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Sample records for aureus induced pyemia

  1. A pig model of acute Staphylococcus aureus induced pyemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O. L.; Iburg, T.; Aalbæk, B.;

    2009-01-01

    Background: Sepsis caused by Staphylococcus aureus constitutes an important cause of morbidity and mortality in humans, and the incidence of this disease-entity is increasing. In this paper we describe the initial microbial dynamics and lesions in pigs experimentally infected with S. aureus......, with the aim of mimicking human sepsis and pyemia. Methods: The study was conducted in anaesthetized and intravenously inoculated pigs, and was based on bacteriological examination of blood and testing of blood for IL-6 and C-reactive protein. Following killing of the animals and necropsy bacteriological...... was not detected in the blood and C-reactive protein did not increase, probably because of the short time course of the study. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the successful induction of acute pyemia (microabscesses), and forms a basis for future experiments that should include inoculation with strains of S...

  2. A pig model of acute Staphylococcus aureus induced pyemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O. L.; Iburg, T.; Aalbæk, B.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Sepsis caused by Staphylococcus aureus constitutes an important cause of morbidity and mortality in humans, and the incidence of this disease-entity is increasing. In this paper we describe the initial microbial dynamics and lesions in pigs experimentally infected with S. aureus......, with the aim of mimicking human sepsis and pyemia. Methods: The study was conducted in anaesthetized and intravenously inoculated pigs, and was based on bacteriological examination of blood and testing of blood for IL-6 and C-reactive protein. Following killing of the animals and necropsy bacteriological...... and histological examinations of different organs were performed 4, 5 or 6 h after inoculation. Results: Clearance of bacteria from the blood was completed within the first 2 h in some of the pigs and the highest bacterial load was recorded in the lungs as compared to the spleen, liver and bones. This probably...

  3. A pig model of acute Staphylococcus aureus induced pyemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O. L.; Iburg, T.; Aalbæk, B.;

    2009-01-01

    Background: Sepsis caused by Staphylococcus aureus constitutes an important cause of morbidity and mortality in humans, and the incidence of this disease-entity is increasing. In this paper we describe the initial microbial dynamics and lesions in pigs experimentally infected with S. aureus....... aureus isolated from man and an extension of the timeframe aiming at inducing sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock....

  4. Tea Tree Oil-Induced Transcriptional Alterations in Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Cuaron, Jesus A.; Dulal, Santosh; Song, Yang; Singh, Atul K; Montelongo, Cesar E.; Yu, Wanqin; Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Jayaswal, Radheshyam K.; Wilkinson, Brian J; Gustafson, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Tea tree oil (TTO) is a steam distillate of Melaleuca alternifolia that demonstrates broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. This study was designed to document how TTO challenge influences the Staphylococcus aureus transcriptome. Overall, bioinformatic analyses (S. aureus microarray meta-database) revealed that both ethanol and TTO induce related transcriptional alterations. TTO challenge led to the down-regulation of genes involved with energy-intensive transcription and translation, and alt...

  5. Tea tree oil-induced transcriptional alterations in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuaron, Jesus A; Dulal, Santosh; Song, Yang; Singh, Atul K; Montelongo, Cesar E; Yu, Wanqin; Nagarajan, Vijayaraj; Jayaswal, Radheshyam K; Wilkinson, Brian J; Gustafson, John E

    2013-03-01

    Tea tree oil (TTO) is a steam distillate of Melaleuca alternifolia that demonstrates broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. This study was designed to document how TTO challenge influences the Staphylococcus aureus transcriptome. Overall, bioinformatic analyses (S. aureus microarray meta-database) revealed that both ethanol and TTO induce related transcriptional alterations. TTO challenge led to the down-regulation of genes involved with energy-intensive transcription and translation, and altered the regulation of genes involved with heat shock (e.g. clpC, clpL, ctsR, dnaK, groES, groEL, grpE and hrcA) and cell wall metabolism (e.g. cwrA, isaA, sle1, vraSR and vraX). Inactivation of the heat shock gene dnaK or vraSR which encodes a two-component regulatory system that responds to peptidoglycan biosynthesis inhibition led to an increase in TTO susceptibility which demonstrates a protective role for these genes in the S. aureus TTO response. A gene (mmpL) encoding a putative resistance, nodulation and cell division efflux pump was also highly induced by TTO. The principal antimicrobial TTO terpene, terpinen-4-ol, altered ten genes in a transcriptional direction analogous to TTO. Collectively, this study provides additional insight into the response of a bacterial pathogen to the antimicrobial terpene mixture TTO.

  6. 哈士蟆治疗脓毒血症的可行性分析%Possibility analysis of Rana Temporaria chensinensis Dacid applied in pyemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张娴; 盛颖

    2015-01-01

    To discuss the pathogenesis,Chinese and west medical curing method and pharmacology of Rana Temporaria chensinensis Dacid applied in pyemia,and to raise the possibility of Rana Temporaria chensinensis Dacid applied in pyemia.%探讨了脓毒血症的病机、中西医治法以及哈士蟆应用于脓毒血症的药理研究,提出哈士蟆治疗脓毒血症的可行性。

  7. Isorhamnetin Attenuates Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Lung Cell Injury by Inhibiting Alpha-Hemolysin Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lanxiang; Li, Hongen; Wang, Laiying; Song, Zexin; Shi, Lei; Li, Wenhua; Deng, Xuming; Wang, Jianfeng

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, like other gram-positive pathogens, has evolved a large repertoire of virulence factors as a powerful weapon to subvert the host immune system, among which alpha-hemolysin (Hla), a secreted pore-forming cytotoxin, plays a preeminent role. We observed a concentration-dependent reduction in Hla production by S. aureus in the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of isorhamnetin, a flavonoid from the fruits of Hippophae rhamnoides L., which has little antibacterial activity. We further evaluate the effect of isorhamnetin on the transcription of the Hla-encoding gene hla and RNAIII, an effector molecule in the agr system. Isorhamnetin significantly down-regulated RNAIII expression and subsequently inhibited hla transcription. In a co-culture of S. aureus and lung cells, topical isorhamnetin treatment protected against S. aureus-induced cell injury. Isorhamnetin may represent a leading compound for the development of anti-virulence drugs against S. aureus infections.

  8. D-Test Method for Detection of Inducible Clindamycin Resistance in Staphylococcus Aureus

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    Neda Pak

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a frequent cause of infections in children. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of nasal colonization of S. aureus in children and detection of inducible clindamycin resistance (ICR by disk approximation test (D-test. Methods:This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Hamedan from 2007 to 2008. 520 nasal swabs were obtained from children under 12 years of age at the time of admission and 287 swabs at the time of discharge. Antibiogram was performed by method of disk diffusion for oxacillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, cefazolin and vancomycin as well as D-test. Chi-square test was applied for statistical analysis. Findings:Out of 520 patients, 118 (22.3% were colonized with S. aureus as community-acquired (CA-S. aureus. Of 287 patients, 64 (22.3% were colonized with isolates of S. aureus at discharge time. Of these 64 patients, 32 cases were colonized with hospital acquired (HA-S. aureus isolates after admission. Only one CA-MRSA isolate was resistant to clindamycin, 5% of 118 CA-S. aureus isolates and 6.3% of HA-S. aureus isolates had inducible clindamycin resistance (D-test. Also 37.5% of CA-MRSA isolates at the time of admission and 22.2% of HA-MRSA isolates at discharge had positive D-test. Conclusion:We emphasize that D-test should be used routinely and clindamycin should not be used in patients with infections caused by inducible resistant S. aureus.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus produces membrane-derived vesicles that induce host cell death.

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    Mamata Gurung

    Full Text Available Gram-negative bacteria produce outer membrane vesicles that play a role in the delivery of virulence factors to host cells. However, little is known about the membrane-derived vesicles (MVs produced by gram-positive bacteria. The present study examined the production of MVs from Staphylococcus aureus and investigated the delivery of MVs to host cells and subsequent cytotoxicity. Four S. aureus strains tested, two type strains and two clinical isolates, produced spherical nanovesicles during in vitro culture. MVs were also produced during in vivo infection of a clinical S. aureus isolate in a mouse pneumonia model. Proteomic analysis showed that 143 different proteins were identified in the S. aureus-derived MVs. S. aureus MVs were interacted with the plasma membrane of host cells via a cholesterol-rich membrane microdomain and then delivered their component protein A to host cells within 30 min. Intact S. aureus MVs induced apoptosis of HEp-2 cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas lysed MVs neither delivered their component into the cytosol of host cells nor induced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, this study is the first report that S. aureus MVs are an important vehicle for delivery of bacterial effector molecules to host cells.

  10. Toll-Like Receptor 2 Stimulation of Osteoblasts Mediates Staphylococcus Aureus Induced Bone Resorption and Osteoclastogenesis through Enhanced RANKL

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    Kassem, Ali; Lindholm, Catharina; Lerner, Ulf H

    2016-01-01

    Severe Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infections pose an immense threat to population health and constitute a great burden for the health care worldwide. Inter alia, S. aureus septic arthritis is a disease with high mortality and morbidity caused by destruction of the infected joints and systemic bone loss, osteoporosis. Toll-Like receptors (TLRs) are innate immune cell receptors recognizing a variety of microbial molecules and structures. S. aureus recognition via TLR2 initiates a signaling cascade resulting in production of various cytokines, but the mechanisms by which S. aureus causes rapid and excessive bone loss are still unclear. We, therefore, investigated how S. aureus regulates periosteal/endosteal osteoclast formation and bone resorption. S. aureus stimulation of neonatal mouse parietal bone induced ex vivo bone resorption and osteoclastic gene expression. This effect was associated with increased mRNA and protein expression of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL) without significant change in osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression. Bone resorption induced by S. aureus was abolished by OPG. S. aureus increased the expression of osteoclastogenic cytokines and prostaglandins in the parietal bones but the stimulatory effect of S. aureus on bone resorption and Tnfsf11 mRNA expression was independent of these cytokines and prostaglandins. Stimulation of isolated periosteal osteoblasts with S. aureus also resulted in increased expression of Tnfsf11 mRNA, an effect lost in osteoblasts from Tlr2 knockout mice. S. aureus stimulated osteoclastogenesis in isolated periosteal cells without affecting RANKL-stimulated resorption. In contrast, S. aureus inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in bone marrow macrophages. These data show that S. aureus enhances bone resorption and periosteal osteoclast formation by increasing osteoblast RANKL production through TLR2. Our study indicates the importance of using different in vitro approaches for studies of how S

  11. Reversible antibiotic tolerance induced in Staphylococcus aureus by concurrent drug exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob Krause; Friberg, Cathrine; McCreary, Mark;

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to beta-lactam antibiotics has led to increasing use of the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin as a life-saving treatment for major S. aureus infections. Coinfection by an unrelated bacterial species may necessitate concurrent treatment with a second...... antibiotic that targets the coinfecting pathogen. While investigating factors that affect bacterial antibiotic sensitivity, we discovered that susceptibility of S. aureus to vancomycin is reduced by concurrent exposure to colistin, a cationic peptide antimicrobial employed to treat infections by Gram......-negative pathogens. We show that colistin-induced vancomycin tolerance persists only as long as the inducer is present and is accompanied by gene expression changes similar to those resulting from mutations that produce stably inherited reduction of vancomycin sensitivity (vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus [VISA...

  12. Staphylococcus aureus - induced tumor necrosis factor - related apoptosis - inducing ligand expression mediates apoptosis and caspase-8 activation in infected osteoblasts

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    Bost Kenneth L

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus infection of normal osteoblasts induces expression of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL. Results Normal osteoblasts were incubated in the presence of purified bacterial products over a range of concentrations. Results demonstrate that purified surface structures and a selected superantigen present in the extracellular environment are not capable of inducing TRAIL expression by osteoblasts. Osteoblasts were co-cultured with S. aureus at various multiplicities of infection utilizing cell culture chamber inserts. Results of those experiments suggest that direct contact between bacteria and osteoblasts is necessary for optimal TRAIL induction. Finally, S. aureus infection of osteoblasts in the presence of anti-TRAIL antibody demonstrates that TRAIL mediates caspase-8 activation and apoptosis of infected cells. Conclusions Collectively, these findings suggest a mechanism whereby S. aureus mediates bone destruction via induction of osteoblast apoptosis.

  13. Mast Cells Play a Crucial Role in Staphylococcus aureus Peptidoglycan-Induced Diarrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Bai-Sui; He, Shao-Heng; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Wu, Linda; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2007-01-01

    Bacterium-induced diarrhea results in 2 to 2.5 million deaths in the world each year. The mechanism needs to be further understood. Staphylococcus aureus infection has a close relation with diarrhea; its cell wall component peptidoglycan (PGN) has strong biological activity on immune cells and possibly plays a role in S. aureus-induced diarrhea. The present study showed that oral PGN-induced diarrhea in mice in a dose-dependent manner. Intestinal epithelial cells absorbed PGN via the intracel...

  14. Inducible clindamycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from Mashhad, Iran

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    Najmeh seifi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Staphylococcus aureus is an important agent in hospital and community-associated infections, causing high morbidity and mortality. Introduction of the new antimicrobial classes for this pathogen is usually followed by the emergence of resistant strains through multiple mechanisms. For instance, resistance to clindamycin (CLI, can be constitutive or inducible. Inducible clindamycin resistance which may lead to treatment failure can simply be identified by performing D-test. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of inducible clindamycin resistance among Staphylococcus aureus isolates by D-test method.Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted on 254 non-duplicated S. aureus isolates in Imam Reza hospital of Mashhad during 2010. Susceptibility to oxacillin, cefoxitin, erythromycin and clindamycin was performed by disk agar diffusion method according to CLSI guidelines and D-shaped clindamycin susceptibility patterns where considered as D-test positive (D+.Results: Of 211 S. aureus isolates 88 (37.82% were methicillin resistant. It was found that of 88 MRSA isolates, 78 (88.63% were erythromycin (ERY resistant and 46 (52.27% were CLI resistant. ERY and CLI resistance in MSSA strains was 21.95% and 11.96% respectively. Inducible clindamycin resistance was detected in 18 (20.45% MRSA isolates. 47(53.40% of MRSA isolates and 9 (7.32% of MSSA showed constitutive MLSB phenotype.Conclusion: In conclusion, we found a high prevalence of inducible clindamycin resistance phenotype in our region. We recommend that whenever clindamycin is intended for S. aureus infections, D-test should be performed to facilitate the optimal treatment of patients.Keywords: Staphylococcus aureus, clindamycin, Inducible resistance

  15. Exposure of Staphylococcus aureus to subinhibitory concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics induces heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roch, Mélanie; Clair, Perrine; Renzoni, Adriana; Reverdy, Marie-Elisabeth; Dauwalder, Olivier; Bes, Michèle; Martra, Annie; Freydière, Anne-Marie; Laurent, Frédéric; Reix, Philippe; Dumitrescu, Oana; Vandenesch, François

    2014-09-01

    Glycopeptides are known to select for heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (h-VISA) from susceptible strains. In certain clinical situations, h-VISA strains have been isolated from patients without previous exposure to glycopeptides, such as cystic fibrosis patients, who frequently receive repeated treatments with beta-lactam antibiotics. Our objective was to determine whether prolonged exposure to beta-lactam antibiotics can induce h-VISA. We exposed 3 clinical vancomycin-susceptible methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains to ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, imipenem, and vancomycin (as a control) at subinhibitory concentrations for 18 days in vitro. Population analyses showed progressive increases in vancomycin resistance; seven of the 12 derived strains obtained after induction were classified as h-VISA according to the following criteria: area under the curve (AUC) on day 18/AUC of Mu3 of ≥90% and/or growth on brain heart infusion (BHI) agar with 4 mg/liter vancomycin. The derived isolates had thickened cell walls proportional to the level of glycopeptide resistance. Genes known to be associated with glycopeptide resistance (vraSR, yvqF, SA1703, graRS, walKR, and rpoB) were PCR sequenced; no de novo mutations were observed upon beta-lactam exposure. To determine whether trfA, a gene encoding a glycopeptide resistance factor, was essential in the selection of h-VISA upon beta-lactam pressure, a trfA-knockout strain was generated by allelic replacement. Indeed, beta-lactam exposure of this mutated strain showed no capacity to induce vancomycin resistance. In conclusion, these results showed that beta-lactam antibiotics at subinhibitory concentrations can induce intermediate vancomycin resistance in vitro. This induction required an intact trfA locus. Our results suggest that prior use of beta-lactam antibiotics can compromise vancomycin efficacy in the treatment of MRSA infections.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin-induced cell death : predominant necrosis despite apoptotic caspase activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Essmann, F; Bantel, H; Totzke, G; Engels, I H; Sinha, B; Schulze-Osthoff, K; Jänicke, R U

    2003-01-01

    Recent data suggest that alpha-toxin, the major hemolysin of Staphylococcus aureus, induces cell death via the classical apoptotic pathway. Here we demonstrate, however, that although zVAD-fmk or overexpression of Bcl-2 completely abrogated caspase activation and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation,

  17. Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids Increase Survival and Decrease Bacterial Load in Mice Subjected to Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Sepsis.

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    Svahn, Sara L; Ulleryd, Marcus A; Grahnemo, Louise; Ståhlman, Marcus; Borén, Jan; Nilsson, Staffan; Jansson, John-Olov; Johansson, Maria E

    2016-04-01

    Sepsis caused by Staphylococcus aureus is increasing in incidence. With the alarming use of antibiotics,S. aureus is prone to become methicillin resistant. Antibiotics are the only widely used pharmacological treatment for sepsis. Interestingly, mice fed high-fat diet (HFD) rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids have better survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis than mice fed HFD rich in saturated fatty acids (HFD-S). To investigate what component of polyunsaturated fatty acids, i.e., omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids, exerts beneficial effects on the survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis, mice were fed HFD rich in omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids for 8 weeks prior to inoculation with S. aureus Further, mice fed HFD-S were treated with omega-3 fatty acid metabolites known as resolvins. Mice fed HFD rich in omega-3 fatty acids had increased survival and decreased bacterial loads compared to those for mice fed HFD-S after S. aureus-induced sepsis. Furthermore, the bacterial load was decreased in resolvin-treated mice fed HFD-S after S. aureus-induced sepsis compared with that in mice treated with vehicle. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids increase the survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis by reversing the deleterious effect of HFD-S on mouse survival.

  18. C-jun N-terminal Kinase-mediated Signaling Is Essential for Staphylococcus Aureus-induced U937 Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-he Wang; Bo Yu; Hui-yan Niu; Hui Li; Yi Zhang; Xin Wang; Ping He

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of SP600125, a specific c-jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) inhibitor, on Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus)-induced U937 cell death and the underlying mechanism. Methods The human monocytic U937 cells were treated with S. aureus at different time with or without SP600125. Cell apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry. JNK, Bax, and caspase-3 activities were detected by Western blotting. Results S. aureus induced apoptosis in cultured U937 cells in a time-dependent manner. Expression of Bax and phospho-JNK significantly increased in S. aureus-treated U937 cells, and the level of activated caspase-3 also increased in a time-dependent manner. Inhibition of JNK with SP600125 significantly inhibited S. aureus-induced apoptosis in U937 cells. Conclusions S. aureus can induce apoptosis in U937 cells by phosphorylation of JNK and activation of Bax and caspase-3. SP600125 protects U937 cells from apoptosis induced by S. aureus via inhibiting the activity of JNK.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa induces pigment production and enhances virulence in a white phenotypic variant of Staphylococcus aureus

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    Antonic V

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Vlado Antonic,1–3 Alexander Stojadinovic,3–5 Binxue Zhang,1–3 Mina J Izadjoo,1–3,5 Mohammad Alavi1–3 1Henry M Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Diagnostic and Translational Research Center, Gaithersburg, MD, USA; 3Combat Wound Initiative Program, Bethesda, MD, USA; 4Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA; 5Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA Abstract: Staphyloxanthin is a virulence factor which protects Staphylococcus aureus in stress conditions. We isolated two pigment variants of S. aureus and one strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a single wound infection. S. aureus variants displayed white and yellow colony phenotypes. The sequence of the operons for staphyloxanthin synthesis indicated that coding and promoter regions were identical between the two pigment variants. Quorum sensing controls pigment synthesis in some bacteria. It is also shown that P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing molecules affect S. aureus transcription. We explored whether the co-infecting P. aeruginosa can affect pigment production in the white S. aureus variant. In co-culture experiments between the white variants and a selected number of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, only P. aeruginosa induced pigment production in the white variant. Gene expression analysis of the white variant did not indicate upregulation of the crtM and other genes known to be involved in pigment production (sigB, sarA, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase gene [FPP-synthase], hfq. In contrast, transcription of the catalase gene was significantly upregulated after co-culture. P. aeruginosa-induced pigment synthesis and catalase upregulation correlated with increased resistance to polymyxin B, hydrogen peroxide, and the intracellular environment of macrophages. Our data indicate the presence of silent but functional staphyloxanthin synthesis machinery in a white phenotypic variant

  20. Inducible Clindamycin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Iran: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

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    Ahmadreza Zarifian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus is a prominent human pathogen. One of the drugs used in the treatment of staphylococcal infections (particularly infections of skin and soft tissue, is clindamycin. Resistance to clindamycin includes two types: inducible and constitutive. Routine laboratory methods of antibiotic susceptibility testing cannot detect the inducible type and D- test is required for its detection. The purpose of this systematic review was to determine the relative prevalence of this type of resistance in Iran.Methods: Search terms "inducible clindamycin resistant", "D-test", "Staphylococcus aureus" and "Iran" were used to find relevant articles in PubMed, Google Scholar and two Persian search engines. Also, the abstracts of the recent national microbiology congresses were checked.All studies used D-test to find iMLSB  (inducible macrolide, lincosamide and streptograminB resistance phenotype among clinical isolates (not nasal swabs of S. aureus, were included. In order to perform meta-analysis, we used “comprehensive meta-analysis” software (ver. 2.Results: In total, 9 articles and 8 abstracts related to the topic of the study were found. Random effects meta-analyses showed a pooled estimate for percentage of iMLSB  phenotype among 2683 samples of S. aureus was about 10% (95% confidence interval: 0.07-0.12. Using the fixed effect model, the odds of positive iMLSB  in methicillin-resistant S. aureus was about 5 times more likely to occur in comparison with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (95% CI: 3.49 to 7.76.Conclusion: Fortunately, the relative frequency of inducible resistance to clindamycin in our country is relatively low. However, we believe that D-test should be performed for all erythromicin-resistant  isolates  in  order  to  identify  inducible  resistance  to  clindamycin.Moreover, reevaluation of inducible reistance to clindamycin in forthcoming years is highly recommended.

  1. Toxin-induced necroptosis is a major mechanism of Staphylococcus aureus lung damage.

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    Kitur, Kipyegon; Parker, Dane; Nieto, Pamela; Ahn, Danielle S; Cohen, Taylor S; Chung, Samuel; Wachtel, Sarah; Bueno, Susan; Prince, Alice

    2015-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus USA300 strains cause a highly inflammatory necrotizing pneumonia. The virulence of this strain has been attributed to its expression of multiple toxins that have diverse targets including ADAM10, NLRP3 and CD11b. We demonstrate that induction of necroptosis through RIP1/RIP3/MLKL signaling is a major consequence of S. aureus toxin production. Cytotoxicity could be prevented by inhibiting either RIP1 or MLKL signaling and S. aureus mutants lacking agr, hla or Hla pore formation, lukAB or psms were deficient in inducing cell death in human and murine immune cells. Toxin-associated pore formation was essential, as cell death was blocked by exogenous K+ or dextran. MLKL inhibition also blocked caspase-1 and IL-1β production, suggesting a link to the inflammasome. Rip3(-/-) mice exhibited significantly improved staphylococcal clearance and retained an alveolar macrophage population with CD200R and CD206 markers in the setting of acute infection, suggesting increased susceptibility of these leukocytes to necroptosis. The importance of this anti-inflammatory signaling was indicated by the correlation between improved outcome and significantly decreased expression of KC, IL-6, TNF, IL-1α and IL-1β in infected mice. These findings indicate that toxin-induced necroptosis is a major cause of lung pathology in S. aureus pneumonia and suggest the possibility of targeting components of this signaling pathway as a therapeutic strategy.

  2. Toxin-induced necroptosis is a major mechanism of Staphylococcus aureus lung damage.

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    Kipyegon Kitur

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus USA300 strains cause a highly inflammatory necrotizing pneumonia. The virulence of this strain has been attributed to its expression of multiple toxins that have diverse targets including ADAM10, NLRP3 and CD11b. We demonstrate that induction of necroptosis through RIP1/RIP3/MLKL signaling is a major consequence of S. aureus toxin production. Cytotoxicity could be prevented by inhibiting either RIP1 or MLKL signaling and S. aureus mutants lacking agr, hla or Hla pore formation, lukAB or psms were deficient in inducing cell death in human and murine immune cells. Toxin-associated pore formation was essential, as cell death was blocked by exogenous K+ or dextran. MLKL inhibition also blocked caspase-1 and IL-1β production, suggesting a link to the inflammasome. Rip3(-/- mice exhibited significantly improved staphylococcal clearance and retained an alveolar macrophage population with CD200R and CD206 markers in the setting of acute infection, suggesting increased susceptibility of these leukocytes to necroptosis. The importance of this anti-inflammatory signaling was indicated by the correlation between improved outcome and significantly decreased expression of KC, IL-6, TNF, IL-1α and IL-1β in infected mice. These findings indicate that toxin-induced necroptosis is a major cause of lung pathology in S. aureus pneumonia and suggest the possibility of targeting components of this signaling pathway as a therapeutic strategy.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus sepsis induces early renal mitochondrial DNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis in mice.

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    Raquel R Bartz

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI contributes to the high morbidity and mortality of multi-system organ failure in sepsis. However, recovery of renal function after sepsis-induced AKI suggests active repair of energy-producing pathways. Here, we tested the hypothesis in mice that Staphyloccocus aureus sepsis damages mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA in the kidney and activates mtDNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis. Sepsis was induced in wild-type C57Bl/6J and Cox-8 Gfp-tagged mitochondrial-reporter mice via intraperitoneal fibrin clots embedded with S. aureus. Kidneys from surviving mice were harvested at time zero (control, 24, or 48 hours after infection and evaluated for renal inflammation, oxidative stress markers, mtDNA content, and mitochondrial biogenesis markers, and OGG1 and UDG mitochondrial DNA repair enzymes. We examined the kidneys of the mitochondrial reporter mice for changes in staining density and distribution. S. aureus sepsis induced sharp amplification of renal Tnf, Il-10, and Ngal mRNAs with decreased renal mtDNA content and increased tubular and glomerular cell death and accumulation of protein carbonyls and 8-OHdG. Subsequently, mtDNA repair and mitochondrial biogenesis was evidenced by elevated OGG1 levels and significant increases in NRF-1, NRF-2, and mtTFA expression. Overall, renal mitochondrial mass, tracked by citrate synthase mRNA and protein, increased in parallel with changes in mitochondrial GFP-fluorescence especially in proximal tubules in the renal cortex and medulla. Sub-lethal S. aureus sepsis thus induces widespread renal mitochondrial damage that triggers the induction of the renal mtDNA repair protein, OGG1, and mitochondrial biogenesis as a conspicuous resolution mechanism after systemic bacterial infection.

  4. Sepsis Induced by Staphylococcus aureus: Participation of Biomarkers in a Murine Model

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    de Oliveira, Thiago Henrique Caldeira; Amorin, Aline Teixeira; Rezende, Izadora Souza; Barbosa, Maysa Santos; Martins, Hellen Braga; Brito, Anne Karoline Pereira; Andrade, Ewerton Ferraz; Gonçalves, Gleisy Kelly Neves; Campos, Guilherme Barreto; Silva, Robson Amaro Augusto; Timenetsky, Jorge; Marques, Lucas Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the role of biomarkers in the pathophysiological process induced by a Staphylococcus aureus strain obtained in a hospital environment. For this, we intraperitoneally inoculated groups of male BALB/c mice with S. aureus, using a clinical isolate (CI) of S. aureus. Material/Methods Mice were divided into groups according to time of euthanasia (24, 48, 72, 96, 120, 144, and 168 hours of infection). After being euthanized, blood samples were collected for quantification of microorganisms and leukocytes, as well as measurement of biomarkers of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), and Procalcitonin (PCT) by ELISA. Heart, kidneys, and lungs were removed for histopathological analysis, assessment of biomarkers of tissue expression by RT-PCR (polymerase chain reaction with reverse transcriptase), and quantification of microorganisms by real-time quantitative PCR (real-time PCR). Results The animals infected at between 120 hours and 168 hours had the highest blood levels of S. aureus. We observed that infection promoted increases in the levels of circulating neutrophils and monocytes. However, there was a reduction of circulating neutrophils and monocytes after 96 hours of infection. The infected mice also had increased levels of blood lymphocytes. In this model of infection with S. aureus, IL-6, CRP, and PCT demonstrated greater fidelity as markers of infection, since serum levels were elevated and lowered along with the number of circulating neutrophils and monocytes after resolution of the infection. The lungs showed hyperemia, with enlargement of the alveolar septa. On the other hand, infection with S. aureus did not promote visible change in histological tissue in the heart and kidneys. Conclusions In this model of infection with S. aureus, IL-6, CRP, and PCT demonstrated greater fidelity as markers of infection, since serum levels were elevated and lowered along with the number of

  5. Staphylococcus aureus-induced G2/M phase transition delay in host epithelial cells increases bacterial infective efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseeva, Ludmila; Rault, Lucie; Almeida, Sintia; Legembre, Patrick; Edmond, Valérie; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Even, Sergine; Taieb, Frédéric; Arlot-Bonnemains, Yannick; Le Loir, Yves; Berkova, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a highly versatile, opportunistic pathogen and the etiological agent of a wide range of infections in humans and warm-blooded animals. The epithelial surface is its principal site of colonization and infection. In this work, we investigated the cytopathic effect of S. aureus strains from human and animal origins and their ability to affect the host cell cycle in human HeLa and bovine MAC-T epithelial cell lines. S. aureus invasion slowed down cell proliferation and induced a cytopathic effect, resulting in the enlargement of host cells. A dramatic decrease in the number of mitotic cells was observed in the infected cultures. Flow cytometry analysis revealed an S. aureus-induced delay in the G2/M phase transition in synchronous HeLa cells. This delay required the presence of live S. aureus since the addition of the heat-killed bacteria did not alter the cell cycle. The results of Western blot experiments showed that the G2/M transition delay was associated with the accumulation of inactive cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1, a key inducer of mitosis entry, and with the accumulation of unphosphorylated histone H3, which was correlated with a reduction of the mitotic cell number. Analysis of S. aureus proliferation in asynchronous, G1- and G2-phase-enriched HeLa cells showed that the G2 phase was preferential for bacterial infective efficiency, suggesting that the G2 phase delay may be used by S. aureus for propagation within the host. Taken together, our results divulge the potential of S. aureus in the subversion of key cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, and shed light on the biological significance of S. aureus-induced host cell cycle alteration.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus-induced G2/M phase transition delay in host epithelial cells increases bacterial infective efficiency.

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    Ludmila Alekseeva

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a highly versatile, opportunistic pathogen and the etiological agent of a wide range of infections in humans and warm-blooded animals. The epithelial surface is its principal site of colonization and infection. In this work, we investigated the cytopathic effect of S. aureus strains from human and animal origins and their ability to affect the host cell cycle in human HeLa and bovine MAC-T epithelial cell lines. S. aureus invasion slowed down cell proliferation and induced a cytopathic effect, resulting in the enlargement of host cells. A dramatic decrease in the number of mitotic cells was observed in the infected cultures. Flow cytometry analysis revealed an S. aureus-induced delay in the G2/M phase transition in synchronous HeLa cells. This delay required the presence of live S. aureus since the addition of the heat-killed bacteria did not alter the cell cycle. The results of Western blot experiments showed that the G2/M transition delay was associated with the accumulation of inactive cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1, a key inducer of mitosis entry, and with the accumulation of unphosphorylated histone H3, which was correlated with a reduction of the mitotic cell number. Analysis of S. aureus proliferation in asynchronous, G1- and G2-phase-enriched HeLa cells showed that the G2 phase was preferential for bacterial infective efficiency, suggesting that the G2 phase delay may be used by S. aureus for propagation within the host. Taken together, our results divulge the potential of S. aureus in the subversion of key cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, and shed light on the biological significance of S. aureus-induced host cell cycle alteration.

  7. A3R Phage and Staphylococcus aureus Lysate Do Not Induce Neutrophil Degranulation

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    Jan Borysowski

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of A3R phage and Staphylococcus aureus lysate obtained after phage infection on neutrophil degranulation. The exocytosis of primary and secondary granules from neutrophils was investigated in vitro in whole blood specimens by flow cytometry based on the expression of specific markers of exocytosis (CD63 for primary granules and CD66b for secondary granules. We found that both A3R and S. aureus lysate had no significant effect on the exocytosis of primary and secondary granules. These data suggest that neither A3R virions nor any products of phage-induced lysis of S. aureus are likely to induce neutrophil degranulation in patients who are treated with phage preparations. Since neutrophil granules contain some potentially toxic proteins, our results provide an important argument for the safety of phage therapy. Moreover, these data indicate that the induction of neutrophil degranulation is not likely to contribute to antibacterial effects of phages.

  8. A3R Phage and Staphylococcus aureus Lysate Do Not Induce Neutrophil Degranulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysowski, Jan; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Wierzbicki, Piotr; Kłosowska, Danuta; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Górski, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of A3R phage and Staphylococcus aureus lysate obtained after phage infection on neutrophil degranulation. The exocytosis of primary and secondary granules from neutrophils was investigated in vitro in whole blood specimens by flow cytometry based on the expression of specific markers of exocytosis (CD63 for primary granules and CD66b for secondary granules). We found that both A3R and S. aureus lysate had no significant effect on the exocytosis of primary and secondary granules. These data suggest that neither A3R virions nor any products of phage-induced lysis of S. aureus are likely to induce neutrophil degranulation in patients who are treated with phage preparations. Since neutrophil granules contain some potentially toxic proteins, our results provide an important argument for the safety of phage therapy. Moreover, these data indicate that the induction of neutrophil degranulation is not likely to contribute to antibacterial effects of phages. PMID:28230780

  9. A Surfactant-Induced Functional Modulation of a Global Virulence Regulator from Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Sukhendu Mandal

    Full Text Available Triton X-100 (TX-100, a useful non-ionic surfactant, reduced the methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus significantly. Many S. aureus proteins were expressed in the presence of TX-100. SarA, one of the TX-100-induced proteins, acts as a global virulence regulator in S. aureus. To understand the effects of TX-100 on the structure, and function of SarA, a recombinant S. aureus SarA (rSarA and its derivative (C9W have been investigated in the presence of varying concentrations of this surfactant using various probes. Our data have revealed that both rSarA and C9W bind to the cognate DNA with nearly similar affinity in the absence of TX-100. Interestingly, their DNA binding activities have been significantly increased in the presence of pre-micellar concentration of TX-100. The increase of TX-100 concentrations to micellar or post-micellar concentration did not greatly enhance their activities further. TX-100 molecules have altered the secondary and tertiary structures of both proteins to some extents. Size of the rSarA-TX-100 complex appears to be intermediate to those of rSarA and TX-100. Additional analyses show a relatively moderate interaction between C9W and TX-100. Binding of TX-100 to C9W has, however, occurred by a cooperative pathway particularly at micellar and higher concentrations of this surfactant. Taken together, TX-100-induced structural alteration of rSarA and C9W might be responsible for their increased DNA binding activity. As TX-100 has stabilized the somewhat weaker SarA-DNA complex effectively, it could be used to study its structure in the future.

  10. MRI visualization of Staphyloccocus aureus-induced infective endocarditis in mice.

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    Janine Ring

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis (IE is a severe and often fatal disease, lacking a fast and reliable diagnostic procedure. The purpose of this study was to establish a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus-induced IE and to develop a MRI technology to characterize and diagnose IE. To establish the mouse model of hematogenous IE, aortic valve damage was induced by placing a permanent catheter into right carotid artery. 24 h after surgery, mice were injected intravenously with either iron particle-labeled or unlabeled S. aureus (strain 6850. To distinguish the effect of IE from mere tissue injury or recruited macrophages, subgroups of mice received sham surgery prior to infection (n = 17, received surgery without infection (n = 8, or obtained additionally injection of free iron particles to label macrophages (n = 17. Cardiac MRI was performed 48 h after surgery using a self-gated ultra-short echo time (UTE sequence (TR/TE, 5/0.31 ms; in-plane/slice, 0.125/1 mm; duration, 12∶08 min to obtain high-resolution, artifact-free cinematographic images of the valves. After MRI, valves were either homogenized and plated on blood agar plates for determination of bacterial titers, or sectioned and stained for histology. In the animal model, both severity of the disease and mortality increased with bacterial numbers. Infection with 105 S. aureus bacteria reliably caused endocarditis with vegetations on the valves. Cinematographic UTE MRI visualised the aortic valve over the cardiac cycle and allowed for detection of bacterial vegetations, while mere tissue trauma or labeled macrophages were not detected. Iron labeling of S. aureus was not required for detection. MRI results were consistent with histology and microbial assessment. These data showed that S. aureus-induced IE in mice can be detected by MRI. The established mouse model allows for investigation of the pathophysiology of IE, testing of novel drugs and may serve for the development of a clinical

  11. Identification of Functional Regulatory Residues of the β-Lactam Inducible Penicillin Binding Protein in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Mbah, Andreas N.; Isokpehi, Raphael D

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to methicillin by Staphylococcus aureus is a persistent clinical problem worldwide. A mechanism for resistance has been proposed in which methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates acquired a new protein called β -lactam inducible penicillin binding protein (PBP-2′). The PBP-2′ functions by substituting other penicillin binding proteins which have been inhibited by β -lactam antibiotics. Presently, there is no structural and regulatory information on PBP-2′ protein...

  12. MicroRNA-24 Modulates Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Macrophage Polarization by Suppressing CHI3L1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jingjing, Zhang; Nan, Zhang; Wei, Wu; Qinghe, Guo; Weijuan, Wang; Peng, Wang; Xiangpeng, Wang

    2017-03-16

    Macrophages play a crucial role in host innate anti-Staphylococcus aureus defense, which is tightly regulated by multiple factors, including microRNAs. A recent study showed that miR-24 plays an important role in macrophage polarization. Here, we investigated the biological function of miR-24 in S. aureus-stimulated macrophages. The results revealed that miR-24 expression was significantly decreased in both human and mouse macrophage cell lines with S. aureus stimulation in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, miR-24 overexpression significantly decreased the production of M1 phenotype markers, such as IL-6, iNOS, TNF-α, CD86, and CD80, whereas it increased the production of M2 markers, such as Arg1, CCL17, CCL22, CD163, and CD206, in S. aureus-stimulated macrophages. Conversely, knockdown of miR-24 promoted M1 macrophage polarization but diminished M2 macrophage polarization in S. aureus-stimulated macrophages. Furthermore, CHI3L1 was predicted as a target gene of miR-24 using bioinformatics software and identified by luciferase reporter assay. Additionally, miR-24 overexpression inhibited CHI3L1 expression and downregulated the downstream MAPK pathway in S. aureus-stimulated macrophages. Finally, CHI3L1 overexpression rescued macrophage polarization and MAPK pathway inhibition induced by miR-24 mimic transfection in S. aureus-stimulated macrophages. In conclusion, the data suggest that miR-24 serves as a molecular regulator in S. aureus-induced macrophage polarization through targeting of CHI3L1 and regulation of the MAPK pathway, which may provide a promising therapeutic target for S. aureus-related infections and inflammatory diseases.

  13. Haemolysis induced by α-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus requires P2X receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skals, Marianne Gerberg; Leipziger, Jens Georg; Prætorius, Helle

    2011-01-01

    -forming bacterial toxins. In this context, it is essential to know whether this is specific to HlyA-induced cell damage or if other bacterial pore-forming toxins involve purinergic signals to orchestrate haemolysis. Here, we investigate if the haemolysis produced by α-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus involves P2...... receptor activation. We observed that α-toxin-induced haemolysis is completely blocked by the unselective P2 receptor antagonist pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid. Moreover, several selective blockers of P2X1 and P2X7 ionotropic receptors abolished haemolysis in murine and equine...... erythrocytes. Inhibitors of pannexin channels partially reduced the α-toxin induced lysis. Thus, we conclude that α-toxin, similar to HlyA from E. coli produces cell damage by specific activation of a purinergic signalling cascade. These data indicate that pore-forming toxins in general require purinergic...

  14. Vaccination with non-toxic mutant toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 induces IL-17-dependent protection against Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Kouji; Hu, Dong-Liang; Asano, Krisana; Nakane, Akio

    2015-06-01

    Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) is one of superantigens produced by Staphylococcus aureus. We have previously demonstrated that vaccination with non-toxic mutant TSST-1 (mTSST-1) develops host protection to lethal S. aureus infection in mice. However, the detailed mechanism underlying this protection is necessary to elucidate because the passive transfer of antibodies against TSST-1 fails to provide complete protection against S. aureus infection. In this study, the results showed that interleukin-17A (IL-17A)-producing cells were increased in the spleen cells of mTSST-1-vaccinated mice. The main source of IL-17A in mTSST-1-vaccinated mice was T-helper 17 (Th17) cells. The protective effect of vaccination was induced when the vaccinated wild type but not IL-17A-deficient mice were challenged with S. aureus. Gene expression of chemokines, CCL2 and CXCL1, and infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages were increased in spleens and livers of vaccinated mice after infection. The IL-17A-dependent immune response was TSST-1 specific because TSST-1-deficient S. aureus failed to induce the response. The present study suggests that mTSST-1 vaccination is able to provide the IL-17A-dependent host defense against S. aureus infection which promotes chemokine-mediated infiltration of phagocytes into the infectious foci.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus induces hypoxia and cellular damage in porcine dermal explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Abdul G; Atci, Erhan; Renslow, Ryan; Beyenal, Haluk; Noh, Susan; Fransson, Boel; Abu-Lail, Nehal; Park, Jeong-Jin; Gang, David R; Call, Douglas R

    2015-06-01

    We developed a porcine dermal explant model to determine the extent to which Staphylococcus aureus biofilm communities deplete oxygen, change pH, and produce damage in underlying tissue. Microelectrode measurements demonstrated that dissolved oxygen (DO) in biofilm-free dermal tissue was 4.45 ± 1.17 mg/liter, while DO levels for biofilm-infected tissue declined sharply from the surface, with no measurable oxygen detectable in the underlying dermal tissue. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that biofilm-free dermal tissue had a significantly lower relative effective diffusion coefficient (0.26 ± 0.09 to 0.30 ± 0.12) than biofilm-infected dermal tissue (0.40 ± 0.12 to 0.48 ± 0.12; P < 0.0001). Thus, the difference in DO level was attributable to biofilm-induced oxygen demand rather than changes in oxygen diffusivity. Microelectrode measures showed that pH within biofilm-infected explants was more alkaline than in biofilm-free explants (8.0 ± 0.17 versus 7.5 ± 0.15, respectively; P < 0.002). Cellular and nuclear details were lost in the infected explants, consistent with cell death. Quantitative label-free shotgun proteomics demonstrated that both proapoptotic programmed cell death protein 5 and antiapoptotic macrophage migration inhibitory factor accumulated in the infected-explant spent medium, compared with uninfected-explant spent media (1,351-fold and 58-fold, respectively), consistent with the cooccurrence of apoptosis and necrosis in the explants. Biofilm-origin proteins reflected an extracellular matrix-adapted lifestyle of S. aureus. S. aureus biofilms deplete oxygen, increase pH, and induce cell death, all factors that contribute to impede wound healing.

  16. alpha-Toxin is a mediator of Staphylococcus aureus-induced cell death and activates caspases via the intrinsic death pathway independently of death receptor signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bantel, H; Sinha, B; Domschke, W; Peters, G; Schulze-Osthoff, K; Jänicke, R U

    2001-01-01

    Infections with Staphylococcus aureus, a common inducer of septic and toxic shock, often result in tissue damage and death of various cell types. Although S. aureus was suggested to induce apoptosis, the underlying signal transduction pathways remained elusive. We show that caspase activation and DN

  17. Altered Competitive Fitness, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Cellular Morphology in a Triclosan-Induced Small-Colony Variant of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Sarah; Latimer, Joe; Bazaid, Abdulrahman; McBain, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can produce small-colony variants (SCVs) that express various phenotypes. While their significance is unclear, SCV propagation may be influenced by relative fitness, antimicrobial susceptibility, and the underlying mechanism. We have investigated triclosan-induced generation of SCVs in six S. aureus strains, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Parent strains (P0) were repeatedly passaged on concentration gradients of triclosan using a solid-state exposure system to generate P10. P10 was subsequently passaged without triclosan to generate X10. Susceptibility to triclosan and 7 antibiotics was assessed at all stages. For S. aureus ATCC 6538, SCVs were further characterized by determining microbicide susceptibility and competitive fitness. Cellular morphology was examined using electron microscopy, and protein expression was evaluated through proteomics. Triclosan susceptibility in all SCVs (which could be generated from 4/6 strains) was markedly decreased, while antibiotic susceptibility was significantly increased in the majority of cases. An SCV of S. aureus ATCC 6538 exhibited significantly increased susceptibility to all tested microbicides. Cross-wall formation was impaired in this bacterium, while expression of FabI, a target of triclosan, and IsaA, a lytic transglycosylase involved in cell division, was increased. The P10 SCV was 49% less fit than P0. In summary, triclosan exposure of S. aureus produced SCVs in 4/6 test bacteria, with decreased triclosan susceptibility but with generally increased antibiotic susceptibility. An SCV derived from S. aureus ATCC 6538 showed reduced competitive fitness, potentially due to impaired cell division. In this SCV, increased FabI expression could account for reduced triclosan susceptibility, while IsaA may be upregulated in response to cell division defects.

  18. Inhibitory Effect of Lactobacillus plantarum Extracts on HT-29 Colon Cancer Cell Apoptosis Induced by Staphylococcus aureus and Its Alpha-Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hangeun; Kim, Hye Sun; Park, Woo Jung; Chung, Dae Kyun

    2015-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus plays an important role in sepsis, septic shock, pneumonia, and wound infections. Here, we demonstrate that Lactobacillus plantarum extracts inhibited S. aureusinduced cell death of a human epithelial cell line, HT-29. In particular, we have shown that S. aureus-induced cell death was abolished by neutralization of α-toxin, indicating that α-toxin is the major mediator of S. aureus-induced cell death. DNA fragmentation experiment and caspase assay revealed that the S. aureus-induced cell death was apoptosis. L. plantarum extracts inhibited the generation of effector caspase-3 and the initiator caspase-9 in S. aureusor α-toxin-induced cell death. Moreover, expression of Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein, was activated in L. plantarum extract-treated cells as compared with the S. aureus- or α-toxintreated only cells. Furthermore, S. aureus-induced apoptosis was efficiently inhibited by lipoteichoic acid and peptidoglycan of L. plantarum. Together, our results suggest that L. plantarum extracts can inhibit the S. aureus-mediated apoptosis, which is associated with S. aureus spreading, in intestinal epithelial cells, and may provide a new therapeutic reagent to treat bacterial infections.

  19. Probiotic Lactobacilli Modulate Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Activation of Conventional and Unconventional T cells and NK cells

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    Maria A Johansson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacilli are probiotic commensal bacteria and potent modulators of immunity. When present in the gut or supplemented as probiotics, they beneficially modulate ex vivo immune responsiveness. Further, factors derived from several lactobacilli strains act immune regulato-ry in vitro. In contrast, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is known to induce excessive T cell activation. In this study we aimed to investigate S. aureus-induced activation of human muco-sal associated invariant T cells (MAIT cells, γδ T cells, NK cells, as well as of conventional CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vitro. Further, we investigated if lactobacilli-derived factors could modulate their activation.PBMC were cultured with S. aureus 161:2 cell free supernatant (CFS, staphylococcal en-terotoxin A or CD3/CD28-beads alone or in combination with Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus GG-CFS or Lactobacillus reuteri (L. reuteri DSM 17938-CFS, and activation of T and NK cells was evaluated. S. aureus-CFS induced IFN-γ and CD107a expression as well as proliferation. Co-stimulation with lactobacilli-CFS dampened lymphocyte activation in all cell types analysed. Pre-incubation with lactobacilli-CFS was enough to reduce subsequent activation and the ab-sence of APC or APC-derived IL-10 did not prevent lactobacilli-mediated dampening. Final-ly, lactate selectively dampened activation of unconventional T cells and NK cells. In summary, we show that molecules present in the lactobacilli-CFS are able to directly dampen in vitro activation of conventional and unconventional T cells and of NK cells. This study provides novel insights on the immune modulatory nature of probiotic lactobacilli and suggests a role for lactobacilli in modulation of induced T and NK cell activation.

  20. Probiotic Lactobacilli Modulate Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Activation of Conventional and Unconventional T cells and NK Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Maria A; Björkander, Sophia; Mata Forsberg, Manuel; Qazi, Khaleda Rahman; Salvany Celades, Maria; Bittmann, Julia; Eberl, Matthias; Sverremark-Ekström, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Lactobacilli are probiotic commensal bacteria and potent modulators of immunity. When present in the gut or supplemented as probiotics, they beneficially modulate ex vivo immune responsiveness. Further, factors derived from several lactobacilli strains act immune regulatory in vitro. In contrast, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is known to induce excessive T cell activation. In this study, we aimed to investigate S. aureus-induced activation of human mucosal-associated invariant T cells (MAIT cells), γδ T cells, NK cells, as well as of conventional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in vitro. Further, we investigated if lactobacilli-derived factors could modulate their activation. PBMC were cultured with S. aureus 161:2 cell-free supernatants (CFS), staphylococcal enterotoxin A or CD3/CD28-beads alone, or in combination with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-CFS or Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938-CFS and activation of T and NK cells was evaluated. S. aureus-CFS induced IFN-γ and CD107a expression as well as proliferation. Costimulation with lactobacilli-CFS dampened lymphocyte-activation in all cell types analyzed. Preincubation with lactobacilli-CFS was enough to reduce subsequent activation, and the absence of APC or APC-derived IL-10 did not prevent lactobacilli-mediated dampening. Finally, lactate selectively dampened activation of unconventional T cells and NK cells. In summary, we show that molecules present in the lactobacilli-CFS are able to directly dampen in vitro activation of conventional and unconventional T cells and of NK cells. This study provides novel insights on the immune-modulatory nature of probiotic lactobacilli and suggests a role for lactobacilli in the modulation of induced T and NK cell activation.

  1. Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT) in osteomyelitis induced by Staphylococcus aureus: Microbiological and histological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Reis, João Alves; Dos Santos, Jean Nunes; Barreto, Brunna Santos; de Assis, Patrícia Nascimento; Almeida, Paulo Fernando; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz Barbosa

    2015-08-01

    Osteomyelitis is an inflammation either of medullar spaces or of the surface of cortical bones, which represents a bacterial infection. Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (PACT) is a treatment based on a cytotoxic photochemical reaction that induces a series of metabolic reactions and culminates in bacterial suppression. Such effect led to the idea that it could be used as a treatment of osteomyelitis. Following approval by the Animal Experimentation Committee of the School of Dentistry of the Federal University of Bahia, the present randomized study used eighty Wistar rats with the aim to evaluate, by microbiological and histological analysis, the effects of Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy - PACT on tibial surgical bone defects in rats infected by Staphylococcus aureus. The animals were divided in groups: Control (non-infected); Control Osteomyelitis Induction; Saline solution; Photosensitizer; Red Laser and PACT - on this group, a diode laser (40mW; λ660nm ∅=0.04cm(2), CW, 10J/cm(2)) was used in combination with 5μg/ml of toluidine blue as the photosensitizer. On the microbiological study, immediately after treatment, the PACT group presented a bacterial reduction of 97.4% (p<0.001). Thirty days after treatment, there was a bacterial reduction of more than 99.9% (p<0.001). In the histological study, it was observed that the PACT group demonstrated an intense presence of osteocytes and absence of bone sequestration and micro-abscesses. The PACT using toluidine blue was effective in reducing the number of S. aureus enabling a better quality bone repair.

  2. 5-Aminolevulinic acid induced photodynamic inactivation on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Ming Hsieh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to develop a simple and fast screening technique to directly evaluate the bactericidal effects of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA-mediated photodynamic inactivation (PDI and to determine the optimal antibacterial conditions of ALA concentrations and the total dosage of light in vitro. The effects of PDI on Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of various concentrations of ALA (1.0 mM, 2.5 mM, 5.0 mM, 10.0 mM were examined. All bacterial strains were exponentially grown in the culture medium at room temperature in the dark for 60 minutes and subsequently irradiated with 630 ± 5 nm using a light-emitting diode (LED red light device for accumulating the light doses up to 216 J/cm2. Both bacterial species were susceptible to the ALA-induced PDI. Photosensitization using 1.0 mM ALA with 162 J/cm2 light dose was able to completely reduce the viable counts of S. aureus. A significant decrease in the bacterial viabilities was observed for P. aeruginosa, where 5.0 mM ALA was photosensitized by accumulating the light dose of 162 J/cm2. We demonstrated that the use of microplate-based assays—by measuring the apparent optical density of bacterial colonies at 595 nm—was able to provide a simple and reliable approach for quickly choosing the parameters of ALA-mediated PDI in the cell suspensions.

  3. Role of Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Factors in Inducing Inflammation and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Model of Bacterial Endophthalmitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus (S. aureus is a common causative agent of bacterial endophthalmitis, a vision threatening complication of eye surgeries. The relative contribution of S. aureus virulence factors in the pathogenesis of endophthalmitis remains unclear. Here, we comprehensively analyzed the development of intraocular inflammation, vascular permeability, and the loss of retinal function in C57BL/6 mouse eyes, challenged with live S. aureus, heat-killed S. aureus (HKSA, peptidoglycan (PGN, lipoteichoic acid (LTA, staphylococcal protein A (SPA, α-toxin, and Toxic-shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST1. Our data showed a dose-dependent (range 0.01 μg/eye to 1.0 μg/eye increase in the levels of inflammatory mediators by all virulence factors. The cell wall components, particularly PGN and LTA, seem to induce higher levels of TNF-α, IL-6, KC, and MIP2, whereas the toxins induced IL-1β. Similarly, among the virulence factors, PGN induced higher PMN infiltration. The vascular permeability assay revealed significant leakage in eyes challenged with live SA (12-fold and HKSA (7.3-fold, in comparison to other virulence factors (~2-fold and controls. These changes coincided with retinal tissue damage, as evidenced by histological analysis. The electroretinogram (ERG analysis revealed a significant decline in retinal function in eyes inoculated with live SA, followed by HKSA, SPA, and α-toxin. Together, these findings demonstrate the differential innate responses of the retina to S. aureus virulence factors, which contribute to intraocular inflammation and retinal function loss in endophthalmitis.

  4. Reversible antibiotic tolerance induced in Staphylococcus aureus by concurrent drug exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob Krause; Friberg, Cathrine; McCreary, Mark

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to beta-lactam antibiotics has led to increasing use of the glycopeptide antibiotic vancomycin as a life-saving treatment for major S. aureus infections. Coinfection by an unrelated bacterial species may necessitate concurrent treatment with a second...

  5. Sclareol protects Staphylococcus aureus-induced lung cell injury via inhibiting alpha-hemolysin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Ping; Sun, Mao; He, Xuewen; Wang, Kaiyu; Yin, Zhongqiong; Fu, Hualin; Li, Yinglun; Geng, Yi; Shu, Gang; He, Changliang; Liang, Xiaoxia; Lai, Weiming; Li, Lixia; Zou, Yuanfeng; Song, Xu; Yin, Lizi

    2016-09-23

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a common Gram-positive bacterium that causes serious infections in human and animals. With the continuous emergence of the methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains, antibiotics have limited efficacy in treating MRSA infections. Accordingly, novel agents that act on new targets are desperately needed to combat these infections. S. aureus alpha-hemolysin plays an indispensable role in its pathogenicity. In this study, we demonstrate that sclareol, a fragrant chemical compound found in clary sage, can prominently decrease alpha-hemolysin secretion in S. aureus strain USA300 at sub-inhibitory concentrations. Hemolysis assays, western-blotting and RT-PCR were used to detect the production of alpha-hemolysin in the culture supernatant. When USA300 was co-cultured with and A549 epithelial cells, sclareol could protect A549 cells at a final concentration of 8 µg/ml. The protective capability of sclareol against the USA300-mediated injury of A549 cells was further shown by cytotoxicity assays and live/dead analysis. In conclusion, sclareol was shown to inhibit the production of S. aureus alpha-hemolysin. Sclareol has potential for development as a new agent to treat S. aureus infections.

  6. Regulation of Expression of Oxacillin-Inducible Methionine Sulfoxide Reductases in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle R. Baum

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell wall-active antibiotics cause induction of a locus that leads to elevated synthesis of two methionine sulfoxide reductases (MsrA1 and MsrB in Staphylococcus aureus. To understand the regulation of this locus, reporter strains were constructed by integrating a DNA fragment consisting of the msrA1/msrB promoter in front of a promoterless lacZ gene in the chromosome of wild-type and MsrA1-, MsrB-, MsrA1/MsrB-, and SigB-deficient methicillin-sensitive S. aureus strain SH1000 and methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain COL. These reporter strains were cultured in TSB and the cellular levels of β-galactosidase activity in these cultures were assayed during different growth phases. β-galactosidase activity assays demonstrated that the lack of MsrA1, MsrB, and SigB upregulated the msrA1/msrB promoter in S. aureus strain SH1000. In S. aureus strain COL, the highest level of β-galactosidase activity was observed under the conditions when both MsrA1 and MsrB proteins were absent. The data suggest that the msrA1/msrB locus, in part, is negatively regulated by MsrA1, MsrB, and SigB in S. aureus.

  7. Potential role of Saudi red propolis in alleviating lung damage induced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus virulence in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddiq, Amna Ali; Mohamed, Azza Mostafa

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the protective impact of aqueous extract of Saudi red propolis against rat lung damage induced by the pathogenic bacteria namely methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ATCC 6538 strain. Infected rats were received a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of bacterial suspension at a dose of 1 X 10(6) CFU / 100g body weight. Results showed that oral administration of an aqueous extract of propolis (50mg/100g body weight) daily for two weeks to infected rats simultaneously with bacterial infection, effectively ameliorated the alteration of oxidative stress biomarker, malondialdehyde (MDA), as well as the antioxidant markers, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), in lungs of infected rats compared with infected untreated ones. Also, the used propolis extract successfully modulated the alterations in proinflammatory mediators, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF- α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in serum. In addition, the propolis extract successfully modulated the oxidative DNA damage and the apoptosis biomarker, caspase 3, in lungs of S aureus infected rats compared with infected untreated animals. The biochemical results were supported by histo-pathological observation of lung tissues. In conclusion, the beneficial prophylactic role of the aqueous extract of Saudi red propolis against lung damage induced by methicillin resistant S aureus may be related to the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and antiapoptosis of its active constituents.

  8. Internalization of Staphylococcus aureus in Lymphocytes Induces Oxidative Stress and DNA Fragmentation: Possible Ameliorative Role of Nanoconjugated Vancomycin

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    Subhankari Prasad Chakraborty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequently isolated pathogen causing bloodstream infections, skin and soft tissue infections and pneumonia. Lymphocyte is an important immune cell. The aim of the present paper was to test the ameliorative role of nanoconjugated vancomycin against Vancomycin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (VSSA and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA infection-induced oxidative stress in lymphocytes. VSSA and VRSA infections were developed in Swiss mice by intraperitoneal injection of 5×106 CFU/mL bacterial solutions. Nanoconjugated vancomycin was adminstrated to VSSA- and VRSA-infected mice at its effective dose for 10 days. Vancomycin was adminstrated to VSSA- and VRSA-infected mice at a similar dose, respectively, for 10 days. Vancomycin and nanoconjugated vancomycin were adminstrated to normal mice at their effective doses for 10 days. The result of this study reveals that in vivo VSSA and VRSA infection significantly increases the level of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, oxidized glutathione level, nitrite generation, nitrite release, and DNA damage and decreases the level of reduced glutathione, antioxidant enzyme status, and glutathione-dependent enzymes as compared to control group, which were increased or decreased significantly near to normal in nanoconjugated vancomycin-treated group. These findings suggest the potential use and beneficial role of nanoconjugated vancomycin against VSSA and VRSA infection-induced oxidative stress in lymphocytes.

  9. Evaluation of constitutive and inducible resistance to clindamycin in clinical samples of Staphylococcus aureus from a tertiary hospital

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    Angelita Bottega

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA have become common in hospitals and the community environment, and this wide resistance has limited patient treatment. Clindamycin (CL represents an important alternative therapy for infections caused by S. aureus. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing using standard methods may not detect inducible CL resistance. This study was performed to detect the phenotypes of resistance to macrolides-lincosamides-streptogramin B (MLSB antibiotics, including CL, in clinical samples of S. aureus from patients at a tertiary hospital in Santa Maria, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Methods One hundred and forty clinical isolates were submitted to the disk diffusion induction test (D-test with an erythromycin (ER disk positioned at a distance of 20mm from a CL disk. The results were interpreted according to the recommendations of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI. Results In this study, 29 (20.7% of the 140 S. aureus samples were resistant to methicillin (MRSA, and 111 (79.3% were susceptible to methicillin (MSSA. The constitutive resistance phenotype (cMLSB was observed in 20 (14.3% MRSA samples and in 5 (3.6% MSSA samples, whereas the inducible resistance phenotype (iMLSB was observed in 3 (2.1% MRSA samples and in 8 (5.8% MSSA samples. Conclusions The D-test is essential for detecting the iMLSB phenotype because the early identification of this phenotype allows clinicians to choose an appropriate treatment for patients. Furthermore, this test is simple, easy to perform and inexpensive.

  10. TiO2 and N-Doped TiO2 Induced Photocatalytic Inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus under 405 nm LED Blue Light Irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Hongfei Chen; Zhong Xie; Xiujuan Jin; Chao Luo; Chao You; Ying Tang; Di Chen; Zhengjia Li; Xiaohong Fan

    2012-01-01

    Irradiation source has been a serious impediment to induce photocatalytic bacterial inactivation which was taken as an advanced indoor air purification technique. Here we reported the synergistic effects of 405 nm LED light and TiO2 photocatalyst in inactivation process of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). In this work, TiO2 and N-doped TiO2 particles were, respectively, suspended into the nutrient broth suspension with S. aureus. Then, the mixed system was exposed to a 405 nm LED light sour...

  11. Staphylococcus aureus infection induces protein A–mediated immune evasion in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Noel T.; Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Huang, Min; Dulac, John; Henry Dunand, Carole; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Kaur, Kaval; Andrews, Sarah F.; Huang, Yunping; DeDent, Andrea; Frank, Karen M.; Charnot-Katsikas, Angella; Schneewind, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacterial infection commonly results in chronic or recurrent disease, suggesting that humoral memory responses are hampered. Understanding how S. aureus subverts the immune response is critical for the rescue of host natural humoral immunity and vaccine development. S. aureus expresses the virulence factor Protein A (SpA) on all clinical isolates, and SpA has been shown in mice to expand and ablate variable heavy 3 (VH3) idiotype B cells. The effects of SpA during natural infection, however, have not been addressed. Acutely activated B cells, or plasmablasts (PBs), were analyzed to dissect the ongoing immune response to infection through the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The B cells that were activated by infection had a highly limited response. When screened against multiple S. aureus antigens, only high-affinity binding to SpA was observed. Consistently, PBs underwent affinity maturation, but their B cell receptors demonstrated significant bias toward the VH3 idiotype. These data suggest that the superantigenic activity of SpA leads to immunodominance, limiting host responses to other S. aureus virulence factors that would be necessary for protection and memory formation. PMID:25348152

  12. A report on infection dynamics of inducible clindamycin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from a teaching hospital in India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debasmita Dubey; Shakti Rath; Mahesh C Sahu; Subhrajita Rout; Nagen K Debata; Rabindra N Padhy

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the infection of hospital-and community-acquired“erythromycin-induced clindamycin resistant”strains or D-test positives of clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (with and without methicillin resistance) in a hospital. Methods: Strains of S. aureus isolated from clinical specimens were subjected to D-test and antibiotic profiling. Results: Of the total 278 isolates, 140 (50.35%) were D-test positives and the rest were D-test negatives. Further, of 140 (100%) positives, 87 (62.14%) and 53 (37.85%) strains were from males and females, respectively. Of 140 (100%) positives, 117 (83.57%) were methicillin resistant S. aureus and 23 (16.42%) were methicillin sensitive S. aureus;of 140 strains, 103 (73.57%) strains from persons with and 37 (26.42%) were without related infections;of 140 strains, 91 (65%) and 49 (35%) were from hospital-and community-acquired samples, respectively. In 140 strains, 118 (84.28%) with comorbidities and 22 (15.71%) without comorbidities cases were recorded;similarly, persons with prior antibiotic uses contributed 108 (77.14%) and without 32 (22.85%) positive strains. These binary data of surveillance were analyzed by a univariate analysis. It was evident that the prior antibiotic uses and comorbidities due to other ailments were the determinative factors in D-test positivity, corroborated by low P values, P=0.001 1 and 0.002 4, respectively. All isolates (278) were resistant to 17 antibiotics of nine groups, in varying degrees;the minimum of 28%resistance for vancomycin and the maximum of 97%resistance for gentamicin were recorded. Further, of 278 strains, only 42 (15.1%) strains were resistant constitutively to both antibiotics, erythromycin resistant and clindamycin resistant, while 45 (16.2%) strains were constitutively sensitive to both antibiotics (erythromycin sensitive and clindamycin sensitive). Further, of the rest 191 (68.7%) strains were with erythromycin resistant and clindamycin

  13. Revealing fosfomycin primary effect on Staphylococcus aureus transcriptome: modulation of cell envelope biosynthesis and phosphoenolpyruvate induced starvation

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    Gruden Kristina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is a highly adaptable human pathogen and there is a constant search for effective antibiotics. Fosfomycin is a potent irreversible inhibitor of MurA, an enolpyruvyl transferase that uses phosphoenolpyruvate as substrate. The goal of this study was to identify the pathways and processes primarily affected by fosfomycin at the genome-wide transcriptome level to aid development of new drugs. Results S. aureus ATCC 29213 cells were treated with sub-MIC concentrations of fosfomycin and harvested at 10, 20 and 40 minutes after treatment. S. aureus GeneChip statistical data analysis was complemented by gene set enrichment analysis. A visualization tool for mapping gene expression data into biological pathways was developed in order to identify the metabolic processes affected by fosfomycin. We have shown that the number of significantly differentially expressed genes in treated cultures increased with time and with increasing fosfomycin concentration. The target pathway - peptidoglycan biosynthesis - was upregulated following fosfomycin treatment. Modulation of transport processes, cofactor biosynthesis, energy metabolism and nucleic acid biosynthesis was also observed. Conclusions Several pathways and genes downregulated by fosfomycin have been identified, in contrast to previously described cell wall active antibiotics, and was explained by starvation response induced by phosphoenolpyruvate accumulation. Transcriptomic profiling, in combination with meta-analysis, has been shown to be a valuable tool in determining bacterial response to a specific antibiotic.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus induces hypoxia and cellular damage in porcine dermal explants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can infect wounds and produce difficult-to- treat biofilms. To determine the extent that MRSA biofilms can deplete oxygen, change pH and damage host tissue, we developed a porcine dermal explant model on which we cultured GFP-labeled MRSA biofilms. ...

  15. Therapeutic relevance of penicillin-induced hypersensitivity of Staphylococcus aureus to killing by polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, C; Georgopoulos, A.; Laber, G.; Schütze, E

    1984-01-01

    There is an overwhelming body of evidence that certain Staphylococcus aureus strains become more sensitive to killing by polymorphonuclear leukocytes after their growth in media containing subinhibitory concentrations of penicillin. However, it is not clear to what extent this phenomenon contributes to the curative effect of penicillin in vivo. To explore its therapeutic relevance, we evaluated the interaction of staphylococci pretreated with penicillin in vitro with leukocytes in cell-proof ...

  16. Comparative efifcacy of marineStreptomyces formulation versus ciprolfoxacin ophthalmic solution for treatingStaphylococcus aureus-induced conjunctivitis in animal model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Femina Wahaab; Kalidass Subramaniam; Morris Jawahar

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To report the efficacy of marine actinomycetes in controllingStaphylococcus aureus (S. aureus)-induced conjunctivitis in experimental rabbit. Methods: The ethyl acetate extracts of the best isolates of actinomycetes from the soil samples of Rameswaram coastal regions, Tamil Nadu, India, were concentrated and re-constituted in buffer and used as actinomycetes ophthalmic suspension in this study. The anti-inflammatory efficacy of actinomycetes ophthalmic suspension was analysed in controllingS. aureus-induced conjunctivitis in rabbit in comparison with that of ciprofloxacin. Results:Among the four best isolates, theRAM25C4isolate had the highest antimicrobial activity in the secondary screening. Shelf life studies indicated that the activity can be retained for 75 days when it was stored at 8°C and the optimum temperature for storage was between –20°°C and 30°°C. The animal model studies indicated that there was a profound anti-conjunctivitis effect. The actinomycetes ophthalmic suspension had better activity than ciprofloxacin ophthalmic solution. Conclusions:This is the first time to report thatStreptomyces bacillaris strainRAM25C4 has antimicrobial effect in controlling ophthalmic pathogenS. aureus underin vitro condition and thein vivo anti-inflammatory activity in controllingS. aureus-induced conjunctivitis.

  17. Identification of Functional Regulatory Residues of the β-Lactam Inducible Penicillin Binding Protein in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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    Andreas N. Mbah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to methicillin by Staphylococcus aureus is a persistent clinical problem worldwide. A mechanism for resistance has been proposed in which methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA isolates acquired a new protein called β-lactam inducible penicillin binding protein (PBP-2′. The PBP-2′ functions by substituting other penicillin binding proteins which have been inhibited by β-lactam antibiotics. Presently, there is no structural and regulatory information on PBP-2′ protein. We conducted a complete structural and functional regulatory analysis of PBP-2′ protein. Our analysis revealed that the PBP-2′ is very stable with more hydrophilic amino acids expressing antigenic sites. PBP-2′ has three striking regulatory points constituted by first penicillin binding site at Ser25, second penicillin binding site at Ser405, and finally a single metallic ligand binding site at Glu657 which binds to Zn2+ ions. This report highlights structural features of PBP-2′ that can serve as targets for developing new chemotherapeutic agents and conducting site direct mutagenesis experiments.

  18. Identification of Functional Regulatory Residues of the β -Lactam Inducible Penicillin Binding Protein in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbah, Andreas N; Isokpehi, Raphael D

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to methicillin by Staphylococcus aureus is a persistent clinical problem worldwide. A mechanism for resistance has been proposed in which methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates acquired a new protein called β -lactam inducible penicillin binding protein (PBP-2'). The PBP-2' functions by substituting other penicillin binding proteins which have been inhibited by β -lactam antibiotics. Presently, there is no structural and regulatory information on PBP-2' protein. We conducted a complete structural and functional regulatory analysis of PBP-2' protein. Our analysis revealed that the PBP-2' is very stable with more hydrophilic amino acids expressing antigenic sites. PBP-2' has three striking regulatory points constituted by first penicillin binding site at Ser25, second penicillin binding site at Ser405, and finally a single metallic ligand binding site at Glu657 which binds to Zn(2+) ions. This report highlights structural features of PBP-2' that can serve as targets for developing new chemotherapeutic agents and conducting site direct mutagenesis experiments.

  19. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy in chronic osteomyelitis induced by Staphylococcus aureus: An in vitro and in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Reis Júnior, João Alves; de Assis, Patrícia Nascimento; Paraguassú, Gardênia Matos; de Vieira de Castro, Isabele Cardoso; Trindade, Renan Ferreira; Marques, Aparecida Maria Cordeiro; Almeida, Paulo Fernando; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz Barbosa

    2012-09-01

    Osteomyelitis it is an acute or chronic inflammation in the marrow spaces in the superficial or cortical bone, and associated to bacterial infection. Chronic osteomyelitis represents a major health problem due to its difficult treatment and increased morbidity. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APT) by laser is a treatment based on a cytotoxic photochemical reaction in which, a bright light produced by a laser system and an active photosensitizer absorbed by cells leads an activation that induces a series of metabolic reactions that culminates a bacterial killing. The aim of this study was to assess, both in vitro and in vivo, the effect of lethal laser photosensitization on osteomyelitis. On the in vitro study a diode laser (λ660nm; 40mW; o/ = 0.4 cm2; 5 or 10 J/cm2) and 5, 10 and 15μg/mL toluidine blue (TB) were tested and the best parameter chosen for the in vivo study. The concentration of 5μg/mL was selected to perform the decontamination of infected by Staphylococcus aureus tibial bone defects in rats. The results were performed by ANOVA test. On the in vitro studies all PDTs groups in the different concentrations reduced significantly (p<0,001) the amount of bacteria. On the in vivo study PDT group presented a bacterial reduction of 97,4% (P<0,001). The photodynamic therapy using toluidine blue was effective in reducing the staphiloccocus aureus in both in vitro and in vivo studies.

  20. The Role of Mcl-1 in S. aureus-Induced Cytoprotection of Infected Macrophages

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    Joanna Koziel

    2013-01-01

    cytoprotection of infected cells leading to apoptosis. Increased MCL1 expression in infected cells was associated with enhanced NFκB activation and subsequent IL-6 secretion, since the inhibition of both NFκB and IL-6 signalling pathways abrogated Mcl-1 induction and cytoprotection. Finally, we confirmed our observation in vivo in murine model of septic arthritis showing the association between the severity of arthritis and Mcl-1 expression. Therefore, we propose that S. aureus is hijacking the Mcl-1-dependent inhibition of apoptosis to prevent the elimination of infected host cells, thus allowing the intracellular persistence of the pathogen, its dissemination by infected macrophages, and the progression of staphylococci diseases.

  1. Brazilin plays an anti-inflammatory role with regulating Toll-like receptor 2 and TLR 2 downstream pathways in Staphylococcus aureus-induced mastitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xue-jiao; Wang, Tian-cheng; Zhang, Ze-cai; Cao, Yong-guo; Zhang, Nai-sheng; Guo, Meng-yao

    2015-07-01

    Mastitis, which commonly occurs during the postpartum period, is caused by the infection of the mammary glands. The most common infectious bacterial pathogen of mastitis is Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) in both human and animals. Brazilin, a compound isolated from the traditional herbal medicine Caesalpinia sappan L., has been shown to exhibit multiple biological properties. The present study was performed to determine the effect of brazilin on the inflammatory response in the mouse model of S. aureus mastitis and to confirm the mechanism of action involved. Brazilin treatment was applied in both a mouse model and cells. After brazilin treatment of cells, Western blotting and qPCR were performed to detect the protein levels and mRNA levels, respectively. Brazilin treatment significantly attenuated inflammatory cell infiltration and inhibited the expressions of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of brazilin in mice suppressed S. aureus-induced inflammatory injury and the production of proinflammatory mediators. This suppression was achieved by reducing the increased expression of TLR2 and regulating the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways in the mammary gland tissues and cells with S. aureus-induced mastitis. These results suggest that brazilin appears to be an effective drug for the treatment of mastitis and may be applied as a clinical therapy.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus isolates from chronic osteomyelitis are characterized by high host cell invasion and intracellular adaptation, but still induce inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinka, Julia; Hachmeister, Marie; Geraci, Jennifer; Sordelli, Daniel; Hansen, Uwe; Niemann, Silke; Oetermann, Sylvia; Peters, Georg; Löffler, Bettina; Tuchscherr, Lorena

    2014-11-01

    Osteomyelitis is a severe inflammatory disease of the bone that is mainly caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Particularly, bone infections are difficult to treat and can develop into a chronic course with a high relapsing rate despite of antimicrobial treatments. The complex interaction of staphylococci with osseous tissue and the bacterial ability to invade host cells are thought to determine the severity of infection. Yet, defined bacterial virulence factors responsible for the pathogenesis of osteomyelitis have not been clearly identified. The aim of this study was to detect S. aureus virulence factors that are associated with osteomyelitis and contribute to a chronic course of infection. To this purpose, we collected 41 S. aureus isolates, each 11 from acute osteomyelitis (infection period less than 2 months), 10 from chronic osteomyelitis (infection period more than 12 months), 10 from sepsis and 10 from nasal colonization. All isolates were analyzed for gene expression and in functional in-vitro systems. Adhesion assays to bone matrix revealed that all isolates equally bound to matrix structures, but invasion assays in human osteoblasts showed a high invasive capacity of chronic osteomyelitis isolates. The high invasion rate could not be explained by defined adhesins, as all infecting strains expressed a multitude of adhesins that act together and determine the level of adhesion. Following host cell invasion isolates from chronic osteomyelitis induced less cytotoxicity than all other isolates and a higher percentage of Small-colony-variant (SCV)-formation, which represents an adaptation mechanism during long-term persistence. Isolates from acute and chronic osteomyelitis strongly produced biofilm and highly expressed agr and sarA that regulate secreted virulence factors and induced an inflammatory response in osteoblasts. In conclusion, chronic osteomyelitis isolates were characterized by a high host cell invasion rate, low cytotoxicity and the ability to

  3. Staphylococcus aureus PSM peptides induce tolerogenic dendritic cells upon treatment with ligands of extracellular and intracellular TLRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Nicole S; Richardson, Jennifer R; Schreiner, Jens; Klenk, Juliane; Günter, Manina; Autenrieth, Stella E

    2016-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key players of the immune system and thus a target for immune evasion by pathogens. We recently showed that the virulence factor phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) produced by community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains induces tolerogenic DCs upon Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 activation via the p38-CREB-IL-10 pathway. Here, we addressed the question whether this tolerogenic phenotype of DCs induced by PSMs is specific for TLR2 activation. Therefore, bone marrow-derived DCs were treated with various ligands for extracellular and intracellular TLRs simultaneously with PSMα3. We show that PSMα3 modulates antigen uptake, maturation and cytokine production of DCs activated by TLR1/2, TLR2/6, TLR4, TLR7, and TLR9. Pre-incubation of DCs with a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor prevented the PSMα3-induced IL-10 secretion, as well as MHC class II up-regulation upon TLR activation. In consequence, the tolerogenic DCs induced by PSMα3 in response to several TLR ligands promoted priming of regulatory T cells. Thus, PSMs could be useful as inducers of tolerogenic DCs upon TLR ligand stimulation for therapeutic applications.

  4. The cell wall component lipoteichoic acid of Staphylococcus aureus induces chemokine gene expression in bovine mammary epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIKU, Yoshio; NAGASAWA, Yuya; TANABE, Fuyuko; SUGAWARA, Kazue; WATANABE, Atsushi; HATA, Eiji; OZAWA, Tomomi; NAKAJIMA, Kei-ichi; ARAI, Toshiro; HAYASHI, Tomohito

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is a major cause of bovine mastitis, but its pathogenic mechanism remains poorly understood. To evaluate the role of lipoteichoic acid (LTA) in the immune or inflammatory response of SA mastitis, we investigated the gene expression profile in bovine mammary epithelial cells stimulated with LTA alone or with formalin-killed SA (FKSA) using cap analysis of gene expression. Seven common differentially expressed genes related to immune or inflammatory mediators were up-regulated under both LTA and FKSA stimulations. Three of these genes encode chemokines (IL-8, CXCL6 and CCL2) functioning as chemoattractant molecules for neutrophils and macrophages. These results suggest that the initial inflammatory response of SA infection in mammary gland may be related with LTA induced chemokine genes. PMID:27211287

  5. Imaging of the Staphylococcus aureus Inactivation Process Induced by a Multigas Plasma Jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Toshihiro; Kawano, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Yota; Uehara, Kodai; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Matsumura, Yuriko; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Azuma, Takeshi; Okino, Akitoshi

    2016-12-01

    To identify mechanisms underlying the bacterial inactivation process by atmospheric nonthermal plasma using a unique plasma jet that can generate various gas plasmas, Staphylococcus aureus were irradiated with carbon dioxide plasma, which produces a large amount of singlet oxygens, and nitrogen plasma, which produces a large amount of OH radicals. And damaged areas of plasma-treated bacteria were observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. As a result, bacteria were damaged by both gas plasmas, but the site of damage differed according to gas species. Therefore, it suggests that singlet oxygen generated by carbon dioxide plasma or other reactive species caused by singlet oxygen contributes to the damage of internal structures of bacteria through the cell wall and membrane, and OH radicals generated by nitrogen plasma or other reactive species derived from OH radicals contribute to damage of the cell wall and membrane.

  6. Short communication: Antimicrobial efficacy of intramammary treatment with a novel biphenomycin compound against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis, and Escherichia coli-induced mouse mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demon, Dieter; Breyne, Koen; Schiffer, Guido; Meyer, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    Bovine mastitis undermines udder health, jeopardizes milk production, and entails prohibitive costs, estimated at $2 billion per year in the dairy industry of the United States. Despite intensive research, the dairy industry has not managed to eradicate the 3 major bovine mastitis-inducing pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis, and Escherichia coli. In this study, the antimicrobial efficacy of a newly formulated biphenomycin compound (AIC102827) was assessed against intramammary Staph. aureus, Strep. uberis, and E. coli infections, using an experimental mouse mastitis model. Based on its effective and protective doses, AIC102827 applied into the mammary gland was most efficient to treat Staph. aureus, but also adequately reduced growth of Strep. uberis or E. coli, indicating its potential as a broad-spectrum candidate to treat staphylococcal, streptococcal, and coliform mastitis in dairy cattle.

  7. Combination therapy with lysin CF-301 and antibiotic is superior to antibiotic alone for treating methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-induced murine bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, Raymond; Lee, Han M; Schneider, Brent C; Sauve, Karen L; Law, Christina; Khan, Babar K; Rotolo, Jimmy A; Horiuchi, Yuki; Couto, Daniel E; Raz, Assaf; Fischetti, Vincent A; Huang, David B; Nowinski, Robert C; Wittekind, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Lysins are bacteriophage-derived enzymes that degrade bacterial peptidoglycans. Lysin CF-301 is being developed to treat Staphylococcus aureus because of its potent, specific, and rapid bacteriolytic effects. It also demonstrates activity on drug-resistant strains, has a low resistance profile, eradicates biofilms, and acts synergistically with antibiotics. CF-301 was bacteriolytic against 250 S. aureus strains tested including 120 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates. In time-kill studies with 62 strains, CF-301 reduced S. aureus by 3-log10 within 30 minutes compared to 6-12 hours required by antibiotics. In bacteremia, CF-301 increased survival by reducing blood MRSA 100-fold within 1 hour. Combinations of CF-301 with vancomycin or daptomycin synergized in vitro and increased survival significantly in staphylococcal-induced bacteremia compared to treatment with antibiotics alone (P combinations with antibiotics was confirmed in 26 independent bacteremia studies. Combinations including CF-301 and antibiotics represent an attractive alternative to antibiotic monotherapies currently used to treat S. aureus bacteremia.

  8. PREVALENCE OF INDUCIBLE CLINDAMYCIN RESISTANCE AMONG STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS ISOLATES IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL: AN ALARM BEFORE “NO ANTIBIOTIC ERA”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nita

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available : INTRODUCTION: Among Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin (MLS antibiotics Clindamycin has been used most commonly because of its excellent pharmacokinetics. Because of increasing use, resistance to this drug is problem. The inducible resistance can only be detected if the erythromycin and Clindamycin discs are placed adjacent to each other. It is very important for each microbiology lab to check for inducible Clindamycin resistance. MATERIALS & METHODS: Total 325 Staphylococcus aureus isolates were studied. Isolates showing resistance to Erythromycin were tested for inducible Clindamycin resistance by disc approximation test, performed as per CLSI 2011 guideline S. RESULTS: 32% isolates were Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and 68% were Methicillin Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA. Inducible Clindamycin resistance was observed in 13.53% isolates, constitutive resistance was found in 12.61% isolates & MS phenotype was observed in 16.61% isolates. Inducible resistance, constitutive resistance and MS phenotype were higher in MRSA (27.80 %, 18.26% & 20.20% respectively as compared to MSSA (6.78%, 9.95% & 14.93% respectively. CONCLUSION: Inducible Clindamycin resistance testing should be done as routine practice. IF not done it can lead to treatment failure and ultimately irrational use of other higher antibiotics. So there is need to guide the clinicians by delivering appropriate reports to prevent the stage of “NO ANTIBIOTIC ERA”

  9. Polydatin ameliorates Staphylococcus aureus-induced mastitis in mice via inhibiting TLR2-mediated activation of the p38 MAPK/NF-κB pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kang-feng; Zhao, Gan; Deng, Gan-zhen; Wu, Hai-chong; Yin, Nan-nan; Chen, Xiu-ying; Qiu, Chang-wei; Peng, Xiu-li

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies show that Polydatin (PD) extracted from the roots of Polygonum cuspidatum Sieb, a widely used traditional Chinese remedies, possesses anti-inflammatory activity in several experimental models. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of PD on Staphylococcus aureus-induced mastitis in mice and elucidated the potential mechanisms. In mice with S aureus-induced mastitis, administration of PD (15, 30, 45 mg/kg, ip) or dexamethasone (Dex, 5 mg/kg, ip) significantly suppressed the infiltration of inflammatory cells, ameliorated the mammary structural damage, and inhibited the activity of myeloperoxidase, a biomarker of neutrophils accumulation. Furthermore, PD treatment dose-dependently decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 in the mammary gland tissues. PD treatment also dose-dependently decreased the expression of TLR2, MyD88, IRAK1, IRAK4 and TRAF6 as well as the phosphorylation of TAK1, MKK3/6, p38 MAPK, IκB-α and NF-κB in the mammary gland tissues. In mouse mammary epithelial cells (mMECs) infected by S aureus in vitro, pretreatment with PD dose-dependently suppressed the upregulated pro-inflammatory cytokines and signaling proteins, and the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and AP-1. A TLR2-neutralizing antibody mimicked PD in its suppression on S aureus-induced upregulation of MyD88, p-p38 and p-p65 levels in mMECs. PD (50, 100 μg/mL) affected neither the growth of S aureus in vitro, nor the viability of mMECs. In conclusion, PD does not exhibit antibacterial activity against S aureus, its therapeutic effects in mouse S aureus-induced mastitis depend on its ability to down-regulate pro-inflammatory cytokine levels via inhibiting TLR2-mediated activation of the p38 MAPK/NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:27890916

  10. Mesenchymal stromal cell implantation for stimulation of long bone healing aggravates Staphylococcus aureus induced osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebach, Elisabeth; Holschbach, Jeannine; Buchta, Nicole; Bitsch, Rudi Georg; Kleinschmidt, Kerstin; Richter, Wiltrud

    2015-07-01

    Large bone defects requiring long-term osteosynthetic stabilization or repeated surgeries show a considerable rate of infection. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been successfully used to enhance bone regeneration, but their powerful immunomodulatory effects may impose an enhanced risk for osteomyelitis development. In order to unravel whether implantation of MSCs aggravates a simultaneous bone infection, a hydrogel-supported osteomyelitis ostectomy model was developed in which rats received a femoral bone defect with rigid plate-fixation. After fibrin-assisted transfer of Staphylococcus aureus (SA), effects of MSC implantation on osteomyelitis development were quantified over 3-4 weeks. All SA-infected animals developed an acute local osteomyelitis with significantly increased blood neutrophil count, abscess formation and bone destruction. MSC-treatment of infected defects aggravated osteomyelitis according to a significantly elevated osteomyelitis score and enhanced distal bone loss with spongy alteration of cortical bone architecture. Increased attraction of macrophages, osteoclasts and regulation of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators were potential MSC actions. Overall trophic actions of MSCs implanted into non-sterile bone defects may enhance an infection and/or exacerbate osteomyelitis. Studies on antibiotic carrier augmentation or antibiotic treatment are warranted to decide whether MSC implantation is a safe and promising therapy for orthopedic implant-stabilized bone defects at high risk for development of infection.

  11. TiO2 and N-Doped TiO2 Induced Photocatalytic Inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus under 405 nm LED Blue Light Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongfei Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation source has been a serious impediment to induce photocatalytic bacterial inactivation which was taken as an advanced indoor air purification technique. Here we reported the synergistic effects of 405 nm LED light and TiO2 photocatalyst in inactivation process of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus. In this work, TiO2 and N-doped TiO2 particles were, respectively, suspended into the nutrient broth suspension with S. aureus. Then, the mixed system was exposed to a 405 nm LED light source with energy density of about 0.2 W/cm2 for 3 hours. Irradiated suspension was then scanned by UV-vis spectrophotometer for bacteria survive/death rate statistics. Subsequently, the inactivation efficiency was calculated based on the difference of the absorption optical density between experimental and controlled suspensions. Results showed that both TiO2 and N-doped TiO2 particles exhibit potential bacterial inactivation effects under similar experimental conditions. Specifically, N-doped TiO2 with the concentration of 5 g/L displayed enhanced inactivation efficiency against S. aureus under 405 nm LED light irradiation. Thus, it is a promising indoor air purification technique by using N-doped TiO2 particles under the LED light irradiation.

  12. Low Fluid Shear Culture of Staphylococcus Aureus Represses hfq Expression and Induces an Attachment-Independent Biofilm Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. Mark; Castro, S. L.; Nickerson, C. A.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The opportunistic pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, experiences fluctuations in fluid shear during infection and colonization of a human host. Colonization frequently occurs at mucus membrane sites such as in the gastrointestinal tract where the bacterium may experience low levels of fluid shear. The response of S. aureus to low fluid shear remains unclear. Methods: S. aureus was cultured to stationary phase using Rotating-Wall Vessel (RWV) bioreactors which produce a physiologically relevant low fluid shear environment. The bacterial aggregates that developed in the RWV were evaluated by electron microscopy as well as for antibiotic resistance and other virulence-associated stressors. Genetic expression profiles for the low-shear cultured S. aureus were determined by microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Planktonic S. aureus cultures in the low-shear environment formed aggregates completely encased in high amounts of extracellular polymeric substances. In addition, these aggregates demonstrated increased antibiotic resistance indicating attachment-independent biofilm formation. Carotenoid production in the low-shear cultured S. aureus was significantly decreased, and these cultures displayed an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and killing by whole blood. The hfq gene, associated with low-shear growth in Gram negative organisms, was also found to be down-regulated in S. aureus. Conclusions: Collectively, this data suggests that S. aureus decreases virulence characteristics in favor of a biofilm-dwelling colonization phenotype in response to a low fluid shear environment. Furthermore, the identification of an Hfq response to low-shear culture in S. aureus, in addition to the previously reported responses in Gram negative organisms, strongly suggests an evolutionarily conserved response to mechanical stimuli among structurally diverse prokaryotes.

  13. Different roles for non-receptor tyrosine kinases in arachidonate release induced by zymosan and Staphylococcus aureus in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundler Roger

    2006-05-01

    induced by either Staphylococcus aureus or zymosan was found to depend on Src family kinases as well as Btk. While members of the Src kinase family were shown to act upstream of Btk and the MAP kinases, Btk plays another role independent of MAP kinases, but down-stream of the Src family kinases.

  14. IFN-τ inhibits S. aureus-induced inflammation by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs in RAW 264.7 cells and mice with pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gan; Wu, Haichong; Jiang, Kangfeng; Rui, Guangze; Zhu, Zhe; Qiu, Changwei; Guo, Mengyao; Deng, Ganzhen

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), a significant cause of pneumonia, leads to severe inflammation. Few effective treatments or drugs have been reported for S. aureus infection. Interferon tau (IFN-τ) is a type I interferon with low cellular toxicity even at high doses. Previous studies have reported that IFN-τ could significantly mitigate tissue inflammation; however, IFN-τ treatment in S. aureus-induced pneumonia has not been well reported. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify the anti-inflammatory mechanism of IFN-τ in S. aureus-induced pneumonia in mice. A S. aureus-induced pneumonia model and RAW 264.7 cells were used in this research. The histopathological as well as lung wet to dry ratio (W/D) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity results showed that IFN-τ could protect the lung from S. aureus damage. In addition, ELISA and qPCR revealed that IFN-τ treatment led to a decreased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) in both the cells and mouse model, but IL-10 was increased. TLR2, which is involved in the response during S. aureus infection, was also down-regulated by IFN-τ treatment and directly affected NF-κB and MAPK pathway activation. Then, we examined the phosphorylation of IκBα, NF-κB p65 and MAPKs by western blotting, and the results displayed that the phosphorylation of IκBα, NF-κB p65 and MAPKs was inhibited upon IFN-τ treatment in both the cells and mouse model. These findings indicate that IFN-τ has anti-inflammatory properties in vitro and in vivo through the inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK activation, suggesting that IFN-τ may have potential as a therapeutic agent against S. aureus-induced inflammatory diseases.

  15. Protective effects of α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid against cardol-induced cell death and reactive oxygen species generation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Wakae; Tanaka, Toshio; Kubo, Isao; Fujita, Ken-ichi

    2013-06-01

    Cardol (C₁₅:₃), isolated from cashew (Anacardium occidentale L.) nut shell liquid, has been shown to exhibit bactericidal activity against various strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant strains. The maximum level of reactive oxygen species generation was detected at around the minimum bactericidal concentration of cardol, while reactive oxygen species production drastically decreased at doses above the minimum bactericidal concentration. The primary response for bactericidal activity around the bactericidal concentration was noted to primarily originate from oxidative stress such as intracellular reactive oxygen species generation. High doses of cardol (C₁₅:₃) were shown to induce leakage of K⁺ from S. aureus cells, which may be related to the decrease in reactive oxygen species. Antioxidants such as α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid restricted reactive oxygen species generation and restored cellular damage induced by the lipid. Cardol (C₁₅:₃) overdose probably disrupts the native membrane-associated function as it acts as a surfactant. The maximum antibacterial activity of cardols against S. aureus depends on their log P values (partition coefficient in octanol/water) and is related to their similarity to those of anacardic acids isolated from the same source.

  16. Membrane Destruction and DNA Binding of Staphylococcus aureus Cells Induced by Carvacrol and Its Combined Effect with a Pulsed Electric Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lang-Hong; Wang, Man-Sheng; Zeng, Xin-An; Zhang, Zhi-Hong; Gong, De-Ming; Huang, Yan-Bo

    2016-08-17

    Carvacrol (5-isopropyl-2-methylphenol, CAR) is an antibacterial ingredient that occurs naturally in the leaves of the plant Origanum vulgare. The antimicrobial mechanism of CAR against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 43300 was investigated in the study. Analysis of the membrane fatty acids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that exposure to CAR at low concentrations induced a marked increase in the level of unbranched fatty acids (from 34.90 ± 1.77% to 62.37 ± 4.26%). Moreover, CAR at higher levels severely damaged the integrity and morphologies of the S. aureus cell membrane. The DNA-binding properties of CAR were also investigated using fluorescence, circular dichroism, molecular modeling, and atomic-force microscopy. The results showed that CAR bound to DNA via the minor-groove mode, mildly perturbed the DNA secondary structure, and induced DNA molecules to be aggregated. Furthermore, a combination of CAR with a pulsed-electric field was found to exhibit strong synergistic effects on S. aureus.

  17. Aspectos clínicos e características do leite em ovelhas com mastite induzida experimentalmente com Staphylococcus aureus Clinical aspects and characteristics of the milk in sheep with mastitis experimentally induced with Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério A. Santos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo estudar os aspectos clínicos e as características físico-químicas do leite em ovelhas com mastite induzida experimentalmente com Staphylococcus aureus. Foram utilizados dez animais da raça Santa Inês, com peso médio de 30 kg, fêmeas, primíparas recém-paridas, mantidos em apriscos e clinicamente sadios. Após se estabelecer os padrões de normalidade para as variáveis estudadas, os animais foram inoculados experimentalmente numa mama com uma cepa de S. aureus, empregando-se o inóculo de 1,0x10(4ufc/ml, enquanto a outra serviu como controle. As observações clínicas e laboratoriais foram realizadas nos intervalos de 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96, 108, 120, 132, 168, 180, 288 e 336 horas após a inoculação do agente etiológico (PI. Todos os animais apresentaram manifestações clínicas sistêmicas e nas glândulas inoculadas, observadas com mais intensidade a partir de 24 horas após a inoculação. Alterações significativas (PThe objective was to study the clinical aspects and the physical-chemical characteristics of the milk in sheep with mastitis experimentally induced with Staphylococcus aureus. For such, were used 10 Santa Inês primiparity ewes, weighing 30 kg, clinically healthy and housed in a stall. After establishing the normality patterns for the studied variables, the animals were inoculated into one teat of the udder with an inoculum of 1.0x10(4ufc/ml of S. aureus, while the other gland served as control. The clinical observations were accomplished in intervals of 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72, 84, 96, 108, 120, 132, 168, 180, 288 and 336 hours after the inoculation of the agent (PI. All the animals presented clinical systemic manifestations, and in the inoculated glands with more intensity from 24 hours on after the inoculation. There were significant alterations (P<0.05 in the production and physical-chemical composition of the milk in relation to the controls, with reduction of volume

  18. Habituation of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus to Origanum vulgare L. essential oil does not induce direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to salts and organic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adassa Gama Tavares

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus strains that were isolated from foods were investigated for their ability to develop direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to sodium chloride (NaCl, potassium chloride (KCl, lactic acid (LA and acetic acid (AA after habituation in sublethal amounts (1/2 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/2 MIC and 1/4 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/4 MIC of Origanum vulgare L. essential oil (OVEO. The habituation of S. aureus to 1/2 MIC and 1/4 MIC of OVEO did not induce direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested strains, as assessed by modulation of MIC values. Otherwise, exposing the strains to OVEO at sublethal concentrations maintained or increased the sensitivity of the cells to the tested stressing agents because the MIC values of OVEO, NaCl, KCl, LA and AA against the cells that were previously habituated to OVEO remained the same or decreased when compared with non-habituated cells. These data indicate that OVEO does not have an inductive effect on the acquisition of direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested enterotoxigenic strains of S. aureus to antimicrobial agents that are typically used in food preservation.

  19. Mild Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection Improves the Course of Subsequent Endogenous S. aureus Bacteremia in Mice.

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    Sanne van den Berg

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus carriers with S. aureus bacteremia may have a reduced mortality risk compared to non-carriers. A role for the immune system is suggested. Here, we study in mice the effect of mild S. aureus skin infection prior to endogenous or exogenous S. aureus bacteremia, and evaluate protection in relation to anti-staphylococcal antibody levels. Skin infections once or twice by a clinical S. aureus isolate (isolate P or S. aureus strain 8325-4 were induced in mice free of S. aureus and anti-staphylococcal antibodies. Five weeks later, immunoglobulin G (IgG levels in blood against 25 S. aureus antigens were determined, and LD50 or LD100 bacteremia caused by S. aureus isolate P was induced. S. aureus skin infections led to elevated levels of anti-staphylococcal IgG in blood. One skin infection improved the course of subsequent severe endogenous bacteremia only. A second skin infection further improved animal survival rate, which was associated with increased pre-bacteremia IgG levels against Efb, IsaA, LukD, LukE, Nuc, PrsA and WTA. In conclusion, S. aureus isolate P skin infection in mice reduces the severity of subsequent endogenous S. aureus bacteremia only. Although cellular immune effects cannot be rules out, anti-staphylococcal IgG against specified antigens may contribute to this effect.

  20. Treatment of localized abscesses induced by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using MRgFUS: First in vivo results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieck, Birgit; Curiel, Laura; Mougenot, Charles; Zhang, Kunyan; Pichardo, Samuel

    2012-11-01

    Background. In the present work we study the therapeutic effect of focused ultrasound on localized abscess induced by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a major nosocomial pathogen in health-care facilities. The people, particularly those who are immunocompromised are prone to develop infectious sites that often are non-responsive to regular treatments. Because of its capability to induce a rise of temperature at a very precise location, the use of focused ultrasound represents a considerable opportunity to propose a new therapy for MRSA-related infections. Methods. A 50μL subcutaneous injection of MRSA strain USA 400 bacteria at a concentration of 7×103/μL was made on the left thigh of BALB/c mice and an abscess of 6±2 mm-length formed after 48hrs. A transducer operating at 3 MHz with a focal length of 50mm and diameter of 32mm was used to treat the abscess. The focal point was positioned 2mm under the skin at the abscess center. Forty-eight hours after injection 4 ultrasound exposures of 9s-each were applied to each abscess under Magnetic Resonance-guidance. Each exposure was followed by a 1 min pause. Real-time estimation of change of temperature was done using a communication toolbox (matMRI) developed in our laboratory. Three experimental groups of 6 animals each were tested: moderate temperature (MT), high temperature (HT) and control. MT and HT groups reached, respectively, 55°C and 65°C at end of exposure. Effectiveness of the treatment was assessed by culturing bacteria of the treated abscess 1 and 4 days after treatment. Spleen samples were cultured to test for septicemia. Results. Macroscopic evaluation of treated abscess indicated a diminution of external size of abscess 1d after treatment. Treatment did not cause open wounds. Bacteria counting 1 day after treatment was 0.7±1.1 × 105, 0.5±0.7 × 105 and 1.1±2.3 × 105 CFU/μl for MT, HT and control groups, respectively; for the 4-day end point, the count was 0.6±0.6

  1. Copper stress induces a global stress response in Staphylococcus aureus and represses sae and agr expression and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jonathan; Sitthisak, Sutthirat; Sengupta, Mrittika; Johnson, Miranda; Jayaswal, R K; Morrissey, Julie A

    2010-01-01

    Copper is an important cofactor for many enzymes; however, high levels of copper are toxic. Therefore, bacteria must ensure there is sufficient copper for use as a cofactor but, more importantly, must limit free intracellular levels to prevent toxicity. In this study, we have used DNA microarray to identify Staphylococcus aureus copper-responsive genes. Transcriptional profiling of S. aureus SH1000 grown in excess copper identified a number of genes which fall into four groups, suggesting that S. aureus has four main mechanisms for adapting to high levels of environmental copper, as follows: (i) induction of direct copper homeostasis mechanisms; (ii) increased oxidative stress resistance; (iii) expression of the misfolded protein response; and (iv) repression of a number of transporters and global regulators such as Agr and Sae. Our experimental data confirm that resistance to oxidative stress and particularly to H2O2 scavenging is an important S. aureus copper resistance mechanism. Our previous studies have demonstrated that Eap and Emp proteins, which are positively regulated by Agr and Sae, are required for biofilm formation under low-iron growth conditions. Our transcriptional analysis has confirmed that sae, agr, and eap are repressed under high-copper conditions and that biofilm formation is indeed repressed under high-copper conditions. Therefore, our results may provide an explanation for how copper films can prevent biofilm formation on catheters.

  2. Caspase-8 Activation Precedes Alterations of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential during Monocyte Apoptosis Induced by Phagocytosis and Killing of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Węglarczyk, Kazimierz; Baran, Jarosław; Zembala, Marek; Pryjma, Juliusz

    2004-01-01

    Human peripheral blood monocytes become apoptotic following phagocytosis and killing of Staphylococcus aureus. Although this type of monocyte apoptosis is known to be initiated by Fas-Fas ligand (FasL) interactions, the downstream signaling pathway has not been determined. In this work the involvement of mitochondria and the kinetics of caspase-8 and caspase-3 activation after phagocytosis of S. aureus were studied. Caspase-8 activity was measured in cell lysates by using the fluorogenic substrate Ac-IETD-AFC. Active caspase-3 levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) were measured in whole cells by flow cytometry using monoclonal antibodies reacting with activated caspase-3 and chloromethyl-X-rosamine, respectively. The results show that caspase-8 was activated shortly after phagocytosis of bacteria. Caspase-8 activation was followed by progressive disruption of Δψm, which is associated with the production of reactive oxygen intermediates. The irreversible caspase-8 inhibitor zIETD-FMK prevented the disruption of Δψm and the release of cytochrome c from S. aureus-exposed monocytes. Caspase-3 activation occurred following disruption of Δψm. These results strongly suggest that apoptosis of monocytes that have phagocytosed and killed S. aureus is driven by the Fas-FasL-initiated pathway, which is typical for type II cells. PMID:15102767

  3. Phenol-Soluble Modulin α Peptide Toxins from Aggressive Staphylococcus aureus Induce Rapid Formation of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps through a Reactive Oxygen Species-Independent Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnsdottir, Halla; Dahlstrand Rudin, Agnes; Klose, Felix P.; Elmwall, Jonas; Welin, Amanda; Stylianou, Marios; Christenson, Karin; Urban, Constantin F.; Forsman, Huamei; Dahlgren, Claes; Karlsson, Anna; Bylund, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils have the ability to capture and kill microbes extracellularly through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These are DNA and protein structures that neutrophils release extracellularly and are believed to function as a defense mechanism against microbes. The classic NET formation process, triggered by, e.g., bacteria, fungi, or by direct stimulation of protein kinase C through phorbol myristate acetate, is an active process that takes several hours and relies on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are further modified by myeloperoxidase (MPO). We show here that NET-like structures can also be formed by neutrophils after interaction with phenol-soluble modulin α (PSMα) that are cytotoxic membrane-disturbing peptides, secreted from community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). The PSMα-induced NETs contained the typical protein markers and were able to capture microbes. The PSMα-induced NET structures were disintegrated upon prolonged exposure to DNase-positive S. aureus but not on exposure to DNase-negative Candida albicans. Opposed to classic NETosis, PSMα-triggered NET formation occurred very rapidly, independently of ROS or MPO, and was also manifest at 4°C. These data indicate that rapid NETs release may result from cytotoxic membrane disturbance by PSMα peptides, a process that may be of importance for CA-MRSA virulence. PMID:28337204

  4. Focused ultrasound treatment of abscesses induced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Feasibility study in a mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieck, Birgit [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B6V4 (Canada); Bates, David; Pichardo, Samuel, E-mail: spichard@lakeheadu.ca, E-mail: lcuriel@lakeheadu.ca; Curiel, Laura, E-mail: spichard@lakeheadu.ca, E-mail: lcuriel@lakeheadu.ca [Thunder Bay Regional Research Institute, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B6V4, Canada and Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B6V4 (Canada); Zhang, Kunyan [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Escott, Nicholas [Department of Pathology, Thunder Bay Regional Health Sciences Centre, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 6V4 (Canada); Mougenot, Charles [Philips Healthcare, Ontario L6C 2S3 (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the therapeutic effect of focused ultrasound on abscesses induced by methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a major nosocomial pathogen where immunocompromised patients are prone to develop infections that are less and less responsive to regular treatments. Because of its capability to induce a rise of temperature at a very precise location, the use of focused ultrasound represents a considerable opportunity for therapy of localized MRSA-related infections. Methods: 50μl of MRSA strain USA400 bacteria suspension at a concentration of 1.32 ± 0.5 × 10{sup 5} colony forming units (cfu)/μl was injected subcutaneously in the left flank of BALB/c mice. An abscess of 6 ± 2 mm in diameter formed after 48 h. A transducer operating at 3 MHz with a focal length of 50 mm and diameter of 32 mm was used to treat the abscess. The focal point was positioned 2 mm under the skin at the abscess center. Forty-eight hours after injection four ultrasound exposures of 9 s each were applied to each abscess under magnetic resonance imaging guidance. Each exposure was followed by a 1 min pause. These parameters were based on preliminary experiments to ensure repetitive accurate heating of the abscess. Real-time estimation of change of temperature was done using water-proton resonance frequency and a communication toolbox (matMRI) developed inhouse. Three experimental groups of animals each were tested: control, moderate temperature (MT), and high temperature (HT). MT and HT groups reached, respectively, 52.3 ± 5.1 and 63.8 ± 7.5 °C at the end of exposure. Effectiveness of the treatment was assessed by evaluating the bacteria amount of the treated abscess 1 and 4 days after treatment. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay evaluating the neutrophil amount was performed to assess the local neutrophil recruitment and the white blood cell count was used to evaluate the systemic inflammatory response after focused ultrasound treatment. Results: Macroscopic

  5. Sn doping induced enhancement in the activity of ZnO nanostructures against antibiotic resistant S. aureus bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan T

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Tariq Jan,1 Javed Iqbal,1 Muhammad Ismail,2 M Zakaullah,3 Sajjad Haider Naqvi,4 Noor Badshah51Laboratory of Nanoscience and Technology, Department of Physics, International Islamic University, Islamabad, Pakistan; 2Institute of Biomedical and Genetic Engineering, Islamabad, Pakistan; 3Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan; 4Department of Biochemistry, University of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan; 5Department of Basic Science, University of Engineering and Technology, Peshawar, PakistanAbstract: Highly ionic metal oxide nanostructures are attractive, not only for their physiochemical properties but also for antibacterial activity. Zinc oxide (ZnO nanostructures are known to have inhibitory activity against many pathogens but very little is known about doping effects on it. The antibacterial activity of undoped ZnO and tin (Sn doped ZnO nanostructures synthesized by a simple, versatile, and wet chemical technique have been investigated against Escherichia coli, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial strains. It has been interestingly observed that Sn doping enhanced the inhibitory activity of ZnO against S. aureus more efficiently than the other two bacterial strains. From cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species (ROS production studies it is found that Sn doping concentration in ZnO does not alter the cytotoxicity and ROS production very much. It has also been observed that undoped and Sn doped ZnO nanostructures are biosafe and biocompatible materials towards SH-SY5Y Cells. The observed behavior of ZnO nanostructures with Sn doping is a new way to prevent bacterial infections of S. aureus, especially on skin, when using these nanostructures in creams or lotions in addition to their sunscreen property as an ultraviolet filter. Structural investigations have confirmed the formation of a single phase wurtzite structure of ZnO. The morphology of ZnO nanostructures is found to vary

  6. Intravenous inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus in pigs induces severe sepsis as indicated by increased hypercoagulability and hepatic dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leifsson, Pall S.; Iburg, Tine; Jensen, Henrik E.;

    2010-01-01

    Nine pigs were inoculated intravenously once or twice with 108 Staphylococcus aureus per kilogram body weight and sacrificed 12, 24 and 48 h after inoculation. Three sham-infected pigs served as controls. Blood samples were taken for bacteriology, haematology and clinical chemistry. A necropsy......-reactive protein (CRP) and IL-6, and decreased levels of serum iron. The CRP and IL-6 levels peaked at 36 h, whereas IL-1 beta and tumour necrosis factor-alpha showed no obvious changes. Thromboelastography showed increasing hypercoagulability from 12 h and onwards, whereas the platelet numbers declined slightly...

  7. Staphylococcus aureus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcus aureus and Pregnancy In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a ... This sheet talks about whether exposure to staphylococcus aureus may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  8. Beta-lactams interfering with PBP1 induce Panton-Valentine leukocidin expression by triggering sarA and rot global regulators of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Oana; Choudhury, Priya; Boisset, Sandrine; Badiou, Cédric; Bes, Michele; Benito, Yvonne; Wolz, Christiane; Vandenesch, François; Etienne, Jerome; Cheung, Ambrose L; Bowden, Maria Gabriela; Lina, Gerard

    2011-07-01

    Previous articles reported that beta-lactam antibiotics increase the expression of Staphylococcus aureus Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) by activating its transcription. We investigated the mechanisms underlying the inductor effect of beta-lactams on PVL expression by determining targets and regulatory pathways possibly implicated in this process. We measured PVL production in the presence of oxacillin (nonselective), imipenem (penicillin-binding protein 1 [PBP1] selective), cefotaxime (PBP2 selective), cefaclore (PBP3 selective), and cefoxitin (PBP4 selective). In vitro, we observed increased PVL production consistent with luk-PV mRNA levels that were 20 to 25 times higher for community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) cultures treated with PBP1-binding oxacillin and imipenem than for cultures treated with other beta-lactams or no antibiotic at all. This effect was also observed in vivo, with increased PVL mRNA levels in lung tissues from CA-MRSA-infected mice treated with imipenem but not cefoxitin. To confirm the involvement of PBP1 inhibition in this pathway, PBP1 depletion by use of an inducible pbp1 antisense RNA showed a dose-dependent relationship between the level of pbp1 antisense RNA and the luk-PV mRNA level. Upon imipenem treatment of exponential-phase cultures, we observed an increased sarA mRNA level after 30 min of incubation followed by a decreased rot mRNA level after 1 to 4 h of incubation. Unlike the agr and saeRS positive regulators, which were nonessential for PVL induction by beta-lactams, the sarA (positive) and rot (negative) PVL regulators were necessary for PVL induction by imipenem. Our results suggest that antibiotics binding to PBP1 increase PVL expression by modulating sarA and rot, which are essential mediators of the inductor effect of beta-lactams on PVL expression.

  9. The establishment of experimental chronic osteomyelitis induced by staphylococcus aureus in rabbits%兔胫骨慢性骨髓炎动物模型的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢旻鹏; 蒋电明; 权正学; 黄伟; 曹何; 况尚如; 李广州

    2010-01-01

    Objective To analyze the relationship between the inoculation dose of the bacteria of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923 and the severity of experimental Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis in rabbits. Methods Thirty-six healthy New Zealand white rabbits were randomized into 4 groups: control group and experimental groups A, B, C. There were 10 rabbits in every experimental group and 6 rabbits in control group. Five percent sodium morrhuate (0. 1 ml) and serial dilutions of the bacteria of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923 [3 × 108 to 3 × 109 colony-forming units ( CFU)/ml]suspended in saline or saline alone were inoculated into the proximal metaphysis of the tibia. No antibiotics were used to prevent fatal sepsis. The severity of experimental Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis in rabbits was evaluated by clinical, radiologic,bacteriologic and histologic parameters at the 4th week after infection. Results There was clinical progression of the disease observed by draining wounds, a postoperative limp that subsided in all rabbits, and varied periods of anorexia despite an average increase in body weight. There were varying degrees of BMD decrease, decreased bone trabeculae and bone trabecular space widening in experimental groups at the 4th week after infection.Slices indicated that there were varying degrees of neutrophil infiltration, necrosis of marrow cells and interstitial hemorrhage. Gross pathologic and radiographic criteria were used to grade the severity of experimental staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis in rabbits. The grading of experimental groups A, B, and C was respectively stage 1 to 2 osteomyelitis, stage 2 to 3 osteomyelitis, stage 3 to 4 osteomyelitis. Conclusion The bacteria of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC25923 suspended in saline was inoculated into the proximal metaphysis of the tibia and can induce osteomyelitis. The severity of experimental Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis in rabbits was aggravated with the increase of the bacteria amount

  10. In vitro Staphylococcus aureus-induced oxidative stress in mice murine peritoneal macrophages:a duration-dependent approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Subhankari Prasad Chakraborty; Somenath Roy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the free radical generation and status of the antioxidant enzymes in murine peritoneal macrophage during in vitro vancomycin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (VSSA) treatment with different time interval.Methods:Peritoneal macrophages were treated with 5í106 CFU/mL VSSA cell suspension in vitro for different time interval (1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h) and superoxide anion generation, NADPH oxidase activity, myeloperoxidase activity, nitric oxide generation, antioxidant enzyme status and components of glutathione cycle were analyzed.Results:Superoxide anion generation, NADPH oxidase activity, myeloperoxidase activity and nitric oxide generation got peak at 3 h, indicating maximum free radical generation through activation of NADPH oxidase in murine peritoneal macrophages during VSSA infection. Reduced glutathione level, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione-s-transferase activity were decreased significantly (P<0.05) with increasing time of VSSA infection. But the oxidized glutathione level was time dependently increased significantly (P<0.05) in murine peritoneal macrophages. All the changes in peritoneal macrophages after 3 h in vitro VSSA treatment had no significant difference.Conclusions:From this study, it may be summarized that in vitro VSSA infection not only generates excess free radical but also affects the antioxidant status and glutathione cycle in murine peritoneal macrophages.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin induces apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells : role of endogenous tumour necrosis factor-alpha and the mitochondrial death pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haslinger, Bettina; Strangfeld, Katrin; Peters, Georg; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Sinha, Bhanu

    2003-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections can result in septic and toxic shock with depletion of immune cells and massive cytokine production. Recently, we showed that, in S. aureus-infected Jurkat T cells, alpha-toxin is the major mediator of caspase activation and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the mecha

  12. Staphylococcus aureus toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a dangerous pathogen that causes a variety of severe diseases. The virulence of S. aureus is defined by a large repertoire of virulence factors, among which secreted toxins play a preeminent role. Many S. aureus toxins damage biological membranes, leading to cell death. In particular, S. aureus produces potent hemolysins and leukotoxins. Among the latter, some were recently identified to lyse neutrophils after ingestion, representing an especially powerful weapon against bacterial elimination by innate host defense. Furthermore, S. aureus secretes many factors that inhibit the complement cascade or prevent recognition by host defenses. Several further toxins add to this multi-faceted program of S. aureus to evade elimination in the host. This review will give an overview over S. aureus toxins focusing on recent advances in our understanding of how leukotoxins work in receptor-mediated or receptor-independent fashions.

  13. MF59- and Al(OH3-adjuvanted Staphylococcus aureus (4C-Staph vaccines induce sustained protective humoral and cellular immune responses, with a critical role for effector CD4 T cells at low antibody titers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta eMonaci

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is an important opportunistic pathogen that may cause invasive life-threatening infections like sepsis and pneumonia. Due to increasing antibiotic-resistance, the development of an effective vaccine against S. aureus is needed. Although a correlate of protection against staphylococcal diseases is not yet established, several findings suggest that both antibodies and CD4 T cells might contribute to optimal immunity. In this study, we show that adjuvanting a multivalent vaccine (4C-Staph with MF59, an oil-in-water emulsion licensed in human vaccines, further potentiated antigen-specific IgG titers and CD4 T cell responses compared to alum and conferred protection in the peritonitis model of S. aureus infection. Moreover, we showed that MF59- and alum-adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines induced persistent antigen-specific humoral and T cell responses, and protected mice from infection up to 4 months after immunization. Furthermore, 4C-Staph formulated with MF59 was used to investigate which immune compartment is involved in vaccine-induced protection. Using CD4 T cell-depleted mice or B cell deficient mice, we demonstrated that both T and B cell responses contributed to 4C-Staph vaccine-mediated protective immunity. However, the role of CD4 T cells seemed more evident in the presence of low antibody responses. This study provides preclinical data further supporting the use of the adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines against S. aureus diseases, and provides critical insights on the correlates of protective immunity necessary to combat this pathogen.

  14. The Two-Component System ArlRS and Alterations in Metabolism Enable Staphylococcus aureus to Resist Calprotectin-Induced Manganese Starvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, Jana N.; Párraga Solórzano, Paola K.; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    During infection the host imposes manganese and zinc starvation on invading pathogens. Despite this, Staphylococcus aureus and other successful pathogens remain capable of causing devastating disease. However, how these invaders adapt to host-imposed metal starvation and overcome nutritional immunity remains unknown. We report that ArlRS, a global staphylococcal virulence regulator, enhances the ability of S. aureus to grow in the presence of the manganese-and zinc-binding innate immune effector calprotectin. Utilization of calprotectin variants with altered metal binding properties revealed that strains lacking ArlRS are specifically more sensitive to manganese starvation. Loss of ArlRS did not alter the expression of manganese importers or prevent S. aureus from acquiring metals. It did, however, alter staphylococcal metabolism and impair the ability of S. aureus to grow on amino acids. Further studies suggested that relative to consuming glucose, the preferred carbon source of S. aureus, utilizing amino acids reduced the cellular demand for manganese. When forced to use glucose as the sole carbon source S. aureus became more sensitive to calprotectin compared to when amino acids are provided. Infection experiments utilizing wild type and calprotectin-deficient mice, which have defects in manganese sequestration, revealed that ArlRS is important for disease when manganese availability is restricted but not when this essential nutrient is freely available. In total, these results indicate that altering cellular metabolism contributes to the ability of pathogens to resist manganese starvation and that ArlRS enables S. aureus to overcome nutritional immunity by facilitating this adaptation. PMID:27902777

  15. Repeated applications of cold atmospheric pressure plasma does not induce resistance in Staphylococcus aureus embedded in biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthes, Rutger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: The increasing microbial resistance against antibiotics complicates the therapy of bacterial infections. Therefore new therapeutic options, particularly those causing no resistance, are of high interest. Cold atmospheric plasma is one possible option to eradicate multidrug resistant microorganisms, and so far no resistance development against physical plasma is known.Method: We tested 6-fold repeated plasma applications on a strain embedded in biofilm and compared the reduction of the colony forming units between the different treatment periods to asses a possible development of resistance.Result: For all treatment periods, the control biofilms were reduced by plasma in average by 1.7 log CFU, and decreased from 7.6 to 5.8 log (CFU/cm within 5 hours. The results demonstrated that repeated plasma doses not induce resistance or habituation against plasma applied within short time periods.Conclusion: The repeated application of cold plasma is a promising option for the treatment of infected wounds without the risk of development of resistance against plasma.

  16. A porcine model of haematogenous brain infectionwith staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Lærke Boye; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Nielsen, Ole Lerberg;

    2012-01-01

    A PORCINE MODEL OF HAEMATOGENOUS BRAIN INFECTION WITH STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS Astrup Lærke1, Agerholm Jørgen1, Nielsen Ole1, Jensen Henrik1, Leifsson Páll1, Iburg Tine2. 1: Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark boye@life.ku.dk 2: National Veterinary Institute......, Uppsala, Sweden Introduction Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) is a common cause of sepsis and brain abscesses in man and a frequent cause of porcine pyaemia. Here we present a porcine model of haematogenous S. aureus-induced brain infection. Materials and Methods Four pigs had two intravenous catheters...

  17. Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus : live-in and let die

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraunholz, Martin; Sinha, Bhanu

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus uses a plethora of virulence factors to accommodate a diversity of niches in its human host. Aside from the classical manifestations of S. aureus-induced diseases, the pathogen also invades and survives within mammalian host cells. The survival strategies of the pathogen are as

  18. Rosmarinus officinalis L. essential oil and its majority compound 1,8-cineole at sublethal amounts induce no direct and cross protection in Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, Nelson Justino; Luz, Isabelle da Silva; Tavares, Adassa Gama; Honório, Vanessa Gonçalves; Magnani, Marciane; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2012-12-01

    In this study, the inhibitory efficacy of Rosmarinus officinalis essential L. (ROEO) and 1,8-cineole (CIN) in inhibiting the growth and survival of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 and the induction of direct and bacterial cross protection (lactic acid pH 5.2; NaCl 100 g/L; high temperature 45°C) were evaluated following exposure to sublethal and increasing amounts of these treatments in meat broth. All of the concentrations of the ROEO and CIN examined in this study (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC], 1/2 MIC, and 1/4 MIC) inhibited the viability of S. aureus throughout the 120 min of exposure. The overnight exposure of S. aureus to sublethal amounts of both ROEO or CIN in meat broth did not result in direct or cross protection. Cells progressively subcultured (24-h cycles) in meat broth with increasing amounts of ROEO or CIN showed no increased direct tolerance. These results reveal the antimicrobial efficacy of ROEO and CIN for use in food conservation systems as anti-S. aureus compounds given their efficacy at inhibiting bacterial growth, in addition to their lack of induction for the development of homologous and heterologous resistance.

  19. Garenoxacin-induced increase of CD11b expression on human polymorphonuclear neutrophils does not affect phagocytosis and killing of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüger, Thomas; Reiners, Ana-Lena; Schnitzler, Norbert; Brandenburg, Kerstin; Zündorf, Josef

    2011-04-01

    Garenoxacin is considered to be the most active quinolone against Staphylococcus aureus. Quinolones are believed to alter the function of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and garenoxacin is known to be the only quinolone which alters the expression of the beta-chain (CD11b) of the complement receptor 3 (CR3) which is known to be important in the phagocytosis of S. aureus by PMN. Therefore, the effect of this altered CD11b expression on phagocytosis, oxidative burst, and killing of S. aureus was addressed and compared with that of standard quinolones. Phagocytosis and oxidative burst were determined by flow cytometry, and killing was measured by a colony-count method. Garenoxacin at therapeutic concentrations affected neither phagocytosis nor killing of Staphylococcus aureus NMS54. At supratherapeutic concentrations (1,500 mg/l) garenoxacin reduced and delayed phagocytosis like all other quinolones tested except norfloxacin. This decrease seems to be a result of inhibition of the oxidative burst of PMN and reduced CD11b expression at this supratherapeutic concentration. In conclusion, the alteration of CD11b expression of PMN caused by garenoxacin at 0.5, 5.0, and 100.0 mg/l is not considered to hamper the function of these first-line-defense phagocytes.

  20. Host Physiologic Changes Induced by Influenza A Virus Lead to Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Dispersion and Transition from Asymptomatic Colonization to Invasive Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Reddinger

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a ubiquitous opportunistic human pathogen and a major health concern worldwide, causing a wide variety of diseases from mild skin infections to systemic disease. S. aureus is a major source of severe secondary bacterial pneumonia after influenza A virus infection, which causes widespread morbidity and mortality. While the phenomenon of secondary bacterial pneumonia is well established, the mechanisms behind the transition from asymptomatic colonization to invasive staphylococcal disease following viral infection remains unknown. In this report, we have shown that S. aureus biofilms, grown on an upper respiratory epithelial substratum, disperse in response to host physiologic changes related to viral infection, such as febrile range temperatures, exogenous ATP, norepinephrine, and increased glucose. Mice that were colonized with S. aureus and subsequently exposed to these physiologic stimuli or influenza A virus coinfection developed pronounced pneumonia. This study provides novel insight into the transition from colonization to invasive disease, providing a better understanding of the events involved in the pathogenesis of secondary staphylococcal pneumonia.

  1. Toll-like receptor 2 and 6 interdependency in the erosive stage of Staphylococcus aureus induced septic arthritis mediated by IFN-γ and IL-6--A possible involvement of IL-17 in the progression of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Chandrayee; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2015-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus induced septic arthritis has emerged as a potent disabling and life threatening disease; hence combating this malady has become an imperative need of medical science. Role of TLR-2 in innate recognition of S. aureus and activation of inflammatory cascade by the interplay of some proinflammatory cytokines, resulting in joint inflammation has been established. Variation in the reports suggesting both functional dependency and independency of TLR-2 on its heterodimeric partner TLR-6 in response to ligands exists, thus this study was postulated to observe the expression pattern of TLR-6 in synovial tissue and lymphoid organs after inducing septic arthritis by S. aureus in Swiss albino mouse model and the instigated cytokine profile could affirm its plausible role in SA. The functional relation of TLR-2 and 6 was verified by simulating an in vitro study design on synovial mononuclear cells, blocking TLR-2 and 6, and it was found that they are required to co-express for generating cytokine, NO and H2O2 on infection. IFN-γ, IL-6 and IL-17 were identified to play a distinguished role in SA from their secretion pattern in both in vivo and in vitro study. IFN-γ and IL-6 remained high throughout the infection possibly by the shift of response from Th1 to Th2 and Th17 and contribute in various converging pathways of inflammation. IL-17 increased with the onset of the disease but reduced on the late period. Hence IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-17 along with TLR-6 can be a potent target for therapeutic approach because of their significant contribution in SA.

  2. Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcal Species via the agr Quorum Sensing System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canovas de la Nuez, Jaime; Baldry, Mara; Bojer, Martin S;

    2016-01-01

    between staphylococci and S. aureus, and show that this interaction may eventually lead to the identification of new anti-virulence candidates to target S. aureus infections. Here we show that culture supernatants of 37 out of 52 staphylococcal isolates representing 17 different species inhibit S. aureus......-inducing peptides (AIPs) sensed by AgrC, a two component histidine kinase. agr loci are found also in other staphylococcal species and for Staphylococcus epidermidis, the encoded AIP represses expression of agr regulated virulence genes in S. aureus. In this study we aimed to better understand the interaction....... To assess impact on S. aureus virulence, we co-inoculated S. aureus and S. schleiferi in vivo in the Galleria mellonella wax moth larva, and found that expression of key S. aureus virulence factors was abrogated. Our data show that the S. aureus agr locus is highly responsive to other staphylococcal species...

  3. Genomic analysis of an emerging multiresistant Staphylococcus aureus strain rapidly spreading in cystic fibrosis patients revealed the presence of an antibiotic inducible bacteriophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boniface Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen responsible for a variety of nosocomial and community-acquired infections. Recent reports show that the prevalence of Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus (MRSA infections in cystic fibrosis (CF patients is increasing. In 2006 in Marseille, France, we have detected an atypical MRSA strain with a specific antibiotic susceptibility profile and a unique growth phenotype. Because of the clinical importance of the spread of such strain among CF patients we decided to sequence the genome of one representative isolate (strain CF-Marseille to compare this to the published genome sequences. We also conducted a retrospective epidemiological analysis on all S. aureus isolated from 2002 to 2007 in CF patients from our institution. Results CF-Marseille is multidrug resistant, has a hetero-Glycopeptide-Intermediate resistance S. aureus phenotype, grows on Cepacia agar with intense orange pigmentation and has a thickened cell wall. Phylogenetic analyses using Complete Genome Hybridization and Multi Locus VNTR Assay showed that CF-Marseille was closely related to strain Mu50, representing vancomycin-resistant S. aureus. Analysis of CF-Marseille shows a similar core genome to that of previously sequenced MRSA strains but with a different genomic organization due to the presence of specific mobile genetic elements i.e. a new SCCmec type IV mosaic cassette that has integrated the pUB110 plasmid, and a new phage closely related to phiETA3. Moreover this phage could be seen by electron microscopy when mobilized with several antibiotics commonly used in CF patients including, tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, cotrimoxazole, or imipenem. Phylogenetic analysis of phenotypically similar h-GISA in our study also suggests that CF patients are colonized by polyclonal populations of MRSA that represents an incredible reservoir for lateral gene transfer. Conclusion In conclusion, we demonstrated the emergence and

  4. Use of technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate and gallium-67 citrate scans after intraarticular injection of Staphylococcus aureus into knee joints of rabbits with chronic antigen-induced arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahowald, M.L.; Raskind, J.R.; Peterson, L.; Gerding, D.; Raddatz, D.A.; Shafer, R.

    1986-08-01

    Numerous clinical studies have questioned the ability of radionuclide scans to differentiate septic from aseptic joint inflammation. A clinical study may not be able to document an underlying disease process or duration of infection and, thus, may make conclusions about the accuracy of scan interpretations open to debate. In this study, the Dumonde-Glynn model of antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits was used as the experimental model to study technetium and gallium scans in Staphylococcus aureus infection of arthritic and normal joints. Gallium scans were negative in normal rabbits, usually negative in antigen-induced arthritis, but positive in septic arthritis. The bone scan was usually negative in early infection but positive in late septic arthritis, a finding reflecting greater penetration of bacteria into subchondral bone because of the underlying inflammatory process.

  5. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brown, Aisling F

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we demonstrated that prior exposure to S. aureus enhanced IFNγ responses upon subsequent infection, while adoptive transfer of S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells was protective in naïve mice. Translating these findings, we found that S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells were also significantly expanded during human S. aureus bloodstream infection (BSI). These Th1 cells were CD45RO+, indicative of a memory phenotype. Thus, exposure to S. aureus induces memory Th1 cells in mice and humans, identifying Th1 cells as potential S. aureus vaccine targets. Consequently, we developed a model vaccine comprising staphylococcal clumping factor A, which we demonstrate to be an effective human T cell antigen, combined with the Th1-driving adjuvant CpG. This novel Th1-inducing vaccine conferred significant protection during S. aureus infection in mice. This study notably advances our understanding of S. aureus cellular immunity, and demonstrates for the first time that a correlate of S. aureus protective immunity identified in mice may be relevant in humans.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Allan Garlik

    2003-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is still associated with a high mortality, and knowledge on risk factors and the clinical and the therapeutic aspects of SAB is still limited. This thesis focuses on the clinical aspects of SAB and its metastatic infections. In a study of all patients with bacteremia in Copenhagen County October 1992 through April 1993 (study I) we emphasized previous findings, that S. aureus is one of the most frequent pathogens in bacteremia, and in a case control study also in Copenhagen County 1994-95 (study II) we demonstrated, that not only an inserted central venous catheter and nasal S. aureus carriage but also hyponatremia and anemia are important risk factors for hospital-acquired SAB (study II). Studies on the treatment of SAB have pointed out, that the eradication of a primary is important, but there are only limited clinical studies dealing with antibiotic treatment. By logistic regression analysis, we were able to demonstrate that focus eradication is essential, but also that treatment with dicloxacillin 1 g x 4 or 2 g x 3 are superior to 1 g x 3 (studie III), indicating that the time for serum concentration above the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) for the bacteria plays a role in the outcome of SAB treatment. S. aureus osteomyelitis secondary to SAB is frequently observed. No other countries, however, have a centralized registration, which make it possible to evaluate a large number of these patients. Since 1960, The Staphylococcal Laboratory, Statens Serum Institut in Copenhagen, has registrated selected clinical informations from nearly all patients with positive blood cultures of S. aureus. Based on this registration, we were able to show an increased number of S. aureus osteomyelitis among older patients and a decreased number of S. aureus osteomyelitis of femur and tibia among younger infants in the period 1980-90 (study IV). By reviewing the records of a large number of patients with vertebral S. aureus

  7. Utility of 11C-methionine and 11C-donepezil for imaging of Staphylococcus aureus induced osteomyelitis in a juvenile porcine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, Pia; Alstrup, Aage Ko; Schønheyder, Henrik C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare (11)C-methionine and (11)C-donepezil positron emission tomography (PET) with (111)In-labeled leukocyte and (99m) Tc-DPD (Tc-99m 3,3-diphosphono-1,2-propanedicarboxylic acid) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F...... in the right femoral artery with a porcine strain of Staphylococcus aureus. The sequential scan protocol included Computed Tomography, (11)C-methionine and (11)C-donepezil PET, (99m) Tc-DPD and (111)In-labelled leukocytes scintigraphy, and (18)F-FDG PET. This was followed by necropsy of the pigs and gross......-methionine in 79%, (11)C-donepezil in 58%, and (99m) Tc-DPD in none. Overall, (18)F-FDG PET was superior to (111)In-leukocyte SPECT and (11)C-methionine in marking infectious lesions....

  8. Utility of (11)C-methionine and (11)C-donepezil for imaging of Staphylococcus aureus induced osteomyelitis in a juvenile porcine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, Pia; Alstrup, Aage Ko; Schønheyder, Henrik C;

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare (11)C-methionine and (11)C-donepezil positron emission tomography (PET) with (111)In-labeled leukocyte and (99m) Tc-DPD (Tc-99m 3,3-diphosphono-1,2-propanedicarboxylic acid) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F...... in the right femoral artery with a porcine strain of Staphylococcus aureus. The sequential scan protocol included Computed Tomography, (11)C-methionine and (11)C-donepezil PET, (99m) Tc-DPD and (111)In-labelled leukocytes scintigraphy, and (18)F-FDG PET. This was followed by necropsy of the pigs and gross......-methionine in 79%, (11)C-donepezil in 58%, and (99m) Tc-DPD in none. Overall, (18)F-FDG PET was superior to (111)In-leukocyte SPECT and (11)C-methionine in marking infectious lesions....

  9. Penicillin Binding Protein 1 Is Important in the Compensatory Response of Staphylococcus aureus to Daptomycin-Induced Membrane Damage and Is a Potential Target for β-Lactam–Daptomycin Synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Andrew D.; Theisen, Erin; Sauer, John-Demian; Nonejuie, Poochit; Olson, Joshua; Pogliano, Joseph; Sakoulas, George; Nizet, Victor; Proctor, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    The activity of daptomycin (DAP) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is enhanced in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics. This effect is more pronounced with β-lactam antibiotics that exhibit avid binding to penicillin binding protein 1 (PBP1). Here, we present evidence that PBP1 has a significant role in responding to DAP-induced stress on the cell. Expression of the pbpA transcript, encoding PBP1, was specifically induced by DAP exposure whereas expression of pbpB, pbpC, and pbpD, encoding PBP2, PBP3, and PBP4, respectively, remained unchanged. Using a MRSA COL strain with pbpA under an inducible promoter, increased pbpA transcription was accompanied by reduced susceptibility to, and killing by, DAP in vitro. Exposure to β-lactams that preferentially inactivate PBP1 was not associated with increased DAP binding, suggesting that synergy in the setting of anti-PBP1 pharmacotherapy results from increased DAP potency on a per-molecule basis. Combination exposure in an in vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model system with β-lactams that preferentially inactivate PBP1 (DAP-meropenem [MEM] or DAP-imipenem [IPM]) resulted in more-rapid killing than did combination exposure with DAP-nafcillin (NAF) (nonselective), DAP-ceftriaxone (CRO) or DAP-cefotaxime (CTX) (PBP2 selective), DAP-cefaclor (CEC) (PBP3 selective), or DAP-cefoxitin (FOX) (PBP4 selective). Compared to β-lactams with poor PBP1 binding specificity, exposure of S. aureus to DAP plus PBP1-selective β-lactams resulted in an increased frequency of septation and cell wall abnormalities. These data suggest that PBP1 activity may contribute to survival during DAP-induced metabolic stress. Therefore, targeted inactivation of PBP1 may enhance the antimicrobial efficiency of DAP, supporting the use of DAP–β-lactam combination therapy for serious MRSA infections, particularly when the β-lactam undermines the PBP1-mediated compensatory response. PMID:26525797

  10. Staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 3 binds to the Toll-like receptor 2 extracellular domain and inhibits cytokine production induced by Staphylococcus aureus, cell wall component, or lipopeptides in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Ryosuke; Itoh, Saotomo; Kamoshida, Go; Takii, Takemasa; Fujii, Satoshi; Tsuji, Tsutomu; Onozaki, Kikuo

    2012-08-01

    Staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs) are a family of exoproteins sharing structural similarity with superantigens, but no superantigenic activity. Corresponding host target proteins or receptors against a portion of SSLs in the family have been identified. In this study, we show that SSL3 specifically binds to Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and inhibits the stimulation of macrophages by TLR2 ligands. An approximately 100-kDa protein was recovered by using recombinant His-tagged SSL3-conjugated Sepharose from the lysate of porcine spleen, and the protein was identified as porcine TLR2 by peptide mass fingerprinting analysis. The SSL3-conjugated Sepharose recovered human and mouse TLR2 but not TLR4 from human neutrophils and mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells, as well as a recombinant TLR2 extracellular domain chimera protein. The production levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12) from mouse macrophages treated with heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus and of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) from RAW 264.7 cells induced by peptidoglycan or lipopeptide TLR2 ligands were strongly suppressed in the presence of SSL3. The mutation of consensus sialic acid-containing glycan-binding residues in SSL3 did not abrogate the binding ability to TLR2 or inhibitory activity on TLR2, indicating that the interaction of SSL3 with TLR2 was independent of the sialic acid-containing glycan-binding residues. These findings demonstrate that SSL3 is able to bind the extracellular domain of TLR2 and interfere with TLR2 function. The present study provides a novel mechanism of SSL3 in immune evasion of S. aureus via interfering with its recognition by innate immune cells.

  11. Lipoteichoic acid from Lactobacillus plantarum inhibits the expression of platelet-activating factor receptor induced by Staphylococcus aureus lipoteichoic acid or Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide in human monocyte-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hangeun; Jung, Bong Jun; Jeong, Jihye; Chun, Honam; Chung, Dae Kyun

    2014-08-01

    Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) plays an important role in bacterial infection and inflammation. We examined the effect of the bacterial cell wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Lactobacillus plantarum (pLTA) and Staphylococcus aureus (aLTA) on PAFR expression in THP-1, a monocyte-like cell line. LPS and aLTA, but not pLTA, significantly increased PAFR expression, whereas priming with pLTA inhibited LPSmediated or aLTA-mediated PAFR expression. Expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 4, and CD14 increased with LPS and aLTA treatments, but was inhibited by pLTA pretreatment. Neutralizing antibodies against TLR2, TLR4, and CD14 showed that these receptors were important in LPS-mediated or aLTA-mediated PAFR expression. PAFR expression is mainly regulated by the nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway. Blocking PAF binding to PAFR using a PAFR inhibitor indicated that LPS-mediated or aLTA-mediated PAF expression affected TNF-α production. In the mouse small intestine, pLTA inhibited PAFR, TLR2, and TLR4 expression that was induced by heat-labile toxin. Our data suggested that pLTA has an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the expression of PAFR that was induced by pathogenic ligands.

  12. Effect of pressure-induced changes in the ionization equilibria of buffers on inactivation of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by high hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayán, Elisa; Condón, Santiago; Álvarez, Ignacio; Nabakabaya, Maria; Mackey, Bernard

    2013-07-01

    Survival rates of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus after high-pressure treatment in buffers that had large or small reaction volumes (ΔV°), and which therefore underwent large or small changes in pH under pressure, were compared. At a low buffer concentration of 0.005 M, survival was, as expected, better in MOPS (morpholinepropanesulfonic acid), HEPES, and Tris, whose ΔV° values are approximately 5.0 to 7.0 cm(3) mol(-1), than in phosphate or dimethyl glutarate (DMG), whose ΔV° values are about -25 cm(3) mol(-1). However, at a concentration of 0.1 M, survival was unexpectedly better in phosphate and DMG than in MOPS, HEPES, or Tris. This was because the baroprotective effect of phosphate and DMG increased much more rapidly with increasing concentration than it did with MOPS, HEPES, or Tris. Further comparisons of survival in solutions of salts expected to cause large electrostriction effects (Na2SO4 and CaCl2) and those causing lower electrostriction (NaCl and KCl) were made. The salts with divalent ions were protective at much lower concentrations than salts with monovalent ions. Buffers and salts both protected against transient membrane disruption in E. coli, but the molar concentrations necessary for membrane protection were much lower for phosphate and Na2SO4 than for HEPES and NaCl. Possible protective mechanisms discussed include effects of electrolytes on water compressibility and kosmotropic and specific ion effects. The results of this systematic study will be of considerable practical significance in studies of pressure inactivation of microbes under defined conditions but also raise important fundamental questions regarding the mechanisms of baroprotection by ionic solutes.

  13. Surface proteins of Staphylococcus aureus play an important role in experimental skin infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiecinski, Jakub; Jin, Tao; Josefsson, Elisabet

    2014-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of skin infections that range from mild diseases up to life-threatening conditions. Mechanisms of S. aureus virulence in those infections remain poorly studied. To investigate the impact of S. aureus surface proteins on skin infection, we used mouse models of skin abscess formation and skin necrosis, induced by a subcutaneous injection of bacteria. In the skin abscess model, a sortase-deficient S. aureus strain lacking all of its cell-wall anchored proteins was less virulent than its wild-type strain. Also, strains specifically lacking protein A, fibronecting binding proteins, clumping factor A or surface protein SasF were impaired in their virulence. When a model of dermonecrosis was studied, the S. aureus surface proteins could not be shown to be involved. In summary, surface proteins play an important role in virulence of S. aureus skin abscess infections, but not in formation of skin necrosis.

  14. Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcal Species via the agr Quorum Sensing System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canovas de la Nuez, Jaime; Baldry, Mara; Bojer, Martin S;

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are associated with both humans and animals. While most are non-pathogenic colonizers, Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing severe infections. S. aureus virulence is controlled by the agr quorum sensing system responding to secreted auto-inducing pep...

  15. Role of Nasal Staphylococcus aureus Carriage in Transmission among Contact Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, K; Tagami, K

    2015-12-01

    Among athletes, Staphylococcus aureus is thought to be transmitted by close physical contact with carriers. Nevertheless, evidence is limited with regard to both the tracking of individual strains and the role of S. aureus on the skin's surface. We investigated its transmission using molecular genotyping and the presence of S. aureus on the skin during exercise. In the first study, nasal samples were obtained from 172 athletes over a period of up to one year. The 200 strains of S. aureus collected from these athletes were genotyped, and transmission of S. aureus was detected by phage open reading frame typing (POT). In the second study, the presence of S. aureus on the skin's surface was compared between nasal carriers (n=9) and non-nasal carriers (n=9), who had participated in the first study. In the first study, 10 cases of transmission were confirmed. In the second study, exercise-induced sweating increased S. aureus isolates from the skin's surface (before vs. after exercise: 5.2±5.4 vs. 41.7±40.6 CFU/ml) in nasal carriers. In 5 of 9 nasal carriers, S. aureus isolates from the skin's surface were clonally identical to those from the nares. These results identify a major route of S. aureus transmission among athletes and provide insight into the role played by exercise-induced sweating in nasal carriers.

  16. NVC-422 inactivates Staphylococcus aureus toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jekle, Andreas; Yoon, Jungjoo; Zuck, Meghan; Najafi, Ramin; Wang, Lu; Shiau, Timothy; Francavilla, Charles; Rani, Suriani Abdul; Eitzinger, Christian; Nagl, Markus; Anderson, Mark; Debabov, Dmitri

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial pathogens have specific virulence factors (e.g., toxins) that contribute significantly to the virulence and infectivity of microorganisms within the human hosts. Virulence factors are molecules expressed by pathogens that enable colonization, immunoevasion, and immunosuppression, obtaining nutrients from the host or gaining entry into host cells. They can cause pathogenesis by inhibiting or stimulating certain host functions. For example, in systemic Staphylococcus aureus infections, virulence factors such as toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) cause sepsis or toxic shock by uncontrolled stimulation of T lymphocytes and by triggering a cytokine storm. In vitro, these superantigens stimulate the proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the release of many cytokines. NVC-422 (N,N-dichloro-2,2-dimethyltaurine) is a broad-spectrum, fast-acting topical anti-infective agent against microbial pathogens, including antibiotic-resistant microbes. Using mass spectrometry, we demonstrate here that NVC-422 oxidizes methionine residues of TSST-1, SEA, SEB, and exfoliative toxin A (ETA). Exposure of virulence factors to 0.1% NVC-422 for 1 h prevented TSST-1-, SEA-, SEB-, and ETA-induced cell proliferation and cytokine release. Moreover, NVC-422 also delayed and reduced the protein A- and clumping factor-associated agglutination of S. aureus cultures. These results show that, in addition to its well-described direct microbicidal activity, NVC-422 can inactivate S. aureus virulence factors through rapid oxidation of methionines.

  17. Lactose-Induced Expression of Staphytococcus aureus Enterotoxin A in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)%乳糖诱导葡萄球菌肠毒素A基因在大肠杆菌中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁岚; 侯晓彦; 王小红; 陈福生; 张永霞

    2011-01-01

    Expression of staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin A in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) using lactose as inducer instead of IPTG was investigated.Effect of inducing conditions,including cell age of recombinant, concentration of lactose, inducing time and adding model of the lactose on the expression level were detaited studied and analyzed.The optimal inducing conditions listed as followed: 0.5 mmol/L(final concentration) lactose by one-time method at the mid-phase of cell growth (OD600 =0.6) and then cultured bacteria at 37 ℃, 180 r/min for 6 h.The yield of recombinant staphylococcal enterotoxin A induced by lactose was about 36.9% of the total cell solution protein.It was just a little below of that induced by IPTG(38.1%).The price of lactose is only 1% of that of IPTG.All of these suggested that the lactose is available to be effective inducer with lower cost in the process of large-scale production of recombinant protein.%以乳糖作为诱导剂代替传统方法中的IPTG,分别从菌龄、诱导剂浓度、诱导时间及诱导剂的添加方式等方面,对乳糖诱导金黄色葡萄球菌肠毒素A(staphylococcal enterotoxins A,SEA)基因在大肠杆菌BL21(DE3)中的表达进行了研究.结果表明,重组大肠杆菌表达SEA的优化条件为:在对数生长期(OD600约为0.6),一次性添加终浓度为0.5 mmol/L的乳糖诱导6 h.目标蛋白的表达量占菌体总蛋白质的36.9%,略低于以IPTG为诱导剂时38.1%的表达量.乳糖价格仅为IPTG的1%左右,因此,在SEA的大规模制备中,使用乳糖作为诱导剂可以大大节约成本.

  18. Linezolid resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavani Gandham

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Linezolid is the only antibiotic available as an oral formulation for resistant staphylococcal infections. It is effective in skin and soft tissue infections, nosocomial pneumonias including VAP, infective endocarditis and MRSA meningitis. It is also effective in the eradication of both nasal and throat colonization of MRSA. Its high bioavailability and post antibiotic effect, ease of switching to oral therapy during its use and the fact that it can be used in patients of all ages, also in patients with liver disease and poor kidney function and its increased effectiveness over glycopeptides makes this drug a precious drug in the treatment of resistant staphylococcal infections. Linezolid resistance in staphylococcus is defined as a linezolid MIC of and #8805;8 mg/L. Reported Linezolid resistance in India and elsewhere is 2-20%. There is clonal dissemination of Linezolid Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LRSA within or across health care settings which demands continuous surveillance to determine the emergent risk of resistance strains and to establish guidelines for appropriate use. Clinical laboratories should confirm any LRSA preferably by a second method, prior to using linezolid for serious infections. Effective surveillance, more judicious use of this antibiotic, avoiding linezolid usage for empiric therapy in hospital acquired staphylococcus infections, optimization of the pharmacological parameters of the antibiotics in specific clinical situation, decreasing bacterial load by timely surgical debridement or drainage of collections, use of combination therapies would prevent the emergence of resistance to linezolid in staphylococcus aureus. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1253-1256

  19. Líquen aureus "algesiogênico" "Algesiogenic" lichen aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rheingantz da Cunha Filho

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Descreve-se caso de líquen aureus em paciente do sexo feminino, com 23 anos de idade que apresentava há dois anos lesão dolorosa, purpúrica, acastanhada tendendo por semelhante a cor de ferrugem e de aspecto liquenóide no antebraço. O exame anatomopatológico revelou denso infiltrado linfo-histiocitário na derme superior papilar, com extravasamento de hemácias. O líquen aureus é relativamente raro, sendo ainda mais raro o sintoma de dor.A case is described of lichen aureus in a 23 year old female with a 2-year history of painful, purpuric, rust-coloured to tan, lichenous lesion on forearm. A biopsy specimen demonstrated a dense lymphohistiocytic infiltrate in the upper dermis, with extravasation of red cells. The "algesiogenic" lichen aureus is a very rare dermatosis.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus: methicillin-susceptible S. aureus to methicillin-resistant S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Susan J; Tice, Alan

    2010-09-15

    The evolution of methicillin-resistant and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has demanded serious review of antimicrobial use and development of new agents and revised approaches to prevent and overcome drug resistance. Depending on local conditions and patient risk factors, empirical therapy of suspected S. aureus infection may require coverage of drug-resistant organisms with newer agents and novel antibiotic combinations. The question of treatment with inappropriate antibiotics raises grave concerns with regard to methicillin-resistant S. aureus selection, overgrowth, and increased virulence. Several strategies to reduce the nosocomial burden of resistance are suggested, including shortened hospital stays and outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy of the most serious infections.

  1. Cross-talk between Staphylococcus aureus and other staphylococcal species via the agr quorum sensing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Canovas de la Nuez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococci are associated with both humans and animals. While most are non-pathogenic colonizers, Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing severe infections. S. aureus virulence is controlled by the agr quorum sensing system responding to secreted auto-inducing peptides (AIPs sensed by AgrC, a two component histidine kinase. agr loci are found also in other staphylococcal species and for S. epidermidis, the encoded AIP represses expression of agr regulated virulence genes in S. aureus. In this study we aimed to determine how other staphylococci affect S. aureus agr, and if such interaction may point to new anti-virulence candidates to target S. aureus infections. Here we show that culture supernatants of 37 out of 52 staphylococcal isolates representing 17 different species inhibit S. aureus agr. The dog pathogen, S. schleiferi, expressed the most potent inhibitory activity and was active against all four agr classes found in S. aureus. By employing a S. aureus strain encoding a constitutively active AIP receptor we show that the activity is mediated via agr. Subsequent cloning and heterologous expression of the S. schleiferi AIP in S. aureus demonstrated that this molecule was likely responsible for the inhibitory activity, and further proof was provided when pure synthetic S. schleiferi AIP was able to completely abolish agr induction of an S. aureus reporter strain. To assess impact on S. aureus virulence, we co-inoculated S. aureus and S. schleiferi in vivo in the Galleria Mellonella wax moth larva, and found that expression of key S. aureus virulence factors was abrogated. Our data show that the S. aureus agr locus is highly responsive to other staphylococcal species suggesting that agr is an inter-species communication system. Based on these results we speculate that interactions between S. aureus and other colonizing staphylococci will significantly influence the ability of S. aureus to cause infection, and

  2. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis Induced by Erlotinib (Tarceva with Superimposed Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection in a Pancreatic Cancer Patient: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egbert Liquete

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP is a rare acute reaction that is drug induced in 90% of the cases and characterized by a widespread, sterile pustular rash. Erlotinib, a small-molecule EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been approved by the FDA for patients with pancreatic cancer and non-small cell lung cancer. Skin rash is a well-known side effect related with all EGFR blocking agents. It has been suggested that rash could be used as a surrogate marker for response and possibly be associated with prolonged survival. We report a case of rare presentation of AGEP involving an adverse effect of erlotinib. The commonly reported adverse effects of erlotinib are mild skin eruptions. However, our case describes the rare presentation of AGEP induced by erlotinib. The estimated incidence rate of AGEP is approximately 1–5 cases per million/year.

  3. Pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Scott D; Malachowa, Natalia; DeLeo, Frank R

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes many types of human infections and syndromes-most notably skin and soft tissue infections. Abscesses are a frequent manifestation of S. aureus skin and soft tissue infections and are formed, in part, to contain the nidus of infection. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) are the primary cellular host defense against S. aureus infections and a major component of S. aureus abscesses. These host cells contain and produce many antimicrobial agents that are effective at killing bacteria, but can also cause non-specific damage to host tissues and contribute to the formation of abscesses. By comparison, S. aureus produces several molecules that also contribute to the formation of abscesses. Such molecules include those that recruit neutrophils, cause host cell lysis, and are involved in the formation of the fibrin capsule surrounding the abscess. Herein, we review our current knowledge of the mechanisms and processes underlying the formation of S. aureus abscesses, including the involvement of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and provide a brief overview of therapeutic approaches.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus Bacteraemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Price

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB is commonly complicated by metastatic infection or relapse after treatment. Objectives. The study aim was to determine the role of bacterial, host, and management factors in development of complicated SAB. Methods. A prospectively-conducted observational study gathered data on predisposition, management and outcome of 100 consecutive SAB cases. Antibiotic susceptibilities and genetic lineage of bacterial isolates were determined. Further clinical and microbiological data were gathered on two retrospective series from 1999–2000 (n=57 and 2004 (n=116. Results. In the prospective cases, 27% met our definition of complicated disease. Expressed as RR and 95% CI, complicated disease was associated with diabetes (1.58, 1.00–2.48, injecting-drug use (5.48, 0.88–33.49, community-onset of symptoms (1.4, 1.02–1.92, and symptom duration ≥48 hours prior to starting effective antibiotic therapy (2.10, 1.22–3.61. Uncomplicated disease was associated with the presence of a central line (0.69, 0.55–0.88 and prompt removal of a primary focus (0.71, 0.57–0.90. Neither methicillin resistance nor genetic lineage was associated with complicated disease, but methicillin resistance was associated with higher mortality. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that clinical rather than microbial factors are the major determinants of SAB outcome and underscores the importance of early treatment.

  5. Genetically enhanced cows resist intramammary Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Robert J; Powell, Anne M; Paape, Max J; Kerr, David E; Bannerman, Douglas D; Pursel, Vernon G; Wells, Kevin D; Talbot, Neil; Hawk, Harold W

    2005-04-01

    Mastitis, the most consequential disease in dairy cattle, costs the US dairy industry billions of dollars annually. To test the feasibility of protecting animals through genetic engineering, transgenic cows secreting lysostaphin at concentrations ranging from 0.9 to 14 micrograms/ml [corrected] in their milk were produced. In vitro assays demonstrated the milk's ability to kill Staphylococcus aureus. Intramammary infusions of S. aureus were administered to three transgenic and ten nontransgenic cows. Increases in milk somatic cells, elevated body temperatures and induced acute phase proteins, each indicative of infection, were observed in all of the nontransgenic cows but in none of the transgenic animals. Protection against S. aureus mastitis appears to be achievable with as little as 3 micrograms/ml [corrected] of lysostaphin in milk. Our results indicate that genetic engineering can provide a viable tool for enhancing resistance to disease and improve the well-being of livestock.

  6. Superantigen Profiling of Staphylococcus aureus Infective Endocarditis Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jin-Won; Karau, Melissa J.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Ballard, Alessandro D.; Tilahun, Ashenafi; Khaleghi, Shahryar Rostamkolaei; David, Chella S.; Patel, Robin; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of superantigen production among Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with endocarditis is not well defined. We tested 154 S. aureus isolates from definite infective endocarditis cases for the presence of staphylococcal enterotoxins A-E, H and TSST-1 by PCR, ELISA and using an HLA-DR3 transgenic mouse splenocyte proliferation assay. Sixty-three isolates (50.8%) tested positive for at least one superantigen gene, with 21 (16.9%) testing positive for more than two. tst (28.6%) was most common, followed by seb (27%), sea (22.2%), sed (20.6%), see (17.5%), and sec (11.1%). Of 41 methicillin-resistant S. aureus, 21 had superantigen genes, with sed being more frequently detected in this group compared to methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (P<0.05). Superantigen genes were not associated with mortality (P=0.81). 75% of PCR-positive isolates induced robust splenocyte proliferation. Overall, more than half of S. aureus isolates causing endocarditis carry superantigen genes of which most are functional. PMID:24745820

  7. Trimethoprim-induced hyperkalemia in burn patients treated with intravenous or oral trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and other infections: nature or nurture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Bruce H; Patton, Mary L; Guilday, Robert E; Haith, Linwood R; Stair-Buchmann, Megan; Reigart, Cynthia L

    2013-01-01

    Trimethoprim is well known to cause rashes; however, what is not commonly known is that it causes sudden and profound hyperkalemia in 10 to 20% of treated patients. The uniqueness of burn patients begs the question whether changes known to occur in these patients might also increase this trimethoprim effect. After institutional review board approval, a retrospective study evaluated 224 patients with thermal injury who had been treated with trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), 24 of whom had underlying renal impairment (creatinine clearances drug-induced hyperkalemia were used: 1) a ≥ 1 mEq/L rise, 2) a >0.8 mEq rise in potassium in hyperkalemia defined as serum potassium of ≥ 5.5 mEq/L within 48 hours. A potassium level before trimethoprim exposure (TxK) and after TxK were collected retrospectively. Demographic data were analyzed with Student's t-test and trimethoprim dose alone, demonstrating a significant difference. Analysis of 200 patients exposed to trimethoprim demonstrated an elevation of potassium (first definition) in 31 patients (15.5%), a rapid change in serum potassium in two patients (second definition), and marked hyperkalemia (>5.5 mEq/L) in 13 patients (6.5%). Hyperkalemia never occurred in 166 of 200 patients (82%; before TxK, 3.9 ± 0.4; after TxK, 4.3 ± 0.5 mEq/L). Change in serum potassium among patients with hyperkalemia was 4.0 ± 0.5 mEq/L before TxK and 5.3 ± 0.7 mEq/L after TxK. Twelve published hyperkalemia risk factors were reviewed in these 200 patients and only history of hypertension and need for intubation was more common in those with hyperkalemia. A nearly 20% incidence of hyperkalemia and 6% serious hyperkalemia in burn patients is consistent with reports in patients without burn injury. These data also suggest that the metabolic and hormonal changes associated with burn injury do not increase further the genetically predisposed hyperkalemia resulting from exposure to trimethoprim. These data suggest patients treated with

  8. Mild Staphylococcus aureus skin infection improves the course of subsequent endogenous S. aureus bacteremia in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van den Berg (Sanne); C.P. de Vogel (Corné); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); I.A.J.M. Bakker-Woudenberg (Irma)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractStaphylococcus aureus carriers with S. aureus bacteremia may have a reduced mortality risk compared to non-carriers. A role for the immune system is suggested. Here, we study in mice the effect of mild S. aureus skin infection prior to endogenous or exogenous S. aureus bacteremia, and ev

  9. [Protein toxins of Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsutdinov, A F; Tiurin, Iu A

    2014-01-01

    Main scientific-research studies regarding protein bacterial toxins of the most widespread bacteria that belong to Staphylococcus spp. genus and in particular the most pathogenic species for humans--Staphylococcus aureus, are analyzed. Structural and biological properties of protein toxins that have received the name of staphylococcus pyrogenic toxins (PTSAg) are presented. Data regarding genetic regulation of secretion and synthesis of these toxins and 3 main regulatory genetic systems (agr--accessory gene regulator, xpr--extracellular protein regulator, sar--staphylococcal accessory regulator) that coordinate synthesis of the most important protein toxins and enzymes for virulence of S. aureus, are presented.

  10. The therapeutic effect of Chlorogenic acid against Staphylococcus aureus infection through Sortase A inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin eWang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and wide spread of multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus requires the development of new therapeutic agents with alternative modes of action. Anti-virulence strategies are hoped to meet that need. Sortase A (SrtA has attracted great interest as a potential drug target to treat infections caused by S. aureus, as many of the surface proteins displayed by SrtA function as virulence factors by mediating bacterial adhesion to specific organ tissues, invasion of host cells, and evasion of the host-immune responses. It has been suggested that inhibitors of SrtA might be promising candidates for the treatment and/or prevention of S. aureus infections. In this study, we report that Chlorogenic acid (CHA, a natural compound that lacks significant anti–S. aureus activity, inhibit the activity of SrtA in vitro (IC50=33.86±5.55μg/ml and the binding of S. aureus to fibrinogen (Fg. Using molecular dynamics simulations and mutagenesis assays, we further demonstrate that CHA binds to the binding sites of C184 and G192 in the SrtA. In vivo studies demonstrated that CHA prevent mice from S. aureus-induced renal abscess, resulting in a significant survival advantage. These findings indicate that CHA is a promising therapeutic compound against SrtA during S. aureus infections.

  11. Subinhibitory concentrations of punicalagin reduces expression of virulence-related exoproteins by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Su-Hyun; Kong, Ryong; Seo, Yun-Soo; Zhou, Tian; Kang, Ok-Hwa; Shin, Dong-Won; Kwon, Dong-Yeul

    2016-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces a number of virulence factors. The major virulence factors exhibited by S aureus include various antigens, enzymes, cytotoxins and exotoxins (e.g. hemolysins, enterotoxins and toxic shock syndrome toxin). In this report, we show the influence of punicalagin on the secretion of exoprotein from S aureus by western blotting, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) release assay and quantitative RT-PCR. When added to S aureus cultures at an OD600 of 0.9, graded subinhibitory concentrations of punicalagin reduced the production of α-toxin, SEA and SEB in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a dose-dependent manner. Consistently, punicalagin reduced TNF-inducing activity by S aureus culture supernatants. Here, the transcriptional level of agr (accessory gene regulator) in S aureus was inhibited by punicalagin, suggesting that the reduced transcription may affect the secretion of exotoxins. These findings suggest that the expression of α-toxin and enterotoxins in S aureus is sensitive to the action of punicalagin, which may be an advantageous candidate in the treatment of toxigenic staphylococcal disease.

  12. Killing of Staphylococcus aureus via Magnetic Hyperthermia Mediated by Magnetotactic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changyou; Chen, Linjie; Yi, Yong; Chen, Chuanfang; Wu, Long-Fei; Song, Tao

    2016-02-12

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common hospital and household pathogen. Given the emergence of antibiotic-resistant derivatives of this pathogen resulting from the use of antibiotics as general treatment, development of alternative therapeutic strategies is urgently needed. Here, we assess the feasibility of killing S. aureus cells in vitro and in vivo through magnetic hyperthermia mediated by magnetotactic bacteria that possess magnetic nanocrystals and demonstrate magnetically steered swimming. The S. aureus suspension was added to magnetotactic MO-1 bacteria either directly or after coating with anti-MO-1 polyclonal antibodies. The suspensions were then subjected to an alternating magnetic field (AMF) for 1 h. S. aureus viability was subsequently assessed through conventional plate counting and flow cytometry. We found that approximately 30% of the S. aureus cells mixed with uncoated MO-1 cells were killed after AMF treatment. Moreover, attachment between the magnetotactic bacteria and S. aureus increased the killing efficiency of hyperthermia to more than 50%. Using mouse models, we demonstrated that magnetic hyperthermia mediated by antibody-coated magnetotactic MO-1 bacteria significantly improved wound healing. These results collectively demonstrated the effective eradication of S. aureus both in vitro and in vivo, indicating the potential of magnetotactic bacterium-mediated magnetic hyperthermia as a treatment for S. aureus-induced skin or wound infections.

  13. Prevention of Healthcare Associated Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G.M. Bode (Lonneke)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ S. aureus colonizes the skin and mucosae of a proportion of the human population. Carriers of S. aureus are at increased risk of developing infections with this pathogen. The aim of this thesis was to add to the prevention of healthcare associated S. aureus infections.

  14. Evaluation of a lysostaphin-fusion protein as a dry-cow therapy for Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in dairy cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a lysostaphin-fusion protein (Lyso-PTD) as a dry-cow therapy for the treatment of experimentally-induced chronic, subclinical Staphylococcus aureus mastitis. Twenty-two Holstein dairy cows were experimentally infected with Staph. aureus in a single pair of diago...

  15. Dermatology case: segmental lichen aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, I.; S. Carvalho; Machado, S.; Alves,R.; Selores, M.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The authors describe a clinical case of a six-year-old boy with history of a segmental brownish maculopapular skin eruption on his left thoracic and lumbar wall, since the last four months. Based on clinical and histological findings he was diagnosed with segmental lichen aureus.

  16. Gold nanoprobe functionalized with specific fusion protein selection from phage display and its application in rapid, selective and sensitive colorimetric biosensing of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei; Han, Lei; Wang, Fei; Petrenko, Valery A; Liu, Aihua

    2016-08-15

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the most ubiquitous pathogens in public healthcare worldwide. It holds great insterest in establishing robust analytical method for S. aureus. Herein, we report a S. aureus-specific recognition element, isolated from phage monoclone GQTTLTTS, which was selected from f8/8 landscape phage library against S. aureus in a high-throughput way. By functionalizing cysteamine (CS)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (CS-AuNPs) with S. aureus-specific pVIII fusion protein (fusion-pVIII), a bifunctional nanoprobe (CS-AuNPs@fusion-pVIII) for S. aureus was developed. In this strategy, the CS-AuNPs@fusion-pVIII could be induced to aggregate quickly in the presence of target S. aureus, resulting in a rapid colorimetric response of gold nanoparticles. More importantly, the as-designed probe exhibited excellent selectivity over other bacteria. Thus, the CS-AuNPs@fusion-pVIII could be used as the indicator of target S. aureus. This assay can detect as low as 19CFUmL(-1)S. aureus within 30min. Further, this approach can be applicable to detect S. aureus in real water samples. Due to its sensitivity, specificity and rapidness, this proposed method is promising for on-site testing of S. aureus without using any costly instruments.

  17. Effect of exposure to staphylococcus aureus, particulate matter, and their combination on the neurobehavioral function of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fan; Liu, Fei; Liu, Haifang

    2016-10-01

    Neurotoxicity in Kunming mice caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Particulate matter (PM) as individual matter and mixtures was studied in this paper. Male Kunming mice were instilled intratracheally with PM at doses of 0.2mg/mouse and S. aureus at doses of 5.08×10(6) CFU/mouse as individual matter and mixtures two times at 5-day intervals. Morris water maze (MWM) test was performed during the exposure experiment. One day following the exposure experiment, the expression of neurotrophins, neurotransmitters, cholinergic system enzymes, oxidative damage levels, and pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β) in the brain of mice were determined. Combined treatment of PM and S. aureus led to significant increment of escape latency at day 6, 8, and 10. Oxidative stress levels, and pro-inflammatory cytokines were affected significantly by S. aureus and PM as individual matter and mixtures. Meanwhile, Glu contents were increased significantly in S. aureus group, ChAT levels were decreased significantly in PM group, combined treatment of PM and S. aureus led to significant concentration reduction of AChE. Treatment of S. aureus or PM- S. aureus combination also led to significant concentration reduction of BDNF. Results showed that combined treatment of PM and S. aureus induced damage on physique and motor function, as well as impairment on learning and memory capacity of mice. Oxidative damage, abnormal metabolism of neurotransmitters and cholinergic system enzymes, and the alternation of neurotrophins and pro-inflammatory cytokines expression might be the possible mechanisms for PM - S. aureus -induced neurotoxicity.

  18. Evasion of Neutrophil Killing by Staphylococcus aureus

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    Will A. McGuinness

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus causes many types of infections, ranging from self-resolving skin infections to severe or fatal pneumonia. Human innate immune cells, called polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs or neutrophils, are essential for defense against S. aureus infections. Neutrophils are the most prominent cell type of the innate immune system and are capable of producing non-specific antimicrobial molecules that are effective at eliminating bacteria. Although significant progress has been made over the past few decades, our knowledge of S. aureus-host innate immune system interactions is incomplete. Most notably, S. aureus has the capacity to produce numerous molecules that are directed to protect the bacterium from neutrophils. Here we review in brief the role played by neutrophils in defense against S. aureus infection, and correspondingly, highlight selected S. aureus molecules that target key neutrophil functions.

  19. Cholecalciferol (vitamin D) differentially regulates antimicrobial peptide expression in bovine mammary epithelial cells: implications during Staphylococcus aureus internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez-Pérez, Ana Dolores; Alva-Murillo, Nayeli; Ochoa-Zarzosa, Alejandra; López-Meza, Joel E

    2012-11-09

    Vitamin D has immunomodulatory functions regulating the expression of host defense genes. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) on S. aureus internalization into bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC) and antimicrobial peptide (AP) mRNA expression. Cholecalciferol (1-200 nM) did not affect S. aureus growth and bMEC viability; but it reduced bacterial internalization into bMEC (15-74%). Also, bMEC showed a basal expression of all AP genes evaluated, which were induced by S. aureus. Cholecalciferol alone or together with bacteria diminished tracheal antimicrobial peptide (TAP) and bovine neutrophil β-defensin (BNBD) 5 mRNA expression; while alone induced the expression of lingual antimicrobial peptide (LAP), bovine β-defensin 1 (DEFB1) and bovine psoriasin (S100A7), which was inhibited in the presence of S. aureus. This compound (50 nM) increased BNBD10 mRNA expression coinciding with the greatest reduction in S. aureus internalization. Genes of vitamin D pathway (25-hydroxylase and 1 α-hydroxylase) show basal expression, which was induced by cholecalciferol or bacteria. S. aureus induced vitamin D receptor (VDR) mRNA expression, but not in the presence of cholecalciferol. In conclusion, cholecalciferol can reduce S. aureus internalization and differentially regulates AP expression in bMEC. Thus, vitamin D could be an effective innate immunity modulator in mammary gland, which leads to a better defense against bacterial infection.

  20. Postoperative Staphylococcus aureus infections in Medicare beneficiaries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moaven Razavi

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus infections are important because of their increasing frequency, resistance to antibiotics, and high associated rates of disabilities and deaths. We examined the incidence and correlates of S. aureus infections following 219,958 major surgical procedures in a 5% random sample of fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries from 2004-2007. Of these surgical patients, 0.3% had S. aureus infections during the hospitalizations when index surgical procedures were performed; and 1.7% and 2.3%, respectively, were hospitalized with infections within 60 days or 180 days following admissions for index surgeries. S. aureus infections occurred within 180 days in 1.9% of patients following coronary artery bypass graft surgery, 2.3% following hip surgery, and 5.9% following gastric or esophageal surgery. Of patients first hospitalized with any major infection reported during the first 180 days after index surgery, 15% of infections were due to S. aureus, 18% to other documented organisms, and no specific organism was reported on claim forms in 67%. Patient-level predictors of S. aureus infections included transfer from skilled nursing facilities or chronic hospitals and comorbid conditions (e.g., diabetes, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and chronic renal disease. In a logarithmic regression, elective index admissions with S. aureus infection stayed 130% longer than comparable patients without that infection. Within 180 days of the index surgery, 23.9% of patients with S. aureus infection and 10.6% of patients without this infection had died. In a multivariate logistic regression of death within 180 days of admission for the index surgery with adjustment for demographics, co-morbidities, and other risks, S. aureus was associated with a 42% excess risk of death. Due to incomplete documentation of organisms in Medicare claims, these statistics may underestimate the magnitude of S. aureus infection

  1. Acacetin Protects Mice from Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection by Inhibiting the Activity of Sortase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Chongwei; Dong, Xiaoyun; Zhong, Xiaobo; Cai, Hongjun; Wang, Dacheng; Wang, Lin

    2016-09-26

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a major cause of infection in hospitals and communities. Widespread dissemination of multi-drug resistant S. aureus is a serious threat to the health of humans and animals. An anti-virulence strategy has been widely considered as an alternative therapeutic approach. Inhibitors of virulence factors are able to treat S. aureus infections without influencing the growth or viability of bacteria and rarely lead to bacterial resistance. Sortase A (SrtA) is a membrane-associated cysteine transpeptidase that catalyzes up to 25 surface proteins that covalently bind to cell wall peptidoglycans. In S. aureus, most of these surface proteins have been identified as important virulence factors that are vital in bacterial pathogenesis. In the present study, we show that acacetin, a natural flavonoid compound, inhibits the activity of SrtA in S. aureus (IC50 = 36.46 ± 4.69 μg/mL, 128 μM) which affects the assembly of protein A (SpA) to cell walls and reduces the binding of S. aureus to fibrinogen (Fg). The mechanism of the interaction between acacetin and SrtA were preliminarily discussed using molecular dynamics simulations. The results suggested that acacetin adopted a compact conformation binding at the pocket of the SrtA via residues Arg-139 and Lys-140. By performing an animal infection model, we demonstrated that acacetin was able to protect mice from renal abscess formation induced by S. aureus and significantly increased survival rates. Taken together, these findings suggest that acacetin may be a promising candidate for the development of anti-S. aureus drugs.

  2. CHROMOSOMAL MAPPING IN STRAINS OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS,

    Science.gov (United States)

    STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS , CHROMOSOMES), (*CHROMOSOMES, MAPPING), NITROSO COMPOUNDS, GUANIDINES, GENETICS, MUTATIONS, DRUGS, TOLERANCES(PHYSIOLOGY), TEST METHODS, DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACIDS, INHIBITION, RESISTANCE(BIOLOGY).

  3. Mastite com lesões sistêmicas por Staphylococus aureus subesp. aureus em coelhos Mastitis with systemic lesions due to Staphylococus aureus subesp. aureus in rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Davi Traverso; Leonardo da Cunha; Joaquim César Teixeira Fernandes; Alexandre Paulino Loretti; Adriana Rhoden; Elsio Wunder Jr.; David Driemeier

    2003-01-01

    Em uma criação composta por 1800 coelhos, 33% das matrizes apresentaram mastite e lesões cutâneas crostosas e purulentas. Estes animais apresentavam-se entre 10 a- 12 meses de idade e em segunda parição. Quinze coelhos afetados foram sacrificados e necropsiados. Na necropsia, além das lesões cutâneas haviam microabscessos em diversos órgãos. Das amostras coletadas isolou-se Staphylococcus aureus subesp. aureus. S. aureus subesp. aureus também foi isolado de "swab" nasal coletado do tratador e...

  4. Anti-Staphylococcus aureus single-chain variable region fragments provide protection against mastitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Man; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Jianguo

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading causative agent of bovine mastitis, which can result in significant economic losses to the dairy industry. However, available vaccines against bovine mastitis do not confer adequate protection, although passive immunization with antibodies may be useful to prevent disease. Hence, we constructed a bovine single-chain variable region fragment (scFv) phage display library using cDNAs from peripheral blood lymphocytes of cows with S. aureus-induced mastitis. After four rounds of selection, eight scFvs that bound S. aureus antigens with high affinity were obtained. The framework regions of the variable domains (VH and VL) of the eight scFvs were highly conserved, and the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) displayed significant diversity, especially CDR3 of the VH domain. All eight scFvs inhibited S. aureus growth in culture medium. Lactating mice were challenged by injecting S. aureus into the fourth mammary gland. Histopathological analysis showed that treatment with these scFvs prior to bacterial challenge maintained the structure of the mammary acini, decreased infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils, increased levels of interferon-gamma and interleukin-4, and reduced tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels in mammary tissues, as compared with mice treatment with physiological saline (P < 0.05). These novel bovine scFvs may be suitable candidates for therapeutic agents for the prevention of S. aureus-induced bovine mastitis.

  5. Proteomic Characterization of Lytic Bacteriophages of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Sewage Affluent of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Kamalpreet Kaur; Kumar, B. V. Sunil; Agrawal, Ravi Kant; Verma, Ramneek

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that causes a variety of diseases, including bovine mastitis, which has severe economic consequences. Standard antibiotic treatment results in selection of resistant strains, leading to need for an alternative treatment such as bacteriophage therapy. Present study describes isolation and characterization of a staphylococcal phage from sewage samples. S. aureus isolates obtained from microbial type culture collection (MTCC), Chandigarh, India, were used to screen staphylococcal phages. A phage designated as ΦMSP was isolated from sewage samples by soft agar overlay method. It produced clear plaques on tryptone soya agar overlaid with S. aureus. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the phage had an icosahedral symmetry. It had 5 major proteins and possessed a peptidoglycan hydrolase corresponding to 70 kDa. ΦMSP infection induced 26 proteins to be uniquely expressed in S. aureus. This phage can be proposed as a candidate phage to treat staphylococcal infections. PMID:27355013

  6. Characterisation of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia at Tygerberg hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orth, H.; Dreyer, Z.S.; Makgotlho, E.; Oosthuysen, W.; Sinha, B.; Wasserman, E.

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate the local epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia, we characterised blood culture isolates using molecular methods and prospectively collected clinical data to determine the occurrence of community-acquired, methicillinresistant S. aureus (MRSA). Consecutive S. aureus blood cu

  7. Significance of biopterin induction in rats with postburn Staphylococcus aureus sepsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Hongyun; Yao Yongming; Shi Zhiguo; Dong Ning; Yu Yan; Lu Lianrong; Sheng Zhiyong

    2002-01-01

    Objective: It has been demonstrated that biopterin, an essential cofactor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), plays an important role in the pathogenesis of endotoxin-induced shock, yet its biological significance in gram-positive sepsis remains unclear. In this study, we adopted a rat model of postburn Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) sepsis to observe the time course and tissue distribution of biopterin in postburn S. aureus infection, and to investigate its potential role in the pathogenesis of gram-positive sepsis. Wistar rats were inflicted with a 20% total body surface area (TBSA) full-chickness scald injury followed by S. aureus challenge, then guanosine triphosphatecyclohydrolase I (GTP-CHI) mRNA expression and biopterin levels in liver, kidneys, lungs and heart were determined at 0. 5, 2, 6, 12 and 24 hours after S. aureus challenge. We found that after S. aureus challenge, GTP-CHI gene expressions and biopterin levels were markedly up-regulated in various tissues, and remained at high values up to 24 hours (P< 0. 05-0.01). Meanwhile, the organ function indexes, including serum alanine amimotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatinine (Cr), MB isoenzyme of creatine kinase (CK-MB), levels and pulmonary myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities significantly increased at 24 hours postburn, and the multiple organ dysfunction was aggravated by S. aureus challenge. Moreover, it was shown that cardiac GTP-CHI mRNA expression and renal BH4levels were positively correlated with CK-MB and Cr (r=0. 892, P=0. 0012 and r=0. 9423,P=0.0015, respectively). Conclusion: These results suggested that thermal injury combined with S. aureus challenge could induce de novo biosynthesis of biopterin, which acts as the most important cofactor of iNOS, might play a role in the development of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome secondary to postburn sepsis.

  8. Chronic ethanol feeding increases the severity of Staphylococcus aureus skin infections by altering local host defenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlet, Corey P.; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Schlueter, Annette J.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholics are at increased risk of Staphylococcus aureus skin infection and serious sequelae, such as bacteremia and death. Despite the association between alcoholism and severe S. aureus skin infection, the impact of EtOH on anti-S. aureus cutaneous immunity has not been investigated in a model of chronic EtOH exposure. To test the hypothesis that EtOH enhances the severity of S. aureus skin infection, mice were fed EtOH for ≥12 weeks via the Meadows-Cook model of alcoholism and inoculated with S. aureus following epidermal abrasion. Evidence of exacerbated staphylococcal disease in EtOH-fed mice included: skin lesions that were larger and contained more organisms, greater weight loss, and increased bacterial dissemination. Infected EtOH-fed mice demonstrated poor maintenance and induction of PMN responses in skin and draining LNs, respectively. Additionally, altered PMN dynamics in the skin of these mice corresponded with reduced production of IL-23 and IL-1β by CD11b+ myeloid cells and IL-17 production by γδ T cells, with the latter defect occurring in the draining LNs as well. In addition, IL-17 restoration attenuated S. aureus-induced dermatopathology and improved bacterial clearance defects in EtOH-fed mice. Taken together, the findings show, in a novel model system, that the EtOH-induced increase in S. aureus-related injury/illness corresponds with defects in the IL-23/IL-17 inflammatory axis and poor PMN accumulation at the site of infection and draining LNs. These findings offer new information about the impact of EtOH on cutaneous host-defense pathways and provide a potential mechanism explaining why alcoholics are predisposed to S. aureus skin infection. PMID:25605871

  9. Triclosan promotes Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Adnan K; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Love, Nancy G; Boles, Blaise R

    2014-04-08

    The biocide triclosan is used in many personal care products, including toothpastes, soaps, clothing, and medical equipment. Consequently, it is present as a contaminant in the environment and has been detected in some human fluids, including serum, urine, and milk. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the noses and throats of approximately 30% of the population. Colonization with S. aureus is known to be a risk factor for several types of infection. Here we demonstrate that triclosan is commonly found in the nasal secretions of healthy adults and the presence of triclosan trends positively with nasal colonization by S. aureus. We demonstrate that triclosan can promote the binding of S. aureus to host proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, and keratin, as well as inanimate surfaces such as plastic and glass. Lastly, triclosan-exposed rats are more susceptible to nasal colonization with S. aureus. These data reveal a novel factor that influences the ability of S. aureus to bind surfaces and alters S. aureus nasal colonization. IMPORTANCE Triclosan has been used as a biocide for over 40 years, but the broader effects that it has on the human microbiome have not been investigated. We demonstrate that triclosan is present in nasal secretions of a large portion of a test population and its presence correlates with Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization. Triclosan also promotes the binding of S. aureus to human proteins and increases the susceptibility of rats to nasal colonization by S. aureus. These findings are significant because S. aureus colonization is a known risk factor for the development of several types of infections. Our data demonstrate the unintended consequences of unregulated triclosan use and contribute to the growing body of research demonstrating inadvertent effects of triclosan on the environment and human health.

  10. Piperine Plays an Anti-Inflammatory Role in Staphylococcus aureus Endometritis by Inhibiting Activation of NF-κB and MAPK Pathways in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-jun Zhai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometritis is commonly caused by pathogenic microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus. Piperine, which is a natural medicine, has shown a variety of biological activities. To explore the effect and mechanism of piperine on S. aureus endometritis, a mouse model of S. aureus endometritis was successfully established in the present study. Histopathological changes were observed with H&E staining, cytokines were analyzed by ELISA, mRNA was analyzed by qPCR, and proteins were detected by western blot. The results showed that piperine could significantly alleviate inflammatory injury in S. aureus endometritis. The qPCR and ELISA results showed that piperine effectively reduced the S. aureus-induced overexpression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 but increased the expression of IL-10. The S. aureus-induced inflammation was related to TLR-2 and TLR-4 because the results showed that their expression was increased in S. aureus infection but then decreased with piperine treatment. To further confirm that piperine caused an anti-inflammatory response by targeting NF-κB and MAPKs, the expression of I-κB, p65, p38, ERK, and JNK was measured. The phosphorylation of I-κB, p65, p38, ERK, and JNK was inhibited by piperine in a dose-dependent manner. All of the results indicated that piperine may be a potential anti-inflammatory drug both in endometritis and in other S. aureus-induced diseases.

  11. Staphylokinase Control of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and Detachment Through Host Plasminogen Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiecinski, Jakub; Peetermans, Marijke; Liesenborghs, Laurens; Na, Manli; Björnsdottir, Halla; Zhu, Xuefeng; Jacobsson, Gunnar; Johansson, Bengt R; Geoghegan, Joan A; Foster, Timothy J; Josefsson, Elisabet; Bylund, Johan; Verhamme, Peter; Jin, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, a leading cause of persistent infections, are highly resistant to immune defenses and antimicrobial therapies. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of fibrin and staphylokinase (Sak) to biofilm formation. In both clinical S. aureus isolates and laboratory strains, high Sak-producing strains formed less biofilm than strains that lacked Sak, suggesting that Sak prevents biofilm formation. In addition, Sak induced detachment of mature biofilms. This effect depended on plasminogen activation by Sak. Host-derived fibrin, the main substrate cleaved by Sak-activated plasminogen, was a major component of biofilm matrix, and dissolution of this fibrin scaffold greatly increased susceptibility of biofilms to antibiotics and neutrophil phagocytosis. Sak also attenuated biofilm-associated catheter infections in mouse models. In conclusion, our results reveal a novel role for Sak-induced plasminogen activation that prevents S. aureus biofilm formation and induces detachment of existing biofilms through proteolytic cleavage of biofilm matrix components.

  12. Applying Convergent Immunity to Innovative Vaccines Targeting Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Yeaman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent perspectives forecast a new paradigm for future 3rd generation vaccines based on commonalities found in diverse pathogens or convergent immune defenses to such pathogens. For Staphylococcus aureus, recurring infections and a limited success of vaccines containing S. aureus antigens imply that native antigens induce immune responses insufficient for optimal efficacy. These perspectives exemplify the need to apply novel vaccine strategies to high priority pathogens. One such approach can be termed convergent immunity, where antigens from non-target organisms that contain epitope homologues found in the target organism are applied in vaccines. This approach aims to evoke atypical immune defenses via synergistic processes that 1 afford protective efficacy; 2 target an epitope from one organism that contributes to protective immunity against another; 3 cross-protect against multiple pathogens occupying a common anatomic or immunologic niche; and/or 4 overcome immune subversion or avoidance strategies of target pathogens. Thus, convergent immunity has a potential to promote protective efficacy not usually elicited by native antigens from a target pathogen. Variations of this concept have been mainstays in the history of viral and bacterial vaccine development. A more far-reaching example is the pre–clinical evidence that specific fungal antigens can induce cross-kingdom protection against bacterial pathogens. This trans-kingdom protection has been demonstrated in preclinical studies of the recombinant Candida albicans agglutinin-like sequence 3 protein (rAls3 where it was shown that a vaccine containing rAls3 provides homologous protection against C. albicans, heterologous protection against several other Candida species, and convergent protection against several strains of S. aureus. Convergent immunity reflects an intriguing new approach to designing and developing vaccine antigens and is considered here in the context of vaccines to target

  13. Chromones from an ascomycete,Chaetomium aureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Mei Li; Qiang Zou; Guo You Li

    2010-01-01

    A novel chromone,named chaetoaurin (1),along with six known chromone derivatives (2-7),was isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of a solid-state fermented culture of Chaetomium aureus.Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectral analysis.All of these compounds were reported from C.aureus for the first time.

  14. Immunogenicity of toxins during Staphylococcus aureus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Verkaik (Nelianne); O. Dauwalder (Olivier); K. Antri (Kenza); I. Boubekri (Ilhem); C.P. de Vogel (Corné); C. Badiou (Cédric); M. Bes (Michèle); F. Vandenesch (François); M. Tazir (Mohammed); H. Hooijkaas (Herbert); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); J. Etienne (Jerome); G. Lina (Gérard); N. Ramdani-Bouguessa (Nadjia); W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAB - BACKGROUND: Toxins are important Staphylococcus aureus virulence factors, but little is known about their immunogenicity during infection. Here, additional insight is generated. METHODS: Serum samples from 206 S. aureus-infected patients and 201 hospital-admitted control subjects we

  15. Selenium Deficiency Facilitates Inflammation Following S. aureus Infection by Regulating TLR2-Related Pathways in the Mouse Mammary Gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuejiao; Zhang, Zecai; Li, Ying; Shen, Peng; Hu, Xiaoyu; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2016-08-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient affecting various aspects of health. Se deficiency has been associated with inflammation and immune responses. Mastitis poses a serious problem for humans and animals in the postpartum period. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is the most common infectious bacterial pathogen associated with mastitis. The present study sought to determine the effects and underlying mechanism of dietary Se on S. aureus-induced inflammation using a model of mouse mastitis. ELISA and Western blotting were performed to detect protein levels. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was performed to detect messenger RNA (mRNA) levels. The histopathological changes indicated that Se deficiency resulted in increased inflammatory lesions in S. aureus mastitis, whereas Se deficiency did not induce inflammatory lesions in the mammary gland. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was increased in Se-deficient mice with S. aureus mastitis. Analysis of cytokine mRNA and protein showed that Se deficiency leads to increased TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 production in S. aureus mastitis. In addition, Se deficiency enhanced the mRNA and protein expressions of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), which were originally upregulated by S. aureus in the mammary gland tissues and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293)-mTLR2 cells. When Se-deficient mice were infected with S. aureus, the phosphorylation of IκB, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 was greatly increased. The results indicate that Se deficiency could intensify the inflammatory reaction in S. aureus mastitis. This work contributes to the exploration of new methods of preventing or treating of S. aureus mastitis and other infectious diseases.

  16. Induction of Staphylococcus aureus-specific IgA and agglutination potency in milk of cows by mucosal immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempelmans Plat-Sinnige, Marjan J; Verkaik, Nelianne J; van Wamel, Willem J B; de Groot, Nanda; Acton, Dennis S; van Belkum, Alex

    2009-06-19

    Lactating cows were immunized with inactivated Staphylococcus aureus strains and concentrated culture supernatants. Application of a repeated mucosal immunization scheme resulted in significant levels of S. aureus-specific IgA in milk of dairy cows. Average IgA titers against whole cell S. aureus increased during the first 10 weeks of immunization after which a plateau level was reached and maintained during lactation. Immune whey agglutinated both bovine and human S. aureus strains including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains and recognized extracted S. aureus proteins on Western blot. ELISAs to quantify milk IgA reactive with a number of S. aureus virulence proteins (e.g. enterotoxins, microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) and immune modulating proteins) and cell wall components, demonstrated the polyclonality of the IgA. Correlations observed between agglutination and specific IgA titers for whey and for purified IgA suggested functionality of the induced antibodies. Milk from immunized cows may provide a way of producing potentially therapeutic polyclonal antibodies against S. aureus colonization and infection.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus and hand eczema severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haslund, P; Bangsgaard, N; Jarløv, J O

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of bacterial infections in hand eczema (HE) remains to be assessed. OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with HE compared with controls, and to relate presence of S. aureus, subtypes and toxin production to severity of HE. METHODS......: Bacterial swabs were taken at three different visits from the hand and nose in 50 patients with HE and 50 controls. Staphylococcus aureus was subtyped by spa typing and assigned to clonal complexes (CCs), and isolates were tested for exotoxin-producing S. aureus strains. The Hand Eczema Severity Index...... was used for severity assessment. RESULTS: Staphylococcus aureus was found on the hands in 24 patients with HE and four controls (P hands...

  18. Detection of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Determination of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of Vancomycin for Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Pus/Wound Swab Samples of the Patients Attending a Tertiary Care Hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghabendra Adhikari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to evaluate the performance of cefoxitin disc diffusion method and oxacillin broth microdilution method for detection of methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA, taking presence of mecA gene as reference. In addition, inducible clindamycin resistance and beta-lactamase production were studied and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of vancomycin for S. aureus isolates was determined. A total of 711 nonrepeated pus/wound swab samples from different anatomic locations were included in the study. The Staphylococcus aureus was identified on the basis of colony morphology, Gram’s stain, and biochemical tests. A total of 110 (15.47% S. aureus isolates were recovered, of which 39 (35.50% isolates were identified as MRSA by cefoxitin disc diffusion method. By oxacillin broth microdilution method, 31.82% of the Staphylococcus aureus isolates were found to be MRSA. However, mecA gene was present in only 29.1% of the isolates. Further, beta-lactamase production was observed in 71.82% of the isolates, while inducible clindamycin resistance was found in 10% of S. aureus isolates. The MIC value of vancomycin for S. aureus ranged from 0.016 μg/mL to 1 μg/mL. On the basis of the absolute sensitivity (100%, both phenotypic methods could be employed for routine diagnosis of MRSA in clinical microbiology laboratory; however cefoxitin disc diffusion could be preferred over MIC method considering time and labour factor.

  19. Detection of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Determination of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of Vancomycin for Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Pus/Wound Swab Samples of the Patients Attending a Tertiary Care Hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Raghabendra; Neupane, Sanjeev; Neupane, Mukesh; Bhattarai, Roshan; Bhatta, Sabita; Chaudhary, Raina; Lekhak, Binod

    2017-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the performance of cefoxitin disc diffusion method and oxacillin broth microdilution method for detection of methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA), taking presence of mecA gene as reference. In addition, inducible clindamycin resistance and beta-lactamase production were studied and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin for S. aureus isolates was determined. A total of 711 nonrepeated pus/wound swab samples from different anatomic locations were included in the study. The Staphylococcus aureus was identified on the basis of colony morphology, Gram's stain, and biochemical tests. A total of 110 (15.47%) S. aureus isolates were recovered, of which 39 (35.50%) isolates were identified as MRSA by cefoxitin disc diffusion method. By oxacillin broth microdilution method, 31.82% of the Staphylococcus aureus isolates were found to be MRSA. However, mecA gene was present in only 29.1% of the isolates. Further, beta-lactamase production was observed in 71.82% of the isolates, while inducible clindamycin resistance was found in 10% of S. aureus isolates. The MIC value of vancomycin for S. aureus ranged from 0.016 μg/mL to 1 μg/mL. On the basis of the absolute sensitivity (100%), both phenotypic methods could be employed for routine diagnosis of MRSA in clinical microbiology laboratory; however cefoxitin disc diffusion could be preferred over MIC method considering time and labour factor.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin-dependent induction of host cell death by membrane-derived vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Thay

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide spectrum of infections in humans, ranging from superficial cutaneous infections, infections in the circum-oral region, to life-threatening bacteremia. It was recently demonstrated that Gram-positive organisms such as S. aureus liberate membrane-derived vesicles (MVs, which analogously to outer membrane vesicles (OMVs of Gram-negative bacteria can play a role in delivering virulence factors to host cells. In the present study we have shown that cholesterol-dependent fusion of S. aureus MVs with the plasma membrane represents a route for delivery of a key virulence factor, α-toxin (α-hemolysin; Hla to human cells. Most S. aureus strains produce this 33-kDa pore-forming protein, which can lyse a wide range of human cells, and induce apoptosis in T-lymphocytes. Our results revealed a tight association of biologically active α-toxin with membrane-derived vesicles isolated from S. aureus strain 8325-4. Concomitantly, α-toxin contributed to HeLa cell cytotoxicity of MVs, and was the main vesicle-associated protein responsible for erythrocyte lysis. In contrast, MVs obtained from an isogenic hla mutant were significantly attenuated with regards to both causing lysis of erythrocytes and death of HeLa cells. This is to our knowledge the first recognition of an S. aureus MV-associated factor contributing to host cell cytotoxicity.

  1. Post-invasion events after infection with Staphylococcus aureus are strongly dependent on both the host cell type and the infecting S. aureus strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, M; Pförtner, H; Tuchscherr, L; Völker, U; Schmidt, F; Kramko, N; Schnittler, H-J; Fraunholz, M J; Löffler, B; Peters, G; Niemann, S

    2016-09-01

    Host cell invasion is a major feature of Staphylococcus aureus and contributes to infection development. The intracellular metabolically active bacteria can induce host cell activation and death but they can also persist for long time periods. In this study a comparative analysis was performed of different well-characterized S. aureus strains in their interaction with a variety of host cell types. Staphylococcus aureus (strains 6850, USA300, LS1, SH1000, Cowan1) invasion was compared in different human cell types (epithelial and endothelial cells, keratinocytes, fibroblasts, osteoblasts). The number of intracellular bacteria was determined, cell inflammation was investigated, as well as cell death and phagosomal escape of bacteria. To explain strain-dependent differences in the secretome, a proteomic approach was used. Barrier cells took up high amounts of bacteria and were killed by aggressive strains. These strains expressed high levels of toxins, and possessed the ability to escape from phagolysosomes. Osteoblasts and keratinocytes ingested less bacteria, and were not killed, even though the primary osteoblasts were strongly activated by S. aureus. In all cell types S. aureus was able to persist. Strong differences in uptake, cytotoxicity, and inflammatory response were observed between primary cells and their corresponding cell lines, demonstrating that cell lines reflect only partially the functions and physiology of primary cells. This study provides a contribution for a better understanding of the pathomechanisms of S. aureus infections. The proteomic data provide important basic knowledge on strains commonly used in the analysis of S. aureus-host cell interaction.

  2. Necroptosis Promotes Staphylococcus aureus Clearance by Inhibiting Excessive Inflammatory Signaling

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    Kipyegon Kitur

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus triggers inflammation through inflammasome activation and recruitment of neutrophils, responses that are critical for pathogen clearance but are associated with substantial tissue damage. We postulated that necroptosis, cell death mediated by the RIPK1/RIPK3/MLKL pathway, would function to limit pathological inflammation. In models of skin infection or sepsis, Mlkl−/− mice had high bacterial loads, an inability to limit interleukin-1b (IL-1b production, and excessive inflammation. Similarly, mice treated with RIPK1 or RIPK3 inhibitors had increased bacterial loads in a model of sepsis. Ripk3−/− mice exhibited increased staphylococcal clearance and decreased inflammation in skin and systemic infection, due to direct effects of RIPK3 on IL-1b activation and apoptosis. In contrast to Casp1/4−/− mice with defective S. aureus killing, the poor outcomes of Mlkl−/− mice could not be attributed to impaired phagocytic function. We conclude that necroptotic cell death limits the pathological inflammation induced by S. aureus.

  3. Exfoliative Toxins of Staphylococcus aureus

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    Michal Bukowski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen of humans and livestock. It causes a diverse array of diseases, ranging from relatively harmless localized skin infections to life-threatening systemic conditions. Among multiple virulence factors, staphylococci secrete several exotoxins directly associated with particular disease symptoms. These include toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1, enterotoxins, and exfoliative toxins (ETs. The latter are particularly interesting as the sole agents responsible for staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS, a disease predominantly affecting infants and characterized by the loss of superficial skin layers, dehydration, and secondary infections. The molecular basis of the clinical symptoms of SSSS is well understood. ETs are serine proteases with high substrate specificity, which selectively recognize and hydrolyze desmosomal proteins in the skin. The fascinating road leading to the discovery of ETs as the agents responsible for SSSS and the characterization of the molecular mechanism of their action, including recent advances in the field, are reviewed in this article.

  4. Adenosine derived from Staphylococcus aureus-engulfed macrophages functions as a potent stimulant for the induction of inflammatory cytokines in mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Kim, Chan-Hee; Ryu, Kyoung-Hwa;

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to isolate novel mast cell-stimulating molecules from Staphylococcus aureus. Water-soluble extract of S. aureus cell lysate strongly induced human interleukin- 8 in human mast cell line-1 and mouse interleukin-6 in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells. The active...... adenosine receptor blocker, verified that purified adenosine can induce interleukin-8 production via adenosine receptors on mast cells. Moreover, adenosine was purified from S. aureusengulfed RAW264.7 cells, a murine macrophage cell line, used to induce phagocytosis of S. aureus. These results show a novel...

  5. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866... Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents are... epidemiological information on these diseases. Certain strains of Staphylococcus aureus produce an...

  6. Mastite com lesões sistêmicas por Staphylococus aureus subesp. aureus em coelhos

    OpenAIRE

    Traverso Sandra Davi; Cunha Leonardo da; Fernandes Joaquim César Teixeira; Loretti Alexandre Paulino; Rhoden Adriana; Wunder Jr. Elsio; Driemeier David

    2003-01-01

    Em uma criação composta por 1800 coelhos, 33% das matrizes apresentaram mastite e lesões cutâneas crostosas e purulentas. Estes animais apresentavam-se entre 10 a- 12 meses de idade e em segunda parição. Quinze coelhos afetados foram sacrificados e necropsiados. Na necropsia, além das lesões cutâneas haviam microabscessos em diversos órgãos. Das amostras coletadas isolou-se Staphylococcus aureus subesp. aureus. S. aureus subesp. aureus também foi isolado de "swab" nasal coletado do tratador e...

  7. Etudes structurales du ribosome de Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Khusainov, Iskander

    2015-01-01

    The ribosome is a large cellular machinery that performs the protein synthesis in every living cell. Therefore, the ribosome is one of the major targets of naturally produced antibiotics, which can kill bacterial cells by blocking protein synthesis. However, some bacteria are resistant to these antibiotics due to small modifications of their ribosomes. Among them, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a severe pathogen that causes numerous infections in humans. The crystal structures of comple...

  8. Iron-regulated biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus Newman requires ica and the secreted protein Emp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Miranda; Cockayne, Alan; Morrissey, Julie A

    2008-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation is induced in iron-restricted growth conditions in vitro. In this study, we showed that Emp and Eap play important roles in low-iron-induced biofilm formation of S. aureus Newman. Eap and Emp are secreted proteins which are non-covalently attached to the S. aureus cell surface and have previously been implicated in a number of aspects of S. aureus pathogenesis. We showed here that the transcription of these important virulence factors is induced by growth in low-iron medium, reflective of the in vivo environment. Our results show that iron regulation of Eap and Emp is Fur independent. However, Fur is required for full induction of eap and emp expression in low-iron conditions. In this study, we demonstrated that in addition to Fur, low-iron-induced biofilm formation requires Sae, Agr, and SarA. In iron-restricted growth conditions, Sae and Agr are essential for Emp and Eap expression and hence for biofilm formation, whereas SarA appears to have a less-significant role. We also showed that expression of the ica operon is required for biofilm formation in iron-restricted growth conditions. We demonstrated that in fact, ica is required for the expression of the important multifunctional virulence determinants eap and emp.

  9. Specific Antibodies to Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Are Present in Serum from Pigs with Osteomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Kruse; Jensen, Henrik Elvang; Koch, Janne

    2015-01-01

    (IL 6) levels was also seen. CONCLUSION: The observed biofilm-specific antibody response represents a T-helper cell 17 (Th17) response and potentially a T-helper cell 1 (Th1) response. This is in agreement with previous studies in mice and rabbits speculating that S. aureus induces a Th1- and Th17...

  10. Divergent responses of different endothelial cell types to infection with Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Kati Seidl

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells are important in the pathogenesis of bloodstream infections caused by Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus. Numerous investigations have used human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs to study microbial-endothelial cell interactions in vitro. However, the use of HUVECs requires a constant supply of umbilical cords, and there are significant donor-to-donor variations in these endothelial cells. The use of an immortalized endothelial cell line would obviate such difficulties. One candidate in this regard is HMEC-1, an immortalized human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line. To determine if HMEC-1 cells are suitable for studying the interactions of C. albicans and S. aureus with endothelial cells in vitro, we compared the interactions of these organisms with HMEC-1 cells and HUVECs. We found that wild-type C. albicans had significantly reduced adherence to and invasion of HMEC-1 cells as compared to HUVECs. Although wild-type S. aureus adhered to and invaded HMEC-1 cells similarly to HUVECs, an agr mutant strain had significantly reduced invasion of HMEC-1 cells, but not HUVECs. Furthermore, HMEC-1 cells were less susceptible to damage induced by C. albicans, but more susceptible to damage caused by S. aureus. In addition, HMEC-1 cells secreted very little IL-8 in response to infection with either organism, whereas infection of HUVECs induced substantial IL-8 secretion. This weak IL-8 response was likely due to the anatomic site from which HMEC-1 cells were obtained because infection of primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells with C. albicans and S. aureus also induced little increase in IL-8 production above basal levels. Thus, C. albicans and S. aureus interact with HMEC-1 cells in a substantially different manner than with HUVECs, and data obtained with one type of endothelial cell cannot necessarily be extrapolated to other types.

  11. Vinculin and Rab5 complex is required [correction of requited]for uptake of Staphylococcus aureus and interleukin-6 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Hagiwara

    Full Text Available Vinculin, a 116-kDa membrane cytoskeletal protein, is an important molecule for cell adhesion; however, little is known about its other cellular functions. Here, we demonstrated that vinculin binds to Rab5 and is required for Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus uptake in cells. Viunculin directly bound to Rab5 and enhanced the activation of S. aureus uptake. Over-expression of active vinculin mutants enhanced S. aureus uptake, whereas over-expression of an inactive vinculin mutant decreased S. aureus uptake. Vinculin bound to Rab5 at the N-terminal region (1-258 of vinculin. Vinculin and Rab5 were involved in the S. aureus-induced phosphorylation of MAP kinases (p38, Erk, and JNK and IL-6 expression. Finally, vinculin and Rab5 knockdown reduced infection of S. aureus, phosphorylation of MAPKs and IL-6 expression in murine lungs. Our results suggest that vinculin binds to Rab5 and that these two molecules cooperatively enhance bacterial infection and the inflammatory response.

  12. Carotenoid Formation by Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Ray K.; White, David C.

    1970-01-01

    The carotenoid pigments of Staphylococcus aureus U-71 were identified as phytoene; ζ-carotene; δ-carotene; phytofluenol; a phytofluenol-like carotenoid, rubixanthin; and three rubixanthin-like carotenoids after extraction, saponification, chromatographic separation, and determination of their absorption spectra. There was no evidence of carotenoid esters or glycoside ethers in the extract before saponification. During the aerobic growth cycle the total carotenoids increased from 45 to 1,000 nmoles per g (dry weight), with the greatest increases in the polar, hydroxylated carotenoids. During the anaerobic growth cycle, the total carotenoids increased from 20 nmoles per g (dry weight) to 80 nmoles per g (dry weight), and only traces of the polar carotenoids were formed. Light had no effect on carotenoid synthesis. About 0.14% of the mevalonate-2-14C added to the culture was incorporated into the carotenoids during each bacterial doubling. The total carotenoids did not lose radioactivity when grown in the absence of 14C for 2.5 bacterial doublings. The total carotenoids did not lose radioactivity when grown in the absence of 14C for 2.5 bacterial doublings. The incorporation and turnover of 14C indicated the carotenes were sequentially desaturated and hydroxylated to form the polar carotenoids. PMID:5423369

  13. Protective Role of Surfactant Protein D in Ocular Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

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    Zhiyong Zhang

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common pathogens causing keratitis. Surfactant protein D (SP-D plays a critical role in host defense and innate immunity. In order to investigate the role of SP-D in ocular S. aureus infection, the eyes of wild-type (WT and SP-D knockout (SP-D KO C57BL/6 mice were infected with S. aureus (10(7 CFU/eye in the presence and absence of cysteine protease inhibitor(E64.Bacterial counts in the ocular surface were examined 3, 6, 12, 24 hrs after infection. Bacterial phagocytosis by neutrophils and bacterial invasion in ocular epithelial cells were evaluated quantitatively. S. aureus-induced ocular injury was determined with corneal fluorescein staining. The results demonstrated that SP-D is expressed in ocular surface epithelium and the lacrimal gland; WT mice had increased clearance of S. aureus from the ocular surface (p<0.05 and reduced ocular injury compared with SP-D KO mice. The protective effects of SP-D include increased bacterial phagocytosis by neutrophils (p<0.05 and decreased bacterial invasion into epithelial cells (p<0.05 in WT mice compared to in SP-D KO mice. In the presence of inhibitor (E64, WT mice showed enhanced bacterial clearance (p<0.05 and reduced ocular injury compared to absent E64 while SP-D KO mice did not. Collectively, we concluded that SP-D protects the ocular surface from S. aureus infection but cysteine protease impairs SP-D function in this murine model, and that cysteine protease inhibitor may be a potential therapeutic agent in S. aureus keratitis.

  14. Phytochemical and Antibacterial Investigations of the Extracts and Fractions from the Stem Bark of Hymenaea stigonocarpa Mart. ex Hayne and Effect on Ultrastructure of Staphylococcus aureus Induced by Hydroalcoholic Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Santiago Dimech

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of different extracts and fractions obtained from Hymenaea stigonocarpa stem barks. The cyclohexanic, ethyl acetate, ethanol, aqueous, and hydroalcoholic extracts were obtained by maceration. The hydroalcoholic extract was partitioned, which resulted in the ethyl acetate and aqueous fractions. All extracts and fractions were subjected to phytochemical screening and evaluation of total phenol and tannin contents. An HPLC-DAD and ultrastructural alterations analysis were performed. Terpenes and coumarins were detected in the cyclohexanic extract. Flavonoids and condensed tannins were present in the other extracts and fractions. The extracts with the highest contents of tannins, ethanol (EE, hydroalcoholic (HE, and aqueous fraction (AF showed also the highest antimicrobial activity. The MIC values ranged from 64 to 526 µg/mL. The chromatographic fingerprints suggest the presence of astilbin and other flavonoids in EE and HE. Presence of the thick cell wall, undulating outer layer, abnormal septa, and leakage of the cytoplasmic contents and absence of cell wall and cell lyses were the main alterations observed on Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 33591 after treatment with the Hymenaea stigonocarpa hydroalcoholic extract. The presence of phenolic compounds like flavonoids and tannins is possibly the reason for the antimicrobial activity.

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from various animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Joseph E; Ball, Katherine R; Chirino-Trejo, Manuel

    2011-02-01

    This study characterized the antimicrobial susceptibility of 221 Staphylococcus aureus isolated from various species, and 60 canine Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolated from 1986 through 2000 at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM). Resistance of S. aureus was most common to penicillin (31%) and tetracycline (14%); resistance of S. pseudintermedius to penicillin was present in 8% and to tetracycline in 34% of isolates. Resistance to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole was only seen among S. pseudintermedius, and there was no resistance to amoxicillin/clavulanate, ampicillin/sulbactam, cephalothin, amikacin, gentamicin, enrofloxacin, chloramphenicol, or rifampin among any isolate. Inducible clindamycin resistance was found in both S. aureus and S. pseudintermedius, highlighting the need for careful interpretation of culture and susceptibility test results. There were significant differences in the minimum inhibitory concentrations of penicillin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, clindamycin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline between avian, bovine, equine, and porcine isolates.

  16. Converting a Staphylococcus aureus toxin into effective cyclic pseudopeptide antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solecki, Olivia; Mosbah, Amor; Baudy Floc'h, Michèle; Felden, Brice

    2015-03-19

    Staphylococcus aureus produces peptide toxins that it uses to respond to environmental cues. We previously characterized PepA1, a peptide toxin from S. aureus, that induces lytic cell death of both bacterial and host cells. That led us to suggest that PepA1 has an antibacterial activity. Here, we demonstrate that exogenously provided PepA1 has activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We also see that PepA1 is significantly hemolytic, thus limiting its use as an antibacterial agent. To overcome these limitations, we converted PepA1 into nonhemolytic derivatives. Our most promising derivative is a cyclic heptapseudopeptide with inconsequential toxicity to human cells, enhanced stability in human sera, and sharp antibacterial activity. Mechanistically, linear and helical PepA1 derivatives form pores at the bacterial and erythrocyte surfaces, while the cyclic peptide induces bacterial envelope reorganization, with insignificant action on the erythrocytes. Our work demonstrates that bacterial toxins might be an attractive starting point for antibacterial drug development.

  17. Observations on Arthritis in Broiler Breeder Chickens Experimentally Infected with Staphylococcus aureus

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    Chang-Qin Gu§, Xue-Ying Hu§, Chang-Qing Xie1, Wan-Po Zhang, De-Hai Wang, Quan Zhou and Guo-Fu Cheng1*

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of bacterial arthritis in broiler breeder chickens. In this study, we established a model of broiler breeder chicken arthritis inoculated with Staph. aureus isolated from a spontaneously occurring bacterial arthritis in chickens. We evaluated the model by bacteriology, serology, pathology, and immunology. The results showed that 2.5 × 109 cfu Staph. aureus injected into the right joint cavity can successfully induce a chicken arthritis model. The majority of the infected chickens suffered lameness and joint swelling at 3 days post-inoculation (DPI. The death peak time was on 7 DPI and the mortality rate was 51.1%. Staph. aureus can be continuously isolated from the blood and left joint synovial fluid of the infected chickens. Lesions found on the infected chickens consisted of swollen joints full of caseous exudates, cartilage injury, and synovial membrane thickening with infiltration of inflammatory cells. The center of the lesion contained many round bacterial cocci. With joint injury aggravation, intra-articular hyaluronic acid gradually decreased, and serum interleukin-6 became significantly higher compared with the control (P<0.01 from 3 DPI. The results indicated that the chicken models of Staph. aureus-mediated arthritis were successful, and can be used to gain a better understanding of the host-bacterium relationship.

  18. Cinnamaldehyde Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Factors and Protects against Infection in a Galleria mellonella Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Thiago A. F.; Araújo, Jéssica M. M.; dos Santos Pinto, Bruna L.; dos Santos, Jéssica S.; Souza, Eliene B.; da Silva, Bruna L. R.; Colares, Valderlane L. P.; Novais, Tânia M. G.; Filho, Clovis M. B.; Struve, Carsten; Calixto, João B.; Monteiro-Neto, Valério; da Silva, Luís C. N.; Fernandes, Elizabeth S.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to the available marketed drugs has prompted the search of novel therapies; especially in regards of anti-virulence strategies that aim to make bacteria less pathogenic and/or decrease their probability to become resistant to therapy. Cinnamaldehyde is widely known for its antibacterial properties through mechanisms that include the interaction of this compound with bacterial cell walls. However, only a handful of studies have addressed its effects on bacterial virulence, especially when tested at sub-inhibitory concentrations. Herein, we show for the first time that cinnamaldehyde is bactericidal against Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis multidrug resistant strains and does not promote bacterial tolerance. Cinnamaldehyde actions were stronger on S. aureus as it was able to inhibit its hemolytic activity on human erythrocytes and reduce its adherence to latex. Furthermore, cinnamaldehyde enhanced the serum-dependent lysis of S. aureus. In vivo testing of cinnamaldehyde in Galleria mellonella larvae infected with S. aureus, showed this compound improves larvae survival whilst diminishing bacterial load in their hemolymph. We suggest that cinnamaldehyde may represent an alternative therapy to control S. aureus-induced bacterial infections as it presents the ability to reduce bacterial virulence/survival without promoting an adaptive phenotype. PMID:28066373

  19. Clinical features of severe Staphylococci aureus pneumonia induced by dope injection: report of 3 cases and review of literature%静脉吸毒所致重症金黄色葡萄球菌肺炎临床特征:3例并文献复习

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    缪明; 苗立云; 裴素莉; 张德平

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore clinical characteristics of patients with severe Staphylococci aureus pneumonia induced by dope injection and improve the understanding of the disease. Methods Clinical data of 3 intravenous drug patients with Staphylococci aureus pneumonia in 2009 were reviewed and the related literature was reviewed. Results All 3 cases were young patients and hid the truth of the drug abuse. They presented hypotension, liver and kidney dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, hypoproteinemia, anaemia and azotemia, but had mild respiratory symptoms. The radiologic findings include lung infiltration,lung aerocyst,lung cavities,lung abscess and pleural efflusion. The cultures of blood or sputum were methicillin-resistant Staphylococci aureus. The patients recovered after effective combined therapy. Conclusion Intravenous drug abusers with severe Staphylococcs aureus pneumonia presented severe toxic symptom,light symptom of respiratory system and the typical radiologic findings that can suggest the diagnosis.Combined therapy based on sensitive antibiotics is the key to the patients.%目的 探讨静脉吸毒所致重症金黄色葡萄球菌(金葡菌)肺灸患者的临床特征,提高对吸毒所致的金葡菌肺炎的认识.方法 回顾性分析2009年南京市鼓楼医院呼吸内科收治的3例重症金葡菌肺炎患者的临床资料,并对相关文献进行复习.结果 3例患者均为年轻患者,就诊时隐瞒吸毒史,均出现明显的低血压或休克、肝肾功能损害,血小板低下,机体消耗显著,表现出明显的低蛋白血症、贫血以及氮质血症,而呼吸系统症状轻微;胸部影像学出现典型的肺浸润、肺气囊/空洞、肺脓肿、胸水;血/痰培养均出现耐甲氧西林金葡菌生长,给予有效的综合治疗后患者痊愈.结论 静脉吸毒者重症金葡菌肺炎全身中毒症状重,呼吸系统症状轻,影像学特征具有诊断意义,选取以敏感的抗生素为基础的综合治疗是治愈的关键.

  20. Vaccination with a recombinant fragment of collagen adhesin provides protection against Staphylococcus aureus-mediated septic death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, I M; Patti, J M; Bremell, T; Höök, M; Tarkowski, A

    1998-06-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections. Morbidity and mortality due to infections such as sepsis, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, and invasive endocarditis remain high despite the use of antibiotics. The emergence of antibiotic resistant super bugs mandates that alternative strategies for the prevention and treatment of S. aureus infections are developed. We investigated the ability of vaccination with a recombinant fragment of the S. aureus collagen adhesin to protect mice against sepsis-induced death. Actively immunized NMRI mice were intravenously inoculated with the S. aureus clinical isolate strain Phillips. 14 d after inoculation, mortality in the collagen adhesin-vaccinated group was only 13%, compared with 87% in the control antigen immunized group (P < 0.001). To determine if the protective effect was antibody mediated, we passively immunized naive mice with collagen adhesin-specific antibodies. Similar to the active immunization strategy, passive transfer of collagen adhesin-specific antibodies protected mice against sepsis-induced death. In vitro experiments indicated that S. aureus opsonized with sera from collagen adhesin immunized mice promoted phagocytic uptake and enhanced intracellular killing compared with bacteria opsonized with sera from control animals. These results indicate that the collagen adhesin is a viable target in the development of immunotherapeutics against S. aureus.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus seroproteomes discriminate ruminant isolates causing mild or severe mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Maréchal Caroline

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of mastitis in ruminants. In ewe mastitis, symptoms range from subclinical to gangrenous mastitis. S. aureus factors or host-factors contributing to the different outcomes are not completely elucidated. In this study, experimental mastitis was induced on primiparous ewes using two S. aureus strains, isolated from gangrenous (strain O11 or subclinical (strain O46 mastitis. Strains induced drastically distinct clinical symptoms when tested in ewe and mice experimental mastitis. Notably, they reproduced mild (O46 or severe (O11 mastitis in ewes. Ewe sera were used to identify staphylococcal immunoreactive proteins commonly or differentially produced during infections of variable severity and to define core and accessory seroproteomes. Such SERological Proteome Analysis (SERPA allowed the identification of 89 immunoreactive proteins, of which only 52 (58.4% were previously identified as immunogenic proteins in other staphylococcal infections. Among the 89 proteins identified, 74 appear to constitute the core seroproteome. Among the 15 remaining proteins defining the accessory seroproteome, 12 were specific for strain O11, 3 were specific for O46. Distribution of one protein specific for each mastitis severity was investigated in ten other strains isolated from subclinical or clinical mastitis. We report here for the first time the identification of staphylococcal immunogenic proteins common or specific to S. aureus strains responsible for mild or severe mastitis. These findings open avenues in S. aureus mastitis studies as some of these proteins, expressed in vivo, are likely to account for the success of S. aureus as a pathogen of the ruminant mammary gland.

  2. Construction of a multiplex promoter reporter platform to monitor Staphylococcus aureus virulence gene expression and the identification of usnic acid as a potent suppressor of psm gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng GAO

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available As antibiotic resistance becomes phenomenal, alternative therapeutic strategies for bacterial infections such as anti-virulence treatments have been advocated. We have constructed a total of 20 gfp-luxABCDE dual-reporter plasmids with selected promoters from S. aureus virulence-associated genes. The plasmids were introduced into various S. aureus strains to establish a gfp-lux based multiplex promoter reporter platform for monitoring S. aureus virulence gene expressions in real time to identify factors or compounds that may perturb virulence of S. aureus. The gene expression profiles monitored by luminescence correlated well with qRT-PCR results and extrinsic factors including carbon dioxide and some antibiotics were shown to suppress or induce the expression of virulence factors in this platform. Using this platform, sub-inhibitory ampicillin was shown to be a potent inducer for the expression of many virulence factors in S. aureus. Bacterial adherence and invasion assays using mammalian cells were employed to measure S. aureus virulence induced by ampicillin. The platform was used for screening of natural extracts that perturb the virulence of S. aureus and usnic acid was identified to be a potent repressor for the expression of psm.

  3. Construction of a Multiplex Promoter Reporter Platform to Monitor Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Gene Expression and the Identification of Usnic Acid as a Potent Suppressor of psm Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Wang, Yanli; Villanueva, Iván; Ho, Pak Leung; Davies, Julian; Kao, Richard Yi Tsun

    2016-01-01

    As antibiotic resistance becomes phenomenal, alternative therapeutic strategies for bacterial infections such as anti-virulence treatments have been advocated. We have constructed a total of 20 gfp-luxABCDE dual-reporter plasmids with selected promoters from S. aureus virulence-associated genes. The plasmids were introduced into various S. aureus strains to establish a gfp-lux based multiplex promoter reporter platform for monitoring S. aureus virulence gene expressions in real time to identify factors or compounds that may perturb virulence of S. aureus. The gene expression profiles monitored by luminescence correlated well with qRT-PCR results and extrinsic factors including carbon dioxide and some antibiotics were shown to suppress or induce the expression of virulence factors in this platform. Using this platform, sub-inhibitory ampicillin was shown to be a potent inducer for the expression of many virulence factors in S. aureus. Bacterial adherence and invasion assays using mammalian cells were employed to measure S. aureus virulence induced by ampicillin. The platform was used for screening of natural extracts that perturb the virulence of S. aureus and usnic acid was identified to be a potent repressor for the expression of psm.

  4. Changes in Holstein cow milk and serum proteins during intramammary infection with three different strains of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Claude

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most prevalent pathogens to cause mastitis in dairy cattle. Intramammary infection of dairy cows with S. aureus is often subclinical, due to the pathogen's ability to evade the innate defense mechanisms, but this can lead to chronic infection. A sub-population of S. aureus, known as small colony variant (SCV, displays atypical phenotypic characteristics, causes persistent infections, and is more resistant to antibiotics than parent strains. Therefore, it was hypothesized that the host immune response will be different for SCV than its parental or typical strains of S. aureus. In this study, the local and systemic immune protein responses to intramammary infection with three strains of S. aureus, including a naturally occurring bovine SCV strain (SCV Heba3231, were characterized. Serum and casein-depleted milk cytokine levels (interleukin-8, interferon-γ, and transforming growth factor-β1, as well as serum haptoglobin concentrations were monitored over time after intramammary infection with each of the three S. aureus strains. Furthermore, comparative proteomics was used to evaluate milk proteome profiles during acute and chronic phases of S. aureus intramammary infection. Results Serum IL-8, IFN-γ, and TGF-β1 responses differed in dairy cows challenged with different strains of S. aureus. Changes in overall serum haptoglobin concentrations were observed for each S. aureus challenge group, but there were no significant differences observed between groups. In casein-depleted milk, strain-specific differences in the host IFN-γ response were observed, but inducible IL-8 and TGF-β1 concentrations were not different between groups. Proteomic analysis of the milk following intramammary infection revealed unique host protein expression profiles that were dependent on the infecting strain as well as phase of infection. Notably, the protein, component-3 of the proteose peptone (CPP3, was

  5. Resistance Change and Oxidative Stress-induced After Infecting Mice with Staphyloccocus aureus Isolated from Bovine%牛源金黄色葡萄球菌感染小鼠后药物敏感性变化及其诱导的氧化应激

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨峰; 王旭荣; 田永刚; 王玲; 李新圃; 罗金印; 李宏胜

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the resistance change of Staphyloccocus aureus after infecting mice and the effect of S.aureus on total antioxidant capacity of liver,kidney and spleen in mice,twenty adult mice were divid-ed into control group and S.aureus infected group randomly.The resistance of the test strain (before the infection)and the isolated strain (after the infection)were detected by disc diffusion method,and the ac-tivity of total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC)and the content of thiobarbituric acid reacting substances (TBARS)produced from lipid peroxidation were measured by colorimetry and analyzed statistically.The results showed that S.aureus could be isolated from kidney and spleen,but not liver in mice after infec-tion.When the isolates from kidney and spleen compared with the test bacteria,the antibacterial circle di-ameters decreased significantly in drugs of lincomycin,vancomycin,amoxicillin,streptomycin,neomycin, gentamicin,cephalosporin,ampicillin,doxycycline,flomoxef sodium,sulfamethoxazole compound,tetra-cycline,erythromycin,kanamycin,florfenicol,enrofloxacin,norfloxacin and sulphonamides (P <0.01), no significant difference was observed between kidney and spleen in the same drug tereatment.In both of penicillin G and bacitracin,the antibacterial circle diameters were zero,and no significant difference be-tween kidney and spleen were observed.In addition,both of the test strain and the isolated strain were completely not sensitive to penicillin G and bacitracin,but sensitive to the other 18 drugs.Moreover,sig-nificant reduction (P <0.01)in the activity levels of total antioxidant capacity accompanied by a significant increase (P <0.01)in the lipid peroxidation products in the liver,kidney and spleen in bacterial infected mice over controls.Thus,the results suggest that the resistance of S.aureus isolated from kidney and spleen in mice will enhance after the infection,and S.aureus isolated from bovine can induce oxidative stress in the liver,kidney and spleen of

  6. Staphylococcus aureus survival in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malachowa, Natalia; DeLeo, Frank R

    2011-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is abundant in hospitals and in the United States is a leading cause of mortality due to infectious agents. Community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains such as USA300, which typically cause disease outside of healthcare settings, are also prevalent in the United States. Although most CA-MRSA infections affect skin and soft tissue, the pathogen can enter the bloodstream and ultimately cause severe disease. In a recent paper, we used USA300-specific microarrays to generate a comprehensive view of the molecules that facilitate S. aureus immune evasion and survival in human blood. Notably, genes encoding proteins involved in iron-uptake and utilization and gamma-hemolysin (hlgABC) are highly up-regulated by USA300 during culture in human blood. Here we discuss the potential implication of these findings and the possible role of gamma-hemolysin in the success of S. aureus as a human pathogen.

  7. Genomics of Natural Populations of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J Ross; Holden, Matthew T G

    2016-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen and an important cause of livestock infections. The first S. aureus genomes to be published, 15 years ago, provided the first view of genome structure and gene content. Since then, thousands of genomes from a wide array of strains from different sources have been sequenced. Comparison of these sequences has resulted in broad insights into population structure, bacterial evolution, clone emergence and expansion, and the molecular basis of niche adaptation. Furthermore, this information is now being applied clinically in outbreak investigations to inform infection control measures and to determine appropriate treatment regimens. In this review, we summarize some of the broad insights into S. aureus biology gained from the analysis of genomes and discuss future directions and opportunities in this dynamic field of research.

  8. Propionibacterium acnes biofilm - A sanctuary for Staphylococcus aureus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyner, Harmony; Patel, Robin

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of combined culture of Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus on biofilm formation under different oxygen concentrations. We measured planktonic growth and biofilm formation of P. acnes and S. aureus alone and together under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Both P. acnes and S. aureus grew under anaerobic conditions. When grown under anaerobic conditions, P. acnes with or without S. aureus formed a denser biomass biofilm than did S. aureus alone. Viable S. aureus was recovered from a16-day old combined P. acnes and S. aureus biofilm, but not a monomicrobial S. aureus biofilm.

  9. Evolution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus towards increasing resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strommenger, Birgit; Bartels, Mette Damkjær; Kurt, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate the evolutionary history of Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex (CC) 8, which encompasses several globally distributed epidemic lineages, including hospital-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and the highly prevalent community-associated MRSA clone USA300....

  10. Mastite com lesões sistêmicas por Staphylococus aureus subesp. aureus em coelhos Mastitis with systemic lesions due to Staphylococus aureus subesp. aureus in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Davi Traverso

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Em uma criação composta por 1800 coelhos, 33% das matrizes apresentaram mastite e lesões cutâneas crostosas e purulentas. Estes animais apresentavam-se entre 10 a- 12 meses de idade e em segunda parição. Quinze coelhos afetados foram sacrificados e necropsiados. Na necropsia, além das lesões cutâneas haviam microabscessos em diversos órgãos. Das amostras coletadas isolou-se Staphylococcus aureus subesp. aureus. S. aureus subesp. aureus também foi isolado de "swab" nasal coletado do tratador encarregado de fazer o diagnóstico de gestação nas coelhas. Histologicamente, havia formação de múltiplos abscessos, presença de bactérias gram positivas em vasos sangüíneos e linfáticos, além de êmbolos bacterianos nos tecidos. Nas mamas, observou-se tecido glandular normal associado a abscessos multifocais delimitados.At a commercial rabbitry which was composed of 1800 New Zealand White rabbits, 30% of the does had presented mastitis and purulent cutaneal lesions. The age of the animals ranged from 10 to 12 months and were at the second parturition. At necropsy, microabscesses were observed in several organs. Bacteriological samples collected from affected animals resulted Staphylococcus aureus subesp. aureus.. Additionally, the same agent has been isolated from a nasal swab collected from the person responsible for the pregnancy diagnosis. Histologically, there were multiple abscesses, gram positive bacteria within blood and lymphatic vessels, and bacterial emboli scattered in the tissues. In the mammas, normal glandular tissue associated with multifocal abscesses were observed.

  11. Role of α-toxin-induced apoptosis of umbilical vein endothelial cells in vertical infection of Staphylococcus aureus L-form%α-毒素诱导的脐静脉内皮细胞凋亡在金葡菌L型垂直感染中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管俊昌; 朱翔; 余峰玲; 杨文选; 刘婷婷; 张涛; 林娜; 刘勇; 刘从森

    2013-01-01

    目的 确定α-毒素诱导脐静脉内皮细胞(HUV-EC-C)的凋亡在金葡菌L型垂直感染中的作用.方法 在培养的HUV-EC-C细胞中加入不同浓度(0、10、30、90、270 ng/ml)的金葡菌α-毒素,处理不同时间(0、2、4、6、8h)后经Annexin V-PI染色,流式细胞仪检测HUV-EC-C细胞的凋亡率.通过ELISA检测α肿瘤坏死因子(TNF-α)、caspase-3与caspase-8的表达量,并观察加入TNF-α中口抗体、caspases-3抑制剂zDEVD-FMK、caspase-8抑制剂zIETD-fmk对α-毒素诱导HUV-EC-C细胞凋亡的影响.结果 α-毒素能够诱导HUV-EC-C细胞凋亡并表现为时间、剂量依赖性,明显增加HUV-EC-C细胞中TNF-α、caspase-3与caspase-8的表达;在加入TNF-α中和抗体、zDEVD-FMK、zIETD-fmk后可部分阻断α-毒素能够诱导的HUV-EC-C细胞凋亡.结论 α-毒素通过TNF-α及caspase-8介导的外源性死亡途径诱导HUV-EC-C细胞凋亡,表明α-毒素诱导内皮细胞凋亡是金葡菌L型垂直感染影响胎儿发育的主要机制之一.%Objective To investigate α-toxin-induced apoptosis of umbilical vein endothelial cells and explore its role in vertical infection of Staphylococcus aureus L-form.Methods HUV-EC-C cells exposed to different concentrations (0,10,30,90,and 270 ng/ml) of α-toxin for different time lengths (0,2,4,6,and 8 h) were examined for apoptosis using flow cytometry with Annexin V-PI staining.The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and the activities of,caspase-3 and caspase-8 in the cell culture were detected by ELISA and colorimetric method,respectively.α-Toxin-induced cell apoptosis was also analyzed in HUV-EC-C cells treated with a neutralizing antibody of TNF-α or with the inhibitory peptides of caspase-3 (zDEVD-FMK) and caspase-8 (zIETD-fmk).Results α-Toxin induced apoptosis of HUV-EC-C cells in a dose-and time-dependent manner and caused significantly enhanced expression of TNF-α and the activation of both caspase-3 and caspase-8.Inhibition of TNF-α with

  12. Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus during space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, D. L.; Chidambaram, M.; Heath, J. D.; Mallary, L.; Mishra, S. K.; Sharma, B.; Weinstock, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus was isolated over 2 years from Space Shuttle mission crewmembers to determine dissemination and retention of bacteria. Samples before and after each mission were from nasal, throat, urine, and feces and from air and surface sampling of the Space Shuttle. DNA fingerprinting of samples by digestion of DNA with SmaI restriction endonuclease followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed S. aureus from each crewmember had a unique fingerprint and usually only one strain was carried by an individual. There was only one instance of transfer between crewmembers. Strains from interior surfaces after flight matched those of crewmembers, suggesting microbial fingerprinting may have forensic application.

  13. The molecular evolution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurenberg, R H; Vink, C; Kalenic, S; Friedrich, A W; Bruggeman, C A; Stobberingh, E E

    2007-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a potentially pathogenic bacterium that causes a broad spectrum of diseases. S. aureus can adapt rapidly to the selective pressure of antibiotics, and this has resulted in the emergence and spread of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Resistance to methicillin and other

  14. 9 CFR 113.115 - Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterin-Toxoid... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.115 Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterin-Toxoid. Staphylococcus... Staphylococcus aureus which has been inactivated and is nontoxic. Each serial of biological product...

  15. The Active Component of Aspirin, Salicylic Acid, Promotes Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation in a PIA-dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotto, Cristian; Lombarte Serrat, Andrea; Cattelan, Natalia; Barbagelata, María S; Yantorno, Osvaldo M; Sordelli, Daniel O; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Grunert, Tom; Buzzola, Fernanda R

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin has provided clear benefits to human health. But salicylic acid (SAL) -the main aspirin biometabolite- exerts several effects on eukaryote and prokaryote cells. SAL can affect, for instance, the expression of Staphylococcus aureus virulence factors. SAL can also form complexes with iron cations and it has been shown that different iron chelating molecules diminished the formation of S. aureus biofilm. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether the iron content limitation caused by SAL can modify the S. aureus metabolism and/or metabolic regulators thus changing the expression of the main polysaccharides involved in biofilm formation. The exposure of biofilm to 2 mM SAL induced a 27% reduction in the intracellular free Fe(2+) concentration compared with the controls. In addition, SAL depleted 23% of the available free Fe(2+) cation in culture media. These moderate iron-limited conditions promoted an intensification of biofilms formed by strain Newman and by S. aureus clinical isolates related to the USA300 and USA100 clones. The slight decrease in iron bioavailability generated by SAL was enough to induce the increase of PIA expression in biofilms formed by methicillin-resistant as well as methicillin-sensitive S. aureus strains. S. aureus did not produce capsular polysaccharide (CP) when it was forming biofilms under any of the experimental conditions tested. Furthermore, SAL diminished aconitase activity and stimulated the lactic fermentation pathway in bacteria forming biofilms. The polysaccharide composition of S. aureus biofilms was examined and FTIR spectroscopic analysis revealed a clear impact of SAL in a codY-dependent manner. Moreover, SAL negatively affected codY transcription in mature biofilms thus relieving the CodY repression of the ica operon. Treatment of mice with SAL induced a significant increase of S aureus colonization. It is suggested that the elevated PIA expression induced by SAL might be responsible for the high nasal

  16. The Active Component of Aspirin, Salicylic Acid, Promotes Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation in a PIA-dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotto, Cristian; Lombarte Serrat, Andrea; Cattelan, Natalia; Barbagelata, María S.; Yantorno, Osvaldo M.; Sordelli, Daniel O.; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Grunert, Tom; Buzzola, Fernanda R.

    2017-01-01

    Aspirin has provided clear benefits to human health. But salicylic acid (SAL) -the main aspirin biometabolite- exerts several effects on eukaryote and prokaryote cells. SAL can affect, for instance, the expression of Staphylococcus aureus virulence factors. SAL can also form complexes with iron cations and it has been shown that different iron chelating molecules diminished the formation of S. aureus biofilm. The aim of this study was to elucidate whether the iron content limitation caused by SAL can modify the S. aureus metabolism and/or metabolic regulators thus changing the expression of the main polysaccharides involved in biofilm formation. The exposure of biofilm to 2 mM SAL induced a 27% reduction in the intracellular free Fe2+ concentration compared with the controls. In addition, SAL depleted 23% of the available free Fe2+ cation in culture media. These moderate iron-limited conditions promoted an intensification of biofilms formed by strain Newman and by S. aureus clinical isolates related to the USA300 and USA100 clones. The slight decrease in iron bioavailability generated by SAL was enough to induce the increase of PIA expression in biofilms formed by methicillin-resistant as well as methicillin-sensitive S. aureus strains. S. aureus did not produce capsular polysaccharide (CP) when it was forming biofilms under any of the experimental conditions tested. Furthermore, SAL diminished aconitase activity and stimulated the lactic fermentation pathway in bacteria forming biofilms. The polysaccharide composition of S. aureus biofilms was examined and FTIR spectroscopic analysis revealed a clear impact of SAL in a codY-dependent manner. Moreover, SAL negatively affected codY transcription in mature biofilms thus relieving the CodY repression of the ica operon. Treatment of mice with SAL induced a significant increase of S aureus colonization. It is suggested that the elevated PIA expression induced by SAL might be responsible for the high nasal colonization

  17. Expression of Four Methionine Sulfoxide Reductases in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus possesses three MsrA enzymes (MsrA1, MsrA2, MsrA3 that reduce the S-epimer of methionine sulfoxide (MetO and an MsrB enzyme that reduces R-MetO. The four msr genes are expressed from three different promoters. The msrA1/msrB genes are coexpressed. To determine the expression pattern of msr genes, three independent reporter strains were constructed where msr promoter was cloned in front of a promoterless lacZ and the resulting construct was integrated in the chromosome. Using these strains, it was determined that the msrA1/B expression is significantly higher in S. aureus compared to msrA2 or msrA3. Expression of msrA1/B was highest during stationary phase growth, but the expression of msrA2 and msrA3 was highest during the early to midexponential growth phase. Expression of msrA1/B was induced by oxacillin and the expression of msrA3 was upregulated by salt. Expression of msrA2 remained unchanged under all tested conditions.

  18. Streptokinase Treatment Reverses Biofilm-Associated Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nis Pedersen Jørgensen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus is a serious complication to the use of medical implants. A central part of the pathogenesis relies on S. aureus’ ability to adhere to host extracellular matrix proteins, which adsorb to medical implants and stimulate biofilm formation. Being coagulase positive, S. aureus furthermore induces formation of fibrin fibers from fibrinogen in the blood. Consequently, we hypothesized that fibrin is a key component of the extracellular matrix of S. aureus biofilms under in vivo conditions, and that the recalcitrance of biofilm infections can be overcome by combining antibiotic treatment with a fibrinolytic drug. We quantified S. aureus USA300 biofilms grown on peg-lids in brain heart infusion (BHI broth with 0%–50% human plasma. Young (2 h and mature (24 h biofilms were then treated with streptokinase to determine if this lead to dispersal. Then, the minimal biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC of 24 h old biofilms was measured for vancomycin and daptomycin alone or in combination with 10 µg/mL rifampicin in the presence or absence of streptokinase in the antibiotic treatment step. Finally, biofilms were visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Addition of human plasma stimulated biofilm formation in BHI in a dose-dependent manner, and biofilms could be partially dispersed by streptokinase. The biofilms could be eradicated with physiologically relevant concentrations of streptokinase in combination with rifampicin and vancomycin or daptomycin, which are commonly used antibiotics for treatment of S. aureus infections. Fibronolytic drugs have been used to treat thromboembolic events for decades, and our findings suggest that their use against biofilm infections has the potential to improve the efficacy of antibiotics in treatment of S. aureus biofilm infections.

  19. The effect of the Ti (IV-citrate complex on staphylococcus aureus growth and biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gritsenko Viktor A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the Ti (IV-citrate complex on growth dynamics and biofilm formation of S. aureus. Speciation analysis was performed in order to estimate the structure of the Ti complex existing in citrate solutions at near-physiological pH. It is estimated that the fully deprotonated tris(citratetitanate ion [Ti(C6H4O73]8- predominates in solution at pH 6.46-7.44, and that this is most probably the biologically active form of Ti(IV-citrate. In in vitro experiments, increasing concentrations of citric acid solutions (0.05, 0.005, 0.0005 M, served as positive controls, while the effects of respective concentrations of Ti(IV-citrate were examined. The obtained results indicate that citrate decreased S. aureus 48 growth at all studied concentrations, whereas S. aureus 44 growth was decreased only by high concentrations of citrate (0.05M. Incubation of S. aureus culture with Ti(IV-citrate significantly potentiated citrate-induced effects. Ti(IV-citrate significantly altered specific bacterial growth rate in a similar manner. The most significant growth reduction was observed at the initial period of bacterial growth. At the same time, the opposite effect was detected in investigations of the effect of citrate and Ti(IV-citrate on S. aureus biofilm formation. Citric acid suppressed S. aureus biofilm formation, whereas Ti(IV-citrate displayed a significant stimulatory effect. Our findings suggest that Ti(IV-citrate possesses a more pronounced biological effect than citrate. The proposed mechanism of this action is activation of complex transport into the cell and induction of oxidative stress. However, the exact mechanism of Ti(IV-citrate biological action on bacterial cultures remains unknown.

  20. Streptokinase Treatment Reverses Biofilm-Associated Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Nis Pedersen; Zobek, Natalia; Dreier, Cindy; Haaber, Jakob; Ingmer, Hanne; Larsen, Ole Halfdan; Meyer, Rikke L.

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus is a serious complication to the use of medical implants. A central part of the pathogenesis relies on S. aureus’ ability to adhere to host extracellular matrix proteins, which adsorb to medical implants and stimulate biofilm formation. Being coagulase positive, S. aureus furthermore induces formation of fibrin fibers from fibrinogen in the blood. Consequently, we hypothesized that fibrin is a key component of the extracellular matrix of S. aureus biofilms under in vivo conditions, and that the recalcitrance of biofilm infections can be overcome by combining antibiotic treatment with a fibrinolytic drug. We quantified S. aureus USA300 biofilms grown on peg-lids in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth with 0%–50% human plasma. Young (2 h) and mature (24 h) biofilms were then treated with streptokinase to determine if this lead to dispersal. Then, the minimal biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) of 24 h old biofilms was measured for vancomycin and daptomycin alone or in combination with 10 µg/mL rifampicin in the presence or absence of streptokinase in the antibiotic treatment step. Finally, biofilms were visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Addition of human plasma stimulated biofilm formation in BHI in a dose-dependent manner, and biofilms could be partially dispersed by streptokinase. The biofilms could be eradicated with physiologically relevant concentrations of streptokinase in combination with rifampicin and vancomycin or daptomycin, which are commonly used antibiotics for treatment of S. aureus infections. Fibronolytic drugs have been used to treat thromboembolic events for decades, and our findings suggest that their use against biofilm infections has the potential to improve the efficacy of antibiotics in treatment of S. aureus biofilm infections. PMID:27681928

  1. A compound magnetic field generating system for targeted killing of Staphylococcus aureus by magnetotactic bacteria in a microfluidic chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linjie; Chen, Changyou; Wang, Pingping; Chen, Chuanfang; Wu, Long-Fei; Song, Tao

    2017-04-01

    A compound magnetic field generating system was built to kill Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) by magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) in a microfluidic chip in this paper. The system was consisted of coil pairs, a switch circuit, a control program and controllable electrical sources. It could produce a guiding magnetic field (gMF) of ±1 mT along arbitrary direction in the horizontal plane, a rotating magnetic field (rMF) and a swing magnetic field (sMF, 2 Hz, 10 mT) by controlling the currents. The gMF was used to guide MTB swimming to the S. aureus pool in the microfluidic chip, and then the rMF enhanced the mixture of S. aureus and MTB cells, therefore beneficial to the attachments of them. Finally, the sMF was used to induce the death of S. aureus via MTB. The results showed that MTB could be navigated by the gMF and that 47.1% of S. aureus were killed when exposed to the sMF. It provides a new solution for the targeted treatment of infected diseases and even cancers.

  2. Utility of 11C-methionine and 11C-donepezil for imaging of Staphylococcus aureus induced osteomyelitis in a juvenile porcine model: comparison to autologous 111In-labelled leukocytes, 99mTc-DPD, and 18F-FDG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzelius, Pia; Alstrup, Aage KO; Schønheyder, Henrik C; Borghammer, Per; Jensen, Svend B; Bender, Dirk; Nielsen, Ole L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 11C-methionine and 11C-donepezil positron emission tomography (PET) with 111In-labeled leukocyte and 99mTc-DPD (Tc-99m 3,3-diphosphono-1,2-propanedicarboxylic acid) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET to improve detection of osteomyelitis. The tracers’ diagnostic utility where tested in a juvenile porcine hematogenously induced osteomyelitis model comparable to osteomyelitis in children. Five 8-9 weeks old female domestic pigs were scanned seven days after intra-arterial inoculation in the right femoral artery with a porcine strain of Staphylococcus aureus. The sequential scan protocol included Computed Tomography, 11C-methionine and 11C-donepezil PET, 99mTc-DPD and 111In-labelled leukocytes scintigraphy, and 18F-FDG PET. This was followed by necropsy of the pigs and gross pathology, histopathology, and microbial examination. The pigs developed a total of 24 osteomyelitic lesions, 4 lesions characterized as contiguous abscesses and pulmonary abscesses (in two pigs). By comparing the 24 osteomyelitic lesions, 18F-FDG accumulated in 100%, 111In-leukocytes in 79%, 11C-methionine in 79%, 11C-donepezil in 58%, and 99mTc-DPD in none. Overall, 18F-FDG PET was superior to 111In-leukocyte SPECT and 11C-methionine in marking infectious lesions. PMID:28078182

  3. Utility of (11)C-methionine and (11)C-donepezil for imaging of Staphylococcus aureus induced osteomyelitis in a juvenile porcine model: comparison to autologous (111)In-labelled leukocytes, (99m) Tc-DPD, and (18)F-FDG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzelius, Pia; Alstrup, Aage Ko; Schønheyder, Henrik C; Borghammer, Per; Jensen, Svend B; Bender, Dirk; Nielsen, Ole L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare (11)C-methionine and (11)C-donepezil positron emission tomography (PET) with (111)In-labeled leukocyte and (99m) Tc-DPD (Tc-99m 3,3-diphosphono-1,2-propanedicarboxylic acid) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET to improve detection of osteomyelitis. The tracers' diagnostic utility where tested in a juvenile porcine hematogenously induced osteomyelitis model comparable to osteomyelitis in children. Five 8-9 weeks old female domestic pigs were scanned seven days after intra-arterial inoculation in the right femoral artery with a porcine strain of Staphylococcus aureus. The sequential scan protocol included Computed Tomography, (11)C-methionine and (11)C-donepezil PET, (99m) Tc-DPD and (111)In-labelled leukocytes scintigraphy, and (18)F-FDG PET. This was followed by necropsy of the pigs and gross pathology, histopathology, and microbial examination. The pigs developed a total of 24 osteomyelitic lesions, 4 lesions characterized as contiguous abscesses and pulmonary abscesses (in two pigs). By comparing the 24 osteomyelitic lesions, (18)F-FDG accumulated in 100%, (111)In-leukocytes in 79%, (11)C-methionine in 79%, (11)C-donepezil in 58%, and (99m) Tc-DPD in none. Overall, (18)F-FDG PET was superior to (111)In-leukocyte SPECT and (11)C-methionine in marking infectious lesions.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus entrance into the dairy chain: Tracking S. aureus from dairy cow to cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Kümmel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important contagious mastitis pathogens in dairy cattle. Due to its zoonotic potential, control of S. aureus is not only of great economic importance in the dairy industry but also a significant public health concern. The aim of this study was to decipher the potential of bovine udder associated S. aureus as reservoir for S. aureus contamination in dairy production and processing. From 18 farms, delivering their milk to an alpine dairy plant for the production of smeared semi-hard and hard cheese. 1176 quarter milk (QM samples of all cows in lactation (n = 294 and representative samples form bulk tank milk (BTM of all farms were surveyed for coagulase positive (CPS and coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS. Furthermore, samples from different steps of the cheese manufacturing process were tested for CPS and CNS. As revealed by chemometric-assisted FTIR spectroscopy and molecular subtyping (spa typing and multi locus sequence typing, dairy cattle represent indeed an important, yet underreported, entrance point of S. aureus into the dairy chain. Our data clearly show that certain S. aureus subtypes are present in primary production as well as in the cheese processing at the dairy plant. However, although a considerable diversity of S. aureus subtypes was observed in QM and BTM at the farms, only certain S. aureus subtypes were able to enter and persist in the cheese manufacturing at the dairy plant and could be isolated from cheese until day fourteen of ripening. Farm strains belonging to the FTIR cluster B1 and B3, which show genetic characteristics (t2953, ST8, enterotoxin profile: sea/sed/sej of the recently described S. aureus genotype B, most successfully contaminated the cheese production at the dairy plant. Thus our study fosters the hypothesis that genotype B S. aureus represent a specific challenge in control of S. aureus in the dairy chain that requires effective clearance strategies and hygienic

  5. Staphylococcus aureus Entrance into the Dairy Chain: Tracking S. aureus from Dairy Cow to Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kümmel, Judith; Stessl, Beatrix; Gonano, Monika; Walcher, Georg; Bereuter, Othmar; Fricker, Martina; Grunert, Tom; Wagner, Martin; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important contagious mastitis pathogens in dairy cattle. Due to its zoonotic potential, control of S. aureus is not only of great economic importance in the dairy industry but also a significant public health concern. The aim of this study was to decipher the potential of bovine udder associated S. aureus as reservoir for S. aureus contamination in dairy production and processing. From 18 farms, delivering their milk to an alpine dairy plant for the production of smeared semi-hard and hard cheese. one thousand hundred seventy six one thousand hundred seventy six quarter milk (QM) samples of all cows in lactation (n = 294) and representative samples form bulk tank milk (BTM) of all farms were surveyed for coagulase positive (CPS) and coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS). Furthermore, samples from different steps of the cheese manufacturing process were tested for CPS and CNS. As revealed by chemometric-assisted FTIR spectroscopy and molecular subtyping (spa typing and multi locus sequence typing), dairy cattle represent indeed an important, yet underreported, entrance point of S. aureus into the dairy chain. Our data clearly show that certain S. aureus subtypes are present in primary production as well as in the cheese processing at the dairy plant. However, although a considerable diversity of S. aureus subtypes was observed in QM and BTM at the farms, only certain S. aureus subtypes were able to enter and persist in the cheese manufacturing at the dairy plant and could be isolated from cheese until day 14 of ripening. Farm strains belonging to the FTIR cluster B1 and B3, which show genetic characteristics (t2953, ST8, enterotoxin profile: sea/sed/sej) of the recently described S. aureus genotype B, most successfully contaminated the cheese production at the dairy plant. Thus, our study fosters the hypothesis that genotype B S. aureus represent a specific challenge in control of S. aureus in the dairy chain that requires

  6. Meningitis causada por staphylococcus aureus catalasa negativa

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez Moreno, Carlos Arturo; Arroyo A., Claudia Patricia; Rodríguez, Elizabeth; Martínez R., Luz Marina; Quevedo S., Ruth

    2011-01-01

    En un paciente con cáncer se aisló del liquido cefaloraquideo y ascitico un coco gram positivo coagulasa positivo. El germen aislado mostró las características típicas de un Staphylococcus aureus, a excepción de la actividad de la catalasa, la cual no pudo ser encontrada.

  7. Staphylococcus aureus spa type t437

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glasner, C; Pluister, G; Westh, H;

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) belonging to the multilocus sequence type clonal complex 59 (MLST CC59) is the predominant community-associated MRSA clone in Asia. This clone, which is primarily linked with the spa type t437, has so far only been reported in low numbers among...

  8. Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Stefania; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Lindsay, Jodi A;

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews recent findings on the global epidemiology of healthcare-acquired/associated (HA), community-acquired/associated (CA) and livestock-associated (LA) meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and aims to reach a consensus regarding the harmonisation of typing methods...

  9. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Leif Percival; Nielsen, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Even though methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common cause of nosocomial infections, it may often be difficult to evaluate the exact route of transmission. METHODS: In this study, we describe four cases of nosocomial transmission of MRSA in a hospital with a low...

  10. Profiling the surfacome of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreisbach, Annette; Hempel, Kristina; Buist, Girbe; Hecker, Michael; Becher, Doerte; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a widespread opportunistic pathogen that can cause a wide variety of life-threatening diseases. Especially for the colonization of human tissues and the development of invasiveness, surface-exposed proteins are of major importance. In the present studies, we optimized a prot

  11. Staphylococcus aureus resistente a la meticilina (SARM)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-10-22

    Datos importantes sobre las infecciones por SARM en Estados Unidos, en las escuelas y los entornos médicos. (Title: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)Created: 10/2007).  Created: 10/22/2007 by National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 11/9/2007.

  12. The Inflammasome and the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR Are Involved in the Staphylococcus aureus-Mediated Induction of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in Human Keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Simanski

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus (S. aureus is an important pathogen causing various infections including those of the skin. Keratinocytes are able to sense invading S. aureus and to initiate a fast defense reaction by the rapid release of innate defense mediators such as antimicrobial peptides and cytokines. There is increasing evidence that the cytokines IL-1alpha and IL-1beta, which both signal through the IL-1 receptor, play an important role in cutaneous defense against S. aureus. The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the underlying mechanisms leading to the S. aureus-induced IL-1alpha and IL-1beta expression in keratinocytes. Infection of human primary keratinocytes with S. aureus led to the induction of gene expression and protein secretion of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta. Full S. aureus-induced IL-1 protein release required the inflammasome components caspase-1 and ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD whereas gene induction of IL-1alpha and IL-beta by S. aureus was not dependent on caspase-1 and ASC. Since patients receiving anti-cancer therapy by inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR often suffer from skin infections caused by S. aureus we additionally evaluated whether the EGFR pathway may be involved in the IL-1alpha and IL-1beta induction by S. aureus. Inactivation of the EGFR with a blocking antibody decreased the S. aureus-mediated IL-1alpha and IL-1beta induction in primary keratinocytes. Moreover, the use of siRNA experiments revealed that ADAM17 (A Disintegrin and A Metalloprotease 17, a metalloproteinase known to mediate the shedding and release of EGFR ligands, was required for full induction of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in keratinocytes infected with S. aureus. A failure of keratinocytes to adequately upregulate IL-1alpha and IL-1beta may promote S. aureus skin infections.

  13. Aureolib - a proteome signature library: towards an understanding of staphylococcus aureus pathophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Fuchs

    Full Text Available Gel-based proteomics is a powerful approach to study the physiology of Staphylococcus aureus under various growth restricting conditions. We analyzed 679 protein spots from a reference 2-dimensional gel of cytosolic proteins of S. aureus COL by mass spectrometry resulting in 521 different proteins. 4,692 time dependent protein synthesis profiles were generated by exposing S. aureus to nine infection-related stress and starvation stimuli (H2O2, diamide, paraquat, NO, fermentation, nitrate respiration, heat shock, puromycin, mupirocin. These expression profiles are stored in an online resource called Aureolib (http://www.aureolib.de. Moreover, information on target genes of 75 regulators and regulatory elements were included in the database. Cross-comparisons of this extensive data collection of protein synthesis profiles using the tools implemented in Aureolib lead to the identification of stress and starvation specific marker proteins. Altogether, 226 protein synthesis profiles showed induction ratios of 2.5-fold or higher under at least one of the tested conditions with 157 protein synthesis profiles specifically induced in response to a single stimulus. The respective proteins might serve as marker proteins for the corresponding stimulus. By contrast, proteins whose synthesis was increased or repressed in response to more than four stimuli are rather exceptional. The only protein that was induced by six stimuli is the universal stress protein SACOL1759. Most strikingly, cluster analyses of synthesis profiles of proteins differentially synthesized under at least one condition revealed only in rare cases a grouping that correlated with known regulon structures. The most prominent examples are the GapR, Rex, and CtsR regulon. In contrast, protein synthesis profiles of proteins belonging to the CodY and σ(B regulon are widely distributed. In summary, Aureolib is by far the most comprehensive protein expression database for S. aureus and provides

  14. Frequency of genes encoding erythromycin ribosomal methylases among Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates with different D-phenotypes in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sareh Sadat Hosseini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin type B (MLSB antibiotics are important in the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections and existence of isolates with ability to resist against MLSB antibiotics is worrisome.Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 101 S. aureus isolates were collected from patients of five selected hospitals in Tehran over a period of five months. Disk diffusion tests and differentiation between constitutive and inducible resistances were carried out by D-test. The presence of mecA, msrA, ermA and ermC genes were detected using PCR or multiplex PCR.Results: Out of 101 S. aureus isolates, 58 (57.4% were methicillin resistant and 57 (56.4% expressed resistance to erythromycin. The prevalence of constitutive MLSB (cMLSB, inducible MLSB (iMLSB and MS (Negative phenotype in all erythromycin resistant isolates were 71.9, 26.3 and 1.7%, respectively. Out of all the erythromycin resistant isolates, 57.8% harbored both ermA and ermC genes which possessed constitutive resistance. 8.7% of the isolates contained ermA gene alone which possessed inducible resistance with D phenotype and 5.2% of isolates just contained ermC gene which had inducible resistance with D+ phenotype. msrA gene was detected in 3.5% of the erythromycin resistant S. aureus isolates with constitutive resistance. None of the genes were detected among MS phenotypes.Conclusion: In this study, most of S. aureus isolates carried both ermA and ermC genes and there was a significant relationship (P value ≤ 0.05 between different resistance phenotypes and erm genes.Keywords: Staphylococcus aureus, D-test, Erm A, ErmC, MsrA

  15. Staphylococcus aureus Shifts toward Commensalism in Response to Corynebacterium Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Matthew M; Freire, Marcelo O; Gabrilska, Rebecca A; Rumbaugh, Kendra P; Lemon, Katherine P

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus-human interactions result in a continuum of outcomes from commensalism to pathogenesis. S. aureus is a clinically important pathogen that asymptomatically colonizes ~25% of humans as a member of the nostril and skin microbiota, where it resides with other bacteria including commensal Corynebacterium species. Commensal Corynebacterium spp. are also positively correlated with S. aureus in chronic polymicrobial diabetic foot infections, distinct from acute monomicrobial S. aureus infections. Recent work by our lab and others indicates that microbe-microbe interactions between S. aureus and human skin/nasal commensals, including Corynebacterium species, affect S. aureus behavior and fitness. Thus, we hypothesized that S. aureus interactions with Corynebacterium spp. diminish S. aureus virulence. We tested this by assaying for changes in S. aureus gene expression during in vitro mono- versus coculture with Corynebacterium striatum, a common skin and nasal commensal. We observed a broad shift in S. aureus gene transcription during in vitro growth with C. striatum, including increased transcription of genes known to exhibit increased expression during human nasal colonization and decreased transcription of virulence genes. S. aureus uses several regulatory pathways to transition between commensal and pathogenic states. One of these, the quorum signal accessory gene regulator (agr) system, was strongly inhibited in response to Corynebacterium spp. Phenotypically, S. aureus exposed to C. striatum exhibited increased adhesion to epithelial cells, reflecting a commensal state, and decreased hemolysin activity, reflecting an attenuation of virulence. Consistent with this, S. aureus displayed diminished fitness in experimental in vivo coinfection with C. striatum when compared to monoinfection. These data support a model in which S. aureus shifts from virulence toward a commensal state when exposed to commensal Corynebacterium species.

  16. Modulation of the inflammatory response of bovine mammary epithelial cells by cholecalciferol (vitamin D) during Staphylococcus aureus internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva-Murillo, Nayeli; Téllez-Pérez, Ana Dolores; Medina-Estrada, Ivan; Alvarez-Aguilar, Cleto; Ochoa-Zarzosa, Alejandra; López-Meza, Joel E

    2014-12-01

    Vitamin D is an immunomodulator that exerts anti-inflammatory effects. In this work, the effects of cholecalciferol, a vitamin D precursor, on the inflammatory response of bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMECs) during the internalization of Staphylococcus aureus were analyzed. Cholecalciferol and S. aureus inhibited TLR2 mRNA expression, but cholecalciferol differentially modulated the TLR2 membrane abundance. In fact, 50 nM cholecalciferol inhibited the TLR2 membrane abundance in bMECs infected with S. aureus, and this concentration also exerted the highest inhibitory effect on internalization. Cholecalciferol down-regulated the mRNA expression of TNF-α and IL-1β and up-regulated that of RANTES and IL-10 but did not modify IL-6 and IL-8 expression. S. aureus strongly induced the mRNA expression of TNF-α, RANTES and IL-10 and inhibited IL-8 expression. Interestingly, cholecalciferol pre-treatments inhibited the bacterial-induced expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, RANTES and IL-10. In conclusion, cholecalciferol differentially regulates the inflammatory response of bMECs during S. aureus internalization and may be an effective innate immunity modulator in mammary gland tissues.

  17. X-ray structural studies of the entire extra-cellular region of the Ser/Thr kinase PrkC from Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Ruggiero, Alessia; Squeglia, Flavia; Marasco, Daniela; Marchetti, Roberta; Molinaro, Antonio; Berisio, Rita

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial Ser/Thr kinases modulate a wide number of cellular processes. PrkC kinase from human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus was also shown to induce germination of Bacillus subtilis spores, in response to cell-wall muropeptides. The presence of muropeptides in the bacterial extra-cellular milieu is a strong signal that growing conditions are promising. We report here the x-ray structure of the entire extra-cellular region of PrkC from Staphylococcus aureus. This structur...

  18. Roles of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein in the apoptosis of human monocytic cells induced by t-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus%X连锁凋亡抑制蛋白通路在金黄色葡萄球菌α-毒素诱导人外周血单核细胞凋亡过程中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻博; 佡剑非; 张萌; 阚亮; 王佳贺

    2013-01-01

    目的 研究金黄色葡萄球菌的主要毒力因子α-毒素感染人外周血单核细胞后细胞的凋亡率及X连锁凋亡抑制蛋白(XIAP)、凋亡抑制蛋白1/2 (cIAP1/2)、Survivin、Bcl-2、Bax和半胱氨酸的天冬氨酸蛋白酶(caspase-3)等的表达.方法 以Annexin V异硫氰酸荧光素(FITC)/碘化丙啶(PI)双染流式细胞仪检测人外周血单核细胞的凋亡率,Western blot法检测XIAP、cIAP1/2、Survivin、Bc1-2、Bax和caspase-3等的表达,采用荧光比色法测定细胞内caspase-3蛋白酶活性.结果 α-毒素能够以时间依赖的方式诱导人外周血单核细胞凋亡,α-毒素感染30、60和90 min凋亡率与感染0 min比较,其差异有统计学意义(P<0.05或P<0.001).随着作用时间的延长,XIAP、cIAP1/2、Survivin和Bcl-2表达逐渐下降,而Bax和caspase-3表达逐渐增加.结论 α-毒素可诱导人外周血单核细胞凋亡,XIAP信号通路在金黄色葡萄球菌的致病过程中起重要作用.%Objective To investigate the roles of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP),cellular inhibitor of apoptosis proteinl/2 (cIAP1/2),Survivin,Bcl-2,Bax,and cysteine aspartic acid specific protease-3 (caspase-3) in the apoptosis of human monocytic cells induced by α-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus.Methods Apoptosis rates of human monocytic cells were detected by Annexin V fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide assay.Western blot was performed to detect the expressions of XIAP,cIAP1/2,Survivin,Bcl-2,Bax,and caspase-3.Results The results showed that α-toxin induced apoptosis in human monocytic cells in a time-dependent manner.The apoptosis rates in the groups of 30,60 and 90 min increased significantly than those in the group of 0 min(P < 0.05 or P < 0.001).With the time extension,there was downregulation of XIAP,cIAP1/2,Survivin and Bcl-2,and upregulation of Bax and caspase-3.Conclusion α-toxin from Staphylococcus aureus can induce the apoptosis of human monocytic cells.It is

  19. Response of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to amicoumacin A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Lama

    Full Text Available Amicoumacin A exhibits strong antimicrobial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, hence we sought to uncover its mechanism of action. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of S. aureus COL in response to amicoumacin A showed alteration in transcription of genes specifying several cellular processes including cell envelope turnover, cross-membrane transport, virulence, metabolism, and general stress response. The most highly induced gene was lrgA, encoding an antiholin-like product, which is induced in cells undergoing a collapse of Δψ. Consistent with the notion that LrgA modulates murein hydrolase activity, COL grown in the presence of amicoumacin A showed reduced autolysis, which was primarily caused by lower hydrolase activity. To gain further insight into the mechanism of action of amicoumacin A, a whole genome comparison of wild-type COL and amicoumacin A-resistant mutants isolated by a serial passage method was carried out. Single point mutations generating codon substitutions were uncovered in ksgA (encoding RNA dimethyltransferase, fusA (elongation factor G, dnaG (primase, lacD (tagatose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, and SACOL0611 (a putative glycosyl transferase. The codon substitutions in EF-G that cause amicoumacin A resistance and fusidic acid resistance reside in separate domains and do not bring about cross resistance. Taken together, these results suggest that amicoumacin A might cause perturbation of the cell membrane and lead to energy dissipation. Decreased rates of cellular metabolism including protein synthesis and DNA replication in resistant strains might allow cells to compensate for membrane dysfunction and thus increase cell survivability.

  20. Transcriptomic and metabolic responses of Staphylococcus aureus exposed to supra-physiological temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Proctor Richard A

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous evaluation by different molecular and physiological assays of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus responses to heat shock exposure yielded a still fragmentary view of the mechanisms determining bacterial survival or death at supra-physiological temperatures. This study analyzed diverse facets of S. aureus heat-shock adjustment by recording global transcriptomic and metabolic responses of bacterial cultures shifted for 10 min from 37°C to a sub-lethal (43°C or eventually lethal (48°C temperature. A relevant metabolic model of the combined action of specific stress response mechanisms with more general, energy-regulating metabolic pathways in heat-shocked S. aureus is presented. Results While S. aureus cultures shifted to 43°C or left at 37°C showed marginal differences in growth and survival rates, bacterial cultures exposed to 48°C showed a rapid growth arrest followed by a subsequent decline in viable counts. The most substantial heat shock-induced changes at both 43°C and 48°C occurred in transcript levels of HrcA- and CtsR-regulated genes, encoding classical chaperones DnaK and GroESL, and some Hsp100/Clp ATPases components, respectively. Other metabolic pathways up-regulated by S. aureus exposure at 48°C included genes encoding several enzymes coping with oxidative stress, and DNA damage, or/and impaired osmotic balance. Some major components of the pentose phosphate cycle and gluconeogenesis were also up-regulated, which reflected depletion of free glucose by bacterial cultures grown in Mueller-Hinton broth prior to heat shock. In contrast, most purine- and pyrimidine-synthesis pathway components and amino acyl-tRNA synthetases were down-regulated at 48°C, as well as arginine deiminase and major fermentative pathway components, such as alcohol, lactate and formate dehydrogenases. Despite the heat-induced, increased requirements for ATP-dependent macromolecular repair mechanisms combined with declining

  1. Bacterial Cytological Profiling (BCP as a Rapid and Accurate Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Method for Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.T. Quach

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Successful treatment of bacterial infections requires the timely administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The failure to initiate the correct therapy in a timely fashion results in poor clinical outcomes, longer hospital stays, and higher medical costs. Current approaches to antibiotic susceptibility testing of cultured pathogens have key limitations ranging from long run times to dependence on prior knowledge of genetic mechanisms of resistance. We have developed a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility assay for Staphylococcus aureus based on bacterial cytological profiling (BCP, which uses quantitative fluorescence microscopy to measure antibiotic induced changes in cellular architecture. BCP discriminated between methicillin-susceptible (MSSA and -resistant (MRSA clinical isolates of S. aureus (n = 71 within 1–2 h with 100% accuracy. Similarly, BCP correctly distinguished daptomycin susceptible (DS from daptomycin non-susceptible (DNS S. aureus strains (n = 20 within 30 min. Among MRSA isolates, BCP further identified two classes of strains that differ in their susceptibility to specific combinations of beta-lactam antibiotics. BCP provides a rapid and flexible alternative to gene-based susceptibility testing methods for S. aureus, and should be readily adaptable to different antibiotics and bacterial species as new mechanisms of resistance or multidrug-resistant pathogens evolve and appear in mainstream clinical practice.

  2. Global analysis of the impact of linezolid onto virulence factor production in S. aureus USA300.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonn, Florian; Pané-Farré, Jan; Schlüter, Rabea; Schaffer, Marc; Fuchs, Stephan; Bernhardt, Jörg; Riedel, Katharina; Otto, Andreas; Völker, Uwe; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Hecker, Michael; Mäder, Ulrike; Becher, Dörte

    2016-05-01

    The translation inhibitor linezolid is an antibiotic of last resort against Gram-positive pathogens including methicillin resistant strains of the nosocomial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Linezolid is reported to inhibit production of extracellular virulence factors, but the molecular cause is unknown. To elucidate the physiological response of S. aureus to linezolid in general and the inhibition of virulence factor synthesis in particular a holistic study was performed. Linezolid was added to exponentially growing S. aureus cells and the linezolid stress response was analyzed with transcriptomics and quantitative proteomics methods. In addition, scanning and transmission electron microscopy experiments as well as fluorescence microscopy analyses of the cellular DNA and membrane were performed. As previously observed in studies on other translation inhibitors, S. aureus adapts its protein biosynthesis machinery to the reduced translation efficiency. For example the synthesis of ribosomal proteins was induced. Also unexpected results like a decline in the amount of extracellular and membrane proteins were obtained. In addition, cell shape and size changed after linezolid stress and cell division was diminished. Finally, the chromosome was condensed after linezolid stress and lost contact to the membrane. These morphological changes cannot be explained by established theories. A new hypothesis is discussed, which suggests that the reduced amount of membrane and extracellular proteins and observed defects in cell division are due to the disintegration of transertion complexes by linezolid.

  3. A systematic review and meta-analysis on Staphylococcus aureus carriage in psoriasis, acne and rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totté, J E E; van der Feltz, W T; Bode, L G M; van Belkum, A; van Zuuren, E J; Pasmans, S G M A

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus might amplify symptoms in chronic inflammatory skin diseases. This study evaluates skin and mucosal colonization with S. aureus in patients with psoriasis, acne and rosacea. A systematic literature search was conducted. Both odds ratios (OR) for colonization in patients versus controls and the prevalence of colonization in patients are reported. Fifteen articles about psoriasis and 13 about acne (12 having a control group) were included. No study in rosacea met our inclusion criteria. For psoriasis, one study out of three controlled studies showed increased skin colonization (OR 18.86; 95 % confidence interval [CI] 2.20-161.99). Three out of the five studies that reported on nasal colonization showed significant ORs varying from 1.73 (95 % CI 1.16-2.58) to 14.64 (95 % CI 2.82-75.95). For acne one of the three studies that evaluated skin colonization reported a significant OR of 4.16 (95 % CI 1.74-9.94). A relation between nasal colonization and acne was not found. Limitations in study design and low sample sizes should be taken into consideration when interpreting the results. Colonisation with S. aureus seems to be increased in patients with psoriasis. This bacterial species, known for its potential to induce long-lasting inflammation, might be involved in psoriasis pathogenesis. Information on acne is limited. Prospective controlled studies should further investigate the role of S. aureus in chronic inflammatory skin diseases.

  4. Development of ebsulfur analogues as potent antibacterials against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Huy X; Shrestha, Sanjib K; Green, Keith D; Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie

    2016-12-15

    Antibiotic resistance is a worldwide problem that needs to be addressed. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the dangerous "ESKAPE" pathogens that rapidly evolve and evade many current FDA-approved antibiotics. Thus, there is an urgent need for new anti-MRSA compounds. Ebselen (also known as 2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one) has shown promising activity in clinical trials for cerebral ischemia, bipolar disorder, and noise-induced hearing loss. Recently, there has been a renewed interest in exploring the antibacterial properties of ebselen. In this study, we synthesized an ebselen-inspired library of 33 compounds where the selenium atom has been replaced by sulfur (ebsulfur derivatives) and evaluated them against a panel of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant S. aureus and non-S. aureus strains. Within our library, we identified three outstanding analogues with potent activity against all S. aureus strains tested (MIC values mostly ⩽2μg/mL), and numerous additional ones with overall very good to good antibacterial activity (1-7.8μg/mL). We also characterized the time-kill analysis, anti-biofilm ability, hemolytic activity, mammalian cytotoxicity, membrane-disruption ability, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production of some of these analogues.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus Infection Reduces Nutrition Uptake and Nucleotide Biosynthesis in a Human Airway Epithelial Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Gierok

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Gram positive opportunistic human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus induces a variety of diseases including pneumonia. S. aureus is the second most isolated pathogen in cystic fibrosis patients and accounts for a large proportion of nosocomial pneumonia. Inside the lung, the human airway epithelium is the first line in defence with regard to microbial recognition and clearance as well as regulation of the immune response. The metabolic host response is, however, yet unknown. To address the question of whether the infection alters the metabolome and metabolic activity of airway epithelial cells, we used a metabolomics approach. The nutrition uptake by the human airway epithelial cell line A549 was monitored over time by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR and the intracellular metabolic fingerprints were investigated by gas chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography (GC-MS and (HPLC-MS. To test the metabolic activity of the host cells, glutamine analogues and labelled precursors were applied after the infection. We found that A549 cells restrict uptake of essential nutrients from the medium after S. aureus infection. Moreover, the infection led to a shutdown of the purine and pyrimidine synthesis in the A549 host cell, whereas other metabolic routes such as the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway remained active. In summary, our data show that the infection with S. aureus negatively affects growth, alters the metabolic composition and specifically impacts the de novo nucleotide biosynthesis in this human airway epithelial cell model.

  6. In vivo activity of ceftobiprole in murine skin infections due to Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Jeffrey; Hilliard, Jamese J; Abbanat, Darren; Zhang, Wenyan; Melton, John L; Santoro, Colleen M; Flamm, Robert K; Bush, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Ceftobiprole, a broad-spectrum cephalosporin with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (P. Hebeisen et al., Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 45:825-836, 2001), was evaluated in a subcutaneous skin infection model with Staphylococcus aureus Smith OC 4172 (methicillin-susceptible S. aureus [MSSA]), S. aureus OC 8525 (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa OC 4351 (having an inducible AmpC beta-lactamase), and P. aeruginosa OC 4354 (overproducing AmpC beta-lactamase). In the MSSA and MRSA infection models, ceftobiprole, administered as the prodrug ceftobiprole medocaril, was more effective in reducing CFU/g skin (P ceftobiprole were 19 to 29% lower than those for cefazolin-, vancomycin-, or linezolid-treated animals (P ceftobiprole-treated mice was 34% less than that with cefazolin or linezolid treatment (P ceftobiprole at similar doses was as effective as meropenem-cilastatin in reductions of CFU/g skin, despite 8- and 32-fold-lower MICs for meropenem; both treatments were more effective than was cefepime (P Ceftobiprole was similar to meropenem-cilastatin and 47 to 54% more effective than cefepime (P ceftobiprole is effective in reducing both bacterial load and lesion volume associated with infections due to MSSA, MRSA, and P. aeruginosa in this murine model of skin and soft tissue infection.

  7. Differential induction of innate defense antimicrobial peptides in primary nasal epithelial cells upon stimulation with inflammatory cytokines, Th17 cytokines or bacterial conditioned medium from Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgey, Christine; Kern, Winfried V; Römer, Winfried; Rieg, Siegbert

    2016-01-01

    To date it is incompletely understood why half of the human population is intrinsically resistant to Staphylococcus aureus colonization whereas the other half is intermittently or permanently colonized. Nasal colonization represents the primary niche for S. aureus. We therefore investigated whether primary nasal epithelial cells (HNEC) express antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) upon stimulation by inflammatory cytokines or bacterial conditioned medium (BCM) of different colonizing and invasive staphylococci. Stimulation with classical cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ) potently induced hBD-3 and RNase7 in HNEC. Th17 cytokines (IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22) yielded comparably weak hBD-3 and RNase7 induction and no synergistic effects with classical cytokines. BCM of S. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates moderately induced hBD3 and RNase7 mRNA expression without significant differences when comparing colonizing vs. invasive isolates. Our results indicate that HNEC contribute to the innate defense by secretion of an AMP-containing chemical defense shield along the nasal mucosa i.e. within the primary colonization niche of S. aureus. Further studies are needed to investigate whether a deficient AMP expression in the nasal mucosa may be related to different S. aureus carrier states. AMPs or AMP-inducing agents may be promising candidates for future topical decolonization regimens that aim to prevent invasive S. aureus infections.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus shifts towards commensalism in response to Corynebacterium species

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    Matthew M Ramsey

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus–human interactions result in a continuum of outcomes from commensalism to pathogenesis. S. aureus is a clinically important pathogen that asymptomatically colonizes ~25% of humans as a member of the nostril and skin microbiota, where it resides with other bacteria including commensal Corynebacterium species. Commensal Corynebacterium spp. are also positively correlated with S. aureus in chronic polymicrobial diabetic foot infections, distinct from acute monomicrobial S. aureus infections. Recent work by our lab and others indicates that microbe-microbe interactions between S. aureus and human skin/nasal commensals, including Corynebacterium species, affect S. aureus behavior and fitness. Thus, we hypothesized that S. aureus interactions with Corynebacterium spp. diminish S. aureus virulence. We tested this by assaying for changes in S. aureus gene expression during in vitro mono- versus coculture with Corynebacterium striatum, a common skin and nasal commensal. We observed a broad shift in S. aureus gene transcription during in vitro growth with C. striatum, including increased transcription of genes known to exhibit increased expression during human nasal colonization and decreased transcription of virulence genes. S. aureus uses several regulatory pathways to transition between commensal and pathogenic states. One of these, the quorum signal accessory gene regulator (agr system, was strongly inhibited in response to Corynebacterium spp. Phenotypically, S. aureus exposed to C. striatum exhibited increased adhesion to epithelial cells, reflecting a commensal state, and decreased hemolysin activity, reflecting an attenuation of virulence. Consistent with this, S. aureus displayed diminished fitness in experimental in vivo coinfection with C. striatum when compared to monoinfection. These data support a model in which S. aureus shifts from virulence towards a commensal state when exposed to commensal Corynebacterium species.

  9. Aspartate inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hang; Wang, Mengyue; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation renders Staphylococcus aureus highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and host defenses. Four D-amino acids (D-Leu, D-Met, D-Trp and D-Tyr) have been reported to be able to inhibit biofilm formation and disassemble established S. aureus biofilms. We report here for the first time that both D- and L-isoforms of aspartate (Asp) inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation on tissue culture plates. Similar biofilm inhibition effects were also observed against other staphylococcal strains, including S. saprophyticus, S. equorum, S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus. It was found that Asp at high concentrations (>10 mM) inhibited the growth of planktonic N315 cells, but at subinhibitory concentrations decreased the cellular metabolic activity without influencing cell growth. The decreased cellular metabolic activity might be the reason for the production of less protein and DNA in the matrix of the biofilms formed in the presence of Asp. However, varied inhibition efficacies of Asp were observed for biofilms formed by clinical staphylococcal isolates. There might be mechanisms other than decreasing the metabolic activity, e.g. the biofilm phenotypes, affecting biofilm formation in the presence of Asp.

  10. Toxin-Antitoxin Systems of Staphylococcus aureus

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    Christopher F. Schuster

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxin-antitoxin (TA systems are small genetic elements found in the majority of prokaryotes. They encode toxin proteins that interfere with vital cellular functions and are counteracted by antitoxins. Dependent on the chemical nature of the antitoxins (protein or RNA and how they control the activity of the toxin, TA systems are currently divided into six different types. Genes comprising the TA types I, II and III have been identified in Staphylococcus aureus. MazF, the toxin of the mazEF locus is a sequence-specific RNase that cleaves a number of transcripts, including those encoding pathogenicity factors. Two yefM-yoeB paralogs represent two independent, but auto-regulated TA systems that give rise to ribosome-dependent RNases. In addition, omega/epsilon/zeta constitutes a tripartite TA system that supposedly plays a role in the stabilization of resistance factors. The SprA1/SprA1AS and SprF1/SprG1 systems are post-transcriptionally regulated by RNA antitoxins and encode small membrane damaging proteins. TA systems controlled by interaction between toxin protein and antitoxin RNA have been identified in S. aureus in silico, but not yet experimentally proven. A closer inspection of possible links between TA systems and S. aureus pathophysiology will reveal, if these genetic loci may represent druggable targets. The modification of a staphylococcal TA toxin to a cyclopeptide antibiotic highlights the potential of TA systems as rather untapped sources of drug discovery.

  11. Toxin-Antitoxin Systems of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Christopher F; Bertram, Ralph

    2016-05-05

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are small genetic elements found in the majority of prokaryotes. They encode toxin proteins that interfere with vital cellular functions and are counteracted by antitoxins. Dependent on the chemical nature of the antitoxins (protein or RNA) and how they control the activity of the toxin, TA systems are currently divided into six different types. Genes comprising the TA types I, II and III have been identified in Staphylococcus aureus. MazF, the toxin of the mazEF locus is a sequence-specific RNase that cleaves a number of transcripts, including those encoding pathogenicity factors. Two yefM-yoeB paralogs represent two independent, but auto-regulated TA systems that give rise to ribosome-dependent RNases. In addition, omega/epsilon/zeta constitutes a tripartite TA system that supposedly plays a role in the stabilization of resistance factors. The SprA1/SprA1AS and SprF1/SprG1 systems are post-transcriptionally regulated by RNA antitoxins and encode small membrane damaging proteins. TA systems controlled by interaction between toxin protein and antitoxin RNA have been identified in S. aureus in silico, but not yet experimentally proven. A closer inspection of possible links between TA systems and S. aureus pathophysiology will reveal, if these genetic loci may represent druggable targets. The modification of a staphylococcal TA toxin to a cyclopeptide antibiotic highlights the potential of TA systems as rather untapped sources of drug discovery.

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and characterization of clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus in KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa

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    Lin Johnson

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA continues to be a problem for clinicians worldwide. However, few data on the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of S. aureus isolates in South Africa have been reported and the prevalence of MRSA in the KwaZulu-Natal (KZN province is unknown. In addition, information on the characterization of S. aureus in this province is unavailable. This study investigated the susceptibility pattern of 227 S. aureus isolates from the KZN province, South Africa. In addition, characterization of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA and MRSA are reported in this survey. Methods The in-vitro activities of 20 antibiotics against 227 consecutive non-duplicate S. aureus isolates from clinical samples in KZN province, South Africa were determined by the disk-diffusion technique. Isolates resistant to oxacillin and mupirocin were confirmed by PCR detection of the mecA and mup genes respectively. PCR-RFLP of the coagulase gene was employed in the characterization of MSSA and MRSA. Results All the isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, teicoplanin and fusidic acid, and 26.9% of isolates studied were confirmed as MRSA. More than 80% of MRSA were resistant to at least four classes of antibiotics and isolates grouped in antibiotype 8 appears to be widespread in the province. The MSSA were also susceptible to streptomycin, neomycin and minocycline, while less than 1% was resistant to chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, rifampicin and mupirocin. The inducible MLSB phenotype was detected in 10.8% of MSSA and 82% of MRSA respectively, and one MSSA and one MRSA exhibited high-level resistance to mupirocin. There was good correlation between antibiotyping and PCR-RFLP of the coagulase gene in the characterization of MRSA in antibiotypes 1, 5 and 12. Conclusion In view of the high resistance rates of MRSA to gentamicin, erythromycin, clindamycin, rifampicin and

  13. TGF-β1 promotes Staphylococcus aureus adhesion to and invasion into bovine mammary fibroblasts via the ERK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuang; Gao, Yuanyuan; Xia, Xiaojing; Che, Yanyi; Wang, Yuping; Liu, Hongtao; Sun, Yingying; Ren, Wenbo; Han, Wenyu; Yang, Junling; Lei, Liancheng

    2017-01-25

    Fibroblasts are the structural base of mammary breast tissues. TGF-β1 can regulate the fibrotic process; however, it remains unclear whether TGF-β1 influences the susceptibility of fibroblasts to bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a major bacterium in both chronic and subclinical mastitis in lactating cows that acts by invading host cells. To better understand the function of TGF-β1 in bovine mammary fibroblasts' (BMFBs) susceptibility to bacteria as well as the mechanisms involved, a primary BMFB model was established by treating cells with TGF-β1 followed by infection with S. aureus. The results revealed that the adhesion and invasion of S. aureus into BMFBs was significantly increased after cells were treated with 5 ng/ml TGF-β1 for 12 h. Moreover, TGF-β1 can increase Collagen I and α-SMA expression via activation of ERK signaling. However, the increased adhesion and invasion of S. aureus can be blocked by specific antibodies against either Collagen I or α-SMA, indicating that the increased adhesion and invasion are dependent on TGF-β1-induced upregulation of both Collagen I and α-SMA. Using PD98059, an ERK inhibitor, could also decrease the adhesion and invasion of S. aureus. These results indicate that TGF-β1 could promote S. aureus adhesion to and invasion into BMFBs by increasing Collagen I and α-SMA expression and may provide a novel target for controlling bovine mastitis.

  14. Forkhead Box O1 Regulates Macrophage Polarization Following Staphylococcus aureus Infection: Experimental Murine Data and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Chen; Ma, Hong-Di; Yin, Xue-Ying; Wang, Yin-Hu; Liu, Qing-Zhi; Yang, Jing-Bo; Shi, Qing-Hua; Sun, Baolin; Gershwin, M Eric; Lian, Zhe-Xiong

    2016-12-01

    The functions of macrophages that lead to effective host responses are critical for protection against Staphylococcus aureus. Deep tissue-invading S. aureus initially countered by macrophages trigger macrophage accumulation and induce inflammatory responses through surface receptors, especially toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Here, we found that macrophages formed sporadic aggregates in the liver during infection. Within those aggregates, macrophages co-localized with T cells and were indispensable for their infiltration. In addition, we have focused on the mechanisms underlying the polarization of macrophages in Forkhead box transcription factor O1 (FoxO1) conditional knockout Lys (Cre/+) FoxO1 (fl/fl) mice following S. aureus infection and report herein that macrophage M1-M2 polarization via TLR2 is intrinsically regulated by FoxO1. Indeed, for effective FoxO1 activity, stimulation of TLR2 is essential. However, following S. aureus challenge, there was a decrease in macrophage FoxO1, with increased phosphorylation of FoxO1 because of TLR2-mediated activation of PI3K/Akt and c-Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. Following infection in Lys (Cre/+) FoxO1 (fl/fl) mice, mice became more susceptible to S. aureus with reduced macrophage aggregation in the liver and attenuated Th1 and Th17 responses. FoxO1 abrogation reduced M1 pro-inflammatory responses triggered by S. aureus and enhanced M2 polarization in macrophages. In contrast, overexpression of FoxO1 in macrophages increased pro-inflammatory mediators and functional surface molecule expression. In conclusion, macrophage FoxO1 is critical to promote M1 polarization and maintain a competent T cell immune response against S. aureus infection in the liver. FoxO1 regulates macrophage M1-M2 polarization downstream of TLR2 dynamically through phosphorylation.

  15. SAMMD: Staphylococcus aureus Microarray Meta-Database

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    Elasri Mohamed O

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen, causing a wide variety of diseases ranging from superficial skin infections to severe life threatening infections. S. aureus is one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections. Its ability to resist multiple antibiotics poses a growing public health problem. In order to understand the mechanism of pathogenesis of S. aureus, several global expression profiles have been developed. These transcriptional profiles included regulatory mutants of S. aureus and growth of wild type under different growth conditions. The abundance of these profiles has generated a large amount of data without a uniform annotation system to comprehensively examine them. We report the development of the Staphylococcus aureus Microarray meta-database (SAMMD which includes data from all the published transcriptional profiles. SAMMD is a web-accessible database that helps users to perform a variety of analysis against and within the existing transcriptional profiles. Description SAMMD is a relational database that uses MySQL as the back end and PHP/JavaScript/DHTML as the front end. The database is normalized and consists of five tables, which holds information about gene annotations, regulated gene lists, experimental details, references, and other details. SAMMD data is collected from the peer-reviewed published articles. Data extraction and conversion was done using perl scripts while data entry was done through phpMyAdmin tool. The database is accessible via a web interface that contains several features such as a simple search by ORF ID, gene name, gene product name, advanced search using gene lists, comparing among datasets, browsing, downloading, statistics, and help. The database is licensed under General Public License (GPL. Conclusion SAMMD is hosted and available at http://www.bioinformatics.org/sammd/. Currently there are over 9500 entries for regulated genes, from 67 microarray

  16. Bacillithiol: a key protective thiol in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Varahenage R; Newton, Gerald L; Pogliano, Kit

    2015-01-01

    Bacillithiol is a low-molecular-weight thiol analogous to glutathione and is found in several Firmicutes, including Staphylococcus aureus. Since its discovery in 2009, bacillithiol has been a topic of interest because it has been found to contribute to resistance during oxidative stress and detoxification of electrophiles, such as the antibiotic fosfomycin, in S. aureus. The rapid increase in resistance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to available therapeutic agents is a great health concern, and many research efforts are focused on identifying new drugs and targets to combat this organism. This review describes the discovery of bacillithiol, studies that have elucidated the physiological roles of this molecule in S. aureus and other Bacilli, and the contribution of bacillithiol to S. aureus fitness during pathogenesis. Additionally, the bacillithiol biosynthesis pathway is evaluated as a novel drug target that can be utilized in combination with existing therapies to treat S. aureus infections.

  17. Exploring the contribution of efflux on the resistance to fluoroquinolones in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Costa, Sofia SANTOS

    2011-10-27

    Abstract Background Antimicrobial resistance mediated by efflux systems is still poorly characterized in Staphylococcus aureus, despite the description of several efflux pumps (EPs) for this bacterium. In this work we used several methodologies to characterize the efflux activity of 52 S. aureus isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin collected in a hospital in Lisbon, Portugal, in order to understand the role played by these systems in the resistance to fluoroquinolones. Results Augmented efflux activity was detected in 12 out of 52 isolates and correlated with increased resistance to fluoroquinolones. Addition of efflux inhibitors did not result in the full reversion of the fluoroquinolone resistance phenotype, yet it implied a significant decrease in the resistance levels, regardless of the type(s) of mutation(s) found in the quinolone-resistance determining region of grlA and gyrA genes, which accounted for the remaining resistance that was not efflux-mediated. Expression analysis of the genes coding for the main efflux pumps revealed increased expression only in the presence of inducing agents. Moreover, it showed that not only different substrates can trigger expression of different EP genes, but also that the same substrate can promote a variable response, according to its concentration. We also found isolates belonging to the same clonal type that showed different responses towards drug exposure, thus evidencing that highly related clinical isolates may diverge in the efflux-mediated response to noxious agents. The data gathered by real-time fluorometric and RT-qPCR assays suggest that S. aureus clinical isolates may be primed to efflux antimicrobial compounds. Conclusions The results obtained in this work do not exclude the importance of mutations in resistance to fluoroquinolones in S. aureus, yet they underline the contribution of efflux systems for the emergence of high-level resistance. All together, the results presented in this study show the potential

  18. Transcriptome MicroRNA Profiling of Bovine Mammary Glands Infected with Staphylococcus aureus

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    Rui Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that are important regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. miRNAs impact the processes of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Thus, the regulation of miRNA expression profiles associated with mastitis will be conducive for its control. In this study, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus was administered to the mammary gland of Chinese Holstein cows to construct a bacteria-type mastitis model. Total RNA was isolated from bovine mammary gland tissue samples from the S. aureus-induced mastitis group and controls. miRNAs were analyzed using Solexa sequencing and bioinformatics processing for the experimental group and control group. Two miRNA libraries were constructed respectively. A total of 370 known bovine miRNAs and 341 novel mi RNAs were detected for the S. aureus and 358 known bovine miRNAs and 232 novel miRNAs for control groups. A total of 77 miRNAs in the S. aureus group showed significant differences compared to the control group. GO (Gene Ontology analysis showed these target genes were involved in the regulation of cells, binding, etc., while KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis showed that these genes were enriched in endocytosis, and olfactory transduction pathways involved in cancer. These results provide an experimental basis to reveal the cause and regulatory mechanism of mastitis and also suggest the potential of miRNAs to serve as biomarkers for the diagnosis of mastitis in dairy cows.

  19. Haemin represses the haemolytic activity of Staphylococcus aureus in an Sae-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Julia; Joost, Insa; Skaar, Eric P; Herrmann, Mathias; Bischoff, Markus

    2012-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen and a common cause of nosocomial infections. This facultative pathogen produces a large arsenal of virulence factors, including the haemolysins, which allow the bacterium to lyse erythrocytes and thereby release large amounts of the haem-containing haemoglobin. The released haem is thought to be the main iron source of this organism during the course of infection, and is considered to be crucial for bacterial proliferation in vivo. High concentrations of haem and its degradation products, on the other hand, are known to be toxic for S. aureus, making it essential for the pathogen to tightly control haem release from red blood cells. Here we show that S. aureus responds to haemin by downregulating the expression of haemolysins. Subinhibitory concentrations of haemin were found to significantly reduce transcription of the haemolysin genes hlb (encoding β-haemolysin) and hlgA (encoding the S-class component of γ-haemolysin), while hla (encoding α-haemolysin) and RNAIII (encoding δ-haemolysin) transcription did not appear to be affected. The presence of haemin also reduced the haemolytic potential of the supernatants of S. aureus LS1 cultures. Inactivation of the sae locus in LS1 abolished the haemin effect on the transcription of haemolysin genes, indicating that the two-component regulatory system is required for this regulatory effect. Iron limitation, on the other hand, was found to induce the expression of haemolysins, and this effect was again abolished in the sae mutant, indicating that S. aureus modulates its haemolysin production in response to iron and haem availability in an Sae-dependent manner.

  20. Mechanical Ventilation Alters the Development of Staphylococcus aureus Pneumonia in Rabbit.

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    Saber-Davide Barbar

    Full Text Available Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is common during mechanical ventilation (MV. Beside obvious deleterious effects on muco-ciliary clearance, MV could adversely shift the host immune response towards a pro-inflammatory pattern through toll-like receptor (TLRs up-regulation. We tested this hypothesis in a rabbit model of Staphylococcus aureus VAP. Pneumonia was caused by airway challenge with S. aureus, in either spontaneously breathing (SB or MV rabbits (n = 13 and 17, respectively. Pneumonia assessment regarding pulmonary and systemic bacterial burden, as well as inflammatory response was done 8 and 24 hours after S. aureus challenge. In addition, ex vivo stimulations of whole blood taken from SB or MV rabbits (n = 7 and 5, respectively with TLR2 agonist or heat-killed S. aureus were performed. Data were expressed as mean±standard deviation. After 8 hours of infection, lung injury was more severe in MV animals (1.40±0.33 versus [vs] 2.40±0.55, p = 0.007, along with greater bacterial concentrations (6.13±0.63 vs. 4.96±1.31 colony forming units/gram, p = 0.002. Interleukin (IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-αserum concentrations reached higher levels in MV animals (p = 0.010. Whole blood obtained from MV animals released larger amounts of cytokines if stimulated with TLR2 agonist or heat-killed S. aureus (e.g., TNF-α: 1656±166 vs. 1005±89; p = 0.014. Moreover, MV induced TLR2 overexpression in both lung and spleen tissue. MV hastened tissue injury, impaired lung bacterial clearance, and promoted a systemic inflammatory response, maybe through TLR2 overexpression.

  1. Selenium Deficiency Deteriorate the Inflammation of S. aureus Infection via Regulating NF-κB and PPAR-γ in Mammary Gland of Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuejiao; Zhang, Zecai; Li, Ying; Hu, Xiaoyu; Shen, Peng; Fu, Yunhe; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2016-07-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient contributing to a strong immune system for the prevention of infections and diseases in humans and animals. Dietary Se regulates the immune status and mediates anti-inflammatory action. Mastitis is an inflammation in the mammary gland typically induced through the major pathogen S. aureus. The aim of the present study was to determine the regulating effect of Se on S. aureus-induced inflammation using a mouse mastitis model. Immunofluorescence staining was used to detect histopathological injury. ELISA was used to detect cytokine expression, while protein and mRNA levels were analyzed through Western blotting and qPCR analysis, respectively. The results showed that Se deficiency increased inflammatory lesions in individuals with S. aureus infection in the mammary gland. The NO levels showed a significant increase in Se-deficient mice with S. aureus mastitis. Se deficiency accelerated the production of pro-inflammatory factors and reduced IL-10 expression. Furthermore, the results of the present study showed that the regulating effect of Se on S. aureus-induced mastitis was associated with the NF-κB pathway. Indeed, Se deficiency suppressed PPAR-γ activity and promoted NF-κB pathway activation. Thus, Se supplementation could improve the effect on PPAR-γ and NF-κB. These results suggest that Se deficiency could aggravate the inflammatory injury resulting from S. aureus-induced mastitis. Moreover, the results of the present study contribute to the development of new prevention or treatment methods for S. aureus-induced mastitis and other infectious diseases.

  2. Phagocytosis and Killing of Staphylococcus aureus by Human Neutrophils

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Thea; Porter, Adeline R.; Kennedy, Adam D.; Kobayashi, Scott D.; Frank R DeLeo

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are essential for host defense against Staphylococcus aureus infections. Although significant progress has been made, our understanding of neutrophil interactions with S. aureus remains incomplete. To provide a more comprehensive view of this process, we investigated phagocytosis and killing of S. aureus by human neutrophils using varied assay conditions in vitro. A greater percentage of bacteria were internalized by adherent neutrophils compared to those in suspension, and unexpe...

  3. In vitro bactericidal efficacy of atmospheric-pressure plasma jet on titanium-based implant infected with Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Ouk; Lee, Chang-Min; Kim, Myung-Sun; Jung, Sang-Chul; Yang, Seong-Won; Kook, Min-Suk; Kim, Byung-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a representative of gram-positive bacteria that causes skin infection, respiratory diseases, and burned tissue infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sterilizing efficiency of an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) on S. aureus adhered on a titanium surface. During the APPJ sterilization, the plasma gases used were Ar, Ar+N2, and Ar+O2. With increasing APPJ treatment time, the viability of S. aureus decreased. The addition of O2 gas to Ar gas resulted in a higher sterilizing efficiency than the addition of other groups. Plasma exposure induced bacterial oxidative stress, and it was confirmed that the cell membrane was seriously damaged by the production of reactive oxygen species. Our finding suggests that the APPJ is an effective tool for clinical antimicrobial therapy.

  4. Diurnal differences in milk composition and its influence on in vitro growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli in bovine quarter milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, S W F; Boerhout, E M; Ravesloot, L; Daemen, A J J M; Benedictus, L; Rutten, V P M G; Koets, A P

    2016-07-01

    In experimental intramammary inoculation studies, it has been observed that mastitis susceptibility is influenced, among others, by cow factors. To identify milk characteristics leading to these differences, quarter milk samples of morning and evening milk were collected and analyzed for their composition (protein, fat, lactose, urea, lactoferrin, lactoperoxidase, and β-lactoglobulin concentrations), somatic cell count, and antibodies against Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, in vitro growth of S. aureus and Escherichia coli in fresh quarter milk samples was determined. All measured parameters differed significantly between quarters and also between morning and evening milk with the exception of lactose levels. In addition, quantitative growth of S. aureus and E. coli was significantly different in morning milk compared with evening milk. Mixed model analysis revealed that replication of S. aureus was negatively associated with the presence of fat, S. aureus-specific IgG1 antibodies, contamination of the milk sample and morning milk. Replication of E. coli was negatively associated with fat concentrations, and positively associated with morning milk. The significant difference between morning and evening milk supports the theory that changes in milk composition influence bacterial growth. Although all determined milk components differed significantly between quarters and in time no significant association with bacterial growth could be identified with the exception of fat for both studied species and IgG1 titers for S. aureus. The negative association of fat with bacterial growth was assumed to occur due to activation of lipolysis by milk handling and can most likely be neglected for in vivo relevance. The fact that S. aureus-specific IgG1 titers were negatively associated with S. aureus growth in vitro encourages the ongoing effort to develop a vaccine against S. aureus-induced mastitis.

  5. Temperature-mediated variations in cellular membrane fatty acid composition of Staphylococcus aureus in resistance to pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lang-Hong; Wang, Man-Sheng; Zeng, Xin-An; Liu, Zhi-Wei

    2016-08-01

    Effects of growth temperature on cell membrane fatty acid composition, fluidity and lethal and sublethal injury by pulsed electric fields (PEF) in Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 43300 (S. aureus) in the stationary phase were investigated. Analysis of the membrane fatty acids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) revealed that branched chain fatty acids (iso C14:0, iso C15:0, anteiso C15:0 and anteiso C17:0) and straight chain fatty acids (C12:0, C14:0, C16:0, C17:0 and C18:0) were primary constituents in the membrane. The S. aureus changed its membrane fatty acid composition and its overall fluidity when exposed to different temperatures. The PEF lethal and sublethal effects were assessed, and results suggested that the degree of inactivation depended on the cell membrane structure, electric field strength and treatment time. The PEF inactivation kinetics including lethal and sublethal injury fractions were fitted with non-linear Weibull distribution, suggesting that inactivation of the first log cycle of S. aureus population was significantly affected by growth temperature, and the membrane of cells became more fluid, and easier to induce electroportion in low temperatures. Moreover, the morphology of S. aureus cells were investigated by electron microscopy, showing that various temperature-modified cells were distorted to differing extents and some even collapsed due to deep irreversible electroporation after PEF treatment.

  6. Factors determining Staphylococcus aureus susceptibility to photoantimicrobial chemotherapy: RsbU activity, staphyloxanthin level and membrane fluidity.

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    Monika Kossakowska-Zwierucho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Photoantimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT constitutes a particular type of stress condition, in which bacterial cells induce a pleiotropic and as yet unexplored effect. In light of this, the key master regulators are of putative significance to the overall phototoxic outcome. In Staphylococcus aureus, the alternative sigma factor σB controls the expression of genes involved in the response to environmental stress. We show that aberration of any sigB operon genes in S. aureus USA300 isogenic mutants causes a pronounced sensitization (>5 log10 reduction in CFU drop to PACT with selected photosensitizers, namely protoporphyrin diarginate, zinc phthalocyanine and rose bengal. This effect is partly due to aberration-coupled staphyloxanthin synthesis inhibition. We identified frequent mutations in RsbU, a σB activator, in PACT-vulnerable clinical isolates of S. aureus, resulting in σB activity impairment. Locations of significant changes in protein structure (IS256 insertion, early STOP codon occurrence, substitutions A230T and A276D were shown in a theoretical model of S. aureus RsbU. As a phenotypic hallmark of PACT-vulnerable S. aureus strains, we observed an increased fluidity of bacterial cell membrane, which is a result of staphyloxanthin content and other yet unidentified factors. Our research indicates σB as a promising target of adjunctive antimicrobial therapy and suggests that enhanced cell membrane fluidity may be an adjuvant strategy in photoantimicrobial chemotherapy.

  7. Colonization of epidermal tissue by Staphylococcus aureus produces localized hypoxia and stimulates secretion of antioxidant and caspase-14 proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lone , Abdul G.; Atci, Erhan; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk; Noh, S.; Fransson, B.; Abu-Lail, Nehal; Park, Jeong-Jin; Gang, David R.; Call, Douglas R.

    2015-08-31

    A partial-thickness epidermal explant model was colonized with GFP-expressing S. aureus and the pattern of S. aureus biofilm growth was characterized using electron and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Oxygen concentration in explants was quantified using microelectrodes. The relative effective diffusivity and porosity of the epidermis were determined using magnetic resonance imaging, while hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration in explant media was measured by using microelectrodes. Secreted proteins were identified and quantified using MSE mass spectrometry. We found that S. aureus biofilm grows predominantly in sebum-rich areas around hair follicles and associated skin folds. Dissolved oxygen was selectively depleted (2-3 fold) in these locations, but the relative effective diffusivity and porosity did not change between colonized and control epidermis. Histological analysis revealed keratinocyte damage across all the layers of colonized epidermis after four days of culture. The colonized explants released significantly (P< 0.01) more anti-oxidant proteins of both epidermal and S. aureus origin, consistent with elevated H2O2 concentration found in the media from the colonized explants (P< 0.001). Caspase-14 was also elevated significantly in media from infected explants. While H2O2 induces primary keratinocyte differentiation, caspase-14 is required for terminal keratinocyte differentiation and desquamation. These results are consistent with a localized biological impact from S. aureus in response to colonization of the skin surface.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus proteins Sbi and Efb recruit human plasmin to degrade complement C3 and C3b.

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    Tina K Koch

    Full Text Available Upon host infection, the human pathogenic microbe Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus immediately faces innate immune reactions such as the activated complement system. Here, a novel innate immune evasion strategy of S. aureus is described. The staphylococcal proteins surface immunoglobulin-binding protein (Sbi and extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb bind C3/C3b simultaneously with plasminogen. Bound plasminogen is converted by bacterial activator staphylokinase or by host-specific urokinase-type plasminogen activator to plasmin, which in turn leads to degradation of complement C3 and C3b. Efb and to a lesser extend Sbi enhance plasmin cleavage of C3/C3b, an effect which is explained by a conformational change in C3/C3b induced by Sbi and Efb. Furthermore, bound plasmin also degrades C3a, which exerts anaphylatoxic and antimicrobial activities. Thus, S. aureus Sbi and Efb comprise platforms to recruit plasmin(ogen together with C3 and its activation product C3b for efficient degradation of these complement components in the local microbial environment and to protect S. aureus from host innate immune reactions.

  9. A Staphylococcus aureus TIR domain protein virulence factor blocks TLR2-mediated NF-κB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askarian, Fatemeh; van Sorge, Nina M; Sangvik, Maria; Beasley, Federico C; Henriksen, Jørn R; Sollid, Johanna U E; van Strijp, Jos A G; Nizet, Victor; Johannessen, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Signaling through Toll-like receptors (TLRs), crucial molecules in the induction of host defense responses, requires adaptor proteins that contain a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. The pathogen Staphylococcus aureus produces several innate immune-evasion molecules that interfere with the host's innate immune response. A database search analysis suggested the presence of a gene encoding a homologue of the human TIR domain in S. aureus MSSA476 which was named staphylococcal TIR domain protein (TirS). Ectopic expression of TirS in human embryonic kidney, macrophage and keratinocyte cell lines interfered with signaling through TLR2, including MyD88 and TIRAP, NF-κB and/or mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Moreover, the presence of TirS reduced the levels of cytokines MCP-1 and G-CSF secreted in response to S. aureus. The effects on NF-κB pathway were confirmed using S. aureus MSSA476 wild type, an isogenic mutant MSSA476ΔtirS, and complemented MSSA476ΔtirS +pTirS in a Transwell system where bacteria and host cells were physically separated. Finally, in a systematic mouse infection model, TirS promoted bacterial accumulation in several organs 4 days postinfection. The results of this study reveal a new S. aureus virulence factor that can interfere with PAMP-induced innate immune signaling in vitro and bacterial survival in vivo.

  10. Colonization of epidermal tissue by Staphylococcus aureus produces localized hypoxia and stimulates secretion of antioxidant and caspase-14 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Abdul G; Atci, Erhan; Renslow, Ryan; Beyenal, Haluk; Noh, Susan; Fransson, Boel; Abu-Lail, Nehal; Park, Jeong-Jin; Gang, David R; Call, Douglas R

    2015-08-01

    A partial-thickness epidermal explant model was colonized with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing Staphylococcus aureus, and the pattern of S. aureus biofilm growth was characterized using electron and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The oxygen concentration in explants was quantified using microelectrodes. The relative effective diffusivity and porosity of the epidermis were determined using magnetic resonance imaging, while hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration in explant media was measured by using microelectrodes. Secreted proteins were identified and quantified using elevated-energy mass spectrometry (MS(E)). S. aureus biofilm grows predominantly in lipid-rich areas around hair follicles and associated skin folds. Dissolved oxygen was selectively depleted (2- to 3-fold) in these locations, but the relative effective diffusivity and porosity did not change between colonized and control epidermis. Histological analysis revealed keratinocyte damage across all the layers of colonized epidermis after 4 days of culture. The colonized explants released significantly (P < 0.01) more antioxidant proteins of both epidermal and S. aureus origin, consistent with elevated H2O2 concentrations found in the media from the colonized explants (P< 0.001). Caspase-14 was also elevated significantly in the media from the colonized explants. While H2O2 induces primary keratinocyte differentiation, caspase-14 is required for terminal keratinocyte differentiation and desquamation. These results are consistent with a localized biological impact from S. aureus in response to colonization of the skin surface.

  11. In vitro susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from cows with subclinical mastitis to different antimicrobial agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Gerd; Szabo, Istvan; Roesler, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Sensitivity to commercial teat dips (nonoxinol-9 iodine complex and chlorhexidine digluconate) of 56 Staphylococcus (S.) aureus strains isolated from quarter milk samples of various German dairy herds treated with different teat dipping schemes was investigated in this study. The minimum inhibitory concentration was determined using a broth macrodilution method according to the German Veterinary Association guidelines. The main objective of the current study was to induce in vitro resistance induction of S. aureus to chemical disinfectants. Ten different strains were repeatedly passed ten times in growth media with sub-lethal concentrations of disinfectants. Nine strains showed a significant reduction in susceptibility to the nonoxinol-9 iodine complex but only one strain developed resistance to chlorhexidine digluconate. Stability of the acquired resistance was observed in all S. aureus strains adapted to the nonoxinol-9 iodine complex and chlorhexidine digluconate. In contrast, simultaneous resistance to different antibiotics was not observed in any of the ten investigated S. aureus strains. However, the isolates exhibited a high degree of resistance to penicillin G. Based on these results, resistance of S. aureus to chemical disinfectants may be more likely to develop if the chemicals are used at concentrations lower than that required for an optimal biocidal effect. PMID:22705737

  12. Resistance in Staphylococcus Aureus: The Never-Ending Story

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    Orlović Jovan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Combating Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus infections using antibacterial drugs is actually an ongoing effort to overcome resistance mechanism of this microorganism. In this paper, we discussed (1 the mechanisms of resistance to some of the most commonly used antimicrobial agents in the treatment of S. aureus: methicillin, vancomicyn and quinolones. In addition, (2 efflux pump mechanisms involved in maintaining homeostasis in the presence of compounds that inhibit S. aureus growth and reproduction, as well as mechanisms of resistance to a number of antibiotics, have been reviewed.

  13. Phagocytosis and killing of Staphylococcus aureus by human neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Thea; Porter, Adeline R; Kennedy, Adam D; Kobayashi, Scott D; DeLeo, Frank R

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are essential for host defense against Staphylococcus aureus infections. Although significant progress has been made, our understanding of neutrophil interactions with S. aureus remains incomplete. To provide a more comprehensive view of this process, we investigated phagocytosis and killing of S. aureus by human neutrophils using varied assay conditions in vitro. A greater percentage of bacteria were internalized by adherent neutrophils compared to those in suspension, and, unexpectedly, uptake of S. aureus by adherent neutrophils occurred efficiently in the absence of opsonins. An antibody specific for S. aureus promoted uptake of unopsonized bacteria in suspension, but had little or no capacity to enhance phagocytosis of S. aureus opsonized with normal human serum or by adherent neutrophils. Collectively, these results indicate that assay conditions can have a significant influence on the phagocytosis and killing of S. aureus by neutrophils. More importantly, the results suggest a vaccine approach directed to enhance opsonophagocytosis alone is not sufficient to promote increased killing of S. aureus by human neutrophils. With the emergence and reemergence of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms, establishing parameters that are optimal for studying neutrophil-S. aureus interactions will pave the way towards developing immune-directed strategies for anti-staphylococcal therapies.

  14. Amphibian antimicrobial peptide fallaxin analogue FL9 affects virulence gene expression and DNA replication in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottschalk, Sanne; Gottlieb, Caroline Trebbien; Vestergaard, Martin;

    2015-01-01

    antimicrobials. In the present study, the analogue FL9, based on the amphibian AMP fallaxin, was studied to elucidate its mode of action and antibacterial activity against the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Our data showed that FL9 may have a dual mode of action against S. aureus. At concentrations around...... the MIC, FL9 bound DNA, inhibited DNA synthesis and induced the SOS DNA damage response, whereas at concentrations above the MIC the interaction between S. aureus and FL9 led to membrane disruption. The antibacterial activity of the peptide was maintained over a wide range of NaCl and MgCl2 concentrations......-encoded natural tolerance mechanisms included peptide cleavage and the addition of positive charge to the cell surface, both of which minimized the antimicrobial activity of FL9. Our results add new information about FL9 and its effect on S. aureus, which may aid in the future development of analogues...

  15. Anti-Inflammatory and Antimicrobial Effects of Estradiol in Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells during Staphylococcus aureus Internalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Estrada, Ivan; López-Meza, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2), the predominant sexual hormone in females, is associated with the modulation of the innate immune response (IIR), and changes in its levels at parturition are related to intramammary infections, such as mastitis. In bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMECs), E2 regulates differentiation and proliferation, but its immunomodulatory functions have not been explored. Staphylococcus aureus is the predominant pathogen causing mastitis, which can persist intracellularly in bMECs. The aim of this work was to analyze whether E2 modulates the IIR of bMECs during S. aureus internalization. bMECs treated with E2 (50 pg/mL, 24 h) reduced bacteria internalization (~50%). The host receptors α5β1 and TLR2 do not participate in this reduction. However, E2 activates ERα and modulates the IIR reducing the S. aureus induced-mRNA expression of TNF-α (~50%) and IL-1β (90%). E2 also decreased the secretion of these cytokines as well as IL-6 production; however, in infected bMECs, E2 induced the secretion of IL-1β. Furthermore, E2 upregulates the expression of the antimicrobial peptides DEFB1, BNBD5, and psoriasin S100A7 (~5-, 3-, and 6-fold, resp.). In addition, E2 induced the production of antimicrobial compounds in bMEC culture medium, which, together with the modulation of the IIR, could be related to the reduction of S. aureus internalization. PMID:27034592

  16. Micheliolide provides protection of mice against Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA infection by down-regulating inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xinru; Wang, Yuli; Qin, Yifei; He, Weigang; Benlahrech, Adel; Zhang, Qingwen; Jiang, Xin; Lu, Zhenhui; Ji, Guang; Zheng, Yuejuan

    2017-01-01

    A major obstacle to therapy in intensive care units is sepsis caused by severe infection. In recent years gram-positive (G+) bacteria, most commonly staphylococci, are thought to be the main pathogens. Micheliolide (MCL) was demonstrated to provide a therapeutic role in rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory intestinal disease, colitis-associated cancer, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the main component of G− bacterial cell wall) induced septic shock. We proved here that MCL played an anti-inflammatory role in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) induced peritonitis. It inhibited the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in macrophages and dendritic cells upon stimulation with peptidoglycan (PGN, the main cell wall composition of G+ bacteria). PI3K/Akt and NF-κB pathways account for the anti-inflammatory role of MCL after PGN stimulation. MCL reduced IL-6 secretion through down-regulating NF-κB activation and improved the survival status in mice challenged with a lethal dose of S. aureus. In MRSA infection mouse model, MCL down-regulated the expression of IL-6, TNF-α, MCP-1/CCL2 and IFN-γ in sera, and ameliorated the organ damage of liver and kidney. In conclusion, MCL can help maintain immune equilibrium and decrease PGN, S. aureus and MRSA-triggered inflammatory response. These provide the rationality for the potential usage of MCL in sepsis caused by G+ bacteria (e.g., S. aureus) and antibiotic-resistant bacteria (e.g., MRSA). PMID:28165033

  17. In vitro characterization of representative clinical South African Staphylococcus aureus isolates from various clonal lineages

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    W.F. Oosthuysen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Data concerning the virulence and pathogenesis of South African strains of Staphylococcus aureus are limited. We investigated host–pathogen interactions of randomly selected clinical S. aureus isolates representing various clones. We characterized the ability of isolates to adhere to fibronectin, fibrinogen, collagens IV and VI, to invade host cells and to induce cell death in vitro. We analysed the possible association of these results with characteristics such as methicillin resistance, Panton–Valentine leucocidin (PVL positivity and clonality. The S. aureus isolates displayed diversity in their abilities to adhere to various human ligands. All isolates were highly invasive except for ST121. PVL-negative isolates were significantly more invasive than the PVL-positive isolates (p 0.004. Isolates of CC5, CC30 and CC121 were non-cytotoxic, whereas isolates of CC22, CC8, CC15, CC45 and CC88 were very cytotoxic. No statistical association was identified between cell death and methicillin resistance, bacterial PVL status, clonality or patient HIV status. The vast majority of isolates were invasive and induced significant cell death. PVL-negative isolates were more invasive than PVL-positive isolates, while methicillin-resistant isolates were not found to be more invasive or cytotoxic than methicillin-susceptible isolates.

  18. Non-classical effects of prolactin on the innate immune response of bovine mammary epithelial cells: Implications during Staphylococcus aureus internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Estrada, Ivan; Alva-Murillo, Nayeli; López-Meza, Joel E; Ochoa-Zarzosa, Alejandra

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has the ability to invade mammary epithelial cells (bMECs) causing mastitis. This event depends primarily on the α5β1 integrin in the host cell. In addition, bMECs are a target for the hormone prolactin (PRL), which can regulate β1 integrin-dependent actions related to differentiation and lactation. Previously, we demonstrated that bovine PRL (bPRL, 5 ng/ml) stimulates S. aureus internalization into bMECs. TLR2 is important during S. aureus infections, but its activation by PRL has not yet been established. The objective of this study was to determine the role of α5β1 integrin and TLR2 during S. aureus internalization into bMECs stimulated with bPRL. We demonstrated that the prolactin-stimulated internalization of S. aureus decreases in response to the blockage of α5β1 integrin (∼ 80%) and TLR2 (∼ 80%). bPRL increases the membrane abundance (MA) of α5β1 integrin (∼ 20%) and induces TLR2 MA (∼ 2-fold). S. aureus reduces the α5β1 integrin MA in bMECs treated with bPRL (∼ 75%) but induces TLR2 MA in bMECs (∼ 3-fold). Bacteria and bPRL did not modify TLR2 MA compared with the hormone alone. S. aureus induces the activation of the transcription factor AP-1, which was inhibited in bMECs treated with bPRL and infected. In general, bPRL induces both pro- and anti-inflammatory responses in bMECs, which are abated in response to bacterial challenge. Interestingly, the canonical Stat-5 transcription factor was not activated in the challenged bMECs and/or treated with bPRL. Taken together, these results support novel functions of prolactin as a modulator of the innate immune response that do not involve the classical prolactin pathway.

  19. Acute phase proteins in bovine milk in an experimental model of Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckersall, P D; Young, F J; Nolan, A M

    2006-01-01

    The objectives were to establish the origin of 2 acute phase proteins in milk during subclinical bovine mastitis and to characterize the relationship between those proteins in milk and blood. Haptoglobin (Hp) and mammary-associated serum amyloid A (M-SAA3) appear in milk during mastitis, whereas Hp...... and serum amyloid A increase in serum during mastitis. The concentrations of these proteins were determined in an experimental model using a field strain of Staphylococcus aureus to induce subclinical mastitis in dairy cows. The expression of mRNA coding for these proteins was assessed and the presence of M......-SAA3 in mammary tissues was determined using immunocytochemistry. Increases of M-SAA3 and Hp in milk occurred within 12 h of Staphylococcus aureus infusion, with peak concentrations occurring 3 d after infusion of the bacteria. The increase of acute phase proteins in milk (15 h) preceded the increase...

  20. Staphylococcus aureus: resistance pattern and risk factors

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    Mohammad Naghavi-Behzad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has emerged as a nosocomial pathogen of major worldwide importance and is an increasingly frequent cause of community-acquired infections. In this study, different risk factors and MRSA resistance pattern were investigated. Methods: In a 24 months period, all of the patients who were confined to bed in the surgery ward were included in the study. Then they were assessed to find out as if they had MRSA infection when hospitalized and once when they were discharged. Almost 48 h after admission, when patients were discharged, social and medical histories were acquired. Acquired samples were examined. Results: During the present study of 475 patients, 108 patients (22.8% had S. aureus. About frequency of antibiotic resistance among collected S. aureus colonies, erythromycin resistance, was the most frequent antibiotic resistance, also resistance to vancomycin was 0.4% that was the least. Only hospitalization duration had statistically significant correlation with antibiotic resistance, also resistance to erythromycin had statistically significant relation with history of surgery and alcohol consumption. Of all 34 MRSA species, 22 (64.7% samples were resistant to erythromycin, 17 (50.0% resistant to cefoxitin, 5 (14.7% resistant to mupirocin, 1 (2.9% resistant to vancomycin and 1 (2.9% resistant to linezolid. Conclusion: The results of the current study show that among hospitalized patients, there is resistance against methicillin. Since based on results of the study there is resistance against oxacillin and erythromycin in most cases, administering appropriate antibiotics have an important role in minimizing the resistance burden among bacterial species.

  1. Curcumin Reverse Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

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    Su-Hyun Mun

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic flavonoid extracted from the rhizome of Curcuma longa L., was shown to possess superior potency to resensitize methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA to antibiotics. Previous studies have shown the synergistic activity of curcumin with β-lactam and quinolone antibiotics. Further, to understand the anti-MRSA mechanism of curcumin, we investigated the potentiated effect of curcumin by its interaction in diverse conditions. The mechanism of anti-MRSA action of curcumin was analyzed by the viability assay in the presence of detergents, ATPase inhibitors and peptidoglycan (PGN from S. aureus, and the PBP2a protein level was analyzed by western blotting. The morphological changes in the curcumin-treated MRSA strains were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. We analyzed increased susceptibility to MRSA isolates in the presence of curcumin. The optical densities at 600 nm (OD600 of the suspensions treated with the combinations of curcumin with triton X-100 and Tris were reduced to 63% and 59%, respectively, compared to curcumin without treatment. N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD and sodium azide (NaN3 were reduced to 94% and 55%, respectively. When peptidoglycan (PGN from S. aureus was combined with curcumin, PGN (0–125 μg/mL gradually blocked the antibacterial activity of curcumin (125 μg/mL; however, at a concentration of 125 µg/mL PGN, it did not completely block curcumin. Curcumin has a significant effect on the protein level of PBP2a. The TEM images of MRSA showed damage of the cell wall, disruption of the cytoplasmic contents, broken cell membrane and cell lysis after the treatment of curcumin. These data indicate a remarkable antibacterial effect of curcumin, with membrane permeability enhancers and ATPase inhibitors, and curcumin did not directly bind to PGN on the cell wall. Further, the antimicrobial action of curcumin involved in the PBP2a-mediated resistance mechanism was

  2. Staphylococcus aureus reservoirs during traditional Austrian raw milk cheese production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walcher, Georg; Gonano, Monika; Kümmel, Judith; Barker, Gary C; Lebl, Karin; Bereuter, Othmar; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Wagner, Martin; Stessl, Beatrix

    2014-11-01

    Sampling approaches following the dairy chain, including microbiological hygiene status of critical processing steps and physicochemical parameters, contribute to our understanding of how Staphylococcus aureus contamination risks can be minimised. Such a sampling approach was adopted in this study, together with rapid culture-independent quantification of Staph. aureus to supplement standard microbiological methods. A regional cheese production chain, involving 18 farms, was sampled on two separate occasions. Overall, 51·4% of bulk milk samples were found to be Staph. aureus positive, most of them (34·3%) at the limit of culture-based detection. Staph. aureus positive samples >100 cfu/ml were recorded in 17·1% of bulk milk samples collected mainly during the sampling in November. A higher number of Staph. aureus positive bulk milk samples (94·3%) were detected after applying the culture-independent approach. A concentration effect of Staph. aureus was observed during curd processing. Staph. aureus were not consistently detectable with cultural methods during the late ripening phase, but >100 Staph. aureus cell equivalents (CE)/ml or g were quantifiable by the culture-independent approach until the end of ripening. Enterotoxin gene PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing provided evidence that livestock adapted strains of Staph. aureus mostly dominate the post processing level and substantiates the belief that animal hygiene plays a pivotal role in minimising the risk of Staph. aureus associated contamination in cheese making. Therefore, the actual data strongly support the need for additional sampling activities and recording of physicochemical parameters during semi-hard cheese-making and cheese ripening, to estimate the risk of Staph. aureus contamination before consumption.

  3. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus laryngitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakos, Tracey; Kaye, Keith; Rubin, Adam D

    2010-09-01

    Infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have become more prevalent, in part because of the emergence and spread of community-acquired MRSA. This trend is particularly concerning because of the significant rates of morbidity and mortality associated with MRSA infections, and because MRSA strains are often resistant to many classes of antibiotics. Reports of infections of the head and neck, including wound infections, cellulitis, sinusitis, otitis media, and otitis externa, are well documented. However, to our knowledge, there have been no reports of bacterial laryngitis due to MRSA. We report the first published case of bacterial laryngitis caused by MRSA.

  4. Resistencia antimicrobiana de cepas de Staphylococcus aureus, Costa Rica Antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus, Costa Rica

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    Víctor Hugo Alvarado

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar y comparar los perfiles de resistencia de cepas de S. aureus aisladas de quesos, producidos en la Zona Sur de Costa Rica y de un centro hospitalario de la misma región. Materiales y Métodos: Se analizaron 35 muestras de queso fresco, adquiridas durante los meses de setiembre y octubre del 2010 en la zona de San Vito de Coto Brus. A cada muestra se le realizaron recuentos de coliformes totales, coliformes fecales y Staphylococcus aureus. Adicionalmente se analizó presencia/ausencia de Listeria monocytogenes en 25 gramos del producto. A las cepas identificadas como S. aureus se les realizó la prueba de sensibilidad a los antibióticos mediante el sistema automatizado Vitek y la interpretación de los datos se realizó siguiendo las pautas del Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute antimicrobial susceptibility testing 2011. Adicional a esto se recolectaron datos acerca de la sensibilidad de las cepas de S. aureus aisladas e identificadas en el Hospital de San Vito de Coto Brus en el mismo período. Resultados: El promedio obtenido para el recuento de coliformes totales fue de 9,7 X 10(6 UFC/g, para coliformes fecales de 6,7 X 10(5 y para S. aureus de 2,8 X 10(5 UFC/g, obteniéndose un 83 % de muestras positivas por esta bacteria. En cuanto a la resistencia antimicrobiana, se obtuvieron porcentajes de resistencia mayores en las cepas de origen clínico. Se encontró también que 23 de las cepas (96% provenientes de muestras clínicas, presentaban resistencia a más de un antibiótico, mientras que siete de las obtenidas a partir de queso (27% presentaban esta característica. Con respecto a los betalactamicos (ampicilina, oxacilina y penicilina se observó la existencia de una diferencia estadísticamente significativa (pObjective: determined and compared the resistance patters of S. aureus strains isolated from cheese produced in the southern zone of Costa Rica and from clinical samples isolated at the hospital center

  5. Macrolide-lincosamide-resistant phenotypes and genotypes of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine clinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wu, Cong-Ming; Lu, Li-Ming; Ren, Gao-Wa Na; Cao, Xing-Yuan; Shen, Jian-Zhong

    2008-07-27

    The present study aimed to determine the prevalence and mechanisms of macrolide-lincosamide (ML) resistance in 72 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from cows with clinical mastitis. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of ML antibiotics were determined by the broth microdilution technique, inducible ML resistance phenotype by the D test, and ML resistance genes by PCR assay. The isolates showed a high level of resistance to erythromycin (93.1%), azithromycin (93.1%), spiramycin (41.7%), tylosin (40.3%), tilmicosin (27.8%), and clindamycin (36.1%). Macrolide-lincosamide MIC(90) values were > or = 128 mg/L. Inducible ML resistance (iML) phenotype was detected in 52.8% (38/72) of isolates. In erythromycin-resistant (ER-R) strains, methylase genes ermB and ermC, efflux gene msrA/msrB, and inactivating enzyme genes lnuA and mphC were present alone or in various combinations, with ermB and ermC genes predominating. This is the first report of ML resistance genes ermB, mrsA/mrsB and mphC in S. aureus isolated from bovine mastitis. The occurrence of high levels of resistance to ML antibiotics among the S. aureus isolates, and the high rate of iML phenotype, indicate that appropriate alternative antibiotics should be prescribed for treating bovine mastitis caused by S. aureus. Furthermore, significant differences in the conformations of lactone rings of 16- and 14-membered macrolides could explain why some isolates with a constitutive ML resistance (cML) phenotype were sensitive to 16-membered macrolides alone. The different interaction of the 16-membered macrolides with the 50S ribosomal subunit is also presumably the reason why the susceptibility results of tilmcosin differed from those of tylosin and spiramycin.

  6. Platelet receptor polymorphisms do not influence Staphylococcus aureus-platelet interactions or infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daga, Shruti; Shepherd, James G; Callaghan, J Garreth S; Hung, Rachel K Y; Dawson, Dana K; Padfield, Gareth J; Hey, Shi Y; Cartwright, Robyn A; Newby, David E; Fitzgerald, J Ross

    2011-03-01

    Cardiac vegetations result from bacterium-platelet adherence, activation and aggregation, and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in infective endocarditis. The GPIIb/IIIa and FcγRIIa platelet receptors play a central role in platelet adhesion, activation and aggregation induced by endocarditis pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, but the influence of known polymorphisms of these receptors on the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis is unknown. We determined the GPIIIa platelet antigen Pl(A1/A2) and FcγRIIa H131R genotype of healthy volunteers (n = 160) and patients with infective endocarditis (n = 40), and investigated the influence of these polymorphisms on clinical outcome in infective endocarditis and S. aureus-platelet interactions in vitro. Platelet receptor genotype did not correlate with development of infective endocarditis, vegetation characteristics on echocardiogram or the composite clinical end-point of embolism, heart failure, need for surgery or mortality (P > 0.05 for all), even though patients with the GPIIIa Pl(A1/A1) genotype had increased in vivo platelet activation (P = 0.001). Furthermore, neither GPIIIa Pl(A1/A2) nor FcγRIIa H131R genotype influenced S. aureus-induced platelet adhesion, activation or aggregation in vitro (P > 0.05). Taken together, our data suggest that the GPIIIa and FcγRIIa platelet receptor polymorphisms do not influence S. aureus-platelet interactions in vitro or the clinical course of infective endocarditis.

  7. Differentially expressed genes associated with Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in dairy goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisoni, G; Moroni, P; Genini, S; Stella, A; Boettcher, P J; Cremonesi, P; Scaccabarozzi, L; Giuffra, E; Castiglioni, B

    2010-06-15

    To study gene expression within the mammary glands of dairy goats with mastitis, mRNA was collected from milk somatic cells (MSCs) of left udder halves challenged with Staphylococcus aureus and right udder halves infused with PBS, as control, at different time points (0, 12, 24 and 48h post-infection). Transcriptional profiles were investigated using bovine cDNA microarrays; of the total 288 differentially expressed genes identified with ANOVA analysis (False Discovery Rate=0.05, 1.5-fold change), 26, 36 and 16 genes were down-regulated at 12, 24 and 48h post-infection, respectively, while 60, 141 and 9 genes were up-regulated at the same corresponding time points. The expression profiles clearly changed at 24h post-infection with 177 genes significantly altered, corresponding to a 10-fold increase of S. aureus bacterial count in milk from infected udders. Differential expression of selected genes (CD2BP2, BCAP31, MHCII, FOSL2, MAPK13, ILT5 and JUNB) was also confirmed by real-time PCR at the different time points considered, showing high correlation with the microarray measurements and high reliability of the microarray analyses. The most readily inducible classes of genes in caprine MSCs infected with S. aureus were pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and their receptors; IL-1alpha, lymphotoxin alpha, granulocyte chemotactic protein (CXCL6), and IL-2 receptor gamma were all up-regulated in infected udders versus healthy controls. This study identified a number of differentially expressed genes induced by S. aureus intramammary infection and demonstrates the intricacy of the patterns of gene expression that influence host response to a complex pathogen of significant relevance to both human and veterinary medicine.

  8. Contribution of the mannan backbone of cryptococcal glucuronoxylomannan and a glycolytic enzyme of Staphylococcus aureus to contact-mediated killing of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Reiko; Saito, Fumito; Matsuo, Miki; Kurokawa, Kenji; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Kawamoto, Susumu

    2007-07-01

    The fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans is killed by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, and the killing is inhibited by soluble capsular polysaccharides. To investigate the mechanism of killing, cells in coculture were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. S. aureus attached to the capsule of C. neoformans, and the ultrastructure of the attached C. neoformans cells was characteristic of dead cells. To identify the molecules that contributed to the fungal-bacterial interaction, we treated each with NaIO(4) or protease. Treatment of C. neoformans with NaIO(4) promoted adherence. It was inferred that cleavage of xylose and glucuronic acid side chains of glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) allowed S. aureus to recognize mannose residues in the backbone, which resisted periodate oxidation. On the other hand, treatment of S. aureus with protease decreased adherence, suggesting that protein contributed to attachment in S. aureus. In confirmation, side chain-cleaved polysaccharide or defined alpha-(1-->3)-mannan inhibited the killing at lower concentrations than native GXM did. Also, these polysaccharides reduced the adherence of the two species and induced clumping of pure S. aureus cells. alpha-(1-->3)-Mannooligosaccharides with a degree of polymerization (DP) of >/=3 induced cluster formation of S. aureus in a dose-dependent manner. Surface plasmon resonance analyses showed interaction of GXM and surface protein from S. aureus; the interaction was inhibited by oligosaccharides with a DP of > or =3. Conformations of alpha-(1-->3) oligosaccharides were predicted. The three-dimensional structures of mannooligosaccharides larger than triose appeared curved and could be imagined to be recognized by a hypothetical staphylococcal lectin. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of staphylococcal protein followed by electroblotting, enzyme-linked immunolectin assay, protein staining, and N-terminal amino acid sequencing suggested that the candidate protein was

  9. Staphylococcus aureus bacteriuria as a prognosticator for outcome of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinstein Robert A

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When Staphylococcus aureus is isolated in urine, it is thought to usually represent hematogenous spread. Because such spread might have special clinical significance, we evaluated predictors and outcomes of S. aureus bacteriuria among patients with S. aureus bacteremia. Methods A case-control study was performed at John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County among adult inpatients during January 2002-December 2006. Cases and controls had positive and negative urine cultures, respectively, for S. aureus, within 72 hours of positive blood culture for S. aureus. Controls were sampled randomly in a 1:4 ratio. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were done. Results Overall, 59% of patients were African-American, 12% died, 56% of infections had community-onset infections, and 58% were infected with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA. Among 61 cases and 247 controls, predictors of S. aureus bacteriuria on multivariate analysis were urological surgery (OR = 3.4, p = 0.06 and genitourinary infection (OR = 9.2, p = 0.002. Among patients who died, there were significantly more patients with bacteriuria than among patients who survived (39% vs. 17%; p = 0.002. In multiple Cox regression analysis, death risks in bacteremic patients were bacteriuria (hazard ratio 2.9, CI 1.4-5.9, p = 0.004, bladder catheter use (2.0, 1.0-4.0, p = 0.06, and Charlson score (1.1, 1.1-1.3, p = 0.02. Neither length of stay nor methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection was a predictor of S. aureus bacteriuria or death. Conclusions Among patients with S. aureus bacteremia, those with S. aureus bacteriuria had 3-fold higher mortality than those without bacteriuria, even after adjustment for comorbidities. Bacteriuria may identify patients with more severe bacteremia, who are at risk of worse outcomes.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus and the ecology of the nasal microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Cindy M; Price, Lance B; Hungate, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    The human microbiome can play a key role in host susceptibility to pathogens, including in the nasal cavity, a site favored by Staphylococcus aureus. However, what determines our resident nasal microbiota-the host or the environment-and can interactions among nasal bacteria determine S. aureus...

  11. Duplex Identification of Staphylococcus aureus by Aptamer and Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tianjun; Wang, Libo; Zhao, Kexu; Ge, Yu; He, Meng; Li, Gang

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the top common pathogen causing infections and food poisoning. Identification of S. aureus is crucial for the disease diagnosis and regulation of food hygiene. Herein, we report an aptamer-AuNPs based method for duplex identification of S. aureus. Using AuNPs as an indicator, SA23, an aptamer against S. aureus, can well identify its target from Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Furthermore, we find citrate-coated AuNPs can strongly bind to S. aureus, but not bind to Salmonella enterica and Proteus mirabilis, which leads to different color changes in salt solution. This colorimetric response is capable of distinguishing S. aureus from S. enteritidis and P. mirabilis. Thus, using the aptasensor and AuNPs together, S. aureus can be accurately identified from the common pathogens. This duplex identification system is a promising platform for simple visual identification of S. aureus. Additionally, in the aptasensing process, bacteria are incubated with aptamers and then be removed before the aptamers adding to AuNPs, which may avoid the interactions between bacteria and AuNPs. This strategy can be potentially applied in principle to detect other cells by AuNPs-based aptasensors.

  12. The changing epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laupland, K B; Lyytikäinen, O; Søgaard, M;

    2012-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect ABSTRACT: Although the epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) has been changing, international comparisons are lacking. We sought to determine the incidence of S. aureus BSI and assess trends over time and by region. Population-based surveillance...

  13. Daya Hambat Ekstrak Aloe Vera terhadap pertumbuhan Staphylococcus Aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmat, drg.Sp,Pros

    2011-01-01

    Dari hasil penelitian , maka dapat disimpulkan bahwa ekstrak Aloe Vera dapat menghambat pertumbuhan bakteri Stafhylococcus aureus, dan kadar hambat minimal ekstrak Aloe Vera adalah pada konsentrasi 25%. Tujuan Penelitan Ini adalah untuk mengetahui efektifitas ekstrak Aloe vera dalam menghambat pertumbuhan bakteri Stafhylococcus aureus dan daya hambat menimal, (DHM) terhadap pertumbuhan bakteri tersebut. Metode yang digunakan adalah pertumbuhan ekstrak Aloe vera, penegnceran ekstrak , pemur...

  14. Pneumonia and new methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garnier, Fabien; Tristan, Anne; François, Bruno; Etienne, Jerome; Delage-Corre, Manuella; Martin, Christian; Liassine, Nadia; Wannet, Wim; Denis, François; Ploy, Marie-Cécile

    2006-01-01

    Necrotizing pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus strains carrying the Panton-Valentin leukocidin gene is a newly described disease entity. We report a new fatal case of necrotizing pneumonia. An S. aureus strain with an agr1 allele and of a new sequence type 377 was recovered, representing a ne

  15. Survival of Staphylococcus aureus on fomites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Alicia; Nastri, Natalia; Bernat, Maria; Brusca, Maria; Turcot, Liliana; Nastri, Maria; Rosa, Alcira C

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate duration of survival of Staphylococcus aureus on contaminated standardized fomites, such as sterilization paper (SP) and polyester previously sterilized in a steam autoclave, and to determine the potential inhibitory effects of the substrates (fabrics used to manufacture garments and special wrapping paper used in the dental setting) using the bacteriostasis test. The test was performed on two types of sterile standardized samples (T1 and T2). Sterility of the samples was validated following the protocol in use at the Department of Microbiology, after which the samples were inoculated with 50 microl of a calibrated suspension of Staphylococcus aureus (reference strain ATCC 25923) in the exponential growth phase, in a final concentration of 10(7) cfu/ml and 10(6) cfu/ml). The samples were incubated at 27 degrees C and survival and concentration of microorganisms attached to the surface of the substrates was determined at the following experimental time points: immediately post-contamination, and 3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days, and 7 days post-contamination. Recovery was determined and expressed as a percentage; the bacteriostasis test was performed and showed negative results. Our results suggest that the quantity of recovered microorganisms varies according to the type of substrate and that there is a relation between survival and incubation time of the inoculated substrate serving as an artificial niche.

  16. Antimicrobial drug resistance ofStaphylococcus aureus in dairy products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sasidharan S; Prema B; Yoga Latha L

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the prevalence of multidrug resistantStaphylococcus aureus(S. aureus) in dairy products.Methods:Isolation and identification ofS. aureus were performed in3 dairy-based food products. The isolates were tested for their susceptibility to5 different common antimicrobial drugs.Results:Of50 samples examined,5 (10%) were contaminated with S. aureus. Subsequently, the5 isolates were subjected to antimicrobial resistance pattern using five antibiotic discs (methicillin, vancomycin, kanamycin, chloramphenicol and tetracycline). Sample 29 showed resistance to methicillin and vancomycin. Sample18 showed intermediate response to tetracycline. The other samples were susceptible to all the antibiotics tested.Conclusions:The results provide preliminary data on sources of food contamination which may act as vehicles for the transmission of antimicrobial-resistantStaphylococcus.Therefore, it enables us to develop preventive strategies to avoid the emergence of new strains of resistantS. aureus.

  17. Quantitation of Staphylococcus aureus in seawater using CHROMagar SA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Alan D; Pombo, David; Hui, Jennifer; Kurano, Michelle; Bankowski, Matthew J; Seifried, Steven E

    2010-01-01

    A microbiological algorithm has been developed to analyze beach water samples for the determination of viable colony forming units (CFU) of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Membrane filtration enumeration of S. aureus from recreational beach waters using the chromogenic media CHROMagar SA alone yields a positive predictive value (PPV) of 70%. Presumptive CHROMagar SA colonies were confirmed as S. aureus by 24-hour tube coagulase test. Combined, these two tests yield a PPV of 100%. This algorithm enables accurate quantitation of S. aureus in seawater in 72 hours and could support risk-prediction processes for recreational waters. A more rapid protocol, utilizing a 4-hour tube coagulase confirmatory test, enables a 48-hour turnaround time with a modest false negative rate of less than 10%.

  18. Specificity for human hemoglobin enhances Staphylococcus aureus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishchany, Gleb; McCoy, Amanda L.; Torres, Victor J.; Krause, Jens C.; Crowe, James E.; Fabry, Mary E.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Iron is required for bacterial proliferation and Staphylococcus aureus steals this metal from host hemoglobin during invasive infections. This process involves hemoglobin binding to the cell wall of S. aureus, heme extraction, passage through the cell envelope, and degradation to release free iron. Herein we demonstrate an enhanced ability of S. aureus to bind hemoglobin derived from humans as compared to other mammals. Increased specificity for human hemoglobin (hHb) translates into an improved ability to acquire iron and is entirely dependent on the staphylococcal hemoglobin receptor IsdB. This feature affects host-pathogen interaction as demonstrated by the increased susceptibility of hHb expressing mice to systemic staphylococcal infection. Interestingly, enhanced utilization of human hemoglobin is not a uniform property of all bacterial pathogens. These results suggest a step in the evolution of S. aureus to better colonize the human host and establish hHb expressing mice as a model of S. aureus pathogenesis. PMID:21147468

  19. In vitro antimicrobial effects and mechanism of atmospheric-pressure He/O2 plasma jet on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zimu; Shen, Jie; Cheng, Cheng; Hu, Shuheng; Lan, Yan; Chu, Paul K.

    2017-03-01

    The antimicrobial effects and associated mechanism of inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) NCTC-8325 biofilms induced by a He/O2 atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) are investigated in vitro. According to CFU (colony forming units) counting and the resazurin-based assay, the 10 min He/O2 (0.5%) APPJ treatment produces the optimal inactivation efficacy (>5 log10 ml‑1) against the S. aureus biofilm and 5% of the bacteria enter a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state. Meanwhile, 94% of the bacteria suffer from membrane damage according to SYTO 9/PI counterstaining. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals that plasma exposure erodes the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and then the cellular structure. The H2DCFDA-stained biofilms show larger concentrations of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in membrane-intact bacteria with increasing plasma dose. The admixture of oxygen in the working gas highly contributes to the deactivation efficacy of the APPJ against S. aureus and the plasma-induced endogenous ROS may work together with the discharge-generated ROS to continuously damage the bacterial membrane structure leading to deactivation of the biofilm microbes.

  20. Subinhibitory concentrations of thymol reduce enterotoxins A and B and alpha-hemolysin production in Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazhang Qiu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Targeting bacterial virulence factors is now gaining interest as an alternative strategy to develop new types of anti-infective agents. It has been shown that thymol, when used at low concentrations, can inhibit the TSST-1 secretion in Staphylococcus aureus. However, there are no data on the effect of thymol on the production of other exotoxins (e.g., alpha-hemolysin and enterotoxins by S. aureus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Secretion of alpha-hemolysin, SEA and SEB in both methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates cultured with graded subinhibitory concentrations of thymol was detected by immunoblot analysis. Hemolysin and tumor necrosis factor (TNF release assays were performed to elucidate the biological relevance of changes in alpha-hemolysin, SEA and SEB secretion induced by thymol. In addition, the influence of thymol on the transcription of hla, sea, and seb (the genes encoding alpha-hemolysin, SEA and SEB, respectively was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. Thymol inhibited transcription of hla, sea and seb in S. aureus, resulting in a reduction of alpha-hemolysin, SEA and SEB secretion and, thus, a reduction in hemolytic and TNF-inducing activities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Subinhibitory concentrations of thymol decreased the production of alpha-hemolysin, SEA and SEB in both MSSA and MRSA in a dose-dependent manner. These data suggest that thymol may be useful for the treatment of S. aureus infections when used in combination with beta-lactams and glycopeptide antibiotics, which induce expression of alpha-hemolysin and enterotoxins at subinhibitory concentrations. Furthermore, the structure of thymol may potentially be used as a basic structure for development of drugs aimed against these bacterial virulence factors.

  1. Efektivitas Ekstrak Daun Jambu Biji Buah Putih Terhadap Pertumbuhan Staphylococcus aureus Dari Abses Dan Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC® 29213™)

    OpenAIRE

    Sinurat, Jojor

    2016-01-01

    Daun jambu biji mengandung senyawa aktif seperti tanin, triterpenoid, flavonoid, saponin yang mempunyai efek antibakteri. Mekanisme tanin sebagai antibakteri dengan mengkerutkan dinding sel dan membran sel, inaktivasi enzim, inaktivasi fungsi materi genetik bakteri. Flavonoid merusak sel bakteri, denaturasi protein, inaktivasi enzim dan menyebabkan lisis. Triterpenoid dan saponin menghambat pertumbuhan Staphylococcus aureus dengan cara merusak struktur membran sel. Staphylococcus aureus adala...

  2. Amphibian antimicrobial peptide fallaxin analogue FL9 affects virulence gene expression and DNA replication in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Sanne; Gottlieb, Caroline T; Vestergaard, Martin; Hansen, Paul R; Gram, Lone; Ingmer, Hanne; Thomsen, Line E

    2015-12-01

    The rapid rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens is causing increased health concerns, and consequently there is an urgent need for novel antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which have been isolated from a wide range of organisms, represent a very promising class of novel antimicrobials. In the present study, the analogue FL9, based on the amphibian AMP fallaxin, was studied to elucidate its mode of action and antibacterial activity against the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Our data showed that FL9 may have a dual mode of action against S. aureus. At concentrations around the MIC, FL9 bound DNA, inhibited DNA synthesis and induced the SOS DNA damage response, whereas at concentrations above the MIC the interaction between S. aureus and FL9 led to membrane disruption. The antibacterial activity of the peptide was maintained over a wide range of NaCl and MgCl(2) concentrations and at alkaline pH, while it was compromised by acidic pH and exposure to serum. Furthermore, at subinhibitory concentrations of FL9, S. aureus responded by increasing the expression of two major virulence factor genes, namely the regulatory rnaIII and hla, encoding α-haemolysin. In addition, the S. aureus-encoded natural tolerance mechanisms included peptide cleavage and the addition of positive charge to the cell surface, both of which minimized the antimicrobial activity of FL9. Our results add new information about FL9 and its effect on S. aureus, which may aid in the future development of analogues with improved therapeutic potential.

  3. The Role of MicroRNA, miR-24, and Its Target CHI3L1 in Osteomyelitis Caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Lu, Yong; He, Qing Xiao; Wang, Hai; Li, Bing Fu; Zhu, Liang Yue; Xu, Qing Yong

    2015-12-01

    Osteomyelitis is a debilitating infectious disease of the bone which is predominantly caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to play a regulatory role in osteogenesis. In the present study, the expression levels of miRNAs proposed to potentially play a regulatory role in bone formation or differentiation (miR-24, miR-29b, miR-200a, miR-208, miR-322) were analyzed in the whole blood of patients with bacterial osteomyelitis or healthy controls, and in MC3T3-E1 cells infected with S. aureus by qRT-PCR. The expression of miR-24 was significantly down-regulated in osteomyelitis patients and S. aureus-infected MC3T3-E1 cells compared with the healthy controls or untreated control cells. Moreover, our results showed that S. aureus inhibited MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation, induced osteoblast apoptosis and prohibited bone formation and mineralization. We found that overexpression of miR-24 could reduce the effects of S. aureus, while inhibition of miR-24 intensified the effects. We also demonstrated that miR-24 suppressed the expression of chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) mRNA, thought to mediate multiple signaling pathways, by directly binding to the 3'-untranslated region.

  4. Petrifilm rapid S. aureus Count Plate method for rapid enumeration of Staphylococcus aureus in selected foods: collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silbernagel, K M; Lindberg, K G

    2001-01-01

    A rehydratable dry-film plating method for Staphylococcus aureus in foods, the 3M Petrifilm Rapid S. aureus Count Plate method, was compared with AOAC Official Method 975.55 (Staphylococcus aureus in Foods). Nine foods-instant nonfat dried milk, dry seasoned vegetable coating, frozen hash browns, frozen cooked chicken patty, frozen ground raw pork, shredded cheddar cheese, fresh green beans, pasta filled with beef and cheese, and egg custard-were analyzed for S. aureus by 13 collaborating laboratories. For each food tested, the collaborators received 8 blind test samples consisting of a control sample and 3 levels of inoculated test sample, each in duplicate. The mean log counts for the methods were comparable for pasta filled with beef and cheese; frozen hash browns; cooked chicken patty; egg custard; frozen ground raw pork; and instant nonfat dried milk. The repeatability and reproducibility variances of the Petrifilm Rapid S. aureus Count Plate method were similar to those of the standard method.

  5. Radiosynthesis and biological evaluation of the {sup 99m}Tc-tricarbonyl moxifloxacin dithiocarbamate complex as a potential Staphylococcus aureus infection radiotracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Syed Qaiser, E-mail: ssqaiser2002@yahoo.co [Nuclear Medicine Research Laboratory (NMRL), University of Peshawar, Peshawar, KPK (Pakistan); Khan, Muhammad Rafiullah [Phytopharmaceutical and Neutraceuticals Research Laboratory (PNRL), University of Peshawar, Peshawar, KPK (Pakistan)

    2011-04-15

    In the present investigation, radiosynthesis of the {sup 99m}Tc-tricarbonyl moxifloxacin dithiocarbamate complex ({sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}-MXND) and its biological evaluation in male Wister rats (MWR) artificially infected with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) was assessed. The {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}-MXND complex was radiochemically examined in terms of stability in saline and in serum and biologically its in-vitro binding with S. aureus and percent absorption in MWR models. Radiochemically the {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}-MXND complex showed more than 90% stability in saline up to 240 min and in serum 14.95% undesirable species was appeared within 16 h. In-vitro the {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}-MXND complex showed saturated binding with S. aureus. In MWR artificially infected with live S. aureus the complex showed about six fold higher uptakes in the infected muscle as compared to the normal muscle. However, insignificant change in the uptake of {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}-MXND complex in the infected and inflamed or normal muscle was observed in the MWR infected with heat killed S. aureus. The {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}-MXND complex disappeared from the circulatory system and appeared in the urinary system within 60-90 min followed by excretion through normal route of urinary system. Based on the elevated and stable radiochemical succumb in saline, serum, saturated in-vitro binding with S. aureus and higher accumulation in the target organ of the MWR, we recommend the {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}-MXND complex for radio-localization of the infection induced by S. aureus in human.

  6. Mammary Gland Pathology Subsequent to Acute Infection with Strong versus Weak Biofilm Forming Staphylococcus aureus Bovine Mastitis Isolates: A Pilot Study Using Non-Invasive Mouse Mastitis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi-Tiwari, Jully; Williams, Vincent; Waryah, Charlene Babra; Costantino, Paul; Al-Salami, Hani; Mathavan, Sangeetha; Wells, Kelsi; Tiwari, Harish Kumar; Hegde, Nagendra; Isloor, Shrikrishna; Al-Sallami, Hesham; Mukkur, Trilochan

    2017-01-01

    Background Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus is an important virulence attribute because of its potential to induce persistent antibiotic resistance, retard phagocytosis and either attenuate or promote inflammation, depending upon the disease syndrome, in vivo. This study was undertaken to evaluate the potential significance of strength of biofilm formation by clinical bovine mastitis-associated S. aureus in mammary tissue damage by using a mouse mastitis model. Methods Two S. aureus strains of the same capsular phenotype with different biofilm forming strengths were used to non-invasively infect mammary glands of lactating mice. Biofilm forming potential of these strains were determined by tissue culture plate method, ica typing and virulence gene profile per detection by PCR. Delivery of the infectious dose of S. aureus was directly through the teat lactiferous duct without invasive scraping of the teat surface. Both bacteriological and histological methods were used for analysis of mammary gland pathology of mice post-infection. Results Histopathological analysis of the infected mammary glands revealed that mice inoculated with the strong biofilm forming S. aureus strain produced marked acute mastitic lesions, showing profuse infiltration predominantly with neutrophils, with evidence of necrosis in the affected mammary glands. In contrast, the damage was significantly less severe in mammary glands of mice infected with the weak biofilm-forming S. aureus strain. Although both IL-1β and TNF-α inflammatory biomarkers were produced in infected mice, level of TNF-α produced was significantly higher (p<0.05) in mice inoculated with strong biofilm forming S. aureus than the weak biofilm forming strain. Conclusion This finding suggests an important role of TNF-α in mammary gland pathology post-infection with strong biofilm-forming S. aureus in the acute mouse mastitis model, and offers an opportunity for the development of novel strategies for reduction of

  7. Antibacterial activity of THAM Trisphenylguanide against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Alan J; Shepard, Joyce B; Wilkinson, Royce A; Watkins, Robert L; Walton, Sarah K; Radke, Amanda R; Wright, Thomas J; Awel, Milat B; Cooper, Catherine; Erikson, Elizabeth; Labib, Mohamed E; Voyich, Jovanka M; Teintze, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the potential antibacterial activity of three series of compounds synthesized from 12 linear and branched polyamines with 2-8 amino groups, which were substituted to produce the corresponding guanides, biguanides, or phenylguanides, against Acinetobacter baumannii, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Antibacterial activity was measured for each compound by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration against the bacteria, and the toxicity towards mammalian cells was determined. The most effective compound, THAM trisphenylguanide, was studied in time-to-kill and cytoplasmic leakage assays against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, USA300) in comparison to chlorhexidine. Preliminary toxicity and MRSA challenge studies in mice were also conducted on this compound. THAM trisphenylguanide showed significant antibacterial activity (MIC ∼1 mg/L) and selectivity against MRSA relative to all the other bacteria examined. In time-to-kill assays it showed increased antimicrobial activity against MRSA versus chlorhexidine. It induced leakage of cytoplasmic content at concentrations that did not reduce cell viability, suggesting the mechanism of action may involve membrane disruption. Using an intraperitoneal mouse model of invasive MRSA disease, THAM trisphenylguanide reduced bacterial burden locally and in deeper tissues. This study has identified a novel guanide compound with selective microbicidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus, including a methicillin-resistant (MRSA) strain.

  8. Low-shear modelled microgravity alters expression of virulence determinants of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Helena; Doyle, Marie; Hinds, Jason; Taylor, Peter W.

    2010-02-01

    Microbiological monitoring of air and surfaces within the ISS indicate that bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus are found with high frequency. Staphylococcus aureus, an opportunistic pathogen with the capacity to cause severe debilitating infection, constitutes a significant proportion of these isolates. Experiments conducted during short-term flight suggest that growth in microgravity leads to increases in bacterial antibiotic resistance and to cell wall changes. Growth under low-shear modelled microgravity (LSMMG) indicated that a reduced gravitational field acts as an environmental signal for expression of enhanced bacterial virulence in gram-negative pathogens. We therefore examined the effect of simulated microgravity on parameters of antibiotic susceptibility and virulence in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates RF1, RF6 and RF11; these strains were grown in a high aspect ratio vessel under LSMMG and compared with cells grown under normal gravity (NG). There were no significant differences in antibiotic susceptibility of staphylococci grown under LSMMG compared to NG. LSMMG-induced reductions in synthesis of the pigment staphyloxanthin and the major virulence determinant α-toxin were noted. Significant changes in global gene expression were identified by DNA microarray analysis; with isolate RF6, the expression of hla and genes of the regulatory system saeR/saeS were reduced approximately two-fold. These data provide strong evidence that growth of S. aureus under modelled microgravity leads to a reduction in expression of virulence determinants.

  9. Antibacterial activity of THAM Trisphenylguanide against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan J Weaver

    Full Text Available This study investigated the potential antibacterial activity of three series of compounds synthesized from 12 linear and branched polyamines with 2-8 amino groups, which were substituted to produce the corresponding guanides, biguanides, or phenylguanides, against Acinetobacter baumannii, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Antibacterial activity was measured for each compound by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration against the bacteria, and the toxicity towards mammalian cells was determined. The most effective compound, THAM trisphenylguanide, was studied in time-to-kill and cytoplasmic leakage assays against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, USA300 in comparison to chlorhexidine. Preliminary toxicity and MRSA challenge studies in mice were also conducted on this compound. THAM trisphenylguanide showed significant antibacterial activity (MIC ∼1 mg/L and selectivity against MRSA relative to all the other bacteria examined. In time-to-kill assays it showed increased antimicrobial activity against MRSA versus chlorhexidine. It induced leakage of cytoplasmic content at concentrations that did not reduce cell viability, suggesting the mechanism of action may involve membrane disruption. Using an intraperitoneal mouse model of invasive MRSA disease, THAM trisphenylguanide reduced bacterial burden locally and in deeper tissues. This study has identified a novel guanide compound with selective microbicidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus, including a methicillin-resistant (MRSA strain.

  10. Cell surface hydrophobicity and charge of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci from bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, W; Rozgonyi, F; Brown, A; Hjertén, S; Wadström, T

    1987-03-01

    The effects of seven growth media on cell surface hydrophobicity of a collection of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from bovine mastitis were compared in the salt-aggregation test. Thirty-three per cent of Staph. aureus strains showed extremely high cell surface hydrophobicity (auto-aggregated) and 28% were moderately hydrophobic while 26% were hydrophilic after growth on horse blood agar at 37 degrees C for 18 h. There were great variations in the proportion and degree of the hydrophobicity depending on the medium used. Cultivations on/in capsule-inducing media caused a shift from a high to a low degree of hydrophobicity, although a microscopically detectable capsule or slime layer was seen in only one strain. This strain and encapsulated reference strains had a hydrophilic cell surface and migrated faster in free zone electrophoresis than cells of unencapsulated strains. Cells of strains grown on staphylococcus medium 110 agar migrated faster than those grown on horse blood agar regardless of their capsule production. Coagulase-negative staphylococci showed uniformly hydrophilic cell surface after cultivation on horse blood agar, but not when grown in tryptic soy broth or proteose peptone broth. It was concluded that most of the Staph. aureus strains from bovine mastitis under a variety of growth conditions in stationary phase culture constantly expressed hydrophobic cell surface.

  11. Electrochemical impedance immunosensor for rapid detection of stressed pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekir, Karima; Barhoumi, Houcine; Braiek, Mohamed; Chrouda, Amani; Zine, Nadia; Abid, Nabil; Maaref, Abdelrazek; Bakhrouf, Amina; Ouada, Hafedh Ben; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Mansour, Hedi Ben

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we report the adaptation of bacteria to stress conditions that induce instability of their cultural, morphological, and enzymatic characters, on which the identification of pathogenic bacteria is based. These can raise serious issues during the characterization of bacteria. The timely detection of pathogens is also a subject of great importance. For this reason, our objective is oriented towards developing an immunosensing system for rapid detection and quantification of Staphylococcus aureus. Polyclonal anti-S. aureus are immobilized onto modified gold electrode by self-assembled molecular monolayer (SAM) method. The electrochemical performances of the developed immunosensor were evaluated by impedance spectroscopy through the monitoring of the charge transfer resistance at the modified solid/liquid interface using ferri-/ferrocyanide as redox probe. The developed immunosensor was applied to detect stressed and resuscitate bacteria. As a result, a stable and reproducible immunosensor with sensitivity of 15 kΩ/decade and a detection limit of 10 CFU/mL was obtained for the S. aureus concentrations ranging from 10(1) to 10(7) CFU/mL. A low deviation in the immunosensor response (±10 %) was signed when it is exposed to stressed and not stressed bacteria.

  12. 58株致肺炎金黄色葡萄球菌耐药性分布及耐药菌体外诱导耐药情况分析%Drug Resistance Distribution of 58 Strains of Staphylococcus Aureus Leading to Pneumonia and Situation Analysis of Drug-fast Bacteria in Vitro Induc-tion of Resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许恒贵

    2015-01-01

    目的:以58株金黄色葡萄球菌为例,分析其耐药性分布,指导临床抗生素的合理使用。通过体外诱导耐药,初步探讨其耐药机制。方法整群选取该院2013年3月—2014年3月临床分离得到的58株金黄色葡萄球菌,进行药敏实验,分析其耐药性分布。通过体外诱导法建立金黄色葡萄球菌的耐药模型,初步探讨其耐药机制。结果58株金黄色葡萄球菌中,分离出32株耐甲氧西林金黄色葡萄球菌(MRSA),占金黄色葡萄球菌的55.2%。金黄色葡萄球菌主要分布在ICU病房、呼吸内科以及神经外科。主要感染标本为痰液和分泌物。所分离到的58株菌对万古霉素和利奈唑胺均敏感,青霉素耐药率为98.3%。结论金黄色葡萄球菌主要分布在门诊、ICU等科室,且耐药菌株的数量已不容乐观,应引起临床上的足够重视,加强抗生素合理使用的管理以及对金黄色葡萄球菌感染的监测。%Objective To analyze the drug resistance distribution by taking 58 strains of staphylococcus aureus for example in order to guide the rational use of clinical antibiotics and preliminarily discuss the drug resistance mechanism by in vitro induction of resistance. Methods 58 strains of Staphylococcus aureus obtained by clinical isolates from March 2013 to March 2014 were selected and the drug resistance distribution of them were analyzed by drug sensitivity test, the drug re-sistance model of staphylococcus aureus was built by in vitro induction method and its drug resistance mechanism was pre-liminarily discussed. Results 32 strains of staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were separated from 58 strains of staphylococcus aureus, accounting for 55.2% of staphylococcus aureus, staphylococcus aureus was mainly distributed in the ICU ward, res-piratory department of internal medicine and department of neurosurgery, the main infection specimens were sputum and se-cretion, the isolated 58 strains were

  13. The molecular changing mechanism of Ampicillin-Sulbactam resistant Staphylococcus aureus towards Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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    Mieke Hemiawati Satari

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the molecular changing of S.aureus, which is resistant to Ampicillin-Sulbactam and then become resistant to Methicillin as a result of improper dosage. The study was conducted by isolating Ampicillin-Sulbactam resistant and Methicillin Resistant S.aureus (MRSA, afterwards an amplification process was performed by PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction. to isolate the betalactamase enzyme regulator and PBP 2a genes. The result of this research showed that there were a deletion of few amino acids from the regulator gene, and a suspicion that the DNA sequence had been substituted from PBP 2 gene into PBP 2a (gen mec. This process had formed MRSA.

  14. Salicylic acid enhances Staphylococcus aureus extracellular adhesin protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Lucía P; Barbagelata, María S; Cheung, Ambrose L; Sordelli, Daniel O; Buzzola, Fernanda R

    2011-11-01

    One of the virulence factors required by Staphylococcus aureus at the early stages of infection is Eap, a secreted adhesin that binds many host proteins and is upregulated by the two-component regulatory system saeRS. The S. aureus Newman strain harbors a mutation in saeS that is thought to be responsible for the high level of Eap expression in this strain. This study was designed to ascertain whether salicylic acid (SAL) affects the expression of Eap and the internalization of S. aureus into epithelial cells. The strain Newman treated with SAL exhibited increased levels of eap transcription and protein expression. Furthermore, SAL treatment increased the eap promoter activity. SAL treatment enhanced Eap expression in the Newman and in other S. aureus strains that do not carry the mutation in saeS. Internalization of S. aureus eap and sae mutants into the MAC-T epithelial cells was significantly decreased compared with the wild-type counterparts. In conclusion, we demonstrated that a low concentration of SAL increased S. aureus Eap expression possibly due to enhancement of sae. SAL may create the conditions for S. aureus persistence in the host, not only by decreasing the capsular polysaccharide expression as shown before, but also by enhancing Eap expression.

  15. Neutrophil-mediated phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus

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    Jos A.G. Van Strijp

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available For invading staphylococci, phagocytosis an killing bij human neutrophils is the biggest threat. Neutrophils are the only cells that can effectively kill staphylococci by engulfment and subsequent bombardment with proteases, amidases, antimicrobial peptides and proteins in concert with reactive oxygen species that are generated during the metabolic burst.Both complement and antibodies are crucial for effective uptake and neutrophil activation. S. aureus is not an innocent bystander in this process. It actively secretes several proteins to impair every single step in this process from receptor modulation, to complement inhibition to neutrophil lysis to protease, antimicrobial peptide inhibition and resistance to reactive oxygen species. For the design of future novel antimicrobial strategies: therapeutic antibodies, vaccines, novel antibiotics, all this should be taken into account. Still the best way to treat diseases is to help to enhance the natural defence mechanism that are already in place.

  16. Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus from patients with surgical site infections at Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda.

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    Jeremiah Seni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is progressively increasing globally with significant regional variation. Understanding the Staphylococcus aureus lineages is crucial in controlling nosocomial infections. Recent studies on S. aureus in Uganda have revealed an escalating burden of MRSA. However, the S. aureus genotypes circulating among patients are not known. Here, we report S. aureus lineages circulating in patients with surgical site infections (SSI at Mulago National hospital, Kampala, Uganda. METHODS: A cross-sectional study involving 314 patients with SSI at Mulago National Hospital was conducted from September 2011 to April 2012. Pus swabs from the patients' SSI were processed using standard microbiological procedures. Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA were identified using phenotypic tests and confirmed by PCR-detection of the nuc and mecA genes, respectively. SCCmec genotypes were determined among MRSA isolates using multiplex PCR. Furthermore, to determine lineages, spa sequence based-genotyping was performed on all S. aureus isolates. RESULTS: Of the 314 patients with SSI, S. aureus accounted for 20.4% (64/314, of which 37.5% (24/64 were MRSA. The predominant SCCmec types were type V (33.3%, 8/24 and type I (16.7%, 4/24. The predominant spa lineages were t645 (17.2%, 11/64 and t4353 (15.6%, 10/64, and these were found to be clonally circulating in all the surgical wards. On the other hand, lineages t064, t355, and t4609 were confined to the obstetrics and gynecology wards. A new spa type (t10277 was identified from MSSA isolate. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, cancer and inducible clindamycin resistance remained as independent predictors of MRSA-SSI. CONCLUSION: SCCmec types I and V are the most prevalent MRSA mecA types from the patients' SSI. The predominant spa lineages (t645 and t4353 are clonally circulating in all the surgical wards, calling for

  17. Simultaneous breakdown of multiple antibiotic resistance mechanisms in S. aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneti, Galoz; Sarig, Hadar; Marjieh, Ibrahim; Fadia, Zaknoon; Mor, Amram

    2013-12-01

    In previous studies, the oligo-acyl-lysyl (OAK) C12(ω7)K-β12 added to cultures of gram-positive bacteria exerted a bacteriostatic activity that was associated with membrane depolarization, even at high concentrations. Here, we report that multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains, unlike other gram-positive species, have reverted to the sensitive phenotype when exposed to subminimal inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of the OAK, thereby increasing antibiotics potency by up to 3 orders of magnitude. Such chemosensitization was achieved using either cytoplasm or cell-wall targeting antibiotics. Moreover, eventual emergence of resistance to antibiotics was significantly delayed. Using the mouse peritonitis-sepsis model, we show that on single-dose administration of oxacillin and OAK combinations, death induced by a lethal staphylococcal infection was prevented in a synergistic manner, thereby supporting the likelihood for synergism to persist under in vivo conditions. Toward illuminating the molecular basis for these observations, we present data arguing that sub-MIC OAK interactions with the plasma membrane can inhibit proton-dependent signal transduction responsible for expression and export of resistance factors, as demonstrated for β-lactamase and PBP2a. Collectively, the data reveal a potentially useful approach for overcoming antibiotic resistance and for preventing resistance from emerging as readily as when bacteria are exposed to an antibiotic alone.

  18. Structural and functional characterization of Staphylococcus aureus dihydrodipicolinate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, Tavarekere S; Sharma, Eshita; Gopal, B

    2008-08-20

    Lysine biosynthesis is crucial for cell-wall formation in bacteria. Enzymes involved in lysine biosynthesis are thus potential targets for anti-microbial therapeutics. Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) catalyzes the first step of this pathway. Unlike its homologues, Staphylococcus aureus DHDPS is a dimer both in solution and in the crystal and is not feedback inhibited by lysine. The crystal structure of S. aureus DHDPS in the free and substrate bound forms provides a structural rationale for its catalytic mechanism. The structure also reveals unique conformational features of the S. aureus enzyme that could be crucial for the design of specific non-competitive inhibitors.

  19. The Effect of Essential Oils on Staphylococcus aureus

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    Seda Ozdikmenli

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus are widespread through the world in spite of developing technology. S. aureus is an important pathogen causing food intoxications besides hospital infections by its antibiotic resistant strains. Nowadays, there has been worldwide increasing concern on usage of natural products to control microorganisms. One of these natural products is essential oils. They are produced from plants especially from spices and composed of many components and volatiles. This review summarizes informative literature on essential oils and their mode of antimicrobial action. In addition, current knowledge on in vitro researches on antibacterial activity of essential oils and food applications to control S. aureus has been discussed.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm and Planktonic cultures differentially impact gene expression, mapk phosphorylation, and cytokine production in human keratinocytes

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    Olerud John E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many chronic diseases, such as non-healing wounds are characterized by prolonged inflammation and respond poorly to conventional treatment. Bacterial biofilms are a major impediment to wound healing. Persistent infection of the skin allows the formation of complex bacterial communities termed biofilm. Bacteria living in biofilms are phenotypically distinct from their planktonic counterparts and are orders of magnitude more resistant to antibiotics, host immune response, and environmental stress. Staphylococcus aureus is prevalent in cutaneous infections such as chronic wounds and is an important human pathogen. Results The impact of S. aureus soluble products in biofilm-conditioned medium (BCM or in planktonic-conditioned medium (PCM on human keratinocytes was investigated. Proteomic analysis of BCM and PCM revealed differential protein compositions with PCM containing several enzymes involved in glycolysis. Global gene expression of keratinocytes exposed to biofilm and planktonic S. aureus was analyzed after four hours of exposure. Gene ontology terms associated with responses to bacteria, inflammation, apoptosis, chemotaxis, and signal transduction were enriched in BCM treated keratinocytes. Several transcripts encoding cytokines were also upregulated by BCM after four hours. ELISA analysis of cytokines confirmed microarray results at four hours and revealed that after 24 hours of exposure, S. aureus biofilm induced sustained low level cytokine production compared to near exponential increases of cytokines in planktonic treated keratinocytes. The reduction in cytokines produced by keratinocytes exposed to biofilm was accompanied by suppressed phosphorylation of MAPKs. Chemical inhibition of MAPKs did not drastically reduce cytokine production in BCM-treated keratinocytes suggesting that the majority of cytokine production is mediated through MAPK-independent mechanisms. Conclusions Collectively the results indicate that S

  1. Staphylococcus aureus 'Down Under': contemporary epidemiology of S. aureus in Australia, New Zealand, and the South West Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, D A; Coombs, G W; Nimmo, G R

    2014-07-01

    The clinical and molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus disease has changed considerably over the past two decades, particularly with the emergence and spread of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) clones. Indeed, some of the first global descriptions of CA-MRSA were from remote indigenous communities in Western Australia, and from Pacific Peoples in New Zealand. The epidemiology of S. aureus infections in the South West Pacific has several unique features, largely because of the relative geographical isolation and unique indigenous communities residing in this region. In particular, a number of distinct CA-MRSA clones circulate in Australia and New Zealand, such as sequence type (ST) 93 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) (Queensland clone) and clonal complex 75 S. aureus (Staphylococcus argenteus) in Australia, and ST30 MRSA (Southwest Pacific clone) in New Zealand. In addition, there is a disproportionate burden of S. aureus disease in indigenous paediatric populations, particularly in remote Aboriginal communities in Australia, and in Pacific Peoples and Maori in New Zealand. In this review, we provide a contemporary overview of the clinical and molecular epidemiology of S. aureus disease in the South West Pacific region, with a particular focus on features distinct to this region.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus intestinal colonization is associated with increased frequency of S. aureus on skin of hospitalized patients

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    Donskey Curtis J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intestinal colonization by Staphylococcus aureus among hospitalized patients has been associated with increased risk of staphylococcal infection and could potentially contribute to transmission. We hypothesized that S. aureus intestinal colonization is associated with increased frequency of S. aureus on patients' skin and nearby environmental surfaces. Methods Selected inpatients were cultured weekly for S. aureus from stool, nares, skin (groin and axilla, and environmental surfaces (bed rail and bedside table. Investigator's hands were cultured after contacting the patients' skin and the environmental surfaces. Results Of 71 subjects, 32 (45.1% had negative nares and stool cultures, 23 (32.4% had positive nares and stool cultures, 13 (18.3% were nares carriers only, and 3 (4.2% were stool carriers only. Of the 39 patients with S. aureus carriage, 30 (76.9% had methicillin-resistant isolates. In comparison to nares colonization only, nares and intestinal colonization was associated with increased frequency of positive skin cultures (41% versus 77%; p = 0.001 and trends toward increased environmental contamination (45% versus 62%; p = 0.188 and acquisition on investigator's hands (36% versus 60%; p = 0.057. Patients with negative nares and stool cultures had low frequency of S. aureus on skin and the environment (4.8% and 11.3%, respectively. Conclusion We found that hospitalized patients with S. aureus nares and/or stool carriage frequently had S. aureus on their skin and on nearby environmental surfaces. S. aureus intestinal colonization was associated with increased frequency of positive skin cultures, which could potentially facilitate staphylococcal infections and nosocomial transmission.

  3. Genetic effects of an air discharge plasma on Staphylococcus aureus at the gene transcription level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zimu; Wei, Jun; Shen, Jie; Liu, Yuan; Ma, Ronghua; Zhang, Zelong; Qian, Shulou; Ma, Jie; Lan, Yan; Zhang, Hao; Zhao, Ying; Xia, Weidong; Sun, Qiang; Cheng, Cheng; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-05-01

    The dynamics of gene expression regulation (at transcription level) in Staphylococcus aureus after different doses of atmospheric-pressure room-temperature air plasma treatments are investigated by monitoring the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The plasma treatment influences the transcription of genes which are associated with several important bio-molecular processes related to the environmental stress resistance of the bacteria, including oxidative stress response, biofilm formation, antibiotics resistance, and DNA damage protection/repair. The reactive species generated by the plasma discharge in the gas phase and/or induced in the liquid phase may account for these gene expression changes.

  4. Evaluation of a lysostaphin-fusion protein as a dry-cow therapy for Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoernig, K J; Donovan, D M; Pithua, P; Williams, F; Middleton, J R

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a recombinant lysostaphin fused to a protein transduction domain (rLYS-PTD) as a dry-cow therapy for the treatment of experimentally induced chronic, subclinical Staphylococcus aureus mastitis. Twenty-two Holstein dairy cows were experimentally infected with Staph. aureus in a single pair of diagonal mammary quarters approximately 45d before dry off. Staphylococcus aureus-infected mammary quarters of cows were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups at dry off: (1) 279mg of rLYS-PTD in 50mL of vehicle (n=11 cows; 22 quarters) or (2) 50mL of vehicle solution (n=11 cows; 22 quarters) by intramammary infusion. All cows were followed for 30d postpartum to determine cure rates using bacteriologic culture, somatic cell counts, and clinical mastitis scores. No cures were recorded in either the treatment or control groups. Milk somatic cell count, bacterial colony counts, and mastitis scores did not significantly differ between treatment groups. In conclusion, rLYS-PTD was not an effective dry-cow therapeutic for chronic, subclinical Staph. aureus mastitis at the tested dose and formulation.

  5. The Antibacterial Activity of Coriolus versicolor Methanol Extract and Its Effect on Ultrastructural Changes of Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella Enteritidis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matijašević, Danka; Pantić, Milena; Rašković, Božidar; Pavlović, Vladimir; Duvnjak, Dunja; Sknepnek, Aleksandra; Nikšić, Miomir

    2016-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of methanol extract obtained from fruiting body of industrially grown basidiomycete Coriolus versicolor was examined. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values against various bacteria ranged from 0.625 to 20 mg mL-1. C. versicolor expressed bactericidal activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The growth curves of Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis, measured at 630 nm, and confirmed with macrodilution method showed that the obtained extract could inhibit the growth of tested bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the loss of 260-nm-absorbing material were used to examine the ultrastructural changes in bacteria induced by the extract. When S. aureus was exposed to the MIC of C. versicolor, elongated and malformed cells were observed by SEM, while S. Enteritidis treated cells appeared shorter and aggregated with ruptured cell walls. TEM revealed the formation of non-membrane-enclosed bodies and depleted inner content of S. aureus. Larger and irregular periplasmic space and deformed and scattered components of the cell envelope were observed in treated S. Enteritidis. The loss of 260-nm-absorbing material indicated that the disruptive action of the extract on cytoplasmic membrane was more pronounced in S. aureus than in S. Enteritidis treated cells. The UV and FTIR spectrophotometric analyses revealed diverse composition of C. versicolor extract and high content of total phenolics. Altogether, mushroom extracts could be used to develop nutraceuticals or drugs effective against pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:27540376

  6. Neutrophil-derived IL-1β is sufficient for abscess formation in immunity against Staphylococcus aureus in mice.

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    John S Cho

    Full Text Available Neutrophil abscess formation is critical in innate immunity against many pathogens. Here, the mechanism of neutrophil abscess formation was investigated using a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus cutaneous infection. Gene expression analysis and in vivo multispectral noninvasive imaging during the S. aureus infection revealed a strong functional and temporal association between neutrophil recruitment and IL-1β/IL-1R activation. Unexpectedly, neutrophils but not monocytes/macrophages or other MHCII-expressing antigen presenting cells were the predominant source of IL-1β at the site of infection. Furthermore, neutrophil-derived IL-1β was essential for host defense since adoptive transfer of IL-1β-expressing neutrophils was sufficient to restore the impaired neutrophil abscess formation in S. aureus-infected IL-1β-deficient mice. S. aureus-induced IL-1β production by neutrophils required TLR2, NOD2, FPR1 and the ASC/NLRP3 inflammasome in an α-toxin-dependent mechanism. Taken together, IL-1β and neutrophil abscess formation during an infection are functionally, temporally and spatially linked as a consequence of direct IL-1β production by neutrophils.

  7. New epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus infection in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumburg, F; Alabi, A S; Peters, G; Becker, K

    2014-07-01

    Research on African Staphylococcus aureus has been largely neglected in the past, despite the cultural and geographical diversity in Africa, which has a significant impact on the epidemiology of this pathogen. The polarity between developed urban societies and remote rural populations (e.g. Pygmies), combined with close contact with animals (e.g. livestock and domestic animals, and wildlife), makes the epidemiology of S. aureus on the African continent unique and fascinating. Here, we try to draw an epidemiological picture of S. aureus colonization and infection in Africa, and focus on the wide spread of Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive isolates, the emergence of the hypervirulent methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clone USA300, and the dissemination of the typical African clone MRSA sequence type 88.

  8. [Recovery of Staphylococcus aureus after acid injury in milk products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assis, E M; De Carvalho, E P; Asquieri, E R; Robbs, P G

    1994-01-01

    The growth behavior of Staphylococcus aureus in fresh Cheese (Minas and Muzzarella) during their shelf-life was studied. The possible injury of this microorganism caused by the increasing acidity was also investigated. Raw milk was inoculated with 10(6) cells/ml (S. aureus FRIA-100) and the cheese production was performed according to normal procedures. Minas and muzzarella cheese were stored at 7 degrees C for 40 and 60 days, respectively. At 2-3 days intervals, the following analysis were performed: acidity, pH, S. aureus counting using agar Baird Parker by the traditional methods and by the method recommended by the American Public Health Association to evaluate the reparation of injured cells. We had a secure indication of the presence of injured S. aureus when acidity was in the range of 0.7 to 0.8% expressed in lactic acid and when the cycle was 1.3 log higher than the traditional one.

  9. Improving Diagnosis and Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus Infections : Experimental Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van den Berg (Sanne)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a variety of infections, ranging from mild skin infections like furuncles and impetigo, to severe, lifethreatening infections including endocarditis, osteomyelitis and pneumonia. Invasive infections are freq

  10. Environmental Staphylococcus aureus contamination in a Tunisian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharsa, Haythem; Dziri, Raoudha; Klibi, Naouel; Chairat, Sarra; Lozano, Carmen; Torres, Carmen; Bellaaj, Ridha; Slama, Karim Ben

    2016-12-01

    One hundred hospital environment samples were obtained in 2012 in a Tunisian hospital and tested for Staphylococcus aureus recovery. Antimicrobial resistance profile and virulence gene content were determined. Multilocus-sequence-typing (MLST), spa-typing, agr-typing and SmaI-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed. Two methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates typed as: ST247-t052-SCCmecI-agrI were recovered from the intensive care unit (ICU). Ten samples contained methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and these samples were collected in different services, highlighting the presence of the tst gene encoding the toxic shock syndrome toxin as well as the lukED, hla, hlb, hld and hlgv virulence genes in some of the isolates. In conclusion, we have shown that the hospital environment could be a reservoir contributing to dissemination of virulent S. aureus and MRSA.

  11. METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS STRAINS IN FOOD AND ANIMAL

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    A. Traversa

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Some authors reported the possibility of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA human infections from meat and dairy products and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus intermedius isolation in animals. The aim of this study is to investigate the methicillin-resistance in S. aureus strains and in S. intermedius strains (food and wild animals. 236 S.aureus strains from food, 36 S.aureus strains and 1 S. intermedius strain from wild animals were analyzed. 2 (0.74% MRSA strains from bovine milk were phenotipically resistant to cefoxitin, grew on chromogenic medium (MRSA Brilliance Oxoid and were mecA positive. All MRSA strains had the spa-type t899. All mecA positive strains showed at least resistance to eight of the antibiotics tested but none to glicopeptides. Both MRSA strains were enterotoxigenic.

  12. Rapid, Culture-Free Detection of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghardt, Elliot L.; Flenker, Katie S.; Clark, Karen C.; Miguel, Jeff; Ince, Dilek; Winokur, Patricia; Ford, Bradley; McNamara, James O.

    2016-01-01

    S. aureus bacteremia (SAB) is a common condition with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Current methods used to diagnose SAB take at least a day, and often longer. Patients with suspected bacteremia must therefore be empirically treated, often unnecessarily, while assay results are pending. In this proof-of-concept study, we describe an inexpensive assay that detects SAB via the detection of micrococcal nuclease (an enzyme secreted by S. aureus) in patient plasma samples in less than three hours. In total, 17 patient plasma samples from culture-confirmed S. aureus bacteremic individuals were tested. 16 of these yielded greater nuclease assay signals than samples from uninfected controls or individuals with non-S. aureus bacteremia. These results suggest that a nuclease-detecting assay may enable the rapid and inexpensive diagnosis of SAB, which is expected to substantially reduce the mortality and morbidity that result from this condition. PMID:27305148

  13. Fibrinogen binding sites P336 and Y338 of clumping factor A are crucial for Staphylococcus aureus virulence.

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    Elisabet Josefsson

    Full Text Available We have earlier shown that clumping factor A (ClfA, a fibrinogen binding surface protein of Staphylococcus aureus, is an important virulence factor in septic arthritis. When two amino acids in the ClfA molecule, P(336 and Y(338, were changed to serine and alanine, respectively, the fibrinogen binding property was lost. ClfAP(336Y(338 mutants have been constructed in two virulent S. aureus strains Newman and LS-1. The aim of this study was to analyze if these two amino acids which are vital for the fibrinogen binding of ClfA are of importance for the ability of S. aureus to generate disease. Septic arthritis or sepsis were induced in mice by intravenous inoculation of bacteria. The clfAP(336Y(338 mutant induced significantly less arthritis than the wild type strain, both with respect to severity and frequency. The mutant infected mice developed also a much milder systemic inflammation, measured as lower mortality, weight loss, bacterial growth in kidneys and lower IL-6 levels. The data were verified with a second mutant where clfAP(336 and Y(338 were changed to alanine and serine respectively. When sepsis was induced by a larger bacterial inoculum, the clfAP(336Y(338 mutants induced significantly less septic death. Importantly, immunization with the recombinant A domain of ClfAP(336SY(338A mutant but not with recombinant ClfA, protected against septic death. Our data strongly suggest that the fibrinogen binding activity of ClfA is crucial for the ability of S. aureus to provoke disease manifestations, and that the vaccine potential of recombinant ClfA is improved by removing its ability to bind fibrinogen.

  14. Long-term mortality after Staphylococcus aureus spondylodiscitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Theis; Larsen, Anders R; Roed-Petersen, Casper;

    2014-01-01

    Patients diagnosed with Staphylococcus aureus spondylodiscitis have increased long-term mortality compared with the background population mainly due to infectious, endocrine, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and alcohol and drug abuse-related diseases.......Patients diagnosed with Staphylococcus aureus spondylodiscitis have increased long-term mortality compared with the background population mainly due to infectious, endocrine, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and alcohol and drug abuse-related diseases....

  15. Phenotype Switching Is a Natural Consequence of Staphylococcus aureus Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    The pathogen Staphylococcus aureus undergoes phenotype switching in vivo from its normal colony phenotype (NCP) to a slow-growing, antibiotic-resistant small-colony-variant (SCV) phenotype that is associated with persistence in host cells and tissues. However, it is not clear whether phenotype switching is the result of a constitutive process that is selected for under certain conditions or is triggered by particular environmental stimuli. Examination of cultures of diverse S. aureus strains ...

  16. Staphylococcus aureus in the community: colonization versus infection.

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    Maureen Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections have increased dramatically in the community, yet S. aureus nasal colonization has remained stable. The objectives of this study were to determine if S. aureus colonization is a useful proxy measure to study disease transmission and infection in community settings, and to identify potential community reservoirs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Randomly selected households in Northern Manhattan, completed a structured social network questionnaire and provided nasal swabs that were typed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis to identify S. aureus colonizing strains. The main outcome measures were: 1 colonization with S. aureus; and 2 recent serious skin infection. Risk factor analyses were conducted at both the individual and the household levels; logistic regression models identified independent risks for household colonization and infection. RESULTS: 321 surveyed households contained 914 members. The S. aureus prevalence was 25% and MRSA was 0.4%. More than 40% of households were colonized. Recent antibiotic use was the only significant correlate for household colonization (p = .002. Seventy-eight (24% households reported serious skin infection. In contrast with colonization, five of the six risk factors that increased the risk of skin infection in the household at the univariate level remained independently significant in multivariable analysis: international travel, sports participation, surgery, antibiotic use and towel sharing. S. aureus colonization was not significantly associated with serious skin infection in any analysis. Among multiperson households with more than one person colonized, 50% carried the same strain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The lack of association between S. aureus nasal colonization and serious skin infection underscores the need to explore alternative venues or body sites that may be crucial to transmission. Moreover, the magnitude of colonization and

  17. Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage in hemodialysis centers of Fez, Morocco.

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    Idrissa Diawara

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus nasal carriage may be responsible for some serious infections in hemodialyzed patients. The main target of this study was to estimate the prevalence of S. aureus nasal carriage in hemodialysis outpatients and medical staff in hemodialysis centers specifically in Fez region. The second target is to identify the risks of colonization, resistance pattern of isolates and their virulence toxin genes.Nasal swab specimens were obtained from 143 hemodialyzed outpatients and 32 medical staff from January to June 2012. Each participant completed a short questionnaire. Nasal carriage of S. aureus was demographically related (age, gender, hemodialysis duration, comorbidity (diabetes, malignancy and exposure to health care (dialysis staff, hospitalization. PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction were used on all the isolates in the research of twelve staphylococcal enterotoxins genes. Also the PCR was used to investigate on the three factors epidermal cell differentiation inhibitors; three exfoliatin toxins; two leukotoxins; the toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 and the hemolysin beta genes.Nasal screening revealed 38.16%, 50% and 18.75% S. aureus carries in chronic, acute hemodialysis patients and medical staff, respectively. Only young participants were likely to be S. aureus carries (p = 0.002. But there were no gender differences between the isolate carriers and non-carriers or some comorbidity factors such as viral hepatitis B and C, HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus infections, diabetes, chronic smoking, recent hospitalization or antibiotic therapy. Out of all isolates, only one (1.61% was methicillin-resistant and Twenty-one (33.87% had at least two virulence toxin genes.Knowledge and monitoring of antibiotic resistance profile and virulence of S. aureus carriage are essential in the treatment of infections generated by this pathogen, as well as in the control of clonal dissemination and prevent the spread of S. aureus resistance.

  18. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in Shrimps in Tehran during 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Mehdi Soltan Dallal; Abbas Rahimi Foroushani; Sara Sharifi –Yazdi; Mohammad Kazem Sharifi -Yazdi; Noushin Arfatahery

    2016-01-01

    Background During fishing and transport, preservation and quality of fish products are importantas well as storage to prevent the growth of pathogenic and toxin producing bacteria.Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of sea food-borne diseases worldwidedue to contamination of food by preformed enterotoxins. The aim of this study was to compare theprevalence and contamination of S. aureus in marine and farmed shrimps in Tehran fishery center.Methods: A total of 300 samples, i...

  19. IDENTIFIKASI MIKROORGANISE STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS PADA PENDERITA ANGULAR CHEILITIS

    OpenAIRE

    MINARTI, NURHAERATUL

    2012-01-01

    2011 Pada suatu penelitian tentang Angular cheilitis ditemukan Staphylococcus aureus hampir dua kali dari candida albicans. Oleh karena itu tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengidentifikasi pengaruh Staphylococcus aureus pada penyakit Angular cheilitis. Sampel penelitian adalah 30 pasien yang datang ke Rumah Sakit Gigi dan Mulut Halimah Daeng Sikati Kandea Bagian Penyakit Gigi dan Mulut dalam periode waktu bulan Oktober-November 2011. Apusan pada permukaan lesi angular cheilitis dima...

  20. Tumor necrosis factor primes neutrophils to kill Staphylococcus aureus by an oxygen-dependent mechanism and Plasmodium falciparum by an oxygen-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowanko, I C; Ferrante, A; Clemente, G; Kumaratilake, L M

    1996-08-01

    The cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays the important role of priming neutrophils for increased antimicrobial activity. We now demonstrate that human neutrophils which lack the ability to generate oxygen radicals, from patients with chronic granulomatous disease, show TNF-induced enhancement of killing of intraerythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum but not of Staphylococcus aureus.

  1. Tumor necrosis factor primes neutrophils to kill Staphylococcus aureus by an oxygen-dependent mechanism and Plasmodium falciparum by an oxygen-independent mechanism.

    OpenAIRE

    Kowanko, I C; Ferrante, A.; Clemente, G.; Kumaratilake, L M

    1996-01-01

    The cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plays the important role of priming neutrophils for increased antimicrobial activity. We now demonstrate that human neutrophils which lack the ability to generate oxygen radicals, from patients with chronic granulomatous disease, show TNF-induced enhancement of killing of intraerythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum but not of Staphylococcus aureus.

  2. Detoxification of toxins by bacillithiol in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Gerald L; Fahey, Robert C; Rawat, Mamta

    2012-04-01

    Bacillithiol (BSH), an α-anomeric glycoside of l-cysteinyl-d-glucosaminyl-l-malate, is a major low-molecular-mass thiol found in bacteria such as Bacillus sp., Staphylococcus aureus and Deinococcus radiodurans. Like other low-molecular-mass thiols such as glutathione and mycothiol, BSH is likely to be involved in protection against environmental toxins including thiol-reactive antibiotics. We report here a BSH-dependent detoxification mechanism in S. aureus. When S. aureus Newman strain was treated with monobromobimane and monochlorobimane, the cellular BSH was converted to the fluorescent S-conjugate BS-bimane. A bacillithiol conjugate amidase activity acted upon the BS-bimane to produce Cys-bimane, which was then acetylated by an N-acetyltransferase to generate N-acetyl-Cys-bimane, a mercapturic acid. An S. aureus mutant lacking BSH did not produce mercapturic acid when treated with monobromobimane and monochlorobimane, confirming the involvement of bacillithiol. Furthermore, treatment of S. aureus Newman with rifamycin, the parent compound of the first-line anti-tuberculosis drug, rifampicin, indicated that this thiol-reactive antibiotic is also detoxified in a BSH-dependent manner, since mercapturic acids of rifamycin were observed in the culture medium. These data indicate that toxins and thiol-reactive antibiotics are detoxified to less potent mercapturic acids in a BSH-dependent manner and then exported out of the cell in S. aureus.

  3. Determining of antibiotic resistance profile inStaphylococcus aureus isolates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hossein Motamedi; Hadis Mirzabeigi; Tahere Shirali

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To determine the pattern of antibiotic resistance amongStaphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) isolates from clinical specimens and to identify community-acquired methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus(CA-MRSA)in specimens that have been collected from patients referring to one of the hospitals of Ahvaz.Methods:S. aureus isolates from a hospital in Ahvaz were screened for resistance to various antibiotics including methicillin. The susceptibility of the isolates was determined by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. TheMRSA was also treated with ethidium bromide to find the origin of resistance.Results: Among the bacterial isolates, all of 11S. aureus were resistant to methicillin and cefixime,2 were resistant to ciprofloxacine,6 were resistant to tetracycline and the reminder were sensitive or intermediate to other antibiotics. The treated isolates were reminded resistant to methicillin and this suggested that the plasmid was not the origin of resistance in these isolates.Conclusions: These results showed that infection due toMRSA is widespread in Ahvaz and with respect to the spread of vancomycin resistance among MRSA and appearance of overwhelming infections. It is necessary to identify continuously the profile of antibiotic resistance amongS. aureus isolates in other regions and finding appropriate antibiotic for infection control and eradication.

  4. Local Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Mediates the Systemic Pathogenic Effects of Staphylococcus aureus Toxic Shock Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Breshears

    Full Text Available Secreted factors of Staphylococcus aureus can activate host signaling from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. The superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1 contributes to mucosal cytokine production through a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM-mediated shedding of EGFR ligands and subsequent EGFR activation. The secreted hemolysin, α-toxin, can also induce EGFR signaling and directly interacts with ADAM10, a sheddase of EGFR ligands. The current work explores the role of EGFR signaling in menstrual toxic shock syndrome (mTSS, a disease mediated by TSST-1. The data presented show that TSST-1 and α-toxin induce ADAM- and EGFR-dependent cytokine production from human vaginal epithelial cells. TSST-1 and α-toxin also induce cytokine production from an ex vivo porcine vaginal mucosa (PVM model. EGFR signaling is responsible for the majority of IL-8 production from PVM in response to secreted toxins and live S. aureus. Finally, data are presented demonstrating that inhibition of EGFR signaling with the EGFR-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478 significantly increases survival in a rabbit model of mTSS. These data indicate that EGFR signaling is critical for progression of an S. aureus exotoxin-mediated disease and may represent an attractive host target for therapeutics.

  5. Strain Specific Phage Treatment for Staphylococcus aureus Infection Is Influenced by Host Immunity and Site of Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan B Pincus

    Full Text Available The response to multi-drug resistant bacterial infections must be a global priority. While mounting resistance threatens to create what the World Health Organization has termed a "post-antibiotic era", the recent discovery that antibiotic use may adversely impact the microbiome adds further urgency to the need for new developmental approaches for anti-pathogen treatments. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, in particular, has declared itself a serious threat within the United States and abroad. A potential solution to the problem of antibiotic resistance may not entail looking to the future for completely novel treatments, but instead looking into our history of bacteriophage therapy. This study aimed to test the efficacy, safety, and commercial viability of the use of phages to treat Staphylococcus aureus infections using the commercially available phage SATA-8505. We found that SATA-8505 effectively controls S. aureus growth and reduces bacterial viability both in vitro and in a skin infection mouse model. However, this killing effect was not observed when phage was cultured in the presence of human whole blood. SATA-8505 did not induce inflammatory responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cultures. However, phage did induce IFN gamma production in primary human keratinocyte cultures and induced inflammatory responses in our mouse models, particularly in a mouse model of chronic granulomatous disease. Our findings support the potential efficacy of phage therapy, although regulatory and market factors may limit its wider investigation and use.

  6. Acetic acid increases the phage-encoded enterotoxin A expression in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silva Ayla

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of acetic acid, a common food preservative, on the bacteriophage-encoded enterotoxin A (SEA expression and production in Staphylococcus aureus was investigated in pH-controlled batch cultures carried out at pH 7.0, 6.5, 6.0, 5.5, 5.0, and 4.5. Also, genomic analysis of S. aureus strains carrying sea was performed to map differences within the gene and in the temperate phage carrying sea. Results The sea expression profile was similar from pH 7.0 to 5.5, with the relative expression peaking in the transition between exponential and stationary growth phase and falling during stationary phase. The levels of sea mRNA were below the detection limit at pH 5.0 and 4.5, confirmed by very low SEA levels at these pH values. The level of relative sea expression at pH 6.0 and 5.5 were nine and four times higher, respectively, in the transitional phase than in the exponential growth phase, compared to pH 7.0 and pH 6.5, where only a slight increase in relative expression in the transitional phase was observed. Furthermore, the increase in sea expression levels at pH 6.0 and 5.5 were observed to be linked to increased intracellular sea gene copy numbers and extracellular sea-containing phage copy numbers. The extracellular SEA levels increased over time, with highest levels produced at pH 6.0 in the four growth phases investigated. Using mitomycin C, it was verified that SEA was at least partially produced as a consequence of prophage induction of the sea-phage in the three S. aureus strains tested. Finally, genetic analysis of six S. aureus strains carrying the sea gene showed specific sea phage-groups and two versions of the sea gene that may explain the different sea expression and production levels observed in this study. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the increased sea expression in S. aureus caused by acetic acid induced the sea-encoding prophage, linking SEA production to the lifecycle of the phage.

  7. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Retail Ready-to-Eat Foods in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Jumei; Yu, Shubo; Wu, Qingping; Guo, Weipeng; Huang, Jiahui; Cai, Shuzhen

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S.aureus (MRSA), is a life-threatening pathogen in humans, and its presence in food is a public health concern. MRSA has been identified in foods in China, but little information is available regarding MRSA in ready-to-eat (RTE) foods. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA in Chinese retail RTE foods. All isolated S. aureus were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility, and MRSA isolates were further characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing. Of the 550 RTE foods collected from 2011 to 2014, 69 (12.5%) were positive for S. aureus. Contamination levels were mostly in the range of 0.3-10 most probable number (MPN)/g, with five samples exceeding 10 MPN/g. Of the 69 S. aureus isolates, seven were identified as MRSA by cefoxitin disc diffusion test. Six isolates were mecA-positive, while no mecC-positive isolates were identified. In total, 75.8% (47/62) of the methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates and all of the MRSA isolates were resistant to three or more antibiotics. Amongst the MRSA isolates, four were identified as community-acquired strains (ST59-MRSA-IVa (n = 2), ST338-MRSA-V, ST1-MRSA-V), while one was a livestock-associated strain (ST9, harboring an unreported SCCmec type 2C2). One novel sequence type was identified (ST3239), the SCCmec gene of which could not be typed. Overall, our findings showed that Chinese retail RTE foods are likely vehicles for transmission of multidrug-resistant S. aureus and MRSA lineages. This is a serious public health risk and highlights the need to implement good hygiene practices.

  8. Control of Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir-Sanchis, Ignacio; Martínez-Rubio, Roser; Martí, Miguel; Chen, John; Lasa, Íñigo; Novick, Richard P; Tormo-Más, María Ángeles; Penadés, José R

    2012-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) are a group of related 15-17 kb mobile genetic elements that commonly carry genes for superantigen toxins and other virulence factors. The key feature of their mobility is the induction of SaPI excision and replication by certain phages and their efficient encapsidation into specific small-headed phage-like infectious particles. Previous work demonstrated that chromosomal integration depends on the SaPI-encoded recombinase, Int. However, although involved in the process, Int alone was not sufficient to mediate efficient SaPI excision from chromosomal sites, and we expected that SaPI excision would involve an Xis function, which could be encoded by a helper phage or by the SaPI, itself. Here we report that the latter is the case. In vivo recombination assays with plasmids in Escherichia coli demonstrate that SaPI-coded Xis is absolutely required for recombination between the SaPI att(L) and att(R) sites, and that both sites, as well as their flanking SaPI sequences, are required for SaPI excision. Mutational analysis reveals that Xis is essential for efficient horizontal SaPI transfer to a recipient strain. Finally, we show that the master regulator of the SaPI life cycle, Stl, blocks expression of int and xis by binding to inverted repeats present in the promoter region, thus controlling SaPI excision.

  9. Inhibition of major integrin αV β3 reduces Staphylococcus aureus attachment to sheared human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, C J; Garciarena, C D; Watkin, R L; McHale, T M; McLoughlin, A; Claes, J; Verhamme, P; Cummins, P M; Kerrigan, S W

    2016-12-01

    Essentials Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) binds and impairs function of vascular endothelial cells (EC). We investigated the molecular signals triggered by S. aureus adhesion to EC. Inhibition of the EC integrin αVβ3 reduces S. aureus binding and rescues EC function. αVβ3 blockade represents an attractive target to treat S. aureus bloodborne infections.

  10. The structure of haemoglobin bound to the haemoglobin receptor IsdH from Staphylococcus aureus shows disruption of the native α-globin haem pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Claire F; Jacques, David A; Clubb, Robert T; Guss, J Mitchell; Gell, David A

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common and serious cause of infection in humans. The bacterium expresses a cell-surface receptor that binds to, and strips haem from, human haemoglobin (Hb). The binding interface has previously been identified; however, the structural changes that promote haem release from haemoglobin were unknown. Here, the structure of the receptor-Hb complex is reported at 2.6 Å resolution, which reveals a conformational change in the α-globin F helix that disrupts the haem-pocket structure and alters the Hb quaternary interactions. These features suggest potential mechanisms by which the S. aureus Hb receptor induces haem release from Hb.

  11. Cytokine and acute phase protein mRNA expression in liver tissue from pigs with severe sepsis caused by intravenous inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Lerberg; Olsen, Helle Gerda; Iburg, Tine;

    2010-01-01

    The aim was to substantiate previous findings of hepatic dysfunction in a porcine model of Staphylococcus aureus induced severe sepsis. Nine pigs were inoculated intravenously once or twice with 108S. aureus per kilogram body weight and killed 12, 24 and 48 h later. Three pigs served as controls...... characterized by fever, neutrophilia, increased serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin (IL)-6, and decreased levels of serum iron. CRP and IL-6 serum levels peaked at 36 h. Serum IL-1β and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα) did not change. Serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and bilirubin were...

  12. ANTISTAPHYBASE: database of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and essential oils (EOs) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouhir, Abdelmajid; Taieb, Malek; Lamine, Mohamed Ashraf; Cherif, Ammar; Jridi, Taoufik; Mahjoubi, Basma; Mbarek, Sarra; Fliss, Ismail; Nefzi, Adel; Sebei, Khaled; Ben Hamida, Jeannette

    2017-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus are major pathogens. The antimicrobial peptides and essential oils (EOs) display narrow- or broad-spectrum activity against bacteria including these strains. A centralized resource, such as a database, designed specifically for anti-S. aureus/anti-methicillin-resistant S. aureus antimicrobial peptides and EOs is therefore needed to facilitate the comprehensive investigation of their structure/activity associations and combinations. The database ANTISTAPHYBASE is created to facilitate access to important information on antimicrobial peptides and essential peptides against methicillin-resistant S. aureus and S. aureus. At the moment, the database contains 596 sequences of antimicrobial peptides produced by diverse organisms and 287 essential oil records. It permits a quick and easy search of peptides based on their activity as well as their general, physicochemical properties and literature data. These data are very useful to perform further bioinformatic or chemometric analysis and would certainly be useful for the development of new drugs for medical use. The ANTISTAPHYBASE database is freely available at: https://www.antistaphybase.com/ .

  13. Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Staphylococcus aureus Surface Protein A (SasA) Protect Against Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis and Peritonitis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yilong; Qian, Mengying; Yi, Shaoqiong; Liu, Shuling; Li, Bing; Yu, Rui; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yu, Changming; Li, Jianmin; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) imposes an increasing impact on public health. Due to multi-antibiotics resistance in MRSA strains, there is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutics such as effective monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against MRSA infections. Staphylococcus aureus surface protein A (SasA), a large surface-located protein (~240 kDa), is one of MSCRAMMs (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules) and a potential target for immunotherapeutic approaches against S. aureus infections. In the present study, we analyzed the sequence of SasA with bioinformatics tools and generated a protective monoclonal antibody (2H7) targeting the conserved domain of SasA. 2H7 was shown to recognize wild-type S. aureus and promote opsonophagocytic killing of S. aureus. In both sepsis and peritoneal infection models, prophylactic administration of 2H7 improved the survival of BALB/c mice challenged by S. aureus strain USA300 and ST239 (prevalent MRSA clones in North America and Asian countries, respectively) and enhanced bacterial clearance in kidneys. Additionally, 2H7 prophylaxis prevented the formation of intraperitoneal abscess in a murine model of peritoneal infection and therapeutic administration of 2H7 showed protective efficacy in a murine sepsis model. Our results presented here provide supporting evidences that an anti-SasA mAb might be a potential component in an antibody-based immunotherapeutic treatment of MRSA infections.

  14. Pathophysiological Mechanisms of Staphylococcus Non-aureus Bone and Joint Infection: Interspecies Homogeneity and Specific Behavior of S. pseudintermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maali, Yousef; Martins-Simões, Patrícia; Valour, Florent; Bouvard, Daniel; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Bes, Michele; Haenni, Marisa; Ferry, Tristan; Laurent, Frédéric; Trouillet-Assant, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Implicated in more than 60% of bone and joint infections (BJIs), Staphylococci have a particular tropism for osteoarticular tissue and lead to difficult-to-treat clinical infections. To date, Staphylococcus aureus internalization in non-professional phagocytic cells (NPPCs) is a well-explored virulence mechanism involved in BJI chronicity. Conversely, the pathophysiological pathways associated with Staphylococcus non-aureus (SNA) BJIs have scarcely been studied despite their high prevalence. In this study, 15 reference strains from 15 different SNA species were compared in terms of (i) adhesion to human fibronectin based on adhesion microplate assays and (ii) internalization ability, intracellular persistence and cytotoxicity based on an in vitro infection model using human osteoblasts. Compared to S. aureus, S. pseudintermedius was the only species that significantly adhered to human fibronectin. This species was also associated with high (even superior to S. aureus) internalization ability, intracellular persistence and cytotoxicity. These findings were confirmed using a panel of 17 different S. pseudintermedius isolates. Additionally, S. pseudintermedius internalization by osteoblasts was completely abolished in β1 integrin-deficient murine osteoblasts. These results suggest the involvement of β1 integrin in the invasion process, although this mechanism was previously restricted to S. aureus. In summary, our results suggest that internalization into NPPCs is not a classical pathophysiologic mechanism of SNA BJIs. S. pseudintermedius appears to be an exception, and its ability to invade and subsequently induce cytotoxicity in NPPCs could explain its severe and necrotic forms of infection, notably in dogs, which exhibit a high prevalence of S. pseudintermedius infection.

  15. Pathophysiological mechanisms of Staphylococcus non-aureus bone and joint infection: interspecies homogeneity and specific behaviour of S. pseudintermedius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Maali

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Implicated in more than 60% of bone and joint infections (BJIs, Staphylococci have a particular tropism for osteoarticular tissue and lead to difficult-to-treat clinical infections. To date, Staphylococcus aureus internalization in non-professional phagocytic cells (NPPCs is a well-explored virulence mechanism involved in BJI chronicity. Conversely, the pathophysiological pathways associated with Staphylococcus non-aureus (SNA BJIs have scarcely been studied despite their high prevalence. In this study, fifteen reference strains from 15 different SNA species were compared in terms of (i adhesion to human fibronectin based on adhesion microplate assays and (ii internalization ability, intracellular persistence and cytotoxicity based on an in vitro infection model using human osteoblasts. Compared to S. aureus, Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was the only species that significantly adhered to human fibronectin. This species was also associated with high (even superior to S. aureus internalization ability, intracellular persistence and cytotoxicity. These findings were confirmed using a panel of 17 different S. pseudintermedius isolates. Additionally, S. pseudintermedius internalization by osteoblasts was completely abolished in β1 integrin-deficient murine osteoblasts. These results suggest the involvement of β1 integrin in the invasion process, although this mechanism was previously restricted to S. aureus. In summary, our results suggest that internalization into NPPCs is not a classical pathophysiologic mechanism of SNA BJIs. S. pseudintermedius appears to be an exception, and its ability to invade and subsequently induce cytotoxicity in NPPCs could explain its severe and necrotic forms of infection, notably in dogs, which exhibit a high prevalence of S. pseudintermedius infection.

  16. Transcriptional and functional analysis of the effects of magnolol: inhibition of autolysis and biofilms in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dacheng Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The targeting of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm structures are now gaining interest as an alternative strategy for developing new types of antimicrobial agents. Magnolol (MOL shows inhibitory activity against S. aureus biofilms and Triton X-100-induced autolysis in vitro, although there are no data regarding the molecular mechanisms of MOL action in bacteria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The molecular basis of the markedly reduced autolytic phenotype and biofilm inhibition triggered by MOL were explored using transcriptomic analysis, and the transcription of important genes were verified by real-time RT-PCR. The inhibition of autolysis by MOL was evaluated using quantitative bacteriolytic assays and zymographic analysis, and antibiofilm activity assays and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to elucidate the inhibition of biofilm formation caused by MOL in 20 clinical isolates or standard strains. The reduction in cidA, atl, sle1, and lytN transcript levels following MOL treatment was consistent with the induced expression of their autolytic repressors lrgA, lrgB, arlR, and sarA. MOL generally inhibited or reversed the expression of most of the genes involved in biofilm production. The growth of S. aureus strain ATCC 25923 in the presence of MOL dose-dependently led to decreases in Triton X-100-induced autolysis, extracellular murein hydrolase activity, and the amount of extracellular DNA (eDNA. MOL may impede biofilm formation by reducing the expression of cidA, a murein hydrolase regulator, to inhibit autolysis and eDNA release, or MOL may directly repress biofilm formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: MOL shows in vitro antimicrobial activity against clinical and standard S. aureus strains grown in planktonic and biofilm cultures, suggesting that the structure of MOL may potentially be used as a basis for the development of drugs targeting biofilms.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) at ambient freshwater beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Lisa R.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Johnson, Heather E.; Brennan, Angela K.; Isaacs, Natasha M.; Spencer, Chelsea

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are a threat to human health worldwide, and although detected at marine beaches, they have been largely unstudied at freshwater beaches. Genes indicating S. aureus (SA; femA) and methicillin resistance (mecA) were detected at 11 and 12 of 13 US Great Lakes beaches and in 18% or 27% of 287 recreational water samples, respectively. Eight beaches had mecA + femA (potential MRSA) detections. During an intensive study, higher bather numbers, staphylococci concentrations, and femA detections were found in samples collected after noon than before noon. Local population density, beach cloud cover, and beach wave height were significantly correlated with SA or MRSA detection frequency. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene, associated with community-acquired MRSA, was detected in 12 out of 27 potential MRSA samples. The femA gene was detected less frequently at beaches that met US enterococci criteria or EU enterococci ‘excellent’ recreational water quality, but was not related to Escherichia coli-defined criteria. Escherichia coli is often the only indicator used to determine water quality at US beaches, given the economic and healthcare burden that can be associated with infections caused by SA and MRSA, monitoring of recreational waters for non-fecal bacteria such as staphylococci and/or SA may be warranted.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in diabetic foot infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estrella Cervantes-García

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is one of the major pathogens causing chronic infections. The ability of S. aureus to acquire resistance to a diverse range of antimicrobial compounds results in limited treatment options, particularly in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. A mechanism by which S. aureus develops reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials is through the formation of small colony variants (SCVs. Infections by SCVs of S. aureus are an upcoming problem due to difficulties in laboratory diagnosis and resistance to antimicrobial therapy. Methods: A prospective study was performed on 120 patients diagnosed with both type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. The study was carried out from July 2012 to December 2013 in Hospital General de Mexico. The samples were cultured in blood agar, mannitol salt agar, and MacConkey agar media, and incubated at 37°C in aerobic conditions. Results: We describe the first known cases of diabetic foot infections caused by MRSA-SCVs in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. In all of our cases, the patients had not received any form of gentamicin therapy. Conclusions: The antibiotic therapy commonly used in diabetic patients with infected diabetic foot ulcers fails in the case of MRSA-SCVs because the intracellular location protects S. aureus-SCVs from the host's defenses and also helps them resist antibiotics. The cases studied in this article add to the spectrum of persistent and relapsing infections attributed to MRSA-SCVs and emphasizes that these variants may also play a relevant role in diabetic foot infections.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in diabetic foot infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-García, Estrella; García-Gonzalez, Rafael; Reyes-Torres, Angélica; Resendiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Salazar-Schettino, Paz María

    2015-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the major pathogens causing chronic infections. The ability of S. aureus to acquire resistance to a diverse range of antimicrobial compounds results in limited treatment options, particularly in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). A mechanism by which S. aureus develops reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials is through the formation of small colony variants (SCVs). Infections by SCVs of S. aureus are an upcoming problem due to difficulties in laboratory diagnosis and resistance to antimicrobial therapy. Methods A prospective study was performed on 120 patients diagnosed with both type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. The study was carried out from July 2012 to December 2013 in Hospital General de Mexico. The samples were cultured in blood agar, mannitol salt agar, and MacConkey agar media, and incubated at 37°C in aerobic conditions. Results We describe the first known cases of diabetic foot infections caused by MRSA-SCVs in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. In all of our cases, the patients had not received any form of gentamicin therapy. Conclusions The antibiotic therapy commonly used in diabetic patients with infected diabetic foot ulcers fails in the case of MRSA-SCVs because the intracellular location protects S. aureus-SCVs from the host's defenses and also helps them resist antibiotics. The cases studied in this article add to the spectrum of persistent and relapsing infections attributed to MRSA-SCVs and emphasizes that these variants may also play a relevant role in diabetic foot infections. PMID:25787018

  20. Pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Postoperative Wounds of Hospitalized Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smritikana Biswas

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus sp., gram positive pyogenic bacteria located on skin, nose etc, secretes toxin that causes toxic shock syndrome, abscess, food poisoning and other infectious diseases. This study was carried out to identify and characterize the type of Staphylococcus sp. bacteria especially Staphylococcus aureus in the pus from postoperative wounds of hospitalized patients. From pus samples collected from twenty-four patients from Kharagpur Hospital, Paschim Medinipur, West Bengal, twenty-eight bacterial isolates were obtained. Among them twenty-five (89.2% were appeared with golden yellow colonies which is usually formed by Staphylococcus aureus. Twenty-three (82.14% of the bacterial isolates were Gram positive. Among them twenty isolates (86.9% were further confirmed to be Staphylococcus aureus by their ability to produce Catalase enzyme (positive in Catalase test and Coagulase enzyme (positive in Coagulase Test. Eighteen (90.00% of these Staphylococcus aureus were found to liquefy gelatin (Gelatin hydrolysis test, were able to hydrolyze urea (Urea hydrolysis test and were also l positive in Mannitol Fermentation Test. But there was no growth found of these isolates on MacConkey Agar, while sixteen isolates (80.00% of Staphylococcus aureus were resistant to penicillin (50µg/ml. Moreover eighteen (90.00% Staphylococcus aureus isolates were able to elaborate Hemolysin (Hemolysis test on Blood Agar media. Hence the bacterial isolates obtained from pus of postoperative wounds were predominantly pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus. So it can be concluded that careful treatment and postoperative measures to be taken to avoid serious health problem that may often be life threatening.

  1. Extensive phage dynamics in Staphylococcus aureus contributes to adaptation to the human host during infection.

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    Goerke, Christiane; Wirtz, Christiane; Flückiger, Ursula; Wolz, Christiane

    2006-09-01

    Bacteriophages serve as a driving force in microbial evolution, adaptation to new environments and the pathogenesis of human bacterial infections. In Staphylococcus aureus phages encoding immune evasion molecules (SAK, SCIN, CHIPS), which integrate specifically into the beta-haemolysin (Hlb) gene, are widely distributed. When comparing S. aureus strain collections from infectious and colonizing situations we could detect a translocation of sak-encoding phages to atypical genomic integration sites in the bacterium only in the disease-related isolates. Additionally, significantly more Hlb producing strains were detected in the infectious strain collection. Extensive phage dynamics (intragenomic translocation, duplication, transfer between hosts, recombination events) during infection was shown by analysing cocolonizing and consecutive isolates of patients. This activity leads to the splitting of the strain population into various subfractions exhibiting different virulence potentials (Hlb-production and/or production of immune evasion molecules). Thus, phage-inducing conditions and strong selection for survival of the bacterial host after phage movement are typical for the infectious situation. Further in vitro characterization of phages revealed that: (i) SAK is encoded not only on serogroup F phages showing a conserved tropism for hlb but also on serogroup B phages which always integrate in a distinct intergenic region, (ii) the level of sak transcription correlates to phage inducibility but is independent of the phage localization in the chromosome, and (iii) phages can be stabilized extra-chromosomally during their life cycle.

  2. Tissue-specific patterning of host innate immune responses by Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin.

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    Becker, Russell E N; Berube, Bryan J; Sampedro, Georgia R; DeDent, Andrea C; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2014-01-01

    Immunomodulatory cytotoxins are prominent virulence factors produced by Staphylococcus aureus, a leading cause of bacterial sepsis, skin infection, and pneumonia. S. aureus α-toxin is a pore-forming toxin that utilizes a widely expressed receptor, ADAM10, to injure the host epithelium, endothelium, and immune cells. As each host tissue is characterized by a unique composition of resident cells and recruited immune cells, the outcome of α-toxin-mediated injury may depend on the infected tissue environment. Utilizing myeloid lineage-specific Adam10 knockout mice, we show that α-toxin exerts tissue-specific effects on innate immunity to staphylococcal infection. Loss of ADAM10 expression exacerbates skin infection, yet affords protection against lethal pneumonia. These diverse outcomes are not related to altered immune cell recruitment, but rather correlate with a defect in toxin-induced IL-1β production. Extension of these studies through analysis of ADAM10 double-knockout mice affecting both the myeloid lineage and either the skin or lung epithelium highlight the prominence of toxin-induced injury to the epithelium in governing the outcome of infection. Together, these studies provide evidence of tissue specificity of pore-forming cytotoxin action in the modulation of host immunity, and illustrate that the outcome of infection is a collective manifestation of all effects of the toxin within the tissue microenvironment.

  3. IFN-τ Displays Anti-Inflammatory Effects on Staphylococcus aureus Endometritis via Inhibiting the Activation of the NF-κB and MAPK Pathways in Mice

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    Zhang, Zhenbiao; Guo, Yingfang; Liu, Yuzhu; Li, Chengye

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the anti-inflammatory effect of IFN-τ on endometritis using a mouse model of S. aureus-induced endometritis and to elucidate the mechanism of action underlying these effects. In the present study, the effect of IFN-τ on S. aureus growth was monitored by turbidimeter at 600 nm. IFN-τ did not affect S. aureus growth. The histopathological changes indicated that IFN-τ had a protective effect on uterus tissues with S. aureus infection. The ELISA and qPCR results showed the production of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 was decreased with IFN-τ treatment. In contrast, the level of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was increased. We further studied the signaling pathway associated with these observations, and the qPCR results showed that the expression of TLR2 was repressed by IFN-τ. Furthermore, the western blotting results showed the phosphorylation of IκB, NF-κB p65, and MAPKs (p38, JNK, and ERK) was inhibited by IFN-τ treatment. The results suggested that IFN-τ may be a potential drug for the treatment of uterine infection due to S. aureus or other infectious inflammatory diseases.

  4. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profiling of the Response of Staphylococcus aureus to Cryptotanshinone

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    Haihua Feng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus strains with multiple antibiotic resistances are increasingly widespread, and new agents are required for the treatment of S. aureus. Cryptotanshinone (CT, a major tanshinone of medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, demonstrated effective in vitro antibacterial activity against all 21 S. aureus strains tested in this experiment. Affymetrix GeneChips were utilized to determine the global transcriptional response of S. aureus ATCC 25923 to treatment with subinhibitory concentrations of CT. Transcriptome profiling indicated that the antibacterial action of CT may be associated with its action as active oxygen radical generator; S. aureus undergoes an oxygen-limiting state upon exposure to CT.

  5. Disruption of the sigS gene attenuates the local innate immune response to Staphylococcus aureus in a mouse mastitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peton, Vincent; Breyne, Koen; Rault, Lucie; Demeyere, Kristel; Berkova, Nadia; Meyer, Evelyne; Even, Sergine; Le Loir, Yves

    2016-04-15

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a major pathogen involved in ruminant mastitis and present worldwide. Clinical signs of S. aureus mastitis vary considerably and are largely dependent on strain-specific factors. A comparison of two S. aureus strains that reproducibly induced either severe (O11) or mild (O46) mastitis in ewes revealed that the transcriptional regulator sigS was mutated in O46 (Le Maréchal et al., 2011. PLoS One. 6 (11) e27354. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0027354). In the present paper, we analysed the sigS sequence in 18 other S. aureus strains isolated from goat or ewe mastitis and found a 4-bp deletion similar to that of the O46 sigS gene in three strains associated with subclinical ewe mastitis. This sigS gene was disrupted in strain O11 (O11ΔsigS), so our aim was to investigate its involvement in the severity of infections in the context of mastitis. The wild type (wt) and mutant strains were then characterized in vitro to determine the involvement of sigS in the response S. aureus under various stress conditions, and assess its influence on the cytotoxicity of the pathogen, its invasive capacity and biofilm formation. The strains were compared in vivo in an experimental mouse mastitis model in which clinical signs and cytokine production were evaluated at 24h post-infection. While no significant differences in the effect on bacterial growth between O11 and O11ΔsigS were observed either in vitro or in vivo, a significantly weaker in vivo production of interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α was measured in the mammary glands infected with the mutant strain, suggesting that infection with O11ΔsigS induced an attenuated local innate immune response. These results suggest an impact of sigS disruption on S. aureus pathogenesis in a ruminant mastitis context. This disruption is probably involved in, and may partly explain, the milder symptoms previously observed in S. aureus O46-induced mastitis in ewes.

  6. In-vitro profile of a new beta-lactam, ceftobiprole, with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Jones, M E

    2007-06-01

    Ceftobiprole is a novel, broad-spectrum cephalosporin with in-vitro activity against common Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. It forms a stable inhibitory complex with Staphylococcus aureus penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 2' (2a), resulting in enhanced activity against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). In recent studies of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, the ceftobiprole MIC(90) value was most frequently Ceftobiprole is active against Enterococcus faecalis (MIC(90) = 4 mg/L), but not generally active against Enterococcus faecium (MIC(90) > 16 mg/L). Ceftobiprole displayed bactericidal activity against Gram-negative pathogens comparable to that of cefepime, ceftazidime or piperacillin-tazobactam in early studies. However, recent data show activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa similar to that of cefepime but less than that of ceftazidime. Ceftobiprole, like cefepime, is stable in the presence of most class A non-extended spectrum beta-lactamases and inducible class C beta-lactamases. Ceftobiprole is a poor inducer of AmpC beta-lactamase and a poor substrate for hydrolysis by AmpC beta-lactamase. Studies of ceftobiprole in several animal models have demonstrated potent in-vivo efficacy against infections caused by MRSA, including strains intermediately resistant to vancomycin. It was also efficacious in murine infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria with MIC values ceftobiprole in vitro and in vivo suggests that it may have potential for empirical treatment of suspected Gram-negative and Gram-positive infections, including those caused by MRSA.

  7. Antibiotic Resistance Profiling of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Clinical Specimens in a Tertiary Hospital from 2010 to 2012

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    Alain C. Juayang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MRSA infection can affect a wide array of individuals that may lead to treatment failure. Also, the infection has the potential to spread from one area to another particularly health care facilities or communities eventually causing minor outbreaks. With this premise, the study aimed to describe MRSA infections using the hospital-based data of a tertiary hospital in Bacolod City, Philippines, from 2010 to 2012. Specifically, this study aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus isolated from clinical specimens and to put emphasis on the prevalence of MRSA and Inducible Clindamycin Resistance. A total of 94 cases from 2010 to 2012 were diagnosed to have S. aureus infection using conventional bacteriologic methods. From these cases, 38 (40.6% were identified as MRSA and 37 (39.4% were inducible clindamycin resistant. Wounds and abscesses were considered to be the most common specimens with MRSA infections having 71.05% while blood was the least with 5.3%. For drug susceptibility, out of the 94 S. aureus cases, including MRSA, 100% were susceptible to linezolid making it the drug of choice for this study. It was then followed by tetracycline having a mean susceptibility of 95%;, while penicillin G was ineffective with 94 cases having 0% susceptibility.

  8. Impact of the β-Lactam Resistance Modifier (−)-Epicatechin Gallate on the Non-Random Distribution of Phospholipids across the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Staphylococcus aureus

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    Rosado, H.; Turner, R.D.; Foster, S. J.; Taylor, P. W.

    2015-01-01

    The polyphenol (−)-epicatechin gallate (ECg) inserts into the cytoplasmic membrane (CM) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and reversibly abrogates resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. ECg elicits an increase in MRSA cell size and induces thickened cell walls. As ECg partially delocalizes penicillin-binding protein PBP2 from the septal division site, reduces PBP2 and PBP2a complexation and induces CM remodelling, we examined the impact of ECg membrane intercalation on phosph...

  9. Prevalence of Salmonella and Staphylococcus aureus in chorizo and longaniza

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    Refugio Torres-Vitela

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological research in developed and developing countries, had found meat products as the principal cause for foodbourne diseases. In addition, Salmonella and Staphyococcus aureus are well known pathogens for their mayor impact in public health. The objective for the present study consisted on determinate the sanitary quality from chorizo and longaniza samples from several butcheries in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. Samples of chorizo (50 and longaniza (50 were obtained from different points in Guadalajara metropolis. Presence of Salmonella and recounts for S. aureus were tested in 25 g samples. Procedure was followed according Mexican NOM 145-SSA1-1995 methods. In chorizo, 18 samples were positive to Salmonella. The count of S. aureus showed a mean of 24,600 UFC/g. On the other hand, 24 samples of longaniza were positive to Salmonella spp. In this case, the mean of S. aureus was 7,800 UFC/g. The serotypes of Salmonella spp were: Derby (30%, Adelaile (17%, Azteca (15%, Infantis (15%, Muenster(10% y Anatum (13 %. The high positivity of Salmonella spp. and S. aureus is a potential hazard to consumers.

  10. Antibacterial Action of Curcumin against Staphylococcus aureus: A Brief Review

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    Liew, Kitson; Ali, Syed A.; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng; Peh, Suat-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, the major constituent of Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae family) or turmeric, commonly used for cooking in Asian cuisine, is known to possess a broad range of pharmacological properties at relatively nontoxic doses. Curcumin is found to be effective against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). As demonstrated by in vitro experiment, curcumin exerts even more potent effects when used in combination with various other antibacterial agents. Hence, curcumin which is a natural product derived from plant is believed to have profound medicinal benefits and could be potentially developed into a naturally derived antibiotic in the future. However, there are several noteworthy challenges in the development of curcumin as a medicine. S. aureus infections, particularly those caused by the multidrug-resistant strains, have emerged as a global health issue and urgent action is needed. This review focuses on the antibacterial activities of curcumin against both methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). We also attempt to highlight the potential challenges in the effort of developing curcumin into a therapeutic antibacterial agent. PMID:27956904

  11. Antibacterial Action of Curcumin against Staphylococcus aureus: A Brief Review

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    Sin-Yeang Teow

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, the major constituent of Curcuma longa L. (Zingiberaceae family or turmeric, commonly used for cooking in Asian cuisine, is known to possess a broad range of pharmacological properties at relatively nontoxic doses. Curcumin is found to be effective against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus. As demonstrated by in vitro experiment, curcumin exerts even more potent effects when used in combination with various other antibacterial agents. Hence, curcumin which is a natural product derived from plant is believed to have profound medicinal benefits and could be potentially developed into a naturally derived antibiotic in the future. However, there are several noteworthy challenges in the development of curcumin as a medicine. S. aureus infections, particularly those caused by the multidrug-resistant strains, have emerged as a global health issue and urgent action is needed. This review focuses on the antibacterial activities of curcumin against both methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. We also attempt to highlight the potential challenges in the effort of developing curcumin into a therapeutic antibacterial agent.

  12. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from tonsillectomized adult patients with recurrent tonsillitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkowska, Marta; Garbacz, Katarzyna; Stromkowski, Józef

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus strains from 118 tonsillectomized adults due to recurrent tonsillitis (RT). The study included strains isolated from the tonsillar surface prior to tonsillectomy, recovered from the tonsillar core at the time of surgery, and from the posterior throat 2-4 weeks after the procedure. Susceptibility of isolates to 19 antibiotics was tested in line with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. Irrespective of the stage, the most commonly isolated bacteria were gram-positive cocci, and among them S. aureus. The tonsillar core was the most common site of S. aureus isolation (30.5%), followed by the tonsillar surface (10.8%) and the posterior pharynx (5.9%). This difference turned out to be statistically significant (p aureus seems to be the most common pathogen isolated from patients tonsillectomized due to RT. Staphylococcal isolates associated with RT are present mostly within the tonsillar core and susceptible to most antibiotics. They are typically isolated from patients between 21 and 30 years of age. Tonsillectomy results in less frequent isolation of S. aureus strains.

  13. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in Shrimps in Tehran during 2013

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    Mohammad Mehdi Soltan Dallal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background During fishing and transport, preservation and quality of fish products are importantas well as storage to prevent the growth of pathogenic and toxin producing bacteria.Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of sea food-borne diseases worldwidedue to contamination of food by preformed enterotoxins. The aim of this study was to compare theprevalence and contamination of S. aureus in marine and farmed shrimps in Tehran fishery center.Methods: A total of 300 samples, including 150 marine, 150 farmed shrimps were selected duringSeptember 2013 to December 2013. Isolation and identification of S. aureus from isolated sampleswere carried out according to conventional methods, and antibiotic susceptibility test wasperformed by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion methodResults: The results of this study showed that 30% of marine and 20% off armed shrimps werecontaminated with S. aureus. The highest resistance was observed with penicillin and ampicillin,whereas 100% were sensitive to vancomycin, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, and rifampin.Conclusions: Due to relatively high contamination of shrimp by S. aureus more attention shouldbe given during processing and manufacturing.

  14. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in Shrimps in Tehran during 2013

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    Mohammad Mehdi Soltan Dallal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background During fishing and transport, preservation and quality of fish products are importantas well as storage to prevent the growth of pathogenic and toxin producing bacteria.Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of sea food-borne diseases worldwidedue to contamination of food by preformed enterotoxins. The aim of this study was to compare theprevalence and contamination of S. aureus in marine and farmed shrimps in Tehran fishery center.Methods: A total of 300 samples, including 150 marine, 150 farmed shrimps were selected duringSeptember 2013 to December 2014. Isolation and identification of S. aureus from isolated sampleswere carried out according to conventional methods, and antibiotic susceptibility test wasperformed by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method.Results: The results of this study showed that 30% of marine and 20% off armed shrimps werecontaminated with S. aureus. The highest resistance was observed with penicillin and ampicillin,whereas 100% were sensitive to vancomycin, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, and rifampin.Conclusions: Due to relatively high contamination of shrimp by S. aureus more attention shouldbe given during processing and manufacturing.

  15. A systematic review of animal models for Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis

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    W Reizner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus osteomyelitis is a significant complication for orthopaedic patients undergoing surgery, particularly with fracture fixation and arthroplasty. Given the difficulty in studying S. aureus infections in human subjects, animal models serve an integral role in exploring the pathogenesis of osteomyelitis, and aid in determining the efficacy of prophylactic and therapeutic treatments. Animal models should mimic the clinical scenarios seen in patients as closely as possible to permit the experimental results to be translated to the corresponding clinical care. To help understand existing animal models of S. aureus, we conducted a systematic search of PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE to identify in vivo animal experiments that have investigated the management of S. aureus osteomyelitis in the context of fractures and metallic implants. In this review, experimental studies are categorised by animal species and are further classified by the setting of the infection. Study methods are summarised and the relevant advantages and disadvantages of each species and model are discussed. While no ideal animal model exists, the understanding of a model’s strengths and limitations should assist clinicians and researchers to appropriately select an animal model to translate the conclusions to the clinical setting.

  16. Detection of Staphylococcus Aureus Enterotoxin Genes A-E

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    Dadgar, T. (PhD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The main cause of spreading staphylococcal infections among patients is the healthy carriers working in hospitals. With the secretion of different sorts of toxins such as entrotoxin, this bacteria can provide the conditions for attacking on the host. The main objective of this study is identification of the characteristics and differences in the Staphylococcus aureus isolated from healthy carriers and from the patients on the basis of enterotoxin genes (sea-see. Material and Methods: One hundred and twenty of the patients and 80 of healthy carriers worked in health centers of Gorgan, north of Iran, were investigated for S. aureus isolate. The isolates were evaluated by PCR for Enterotoxin Genes A-E (SEA to SEE. Results: Enterotoxin genes (SEA to SEE was found in 87.5% of the total isolates and the most frequent one was enterotoxin gene sea (N= 124. The prevalence of these isolates in healthy carriers was significantly higher than those of the patients. Conclusion: Based on the results, the high percentage of S. aureus isolated from clinical samples contains enterotoxin genes. Therefore, Human as the source and carrier of S. aureus is paramount importance, which is due to significant relationship between being toxigenic strains and the source of isolation. Key words: Staphylococcus Aureus; Enterotoxin; Patient; Carrier

  17. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus from bovine mastitis

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    C. G. Unakal and B. B. Kaliwal

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of mastitic Staphylococcus aureus in dairy cows. Milk samples for microbiological culture were collected from dairy herds. A total of 105 samples were screened and 68 confirmed Staphylococcus aureus were obtained. The a, ß and non haemolytic activity revealed 20.58%, 75% and 4.41% respectively in 68 isolated strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus against 10 antimicrobial agents was tested using the disc diffusion method. The highest 86.76% isolates were resistant to penicillin followed by ampicillin 70.50%, amoxicillin 63.23%, gentamycin 47.05%, amikacin 30.80%, erythromycin 27.94%, Ciprofloxacin 26.47%, methicillin 23.52%, cefotaxime 20.58% and the lowest resistant was shown in ceftriaxone 19.11%. The study revealed that the increase in prevalence and antibiotic resistance pattern of the Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine mastitis. [Vet. World 2010; 3(2.000: 65-67

  18. Role of Staphylococcus aureus global regulators sae and sigmaB in virulence gene expression during device-related infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerke, Christiane; Fluckiger, Ursula; Steinhuber, Andrea; Bisanzio, Vittoria; Ulrich, Martina; Bischoff, Markus; Patti, Joseph M; Wolz, Christiane

    2005-06-01

    The ability of Staphylococcus aureus to adapt to different environments is due to a regulatory network comprising several loci. Here we present a detailed study of the interaction between the two global regulators sae and sigmaB of S. aureus and their influence on virulence gene expression in vitro, as well as during device-related infection. The expression of sae, asp23, hla, clfA, coa, and fnbA was determined in strain Newman and its isogenic saeS/R and sigB mutants by Northern analysis and LightCycler reverse transcription-PCR. There was no indication of direct cross talk between the two regulators. sae had a dominant effect on target gene expression during device-related infection. SigmaB seemed to be less active throughout the infection than under induced conditions in vitro.

  19. Enzymatic degradation of in vitro Staphylococcus aureus biofilms supplemented with human plasma

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    Watters CM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chase M Watters,1,2 Tarea Burton,1 Dickson K Kirui,1 Nancy J Millenbaugh1 1Maxillofacial Injury and Disease Department, Naval Medical Research Unit San Antonio, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA; 2Wound Infections Department, Naval Medical Research Center, Silver Spring, MD, USA Abstract: Enzymatic debridement is a therapeutic strategy used clinically to remove necrotic tissue from wounds. Some of the enzymes utilized for debridement have been tested against bacterial pathogens, but the effectiveness of these agents in dispersing clinically relevant biofilms has not been fully characterized. Here, we developed an in vitro Staphylococcus aureus biofilm model that mimics wound-like conditions and employed this model to investigate the antibiofilm activity of four enzymatic compounds. Human plasma at concentrations of 0%–50% was supplemented into growth media and used to evaluate biofilm biomass accumulation over 24 hours and 48 hours in one methicillin-sensitive and five methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus. Supplementation of media with 10% human plasma resulted in the most robust biofilms in all six strains. The enzymes α-amylase, bromelain, lysostaphin, and papain were then tested against S. aureus biofilms cultured in 10% human plasma. Quantification of biofilms after 2 hours and 24 hours of treatment using the crystal violet assay revealed that lysostaphin decreased biomass by up to 76%, whereas a-amylase, bromelain, and papain reduced biomass by up to 97%, 98%, and 98%, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the dispersal agents detached the biofilm exopolysaccharide matrix and bacteria from the growth surface. Lysostaphin caused less visible dispersal of the biofilms, but unlike the other enzymes, induced morphological changes indicative of bacterial cell damage. Overall, our results indicate that use of enzymes may be an effective means of eradicating biofilms and a promising strategy to improve

  20. Diabetic mouse model of orthopaedic implant-related Staphylococcus aureus infection.

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    Arianna B Lovati

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Periprosthetic bacterial infections represent one of the most challenging orthopaedic complications that often require implant removal and surgical debridement and carry high social and economical costs. Diabetes is one of the most relevant risk factors of implant-related infection and its clinical occurrence is growing worldwide. The aim of the present study was to test a model of implant-related infection in the diabetic mouse, with a view to allow further investigation on the relative efficacy of prevention and treatment options in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals. METHODOLOGY: A cohort of diabetic NOD/ShiLtJ mice was compared with non-diabetic CD1 mice as an in vivo model of S. aureus orthopaedic infection of bone and soft tissues after femur intramedullary pin implantation. We tested control and infected groups with 1×10(3 colony-forming units of S. aureus ATCC 25923 strain injected in the implant site. At 4 weeks post-inoculation, host response to infection, microbial biofilm formation, and bone damage were assessed by traditional diagnostic parameters (bacterial culture, C-reactive protein and white blood cell count, histological analysis and imaging techniques (micro computed tomography and scanning electron microscopy. RESULTS: Unlike the controls and the CD1 mice, all the diabetic mice challenged with a single inoculum of S. aureus displayed severe osteomyelitic changes around the implant. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate for the first time that the diabetic mouse can be successfully used in a model of orthopaedic implant-related infection. Furthermore, the same bacteria inoculum induced periprosthetic infection in all the diabetic mice but not in the controls. This animal model of implant-related infection in diabetes may be a useful tool to test in vivo treatments in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals.

  1. Contribution of coagulases towards Staphylococcus aureus disease and protective immunity.

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    Alice G Cheng

    Full Text Available The bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus seeds abscesses in host tissues to replicate at the center of these lesions, protected from host immune cells via a pseudocapsule. Using histochemical staining, we identified prothrombin and fibrin within abscesses and pseudocapsules. S. aureus secretes two clotting factors, coagulase (Coa and von Willebrand factor binding protein (vWbp. We report here that Coa and vWbp together are required for the formation of abscesses. Coa and vWbp promote the non-proteolytic activation of prothrombin and cleavage of fibrinogen, reactions that are inhibited with specific antibody against each of these molecules. Coa and vWbp specific antibodies confer protection against abscess formation and S. aureus lethal bacteremia, suggesting that coagulases function as protective antigens for a staphylococcal vaccine.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms: recent developments in biofilm dispersal.

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    Lister, Jessica L; Horswill, Alexander R

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections and represents a significant burden on the healthcare system. S. aureus attachment to medical implants and host tissue, and the establishment of a mature biofilm, play an important role in the persistence of chronic infections. The formation of a biofilm, and encasement of cells in a polymer-based matrix, decreases the susceptibility to antimicrobials and immune defenses, making these infections difficult to eradicate. During infection, dispersal of cells from the biofilm can result in spread to secondary sites and worsening of the infection. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the pathways behind biofilm dispersal in S. aureus, with a focus on enzymatic and newly described broad-spectrum dispersal mechanisms. Additionally, we explore potential applications of dispersal in the treatment of biofilm-mediated infections.

  3. Repurposing the antihistamine terfenadine for antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlmutter, Jessamyn I; Forbes, Lauren T; Krysan, Damian J; Ebsworth-Mojica, Katherine; Colquhoun, Jennifer M; Wang, Jenna L; Dunman, Paul M; Flaherty, Daniel P

    2014-10-23

    Staphylococcus aureus is a rapidly growing health threat in the U.S., with resistance to several commonly prescribed treatments. A high-throughput screen identified the antihistamine terfenadine to possess, previously unreported, antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and other Gram-positive bacteria. In an effort to repurpose this drug, structure-activity relationship studies yielded 84 terfenadine-based analogues with several modifications providing increased activity versus S. aureus and other bacterial pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mechanism of action studies revealed these compounds to exert their antibacterial effects, at least in part, through inhibition of the bacterial type II topoisomerases. This scaffold suffers from hERG liabilities which were not remedied through this round of optimization; however, given the overall improvement in activity of the set, terfenadine-based analogues provide a novel structural class of antimicrobial compounds with potential for further characterization as part of the continuing process to meet the current need for new antibiotics.

  4. Local inflammation exacerbates the severity of Staphylococcus aureus skin infection.

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    Christopher P Montgomery

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of skin infections. In a mouse model of S. aureus skin infection, we found that lesion size did not correlate with bacterial burden. Athymic nude mice had smaller skin lesions that contained lower levels of myeloperoxidase, IL-17A, and CXCL1, compared with wild type mice, although there was no difference in bacterial burden. T cell deficiency did not explain the difference in lesion size, because TCR βδ (-/- mice did not have smaller lesions, and adoptive transfer of congenic T cells into athymic nude mice prior to infection did not alter lesion size. The differences observed were specific to the skin, because mortality in a pneumonia model was not different between wild type and athymic nude mice. Thus, the clinical severity of S. aureus skin infection is driven by the inflammatory response to the bacteria, rather than bacterial burden, in a T cell independent manner.

  5. Botryomycosis Due to Staphylococcus Aureus-A Case Report

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    Manjula A.Vagarali

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study Staphylococcus aureus as the causative organism of botryomycosis. Background: the botryomycosis is a chronic purulent granulomatous lesion of the skin, subcutaneous tissue and visceral organs caused by several bacterial species. This condition clinically and histopathologically resembles with that of mycetoma and Actinomycosis. Method: A 51 year old male presented to us with swelling over medial aspect of the right foot with multiple sinuses. He gave a history of trauma 3 years back at the same site. The sample was examined directly by KOH preparation and grams stain. The culture was put up on blood, chocolate, lowenstein Jensen (LJ and sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA media. Fungal culture was negative. Result: Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in aerobic culture. Conclusion: the patient with botryomycosis caused by Staphylococcus aureus was subsequently treated with antibiotics and he recovered completely.

  6. Synergistic antibacterial activity of Curcumin with antibiotics against Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teow, Sin-Yeang; Ali, Syed Atif

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the synergistic antibacterial activity of Curcumin with 8 different antibiotic groups. Two reference, one clinical and ten environmental strains of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) were tested. Disc diffusion assay with 25 μg/mL Curcumin demonstrated synergism in combination with a majority of tested antibiotics against S. aureus. However, checkerboard micro dilution assay only showed synergism, fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) indifferent interactions but no antagonism was observed. In time-kill curve, appreciable reduction of bacterial cells was also observed in combination therapy (Curcumin + antibiotics) compared to monotherapy (Curcumin or antibiotic(s) alone). The antibiotics with higher synergistic interaction with Curcumin are arranged in a decreasing order: Amikacin > Gentamicin > Ciprofloxacin.

  7. Quality control of direct molecular diagnostics for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van Belkum (Alex); H.G.M. Niesters (Bert); W.G. MacKay (William); W.B. van Leeuwen (Willem)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractTen samples containing various amounts of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), and combinations thereof were distributed to 51 laboratories for molecular diagnostics testing. Sample

  8. Quality control of direct molecular diagnostics for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Belkum, Alex; Niesters, Hubert G M; MacKay, William G; van Leeuwen, Willem B

    2007-01-01

    Ten samples containing various amounts of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), and combinations thereof were distributed to 51 laboratories for molecular diagnostics testing. Samples containing

  9. Staphylococcus aureus adherence to Candida albicans hyphae is mediated by the hyphal adhesin Als3p

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Brian M.; Ovchinnikova, Ekaterina S.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Schlecht, Lisa Marie; Zhou, Han; Hoyer, Lois L.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; Shirtliff, Mark E.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Staphylococcus (St.) aureus and the opportunistic fungus Candida albicans are currently among the leading nosocomial pathogens, often co-infecting critically ill patients, with high morbidity and mortality. Previous investigations have demonstrated preferential adherence of St. aureus

  10. Prevalence of infective endocarditis in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia: the value of screening with echocardiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Høst, Ulla; Arpi, Magnus;

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis (IE) is a critical medical condition associated with a high morbidity and mortality. In the present study, we prospectively evaluated the importance of screening with echocardiography in an unselected S. aureus bacteraemia (SAB) population....

  11. Mupirocin prophylaxis against nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus infections in nonsurgical patients: a randomized study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Vos (Margreet); A. Ott (Alewijn); A. Voss (Andreas); J.A.J.W. Kluytmans (Jan); C.M.J.E. Vandenbroucke-Grauls (Christina); M.H.M. Meester (Marlene); P.H.J. van Keulen (Peter); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); H.F.L. Wertheim (Heiman)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage is a major risk factor for nosocomial S. aureus infection. Studies show that intranasal mupirocin can prevent nosocomial surgical site infections. No data are available on the efficacy of mupirocin in nonsurgical patients

  12. The Significance of Nasal Carriage of Staphylococcus Aureus and the Incidence of Postoperative Wound Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.P. Wenzel (Richard); T. M. Perl

    1995-01-01

    textabstractStaphylococcus aureus infections are associated with considerable morbidity and, in certain situations, mortality. The association between the nasal carriage of S. aureus and subsequent infection has been comprehensively established in a variety of clinical settings, in particular, patie

  13. Highly sensitive detection of Staphylococcus aureus directly from patient blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmapriya P Banada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rapid detection of bloodstream infections (BSIs can be lifesaving. We investigated the sample processing and assay parameters necessary for highly-sensitive detection of bloodstream bacteria, using Staphylococcus aureus as a model pathogen and an automated fluidic sample processing-polymerase chain reaction (PCR platform as a model diagnostic system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared a short 128 bp amplicon hemi-nested PCR and a relatively shorter 79 bp amplicon nested PCR targeting the S. aureus nuc and sodA genes, respectively. The sodA nested assay showed an enhanced limit of detection (LOD of 5 genomic copies per reaction or 10 colony forming units (CFU per ml blood over 50 copies per reaction or 50 CFU/ml for the nuc assay. To establish optimal extraction protocols, we investigated the relative abundance of the bacteria in different components of the blood (white blood cells (WBCs, plasma or whole blood, using the above assays. The blood samples were obtained from the patients who were culture positive for S. aureus. Whole blood resulted in maximum PCR positives with sodA assay (90% positive as opposed to cell-associated bacteria (in WBCs (71% samples positive or free bacterial DNA in plasma (62.5% samples positive. Both the assays were further tested for direct detection of S. aureus in patient whole blood samples that were contemporaneous culture positive. S. aureus was detected in 40/45 of culture-positive patients (sensitivity 89%, 95% CI 0.75-0.96 and 0/59 negative controls with the sodA assay (specificity 100%, 95% CI 0.92-1. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated a highly sensitive two-hour assay for detection of sepsis causing bacteria like S. aureus directly in 1 ml of whole blood, without the need for blood culture.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus resistance to topical antimicrobials in atopic dermatitis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessa, Giancarlo Rezende; Quinto, Vanessa Petry; Machado, Daiane Corrêa; Lipnharski, Caroline; Weber, Magda Blessmann; Bonamigo, Renan Rangel; D'Azevedo, Pedro Alves

    2016-01-01

    Background Topical antimicrobial drugs are indicated for limited superficial pyodermitis treatment, although they are largely used as self-prescribed medication for a variety of inflammatory dermatoses, including atopic dermatitis. Monitoring bacterial susceptibility to these drugs is difficult, given the paucity of laboratory standardization. Objective To evaluate the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus topical antimicrobial drug resistance in atopic dermatitis patients. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of children and adults diagnosed with atopic dermatitis and S. aureus colonization. We used miscellaneous literature reported breakpoints to define S. aureus resistance to mupirocin, fusidic acid, gentamicin, neomycin and bacitracin. Results A total of 91 patients were included and 100 S. aureus isolates were analyzed. All strains were methicillin-susceptible S. aureus. We found a low prevalence of mupirocin and fusidic acid resistance (1.1% and 5.9%, respectively), but high levels of neomycin and bacitracin resistance (42.6% and 100%, respectively). Fusidic acid resistance was associated with more severe atopic dermatitis, demonstrated by higher EASI scores (median 17.8 vs 5.7, p=.009). Our results also corroborate the literature on the absence of cross-resistance between the aminoglycosides neomycin and gentamicin. Conclusions Our data, in a southern Brazilian sample of AD patients, revealed a low prevalence of mupirocin and fusidic acid resistance of S. aureus atopic eczema colonizer strains. However, for neomycin and bacitracin, which are commonly used topical antimicrobial drugs in Brazil, high levels of resistance were identified. Further restrictions on the use of these antimicrobials seem necessary to keep resistance as low as possible. PMID:27828633

  15. New epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus infection in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C-J; Huang, Y-C

    2014-07-01

    Not only is Asia the most populous region in the world, but inappropriate therapy, including self-medication with over-the-counter antimicrobial agents, is a common response to infectious diseases. The high antibiotic selective pressure among the overcrowded inhabitants creates an environment that is suitable for the rapid development and efficient spread of numerous multidrug-resistant pathogens. Indeed, Asia is among the regions with the highest prevalence rates of healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) and community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) in the world. Most hospitals in Asia are endemic for multidrug-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), with an estimated proportion from 28% (in Hong Kong and Indonesia) to >70% (in Korea) among all clinical S. aureus isolates in the early 2010s. Isolates with reduced susceptibility or a high level of resistance to glycopeptides have also been increasingly identified in the past few years. In contrast, the proportion of MRSA among community-associated S. aureus infections in Asian countries varies markedly, from 35%. Two pandemic HA-MRSA clones, namely multilocus sequence type (ST) 239 and ST5, are disseminated internationally in Asia, whereas the molecular epidemiology of CA-MRSA in Asia is characterized by clonal heterogeneity, similar to that in Europe. In this review, the epidemiology of S. aureus in both healthcare facilities and communities in Asia is addressed, with an emphasis on the prevalence, clonal structure and antibiotic resistant profiles of the MRSA strains. The novel MRSA strains from livestock animals have been considered to constitute a public health threat in western countries. The emerging livestock-associated MRSA strains in Asia are also included in this review.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus in locally produced white cheese in Tirana market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELVIRA BELI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cheese has nutritional value, its consumption is very common in Albania, but is also excellent medium for bacterial growth, source of bacterial infection, particularly when it is produced from raw poor quality or unpasteurized milk. Microbial safety of cheeses may be enhanced by usage good quality raw milk, pasteurized milk, following GMP in aim to prevent cross-contamination. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence and amount of Staphylococcus aureus in white cheeses, as an Albanian traditional product. Totally 120 samples of white cheese, produced in small big plant at different Albanian district, by raw milk or pasteurized milk, were collected from Tirana market. All samples were tested by phosphatase test to determine whether raw milk or pasteurized milk it was used for cheese production. 53/120 samples (44% resulted produced by pasteurized milk, 67/120 samples (56 % resulted produced by raw milk. The S. aureus was isolated in Baird Parker agar, and submitted to coagulase and API-staph test. Out of 120 cheese samples, 47 showed contamination by S. aureus coagulase-positive corresponding to 39.16%, otherwise 58 out of 120, 48.33 % of cheeses samples being contaminated with coagulase-negative strain of S. aureus. The occurrence S. aureus coagulase-positive in cheeses produced by pasteurized milk and raw milk it was respectively 7/53 (13.2 % and 40/67 (59.7%. 10% of the samples had high levels 105- 106cfu/g of S. aureus coagulase-positive, suggested that white cheese, may represent a health risk for the consumers

  17. [recovery Of Staphylococcus Aureus After Acid Injury In Milk Products].

    OpenAIRE

    Assis, E M; CARVALHO, E.P. de; E.R. Asquieri; Robbs, P G

    2015-01-01

    The growth behavior of Staphylococcus aureus in fresh Cheese (Minas and Muzzarella) during their shelf-life was studied. The possible injury of this microorganism caused by the increasing acidity was also investigated. Raw milk was inoculated with 10(6) cells/ml (S. aureus FRIA-100) and the cheese production was performed according to normal procedures. Minas and muzzarella cheese were stored at 7 degrees C for 40 and 60 days, respectively. At 2-3 days intervals, the following analysis were p...

  18. CHARACTERISATION OF METHICILLIN RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS ISOLATES FROM SHINGLES PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine R. et al.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Even after treating Shingles patients with antiviral drugs, they are found to suffer from secondary bacterial infections. With this background as a guide, we undertook an investigation to isolate the bacterial pathogens from the pus of Shingles patients. Among the isolates obtained during the one year study period, Staphylococcus aureus sp. was found to be multi drug resistant and hence it was chosen for the study. The antibiogram pattern of the methicillin resistant S. aureus was obtained, since this could serve as a tool for suggesting useful drugs.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis: a rare cause of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chest pain is a common presenting symptom with a broad differential. Life-threatening cardiac and pulmonary etiologies of chest pain should be evaluated first. However, it is critical to perform a thorough assessment for other sources of chest pain in order to limit morbidity and mortality from less common causes. We present a rare case of a previously healthy 45 year old man who presented with focal, substernal, reproducible chest pain and Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia who was later found to have primary Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus Transcriptome Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäder, Ulrike; Nicolas, Pierre; Depke, Maren;

    2016-01-01

    to their dependence on the RNA polymerase sigma factors SigA or SigB, and allow identification of new potential targets for several known transcription factors. In particular, this study revealed a relatively low abundance of antisense RNAs in S. aureus, where they overlap only 6% of the coding genes, and only 19...... antisense RNAs not co-transcribed with other genes were found. Promoter analysis and comparison with Bacillus subtilis links the small number of antisense RNAs to a less profound impact of alternative sigma factors in S. aureus. Furthermore, we revealed that Rho-dependent transcription termination...

  1. Synthetic peptide inhibitors of DNA replication in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Kjelstrup, Susanne

    of clinically important pathogens and is essential for bacterial proliferation. The bacterial replication apparatus fulfill the requirements for a good drug target. The replisome of S. aureus consists of 5 different subunits (2, PolC2, 4, δ and δ`) who’s organization depends on multiple protein-protein...... interactions. Centrally in the replisome is the -clamp where to multiple proteins binds through a conserved motif. We have identified the protein-protein interactions in the replisome of S. aureus by use of a bacterial two-hybrid system. A reverse bacterial two-hybrid system (R-BTH) based on Pyr...

  2. Response of Staphylococcus Aureus to a Spaceflight Analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, S. L.; Ott, C. M.

    2010-01-01

    The decreased gravity of the spaceflight environment creates quiescent, low fluid shear conditions. This environment can impart considerable effects on the physiology of microorganisms as well as their interactions with potential hosts. Using the rotating wall vessel (RWV), as a spaceflight analogue, the consequence of low fluid shear culture on microbial pathogenesis has provided a better understanding of the risks to the astronaut crew from infectious microorganisms. While the outcome of low fluid shear culture has been investigated for several bacterial pathogens, little has been done to understand how this environmental factor affects Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus is an opportunistic human pathogen which presents a high level of infection risk to the crew, as it has been isolated from both the space shuttle and International Space Station. Given that approximately forty percent of the population are carriers of the bacteria, eradication of this organism from in flight environments is impractical. These reasons have lead to us to assess the response of S. aureus to a reduced fluid shear environment. Culture in the RWV demonstrated that S. aureus grown under the low-shear condition had lower cell concentrations after 10 hours when compared to the control culture. Furthermore, the low-shear cultured bacteria displayed a reduction in carotenoid production, pigments responsible for their yellow/gold coloration. When exposed to various environmental stressors, post low-shear culture, a decrease in the ability to survive oxidative assault was observed compared to control cultures. The low fluid shear environment also resulted in a decrease in hemolysin secretion, a staphylococcal toxin responsible for red blood cell lysis. When challenged by the immune components present in human whole blood, low-shear cultured S. aureus demonstrated significantly reduced survival rates as compared to the control culture. Assays to determine the duration of these alterations

  3. Identification of the ClpX Regulon in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Ingmer, Hanne;

    Staphyloccous aureus is a major human pathogen capable of causing a wide spectrum of infections ranging from superficial wound infections to life-threatening endocarditis and toxic shock syndrome. Essential for S. aureus virulence is a large number of cell-surface-associated proteins and secreted...... proteins. Results from our group have shown that the ClpXP proteolytic complex and the ClpX chaperone play central roles in regulating expression of many of these factors (2;3). By using DNA microarrays to compare transcription of strain 8325-4 (wt) and the isogenic ¿clpX strain during the transition phase...

  4. Disruption of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms with Enzymatic Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-29

    NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH UNIT SAN ANTONIO Disruption of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms with Enzymatic...fold lower than that needed to thoroughly disrupt biofilms in the current investigation. A previous study of α-amylase applied to S. aureus biofilms...Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. Open Microbiology Journal, 2011. 5: p. 21-31. 36. Wu, J.A., et al., Lysostaphin disrupts Staphylococcus aureus and

  5. Minimum inhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin in combination with hexahydroquinoline derivatives against Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    F Amin Harati; M Amini; Shahverdi AR; Pourmand, MR; Yousefi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus is the most common pathogen responsible for skin and soft tissue infections worldwide. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus is a major cause of both nosocomial and community acquired infections. The emergence of antimicrobial-resistant S. aureus is of global concern. Fluoroquinolone antimicrobials including ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and moxifloxacin are used to treat skin and soft tissue infections due to S. aureus. Emergence of ciprofloxacin resistance has inc...

  6. Changes in the Staphylococcus aureus Transcriptome during Early Adaptation to the Lung

    OpenAIRE

    Chaffin, Donald O.; Destry Taylor; Skerrett, Shawn J.; Craig E Rubens

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common inhabitant of the human nasopharynx. It is also a cause of life-threatening illness, producing a potent array of virulence factors that enable survival in normally sterile sites. The transformation of S. aureus from commensal to pathogen is poorly understood. We analyzed S. aureus gene expression during adaptation to the lung using a mouse model of S. aureus pneumonia. Bacteria were isolated by bronchoalveolar lavage after residence in vivo for up to 6 hours....

  7. Familial Clustering of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia in First-Degree Relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oestergaard, Louise B.; Christiansen, Mia N.; Schmiegelow, Michelle D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A genetic predisposition to Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia has been demonstrated in animals, suggesting that genetic differences might influence susceptibility to S aureus in humans. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether a history of S aureus bacteremia in first-degree relatives increases...

  8. Long-term cortisol levels are not associated with nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Manenschijn (Laura); A.M. Jetten; W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem); M. Tavakol (Mehri); E.L.T. van den Akker (Erica); J.W. Koper (Jan); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); E.F.C. van Rossum (Liesbeth)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractStaphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) colonizes the anterior nares in part of the population and the persistent carrier state is associated with increased infection risk. Knowledge concerning the determinants of S. aureus nasal carriage is limited. Previously, we found that glucocorticoid re

  9. Genotypic characterisation of Staphylococcus aureus isolates causing bacteraemia at Tygerberg hospital, western cape province, South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orth, H.; Salaam-Dreyer, Z.; Makgotlho, E.; Sinha, B.; Wasserman, E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: There is a paucity of studies on the genotypic characterisation of invasive S. aureus strains and the incidence of communityacquired methicillin resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) infections in South Africa. In this study we characterized S. aureus isolates from bacteraemia episodes using mol

  10. Phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance traits of foodborne Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcus aureus is a recognized pathogen in humans, which causes nosocomial infections and food poisoning. The transmission of antibiotic resistant S. aureus (ARSA), especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), between food products and humans has become a serious problem. Hence, it is n...

  11. Antibiotic-mediated selection of quorum-sensing-negative Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulander, Wilhelm Erik Axel; Varming, Anders Nissen; Bæk, Kristoffer Torbjørn;

    2012-01-01

    -acquired S. aureus infections and suggest that the adaptability of S. aureus to antibiotics involves the agr locus. IMPORTANCE: Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequently isolated pathogen in intensive care units and a common cause of nosocomial infections, resulting in a high degree of morbidity...

  12. Bactericidal Effect of a Photoresponsive Carbon Monoxide-Releasing Nonwoven against Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger-Strobel, Mareike; Gläser, Steve; Makarewicz, Oliwia; Wyrwa, Ralf; Weisser, Jürgen; Pletz, Mathias W; Schiller, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading pathogen in skin and skin structure infections, including surgical and traumatic infections that are associated with biofilm formation. Because biofilm formation is accompanied by high phenotypic resistance of the embedded bacteria, they are almost impossible to eradicate by conventional antibiotics. Therefore, alternative therapeutic strategies are of high interest. We generated nanostructured hybrid nonwovens via the electrospinning of a photoresponsive carbon monoxide (CO)-releasing molecule [CORM-1, Mn2(CO)10] and the polymer polylactide. This nonwoven showed a CO-induced antimicrobial activity that was sufficient to reduce the biofilm-embedded bacteria by 70% after photostimulation at 405 nm. The released CO increased the concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the biofilms, suggesting that in addition to inhibiting the electron transport chain, ROS might play a role in the antimicrobial activity of CORMs on S. aureus The nonwoven showed increased cytotoxicity on eukaryotic cells after longer exposure, most probably due to the released lactic acid, that might be acceptable for local and short-time treatments. Therefore, CO-releasing nonwovens might be a promising local antimicrobial therapy against biofilm-associated skin wound infections.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus uses a novel multidomain receptor to break apart human hemoglobin and steal its heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirig, Thomas; Malmirchegini, G Reza; Zhang, Jiang; Robson, Scott A; Sjodt, Megan; Liu, Mengyao; Krishna Kumar, Kaavya; Dickson, Claire F; Gell, David A; Lei, Benfang; Loo, Joseph A; Clubb, Robert T

    2013-01-11

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of life-threatening infections in the United States. It requires iron to grow, which must be actively procured from its host to successfully mount an infection. Heme-iron within hemoglobin (Hb) is the most abundant source of iron in the human body and is captured by S. aureus using two closely related receptors, IsdH and IsdB. Here we demonstrate that each receptor captures heme using two conserved near iron transporter (NEAT) domains that function synergistically. NMR studies of the 39-kDa conserved unit from IsdH (IsdH(N2N3), Ala(326)-Asp(660)) reveals that it adopts an elongated dumbbell-shaped structure in which its NEAT domains are properly positioned by a helical linker domain, whose three-dimensional structure is determined here in detail. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and heme transfer measurements indicate that IsdH(N2N3) extracts heme from Hb via an ordered process in which the receptor promotes heme release by inducing steric strain that dissociates the Hb tetramer. Other clinically significant Gram-positive pathogens capture Hb using receptors that contain multiple NEAT domains, suggesting that they use a conserved mechanism.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus Uses a Novel Multidomain Receptor to Break Apart Human Hemoglobin and Steal Its Heme*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirig, Thomas; Malmirchegini, G. Reza; Zhang, Jiang; Robson, Scott A.; Sjodt, Megan; Liu, Mengyao; Krishna Kumar, Kaavya; Dickson, Claire F.; Gell, David A.; Lei, Benfang; Loo, Joseph A.; Clubb, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of life-threatening infections in the United States. It requires iron to grow, which must be actively procured from its host to successfully mount an infection. Heme-iron within hemoglobin (Hb) is the most abundant source of iron in the human body and is captured by S. aureus using two closely related receptors, IsdH and IsdB. Here we demonstrate that each receptor captures heme using two conserved near iron transporter (NEAT) domains that function synergistically. NMR studies of the 39-kDa conserved unit from IsdH (IsdHN2N3, Ala326–Asp660) reveals that it adopts an elongated dumbbell-shaped structure in which its NEAT domains are properly positioned by a helical linker domain, whose three-dimensional structure is determined here in detail. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and heme transfer measurements indicate that IsdHN2N3 extracts heme from Hb via an ordered process in which the receptor promotes heme release by inducing steric strain that dissociates the Hb tetramer. Other clinically significant Gram-positive pathogens capture Hb using receptors that contain multiple NEAT domains, suggesting that they use a conserved mechanism. PMID:23132864

  15. Neutrophil crawling in capillaries; a novel immune response to Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Mark Geoffrey; Zhang, Kunyan; Conly, John; Kubes, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), particularly the USA300 strain, is a highly virulent pathogen responsible for an increasing number of skin and soft tissue infections globally. Furthermore, MRSA-induced soft tissue infections can rapidly progress into life-threatening conditions, such as sepsis and necrotizing fasciitis. The importance of neutrophils in these devastating soft tissue infections remains ambiguous, partly because of our incomplete understanding of their behaviour. Spinning disk confocal microscopy was used to visualize the behaviour of GR1-labelled neutrophils in subcutaneous tissue in response to GFP-expressing MRSA attached to a foreign particle (agarose bead). We observed significant directional neutrophil recruitment towards the S. aureus agarose bead but not a control agarose bead. A significant increase in neutrophil crawling within the capillaries surrounding the infectious nidus was noted, with impaired capillary perfusion in these vessels and increased parenchymal cell death. No neutrophils were able to emigrate from capillaries. The crawling within these capillaries was mediated by the β(2) and α(4) integrins and blocking these integrins 2 hours post infection eliminated neutrophil crawling, improved capillary perfusion, reduced cell death and reduced lesion size. Blocking prior to infection increased pathology. Neutrophil crawling within capillaries during MRSA soft tissue infections, while potentially contributing to walling off or preventing early dissemination of the pathogen, resulted in impaired perfusion and increased tissue injury with time.

  16. Development of a sandwiched microarray platform for studying the interactions of antibiotics with Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Lei, Zhen; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-04-21

    It still confronts an outstanding challenge to screen efficient antibacterial drugs from millions of potential antibiotic candidates. In this regard, a sandwiched microarray platform has been developed to culture live bacteria and carry out high-throughput screening antibacterial drugs. The optimized lectin-hydrogel microarray can be used as an efficient bacterial capturing and culturing platform, which is beneficial to identify spots and collect data. At the same time, a matching drug-laden polyacrylamide microarray with Luria-Bertani (LB) culture medium can be generated automatically and accurately by using a standard non-contacting procedure. A large number of microscale culture chambers (more than 100 individual samples) between two microarrays can be formed by linking two aligned hydrogel spots using LB culture medium, where live bacteria can be co-cultured with drug candidates. Using Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and four well-known antibiotics (amoxicillin, vancomycin, streptomycin and chloramphenicol) as model system, the MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) values of the antibiotics can be determined by the drug induced change of bacterial growth, and the results demonstrate that the MIC values of amoxicillin, vancomycin and streptomycin are 1.7 μg mL(-1), 3.3 μg mL(-1) and 10.3 μg mL(-1), respectively.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus and Lipopolysaccharide Modulate Gene Expressions of Drug Transporters in Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells Correlation to Inflammatory Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Tallkvist, Jonas; Artursson, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation in the mammary gland (mastitis) is the most common disease in dairy herds worldwide, often caused by the pathogens Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli). Little is known about the effects of mastitis on drug transporters and the impact on transporter-mediated excretion of drugs into milk. We used murine mammary epithelial HC11 cells, after lactogenic differentiation into a secreting phenotype, and studied gene expressions of ABC- and SLC- transporters after treatment of cells with S. aureus and lipopolysaccharide, an endotoxin secreted by E. coli. The studied transporters were Bcrp, Mdr1, Mrp1, Oatp1a5, Octn1 and Oct1. In addition, Csn2, the gene encoding β-casein, was analyzed. As biomarkers of the inflammatory response, gene expressions of the cytokines Il6 and Tnfα and the chemokine Cxcl2 were determined. Our results show that S. aureus and LPS treatment of cells, at non-cytotoxic concentrations, induced an up-regulation of Mdr1 and of the inflammatory biomarkers, except that Tnfα was not affected by lipopolysaccharide. By simple regression analysis we could demonstrate statistically significant positive correlations between each of the transporters with each of the inflammatory biomarkers in cells treated with S. aureus. The coefficients of determination (R2) were 0.7–0.9 for all but one correlation. After treatment of cells with lipopolysaccharide, statistically significant correlations were only found between Mdr1 and the two parameters Cxcl2 and Il6. The expression of Csn2 was up-regulated in cells treated with S. aureus, indicating that the secretory function of the cells was not impaired. The strong correlation in gene expressions between transporters and inflammatory biomarkers may suggest a co-regulation and that the transporters have a role in the transport of cytokines and chemokines. Our results demonstrate that transporters in mammary cells can be affected by infection, which may have an impact on

  18. The Spl Serine Proteases Modulate Staphylococcus aureus Protein Production and Virulence in a Rabbit Model of Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Pabon, Wilmara; Meyerholz, David K.; White, Mark J.; Schlievert, Patrick M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Spl proteases are a group of six serine proteases that are encoded on the νSaβ pathogenicity island and are unique to Staphylococcus aureus. Despite their interesting biochemistry, their biological substrates and functions in virulence have been difficult to elucidate. We found that an spl operon mutant of the community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 strain LAC induced localized lung damage in a rabbit model of pneumonia, characterized by bronchopneumonia observed histologically. Disease in the mutant-infected rabbits was restricted in distribution compared to that in wild-type USA300-infected rabbits. We also found that SplA is able to cleave the mucin 16 glycoprotein from the surface of the CalU-3 lung cell line, suggesting a possible mechanism for wild-type USA300 spreading pneumonia to both lungs. Investigation of the secreted and surface proteomes of wild-type USA300 and the spl mutant revealed multiple alterations in metabolic proteins and virulence factors. This study demonstrates that the Spls modulate S. aureus physiology and virulence, identifies a human target of SplA, and suggests potential S. aureus targets of the Spl proteases. IMPORTANCE Staphylococcus aureus is a versatile human pathogen that produces an array of virulence factors, including several proteases. Of these, six proteases called the Spls are the least characterized. Previous evidence suggests that the Spls are expressed during human infection; however, their function is unknown. Our study shows that the Spls are required for S. aureus to cause disseminated lung damage during pneumonia. Further, we present the first example of a human protein cut by an Spl protease. Although the Spls were predicted not to cut staphylococcal proteins, we also show that an spl mutant has altered abundance of both secreted and surface-associated proteins. This work provides novel insight into the function of Spls during infection and their potential ability to degrade

  19. Surface coatings that promote rapid release of peptide-based AgrC inhibitors for attenuation of quorum sensing in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Adam H; Stacy, Danielle M; Tal-Gan, Yftah; Kratochvil, Michael J; Blackwell, Helen E; Lynn, David M

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen responsible for a variety of life-threatening infections. The pathogenicity of this organism is attributed to its ability to produce a range of virulence factors and toxins, including the superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1). While many S. aureus infections can be treated using conventional antibiotics, strains resistant to these bactericidal agents have emerged. Approaches that suppress pathogenicity through mechanisms that are nonbactericidal (i.e., antivirulence approaches) could provide new options for treating infections, including those caused by resistant strains. Here, we report a nonbactericidal approach to suppressing pathogenicity based on the release of macrocyclic peptides (1 and 2) that inhibit the agr quorum sensing (QS) circuit in group-III S. aureus. It is demonstrated that these peptides can be immobilized on planar and complex objects (on glass slides, nonwoven meshes, or within absorbent tampons) using the rapidly dissolving polymer carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). Peptide-loaded CMC films released peptide rapidly (95%) inhibition of the agr QS circuit without inducing cell death when incubated in the presence of a group-III S. aureus gfp-reporter strain. Peptide 1 is among the most potent inhibitors of QS in S. aureus reported to date, and the group-III QS circuit regulates production of TSST-1, the primary cause of toxic shock syndrome (TSS). These results thus suggest approaches to treat the outer covers of tampons, wound dressings, or other objects to suppress toxin production and reduce the severity of TSS in clinical and personal care contexts. Because peptide 1 also inhibits QS in S. aureus groups-I, -II, and -IV, this approach could also provide a pathway for attenuation of QS and associated virulence phenotypes in a broader range of contexts.

  20. Visible light photocatalytic antibacterial activity of Ni-doped and N-doped TiO2 on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananpattarachai, Jirapat; Boonto, Yuphada; Kajitvichyanukul, Puangrat

    2016-03-01

    The Ni-doped and N-doped TiO2 nanoparticles were investigated for their antibacterial activities on Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria. Their morphological features and characteristics such as particle size, surface area, and visible light absorbing capacity were compared and discussed. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and UV-visible spectrophotometry were used to characterize both materials. The inactivation of E. coli (as an example of Gram-negative bacteria) and S. aureus (as an example of Gram-positive bacteria) with Ni-doped and N-doped TiO2 was investigated in the absence and presence of visible light. Antibacterial activity tests were conducted using undoped, Ni-doped, and N-doped TiO2. The N-doped TiO2 nanoparticles show higher antibacterial activity than Ni-doped TiO2. The band gap narrowing of N-doped TiO2 can induce more visible light absorption and leads to the superb antibacterial properties of this material. The complete inactivation time for E. coli at an initial cell concentration of 2.7 × 10(4) CFU/mL was 420 min which is longer than the 360 min required for S. aureus inactivation. The rate of inactivation of S. aureus using the doped TiO2 nanoparticles in the presence of visible light is greater than that of E. coli. The median lethal dose (LD50) values of S. aureus and E. coli by antibacterial activity under an 18-W visible light intensity were 80 and 350 mg/ml for N-doped TiO2, respectively.

  1. Synthetic LPETG-containing peptide incorporation in the Staphylococcus aureus cell-wall in a sortase A- and growth phase-dependent manner.

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    Silvie Hansenová Maňásková

    Full Text Available The majority of Staphylococcus aureus virulence- and colonization-associated surface proteins contain a pentapeptide recognition motif (LPXTG. This motif can be recognized and cleaved by sortase A (SrtA which is a membrane-bound transpeptidase. After cleavage these proteins are covalently incorporated into the peptidoglycan. Therefore, SrtA plays a key role in S. aureus virulence. We aimed to generate a substrate mimicking this SrtA recognition motif for several purposes: to incorporate this substrate into the S. aureus cell-wall in a SrtA-dependent manner, to characterize this incorporation and to determine the effect of substrate incorporation on the incorporation of native SrtA-dependent cell-surface-associated proteins. We synthesized substrate containing the specific LPXTG motif, LPETG. As a negative control we used a scrambled version of this substrate, EGTLP and a S. aureus srtA knockout strain. Both substrates contained a fluorescence label for detection by FACScan and fluorescence microscope. A spreading assay and a competitive Luminex assay were used to determine the effect of substrate treatment on native LPXTG containing proteins deposition in the bacterial cell-wall. We demonstrate a SrtA-dependent covalent incorporation of the LPETG-containing substrate in wild type S. aureus strains and several other Gram-positive bacterial species. LPETG-containing substrate incorporation in S. aureus was growth phase-dependent and peaked at the stationary phase. This incorporation negatively correlated with srtA mRNA expression. Exogenous addition of the artificial substrate did not result in a decreased expression of native SrtA substrates (e.g. clumping factor A/B and protein A nor induced a srtA knockout phenotype.

  2. Threat of multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Western Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatta, Dharm R.; Cavaco, Lina; Nath, Gopal;

    2015-01-01

    ObjectiveTo determine the prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the isolates from Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal. MethodsThis study was conducted over a period of 11 months (September 2012–August 2013) at the Manip...

  3. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Colonization among Medical Residents

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    Pascale Trépanier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Medical residents may be at risk of becoming colonized by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA during their training. The occupational risk of this specific population is unknown. Furthermore, there are no data regarding MRSA colonization among health care professionals in Quebec.

  4. Multilocus sequence typing of Staphylococcus aureus with DNA array technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.B. van Leeuwen (Willem); C. Jay (Corinne); S.V. Snijders (Susan); N. Durin (Nathalia); B. Lacroix (Bruno); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); M.C. Enright (Mark); A. Troesch (Alain); A.F. van Belkum (Alex)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractA newly developed oligonucleotide array suited for multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of Staphylococcus aureus strains was analyzed with two strain collections in a two-center study. MLST allele identification for the first strain collection fully agreed with conventiona

  5. Staphylococcus aureus colonization related to severity of hand eczema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mernelius, S; Carlsson, E; Henricson, J; Löfgren, S; Lindgren, P-E; Ehricht, R; Monecke, S; Matussek, A; Anderson, C D

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge on Staphylococcus aureus colonization rates and epidemiology in hand eczema is limited. The aim of this study was to clarify some of these issues. Samples were collected by the "glove juice" method from the hands of 59 patients with chronic hand eczema and 24 healthy individuals. Swab samples were taken from anterior nares and throat from 43 of the 59 patients and all healthy individuals. S. aureus were spa typed and analysed by DNA-microarray-based genotyping. The extent of the eczema was evaluated by the hand eczema extent score (HEES). The colonization rate was higher on the hands of hand eczema patients (69 %) compared to healthy individuals (21 %, p eczema (HEES ≥ 13) had a significantly higher S. aureus density on their hands compared to those with milder eczema (HEES = 1 to 12, p = 0.004). There was no difference between patients and healthy individuals regarding colonization rates in anterior nares or throat. spa typing and DNA-microarray-based genotyping indicated certain types more prone to colonize eczematous skin. Simultaneous colonization, in one individual, with S. aureus of different types, was identified in 60-85 % of the study subjects. The colonization rate and density indicate a need for effective treatment of eczema and may have an impact on infection control in healthcare.

  6. Menaquinone biosynthesis potentiates haem toxicity in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeman, Catherine A; Hammer, Neal D; Stauff, Devin L; Attia, Ahmed S; Anzaldi, Laura L; Dikalov, Sergey I; Calcutt, M Wade; Skaar, Eric P

    2012-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a pathogen that infects multiple anatomical sites leading to a diverse array of diseases. Although vertebrates can restrict the growth of invading pathogens by sequestering iron within haem, S. aureus surmounts this challenge by employing high-affinity haem uptake systems. However, the presence of excess haem is highly toxic, necessitating tight regulation of haem levels. To overcome haem stress, S. aureus expresses the detoxification system HrtAB. In this work, a transposon screen was performed in the background of a haem-susceptible, HrtAB-deficient S. aureus strain to identify the substrate transported by this putative pump and the source of haem toxicity. While a recent report indicates that HrtAB exports haem itself, the haem-resistant mutants uncovered by the transposon selection enabled us to elucidate the cellular factors contributing to haem toxicity. All mutants identified in this screen inactivated the menaquinone (MK) biosynthesis pathway. Deletion of the final steps of this pathway revealed that quinone molecules localizing to the cell membrane potentiate haem-associated superoxide production and subsequent oxidative damage. These data suggest a model in which membrane-associated haem and quinone molecules form a redox cycle that continuously generates semiquinones and reduced haem, both of which react with atmospheric oxygen to produce superoxide.

  7. Putative link between Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage serotype and community association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, D H; Saberesheikh, S; Kearns, A M; Saunders, N A

    2012-07-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from humans can be broadly separated into 3 groups: healthcare-associated (HA), community-associated (CA), and livestock-associated (LA) MRSA. Initially based on epidemiological features, division into these classes is becoming increasingly problematic. The sequencing of S. aureus genomes has highlighted variations in their accessory components, which likely account for differences in pathogenicity and epidemicity. In particular, temperate bacteriophages have been regarded as key players in bacterial pathogenesis. Bacteriophage-associated Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes (luk-PV) are regarded as epidemiological markers of the CA-MRSA due to their high prevalence in CA strains. This paper describes the development and application of a partial composite S. aureus virulence-associated gene microarray. Epidemic, pandemic, and sporadic lineages of UK HA and CA S. aureus were compared. Phage structural genes linked with CA isolates were identified and in silico analysis revealed these to be correlated with phage serogroup. CA strains predominantly carried a PVL-associated phage either of the A or Fb serogroup, whilst HA strains predominantly carried serogroup Fa or B phages. We speculate that carriage of a serogroup A/Fb PVL-associated phage rather than the luk-PV genes specifically is correlated with CA status.

  8. Phenotype switching is a natural consequence of Staphylococcus aureus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Andrew M

    2012-10-01

    The pathogen Staphylococcus aureus undergoes phenotype switching in vivo from its normal colony phenotype (NCP) to a slow-growing, antibiotic-resistant small-colony-variant (SCV) phenotype that is associated with persistence in host cells and tissues. However, it is not clear whether phenotype switching is the result of a constitutive process that is selected for under certain conditions or is triggered by particular environmental stimuli. Examination of cultures of diverse S. aureus strains in the absence of selective pressure consistently revealed a small gentamicin-resistant SCV subpopulation that emerged during exponential-phase NCP growth and increased in number until NCP stationary phase. Treatment of replicating bacteria with the antibiotic gentamicin, which inhibited NCP but not SCV replication, resulted in an initial decrease in SCV numbers, demonstrating that SCVs arise as a consequence of NCP replication. However, SCV population expansion in the presence of gentamicin was reestablished by selection of phenotype-stable SCVs and subsequent SCV replication. In the absence of selective pressure, however, phenotype switching was bidirectional and occurred at a high frequency during NCP replication, resulting in SCV turnover. In summary, these data demonstrate that S. aureus phenotype switching occurs via a constitutive mechanism that generates a dynamic, antibiotic-resistant subpopulation of bacteria that can revert to the parental phenotype. The emergence of SCVs can therefore be considered a normal part of the S. aureus life cycle and provides an insurance policy against exposure to antibiotics that would otherwise eliminate the entire population.

  9. Surveillance van meticilline resistente Staphylococcus aureus in Nederland in 1990

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenay HME; van Leeuwen WJ; van Klingeren B; Rost JA; Schot CS

    1991-01-01

    Follow-up studies on the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Dutch hospitals were continued in 1990. The number of MRSA-isolates in 1990 compared to 1989 is approximately the same. Phage-type pattern and antibiogram were determined for 168 MRSA-isolates from 42 hosp

  10. USA300 Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Cuba

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    Hopman Joost

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is an increasing problem in the Caribbean. We investigated the molecular epidemiology of MRSA isolates on Cuba. Findings The predominant clone was of the spa type t149, followed by community-associated MRSA USA300. Conclusions We report the first molecular typing results of MRSA isolates from Cuba.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin in healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, A M; Orlando, P; Panatto, D; Amicizia, D; Perdelli, F; Cristina, M L

    2014-12-01

    Glycopeptide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is a source of great concern because, especially in hospitals, this class of antibiotics, particularly vancomycin, is one of the main resources for combating infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains (MRSA). Reduced susceptibility to vancomycin (VISA) was first described in 1996 in Japan; since then, a phenotype with heterogeneous resistance to vancomycin (h-VISA) has emerged. H-VISA isolates are characterised by the presence of a resistant subpopulation, typically at a rate of 1 in 10(5) organisms, which constitutes the intermediate stage betweenfully vancomycin-susceptible S. aureus (VSSA) and VISA isolates. As VISA phenotypes are almost uniformly cross-resistant to teicoplanin, they are also called Glycopeptides-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus strains (GISA) and, in the case of heterogeneous resistance to glycopeptides, h-GISA. The overall prevalence of h-VISA is low, accounting for approximately 1.3% of all MRSA isolates tested. Mortality due to h-GISA infections is very high (about 70%), especially among patients hospitalised in high-risk departments, such as intensive care units (ICU). Given the great clinical relevance of strains that are heteroresistant to glycopeptides and the possible negative impact on treatment choices, it is important to draw up and implement infection control practices, including surveillance, the appropriate use of isolation precautions, staff training, hand hygiene, environmental cleansing and good antibiotic stewardship.

  12. Superantigens in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from prosthetic joint infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Choon K.; Karau, Melissa J.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Tilahun, Ashenafi Y.; David, Chella S.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Patel, Robin; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of prosthetic joint infection (PJI). The prevalence of superantigens (SAgs) among PJI-associated S. aureus is unknown. Eighty-four S. aureus isolates associated with PJI isolated between 1999 and 2006 were studied. SAg genes, sea, seb, sec, sed, see, seg, seh, sei and tst, were assayed by PCR. Seventy-eight (92.9%) isolates carried at least one SAg gene studied, with 61 (72.6%) harboring more than one. seg was most commonly (70.2%) and seh was least frequently (4.8%) detected. tst-positive isolates were associated with early infection and increased ESR at diagnosis (P = 0.006 and P = 0.021, respectively). seg and sei were associated with methicillin resistance (P = 0.008 and 0.002, respectively). SAg genes are prevalent in S. aureus causing PJI; a majority of PJI-associated isolates produce biologically active SAgs in both planktonic and biofilm growth modes. PMID:25619753

  13. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Staphylococcus aureus isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is the most applied and effective genetic typing method for epidemiological studies and investigation of foodborne outbreaks caused by different pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus. The technique relies on analysis of large DNA fragments generated by th...

  14. An Interdisciplinary Experiment: Azo-Dye Metabolism by "Staphylococcus Aureus"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklesby, Kayleigh; Smith, Robert; Sharp, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    An interdisciplinary and engaging practical is detailed which offers great versatility in the study of a qualitative and quantitative metabolism of azo-dyes by "Staphylococcus aureus". This practical has broad scope for adaptation in the number and depth of variables to allow a focused practical experiment or small research project. Azo-dyes are…

  15. Increased risk of arterial thromboembolic events after Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejer, N; Gotland, N; Uhre, M L;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: An association between infection and arterial thromboembolic events (ATE) has been suggested. Here we examined the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke and other ATE after Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB). METHODS: Danish register-based nation-wide observational cohort study...

  16. Human Staphylococcus aureus lineages among Zoological Park residents in Greece

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    E. Drougka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a part of the microbiota flora in many animal species. The clonal spread of S. aureus among animals and personnel in a Zoological Park was investigated. Samples were collected from colonized and infected sites among 32 mammals, 11 birds and eight humans. The genes mecA, mecC, lukF/lukS-PV (encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin, PVL and tst (toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 were investigated by PCR. Clones were defined by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST, spa type and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE. Seven S. aureus isolates were recovered from four animals and one from an employee. All were mecA, mecC and tst–negative, whereas, one carried the PVL genes and was isolated from an infected Squirrel monkey. Clonal analysis revealed the occurrence of seven STs, eight PFGE and five spa types including ones of human origin. Even though a variety of genotypes were identified among S. aureus strains colonizing zoo park residents, our results indicate that colonization with human lineages has indeed occurred.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus causing tropical pyomyositis, Amazon Basin, Peru.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, C.; Hallin, M.; Deplano, A.; Denis, O.; Sihuincha, M.; Groot, R. de; Gotuzzo, E.; Jacobs, J.

    2013-01-01

    We studied 12 Staphylococcus aureus isolates causing tropical pyomyositis in the Amazon Basin of Peru. All isolates were methicillin-susceptible; 11 carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin-encoding genes, and 5 belonged to multilocus sequence type 25 and possessed an extensive set of enterotoxins. Our f

  18. Diabetes and risk of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Jesper; Søgaard, Mette; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with diabetes may experience higher risk of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) than patients without diabetes due to decreased immunity or coexisting morbidities. We investigated the risk of community-acquired (CA) SAB in persons with and without diabetes. DESIGN: Using...

  19. Transmissibility of Livestock-associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hetem, D.J.; Bootsma, M.C.J.; Troelstra, A.; Bonten, M.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous findings have suggested that the nosocomial transmission capacity of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) is lower than that of other MRSA genotypes. We therefore performed a 6-month (June 1–November 30, 2011) nationwide study to quantify the single-adm

  20. Staphylococcus aureus α toxin potentiates opportunistic bacterial lung infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Taylor S; Hilliard, Jamese J; Jones-Nelson, Omari; Keller, Ashley E; O'Day, Terrence; Tkaczyk, Christine; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Hamilton, Melissa; Pelletier, Mark; Wang, Qun; Diep, Binh An; Le, Vien T M; Cheng, Lily; Suzich, JoAnn; Stover, C Kendall; Sellman, Bret R

    2016-03-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotic use may adversely affect a patient's beneficial microbiome and fuel cross-species spread of drug resistance. Although alternative pathogen-specific approaches are rationally justified, a major concern for this precision medicine strategy is that co-colonizing or co-infecting opportunistic bacteria may still cause serious disease. In a mixed-pathogen lung infection model, we find that the Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor α toxin potentiates Gram-negative bacterial proliferation, systemic spread, and lethality by preventing acidification of bacteria-containing macrophage phagosomes, thereby reducing effective killing of both S. aureus and Gram-negative bacteria. Prophylaxis or early treatment with a single α toxin neutralizing monoclonal antibody prevented proliferation of co-infecting Gram-negative pathogens and lethality while also promoting S. aureus clearance. These studies suggest that some pathogen-specific, antibody-based approaches may also work to reduce infection risk in patients colonized or co-infected with S. aureus and disparate drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial opportunists.

  1. Genetic Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus in Buruli Ulcer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amissah, Nana Ama; Glasner, Corinna; Ablordey, Anthony; Tetteh, Caitlin S.; Kotey, Nana Konama; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip; Rossen, John W.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2015-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Previous studies have shown that wounds of BU patients are colonized with M. ulcerans and several other microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus, which may interfere with wound healing. The present st

  2. Strain Discrimination of Staphylococcus aureus Using Superantigen Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsen, Hau-Yang; Li, Sheng-Chih; Chiang, Yu-Cheng; Tsai, Shuo-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major bacterial species that may cause clinical infection and food-poisoning cases. Strains of this species may produce a series of superantigens (SAgs). Due to the importance of staphylococcal infections, reliable methods for the discrimination of strains of this species are important. Such data may allow us to trace the infection origins and be used for epidemiological study. For strain discrimination, genotyping methods, such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), etc., could be used. Recently, toxin gene profiles, which can be used for the elucidation of the genetic and pathogenic relatedness between strains, also have been used to improve the strain discrimination. For S. aureus, as more SAg genes were discovered, the SAg profiles become more useful for the strain discrimination of S. aureus. In this chapter, a method for the discrimination of S. aureus strains using superantigen profiles will be described in detail.

  3. Efficacy of extended cefquinome treatment of clinical Staphylococcus aureus mastitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, J. M.; Cox, P.; Schukken, Y. H.; Lam, T. J G M

    2013-01-01

    Clinical Staphylococcus aureus mastitis is difficult to cure. Extended antimicrobial treatment is often advocated as a practical approach to improve cure rates; however, scientific evidence of this hypothesis is lacking. A multi-centered, nonblinded, randomized, positive-controlled clinical trial wa

  4. spa typing for epidemiological surveillance of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallin, Marie; Friedrich, Alexander W; Struelens, Marc J; Caugant, Dominique A.

    2009-01-01

    The spa typing method is based on sequencing of the polymorphic X region of the protein A gene (spa), present in all strains of Staphylococcus aureus. The X region is constituted of a variable number of 24-bp repeats flanked by well-conserved regions. This single-locus sequence-based typing method c

  5. Low efficacy of tobramycin in experimental Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, C. J.; Christophersen, L. J.; Trøstrup, H.;

    2015-01-01

    The empiric treatment of infective endocarditis (IE) varies widely and, in some places, a regimen of penicillin in combination with an aminoglycoside is administered. The increasing incidence of Staphylococcus aureus IE, poor tissue penetration by aminoglycosides and low frequency of penicillin...

  6. Staphylococcus aureus redirects central metabolism to increase iron availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Friedman

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis is significantly influenced by the iron status of the host. However, the regulatory impact of host iron sources on S. aureus gene expression remains unknown. In this study, we combine multivariable difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry with multivariate statistical analyses to systematically cluster cellular protein response across distinct iron-exposure conditions. Quadruplicate samples were simultaneously analyzed for alterations in protein abundance and/or post-translational modification state in response to environmental (iron chelation, hemin treatment or genetic (Deltafur alterations in bacterial iron exposure. We identified 120 proteins representing several coordinated biochemical pathways that are affected by changes in iron-exposure status. Highlighted in these experiments is the identification of the heme-regulated transport system (HrtAB, a novel transport system which plays a critical role in staphylococcal heme metabolism. Further, we show that regulated overproduction of acidic end-products brought on by iron starvation decreases local pH resulting in the release of iron from the host iron-sequestering protein transferrin. These findings reveal novel strategies used by S. aureus to acquire scarce nutrients in the hostile host environment and begin to define the iron and heme-dependent regulons of S. aureus.

  7. Natural Population Dynamics and Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Melles (Damian)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractStaphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen capable of causing a wide range of infections, from relatively mild skin infections such as folliculitis and furunculosis to life-threatening conditions, including sepsis, deep abscesses, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, and infective endocarditis

  8. Methicillin‐resistant Staphylococcus aureus and the media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perencevich, Eli N; Treise, Debbie M

    2010-11-01

    How the media communicate and how the scientific community influences the media are important factors to consider in the public health response to emerging pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Social representation theory suggests that the media link "the threatening" to commonplace "anchor representations" which can serve to educate or to create fear.

  9. Dual Toxic-Peptide-Coding Staphylococcus aureus RNA under Antisense Regulation Targets Host Cells and Bacterial Rivals Unequally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Laure Pinel-Marie

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Produced from the pathogenicity islands of Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates, stable SprG1 RNA encodes two peptides from a single internal reading frame. These two peptides accumulate at the membrane, and inducing their expression triggers S. aureus death. Replacement of the two initiation codons by termination signals reverses this toxicity. During growth, cis-antisense RNA SprF1 is expressed, preventing mortality by reducing SprG1 RNA and peptide levels. The peptides are secreted extracellularly, where they lyse human host erythrocytes, a process performed more efficiently by the longer peptide. The two peptides also inactivate Gram-negative and -positive bacteria, with the shorter peptide more effective against S. aureus rivals. Two peptides are secreted from an individual RNA containing two functional initiation codons. Thus, we present an unconventional type I toxin-antitoxin system expressed from a human pathogen producing two hemolytic and antibacterial peptides from a dual-coding RNA, negatively regulated by a dual-acting antisense RNA.

  10. Influence of Sae-regulated and Agr-regulated factors on the escape of Staphylococcus aureus from human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzenmayer, Lisa; Geiger, Tobias; Daiber, Ellen; Schulte, Berit; Autenrieth, Stella E; Fraunholz, Martin; Wolz, Christiane

    2016-08-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus is not a classical intracellular pathogen, it can survive within phagocytes and many other cell types. However, the pathogen is also able to escape from cells by mechanisms that are only partially understood. We analysed a series of isogenic S. aureus mutants of the USA300 derivative JE2 for their capacity to destroy human macrophages from within. Intracellular S. aureus JE2 caused severe cell damage in human macrophages and could efficiently escape from within the cells. To obtain this full escape phenotype including an intermittent residency in the cytoplasm, the combined action of the regulatory systems Sae and Agr is required. Mutants in Sae or mutants deficient in the Sae target genes lukAB and pvl remained in high numbers within the macrophages causing reduced cell damage. Mutants in the regulatory system Agr or in the Agr target gene psmα were largely similar to wild-type bacteria concerning cell damage and escape efficiency. However, these strains were rarely detectable in the cytoplasm, emphasizing the role of phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) for phagosomal escape. Thus, Sae-regulated toxins largely determine damage and escape from within macrophages, whereas PSMs are mainly responsible for the escape from the phagosome into the cytoplasm. Damage of macrophages induced by intracellular bacteria was linked neither to activation of apoptosis-related caspase 3, 7 or 8 nor to NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activation.

  11. The pleiotropic CymR regulator of Staphylococcus aureus plays an important role in virulence and stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Soutourina

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We have characterized a novel pleiotropic role for CymR, the master regulator of cysteine metabolism. We show here that CymR plays an important role both in stress response and virulence of Staphylococcus aureus. Genes involved in detoxification processes, including oxidative stress response and metal ion homeostasis, were differentially expressed in a DeltacymR mutant. Deletion of cymR resulted in increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide-, disulfide-, tellurite- and copper-induced stresses. Estimation of metabolite pools suggests that this heightened sensitivity could be the result of profound metabolic changes in the DeltacymR mutant, with an increase in the intracellular cysteine pool and hydrogen sulfide formation. Since resistance to oxidative stress within the host organism is important for pathogen survival, we investigated the role of CymR during the infectious process. Our results indicate that the deletion of cymR promotes survival of S. aureus inside macrophages, whereas virulence of the DeltacymR mutant is highly impaired in mice. These data indicate that CymR plays a major role in virulence and adaptation of S. aureus for survival within the host.

  12. Effects of vitamin D and its metabolites on cell viability and Staphylococcus aureus invasion in bovine mammary epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuan; Purup, Stig; Lauridsen, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D has been found have various biological effects that may be potent in preventing bovine mastitis. Two forms of vitamin D, vitamin D2 (D2) and vitamin D3 (D3), can be hydroxylated to functional metabolites in cattle. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the effects of D2...... and D3 compounds on bovine mammary epithelial cell proliferation and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) invasion.. Results showed that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D2 have an anti-proliferation activity comparable to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, while D2 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 (25(OH)D2) was slightly more potent...... than D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) in inhibiting MAC-T cell viability in vitro. S. aureus growth was inhibited by high concentrations of D2, D3, 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3. 25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 induced CYP24A1 expression but reduced VDR mRNA expression, whereas the expression of CYP27B1, occludin...

  13. Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus in Italy: First nationwide survey, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanile, Floriana; Bongiorno, Dafne; Perez, Marianna; Mongelli, Gino; Sessa, Laura; Benvenuto, Sabrina; Gona, Floriana; Varaldo, Pietro E; Stefani, Stefania

    2015-12-01

    A 3-month epidemiological study to determine the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus nosocomial infections was performed in 52 centres throughout Italy in 2012. A total of 21,873 pathogens were analysed. The prevalence of S. aureus among all nosocomial pathogens isolated in that period was 11.6% (n=2541), whilst the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) among the S. aureus was 35.8% (n=910). All tested antimicrobials demonstrated ≥92.2% susceptibility against methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, with the exception of clindamycin (89.7%) and erythromycin (84.2%). Among MRSA, percentages of resistance ranged from 12.6% to >39% for tetracycline, rifampicin, clindamycin and gentamicin; higher percentages were found for erythromycin (65.4%) and fluoroquinolones (72.3-85.8%). Overall, the glycopeptide minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distribution showed that 58.3% of strains possessed MICs of 1-2mg/L and few strains were linezolid- or daptomycin-resistant. Molecular characterisation was performed on 102 MRSA selected from Northern, Central and Southern regions. Five major clones were found: Italian/ST228-I (t001-t023-t041-t1686-t3217), 33.3%; USA500/ST8-IV (t008), 17.6%; E-MRSA15/ST22-IVh (t020-t025-t032-t223), 16.7%; USA100/ST5-II (t002-t653-t1349-t2164-t3217-t388), 14.7%; and Brazilian/ST239/241-III (t030-t037), 3.9%. Five PVL-positive CA-MRSA isolates, belonging to USA300 and minor clones, were also identified. In conclusion, this first nationwide surveillance study showed that in Italy, S. aureus infections accounted for 11.6% of all nosocomial infections; MRSA accounted for approximately one-third of the S. aureus isolates and these were multidrug-resistant organisms. Five major MRSA epidemic clones were observed and were inter-regionally distributed, with ST228-SCCmecI becoming predominant.

  14. No decrease in susceptibility to NVC-422 in multiple-passage studies with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, S. aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Lima, Louisa; Friedman, Lisa; Wang, Lu; Xu, Ping; Anderson, Mark; Debabov, Dmitri

    2012-05-01

    Twenty-five serial passages of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus and 50 passages of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus resulted in no significant increase in NVC-422 MICs, while ciprofloxacin MICs increased 256-fold for E. coli and 32-fold for P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. Mupirocin, fusidic acid, and retapamulin MICs for MRSA increased 64-, 256-, and 16-fold, respectively. No cross-resistance to NVC-422 was observed with mupirocin-, fusidic acid-, and retapamulin-resistant strains.

  15. Complex network perspective on structure and function of Staphylococcus aureus metabolic network

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L Ying; D W Ding

    2013-02-01

    With remarkable advances in reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic networks, uncovering complex network structure and function from these networks is becoming one of the most important topics in system biology. This work aims at studying the structure and function of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) metabolic network by complex network methods. We first generated a metabolite graph from the recently reconstructed high-quality S. aureus metabolic network model. Then, based on `bow tie' structure character, we explain and discuss the global structure of S. aureus metabolic network. The functional significance, global structural properties, modularity and centrality analysis of giant strong component in S. aureus metabolic networks are studied.

  16. Methicillin resistant S. aureus in human and bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Mark A; Zadoks, Ruth N

    2011-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a ubiquitous organism that causes a variety of diseases including mastitis in cattle and humans. High-level resistance of S. aureus to β-lactams conferred by a mecA gene encoding a modified penicillin binding protein (PBP2a) was first observed in the early 1960's. These methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) have been responsible for both hospital acquired infections (HA-MRSA) and, more recently, community acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA). A small number of human MRSA mastitis cases and outbreaks in maternity or neonatal units have been reported which are generally the result of CA-MRSA. The establishment of the sequence type 398 (ST398) in farm animals, primarily pigs, in the early 2000's has provided a reservoir of infection for humans and dairy cattle, particularly in continental Europe, described as livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA). Prior to the emergence of ST398 there were sporadic reports of MRSA in bovine milk and cases of mastitis, often caused by strains from human associated lineages. Subsequently, there have been several reports describing bovine udder infections caused by ST-398 MRSA. Recently, another group of LA-MRSA strains was discovered in humans and dairy cattle in Europe. This group carries a divergent mecA gene and includes a number of S. aureus lineages (CC130, ST425, and CC1943) that were hitherto thought to be bovine-specific but are now also found as carriage or clinical isolates in humans. The emergence of MRSA in dairy cattle may be associated with contact with other host species, as in the case of ST398, or with the exchange of genetic material between S. aureus and coagulase negative Staphylococcus species, which are the most common species associated with bovine intramammary infections and commonly carry antimicrobial resistance determinants.

  17. Heme Recognition By a Staphylococcus Aureus IsdE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, J.C.; Vermeiren, C.L.; Heinrichs, D.E.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-06-03

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen and a leading cause of hospital acquired infections. Because the free iron concentration in the human body is too low to support growth, S. aureus must acquire iron from host sources. Heme iron is the most prevalent iron reservoir in the human body and a predominant source of iron for S. aureus. The iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) system removes heme from host heme proteins and transfers it to IsdE, the cognate substrate-binding lipoprotein of an ATP-binding cassette transporter, for import and subsequent degradation. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the soluble portion of the IsdE lipoprotein in complex with heme. The structure reveals a bi-lobed topology formed by an N- and C-terminal domain bridged by a single {alpha}-helix. The structure places IsdE as a member of the helical backbone metal receptor superfamily. A six-coordinate heme molecule is bound in the groove established at the domain interface, and the heme iron is coordinated in a novel fashion for heme transporters by Met{sup 78} and His{sup 229}. Both heme propionate groups are secured by H-bonds to IsdE main chain and side chain groups. Of these residues, His{sup 299} is essential for IsdE-mediated heme uptake by S. aureus when growth on heme as a sole iron source is measured. Multiple sequence alignments of homologues from several other Gram-positive bacteria, including the human pathogens pyogenes, Bacillus anthracis, and Listeria monocytogenes, suggest that these other systems function equivalently to S. aureus IsdE with respect to heme binding and transport.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus phage types and their correlation to antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehndiratta P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Context: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most devastating human pathogen. The organism has a differential ability to spread and cause outbreak of infections. Characterization of these strains is important to control the spread of infection in the hospitals as well as in the community. Aim: To identify the currently existing phage groups of Staphylococcus aureus, their prevalence and resistance to antibiotics. Materials and Methods: Study was undertaken on 252 Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from clinical samples. Strains were phage typed and their resistance to antibiotics was determined following standard microbiological procedures. Statistical Analysis: Chi square test was used to compare the antibiotic susceptibility between methicillin resistant Staph. aureus (MRSA and methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA strains. Results: Prevalence of MRSA and MSSA strains was found to be 29.36% and 70.65% respectively. Of these 17.56% of MRSA and 40.44% of MSSA strains were community acquired. All the MSSA strains belonging to phage type 81 from the community were sensitive to all the antibiotics tested including clindamycin and were resistant to penicillin. Forty five percent strains of phage group III and 39% of non-typable MRSA strains from the hospital were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Conclusion: The study revealed that predominant phage group amongst MRSA strains was phage group III and amongst MSSA from the community was phage group NA (phage type 81. MSSA strains isolated from the community differed significantly from hospital strains in their phage type and antibiotic susceptibility. A good correlation was observed between community acquired strains of phage type 81 and sensitivity to gentamycin and clindamycin.

  19. Characterization of a mouse-adapted Staphylococcus aureus strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Holtfreter

    Full Text Available More effective antibiotics and a protective vaccine are desperately needed to combat the 'superbug' Staphylococcus aureus. While in vivo pathogenicity studies routinely involve infection of mice with human S. aureus isolates, recent genetic studies have demonstrated that S. aureus lineages are largely host-specific. The use of such animal-adapted S. aureus strains may therefore be a promising approach for developing more clinically relevant animal infection models. We have isolated a mouse-adapted S. aureus strain (JSNZ which caused a severe outbreak of preputial gland abscesses among male C57BL/6J mice. We aimed to extensively characterize this strain on a genomic level and determine its virulence potential in murine colonization and infection models. JSNZ belongs to the MLST type ST88, rare among human isolates, and lacks an hlb-converting phage encoding human-specific immune evasion factors. Naive mice were found to be more susceptible to nasal and gastrointestinal colonization with JSNZ than with the human-derived Newman strain. Furthermore, naïve mice required antibiotic pre-treatment to become colonized with Newman. In contrast, JSNZ was able to colonize mice in the absence of antibiotic treatment suggesting that this strain can compete with the natural flora for space and nutrients. In a renal abscess model, JSNZ caused more severe disease than Newman with greater weight loss and bacterial burden. In contrast to most other clinical isolates, JSNZ can also be readily genetically modified by phage transduction and electroporation. In conclusion, the mouse-adapted strain JSNZ may represent a valuable tool for studying aspects of mucosal colonization and for screening novel vaccines and therapies directed at preventing colonization.

  20. Population structure of Staphylococcus aureus from remote African Babongo Pygmies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frieder Schaumburg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pandemic community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates (CA-MRSA predominantly encode the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, which can be associated with severe infections. Reports from non-indigenous Sub-Saharan African populations revealed a high prevalence of PVL-positive isolates. The objective of our study was to investigate the S. aureus carriage among a remote indigenous African population and to determine the molecular characteristics of the isolates, particularly those that were PVL-positive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Nasal S. aureus carriage and risk factors of colonization were systematically assessed in remote Gabonese Babongo Pygmies. Susceptibility to antibiotics, possession of toxin-encoding genes (i.e., PVL, enterotoxins, and exfoliative toxins, S. aureus protein A (spa types and multi-locus sequence types (MLST were determined for each isolate. The carriage rate was 33%. No MRSA was detected, 61.8% of the isolates were susceptible to penicillin. Genes encoding PVL (55.9%, enterotoxin B (20.6%, exfoliative toxin D (11.7% and the epidermal cell differentiation inhibitor B (11.7% were highly prevalent. Thirteen spa types were detected and were associated with 10 STs predominated by ST15, ST30, ST72, ST80, and ST88. CONCLUSIONS: The high prevalence of PVL-positive isolates among Babongo Pygmies demands our attention as PVL can be associated with necrotinzing infection and may increase the risk of severe infections in remote Pygmy populations. Many S. aureus isolates from Babongo Pygmies and pandemic CA-MRSA-clones have a common genetic background. Surveillance is needed to control the development of resistance to antibiotic drugs and to assess the impact of the high prevalence of PVL in indigenous populations.

  1. Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in European Wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monecke, Stefan; Gavier-Widén, Dolores; Hotzel, Helmut; Peters, Martin; Guenther, Sebastian; Lazaris, Alexandros; Loncaric, Igor; Müller, Elke; Reissig, Annett; Ruppelt-Lorz, Antje; Shore, Anna C.; Walter, Birgit; Coleman, David C.; Ehricht, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a well-known colonizer and cause of infection among animals and it has been described from numerous domestic and wild animal species. The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular epidemiology of S. aureus in a convenience sample of European wildlife and to review what previously has been observed in the subject field. 124 S. aureus isolates were collected from wildlife in Germany, Austria and Sweden; they were characterized by DNA microarray hybridization and, for isolates with novel hybridization patterns, by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The isolates were assigned to 29 clonal complexes and singleton sequence types (CC1, CC5, CC6, CC7, CC8, CC9, CC12, CC15, CC22, CC25, CC30, CC49, CC59, CC88, CC97, CC130, CC133, CC398, ST425, CC599, CC692, CC707, ST890, CC1956, ST2425, CC2671, ST2691, CC2767 and ST2963), some of which (ST2425, ST2691, ST2963) were not described previously. Resistance rates in wildlife strains were rather low and mecA-MRSA isolates were rare (n = 6). mecC-MRSA (n = 8) were identified from a fox, a fallow deer, hares and hedgehogs. The common cattle-associated lineages CC479 and CC705 were not detected in wildlife in the present study while, in contrast, a third common cattle lineage, CC97, was found to be common among cervids. No Staphylococcus argenteus or Staphylococcus schweitzeri-like isolates were found. Systematic studies are required to monitor the possible transmission of human- and livestock-associated S. aureus/MRSA to wildlife and vice versa as well as the possible transmission, by unprotected contact to animals. The prevalence of S. aureus/MRSA in wildlife as well as its population structures in different wildlife host species warrants further investigation. PMID:27992523

  2. Photodynamic inactivation of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by chlorin e6 and red light (λ=670nm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Katrin; Simon, Carole; Finke, Melanie; Bleses, Katharina; Birke, Martina; Szentmáry, Nora; Hüttenberger, Dirk; Eppig, Timo; Stachon, Tanja; Langenbucher, Achim; Foth, Hans-Jochen; Herrmann, Mathias; Seitz, Berthold; Bischoff, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MDR-SA) are a frequent cause of antibiotic treatment refractory bacterial corneal infections. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is being discussed as a putative treatment option to cure this type of bacterial infection. Here we tested the in vitro susceptibility of a set of 12 clinically derived MDR-SA isolates with differing genetic backgrounds and antibiotic resistance profiles against photodynamic inactivation (PDI) by the porphyrin chlorin e6 (Ce6) and red light (λ=670nm). All tested clinical isolates displayed a 5-log10 reduction in viable cells by Ce6 and red light, when cells were preincubated with the photosensitizer at concentrations ≥128μM for 30min in the dark, and a subsequent irradiation with light at λ=670nm (power density: 31mW/cm(2), absorbed dose: 18,6J/cm(2)) was applied. Similarly, cells of the laboratory strain Newman required the same Ce6 pre-incubation and light dose for a 5-log10 reduction in cell viability. Inactivation of crtM in strain Newman, which interferes with pigment production in S. aureus, rendered the mutant more susceptible to this PDT procedure, indicating that the level of resistance of S. aureus to this therapy form is affected by ability of the pathogen to produce the carotenoid pigment staphyloxanthin. Incubation of freshly explanted porcine corneas with a 0.5% Ce6 gel demonstrated that the photosensitizer can diffuse into and accumulate within the stroma of the cornea in concentrations found to be sufficient to yield a 5-log10 reduction of the S. aureus cell pool in vitro. These data suggest that PDI with Ce6 and red light might be a promising new option for the treatment of MDR-SA induced corneal infections.

  3. Panton-Valentine leukocidin does play a role in the early stage of Staphylococcus aureus skin infections: a rabbit model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Lipinska

    Full Text Available Despite epidemiological data linking necrotizing skin infections with the production of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, the contribution of this toxin to the virulence of S. aureus has been highly discussed as a result of inconclusive results of in vivo studies. However, the majority of these results originate from experiments using mice, an animal species which neutrophils--the major target cells for PVL--are highly insensitive to the action of this leukocidin. In contrast, the rabbit neutrophils have been shown to be as sensitive to PVL action as human cells, making the rabbit a better experimental animal to explore the PVL role. In this study we examined whether PVL contributes to S. aureus pathogenicity by means of a rabbit skin infection model. The rabbits were injected intradermally with 10(8 cfu of either a PVL positive community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolate, its isogenic PVL knockout or a PVL complemented knockout strain, and the development of skin lesions was observed. While all strains induced skin infection, the wild type strain produced larger lesions and a higher degree of skin necrosis compared to the PVL knockout strain in the first week after the infection. The PVL expression in the rabbits was indirectly confirmed by a raise in the serum titer of anti-LukS-PV antibodies observed only in the rabbits infected with PVL positive strains. These results indicate that the rabbit model is more suitable for studying the role of PVL in staphylococcal diseases than other animal models. Further, they support the epidemiological link between PVL producing S. aureus strains and necrotizing skin infections.

  4. Soluble CD163 masks fibronectin-binding protein A-mediated inflammatory activation of Staphylococcus aureus infected monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneidl, Jessica; Mysore, Vijayashree; Geraci, Jennifer; Tuchscherr, Lorena; Löffler, Bettina; Holzinger, Dirk; Roth, Johannes; Barczyk-Kahlert, Katarzyna

    2014-03-01

    Binding to fibronectin (FN) is a crucial pathogenic factor of Staphylococcus aureus mediated by fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBP-A) and extracellular adherence protein (Eap). Recently, we have shown that binding of soluble CD163 (sCD163) to FN linked to these molecules exhibits anti-microbial effects by enhancing phagocytosis and killing activity of S. aureus-infected monocytes. However, it remained unclear whether sCD163 also influences the monocytic activation status. Using genetically modified staphylococcal strains we now identified FnBP-A, but not Eap, as activator of the inflammatory response of monocytes to infection. FnBP-A-mediated inflammatory activation was masked by sCD163 binding to S. aureus promoting efficient pathogen elimination. Thus, sCD163 protects monocytes from overwhelming activation upon staphylococcal infection by dampening the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 and DAMP molecule MRP8/14. Moreover, sCD163 limited expression of pro-apoptotic transcription factor NR4A1 induced during S. aureus infection and inhibited induction of chemokine CXCL2promoting survival of staphylococci in vivo. sCD163-mediated effects were not due to general immunosuppression since MAP kinase activation and ROS production were unaltered during infection of monocytes with sCD163-bound bacteria. Thus, sCD163 promotes a specific defence of the immune system against FnBP-A-mediated inflammatory activation enabling successful pathogen elimination, tissue recovery and resolution of inflammation.

  5. Efficacy evaluation of Bauhinia variegata L. stem bark powder as adjunct therapy in chronic Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeevan Ranjan Dash

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective was to study the effect of Bauhinia variegata L. stem bark powder as adjunct therapy in chronic Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in goat. Materials and Methods: Mastitis was induced by intracisternal inoculation of coagulase positive S. aureus (J638 at the concentration of 2000 colony forming units. Group I animals were treated with repeated dose of ceftriaxone at 20 mg/kg intravenously, and Group II animals were treated with once daily oral administration of B. variegata L. stem bark powder at 6 g/kg for 7 days followed by maintenance dose at 3 g/kg for next 7 days along with repeated dose of the antibiotic at 20 mg/kg intravenously at 4 days interval. Results: No significant improvement in the clinical condition of the udder was noticed in the group treated with repeated dose of ceftriaxone alone. However, in the group treated with B. variegata L. stem bark powder along with repeated dose of ceftriaxone, no S. aureus colony was seen at 96 h and onwards in milk samples with a marked decrease in somatic cell count and milk alkaline phosphatase activity and increased lactoperoxidase activity. Further, plasma and milk concentration of ceftriaxone/ceftizoxime was increased, which indicated antibacterial, bioenhancing and antiinflammatory properties of the bark powder. The Group II animals also exhibited marked reduction in polymorphonuclear cells and fibrous tissue indicating antifibrotic property of B. variegata L. Conclusion: B. variegata L. stem bark powder can be considered as an effective adjunct therapy to intravenous ceftriaxone in S. aureus chronic mastitis in goat.

  6. Catalase Expression Is Modulated by Vancomycin and Ciprofloxacin and Influences the Formation of Free Radicals in Staphylococcus aureus Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Hougaard, Anni B; Paulander, Wilhelm; Skibsted, Leif H; Ingmer, Hanne; Andersen, Mogens L

    2015-09-01

    Detection of free radicals in biological systems is challenging due to their short half-lives. We have applied electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy combined with spin traps using the probes PBN (N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone) and DMPO (5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide) to assess free radical formation in the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus treated with a bactericidal antibiotic, vancomycin or ciprofloxacin. While we were unable to detect ESR signals in bacterial cells, hydroxyl radicals were observed in the supernatant of bacterial cell cultures. Surprisingly, the strongest signal was detected in broth medium without bacterial cells present and it was mitigated by iron chelation or by addition of catalase, which catalyzes the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen. This suggests that the signal originates from hydroxyl radicals formed by the Fenton reaction, in which iron is oxidized by hydrogen peroxide. Previously, hydroxyl radicals have been proposed to be generated within bacterial cells in response to bactericidal antibiotics. We found that when S. aureus was exposed to vancomycin or ciprofloxacin, hydroxyl radical formation in the broth was indeed increased compared to the level seen with untreated bacterial cells. However, S. aureus cells express catalase, and the antibiotic-mediated increase in hydroxyl radical formation was correlated with reduced katA expression and catalase activity in the presence of either antibiotic. Therefore, our results show that in S. aureus, bactericidal antibiotics modulate catalase expression, which in turn influences the formation of free radicals in the surrounding broth medium. If similar regulation is found in other bacterial species, it might explain why bactericidal antibiotics are perceived as inducing formation of free radicals.

  7. Environmental study of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus epidemic in a burn unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutala, W A; Katz, E B; Sherertz, R J; Sarubbi, F A

    1983-01-01

    During an outbreak of infections caused by methicillin-resistant (MR) Staphylococcus aureus in our burn unit, we conducted an extensive 10-week study to define the environmental epidemiology of the organism. The inanimate environment in patient rooms and adjacent areas was examined by using volumetric air samplers and Rodac plates. Airborne and surface level contamination with MR S. aureus was quantitated, and overall, MR S. aureus comprised 16, 31, and 40% of all bacterial growth from air, elevated surfaces, and floor surfaces, respectively. Mean air, elevated surface, and floor surface MR S. aureus contamination in rooms of MR S. aureus-infected burn patients were 1.9 MR S. aureus per ft3 (ca. 0.028 m3), 20 MR S. aureus per Rodac plate and 48 MR S. aureus per Rodac plate, respectively. Peak patient room environmental contamination levels were 6.9 MR S. aureus per ft3 of air, 70 MR S. aureus per Rodac plate per elevated surface and 138 MR S. aureus per Rodac plate per floor surface. Environmental contamination levels in the adjacent work areas were considerably lower than in infected patient rooms. There was ample opportunity for contamination of personnel through the inanimate environment in this unit. PMID:6630447

  8. The dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus intramammary infection in nine Danish dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, H. D.; Sloth, K. H.; Elsberg, C.

    2000-01-01

    ribo- and phage patterns identical to S. aureus isolates from human carriers. The findings of the present study underline the importance of strict milking hygiene and improvement of current mastitis therapy. The results support the hypothesis that some S. aureus mastitis strains are more contagious......The aim of the present study was to examine the diversity of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine intramammary infections (IMI) in nine dairy herds, and compare these with isolates from other sites on the cows by phage- and ribotyping. Whether colonisation of milkers with S. aureus could...... be a source of infection for bovine IMI was investigated. In addition, 100 epidemiologically unrelated S. aureus isolates from asymptomatic human carriers were also phage- and ribotyped to compare the human and bovine reservoir of S. aureus in Denmark. A total of 625 S. aureus isolates from bovine IMI, bovine...

  9. Inhibiting platelets aggregation could aggravate the acute infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Liu, Yu; Gao, Yaping; Dong, Jie; Mu, Chunhua; Lu, Qiang; Shao, Ningsheng; Yang, Guang

    2011-01-01

    Several fibrinogen binding proteins (Fibs) play important roles in the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Most Fibs can promote the aggregation of platelets during infection, but the extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) is an exception. It is reported that Efb can specifically bind fibrinogen and inhibit the aggregation of platelet with its N terminal. However, the biological significance of platelet aggregation inhibition in the infection caused by S. aureus is unclear until now. Here, we demonstrated that the persistence and aggregation of platelets were important for killing S. aureus in whole blood. It was found that the N terminal of Efb (EfbN) and platelets inhibitors could increase the survival of S. aureus in whole blood. The study in vivo also showed that EfbN and platelets inhibitors could reduce the killing of S. aureus and increase the lethality rate of S. aureus in the acute infection mouse model.

  10. Detection of Staphylococcus aureus in Milk Using Real-time Fluorescence Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a kind of worldwide food-borne pathogen. Recently, S. aureus has gained considerable attention because of the increasing alimentary toxicosis incidence. In this study, a Real-Time fluorescence Loop-Mediated isothermal Amplification (RT-LAMP was developed to detect S. aureus rapidly. The heat-stable nuclease (nuc gene of S. aureus, the target sequence, was selected to design four special primers. A rapid detection method for S. aureus was initially established under optimum reaction conditions. The assay, performed for 40 min at 61°C, did not show cross reactivity with other bacterial species. The specificity and sensitivity of RT-LAMP for detecting S. aureus were 100% and 8.0 CFU/mL, respectively. Results indicated that RT-LAMP was a potential field-usable molecular tool for detecting S. aureus This method can be an alternative to conventional LAMP in clinical applications and operational programs.

  11. Shedding of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from adult and pediatric bathers in marine waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinigalliano Christopher D

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin resistant S. aureus, MRSA, are human colonizing bacteria that commonly cause opportunistic infections primarily involving the skin in otherwise healthy individuals. These infections have been linked to close contact and sharing of common facilities such as locker rooms, schools and prisons Waterborne exposure and transmission routes have not been traditionally associated with S. aureus infections. Coastal marine waters and beaches used for recreation are potential locations for the combination of high numbers of people with close contact and therefore could contribute to the exposure to and infection by these organisms. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the amount and characteristics of the shedding of methicillin sensitive S. aureus, MSSA and MRSA by human bathers in marine waters. Results Nasal cultures were collected from bathers, and water samples were collected from two sets of pools designed to isolate and quantify MSSA and MRSA shed by adults and toddlers during exposure to marine water. A combination of selective growth media and biochemical and polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to identify and perform limited characterization of the S. aureus isolated from the water and the participants. Twelve of 15 MRSA isolates collected from the water had identical genetic characteristics as the organisms isolated from the participants exposed to that water while the remaining 3 MRSA were without matching nasal isolates from participants. The amount of S. aureus shed per person corresponded to 105 to 106 CFU per person per 15-minute bathing period, with 15 to 20% of this quantity testing positive for MRSA. Conclusions This is the first report of a comparison of human colonizing organisms with bacteria from human exposed marine water attempting to confirm that participants shed their own colonizing MSSA and MRSA into their bathing milieu. These findings clearly

  12. Staphylococcus aureus capsular polysaccharide types 5 and 8 reduce killing by bovine neutrophils in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampen, Annette H; Tollersrud, Tore; Lund, Arve

    2005-03-01

    Isogenic variants of Staphylococcus aureus strain Reynolds expressing either no capsule or capsular polysaccharide (CP) type 5 (CP5) or type 8 (CP8) were used to assess the effect of CP on bacterial killing and the respiratory burst of bovine neutrophils. The effects of antisera specific for CP5 and CP8 were also evaluated. The killing of live bacteria by isolated neutrophils was quantified in a bactericidal assay, while the respiratory burst after stimulation with live bacteria in whole blood was measured by flow cytometry. The expression of a CP5 or CP8 capsule protected the bacteria from being killed by bovine neutrophils in vitro (P killing of the capsule-expressing bacteria and enhanced their stimulating effect in the respiratory burst assay (P killing and prevents the bacteria from inducing respiratory burst of bovine neutrophils in vitro and that these effects can be reversed by the addition of serotype-specific antisera.

  13. Global transcriptional response of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to thioridazine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mette; Jacobsen, Kirstine; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    is a phenothiazine derivate, which is known to restore in vitro susceptibility of MRSA strains to β-lactam antibiotics (e.g. oxacillin) [4]. Previously, we have demonstrated that thioridazine prevents the oxacillin-induced transcription of the resistance determinant mecA in a hospital-associated MRSA isolate leading......Few drugs are available against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and decreased susceptibility among staphylococci to newly introduced agents such as linezolid, daptomycin, and tigecycline has been observed [1-3]. Consequently, new treatment strategies are urgently needed. Thioridazine...... to examine the underlying mechanism we are conducting a global transcriptional analysis of the response of strain USA300 to thioridazine treatment with and without oxacillin. We show that thioridazine by itself elicits extensive transcriptional changes, including pathways involved in amino acid synthesis...

  14. Fitness cost of VanA-type vancomycin resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, Marie-Laure; Courvalin, Patrice; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2009-06-01

    We have quantified the biological cost of VanA-type glycopeptide resistance due to the acquisition of the resistance operon by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from Enterococcus sp. Exponential growths of recipient strain HIP11713, its transconjugant VRSA-1, VRSA-5, and VRSA-6 were compared in the absence or, except for HIP11713, in the presence of vancomycin. Induction of resistance was performed by adding vancomycin in both the preculture and the culture or the culture at only 1/50 the MIC. In the absence of vancomycin, the growth rates of the vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) strains were similar to that of susceptible MRSA strain HIP11713. When resistance was induced, and under both conditions, there was a significant reduction of the growth rate of the VRSA strains relative to that of HIP11713 and to those of their noninduced counterparts, corresponding to a ca. 20% to 38% reduction in fitness. Competition experiments between isogenic VRSA-1 and HIP11713 mixed at a 1:1, 1:100, or 100:1 ratio revealed a competitive disadvantage of 0.4% to 3% per 10 generations of the transconjugant versus the recipient. This slight fitness burden can be attributed to the basal level of expression of the van genes in the absence of induction combined with a gene dosage effect due to the presence of the van operon on multicopy plasmids. These data indicate that VanA-type resistance, when induced, is highly costly for the MRSA host, whereas in the absence of induction, its biological cost is minimal. Thus, the potential for the dissemination of VRSA clinical isolates should not be underestimated.

  15. Induction of virulence gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus by pulmonary surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Yasukawa, Jyunichiro; Suzuki, Yutaka; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2014-04-01

    We performed a genomewide analysis using a next-generation sequencer to investigate the effect of pulmonary surfactant on gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus, a clinically important opportunistic pathogen. RNA sequence (RNA-seq) analysis of bacterial transcripts at late log phase revealed 142 genes that were upregulated >2-fold following the addition of pulmonary surfactant to the culture medium. Among these genes, we confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis that mRNA amounts for genes encoding ESAT-6 secretion system C (EssC), an unknown hypothetical protein (NWMN_0246; also called pulmonary surfactant-inducible factor A [PsiA] in this study), and hemolysin gamma subunit B (HlgB) were increased 3- to 10-fold by the surfactant treatment. Among the major constituents of pulmonary surfactant, i.e., phospholipids and palmitate, only palmitate, which is the most abundant fatty acid in the pulmonary surfactant and a known antibacterial substance, stimulated the expression of these three genes. Moreover, these genes were also induced by supplementing the culture with detergents. The induction of gene expression by surfactant or palmitate was not observed in a disruption mutant of the sigB gene, which encodes an alternative sigma factor involved in bacterial stress responses. Furthermore, each disruption mutant of the essC, psiA, and hlgB genes showed attenuation of both survival in the lung and host-killing ability in a murine pneumonia model. These findings suggest that S. aureus resists membrane stress caused by free fatty acids present in the pulmonary surfactant through the regulation of virulence gene expression, which contributes to its pathogenesis within the lungs of the host animal.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus panton-valentine leukocidin is a very potent cytotoxic factor for human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Löffler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the pore-forming Staphylococcus aureus toxin Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL in severe necrotizing diseases is debated due to conflicting data from epidemiological studies of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA infections and various murine disease-models. In this study, we used neutrophils isolated from different species to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of PVL in comparison to other staphylococcal cytolytic components. Furthermore, to study the impact of PVL we expressed it heterologously in a non-virulent staphylococcal species and examined pvl-positive and pvl-negative clinical isolates as well as the strain USA300 and its pvl-negative mutant. We demonstrate that PVL induces rapid activation and cell death in human and rabbit neutrophils, but not in murine or simian cells. By contrast, the phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs, a newly identified group of cytolytic staphylococcal components, lack species-specificity. In general, after phagocytosis of bacteria different pvl-positive and pvl-negative staphylococcal strains, expressing a variety of other virulence factors (such as surface proteins, induced cell death in neutrophils, which is most likely associated with the physiological clearing function of these cells. However, the release of PVL by staphylococcal strains caused rapid and premature cell death, which is different from the physiological (and programmed cell death of neutrophils following phagocytosis and degradation of virulent bacteria. Taken together, our results question the value of infection-models in mice and non-human primates to elucidate the impact of PVL. Our data clearly demonstrate that PVL acts differentially on neutrophils of various species and suggests that PVL has an important cytotoxic role in human neutrophils, which has major implications for the pathogenesis of CA-MRSA infections.

  17. RIP-V improves murine survival in a sepsis model by down-regulating RNAIII expression and α-hemolysin release of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bo; Zhou, Ying; Li, Mingkai; Yu, Qian; Xue, Xiaoyan; Li, Zhi; Da, Fei; Hou, Zheng; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2015-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is associated with serious invasive infections and high mortality rates due to a large number of toxins released. The persistent increasing resistance of S. aureus has driven the need for new anti-infection agents and innovative therapeutic strategies. RNAIII-inhibiting peptide (RIP) has been reported to reduce bacterial virulence by interfering with S. aureus quorum sensing system. The present study aimed to investigate whether two new RIP derivatives (RIP-V and RIP-L) could improve the survival rate of mice in a MRSA sepsis model. We found that neither anti-bacterial nor cell toxicity were displayed by all RIPs in vitro. In vivo protective effects were observed using a MRSA-induced mice sepsis model. Among RIPs, RIP-V exhibited the strongest protection function on mice survival and inhibition of pathological damages. Our studies firstly verified that RIPs could inhibited the RNAIII expression of S. aurues isolated from liver tissue of BALB/c mice. Moreover, RIP-V exhibited the strongest inhibitory effect on RNAIII and can decrease markedly the secretion of o-hemolysin in liver. These findings indicate that RIP-V might be considered as a potential and specific drug candidate for treating S. aureus infections, especially for MRSA.

  18. Effects of sub-lethal concentrations of mupirocin on global transcription in Staphylococcus aureus 8325-4 and a model for the escape from inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHoufie, Sari Talal S; Foster, Howard A

    2016-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen in both hospital and community settings, causing infections ranging from mild skin and wound infections to life-threatening systemic illness. Gene expression changes due to the stringent response have been studied in S. aureus using lethal concentrations of mupirocin, but no studies have investigated the effects of sub-lethal concentrations. S. aureus 8325-4 was exposed to sub-inhibitory concentrations of mupirocin. The production of ppGpp was assessed via HPLC and the effects on global transcription were studied by RNAseq (RNA sequencing) analysis. Growth inhibition had occurred after 1 h of treatment and metabolic analysis revealed that the stringent response alarmone ppGpp was present and GTP concentrations decreased. Transcriptome profiles showed that global transcriptional alterations were similar to those for S. aureus after treatment with lethal concentrations of mupirocin, including the repression of genes involved in transcription, translation and replication machineries. Furthermore, up-regulation of genes involved in stress responses, and amino acid biosynthesis and transport, as well as some virulence factor genes, was observed. However, ppGpp was not detectable after 12 or 24 h and cell growth had resumed, although some transcriptional changes remained. Sub-lethal concentrations of mupirocin induce the stringent response, but cells adapt and resume growth once ppGpp levels decrease.

  19. Phenotypic and genotypic study of macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B (MLSB) resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus in Tehran, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Saderi, Horieh; Emadi, Behzad; Owlia, Parviz

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Resistance to antimicrobial agents among Staphylococcus aureus is an increasing problem. Two common genes responsible for resistance to macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B (MLSB) antibiotics are the ermA and ermC genes. Three resistance phenotypes have been detected to these antibiotics: strains containing cMLSB (constitutive MLSB) and iMLSB (inducible MLSB), which are resistant to macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B antibiotics, and MS, which is only resistan...

  20. Prevalence and resistance of commensal Staphylococcus aureus, including meticillin-resistant S aureus, in nine European countries: a cross-sectional study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijer, C.D.J. den; Bijnen, E.M.E. van; Paget, W.J.; Pringle, M.; Goossen, H.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Information about the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus resistance to antimicrobial drugs has mainly been obtained from invasive strains, although the commensal microbiota is thought to be an important reservoir of resistance. We aimed to compare the prevalence of nasal S aureus carria

  1. Prevalence and resistance of commensal Staphylococcus aureus, including meticillin-resistant S aureus, in nine European countries: a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijer, C.D. den; Bijnen, E.M. van; Paget, W.J.; Pringle, M.; Goossens, H.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Information about the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus resistance to antimicrobial drugs has mainly been obtained from invasive strains, although the commensal microbiota is thought to be an important reservoir of resistance. We aimed to compare the prevalence of nasal S aureus carria

  2. Preventing Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia and Sepsis in Patients With Staphylococcus aureus Colonization of Intravascular Catheters A Retrospective Multicenter Study and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hetem, David J.; de Ruiter, Susanne C.; Buiting, Anton G. M.; Kluytmans, Jan A. J. W.; Thijsen, Steven F.; Vlaminckx, Bart J. M.; Wintermans, Robert G. F.; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Ekkelenkamp, Miquel B.

    2011-01-01

    Two previous studies in tertiary care hospitals identified Staphylococcus aureus colonization of intravascular (IV) catheters as a strong predictor of subsequent S. aureus bacteremia (SAB), even in the absence of clinical signs of systemic infection. Bacteremia was effectively prevented by timely an

  3. In Vitro Susceptibility of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus to a New Antimicrobial, Copper Silicate▿

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The soluble copper silicate (CS) MIC of 100 strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and 100 strains of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) was 175 mg Cu/liter. Bactericidal and postantibiotic effects (≥1 h) were seen at 2× MIC and 4× MIC. The frequency of mutation was

  4. Mastitis Bovina: Resistencia a antibióticos de cepas de Staphylococcus aureus asiladas de leche (Bovine Mastitis: Antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pellegrino, MS

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available ResumenLa mastitis bovina es considerada la enfermedad infecciosa del ganado lechero de mayor impacto económico mundial, siendo Staphylococcus aureus el principal agente patógeno en muchos países.SummaryBovine mastitis is a frequent cause of economic loss in worldwide dairy herds, being Staphylococcus aureus the main etiological agent in many countries.

  5. Mastitis Bovina: Resistencia a antibióticos de cepas de Staphylococcus aureus asiladas de leche (Bovine Mastitis: Antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from milk)

    OpenAIRE

    Pellegrino, MS; Frola, ID; Odierno, LM; Bogni, CI

    2011-01-01

    ResumenLa mastitis bovina es considerada la enfermedad infecciosa del ganado lechero de mayor impacto económico mundial, siendo Staphylococcus aureus el principal agente patógeno en muchos países.SummaryBovine mastitis is a frequent cause of economic loss in worldwide dairy herds, being Staphylococcus aureus the main etiological agent in many countries.

  6. Antimicrobial potential of Pakistani medicinal plants against multi-drug resistance Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahat Ejaz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine resistance patterns of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus isolated from different areas of Pakistan and to identify antimicrobial agents against multi-drug resistant S. aureus strains. Methods: A total of 67 samples (sewerage, nasal and milk were collected from different farm areas of Pakistan to identify local strains of S. aureus. Sixteen out of 67 samples were positive for S. aureus. Only 6 out of 16 S. aureus strains showed resistance to antibiotics. Then the antibacterial effect of 29 medicinal plants was evaluated on these S. aureus isolates and a standard S. aureus strain ATCC 25923. The solvents used for the extraction of plants were acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide and methanol. The in vitro antibacterial activity was performed using agar disc diffusion method. Moreover, minimum inhibitory concentration of effective medicinal plant extracts was identified through micro-dilution method to find out their 50% inhibitory concentration. Results: Plant extracts of 5 medicinal plants (Psidium guajava, Nigella sativa, Piper nigrum, Valeriana jatamansi, and Cucurbita pepo exhibited antibacterial activity against locally isolated multidrug resistant strains of S. aureus. The minimum inhibitory concentration of these extracts was ranged from 0.328 to 5.000 mg/mL. Conclusions: Plant extracts of Psidium guajava, Piper nigrum seed, Valeriana jatamansi, Cucurbita pepo and Nigella sativa showed significant in vitro antibacterial activity and thus, such findings may serve as valuable contribution in the treatment of infection and may contribute to the development of potential antimicrobial agents against multi drug resistant strains of S. aureus

  7. Antimicrobial potential of Pakistani medicinal plants against multi-drug resistance Staphylococcus aureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rahat Ejaz; Usman A Ashfaq; Sobia Idrees

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine resistance patterns of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) isolated from different areas of Pakistan and to identify antimicrobial agents against multi-drug resistant S.aureus strains. Methods: A total of 67 samples (sewerage, nasal and milk) were collected from different farm areas of Pakistan to identify local strains of S. aureus. Sixteen out of 67 samples were positive for S.aureus. Only 6 out of 16 S. aureus strains showed resistance to antibiotics. Then the antibacterial effect of 29 medicinal plants was evaluated on these S. aureus isolates and a standard S. aureus strain ATCC 25923. The solvents used for the extraction of plants were acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide and methanol. The in vitro antibacterial activity was performed using agar disc diffusion method. Moreover, minimum inhibitory concentration of effective medicinal plant extracts was identified through micro-dilution method to find out their 50% inhibitory concentration.Results:Plant extracts of 5 medicinal plants (Psidium guajava, Nigella sativa, Piper nigrum, Valeriana jatamansi, and Cucurbita pepo) exhibited antibacterial activity against locally isolated multidrug resistant strains of S. aureus. The minimum inhibitory concentration of these extracts was ranged from 0.328 to 5.000 mg/mL. Conclusions: Plant extracts of Psidium guajava, Piper nigrum seed, Valeriana jatamansi, Cucurbita pepo and Nigella sativa showed significant in vitro antibacterial activity and thus, such findings may serve as valuable contribution in the treatment of infection and may contribute to the development of potential antimicrobial agents against multi drug resistant strains of S. aureus.

  8. Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia at a tertiary children's hospital in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reené Naidoo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen in paediatric patients with bloodstream infections. The epidemiology of S. aureus bacteraemia, however, has not been well documented in children in South Africa. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted at a children's hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, to investigate the epidemiology of S. aureus bacteraemia from 2007-2011. The incidence, clinical presentation, risk factors, management and outcomes of methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA and methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA bacteraemia were compared. RESULTS: Over the five year study period, 365 episodes of S. aureus bacteraemia were identified. The annual incidence was 3.28 cases per 1000 hospital admissions. MRSA was responsible for 26% of S. aureus bacteraemia and 72% of nosocomial infections. Only six possible cases of community-acquired MRSA infections were described. MSSA bacteraemia was more likely to present as pulmonary and bone or joint infections, while bacteraemia without a source was the most common presentation with MRSA.  Infants, children with malnutrition, and residents of long-term care facilities were at highest risk for MRSA bacteraemia. The overall case fatality rate for S. aureus bacteraemia was 8.8% over five years, with MRSA being the only significant risk factor for mortality. CONCLUSION: The incidence of S. aureus bacteraemia and MRSA bacteraemia in children has remained stable over the past five years. MRSA is a predominantly nosocomial pathogen in children with S. aureus bacteraemia in Cape Town, South Africa.

  9. Cavity Forming Pneumonia Due to Staphylococcus aureus Following Dengue Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Nobuyuki; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Tachikawa, Natsuo; Amano, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Yohei; Kosuge, Youko

    2015-11-01

    While visiting Malaysia, a 22-year-old previously healthy Japanese man developed myalgia, headache, and fever, leading to a diagnosis of classical dengue fever. After improvement and returning to Japan after a five day hospitalization, he developed productive cough several days after defervescing from dengue. Computed tomography (CT) thorax scan showed multiple lung cavities. A sputum smear revealed leukocytes with phagocytized gram-positive cocci in clusters, and grew an isolate Staphylococcus aureus sensitive to semi-synthetic penicillin; he was treated successfully with ceftriaxone and cephalexin. This second reported case of pneumonia due to S. aureus occurring after dengue fever, was associated both with nosocomial exposure and might have been associated with dengue-associated immunosuppression. Clinicians should pay systematic attention to bacterial pneumonia following dengue fever to establish whether such a connection is causally associated.

  10. Facing antibiotic resistance: Staphylococcus aureus phages as a medical tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaźmierczak, Zuzanna; Górski, Andrzej; Dąbrowska, Krystyna

    2014-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common and often virulent pathogen in humans. This bacterium is widespread, being present on the skin and in the nose of healthy people. Staphylococcus aureus can cause infections with severe outcomes ranging from pustules to sepsis and death. The introduction of antibiotics led to a general belief that the problem of bacterial infections would be solved. Nonetheless, pathogens including staphylococci have evolved mechanisms of drug resistance. Among current attempts to address this problem, phage therapy offers a promising alternative to combat staphylococcal infections. Here, we present an overview of current knowledge on staphylococcal infections and bacteriophages able to kill Staphylococcus, including experimental studies and available data on their clinical use.

  11. Facing Antibiotic Resistance: Staphylococcus aureus Phages as a Medical Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzanna Kaźmierczak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a common and often virulent pathogen in humans. This bacterium is widespread, being present on the skin and in the nose of healthy people. Staphylococcus aureus can cause infections with severe outcomes ranging from pustules to sepsis and death. The introduction of antibiotics led to a general belief that the problem of bacterial infections would be solved. Nonetheless, pathogens including staphylococci have evolved mechanisms of drug resistance. Among current attempts to address this problem, phage therapy offers a promising alternative to combat staphylococcal infections. Here, we present an overview of current knowledge on staphylococcal infections and bacteriophages able to kill Staphylococcus, including experimental studies and available data on their clinical use.

  12. Fluorescent reporters for markerless genomic integration in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Nienke W. M.; van der Horst, Thijs; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; Nijland, Reindert

    2017-01-01

    We present integration vectors for Staphylococcus aureus encoding the fluorescent reporters mAmetrine, CFP, sGFP, YFP, mCherry and mKate. The expression is driven either from the sarA-P1 promoter or from any other promoter of choice. The reporter can be inserted markerless in the chromosome of a wide range of S. aureus strains. The integration site chosen does not disrupt any open reading frame, provides good expression, and has no detectable effect on the strains physiology. As an intermediate construct, we present a set of replicating plasmids containing the same fluorescent reporters. Also in these reporter plasmids the sarA-P1 promoter can be replaced by any other promoter of interest for expression studies. Cassettes from the replication plasmids can be readily swapped with the integration vector. With these constructs it becomes possible to monitor reporters of separate fluorescent wavelengths simultaneously. PMID:28266573

  13. An Aromatic Hydroxyamide Attenuates Multiresistant Staphylococcus aureus Toxin Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vomacka, Jan; Korotkov, Vadim S; Bauer, Bianca; Weinandy, Franziska; Kunzmann, Martin H; Krysiak, Joanna; Baron, Oliver; Böttcher, Thomas; Lorenz-Baath, Katrin; Sieber, Stephan A

    2016-01-26

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) causes severe infections with only few effective antibiotic therapies currently available. To approach this challenge, chemical entities with a novel and resistance-free mode of action are desperately needed. Here, we introduce a new hydroxyamide compound that effectively reduces the expression of devastating toxins in various S. aureus and MRSA strains. The molecular mechanism was investigated by transcriptome analysis as well as by affinity-based protein profiling. Down-regulation of several pathogenesis associated genes suggested the inhibition of a central virulence-related pathway. Mass spectrometry-based chemical proteomics revealed putative molecular targets. Systemic treatment with the hydroxyamide showed significant reduction of abscess sizes in a MRSA mouse skin infection model. The absence of resistance development in vitro further underlines the finding that targeting virulence could lead to prolonged therapeutic options in comparison to antibiotics that directly address bacterial survival.

  14. Multilocus sequence typing of Staphylococcus aureus with DNA array technology

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    textabstractA newly developed oligonucleotide array suited for multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of Staphylococcus aureus strains was analyzed with two strain collections in a two-center study. MLST allele identification for the first strain collection fully agreed with conventional strain typing. Analysis of strains from the second collection revealed that chip-defined MLST was concordant with conventional MLST. Array-mediated MLST data were reproducible, exchangeable, and epidemiologically ...

  15. Methicillin-resistente Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in der medizinischen Rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Hergenröder, H.; Mielke, Martin; Höller, C.; Herr, C.

    2012-01-01

    Reha-Kliniken legen im Umgang mit Methicillin-resistentem Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) häufig das Hygienemanagement der akutmedizinischen Versorgung zugrunde, was Patienten mit positivem MRSA-Status den Zugang in die stationäre Rehabilitation erschwert. In einer Arbeitsgruppe der Bayerischen Landesarbeitsgemeinschaft Multiresistente Erreger (LARE) wurde die Problematik auf Basis einer systematischen Literaturrecherche, der Gründung eines Expertengremiums sowie der Auswertung vorliegender Hygi...

  16. Staphylococcus aureus nasal and pharyngeal carriage in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, C; Richard, V; Dufougeray, A; Biron, A; Seck, A; Laurent, F; Breurec, S

    2014-04-01

    Nasal and pharyngeal swabs were collected from 132 patients admitted to the Principal Hospital in Dakar (Senegal), in January and February 2012. The prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus carriage was 56.1% (n = 74): 40.2% for pharyngeal samples and 36.4% for nasal samples. None of the isolates was methicillin-resistant. Carriage was independently associated with being female (p Senegal as compared with industrialized countries.

  17. Phagotherapy faced with Staphylococcus aureus methicilin resistant infections in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Tamariz, Jesús H.; Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Biólogo, doctor en Ciencias Biológicas.; Lezameta, Lizet; Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. licenciada en Tecnología Médica.; Guerra, Humberto; Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the bacteriophage activity in localized and systemic infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus resistant to methicilin (MRSA). Materials and methods. An experimental study was performed in 45 mice of the Balb/c strain divided in nine groups of five individuals. Ten naive bacteriophages were isolated through clinical samples and hospital effluents. Lytic capacity and spectrum activity was evaluated on the basis of which six phages were selected for phagotherapy trials. A...

  18. Global distribution and diversity of ovine-associated Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Edward M; Needs, Polly F; Manley, Grace; Green, Laura E

    2014-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen of many species, including sheep, and impacts on both human and animal health, animal welfare, and farm productivity. Here we present the widest global diversity study of ovine-associated S. aureus to date. We analysed 97 S. aureus isolates from sheep and sheep products from the UK, Turkey, France, Norway, Australia, Canada and the USA using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and spa typing. These were compared with 196 sheep isolates from Europe (n=153), Africa (n=28), South America (n=14) and Australia (n=1); 172 bovine, 68 caprine and 433 human S. aureus profiles. Overall there were 59 STs and 87 spa types in the 293 ovine isolates; in the 97 new ovine isolates there were 22 STs and 37 spa types, including three novel MLST alleles, four novel STs and eight novel spa types. Three main CCs (CC133, CC522 and CC700) were detected in sheep and these contained 61% of all isolates. Four spa types (t002, t1534, t2678 and t3576) contained 31% of all isolates and were associated with CC5, CC522, CC133 and CC522 respectively. spa types were consistent with MLST CCs, only one spa type (t1403) was present in multiple CCs. The three main ovine CCs have different but overlapping patterns of geographical dissemination that appear to match the location and timing of sheep domestication and selection for meat and wool production. CC133, CC522 and CC700 remained ovine-associated following the inclusion of additional host species. Ovine isolates clustered separately from human and bovine isolates and those from sheep cheeses, but closely with caprine isolates. As with cattle isolates, patterns of clonal diversification of sheep isolates differ from humans, indicative of their relatively recent host-jump.

  19. Extensive Spinal Cord Injury following Staphylococcus aureus Septicemia and Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas De Schryver

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial meningitis is rarely complicated by spinal cord involvement in adults. We report a case of Staphylococcus aureus septicemia complicated by meningitis and extensive spinal cord injury, leading to ascending brain stem necrosis and death. This complication was investigated by magnetic resonance imaging which demonstrated intramedullary hyperintensity on T2-weighted images and by multimodality evoked potentials. Postmortem microscopic examination confirmed that the extensive spinal cord injury was of ischemic origin, caused by diffuse leptomeningitis and endarteritis.

  20. Nanoscale Plasma Coating Inhibits Formation of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus commonly infects medical implants or devices, with devastating consequences for the patient. The infection begins with bacterial attachment to the device, followed by bacterial multiplication over the surface of the device, generating an adherent sheet of bacteria known as a biofilm. Biofilms resist antimicrobial therapy and promote persistent infection, making management difficult to futile. Infections might be prevented by engineering the surface of the device to disco...

  1. Distribution of food-borne Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, W D

    2016-01-29

    We identified and analyzed 5 new-type enterotoxin genes, including SEj, SEl, SEq, SEm, and SEr, to explore the distribution of 5 enterotoxin genes in Staphylococcus aureus of different origins as well as their correlations and differences. We examined the distribution of the S. aureus enterotoxin genes and their pathogenic mechanisms. A total of 660 specimens were collected from January 2011 to December 2014, and 217 strains of S. aureus were isolated. The template DNA of S. aureus was extracted. The Primer6.0 and Oligo7 software were used to design and synthesize polymerase chain reaction primers. Amplification results were analyzed by electrophoresis, and the amplification products were recovered and sequenced. Thirty-six bacterial strains contained the SEj gene (16.6%), including 15, 8, 8, 4, and 1 strains in fresh meat, quick-frozen food, raw milk, human purulent tissue, and living environment, respectively. Thirty-one bacterial strains contained the SEr gene (14.3%), including 16, 9, and 6 strains in fresh meat, quick-frozen food, and raw milk, respectively. Twenty-one bacterial strains contained the enterotoxin SEq gene (9.7%), including 8, 6, 6, and 1 strains in fresh meat, quick-frozen food, raw milk, and human purulent tissue, respectively. No SEm and SEl genes were detected. Different types of foods carry different types of enterotoxins, providing a basis for quick tracing for food poisoning. Three enterotoxin genes, SEj, SEr, and SEq, showed the highest carrier rate in quick-frozen food. It is imperative to improve their detection in quick-frozen food.

  2. Fatal pneumoni med Panton-Valentine-leukocidinproducerende Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Peter Hedelund; Dessau, Ram Benny; Warnecke, Mads

    2010-01-01

    We describe a case of fatal pneumonia in a previously healthy 14-year-old boy. The patient was severely affected at the time of admission with high fever, tachypnea, tachycardia and peripheral cyanosis. The condition worsened despite treatment with antibiotics as well as respiratory and pressure ...... support. Acidosis and critical leucopenia supervened and the patient died just short of 24 hours after admission. Subsequent bacterial cultivation showed Panton-Valentine Leucocidin-producing Staphylococcus aureus....

  3. [Comparison of the in vitro post-antibiotic effect of C14 macrolides (erythromycin and roxithromycin) and C16 macrolides (josamycin and spiramycin) against Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, O; Bouanchaud, D H

    1989-05-01

    In vitro post-antibiotic effect (PAE) induced by erythromycin, roxithromycin, josamycin and spiramycin has been compared on Staphylococcus aureus. Three MLSB sensitive and three MLSB inducible resistant S. aureus strains have been used. delta t was the time required for culture to increase by 1 log10 after drug removal in comparison with controls. For erythromycin and roxithromycin delta t ranged from 6 minutes at 1 x MIC to 48 minutes at 4 x MIC (average of the six strains at 4 x MIC: 33 minutes). For josamycin and spiramycin, delta t ranged from 36 at 1/2 x MIC to 138 minutes at 4 x MIC (average at 4 x MIC: 101 minutes). No difference was observed between MLSB sensitive and MLSB inducible resistant S. aureus strains. In our experimental conditions, PAEs observed with josamycin and spiramycin (16-membered-ring macrolides) were 2.5 to 3 times longer than those observed with erythromycin and roxithromycin (14-membered-ring macrolides). These results added to biological differences previously observed between 14-membered-ring and 16-membered-ring macrolides.

  4. Improved lux reporters for use in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesak, Lili Rosana; Yim, Grace; Davies, Julian

    2009-05-01

    The use of luxABCDE (lux) offers certain advantages over other reporters, such as: lacZ and xylE. It is real time and its signal generation is produced without the requirement for any additional substrates. In some bacteria such as Staphylococcus spp, light production by luciferase is restricted because of a limited availability of endogenous substrates such as fatty acid aldehyde. We describe the construction of promoterless-lux cloning vectors, pGYlux and pAmilux. S. aureus carrying B. subtilis xyl/tetO promoter fused to the lux genes of pGYlux gave up to a 2.5-fold enhancement of luminescence over S. aureus carrying the xyl/tetO promoter fused to lux genes of the previously published parent vector pAL2. Furthermore, pAmilux showed a 6-fold enhancement of lux expression when compared to pGYlux in S. aureus. This was achieved by cloning the constitutive ami promoter upstream of the luxCDE genes to increase endogenous fatty acid aldehyde production while maintaining its reporter functionality by fusing promoters to the luxAB genes.

  5. Persister formation in Staphylococcus aureus is associated with ATP depletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conlon, Brian P.; Rowe, Sarah E.; Gandt, Autumn Brown; Nuxoll, Austin S.; Donegan, Niles P.; Zalis, Eliza A.; Clair, Geremy; Adkins, Joshua N.; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Lewis, Kim

    2016-04-18

    Persisters are dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are tolerant to killing by antibiotics1. Persisters are associated with chronic bacterial infection and antibiotic treatment failure. In Escherichia coli, toxin/antitoxin (TA) modules are responsible for persister formation. The mechanism of persister formation in Gram positive bacteria is unknown. Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen, responsible for a variety of chronic and relapsing infections such as osteomyelitis, endocarditis and infections of implanted devices. Deleting TA modules in S. aureus did not affect the level of persisters. Here we show that S. aureus persisters are produced due to a stochastic entrance to stationary phase accompanied by a drop in intracellular ATP. Cells expressing stationary state markers are present throughout the growth phase, increasing in frequency with cell density. Cell sorting revealed that expression of stationary markers was associated with a 100-1000 fold increased likelihood of survival to antibiotic challenge. We find that the antibiotic tolerance of these cells is due to a drop in intracellular ATP. The ATP level of the cell is predictive of bactericidal antibiotic efficacy and explains bacterial tolerance to antibiotic treatment.

  6. Predictors of Staphylococcus aureus Colonization and Results after Decolonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tennison L. Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Protocols for the screening and decolonization of Staphylococcus aureus prior to total joint arthroplasty (TJA have become widely adopted. The goals of this study were to determine: (1 whether implementation of a screening protocol followed by decolonization with mupirocin/vancomycin and chlorhexidine reduces the risk of revision compared with no screening protocol (i.e., chlorhexidine alone and (2 whether clinical criteria could reliably predict colonization with MSSA and/or MRSA. Electronic medical records of primary patients undergoing TJA that were screened (n=3,927 and were not screened (n=1,751 for Staphylococcus aureus at least 4 days prior to surgery, respectively, were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received chlorhexidine body wipes preoperatively. Patients carrying MSSA and MRSA were treated preoperatively with mupirocin and vancomycin, respectively, along with the standard preoperative antibiotics and chlorhexidine body wipes. Screened patients were 50% less likely to require revision due to prosthetic joint infection compared to those not screened (p=0.04. Multivariate regression models were poorly accurate in predicting colonization with MSSA (AUC = 0.58 and MRSA (AUC = 0.62. These results support the routine screening and decolonization of S. aureus prior to TJA.

  7. Biochemical characters and antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus isolates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Subhankari Prasad Chakraborty; Santanu Kar Mahapatra; Somenath Roy

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe the biochemical characters and antibiotic susceptibility of isolated Staphylococcus aureus (S. auerus) strains against some conventional and traditional