of 100 cases of COM, microbiological culture yielded 101 bacterial isolates from 90 patients and 4 fungal isolates (3 isolates of Candida albicans and 1 isolate of Aspergillusfumigatus from 4 patients. Polymicrobial infections were seen in 11.11% patients. In this study Staphylococcus aureus (31.68% was the commonest isolate followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (23.76%. Other common bacterial isolates were E.coli, Klebsiellapneumoniae, coagulase negative Staphylococcus (CONS, Proteus mirabilis in descending order. Piperacillin-tazobactum was the most sensitive drug (85.45% among the gram-negative bacteria followed by meropenem (81.81%, amikacin (76.36% and levofloxacin (74.54%. Gram positive bacteria showed 100% sensitivity to vancomycin and 93.47% sensitivity to linezolid. For Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA isolates ciprofloxacin, cotrimoxazole, tetracycline, linezolid and vancomycin were found to have good activity. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that the common etiological

  9. Colorimetric method for rapid detection of Oxacillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus and its comparison with PCR for mec A gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanwate, Niraj; Thakare, Prashant; Bhise, P R; Gawande, Sonali

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and accurate detection of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important role of clinical microbiology laboratories to avoid treatment failure. The detection of MRSA is based on phenotypic assays which require at least 24 h to perform. Detection of the mecA gene or of PBP 2a is the "gold standard", but not always available. The aim of this study was to evaluate a rapid method for detection of MRSA by using 3 (4, 5 dimethyl thiazole -2-yl) -2, 5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT). Total 126 isolates of MRSA were collected from tertiary healthcare center and were confirmed by oxacillin screening agar test as per CLSI guidelines. Amplification of mecA gene was performed by using PCR. MTT assay was carried out for all the isolates in 96 well Microtitre plate and compared with standard methods of CLSI. Out of 126 isolates, 98 were found to be mecA positive. MTT method was found to be 98.98% sensitive and 96.43% specific. The MTT based colorimetric method is rapid and simple test for screening of oxacillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. It significantly shortens the time to just 7 h required to obtained a drug susceptibility test and could be useful to screen MRSA. PMID:26960268

  10. The molecular changing mechanism of Ampicillin-Sulbactam resistant Staphylococcus aureus towards Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieke Hemiawati Satari

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the molecular changing of S.aureus, which is resistant to Ampicillin-Sulbactam and then become resistant to Methicillin as a result of improper dosage. The study was conducted by isolating Ampicillin-Sulbactam resistant and Methicillin Resistant S.aureus (MRSA, afterwards an amplification process was performed by PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction. to isolate the betalactamase enzyme regulator and PBP 2a genes. The result of this research showed that there were a deletion of few amino acids from the regulator gene, and a suspicion that the DNA sequence had been substituted from PBP 2 gene into PBP 2a (gen mec. This process had formed MRSA.

  11. Indole and 7-benzyloxyindole attenuate the virulence of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Cho, Hyun Seob; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Jung-Ae; Banskota, Suhrid; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2013-05-01

    Human pathogens can readily develop drug resistance due to the long-term use of antibiotics that mostly inhibit bacterial growth. Unlike antibiotics, antivirulence compounds diminish bacterial virulence without affecting cell viability and thus, may not lead to drug resistance. Staphylococcus aureus is a major agent of nosocomial infections and produces diverse virulence factors, such as the yellow carotenoid staphyloxanthin, which promotes resistance to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the host immune system. To identify novel antivirulence compounds, bacterial signal indole present in animal gut and diverse indole derivatives were investigated with respect to reducing staphyloxanthin production and the hemolytic activity of S. aureus. Treatment with indole or its derivative 7-benzyloxyindole (7BOI) caused S. aureus to become colorless and inhibited its hemolytic ability without affecting bacterial growth. As a result, S. aureus was more easily killed by hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and by human whole blood in the presence of indole or 7BOI. In addition, 7BOI attenuated S. aureus virulence in an in vivo model of nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which is readily infected and killed by S. aureus. Transcriptional analyses showed that both indole and 7BOI repressed the expressions of several virulence genes such as α-hemolysin gene hla, enterotoxin seb, and the protease genes splA and sspA and modulated the expressions of the important regulatory genes agrA and sarA. These findings show that indole derivatives are potential candidates for use in antivirulence strategies against persistent S. aureus infection. PMID:23318836

  12. The changing epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galbraith, J.C.; Valiquette, G.; Kennedy, K.J.;

    2013-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect ABSTRACT: Although the epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) has been changing, international comparisons are lacking. We sought to determine the incidence of S. aureus BSI and assess trends over time and by region. Population-based surveillance...... episodes of S. aureus BSI were identified. The overall annual incidence rate for S. aureus BSI was 26.1 per 100 000 population, and those for methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were 24.2 and 1.9 per 100 000, respectively. Although the overall incidence...... of community-onset MSSA BSI (15.0 per 100 000) was relatively similar across regions, the incidence rates of hospital-onset MSSA (9.2 per 100 000), community-onset MRSA (1.0 per 100 000) and hospital-onset MRSA (0.8 per 100 000) BSI varied substantially. Whereas the overall incidence of S. aureus BSI did...

  13. Tertiary nuclear burning - neutron star deflagration?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A motivation is presented for the idea that dense nuclear matter can burn to a new class of stable particles. One of several possibilities is an octet particle which is the 16 baryon extension of alpha particle, but now composed of a pair of each of the two nucleons, (3Sigma, Delta, and 2Xi). Such tertiary nuclear burning (here primary is H-He and secondary is He-Fe) may lead to neutron star explosions rather than collapse to a black hole, analogous to some Type I supernovae models wherein accreting white dwarfs are pushed over the Chandrasekhar mass limit but explode rather than collapse to form neutron stars. Such explosions could possibly give gamma-ray bursts and power quasars, with efficient particle acceleration in the resultant relativistic shocks. The new stable particles themselves could possibly be the sought-after weakly interacting, massive particles (WIMPs) or dark' matter. 26 references

  14. MATERNAL MORTALITY IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpreet

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Maternal Mortality in A Tertiary Care Centre. OBJECTIVE: To study maternal mortality and the complications leading to maternal death. METHODS: A retrospective study of hospital record to study maternal mortality and its causes over 3 years from January 2010 to December 2012. RESULTS: There were a total of 58 maternal deaths out of 2823 live births giving a maternal mortality ratio of 2054.55 per one lakh live births. Unbooked and late referrals account for 77.58% of maternal deaths. The majority of deaths around 75.86% were in 20-30 years age group. Haemorrhage was the commonest causes of death (24.12% followed by sepsis (18.96% and pregnancy induced hypertension 15.51% Anemia contributed to the most common indirect cause of maternal morality. CONCLUSION: Haemorrhage, sepsis and pregnancy induced hypertension including eclampsia were the direct major causes of death. Anaemia and cardiac diseases were other indirect causes of death.

  15. A study of the effects of different disinfectants used in Riyadh hospitals and their efficacy against Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and the means of controlling it, continue to be of major interest to the healthcare community. The bactericidal activity of some disinfectants which are in common use in seven major tertiary care hospitals in Riyadh was tested against two control strains of S.aureus, namely MRSA ATCC 33591 and Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) ATCC 29213. The disinfectants tested in this study were a group used for hand antisepsis (Purell, EZ-clean, Cida stat and Manorapid Synergy) and another group used for environmental disinfection (Combi spray, Tristel fusion, Alphadine, Isopropanol, Presept and Diesin). Presept, diesin and tristel fusion had a remarkable effect on the tested strains, both methicillin sensitive and methicillin resistant. There was hardly any noticeable difference between the effects on either (P>0.05). On the other hand, Purell and EZ-clean and Manorapid Synergy hand rubs had a relatively weak action after 15 and 30 minutes while their effect was better after 1 and 2 hours. There was no observable differences between their effects on MRSA or MSSA, P>0.05. Cita stat had a remarkably pronounced effect against both MRSA and MSSA. Contrary to some previous reports, this study has proven also that chlorhexidine and quaternary ammonium compounds show comparable efficacy against both MRSA and MSSA. (author)

  16. Staphylococcus aureus: portadores entre manipuladores de alimentos Staphylococcus aureus: food handler carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Stella Gonçalves Raddi

    1988-02-01

    Full Text Available Foram colhidas amostras de mãos e fossas nasais de 48 manipuladores de alimentos das principais casas comerciais da cidade de Araraquara, Estado de São Paulo (Brasil, e de 20 estudantes universitários. Dentre os indivíduos foram encontrados 44,1% e 34,8% que portavam Staphylococcus aureus em fossas nasais e mãos, respectivamente. Observou-se predomínio de fagotipos dos grupos I e III. Dos 12 portadores do microrganismo, concomitantemente em mãos e fossas nasais, 75,0% apresentaram cepas com vínculo epidemiológico. Os achados mostram o risco potencial representado pelas mãos nas intoxicações alimentares.Material was collected from the hands and nasal passages of forty-eight food handlers and twenty college students of Araraquara (S. Paulo State, Brazil and analized in order to evaluate the carrier function with regard to Staphylococcus aureus. The organism discovered in both samples of nine out of the twelve volunteers were of the same S. aureus phage types. The incidence of carriage on the hands was much greater in the handlers' group. These findings demonstrate the potential risk represented by hands in the transmission of food poisoning.

  17. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Leif Percival; Nielsen, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    increase the risk of contaminating hands, arms and the front of the uniform. Hand hygiene is therefore essential, but the use of protection gowns with long sleeves is also important in order to prevent transmission of MRSA. After culture of MRSA and implementation of specific precautions to prevent......INTRODUCTION: Even though methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common cause of nosocomial infections, it may often be difficult to evaluate the exact route of transmission. METHODS: In this study, we describe four cases of nosocomial transmission of MRSA in a hospital with a low...... transmission of MRSA, no further transmissions were observed. FUNDING: not relevant. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The data in this study are included in the routine surveillance of MRSA at Rigshospitalet and do not form part of a trial....

  18. Cord factor and peptidoglycan recapitulate the Th17-promoting adjuvant activity of mycobacteria through mincle/CARD9 signaling and the inflammasome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenderov, Kevin; Barber, Daniel L; Mayer-Barber, Katrin D; Gurcha, Sudagar S; Jankovic, Dragana; Feng, Carl G; Oland, Sandy; Hieny, Sara; Caspar, Pat; Yamasaki, Sho; Lin, Xin; Ting, Jenny P-Y; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Besra, Gurdyal S; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Sher, Alan

    2013-06-01

    Although adjuvants are critical vaccine components, their modes of action are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which the heat-killed mycobacteria in CFA promote Th17 CD4(+) T cell responses. We found that IL-17 secretion by CD4(+) T cells following CFA immunization requires MyD88 and IL-1β/IL-1R signaling. Through measurement of Ag-specific responses after adoptive transfer of OTII cells, we confirmed that MyD88-dependent signaling controls Th17 differentiation rather than simply production of IL-17. Additional experiments showed that CFA-induced Th17 differentiation involves IL-1β processing by the inflammasome, as mice lacking caspase-1, ASC, or NLRP3 exhibit partially defective responses after immunization. Biochemical fractionation studies further revealed that peptidoglycan is the major component of heat-killed mycobacteria responsible for inflammasome activation. By assaying Il1b transcripts in the injection site skin of CFA-immunized mice, we found that signaling through the adaptor molecule caspase activation and recruitment domain 9 (CARD9) plays a major role in triggering pro-IL-1β expression. Moreover, we demonstrated that recognition of the mycobacterial glycolipid trehalose dimycolate (cord factor) by the C-type lectin receptor mincle partially explains this CARD9 requirement. Importantly, purified peptidoglycan and cord factor administered in mineral oil synergized to recapitulate the Th17-promoting activity of CFA, and, as expected, this response was diminished in caspase-1- and CARD9-deficient mice. Taken together, these findings suggest a general strategy for the rational design of Th17-skewing adjuvants by combining agonists of the CARD9 pathway with inflammasome activators. PMID:23630357

  19. Bovine Staphylococcus aureus: Subtyping, evolution, and zoonotic transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, R; Cosandey, A; Luini, M; Artursson, K; Bardiau, M; Breitenwieser, F; Hehenberger, E; Lam, Th; Mansfeld, M; Michel, A; Mösslacher, G; Naskova, J; Nelson, S; Podpečan, O; Raemy, A; Ryan, E; Salat, O; Zangerl, P; Steiner, A; Graber, H U

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is globally one of the most important pathogens causing contagious mastitis in cattle. Previous studies using ribosomal spacer (RS)-PCR, however, demonstrated in Swiss cows that Staph. aureus isolated from bovine intramammary infections are genetically heterogeneous, with Staph. aureus genotype B (GTB) and GTC being the most prominent genotypes. Furthermore, Staph. aureus GTB was found to be contagious, whereas Staph. aureus GTC and all the remaining genotypes were involved in individual cow disease. In addition to RS-PCR, other methods for subtyping Staph. aureus are known, including spa typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). They are based on sequencing the spa and various housekeeping genes, respectively. The aim of the present study was to compare the 3 analytic methods using 456 strains of Staph. aureus isolated from milk of bovine intramammary infections and bulk tanks obtained from 12 European countries. Furthermore, the phylogeny of animal Staph. aureus was inferred and the zoonotic transfer of Staph. aureus between cattle and humans was studied. The analyzed strains could be grouped into 6 genotypic clusters, with CLB, CLC, and CLR being the most prominent ones. Comparing the 3 subtyping methods, RS-PCR showed the highest resolution, followed by spa typing and MLST. We found associations among the methods but in many cases they were unsatisfactory except for CLB and CLC. Cluster CLB was positive for clonal complex (CC)8 in 99% of the cases and typically positive for t2953; it is the cattle-adapted form of CC8. Cluster CLC was always positive for tbl 2645 and typically positive for CC705. For CLR and the remaining subtypes, links among the 3 methods were generally poor. Bovine Staph. aureus is highly clonal and a few clones predominate. Animal Staph. aureus always evolve from human strains, such that every human strain may be the ancestor of a novel animal-adapted strain. The zoonotic transfer of IMI- and milk-associated strains

  20. Identification of the ClpX Regulon in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Ingmer, Hanne;

    Staphyloccous aureus is a major human pathogen capable of causing a wide spectrum of infections ranging from superficial wound infections to life-threatening endocarditis and toxic shock syndrome. Essential for S. aureus virulence is a large number of cell-surface-associated proteins and secreted...... we show here that almost 400 genes (15%) are influenced by the clpX deletion. Furthermore, ClpX not only regulates many virulence factors, but rather serves as a global regulator of central functions for S. aureus lifestyle and pathogenicity....

  1. Separation of Staphylococcus aureus causing serious infections by electrophoretic techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tesařová, Marie; Horká, Marie; Moravcová, Dana; Šťavíková, Lenka; Růžička, F.

    2014. s. 237-238. [Chemtech /14./. 22.10.2014-25.10.2014, Istambul] R&D Projects: GA MV VG20112015021 Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : Staphylococcus aureus * electrophoretic techniques Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  2. Improving Diagnosis and Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus Infections : Experimental Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van den Berg (Sanne)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a variety of infections, ranging from mild skin infections like furuncles and impetigo, to severe, lifethreatening infections including endocarditis, osteomyelitis and pneumonia. Invasive infections are freq

  3. S. aureus bacteria : a new target of serum calcification activity

    OpenAIRE

    Dy, Diane Jazmin

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus are gram- positive bacteria that cause skin and soft tissue infections. The continual incidence of infection is of great concern especially with the advent of methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Continued investigation on mechanisms our body uses to fight bacterial infection is vital. Our study suggests that the body takes advantage of a mechanism that mineralizes type-I collagen of bone and tendon to also mineralize bacteria. Serum driven bacterial mineralization ma...

  4. Comparative Pharmacodynamics of Gentamicin against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa†

    OpenAIRE

    Tam, Vincent H.; Kabbara, Samer; Vo, Giao; Schilling, Amy N.; Coyle, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    Aminoglycosides are often used to treat severe infections with gram-positive organisms. Previous studies have shown concentration-dependent killing by aminoglycosides of gram-negative bacteria, but limited data are available for gram-positive bacteria. We compared the in vitro pharmacodynamics of gentamicin against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Five S. aureus strains were examined (ATCC 29213 and four clinical isolates). Time-kill studies (TKS) in duplicate (baseline inocu...

  5. Role of Monocytes in Experimental Staphylococcus aureus Endocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    Veltrop, Marcel H. A. M.; Bancsi, Maurice J. L. M. F.; Bertina, Rogier M.; Thompson, Jan

    2000-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of bacterial endocarditis (BE), the clotting system plays a cardinal role in the formation and maintenance of the endocardial vegetations. The extrinsic pathway is involved in the activation of the coagulation pathway with tissue factor (TF) as the key protein. Staphylococcus aureus is a frequently isolated bacterium from patients with BE. We therefore investigated whether S. aureus can induce TF activity (TFA) on fibrin-adherent monocytes, used as an in vitro model of BE....

  6. Vancomycin Resistance Pattern of Staphylococcus Aureus among Clinical Samples

    OpenAIRE

    S Saadat; K Solhjoo; A. Kazemi; Erfanian, S. (MSc); Ashrafian, F. (MSc)

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: Vancomycin is used for treatment of methicillin-resistant S. Aureus (MRSA) infections; therefore, resistance to this antibiotic is increasing. We aimed to determine the antibiotic resistance pattern and frequency of vancomycin resistant S. Areas (VRSA) strains isolated from clinical samples. Material and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 100 S. Aureus isolates collected from hospitals in Shiraz during six months, 2012, were identified by biochemical, microbiolo...

  7. AKTIVITAS ANTIBAKTERI KITOSAN TERHADAP BAKTERI S.aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Mardiyah Kurniasih; Dwi Kartika

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan is the N-deacetylated derivative of chitin. Chitosan is biodegradable, biocompatible and non-toxic. Chitosan is polycationic in acidic media and give antibacterial activity. In this paper, antibacterial activity of chitosan have been studied. Chitosan had been isolated from white shrimp. Antibacterial activity of chitosan solutions was examined against S. aureus The result showed that antimicrobial effect on S. aureus was strengthened as the choitosan concentrate decreased.

  8. Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms to reactive discharge gases

    OpenAIRE

    Traba, Christian; Liang, Jun F.

    2011-01-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms at solid-liquid interfaces creates numerous problems in both industrial and biomedical sciences. In this study, the susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms to discharge gas generated from plasma was tested. It was found that despite distinct chemical/physical properties, discharge gases from oxygen, nitrogen, and argon demonstrated very potent and almost the same anti-biofilm activity. The bacterial cells in S. aureus biofilms were killed (>99.9%) by d...

  9. Resistance to Antimicrobials Mediated by Efflux Pumps in Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Isabel Couto; Leonard Amaral; José Melo-Cristino; Miguel Viveiros; Cláudia Palma; Elisabete Junqueira; Costa, Sofia S.

    2013-01-01

    Resistance mediated by efflux has been recognized in Staphylococcus aureus in the last few decades, although its clinical relevance has only been recognized recently. The existence of only a few studies on the individual and overall contribution of efflux to resistance phenotypes associated with the need of well-established methods to assess efflux activity in clinical isolates contributes greatly to the lack of solid knowledge of this mechanism in S. aureus. This study aims to provide inform...

  10. Methicillin resistance & inducible clindamycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Soumyadeep Ghosh; Mandira Banerjee

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates with inducible clindamycin resistance (iCR) are resistant to erythromycin and sensitive to clindamycin on routine testing and inducible clindamycin resistance can only be identified by D-test. This study was aimed to detect methicillin resistance and iCR among S. aureus isolates, effectiveness of some commonly used antibiotics and correlation between methicillin resistance and iCR. Methods: The present cro...

  11. Detection and characterization of mupirocin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, D A; Zarins, L T; Schaberg, D R; Bradley, S. F.; Terpenning, M S; Kauffman, C A

    1993-01-01

    Fourteen mupirocin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains were isolated over 18 months; 12 exhibited low-level resistance, while two showed high-level resistance. Highly mupirocin-resistant strains contained a large plasmid which transferred mupirocin resistance to other S. aureus strains and to Staphylococcus epidermidis. This plasmid and pAM899-1, a self-transferable gentamicin resistance plasmid, have molecular and biologic similarities.

  12. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Ocular Infection in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Yu-Chuan; Hsiao, Ching-Hsi; Yeh, Lung-Kun; Ma, David H. K.; Chen, Phil Y. F.; Lin, Hsin-Chiung; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Chen, Hung-Chi; Chen, Shin-Yi; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is an important public health issue. This observational study aimed to characterize clinical features, antibiotic susceptibility, and genotypes of ocular infections caused by MRSA based on the clinical and molecular definitions of community-associated (CA) and healthcare-associated (HA) strains. Fifty-nine patients with culture-proven S aureus ocular infection were enrolled from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2011 at Chang...

  13. Resistance to Antimicrobials Mediated by Efflux Pumps in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Couto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Resistance mediated by efflux has been recognized in Staphylococcus aureus in the last few decades, although its clinical relevance has only been recognized recently. The existence of only a few studies on the individual and overall contribution of efflux to resistance phenotypes associated with the need of well-established methods to assess efflux activity in clinical isolates contributes greatly to the lack of solid knowledge of this mechanism in S. aureus. This study aims to provide information on approaches useful to the assessment and characterization of efflux activity, as well as contributing to our understanding of the role of efflux to phenotypes of antibiotic resistance and biocide tolerance in S. aureus clinical isolates. The results described show that efflux is an important contributor to fluoroquinolone resistance in S. aureus and suggest it as a major mechanism in the early stages of resistance development. We also show that efflux plays an important role on the reduced susceptibility to biocides in S. aureus, strengthening the importance of this long neglected resistance mechanism to the persistence and proliferation of antibiotic/biocide-resistant S. aureus in the hospital environment.

  14. Photoreactivation of ultraviolet-irradiation damage in Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports the capacity of Staphylococcus aureus strain 7 - 8 to undergo photoenzymatic repair of UV-irradiation induced damage and compares it to the photoreactivation (PR) response of Escherichia coli strain B. Staphylococcus aureaus showed greater inhibition by UV irradiation than E. coli, consistent with its higher adenine and thymine content of DNA. Staphylococcus aureus showed an enhanced rate of photoreactivation with no lag in initiation of the PR response at low PR doses compared to E. coli. Maximum PR capacity of both cultures was about equal and occurred in cultures incubated at 23 - 250. The PR responses at 11 - 12 and 35 - 370 for S. aureus and E. coli differed although both were capable of PR at each of these temperatures. The PR response of E. coli was directly related to the dosage of PR light (J/m2); however, the photoenzymatic capacity of S. aureus was not directly responsive to continued decrease in light intensity. The capacity of S. aureus to undergo liquid holding recovery (LHR) occurred at 23 - 250 (not at 11 - 120 or 35 - 370), whereas E. coli underwent LHR at 11 - 120 and 23 - 250 but not at 35 - 370. The LHR response of S. aureus was somewhat more effective than E. coli and did not show the direct response to increased liquid-holding period as did E. coli. (author)

  15. Staphylococcus aureus – antimicrobial resistance and the immunocompromised child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNeil JC

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available J Chase McNeilDepartment of Pediatrics, Section of Infectious Diseases, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USAAbstract: Children with immunocompromising conditions represent a unique group for the acquisition of antimicrobial resistant infections due to their frequent encounters with the health care system, need for empiric antimicrobials, and immune dysfunction. These infections are further complicated in that there is a relative paucity of literature on the clinical features and management of Staphylococcus aureus infections in immunocompromised children. The available literature on the clinical features, antimicrobial susceptibility, and management of S. aureus infections in immunocompromised children is reviewed. S. aureus infections in children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are associated with higher HIV viral loads and a greater degree of CD4 T-cell suppression. In addition, staphylococcal infections in children with HIV often exhibit a multidrug resistant phenotype. Children with cancer have a high rate of S. aureus bacteremia and associated complications. Increased tolerance to antiseptics among staphylococcal isolates from pediatric oncology patients is an emerging area of research. The incidence of S. aureus infections among pediatric solid organ transplant recipients varies considerably by the organ transplanted; in general however, staphylococci figure prominently among infections in the early posttransplant period. Staphylococcal infections are also prominent pathogens among children with a number of immunodeficiencies, notably chronic granulomatous disease. Significant gaps in knowledge exist regarding the epidemiology and management of S. aureus infection in these vulnerable children.Keywords: pediatric, HIV, cancer, transplant

  16. Determining of antibiotic resistance profile inStaphylococcus aureus isolates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hossein Motamedi; Hadis Mirzabeigi; Tahere Shirali

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To determine the pattern of antibiotic resistance amongStaphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) isolates from clinical specimens and to identify community-acquired methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus(CA-MRSA)in specimens that have been collected from patients referring to one of the hospitals of Ahvaz.Methods:S. aureus isolates from a hospital in Ahvaz were screened for resistance to various antibiotics including methicillin. The susceptibility of the isolates was determined by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. TheMRSA was also treated with ethidium bromide to find the origin of resistance.Results: Among the bacterial isolates, all of 11S. aureus were resistant to methicillin and cefixime,2 were resistant to ciprofloxacine,6 were resistant to tetracycline and the reminder were sensitive or intermediate to other antibiotics. The treated isolates were reminded resistant to methicillin and this suggested that the plasmid was not the origin of resistance in these isolates.Conclusions: These results showed that infection due toMRSA is widespread in Ahvaz and with respect to the spread of vancomycin resistance among MRSA and appearance of overwhelming infections. It is necessary to identify continuously the profile of antibiotic resistance amongS. aureus isolates in other regions and finding appropriate antibiotic for infection control and eradication.

  17. Clinical impact of antimicrobial resistance in European hospitals: excess mortality and length of hospital stay related to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    de Kraker, Marlieke E A

    2011-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is threatening the successful management of nosocomial infections worldwide. Despite the therapeutic limitations imposed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), its clinical impact is still debated. The objective of this study was to estimate the excess mortality and length of hospital stay (LOS) associated with MRSA bloodstream infections (BSI) in European hospitals. Between July 2007 and June 2008, a multicenter, prospective, parallel matched-cohort study was carried out in 13 tertiary care hospitals in as many European countries. Cohort I consisted of patients with MRSA BSI and cohort II of patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) BSI. The patients in both cohorts were matched for LOS prior to the onset of BSI with patients free of the respective BSI. Cohort I consisted of 248 MRSA patients and 453 controls and cohort II of 618 MSSA patients and 1,170 controls. Compared to the controls, MRSA patients had higher 30-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.4) and higher hospital mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 3.5). Their excess LOS was 9.2 days. MSSA patients also had higher 30-day (aOR = 2.4) and hospital (aHR = 3.1) mortality and an excess LOS of 8.6 days. When the outcomes from the two cohorts were compared, an effect attributable to methicillin resistance was found for 30-day mortality (OR = 1.8; P = 0.04), but not for hospital mortality (HR = 1.1; P = 0.63) or LOS (difference = 0.6 days; P = 0.96). Irrespective of methicillin susceptibility, S. aureus BSI has a significant impact on morbidity and mortality. In addition, MRSA BSI leads to a fatal outcome more frequently than MSSA BSI. Infection control efforts in hospitals should aim to contain infections caused by both resistant and susceptible S. aureus.

  18. The policy determinants of investment in tertiary education

    OpenAIRE

    Joaquim Oliveira Martins; Romina Boarini; Hubert Strauss; Christine de la Maisonneuve

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss how policies can affect investment in tertiary education in ways that would eliminate some of the perceived shortcomings of existing systems, while preserving or (preferably) enhancing equality of access to higher education. To this end, the analysis focuses on the institutional set-up of tertiary education that provides incentives for supplying quality educational services; the private returns from higher education which act to attract prospective st...

  19. Mineral resources of the Tertiary deposits of Spain

    OpenAIRE

    García del Cura, M. Ángeles; Cristino J. Dabrio; Ordóñez Delgado, Salvador

    1996-01-01

    Spain is the most self-sufficient country for minerals in the EsU. A major proportion of these Spanish mineral resources has been oblained from Tertiary material-. The main material exploited in Tertiary basins have been: brown coal and lignites, potassium salts, sodium salts (sulphates and chlorides), diátomite, sepiolite and other absorbent days, bentonites, celestine. pumíce and also dimension (building) stones and ceramícs, portland cement and plaster raw materials. Pb-...

  20. Study of feasibility of daycare surgery in tertiary health center

    OpenAIRE

    Hedawoo, J. B.; Amrin Sheikh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study the feasibility of daycare surgery in a tertiary care center. Background: Day care surgery is advantageous to patient in terms of early recovery less hospital stay, less rate of complications. Now a-days number of day care surgeries has increased and nearly 50 percent surgeries in western countries are done on daycare basis. Methods: This is Hospital Based observational study carried out in Department of Surgery in tertiary care center over the period from August 2013 to Novembe...

  1. Career Entry and Success After Tertiary Vocational Education

    OpenAIRE

    Regula Geel; Uschi Backes-Gellner

    2011-01-01

    Using the Swiss Graduate Survey, we study how the type of tertiary education an individual chooses (i.e., vocational or academic) influences career entry and labor market success after graduation. Our results show that vocational graduates face less risky career entry than academic graduates. Considering endogenous educational choice by using parental education as an instrument, we find higher returns for vocational tertiary education. In the longer term, initial educational type effects disa...

  2. Reviews of National Policies for Education : Tertiary Education in Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Mogollón, Maria Paulina; Crawford, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Tertiary education in Chile has been transformed radically over the past 20 years. As recently as 1990, tertiary education was an elite system centered on a handful of traditional universities which served a small number of well-prepared students. Today the system is diverse and dynamic, with over 6,000 programs of study offered by more than 200 institutions. More than 800,000 students are...

  3. Positive and negative impact of increased tertiary attainment

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The theory of human capital clearly states that the investments into the education bring many benefits and are worth the cost. The OECD Education at a Glance analysis provides support for both public and private investing in tertiary education as the net present value is positive for all observed countries. Considering the benefits of education, a growth in tertiary education should be viewed very positively. In this context, the European Strategy Europe 2020 set up one of its main goals for ...

  4. The Transition to Tertiary Education and Parental Background over Time

    OpenAIRE

    Riphahn, Regina; Schieferdecker, Florian

    2008-01-01

    Using SOEP data (1984-2006) we analyze the role of parental background for transitions to tertiary education in Germany and answer three questions: (a) does the relevance of parental background shift from short-term (contemporary income) to long factors (ability, parental education) at higher levels of education? (b) Did the impact of parental background on participation in tertiary education change over time? (c) Are there different patterns by sex and region? We consider panel estimators wi...

  5. Mining Tertiary Structural Motifs for Assessment of Designability

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jian; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2013-01-01

    The observation of a limited secondary-structural alphabet in native proteins, with significant sequence preferences, has profoundly influenced the fields of protein design and structure prediction (Simons et al., 1997; Verschueren et al., 2011). In the era of structural genomics, as the size of the structural dataset continues to grow rapidly, it is becoming possible to extend this analysis to tertiary structural motifs and their sequences. For a hypothetical tertiary motif, the rate of its ...

  6. Challenges with Tertiary-Level Mechatronic Fluid Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dransfield, Peter; Conrad, Finn

    1996-01-01

    As authors we take the view that mechatronics, as it relates to fluid power, has three levels which we designate as primary, secondary and tertiary. A brief review of the current status of fluid power, hydraulic and pneumatic, and of electronic control of it is presented and discussed. The focus is...... then on tertiary-level mechatronic fluid power and the challenges to it being applied successfully....

  7. Eclampsia: maternal and perinatal outcomes in a tertiary care centre

    OpenAIRE

    Sunita Mor; Daya Sirohiwal; Reetu Hooda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Eclampsia is a life threatening emergency that continues to be a major cause of maternal and perinatal mortality. The purpose of our study was to analyse the trend of eclampsia in a tertiary care teaching institute and to find out maternal and perinatal outcomes of eclampsia. Methods: A prospective study was undertaken in a tertiary care teaching institute over a period of one year. Patients of eclampsia were followed up with regard to the management and maternal and fetal morb...

  8. Tertiary colleges: a study of perspectives on organizational innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Preedy, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to explore organisational innovation in education with reference to one particular type of organisation - the tertiary college. The research sought to examine the extent to which the intended objectives for new educational organisations are realised in practice, and how far the goals and ethos which organisational leaders seek to promote are shared by organisational members. The study focused on eleven tertiary colleges, comparing the 'official' view of ...

  9. Some Issues in the Economics of Tertiary Education

    OpenAIRE

    Dante B. Canlas

    1987-01-01

    The failure of the tertiary education to respond to the manpower needs of a technologically changing environment has been the concern of most social scientists. The inabilities to deliver higher education to a wider base and the deterioration of academic standards have been plaguing the education sector. This article attempts to present some of the issues related to the government’s role in higher education, rates of return from human capital investments, loan markets for tertiary education, ...

  10. Diabetic nephropathy: Prescription trends in tertiary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end stage renal disease. Drug utilization studies could promote rational drug use. The objective of this study was to evaluate prescribing trends in hospitalized patients with diabetic nephropathy. A prospective, observational study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital. The demographic, disease and treatment data of patients with diabetic nephropathy were collected for a period of six months and analysed. Drugs were classified using World Health Organization recommended Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical classification. A total of 755 drugs (7.4 drugs per prescription were prescribed to 102 study patients, who were all hypertensive and in late stages of diabetic nephropathy. Drug classes with largest representation were those acting on gastrointestinal tract plus metabolism (37% and cardiovascular drugs (28%. Calcium channel blockers represented the largest antihypertensive drug class (41%. Almost three-fourths of patients received more than one antihypertensive agent. Approximately 37% of patients did not receive any antidiabetic medication. Of those who did, prescriptions for insulin (91% exceeded those of oral hypoglycaemic drugs (9%. Antimicrobials accounted for 10.2% of all drugs prescribed, of which 31.8% were quinolones. Drugs prescribed by generic name accounted for 11.98%. While all patients received antihypertensive therapy, more than a third were not on any antidiabetic treatment. Antihypertensive poly-therapy was observed in the majority with calcium channel blockers being most frequently prescribed antihypertensive drug class. Insulin was the preferred to hypoglycaemic drugs.

  11. ELT at Tertiary Level-- An Undergraduate Perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨慧琴

    2002-01-01

    With the advocacy of communicative approaches in ELT coming from the English world, teachers of English in China find that their traditional Chinese teaching methods are being challenged. Educators and scholars express different opinions concerning the strength and weaknesses of traditional teaching methodology, but by and large, the overwhelming consensus is in favor of reform. The new syllabus promulgated by the State Educational Commission attaches more importance to the cultivation of students' communicative competence; journals and newspapers carry articles to urge the change; new textbooks with emphasis laid on communicative skills have been published and put to use in many institutions of higher learning; the commercial and business world is joining the chorus. Despite this, many teachers of English still use the traditional teaching methods with the new textbooks. As a teacher of English, I understand that, as well as an intrinsic reluctance to initiate change, they also have uncertainty about students' acceptance of and enthusiam for the new teaching approaches, and they have doubts about the benefits such approaches are supposed to bring to the learners. This article probes into the question of whether the existing ELT program and its overall lingustic input at tertiary level is really appropriate to the students' needs by examining the question from a different angle-the perspective of the undergraduates themselves.

  12. Antenatal depression in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar D Bavle

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Antenatal depression is not easily visible, though the prevalence is high. The idea of conducting this study was conceived from this fact. Aims and Objectives: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of antenatal depression and identify the risk factors, for early diagnosis and intervention. Settings and Design: The study conducted in a Tertiary Care Hospital was prospective and cross-sectional. Materials and Methods: Pregnant women between 18 and 40 years of age were studied. The sample size comprised 318 women. They were assessed using Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS score, Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition Axis I Disorders, Life Event Stress Scale (LESS, and Life Distress Inventory (LDI. Statistical Analysis Used: The Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Version 15 software was used to measure percentages, mean, correlation, and P < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: Prevalence of antenatal depression in the study was 12.3%. Correlation of the sociodemographic factors, obstetric factors, LDI, and LESS with EPDS scores showed statistical significance for unplanned pregnancy, distress associated with relationships, physical health, financial situation, social life, presence of personality disorder, being a homemaker, and higher educational status. Conclusion: The study showed a high prevalence rate of depression and identified risk factors.

  13. Tertiary tectonic in the Tehuantepec Isthmus, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, F.A.

    1993-02-01

    A microplate model in the basement was proposed according to photointerpretation of satellite imagery and supported with microtectonic studies in the Tehuantepec's Isthmus. The microplate is located in the northwestern part of the [open quotes]Sierra de Chiapas,[close quotes] and structurally has lineaments that correspond with sinestral wrench faults oriented northeast-southwest and dextral faults oriented northwest-southeast. In the front of the microplate, these faults are joined in an arc form. The microplate began its movement forward to the north in the middle Tertiary. This movement originated in a regional compressional stress that was younger to the north. The stress changed the orientation of the anticline axis from northwest-southeast to west-east. In its western limit, the stress produces a sinestral shear stress that built a rotational deformation in the [open quotes]Sierra Atravesada,[close quotes] and represents a superimposed tectonic block over an ancient (laramide) orogeny. This system has also produced other secondary transtensional effects oriented northwest-southeast, represented along the [open quotes]Depression Central del Istmo.[close quotes] The microplate has formed a tensional system opening the [open quotes]Superior, Inferior, and Mar Muerto[close quotes] lagoons. The microplate is strongly related with the relief, seismic activity, and the tectonics of the salt of the Tehuantepec's Isthmus.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) at ambient freshwater beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Lisa R.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Johnson, Heather E.; Brennan, Angela K.; Isaacs, Natasha M.; Spencer, Chelsea

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are a threat to human health worldwide, and although detected at marine beaches, they have been largely unstudied at freshwater beaches. Genes indicating S. aureus (SA; femA) and methicillin resistance (mecA) were detected at 11 and 12 of 13 US Great Lakes beaches and in 18% or 27% of 287 recreational water samples, respectively. Eight beaches had mecA + femA (potential MRSA) detections. During an intensive study, higher bather numbers, staphylococci concentrations, and femA detections were found in samples collected after noon than before noon. Local population density, beach cloud cover, and beach wave height were significantly correlated with SA or MRSA detection frequency. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene, associated with community-acquired MRSA, was detected in 12 out of 27 potential MRSA samples. The femA gene was detected less frequently at beaches that met US enterococci criteria or EU enterococci ‘excellent’ recreational water quality, but was not related to Escherichia coli-defined criteria. Escherichia coli is often the only indicator used to determine water quality at US beaches, given the economic and healthcare burden that can be associated with infections caused by SA and MRSA, monitoring of recreational waters for non-fecal bacteria such as staphylococci and/or SA may be warranted.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in diabetic foot infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-García, Estrella; García-Gonzalez, Rafael; Reyes-Torres, Angélica; Resendiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Salazar-Schettino, Paz María

    2015-01-01

    Background : Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the major pathogens causing chronic infections. The ability of S. aureus to acquire resistance to a diverse range of antimicrobial compounds results in limited treatment options, particularly in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). A mechanism by which S. aureus develops reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials is through the formation of small colony variants (SCVs). Infections by SCVs of S. aureus are an upcoming problem due to difficulties in laboratory diagnosis and resistance to antimicrobial therapy. Methods : A prospective study was performed on 120 patients diagnosed with both type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. The study was carried out from July 2012 to December 2013 in Hospital General de Mexico. The samples were cultured in blood agar, mannitol salt agar, and MacConkey agar media, and incubated at 37°C in aerobic conditions. Results : We describe the first known cases of diabetic foot infections caused by MRSA-SCVs in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. In all of our cases, the patients had not received any form of gentamicin therapy. Conclusions : The antibiotic therapy commonly used in diabetic patients with infected diabetic foot ulcers fails in the case of MRSA-SCVs because the intracellular location protects S. aureus-SCVs from the host's defenses and also helps them resist antibiotics. The cases studied in this article add to the spectrum of persistent and relapsing infections attributed to MRSA-SCVs and emphasizes that these variants may also play a relevant role in diabetic foot infections. PMID:25787018

  16. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in diabetic foot infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estrella Cervantes-García

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is one of the major pathogens causing chronic infections. The ability of S. aureus to acquire resistance to a diverse range of antimicrobial compounds results in limited treatment options, particularly in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. A mechanism by which S. aureus develops reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials is through the formation of small colony variants (SCVs. Infections by SCVs of S. aureus are an upcoming problem due to difficulties in laboratory diagnosis and resistance to antimicrobial therapy. Methods: A prospective study was performed on 120 patients diagnosed with both type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. The study was carried out from July 2012 to December 2013 in Hospital General de Mexico. The samples were cultured in blood agar, mannitol salt agar, and MacConkey agar media, and incubated at 37°C in aerobic conditions. Results: We describe the first known cases of diabetic foot infections caused by MRSA-SCVs in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. In all of our cases, the patients had not received any form of gentamicin therapy. Conclusions: The antibiotic therapy commonly used in diabetic patients with infected diabetic foot ulcers fails in the case of MRSA-SCVs because the intracellular location protects S. aureus-SCVs from the host's defenses and also helps them resist antibiotics. The cases studied in this article add to the spectrum of persistent and relapsing infections attributed to MRSA-SCVs and emphasizes that these variants may also play a relevant role in diabetic foot infections.

  17. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the peptidoglycan N-acetylglucosamine deacetylase BC1960 from Bacillus cereus in the presence of its substrate (GlcNAc)6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The peptidoglycan N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) deacetylase BC1960 from B. cereus was crystallized in the presence of the substrate (GlcNAc)6. The crystals belonged to space group P41212 and diffracted to 2.38 Å resolution. The peptidoglycan N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) deacetylase BC1960 from Bacillus cereus (EC 3.5.1.33), an enzyme consisting of 275 amino acids, was crystallized in the presence of its substrate (GlcNAc)6. The crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P41212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 92.7, c = 242.9 Å and four molecules in the asymmetric unit. A complete data set was collected at 100 K to a resolution of 2.38 Å using synchrotron radiation

  18. Candidaemia in a tertiary hospital in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita O. Oladele

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Candidaemia is a widely-studied and reviewed topic in the developed world; however, there is a dearth of information on nosocomial candidaemia in Nigeria, despite the increasing use of more invasive therapeutic modalities, immunosuppressive agents and increasing incidence of immunosuppression as a result of malignancies and HIV.Objectives: To determine the hospital-based frequency of candidaemia in a tertiary hospital in Ibadan, Nigeria.Method: This was a prospective descriptive study which included 230 immunosuppressed patients. All isolates were identified to the species level using both conventional and automated methods. Thereafter, all Candida species isolated were tested for antifungal susceptibility using the broth microdilution method.Results: Candidaemia occurred in 12 (5.21% of the 230 study patients, with C. tropicalis accounting for 50% of the infections. Four patients (33.3% presented with C. parapsilosis, one (8.3% with C. albicans and one (8.3% with a mixed infection of C. albicans and C. tropicalis. All 12 isolates were sensitive to fluconazole (minimal inhibitory concentration < 8 mg/mL. Univariate analysis revealed that old age, multiple surgeries and long-term hospitalisation were significant contributing factors for the occurrence of candidaemia. Eleven (91.7% of the 12 patients with candidaemia had Candida colonisation of other sterile sites including the bladder, peritoneum and trachea. Furthermore, bivariate analysis revealed that mucositis (p = 0.019 and diarrhoea (p = 0.017 were significantly associated with an increased risk of candidaemia. The crude mortality rate of candidaemia was 91.7%.Conclusion: This study highlights the significance of nosocomial candidaemia and the need for proactive laboratory investigation and clinical management of this life-threatening disease.

  19. A cohort study of the Copenhagen CF Centre eradication strategy against Staphylococcus aureus in patients with CF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalbøge, Christina Schjellerup; Pressler, Tacjana; Høiby, Niels;

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen in CF. Centre prevalence of intermittent colonization and chronic S. aureus infections and the effectiveness of an anti-S. aureus eradication strategy was assessed....

  20. Research Progress on Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins of Medical Shells and Molluscs%医学贝类及相关软体动物肽聚糖模式识别蛋白的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宗禄; 郭云海; 罗泰昌; 张仪

    2012-01-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) are highly conserved pattern recognition receptors in evolution, and they can recognize peptidoglycan (PGN) and bacteria that contain PGN in their cell wall component in early immune process of host, then provide signal transduction and activate a series of immune proteins. PGRPs are extensively present in insects, molluscs, echinoderms and vertebrates. Research progress and frontiers on PGRPs gene, type, structure, express localization, function, and evolution in medical molluscs and other snails were briefly reviewed in this article.%肽聚糖模式识别蛋白(Peptidoglycan recognition proteins,PGRPs)是一类高度保守的模式识别受体,参与宿主早期对病原微生物的识别作用,可识别肽聚糖和含有肽聚糖的细菌,进而激发和调节下游系列宿主免疫反应.PGRPs广泛存在于昆虫、软体动物、棘皮动物和脊椎动物中.本文对医学贝类和相关软体动物PGRPs的基因、类型、结构、表达分布、功能和进化进行综述.

  1. Radioimmunoassays for protein A of Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioimmunoassays have been developed that can detect nanogram amounts of protein A (SpA), a product generated by Staphylococcus aureus that binds selectively to the Fc region of IgG from most mammalian species. Competition assays for fluid phase SpA utilize antibodies produced in chickens, 125I-labeled SpA as the tracer molecule, and either F(ab')2 fragments of rabbit IgG anti-chicken IgG or 40% ammonium sulfate as the precipitating agent to separate antigen-antibody complexes from free antigen. The double antibody assay could be carried out in serum from species that form only soluble complexes with SpA (e.g., rabbit), that react poorly with SpA (e.g., rat) or under appropriate conditions in serum from species (e.g., dog) that show high reactivity with SpA and form precipitating complexes. Chicken antibodies prepared by affinity chromatography on SpA-Sepharose and labeled with 125I were used in a direct binding assay for SpA present either on the cell wall of Cowan strain I or Wood 46 bacteria, in insoluble complexes prepared from SpA and whole serum or purified IgG, or in C1q binding complexes that were formed by passage of serum from normal or tumor bearing humans or dogs over SpA-collodion charcoal. Since both types of assays could detect SpA even in the presence of serum or IgG, they offer advantages over other techniques in which the SpA-Fc interaction may interfere. (Auth.)

  2. A systematic review of animal models for Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Reizner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus osteomyelitis is a significant complication for orthopaedic patients undergoing surgery, particularly with fracture fixation and arthroplasty. Given the difficulty in studying S. aureus infections in human subjects, animal models serve an integral role in exploring the pathogenesis of osteomyelitis, and aid in determining the efficacy of prophylactic and therapeutic treatments. Animal models should mimic the clinical scenarios seen in patients as closely as possible to permit the experimental results to be translated to the corresponding clinical care. To help understand existing animal models of S. aureus, we conducted a systematic search of PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE to identify in vivo animal experiments that have investigated the management of S. aureus osteomyelitis in the context of fractures and metallic implants. In this review, experimental studies are categorised by animal species and are further classified by the setting of the infection. Study methods are summarised and the relevant advantages and disadvantages of each species and model are discussed. While no ideal animal model exists, the understanding of a model’s strengths and limitations should assist clinicians and researchers to appropriately select an animal model to translate the conclusions to the clinical setting.

  3. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in central Iowa wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardyn, Shylo E; Kauffman, Lin K; Smith, Tara C

    2012-10-01

    Livestock and pets have been identified as carriers of Staphylococcus aureus; however, the role of wild animals as a reservoir of S. aureus strains has not yet been examined. We conducted a pilot study to determine the prevalence of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in 37 species of wild animals rehabilitated at a university clinic. Nasal, wing, wound, and cloacal swabs were collected. Of 114 animals, seven (6.1%) were MSSA-positive and three (2.6%) were MRSA-positive. The MRSA isolates were obtained from two eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) and a Lesser Yellowlegs (Tringa flavipes), a migratory shorebird. Antibiotic resistance testing of the MRSA isolates revealed that two were additionally resistant to tetracycline and erythromycin, and the third isolate was also resistant to erythromycin, clindamycin, and levofloxacin. All three isolates were positive for the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene. Sequence typing of the staphylococcal protein A (spa) region revealed one MRSA isolate to be t002, whereas the other two MRSA isolates were found to be t008. Our results suggest that S. aureus, including MRSA, is being carried by wild animals, although at a low prevalence with the limited number of animals tested. Additional studies are needed to determine how this may impact human health. PMID:23060511

  4. Crystal Violet and XTT Assays on Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhenbo; Liang, Yanrui; Lin, Shiqi; Chen, Dingqiang; Li, Bing; Li, Lin; Deng, Yang

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. Aureus) is a common food-borne pathogenic microorganism. Biofilm formation remains the major obstruction for bacterial elimination. The study aims at providing a basis for determining S. aureus biofilm formation. 257 clinical samples of S. aureus isolates were identified by routine analysis and multiplex PCR detection and found to contain 227 MRSA, 16 MSSA, 11 MRCNS, and 3 MSCNS strains. Two assays for quantification of S. aureus biofilm formation, the crystal violet (CV) assay and the XTT (tetrazolium salt reduction) assay, were optimized, evaluated, and further compared. In CV assay, most isolates formed weak biofilm 74.3 %), while the rest formed moderate biofilm (23.3 %) or strong biofilm (2.3 %). However, most isolates in XTT assay showed weak metabolic activity (77.0 %), while the rest showed moderate metabolic activity (17.9 %) or high metabolic activity (5.1 %). In this study, we found a distinct strain-to-strain dissimilarity in terms of both biomass formation and metabolic activity, and it was concluded from this study that two assays were mutual complementation rather than being comparison. PMID:27324342

  5. Enterotoxin production by Staphylococcus aureus isolated from mastitic cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenci-Goga, B T; Karama, M; Rossitto, P V; Morgante, R A; Cullor, J S

    2003-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important cause of mastitis in cows. The ability of S. aureus strains to produce one or more enterotoxins in milk and dairy products is linked to staphylococcal food poisoning. To determine whether staphylococci causing bovine mastitis could cause human foodborne intoxication, the production of staphylococcal enterotoxins A through D (SEA, SEB, SEC, and SED) by 160 S. aureus isolates was evaluated with the use of a reverse passive latex agglutination enterotoxin kit. All S. aureus strains were isolated over a 9-month period from 2,343 routine submissions of a composite quarter collection of individual mastitic cows at 18 dairy farms in the San Joaquin Valley in California. Prior to enterotoxin detection, isolates were grown by a method that enhances the in vitro synthesis of enterotoxin. Twenty-two of 160 S. aureus isolates produced enterotoxin. Seven produced SEC, 12 produced SED, and 3 produced both SEC and SED. None of the isolates produced SEA or SEB. PMID:14503727

  6. Prevalence of Salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus in chorizo and longaniza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refugio Torres-Vitela

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological research in developed and developing countries, had found meat products as the principal cause for foodbourne diseases. In addition, Salmonella and Staphyococcus aureus are well known pathogens for their mayor impact in public health. The objective for the present study consisted on determinate the sanitary quality from chorizo and longaniza samples from several butcheries in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. Samples of chorizo (50 and longaniza (50 were obtained from different points in Guadalajara metropolis. Presence of Salmonella and recounts for S. aureus were tested in 25 g samples. Procedure was followed according Mexican NOM 145-SSA1-1995 methods. In chorizo, 18 samples were positive to Salmonella. The count of S. aureus showed a mean of 24,600 UFC/g. On the other hand, 24 samples of longaniza were positive to Salmonella spp. In this case, the mean of S. aureus was 7,800 UFC/g. The serotypes of Salmonella spp were: Derby (30%, Adelaile (17%, Azteca (15%, Infantis (15%, Muenster(10% y Anatum (13 %. The high positivity of Salmonella spp. and S. aureus is a potential hazard to consumers.

  7. Molecular cloning of peroxinectin gene and its expression in response to peptidoglycan and Vibrio harveyi in Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaeus indicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanthi, Sathappan; Manju, Sivalingam; Rajakumaran, Perumal; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam

    2014-12-01

    The cDNA sequence of peroxinectin was obtained from the haemocytes of Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaeus indicus using RT-PCR and RACE. Fenneropenaeus indicus peroxinectin (Fi-Pxn) sequence has an open reading frame (ORF) of 2415 bp encoding a protein of 804 amino acids with 21 residues signal sequence. The mature protein has molecular mass of 89.8 kDa with an estimated pI of 8.6. Two putative integrin-binding motifs, RGD and KGD, were observed at the basic N-terminal and C-terminal part of the mature aminoacid sequence. Fi-Pxn nucleotide sequence comparison showed high homology to mud crab Scylla serrata (89%) and to various vertebrate and invertebrate species. qRT-PCR showed peroxinectin mRNA transcript in haemocytes of F. indicus increased at 6 h post injection of peptidoglycan and Vibrio harveyi. The Fi-Pxn was mainly expressed in the tissues of haemocytes and the heart. The moulting stage responses showed Fi-Pxn expression in premoult stages D0/1 and D0/2. PMID:25072536

  8. Comparative effectiveness of nafcillin or cefazolin versus vancomycin in methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGregor Jessina C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA has led clinicians to select antibiotics that have coverage against MRSA, usually vancomycin, for empiric therapy for suspected staphylococcal infections. Clinicians often continue vancomycin started empirically even when methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA strains are identified by culture. However, vancomycin has been associated with poor outcomes such as nephrotoxicity, persistent bacteremia and treatment failure. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of vancomycin versus the beta-lactam antibiotics nafcillin and cefazolin among patients with MSSA bacteremia. The outcome of interest for this study was 30-day in-hospital mortality. Methods This retrospective cohort study included all adult in-patients admitted to a tertiary-care facility between January 1, 2003 and June 30, 2007 who had a positive blood culture for MSSA and received nafcillin, cefazolin or vancomycin. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess independent mortality hazards comparing nafcillin or cefazolin versus vancomycin. Similar methods were used to estimate the survival benefits of switching from vancomycin to nafcillin or cefazolin versus leaving patients on vancomycin. Each model included statistical adjustment using propensity scores which contained variables associated with an increased propensity to receive vancomycin. Results 267 patients were included; 14% (38/267 received nafcillin or cefazolin, 51% (135/267 received both vancomycin and either nafcillin or cefazolin, and 35% (94/267 received vancomycin. Thirty (11% died within 30 days. Those receiving nafcillin or cefazolin had 79% lower mortality hazards compared with those who received vancomycin alone (adjusted hazard ratio (HR: 0.21; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.09, 0.47. Among the 122 patients who initially received vancomycin empirically, those who were switched to nafcillin or cefazolin (66

  9. Occurrence of Multidrug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in horses in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zunita

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A total of 22 Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from 50 samples from 8 stable horses. They are positive in the catalase and coagulase tests. Upon testing the cultures with SLIDEX test kit all formed agglutination within a few seconds, confirming they are of S. aureus. When cultured onto MSA, all isolates formed yellow colonies. However, none of the isolates produced blue colonies on ORSAB indicating that there were no MRSA among the S. aureus. There were 13 isolates which were multiresistant. Eleven are resistant to eight out of ten antibiotics tested. All these isolates were found to originate from stable G. One isolate is resistant to 5 antibiotics while another one isolate is resistant to 3 antibiotics. The rest of the isolates are not multiresistant to the antibiotics tested. [Veterinary World 2008; 1(6.000: 165-167

  10. Risk factors for Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization in Danish middle-aged and elderly twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Larsen, Lisbeth Aagaard; Fowler, V G;

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal bacterium found in the nasal cavity and other body sites. Identifying risk factors for S. aureus nasal carriage is of interest, as nasal carriage is a risk factor for subsequent invasive infection. We recently investigated the influence of host genetics...... on S. aureus carriage in Danish middle-aged and elderly twins, which indicated no significant heritability that could account for the observed S. aureus carriage. In the present study, we performed a questionnaire-based study of S. aureus colonization on the same cohort of 2,196 Danish middle......-aged and elderly twins to identify specific risk factors for S. aureus nasal colonization, including analyzing the paired twins (n = 478) that were discordant for S. aureus colonization. We found associations between risk factors and S. aureus nasal colonization among middle-aged and elderly twins, including age...

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213

    OpenAIRE

    Soni, Isha; Chakrapani, Harinath; Chopra, Sidharth

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus subsp. aureus ATCC 29213 is one of the most commonly used strains in drug discovery research and for quality control. We report the completed draft genome sequence for the strain.

  12. Quality control of direct molecular diagnostics for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van Belkum (Alex); H.G.M. Niesters (Bert); W.G. MacKay (William); W.B. van Leeuwen (Willem)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractTen samples containing various amounts of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), and combinations thereof were distributed to 51 laboratories for molecular diagnostics testing. Sample

  13. Quality control of direct molecular diagnostics for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Belkum, Alex; Niesters, Hubert G M; MacKay, William G; van Leeuwen, Willem B

    2007-01-01

    Ten samples containing various amounts of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), and combinations thereof were distributed to 51 laboratories for molecular diagnostics testing. Samples containing

  14. The Significance of Nasal Carriage of Staphylococcus Aureus and the Incidence of Postoperative Wound Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P. Wenzel (Richard); T. M. Perl

    1995-01-01

    textabstractStaphylococcus aureus infections are associated with considerable morbidity and, in certain situations, mortality. The association between the nasal carriage of S. aureus and subsequent infection has been comprehensively established in a variety of clinical settings, in particular, patie

  15. Prevalence of infective endocarditis in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia: the value of screening with echocardiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Høst, Ulla; Arpi, Magnus;

    2011-01-01

    Aims Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis (IE) is a critical medical condition associated with a high morbidity and mortality. In the present study, we prospectively evaluated the importance of screening with echocardiography in an unselected S. aureus bacteraemia (SAB) population. Methods...

  16. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus infections in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jeffrey N; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Mason, Edward O; Hulten, Kristina G

    2015-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections in the Down syndrome (DS) population have not been well characterized. This study determined clinical and molecular characteristics of S. aureus infections in children with DS followed at Texas Children's Hospital (TCH), from 2001 to 2011. Patients were retrospectively identified from an ongoing S. aureus surveillance study. Medical records were reviewed. Isolates were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, and detection of PVL genes (pvl), mupA (high-level mupirocin resistance gene), smr (chlorhexidine resistance conferring gene), and Staphylococcal Chromosomal Cassette mec (SCCmec) type. Twenty-six patients with DS had a total of 34 S. aureus infections (8 recurrent); 61% were MRSA. DS patients represented 16.8 per 10,000 community onset S. aureus infections seen at TCH. Among 26 initial infections 17 were skin and soft tissue (SSTI), 7 were outer or middle ear and 2 were invasive infections. Seventeen patients were hospitalized. Thirteen (65%) of 20 available isolates were USA300, 14 were pvl+, 5 were mupA+, and 8 were smr+. Five of 8 (63%) recurrent infections were ear infections. All 4 recurrent ear isolates available for study were smr+, ciprofloxacin non-susceptible and treated with ciprofloxacin otic drops. S. aureus infections among patients with DS were similar in presentation to other patient groups, except for a greater proportion being associated with ear infections. Seventy percent of ear fluid isolates carried antiseptic and fluoroquinolone resistance genes. A study of a greater number of DS patients is warranted to further explore these findings. PMID:26386776

  17. Highly sensitive detection of Staphylococcus aureus directly from patient blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmapriya P Banada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rapid detection of bloodstream infections (BSIs can be lifesaving. We investigated the sample processing and assay parameters necessary for highly-sensitive detection of bloodstream bacteria, using Staphylococcus aureus as a model pathogen and an automated fluidic sample processing-polymerase chain reaction (PCR platform as a model diagnostic system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared a short 128 bp amplicon hemi-nested PCR and a relatively shorter 79 bp amplicon nested PCR targeting the S. aureus nuc and sodA genes, respectively. The sodA nested assay showed an enhanced limit of detection (LOD of 5 genomic copies per reaction or 10 colony forming units (CFU per ml blood over 50 copies per reaction or 50 CFU/ml for the nuc assay. To establish optimal extraction protocols, we investigated the relative abundance of the bacteria in different components of the blood (white blood cells (WBCs, plasma or whole blood, using the above assays. The blood samples were obtained from the patients who were culture positive for S. aureus. Whole blood resulted in maximum PCR positives with sodA assay (90% positive as opposed to cell-associated bacteria (in WBCs (71% samples positive or free bacterial DNA in plasma (62.5% samples positive. Both the assays were further tested for direct detection of S. aureus in patient whole blood samples that were contemporaneous culture positive. S. aureus was detected in 40/45 of culture-positive patients (sensitivity 89%, 95% CI 0.75-0.96 and 0/59 negative controls with the sodA assay (specificity 100%, 95% CI 0.92-1. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated a highly sensitive two-hour assay for detection of sepsis causing bacteria like S. aureus directly in 1 ml of whole blood, without the need for blood culture.

  18. The equity imperative in tertiary education: Promoting fairness and efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmi, Jamil; Bassett, Roberta Malee

    2014-06-01

    While the share of the tertiary education age cohort (19-25) which is being given the opportunity to study has increased worldwide over the past two decades, this does not in fact translate into reduced inequality. For many young people, especially in the developing world, major obstacles such as disparities in terms of gender, minority population membership or disabilities as well as academic and financial barriers are still standing in their way. The authors of this article propose a conceptual framework to analyse equity issues in tertiary education and document the scope, significance and consequences of disparities in tertiary education opportunities. They throw some light on the main determinants of these inequalities and offer suggestions about effective equity promotion policies directed towards widening participation and improving the chances of success of underprivileged youths in order to create societies which uphold humanistic values.

  19. Untersuchungen zur Diagnostik und Epidemiologie von Staphylococcus aureus in Milchviehbetrieben in Brandenburg

    OpenAIRE

    Scheibe, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse the epidemiological features of Staphylococcus (S.) aureus by using genotyping and antibiogram typing. Furthermore different methods for identification of S. aureus were performed to compare the methods’ ability to identify S. aureus from bovine milk. Milk samples were collected from six dairy herds with high prevalence of S. aureus in the federal state of Brandenburg, Germany. Of each herd, 32 cows in different stages of lactation and different a...

  20. In Vivo Activity of Ceftobiprole in Murine Skin Infections Due to Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa▿

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Jeffrey; Hilliard, Jamese J.; Abbanat, Darren; Zhang, Wenyan; Melton, John L.; Santoro, Colleen M.; Flamm, Robert K.; Bush, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Ceftobiprole, a broad-spectrum cephalosporin with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (P. Hebeisen et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 45:825-836, 2001), was evaluated in a subcutaneous skin infection model with Staphylococcus aureus Smith OC 4172 (methicillin-susceptible S. aureus [MSSA]), S. aureus OC 8525 (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa OC 4351 (having an inducible AmpC β-lactamase), and P. aeruginosa OC 4354 (overproducing AmpC β-lactamase). In the MSSA an...

  1. Investigation of the bactericidal effects of vancomycin and quinupristin/dalfopristin on Staphylococcus aureus isolates

    OpenAIRE

    HOŞGÖR-LİMONCU, Mine; ERMERTCAN, Şafak; COŞAR, Güner

    2004-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the correlation between the bactericidal activity of vancomycin and quinupristin/dalfopristin (Q/D) on Staphylococcus aureus isolates and their minimal inhibition concentrations. The in-vitro susceptibilities of the 99 S. aureus isolates to vancomycin and Q/D were investigated by agar dilution. Thirty methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and 30 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) vancomycin and Q/D susceptible isolates were involved in time-kill stu...

  2. Molecular Characterization and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Nasal Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from a Chinese Medical College Campus

    OpenAIRE

    DU, JIMEI; Chen, Chun; Ding, Baixing; Tu, Jinjing; Qin, Zhiqiang; Parsons, Chris; Salgado, Cassandra; Cai, Qiangjun; SONG, Yulong; Bao, Qiyu; Zhang, Liming; Pan, Jingye; Wang, LiangXing; Yu, Fangyou

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection occur more commonly among persons living or working in crowded conditions, but characterization of S. aureus colonization within medical communities in China is lacking. A total of 144 (15.4%, 144/935) S. aureus isolates, including 28 (3.0%, 28/935) MRSA isolates, were recovered from the nares of 935 healthy human volunteers residing on a Chinese medical college campus. All S. aureus isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, quinupristin/dalfopr...

  3. Daptomycin-nonsusceptible, vancomycin-intermediate, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan Yu; Dale, Suzanne E; Deborah Yamamura; Vida Stankus; Christine Lee

    2012-01-01

    Due to the emergence of Staphylococcus aureus with reduced vancomycin susceptibility, newer antibiotics, including daptomycin, have been used to treat methicillin-resistant S aureus infections. Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide that is approved to treat S aureus bacteremia and right-sided endocarditis, and reports of S aureus with reduced susceptibility to daptomycin are infrequent. To our knowledge, the present report describes the first Canadian case of daptomycin-nonsusceptible, vancomyci...

  4. Human-associated Staphylococcus aureus strains within great ape populations in Central Africa (Gabon)

    OpenAIRE

    M. Nagel; Dischinger, J.; Türck, M.; Verrier, D.; Oedenkoven, M.; Ngoubangoye, B.; Le Flohic, G.; Drexler, J. F.; Bierbaum, G.; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    The risk of serious infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus is well-known. However, most studies regarding the distribution of (clinically relevant) S.aureus among humans and animals took place in the western hemisphere and only limited data are available from (Central) Africa. In this context, recent studies focused on S.aureus strains in humans and primates, but the question of whether humans and monkeys share related S.aureus strains or may interchange strains remained largely unsolved....

  5. Minimum inhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin in combination with hexahydroquinoline derivatives against Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    F Amin Harati; Amini, M; AR Shahverdi; Pourmand MR; Yousefi, M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus is the most common pathogen responsible for skin and soft tissue infections worldwide. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus is a major cause of both nosocomial and community acquired infections. The emergence of antimicrobial-resistant S. aureus is of global concern. Fluoroquinolone antimicrobials including ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin are used to treat skin and soft tissue infections due to S. aureus. Emergence of ciprofloxacin resistance has inc...

  6. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Colonization in Schoolteachers in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth A Hanselman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A prospective study of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA colonization was performed involving teachers at a science teachers’ conference in Toronto, Ontario. Nasal swabs and questionnaire data were collected from consenting individuals. MRSA colonization was identified in seven of 220 (3.2% participants. No colonized individuals reported recent contact with the health care system, antimicrobial therapy, residence with health care workers or previous MRSA infections. Methicillin-susceptible S aureus colonization was identified in 72 of 220 (33% individuals. The prevalence of MRSA colonization was higher than expected for a purportedly low-risk population.

  7. Genotyping of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from healthy persistent carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzegorczyk, Agnieszka; Malm, Anna

    2014-07-01

    The paper presents results on the relatedness of Staphylococcus aureus strains colonizing the upper respiratory tract isolated from healthy persistent carriers. Genotyping was carried out using two methods--multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat fingerprinting (MLVF) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). By comparison of the results obtained by both methods, good correlations between MLVF and PFGE genotyping of strains isolated from the asymptomatic carriers were observed. Further studies are needed to evaluate methods useful for genotyping of S. aureus strains circulating in the community. PMID:24488811

  8. Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis: a rare cause of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chest pain is a common presenting symptom with a broad differential. Life-threatening cardiac and pulmonary etiologies of chest pain should be evaluated first. However, it is critical to perform a thorough assessment for other sources of chest pain in order to limit morbidity and mortality from less common causes. We present a rare case of a previously healthy 45 year old man who presented with focal, substernal, reproducible chest pain and Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia who was later found to have primary Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis.

  9. Threat of multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Western Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatta, Dharm R.; Cavaco, Lina; Nath, Gopal;

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo determine the prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates from Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal. MethodsThis study was conducted over a period of 11 months (September 2012–August 2013) at the Manipal...... using disc diffusion test by cefoxitin (30 μg) and oxacillin (1 μg) disc, further confirmation was done by detection of mecA gene using PCR. ResultsOut of 400 Staphylococcus aureus strains, 139 (34.75%) were found to be MRSA. Among the MRSA isolates, 74 (53.2%) were from inpatient departments, 58 (41...

  10. Capturing of staphylococcus aureus onto an interface containing graft chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microbial-cell-capturing material was prepared by radiation-induced grafting of glycidyl methacrylate onto a polyethylene-based fiber before the introduction of diethylamine. The prepared fiber was tested against a Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli solution. The results showed that the grafted-type fiber had a capturing rate constant 1000-fold higher than the commercial crosslinked-type bead for S. aureus and that an activation energy of 39 kJ/mol was obtained for the microbial-cell-capturing action. (author)

  11. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in schoolteachers in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanselman, Beth A; Kruth, Steven A; Rousseau, Joyce; Weese, J Scott

    2008-11-01

    A prospective study of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization was performed involving teachers at a science teachers' conference in Toronto, Ontario. Nasal swabs and questionnaire data were collected from consenting individuals. MRSA colonization was identified in seven of 220 (3.2%) participants. No colonized individuals reported recent contact with the health care system, antimicrobial therapy, residence with health care workers or previous MRSA infections. Methicillin-susceptible S aureus colonization was identified in 72 of 220 (33%) individuals. The prevalence of MRSA colonization was higher than expected for a purportedly low-risk population. PMID:19436569

  12. Response of Staphylococcus Aureus to a Spaceflight Analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, S. L.; Ott, C. M.

    2010-01-01

    The decreased gravity of the spaceflight environment creates quiescent, low fluid shear conditions. This environment can impart considerable effects on the physiology of microorganisms as well as their interactions with potential hosts. Using the rotating wall vessel (RWV), as a spaceflight analogue, the consequence of low fluid shear culture on microbial pathogenesis has provided a better understanding of the risks to the astronaut crew from infectious microorganisms. While the outcome of low fluid shear culture has been investigated for several bacterial pathogens, little has been done to understand how this environmental factor affects Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus is an opportunistic human pathogen which presents a high level of infection risk to the crew, as it has been isolated from both the space shuttle and International Space Station. Given that approximately forty percent of the population are carriers of the bacteria, eradication of this organism from in flight environments is impractical. These reasons have lead to us to assess the response of S. aureus to a reduced fluid shear environment. Culture in the RWV demonstrated that S. aureus grown under the low-shear condition had lower cell concentrations after 10 hours when compared to the control culture. Furthermore, the low-shear cultured bacteria displayed a reduction in carotenoid production, pigments responsible for their yellow/gold coloration. When exposed to various environmental stressors, post low-shear culture, a decrease in the ability to survive oxidative assault was observed compared to control cultures. The low fluid shear environment also resulted in a decrease in hemolysin secretion, a staphylococcal toxin responsible for red blood cell lysis. When challenged by the immune components present in human whole blood, low-shear cultured S. aureus demonstrated significantly reduced survival rates as compared to the control culture. Assays to determine the duration of these alterations

  13. Mechanism of bacteriophage conversion of lipase activity in Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, C Y; Iandolo, J J

    1985-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus PS54 harbors two temperate bacteriophages and manifests no lipase activity on egg yolk agar. Curing of one of the resident prophages (L54a) restores lipase activity. To study the mechanism of bacteriophage conversion, the prophage was cured, and the gene encoding lipase activity was cloned into pBR322 in Escherichia coli on a 2.9-kilobase DNA fragment of the chromosome. The fragment was subcloned into a shuttle vector and subsequently transformed into S. aureus and Bacil...

  14. Spatio-temporal observations of tertiary ozone maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Sofieva

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We present spatio-temporal distributions of tertiary ozone maximum (TOM, based on GOMOS (Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars ozone measurements in 2002–2006. The tertiary ozone maximum is typically observed in the high-latitude winter mesosphere at altitude ~72 km. Although the explanation for this phenomenon has been found recently – low concentrations of odd-hydrogen cause the subsequent decrease in odd-oxygen losses – models have had significant deviations from existing observations until recently. Good coverage of polar night regions by GOMOS data has allowed for the first time obtaining spatial and temporal observational distributions of night-time ozone mixing ratio in the mesosphere.

    The distributions obtained from GOMOS data have specific features, which are variable from year to year. In particular, due to a long lifetime of ozone in polar night conditions, the downward transport of polar air by the meridional circulation is clearly observed in the tertiary ozone maximum time series. Although the maximum tertiary ozone mixing ratio is achieved close to the polar night terminator (as predicted by the theory, TOM can be observed also at very high latitudes, not only in the beginning and at the end, but also in the middle of winter. We have compared the observational spatio-temporal distributions of tertiary ozone maximum with that obtained using WACCM (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model and found that the specific features are reproduced satisfactorily by the model.

    Since ozone in the mesosphere is very sensitive to HOx concentrations, energetic particle precipitation can significantly modify the shape of the ozone profiles. In particular, GOMOS observations have shown that the tertiary ozone maximum was temporarily destroyed during the January 2005 and December 2006 solar proton events as a result of the HOx enhancement from the increased ionization.

  15. Study on Bacteria Associated with White Coats of Healthcare Workers in Two Tertiary Hospitals, Mashhad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Moravvej

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Health care-associated infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitals. Reports have shown that nurses’ uniforms are sources of health care-associated infection transmission. The present study assessed the rate of bacterial contamination of healthcare worker’s white coats in two tertiary hospitals in Mashhad, Iran.Methods: 300 healthcare workers participated in the study from July to October2011. Samples were obtained with a sterile swab from the outer surfaces of three sites of the white coat including the cuff, pocket mouth of the dominant hand and abdominal region. The samples were examined according to standard procedures. Results: Overall, 1220 microorganisms belonging to 13 different genera were isolated from a total of 900 samples. All 300 white coats were contaminated by bacteria of which 282 (94% were pathogenic. The abdominal region had significantly higher number of isolates than the pocket and sleeve (p = 0.02. The white coats of “cardiac surgery ICU” and “surgery ward” had the mean highest number  of  isolates.  Gram-positive  Bacilli  (36.1%  were  the  most  common isolates followed by Staphylococcus aureus (28% and coagulase-negative Staphylococci (24.8%.Conclusion: Health care workers’ white coats are contaminated with a variety of bacteria. In order to reduce cross contamination from white coats to patients, re- educational programs and stricter rules of laundering and changing white coats are suggested.

  16. Automated DNA sequence-based early warning system for the detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus outbreaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mellmann

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA usually requires the implementation of often rigorous infection-control measures. Prompt identification of an MRSA epidemic is crucial for the control of an outbreak. In this study we evaluated various early warning algorithms for the detection of an MRSA cluster. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Between 1998 and 2003, 557 non-replicate MRSA strains were collected from staff and patients admitted to a German tertiary-care university hospital. The repeat region of the S. aureus protein A (spa gene in each of these strains was sequenced. Using epidemiological and typing information for the period 1998-2002 as reference data, clusters in 2003 were determined by temporal-scan test statistics. Various early warning algorithms (frequency, clonal, and infection control professionals [ICP] alerts were tested in a prospective analysis for the year 2003. In addition, a newly implemented automated clonal alert system of the Ridom StaphType software was evaluated. A total of 549 of 557 MRSA were typeable using spa sequencing. When analyzed using scan test statistics, 42 out of 175 MRSA in 2003 formed 13 significant clusters (p < 0.05. These clusters were used as the "gold standard" to evaluate the various algorithms. Clonal alerts (spa typing and epidemiological data were 100% sensitive and 95.2% specific. Frequency (epidemiological data only and ICP alerts were 100% and 62.1% sensitive and 47.2% and 97.3% specific, respectively. The difference in specificity between clonal and ICP alerts was not significant. Both methods exhibited a positive predictive value above 80%. CONCLUSIONS: Rapid MRSA outbreak detection, based on epidemiological and spa typing data, is a suitable alternative for classical approaches and can assist in the identification of potential sources of infection.

  17. Phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance traits of foodborne Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcus aureus is a recognized pathogen in humans, which causes nosocomial infections and food poisoning. The transmission of antibiotic resistant S. aureus (ARSA), especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), between food products and humans has become a serious problem. Hence, it is n...

  18. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern and Biochemical Characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus: Impact of Bio field Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Mahendra Kumar Trivedi

    2015-01-01

    Study background: Staphylococci are widespread in nature, mainly found on the skin and mucous membranes. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is the key organism for food poisoning due to massive production of heat stable exotoxins. The current study was attempted to investigate the effect of biofield treatment on antimicrobial susceptibility pattern and biochemical characteristics of S. aureus (ATCC 25923).

  19. Nosocomial Infections and Drug Susceptibility Patterns in Methicillin Sensitive and Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Nitish Kumar; Garg, Raina; Baliga, Shrikala; Bhat K., Gopalkrishna

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections and is known for its ability to develop resistance to antibiotics. The drug susceptibility pattern of Methicillin Sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) may vary.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus Strains That are Hypersusceptible to Resistance Gene Transfer from Enterococci▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Julia M.-L.; Lindsay, Jodi A

    2007-01-01

    We identified naturally occurring Staphylococcus aureus mutants of the restriction modification pathway SauI, including bovine lineage ST151. In a model of vancomycin resistance transfer from Enterococcus faecalis, ST151 isolates are 500 times more susceptible than human S. aureus isolates. The eradication of “hyperrecipient” strains may reduce the evolution of vancomycin-resistant S. aureus.

  1. The population structure of Staphylococcus Aureus among general practice patients from The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donker, G.A.; Deurenberg, R.H.; Driessen, C.; Sebastian, S.; Nijs, S.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence, the antibiotic resistance pattern and the population structure of Staphylococcus aureus, S. aureus isolates from the anterior nostrils of patients of general practitioners (GPs) were analysed. Insight into the S. aureus population structure is essential, as nasal carri

  2. Genome Sequences of Four Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Bovine Mastitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kant, Ravi; Taponen, Suvi; Koort, Joanna; Paulin, Lars; Åvall-Jääskeläinen, Silja; Palva, Airi

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major causative agent of mastitis in dairy cows. The pathogenicity of S. aureus may vary; it is able to cause severe clinical mastitis, but most often it is associated with chronic subclinical mastitis. Here, we present the genome assemblies of four S. aureus strains from bovine mastitis.

  3. Genome Sequences of Four Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Bovine Mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Ravi; Taponen, Suvi; Koort, Joanna; Paulin, Lars; Åvall-Jääskeläinen, Silja; Palva, Airi

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major causative agent of mastitis in dairy cows. The pathogenicity of S. aureus may vary; it is able to cause severe clinical mastitis, but most often it is associated with chronic subclinical mastitis. Here, we present the genome assemblies of four S. aureus strains from bovine mastitis. PMID:25908141

  4. Sexual harassment in tertiary institutions: A comparative perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Janice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual harassment is not a new phenomenon in tertiary institutions. It has been receiving considerable attention in research and the media and public awareness has increased dramatically. However, the term sexual harassment is not used uniformly across the globe because countries have defined it differently. Consequently, prevalence of sexual harassment in education varies across cultures. This paper examines sexual harassment from a comparative perspective. It specifically focuses on the definition of sexual harassment, incidence of sexual harassment of students in tertiary institutions, effects of sexual harassment on victims; and victims’ responses to sexual harassment. It also offers suggestions for curtailing sexual harassment in these institutions.

  5. Exports of Tertiary Education Services and the Queensland Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Duhs, Ted; Duhs, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Exports of tertiary education services have become a growth industry for the Queensland economy. Since a policy change in 1987 from an aid to a trade approach to overseas students, fee paying overseas students have risen from a mere 5.9 per cent of all overseas students in 1987, to 89.6 per cent in 1995. Exports of tertiary education services from the Queensland economy now rival wool and wheat in importance. A number of marketing and policy issues arise in the context of further change in th...

  6. Graph Theory In Protein Sequence Clustering And Tertiary Structural Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Rosni; Rashid, Nur'Aini Abdul; Othman, Fazilah

    2008-01-01

    The principle of graph theory which has been widely used in computer networks is now being adopted for work in protein clustering, protein structural matching, and protein folding and modeling. In this work, we present two case studies on the use of graph theory for protein clustering and tertiary structural matching. In protein clustering, we extended a clustering algorithm based on a maximal clique while in the protein tertiary structural matching we explored the bipartite graph matching algorithm. The results obtained in both the case studies will be presented.

  7. When are the hands of healthcare workers positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Creamer, E

    2010-06-01

    Hand hygiene is a key component in reducing infection. There are few reports on the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on healthcare workers\\' (HCWs\\') hands. The aim of this study was to establish whether HCWs\\' fingertips were contaminated with MRSA in a clinical hospital setting. The study was conducted in an acute tertiary referral hospital on four MRSA wards that were part of a larger research study on MRSA epidemiology and four other wards not included in the study. The fingertips from all categories of 523 HCWs were sampled on 822 occasions by the imprinting of fingertips on MRSA chromogenic agar plates. The type of hand hygiene agent used, if any, and the immediate prior activity of the HCW were recorded. Overall, 38\\/822 (5%) fingertips from 523 HCWs were MRSA-positive; 12\\/194 (6%) after clinical contact, 10\\/138 (10%) after contact with the patient\\'s environment and 15\\/346 (4%) after no specific contact. MRSA was recovered on 2\\/61 (3%) occasions after use of alcohol hand rub, 2\\/35 (6%) after 4% chlorhexidine detergent, 7\\/210 (3%) hand washing with soap and water, and 27\\/493 (5%) when no hand hygiene had been performed. MRSA was recovered from HCWs on seven of the eight wards. MRSA was more frequently present on fingertips on the four non-study wards vs the four MRSA study wards [18\\/250 (7%), 3\\/201 (1%), respectively; P

  8. Limits and opportunities of marketeering tertiary education in post-colonial Zimbabwe

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Sibanda

    2016-01-01

    This paper intended to assess the impact of marketeering tertiary education in Zimbabwe. The paper revealed that marketeering of tertiary education in Zimbabwe has drastically impacted on access to higher education and training. Poor and vulnerable students have found it difficult to access tertiary education due to escalating commercialized fees. Literature indicates that, even in developed countries like UK, marketeering tertiary education has led to decreased enrolments, diminishing prospe...

  9. Disaster resilience in tertiary hospitals: a cross-sectional survey in Shandong Province, China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Shuang; Hou, Xiang-yu; Clark, Michele; Zang, Yu-Li; Wang, Lu; Xu, Ling-Zhong; FitzGerald, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Background Hospital disaster resilience can be defined as a hospital’s ability to resist, absorb, and respond to the shock of disasters while maintaining critical functions, and then to recover to its original state or adapt to a new one. This study aims to explore the status of resilience among tertiary hospitals in Shandong Province, China. Methods A stratified random sample (n = 50) was derived from tertiary A, tertiary B, and tertiary C hospitals in Shandong Province, and was surveyed by ...

  10. Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus in Bangalore, India: emergence of the ST217 clone and high rate of resistance to erythromycin and ciprofloxacin in the community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchiat, C.; El-Zeenni, N.; Chakrakodi, B.; Nagaraj, S.; Arakere, G.; Etienne, J.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and the circulating clones in Bangalore, India. Susceptibility testing was performed for all cases of SA infections in a tertiary-care hospital. Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) encoding genes were detected, and sequence type and spa type were determined. Out of the 92 collected strains, 52.2% were methicillin-resistant SA (MRSA), isolated from community-acquired (CA) infections in 60.4% and hospital-acquired (HA) infections in 39.6%. S. aureus isolates were also highly resistant to erythromycin (54.3%) and ciprofloxacin (70.6%) in methicillin-susceptible SA (MSSA) and MRSA, as well as in CA and HA infections. MRSA were found to be significantly more resistant to gentamicin (p <0.001), cotrimoxazole (p <0.001) and ciprofloxacin (p 0.001) than MSSA, but no significant difference was observed between CA- and HA-SA. ST217 appeared as a new emerging and prevalent clone, but ST772 remained the predominant clone, all being PVL-positive isolates. Our study points out the high prevalence of MRSA, even in the community, and the worrying increase of resistance to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin among CA-MSSA. Emergence of clone ST217 is reported for the first time in India. PMID:26110062

  11. Climatic Factors and Community — Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin and Soft-Tissue Infections — A Time-Series Analysis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krushna Chandra Sahoo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Skin and soft tissue infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (SA-SSTIs including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA have experienced a significant surge all over the world. Changing climatic factors are affecting the global burden of dermatological infections and there is a lack of information on the association between climatic factors and MRSA infections. Therefore, association of temperature and relative humidity (RH with occurrence of SA-SSTIs (n = 387 and also MRSA (n = 251 was monitored for 18 months in the outpatient clinic at a tertiary care hospital located in Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India. The Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method was used for antibiotic susceptibility testing. Time-series analysis was used to investigate the potential association of climatic factors (weekly averages of maximum temperature, minimum temperature and RH with weekly incidence of SA-SSTIs and MRSA infections. The analysis showed that a combination of weekly average maximum temperature above 33 °C coinciding with weekly average RH ranging between 55% and 78%, is most favorable for the occurrence of SA-SSTIs and MRSA and within these parameters, each unit increase in occurrence of MRSA was associated with increase in weekly average maximum temperature of 1.7 °C (p = 0.044 and weekly average RH increase of 10% (p = 0.097.

  12. Staphylococcus aureus with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin in healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, A M; Orlando, P; Panatto, D; Amicizia, D; Perdelli, F; Cristina, M L

    2014-12-01

    Glycopeptide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is a source of great concern because, especially in hospitals, this class of antibiotics, particularly vancomycin, is one of the main resources for combating infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains (MRSA). Reduced susceptibility to vancomycin (VISA) was first described in 1996 in Japan; since then, a phenotype with heterogeneous resistance to vancomycin (h-VISA) has emerged. H-VISA isolates are characterised by the presence of a resistant subpopulation, typically at a rate of 1 in 10(5) organisms, which constitutes the intermediate stage betweenfully vancomycin-susceptible S. aureus (VSSA) and VISA isolates. As VISA phenotypes are almost uniformly cross-resistant to teicoplanin, they are also called Glycopeptides-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus strains (GISA) and, in the case of heterogeneous resistance to glycopeptides, h-GISA. The overall prevalence of h-VISA is low, accounting for approximately 1.3% of all MRSA isolates tested. Mortality due to h-GISA infections is very high (about 70%), especially among patients hospitalised in high-risk departments, such as intensive care units (ICU). Given the great clinical relevance of strains that are heteroresistant to glycopeptides and the possible negative impact on treatment choices, it is important to draw up and implement infection control practices, including surveillance, the appropriate use of isolation precautions, staff training, hand hygiene, environmental cleansing and good antibiotic stewardship. PMID:26137787

  13. Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: no apocalypse now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, F W; Kitzis, M D

    2003-08-01

    The number of reports concerning vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is much higher than the number of true resistant strains or unexpected clinical failures. Many confounding factors, including inadequate serum levels, severely ill patients, foreign devices or undrained abscesses, are more likely to be responsible for the clinical failures than resistance to vancomycin. PMID:14616695

  14. Review on Panton Valentine leukocidin toxin carriage among Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, B

    2013-09-01

    Panton Valentine leukocidin is a toxin making pores in the polymorphonuclear cells which is a virulence factor of some strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Initially it was produced by methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus only. Later with the acquisition of mecA gene has lead it to be PVL positive methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Since MRSA are resistant to many antibiotics and further they produce a toxin the infections by PVL positive MRSA has become a challenge. PVL positive MRSA a virulent strain of drug resistant superbug MRSA that has spread around the world, has claimed many lives in UK, Europe, USA and Australia. Some strains of superbug attack the healthy young people and kill within 24 hrs. PVL positive Staphylococcus aureus has been reported to be associated with skin and soft tissue infections however they also cause invasive infections and necrotizing pneumonia. These microorganisms known to be community associated have spread to hospitals. Hospital acquired infection by such microorganisms lead to an increase in mortality hence should be controlled before they become prevalent in hospitals. PMID:24908537

  15. An Interdisciplinary Experiment: Azo-Dye Metabolism by "Staphylococcus Aureus"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklesby, Kayleigh; Smith, Robert; Sharp, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    An interdisciplinary and engaging practical is detailed which offers great versatility in the study of a qualitative and quantitative metabolism of azo-dyes by "Staphylococcus aureus". This practical has broad scope for adaptation in the number and depth of variables to allow a focused practical experiment or small research project. Azo-dyes are…

  16. Increased risk of arterial thromboembolic events after Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejer, N; Gotland, N; Uhre, M L;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: An association between infection and arterial thromboembolic events (ATE) has been suggested. Here we examined the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke and other ATE after Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB). METHODS: Danish register-based nation-wide observational cohort study...

  17. Pyrazole Based Inhibitors against Enzymes of Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagadeesan, G.; Vijayakuma, Vinodhkumar; Palayam, Malathy;

    2015-01-01

    agents. The current study focuses on molecular docking and dynamics studies of pyrazole derivatives against Nucleosidase and DNA gyrase B of Staphylococcus aureus. Molecular docking and dynamics studies reveal that some of these derivatives show better binding abilities than some of the current drugs...

  18. Killing of Staphylococcus aureus by C-8-Methoxy Fluoroquinolones

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Xilin; Wang, Jian-Ying; Xu, Chen; Dong, Yuzhi; Zhou, Jianfeng; Domagala, John; Drlica, Karl

    1998-01-01

    C-8-methoxy fluoroquinolones were more lethal than C-8-bromine, C-8-ethoxy, and C-8-H derivatives for Staphylococcus aureus, especially when topoisomerase IV was resistant. The methoxy group also increased lethality against wild-type cells when protein synthesis was inhibited. These properties encourage refinement of C-8-methoxy fluoroquinolones to kill staphylococci.

  19. Simple method for correct enumeration of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haaber, J; Cohn, M T; Petersen, A; Ingmer, H

    2016-06-01

    Optical density (OD) measurement is applied universally to estimate cell numbers of microorganisms growing in liquid cultures. It is a fast and reliable method but is based on the assumption that the bacteria grow as single cells of equal size and that the cells are dispersed evenly in the liquid culture. When grown in such liquid cultures, the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is characterized by its aggregation of single cells into clusters of variable size. Here, we show that aggregation during growth in the laboratory standard medium tryptic soy broth (TSB) is common among clinical and laboratory S. aureus isolates and that aggregation may introduce significant bias when applying standard enumeration methods on S. aureus growing in laboratory batch cultures. We provide a simple and efficient sonication procedure, which can be applied prior to optical density measurements to give an accurate estimate of cellular numbers in liquid cultures of S. aureus regardless of the aggregation level of the given strain. We further show that the sonication procedure is applicable for accurate determination of cell numbers using agar plate counting of aggregating strains. PMID:27080188

  20. Staphylococcus aureus redirects central metabolism to increase iron availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Friedman

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis is significantly influenced by the iron status of the host. However, the regulatory impact of host iron sources on S. aureus gene expression remains unknown. In this study, we combine multivariable difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry with multivariate statistical analyses to systematically cluster cellular protein response across distinct iron-exposure conditions. Quadruplicate samples were simultaneously analyzed for alterations in protein abundance and/or post-translational modification state in response to environmental (iron chelation, hemin treatment or genetic (Deltafur alterations in bacterial iron exposure. We identified 120 proteins representing several coordinated biochemical pathways that are affected by changes in iron-exposure status. Highlighted in these experiments is the identification of the heme-regulated transport system (HrtAB, a novel transport system which plays a critical role in staphylococcal heme metabolism. Further, we show that regulated overproduction of acidic end-products brought on by iron starvation decreases local pH resulting in the release of iron from the host iron-sequestering protein transferrin. These findings reveal novel strategies used by S. aureus to acquire scarce nutrients in the hostile host environment and begin to define the iron and heme-dependent regulons of S. aureus.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus aureus Siphovirus Phage JS01

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Hongying; Bai, Qinqin; Yang, Yongchun; Yao, Huochun

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most prevalent and economically significant pathogen causing bovine mastitis. We isolated and characterized one staphylophage from the milk of mastitis-affected cattle and sequenced its genome. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation shows that it belongs to the family Siphovirus. We announce here its complete genome sequence and report major findings from the genomic analysis.

  2. Natural Population Dynamics and Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Melles (Damian)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractStaphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen capable of causing a wide range of infections, from relatively mild skin infections such as folliculitis and furunculosis to life-threatening conditions, including sepsis, deep abscesses, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, and infective endocarditis

  3. THE STUDY OF RESISTENCE OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS STRAINS TO ANTIMICROBIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazarchuk GG

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the research work the results of the study of resistance forming to antibiotics, antiseptics and decametoxine composition with modified polysaccharides in S.aureus strains are presented. The development of resistance to penicillins, cephalosporins, glycopeptides, macrolides is shown. Slow forming of resistance to decasan and decametoxine composition with carboxymethylamylum, oxyethylcellulose was determined.

  4. Human Staphylococcus aureus lineages among Zoological Park residents in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Drougka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a part of the microbiota flora in many animal species. The clonal spread of S. aureus among animals and personnel in a Zoological Park was investigated. Samples were collected from colonized and infected sites among 32 mammals, 11 birds and eight humans. The genes mecA, mecC, lukF/lukS-PV (encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin, PVL and tst (toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 were investigated by PCR. Clones were defined by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST, spa type and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE. Seven S. aureus isolates were recovered from four animals and one from an employee. All were mecA, mecC and tst–negative, whereas, one carried the PVL genes and was isolated from an infected Squirrel monkey. Clonal analysis revealed the occurrence of seven STs, eight PFGE and five spa types including ones of human origin. Even though a variety of genotypes were identified among S. aureus strains colonizing zoo park residents, our results indicate that colonization with human lineages has indeed occurred.

  5. Genetic Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus in Buruli Ulcer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amissah, Nana Ama; Glasner, Corinna; Ablordey, Anthony; Tetteh, Caitlin S.; Kotey, Nana Konama; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip; Rossen, John W.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2015-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Previous studies have shown that wounds of BU patients are colonized with M. ulcerans and several other microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus, which may interfere with wound healing. The present st

  6. New insights into molecular typing methods for Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikawaty, R.

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) remains a significant problem causing infections in both hospital and community settings. Methicillin-resistant SA (MRSA) continues to evolve and pose a great challenge through outbreaks and pandemic spread. Humans are no longer the only and the most important reservoir of

  7. Vancomycin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Michigan, USA, 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Finks, Jennie; Wells, Eden; Dyke, Teri Lee; Husain, Nasir; Plizga, Linda; Heddurshetti, Renuka; Wilkins, Melinda; Rudrik, James; Hageman, Jeffrey; Patel, Jean; Miller, Corinne

    2009-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) infections, which are always methicillin-resistant, are a rare but serious public health concern. We examined 2 cases in Michigan in 2007. Both patients had underlying illnesses. Isolates were vanA-positive. VRSA was neither transmitted to or from another known VRSA patient nor transmitted from patients to identified contacts.

  8. Virulence Factors and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in Ready-to-Eat Foods: Detection of S. aureus Contamination and a High Prevalence of Virulence Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Suat Moi Puah; Kek Heng Chua; Jin Ai Mary Anne Tan

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the leading causes of food poisoning. Its pathogenicity results from the possession of virulence genes that produce different toxins which result in self-limiting to severe illness often requiring hospitalization. In this study of 200 sushi and sashimi samples, S. aureus contamination was confirmed in 26% of the food samples. The S. aureus isolates were further characterized for virulence genes and antibiotic susceptibility. A high incidence of virulence genes ...

  9. Expression and inducibility in Staphylococcus aureus of the mecA gene, which encodes a methicillin-resistant S. aureus-specific penicillin-binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Ubukata, K; Nonoguchi, R; Matsuhashi, M; Konno, M

    1989-01-01

    A beta-lactam-sensitive strain of Staphylococcus aureus could be converted to methicillin resistance by the introduction of a plasmid carrying the 4.3-kilobase HindIII chromosomal DNA fragment which encoded the mecA gene from a methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Transformant cells produced methicillin-resistant S. aureus-specific penicillin-binding protein constitutively, and additional insertion of an inducible penicillinase plasmid caused production of the pencillin-binding protein to become ...

  10. The Policy Determinants of Investment in Tertiary Education. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 576

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Joaquim Oliveira; Boarini, Romina; Strauss, Hubert; de la Maisonneuve, Christine; Saadi, Clarice

    2007-01-01

    This paper assesses how policies and institutions affect private returns to invest in tertiary human capital, the ability of individuals to finance this investment and the institutional characteristics of tertiary education systems. Focusing on core tertiary education services, the paper presents new measures of private returns to tertiary…

  11. Policy Innovation and Tertiary Education Graduation Rates: A Cross-Country Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Jennifer A.; Yu, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This study extends Trow's theory of higher education development to examine changes in national-level tertiary education graduation rates. Applying Trow's framework we arrive at three stages: (1) elite systems with gross tertiary graduation rates less than 15%, (2) massified systems with gross tertiary graduation rates between 15% and 50%, and (3)…

  12. A Comparison of Career Success between Graduates of Vocational and Academic Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes-Gellner, Uschi; Geel, Regula

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses whether tertiary education of different types, i.e., academic or vocational tertiary education, leads to more or less favorable labor market outcomes. We study the problem for Switzerland, where more than two thirds of the workforce gain vocational secondary degrees and a substantial number go on to a vocational tertiary degree…

  13. Colombia - Assisting Talented Students from Low-income Families Attend Tertiary Education

    OpenAIRE

    Cerdán-Infantes, Pedro; Blom, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    With the support of the ACCES (Acceso Con Calidad a la Educacion Superior, in Spanish) Project Colombia shifted its tertiary education policy, implementing comprehensive reforms to improve equity of tertiary education. The result of this shift has been impressive: enrollment in tertiary education increased by 30 percent in the last 3 years. The project has contributed to improved access to...

  14. Improving Incentives in Tertiary Education in Belgium. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 587

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoj, Jens

    2007-01-01

    The tertiary education system has been transformed from an elite-oriented system to a system providing tertiary education to a much larger share of each new generation. This re-orientation has contributed to raising education attainment in Belgium. However, in many respects the organisation of the tertiary education systems has not been changed…

  15. Analysis of Management Practices in Lagos State Tertiary Institutions through Total Quality Management Structural Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbdulAzeez, Abbas Tunde

    2016-01-01

    This research investigated total quality management practices and quality teacher education in public tertiary institutions in Lagos State. The study was therefore designed to analyse management practices in Lagos state tertiary institutions through total quality management structural framework. The selected public tertiary institutions in Lagos…

  16. Synthesis of sulfonamides via copper-catalyzed oxidative C-N bond cleavage of tertiary amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jing; Liu, Zhengyi; Liu, Ping; Sun, Peipei

    2016-08-01

    A copper-catalyzed coupling reaction of sulfonyl chlorides with tertiary amines via the oxidative C-N bond cleavage of tertiary amines was developed. Sulfonamides were synthesized using this strategy in moderate to good yields. The reaction was applicable to various tertiary amines, as well as sulfonyl chlorides. PMID:27356858

  17. Complex network perspective on structure and function of Staphylococcus aureus metabolic network

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L Ying; D W Ding

    2013-02-01

    With remarkable advances in reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic networks, uncovering complex network structure and function from these networks is becoming one of the most important topics in system biology. This work aims at studying the structure and function of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) metabolic network by complex network methods. We first generated a metabolite graph from the recently reconstructed high-quality S. aureus metabolic network model. Then, based on `bow tie' structure character, we explain and discuss the global structure of S. aureus metabolic network. The functional significance, global structural properties, modularity and centrality analysis of giant strong component in S. aureus metabolic networks are studied.

  18. Suppression of a deletion mutation in the gene encoding essential PBP2b reveals a new lytic transglycosylase involved in peripheral peptidoglycan synthesis in Streptococcus pneumoniae D39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Ho-Ching Tiffany; Zheng, Jiaqi J; Magallon, Ariel N; Ryan, John D; Yunck, Rachel; Rued, Britta E; Bernhardt, Thomas G; Winkler, Malcolm E

    2016-06-01

    In ellipsoid-shaped ovococcus bacteria, such as the pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus), side-wall (peripheral) peptidoglycan (PG) synthesis emanates from midcells and is catalyzed by the essential class B penicillin-binding protein PBP2b transpeptidase (TP). We report that mutations that inactivate the pneumococcal YceG-domain protein, Spd_1346 (renamed MltG), remove the requirement for PBP2b. ΔmltG mutants in unencapsulated strains accumulate inactivation mutations of class A PBP1a, which possesses TP and transglycosylase (TG) activities. The 'synthetic viable' genetic relationship between Δpbp1a and ΔmltG mutations extends to essential ΔmreCD and ΔrodZ mutations that misregulate peripheral PG synthesis. Remarkably, the single MltG(Y488D) change suppresses the requirement for PBP2b, MreCD, RodZ and RodA. Structural modeling and comparisons, catalytic-site changes and an interspecies chimera indicate that pneumococcal MltG is the functional homologue of the recently reported MltG endo-lytic transglycosylase of Escherichia coli. Depletion of pneumococcal MltG or mltG(Y488D) increases sphericity of cells, and MltG localizes with peripheral PG synthesis proteins during division. Finally, growth of Δpbp1a ΔmltG or mltG(Y488D) mutants depends on induction of expression of the WalRK TCS regulon of PG hydrolases. These results fit a model in which MltG releases anchored PG glycan strands synthesized by PBP1a for crosslinking by a PBP2b:RodA complex in peripheral PG synthesis. PMID:26933838

  19. Peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 enhances experimental asthma by promoting Th2 and Th17 and limiting regulatory T cell and plasmacytoid dendritic cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin Yong; Jing, Xuefang; Gupta, Dipika; Dziarski, Roman

    2013-04-01

    Asthma is a common inflammatory disease involving cross-talk between innate and adaptive immunity. We reveal that antibacterial innate immunity protein, peptidoglycan recognition protein (Pglyrp)1, is involved in the development of allergic asthma. Pglyrp1(-/-) mice developed less severe asthma than wild-type (WT) mice following sensitization with house dust mite (allergen) (HDM). HDM-sensitized Pglyrp1(-/-) mice, compared with WT mice, had diminished bronchial hyperresponsiveness (lung airway resistance); numbers of eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lungs; inflammatory cell infiltrates in the lungs around bronchi, bronchioles, and pulmonary arteries and veins; lung remodeling (mucin-producing goblet cell hyperplasia and metaplasia and smooth muscle hypertrophy and fibrosis); levels of IgE, eotaxins, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-17 in the lungs; and numbers of Th2 and Th17 cells and expression of their marker genes in the lungs. The mechanism underlying this decreased sensitivity of Pglyrp1(-/-) mice to asthma was increased generation and activation of CD8α(+)β(+) and CD8α(+)β(-) plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) and increased recruitment and activity of regulatory T (Treg) cells in the lungs. In vivo depletion of pDC in HDM-sensitized Pglyrp1(-/-) mice reversed the low responsive asthma phenotype of Pglyrp1(-/-) mice to resemble the more severe WT phenotype. Thus, Pglyrp1(-/-) mice efficiently control allergic asthma by upregulating pDC and Treg cells in the lungs, whereas in WT mice, Pglyrp1 is proinflammatory and decreases pDC and Treg cells and increases proasthmatic Th2 and Th17 responses. Blocking Pglyrp1 or enhancing pDC in the lungs may be beneficial for prevention and treatment of asthma. PMID:23420883

  20. The Equity Imperative in Tertiary Education: Promoting Fairness and Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmi, Jamil; Bassett, Roberta Malee

    2014-01-01

    While the share of the tertiary education age cohort (19-25) which is being given the opportunity to study has increased worldwide over the past two decades, this does not in fact translate into reduced inequality. For many young people, especially in the developing world, major obstacles such as disparities in terms of gender, minority population…

  1. Equity in Tertiary Education in Central America : An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Bashir, Sajitha; Luque, Javier

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the evolution in socio-economic and ethnic disparities in tertiary education attainment, participation, and completion and labor market outcomes in the six countries of Central America. There is evidence of differential progress, with Costa Rica, a middle-income country, and Nicaragua, a low-income country, having improved participation of low-income students in tertiar...

  2. Tertiary Control for Optimal Unbalance Compensation in Islanded Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Lexuan; Tang, Fen; Savaghebi, Mehdi;

    2014-01-01

    in different areas and for different consumers can be different, this paper implements a tertiary control over secondary and primary control levels so as to achieve optimal unbalance compensation control. Hardware-in-the-loop results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method....

  3. Sexual harassment in tertiary institutions: A comparative perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph Janice

    2015-01-01

    Sexual harassment is not a new phenomenon in tertiary institutions. It has been receiving considerable attention in research and the media and public awareness has increased dramatically. However, the term sexual harassment is not used uniformly across the globe because countries have defined it differently. Consequently, prevalence of sexual harassment in education varies across cultures. This paper examines sexual harassment from a comparative perspective...

  4. Tertiary Educational Institutions for Teaching, Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoo, Sikiru A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the quality of teaching and research in developing human resources to facilitate the development of tertiary education in the nation. It discusses the challenges and the roles of research in higher education. The author argues that the combination of content and pedagogical knowledge could help to develop human resources for…

  5. A Conceptual Approach for Blended Leadership for Tertiary Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sandra; Harvey, Marina; Lefoe, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, the tertiary education sector has adopted new administrative management approaches, with the aim of improving accountable and strategic focus. Over the same period, the question of how to build leadership capacity to improve learning and teaching and research outcomes has led to discussion on what constitutes academic…

  6. Competition and Reform of the New Zealand Tertiary Education Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Malcolm

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to use an historical approach to examine the changing nature, size and diversification of education and training in New Zealand. In particular, attention will be concentrated on the impact of the introduction of competition into the New Zealand tertiary education industry since 1989. It will examine the relationship…

  7. The Place of VET in the Tertiary Sector. Conference Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beddie, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    The utilitarian spirit of Australian education has meant that since the nineteenth century the notion of tertiary education has embraced all post-school learning, delivered in sandstone universities or working men's institutes or on the job. This is not the definition the peak bodies TAFE (Technical and Further Education) Directors Australia (TDA)…

  8. English Textbooks in Parallel-Language Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecorari, Diane; Shaw, Philip; Malmstrom, Hans; Irvine, Aileen

    2011-01-01

    Tertiary education in many countries is increasingly bilingual, with English used in parallel with the national language, particularly as a reading language. This article describes the results of a survey of student attitudes toward, and reading practices regarding, English language textbooks. Over 1,000 students at three Swedish universities…

  9. Pedagogical Practices of Reflection in Tertiary Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leijen, Ali; Lam, Ineke; Simons, P. Robert-Jan; Wildschut, Liesbeth

    2008-01-01

    The three different perspectives on reflection in education are embedded in the philosophical traditions of pragmatism, critical social theory and Kant. We aimed to describe the pedagogical practices of reflection, and to develop a descriptive model of the practices of reflection in tertiary dance education which can be used by dance educators to…

  10. Usability of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in a tertiary memory clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C.; Bahl, J.C.; Heegaard, N.H.;

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Assays for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of total tau, phospho-tau protein and beta-amyloid 1-42 have been available for some years. The aim of the study was to assess the usability of these biomarkers in a mixed population of tertiary dementia referral patients in a university-based memory...

  11. Teaching the Attributes of Venture Teamwork in Tertiary Entrepreneurship Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotey, Bernice

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper seeks to demonstrate the characteristics of group work that are required to teach the attributes of real world venture teamwork in tertiary entrepreneurship programmes. Design/methodology/approach: One-tailed Spearman correlation analysis is used to assess the associations between students' grades in four group assessment tasks…

  12. Secret Cults in Tertiary Institutions in Nigeria: An Appraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluede, Raymond O. A.; Oniyama, Hope O.

    2009-01-01

    Cultism has remained a problem for tertiary institutions in Nigeria and the Larger Nigerian society since the first decade of the existence of university education in Nigeria. It has been worrisome to have children on campuses and several measures had been adopted to curb cultism some of such measures were the expulsion of the cultists caught and…

  13. Tertiary Institutions, Entrepreneurship Education and Youth Empowerment in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasunkanmi, Abari Ayodeji; Olufunke, Oyetola Idowu; Adetayo, Okunuga Adedapo

    2013-01-01

    Entrepreneurship Education has recently become a global phenomenon in the development of world youths for self employment and self-reliance. The Nigerian nation cannot afford to be left out and left behind in this new trend in education both at the secondary and tertiary levels. However, while the Universal Basic Education (UBE) curriculum has…

  14. Food Insecurity: Is It an Issue among Tertiary Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Danielle; Ramsey, Rebecca; Ong, Kai Wen

    2014-01-01

    Insufficient access to food is known to compromise tertiary studies. Students often belong to groups known to have poor food security such as those renting or relying on government payments. The present study administered a cross-sectional survey incorporating the USDA food security survey module (FSSM) to 810 students at a metropolitan university…

  15. Patterns of cancer occurrence in a tertiary care centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atla Bhagyalakshmi

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: The current study mainly summarizes the different patterns of cancer incidence in the tertiary care centre region. Cancer incidence is increasing gradually among the population and there is raise of cancer incidence in females compared to their counterparts. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 2153-2163

  16. Anisotropy of tertiary creep in aluminium-based composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dobeš, Ferdinand; Milička, Karel

    Naples : University of Naples, 2005 - (Crivelli-Visconti, I.), s. 225-226 [Advancing with composites 2005. Naples (IT), 11.10.2005-14.10.2005] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : metal matrix composite * tertiary creep * aluminium alloys Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials

  17. STUDY OF MATERNAL MORTALITY IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Sandhya Devi; Madhuri; Sarada Bai; Srividya

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A woman dies from complications of child birth every minute . The major causes for maternal mortality in India are uncontrolled fertility , inaccessibility or inadequate utilization of health care facilities , illiteracy , ignorance and gender discrimination . OBJECTIV ES: (1 ) To identify various causes of maternal deaths in a teaching hospital . (2 ) To study the profile of population attending the tertiary hos...

  18. Establishing Self-access with CALL in Chinese Tertiary Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangYuwen; LiHeng

    2004-01-01

    This paper aims tO bridge up the gap between theoretical perspectives of self-access language learning (SALL) and practice of computer assisted language learning (CALL) in Chinese tertiary education. While much of the paper presented ideas dealing with issues related to SALL and CALL, they are supported by references to relevant literature and research.

  19. Accountability of Tertiary Education at the National Level: A Chimera?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Alan; O'Byrne, Garry

    1979-01-01

    The concept of accountability and its application to Australian higher education are discussed. It is suggested that due to political, financial, and educational characteristics of tertiary education at the national system level there are fundamental and insoluble problems associated with achieving accountability. (SF)

  20. Orogenic Tertiary magmatism on the Macedonian Dinarides: a Review

    OpenAIRE

    Boev, Blazo; Yanev, Yotzo

    2001-01-01

    Widespread Tertiary magmatism of orogenic signature developed on the Macedonian part of the Dinarides, essentially in the Serbo-Macedonian massif and in the Vardar zone (KARAMATA et al., 1992). Orogenic magmatic rocks (predominantly volcanic) are presented in 5 areas (from east to west): the Osogovo-Besna Kobila, Kratovo-Zletovo, BuCim-Borov Dol, Dojran and Kozuf.

  1. Reflections on the Tertiary Education Sector in Australia. Conference Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmel, Tom

    2009-01-01

    The split between higher education and vocational education and training (VET) in Australia is not clean. This paper discusses a number of aspects of this tertiary education sector: the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF), which describes the qualifications offered by the three education sectors: schools, higher education and VET; student…

  2. Mining tertiary structural motifs for assessment of designability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2013-01-01

    The observation of a limited secondary-structural alphabet in native proteins, with significant sequence preferences, has profoundly influenced the fields of protein design and structure prediction (Simons, Kooperberg, Huang, & Baker, 1997; Verschueren et al., 2011). In the era of structural genomics, as the size of the structural dataset continues to grow rapidly, it is becoming possible to extend this analysis to tertiary structural motifs and their sequences. For a hypothetical tertiary motif, the rate of its utilization in natural proteins may be used to assess its designability-the ease with which the motif can be realized with natural amino acids. This requires a structural similarity search methodology, which rather than looking for global topological agreement (more appropriate for categorization of full proteins or domains), identifies detailed geometric matches. In this chapter, we introduce such a method, called MaDCaT, and demonstrate its use by assessing the designability landscapes of two tertiary structural motifs. We also show that such analysis can establish structure/sequence links by providing the sequence constraints necessary to encode designable motifs. As logical extension of their secondary-structure counterparts, tertiary structural preferences will likely prove extremely useful in de novo protein design and structure prediction. PMID:23422424

  3. Heme Recognition By a Staphylococcus Aureus IsdE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, J.C.; Vermeiren, C.L.; Heinrichs, D.E.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-06-03

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen and a leading cause of hospital acquired infections. Because the free iron concentration in the human body is too low to support growth, S. aureus must acquire iron from host sources. Heme iron is the most prevalent iron reservoir in the human body and a predominant source of iron for S. aureus. The iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) system removes heme from host heme proteins and transfers it to IsdE, the cognate substrate-binding lipoprotein of an ATP-binding cassette transporter, for import and subsequent degradation. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the soluble portion of the IsdE lipoprotein in complex with heme. The structure reveals a bi-lobed topology formed by an N- and C-terminal domain bridged by a single {alpha}-helix. The structure places IsdE as a member of the helical backbone metal receptor superfamily. A six-coordinate heme molecule is bound in the groove established at the domain interface, and the heme iron is coordinated in a novel fashion for heme transporters by Met{sup 78} and His{sup 229}. Both heme propionate groups are secured by H-bonds to IsdE main chain and side chain groups. Of these residues, His{sup 299} is essential for IsdE-mediated heme uptake by S. aureus when growth on heme as a sole iron source is measured. Multiple sequence alignments of homologues from several other Gram-positive bacteria, including the human pathogens pyogenes, Bacillus anthracis, and Listeria monocytogenes, suggest that these other systems function equivalently to S. aureus IsdE with respect to heme binding and transport.

  4. Characterization of a mouse-adapted Staphylococcus aureus strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtfreter, Silva; Radcliff, Fiona J; Grumann, Dorothee; Read, Hannah; Johnson, Sarah; Monecke, Stefan; Ritchie, Stephen; Clow, Fiona; Goerke, Christiane; Bröker, Barbara M; Fraser, John D; Wiles, Siouxsie

    2013-01-01

    More effective antibiotics and a protective vaccine are desperately needed to combat the 'superbug' Staphylococcus aureus. While in vivo pathogenicity studies routinely involve infection of mice with human S. aureus isolates, recent genetic studies have demonstrated that S. aureus lineages are largely host-specific. The use of such animal-adapted S. aureus strains may therefore be a promising approach for developing more clinically relevant animal infection models. We have isolated a mouse-adapted S. aureus strain (JSNZ) which caused a severe outbreak of preputial gland abscesses among male C57BL/6J mice. We aimed to extensively characterize this strain on a genomic level and determine its virulence potential in murine colonization and infection models. JSNZ belongs to the MLST type ST88, rare among human isolates, and lacks an hlb-converting phage encoding human-specific immune evasion factors. Naive mice were found to be more susceptible to nasal and gastrointestinal colonization with JSNZ than with the human-derived Newman strain. Furthermore, naïve mice required antibiotic pre-treatment to become colonized with Newman. In contrast, JSNZ was able to colonize mice in the absence of antibiotic treatment suggesting that this strain can compete with the natural flora for space and nutrients. In a renal abscess model, JSNZ caused more severe disease than Newman with greater weight loss and bacterial burden. In contrast to most other clinical isolates, JSNZ can also be readily genetically modified by phage transduction and electroporation. In conclusion, the mouse-adapted strain JSNZ may represent a valuable tool for studying aspects of mucosal colonization and for screening novel vaccines and therapies directed at preventing colonization. PMID:24023720

  5. Staphylococcus aureus phage types and their correlation to antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehndiratta P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Context: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most devastating human pathogen. The organism has a differential ability to spread and cause outbreak of infections. Characterization of these strains is important to control the spread of infection in the hospitals as well as in the community. Aim: To identify the currently existing phage groups of Staphylococcus aureus, their prevalence and resistance to antibiotics. Materials and Methods: Study was undertaken on 252 Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from clinical samples. Strains were phage typed and their resistance to antibiotics was determined following standard microbiological procedures. Statistical Analysis: Chi square test was used to compare the antibiotic susceptibility between methicillin resistant Staph. aureus (MRSA and methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA strains. Results: Prevalence of MRSA and MSSA strains was found to be 29.36% and 70.65% respectively. Of these 17.56% of MRSA and 40.44% of MSSA strains were community acquired. All the MSSA strains belonging to phage type 81 from the community were sensitive to all the antibiotics tested including clindamycin and were resistant to penicillin. Forty five percent strains of phage group III and 39% of non-typable MRSA strains from the hospital were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Conclusion: The study revealed that predominant phage group amongst MRSA strains was phage group III and amongst MSSA from the community was phage group NA (phage type 81. MSSA strains isolated from the community differed significantly from hospital strains in their phage type and antibiotic susceptibility. A good correlation was observed between community acquired strains of phage type 81 and sensitivity to gentamycin and clindamycin.

  6. Characterization of a mouse-adapted Staphylococcus aureus strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Holtfreter

    Full Text Available More effective antibiotics and a protective vaccine are desperately needed to combat the 'superbug' Staphylococcus aureus. While in vivo pathogenicity studies routinely involve infection of mice with human S. aureus isolates, recent genetic studies have demonstrated that S. aureus lineages are largely host-specific. The use of such animal-adapted S. aureus strains may therefore be a promising approach for developing more clinically relevant animal infection models. We have isolated a mouse-adapted S. aureus strain (JSNZ which caused a severe outbreak of preputial gland abscesses among male C57BL/6J mice. We aimed to extensively characterize this strain on a genomic level and determine its virulence potential in murine colonization and infection models. JSNZ belongs to the MLST type ST88, rare among human isolates, and lacks an hlb-converting phage encoding human-specific immune evasion factors. Naive mice were found to be more susceptible to nasal and gastrointestinal colonization with JSNZ than with the human-derived Newman strain. Furthermore, naïve mice required antibiotic pre-treatment to become colonized with Newman. In contrast, JSNZ was able to colonize mice in the absence of antibiotic treatment suggesting that this strain can compete with the natural flora for space and nutrients. In a renal abscess model, JSNZ caused more severe disease than Newman with greater weight loss and bacterial burden. In contrast to most other clinical isolates, JSNZ can also be readily genetically modified by phage transduction and electroporation. In conclusion, the mouse-adapted strain JSNZ may represent a valuable tool for studying aspects of mucosal colonization and for screening novel vaccines and therapies directed at preventing colonization.

  7. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisling F Brown

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we demonstrated that prior exposure to S. aureus enhanced IFNγ responses upon subsequent infection, while adoptive transfer of S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells was protective in naïve mice. Translating these findings, we found that S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells were also significantly expanded during human S. aureus bloodstream infection (BSI. These Th1 cells were CD45RO+, indicative of a memory phenotype. Thus, exposure to S. aureus induces memory Th1 cells in mice and humans, identifying Th1 cells as potential S. aureus vaccine targets. Consequently, we developed a model vaccine comprising staphylococcal clumping factor A, which we demonstrate to be an effective human T cell antigen, combined with the Th1-driving adjuvant CpG. This novel Th1-inducing vaccine conferred significant protection during S. aureus infection in mice. This study notably advances our understanding of S. aureus cellular immunity, and demonstrates for the first time that a correlate of S. aureus protective immunity identified in mice may be relevant in humans.

  8. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Aisling F; Murphy, Alison G; Lalor, Stephen J; Leech, John M; O'Keeffe, Kate M; Mac Aogáin, Micheál; O'Halloran, Dara P; Lacey, Keenan A; Tavakol, Mehri; Hearnden, Claire H; Fitzgerald-Hughes, Deirdre; Humphreys, Hilary; Fennell, Jérôme P; van Wamel, Willem J; Foster, Timothy J; Geoghegan, Joan A; Lavelle, Ed C; Rogers, Thomas R; McLoughlin, Rachel M

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we demonstrated that prior exposure to S. aureus enhanced IFNγ responses upon subsequent infection, while adoptive transfer of S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells was protective in naïve mice. Translating these findings, we found that S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells were also significantly expanded during human S. aureus bloodstream infection (BSI). These Th1 cells were CD45RO+, indicative of a memory phenotype. Thus, exposure to S. aureus induces memory Th1 cells in mice and humans, identifying Th1 cells as potential S. aureus vaccine targets. Consequently, we developed a model vaccine comprising staphylococcal clumping factor A, which we demonstrate to be an effective human T cell antigen, combined with the Th1-driving adjuvant CpG. This novel Th1-inducing vaccine conferred significant protection during S. aureus infection in mice. This study notably advances our understanding of S. aureus cellular immunity, and demonstrates for the first time that a correlate of S. aureus protective immunity identified in mice may be relevant in humans. PMID:26539822

  9. Sensitive and rapid detection of staphylococcus aureus in milk via cell binding domain of lysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junping; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Yun; Li, Heng; Yang, Hang; Wei, Hongping

    2016-03-15

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is an important food-borne pathogen in dairy products contaminated through raw ingredients or improper food handling. Rapid detection of S. aureus with high sensitivity is of significance for food quality and safety. In this study, a new method was developed for detecting S. aureus in milk by coupling immunomagnetic separation with enzyme linked cell wall binding domain (CBD) of lysin plyV12, which can bind to S. aureus with high affinity. There are millions of binding sites present on the cell surface of S. aureus for the CBD attachment, which greatly improves the detection sensitivity. The method has the overall testing time of only 1.5h with the detection limit of 4 × 10(3)CFU/mL in spiked milk. Because it is simple, rapid and sensitive, this method could be used for the detection of S. aureus in various food samples. PMID:26433070

  10. Antibiotic-mediated selection of quorum-sensing-negative Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulander, Wilhelm Erik Axel; Varming, Anders Nissen; Bæk, Kristoffer Torbjørn;

    2012-01-01

    -acquired S. aureus infections and suggest that the adaptability of S. aureus to antibiotics involves the agr locus. IMPORTANCE: Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequently isolated pathogen in intensive care units and a common cause of nosocomial infections, resulting in a high degree of morbidity and......Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal that at times turns into a serious bacterial pathogen causing life-threatening infections. For the delicate control of virulence, S. aureus employs the agr quorum-sensing system that, via the intracellular effector molecule RNAIII, regulates virulence gene...... increases the agr-mediated fitness cost by inducing the expression of RNAIII. Thus, the extensive use of antibiotics in hospitals may explain why agr-negative variants are frequently isolated from hospital-acquired S. aureus infections but rarely found among community-acquired S. aureus strains. Importantly...

  11. Shedding of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from adult and pediatric bathers in marine waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinigalliano Christopher D

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin resistant S. aureus, MRSA, are human colonizing bacteria that commonly cause opportunistic infections primarily involving the skin in otherwise healthy individuals. These infections have been linked to close contact and sharing of common facilities such as locker rooms, schools and prisons Waterborne exposure and transmission routes have not been traditionally associated with S. aureus infections. Coastal marine waters and beaches used for recreation are potential locations for the combination of high numbers of people with close contact and therefore could contribute to the exposure to and infection by these organisms. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the amount and characteristics of the shedding of methicillin sensitive S. aureus, MSSA and MRSA by human bathers in marine waters. Results Nasal cultures were collected from bathers, and water samples were collected from two sets of pools designed to isolate and quantify MSSA and MRSA shed by adults and toddlers during exposure to marine water. A combination of selective growth media and biochemical and polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to identify and perform limited characterization of the S. aureus isolated from the water and the participants. Twelve of 15 MRSA isolates collected from the water had identical genetic characteristics as the organisms isolated from the participants exposed to that water while the remaining 3 MRSA were without matching nasal isolates from participants. The amount of S. aureus shed per person corresponded to 105 to 106 CFU per person per 15-minute bathing period, with 15 to 20% of this quantity testing positive for MRSA. Conclusions This is the first report of a comparison of human colonizing organisms with bacteria from human exposed marine water attempting to confirm that participants shed their own colonizing MSSA and MRSA into their bathing milieu. These findings clearly

  12. Superbugs causing ventilator associated pneumonia in a tertiary care hospital and the return of pre-antibiotic era!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Qureshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rise in super bugs causing Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP is a major cause of mortality and morbidity despite recent advances in management owing to the looming ′antibiotic apocalypse′. The aetiology and susceptibility pattern of the VAP isolates varies with patient population, type of intensive care unit (ICU and is an urgent diagnostic challenge. The present study carried out for a period of one year in a tertiary care hospital, enrolled patients on mechanical ventilation (MV for ≥48 hrs. Endotracheal aspirates (ETA from suspected VAP patients were processed by semi quantitative method. Staphylococus aureus, members of Enterobacteriaceae were more common in early onset VAP (EOVAP, while Nonfermenting Gram negative bacilli (NFGNB were significantly associated with late onset VAP (LOVAP. Most of the isolates were multi drug resistant (MDR super bugs. With limited treatment options left for this crisis situation like the pre-antibiotic era; it is an alarm for rational antibiotic therapy usage and intensive education programs.

  13. Antimicrobial potential of Pakistani medicinal plants against multi-drug resistance Staphylococcus aureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rahat Ejaz; Usman A Ashfaq; Sobia Idrees

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine resistance patterns of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) isolated from different areas of Pakistan and to identify antimicrobial agents against multi-drug resistant S.aureus strains. Methods: A total of 67 samples (sewerage, nasal and milk) were collected from different farm areas of Pakistan to identify local strains of S. aureus. Sixteen out of 67 samples were positive for S.aureus. Only 6 out of 16 S. aureus strains showed resistance to antibiotics. Then the antibacterial effect of 29 medicinal plants was evaluated on these S. aureus isolates and a standard S. aureus strain ATCC 25923. The solvents used for the extraction of plants were acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide and methanol. The in vitro antibacterial activity was performed using agar disc diffusion method. Moreover, minimum inhibitory concentration of effective medicinal plant extracts was identified through micro-dilution method to find out their 50% inhibitory concentration.Results:Plant extracts of 5 medicinal plants (Psidium guajava, Nigella sativa, Piper nigrum, Valeriana jatamansi, and Cucurbita pepo) exhibited antibacterial activity against locally isolated multidrug resistant strains of S. aureus. The minimum inhibitory concentration of these extracts was ranged from 0.328 to 5.000 mg/mL. Conclusions: Plant extracts of Psidium guajava, Piper nigrum seed, Valeriana jatamansi, Cucurbita pepo and Nigella sativa showed significant in vitro antibacterial activity and thus, such findings may serve as valuable contribution in the treatment of infection and may contribute to the development of potential antimicrobial agents against multi drug resistant strains of S. aureus.

  14. Antimicrobial potential of Pakistani medicinal plants against multi-drug resistance Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahat Ejaz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine resistance patterns of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus isolated from different areas of Pakistan and to identify antimicrobial agents against multi-drug resistant S. aureus strains. Methods: A total of 67 samples (sewerage, nasal and milk were collected from different farm areas of Pakistan to identify local strains of S. aureus. Sixteen out of 67 samples were positive for S. aureus. Only 6 out of 16 S. aureus strains showed resistance to antibiotics. Then the antibacterial effect of 29 medicinal plants was evaluated on these S. aureus isolates and a standard S. aureus strain ATCC 25923. The solvents used for the extraction of plants were acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide and methanol. The in vitro antibacterial activity was performed using agar disc diffusion method. Moreover, minimum inhibitory concentration of effective medicinal plant extracts was identified through micro-dilution method to find out their 50% inhibitory concentration. Results: Plant extracts of 5 medicinal plants (Psidium guajava, Nigella sativa, Piper nigrum, Valeriana jatamansi, and Cucurbita pepo exhibited antibacterial activity against locally isolated multidrug resistant strains of S. aureus. The minimum inhibitory concentration of these extracts was ranged from 0.328 to 5.000 mg/mL. Conclusions: Plant extracts of Psidium guajava, Piper nigrum seed, Valeriana jatamansi, Cucurbita pepo and Nigella sativa showed significant in vitro antibacterial activity and thus, such findings may serve as valuable contribution in the treatment of infection and may contribute to the development of potential antimicrobial agents against multi drug resistant strains of S. aureus

  15. Portación de Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxigénicos en manipuladores de alimentos Carriage of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus in food handlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Figueroa G

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the most common pathogens causing alimentary toxi-infections is Staphylococcus aureus (S aureus. The presence of S aureus in food, indicates flaws during food manipulations. For this reason most sanitary norms require the detection of S aureus carriers. Aim: To determine the carriage rate of enterotoxin producing S aureus strains in food handlers, and to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility to six antimicrobial agents. Materials and Methods: A total of 102 food handlers from 19 restaurants in Santiago, were analyzed. Samples for microbiological analysis were obtained with a swab from the retropharynx. Results: S aureus grew in 35 out of the 102 samples obtained (34%. Further analysis revealed that 19/35 (54% strains were able to produce enterotoxins. Therefore the corrected carriage rate was 19% (19/102. The most frequently detected enterotoxin was the type A (12/19. All S aureus isolates were resistant to penicillin and susceptible to oxacillin, clindamycin, kanamycin, vancomycin and linezolid. Conclusions: The carriage rate of S aureus in food handlers is similar to the rate reported in the general population in our country. These results confirm the need for education and training programs in food safety, directed to food handlers (Rev Méd Chile 2002; 130: 859-64

  16. Mastitis Bovina: Resistencia a antibióticos de cepas de Staphylococcus aureus asiladas de leche (Bovine Mastitis: Antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from milk)

    OpenAIRE

    Pellegrino, MS; Frola, ID; Odierno, LM; Bogni, CI

    2011-01-01

    ResumenLa mastitis bovina es considerada la enfermedad infecciosa del ganado lechero de mayor impacto económico mundial, siendo Staphylococcus aureus el principal agente patógeno en muchos países.SummaryBovine mastitis is a frequent cause of economic loss in worldwide dairy herds, being Staphylococcus aureus the main etiological agent in many countries.

  17. Mastitis Bovina: Resistencia a antibióticos de cepas de Staphylococcus aureus asiladas de leche (Bovine Mastitis: Antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pellegrino, MS

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available ResumenLa mastitis bovina es considerada la enfermedad infecciosa del ganado lechero de mayor impacto económico mundial, siendo Staphylococcus aureus el principal agente patógeno en muchos países.SummaryBovine mastitis is a frequent cause of economic loss in worldwide dairy herds, being Staphylococcus aureus the main etiological agent in many countries.

  18. Cavity Forming Pneumonia Due to Staphylococcus aureus Following Dengue Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Nobuyuki; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Tachikawa, Natsuo; Amano, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Yohei; Kosuge, Youko

    2015-11-01

    While visiting Malaysia, a 22-year-old previously healthy Japanese man developed myalgia, headache, and fever, leading to a diagnosis of classical dengue fever. After improvement and returning to Japan after a five day hospitalization, he developed productive cough several days after defervescing from dengue. Computed tomography (CT) thorax scan showed multiple lung cavities. A sputum smear revealed leukocytes with phagocytized gram-positive cocci in clusters, and grew an isolate Staphylococcus aureus sensitive to semi-synthetic penicillin; he was treated successfully with ceftriaxone and cephalexin. This second reported case of pneumonia due to S. aureus occurring after dengue fever, was associated both with nosocomial exposure and might have been associated with dengue-associated immunosuppression. Clinicians should pay systematic attention to bacterial pneumonia following dengue fever to establish whether such a connection is causally associated. PMID:26304914

  19. Analysis of the peptidoglycan hydrolase complement of Lactobacillus casei and characterization of the major γ-D-glutamyl-L-lysyl-endopeptidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Regulski

    Full Text Available Peptidoglycan (PG is the major component of Gram positive bacteria cell wall and is essential for bacterial integrity and shape. Bacteria synthesize PG hydrolases (PGHs which are able to cleave bonds in their own PG and play major roles in PG remodelling required for bacterial growth and division. Our aim was to identify the main PGHs in Lactobacillus casei BL23, a lactic acid bacterium with probiotic properties.The PGH complement was first identified in silico by amino acid sequence similarity searches of the BL23 genome sequence. Thirteen PGHs were detected with different predicted hydrolytic specificities. Transcription of the genes was confirmed by RT-PCR. A proteomic analysis combining the use of SDS-PAGE and LC-MS/MS revealed the main seven PGHs synthesized during growth of L. casei BL23. Among these PGHs, LCABL_02770 (renamed Lc-p75 was identified as the major one. This protein is the homolog of p75 (Msp1 major secreted protein of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, which was shown to promote survival and growth of intestinal epithelial cells. We identified its hydrolytic specificity on PG and showed that it is a γ-D-glutamyl-L-lysyl-endopeptidase. It has a marked specificity towards PG tetrapeptide chains versus tripeptide chains and for oligomers rather than monomers. Immunofluorescence experiments demonstrated that Lc-p75 localizes at cell septa in agreement with its role in daughter cell separation. It is also secreted under an active form as detected in zymogram. Comparison of the muropeptide profiles of wild type and Lc-p75-negative mutant revealed a decrease of the amount of disaccharide-dipeptide in the mutant PG in agreement with Lc-p75 activity. As a conclusion, Lc-p75 is the major L. casei BL23 PGH with endopeptidase specificity and a key role in daughter cell separation. Further studies will aim at investigating the role of Lc-p75 in the anti-inflammatory potential of L. casei BL23.

  20. STUDY OF MATERNAL MORTALITY IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Devi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A woman dies from complications of child birth every minute . The major causes for maternal mortality in India are uncontrolled fertility , inaccessibility or inadequate utilization of health care facilities , illiteracy , ignorance and gender discrimination . OBJECTIV ES: (1 To identify various causes of maternal deaths in a teaching hospital . (2 To study the profile of population attending the tertiary hospital . Methodology : A retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary hospital over a period of 2 years (January 2013 - December 2014 and data was analysed manually using case sheets and maternal death audit forms . RESULTS: In the study period , there were 11636 deliveries and 97 maternal deaths . The direct causes accounted for 77 maternal deaths with haemorrhage , hype rtension and sepsis as leading causes of maternal mortality . Conclusion : Emphasis on health education , need for regular antenatal checkups and proper training of health personnel is required to reduce maternal mortality .