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Sample records for aureus colonizing healthy

  1. Epidemiology of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus colonization in healthy Venezuelan children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, B; Araque, M; van der Gaast-de Jongh, C; Escalona, F; Correa, M; Morillo-Puente, S; Vielma, S; Hermans, P W M

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. We investigated both the colonization and co-colonization characteristics for these pathogens among 250 healthy children from 2 to 5 years of age in Merida, Venezuela, in 2007. The prevalence of S. pneumoniae colonization, S. aureus colonization, and S. pneumoniae-S. aureus co-colonization was 28%, 56%, and 16%, respectively. Pneumococcal serotypes 6B (14%), 19F (12%), 23F (12%), 15 (9%), 6A (8%), 11 (8%), 23A (6%), and 34 (6%) were the most prevalent. Non-respiratory atopy was a risk factor for S. aureus colonization (p = 0.017). Vaccine serotypes were negatively associated with preceding respiratory infection (p = 0.02) and with S. aureus colonization (p = 0.03). We observed a high prevalence of pneumococcal resistance against trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (40%), erythromycin (38%), and penicillin (14%). Semi-quantitative measurement of pneumococcal colonization density showed that children with young siblings and low socioeconomic status were more densely colonized (p = 0.02 and p = 0.02, respectively). In contrast, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole- and multidrug-resistant-pneumococci colonized children sparsely (p = 0.03 and p = 0.01, respectively). Our data form an important basis to monitor the future impact of pneumococcal vaccination on bacterial colonization, as well as to recommend a rationalized and restrictive antimicrobial use in our community.

  2. Epidemiology of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus colonization in healthy Venezuelan children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, B.; Araque, M.; van der Gaast-de Jongh, C.; Escalona, F.; Correa, M.; Morillo-Puente, S.; Vielma, S.

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. We investigated both the colonization and co-colonization characteristics for these pathogens among 250 healthy children from 2 to 5 years of age in Merida, Venezuela, in 2007. The prevalence of S. pneumoniae colonization, S. aureus colonization, and S. pneumoniae–S. aureus co-colonization was 28%, 56%, and 16%, respectively. Pneumococcal serotypes 6B (14%), 19F (12%), 23F (12%), 15 (9%), 6A (8%), 11 (8%), 23A (6%), and 34 (6%) were the most prevalent. Non-respiratory atopy was a risk factor for S. aureus colonization (p = 0.017). Vaccine serotypes were negatively associated with preceding respiratory infection (p = 0.02) and with S. aureus colonization (p = 0.03). We observed a high prevalence of pneumococcal resistance against trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole (40%), erythromycin (38%), and penicillin (14%). Semi-quantitative measurement of pneumococcal colonization density showed that children with young siblings and low socioeconomic status were more densely colonized (p = 0.02 and p = 0.02, respectively). In contrast, trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole- and multidrug-resistant-pneumococci colonized children sparsely (p = 0.03 and p = 0.01, respectively). Our data form an important basis to monitor the future impact of pneumococcal vaccination on bacterial colonization, as well as to recommend a rationalized and restrictive antimicrobial use in our community. PMID:20803226

  3. Epidemiology of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus colonization in healthy Venezuelan children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quintero, B.; Araque, M.; Gaast-de Jongh, C.E. van der; Escalona, F.; Correa, M.; Morillo-Puente, S.; Vielma, S.; Hermans, P.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. We investigated both the colonization and co-colonization characteristics for these pathogens among 250 healthy children from 2 to 5 years of age in Merida, Venezuela, in 2007. The prevalence of

  4. Staphylococcus aureus colonization of healthy military service members in the United States and Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vento, Todd J; Calvano, Tatjana P; Cole, David W; Mende, Katrin; Rini, Elizabeth A; Tully, Charla C; Landrum, Michael L; Zera, Wendy; Guymon, Charles H; Yu, Xin; Beckius, Miriam L; Cheatle, Kristelle A; Murray, Clinton K

    2013-07-16

    Staphylococcus aureus [methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible (MRSA/MSSA)] is a leading cause of infections in military personnel, but there are limited data regarding baseline colonization of individuals while deployed. We conducted a pilot study to screen non-deployed and deployed healthy military service members for MRSA/MSSA colonization at various anatomic sites and assessed isolates for molecular differences. Colonization point-prevalence of 101 military personnel in the US and 100 in Afghanistan was determined by swabbing 7 anatomic sites. US-based individuals had received no antibiotics within 30 days, and Afghanistan-deployed personnel were taking doxycycline for malaria prophylaxis. Isolates underwent identification and testing for antimicrobial resistance, virulence factors, and pulsed-field type (PFT). 4 individuals in the US (4 isolates- 3 oropharynx, 1 perirectal) and 4 in Afghanistan (6 isolates- 2 oropharynx, 2 nare, 1 hand, 1 foot) were colonized with MRSA. Among US-based personnel, 3 had USA300 (1 PVL+) and 1 USA700. Among Afghanistan-based personnel, 1 had USA300 (PVL+), 1 USA800 and 2 USA1000. MSSA was present in 40 (71 isolates-25 oropharynx, 15 nare) of the US-based and 32 (65 isolates- 16 oropharynx, 24 nare) of the Afghanistan-based individuals. 56 (79%) US and 41(63%) Afghanistan-based individuals had MSSA isolates recovered from extra-nare sites. The most common MSSA PFTs were USA200 (9 isolates) in the US and USA800 (7 isolates) in Afghanistan. MRSA/MSSA isolates were susceptible to doxycycline in all but 3 personnel (1 US, 2 Afghanistan; all were MSSA isolates that carried tetM). MRSA and MSSA colonization of military personnel was not associated with deployment status or doxycycline exposure. Higher S. aureus oropharynx colonization rates were observed and may warrant changes in decolonization practices.

  5. Factors associated with nasal colonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among healthy children in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Jung; Hsu, Kuang-Hung; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Hwang, Kao-Pin; Chen, Po-Yen; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2011-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been identified as a major cause of community-associated (CA) S. aureus infections in the past decade. The main reservoir in the community for MRSA and the factors contributing to its worldwide spread remain poorly defined. Between July 2005 and June 2008, a total of 6,057 healthy children 2 to 60 months of age were screened for carriage of S. aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae in Taiwan. The prevalence and epidemiological factors influencing MRSA carriage were determined. MRSA strains were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility and underwent molecular characterization. The overall prevalences of MRSA and S. aureus carriage were 7.8% and 23.2%, respectively. A majority (88%) of MRSA isolates belonged to a common Asian-Pacific CA-MRSA lineage, multilocus sequence type 59, and were resistant to multiple non-beta-lactam antibiotics. The carriage rate of MRSA was higher among subjects 2 to 6 months old (P family (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.114; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.002 to 1.240; P = 0.0463) and day care attendance (aOR, 1.530; 95% CI, 1.201 to 1.949; P = 0.0006). Breast feeding (P risk factor that might accelerate CA-MRSA transmission in the community.

  6. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization rates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carriers of Staphylococcus aureus have an important role in its dissemination. The colonization rates of S. aureus in anterior nose nares from 210 healthy volunteers (70 from the non-hospital adult personnel in the community, 68 from clinical students and 72 from healthcare workers “HCWs” in 6 hospitals) in the eastern ...

  7. High prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization among healthy children attending public daycare centers in informal settlements in a large urban center in Brazil.

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    Braga, Eneida Dias Vianna; Aguiar-Alves, Fábio; de Freitas, Maria de Fátima Nogueira; de e Silva, Monique Oliveira; Correa, Thami Valadares; Snyder, Robert E; de Araújo, Verônica Afonso; Marlow, Mariel Asbury; Riley, Lee W; Setúbal, Sérgio; Silva, Licínio Esmeraldo; Araújo Cardoso, Claudete Aparecida

    2014-10-06

    In the past decade methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become increasingly prevalent in community settings. Attending a daycare center (DCC) is a known risk factor for colonization with MRSA. Brazil operates free, public DCCs for low-income families, some of which are located in census tracts defined by the Brazilian Census Bureau as informal settlements (aglomerados subnormais, AGSN). Physical and demographic characteristics of AGSNs suggest that S. aureus colonization prevalence would be higher, but little is known about the prevalence of MRSA in these settings. We conducted a cross-sectional study to assess risk factors for S. aureus and MRSA colonization among children attending DCCs located in AGSN vs non-AGSN. Nasal swabs were collected from children aged three months to six years in 23 public DCCs in Niterói, Brazil between August 2011 and October 2012. Of 500 children enrolled in the study, 240 (48%) were colonized with S. aureus and 31 (6.2%) were colonized with MRSA. Children attending DCCs in AGSNs were 2.32 times more likely to be colonized with S. aureus (95% CI: 1.32, 4.08), and 3.27 times more likely to be colonized with MRSA than children attending non-AGSN DCCs (95% CI: 1.52, 7.01), adjusted for confounding variables. S. aureus and MRSA colonization prevalence among children attending DCCs in informal settlement census tracts was higher than previously reported in healthy pre-school children in Latin America. Our data suggest that transmission may occur more frequently in DCCs rather than at home, highlighting the importance of DCCs in AGSNs as potential MRSA reservoirs. This finding underscores the importance of local epidemiologic surveillance in vulnerable AGSN communities.

  8. Large screening of CA-MRSA among Staphylococcus aureus colonizing healthy young children living in two areas (urban and rural of Portugal

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    Miragaia Maria

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of pediatric infections due to community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA, including children with no identifiable risk factors, has increased worldwide in the last decade. This suggests that healthy children may constitute a reservoir of MRSA in the community. In this study, nested within a larger one on nasopharyngeal ecology, we aimed to: (i evaluate the prevalence of MRSA colonizing young children in Portugal; and (ii compare results with those obtained in a study conducted a decade ago, when this prevalence was Methods In the years 2006, 2007, and 2009, nasopharyngeal samples were obtained from 2,100 children aged up to 6 years attending day-care centers. S. aureus were isolated by routine procedures and strains were tested for susceptibility against a panel of 12 antimicrobial agents. MRSA isolates were further characterized by SmaI-PFGE profiling, MLST, spa typing, SCCmec typing, and presence of virulence factors. Results Seventeen percent of the children carried S. aureus. Among the 365 isolates, non-susceptibility rates were 88% to penicillin, 14% to erythromycin, 6% to clindamycin, 2% to tetracycline, and spa type t148; the other was ST939-IVa (ST939 is a single locus variant (SLV of ST72, spa type t324. The third strain was related to USA300 (ST8-IV being characterized by ST931 (SLV of ST8-VI, spa type t008. The three MRSA strains were PVL-negative, but all carried LukE-LukD leukocidin, hemolysins gamma, gamma variant and beta, and staphylococcal enterotoxin sel. Conclusions Our results, based on analysis of S. aureus isolated from nasopharyngeal samples, suggest that in Portugal the prevalence of CA-MRSA carriage in healthy young children remains extremely low favoring the exclusion of this group as a reservoir of such isolates.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus colonization related to severity of hand eczema.

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    Mernelius, S; Carlsson, E; Henricson, J; Löfgren, S; Lindgren, P-E; Ehricht, R; Monecke, S; Matussek, A; Anderson, C D

    2016-08-01

    Knowledge on Staphylococcus aureus colonization rates and epidemiology in hand eczema is limited. The aim of this study was to clarify some of these issues. Samples were collected by the "glove juice" method from the hands of 59 patients with chronic hand eczema and 24 healthy individuals. Swab samples were taken from anterior nares and throat from 43 of the 59 patients and all healthy individuals. S. aureus were spa typed and analysed by DNA-microarray-based genotyping. The extent of the eczema was evaluated by the hand eczema extent score (HEES). The colonization rate was higher on the hands of hand eczema patients (69 %) compared to healthy individuals (21 %, p eczema (HEES ≥ 13) had a significantly higher S. aureus density on their hands compared to those with milder eczema (HEES = 1 to 12, p = 0.004). There was no difference between patients and healthy individuals regarding colonization rates in anterior nares or throat. spa typing and DNA-microarray-based genotyping indicated certain types more prone to colonize eczematous skin. Simultaneous colonization, in one individual, with S. aureus of different types, was identified in 60-85 % of the study subjects. The colonization rate and density indicate a need for effective treatment of eczema and may have an impact on infection control in healthcare.

  10. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus among healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chong Seng; Yin, Chow Suet; Bakar, Afra Abu; Sakewi, Zamberi; Naing, Nyi Nyi; Jamal, Farida; Othman, Norlijah

    2006-12-01

    Data on the carriage rate and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of Staphylococcus aureus strains prevalent in the community are not available for many developing countries including Malaysia. To estimate the extent of community S. aureus transmission, in particular methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), the prevalence of S. aureus nasal colonization in a population of healthy adults was determined. Factors associated with S. aureus nasal carriage and antibiotic sensitivity patterns of the isolates were also analyzed. A cross-sectional study involving 346 adults was conducted. Nasal swabs were examined for the presence of S. aureus. Epidemiological information concerning risk factors for nasal carriage was also obtained. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using the disk diffusion method according to the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards guidelines. MRSA strains isolated were further subjected to pulse-field gel electrophoresis analysis. The prevalence of S. aureus nasal carriage was 23.4%. The findings also revealed that ex-smokers (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08-6.32, p=0.033) and oral contraceptive users (95% CI 1.12-21.67, p=0.035) were more likely to harbor S. aureus. One person was colonized with MRSA, which was different from the hospital strain. MRSA nasal colonization was found to be low outside of the health care environment. Smokers and oral contraceptive users have high nasal carrier rates.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus in the community: colonization versus infection.

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    Maureen Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections have increased dramatically in the community, yet S. aureus nasal colonization has remained stable. The objectives of this study were to determine if S. aureus colonization is a useful proxy measure to study disease transmission and infection in community settings, and to identify potential community reservoirs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Randomly selected households in Northern Manhattan, completed a structured social network questionnaire and provided nasal swabs that were typed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis to identify S. aureus colonizing strains. The main outcome measures were: 1 colonization with S. aureus; and 2 recent serious skin infection. Risk factor analyses were conducted at both the individual and the household levels; logistic regression models identified independent risks for household colonization and infection. RESULTS: 321 surveyed households contained 914 members. The S. aureus prevalence was 25% and MRSA was 0.4%. More than 40% of households were colonized. Recent antibiotic use was the only significant correlate for household colonization (p = .002. Seventy-eight (24% households reported serious skin infection. In contrast with colonization, five of the six risk factors that increased the risk of skin infection in the household at the univariate level remained independently significant in multivariable analysis: international travel, sports participation, surgery, antibiotic use and towel sharing. S. aureus colonization was not significantly associated with serious skin infection in any analysis. Among multiperson households with more than one person colonized, 50% carried the same strain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The lack of association between S. aureus nasal colonization and serious skin infection underscores the need to explore alternative venues or body sites that may be crucial to transmission. Moreover, the magnitude of colonization and

  12. Persistent Staphylococcus aureus colonization is not a strongly heritable trait in Amish families.

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    Mary-Claire Roghmann

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available About 20% of adults are persistently colonized with S. aureus in the anterior nares. Host genetic factors could contribute susceptibility to this phenotype. The objective of this study was to determine whether the phenotype of persistent S. aureus colonization aggregates in family members who live in different households. Healthy adults and their eligible same sex siblings who lived in different households were recruited from the Old Order Amish of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. All participants had two cultures of the anterior nares to determine if they were persistently colonized with S. aureus. Three hundred and ninety eight participants finished the study, of whom 166 were index cases and 232 were siblings of index cases. Eighteen per cent (71/398 of all participants and 17% (29/166 of index cases were persistently colonized with S. aureus. Twenty two per cent (8/36 of siblings of persistently colonized index cases were persistently colonized with S. aureus compared to 17% (34/196 of siblings of non-persistently colonized index cases, yielding a prevalence rate ratio of 1.28 (95% CI: 0.65-2.54, p = 0.64 and sibling relative risk of 1.25 (95% CI: 0.65-2.38, p = 0.51. The heritability of persistent colonization was 0.19±0.21 (p = 0.31. Persistent S. aureus colonization does not strongly aggregate in Amish family members in different households and heritability is low, suggesting that environmental factors or acquired host factors are more important than host genetic factors in determining persistent S. aureus colonization in this community.

  13. S. aureus colonization at ICU admission as a risk factor for developing S. aureus ICU pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paling, Fleur P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413968669; Wolkewitz, Martin; Bode, Lonneke G M; Klein Klouwenberg, Peter M C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/33706864X; Ong, David S Y; Depuydt, Pieter; de Bus, Liesbet; Sifakis, Frangiscos; Bonten, Marc J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337; Kluijtmans, Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323262139

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the incidence of intensive care unit (ICU) acquired pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and its association with S. aureus colonization at ICU admission. METHODS: This was a post-hoc analysis of two cohort studies in critically ill patients. The primary

  14. Epidemiology and risk factors for Staphylococcus aureus colonization in children in the post-PCV7 era

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    Kleinman Ken

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has risen dramatically in the U.S., particularly among children. Although Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization has been inversely associated with S. aureus colonization in unvaccinated children, this and other risk factors for S. aureus carriage have not been assessed following widespread use of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7. Our objectives were to (1 determine the prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA colonization in young children in the context of widespread use of PCV7; and (2 examine risk factors for S. aureus colonization in the post-PCV7 era, including the absence of vaccine-type S. pneumoniae colonization. Methods Swabs of the anterior nares (S. aureus were obtained from children enrolled in an ongoing study of nasopharyngeal pneumococcal colonization of healthy children in 8 Massachusetts communities. Children 3 months to S. aureus was identified and antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed. Epidemiologic risk factors for S. aureus colonization were collected from parent surveys and chart reviews, along with data on pneumococcal colonization. Multivariate mixed model analyses were performed to identify factors associated with S. aureus colonization. Results Among 1,968 children, the mean age (SD was 2.7 (1.8 years, 32% received an antibiotic in the past 2 months, 2% were colonized with PCV7 strains and 24% were colonized with non-PCV7 strains. The prevalence of S. aureus colonization remained stable between 2003–04 and 2006–07 (14.6% vs. 14.1%, while MRSA colonization remained low (0.2% vs. 0.9%, p = 0.09. Although absence of pneumococcal colonization was not significantly associated with S. aureus colonization, age (6–11 mo vs. ≥5 yrs, OR 0.39 [95% CI 0.24–0.64]; 1–1.99 yrs vs. ≥5 yrs, OR 0.35 [0.23–0.54]; 2–2.99 yrs vs. ≥5 yrs, OR 0.45 [0.28–0.73]; 3–3.99 yrs vs. ≥5 yrs, OR 0

  15. Maternal-neonatal outcome with Staphylococcus aureus rectovaginal colonization.

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    Ghanim, Nibal; Alchyib, Omrou; Morrish, Donald; Tompkins, David; Julliard, Kell; Visconti, Ernest; Hoskins, Iffath A

    2011-01-01

    To estimate prevalence of rectovaginal colonization by Staphylococcus aureus among pregnant women with group B streptococcus (GBS) screening results and its association with maternal and infant outcomes. Cultures that detected both group B streptococcus (GBS) and S. aureus were obtained at > or = 35 weeks of gestation. Computerized database search and chart review determined invasive neonatal infection and maternal outcomes at the time of delivery through 6 months postpartum. A total of 6,626 GBS screening cultures met study criteria, and 769 (11.6%) GBS isolates and 67 (1.0%) S. aureus were identified. No maternal S. aureus-related outcomes were found. The rate of maternal methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization was 0.1% (7 in 6,626). GBS-positive patients were twice as likely to be colonized with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus than GBS-negative patients. GBS-positive culture rates differed significantly by primary language: Spanish 10.0%, English 13.7%, Russian 26.9%, Cantonese 13.2%, Mandarin 11.5%, Arabic 15.9%, and other 17.8%. In our population, S. aureus colonization percentage (1.0%) was lower than the 7.5-8.2% reported by other medical centers, as was overall GBS carriage rate. S. aureus did not predispose to maternal or infant morbidity or mortality up to 6 months postpartum.

  16. Beta-Hemolysin Promotes Skin Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Katayama, Yuki; Baba, Tadashi; Sekine, Miwa; Fukuda, Minoru; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus is a characteristic feature of several inflammatory skin diseases and is often followed by epidermal damage and invasive infection. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of skin colonization by a virulent community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strain, MW2, using a murine ear colonization model. MW2 does not produce a hemolytic toxin, beta-hemolysin (Hlb), due to integration of a prophage, ϕSa3mw, inside the toxin gene (hlb). H...

  17. Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been recognized as important nosocomial pathogens worldwide. S aureus may induce clinically manifested diseases, or the host may remain completely asymptomatic. Methods: a cross-sectional hospital-based study was conducted from October 2012 ...

  18. Beta-hemolysin promotes skin colonization by Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Katayama, Yuki; Baba, Tadashi; Sekine, Miwa; Fukuda, Minoru; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2013-03-01

    Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus is a characteristic feature of several inflammatory skin diseases and is often followed by epidermal damage and invasive infection. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of skin colonization by a virulent community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strain, MW2, using a murine ear colonization model. MW2 does not produce a hemolytic toxin, beta-hemolysin (Hlb), due to integration of a prophage, Sa3mw, inside the toxin gene (hlb). However, we found that strain MW2 bacteria that had successfully colonized murine ears included derivatives that produced Hlb. Genome sequencing of the Hlb-producing colonies revealed that precise excision of prophage Sa3mw occurred, leading to reconstruction of the intact hlb gene in their chromosomes. To address the question of whether Hlb is involved in skin colonization, we constructed MW2-derivative strains with and without the Hlb gene and then subjected them to colonization tests. The colonization efficiency of the Hlb-producing mutant on murine ears was more than 50-fold greater than that of the mutant without hlb. Furthermore, we also showed that Hlb toxin had elevated cytotoxicity for human primary keratinocytes. Our results indicate that S. aureus Hlb plays an important role in skin colonization by damaging keratinocytes, in addition to its well-known hemolytic activity for erythrocytes.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus still colonizes the untreated neonatal umbilicus.

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    Watkinson, M; Dyas, A

    1992-06-01

    Two different neonatal umbilical cord treatment regimens were studied prospectively. Although a greater proportion of cords had separated by the seventh day in those babies not treated with topical antiseptics (47% vs. 26%), there was a significant excess (53% vs. 30%) of umbilical colonization by Staphylococcus aureus compared to those neonates whose cords were treated with alcohol wipes and hexachlorophane powder. The main purpose of treating cords is to prevent significant S. aureus colonization, and therefore current proposals to stop antiseptic treatment of umbilical cords should be disregarded.

  20. Psoriasis and staphylococcus aureus skin colonization in Moroccan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This colonization was less important in lesional psoriatic skin (3%) than in non lesional psoriatic skin (12.1%) p= 0.20. Nasal screening identified (7/33) 21, 21% S. aureus carriers in psoriasis group and in control group. Our results are in consensus withliterature findings. They have confirmed the importance of antimicrobial ...

  1. The inverse correlation between Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization in infants is not explained by differences in serum antibody levels in the Generation R Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebon, Ankie; Verkaik, Nelianne J; de Vogel, Corné P; Hooijkaas, Herbert; Verbrugh, Henri A; van Wamel, Willem J B; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Hofman, Albert; Hermans, Peter W M; Mitchell, Tim J; Moll, Henriette A; van Belkum, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Colonization rates of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus are inversely correlated in infants. Several studies have searched for determinants of this negative association. We studied the association between antipneumococcal antibodies with Staphylococcus aureus colonization and the association between antistaphylococcal antibodies with pneumococcal colonization in healthy children in the pneumococcal vaccine era. In the first year of life, no association between maternal IgG levels and colonization was seen. In addition, no association between the IgG and IgA levels in the child versus colonization status was seen.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of Staphyloccocus aureus colonization in the Old Order of Amish of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roghmann, M-C; Longinaker, N; Croft, L; Johnson, J K; Lydecker, A D; Stine, O C

    2014-08-01

    Transmission of Staphylococcus aureus colonization in community-based populations is not well understood. We sought to describe the molecular epidemiology of S. aureus colonization in the Old Order Amish. The study was a prospective, observational study of healthy adults and their same-sex siblings who were cultured from the anterior nares twice. S. aureus isolates were characterized using spa typing. Overall, 40% (159/398) of the study population was colonized with S. aureus. There were 84 spa types with the most abundant spa types being t012 (13%) and t021 (7%). There was no clustering of spa types within sibling groups; however, there was clustering within households. There were 111 S. aureus-colonized participant pairs living within the same household. Of these, 47% had concordant spa types. The diversity of spa types across a relatively isolated, genetically homogenous population with a similar lifestyle is striking. Taken together this suggests that S. aureus transmission is a local phenomenon limited to very close contact.

  3. Predictors of Staphylococcus aureus Colonization and Results after Decolonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tennison L. Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Protocols for the screening and decolonization of Staphylococcus aureus prior to total joint arthroplasty (TJA have become widely adopted. The goals of this study were to determine: (1 whether implementation of a screening protocol followed by decolonization with mupirocin/vancomycin and chlorhexidine reduces the risk of revision compared with no screening protocol (i.e., chlorhexidine alone and (2 whether clinical criteria could reliably predict colonization with MSSA and/or MRSA. Electronic medical records of primary patients undergoing TJA that were screened (n=3,927 and were not screened (n=1,751 for Staphylococcus aureus at least 4 days prior to surgery, respectively, were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received chlorhexidine body wipes preoperatively. Patients carrying MSSA and MRSA were treated preoperatively with mupirocin and vancomycin, respectively, along with the standard preoperative antibiotics and chlorhexidine body wipes. Screened patients were 50% less likely to require revision due to prosthetic joint infection compared to those not screened (p=0.04. Multivariate regression models were poorly accurate in predicting colonization with MSSA (AUC = 0.58 and MRSA (AUC = 0.62. These results support the routine screening and decolonization of S. aureus prior to TJA.

  4. Dysbiosis and Staphylococcus aureus Colonization Drives Inflammation in Atopic Dermatitis.

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    Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Glatz, Martin; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Kaplan, Daniel H; Kong, Heidi H; Amagai, Masayuki; Nagao, Keisuke

    2015-04-21

    Staphylococcus aureus skin colonization is universal in atopic dermatitis and common in cancer patients treated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. However, the causal relationship of dysbiosis and eczema has yet to be clarified. Herein, we demonstrate that Adam17(fl/fl)Sox9-(Cre) mice, generated to model ADAM17-deficiency in human, developed eczematous dermatitis with naturally occurring dysbiosis, similar to that observed in atopic dermatitis. Corynebacterium mastitidis, S. aureus, and Corynebacterium bovis sequentially emerged during the onset of eczematous dermatitis, and antibiotics specific for these bacterial species almost completely reversed dysbiosis and eliminated skin inflammation. Whereas S. aureus prominently drove eczema formation, C. bovis induced robust T helper 2 cell responses. Langerhans cells were required for eliciting immune responses against S. aureus inoculation. These results characterize differential contributions of dysbiotic flora during eczema formation, and highlight the microbiota-host immunity axis as a possible target for future therapeutics in eczematous dermatitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Maternal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus and Group B streptococcus is associated with colonization in newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, A; Bojang, A; Camara, B; Oluwalana, C; Lette, K; West, P; D'Alessandro, U; Bottomley, C

    2017-12-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus and Group B streptococcus (GBS) are major causes of neonatal sepsis in sub-Saharan Africa, it is unclear how these bacteria are transmitted to the neonate. In a cohort of 377 Gambian women and their newborns, nasopharyngeal swabs were collected at delivery (day 0), and 3, 6, 14 and 28 days later. Breast milk samples and vaginal swabs were collected from the mother. Staphylococcus aureus and GBS were isolated using conventional microbiological methods. Most women were carriers of S. aureus (264 out of 361 with all samples collected, 73.1%) at some point during follow up and many were carriers of GBS (114 out of 361, 31.6%). Carriage of S. aureus was common in all three maternal sites and GBS was common in the vaginal tract and breast milk. Among newborns, carriage of S. aureus peaked at day 6 (238 out of 377, 63.1%) and GBS at day 3 (39 out of 377, 10.3%). Neonatal carriage of S. aureus at day 6 was associated with maternal carriage in the breast milk adjusted OR 2.54; 95% CI 1.45-4.45, vaginal tract (aOR 2.55; 95% CI 1.32-4.92) and nasopharynx (aOR 2.49; 95% CI 1.56-3.97). Neonatal carriage of GBS at day 6 was associated with maternal carriage in the breast milk (aOR 3.75; 95% CI 1.32-10.65) and vaginal tract (aOR 3.42; 95% CI 1.27-9.22). Maternal colonization with S. aureus or GBS is a risk factor for bacterial colonization in newborns. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus colonization in atopic eczema and its association with filaggrin gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M. L.; Edslev, S. M.; Andersen, P. S.

    2017-01-01

    were characterized with respect to disease severity (Scoring Atopic Dermatitis) and FLG mutations (n = 88). Fisher's exact test was used to analyse differences in S. aureus colonization in relation to FLG mutations. Results: Of the 101 patients included, 74 (73%) were colonized with S. aureus...

  7. Predictors of Staphylococcus aureus Rectovaginal Colonization in Pregnant Women and Risk for Maternal and Neonatal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, Karina A; Buet, Amanda; Whittier, Susan; Ratner, Adam J; Saiman, Lisa

    2012-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections are increasing among pregnant and postpartum women and neonates, but risk factors for S. aureus colonization in pregnancy and the association between maternal colonization and infant infections are not well defined. We sought to identify risk factors for maternal S. aureus rectovaginal colonization and assess colonization as a risk factor for infections among mothers and infants. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of pregnant women and their infants. Demographic and clinical data, including S. aureus infections that occurred in mothers from 3 months before to 3 months after delivery and in infants during the first 3 months of life, were extracted from electronic medical records. Predictors for maternal S. aureus rectovaginal colonization were assessed through multivariable logistic regression analysis. The cohort included 2702 women and 2789 infants. The prevalence of maternal rectovaginal colonization with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was 13% and 0.7%. Independent predictors of colonization included multigravidity, human immunodeficiency virus seropositivity, and group B Streptococcus colonization. S. aureus colonization was associated with an increased risk of infection in mothers (odds ratio [OR], 3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-8.8) but not in their infants (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, .6-5.6). The frequency of S. aureus infections was 0.8% in mothers and 0.7% in infants. S. aureus rectovaginal colonization was associated with an increased risk of infections in women but not in their infants. The frequency of MRSA infections was low. These data suggest that routine MRSA screening of pregnant women may not be indicated. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in children with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Liza; Coffin, Susan; Leckerman, Kateri Heydon; Gelfand, Joel M; Honig, Paul J; Yan, Albert C

    2008-01-01

    Children with atopic dermatitis are more frequently colonized with Staphylococcus aureus than children without atopic dermatitis. However, little epidemiological data exist regarding the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus among children with atopic dermatitis. Recent studies have revealed an increasing prevalence of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus among patients presenting to hospitals with serious bacterial infections, particularly those with cutaneous and soft tissue infections. As many atopic dermatitis patients are treated empirically with antibiotics for secondary skin infections, an understanding of the epidemiology of bacterial colonization and superinfection is essential for directing proper treatment in the atopic patient population. This study investigates the prevalence of risk factors for community-associated, methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization among pediatric atopic dermatitis patients encountered at an academic pediatric dermatology clinic. An observational cross-sectional study was conducted at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in which 54 patients previously diagnosed with atopic dermatitis were enrolled. A detailed patient questionnaire, a complete cutaneous examination, and an evaluation of eczema severity according to the Eczema Area and Severity Index were completed at the time of enrollment. Bacterial cultures from the skin and nares were obtained to determine the frequency of colonization with either methicillin-sensitive S. aureus or methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Although most atopic dermatitis patients studied were colonized with S. aureus (43/54 [80%]), methicillin-resistant S. aureus was isolated from only seven atopic dermatitis patients (7/43 [16%]). Patients colonized with S. aureus were more likely to be male, to have been previously hospitalized, to have used a topical calcineurin inhibitor in combination with a topical steroid, and less likely to have used topical antibiotics

  9. Staphylococcus aureus intestinal colonization is associated with increased frequency of S. aureus on skin of hospitalized patients

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    Donskey Curtis J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intestinal colonization by Staphylococcus aureus among hospitalized patients has been associated with increased risk of staphylococcal infection and could potentially contribute to transmission. We hypothesized that S. aureus intestinal colonization is associated with increased frequency of S. aureus on patients' skin and nearby environmental surfaces. Methods Selected inpatients were cultured weekly for S. aureus from stool, nares, skin (groin and axilla, and environmental surfaces (bed rail and bedside table. Investigator's hands were cultured after contacting the patients' skin and the environmental surfaces. Results Of 71 subjects, 32 (45.1% had negative nares and stool cultures, 23 (32.4% had positive nares and stool cultures, 13 (18.3% were nares carriers only, and 3 (4.2% were stool carriers only. Of the 39 patients with S. aureus carriage, 30 (76.9% had methicillin-resistant isolates. In comparison to nares colonization only, nares and intestinal colonization was associated with increased frequency of positive skin cultures (41% versus 77%; p = 0.001 and trends toward increased environmental contamination (45% versus 62%; p = 0.188 and acquisition on investigator's hands (36% versus 60%; p = 0.057. Patients with negative nares and stool cultures had low frequency of S. aureus on skin and the environment (4.8% and 11.3%, respectively. Conclusion We found that hospitalized patients with S. aureus nares and/or stool carriage frequently had S. aureus on their skin and on nearby environmental surfaces. S. aureus intestinal colonization was associated with increased frequency of positive skin cultures, which could potentially facilitate staphylococcal infections and nosocomial transmission.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization: Modulation of Host Immune Response and Impact on Human Vaccine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Aisling F.; Leech, John M.; Rogers, Thomas R.; McLoughlin, Rachel M.

    2014-01-01

    In apparent contrast to its invasive potential Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the anterior nares of 20–80% of the human population. The relationship between host and microbe appears particularly individualized and colonization status seems somehow predetermined. After decolonization, persistent carriers often become re-colonized with their prior S. aureus strain, whereas non-carriers resist experimental colonization. Efforts to identify factors facilitating colonization have thus far largely focused on the microorganism rather than on the human host. The host responds to S. aureus nasal colonization via local expression of anti-microbial peptides, lipids, and cytokines. Interplay with the co-existing microbiota also influences colonization and immune regulation. Transient or persistent S. aureus colonization induces specific systemic immune responses. Humoral responses are the most studied of these and little is known of cellular responses induced by colonization. Intriguingly, colonized patients who develop bacteremia may have a lower S. aureus-attributable mortality than their non-colonized counterparts. This could imply a staphylococcal-specific immune “priming” or immunomodulation occurring as a consequence of colonization and impacting on the outcome of infection. This has yet to be fully explored. An effective vaccine remains elusive. Anti-S. aureus vaccine strategies may need to drive both humoral and cellular immune responses to confer efficient protection. Understanding the influence of colonization on adaptive response is essential to intelligent vaccine design, and may determine the efficacy of vaccine-mediated immunity. Clinical trials should consider colonization status and the resulting impact of this on individual patient responses. We urgently need an increased appreciation of colonization and its modulation of host immunity. PMID:24409186

  11. Nasal Carriage and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus in healthy preschool children in Ujjain, India

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    Sharma Megha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that community acquired S. aureus infections are spreading among healthy children. Nasal colonization with S. aureus plays pivotal role in the increasing prevalence of resistant community acquired S. aureus infections worldwide. A regular surveillance system is important in ensuring quality of patient care. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of and the factors associated with nasal carriage of S. aureus and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern among healthy children in Ujjain, India. Methods A prospective study was done in paediatric outpatient clinics of R.D. Gardi medical college Ujjain, India. Healthy children from 1 month to 59 months of age were included. Information on previously known risk factors for nasal colonization was collected using a pre-tested questionnaire. Swabs from anterior nares were collected and transported in Amies transport media with charcoal and cultured on 5% sheep blood agar. Antibiotic sensitivity tests were performed using Kirby Bauer's disc diffusion method according to performance standards of Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute guidelines. Results Of the 1,562 children from 1-month up-to five years of age included in the study 98 children tested positive for nasal carriage of S. aureus. The prevalence of nasal carriage of S. aureus was 6.3% (95% CI 5.1-7.5 out of which 16.3% (95% CI 8.9-23.8 were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. The factors associated with nasal carriage were "child attending preschool" (OR 4.26, 95% CI 2.25-8.03; P = 0.007 or "school" (OR 3.02, 95% CI 1.27-7.18; P P = 0.03. The sensitivity pattern of isolated S. aureus showed resistance to commonly used oral antibiotics while resistance to glycopeptides was not noted. Conclusions We found a relatively low rate of nasal carriage of S. aureus in children below five years when compared to children of older age groups in India. Yet, prevalence of MRSA was relatively high.

  12. Nasal Carriage and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus in healthy preschool children in Ujjain, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that community acquired S. aureus infections are spreading among healthy children. Nasal colonization with S. aureus plays pivotal role in the increasing prevalence of resistant community acquired S. aureus infections worldwide. A regular surveillance system is important in ensuring quality of patient care. The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of and the factors associated with nasal carriage of S. aureus and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern among healthy children in Ujjain, India. Methods A prospective study was done in paediatric outpatient clinics of R.D. Gardi medical college Ujjain, India. Healthy children from 1 month to 59 months of age were included. Information on previously known risk factors for nasal colonization was collected using a pre-tested questionnaire. Swabs from anterior nares were collected and transported in Amies transport media with charcoal and cultured on 5% sheep blood agar. Antibiotic sensitivity tests were performed using Kirby Bauer's disc diffusion method according to performance standards of Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute guidelines. Results Of the 1,562 children from 1-month up-to five years of age included in the study 98 children tested positive for nasal carriage of S. aureus. The prevalence of nasal carriage of S. aureus was 6.3% (95% CI 5.1-7.5) out of which 16.3% (95% CI 8.9-23.8) were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The factors associated with nasal carriage were "child attending preschool" (OR 4.26, 95% CI 2.25-8.03; P = 0.007) or "school" (OR 3.02, 95% CI 1.27-7.18; P < 0.001) and "family size more than 10 members" (OR 2.76 95% CI 1.06-7.15; P = 0.03). The sensitivity pattern of isolated S. aureus showed resistance to commonly used oral antibiotics while resistance to glycopeptides was not noted. Conclusions We found a relatively low rate of nasal carriage of S. aureus in children below five years when compared to children of older age groups in

  13. HIV and colonization with Staphylococcus aureus in two maximum-security prisons in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Befus, Montina B; Miko, Benjamin A; Herzig, Carolyn T A; Keleekai, Nowai; Mukherjee, Dhritiman V; Larson, Elaine; Lowy, Franklin D

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the association between HIV and Staphylococcus aureus colonization after confounding by incarceration is removed. A cross sectional stratified study of all HIV infected and a random sample of HIV-uninfected inmates from two maximum-security prisons in New York State. Structured interviews were conducted. Anterior nares and oropharyngeal samples were cultured and S. aureus isolates were characterized. Log-binomial regression was used to assess the association between HIV and S. aureus colonization of the anterior nares and/or oropharynx and exclusive oropharynx colonization. Differences in S. aureus strain diversity between HIV-infected and uninfected individuals were assessed using Simpson's Index of Diversity. Among 117 HIV infected and 351 HIV uninfected individuals assessed, 47% were colonized with S. aureus and 6% were colonized with methicillin resistant S. aureus. The prevalence of S. aureus colonization did not differ by HIV status (PR = 0.99, 95% CI = 0.76-1.24). HIV infected inmates were less likely to be exclusively colonized in the oropharynx (PR = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.30-0.99). Spa types t571 and t064 were both more prevalent among HIV infected individuals, however, strain diversity was similar in HIV infected and uninfected inmates. HIV infection was not associated with S. aureus colonization in these maximum-security prison populations, but was associated with decreased likelihood of oropharyngeal colonization. Factors that influence colonization site require further evaluation. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Low Efficacy of Antibiotics Against Staphylococcus aureus Airway Colonization in Ventilated Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulik, Lukas; Hudcova, Jana; Craven, Donald E; Nagy, Gabor; Nagy, Eszter

    2017-04-15

    Airway-colonization by Staphylococcus aureus predisposes to the development of ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis (VAT) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Despite extensive antibiotic treatment of intensive care unit patients, limited data are available on the efficacy of antibiotics on bacterial airway colonization and/or prevention of infections. Therefore, microbiologic responses to antibiotic treatment were evaluated in ventilated patients. Results of semiquantitative analyses of S. aureus burden in serial endotracheal-aspirate (ETA) samples and VAT/VAP diagnosis were correlated to antibiotic treatment. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of relevant antibiotics using serially collected isolates were evaluated. Forty-eight mechanically ventilated patients who were S. aureus positive by ETA samples and treated with relevant antibiotics for at least 2 consecutive days were included in the study. Vancomycin failed to reduce methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) or methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) burden in the airways. Oxacillin was ineffective for MSSA colonization in approximately 30% of the patients, and responders were typically coadministered additional antibiotics. Despite antibiotic exposure, 15 of the 39 patients (approximately 38%) colonized only by S. aureus and treated with appropriate antibiotic for at least 2 days still progressed to VAP. Importantly, no change in antibiotic susceptibility of S. aureus isolates was observed during treatment. Staphylococcus aureus colonization levels inversely correlated with the presence of normal respiratory flora. Antibiotic treatment is ineffective in reducing S. aureus colonization in the lower airways and preventing VAT or VAP. Staphylococcus aureus is in competition for colonization with the normal respiratory flora. To improve patient outcomes, alternatives to antibiotics are urgently needed.

  15. Staphylococcus epidermidis Esp inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation and nasal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Tadayuki; Uehara, Yoshio; Shinji, Hitomi; Tajima, Akiko; Seo, Hiromi; Takada, Koji; Agata, Toshihiko; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu

    2010-05-20

    Commensal bacteria are known to inhibit pathogen colonization; however, complex host-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions have made it difficult to gain a detailed understanding of the mechanisms involved in the inhibition of colonization. Here we show that the serine protease Esp secreted by a subset of Staphylococcus epidermidis, a commensal bacterium, inhibits biofilm formation and nasal colonization by Staphylococcus aureus, a human pathogen. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that the presence of Esp-secreting S. epidermidis in the nasal cavities of human volunteers correlates with the absence of S. aureus. Purified Esp inhibits biofilm formation and destroys pre-existing S. aureus biofilms. Furthermore, Esp enhances the susceptibility of S. aureus in biofilms to immune system components. In vivo studies have shown that Esp-secreting S. epidermidis eliminates S. aureus nasal colonization. These findings indicate that Esp hinders S. aureus colonization in vivo through a novel mechanism of bacterial interference, which could lead to the development of novel therapeutics to prevent S. aureus colonization and infection.

  16. Infection and colonization by Staphylococcus aureus in a high risk nursery of a Brazilian teaching hospital

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    Helisângela de Almeida Silva

    Full Text Available Neonates are susceptible to nosocomial infections due to immunological immaturity, prolonged hospital stay and the use of invasive procedures. We evaluated the incidence of infections and the prevalence of colonization by MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and MSSA (Methilin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, as well as colonization risk factors. Staphylococcal infections were observed by analyzing medical records in the HICS (Hospital Infection Control Service and the HRN (High Risk Nursery. Additionally, four inquiries concerning colonization prevalence were made for S. aureus, from January/2000 to December/2002. Clinical specimens from the nostrils, mouth and anus were cultivated in mannitol-salt agar plates and identification was made through standard methods. The frequency of neonates colonized by S. aureus was 49%. MSSA was more prevalent (57% than MRSA (43%. Risk factors related to the acquisition of MRSA were: low weight and antibiotic use. , Hospital stay was the only variable significantly associated with colonization by S. aureus. The incidence of infections by S. aureus during the last three years was 2.18% (159 cases. Nine of them (5.5% were associated with MRSA and 150 (94.5% with MSSA. Staphylococcal infections were considered as invasive (sepsis and non-invasive (conjunctivitis, cutaneous, corresponding to 31% and 69%, respectively. The MRSA phenotype in infection was rare compared with methicillin-susceptible samples, although S. aureus, MRSA and MSSA colonization rates were high.

  17. Infection and colonization by Staphylococcus aureus in a high risk nursery of a Brazilian teaching hospital

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    Silva Helisângela de Almeida

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonates are susceptible to nosocomial infections due to immunological immaturity, prolonged hospital stay and the use of invasive procedures. We evaluated the incidence of infections and the prevalence of colonization by MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and MSSA (Methilin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, as well as colonization risk factors. Staphylococcal infections were observed by analyzing medical records in the HICS (Hospital Infection Control Service and the HRN (High Risk Nursery. Additionally, four inquiries concerning colonization prevalence were made for S. aureus, from January/2000 to December/2002. Clinical specimens from the nostrils, mouth and anus were cultivated in mannitol-salt agar plates and identification was made through standard methods. The frequency of neonates colonized by S. aureus was 49%. MSSA was more prevalent (57% than MRSA (43%. Risk factors related to the acquisition of MRSA were: low weight and antibiotic use. , Hospital stay was the only variable significantly associated with colonization by S. aureus. The incidence of infections by S. aureus during the last three years was 2.18% (159 cases. Nine of them (5.5% were associated with MRSA and 150 (94.5% with MSSA. Staphylococcal infections were considered as invasive (sepsis and non-invasive (conjunctivitis, cutaneous, corresponding to 31% and 69%, respectively. The MRSA phenotype in infection was rare compared with methicillin-susceptible samples, although S. aureus, MRSA and MSSA colonization rates were high.

  18. [Prevalence of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae in Primary Care and factors associated with colonization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boada, Albert; Almeda, Jesús; Grenzner, Elisabet; Pons-Vigués, Mariona; Morros, Rosa; Juvé, Rosa; Simonet, Pere J; den Heijer, Casper D J; Bolíbar, Bonaventura

    2015-01-01

    To determine (i) the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S.pneumoniae) nasal carriage in Primary Health Care patients in area of Barcelona, and (ii) the factors associated with S.aureus and S.pneumoniae colonization. Multi-center cross-sectional study conducted in 2010-2011 with the participation of 27 Primary Health Care professionals. Nasopharyngeal swabs were obtained from 3,969 patients over 4 years of age who did not present with any sign of infection. S.aureus and/or S.pneumoniae carrier state. socio-demographic characteristics, health status, vaccination status, occupation, and living with children. A descriptive analysis was performed. The prevalence of carriers of S.aureus and/or S.pneumoniae was calculated and logistic regression models were adjusted by age. In children from 4 to 14 years old, the prevalence of S.aureus carriers was 35.7%, of S.pneumoniae 27.1%, and 5.8% were co-colonized. In adults older than 14 years old, the prevalence was 17.8%, 3.5%, and 0.5%, respectively. In children, S.aureus carrier state was inversely associated with S.pneumoniae carrier state; S.pneumoniae was associated with younger age, and inversely associated with S.aureus carrier state. In adults, being a carrier of S.aureus was associated with male gender, younger age, and a health-related occupation, whereas S.pneumoniae carrier state was associated with living with children under 6 years of age. The proportion of co-colonized carriers was low (1.0%). The proportion of S.aureus and S.pneumoniae carriers was higher in children than in adults. Age was the only factor associated with healthy carrier status for S.aureus and for S.pneumoniae. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  19. Nasopharyngeal co-colonization with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae in children is bacterial genotype independent.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melles, D.C.; Bogaert, D.; Gorkink, R.F.; Peeters, J.K.; Moorhouse, M.J.; Ott, A.; Leeuwen, W.B. van; Simons, G.; Verbrugh, H.A.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Belkum, A. van

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial interference between Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae in the nasopharynx has been observed during colonization, which might have important clinical implications for the widespread use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in young children. This study aimed to determine

  20. Impact of Colonization Pressure and Strain Type on Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Transmission in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Popoola, Victor O.; Carroll, Karen C.; Ross, Tracy; Reich, Nicholas G.; Perl, Trish M.; Milstone, Aaron M.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the transmissibility of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) and healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (HA-MRSA) strains and the association of MRSA colonization pressure and MRSA transmission in critically ill children. Importantly, we found that in hospitalized children MRSA colonization pressure above 10% increases the risk of MRSA transmission 3-fold, and CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA strains have similar transmission dynamics.

  1. Neonatal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus is not associated with development of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, L; Halkjaer, L B; Agner, T

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus in atopic skin has been associated with exacerbation of eczema. Objectives To investigate a possible association between neonatal colonization with S. aureus and the risk of atopic dermatitis (AD) during the first 3 years of life. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study...

  2. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization in the United States, 2001-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehnert, Matthew J; Kruszon-Moran, Deanna; Hill, Holly A; McQuillan, Geraldine; McAllister, Sigrid K; Fosheim, Gregory; McDougal, Linda K; Chaitram, Jasmine; Jensen, Bette; Fridkin, Scott K; Killgore, George; Tenover, Fred C

    2006-01-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of disease, particularly in colonized persons. Although methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infection has become increasingly reported, population-based S. aureus and MRSA colonization estimates are lacking. Nasal samples for S. aureus culture and sociodemographic data were obtained from 9622 persons > or = 1 year old as part of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2001-2002. After screening for oxacillin susceptibility, MRSA and selected methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis clonal type, toxin genes (e.g., for Panton-Valentine leukocidin [PVL]), and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type I-IV genes. For 2001-2002, national S. aureus and MRSA colonization prevalence estimates were 32.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 30.7%-34.1%) and 0.8% (95% CI, 0.4%-1.4%), respectively, and population estimates were 89.4 million persons (95% CI, 84.8-94.1 million persons) and 2.3 million persons (95% CI, 1.2-3.8 million persons), respectively. S. aureus colonization prevalence was highest in participants 6-11 years old. MRSA colonization was associated with age > or = 60 years and being female but not with recent health-care exposure. In unweighted analyses, the SCCmec type IV gene was more frequent in isolates from participants of younger age and of non-Hispanic black race/ethnicity; the PVL gene was present in 9 (2.4%) of 372 of isolates tested. Many persons in the United States are colonized with S. aureus; prevalence rates differ demographically. MRSA colonization prevalence, although low nationally in 2001-2002, may vary with demographic and organism characteristics.

  3. Prevalence of Methicillin and Vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in nasopharynx; Amir-Alam hospital, 2005

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    Hasibi M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of nosocomial infections with high morbidity and mortality rate. Traditionally, methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus has been considered a major nosocomial pathogen in healthcare facilities, but in the past decade, it has been observed emerging in the community as well. Informations regarding hospital microbial colonization could be an important step for prevention of nosocomial infections. Our objective was clarifying the prevalence of methicillin resistant and vancomycin resistant staphylococcus aureus colonization in nasopharynx. Methods: A descriptive cross sectional study was carried on 106 patients and nursing staff of surgery and hemodialysis wards in Amir-Alam hospital from April 2005 to July 2005. The samples were collected from nasal region of cases using cotton swab by two experienced technician and were sent to laboratory for culture and antibiogram. Results: Twenty six (29.5% out of 106 cases were nasopharyngeal carriers of staphylococcus aureus. Eight cases (7.5% had methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus. The most frequent colonization rate was seen in hemodialysis nursing staff and in all of them methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus was reported. Carrier rates in hemodialysis patients were twice compared to surgery ward patients. The interesting point was that no sample of vancomycin resistant staphylococcus aureus was isolated. Conclusion: Prevalence of methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus colonization seems to be increased; therefore proper management for controlling this problem is mandatory. The results of the present study suggest that the prevalence of methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus infections is higher than was expected in Iran and vigorous preventive strategies should therefore be taken to stop the growth of this major health problem.

  4. Prevalence of Methicillin and Vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in nasopharynx; Amir-Alam hospital, 2005

    OpenAIRE

    Hasibi M.; Iravani BM

    2007-01-01

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of nosocomial infections with high morbidity and mortality rate. Traditionally, methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus has been considered a major nosocomial pathogen in healthcare facilities, but in the past decade, it has been observed emerging in the community as well. Informations regarding hospital microbial colonization could be an important step for prevention of nosocomial infections. Our objective was clarifying ...

  5. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization among secondary school students at Duhok City-Iraq

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    Ary Habeeb

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA widely distributed in hospitals around the world. There is strong relationship between disease development and S. aureus nasal carriage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and epidemiology of nasal colonization with S. aureus and MRSA in the community of Duhok city, Iraq. Methods: 489 students aged 16 to18 years were included. Nasal swab samples were collected followed by antimicrobial susceptibility test. MRSA isolates were selected and investigated for the mecA gene. Also the prevalence of PantonValentine Leukocidin (PVL gene was also studied. Results: A total of 90 (18.4% out of 489 (18.4% of the students were found to be colonized by S. aureus . Only 10 (2.04% of the students were found to be MRSA carrier. All MRSA isolates were sensitive to Vancomycin. PLV gene was detected in one MRSA strain. Conclusion: This is the first study investigating S. aureus colonization in students in the Duhok city. Nasal carriage of S. aureus and MRSA is comparable with reports from elsewhere. Fortunately, all trains included in our study were sensitive to vancomycin. Further research is needed to examine the SCCmec elements and the evolution of MRSA over the time. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2014;4(2: 59-63

  6. Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Colonization Differs among Pig Lineages and Is Associated with the Presence of Other Staphylococcal Species

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    Koen M. Verstappen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a common colonizer in pigs, with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA in particular being a potential health risk to humans. To reduce the exposure to humans, the colonization in pigs should be reduced. The aim of this study was to quantitatively compare the susceptibility of pig lineages for S. aureus colonization, and if the absence of S. aureus could be associated with the presence or absence of other staphylococcal species. Nasal samples (n = 129 were obtained from seven different pig lineages in the Netherlands, France, and Germany. S. aureus and other staphylococci were enumerated from these samples by real-time (RT-PCR and culture. Associations were explored between the presence of S. aureus and other staphylococci. S. aureus was detected by RT-PCR on all farms and in samples from pigs of all lineages. Twenty-five percent of the pigs from lineage F (from two farms were colonized with S. aureus, while in all other lineages it was more than 50% (p < 0.01. Moreover, in S. aureus-positive samples from pigs of lineage F smaller amounts of S. aureus were found than in other lineages. Staphylococcus sciuri, Staphylococcus cohnii, and Staphylococcus saprophyticus were usually not found in combination with S. aureus in these samples. In conclusion: (i pigs from different genetic lineages have different susceptibilities for colonization with S. aureus. These pigs might contain a genetic factor influencing nasal colonization. (ii Colonization of S. aureus is also associated with the absence of S. sciuri, S. cohnii, or S. saprophyticus. (iii The farm environment seems to influence the presence of S. aureus in pigs.

  7. The inverse correlation between Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization in infants is not explained by differences in serum antibody levels in the Generation R Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebon, A.; Verkaik, N.J.; Vogel, C.P. de; Hooijkaas, H.; Verbrugh, H.A.; Wamel, W.J. van; Jaddoe, V.W.; Hofman, A.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Mitchell, T.J.; Moll, H.A.; Belkum, A. van

    2011-01-01

    Colonization rates of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus are inversely correlated in infants. Several studies have searched for determinants of this negative association. We studied the association between antipneumococcal antibodies with Staphylococcus aureus colonization and the

  8. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus Colonization and Risk Factors for Infection Among Military Personnel in a Shipboard Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Jennifer A; Maguire, Jason D; Fraser, Jamie; Tribble, David R; Deiss, Robert G; Bryan, Coleman; Tisdale, Michele D; Crawford, Katrina; Ellis, Michael; Lalani, Tahaniyat

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcal skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), especially those due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are an important public health issue for the military. Limited data exist regarding the prevalence of S. aureus colonization in the shipboard setting. We conducted a cross-sectional, observational study to determine the point prevalence of S. aureus colonization among military personnel onboard a naval vessel. Asymptomatic active duty personnel completed a survey for risk factors associated with colonization and SSTIs. Culture specimens were obtained from the anterior nares, pharynx, groin, and perirectal regions. MRSA isolates underwent testing for antimicrobial resistance, virulence factors, and pulsed-field type. 400 individuals were enrolled, 198 (49.5%) of whom were colonized with S. aureus, with MRSA identified in 14 participants (3.5%). No significant risk factors were associated with MRSA colonization. USA800 was the most common colonizing MRSA strain in the cohort and was detected in 10 participants (71%). Two participants (14%) were colonized with USA300 MRSA. In this first report of S. aureus epidemiology in a shipboard setting, we observed high rates of S. aureus and MRSA colonization. Longitudinal studies are needed to document the incident rates of S. aureus colonization during shipboard deployment and its impact on SSTI risk. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  9. Skin Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus Precedes the Clinical Diagnosis of Atopic Dermatitis in Infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylan, Patrick; Lang, Caroline; Mermoud, Sophie; Johannsen, Alexandre; Norrenberg, Sarah; Hohl, Daniel; Vial, Yvan; Prod'hom, Guy; Greub, Gilbert; Kypriotou, Magdalini; Christen-Zaech, Stéphanie

    2017-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) has a well-established association with skin colonization or infection by Staphylococcus aureus, which can exacerbate the disease. However, a causal relationship between specific changes in skin colonization during the first years of life and AD development still remains unclear. In this prospective birth cohort study, we aimed to characterize the association between skin colonization and AD development in 149 white infants with or without a family history of atopy. We assessed infants clinically and collected axillary and antecubital fossa skin swabs for culture-based analysis at birth and at seven time points over the first 2 years of life. We found that at age 3 months, S. aureus was more prevalent on the skin of infants who developed AD later on. S. aureus prevalence was increased on infants' skin at the time of AD onset and also 2 months before it, when compared with age-matched, unaffected infants. Furthermore, at AD onset, infants testing positive for S. aureus were younger than uncolonized subjects. In conclusion, our results suggest that specific changes in early-life skin colonization may actively contribute to clinical AD onset in infancy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus among the nursing staff of a teaching hospital in Pernambuco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Eduardo Caetano Brandão Ferreira; Samico, Thammy Moura; Cardoso, Rodrigo Rosa; Rabelo, Marcelle Aquino; Bezerra Neto, Armando Monteiro; de Melo, Fábio Lopes; de Souza Lopes, Ana Catarina; da Silva Aca, Ivanize; Maciel, Maria Amélia Vieira

    2012-02-01

    This study was performed with the objective to identify the prevalence of colonization by Staphylococcus aureus in nursing professionals from a teaching hospital in Pernambuco, and evaluate the resistance profile of these isolates. To do this, we performed a cross-sectional study where biological samples were collected from the hands and nasal cavities of the subjects. S. aureus was identified using agar (blood agar and mannitol salt) via catalase and coagulase tests. The sensitivity profile was determined by Kirby Bauer technique and determination of methicillin resistance was performed with oxacillin screening with sodium chloride (NaCl) addition. Of the 151 professionals evaluated, 39 were colonized which showed a prevalence of 25.8%. Among the variables studied, age and use of PPE were associated with colonization by the organism. Of all the isolates, only five were resistant to methicillin.

  11. Colonization and virulence factors of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a pediatric population in Montería, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo-Caldera, Dina Marcela

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is able to colonize the human body, most frequently the nostrils, but also the hands, perineum and throat. Such colonization has been proposed as a risk factor to acquire future infections. Objective: To determine the prevalence, and the microbiological and molecular characteristics of MRSA in healthy children. Methodology: A cross-sectional descriptive study was done of 150 children from 13 day care centers in Montería, Colombia. Nasal and throat swabs were obtained. The isolates were identified and characterized by microbiological and molecular methods. Results: The MRSA colonization rate was 9.3% (14/150. 62.5% of the isolates carried the subtype IVc of SCCmec, and 87.5% had the genes encoding for PVL and Sek, while 81.2% carried the gene bsaB. Conclusion: The percentage of colonization found is one of the highest reported among children from the Colombian Caribbean region, and the isolates have virulence factors that have been associated with an aggressive clinical course.

  12. Evaluation of non-invasive biological samples to monitor Staphylococcus aureus colonization in great apes and lemurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frieder Schaumburg

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Reintroduction of endangered animals as part of conservational programs bears the risk of importing human pathogens from the sanctuary to the natural habitat. One bacterial pathogen that serves as a model organism to analyze this transmission is Staphylococcus aureus as it can colonize and infect both humans and animals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of various biological samples to monitor S. aureus colonization in great apes and lemurs. METHODS: Mucosal swabs from wild lemurs (n=25, Kirindy, Madagascar, feces, oral and genital swabs from captive chimpanzees (n=58, Ngamba and Entebbe, Uganda and fruit wadges and feces from wild chimpanzees (n=21, Taï National Parc, Côte d'Ivoire were screened for S. aureus. Antimicrobial resistance and selected virulence factors were tested for each isolate. Sequence based genotyping (spa typing, multilocus sequence typing was applied to assess the population structure of S. aureus. RESULTS: Oro-pharyngeal carriage of S. aureus was high in lemurs (72%, n=18 and captive chimpanzees (69.2%, n=27 and 100%, n=6, respectively. Wild chimpanzees shed S. aureus through feces (43.8, n=7 and fruit wadges (54.5, n=12. Analysis of multiple sampling revealed that two samples are sufficient to detect those animals which shed S. aureus through feces or fruit wadges. Genotyping showed that captive animals are more frequently colonized with human-associated S. aureus lineages. CONCLUSION: Oro-pharyngeal swabs are useful to screen for S. aureus colonization in apes and lemurs before reintroduction. Duplicates of stool and fruit wadges reliably detect S. aureus shedding in wild chimpanzees. We propose to apply these sampling strategies in future reintroduction programs to screen for S. aureus colonization. They may also be useful to monitor S. aureus in wild populations.

  13. Streptococcus pneumoniae Modulates Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Dispersion and the Transition from Colonization to Invasive Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddinger, Ryan M; Luke-Marshall, Nicole R; Sauberan, Shauna L; Hakansson, Anders P; Campagnari, Anthony A

    2018-01-09

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus are ubiquitous upper respiratory opportunistic pathogens. Individually, these Gram-positive microbes are two of the most common causative agents of secondary bacterial pneumonia following influenza A virus infection, and they constitute a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Since the introduction of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, rates of cocolonization with both of these bacterial species have increased, despite the traditional view that they are antagonistic and mutually exclusive. The interactions between S. pneumoniae and S. aureus in the context of colonization and the transition to invasive disease have not been characterized. In this report, we show that S. pneumoniae and S. aureus form stable dual-species biofilms on epithelial cells in vitro When these biofilms are exposed to physiological changes associated with viral infection, S. pneumoniae disperses from the biofilm, whereas S. aureus dispersal is inhibited. These findings were supported by results of an in vivo study in which we used a novel mouse cocolonization model. In these experiments, mice cocolonized in the nares with both bacterial species were subsequently infected with influenza A virus. The coinfected mice almost exclusively developed pneumococcal pneumonia. These results indicate that despite our previous report that S. aureus disseminates into the lungs of mice stably colonized with these bacteria following influenza A virus infection, cocolonization with S. pneumoniae in vitro and in vivo inhibits S. aureus dispersal and transition to disease. This study provides novel insight into both the interactions between S. pneumoniae and S. aureus during carriage and the transition from colonization to secondary bacterial pneumonia.IMPORTANCE In this study, we demonstrate that Streptococcus pneumoniae can modulate the pathogenic potential of Staphylococcus aureus in a model of secondary bacterial pneumonia. We report

  14. A prevalence study of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in emergency department health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisaga, April; Paquette, Katherine; Sabatini, Linda; Lovell, Elise O

    2008-11-01

    Few studies of the prevalence of nasal colonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in emergency department (ED) health care workers have been conducted. To better understand the epidemiology of this pathogen, we seek to determine the MRSA nasal colonization rates in the ED health care workers in our hospital. We conducted a prospective cohort study on a convenience sample of ED health care workers, including nurses, physicians, and technicians. Nasal swabs from subjects were analyzed with a polymerase chain reaction assay for the presence of MRSA. Of the 105 ED health care workers enrolled, a total of 16 (15%, 95% confidence interval 9.6% to 23%) were MRSA positive. No significant difference was observed in colonization rates between nurses, physicians, and technicians. Our ED health care workers demonstrated a high prevalence of nasal MRSA colonization compared with individuals in recent community surveillance and other studies involving ED staff.

  15. Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus of Nano-Structured Fluorinated Surfaces, Formed by Different Methods of Ion-Plasma Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elinson, V M; Didenko, L V; Shevlyagina, N V; Avtandilov, G A; Gaidarova, A Kh; Lyamin, A N

    2016-11-01

    Colonization of fluorinated surfaces produced by ion-plasma technology by Staphylococcus aureus was studied by scanning electron microscopy and surface energy analysis. It was shown that the intensity of colonization was determined by the surface relief and fluorine content. Formation of nanostructured surfaces accompanied by a sharp decrease in the surface energy prevented adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus cells to the fluorine-containing surface.

  16. Frequency and Possible Infection Control Implications of Gastrointestinal Colonization with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Boyce, John M.; Havill, Nancy L.; Maria, Benedicte

    2005-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of health care-associated infections. Multiple factors, including transmission from unrecognized reservoirs of MRSA, are responsible for failure to control the spread of MRSA. We conducted prospective surveillance to determine the frequency of gastrointestinal colonization with MRSA among patients and its possible impact on nosocomial transmission of MRSA. Stool specimens submitted for Clostridium difficile toxin A/B assays w...

  17. Colonization of epidermal tissue by Staphylococcus aureus produces localized hypoxia and stimulates secretion of antioxidant and caspase-14 proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    A partial-thickness epidermal explant model was colonized with GFP-expressing S. aureus and the pattern of S. aureus biofilm growth was characterized using electron and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Oxygen concentration in explants and H2O2 in media was quantified using microelectrodes. The re...

  18. Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus mutans colonization in patients wearing dental prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Monroy, Tania; Moreno-Maldonado, Víctor; Franco-Martínez, Fernando; Aldape-Barrios, Beatriz; Quindós, Guillermo; Sánchez-Vargas, Luis Octavio

    2005-04-01

    Denture stomatitis is associated to Candida albicans, different bacteria and other co-factors such as an acid pH, a carbohydrate ingestion increase, different systemic illnesses and pharmacological treatments. The aim of this study was to determine Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus mutans prevalence in the mucous membrane and prosthesis of patients with and without atrophic denture stomatitis and its relationship with other potential clinical co-factors. Saliva was collected from 105 patients (62 female and 43 male) wearing dental prosthesis in order to measure their pH. Oral samples of the mucous membrane and the internal surface of dental prosthesis were taken with sterile cotton to proceed with the microbiological study. The identification of the isolated microorganisms was performed using conventional microbiological methods. Diabetes and Hypertension were the most frequent systemic illnesses. High carbohydrate ingestion was observed in numerous patients. Atrophic denture stomatitis was reported in 50 patients and the pH average in saliva was of 5.2. The presence of C albicans, S. aureus and S. mutans in the mucous membrane and prosthesis was of 51.4%, 52.4% and 67.6%, respectively. C. albicans was isolated in 66.7% from the prosthesis, whereas S. aureus and S. mutans were isolated in 49.5% of those same prosthesis. C. albicans was isolated in 86% of the patients with atrophic denture stomatitis and S. aureus was isolated in a similar percentage (84% of patients). The isolation of S. mutans was less frequent, and it was observed in 16% of the oral samples of these patients. C. albicans, S. aureus and S. mutans frequently colonize the oral mucous of patients wearing dental prosthesis. This illness-bearing condition is more frequent in patients with denture stomatitis, even though dental prosthesis colonization is lower than in the oral mucous.

  19. The inverse correlation between Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization in infants is not explained by differences in serum antibody levels in the generation R study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Lebon (Ankie); N.J. Verkaik (Nelianne); C.P. de Vogel (Corné); H. Hooijkaas (Herbert); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); A. Hofman (Albert); P.W.M. Hermans (Peter); T.J. Mitchell (Tim); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte); A.F. van Belkum (Alex)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractColonization rates of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus are inversely correlated in infants. Several studies have searched for determinants of this negative association. We studied the association between antipneumococcal antibodies with Staphylococcus aureus

  20. Colonization of epidermal tissue by Staphylococcus aureus produces localized hypoxia and stimulates secretion of antioxidant and caspase-14 proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lone , Abdul G.; Atci, Erhan; Renslow, Ryan S.; Beyenal, Haluk; Noh, S.; Fransson, B.; Abu-Lail, Nehal; Park, Jeong-Jin; Gang, David R.; Call, Douglas R.

    2015-08-31

    A partial-thickness epidermal explant model was colonized with GFP-expressing S. aureus and the pattern of S. aureus biofilm growth was characterized using electron and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Oxygen concentration in explants was quantified using microelectrodes. The relative effective diffusivity and porosity of the epidermis were determined using magnetic resonance imaging, while hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration in explant media was measured by using microelectrodes. Secreted proteins were identified and quantified using MSE mass spectrometry. We found that S. aureus biofilm grows predominantly in sebum-rich areas around hair follicles and associated skin folds. Dissolved oxygen was selectively depleted (2-3 fold) in these locations, but the relative effective diffusivity and porosity did not change between colonized and control epidermis. Histological analysis revealed keratinocyte damage across all the layers of colonized epidermis after four days of culture. The colonized explants released significantly (P< 0.01) more anti-oxidant proteins of both epidermal and S. aureus origin, consistent with elevated H2O2 concentration found in the media from the colonized explants (P< 0.001). Caspase-14 was also elevated significantly in media from infected explants. While H2O2 induces primary keratinocyte differentiation, caspase-14 is required for terminal keratinocyte differentiation and desquamation. These results are consistent with a localized biological impact from S. aureus in response to colonization of the skin surface.

  1. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Colonization among Health Care Workers in a Downtown Emergency Department in Toronto, Ontario

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory Saito; Jessica Thom; Yanliang Wei; Piraveina Gnanasuntharam; Pirasanya Gnanasuntharam; Nathan Kreiswirth; Barbara Willey; Michelle Loftus; Catherine Varner; Vanessa Porter; Allison McGeer; Bjug Borgundvaag

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) acquired in the community, otherwise known as community-acquired MRSA, has emerged rapidly in recent years. Colonization with MRSA has been associated with an increased risk of symptomatic and serious infections and, in some settings, health care workers (HCWs) exhibit a higher prevalence of MRSA colonization.OBJECTIVE: To determine MRSA colonization in emergency department (ED) HCWs in the setting of a moderate prevalence of MRSA...

  2. Dynamic pattern and genotypic diversity of Staphylococcus aureus nasopharyngeal carriage in healthy pre-school children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blumental, S; Deplano, A; Jourdain, S; De Mendonça, R; Hallin, M; Nonhoff, C; Rottiers, S; Vergison, A; Denis, O

    2013-01-01

    .... The objectives of this study were to assess the S. aureus temporal carriage pattern among a healthy community of pre-school children, with concomitant description of genotype diversity, toxin-encoding genes and antibiotic resistance...

  3. Risk and outcomes of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia among patients admitted with and without MRSA nares colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzec, Natalie S; Bessesen, Mary T

    2016-04-01

    The risk of nosocomial methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in patients with nasal colonization on admission is 3-fold higher than in patients who are not colonized. Limited data on this question have been reported for methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA). This is an observational cohort study of patients admitted to a tertiary care medical center from October 1, 2007-September 30, 2013, who underwent active screening for nasal colonization with MRSA. There were 29,371 patients who underwent screening for nasal MRSA colonization; 3,262 (11%) were colonized with MRSA. There were 32 cases of MRSA bacteremia among colonized patients, for an incidence of 1%. Thirteen cases of bacteremia occurred in non-MRSA-colonized patients, for an incidence of 0.05%. The odds of developing MRSA bacteremia for patients who were nasally colonized with MRSA compared with those who were not colonized were 19.89. There was no difference between colonized and noncolonized subjects with bacteremia in all-cause mortality at 30 days or 1 year. In a setting with active screening for MRSA, the risk of MRSA bacteremia is 19.89-fold higher among colonized than noncolonized patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection risks from companion animals: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petinaki E

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Efthimia Petinaki,1 Iris Spiliopoulou21Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, University of Thessalia, Larissa, 2Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Patras, GreeceAbstract: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA remains one of the most virulent human pathogens and has also recently been recognized as such in the veterinary settings. Companion animals, including dogs, cats, horses, small exotic animals, wildlife animals, and livestock, may constitute a reservoir for MRSA transmission to humans and vice versa. The evolution, emergence, and risk factors for MRSA transmission among colonized or infected animals are reviewed in the present paper, and infection control practices are discussed.Keywords: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, companion animals, close contacts

  5. Longitudinal investigation of nasopharyngeal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in early infancy: The PATCH birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, M-H; Chiu, C-Y; Shih, H-J; Liao, S-L; Hua, M-C; Huang, S-H; Yao, T-C; Lai, S-H; Huang, T-S; Yeh, K-W; Chen, L-C; Su, K-W; Lim, W-H; Chang, Y-J; Chiang, C-H; Huang, S-Y; Huang, J-L

    2017-02-01

    The study aimed to determine the long-term Staphylococcus aureus colonization patterns and strain relatedness, and the association between maternal and infant colonization in infancy. A birth cohort study was conducted from January 2012 to November 2014. Nasopharyngeal swabs for S. aureus detection were collected from infants at the age of 1, 2, 4, 6 and 12 months and from mothers when their children were 1-month-old. In total, 254 samples were collected at each planned visit during the first 12-month study. The prevalence of S. aureus colonization decreased in the first year of life, ranging from 61.0% (155/254) at the age of 1 month to 12.2% (31/254) at 12 months. Persistent colonization, defined as a positive culture on four or five occasions, was detected in only 13.8% (35/254) of carriers. Most of the persistent carriers were colonized with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) only, and among persistent MRSA carriers, 61.1% (11/18) had indistinguishable genotypes. Of the mothers with MRSA colonization, 77.1% (27/35) had infants who were concomitantly colonized at the age of 1 month; 70.4% (19/27) of the infant-mother paired isolates belonged to indistinguishable or related subtypes, which suggests that surrounding carriers, probably their mothers, may be the possible source for MRSA acquisition in early infancy. Staphylococcus aureus colonization including MRSA was commonly observed in our cohort. Strains of persistent MRSA among infant-mother pairs were usually of indistinguishable genotypes. Therefore, horizontal spread within households is possibly an important factor related to infant MRSA colonization. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius colonization patterns and strain diversity in healthy dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, Narayan Chandra; Bärgman, Sofia Cathrine; Moodley, Arshnee

    2012-01-01

    This is the first large-scale study of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius colonization and diversity in healthy dogs where samples were collected over a long time and strains were identified by PCR according to the current taxonomy of the S. intermedius group and typed by a highly discriminatory...... method such as pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). A cross-sectional study of nasal, oral, perineal and inguinal carriage in 119 healthy dogs was followed by a longitudinal study where oral and perineal carriage was examined in 16 dogs for 10 times over a period of 1 year. Altogether we collected...... 762 samples and 285 S. pseudintermedius isolates, 182 of which were typed by PFGE to determine spatial and temporal strain diversity within individual carriers. In the cross-sectional study, S. pseudintermedius was isolated from at least one body site in 82 (69%) of the 119 dogs. The most frequent...

  7. Incidence of Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization and soft tissue infection among high school football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lear, Aaron; McCord, Gary; Peiffer, Jeffrey; Watkins, Richard R; Parikh, Arpan; Warrington, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) skin and soft tissue infections have been documented with increasing frequency in both team and individual sports in recent years. It also seems that the level of MRSA skin and soft tissue infections in the general population has increased. One hundred ninety athletes from 6 local high school football teams were recruited for this prospective observational study to document nasal colonization and the potential role this plays in skin and soft tissue infections in football players and, in particular, MRSA infections. Athletes had nasal swabs done before their season started, and they filled out questionnaires regarding potential risk factors for skin and soft tissue infections. Those enrolled in the study were then observed over the course of the season for skin and soft tissue infections. Those infected had data about their infections collected. One hundred ninety of 386 available student athletes enrolled in the study. Forty-four of the subjects had nasal colonization with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, and none were colonized with MRSA. There were 10 skin and soft tissue infections (8 bacterial and 2 fungal) documented over the course of the season. All were treated as outpatients with oral or topical antibiotics, and none were considered serious. Survey data from the preseason questionnaire showed 21% with skin infection, 11% with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, and none with MRSA infection during the past year. Three reported a remote history of MRSA infection. We documented an overall skin infection rate of 5.3% among high school football players over a single season. Our results suggest that skin and soft tissue infection may not be widespread among high school athletes in northeast Ohio.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization of the Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract Is Modulated by Wall Teichoic Acid, Capsule, and Surface Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Misawa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the nose, throat, skin, and gastrointestinal (GI tract of humans. GI carriage of S. aureus is difficult to eradicate and has been shown to facilitate the transmission of the bacterium among individuals. Although staphylococcal colonization of the GI tract is asymptomatic, it increases the likelihood of infection, particularly skin and soft tissue infections caused by USA300 isolates. We established a mouse model of persistent S. aureus GI colonization and characterized the impact of selected surface antigens on colonization. In competition experiments, an acapsular mutant colonized better than the parental strain Newman, whereas mutants defective in sortase A and clumping factor A showed impaired ability to colonize the GI tract. Mutants lacking protein A, clumping factor B, poly-N-acetyl glucosamine, or SdrCDE showed no defect in colonization. An S. aureus wall teichoic acid (WTA mutant (ΔtagO failed to colonize the mouse nose or GI tract, and the tagO and clfA mutants showed reduced adherence in vitro to intestinal epithelial cells. The tagO mutant was recovered in lower numbers than the wild type strain in the murine stomach and duodenum 1 h after inoculation. This reduced fitness correlated with the in vitro susceptibility of the tagO mutant to bile salts, proteases, and a gut-associated defensin. Newman ΔtagO showed enhanced susceptibility to autolysis, and an autolysin (atl tagO double mutant abrogated this phenotype. However, the atl tagO mutant did not survive better in the mouse GI tract than the tagO mutant. Our results indicate that the failure of the tagO mutant to colonize the GI tract correlates with its poor adherence and susceptibility to bactericidal factors within the mouse gut, but not to enhanced activity of its major autolysin.

  9. spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from healthy humans, pigs and dogs in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakweba, Abdul Sekemani; Muhairwa, Amandus Pachificus; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Guardabassi, Luca; Mtambo, Madundo M A; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-02-28

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in humans and animals. Here we report for the first time the prevalence of nasal carriage, spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus in a Tanzanian livestock community. Nasal swabs were taken from 100 humans, 100 pigs and 100 dogs in Morogoro Municipal. Each swab was enriched in Mueller Hinton broth with 6.5% NaCl and subcultured on chromogenic agar for S. aureus detection. Presumptive S. aureus colonies were confirmed to the species level by nuc PCR and analysed by spa typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined by disc diffusion method. S. aureus was isolated from 22% of humans, 4% of pigs and 11% of dogs. A total of 21 spa types were identified: 13, 7 and 1 in human, dogs, and pigs, respectively. Three spa types (t314, t223 and t084) were shared between humans and dogs. A novel spa type (t10779) was identified in an isolate recovered from a colonized human. Antimicrobials tested revealed resistance to ampicillin in all isolates, moderate resistances to other antimicrobials with tetracycline resistance being the most frequent. S. aureus carrier frequencies in dogs and humans were within the expected range and low in pigs. The S. aureus spa types circulating in the community were generally not shared by different hosts and majority of types belonged to known clones. Besides ampicillin resistance, moderate levels of antimicrobial resistance were observed irrespective of the host species from which the strains were isolated.

  10. Close association between oropharyngeal and rhinopharyngeal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus - clues to new insight of MRSA colonization of the oropharynx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, I S; Larsen, P L; Brandelev, B L

    2013-01-01

    This study provides data on prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in oropharynx, rhinopharynx and vestibulum nasi. Specimens were taken from these three pharyngeal sites in 346 patients and analysed for S. aureus. Abnormal pharyngeal findings and patient histories were recorded. S. aureus was found...... meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus decolonization regimes....

  11. Frequency and possible infection control implications of gastrointestinal colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, John M; Havill, Nancy L; Maria, Benedicte

    2005-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of health care-associated infections. Multiple factors, including transmission from unrecognized reservoirs of MRSA, are responsible for failure to control the spread of MRSA. We conducted prospective surveillance to determine the frequency of gastrointestinal colonization with MRSA among patients and its possible impact on nosocomial transmission of MRSA. Stool specimens submitted for Clostridium difficile toxin A/B assays were routinely inoculated on colistin-naladixic acid agar plates, and S. aureus was identified by using standard methods. Methicillin resistance was confirmed by growth on oxacillin-salt screening agar. For patients whose stool yielded MRSA, information regarding any previous cultures positive for MRSA or other organisms that would require contact precautions was obtained from the laboratory's computer system. During a 1-year period, 151 (9.8%) of 1,543 patients who had one or more stool specimens screened had MRSA in their stool. Ninety-three (62%) of the 151 patients had no previous history of MRSA colonization or infection. Of these 93, 75 were inpatients. Sixty (80%) of the 75 inpatients with no previous history of MRSA were not under "contact precautions." The 60 patients would have spent an estimated total of 267 days without being placed under contact precautions if their positive stool cultures had not resulted in their being isolated. Placing patients under contact precautions based on their positive stool cultures prevented an estimated 35 episodes of MRSA transmission. We conclude that gastrointestinal colonization with MRSA may serve as an unrecognized reservoir from which transmission of MRSA may occur in health care facilities.

  12. [Prevalence and risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization among outpatients undergoing hemodialysis treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köseoğlu, Ozlem; Sayın Kutlu, Selda; Cevahir, Nural

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is frequent among hemodialysis patients and lead to increased morbidity and mortality rates. It is known that nasal colonization plays an important role for the development of MRSA infections. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for MRSA colonization among outpatients undergoing hemodialysis. A total of 466 adult patients (199 female, 267 male; age range: 18-89 years, mean age: 55.8 ± 15.1 years) who were under hemodialysis between September-December 2008 in different health centers at Pamukkale/ Denizli region, Turkey, were included in the study. Swab samples obtained from anterior nares of patients were cultivated on sheep-blood agar and mannitol-salt agar media. The isolates were identified by conventional bacteriological methods. S.aureus strains were isolated from 204 (43.8%) patients and 34 (16.7%) were found methicillin-resistant. Thus the rate of MRSA colonization in hemodialysis patients was detected as 7.3% (34/466). All of the MRSA strains were found susceptible to vancomycin, linezolid and tigecycline, while the resistance rates for the other antimicrobial agents were as follows: 70.6% to azithromycin and claritromycin; 64.7% to erythromycin; %58.8 to clindamycin, gentamicin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole; 55.9% to ciprofloxacin; 44.1% to tetracycline and rifampin; 5.9% to chloramphenicol. Inducible clindamycin resistance in MRSA isolates was %23.5 (8/34), and multidrug resistance rate was 76.5% (26/34). Multivariate analysis revealed that the history of previous hospitalization within a year [odds ratio (OR), 3.426; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.595-7.361, p= 0.002] and the presence of chronic obstructive lung disease (OR, 5.181; 95% CI, 1.612-16.648, p= 0.006) were independent risk factors for MRSA colonization in this population. A better understanding of the prevalence and risk factors for nasal MRSA colonization among hemodialysis

  13. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization among patients and their parents /guardian in an Iranian referral hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourakbari, Babak; Khodabandeh, Mahmoud; Mahmoudi, Shima; Sabouni, Farah; Aziz-Ahari, Alireza; Bahador, Abbas; Keshavarz Valian, Sepideh; Hosseinpour Sadeghi, Reihaneh; Mamishi, Setareh

    2017-06-01

    MRSA indicates the urgent need to improve strategies for management of S. aureus infections. Our findings are useful for understanding of S. aureus nasal colonization dynamics within the patients and general population. Surveillance for S. aureus in community settings can provide data on circulating strains and might help developing control measures for reducing of infection spread in hospitals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence and characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from healthy university student athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Anna E; Goodwin, Thomas A; Brolinson, P Gunnar; Werre, Stephen R; Prater, M Renee; Inzana, Thomas J

    2014-08-02

    The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been increasing in the general population, and there is concern that close or physical contact, such as in professional and collegiate sports, may increase spread of MRSA. We sought to determine the prevalence of MRSA colonization of male and female athletes from 9 different sports at a major, Division I University during a 12-week period, and determine the USA and SCCmec type from select isolates. Swabs for culture of MRSA were obtained from nasal, axillary, and inguinal sites from healthy, asymptomatic student athletes and support staff each week for 12 weeks. Select MRSA isolates were typed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and the genes encoding for MecA, cassette chromosome recombinase (Ccr), and several toxins were determined by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Discrepant results were clarified by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and spa typing. Thirty-five percent (78/223) of test subjects were positive for MRSA during the study period, resulting in isolation of 139 MRSA isolates. However, 47% (37/78) of MRSA-positive participants carried MRSA in axillary or inguinal sites, but not in the anterior nares. There was significant correlation between MRSA carriage and participation in wrestling (76%, 19/25; adjusted odds ratio 29.7, 95% CI 5.8-151.5) and baseball (44%, 17/39; adjusted odds ratio 4.4, 95% CI 1.1- 17.4), compared with a staff prevalence of 18.1% (4/22), but other factors were not examined. Multiplex PCR analysis indicated that of the 32 isolates examined 26 could be typed, and all of these carried the SCCmec type IV cassette. PFGE typing identified USA types 300, 400, 500, 700, and 800. However, one isolate was not a known USA type, but was identified as a novel ST951 by MLST, and as spa type t216. Of the strains typed from the same individual, there was consistency, but also variation and alternation of the SCCmec and spa types isolated from individual

  15. Prospective Study of Infection, Colonization and Carriage of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in an Outbreak Affecting 990 Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Coello; J. Jimenez (Jose); M. Garcia (Melissa); P. Arroyo; D. Minguez; C. Fernandez; F. Cruzet; C. Gaspar

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn the three years between November 1989 and October 1992, an outbreak of methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA) affected 990 patients at a university hospital. The distribution of patients with carriage, colonization or infection was investigated prospectively. Nosocomial

  16. Change in Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Skin-Colonizing Staphylococcus aureus in Korean Patients with Atopic Dermatitis during Ten-Year Period

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jung-Min; Jo, Ju-Hyun; Jin, Hyunju; Ko, Hyun-Chang; Kim, Moon-Bum; Kim, Jung-Min; Kim, Do-Won; Jang, Ho-Sun; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background A small subset of adolescents atopic dermatitis (AD) tends to persist. This also leads to get more antibiotics exposure with advancing years. Antibiotic resistance has been regarded as a serious problem during Staphylococcus aureus treatment, especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Objective It was investigated the S. aureus colonization frequency in the skin lesions and anterior nares of adolescent AD patients and evaluated the changes in S. aureus antimicrobial suscept...

  17. Investigating Colonization of Staphylococcus aureus among Patients Admitted to the Infectious Diseases Ward of Imam Hospital in Mashhad

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    Mahboobeh Naderi-Nasab

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus colonization has been recognized as one of the most important risk factors for subsequent infections with this microorganism. In this study, we intended to identify all patients who were MRSA-positive upon admission and compare the prevalence of MRSAcolonization on different days of study admitted in Imam Reza hospital in Mashhad, Iran.Methods: This cross-sectional study was done on 600 admitted patients in Infectious disease ward. Samples of patients were drawn from patients’ nares (and if they were culture negative, re-cultures were done on days 3, 7 and finally on discharge time. After identification of the isolates, theirsusceptibility to methicillin was evaluated. Before we collect nasal swabs, patients filled out a survey questionnaire.Results: S. aureus colonization early after hospitalization in infectious ward was observed in 39.8% (n=239 of patients, of which 59% (n=141 were resistant to methicillin. On the third day of admission, S. aureus new colonization rate was 15.8% (n=57, of which 87.7% (n=50 were methicillin resistant. On the seventh day, S. aureus were found in 13% (n=32 patients with 90.6% (n=29 were methicillin-resistant. Upon discharge, 8.2% (n=13 patients were S. aureus positive and 92.3% (n=12 were resistant to methicillin.Conclusion: Most of the carriers had the methicillin resistant strains of bacteria at the time of admission, and the number of colonized patients with resistant bacteria increased in time. The most common risk factors in methicillin-resistant S. aureus carriers were taking antibiotic, history of priorhospitalization and being an intravenous (IV drug abuser.

  18. Colonization of butchers with livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boost, M; Ho, J; Guardabassi, L; O'Donoghue, M

    2013-12-01

    Reports have documented colonization of swine in Europe, North America and more recently in China with livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA). Contamination of pig farmers, veterinarians and abattoir workers with these strains has been observed. However, although contamination levels of 10% of retail pork were reported from the Netherlands and Canada, there are limited data of contamination rates of workers handling raw meat. We investigated the rates of MRSA contamination of local butchers working in wet markets, where recently slaughtered pigs are cut up. Nasal swabs collected from 300 pork butchers at markets throughout Hong Kong were enriched in brain heart infusion broth with 5% salt and cultured on MRSASelect(®) . Isolates were confirmed as Staphylococcus aureus and susceptibility testing performed. The presence of mecA was confirmed, SCCmec and spa type determined and relatedness investigated by PFGE. Subjects completed a questionnaire on MRSA carriage risk factors. Seventeen samples (5.6%) yielded MRSA, 15 harbouring SCCmec IVb. Ten strains were t899 (CC9), previously reported from local pig carcasses. Five strains were healthcare associated: SCCmec type II, t701(CC6), colonizing two subjects at the same establishment, and single isolates of t008 (CC8), t002 (CC5) and t123 (CC45). The remaining isolates were t359 (CC97), previously reported from buffaloes, and t375 (CC5), reported from bovine milk. None of these butchers reported recent hospitalization or a healthcare worker in the family. Two had recently received antibiotics, one for a skin infection. Four reported wound infections within the last year. All were exposed to meat for >9 h per day. Carriage of MRSA was higher in butchers than in the general community. Although five strains were probably of healthcare origin, the high incidence of t899 (CC9) suggests that cross-contamination from pork occurs frequently. Washing of hands after touching raw pork is advised

  19. Laboratory Mice Are Frequently Colonized with Staphylococcus aureus and Mount a Systemic Immune Response—Note of Caution for In vivo Infection Experiments

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    Silva Holtfreter

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Whether mice are an appropriate model for S. aureus infection and vaccination studies is a matter of debate, because they are not considered as natural hosts of S. aureus. We previously identified a mouse-adapted S. aureus strain, which caused infections in laboratory mice. This raised the question whether laboratory mice are commonly colonized with S. aureus and whether this might impact on infection experiments. Publicly available health reports from commercial vendors revealed that S. aureus colonization is rather frequent, with rates as high as 21% among specific-pathogen-free mice. In animal facilities, S. aureus was readily transmitted from parents to offspring, which became persistently colonized. Among 99 murine S. aureus isolates from Charles River Laboratories half belonged to the lineage CC88 (54.5%, followed by CC15, CC5, CC188, and CC8. A comparison of human and murine S. aureus isolates revealed features of host adaptation. In detail, murine strains lacked hlb-converting phages and superantigen-encoding mobile genetic elements, and were frequently ampicillin-sensitive. Moreover, murine CC88 isolates coagulated mouse plasma faster than human CC88 isolates. Importantly, S. aureus colonization clearly primed the murine immune system, inducing a systemic IgG response specific for numerous S. aureus proteins, including several vaccine candidates. Phospholipase C emerged as a promising test antigen for monitoring S. aureus colonization in laboratory mice. In conclusion, laboratory mice are natural hosts of S. aureus and therefore, could provide better infection models than previously assumed. Pre-exposure to the bacteria is a possible confounder in S. aureus infection and vaccination studies and should be monitored.

  20. Meticillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus costochondritis in a healthy man.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohammad, Ausaf F

    2009-12-01

    A 54-year-old previously healthy white man presented to hospital with fever, right parasternal pain and swelling over the right second and third costochondral joints. The symptoms had developed 1 week earlier.

  1. Throat Swabs and Sputum Culture as Predictors of P. aeruginosa or S. aureus Lung Colonization in Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patients.

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    Darius Seidler

    Full Text Available Due to frequent infections in cystic fibrosis (CF patients, repeated respiratory cultures are obtained to inform treatment. When patients are unable to expectorate sputum, clinicians obtain throat swabs as a surrogate for lower respiratory cultures. There is no clear data in adult subjects demonstrating the adequacy of throat swabs as a surrogate for sputum or BAL. Our study was designed to determine the utility of throat swabs in identifying lung colonization with common organisms in adults with CF.Adult CF subjects (n = 20 underwent bronchoscopy with BAL. Prior to bronchoscopy, a throat swab was obtained. A sputum sample was obtained from subjects who were able to spontaneously expectorate. All samples were sent for standard microbiology culture.Using BAL as the gold standard, we found the positive predictive value for Pseudomonas aeruginosa to be 100% in both sputum and throat swab compared to BAL. However, the negative predictive value for P. aeruginosa was 60% and 50% in sputum and throat swab, respectively. Conversely, the positive predictive value for Staphylococcus aureus was 57% in sputum and only 41% in throat swab and the negative predictive value of S. aureus was 100% in sputum and throat swab compared to BAL.Our data show that positive sputum and throat culture findings of P. aeruginosa reflect results found on BAL fluid analysis, suggesting these are reasonable surrogates to determine lung colonization with P. aeruginosa. However, sputum and throat culture findings of S. aureus do not appear to reflect S. aureus colonization of the lung.

  2. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization among health care workers in a downtown emergency department in Toronto, Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Gregory; Thom, Jessica; Wei, Yanliang; Gnanasuntharam, Piraveina; Gnanasuntharam, Pirasanya; Kreiswirth, Nathan; Willey, Barbara; Loftus, Michelle; Varner, Catherine; Porter, Vanessa; McGeer, Allison; Borgundvaag, Bjug

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) acquired in the community, otherwise known as community-acquired MRSA, has emerged rapidly in recent years. Colonization with MRSA has been associated with an increased risk of symptomatic and serious infections and, in some settings, health care workers (HCWs) exhibit a higher prevalence of MRSA colonization. To determine MRSA colonization in emergency department (ED) HCWs in the setting of a moderate prevalence of MRSA in skin and soft tissue infections. The present study was conducted at a downtown ED in Toronto, Ontario. ED HCWs completed a brief questionnaire and swabs were taken from one anterior nare, one axilla and any open wounds (if present). Swabs were processed using standard laboratory techniques. None of the 89 staff (registered nurses [n=55], physicians [n=15], other [n=19]) were MRSA positive and 25 (28.1%) were colonized with methicillin-susceptible S aureus. Contrary to common belief among HCWs and previous studies documenting MRSA colonization of HCWs, MRSA colonization of this particular Canadian ED HCW cohort was very low and similar to that of the local population.

  3. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization in a department of pediatrics: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesualdo, Francesco; Onori, Manuela; Bongiorno, Dafne; Campanile, Floriana; Carloni, Emanuela; Mancinelli, Livia; Russo, Cristina; Villani, Alberto; Valentini, Diletta; Raponi, Massimiliano; Tozzi, Alberto E; Stefani, Stefania

    2014-01-10

    We describe methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal carriage at admission in patients admitted to a Department of Pediatrics. All patients received a nasal swab at admission. A questionnaire was administered and molecular genetics analyses were performed on all identified MRSA isolates. We enrolled 785 patients, affected with both acute and chronic diseases. MRSA nasal colonization prevalence was 1.15% (CI: 0.5607%-2.093%). Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) nasal colonization prevalence at admission was 19.75% (CI 17.07%-22.64%). Only one MRSA isolate carried the SCCmec V variant; all other isolates carried the SCCmecIV variant. Five out of 9 MRSA-colonized patients had an underlying condition. Antibiotic therapy in the previous 6 months was a protective factor for both MRSA (OR 0,66; 95% CI: 0,46-0,96) and MSSA (OR 0,65; 95% CI: 0,45-0,97) colonization. A tendency to statistical significance was seen in the association between hospitalization in the 6 months prior to admission and MRSA colonization at admission (OR 4,92; 95% CI: 0,97-24,83). No patient was diagnosed with an S. aureus infection during hospitalization. The majority of our MRSA colonizing isolates have community origins. Nevertheless, most MRSA-colonized patients had been hospitalized previously, suggesting that strains that circulate in the community also circulate in hospital settings. Further studies should elucidate the role of children with frequent contact with health care institutions in the circulation of antibiotic resistant strains between the hospital and the community.

  4. Dynamic pattern and genotypic diversity of Staphylococcus aureus nasopharyngeal carriage in healthy pre-school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumental, S; Deplano, A; Jourdain, S; De Mendonça, R; Hallin, M; Nonhoff, C; Rottiers, S; Vergison, A; Denis, O

    2013-07-01

    It is common wisdom that persistent carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is more frequent in young children than in adults. The objectives of this study were to assess the S. aureus temporal carriage pattern among a healthy community of pre-school children, with concomitant description of genotype diversity, toxin-encoding genes and antibiotic resistance. Among 333 children 3-6 years of age, S. aureus nasopharyngeal carriage was assessed over one school year by culture of three sequential nasopharyngeal aspirates. Identification, methicillin resistance and toxin production profile were determined by PCR. Genotyping was performed by spa sequencing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Out of 830 samples collected, 286 (34%) yielded S. aureus from 185 carriers (55%). Based on consecutive genotype analysis, only 40/268 (15%) children could be classified as persistent carriers, and the remaining 118 (44%) showed intermittent carriage. spa typing revealed 82 types clustered into 13 spa clonal complexes (CCs). Fourteen strains isolated from 11 (3%) children were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), half of these strains belonged to the commonly hospital-associated spa t008-ST8-SCCmec IV. Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) were genotypically more diverse. Toxic shock syndrome toxin and egc1/2 complexes were highly prevalent (24%). Contrastingly, Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) was carried only by three MSSA strains (0.6% of children). Exfoliative toxins were detected in 10 (3.5%) MSSA strains, of which 5 were related to the impetigo clone CC121. Although S. aureus nasopharyngeal carriage was high among healthy pre-school children, persistent carriage seems to be less frequent than previously reported. The prevalence of MRSA carriage was 3%, but was not associated with PVL.

  5. Occupational exposure to raw meat: a newly-recognized risk factor for Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization amongst food handlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J; O'Donoghue, M M; Boost, M V

    2014-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus contaminating raw meat may increase nasal colonization risk for occupationally-exposed food handlers. Food handlers from six catering establishments were nasally sampled for S. aureus and completed a questionnaire on carriage risk factors. Isolates were characterized for antibiotic susceptibility, spa type and, for methicillin-resistant strains, SCCmec type. Of 434 food handlers, 99 (22.8%) were colonized with S. aureus. Five isolates were methicillin-resistant belonging to SCCmec IV (2) and V (3). Resistance to tetracycline (20%), and erythromycin (16%) was high, but Food handlers ever handling raw meat had a significantly higher colonization risk (OR=2.7; 95% CI: 1.7-4.5), increasing to 3.7 (95% CI: 2.0-6.8) for those always exposed. This is the first report of increased colonization risk in food handlers exposed to raw meat. This occupational hazard may increase infection risk, so improved compliance with workplace hygiene may be required. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carrying SCCmec type IV and V isolated from healthy children attending public daycares in northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Suzi P de; Almeida, Jéssica B de; Andrade, Yasmin M F S; Silva, Lucas S C da; Oliveira, Arianne C de; Nascimento, Flávia S; Campos, Guilherme B; Oliveira, Márcio V; Timenetsky, Jorge; Marques, Lucas M

    Nasal colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have increasingly been reported in healthy communities. This study aimed to assess the rate of S. aureus in general and MRSA in particular from nasal secretion of children in daycare centers in Vitória da Conquista, Brazil. The isolates were identified based on morphology, biochemical tests and by PCR. Detection of virulence genes, biofilm production, and susceptibility test by disk diffusion agar were performed. MRSA isolates were characterized by spa, SCCmec, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). S. aureus were recovered from 70 (47.3%) of 148 children. Among the 11 MRSA strains (15.7%), two SCCmec types (IV and V) were detected. MLST identified four STs related to three clonal complexes (CC): 5, 45, and 398. Four spa types were found circulating in this setting. Resistance of S. aureus isolates to ampicillin, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, and tetracycline was 80%, 32.8%, 7.1%, 7.1% and 4.3%, respectively. One isolate presented intermediate resistance to vancomycin detected by Etest methodology. All strains were biofilm producers. The virulence genes seb, sec, spa, and pvl were detected in some isolates. This study revealed a high rate of children carrying MRSA among healthy attendees in daycare centers in Vitória da Conquista, Brazil. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carrying SCCmec type IV and V isolated from healthy children attending public daycares in northeastern Brazil

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    Suzi P. de Carvalho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nasal colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA have increasingly been reported in healthy communities. This study aimed to assess the rate of S. aureus in general and MRSA in particular from nasal secretion of children in daycare centers in Vitória da Conquista, Brazil. The isolates were identified based on morphology, biochemical tests and by PCR. Detection of virulence genes, biofilm production, and susceptibility test by disk diffusion agar were performed. MRSA isolates were characterized by spa, SCCmec, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST. S. aureus were recovered from 70 (47.3% of 148 children. Among the 11 MRSA strains (15.7%, two SCCmec types (IV and V were detected. MLST identified four STs related to three clonal complexes (CC: 5, 45, and 398. Four spa types were found circulating in this setting. Resistance of S. aureus isolates to ampicillin, erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, and tetracycline was 80%, 32.8%, 7.1%, 7.1% and 4.3%, respectively. One isolate presented intermediate resistance to vancomycin detected by Etest methodology. All strains were biofilm producers. The virulence genes seb, sec, spa, and pvl were detected in some isolates. This study revealed a high rate of children carrying MRSA among healthy attendees in daycare centers in Vitória da Conquista, Brazil.

  8. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus carriage in healthy school-age children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Terranova, Leonardo; Ruggiero, Luca; Ascolese, Beatrice; Montinaro, Valentina; Rios, Walter Peves; Galeone, Carlotta; Principi, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus are common commensals of the upper respiratory tract in children and adolescents. Understanding the relationship between these two pathogens, including their potential for mutual interference, is needed to evaluate the epidemiology of the diseases they cause, the factors that condition acquisition and carriage, and the impact of related preventative measures. We obtained oropharyngeal and nasal swabs from 497 healthy subjects aged 6-17 years. S. pneumoniae detection and serotyping were performed using a real-time PCR and S. aureus detection was performed using the RIDAGENE MRSA system. We found that 136 (27.3%) of the children were carriers of both species, 121 (24.3%) of the children carried S. pneumoniae alone and 128 (25.7%) of the children carried S. aureus alone. S. aureus carriage was similar between children who carried S. pneumoniae (136/257, 52.9 %, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 46.8-58.9%) vs those who did not (128/240, 53.3%, 95% CI: 47.0 -59.5%) and was independent of age and vaccination with 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7). Vaccination with PCV7 did not affect S. aureus carriage [S. pneumoniae: 84/143 (58.7%, 95% CI: 50.5 -66.5%) vaccinated children vs 171/351 (48.7%, 95% CI: 43.5 -53.9%) unvaccinated children; S. aureus: 67/143 (46.9%, 95% CI: 38.9-55.0 %) vaccinated children vs 195/351 (55.6%, 95% CI: 50.3 -60.7%) unvaccinated children]. Pneumococcal serotype also did not appear to affect S. aureus carriage. These findings suggested that the carriage of S. pneumoniae did not affect that of S. aureus in older children and adolescents, regardless of age, PCV7 vaccination and pneumococcal serotype. © 2015 The Authors.

  9. Seven-year experience with a surveillance program to reduce methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Mary Lucia; Eichenwald, Eric C; Puopolo, Karen M

    2009-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the incidence rates of neonatal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection after the implementation of a NICU methicillin-resistant S aureus surveillance and isolation program and to describe the characteristics of infants with methicillin-resistant S aureus colonization and invasive disease. From August 2000 through August 2007, all infants admitted to the study NICU were screened for methicillin-resistant S aureus colonization with weekly nasal/rectal swabs; colonized or infected infants were isolated and cared for as a cohort. The annual incidence rates of methicillin-resistant S aureus colonization and infection were monitored, and characteristics of methicillin-resistant S aureus-colonized and -infected infants were compared. Data were collected from infant, maternal, and hospital laboratory records. During the study period, 7997 infants were admitted to the NICU and 102 methicillin-resistant S aureus-colonized or -infected infants (1.3%) were identified. The incidence of methicillin-resistant S aureus decreased progressively from 1.79 cases per 1000 patient-days in 2000 to 0.15 cases per 1000 patient-days in 2005, but the incidence then increased to 1.26 cases per 1000 patient-days in 2007. Fifteen of the 102 case infants (14.7%) had invasive infections; no significant differences between infected and colonized infants were identified. Methicillin-resistant S aureus isolates with 14 different antibiograms were found during the study period. There was a shift from isolates predominantly likely to be hospital-associated in 2000-2004 to those likely to be community-associated in 2006-2007. A continuous program of weekly methicillin-resistant S aureus surveillance cultures and isolation of affected infants was associated with a variable incidence of methicillin-resistant S aureus colonization over a 7-year study period. Methicillin-resistant S aureus was not eradicated from this tertiary

  10. Longitudinal study of Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection in a cohort of swine veterinarians in the United States

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    Jisun Sun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People working with pigs are at elevated risk of harboring methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA in their nose, which is attributable to occupational exposure to animals harboring livestock adapted S. aureus. To obtain insight into the biological nature of occupationally related nasal culture positivity, we conducted a longitudinal study of 66 swine veterinarians in the USA. Methods The study cohort resided in 15 US states and worked predominantly with swine. Monthly for 18 months, participants self-collected nasal swabs and completed a survey to report recent exposure to pigs and other animals; the occurrence of work related injuries; and any relevant health events such as skin and soft tissue infections or confirmed staphylococcal infections. Nasal swabs were cultured using selective methods to determine the presence of MRSA and methicillin susceptible S. aureus (MSSA, and isolates were characterized by spa typing and MLST. Results Prevalences of S. aureus (64%, monthly range from 58 to 82% and MRSA (9.5%; monthly range from 6 to15% were higher than reported for the US population (30% and 1.5% respectively. Predominant spa types were t034 (ST398, 37%, t002 (ST5, 17% and t337 (ST9/ST398 13%, a distribution similar to that found in a concurrent study in pigs in the USA. Veterinarians were classified into three groups: Persistent carriers (PC, 52%, Intermittent carriers (IC, 47% and Non-carriers (NC, 1%. Persistent carriage of a single spa type was observed in 14 (21% of participants, and paired (first and last isolates from PC subjects had minor genetic differences. Swabs from PC veterinarians carried higher numbers of S. aureus. Among IC veterinarians, culture positivity was significantly associated with recent contact with pigs. Conclusions Exposure to pigs did not lead to prolonged colonization in most subjects, and the higher numbers of S. aureus in PC subjects suggests that unknown host factors may determine the

  11. Nasal carriage of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among healthy population of Kashmir, India

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    B A Fomda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nasal colonisation with community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA is being increasingly reported, especially in places where people are in close contact and where hygiene is compromised. The aim of this study was to find out prevalence of methicillin resistant S.aureus (MRSA colonising anterior nares of healthy subjects. Materials and Methods: Nasal swabs of healthy subjects were collected aseptically and cultured using standard microbiological protocols. Antibiotic susceptibility was done by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method according to CLSI guidelines. Methicillin resistance was detected by cefoxitin disc diffusion method and confirmed by minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and amplification of mecA gene by PCR. Strain typing of MRSA strains was done by PFGE. Results: Out of 820 samples, S.aureus was isolated from 229 (27.92% subjects. Of the 229 isolates, 15 were methicillin resistant. All S. aureus isolates were susceptible to vancomycin. Nasal carriage of MRSA was found to be 1.83% among healthy population. The isolates were found to be polyclonal by PFGE analysis. Conclusion: High prevalence of MRSA is a cause of concern and strategies to interrupt transmission should be implemented.

  12. A cross sectional study of animal and human colonization with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in an Aboriginal community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Peter; Bajgai, Janak; Penney, Carla; Williams, Karen; Whitney, Hugh; Golding, George R; Weese, Scott

    2016-07-19

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are common among humans in Aboriginal communities in Canada, for unknown reasons. Cross sectional study of humans and dogs in an Aboriginal community of approximately 1200 persons. Our objectives were to measure community-based prevalence of nasal MRSA colonization among humans, use multivariable logistic regression to analyze risk factors for MRSA colonization, and perform molecular typing of Staphylococci isolated to investigate interspecies transmission. 461 humans were approached for consent and 442 provided complete data. 109/442 (24.7 %, 95 % C.I. = 20.7-28.7 %) of humans were colonized with MRSA. 169/442 (38.2 %) of humans had received antibiotics in the last 12 months. Only number of rooms in the house (OR 0.86, p = 0.023) and recreational dog use (OR 7.7, p = 0.002) were significant risk factors for MRSA colonization. 95/109 (87.1 %) of MRSA strains from humans were of the same spa type (CMRSA10/USA300). 8/157 (5.1 %, 95 % C.I. = 1.7-8.5 %) of dogs were colonized with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, and no dogs were colonized with MRSA. Human MRSA colonization in this community is very common, and a single clone is predominant, suggesting local transmission. Antibiotic use is also very common. Crowding may partially explain high colonization, but most considered risk factors including animal exposure were not predictive. Very few dogs carried human Staphylococcal strains.

  13. A cross sectional study of animal and human colonization with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in an Aboriginal community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Daley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections are common among humans in Aboriginal communities in Canada, for unknown reasons. Methods Cross sectional study of humans and dogs in an Aboriginal community of approximately 1200 persons. Our objectives were to measure community-based prevalence of nasal MRSA colonization among humans, use multivariable logistic regression to analyze risk factors for MRSA colonization, and perform molecular typing of Staphylococci isolated to investigate interspecies transmission. Results 461 humans were approached for consent and 442 provided complete data. 109/442 (24.7 %, 95 % C.I. = 20.7–28.7 % of humans were colonized with MRSA. 169/442 (38.2 % of humans had received antibiotics in the last 12 months. Only number of rooms in the house (OR 0.86, p = 0.023 and recreational dog use (OR 7.7, p = 0.002 were significant risk factors for MRSA colonization. 95/109 (87.1 % of MRSA strains from humans were of the same spa type (CMRSA10/USA300. 8/157 (5.1 %, 95 % C.I. = 1.7–8.5 % of dogs were colonized with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, and no dogs were colonized with MRSA. Conclusions Human MRSA colonization in this community is very common, and a single clone is predominant, suggesting local transmission. Antibiotic use is also very common. Crowding may partially explain high colonization, but most considered risk factors including animal exposure were not predictive. Very few dogs carried human Staphylococcal strains.

  14. Live attenuated influenza vaccine enhances colonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Michael J; McCullers, Jonathan A; Klugman, Keith P

    2014-02-18

    Community interactions at mucosal surfaces between viruses, like influenza virus, and respiratory bacterial pathogens are important contributors toward pathogenesis of bacterial disease. What has not been considered is the natural extension of these interactions to live attenuated immunizations, and in particular, live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs). Using a mouse-adapted LAIV against influenza A (H3N2) virus carrying the same mutations as the human FluMist vaccine, we find that LAIV vaccination reverses normal bacterial clearance from the nasopharynx and significantly increases bacterial carriage densities of the clinically important bacterial pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae (serotypes 19F and 7F) and Staphylococcus aureus (strains Newman and Wright) within the upper respiratory tract of mice. Vaccination with LAIV also resulted in 2- to 5-fold increases in mean durations of bacterial carriage. Furthermore, we show that the increases in carriage density and duration were nearly identical in all aspects to changes in bacterial colonizing dynamics following infection with wild-type (WT) influenza virus. Importantly, LAIV, unlike WT influenza viruses, had no effect on severe bacterial disease or mortality within the lower respiratory tract. Our findings are, to the best of our knowledge, the first to demonstrate that vaccination with a live attenuated viral vaccine can directly modulate colonizing dynamics of important and unrelated human bacterial pathogens, and does so in a manner highly analogous to that seen following wild-type virus infection. Following infection with an influenza virus, infected or recently recovered individuals become transiently susceptible to excess bacterial infections, particularly Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus. Indeed, in the absence of preexisting comorbidities, bacterial infections are a leading cause of severe disease during influenza epidemics. While this synergy has been known and is well studied, what

  15. Basic Rules of Hygiene Protect Health Care and Lab Workers from Nasal Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus: An International Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra Saadatian-Elahi; Anne Tristan; Frédéric Laurent; Jean-Philippe Rasigade; Coralie Bouchiat; Anne-Gaëlle Ranc; Gérard Lina; Olivier Dauwalder; Jérôme Etienne; Michèle Bes; François Vandenesch

    2013-01-01

    Acquisition of nasal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) colonization by contaminated hands is likely an important determinant of its nasal carriage rate in health care and lab setting. The objective of our cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of nasal methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) or -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage among health care professionals (HCPs) attending an international symposium and to study the association between compliance with hygiene rules, individ...

  16. A failed RCT to determine if antibiotics prevent mastitis: Cracked nipples colonized with Staphylococcus aureus: A randomized treatment trial [ISRCTN65289389

    OpenAIRE

    Garland Suzanne M; Lumley Judith; Amir Lisa

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background A small, non-blinded, RCT (randomised controlled trial) had reported that oral antibiotics reduced the incidence of mastitis in lactating women with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus)- colonized cracked nipples. We aimed to replicate the study with a more rigorous design and adequate sample size. Methods Our intention was to conduct a double-blind placebo-controlled trial to determine if an antibiotic (flucloxacillin) could prevent mastitis in lactating women with S. aureus...

  17. Staphylococcus aureus colonization modulates tic expression and the host immune response in a girl with Tourette syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costantino eEftimiadi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A 9-year-old girl with Tourette syndrome and increased antibody levels against Streptococcus pyogenes was monitored longitudinally for the presence of nasopharyngeal bacteria, specific antibody titers, and autoimmunity directed against brain antigens. Microbiological monitoring indicated that the child was an intermittent Staphylococcus aureus nasopharyngeal carrier. Clinical improvements in motor tic frequency and severity were observed during the S. aureus colonization phase, and were temporally correlated with the downregulation of anti-streptococcal and anti-D1/D2 dopamine receptor antibody production. After decolonization, clinical conditions reverted to the poor scores previously observed, suggesting a possible role of the immune response in bacterial clearance as a trigger of symptom recrudescence. These findings imply that a cause-effect relationship exists between S. aureus colonization and tic improvement, as well as between bacterial decolonization and tic exacerbation. Understanding the impact of S. aureus on the host adaptive immune response and the function of autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of Tourette syndrome may alter approaches for managing autoimmune neuropsychiatric and tic disorders.

  18. Clinical significance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in residents in community long-term-care facilities in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzur, A; De Gopegui, E Ruiz; Dominguez, M; Mariscal, D; Gavalda, L; Perez, J L; Segura, F; Pujol, M

    2012-03-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is highly prevalent in Spanish hospitals and community long-term-care facilities (LTCFs). This longitudinal study was performed in community LTCFs to determine whether MRSA colonization is associated with MRSA infections and overall mortality. Nasal and decubitus ulcer cultures were performed every 6 months for an 18-month period on 178 MRSA-colonized residents (86 490 patient-days) and 196 non-MRSA carriers (97 470 patient-days). Fourteen residents developed MRSA infections and 10 of these were skin and soft tissue infections. Two patients with respiratory infections required hospitalization. The incidence rate of MRSA infection was 0·12/1000 patient-days in MRSA carriers and 0·05/1000 patient-days in non-carriers (P=0·46). No difference in MRSA infection rate was found according to the duration of MRSA colonization (P=0·69). The mortality rate was 20·8% in colonized residents and 16·8% in non-carriers; four residents with MRSA infection died. Overall mortality was statistically similar in both cohorts. Our results suggest that despite a high prevalence of MRSA colonization in LTCFs, MRSA infections are neither frequent nor severe while colonized residents remain at the facility. The epidemiological impact of an MRSA reservoir is more relevant than the clinical impact of this colonization for an individual resident and supports current recommendations to control MRSA spread in community LTCFs.

  19. The ecology of nasal colonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus aureus: the role of competition and interactions with host's immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Elisa; Yates, Andrew; Levin, Bruce R

    2010-02-23

    The first step in invasive disease caused by the normally commensal bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae is their colonization of the nasal passages. For any population to colonize a new habitat it is necessary for it to be able to compete with the existing organisms and evade predation. In the case of colonization of these species the competition is between strains of the same and different species of bacteria and the predation is mediated by the host's immune response. Here, we use a neonatal rat model to explore these elements of the ecology of nasal colonization by these occasionally invasive bacteria. When neonatal rats are colonized by any one of these species the density of bacteria in the nasal passage rapidly reaches a steady-state density that is species-specific but independent of inoculum size. When novel populations of H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae are introduced into the nasal passages of neonatal rats with established populations of the same species, residents and invaders coexisted. However, this was not the case for S. aureus - the established population inhibited invasion of new S. aureus populations. In mixed-species introductions, S. aureus or S. pneumoniae facilitated the invasion of another H. influenzae population; for other pairs the interaction was antagonistic and immune-mediated. For example, under some conditions H. influenzae promoted an immune response which limited the invasion of S. pneumoniae. Nasal colonization is a dynamic process with turnover of new strains and new species. These results suggest that multiple strains of either H. influenzae or S. pneumoniae can coexist; in contrast, S. aureus strains require a host to have no other S. aureus present to colonize. Levels of colonization (and hence the possible risk of invasive disease) by H. influenzae are increased in hosts pre-colonized with either S. aureus or S. pneumoniae.

  20. Prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA] colonization or carriage among health-care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathare, Nirmal A; Asogan, Harshini; Tejani, Sara; Al Mahruqi, Gaitha; Al Fakhri, Salma; Zafarulla, Roshna; Pathare, Anil V

    2016-01-01

    In Oman, the prevalence of health care associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus [HA-MRSA] is unknown. Therefore, to estimate the prevalence of HA-MRSA, we collected nasal swabs and swabs from cell phones on sterile polyester swabs and immediately inoculated on the mannitol salt agar containing oxacillin from medical students and hospital health care providers. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of the isolates was then performed using the Kirby Bauer's disc diffusion method. Additionally, a brief survey questionnaire was used to acquire demographic data. Amongst the 311 participants enrolled, nasal colonization with HA-MRSA was found in 47 individuals (15.1%, 95% confidence interval [CI]=11.1%, 19.1%). HA-MRSA was also isolated from the cell phone surfaces in 28 participants (9.0%, 95% CI=8.6%, 9.3%). 5 participants (1.6%) showed positive results both from their nasal swabs and from their cell phones. Antibiotic resistance to erythromycin [48%] and clindamycin [29%] was relatively high. 9.3% HA-MRSA isolates were vancomycin resistant [6.6% nasal carriage]. There was no statistically significant correlation between HA-MRSA isolates and the demographic characteristics or the risk factors namely gender, underlying co-morbidities like diabetes, hypertension, skin/soft tissue infections, skin ulcers/wounds, recent exposure to antibiotics, or hospital visits (p>0.05, Chi-square test). Copyright © 2015 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An investigation of vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration creep among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from pediatric patients and healthy children in Northern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Ning; Lo, Wen-Tsung; Chan, Ming-Chin; Yu, Ching-Mei; Wang, Chih-Chien

    2017-06-01

    The phenomenon of vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) creep is an increasingly serious problem in the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. In this study, we investigated the vancomycin and daptomycin MIC values of MRSA strains isolated from pediatric patients and MRSA colonized healthy children. Then, we assessed whether there was evidence of clonal dissemination for strains with an MIC to vancomycin of ≥ 1.5 μg/mL. We collected clinical MRSA isolates from pediatric patients and from healthy children colonized with MRSA during 2008-2012 at a tertiary medical center in northern Taiwan and obtained vancomycin and daptomycin MIC values using the Etest method. Pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCCmec) typing were used to assess clonal dissemination for strains with an MIC to vancomycin of ≥ 1.5 μg/mL. A total 195 MRSA strains were included in this study; 87 were isolated patients with a clinical MRSA infection, and the other 108 strains from nasally colonized healthy children. Vancomycin MIC≥1.5 μg/mL was seen in more clinical isolates (60/87, 69%) than colonized isolates (32/108, 29.6%), p < 0.001. The PFGE typing of both strains revealed multiple pulsotypes. Vancomycin MIC creeps existed in both clinical MRSA isolates and colonized MRSA strains. Great diversity of PFGE typing was in both strains collected. There was no association between the clinical and colonized MRSA isolates with vancomycin MIC creep. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Frequency of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage in healthy children

    OpenAIRE

    Nikfar, Roya; Shamsizadeh, Ahmad; Ziaei Kajbaf, Tahereh; Kamali Panah, Mohammad; Khaghani, Soheila; Moghddam, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: The prevalence of community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is increasing around the world. It involves healthy people and causes a variety of diseases.Material and Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted from September 2010 - June 2011 on children less than 14 years of Ahvaz, southwest Iran. The participants were selected with two staged cluster sampling. A sterile cotton nasal swab was used to collect the samples from the 86...

  3. Prevalence and factors associated with wound colonization by Staphylococcus spp. and Staphylococcus aureus in hospitalized patients in inland northeastern Brazil: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Gilmara Celli Maia; dos Santos, Marquiony Marques; Lima, Nara Grazieli Martins; Cidral, Thiago André; Melo, Maria Celeste Nunes; Lima, Kenio Costa

    2014-06-13

    Infections by Staphylococcus spp. are often associated with wounds, especially in hospitalized patients. Wounds may be the source of bacteria causing cross-contamination, and are a risk factor for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of wound colonization by Staphylococcus spp., especially S. aureus and MRSA, in hospitalized patients, and to identify the factors associated with such colonization. This cross-sectional study enrolled patients with wounds who were hospitalized in a remote and underdeveloped inland region of northeastern Brazil with extreme poverty. Samples were collected using sterile swabs with 0.85% saline solution, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp., S. aureus, and MRSA were identified using standard laboratory procedures. Data regarding the sociodemographic characteristics, antibiotic use, and comorbidities of the patients were collected using the medical records and a questionnaire. A total of 125 wounds were analyzed. The patients had a mean age of 63.88 years and a mean 3.84 years of school education. Eighty-one wounds (64.80%) were colonized by Staphylococcus spp. Twenty-five wounds (20%) were colonized by S. aureus, 32% of which were colonized by MRSA. Wound colonization by Staphylococcus spp. was associated with pneumonia or other respiratory disease (p = 0.03). Wound colonization by S. aureus was associated with nasal colonization by S. aureus (p 65 years (p = 0.05). Among patients with wound colonization by MRSA, 37.50% had a history of prior antibiotic use, 75% had two or more comorbidities, 25% had cancer or diabetes, 50% had cardiovascular disease, and 50% died. Wounds can be the source of Staphylococcus spp. infection, and high proportions of wounds are colonized by S. aureus and MRSA. Nasal colonization by S. aureus may be a source for wound colonization by S. aureus, illustrating the importance of preventing cross-contamination in hospital

  4. Living Conditions as a Driving Factor in Persistent Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Colonization Among HIV-infected Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Maria Teresa C; Marlow, Mariel A; Aguiar-Alves, Fábio; Pinheiro, Marcos Gabriel; Freitas Alves, Maria de Fátima Nogueira de; Santos Cruz, Maria Letícia; Saavedra Gaspar, Mariza Curto; Rocha, Rebeca; Velarde, Luis Guillermo C; Araújo Cardoso, Claudete A

    2016-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization has been linked to HIV-related sexual and social behaviors. MRSA risk factors may be different for HIV-infected children, adolescents and young adults. We investigated the association of MRSA colonization, persistent colonization and genotypes with potential risk factors among HIV-infected youth. For this case-control study, patients 24 years of age or younger attending 2 HIV reference centers were recruited from February to August 2012 and followed for 1 year. Nasal swabs were collected at enrollment and every 3 months. MRSA clones were characterized by staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec typing, spa typing and multilocus sequence typing. We compared MRSA colonization and persistent colonization with patient demographic and clinical characteristics. Among 117 participants, MRSA colonization frequency (calculated for each collection based on the number of positive cultures per patient) was 12.8% at the first collection. The average MRSA colonization frequency was 10.4%. Our results showed 11.1% were persistent carriers (subjects with more than 1 positive culture in at least 3). Crowding was the only factor associated with MRSA colonization (P = 0.018). Persistent carriers had significantly higher (4.2 times) odds of living in a crowded household (95% confidence interval-1.1-16.2). We observed high genetic diversity among MRSA isolates, with t002/ST5 and t318/ST30 being the most frequent. MRSA colonization among HIV-infected youth is more closely related to living in a low-income or slum community than to HIV-related clinical factors. High genetic MRSA isolate diversity in our population suggests frequent transmission.

  5. Risk factors for developing clinical infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) amongst hospital patients initially only colonized with MRSA.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Coello; J.R. Glynn (Judith); J. J. Picazo; J. Fereres; C. Gaspar

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn hospital outbreaks of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) many patients are initially colonized without infection. The reasons why some progress to infection while others do not are not known. A cohort of 479 hospital patients, initially only colonized with MRSA, was

  6. Co-colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus in the throat during acute respiratory illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE Lastours, V; Malosh, R; Ramadugu, K; Srinivasan, U; Dawid, S; Ohmit, S; Foxman, B

    2016-08-18

    Pneumonia due to either Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) or Staphylococcus aureus (Sa) accounts for most mortality after influenza and acute respiratory illness (ARI). Because carriage precedes infection, we estimated Sp and Sa carriage to examine the co-colonization dynamics between Sp, Sa and respiratory viruses in the presence of ARI in the oropharynx. We tested oropharyngeal specimens of community subjects (aged ⩾2 years) with ARI for the presence of influenza A and B, 11 other common respiratory viruses, Sp and Sa, using real-time PCR. A total of 338 participants reported 519 ARI episodes of which 119 (35%) carried Sp, 52 (13%) carried Sa and 25 (7%) carried both. Thirty-five subjects tested positive for influenza, of which 14 (40%) carried Sp and six (17%) carried Sa, significantly more than in the influenza-negative group (P = 0·03 and P = 0·04, respectively). In subjects infected by any virus compared to those with no virus, Sp carriage (39·2% vs. 27·9%, P = 0·03) but not Sa carriage (11·6% vs. 14%, P = 0·6) was more frequent. For children, when Sa was present, Sp carriage tended to be less frequent than expected given the presence of viral infection, but not significantly [observed relative risk 1·14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·4-3·1; with a relative excess risk due to interaction of -0·11]. Independent of age, Sp carriers were more likely to return that season with subsequent ARI (odds ratio 2·14, 95% CI 1·1-4·3, P = 0·03). Both Sp and Sa carriage rates in the oropharynx increase during influenza infection in children. However, no negative interaction between Sp and Sa was observed. Sp carriers are more likely to suffer subsequent ARI episodes than non-carriers.

  7. Effect of a chloride channel activator, lubiprostone, on colonic sensory and motor functions in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetser, Seth; Busciglio, Irene A; Camilleri, Michael; Bharucha, Adil E; Szarka, Lawrence A; Papathanasopoulos, Athanasios; Burton, Duane D; Eckert, Deborah J; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2009-02-01

    Lubiprostone, a bicyclic fatty acid chloride channel activator, is efficacious in treatment of chronic constipation and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. The study aim was to compare effects of lubiprostone and placebo on colonic sensory and motor functions in humans. In double-blind, randomized fashion, 60 healthy adults received three oral doses of placebo or 24 microg lubiprostone per day in a parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial. A barostat-manometry tube was placed in the left colon by flexible sigmoidoscopy and fluoroscopy. We measured treatment effects on colonic sensation and motility with validated methods, with the following end points: colonic compliance, fasting and postprandial tone and motility indexes, pain thresholds, and sensory ratings to distensions. Among participants receiving lubiprostone or placebo, 26 of 30 and 28 of 30, respectively, completed the study. There were no overall effects of lubiprostone on compliance, fasting tone, motility indexes, or sensation. However, there was a treatment-by-sex interaction effect for compliance (P = 0.02), with lubiprostone inducing decreased fasting compliance in women (P = 0.06) and an overall decreased colonic tone contraction after a standard meal relative to fasting tone (P = 0.014), with greater effect in women (P lubiprostone 24 microg does not increase colonic motor function. The findings of decreased colonic compliance and decreased postprandial colonic tone in women suggest that motor effects are unlikely to cause accelerated colonic transit with lubiprostone, although they may facilitate laxation. Effects of lubiprostone on sensitivity deserve further study.

  8. Colonization of nursing professionals by Staphylococcus aureus La colonización de los profesionales de enfermería por Staphylococcus aureus A colonização dos profissionais de enfermagem por Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josely Pinto de Moura

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the presence of Staphylococcus aureus in the saliva of the nursing team of a teaching hospital in the interior of São Paulo State. Three saliva samples were collected from 351 individuals with an interval of two months between each collection. All ethical aspects were considered. In 867 (82.3% cultures there was no identification of Staphylococcus aureus in the saliva, in 88 (17.7% cultures Staphylococcus aureus was isolated, 26 (2.5% of which were resistant to methicillin. The prevalence of professionals colonized by Staphylococcus aureus was 41.0% (144/351, of which 7.1% (25/351 were characterized as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Transient carriers represented 81.2% and persistent carriers 18.8%. Resistance to mupirocin was 73.1% of MRSA and 9.3% of MSSA. The results demonstrate that it is the nurse and nursing technician that are the professional categories most susceptible to MRSA. Broader discussion on the thematic and interventions are needed.Se trata de un estudio transversal que tuvo como objetivo investigar la presencia de Staphylococcus aureus en la saliva del equipo de enfermería de un hospital escuela del interior del estado de Sao Paulo. Fueron recolectadas tres muestras de saliva de 351 individuos con intervalo de dos meses. Todos los aspectos éticos fueron contemplados. En 867 (82,3% culturas no hubo identificación de Staphylococcus aureus en la saliva, en 88 (17,7% culturas fue aislado Staphylococcus aureus, siendo 26 (2,5% resistentes a la meticilina. La prevalencia de profesionales colonizados por Staphylococcus aureus fue de 41,0% (144/351, de los cuales 7,1% (25/351 fueron caracterizados como Staphylococcus aureus resistentes a la meticilina. Los portadores transitorios representaron 81,2% y los persistentes 18,8%. La resistencia a la mupirocina fue de 73,1% entre los resistentes a la meticilina y 9,3% en los sensibles a la meticilina. Los resultados

  9. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated interference competition by Streptococcus pneumoniae has no significant effect on Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization of neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Elisa

    2009-01-01

    It has been proposed that the relative scarcity of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae cocolonization in the nasopharynxes of humans can be attributed to hydrogen peroxide-mediated interference competition. Previously it has been shown in vitro that H(2)O(2) produced by S. pneumoniae is bactericidal to S. aureus. To ascertain whether H(2)O(2) has this inhibitory effect in the nasal passages of neonatal rats, colonization experiments were performed with S. aureus and S. pneumoniae. The results of these experiments with neonatal rats are inconsistent with the hypothesis that hydrogen peroxide-mediated killing of S. aureus by S. pneumoniae is responsible for the relative scarcity of cocolonization by these bacteria. In mixed-inoculum colonization experiments and experiments where S. aureus invaded the nasopharynxes of rats with established S. pneumoniae populations, the density of S. aureus did not differ whether the S. pneumoniae strain was H(2)O(2) secreting or non-H(2)O(2) secreting (SpxB). Moreover, the advantage of catalase production by S. aureus in competition with a non-catalase-producing strain (KatA) during nasal colonization was no greater in the presence of H(2)O(2)-producing S. pneumoniae than in the presence of non-H(2)O(2)-producing S. pneumoniae.

  10. Risk factors for Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization in Danish middle-aged and elderly twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Larsen, Lisbeth Aagaard; Fowler, V G

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal bacterium found in the nasal cavity and other body sites. Identifying risk factors for S. aureus nasal carriage is of interest, as nasal carriage is a risk factor for subsequent invasive infection. We recently investigated the influence of host genetics...

  11. COMPARISON OF METHICILLIN RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS IN HEALTHY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL VISITORS[CA-MRSA] AND HOSPITAL STAFF [HA-MRSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal A Pathare

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of community associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus [CA-MRSA] in unknown in Oman. Methods: Nasal and cell phones swabs were collected from hospital visitors and health-care workers on sterile polyester swabs and directly inoculated onto a mannitol salt agar containing oxacillin, allowing growth of methicillin-resistant microorganisms. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using Kirby Bauer’s disc diffusion method on the isolates. A brief survey questionnaire was requested be filled to ascertain the exposure to known risk factors for CA-MRSA carriage. Results: Overall, nasal colonization with CA-MRSA was seen in 34 individuals (18%, 95% confidence interval [CI] =12.5%-23.5%, whereas, CA-MRSA was additionally isolated from the cell phone surface in 12 participants (6.3%, 95% CI =5.6%-6.98%. Nasal colonization prevalence with HA-MRSA was seen in 16 individuals (13.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] =7.5%-20.06%, whereas, HA-MRSA was additionally isolated from the cell phone surface in 3 participants (2.6%, 95% CI =1.7-4.54.  Antibiotic sensitivity was 100% to linezolid and rifampicin in the CA-MRSA isolates. Antibiotic resistance to vancomycin and clindamycin varied between 9-11 % in the CA-MRSA isolates.  There was no statistically significant correlation between CA-MRSA nasal carriage and the risk factors (P>0.05, Chi-square test. Conclusions: The prevalence of CA-MRSA in the healthy community hospital visitors was 18 % (95% CI, 12.5% to 23.5% as compared to 13.8% [HA-MRSA] in the hospital health-care staff. In spite of a significant prevalence of CA-MRSA, these strains were mostly sensitive. Recommendation the universal techniques of hand washing, personal hygiene and sanitation are thus warranted.

  12. Nasopharyngeal colonization of Gambian infants by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae before the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuf, E; Bojang, A; Hill, P C; Bottomley, C; Greenwood, B; Roca, A

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae commonly colonize the upper respiratory tract and can cause invasive disease. Several studies suggest an inverse relationship between these two bacteria in the nasopharynx. This association is of particular concern as the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) that affect pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage become widespread. A cohort of children in rural Gambia were recruited at birth and followed for 1 year, before the introduction of PCV into the routine immunization program. Nasopharyngeal swabs were taken immediately after birth, every 2 weeks for the first 6 months and then every other month. The presence of S. aureus and S. pneumoniae was determined using conventional microbiologic methods. Prevalence of S. aureus carriage was 71.6% at birth, decreasing with age to reach a plateau at approximately 20% between 10 to 20 weeks of age. Carriage with any S. pneumoniae increased during the first 10 weeks of life to peak at approximately 90%, mostly of PCV13 serotypes. Although in the crude analysis S. aureus carriage was inversely associated with carriage of any S. pneumoniae and PCV13 serotypes, after adjusting by age and season, there was a positive association with any carriage (odds ratio 1.32; 95% confidence interval 1.07-1.64; p 0.009) and no association with carriage of PCV13 serotypes (odds ratio 0.99; 95% confidence interval 0.70-1.41; p 0.973). Among Gambian infants, S. aureus and S. pneumoniae are not inversely associated in nasopharyngeal carriage after adjustment for age. Further carriage studies following the introduction of PCV are needed to better understand the relationship between the two bacteria.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Quantification of Fasted State Colonic Liquid Pockets in Healthy Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Kathryn; Hoad, Caroline L; Mudie, Deanna M; Wright, Jeff; Heissam, Khaled; Abrehart, Nichola; Pritchard, Susan E; Al Atwah, Salem; Gowland, Penny A; Garnett, Martin C; Amidon, Gregory E; Spiller, Robin C; Amidon, Gordon L; Marciani, Luca

    2017-08-07

    The rate and extent of drug dissolution and absorption from solid oral dosage forms is highly dependent on the volume of liquid in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). However, little is known about the time course of GIT liquid volumes after drinking a glass of water (8 oz), particularly in the colon, which is a targeted site for both locally and systemically acting drug products. Previous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies offered novel insights on GIT liquid distribution in fasted humans in the stomach and small intestine, and showed that freely mobile liquid in the intestine collects in fairly distinct regions or "pockets". Based on this previous pilot data, we hypothesized that (1) it is possible to quantify the time course of the volume and number of liquid pockets in the undisturbed colon of fasted healthy humans following ingestion of 240 mL, using noninvasive MRI methods; (2) the amount of freely mobile water in the fasted human colon is of the order of only a few milliliters. Twelve healthy volunteers fasted overnight and underwent fasted abdominal MRI scans before drinking 240 mL (∼8 fluid ounces) of water. After ingesting the water they were scanned at frequent intervals for 2 h. The images were processed to quantify freely mobile water in the total and regional colon: ascending, transverse, and descending. The fasted colon contained (mean ± SEM) 11 ± 5 pockets of resting liquid with a total volume of 2 ± 1 mL (average). The colonic fluid peaked at 7 ± 4 mL 30 min after the water drink. This peak fluid was distributed in 17 ± 7 separate liquid pockets in the colon. The regional analysis showed that pockets of free fluid were found primarily in the ascending colon. The interindividual variability was very high; the subjects showed a range of number of colonic fluid pockets from 0 to 89 and total colonic freely mobile fluid volume from 0 to 49 mL. This is the first study measuring the time course of the number, regional location, and volume of

  14. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in residents and staff in nursing homes in Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Naomi S; Gilpin, Deirdre F; Hughes, Carmel M; Kearney, Mary P; Gardiner, D Ann; Cardwell, Chris; Tunney, Michael M

    2009-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of, and factors associated with, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization in residents and staff in nursing homes in one geographically defined health administration area of Northern Ireland. Point prevalence study. Nursing homes. Residents and staff in nursing homes. Nasal swabs were taken from all consenting residents and staff. If relevant, residents also provided urine samples, and swabs were taken from wounds and indwelling devices. A total of 1,111 residents (66% of all residents) and 553 staff (86% of available staff) in 45 nursing homes participated. The combined prevalence rate of MRSA in the resident population was 23.3% (95% confidence interval (CI)=18.8-27.7%) and 7.5% in staff (95% CI=5.1-9.9%). Residents who lived in nursing homes that were part of a chain were more likely to be colonized with MRSA (odds ratio (OR)=1.91, 95% CI=1.21-3.02) than those living in independently owned facilities. Residents were also more likely to be colonized if they lived in homes in which more than 12.5% of all screened healthcare staff (care assistants and nurses) were colonized with MRSA (OR=2.46, 95% CI=1.41-4.29) or if they lived in homes in which more than 15% of care assistants were colonized with MRSA (OR=2.64, 95% CI=1.58-4.42). The findings suggest that there is substantial colonization of MRSA in nursing home residents and staff in this one administrative health area. Implementation of infection control strategies should be given high priority in nursing homes.

  15. Various functions of PBMC from colon cancer patients are not decreased compared to healthy blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, P; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    -2 and its receptor proteins in T helper cells. The proliferative responses and IL-2 synthesis of PBMC have earlier been shown to be reduced in patients with colon cancer. Recently immune modulating agents have been demonstrated to increase the proliferative response of PBMC in vitro, probably...... by inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and induction of IL-2 mRNA expression. We have therefore studied the proliferative responses of PBMC from colon cancer patients to PWM and tested the effect of immune modulating agents, such as Serotonin, Sumatriptan, and Buspirone on these PBMC. We found...... no difference in levels of intracellular cAMP, IL-2 mRNA expression, IL-2R mRNA expression, or proliferative responses of PBMC from colon cancer patients compared to healthy blood donors. There was no effect of the immune modulating agents on PBMC from colon cancer patients....

  16. High prevalence of colonization with Staphylococcus aureus clone USA300 at multiple body sites among sexually transmitted disease clinic patients: an unrecognized reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miko, Benjamin A; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin; Gelman, Amanda; Lee, Caroline J; Hafer, Cory A; Sullivan, Sean B; Shi, Qiuhu; Miller, Maureen; Zenilman, Jonathan; Lowy, Franklin D

    2012-10-01

    Extranasal colonization is increasingly recognized as an important reservoir for Staphylococcus aureus among high-risk populations. We conducted a cross-sectional study of multiple body site colonization among 173 randomly selected STD clinic patients in Baltimore, Maryland. Staphylococcal carriage at extranasal sites, including the oropharynx, groin, rectum, and genitals, was common among study subjects. The USA300 clone was particularly associated with multiple sites of colonization compared with non-USA300 strains (p = .01). Given their high burden of multi-site colonization and confluence of established staphylococcal risk factors, STD clinic patients may represent a community-based reservoir for S. aureus and be well suited for innovative infection control initiatives. Copyright © 2012 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Basic rules of hygiene protect health care and lab workers from nasal colonization by Staphylococcus aureus: an international cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra; Tristan, Anne; Laurent, Frédéric; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Bouchiat, Coralie; Ranc, Anne-Gaëlle; Lina, Gérard; Dauwalder, Olivier; Etienne, Jérôme; Bes, Michèle; Vandenesch, François

    2013-01-01

    Acquisition of nasal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) colonization by contaminated hands is likely an important determinant of its nasal carriage rate in health care and lab setting. The objective of our cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of nasal methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) or -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage among health care professionals (HCPs) attending an international symposium and to study the association between compliance with hygiene rules, individual-related parameters, and medical conditions with nasal S. aureus carriage in this population. After obtaining consent, two nasal swabs were collected. Nasal MSSA and MRSA carriage was measured by the: i) molecular approach targeting spa, mecA and mecA-orfX junction sequences, and ii) culture on selective S. aureus media combined with mecA molecular detection of isolated strains. Information on compliance with hygiene rules, demographic variables, sector of activity and long-term medication was collected by anonymous questionnaire. The participation rate was 32.3%. In total, 176 subjects from 34 countries were included in the analysis. S. aureus was isolated from the nasal swabs of 57 (32.4%) subjects, of whom 3 (5.3%) harbored MRSA strains. Overall, 123 subjects reported working in microbiology laboratories with direct manipulation of S. aureus, and 29 acknowledged regular contacts with patients. In this exposed population, hydro-alcoholic solutions appeared to have a significant protective effect against nasal S. aureus carriage (OR = 0.36; 95% CI: 0.15-0.85). Hospital work was associated with increased risk of nasal S. aureus carriage (OR = 2.38; 95% CI: 1.07-5.29). The results of this study showed that compliance with basic rules of hygiene, such as the use of hydro-alcoholic solutions, could reduce the risk of nasal S. aureus colonization. Hydro-alcoholic solution could interrupt auto-transmission of the pathogen, consequently decreasing the overall nasal

  18. Prevalence of colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 in pigs and pig farm workers in an area of Catalonia, Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Reynaga, Esteban; Navarro, Marian; Vilamala, Anna; Roure, Pere; Quintana, Manuel; Garcia-Nu?ez, Marian; Figueras, Ra?l; Torres, Carmen; Lucchetti, Gianni; Sabri?, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    Background A livestock-associated clonal lineage (ST398) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been identified causing colonization or infection in farm workers. The aim of the study was to analyze the prevalence of MRSA-ST398 colonization in pigs and in pig farmers in an area with a high pig population (Osona, Barcelona province, Catalonia, Spain). Methods We performed a cross-sectional prevalence study in Osona (Catalonia, Spain), from June 2014 to June 2015. All pig far...

  19. Interrelationship of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus aureus colonization within and between pneumococcal-vaccine naïve mother-child dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Tinevimbo; Nunes, Marta C; Adrian, Peter V; Van Niekerk, Nadia; Klugman, Keith P; Madhi, Shabir A

    2013-10-17

    A high prevalence of bacterial nasopharyngeal co-infections has been reported in children, however, such data is limited in adults. We examined the interaction of Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae pharyngeal colonization in mother-child dyads. Pneumococcal-vaccine naïve children and their mothers had pharyngeal swabs undertaken at 1.6, 2.5, 3.5, 4.5, 7.4, 9.5, 12.5, 16.2 and 24.2 months of child's age. Swabs were cultured for S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and S. aureus using standard microbiologic methods. Multivariate generalized estimating equation-models were used to explore the associations of the three bacteria within and between children and their mothers. In children, the observed probability of co-colonization was higher than expected. Well-defined associations in colonization between the bacteria were observed in children but not among mothers. In children, a synergistic association was observed between S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae (Adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.75, 95% CI: 1.32-2.32) and a negative association between S. pneumoniae and S. aureus (AOR: 0.51, 95% CI: 0.39-0.67) or H. influenzae and S. aureus (AOR: 0.24, 95% CI: 0.16-0.34) colonization. Additionally, all three bacteria had a higher likelihood of concurrent colonization. There was a strong association in colonization by the bacteria in children and their mothers, including increased likelihood of maternal colonization if the child was colonized by S. pneumoniae (AOR: 1.84, 95% CI: 1.28-2.63) and H. influenzae (AOR: 6.34, 95% CI: 2.24-18.0). The effects of immunization of children with pneumococcal-conjugate-vaccine in settings such as ours needs monitoring with regard to potential changes of pharyngeal bacterial ecology which could occur in vaccinated and -unvaccinated age-groups.

  20. Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from healthy turkeys and broilers using DNA microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosny El-Adawy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a major human health problem and recently, domestic animals, in particular pigs and poultry are discussed as carriers and possible reservoirs of MRSA. Twenty seven S. aureus isolates from five turkey farms (n=18 and two broiler farms (n=9 were obtained by culturing of choana and skin swabs from apparently healthy birds, identified by Taqman-based real-time duplex nuc-mecA-PCR and characterized by spa typing as well as by a DNA microarray based assay which covered, amongst others, a considerable number of antibiotic resistance genes, species controls and virulence markers. The antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were tested by agar diffusion assays and genotypically confirmed by the microarray. Five different spa types (3 in turkeys and 2 in broilers were detected. The majority of MRSA isolates (24/27 belonged to clonal complex 398-MRSA-V. The most frequently occurring spa types were accordingly t011, t034 and t899. A single CC5-MRSA-III isolated from turkey and CC398-MRSA with an unidentified/truncated SCCmec element in turkey and broiler were additionally detected. The phenotypic antimicrobial resistance profiles of S. aureus isolated from both turkeys and broilers against 14 different antimicrobials showed that all isolates were resistant to ampicillin, cefoxitin, oxacillin, doxycycline and tetracycline. Moreover, all S. aureus isolated from broilers were resistant to erythromycin and azithromycin. All isolates were susceptible to gentamicin, chloramphenicol, sulphonamides and fusidic acid. The resistance rate against ciprofloxacin was 55.6% in broiler isolates and 42.1% in turkey isolates. All tetracycline resistant isolates possessed genes tetK/M. All erythromycin-resistant broiler isolates carried ermA. Only one broiler isolate (11.1% carried genes ermA, ermB and ermC, while 55.6% of turkey isolates possessed ermA and ermB genes.Neither PVL genes (lukF/S-PV, animal-associated leukocidin

  1. Characterization of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Healthy Turkeys and Broilers Using DNA Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Adawy, Hosny; Ahmed, Marwa; Hotzel, Helmut; Monecke, Stefan; Schulz, Jochen; Hartung, Joerg; Ehricht, Ralf; Neubauer, Heinrich; Hafez, Hafez M

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major human health problem and recently, domestic animals are described as carriers and possible reservoirs. Twenty seven S. aureus isolates from five turkey farms (n = 18) and two broiler farms (n = 9) were obtained by culturing of choana and skin swabs from apparently healthy birds, identified by Taqman-based real-time duplex nuc-mecA-PCR and characterized by spa typing as well as by a DNA microarray based assay which covered, amongst others, a considerable number of antibiotic resistance genes, species controls, and virulence markers. The antimicrobial susceptibility profiles were tested by agar diffusion assays and genotypically confirmed by the microarray. Five different spa types (3 in turkeys and 2 in broilers) were detected. The majority of MRSA isolates (24/27) belonged to clonal complex 398-MRSA-V. The most frequently occurring spa types were accordingly t011, t034, and t899. A single CC5-MRSA-III isolated from turkey and CC398-MRSA with an unidentified/truncated SCCmec element in turkey and broiler were additionally detected. The phenotypic antimicrobial resistance profiles of S. aureus isolated from both turkeys and broilers against 14 different antimicrobials showed that all isolates were resistant to ampicillin, cefoxitin, oxacillin, doxycycline, and tetracycline. Moreover, all S. aureus isolated from broilers were resistant to erythromycin and azithromycin. All isolates were susceptible to gentamicin, chloramphenicol, sulphonamides, and fusidic acid. The resistance rate against ciprofloxacin was 55.6% in broiler isolates and 42.1% in turkey isolates. All tetracycline resistant isolates possessed genes tetK/M. All erythromycin-resistant broiler isolates carried ermA. Only one broiler isolate (11.1%) carried genes ermA, ermB, and ermC, while 55.6% of turkey isolates possessed ermA and ermB genes. Neither PVL genes (lukF/S-PV), animal-associated leukocidin (lukM and luk-P83) nor the gene encoding

  2. Student self-screening for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal colonization in hand hygiene education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Tia; Picardo, Kristin; Westbay, Theresa; Barnello, Amber; Fine, Lynn; Lavigne, Jill

    2014-09-15

    To determine the feasibility and effectiveness of adding a hand hygiene exercise in self-screening for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) nasal colonization to a health care delivery course for first-year pharmacy (P1) students. About one month after students were trained in hand hygiene technique and indications, faculty members demonstrated how to self-screen for MRSA nasal colonization. Students were then asked to screen themselves during the required class time. Aggregated class results were shared and compared to prevalence estimates for the general population and health care providers. The 71 students present in class on the day of the self-screening exercise chose to participate. A survey comparing presecreening and postscreening responses indicated incremental improvements in student knowledge and awareness of health care associated infections and motivation to perform hand hygiene. On the written exam, student performance demonstrated improved knowledge compared to previous class years. Self-screening for MRSA nasal colonization in a health care delivery course for P1 students increased students' motivation to perform hand hygiene techniques and follow indications promulgated by the World Health Organization.

  3. Long-term risk for readmission, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection, and death among MRSA-colonized veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada Joaquin, Nestor M; Diekema, Daniel J; Perencevich, Eli N; Bailey, George; Winokur, Patricia L; Schweizer, Marin L

    2013-03-01

    While numerous studies have assessed the outcomes of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) colonization over the short term, little is known about longer-term outcomes after discharge. An assessment of long-term outcomes could provide information about the utility of various MRSA prevention approaches. A matched-cohort study was performed among Veterans Affairs (VA) patients screened for MRSA colonization between the years 2007 and 2009 and followed to evaluate outcomes until 2010. Cox proportional-hazard models were used to evaluate the association between MRSA colonization and long-term outcomes, such as infection-related readmission and crude mortality. A total of 404 veterans were included, 206 of whom were MRSA carriers and 198 of whom were noncarriers. There were no culture-proven MRSA infections on readmission among the noncarriers, but 13% of MRSA carriers were readmitted with culture-proven MRSA infections on readmission (P MRSA carriers were significantly more likely to be readmitted, to be readmitted more than once due to proven or probable MRSA infections, and to be readmitted within 90 days of discharge than noncarriers (P MRSA carriers than among noncarriers after statistically adjusting for potential confounders. Among a cohort of VA patients, MRSA carriers are at high risk of infection-related readmission, MRSA infection, and mortality compared to noncarriers. Noncarriers are at very low risk of subsequent MRSA infection. Future studies should address whether interventions such as nasal or skin decolonization could result in improved outcomes for MRSA carriers.

  4. Various functions of PBMC from colon cancer patients are not decreased compared to healthy blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzelius, P; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    The immune surveillance hypothesis suggests impaired immune responses to participate in development of cancer. This may partly be due to increased amounts of PGE2 and histamine, which inhibit cellular immunity. These effects are mediated by cAMP, which is increased and thereby may down-regulate I...... no difference in levels of intracellular cAMP, IL-2 mRNA expression, IL-2R mRNA expression, or proliferative responses of PBMC from colon cancer patients compared to healthy blood donors. There was no effect of the immune modulating agents on PBMC from colon cancer patients....

  5. Characterization of colonizing Staphylococcus aureus isolated from surgical wards' patients in a Nigerian university hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deboye O Kolawole

    Full Text Available In contrast to developed countries, only limited data on the prevalence, resistance and clonal structure of Staphylococcus aureus are available for African countries. Since S. aureus carriage is a risk factor for postoperative wound infection, patients who had been hospitalized in surgical wards in a Nigerian University Teaching Hospital were screened for S. aureus carriage. All S. aureus isolates were genotyped (spa, agr and assigned to multilocus sequence types (MLST. Species affiliation, methicillin-resistance, and the possession of pyrogenic toxin superantigens (PTSAg, exfoliative toxins (ETs and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL were analyzed. Of 192 patients screened, the S. aureus carrier rate was 31.8 % (n = 61. Of these isolates, 7 (11.5% were methicillin-resistant (MRSA. The isolates comprised 24 spa types. The most frequent spa types were t064, t084, t311, and t1931, while the most prevalent MLST clonal complexes were CC5 and CC15. The most frequent PTSAg genes detected were seg/sei (41.0% followed by seb (29.5%, sea (19.7%, seh (14.7% and sec (11.5. The difference between the possession of classical and newly described PTSAg genes was not significant (63.9% versus 59.0% respectively; P = 0.602. PVL encoding genes were found in 39.3% isolates. All MRSA isolates were PVL negative, SCCmec types I and VI in MLST CC 5 and CC 30, respectively. Typing of the accessory gene regulator (agr showed the following distribution: agr group 1 (n = 20, group II (n = 17, group III (n = 14 and group IV (n = 10. Compared to European data, enterotoxin gene seb and PVL-encoding genes were more prevalent in Nigerian methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates, which may therefore act as potential reservoir for PVL and PTSAg genes.

  6. Longitudinal study on Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus aureus nasopharyngeal colonization in HIV-infected and -uninfected infants vaccinated with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhi, Shabir A; Izu, Alane; Nunes, Marta C; Violari, Avye; Cotton, Mark F; Jean-Philippe, Patrick; Klugman, Keith P; von Gottberg, Anne; van Niekerk, Nadia; Adrian, Peter V

    2015-05-28

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus aureus are all potentially pathogenic, which frequently colonize the nasopharynx (NP) prior to causing disease. We studied bacterial NP-colonization in 321 HIV-infected and 243 HIV-uninfected children vaccinated with 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) at 6, 10 and 14 weeks of age. HIV-uninfected infants included those born to HIV-uninfected (HUU) and HIV-infected women (HEU); HIV-infected children with CD4+ lymphocyte ≥25% were randomized to initiate antiretroviral therapy immediately (ART-Immed) or when clinically indicated (ART-Def). Nasopharyngeal swabs for bacterial culture were taken prior to each PCV7 dose (Visits 1-3) and at 20, 39, 47 and 67 weeks of age (Visits 4-7). Swabs were cultured by standard methods and pneumococcal serotyping done by the Quellung method. Colonization patterns for pneumococcus, H. influenzae and S. aureus did not differ between HUU and HEU children; and were also generally similar between ART-Def and ART-Immed children. Prevalence of PCV7-serotype colonization was similar between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children, however, overall pneumococcal and specifically non-vaccine serotype colonization tended to be lower in HIV-infected children. HIV-infected children also had a 44% lower prevalence of S. aureus colonization at Visit-1 (p=0.010); and H. influenzae colonization was also lower among HIV-infected than HIV-uninfected children at Visit-2, Visit-3, Visit-6 and Visit-7. Vaccine-serotype colonization is similar in PCV-immunized HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children. We, however, identified a lower prevalence of overall-pneumococcal and H. influenzae colonization in HIV-infected children post-PCV vaccination, the clinical-relevance of which warrants further study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence of USA300 Colonization or Infection and Associated Variables During an Outbreak of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Marginalized Urban Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Gilbert

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2004, an outbreak of the USA300 strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA was identified in persons with histories of homelessness, illicit drug use or incarceration in the Calgary Health Region (Calgary, Alberta. A prevalence study was conducted to test the hypotheses for factors associated with USA300 colonization or infection.

  8. Variation in Staphylococcus aureus Colonization in Relation to Disease Severity in Adults with Atopic Dermatitis during a Five-month Follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Alsterholm

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to monitor Staphylococcus aureus colonization and disease severity in adults with atopic dermatitis (AD during 5 months. Twenty-one patients attended 3 visits each for severity SCORing of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD assessment, quantitative cultures from the skin and conventional cultures from the anterior nares, tonsils and perineum. S. aureus isolates were typed for strain identity with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. Seventy-one percent of patients were colonized with S. aureus on lesional skin at least once. Density (colony-forming units (CFU/cm2 was higher on lesional skin than on non-lesional skin (p < 0.05. Density on lesional skin and number of colonized body sites were positively correlated with SCORAD (p = 0.0003 and p = 0.007, respectively. Persistent carriers of the same strain on lesional skin had higher mean SCORAD index than intermittent/non-carriers (36.3 and 17.1, respectively, p = 0.002. The results show a temporal correlation between several aspects of S. aureus colonization and disease severity in AD raising the question of the importance of this in pathogenesis and treatment.

  9. Persistence of Nasal Colonization with Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Pig Farmers after Holidays from Pig Exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koeck, Robin; Loth, Bea; Koeksal, Mahir; Schulte-Wuelwer, Josef; Harlizius, Juergen; Friedrich, Alexander W.

    Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) is frequently transmitted from pigs to farmers. This study analyzed whether an absence from direct contact with pigs during holidays had an impact on nasal MRSA colonization rates of pig farmers. Overall, 59% of the farmers

  10. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in HIV patients: Risk factors associated with colonization and/or infection and methods for characterization of isolates - a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis de Carvalho Ferreira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important cause of infections and HIV-infected individuals are frequently susceptible to this pathogen. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review to identify both the risk factors associated with colonization/infection by methicillin-resistant S. aureus in HIV patients and the methods used for characterization of isolates. An electronic search of articles published between January 2001 and December 2013 was first conducted. Among 116 studies categorized as being at a quality level of A, B or C, only 9 studies were considered to have high methodological quality (level A. The majority of these studies were retrospective (4/9 studies. The risk factors associated with colonization/infection by S. aureus were use of antimicrobials (4/9 studies, previous hospitalization (4/9 studies and low CD4+ T lymphocyte counts (<200 cells/μl (3/9 studies. Culture in mannitol salt agar (3/9 studies and the latex agglutination test (5/9 studies were the main methods used for bacterial phenotypic identification. Genotypic profiles were accessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (6/9 studies and USA300 was the most prevalent lineage (5/9 studies. Most isolates were resistant to erythromycin (3/9 studies and susceptible to vancomycin (4/9 studies. Ultimately, use of antimicrobials and previous hospitalization were the main risk factors for colonization/infection by methicillin-resistant S. aureus in HIV-infected individuals. However, the numbers of evaluated patients, the exclusion and inclusion criteria and the characterization of the S. aureus isolates were not uniform, which made it difficult to establish the characteristics associated with HIV patients who are colonized/infected by S. aureus.

  11. Vancomycin heteroresistant community associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST72-SCCmecIVa strain colonizing the nostrils of a five-year-old Spanish girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varona-Barquín, Aketza; Iglesias-Losada, Juan José; Ezpeleta, Guillermo; Eraso, Elena; Quindós, Guillermo

    2017-03-01

    During a community methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal colonization study, an MRSA strain with vancomycin hetero-resistance (h-VISA) was isolated from a five year-old girl with tetralogy of Fallot without previous exposure to vancomycin. An extended nasal colonization study was performed on all her close relatives. Only the patient and her sister were colonized by an h-VISA MRSA strain (clone USA 700, ST72, t148, agr 1 and SCCmec IVa). Mupirocin decolonisation was effective in the elder sister. A new nasal decolonisation in the younger girl using fusidic acid was also successful. However, after decolonisation both sisters were colonized by a methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (ST30, t012 and agr 3) previously isolated from their mother's nostrils. As S. aureus have a great capacity to spread among people in close contact, knowledge of a patients' colonization status, tracing contacts, and a correct management are critical issues for the successful containment of multiresistant staphylococci. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of co-colonization with community-acquired and hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains on competitive exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, Joanna; D'Agata, Erika M C; Webb, Glenn F

    2010-06-07

    We investigate the in-hospital transmission dynamics of two methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains: hospital-acquired methicillin resistant S. aureus (HA-MRSA) and community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA). Under the assumption that patients can only be colonized with one strain of MRSA at a time, global results show that competitive exclusion occurs between HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA strains; the strain with the larger basic reproduction ratio will become endemic while the other is extinguished due to competition. Because new studies suggest that patients can be concurrently colonized with multiple strains of MRSA, we extend the model to allow patients to be co-colonized with HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA. Using the extended model, we explore the effect of co-colonization on competitive exclusion by determining the invasion reproduction ratios of the boundary equilibria. In contrast to results derived from the assumption that co-colonization does not occur, the extended model rarely exhibits competitive exclusion. More commonly, both strains become endemic in the hospital. When transmission rates are assumed equal and decolonization measures act equally on all strains, competitive exclusion never occurs. Other interesting phenomena are exhibited. For example, solutions can tend toward a co-existence equilibrium, even when the basic reproduction ratio of one of the strains is less than one. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Clinical Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Healthy Children in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Suzi P.; de Almeida, Jéssica B.; de Freitas, Leandro M.; Guimaraes, Ana Marcia S.; do Nascimento, Naíla C.; dos Santos, Andrea P.; Messick, Joanne B.; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the draft genome sequences of two community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strains, C18 and C80, isolated from healthy children from day care centers. To our knowledge, these are the first draft genome sequences of CA-MRSA ST398/CC398/SccmecV and CA-MRSA ST5/CC5/SccmecIVa isolated from healthy children in Brazil. PMID:28408675

  14. Gene expression profiles of colonic mucosa in healthy young adult and senior dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Yong Kil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously reported the effects of age and diet on nutrient digestibility, intestinal morphology, and large intestinal fermentation patterns in healthy young adult and senior dogs. However, a genome-wide molecular analysis of colonic mucosa as a function of age and diet has not yet been performed in dogs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Colonic mucosa samples were collected from six senior (12-year old and six young adult (1-year old female beagles fed one of two diets (animal protein-based vs. plant protein-based for 12 months. Total RNA in colonic mucosa was extracted and hybridized to Affymetrix GeneChip® Canine Genome Arrays. Results indicated that the majority of gene expression changes were due to age (212 genes rather than diet (66 genes. In particular, the colonic mucosa of senior dogs had increased expression of genes associated with cell proliferation, inflammation, stress response, and cellular metabolism, whereas the expression of genes associated with apoptosis and defensive mechanisms were decreased in senior vs. young adult dogs. No consistent diet-induced alterations in gene expression existed in both age groups, with the effects of diet being more pronounced in senior dogs than in young adult dogs. CONCLUSION: Our results provide molecular insight pertaining to the aged canine colon and its predisposition to dysfunction and disease. Therefore, our data may aid in future research pertaining to age-associated gastrointestinal physiological changes and highlight potential targets for dietary intervention to limit their progression.

  15. Gene expression profiles of colonic mucosa in healthy young adult and senior dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Dong Yong; Vester Boler, Brittany M; Apanavicius, Carolyn J; Schook, Lawrence B; Swanson, Kelly S

    2010-09-22

    We have previously reported the effects of age and diet on nutrient digestibility, intestinal morphology, and large intestinal fermentation patterns in healthy young adult and senior dogs. However, a genome-wide molecular analysis of colonic mucosa as a function of age and diet has not yet been performed in dogs. Colonic mucosa samples were collected from six senior (12-year old) and six young adult (1-year old) female beagles fed one of two diets (animal protein-based vs. plant protein-based) for 12 months. Total RNA in colonic mucosa was extracted and hybridized to Affymetrix GeneChip® Canine Genome Arrays. Results indicated that the majority of gene expression changes were due to age (212 genes) rather than diet (66 genes). In particular, the colonic mucosa of senior dogs had increased expression of genes associated with cell proliferation, inflammation, stress response, and cellular metabolism, whereas the expression of genes associated with apoptosis and defensive mechanisms were decreased in senior vs. young adult dogs. No consistent diet-induced alterations in gene expression existed in both age groups, with the effects of diet being more pronounced in senior dogs than in young adult dogs. Our results provide molecular insight pertaining to the aged canine colon and its predisposition to dysfunction and disease. Therefore, our data may aid in future research pertaining to age-associated gastrointestinal physiological changes and highlight potential targets for dietary intervention to limit their progression.

  16. Effect of a chloride channel activator, lubiprostone, on colonic sensory and motor functions in healthy subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Sweetser, Seth; Busciglio, Irene A.; Camilleri, Michael; Bharucha, Adil E.; Szarka, Lawrence A.; Papathanasopoulos, Athanasios; Burton, Duane D.; Eckert, Deborah J.; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2008-01-01

    Lubiprostone, a bicyclic fatty acid chloride channel activator, is efficacious in treatment of chronic constipation and constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. The study aim was to compare effects of lubiprostone and placebo on colonic sensory and motor functions in humans. In double-blind, randomized fashion, 60 healthy adults received three oral doses of placebo or 24 μg lubiprostone per day in a parallel-group, placebo-controlled trial. A barostat-manometry tube was placed in th...

  17. Comparison of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in Healthy Community Hospital Visitors [CA-MRSA] and Hospital Staff [HA-MRSA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathare, Nirmal A; Tejani, Sara; Asogan, Harshini; Al Mahruqi, Gaitha; Al Fakhri, Salma; Zafarulla, Roshna; Pathare, Anil V

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [CA-MRSA] is unknown in Oman. Nasal and cell phones swabs were collected from hospital visitors and health-care workers on sterile polyester swabs and directly inoculated onto a mannitol salt agar containing oxacillin, allowing growth of methicillin-resistant microorganisms. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using Kirby Bauer's disc diffusion method on the isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for vancomycin and teicoplanin against the resistant isolates of MRSA by the Epsilometer [E] test. A brief survey questionnaire was requested be filled to ascertain the exposure to known risk factors for CA-MRSA carriage. Overall, nasal colonization with CA-MRSA was seen in 34 individuals (18%, 95% confidence interval [CI] =12.5%-23.5%), whereas, CA-MRSA was additionally isolated from the cell phone surface in 12 participants (6.3%, 95% CI =5.6%-6.98%). Nasal colonization prevalence with hospital-acquired [HA] MRSA was seen in 16 individuals (13.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] =7.5%-20.06%), whereas, HA-MRSA was additionally isolated from the cell phone surface in 3 participants (2.6%, 95% CI =1.7-4.54). Antibiotic sensitivity was 100% to linezolid and rifampicin in the CA-MRSA isolates. Antibiotic resistance to vancomycin and clindamycin varied between 9-11 % in the CA-MRSA isolates. Mean MIC for vancomycin amongst CA- and HA-MRSA were 6.3 and 9.3 μg/ml, whereas for teicoplanin they were 13 and 14 μg/ml respectively by the E-test. There was no statistically significant correlation between CA-MRSA nasal carriage and the risk factors (P>0.05, Chi-square test). The prevalence of CA-MRSA in the healthy community hospital visitors was 18 % (95% CI, 12.5% to 23.5%) as compared to 13.8% HA-MRSA in the hospital health-care staff. Despite a significant prevalence of CA-MRSA, these strains were mostly sensitive. The universal techniques of hand washing, personal

  18. Frequent isolation of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST398 among healthy pigs in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição, Teresa; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Aires-de-Sousa, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Although livestock-associated ST398 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been widely reported in different geographic regions, MRSA carriage studies among healthy pigs in Portugal are very limited. In total, 101 swine nasal samples from two Portuguese farms were screened for MRSA. In addition five swine workers (including one veterinary and one engineer) and four household members were nasally screened. The isolates were characterized by spa typing, SCCmec typing and MLST. All isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility, presence of mecA and mecC genes, and virulence determinants. MRSA prevalence in swine was 99% (100/101), 80% (4/5) in swine workers and 25% (1/4) in household members. All isolates belonged to ST398 distributed over two spa types-t011 (57%) and t108 (42%). SCCmec type V was present in most of the isolates (n = 95; 82%) while 21 isolates amplified the mecA gene only and were classified as nontypeable. The majority of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline (100%), clindamycin (97%), erythromycin (96%), chloramphenicol (84%) and gentamycin (69%). Notably, 12% showed resistance to quinupristin-dalfopristin (MICs 3-8 μg/mL). Beta-hemolysin (81%) and gamma-hemolysin (74%) were the unique virulence determinants detected. None of the isolates harboured PVL or mecC gene. This study showed a massive occurrence of ST398-MRSA in two independent swine farms, highlighting its establishment among healthy pigs in Portugal.

  19. Frequent isolation of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA ST398 among healthy pigs in Portugal.

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    Teresa Conceição

    Full Text Available Although livestock-associated ST398 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has been widely reported in different geographic regions, MRSA carriage studies among healthy pigs in Portugal are very limited.In total, 101 swine nasal samples from two Portuguese farms were screened for MRSA. In addition five swine workers (including one veterinary and one engineer and four household members were nasally screened. The isolates were characterized by spa typing, SCCmec typing and MLST. All isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility, presence of mecA and mecC genes, and virulence determinants. MRSA prevalence in swine was 99% (100/101, 80% (4/5 in swine workers and 25% (1/4 in household members. All isolates belonged to ST398 distributed over two spa types-t011 (57% and t108 (42%. SCCmec type V was present in most of the isolates (n = 95; 82% while 21 isolates amplified the mecA gene only and were classified as nontypeable. The majority of the isolates were resistant to tetracycline (100%, clindamycin (97%, erythromycin (96%, chloramphenicol (84% and gentamycin (69%. Notably, 12% showed resistance to quinupristin-dalfopristin (MICs 3-8 μg/mL. Beta-hemolysin (81% and gamma-hemolysin (74% were the unique virulence determinants detected. None of the isolates harboured PVL or mecC gene.This study showed a massive occurrence of ST398-MRSA in two independent swine farms, highlighting its establishment among healthy pigs in Portugal.

  20. Prevalence of nasal colonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in homeless and economically disadvantaged populations in Kansas City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Ottomeyer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nasal colonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA plays an important role in the epidemiology and pathogenesis of disease. Situations of close-quarter contact in groups are generally regarded as a risk factor for community acquired MRSA strains due to transmission via fomites and person to person contact. With these criteria for risk, homeless individuals using shelter facilities, including showers and toilets, should be considered high risk for colonization and infection. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of nasal colonization of MRSA in a homeless population compared to established rates of colonization within the public and a control group of subjects from a neighboring medical school campus, and to analyze phylogenetic diversity among the MRSA strains. Nasal samples were taken from the study population of 332 adult participants, and analyzed. In addition, participants were surveyed about various lifestyle factors in order to elucidate potential patterns of behavior associated with MRSA colonization. Homeless and control groups both had higher prevalence of MRSA (9.8% and 10.6% respectively when compared to the general population reported by previous studies (1.8%. However, the control group had a similar MRSA rate compared to healthcare workers (4.6% while the homeless population had an increased prevalence. Risk factors identified in this study included male gender, age over 50 years and use of antibiotics within the past 3 months. Phylogenetic relationships between 9 of the positive samples from the homeless population were analyzed, showing 8 of the 9 samples had a high degree of relatedness between the spaA genes of the MRSA strains. This indicates that the same MRSA strain might be transmitted from person to person among homeless population. These findings increase our understanding of key differences in MRSA characteristics within homeless populations as well as risks for MRSA associated with

  1. Prolonged outbreak of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a cardiac surgery unit linked to a single colonized healthcare worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haill, C; Fletcher, S; Archer, R; Jones, G; Jayarajah, M; Frame, J; Williams, A; Kearns, A M; Jenks, P J

    2013-03-01

    In low- as well as in high-prevalence settings, healthcare workers (HCWs) may be a substantial, under-recognized, reservoir of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and an important potential source of transmission to patients. To report an outbreak of MRSA in a cardiac surgery unit in England over a 10-month period. Cases were defined as patients and staff on the cardiac surgery unit from whom the outbreak strain was newly isolated between 20 May 2011 and 16 March 2012. Representative isolates from all cases were characterized by spa-typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multi-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA). Four patients appeared to acquire MRSA during their inpatient stay on the cardiac surgery unit. All four patients and one HCW were found to be carrying an identical epidemic (E)MRSA-15 strain (spa t032, pulsotype A, MLVA profile 16-6-3-1-1-17-1-4). No other members of staff were found to be colonized with MRSA. The colonized HCW was thought to be the source of the outbreak and was decolonized using a combination of nasal mupirocin, chlorhexidine body wash and oral rifampicin and doxycycline. This report highlights recent changes in the epidemiology of MRSA in England and suggests an important role for colonized HCWs in the transmission of MRSA to patients. Screening HCWs may provide an increasingly valuable strategy in managing linked hospital acquisitions and well-defined outbreaks where initial investigation does not reveal a source. Copyright © 2012 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Host Physiologic Changes Induced by Influenza A Virus Lead to Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Dispersion and Transition from Asymptomatic Colonization to Invasive Disease

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    Ryan M. Reddinger

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a ubiquitous opportunistic human pathogen and a major health concern worldwide, causing a wide variety of diseases from mild skin infections to systemic disease. S. aureus is a major source of severe secondary bacterial pneumonia after influenza A virus infection, which causes widespread morbidity and mortality. While the phenomenon of secondary bacterial pneumonia is well established, the mechanisms behind the transition from asymptomatic colonization to invasive staphylococcal disease following viral infection remains unknown. In this report, we have shown that S. aureus biofilms, grown on an upper respiratory epithelial substratum, disperse in response to host physiologic changes related to viral infection, such as febrile range temperatures, exogenous ATP, norepinephrine, and increased glucose. Mice that were colonized with S. aureus and subsequently exposed to these physiologic stimuli or influenza A virus coinfection developed pronounced pneumonia. This study provides novel insight into the transition from colonization to invasive disease, providing a better understanding of the events involved in the pathogenesis of secondary staphylococcal pneumonia.

  3. A failed RCT to determine if antibiotics prevent mastitis: Cracked nipples colonized with Staphylococcus aureus: A randomized treatment trial [ISRCTN65289389

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garland Suzanne M

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A small, non-blinded, RCT (randomised controlled trial had reported that oral antibiotics reduced the incidence of mastitis in lactating women with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus- colonized cracked nipples. We aimed to replicate the study with a more rigorous design and adequate sample size. Methods Our intention was to conduct a double-blind placebo-controlled trial to determine if an antibiotic (flucloxacillin could prevent mastitis in lactating women with S. aureus-colonized cracked nipples. We planned to recruit two groups of 133 women with S. aureus-colonized cracked nipples. Results We spent over twelve months submitting applications to five hospital ethics committees and seven funding bodies, before commencing the trial. Recruitment to the trial was very slow and only ten women were randomized to the trial after twelve months, and therefore the trial was stopped early. Conclusions In retrospect we should have conducted a feasibility study, which would have revealed the low number of women in these Melbourne hospitals (maternity wards and breastfeeding clinics with damaged nipples. The appropriate use of antibiotics for breastfeeding women with cracked nipples still needs to be tested.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus sarA Regulates Inflammation and Colonization during Central Nervous System Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Jessica N.; Beaver, Matt; Beenken, Karen; Smeltzer, Mark; Horswill, Alexander R.; Kielian, Tammy

    2013-01-01

    Infection is a frequent and serious complication following the treatment of hydrocephalus with CSF shunts, with limited therapeutic options because of biofilm formation along the catheter surface. Here we evaluated the possibility that the sarA regulatory locus engenders S. aureus more resistant to immune recognition in the central nervous system (CNS) based on its reported ability to regulate biofilm formation. We utilized our established model of CNS catheter-associated infection, similar to CSF shunt infections seen in humans, to compare the kinetics of bacterial titers, cytokine production and inflammatory cell influx elicited by wild type S. aureus versus an isogenic sarA mutant. The sarA mutant was more rapidly cleared from infected catheters compared to its isogenic wild type strain. Consistent with this finding, several pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-17, CXCL1, and IL-1β were significantly increased in the brain following infection with the sarA mutant versus wild type S. aureus, in agreement with the fact that the sarA mutant displayed impaired biofilm growth and favored a planktonic state. Neutrophil influx into the infected hemisphere was also increased in the animals infected with the sarA mutant compared to wild type bacteria. These changes were not attributable to extracellular protease activity, which is increased in the context of SarA mutation, since similar responses were observed between sarA and a sarA/protease mutant. Overall, these results demonstrate that sarA plays an important role in attenuating the inflammatory response during staphylococcal biofilm infection in the CNS via a mechanism that remains to be determined. PMID:24386336

  5. Staphylococcus aureus sarA regulates inflammation and colonization during central nervous system biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica N Snowden

    Full Text Available Infection is a frequent and serious complication following the treatment of hydrocephalus with CSF shunts, with limited therapeutic options because of biofilm formation along the catheter surface. Here we evaluated the possibility that the sarA regulatory locus engenders S. aureus more resistant to immune recognition in the central nervous system (CNS based on its reported ability to regulate biofilm formation. We utilized our established model of CNS catheter-associated infection, similar to CSF shunt infections seen in humans, to compare the kinetics of bacterial titers, cytokine production and inflammatory cell influx elicited by wild type S. aureus versus an isogenic sarA mutant. The sarA mutant was more rapidly cleared from infected catheters compared to its isogenic wild type strain. Consistent with this finding, several pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-17, CXCL1, and IL-1β were significantly increased in the brain following infection with the sarA mutant versus wild type S. aureus, in agreement with the fact that the sarA mutant displayed impaired biofilm growth and favored a planktonic state. Neutrophil influx into the infected hemisphere was also increased in the animals infected with the sarA mutant compared to wild type bacteria. These changes were not attributable to extracellular protease activity, which is increased in the context of SarA mutation, since similar responses were observed between sarA and a sarA/protease mutant. Overall, these results demonstrate that sarA plays an important role in attenuating the inflammatory response during staphylococcal biofilm infection in the CNS via a mechanism that remains to be determined.

  6. Colonization of healthy children by Moraxella catarrhalis is characterized by genotype heterogeneity, virulence gene diversity and co-colonization with Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaegh, Suzanne J C; Snippe, Martine L; Levy, Foster; Verbrugh, Henri A; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Hofman, Albert; Moll, Henriëtte A; van Belkum, Alex; Hays, John P

    2011-01-01

    The colonization dynamics of Moraxella catarrhalis were studied in a population comprising 1079 healthy children living in Rotterdam, The Netherlands (the Generation R Focus cohort). A total of 2751 nasal swabs were obtained during four clinic visits timed to take place at 1.5, 6, 14 and 24 months of age, yielding a total of 709 M. catarrhalis and 621 Haemophilus influenzae isolates. Between January 2004 and December 2006, approximate but regular 6-monthly cycles of colonization were observed, with peak colonization incidences occurring in the autumn/winter for M. catarrhalis, and winter/spring for H. influenzae. Co-colonization was significantly more likely than single-species colonization with either M. catarrhalis or H. influenzae, with genotypic analysis revealing no clonality for co-colonizing or single colonizers of either bacterial species. This finding is especially relevant considering the recent discovery of the importance of H. influenzae-M. catarrhalis quorum sensing in biofilm formation and host clearance. Bacterial genotype heterogeneity was maintained over the 3-year period of the study, even within this relatively localized geographical region, and there was no association of genotypes with either season or year of isolation. Furthermore, chronological and genotypic diversity in three immunologically important M. catarrhalis virulence genes (uspA1, uspA2 and hag/mid) was also observed. This study indicates that genotypic variation is a key factor contributing to the success of M. catarrhalis colonization of healthy children in the first years of life. Furthermore, variation in immunologically relevant virulence genes within colonizing populations, and even within genotypically identical M. catarrhalis isolates, may be a result of immune evasion by this pathogen. Finally, the factors facilitating M. catarrhalis and H. influenzae co-colonization need to be further investigated.

  7. Emergence of trimethoprim resistance gene dfrG in Staphylococcus aureus causing human infection and colonization in sub-Saharan Africa and its import to Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjadi, Dennis; Olalekan, Adesola O; Layer, Franziska; Shittu, Adebayo O; Alabi, Abraham; Ghebremedhin, Beniam; Schaumburg, Frieder; Hofmann-Eifler, Jonas; Van Genderen, Perry J J; Caumes, Eric; Fleck, Ralf; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Herrmann, Mathias; Kern, Winfried V; Abdulla, Salim; Grobusch, Martin P; Kremsner, Peter G; Wolz, Christiane; Zanger, Philipp

    2014-09-01

    Co-trimoxazole (trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole) is clinically valuable in treating skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) caused by community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The genetic basis of emerging trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistance in S. aureus from Africa is unknown. Such knowledge is essential to anticipate its further spread. We investigated the molecular epidemiology of trimethoprim resistance in S. aureus collected in and imported from Africa. Five hundred and ninety-eight human S. aureus isolates collected at five locations across sub-Saharan Africa [Gabon, Namibia, Nigeria (two) and Tanzania] and 47 isolates from travellers treated at six clinics in Europe because of SSTIs on return from Africa were tested for susceptibility to trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, screened for genes mediating trimethoprim resistance in staphylococci [dfrA (dfrS1), dfrB, dfrG and dfrK] and assigned to spa genotypes and clonal complexes. In 313 clinical and 285 colonizing S. aureus from Africa, 54% of isolates were resistant to trimethoprim, 21% to sulfamethoxazole and 19% to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. We found that 94% of trimethoprim resistance was mediated by the dfrG gene. Of the 47 S. aureus isolates from travellers with SSTIs, 27 (57%) were trimethoprim resistant and carried dfrG. Markers of trimethoprim resistance other than dfrG were rare. The presence of dfrG genes in S. aureus was neither geographically nor clonally restricted. dfrG, previously perceived to be an uncommon cause of trimethoprim resistance in human S. aureus, is widespread in Africa and abundant in imported S. aureus from ill returning travellers. These findings may foreshadow the loss of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole for the empirical treatment of SSTIs caused by community-associated MRSA. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights

  8. Colonization Density of the Upper Respiratory Tract as a Predictor of Pneumonia-Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pneumocystis jirovecii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Daniel E; Baggett, Henry C; Howie, Stephen R C; Shi, Qiyuan; Watson, Nora L; Brooks, W Abdullah; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Hammitt, Laura L; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; Murdoch, David R; O'Brien, Katherine L; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Ahmed, Dilruba; Antonio, Martin; Baillie, Vicky L; DeLuca, Andrea N; Driscoll, Amanda J; Fu, Wei; Gitahi, Caroline W; Olutunde, Emmanuel; Higdon, Melissa M; Hossain, Lokman; Karron, Ruth A; Maiga, Abdoul Aziz; Maloney, Susan A; Moore, David P; Morpeth, Susan C; Mwaba, John; Mwenechanya, Musaku; Prosperi, Christine; Sylla, Mamadou; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Zeger, Scott L; Feikin, Daniel R

    2017-06-15

    There is limited information on the association between colonization density of upper respiratory tract colonizers and pathogen-specific pneumonia. We assessed this association for Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pneumocystis jirovecii. In 7 low- and middle-income countries, nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs from children with severe pneumonia and age-frequency matched community controls were tested using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Differences in median colonization density were evaluated using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Density cutoffs were determined using receiver operating characteristic curves. Cases with a pathogen identified from lung aspirate culture or PCR, pleural fluid culture or PCR, blood culture, and immunofluorescence for P. jirovecii defined microbiologically confirmed cases for the given pathogens. Higher densities of H. influenzae were observed in both microbiologically confirmed cases and chest radiograph (CXR)-positive cases compared to controls. Staphylococcus aureus and P. jirovecii had higher densities in CXR-positive cases vs controls. A 5.9 log10 copies/mL density cutoff for H. influenzae yielded 86% sensitivity and 77% specificity for detecting microbiologically confirmed cases; however, densities overlapped between cases and controls and positive predictive values were poor (<3%). Informative density cutoffs were not found for S. aureus and M. catarrhalis, and a lack of confirmed case data limited the cutoff identification for P. jirovecii. There is evidence for an association between H. influenzae colonization density and H. influenzae-confirmed pneumonia in children; the association may be particularly informative in epidemiologic studies. Colonization densities of M. catarrhalis, S. aureus, and P. jirovecii are unlikely to be of diagnostic value in clinical settings.

  9. Basic rules of hygiene protect health care and lab workers from nasal colonization by Staphylococcus aureus: an international cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Saadatian-Elahi

    Full Text Available Acquisition of nasal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus colonization by contaminated hands is likely an important determinant of its nasal carriage rate in health care and lab setting. The objective of our cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of nasal methicillin-sensitive (MSSA or -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA carriage among health care professionals (HCPs attending an international symposium and to study the association between compliance with hygiene rules, individual-related parameters, and medical conditions with nasal S. aureus carriage in this population. After obtaining consent, two nasal swabs were collected. Nasal MSSA and MRSA carriage was measured by the: i molecular approach targeting spa, mecA and mecA-orfX junction sequences, and ii culture on selective S. aureus media combined with mecA molecular detection of isolated strains. Information on compliance with hygiene rules, demographic variables, sector of activity and long-term medication was collected by anonymous questionnaire. The participation rate was 32.3%. In total, 176 subjects from 34 countries were included in the analysis. S. aureus was isolated from the nasal swabs of 57 (32.4% subjects, of whom 3 (5.3% harbored MRSA strains. Overall, 123 subjects reported working in microbiology laboratories with direct manipulation of S. aureus, and 29 acknowledged regular contacts with patients. In this exposed population, hydro-alcoholic solutions appeared to have a significant protective effect against nasal S. aureus carriage (OR = 0.36; 95% CI: 0.15-0.85. Hospital work was associated with increased risk of nasal S. aureus carriage (OR = 2.38; 95% CI: 1.07-5.29. The results of this study showed that compliance with basic rules of hygiene, such as the use of hydro-alcoholic solutions, could reduce the risk of nasal S. aureus colonization. Hydro-alcoholic solution could interrupt auto-transmission of the pathogen, consequently decreasing the overall

  10. Acquisition of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in contacts of patients newly identified as colonized or infected with MRSA in the immediate postexposure and postdischarge periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Victoria R; Callery, Sandra; Vearncombe, Mary; Simor, Andrew E

    2017-03-01

    The acquisition of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) after exposure to patients colonized or infected with MRSA was assessed. Among contacts with complete surveillance screening, the rate of acquisition was 5.7% and was lower in those identified postdischarge (17/683, 2.5%) compared with those tested in the immediate postexposure period (62/706, 8.8%). Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Rapid Emergence of Co-colonization with Community-acquired and Hospital-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains in the Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agata, E M C; Webb, G F; Pressley, J

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA- MRSA), a novel strain of MRSA, has recently emerged and rapidly spread in the community. Invasion into the hospital setting with replacement of the hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) has also been documented. Co-colonization with both CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA would have important clinical implications given differences in antimicrobial susceptibility profiles and the potential for exchange of genetic information. METHODS: A deterministic mathematical model was developed to characterize the transmission dynamics of HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA in the hospital setting and to quantify the emergence of co-colonization with both strains RESULTS: The model analysis shows that the state of co-colonization becomes endemic over time and that typically there is no competitive exclusion of either strain. Increasing the length of stay or rate of hospital entry among patients colonized with CA-MRSA leads to a rapid increase in the co-colonized state. Compared to MRSA decolonization strategy, improving hand hygiene compliance has the greatest impact on decreasing the prevalence of HA-MRSA, CA-MRSA and the co-colonized state. CONCLUSIONS: The model predicts that with the expanding community reservoir of CA-MRSA, the majority of hospitalized patients will become colonized with both CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA.

  12. Effect of mupirocin treatment on nasal, pharyngeal, and perineal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in healthy adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.F.L. Wertheim (Heiman); J. Verveer (Jeroen); H.A.M. Boelens (Hélène); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); M.C. Vos (Margreet)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractNasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is an important risk factor for S. aureus infections. Mupirocin nasal ointment is presently the treatment of choice for decolonizing the anterior nares. However, recent clinical trials show limited benefit from mupirocin prophylaxis in preventing

  13. Effect of meteorological factors and geographic location on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci colonization in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Natalia; Perencevich, Eli; Li, Shan Shan; Morgan, Daniel J; Pineles, Lisa; Johnson, J Kristie; Robinson, Gwen; Anderson, Deverick J; Jacob, Jesse T; Maragakis, Lisa L; Harris, Anthony D

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of meteorological conditions and geographical location on bacterial colonization rates particularly of antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. We aimed to evaluate the effect of season, meteorological factors, and geographic location on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) colonization. The prospective cohort included all adults admitted to 20 geographically-dispersed ICUs across the US from September 1, 2011 to October 4, 2012. Nasal and perianal swabs were collected at admission and tested for MRSA and VRE colonization respectively. Poisson regression models using monthly aggregated colonization counts as the outcome and mean temperature, relative humidity, total precipitation, season, and/or latitude as predictors were constructed for each pathogen. A total of 24,704 ICU-admitted patients were tested for MRSA and 24,468 for VRE. On admission, 10% of patients were colonized with MRSA and 12% with VRE. For MRSA and VRE, a 10% increase in relative humidity was associated with approximately a 9% increase in prevalence rate. Southerly latitudes in the US were associated with higher MRSA colonization, while northerly latitudes were associated with higher VRE colonization. In contrast to MRSA, the association between VRE colonization and latitude was observed only after adjusting for relative humidity, which demonstrates how this effect is highly driven by this meteorological factor. To our knowledge, we are the first to study the effect of meteorological factors and geographical location/latitude on MRSA and VRE colonization in adults. Increasing humidity was associated with greater MRSA and VRE colonization. Southerly latitudes in the US were associated with greater MRSA and less VRE. The effect of these factors on MRSA and VRE rates has the potential not only to inform patient management and treatment, but also infection prevention interventions.

  14. Aleitamento materno e colonização mucocutânea pelo Staphylococcus aureus na criança com dermatite atópica Breastfeeding and mucosal and cutaneous colonization by Staphylococcus aureus in atopic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raissa Massaia Londero Chemello

    2011-06-01

    remains unclear whether colonization of atopic patients by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus through breastfeeding is relevant to the development of AD. OBJECTIVE: To examine the potential relation between breastfeeding and colonization by S. aureus in atopic patients. METHOD: Transversal study of atopic patients, aged from 4 to 24 months, both genders, receiving outpatient care and 72 mothers. Data on infant breastfeeding practices and on clinical-epidemiological profile were registered. Swabs of the infants' nares and skin (cubital fossa and swabs of the mothers' nares were collected. For univariate analysis, X2 (chi-square and Fischer Exact's test were used. RESULTS: Among breastfed children, S. aureus was isolated from 8 (25.8% infants' nares swabs and from 4 (12.9% skin swabs. Among not breastfed children, S. aureus was isolated from 10 (20.8% infants' nares swabs and from 11 (22.9% skin swabs. Sixteen mothers (22.2% had S. aureus isolated from their nares swabs. There was no significant association between breastfeeding and S. aureus colonization (child skin and/or nares. However, there was a degree of concordance for S. aureus carriage among mothers and infants. Among 72 pairs, 56 (77.8% were concordant. CONCLUSION: Breastfeeding was not associated with S. aureus muco-cutaneous colonization in atopic infants

  15. spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from healthy humans, pigs and dogs in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katakweba, Abdul S.; Muhairwa, Amandus P.; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in humans and animals. Here we report for the first time the prevalence of nasal carriage, spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus in a Tanzanian livestock community. Methodology: Nasal swabs were taken...... from 100 humans, 100 pigs and 100 dogs in Morogoro Municipal. Each swab was enriched in Mueller Hinton broth with 6.5% NaCl and subcultured on chromogenic agar for S. aureus detection. Presumptive S. aureus colonies were confirmed to the species level by nuc PCR and analysed by spa typing....... Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined by disc diffusion method. Results: S. aureus was isolated from 22 % of humans, 4 % of pigs and 11 % of dogs. A total of 21 spa types were identified: 13, 7 and 1 in human, dogs, and pigs, respectively. Three spa types (t314, t223 and t084) were shared...

  16. Nasopharyngeal and Oropharyngeal Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae and Prognostic Markers in Children with Sickle Cell Disease from the Northeast of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Larissa C; Carvalho, Magda O S; Nascimento, Valma M L; Dos Santos, Milena S; Barros, Tânia F; Adorno, Elisângela V; Reis, Joice N; da Guarda, Caroline C; Santiago, Rayra P; Gonçalves, Marilda de Souza

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the nasopharynx and oropharynx microbiota in sickle cell disease (SCD) to identify the microorganisms, antibiotic sensitivity, prevalent serotypes, and association of with laboratorial markers. Oropharynx/nasopharynx secretions were investigated in 143 SCD children aging 6 months to 17 years. Pathogens were isolated using standard procedures, and laboratorial markers were performed by automated methods. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) was isolated from nasopharynx and oropharynx of 64 and of 17 SCD children respectively. Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) was isolated from the nasopharynx and oropharynx of eight SCD patients. Serotypes of S. pneumoniae were 19F, 23F, and 14. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin, and patients whose nasopharynx and oropharynx were colonized by S. pneumoniae had high concentrations of aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, and ferritin. S. pneumoniae isolated were not penicillin-resistant serotypes suggesting that the use of penicillin for prophylaxis and/or treatment of infections is safe. Our finding of colonization and laboratory evaluation in SCD patients suggests that microorganisms are involved in the modulation of chronic inflammatory. The association of colonized microorganisms and laboratorial markers suggest a new approach to these patients follow-up, and additional studies of microorganism colonization and their association with SCD patients' clinical outcome will improve control and prevention strategies.

  17. Small Demodex populations colonize most parts of the skin of healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravera, Iván; Altet, Laura; Francino, Olga; Sánchez, Armand; Roldán, Wendy; Villanueva, Sergio; Bardagí, Mar; Ferrer, Lluís

    2013-02-01

    It is unproven that all dogs harbour Demodex mites in their skin. In fact, several microscopic studies have failed to demonstrate mites in healthy dogs. Demodex canis is a normal inhabitant of the skin of most, if not all, dogs. This hypothesis was tested using a sensitive real-time PCR to detect Demodex DNA in the skin of dogs. One hundred dogs living in a humane society shelter, 20 privately owned and healthy dogs and eight dogs receiving immunosuppressive or antineoplastic therapy. Hair samples (250-300 hairs with their hair bulbs) were taken from five or 20 skin locations. A real-time PCR that amplifies a 166 bp sequence of the D. canis chitin synthase gene was used. The percentage of positive dogs increased with the number of sampling points. When a large canine population was sampled at five cutaneous locations, 18% of dogs were positive for Demodex DNA. When 20 skin locations were sampled, all dogs tested positive for mite DNA. Our study indicates that Demodex colonization of the skin is present in all dogs, independent of age, sex, breed or coat. Nevertheless, the population of mites in a healthy dog appears to be small. Demodex DNA was amplified from all 20 cutaneous points investigated, without statistically significant differences. Using a real-time PCR technique, Demodex mites, albeit in very low numbers, were found to be normal inhabitants of haired areas of the skin of healthy dogs. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology © 2013 ESVD and ACVD.

  18. agr-dependent bacterial interference has no impact on long-term colonization of Staphylococcus aureus during persistent airway infection of cystic fibrosis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kahl, Barbara C; Becker, Karsten; Friedrich, Alexander W; Clasen, Julia; Sinha, Bhanu; Von Eiff, Christof; Peters, Georg

    2003-01-01

    The agr specificity group distribution of persistent Staphylococcus aureus clones recovered from the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients did not differ from that of isolates recovered from various clinical infections and healthy nasal carriers. The success of CF clones in terms of

  19. Colonização microbiana precoce de pacientes identificados por triagem neonatal para fibrose cística, com ênfase em Staphylococcus aureus Early microbial colonization of cystic fibrosis patients identified by neonatal screening, with emphasis on Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena A. P. H. M. Souza

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar prospectivamente a colonização bacteriana de pacientes com fibrose cística identificados por triagem neonatal. Avaliar a suscetibilidade a antimicrobianos e caracterizar molecularmente as cepas de Staphylococcus aureus isoladas da orofaringe dos pacientes no período do estudo. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 25 pacientes com fibrose cística, identificados por tripsina imunorreativa e com diagnóstico confirmado por duas ou mais provas de suor, atendidos regularmente no ambulatório de fibrose cística do Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal do Paraná. Foram coletadas amostras de orofaringe com swab e cultivadas por métodos rotineiros; as colônias bacterianas foram identificadas fenotipicamente e testadas quanto à suscetibilidade a antimicrobianos. Os isolados de S. aureus foram submetidos a tipagem molecular por eletroforese em campo pulsado. RESULTADOS: De um total de 234 amostras de orofaringe, S. aureus foi isolado em maior número (76% dos pacientes, 42% das amostras, seguido de Pseudomonas aeruginosa (36% dos pacientes, 16% das amostras e Haemophilus spp. (76% dos pacientes; 19% das amostras. Dos 19 pacientes colonizados com S. aureus, foram obtidos 73 isolados, 18 oxacilina-resistentes (24,6%, isolados de dois pacientes, com perfis eletroforéticos idênticos ao do clone brasileiro. Os demais isolados oxacilina-sensíveis distribuíram-se entre 18 perfis eletroforéticos distintos. CONCLUSÃO: Observou-se uma maior prevalência de S. aureus, com isolamento mais precoce em relação aos outros patógenos pesquisados. Os isolados multissensíveis distribuíram-se em clones distintos, caracterizando a não transmissibilidade entre as cepas comunitárias. Os S. aureus resistentes a oxacilina isolados apresentaram perfis eletroforéticos idênticos, provavelmente adquiridos no ambiente hospitalar. P. aeruginosa foi pouco freqüente na população estudada.OBJECTIVES: To assess bacterial colonization prospectively

  20. Multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria colonization of healthy US military personnel in the US and Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vento, Todd J; Cole, David W; Mende, Katrin; Calvano, Tatjana P; Rini, Elizabeth A; Tully, Charla C; Zera, Wendy C; Guymon, Charles H; Yu, Xin; Cheatle, Kristelle A; Akers, Kevin S; Beckius, Miriam L; Landrum, Michael L; Murray, Clinton K

    2013-02-05

    The US military has seen steady increases in multidrug-resistant (MDR) gram-negative bacteria (GNB) infections in casualties from Iraq and Afghanistan. This study evaluates the prevalence of MDR GNB colonization in US military personnel. GNB colonization surveillance of healthy, asymptomatic military personnel (101 in the US and 100 in Afghanistan) was performed by swabbing 7 anatomical sites. US-based personnel had received no antibiotics within 30 days of specimen collection, and Afghanistan-based personnel were receiving doxycycline for malaria chemoprophylaxis at time of specimen collection. Isolates underwent genotypic and phenotypic characterization. The only colonizing MDR GNB recovered in both populations was Escherichia coli (p=0.01), which was seen in 2% of US-based personnel (all perirectal) and 11% of Afghanistan-based personnel (10 perirectal, 1 foot+groin). Individuals with higher off-base exposures in Afghanistan did not show a difference in overall GNB colonization or MDR E. coli colonization, compared with those with limited off-base exposures. Healthy US- and Afghanistan-based military personnel have community onset-MDR E. coli colonization, with Afghanistan-based personnel showing a 5.5-fold higher prevalence. The association of doxycycline prophylaxis or other exposures with antimicrobial resistance and increased rates of MDR E. coli colonization needs further evaluation.

  1. Orbital cellulitis caused by community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a previously healthy neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Tzu-Hui; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Chu, Yen-Chang; Lee, Chien-Yu; Lien, Reyin

    2013-04-01

    A 30-day-old, previously healthy, near-term neonate presented with fever and swelling of the left eye. Orbital cellulitis of the left eye was diagnosed by computed tomography. Both blood culture and pus that was drained from the orbital abscess were positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which was found to be a strain indigenous to the local community by a molecular method. Using vancomycin therapy and surgical drainage, the infant recovered uneventfully. Orbital cellulitis in neonates may rapidly progress to abscess formation, even to sepsis, and S. aureus is the most common pathogen. With the increasing prevalence of community-associated MRSA, empiric antibiotics effective against MRSA should be first considered in endemic areas. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Upper respiratory colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae in healthy pre-school children in south-east Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korona-Glowniak, Izabela; Niedzielski, Artur; Malm, Anna

    2011-12-01

    Carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae in upper respiratory tract of healthy children is a major factor in the horizontal transmission of pneumococcal strains, especially between children attending day-care centers and may be also the source of infection in other individuals. During 8-month prospective study including 3 seasons (autumn, winter, spring), we determined risk factors for S. pneumoniae colonization in general and colonization at 2 or 3 time points in healthy pre-school children, including penicillin non-susceptible likewise multidrug resistant strains. Pneumococcal cultures were obtained from 311 children aged 3-5. Finally, a total of 342 isolates were identified. Resistance of pneumococcal isolates was determined and information about potential risk factors were obtained from questionnaires. A total of 72.4% children were colonized by pneumococci at least once, including 8.4% children colonized at 3 time points, 25.4% children - twice and 38.6% children - only once. Penicillin non-susceptible pneumococcal colonization was found in 36.3% children at least once while multidrug-resistant pneumococcal colonization in 34.1% children. Of the 10.9% and 10.6% children were colonized at 2 or 3 time points by penicillin non-sussceptible and multidrug-resistant isolates, respectively. Pneumococcal colonization (in general or by non-susceptible to penicillin isolates) was independently associated with day care attendance, having no siblings, frequent respiratory tract infections and higher number of antibiotic courses. Children attending day care center, with frequent respiratory tract infections, exposed to tobacco smoke were prone to colonization by multidrug-resistant isolates. Risk of colonization at 2 or 3 time points by pneumococcal isolates, including penicillin-nonsusceptible isolates, was associated with age and day care attendance while multidrug-resistant pneumococcal colonization was found to be significantly higher in children aged 3, with frequent

  3. Increased use of surgical energy promotes methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in rabbits following open ventral hernia mesh repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Moure, Joseph S; Van Eps, Jeffrey L; Peress, Lilia; Cantu, Concepcion; Olsen, Randall J; Jenkins, Leslie; Cabrera, Fernando J; Tasciotti, Ennio; Weiner, Bradley K; Dunkin, Brian J

    2017-02-01

    Surgical energy has been widely implemented because of ease of use, effective hemostasis, and surgical dissection. Studies demonstrate its use to be an independent risk factor for postoperative wound infection. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most common bacteria found in postoperative mesh infection. No reports are available on the sequelae of surgical energy use for open ventral hernia repair (oVHR) with mesh. We hypothesized that increasing amounts of surgical energy will result in higher infectious burden after oVHR with composite multifilament polyester mesh (Parietex™ PCO). New Zealand rabbits underwent bridging oVHR with Parietex™ PCO and were divided into three surgical treatment groups: (1) scalpel alone, (2) 120 J of energy, and (3) 600 J of energy. The bioprosthesis was then inoculated with 105 colony-forming units of MRSA. Rabbits were survived for 7 days with daily physical examination. Complete blood count, basci metabolic panel, and blood cultures were performed on postoperative days one, four, and seven. Surviving rabbits were killed, and meshes explanted for MRSA colony counts. Rabbits receiving the most surgical energy developed signs and symptoms of severe sepsis and wound necrosis within 24 h. In comparison, rabbits receiving no surgical energy had significantly less MRSA recovered from explanted mesh, significantly less bacteremia, and fewer adhesions. Increased use of surgical energy promoted greater colonization, exaggerated septic response to bacterial contamination, and more severe adhesions. In the absence of devitalized tissue, rabbits can effectively limit bacterial contamination. These findings support the surgical principles of proper tissue handling and highlight the detrimental effects of indiscriminant surgical energy usage, thus emphasizing the importance of programs such as Fundamental Use of Surgical Energy.

  4. Risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in the neonatal intensive care unit: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washam, Matthew; Woltmann, Jon; Haberman, Beth; Haslam, David; Staat, Mary Allen

    2017-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) causes a significant burden of illness in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) worldwide. Identifying infants colonized with MRSA has become an important infection control strategy to interrupt nosocomial transmission. Assess risk factors for MRSA colonization in NICUs via a systematic review and meta-analysis. MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, and The Cochrane Library databases were searched from inception through September 2015. Studies reporting risk factors for MRSA colonization using noncolonized controls in subspecialty level III or IV NICUs were included. Two authors independently extracted data on MRSA colonization risk factors, study design, and MRSA screening methodology. Eleven articles were included in the systematic review, with 10 articles analyzed via meta-analysis. MRSA colonization was associated with gestational age <32 weeks (odds ratio [OR], 2.67; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.35-5.27; P = .01) and birth weight <1,500 g (OR, 2.63; 95% CI, 1.25-5.55; P = .01). Infant sex (P = .21), race (P = .06), inborn status (P = .09), and delivery type (P = .24) were not significantly associated with colonization. Very preterm and very-low birth weight infants were identified as having an increased risk for MRSA colonization on meta-analysis. Multifaceted infection prevention strategies should target these high-risk infants to reduce MRSA colonization rates in NICUs. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Characteristics of Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains Colonizing Upper Respiratory Tract of Healthy Preschool Children in Poland

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    Izabela Korona-Glowniak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistant and invasive pneumococci may spread temporally and locally in day care centers (DCCs. We examined 267 children attending four DCCs located in the same city and 70 children staying at home in three seasons (autumn, winter, and spring to determine prevalence, serotype distribution, antibiotic resistance patterns, and transmission of pneumococcal strains colonizing upper respiratory tract of healthy children without antipneumococcal vaccination. By pheno- and genotyping, we determined clonality of pneumococci, including drug-resistant strains. The average carriage of pneumococci in three seasons was 38.2%. 73.4% and 80.4% of the isolates belonged to serotypes present in 10- and 13-valent conjugate vaccine, respectively. Among the pneumococcal strains, 33.3% were susceptible to all antimicrobial tested and 39.2% had decreased susceptibility to penicillin. Multidrug resistance was common (35.7%; 97.5% of drug-resistant isolates represented serotypes included to 10- and 13-valent conjugate vaccine. According to BOX-PCR, clonality definitely was observed only in case of serotype 14. Multivariate analysis determined DCC attendance as strongly related to pneumococcal colonization in all three seasons, but important seasonal differences were demonstrated. In children attending DCCs, we observed dynamic turnover of pneumococcal strains, especially penicillin nonsusceptible and multidrug resistant, which were mostly distributed among serotypes included to available pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.

  6. Ex vivo photometric and polarimetric multilayer characterization of human healthy colon by multispectral Mueller imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierangelo, Angelo; Manhas, Sandeep; Benali, Abdelali; Fallet, Clément; Antonelli, Maria-Rosaria; Novikova, Tatiana; Gayet, Brice; Validire, Pierre; De Martino, Antonello

    2012-06-01

    Healthy human colon samples were analyzed ex vivo with a multispectral imaging Mueller polarimeter operating from 500 to 700 nm in a backscattering configuration with diffuse light illumination impinging on the innermost tissue layer, the mucosa. The intensity and polarimetric responses were taken on whole tissues first and after progressive exfoliation of the outer layers afterwards. Moreover, these measurements were carried out with two different substrates (one bright and the other dark) successively placed beneath each sample, allowing a reasonably accurate evaluation of the contributions to the overall backscattered light by the various layers. For the shorter investigated wavelengths (500 to 550 nm) the major contribution comes from mucosa and submucosa, while for the longer wavelengths (650 to 700 nm) muscular tissue and fat also contribute significantly. The depolarization has also been studied and is found to be stronger in the red part of the spectrum, mainly due to the highly depolarizing power of the muscular and fat layers.

  7. Nasal colonization of mecA-positive, oxacillin-susceptible, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates among nursing staff in an Iranian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannati, Elham; Arzanlou, Mohsen; Habibzadeh, Shahram; Mohammadi, Saeed; Ahadi, Parisa; Mohammadi-Ghalehbin, Behnam; Dogaheh, Hadi Peeri; Dibah, Solmaz; Kazemi, Ebrahim

    2013-11-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of health care-associated infections. In this study, a total of 173 nurses was screened for S aureus nasal colonization, of which 8 (4.6%) were MRSA carriers. Among the MRSA isolates, 6 were mecA positive and oxacillin resistant, and 2 were mecA-positive, oxacillin-susceptible (OS-MRSA) strains. Reports of the OS-MRSA strains are increasing worldwide. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report on the occurrence of OS-MRSA strains in Iran. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Gut microbial diversity in health and disease: experience of healthy Indian subjects, and colon carcinoma and inflammatory bowel disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamola, V Deepak; Ghosh, Arnab; Kapardar, Raj Kishor; Lal, Banwari; Cheema, Simrita; Sarma, Priyangshu; Chaudhry, Rama

    2017-01-01

    Background: The intestinal microbiota, through complex interactions with the gut mucosa, play a key role in the pathogenesis of colon carcinoma and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The disease condition and dietary habits both influence gut microbial diversity. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the gut microbial profile of healthy subjects and patients with colon carcinoma and IBD. Healthy subjects included 'Indian vegetarians/lactovegetarians', who eat plant produce, milk and milk products, and 'Indian non-vegetarians', who eat plant produce, milk and milk products, certain meats and fish, and the eggs of certain birds and fish. 'Indian vegetarians' are different from 'vegans', who do not eat any foods derived wholly or partly from animals, including milk products. Design: Stool samples were collected from healthy Indian vegetarians/lactovegetarians and non-vegetarians, and colon cancer and IBD patients. Clonal libraries of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of bacteria were created from each sample. Clones were sequenced from one representative sample of each group. Approximately 500 white colonies were picked at random from each sample and 100 colonies were sequenced after amplified rDNA restriction analysis. Results: The dominant phylum from the healthy vegetarian was Firmicutes (34%), followed by Bacteroidetes (15%). The balance was reversed in the healthy non-vegetarian (Bacteroidetes 84%, Firmicutes 4%; ratio 21:1). The colon cancer and IBD patients had higher percentages of Bacteroidetes (55% in both) than Firmicutes (26% and 12%, respectively) but lower Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratios (3.8:1 and 2.4:1, respectively) than the healthy non-vegetarian. Bacterial phyla of Verrucomicrobiota and Actinobacteria were detected in 23% and 5% of IBD and colon patients, respectively. Conclusions: Ribosomal Database Project profiling of gut flora in this study population showed remarkable differences, with unique diversity attributed to different diets and disease

  9. The effects of various sources of dietary fibre on cholesterol metabolism and colonic function in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stasse-Wolthuis, M.

    1980-01-01

    This thesis deals with the influence of several types of dietary fibre on cholesterol metabolism and colonic function in young healthy subjects. Dietary fibre has been defined as those plant polysaccharides (cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectic substances) and lignin which are resistant to hydrolysis

  10. Adaptive immune response to lipoproteins of Staphylococcus aureus in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chi Hai Vu,; Kolata, Julia; Stentzel, Sebastian; Beyer, Anica; Salazar, Manuela Gesell; Steil, Leif; Pane-Farre, Jan; Ruehmling, Vanessa; Engelmann, Susanne; Goetz, Friedrich; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Hecker, Michael; Maeder, Ulrike; Schmidt, Frank; Voelker, Uwe; Broeker, Barbara M.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent commensal but also a dangerous pathogen, causing many forms of infection ranging from mild to life-threatening conditions. Among its virulence factors are lipoproteins, which are anchored in the bacterial cell membrane. Lipoproteins perform various functions in

  11. Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA as causes of human infection and colonization in Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Köck

    Full Text Available Pigs, cattle and poultry are colonized with MRSA and the zoonotic transmission of such MRSA to humans via direct animal contact, environmental contaminations or meat are a matter of concern. Livestock-associated (LA MRSA are mostly belonging to clonal complex (CC 398 as defined by multilocus sequence typing. However, MRSA of other clonal lineages including CC5, CC9 and CC97 have also been detected in livestock animals in Germany. Within the framework of a Dutch-German network project (EUREGIO, 14,036 MRSA isolated from clinical and screening specimens (January 2008 - June 2012 derived from human patients in hospitals as well as general or specialized practices in a German region characterized by a high density of livestock production, were subjected to S. aureus protein A (spa sequence typing. The prevalence of putative LA-MRSA among the human MRSA isolates was determined by analyzing the detection of livestock-indicator (LI spa types which had already been reported in German livestock. Overall, 578 spa types were detected among the MRSA isolates. LI spa types t011, t034, t108, t1451, t2011, t571, t1456, t1250, t1255, t1580, t2970, t2346, t1344, t2576, t2330 and t2510 (all of which are indicative for LA-MRSA CC398 accounted for 18.6% of all human isolates. The LI spa types t1430 (CC9, t3992 (CC97, t002 (CC5 and t007 (CC30 were found in 0.14%, 0.01%, 1.01% and 0.04% of all human MRSA isolates, respectively. LI spa types associated with CC398 represented 23% of all MRSA from screening samples and a varying proportion among isolates from clinical specimens ranging between 0% in cerebrospinal fluid, 8% in blood cultures and 14% in deep respiratory fluids. Our findings indicate that LA-MRSA are a major cause for human infection and stress the need for close surveillance. Although LA-MRSA CC398 predominates, the occurrence of putative LA-MRSA from other clonal lineages should be monitored.

  12. Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization among Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients and health care workers at Muhimbili national hospital, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geofrey, Alfred; Abade, Ahmed; Aboud, Said

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been recognized as important nosocomial pathogens worldwide. S aureus may induce clinically manifested diseases, or the host may remain completely asymptomatic. A cross-sectional hospital-based study was conducted from October 2012 to March 2013 in two ICUs at MNH. Admitted patients and health care workers were enrolled in the study. Interviewer administered questionnaires; patient history forms, observation charts and case report forms were used to collect data. Swabs (nostrils, axillary or wounds) were collected. MRSA were screened and confirmed using cefoxitin, oxacillin discs and oxacillin screen agar. Antibiotic susceptibility was performed using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The risk factors for MRSA were determined using the logistic regression analysis and a p - value of MRSA colonization among patients and health care workers was 11.83% and 2.1% respectively. All (21) MRSA isolates were highly resistant to penicillin and erythromycin, and 17 (85.7%) were highly sensitive to vancomycin. Being male (AOR 6.74, 95% CI 1.31-34.76), history of sickness in past year (AOR 4.89, 95% CI 1.82- 13.12), being sick for more 3 times (AOR 8.91, 95% CI 2.32-34.20), being diabetic (AOR 4.87, 95% CI 1.55-15.36) and illicit drug use (AOR 10.18, 95%CI 1.36-76.52) were found to be independently associated with MRSA colonization. A study identified a high prevalence of MRSA colonization among patients admitted in the ICU. MRSA isolates were highly resistant to penicillin and erythromycin. History of illegal drug use was highly associated with MRSA colonization.

  13. Relationships between rhinitis symptoms, respiratory viral infections and nasopharyngeal colonization with Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus aureus in children attending daycare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Fernanda; Foster, Dona; Nicoli, Emily; Trotter, Caroline; Vipond, Barry; Muir, Peter; Gonçalves, Guilherme; Januário, Luís; Finn, Adam

    2013-03-01

    Nasal bacterial colonization is often dubbed "asymptomatic." We hypothesized that rhinitis, common in preschool children, is associated with bacterial colonization and that respiratory viruses, which cause rhinitis, interact with bacteria in ways which promote transmission. Five hundred eighty-five children (4.2-73.6 months) attending daycare had clinical information, a rhinitis score and nasal swabs collected in February 2009. Swabs in soya tryptone glucose glycerine broth were cultured for Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp), Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) and Staphylococcus aureus and analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction for respiratory viruses, both semiquantitatively. Rhinitis symptoms, carriage of Sp and Hi and viral detection fell, whereas S. aureus carriage rates rose with age. Significant, age-independent associations between rhinitis symptoms and detection of Hi (P < 0.033) and Hi colonization density (P < 0.027) were observed. Of the 42% with detected viruses, most (78%) had picornavirus detection. There was a significant age-independent association between viral detection (and viral load, picornavirus detection and picorn aviral load) and detection of Sp (P = 0.020, 0.035, 0.005, 0.014) and between viral detection and viral load and Sp colonization density (P = 0.024, 0.028) [corrected]. Hi may promote its own transmission by inducing or ampli¬fying rhinitis in children. There isa close quantitative relationship between respiratory viral detection, including picornavirus detection and Spcoloni¬zation. These findings have implications for understanding disease patho¬genesis and formulating prevention strategies using vaccines [corrected].

  14. Nasopharyngeal colonization by potentially pathogenic bacteria found in healthy semi-captive wild-born chimpanzees in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugisha, Lawrence; Köndgen, Sophie; Kaddu-Mulindwa, Deogratias; Gaffikin, Lynne; Leendertz, Fabian H

    2014-02-01

    Information on the chimpanzee nasopharygeal colonization in captive sanctuaries and in the wild is rare. This study was undertaken to establish the nasopharygeal colonization and potential bacterial pathogens in sanctuary chimpanzees as a basis for improving chimpanzee and employee health. Nasopharygeal colonization of 39 healthy chimpanzees were analyzed by microbiological cultivation method and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. We report four major phyla dominated by Proteobacteria (50%), Fermicutes (35.7%), Bacteriodes (7.1%), and Cynobacteria (7.1%) in healthy semi-captive chimpanzees. Further classification based on 7-base oligomers revealed the following genera: Streptococcus, Veillonella, Neisseria, Prevotella, Kingella and unclassified Cynobacteria, Actinobacillus, Bacteriodes and Pasteurellaceae. On microbiological cultivation we were able to identify and characterize some of the bacteria to species level as Klebsiella pneumonie and Pseudomonas aeruginosa being dominant bacteria with 54.7% and 50% colonization, respectively. Of these, Streptococcus, Neisseria, Klebsiella, and Haemophillus have representatives known to potentially cause severe respiratory disease. Our data present important information on chimpanzee nasopharygeal colonization as a guide to understanding disease processes and pharmaceutical therapies required for improving the health of chimpanzees. The results from this study will guide the processes to improve procedures for routine management of sanctuary chimpanzees and use it as a basis for evaluation of future reintroduction possibilities. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The expression of small regulatory RNAs in clinical samples reflects the different life styles of Staphylococcus aureus in colonization vs. infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Song

    Full Text Available Small RNAs (sRNAs are involved in the post-transcriptional regulation of metabolic pathways and in responses to stress and virulence. We analyzed the expression levels of five sRNAs of Staphylococcus aureus during human colonization or infection. Total RNA was isolated from nasal carriers, abscesses and cystic fibrosis patients (20 subjects per condition. The expression levels of the sRNAs were measured in the clinical samples and compared with those of the corresponding strains grown in vitro. Five sRNAs were encoded and expressed in all clinical strains in vitro. In vivo, the global expression of the five sRNAs was extremely variable in the abscessed patients, more homogeneous in the cystic fibrosis patients, and highly uniform in the nasal carrier samples. The expression levels of the sRNAs in vivo resembled those obtained at exponential phase or late exponential phase of growth in vitro, for three and one sRNA respectively; while for one sRNA, the expression was always higher in vivo as compared to in vitro growth. The in vitro conditions do not uniformly mimic the in vivo conditions for sRNA expression. Nasal colonization is associated with a unique expression pattern of sRNA that might reflect the commensalism of S. aureus in this niche.

  16. Anatomical patterns of colonization of pets with staphylococcal species in homes of people with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) skin or soft tissue infection (SSTI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, S A; Brazil, A M; Ferguson, J M; Nelson, K; Lautenbach, E; Rankin, S C; Morris, D O; Davis, M F

    2015-03-23

    Methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP), and other pathogenic staphylococci can cause infections in companion animals and humans. Identification of colonized animals is fundamental to research and practice needs, but harmonized methods have not yet been established. To establish the optimal anatomic site for the recovery of methicillin-resistant coagulase positive staphylococci (CPS), survey data and swabs were collected from 196 pets (dogs, cats, reptiles, birds, fish and pocket pets) that lived in households with an MRSA-infected person. Using broth-enrichment culture and PCR for speciation, S. aureus was identified in 27 of 179 (15%) pets sampled at baseline and 19 of 125 (15%) pets sampled at a three-month follow-up home visit. S. pseudintermedius was isolated from 33 of 179 (18%) pets sampled at baseline and 21 of 125 (17%) of pets sampled at follow-up. The baseline MRSA and MRSP prevalence was 8% and 1% respectively from 145 mammalian pets. The follow-up MRSA and MRSP prevalence was 7% and pets. The mouth was the most sensitive single site sampled for isolation of S. aureus and S. pseudintermedius in mammals. In a subset of pets, from which all available isolates were identified, dual carriage of S. aureus and S. pseudintermedius was 22% at baseline and 11% at follow-up. These results identify the mouth as the most sensitive site to screen for pathogenic staphylococci and suggest that it should be included in sampling protocols. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. An investigation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in people and pets in the same household with an infected person or infected pet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faires, Meredith C; Tater, Kathy C; Weese, J Scott

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the prevalence of concurrent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization in people and pets in the same household with a person or pet with an MRSA infection and to compare MRSA isolates by use of molecular techniques. 2 cross-sectional evaluations conducted concurrently. 24 dogs, 10 cats, and 56 humans in part 1 and 21 dogs, 4 cats, and 16 humans in part 2 of the study. In both parts of the study, nasal swab specimens were collected from humans and nasal and rectal swab specimens were collected from household pets. Selective culture for MRSA was performed, and isolates were typed via pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and spa typing. Households were defined as positive when MRSA was isolated from at least 1 person (part 1) or 1 pet (part 2). In part 1, 6 of 22 (27.3%) households were identified with MRSA colonization in a person. In these households, 10 of 56 (17.9%) humans, 2 of 24 (8.3%) dogs, and 1 of 10 (10%) cats were colonized with MRSA. In part 2, only 1 of 8 households was identified with MRSA colonization in a pet. Most MRSA isolates obtained from humans and pets in the same household were indistinguishable by use of PFGE. The high prevalence of concurrent MRSA colonization as well as identification of indistinguishable strains in humans and pet dogs and cats in the same household suggested that interspecies transmission of MRSA is possible. Longitudinal studies are required to identify factors associated with interspecies transmission.

  18. Knowing prior methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection or colonization status increases the empirical use of glycopeptides in MRSA bacteraemia and may decrease mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J O; Phillips, M; Christiansen, K J; Pearson, J C; Coombs, G W; Murray, R J

    2014-06-01

    To compare the management and outcome of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteraemia in patients known to be MRSA-colonized/infected (C-patients) with the management and outcome in those not known to be colonized/infected (NC-patients), we conducted a 10-year retrospective review of MRSA bacteraemia in an adult tertiary hospital. Clinical data were obtained by chart review, and mortality data from linked databases. Prior MRSA colonization/infection status was available to treating clinicians at the time of the bacteraemia as a 'Micro-Alert' tag on the patient's labels, in medical charts, and in electronic information systems. C-patients accounted for 35.4% of all MRSA bacteraemia episodes. C-patients were more likely to be indigenous, to be diabetic, or to have a history of previous S. aureus infection. Markers of illness severity (Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS)-II, need for admission to the intensive-care unit, length of stay, and metastatic seeding) were similar in both groups. Empirical therapy included a glycopeptide in 49.3% of C-patients vs. 18.9% of NC-patients (p MRSA isolate tested susceptible in vitro in 56.7% of C-patients vs. 45.1% of NC-patients (p 0.13). All-cause 7-day and 30-day mortality were 7.5% vs. 18.9% (p 0.04), and 22.4% vs. 31.1% (p 0.20), in the C-patient and NC-patient groups, respectively. Knowing MRSA colonization status was significantly associated with lower 30-day mortality in Cox regression analysis (p MRSA bacteraemia is lower in C-patients, which may reflect the earlier use of glycopeptides. The low use of empirical glycopeptides in septic patients known to be previously MRSA-colonized/infected may represent a missed opportunity for infection control to positively impact on clinical management. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  19. Effect of the α2δ ligand, pregabalin, on colonic sensory and motor functions in healthy adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturrino, Johanna; Busciglio, Irene; Burton, Duane; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2011-01-01

    Pregabalin, an α2δ ligand, is used clinically to treat somatic pain. A prior study suggested that pregabalin reduces distension-induced pain while increasing rectal compliance. We aimed to quantify effects of pregabalin on colonic sensory and motor functions and assess relationships between sensory effects and colonic compliance. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study of a single oral administration of 75 or 200 mg of pregabalin in 62 healthy adults (aged 18–75 yr). Subjects underwent left colon intubation. We assessed “stress-arousal symptoms”, compliance, sensation thresholds, sensation ratings averaged over four levels of distension, fasting and postprandial colonic tone, and phasic motility index (MI). Analysis of covariance (adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, and corresponding predrug response) and proportional hazard models were used. There were no clinically important differences among treatment groups for demographics, predrug compliance, tone, MI, and sensation. Treatment was associated with reduced energy and increased drowsiness but no change in tension or relaxation. Sensation ratings averaged over the four distension levels were lower for gas sensation [overall effect P = 0.14, P = 0.05 (pregabalin 200 mg vs. placebo)] and for pain sensation [overall effect P = 0.12, P = 0.04 (pregabalin 200 mg vs. placebo)]. The magnitude of the effect of 200 mg of pregabalin relative to placebo is on average a 25% reduction of both gas and pain sensation ratings. Pregabalin did not significantly affect colonic compliance, sensation thresholds, colonic fasting tone, and MI. Thus 200 mg of pregabalin reduces gas and pain sensation and should be tested in patients with colonic pain. PMID:21596994

  20. [Antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae in healthy carrier individuals in primary care in Barcelona area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llor, Carles; Boada, Albert; Pons-Vigués, Mariona; Grenzner, Elisabet; Juvé, Rosa; Almeda, Jesús

    2018-01-01

    The information available on antibiotic resistance patterns are generally based on specimens from hospitalised individuals. This study was aimed at evaluating the antibiotic resistance rate of nasal carriage strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae in healthy individuals, in accordance with age and gender, attended in Primary Care Centres (PCC). Cross-sectional study. Seven PCC in the Barcelona area. Healthy nasal carriers aged 4years or more who did not present with any sign of infectious disease, and had not taken any antibiotic or had been hospitalised in the previous 3months. A total of 3,969 nasal swabs valid for identification were collected between 2010 and 2011 and were sent to one central microbiological laboratory for isolation of both pathogens. Resistance to common antibiotics was determined on the basis of the current European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing guidelines on cut-off points. The prevalence of methicillin-resistant S.aureus was 1.3% (95%CI: 0.5-2.1%), with resistance rates of 87.1% to phenoxymethylpenicillin and 11.6% to azithromycin, with no significant differences with age and gender. A total of 2.4% (95CI%: 0.1-4.7%) of the pneumococcal strains were highly resistant to both phenoxymethylpenicillin and macrolides, whereas the highest resistance rates were to cefaclor (53.3%), followed by tetracycline (20%) and cefuroxime (12.1%). These pathogens have lower resistance rates in the community than in the hospital setting. Primary Care physicians must be more aware of the current antimicrobial resistance, in order to ensure prudent use of antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Nasal Colonization rate of Staphylococcus aureus strains among Health Care Service Employee’s of Teaching University Hospitals in Yazd

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    Khalili Mohammad Bagher

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to find the extent of staphylococcal carriages including Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus MRSA in employee's of teaching university hospitals in Yazd. Nasal swabs of 742 employees in four different medical teaching hospitals in Yazd were collected, and tested for detection of staphylococci strains. Out of 742 employees, 94 (12.7% were carrier of staphylococcus aurus and 57 (11.38% for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA respectively. Prevalence of Staphylococci aureus and MRSA in individual hospitals and wards were different. In general the highest carriers were personnel of dialysis ward and the lowest pediatrics wards. Resistance rate of MRSA against Ciprofloxacin, Vancomycin, and Rifampin were found to be as 28.1%, 10.5% and 35.1% respectively.

  2. Colonización por Staphylococcus aureus resistente a meticilina en las manos de individuos de la comunidad Hand colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in the community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Felipe Baéz Benavides

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections (CA-MRSA have been reported with increasing frequency during the past decade. Colonization plays an important role in the epidemiology of such infections. However, colonization studies have focused mostly on hospital settings and only a few have been carried out in communities. This was a study of the frequency of hand colonization by S. aureus in general and by CA-MRSA, by means of phenotypical and molecular methods, in 800 adults from the community who had no relationship with the health area.

    Staphylococcus aureus colonization was found in 65 individuals (8.1% and MRSA was present in 5 (0.63%. The 5 MRSA strains were found to have mec chromosomic cassettes (SCCmec of either type IV or V, typical of CA-MRSA. Our study provides evidence of CA-MRSA colonization in the hands of individuals from the community. This constitutes an important risk factor, not only by its association with subsequent infections, but also for the risk of dissemination of this microorganism to the general population.

    En la última década han sido cada vez más frecuentes los informes de infecciones causadas por cepas de Staphylococcus aureus resistente a meticilina asociadas a la comunidad (CA-MRSA, por Community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus. La colonización juega un papel

  3. Prevalence and risk factors for colonization with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and other Staphylococci species in hospitalized and farm horses in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirosh-Levy, Sharon; Steinman, Amir; Carmeli, Yehuda; Klement, Eyal; Navon-Venezia, Shiri

    2015-11-01

    Methicillin-resistant staphylococci (MRS), and specifically Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization or infection have become a serious emerging condition in equine hospitals, with complex concerns regarding animals, personnel and public health. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence and risk factors for colonization by Staphylococci, MRS, and MRSA among horses in Israel. Nasal swabs were collected from horses at 17 riding stables (n=206), and from hospitalized horses admitted to a veterinary hospital (n=84). Species identification was performed by pta gene PCR, RFLP analysis and sequencing. MRS was identified by the presence of mecA. Genetic relatedness of MRSA isolates was determined by spa typing and MLST. SCCmec-type and pvl gene were determined. Univariable and multivariable statistical analysis were used to identify potential risk factors. Colonization with Staphylococci was found among 3.8% of farm horses and 50.6% of hospitalized horses (pMRSA was found exclusively among hospitalized horses (7.2%). All MRSA isolates belonged to a unique single multi-drug-resistant clone, ST5-SCCmec V, pvl-negative, spa-type t535. Risk factors for colonization with MRS were pure bred, hospitalization and antibiotic use. This is the first surveillance study of Staphylococci in horses in Israel, and the first report on the presence of a unique MRSA strain among hospital horses, recognizing the veterinary hospital as a potential reservoir for MRSA, an antibiotic resistant pathogen with human relevance. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Lack of transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) between apparently healthy dogs in a rescue kennel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, A; Pfeiffer, D U; Lindsay, J A; Soares-Magalhaes, R; Lloyd, D H

    2010-02-24

    Although it is widely accepted that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can be transmitted between humans and animals in both directions, little is known about the dynamics of animal-to-animal transfer. This study aimed to investigate aspects of dog-to-dog MRSA transfer in a rescue facility in the South-East of England during an MRSA outbreak. One hundred and twenty-nine apparently healthy dogs, mostly housed in pairs, were swabbed at nasal, oral, axillary and perianal sites. Swabs were enriched in selective broth and staphylococci identified using standard biological methods. MRSA isolates were confirmed by demonstration of the thermonuclease gene (nuc) and mecA. After initial swabbing, a dog excluded from the study design but housed at the same facility was discovered to have a wound infection due to MRSA. MRSA carriage was identified in 10/129 dogs (7.8%) and all isolates were of the same lineage as the one isolated from the infected dog. All carrier dogs lived in shared kennels and their 16 kennel partners sampled negative on two occasions. Concurrently with successful antimicrobial treatment of the infected patient, MRSA carriage resolved spontaneously in all dogs within two weeks. In conclusion, MRSA did not transmit readily between apparently healthy dogs, MRSA carriage was not supported for long periods in a regularly cleaned environment and exposure alone may not lead to MRSA acquisition by dogs without the presence of additional risk factors. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Nasal colonization of humans with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA CC398 with and without exposure to pigs.

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    Christiane Cuny

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies in several European countries and in North America revealed a frequent nasal colonization of livestock with MRSA CC398 and also in humans with direct professional exposure to colonized animals. The study presented here addresses the question of further transmission to non exposed humans. METHODS: After selecting 47 farms with colonized pigs in different regions of Germany we sampled the nares of 113 humans working daily with pigs and of their 116 non exposed family members. The same was performed in 18 veterinarians attending pig farms and in 44 of their non exposed family members. For investigating transmission beyond families we samples the nares of 462 pupils attending a secondary school in a high density pig farming area. MRSA were detected by direct culture on selective agar. The isolates were typed by means of spa-sequence typing and classification of SCCmec elements. For attribution of spa sequence types to clonal lineages as defined by multi locus sequence typing we used the BURP algorithm. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by microbroth dilution assay. RESULTS: At the farms investigated 86% of humans exposed and only 4.3% of their family members were found to carry MRSA exhibiting spa-types corresponding to clonal complex CC398. Nasal colonization was also found in 45% of veterinarians caring for pig farms and in 9% of their non exposed family members. Multivariate analysis revealed that antibiotic usage prior to sampling beard no risk with respect to colonization. From 462 pupils only 3 were found colonized, all 3 were living on pig farms. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that so far the dissemination of MRSA CC398 to non exposed humans is infrequent and probably does not reach beyond familial communities.

  6. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among university students in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitti, Thawatchai; Boonyonying, Kamala; Sitthisak, Sutthirat

    2011-11-01

    We studied the prevalence of methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal colonization among healthy young Thai adults. MSSA nasal colonization was found in 30 of 200 subjects (15%). The prevalence of MRSAnasal carriage was 1% (2 of 200) detected by cefoxitin/oxacillin disk diffusion and oxacillin salt screening methods. These carriers were associated with health care risk factors. The two MRSA isolates were mecA positive, SCCmec type II. All S. aureus isolates were tested for antibiotic resistance. Their resistance rates to penicillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, oxacillin and cefoxitin were 96.7, 26.7, 26.7, 6.7 and 6.7%, respectively. All MSSA and MRSA isolates were susceptible to gentamicin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, rifampicin, linezolid, fusidic acid, mupirocin, ciprofloxacin and vancomycin. The results of this first study of MRSA nasal colonization among healthy young Thai adults suggests MRSA is present in the Thai community.

  7. Another cause of chest pain: Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis in an otherwise healthy adult

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    Vacek TP

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Thomas P Vacek, Shahnaz Rehman, Shipeng Yu, Ankush Moza, Ragheb Assaly Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo OH, USAAbstract: Chest pain requires a detailed differential diagnosis with good history-taking skills to differentiate between cardiogenic and noncardiogenic causes. Moreover, when other symptoms such as fever and elevated white blood cell count are involved, it may be necessary to consider causes that include infectious sources. A 53-year-old female with no significant past medical history returned to the hospital with recurrent complaints of chest pain that was constant, substernal, reproducible, and exacerbated with inspiration and expiration. The chest pain was thought to be noncardiogenic, as electrocardiography did not demonstrate changes, and cardiac enzymes were found to be negative for signs of ischemia. The patient's blood cultures were analyzed from a previous admission and were shown to be positive for Staphylococcus aureus. The patient was started empirically on vancomycin, which was later switched to ceftriaxone as the bacteria were more sensitive to this antibiotic. A transthoracic echocardiogram did not demonstrate any vegetation or signs of endocarditis. There was a small right pleural effusion discovered on X-ray. Therefore, computed tomography as well as magnetic resonance imaging of the chest were performed, and showed osteomyelitis of the chest. The patient was continued on intravenous ceftriaxone for a total of 6 weeks. Tests for HIV, hepatitis A, B, and C were all found to be negative. The patient had no history of childhood illness, recurrent infections, or previous trauma to the chest, and had had no recent respiratory infections, pneumonia, or any underlying lung condition. Hence, her condition was thought to be a case of primary sternal osteomyelitis without known cause.Keywords: substernal, pleuritic, myocardial infarction, differential

  8. Soft salt-mannitol agar-cloxacillin test: a highly specific bedside screening test for detection of colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, N; Sánchez, M; Baquero, F; López, B; Calderón, C; Cantón, R

    1998-04-01

    The early detection of colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) of patients in intensive-care units is an essential step in the strategy for preventing MRSA epidemics. In this study, tubes containing soft salt-mannitol agar with cloxacillin (6 microg/ml) (SSMAC) were prepared for inoculation of clinical samples at patients' bedsides by personnel of an intensive-care unit. A total of 1,914 swabs from different sample sites of 81 patients were dipped into SSMAC tubes, and after 24 h of incubation (in an incubator located near the intensive-care unit), an evident color change was considered by the intensive-care-unit personnel to be an MRSA alarm. Sixty-three (3.3%) SSMAC tubes were considered positive for MRSA, 1,827 (95.4%) were considered negative, and 24 (1.2%) were considered intermediate. Compared with values for parallel conventional surveillance cultures for MRSA, excluding tubes with intermediate results, the SSMAC test had a sensitivity of 72.7%, a specificity of 99.2%, a positive predictive value of 76.2%, and a negative predictive value of 99.0%. When intermediate tubes were considered positive, the corresponding values were 75.3, 98.2, 63.2, and 99.0%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity values of the test to identify MRSA-colonized patients were 89.4 and 100%, respectively. Oropharyngeal and naris specimens were the most reliable samples for MRSA detection. False-negative results were frequent in bronchial aspirates with low (< 10(3) to 10(6) CFU/ml) MRSA counts. False-positive results were mainly due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus. The SSMAC tube is a useful, rapid, and inexpensive tool for the early identification of MRSA-colonized patients and, consequently, for the implementation of measures to prevent the spread of MRSA.

  9. Soft Salt-Mannitol Agar–Cloxacillin Test: a Highly Specific Bedside Screening Test for Detection of Colonization with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Nuria; Sánchez, Miguel; Baquero, Fernando; López, Blanca; Calderón, Celia; Cantón, Rafael

    1998-01-01

    The early detection of colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) of patients in intensive-care units is an essential step in the strategy for preventing MRSA epidemics. In this study, tubes containing soft salt-mannitol agar with cloxacillin (6 μg/ml) (SSMAC) were prepared for inoculation of clinical samples at patients’ bedsides by personnel of an intensive-care unit. A total of 1,914 swabs from different sample sites of 81 patients were dipped into SSMAC tubes, and after 24 h of incubation (in an incubator located near the intensive-care unit), an evident color change was considered by the intensive-care-unit personnel to be an MRSA alarm. Sixty-three (3.3%) SSMAC tubes were considered positive for MRSA, 1,827 (95.4%) were considered negative, and 24 (1.2%) were considered intermediate. Compared with values for parallel conventional surveillance cultures for MRSA, excluding tubes with intermediate results, the SSMAC test had a sensitivity of 72.7%, a specificity of 99.2%, a positive predictive value of 76.2%, and a negative predictive value of 99.0%. When intermediate tubes were considered positive, the corresponding values were 75.3, 98.2, 63.2, and 99.0%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity values of the test to identify MRSA-colonized patients were 89.4 and 100%, respectively. Oropharyngeal and naris specimens were the most reliable samples for MRSA detection. False-negative results were frequent in bronchial aspirates with low (<103 to 106 CFU/ml) MRSA counts. False-positive results were mainly due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus haemolyticus. The SSMAC tube is a useful, rapid, and inexpensive tool for the early identification of MRSA-colonized patients and, consequently, for the implementation of measures to prevent the spread of MRSA. PMID:9542922

  10. Descriptive Analysis of Antibiotic-Resistant Patterns of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA st398 Isolated from Healthy Swine

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    Ana Morcillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA such as the MRSA ST398 strain has spread all over the World and the most worrying aspect of this fact appears to be its capacity to easily spread to humans. The excessive use of antibiotics has made swine a reservoir of MRSA. The aim of the present study was to determine the antibiotic resistance profile of MRSA samples isolated from healthy swine of the island of Tenerife (Spain. Methods: A total of 256 MRSA isolates from swine samples and five MRSA isolates from pig worker samples were investigated for MRSA antibiotic resistant patterns. Results: Analysis of the susceptibility status of MRSA pig isolates revealed that 39 isolates were resistant to one antibiotic, 71 isolates were resistant to two antibiotics and 96 isolates were resistant to three or more antibiotics. SCCmec typing revealed the presence of types IV and V. Isolates having SCCmec IV had an increased resistance to the antimicrobial agents tested than those having SCCmec V. We observed significant differences when comparing the most common resistance patterns and SCCmec type. Conclusions: MRSA isolated from humans showed similar resistance to those isolated from pigs, excepting erythromycin, since all the workers’ isolates were sensitive to this antibiotic. The evolution of new MRSA clones has emphasized the need for infection control practices in animals and humans in close contact.

  11. In vitro synthesis of IgM rheumatoid factor in response to Staphylococcus aureus, by lymphocytes from healthy adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, R.; Karsh, J.

    1986-12-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 20 healthy adults were tested in vitro for the production of IgM rheumatoid factor (RF) in response to Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I (SAC) or pokeweed mitogen. Fifteen of the 20 normal subjects produced greater than or equal to 4 ng/ml IgM-RF (mean +/- SD 46 +/- 55 ng/ml) in response to SAC, compared with only 2 of 20 who produced greater than or equal to 4 ng/ml IgM-RF (mean +/- SD 2 +/- 4 ng/ml) in response to pokeweed mitogen (P = 0.0001). Separation and reconstitution of autologous T and B cell-enriched fractions, with and without prior T cell irradiation, provided evidence for a radiosensitive T helper/inducer cell involved in the IgM-RF response to SAC in 70% of the normal subjects studied. SAC appears to be a potent stimulus of IgM-RF production, with a cellular mechanism distinct from that of other in vitro systems.

  12. Hospitalization cost at childbirth: Health parameters and colonization with antimicrobial resistant bacteria and methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Alexandra C; Zamfir, Mihai; Hendrowarsito, Lana; Dammeyer, Antchen; Schomacher, Lasse; Karlin, Barbara; Franitza, Manuela; Nasri, Lilia; Hörmansdorfer, Stefan; Tuschak, Christian; Valenza, Giuseppe; Ewert, Thomas; Hierl, Wolfgang; Ochmann, Uta; Herr, Caroline; Heinze, Stefanie

    2017-08-01

    Antimicrobial resistant bacteria (AMR) are of public health and economic relevance. However, there is a lack of data regarding AMR colonization in pregnant women and in newborns. Furthermore, there are few studies analyzing hospital's net income (revenues and costs). The cross-sectional study took place in two Bavarian clinics. Available data regarding women and newborns were collected using a standardized questionnaire, personal IDs and medical records in addition to AMR/MSSA screening. Economic data consisted of estimated hospitalization costs, calculated using a billing system called G-DRG (German-Diagnosis Related Groups) as well as real hospitalization costs (e.g. staff, medical and non-medical infrastructure costs). Data from 635 pregnant women and 566 newborns were included. While AMR colonization has shown no significant association with clinical complications, or net hospital income; primipara status and medical condition during pregnancy did. AMR colonization did not have a significant influence on the health status of pregnant women or of the newborns. Net hospital income for pregnant women was mostly negative in 2014. In 2014 and 2015 the majority of the cases had a net income between ±€ 1000. Newborns with clinical complications differed significantly in Apgar score at 1min, weight, body length and AMR colonization of the pregnant woman and/or the newborn (phealth status. In future studies, a Centralized Cost Accounting as billing method and an improved possibility of AMR coding in G-DRG catalog would be desirable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Reduction in hospitalwide incidence of infection or colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with use of antimicrobial hand-hygiene gel and statistical process control charts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Glenys; Watson, Kerrie; Bailey, Michael; Land, Gillian; Borrell, Susan; Houston, Leanne; Kehoe, Rosaleen; Bass, Pauline; Cockroft, Emma; Marshall, Caroline; Mijch, Anne; Spelman, Denis

    2007-07-01

    To evaluate the impact of serial interventions on the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Longitudinal observational study before and after interventions. The Alfred Hospital is a 350-bed tertiary referral hospital with a 35-bed intensive care unit (ICU). A series of interventions including the introduction of an antimicrobial hand-hygiene gel to the intensive care unit and a hospitalwide MRSA surveillance feedback program that used statistical process control charts but not active surveillance cultures. Serial interventions were introduced between January 2003 and May 2006. The incidence and rates of new patients colonized or infected with MRSA and episodes of MRSA bacteremia in the intensive care unit and hospitalwide were compared between the preintervention and intervention periods. Segmented regression analysis was used to calculate the percentage reduction in new patients with MRSA and in episodes of MRSA bacteremia hospitalwide in the intervention period. The rate of new patients with MRSA in the ICU was 6.7 cases per 100 patient admissions in the intervention period, compared with 9.3 cases per 100 patient admissions in the preintervention period (P=.047). The hospitalwide rate of new patients with MRSA was 1.7 cases per 100 patient admissions in the intervention period, compared with 3.0 cases per 100 patient admissions in the preintervention period (P<.001). By use of segmented regression analysis, the maximum and conservative estimates for percentage reduction in the rate of new patients with MRSA were 79.5% and 42.0%, respectively, and the maximum and conservative estimates for percentage reduction in the rate of episodes of MRSA bacteremia were 87.4% and 39.0%, respectively. A sustained reduction in the number of new patients with MRSA colonization or infection has been demonstrated using minimal resources and a limited number of interventions.

  14. Seroepidemiology of Klebsiella pneumoniae colonizing the intestinal tract of healthy chinese and overseas chinese adults in Asian countries

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    Lin Yi-Tsung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Capsular serotypes K1 and K2 of Klebsiella pneumoniae are thought to the major virulence determinants responsible for liver abscess. The intestine is one of the major reservoirs of K. pneumoniae, and epidemiological studies have suggested that the majority of K. pneumoniae infections are preceded by colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. The possibility of fecal-oral transmission in liver abscess has been raised on the basis of molecular typing of isolates. Data on the serotype distribution of K. pneumoniae in stool samples from healthy individuals has not been previously reported. This study investigated the seroepidemiology of K. pneumoniae isolates from the intestinal tract of healthy Chinese in Asian countries. Stool specimens from healthy adult Chinese residents of Taiwan, Japan, Hong Kong, China, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, and Vietnam were collected from August 2004 to August 2010 for analysis. Results Serotypes K1/K2 accounted for 9.8% of all K. pneumoniae isolates from stools in all countries. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of K1/K2 isolates among the countries excluding Thailand and Vietnam. The antimicrobial susceptibility pattern was nearly the same in K. pneumoniae isolates. The result of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed no major clonal cluster of serotype K1 isolates. Conclusions The result showed that Chinese ethnicity itself might be a major factor predisposing to intestinal colonization by serotype K1/K2 K. pneumoniae isolates. The prevalent serotype K1/K2 isolates may partially correspond to the prevalence of K. pneumoniae liver abscess in Asian countries.

  15. Seroepidemiology of Klebsiella pneumoniae colonizing the intestinal tract of healthy Chinese and overseas Chinese adults in Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Tsung; Siu, L Kristopher; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chen, Te-Li; Tseng, Chih-Peng; Yeh, Kuo-Ming; Chang, Feng-Yee; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2012-01-19

    Capsular serotypes K1 and K2 of Klebsiella pneumoniae are thought to the major virulence determinants responsible for liver abscess. The intestine is one of the major reservoirs of K. pneumoniae, and epidemiological studies have suggested that the majority of K. pneumoniae infections are preceded by colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. The possibility of fecal-oral transmission in liver abscess has been raised on the basis of molecular typing of isolates. Data on the serotype distribution of K. pneumoniae in stool samples from healthy individuals has not been previously reported. This study investigated the seroepidemiology of K. pneumoniae isolates from the intestinal tract of healthy Chinese in Asian countries. Stool specimens from healthy adult Chinese residents of Taiwan, Japan, Hong Kong, China, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, and Vietnam were collected from August 2004 to August 2010 for analysis. Serotypes K1/K2 accounted for 9.8% of all K. pneumoniae isolates from stools in all countries. There was no significant difference in the prevalence of K1/K2 isolates among the countries excluding Thailand and Vietnam. The antimicrobial susceptibility pattern was nearly the same in K. pneumoniae isolates. The result of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed no major clonal cluster of serotype K1 isolates. The result showed that Chinese ethnicity itself might be a major factor predisposing to intestinal colonization by serotype K1/K2 K. pneumoniae isolates. The prevalent serotype K1/K2 isolates may partially correspond to the prevalence of K. pneumoniae liver abscess in Asian countries.

  16. Gene Expression Profiles of Colonic Mucosa in Healthy Young Adult and Senior Dogs: e12882

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dong Yong Kil; Brittany M Vester Boler; Carolyn J Apanavicius; Lawrence B Schook; Kelly S Swanson

    2010-01-01

      Background We have previously reported the effects of age and diet on nutrient digestibility, intestinal morphology, and large intestinal fermentation patterns in healthy young adult and senior dogs...

  17. A methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Sequence Type 8, spa type t11469 causing infection and colonizing horses in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carfora, Virginia; Caprioli, Andrea; Grossi, Ilaria; Pepe, Marco; Alba, Patricia; Lorenzetti, Serena; Amoruso, Roberta; Sorbara, Luigi; Franco, Alessia; Battisti, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    A Methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus(MRSA) was isolated in Italy from a pathological sample of a mare presenting chronic purulent sinusitis and that had undergone frontal-sinus surgery three months before. Humans, horses, dogs and environmental samples were subsequently collected at the mare's stable and at the Veterinary Hospital, where the mare was operated/hospitalized, and screened for the presence of MRSA that was detected from other horses and from the environment at both sites. All the MRSA isolates belonged to clonal complex (CC)8, ST8-t11469-SCCmec-IVa, and showed similar phenotypic and genetic multidrug resistance patterns and macrorestriction-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles. The only MRSA detected from humans was a CC1, ST1-t127-SCCmec-IVa. This paper represents the first report of a clinical MRSA infection in a horse in Italy. This study also supports the opinion that improper use of antibiotics and hospitalization/surgery can represent risk factors for MRSA colonization/infection in horses, and that the environment is among important sources for exposure. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Prevalence of colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 in pigs and pig farm workers in an area of Catalonia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaga, Esteban; Navarro, Marian; Vilamala, Anna; Roure, Pere; Quintana, Manuel; Garcia-Nuñez, Marian; Figueras, Raül; Torres, Carmen; Lucchetti, Gianni; Sabrià, Miquel

    2016-11-28

    A livestock-associated clonal lineage (ST398) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been identified causing colonization or infection in farm workers. The aim of the study was to analyze the prevalence of MRSA-ST398 colonization in pigs and in pig farmers in an area with a high pig population (Osona, Barcelona province, Catalonia, Spain). We performed a cross-sectional prevalence study in Osona (Catalonia, Spain), from June 2014 to June 2015. All pig farm workers from 83 farms were studied. Twenty of these farms were randomly selected for the study of both pigs and farmers: 9 fattening and 11 farrow-to-finish farms. All workers over the age of 18 who agreed to participate were included. Samples were analyzed to identify MRSA-ST398 and their spa type. Eighty-one of the 140 pig farm workers analyzed (57.9% (95% IC: 50.0-66.4%)) were MRSA-positive, all of them ST398. The mean number of years worked on farms was 17.5 ± 12.6 (range:1-50), without significant differences between positive and negative MRSA results (p = 0.763). Over 75% of MRSA-ST398 carriers worked on farms with more than 1250 pigs (p pig farms. Ninety-two (46.0% (95% IC: 39.0-53.0%)) of the nasal swabs from 200 pigs from these 20 farms were MRSA-positive, with 50.5% of sows and 41.4% of fattening pigs (p = 0.198) giving MRSA-positive results. All the isolates were tetracycline-resistant, and were identified as MRSA-ST398. The spa type identified most frequently was t011 (62%). Similar spa types and phenotypes of antibiotic resistance were identified in pigs and farmers of 19/20 tested farms. The prevalence of MRSA-ST398 among pig farm workers and pigs on farms in the studied region is very high, and the size of the farm seems to correlate with the frequency of colonization of farmers. The similar spa-types and phenotypes of resistance detected in pigs and workers in most of the farms studied suggest animal-to-human transmission.

  19. A cohort study of the Copenhagen CF Centre eradication strategy against Staphylococcus aureus in patients with CF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalbøge, Christina Schjellerup; Pressler, Tacjana; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen in CF. Centre prevalence of intermittent colonization and chronic S. aureus infections and the effectiveness of an anti-S. aureus eradication strategy was assessed.......Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen in CF. Centre prevalence of intermittent colonization and chronic S. aureus infections and the effectiveness of an anti-S. aureus eradication strategy was assessed....

  20. The effect of unfiltered coffee on potential biomarkers for colonic cancer risk in healthy volunteers: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubben, M J; Van Den Braak, C C; Broekhuizen, R; De Jong, R; Van Rijt, L; De Ruijter, E; Peters, W H; Katan, M B; Nagengast, F M

    2000-09-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that coffee use might protect against colorectal cancer. Inconsistencies as to the effect of coffee use and colorectal cancer between epidemiologic studies might be related to the type of coffee brew. We studied the effect of unfiltered coffee consumption on putative biomarkers for colonic cancer risk. A total of 64 healthy volunteers (31 men and 33 women), with a mean age of 43 +/- 11 years were randomly assigned to two groups in a crossover design, with two intervention periods of 2 weeks separated by a washout period of 8 weeks. Treatments were 1 L of cafetière (French press) coffee daily or no coffee. At the end of each intervention period, fasting blood samples, colorectal biopsies and 48 h faeces were collected. No effect of coffee on colorectal cell proliferation, assayed by estimating the Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen labelling index, was seen. Additionally, no effects were seen on the concentrations of faecal soluble bile acids and colorectal mucosal glutathione S-transferase activity. However, unfiltered coffee significantly increased the glutathione content in the colorectal mucosa by 8% and in plasma by 15%. Other aminothiols in plasma also increased on coffee. Unfiltered coffee does not influence the colorectal mucosal proliferation rate, but might increase the detoxification capacity and anti-mutagenic properties in the colorectal mucosa through an increase in glutathione concentration. Whether this effect indeed contributes to a lower colon cancer risk remains to be established.

  1. Case-control study: Determination of potential risk factors for the colonization of healthy volunteers with Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessika Dumke

    Full Text Available Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus was identified in humans and animals as commensal of the gut and can act as a causative agent of endocarditis and septicemia. A case-control study was performed to identify yet unknown risk factors for the transmission of this facultative pathogen. The prevalence in the gut of 99 healthy volunteers was determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction resulting in 62.5% S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus positive excrements. Subsequent cultivation offered three isolates and epidemiological analysis based on MLST revealed sequence type (ST 3 and ST 7, previously detected from bovine and endocarditis patients. These results support the hypotheses of the zoonotic potential of this bacterium. Participant questionnaires were evaluated concerning personal characteristics, nutritional habits and animal contact. Specifically, closer contact between participants and animals influenced the colonization of the human gut significantly and was further affected if volunteers used excrement for the fertilization of plants.

  2. Bacillus subtilis and Enterobacter cloacae endophytes from healthy Theobroma cacao L. trees can systemically colonize seedlings and promote growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Hianna Almeida Câmara; Silva, Anderson Barbosa; Gomes, Fábio Pinto; Gramacho, Karina Peres; Faria, José Cláudio; de Souza, Jorge Teodoro; Loguercio, Leandro Lopes

    2013-03-01

    Clonal genotypes resistant to fungal diseases are an important component of the cocoa production system in southeastern Bahia state (Brazil), so that technologies for faster production of stronger and healthier plantlets are highly desirable. In this study, the effects of inoculated bacterial endophytes isolated from healthy adult cacao plants on seedlings, and aspects related to inoculation methods, colonization patterns, and photosynthesis were investigated. Sequencing of 16S rRNA, hsp-60, and rpo-B genes placed the wild-type isolates within the species Enterobacter cloacae (isolates 341 and 344) and Bacillus subtilis (isolate 629). Spontaneous rifampicin-resistant (rif(R)) variants for 344 were also produced and tested. Endophytic application was either by immersion of surface sterilized seeds in bacterial suspensions or direct inoculation into soil, 20 days after planting non-inoculated seeds into pots. Results from in vitro recovery of inoculated isolates showed that the wild-type endophytes and rif(R) variants systemically colonized the entire cacao seedlings in 15-20 days, regardless of the inoculation method. Some endophytic treatments showed significant increases in seedlings' height, number of leaves, and dry matter. Inoculation methods affected the combined application of endophytes, which maintained the growth-promotion effects, but not in the same manner as in single applications. Interestingly, the 344-3.2 rif(R) variant showed improved performance in relation to both the wild type and another related variant. Photosynthetic rates and stomatal conductance increased significantly for some endophytic treatments, being partially associated with effects on growth and affected by the inoculation method. The results suggest that E. cloacae and B. subtilis endophytes from healthy adult plants (not transmitted by seeds) were able to promote vegetative growth on cacao seedlings. The development of products for large-scale use in seedlings

  3. The effects of omeprazole therapy on bacterial colonization of the pharynx in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Lauren A; Wakayama, Justin; Boscan, Pedro L; Hyatt, Doreene R; Twedt, David C; Lappin, Michael R; Dargatz, David A

    2016-01-01

    To identify the relative abundance of commensal pharyngeal flora in healthy dogs and determine if abundance of pharyngeal flora is altered during omeprazole administration. Eight adult Beagles. A total of 3 baseline pharyngeal swabs, collected 48 hours apart, were obtained from each dog. Omeprazole (1 mg/kg PO q 24 h) was administered for a total of 12 days. During omeprazole administration, pharyngeal swabs were obtained on Days 8, 10, and 12. All swabs were submitted for semiquantitative aerobic and anaerobic culture. Growth of bacterial isolates, as well as genus of isolates, was compared between the pretreatment (n = 24) and treatment (n = 24) swabs. A greater abundance of several bacterial species was identified during the treatment period, including coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (P omeprazole therapy. Further studies are warranted to determine the clinical significance of gastric acid suppressants on pharyngeal flora in dogs. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  4. Attachment and colonization by Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus on stone fruit surfaces and Survival through a simulated commercial export chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collignon, Stacey; Korsten, Lise

    2010-07-01

    The ability of the foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus to attach, colonize, and survive on stone fruit surfaces was investigated. Fifty microliters of bacterial suspension was spot inoculated onto the sterile intact fructoplane of whole peaches and plums. Minimum time required for initial adhesion and attachment was recorded for different surface contact times. Surface colonization patterns of the four pathogens and survival under simulated commercial export conditions also were evaluated. L. monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium attached immediately to stone fruit surfaces. E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus were visibly attached after 30 s and 1 h, respectively, of direct exposure. Holding freshly harvested stone fruit at 0.5 degrees C to simulate cold storage conditions significantly lowered the titer of E. coli O157:H7 on plums and the titers of L. monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium on stone fruit. E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes at a low inoculum level and S. aureus and Salmonella Typhimurium at high and low levels did not survive the simulated export chain conditions at titers that exceeded the minimum infectious dose. However, E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes were able to survive on stone fruit surfaces when inoculated at an artificially high level. In this case, the final titer at the end of the supply chain was higher than the infectious dose. In this laboratory experiment, E. coli O157:H7, L. monocytogenes, Salmonella Typhimurium, and S. aureus at potential natural contamination levels were unable to survive simulated export conditions.

  5. Comparison of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in Healthy Community Hospital Visitors [CA-MRSA] and Hospital Staff [HA-MRSA

    OpenAIRE

    Pathare, Nirmal A.; Anil Pathare

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [CA-MRSA] is unknown in Oman. Methods Nasal and cell phones swabs were collected from hospital visitors and health-care workers on sterile polyester swabs and directly inoculated onto a mannitol salt agar containing oxacillin, allowing growth of methicillin-resistant microorganisms. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using Kirby Bauer?s disc diffusion method on the isolates. Minimum inhib...

  6. A Nosocomial Outbreak of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus among Healthy Newborns and Postpartum Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Saunders

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA has increasingly been isolated from individuals with no predisposing risk factors; however, such strains have rarely been linked to outbreaks in the hospital setting. The present study describes the investigation of an outbreak of CA-MRSA that occurred in the maternal-newborn unit of a large community teaching hospital in Toronto, Ontario.

  7. Molecular characterization of multidrug pneumococcal clones colonizing healthy children in Mérida, Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Moreno, Beatríz; Araque, María

    2018-02-12

    We analyzed genetics mechanisms of antibiotics resistance, clonal composition and pili in forty eight MDR-pneumococci isolated from healthy children in Mérida, Venezuela. Intermediate resistance to penicillin was related to variations on pbp2b and pbp2x genes. High-level resistance to penicillin, low susceptibility to cephalosporins and carbapenems were associated with alterations on pbp1a, pbp2b and pbp2x genes. Non-beta-lactam resistance was associated with Tn3872, Tn5253, Tn6002, Tn2010 transposons. Macrolide-resistant strains carried ermB or mefE, but not the mefA gene. Tetracycline and chloramphenicol-resistant pneumococci carried tetM and cat genes, respectively. MDR- pneumococci were related to 6 clonal complexes (CCs), largely CC156 or CC15. A limited diversity on pbp2a,2b,2x-RFLP profile within each clone was observed. Conversely, the detection of non-beta-lactam resistance and transposons revealed a clear genetic diversity within clones. We found a group of nontypeable/cpsA-negative pneumococci related to the Null Capsule Clade 1 (NCC1) carrying a Tn2009-element. Each NCC1-related strain showed a novel MLST allelic combination and a different pbp2a,2b,2x-RFLP profile. PI-1 (Pilus type 1 rrgC gene) was present in most of the MDR-pneumococci and its occurrence was commonly homogeneous within each clone. PI-1 was present in all CC242 and CC320 pneumococci whereas it was absent in all CC37, CC81 and NCC1 isolates. CC156 and CC15 isolates showed variations on the occurrence of PI-1. Both PI-1 and the islet for pilus type 2 were present in CC230 isolates. We provide useful data to follow the evolution of clonal composition, mechanism of antibiotics resistance and the occurrence of pili among pneumococci circulating in Mérida, Venezuela. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Oropharyngeal colonization by Haemophilus influenzae in healthy children from Taubaté (São Paulo), prior to the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccination program in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Lucia Ferro Bricks; Caio Márcio Figueredo Mendes; Bianca Rezende Lucarevschi; Carmem Paz Oplustil; Zanella, Rosemeire C.; Adriana Bori; Ciro João Bertoli

    2004-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is one of the most important bacterial agents of otitis and sinusitis. H. influenzae type b (Hib) is one of the main causes of meningitis, pneumonia, and septicemia in nonvaccinated children under 6 years of age. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of H. influenzae and Hib oropharyngeal colonization prior to the onset of the Hib vaccination program in Brazil in previously healthy children and to assess the susceptibility profile of this microorganism...

  9. Molecular epidemiological analysis to assess the influence of pet-ownership in the biodiversity of Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA in dog- and non-dog-owning healthy households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAN Balen, J C; Landers, T; Nutt, E; Dent, A; Hoet, A E

    2017-04-01

    It has been suggested that zoonotic transmission of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) can occur between owners and their pets within the same household. However, the influence that pet-ownership could have in the biodiversity of SA/MRSA strains circulating among owners is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to perform a molecular epidemiological analysis to evaluate and compare the biodiversity of SA/MRSA strains in dog-owning and non-dog-owning healthy households within the same community. Antimicrobial resistance, SCCmec type, USA type and clonality were assessed. Overall, 33·1% (165/499) of human subjects carried SA and 2·8% (14/499) carried MRSA. Among dogs, 7·1% (8/113) carried SA but none were MRSA positive. No difference was detected in the diversity index of SA/MRSA pulsotypes between dog-owning and non-dog-owning households; but, a marked variation was still observed in the pulsotypes circulating in each type of household. Additionally, simultaneous carriage of the same SA pulsotype in owner(s) and dog was observed in 57% of households with positive humans and pets. These results demonstrate that dogs can indeed participate in the circulation of SA/MRSA pulsotypes within a home and that the presence of a pet does not seem to favour certain strains within their household.

  10. Human methanogen diversity and incidence in healthy and diseased colonic groups using mcrA gene analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scanlan Pauline D

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence and diversity of human methanogens are insufficiently characterised in the gastrointestinal tract of both health and disease. A PCR and clone library methodology targeting the mcrA gene was adopted to facilitate the two-fold aim of surveying the relative incidence of methanogens in health and disease groups and also to provide an overview of methanogen diversity in the human gastrointestinal tract. Results DNA faecal extracts (207 in total from a group of healthy controls and five gastrointestinal disease groups were investigated. Colorectal cancer, polypectomised, irritable bowel syndrome and the control group had largely equivalent numbers of individuals positive for methanogens (range 45–50%. Methanogen incidence in the inflammatory bowel disease groups was reduced, 24% for ulcerative colitis and 30% for Crohn's disease. Four unique mcrA gene restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles were identified and bioinformatic analyses revealed that the majority of all sequences (94% retrieved from libraries were 100% identical to Methanobrevibacter smithii mcrA gene. In addition, mcrA gene sequences most closely related to Methanobrevibacter oralis and members of the order Methanosarcinales were also recovered. Conclusion The mcrA gene serves as a useful biomarker for methanogen detection in the human gut and the varying trends of methanogen incidence in the human gut could serve as important indicators of intestinal function. Although Methanobrevibacter smithii is the dominant methanogen in both the distal colon of individuals in health and disease, the diversity of methanogens is greater than previously reported. In conclusion, the low incidence of methanogens in Inflammatory Bowel Disease, the functionality of the methanogens and impact of methane production in addition to competitive interactions between methanogens and other microbial groups in the human gastrointestinal tract warrants further

  11. Serial monitoring of the physiological effects of the standard Pico-Salax® regimen for colon cleansing in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Adam; Vanner, Stephen J; Baranchuk, Adrian; Hookey, Lawrence C

    2012-07-01

    Sodium picosulfate⁄magnesium oxide⁄citric acid (Pico-Salax, Ferring Inc, Canada) is used widely in Canada and other countries for colon cleansing before colonoscopy. It is a low-volume osmotic⁄stimulant agent with the potential to deplete intravascular volume and alter electrolyte balance, yet there are little data regarding its effects on these clinically important end points. To serially measure parameters of intravascular volume and electrolyte status in healthy volunteers over a 24 h period using the standard two-sachet dosing. Twenty volunteers were given one sachet of Pico-Salax at time 0 h and another sachet 5 h later, as per usual bowel cleansing protocol. Subjects were continually monitored during the first 12 h of the study with postural vital signs, serum electrolytes and electrocardiograms obtained at intervals throughout this initial period and again at 24 h postingestion. No adverse events were reported nor were there any signs of intravascular volume depletion observed. There were decreases in potassium and calcium levels from baseline to 12 h, but these appeared minor and were corrected by 24 h. The proportions of patients with hypermagnesmia at 0 h, 5 h, 12 h and 24 h were 5%, 35%, 35% and 20%, respectively (PPico-Salax is significant, but the magnitude of the changes was not clinically relevant in this relatively small group, and both calcium and potassium levels normalized at 24 h. Nonetheless, this could have implications in patients with pre-existing electrolyte abnormalities and the safety of dosing with more than two sachets.

  12. Genome-wide association study reveals a locus for nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in Danish crossbred pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skallerup, Per; Gongora, Carmen Espinosa; Jørgensen, Claus Bøttcher

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is an important human opportunistic pathogen residing on skin and mucosae of healthy people. Pigs have been identified as a source of human colonization and infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and novel measures are needed to control...... of S. aureus in Danish crossbred pigs (Danish Landrace/Yorkshire/Duroc). RESULTS: Fifty-six persistent carriers and 65 non-carriers selected from 15 farms surveyed in the previous longitudinal study were genotyped using Illumina's Porcine SNP60 beadchip. In addition, spa typing was performed on 126 S...

  13. Modulation of Age- and Cancer-Associated DNA Methylation Change in the Healthy Colon by Aspirin and Lifestyle

    OpenAIRE

    Noreen, Faiza; Röösli, Martin; Gaj, Pawel; Pietrzak, Jakub; Weis, Stefan; Urfer, Patric; Regula, Jaroslaw; Schär, Primo; Truninger, Kaspar

    2014-01-01

    Background Aberrant DNA methylation in gene promoters is associated with aging and cancer, but the circumstances determining methylation change are unknown. We investigated the impact of lifestyle modulators of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk on the stability of gene promoter methylation in the colonic mucosa. Methods We measured genome-wide promoter CpG methylation in normal colon biopsies (n = 1092) from a female screening cohort, investigated the interaction of lifestyle factors with age-depe...

  14. Characteristics of hospital patients colonized with livestock-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) CC398 versus other MRSA clones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köck, R; Siam, K; Al-Malat, S; Christmann, J; Schaumburg, F; Becker, K; Friedrich, A W

    2011-01-01

    Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) associated with the clonal complex (CC) 398 has emerged among livestock and humans exposed to these animals. MRSA CC398 has so far contributed relatively little to spread of MRSA and the burden of disease in the healthcare setting. This study aimed

  15. Shedding of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from adult and pediatric bathers in marine waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinigalliano Christopher D

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin resistant S. aureus, MRSA, are human colonizing bacteria that commonly cause opportunistic infections primarily involving the skin in otherwise healthy individuals. These infections have been linked to close contact and sharing of common facilities such as locker rooms, schools and prisons Waterborne exposure and transmission routes have not been traditionally associated with S. aureus infections. Coastal marine waters and beaches used for recreation are potential locations for the combination of high numbers of people with close contact and therefore could contribute to the exposure to and infection by these organisms. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the amount and characteristics of the shedding of methicillin sensitive S. aureus, MSSA and MRSA by human bathers in marine waters. Results Nasal cultures were collected from bathers, and water samples were collected from two sets of pools designed to isolate and quantify MSSA and MRSA shed by adults and toddlers during exposure to marine water. A combination of selective growth media and biochemical and polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to identify and perform limited characterization of the S. aureus isolated from the water and the participants. Twelve of 15 MRSA isolates collected from the water had identical genetic characteristics as the organisms isolated from the participants exposed to that water while the remaining 3 MRSA were without matching nasal isolates from participants. The amount of S. aureus shed per person corresponded to 105 to 106 CFU per person per 15-minute bathing period, with 15 to 20% of this quantity testing positive for MRSA. Conclusions This is the first report of a comparison of human colonizing organisms with bacteria from human exposed marine water attempting to confirm that participants shed their own colonizing MSSA and MRSA into their bathing milieu. These findings clearly

  16. INFLUENCE OF LACTOBACILLUS SPP. ON COLONIZATION AND ANTI-INFECTIOUS RESISTANCE OF THE MUCOUS MEMBRANES OF THE UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kalinichenko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lactobacilli are very important for the formation of colonization resistance and have pronounced antagonistic effect against a wide range of microorganisms. That is why the lactobacilli have extensive use as a component of classic probiotic agents that are widely used to prevent and treat dysbiotic conditions of digestive and genital systems of people. Objective. The aim of the research was to study the effect of lactobacilli on anti-infectious resistance of mucous membranes of upper respiratory tract. Methods. The colonization degree (lg CFU / g of nasal mucosal membranes by Lactobacillus spp. and S. aureus was determined in all carriers before the experiment. Also, the level of lysozyme and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA in nasal secretions cavities was identified. Results. It was established a clear dysfunction of anti-infectious resistance in carriers of Staphylococcus aureus - a decrease of colonization resistance and local immunity of mucous membranes of upper respiratory tract. As for the anti-infectious resistance of nasal mucosal of S. aureus carriers, the level of lysozyme and secretory immunoglobulin A gradually increased after the application of probiotic strain L. rhamnosus GG, and in 21 days it reached rates of healthy individuals. Conclusions. It was found out that probiotics for nasal passages sanitation in Staphylococcus aureus carriers lead to gradual eradication of the pathogen (S. aureus with restoration of colonization and anti-infectious resistance, mucous membranes and upper respiratory tract.

  17. Colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorectal cancer; Cancer - colon; Rectal cancer; Cancer - rectum; Adenocarcinoma - colon; Colon - adenocarcinoma; Colon carcinoma ... eat may play a role in getting colon cancer. Colon cancer may be linked to a high-fat, ...

  18. Monitoramento da colonização pelo Staphylococcus aureus em alunos de um curso de auxiliar de enfermagem durante a formação profissional Monitoreo de la colonización por Staphylococcus aureus en alumnos de un curso de auxiliar de enfermería durante su formación Monitoring the colonization by Staphylococcus aureus in students from a nursing auxiliary program during the professional formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branca Maria de Oliveira Santos

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Tendo em vista o nosso objetivo de conhecer o quadro de colonização pelo Staphylococcus aureus em alunos de um curso de Auxiliar de Enfermagem, durante a formação profissional, realizamos a coleta de material da cavidade nasal (N e mãos direita (Md e esquerda (Me de 42 alunos, em diferentes momentos da formação, relacionando as taxas com as atividades desenvolvidas durante a programação do curso. Os resultados evidenciaram uma oscilação nas taxas de colonização nos diferentes momentos e a possibilidade de transmissão recíproca do agente entre os alunos e os receptores dos cuidados prestados, considerando o tipo de contato mantido entre eles.Considerando nuestro objetivo de conocer el cuadro de colonización por Staphylococcus aureus en alumnos de un curso de auxiliar de enfermería durante su formación, realizamos la colecta de material de la cavidad nasal (N, manos derecha (Md e izquierda (Me de 42 alumnos, en diferentes momentos de su formación, relacionando las tasas con las actividades desarrolladas durante la programación del curso. Los resultados evidenciaron una oscilación en las tasas de colonización en los diferentes momentos y la posibilidad de transmisión mutua del agente entre los alumnos y los receptores de los cuidados, considerando el tipo de contacto mantenido entre ellos.Considering our goal of understanding the colonization by Staphylococcus aureus in students from a nursing auxiliary program, during their professional formation, we collected material from the nasal cavity (N, right (Md and left (Mehands from 42 students on different moments of their formation relating the levels of colonization to the activities developed during the program. Results showed an oscillation in the colonization rate in different moments and the possibility of agent reciprocal transmission between the students and the taken care receptors, considering the type of contact.

  19. Postpartum pyogenic sacroiliitis with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a healthy adult: A case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imagama, Takashi; Tokushige, Atsunori; Sakka, Akihito; Seki, Kazushige; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2015-06-01

    Back and buttock pain during pregnancy and the postpartum period generally improves spontaneously and rarely causes problems. However, such pain is infrequently induced by pyogenic sacroiliitis. We herein present a 37-year-old female patient with no previous medical history who developed pyogenic sacroiliitis with severe right buttock pain 7 days after cesarean delivery. Arthrocentesis was performed, and a culture revealed the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). After 6 weeks of treatment with intravenous antibiotics, her infection became quiescent. Eight cases of pyogenic sacroiliitis during the postpartum period and seven cases during pregnancy have been reported, but most of the causative pathogens were methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus or Streptococcus species. This report describes the first case of postpartum pyogenic sacroiliitis caused by MRSA. The frequency of infection with MRSA has recently increased, and community-acquired MRSA, which affects even healthy young people, has also become a problem. Antibiotics for empirical therapy after a diagnosis of pyogenic sacroiliitis, including anti-MRSA antibiotics, should be carefully selected. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Purulent pericarditis secondary to community-acquired, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in previously healthy children. A sign of the times?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutmer, Jeffrey E; Yates, Andrew R; Bannerman, Tammy L; Marcon, Mario J; Karsies, Todd J

    2013-06-01

    Purulent pericarditis secondary to community-acquired, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is a potentially lethal infection that has yet to be described in the pediatric population. Only four cases of purulent pericarditis secondary to CA-MRSA have been described in the English literature, all of whom were adults. We report on the first two pediatric cases of purulent pericarditis secondary to CA-MRSA to increase awareness of this potentially fatal condition. Clinical data were obtained from an 8-year-old male patient and a 7-month-old female patient, both previously healthy, who presented to our hospital for treatment of severe shock and multiorgan failure. Literature review was performed using MEDLINE and Cochrane databases. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was performed to confirm the organism type. Our previously healthy patients presented with refractory shock and were found to have purulent pericarditis with tamponade secondary to CA-MRSA. Both patients required emergent pericardiocentesis and surgical pericardial debridement. Isolates from both patients were found to be MRSA USA type 300, a common type of CA-MRSA that has become the most frequent cause of skin and soft tissue infections in the United States. Purulent pericarditis survival hinges upon early empiric antibiotic therapy targeting resistant Staphylococcus, rapid diagnostic efforts, and expeditious pericardial drainage when diagnosed. An aggressive multidisciplinary approach provided for complete recovery in both cases, and both children were discharged with normal cardiac function. These two cases emphasize the need for consideration of CA-MRSA presenting with purulent pericarditis as an etiology for refractory shock.

  1. Modulation of age- and cancer-associated DNA methylation change in the healthy colon by aspirin and lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, Faiza; Röösli, Martin; Gaj, Pawel; Pietrzak, Jakub; Weis, Stefan; Urfer, Patric; Regula, Jaroslaw; Schär, Primo; Truninger, Kaspar

    2014-07-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation in gene promoters is associated with aging and cancer, but the circumstances determining methylation change are unknown. We investigated the impact of lifestyle modulators of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk on the stability of gene promoter methylation in the colonic mucosa. We measured genome-wide promoter CpG methylation in normal colon biopsies (n = 1092) from a female screening cohort, investigated the interaction of lifestyle factors with age-dependent increase in methylation with log-linear multivariable regression, and related their modifying effect to hypermethylation in CRC. All statistical tests were two-sided. Of 20025 promoter-associated CpGs analyzed, 1713 showed statistically significant age-dependent methylation gains. Fewer CpGs acquired methylation in users of aspirin (≥ 2 years) and hormonal replacement therapy (HRT age ≥ 50 years) compared with nonusers (43 vs 1355; 1 vs1377, respectively), whereas more CpGs were affected in smokers (≥ 20 years) and individuals with a body mass index (BMI) of 25 kg/m(2) and greater compared with control groups (180 vs 39; 554 vs 144, respectively). Fifty percent of the CpGs showing age-dependent methylation were found hypermethylated in CRC (odds ratio [OR] = 20; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 18 to 23; P cancer-related genes, whereas smoking (P colonic epithelium and thereby impacts the evolution of cancer methylomes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Microbiology of middle meatus in healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariante, Afonso Ravanello

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The nasosinusal microbiology of healthy individuals is not much documented. Its knowledge allows to determine the nasosinusal colonizing agents and to monitor the patterns of bacterial resistance. Objective: To evaluate the microbiology of the middle meatus in healthy individuals and to compare it with that of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. Method: 61 healthy individuals were included. The samples were collected under endoscopic view and Gram stained with leucocytes count and aerobic, anaerobic and fungus cultures. 114 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis formed the control group. Results: In healthy individuals 58 microorganisms were isolated. The most frequent ones were coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, Staphylococcus and Corynebacterium. Fungi were cultivated in 10%. There were rare or no white blood cells in all samples. There was penicillin resistance in 75% of the Staphylococcus aureus and 69% of the coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. As for oxacillin, 100% of Staphylococcus aureus and 92% of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus were sensitive. In the control group 158 microorganisms were cultivated. The most common ones were Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. Gram-negatives represented 26% of the aerobics. 73% of the samples with positive cultures presented a few or many white blood cells. Conclusion: Rare or no white blood cell, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and Corynebacterium were more frequent in healthy individuals and Streptococcus pneumoniae, anaerobics and oxacillin resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and Gram-negative were more frequent in the control group.

  3. An investigation of vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration creep among methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from pediatric patients and healthy children in Northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ning Chang

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Vancomycin MIC creeps existed in both clinical MRSA isolates and colonized MRSA strains. Great diversity of PFGE typing was in both strains collected. There was no association between the clinical and colonized MRSA isolates with vancomycin MIC creep.

  4. Challenges of implementing national guidelines for the control and prevention of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization or infection in acute care hospitals in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, Fidelma

    2009-03-01

    Of the 49 acute care hospitals in Ireland that responded to the survey questionnaire drafted by the Infection Control Subcommittee of the Health Protection Surveillance Centre\\'s Strategy for the Control of Antimicrobial Resistance in Ireland, 43 reported barriers to the full implementation of national guidelines for the control and prevention of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection; these barriers included poor infrastructure (42 hospitals), inadequate laboratory resources (40 hospitals), inadequate staffing (39 hospitals), and inadequate numbers of isolation rooms and beds (40 hospitals). Four of the hospitals did not have an educational program on hand hygiene, and only 17 had an antibiotic stewardship program.

  5. Gastrointestinal pH and Transit Time Profiling in Healthy Volunteers Using the IntelliCap System Confirms Ileo-Colonic Release of ColoPulse Tablets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacoba M Maurer

    Full Text Available ColoPulse tablets are an innovative development in the field of oral dosage forms characterized by a distal ileum and colon-specific release. Previous studies in humans showed release in the ileo-colonic region, but the relationship between gastrointestinal pH and release was not experimentally proven in vivo. This information will complete the in vivo release-profile of ColoPulse tablets.Release from ColoPulse tablets was studied in 16 healthy volunteers using the dual label isotope strategy. To determine gastrointestinal pH profiles and transit times the IntelliCap system was used. A ColoPulse tablet containing 13C-urea and an uncoated, immediate release tablet containing 15N2-urea were taken simultaneously followed by a standardized breakfast after three hours. Five minutes after intake of the tablets the IntelliCap capsule was swallowed and pH was measured until excretion in the feces. Breath and urine samples were collected for isotope analysis.Full analysis could be performed in 12 subjects. Median bioavailability of 13C -urea was 82% (95% CI 74-94%, range 61-114%. The median lag time (5% release of 13C was 5:42 h (95% CI 5:18-6:18 h, range 2:36-6:36 h, There was no statistically significant difference between lag time based on isotope signal and colon arrival time (CAT based on pH (median 5:42 vs 5:31 h p = 0.903. In all subjects an intestinal pH value of 7.0 was reached before release of 13C from the ColoPulse tablet occurred.From the combined data from the IntelliCap system and the 13C -isotope signal it can be concluded that release from a ColoPulse tablet in vivo is not related to transit times but occurs in the ileo-colonic region after pH 7.0 is reached. This supports our earlier findings and confirms that the ColoPulse system is a promising delivery system for targeting the distal ileum and colon.ISRCTN Registry 18301880.

  6. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. in the conjunctival sac of healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouney, Meredith C; Stiles, Jean; Townsend, Wendy M; Guptill, Lynn; Weese, J Scott

    2015-03-01

    To determine the prevalence of selected coagulase-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRS) in the conjunctival sac in a group of healthy dogs and to compare the prevalence of ocular MRS colonization with colonization of typically assessed body sites including the nasal cavity and rectum. 123 healthy dogs were used in the prevalence study: 40 dogs from a shelter and 83 privately owned dogs. The sampling procedure included culturing three separate sites per subject in the following order: the lower conjunctival fornices, the nares, and rectum. A low prevalence of 1.6% (2/123) of MRS was detected in healthy dogs. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was isolated from two dogs, one from a conjunctival swab and the other from a rectal swab. The survey data indicate the ocular surface is a potential site of MRS colonization, although the prevalence was low in healthy dogs. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  7. Oropharyngeal colonization by Haemophilus influenzae in healthy children from Taubaté (São Paulo), prior to the Haemophilus influenzae type B vaccination program in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricks, Lucia Ferro; Mendes, Caio Márcio Figueredo; Lucarevschi, Bianca Rezende; Oplustil, Carmem Paz; Zanella, Rosemeire C; Bori, Adriana; Bertoli, Ciro João

    2004-10-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is one of the most important bacterial agents of otitis and sinusitis. H. influenzae type b (Hib) is one of the main causes of meningitis, pneumonia, and septicemia in nonvaccinated children under 6 years of age. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of H. influenzae and Hib oropharyngeal colonization prior to the onset of the Hib vaccination program in Brazil in previously healthy children and to assess the susceptibility profile of this microorganism to a selected group of antimicrobials that are used to treat acute respiratory infections. Cultures of Haemophilus influenzae were made from oropharynx swabs from 987 children under 6 years of age who were enrolled in 29 day-care centers in Taubaté (a city of São Paulo state, Brazil) between July and December 1998. The prevalence of H. influenzae carriers was 17.4%, and only 5.5% of the strains were beta-lactamase producers. The prevalence of Hib carriers was high, 7.3% on average (range, 0.0 - 33.3%). The low prevalence of colonization by penicillin-resistant strains indicates that it is not necessary to substitute ampicilin or amoxicilin to effectively treat otitis and sinusitis caused by H. influenzae in Taubaté.

  8. Co-detection of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin and cotrimoxazole resistance in Staphylococcus aureus: Implications for HIV-patients' care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eKraef

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV are frequently exposed to antimicrobial agents. This might have an impact on the resistance profile, genetic background and virulence factors of colonizing Staphylococcus aureus. Sub-Saharan Africa is considered to be endemic for Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL positive S. aureus which can be associated with skin and soft tissue infections. We compared S. aureus from nasal and pharyngeal swabs from HIV patients (n=141 and healthy controls (n=206 in Gabon in 2013, and analyzed determinants of colonization with PVL positive isolates in a cross-sectional study. S. aureus isolates were screened for the presence of selected virulence factors (incl. PVL and were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing and genotyping. In HIV patients, S. aureus was more frequently detected (36.9 vs. 31.6% and the isolates were more frequently PVL positive than in healthy controls (42.1 vs. 23.2%. The presence of PVL was associated with cotrimoxazole resistance (OR=25.1, p<0.001 and the use of cotrimoxazole was a risk factor for colonization with PVL positive isolates (OR=2.5, p=0.06. PVL positive isolates were associated with the multilocus sequence types ST15 (OR=5.6, p<0.001 and ST152 (OR=62.1, p<0.001.Participants colonized with PVL positive isolates reported more frequently skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI in the past compared to carriers of PVL negative isolates (OR=2.7, p=0.01. In conclusion, the novelty of our study is that cotrimoxazole might increase the risk of SSTI in regions where cotrimoxazole resistance is high and associated with PVL. This finding needs to be confirmed in prospective studies.

  9. Personalized Proteome Profiles of Healthy and Tumor Human Colon Organoids Reveal Both Individual Diversity and Basic Features of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristobal, Alba; van den Toorn, Henk W P; van de Wetering, Marc; Clevers, Hans; Heck, Albert J R; Mohammed, Shabaz

    2017-01-03

    Diseases at the molecular level are complex and patient dependent, necessitating development of strategies that enable precision treatment to optimize clinical outcomes. Organoid technology has recently been shown to have the potential to recapitulate the in vivo characteristics of the original individual's tissue in a three-dimensional in vitro culture system. Here, we present a quantitative mass-spectrometry-based proteomic analysis and a comparative transcriptomic analysis of human colorectal tumor and healthy organoids derived, in parallel, from seven patients. Although gene and protein signatures can be derived to distinguish the tumor organoid population from healthy organoids, our data clearly reveal that each patient possesses a distinct organoid signature at the proteomic level. We demonstrate that a personalized patient-specific organoid proteome profile can be related to the diagnosis of a patient and with future development contribute to the generation of personalized therapies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ability of Lactobacillus kefiri LKF01 (DSM32079) to colonize the intestinal environment and modify the gut microbiota composition of healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, Marco; De Grandi, Roberta; Miniello, Vito Leonardo; Mattina, Roberto; Drago, Lorenzo

    2017-03-01

    Probiotics have been observed to positively influence the host's health, but to date few data about the ability of probiotics to modify the gut microbiota composition exist. To evaluate the ability of Lactobacillus kefiri LKF01 DSM32079 (LKEF) to colonize the intestinal environment of healthy subjects and modify the gut microbiota composition. Twenty Italian healthy volunteers were randomized in pre-prandial and post-prandial groups. Changes in the gut microbiota composition were detected by using a Next Generation Sequencing technology (Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine). L. kefiri was recovered in the feces of all volunteers after one month of probiotic administration, while it was detected only in three subjects belonging to the pre-prandial group and in two subjects belonging to the post-prandial group one month after the end of probiotic consumption. After one month of probiotic oral intake we observed a reduction of Bilophila, Butyricicomonas, Flavonifractor, Oscillibacter and Prevotella. Interestingly, after the end of probiotic administration Bacteroides, Barnesiella, Butyricicomonas, Clostridium, Haemophilus, Oscillibacter, Salmonella, Streptococcus, Subdoligranolum, and Veillonella were significantly reduced if compared to baseline samples. L. kefiri LKF01 showed a strong ability to modulate the gut microbiota composition, leading to a significant reduction of several bacterial genera directly involved in the onset of pro-inflammatory response and gastrointestinal diseases. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Safety and immunogenicity of a recombinant Staphylococcus aureus α-toxoid and a recombinant Panton-Valentine leukocidin subunit, in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, Michael L; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Niknian, Minoo; Maguire, Jason D; Hospenthal, Duane R; Fattom, Ali; Taylor, Kimberly; Fraser, Jamie; Wilkins, Kenneth; Ellis, Michael W; Kessler, Paul D; Fahim, Rafaat E F; Tribble, David R

    2017-04-03

    We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled dose-escalation study in healthy adults to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of recombinant Staphylococcus aureus candidate vaccine antigens, recombinant α-toxoid (rAT) and a sub-unit of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (rLukS-PV). 176 subjects were enrolled and randomized within 1 of 11 treatment cohorts: monovalent rAT or rLukS-PV dosages of 10, 25, 50, and 100 μg; bivalent rAT:rLukS dosages of 10:10, 25:25, and 50:50 μg; and alum or saline placebo. All subjects were assessed at Days 0, 7, 14, 28, and 84. Subjects in the 50:50 μg bivalent cohort received a second injection on Day 84 and were assessed on Days 98 and 112. Incidence and severity of reactogenicity and adverse events (AEs) were compared. Geometric mean serum concentrations (GMC) and neutralizing activity of anti-rAT and anti-rLukS-PV IgG were assessed. Reactogenicity incidence was significantly higher in vaccine than placebo recipients (77% versus 55%, respectively; p = 0.006). However, 77% of reactogenicity events were mild and 19% were moderate in severity. The AE incidence and severity were similar between the cohorts. All monovalent and bivalent rAT dosages resulted in a significant increase in the anti-rAT IgG and anti- rLukS-PV GMCs between day 0 and 28 compared with placebo, and persisted through Day 84. Exploratory subgroup analyses suggested a higher GMC and neutralizing antibody titers for the 50 μg monovalent or bivalent rAT and rLukS-PV dose as compared to the other doses. No booster effect was observed after administration of the second dose. We conclude that the rAT and rLukS-PV vaccine formulations were well-tolerated and had a favorable immunogenicity profile, producing antibody with neutralizing activity through day 84. There was no benefit observed with a booster dose of the vaccine.

  12. Incidence of and risk factors for community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus acquired infection or colonization in intensive-care-unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jann-Tay; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Fang, Chi-Tai; Chie, Wei-Chu; Lai, Mei-Shu; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2010-12-01

    The incidence of and risk factors for acquiring community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) among patients staying in intensive care units (ICUs) remain unclear. We enrolled patients staying in two ICUs at the Far Eastern Memorial Hospital during the period of 1 September 2008 to 30 September 2009 to clarify this issue. Surveillance cultures for MRSA were taken from nostril, sputum or throat, axillae, and the inguinal area in all enrolled patients upon admission to the ICU, every 3 days thereafter, and on the day of discharge from the ICU. For each MRSA isolate, we performed multilocus sequence typing, identified the type of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec, detected the presence of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene, and conducted drug susceptibility tests. Among the 1,906 patients who were screened, 203 patients were carriers of MRSA before their admission to the ICU; 81 patients acquired MRSA during their stay in the ICU, including 31 who acquired CA-MRSA. The incidence rates of newly acquired MRSA and CA-MRSA during the ICU stay were 7.9 and 3.0 per 1,000 patient-days, respectively. Prior usage of antipseudomonal penicillins and antifungals and the presence of a nasogastric tube were found to be independent risk factors for acquiring CA-MRSA during the ICU stay when data for CA-MRSA carriers and patients without carriage of MRSA were compared (P=0.0035, 0.0330, and 0.0262, respectively). Prior usage of carbapenems was found to be a protective factor against acquiring CA-MRSA when data for patients with CA-MRSA and those with health care-associated MRSA acquired during ICU stay were compared (P=0.0240).

  13. Antimicrobial resistance profile of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonizing the anterior nares of health-care workers and outpatients attending the remotely located tertiary care hospital of North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Seema; Malhotra, Rubina; Grover, Pragati; Bansal, Renu; Galhotra, Shipra; Kaur, Rupinderjit; Jindal, Neerja

    2017-01-01

    Resistance to antimicrobial agents is a major concern worldwide and is exemplified by the global spread of the Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Health care workers (HCWs) and asymptomatically colonized patients are important sources of nosocomial MRSA infections. To determine the prevalence of MRSA colonisation, two hundred HCWs and 200 consecutive outpatients attending our tertiary care hospital were studied. Two sterile pre-moistened cotton tipped swabs were used to collect specimens from their anterior nares. These were inoculated immediately on Blood agar with oxacillin, Mannitol salt agar with oxacillin and CHROM agar. Resistance to cefoxitin was confirmed by PCR by demonstration of mecA gene. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by Kirby Bauer's disc diffusion method and MIC of vancomycin by using broth dilution and Vitek-2 Compact system. The nasal carriage of MRSA among HCWs was found to be 7.5% and in outpatients 3%. All strains of MRSA from HCWs and outpatients grew on three selective media and mecA gene amplified in all of them. All the isolated strains of MRSA showed high degree of resistance to co-trimoxazole (93.3%), ciprofloxacin (80%) and erythromycin (66.66%). However, there was 100% susceptiability to vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid and Rifampicin. Although a direct casual relationship could not be established, it could be assumed that the transmission from colonised health care worker is responsible atleast in part for MRSA infection among patients. Therefore emphasis should be laid on strict implementation of standard infection control practices which would help in minimizing the carriage and transmission of MRSA in the hospital.

  14. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic resistance in children with atopic dermatitis in Arar, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaifallah A. Alenizi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: 65% of Saudi children with atopic dermatitis are colonized with S. aureus in their skin lesions. The rate of colonization is affected by severity of the disease and by the age of the patient.

  15. Estudo comparativo da prevalência de Staphylococcus aureus importado para as unidades de terapia intensiva de hospital universitário, Pernambuco, Brasil Comparative study on the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus imported to intensive care units of a university hospital, Pernambuco, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Maria de Morais Cavalcanti

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available O Staphylococcus aureus é um dos principais patógenos que coloniza indivíduos saudáveis na comunidade e responde por infecções em pacientes hospitalizados. Um estudo transversal foi realizado para determinar a prevalência de S. aureus meticilina-resistente e sensível entre 231 pacientes, internados entre janeiro e abril de 2003, nas unidades de terapia intensiva (UTIs do Hospital Universitário Oswaldo Cruz, assim como os possíveis fatores associados à colonização. Foram coletadas secreções de narinas, axilas, região perineal e dermatoses com soluções de continuidade, de todos os pacientes, nas primeiras 48 horas de internamento nas UTIs. O material foi semeado em meios de cultura adequados. A prevalência de S. aureus igualou-se a 37,7% (87/231, sendo 13% (30/231 meticilina-resistente e 24,8% (57/231 meticilina-sensível. Idade, sexo, uso de antibioticoterapia, corticoterapia, motivo e local do internamento não se associaram à presença do S. aureus ou do meticilina-resistente. Houve associação significante entre procedência hospitalar e colonização por S. aureus, independente da cepa, e entre internamento anterior e presença do S. aureus meticilina-resistente. As narinas foram o sítio de colonização mais significante, por S. aureus meticilina-resistente (47/57=82,4% e sensível (23/30=76,7%. Foi alta a prevalência do S. aureus (meticilina resistente ou sensível, assim como do meticilina-resistente entre os pacientes das UTIs deste hospital. Estudos futuros poderão comprovar se os resultados aqui descritos e medidas de rastreamento para S. aureus poderiam ser adotadas, de forma prospectiva, para se avaliar o risco, assim como a magnitude do efeito, no controle de infecções hospitalares provocadas por estes patógenos.Staphylococcus aureus is the most important pathogen that colonizes healthy individuals in the community and is responsible for infections in hospitalized patients. A cross-sectional study was

  16. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus pada Penderita Dermatitis Atopik dan Sensitivitasnya terhadap Mupirosin Dibandingkan dengan Gentamisin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keni Istasaputri M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is found in moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (AD and is multiresistant against topical antibiotic. Gentamycin is widely used while mupirocin is the first line therapy to eliminate MRSA. This research is intended to observe the colonization of MSRA case in AD patients and its sensitivity to mupirocin compared to gentamycin in Dermato-venereology Clinic Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. An analytical cross sectional survey was intended from 19th September–31st October 2011 in 22 moderate to severe AD patients based on objective Scoring Atopic Dermatitis and 22 healthy persons. All subjects went through skin-scraping, MSRA was detected and sensitivity test was done for mupirocin and gentamycin. The subjects consisted of 10 boys and 12 girls in both group. Based on severity, 10/22 of AD subjects were in moderate AD and 12/22 were severe AD, 14/22 of AD subjects presented with acute lesions and 8/22 subjects had chronic lesions. In the group of AD patients, 17/22 growth of S. aureus were found with sensitivity against mupirocin 14/17 and gentamycin 11/17. In healthy individual group, no S. aureus growth was found. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain in AD patients was observed on 3/17 patients, and this was declared significantly different compared to healthy individuals (p <0.01. The isolates in 2/3 patients were sensitive to mupirocin and all patients were resistant to gentamycin. In conclusion, the patients of moderate to severe AD are prone to MRSA colonization and therefore requires mupirocin topical antibiotic treatment.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus clonal dynamics and virulence factors in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Hans; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    , toxins, and were assigned to agr groups. S. aureus colonization patterns ranged from rare colonization over transient colonization to persistent colonization by a single clone or a dynamic exchange of up to five clones. Production of no single virulence factor including superantigens and toxins...

  18. Staphylococcus aureus and healthcare-associated infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekkelenkamp, M.B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304817716

    2011-01-01

    Many medical procedures breach or suppress patients’ natural defences, leaving them vulnerable to infections which would not occur in healthy humans: “healthcare-associated infections”. Healthcare-associated infections caused by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) are probably the most

  19. Host- and tissue-specific pathogenic traits of Staphylococcus aureus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.B. van Leeuwen (Willem); D.C. Melles (Damian); A. Alaidan (Alwaleed); M. Al-Ahdal (Mohammed); H.A.M. Boelens (Hélène); S.V. Snijders (Susan); H.F.L. Wertheim (Heiman); E. van Duijkeren (Engeline); J.K. Peeters (Justine); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); R.F.J. Gorkink (Raymond); G. Simons (Guus); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); A.F. van Belkum (Alex)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractComparative genomics were used to assess genetic differences between Staphylococcus aureus strains derived from infected animals versus colonized or infected humans. A total of 77 veterinary isolates were genetically characterized by high-throughput amplified fragment length polymorphism

  20. Nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strains of Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from the anterior nares of healthy pupils and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns were determined. 116 isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (100%) were biochemically characterized as coagulase positive S. aureus. Susceptibility profile of the isolates revealed that 15(14.85%) ...

  1. Gastrointestinal pH and Transit Time Profiling in Healthy Volunteers Using the IntelliCap System Confirms Ileo-Colonic Release of ColoPulse Tablets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurer, Jacoba M.; Schellekens, Reinout C. A.; van Rieke, Helen M.; Wanke, Christoph; Iordanov, Ventzeslav; Stellaard, Frans; Wutzke, Klaus D.; Dijkstra, Gerard; van der Zee, Margot; Woerdenbag, Herman J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Kosterink, Jos G. W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction ColoPulse tablets are an innovative development in the field of oral dosage forms characterized by a distal ileum and colon-specific release. Previous studies in humans showed release in the ileo-colonic region, but the relationship between gastrointestinal pH and release was not

  2. Prevalence and Genetic Characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus argenteus Isolates Harboring Panton-Valentine Leukocidin, Enterotoxins, and TSST-1 Genes from Food Handlers in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Meiji Soe; San, Thida; Aye, Mya Mya; Mya, San; Maw, Win Win; Zan, Khin Nyein; Htut, Wut Hmone Win; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Urushibara, Noriko; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2017-08-04

    Asymptomatic carriers of toxigenic Staphylococcus aureus are potential source of diseases, including food poisoning. Toxigenic potential and genetic traits of colonizing S. aureus were investigated for 563 healthy food handlers in Myanmar. Carriage of S. aureus was found in 110 individuals (19.5%), and a total of 144 S. aureus isolates were recovered from nasal cavities (110 isolates) and hands (34 isolates). Panton-Valentine leucocidin genes (pvl) were detected in 18 isolates (12.5%), among which 11 isolates were classified into coa-VIa, agr type III, and ST1930 (CC96) that had been also detected in pvl-positive clinical isolates in Myanmar. A pvl-positive, ST2250 nasal isolate was identified as S. argenteus, a novel coagulase-positive staphylococcus species. Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) gene was detected in five pvl-negative isolates. All of the 144 isolates harbored at least one of the 21 enterotoxin(-like) gene(s). The most prevalent enterotoxin(-like) gene was selw (98%), followed by selx (97%), sei (28%), sely (28%), sem (26%), sel (24%), and sea and sec (22% each). Considerable genetic diversity with five groups was detected for selw. The present study revealed the relatively high rate of pvl, as well as the wide distribution of enterotoxin(-like) genes among colonizing S. aureus in Myanmar.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage in hemodialysis centers of Fez, Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    Idrissa Diawara; Khadija Bekhti; Driss Elhabchi; Rachid Saile; Naima Elmdaghri; Mohammed Timinouni; Mohamed Elazhari

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) nasal carriage may be responsible for some serious infections in hemodialyzed patients. The main target of this study was to estimate the prevalence of S. aureus nasal carriage in hemodialysis outpatients and medical staff in hemodialysis centers specifically in Fez region. The second target is to identify the risks of colonization, resistance pattern of isolates and their virulence toxin genes. Patients and Methods Nasal swab specim...

  4. Staphylococcus aureus from the German general population is highly diverse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, Karsten; Schaumburg, Frieder; Fegeler, Christian; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Kock, Robin

    Objectives: This prospective cohort study evaluates colonization dynamics and molecular characteristics of methicillin-susceptible and - resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA/MRSA) in a German general population. Methods: Nasal swabs of 1878 non-hospitalized adults were screened for S. aureus.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus ST398 from slaughter pigs in northeast China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Xiaomei; Yu, Xiaojie; Tao, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Binghua; Dong, Rui; Xue, Chengyu; Grundmann, Hajo; Zhang, Jianzhong

    To describe the prevalence and population structure of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria that colonize pigs at slaughterhouses in northeastern China, nose swabs were collected from pigs in two slaughterhouses in Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China in 2009.S. aureus isolates were characterized by

  6. Virulence potential of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Buruli ulcer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amissah, Nana Ama; Chlebowicz, Monika A.; Ablordey, Anthony; Tetteh, Caitlin S.; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Friedrich, Alex W.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Stienstra, Ymkje; Rossen, John W.

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. BU wounds may also be colonized with other microorganisms including Staphylococcus aureus. This study aimed to characterize the virulence factors of S. aureus isolated from BU patients.

  7. Distinct Roles of Phenol-Soluble Modulins in Spreading of Staphylococcus aureus on Wet Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsompanidou, Eleni; Denham, Emma L.; Becher, Doerte; de Jong, Anne; Buist, Girbe; van Oosten, Marleen; Manson, Willem L.; Back, Jaap Willem; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Dreisbach, Annette

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is renowned for the rapid colonization of contaminated wounds, medical implants, and food products. Nevertheless, little is known about the mechanisms that allow S. aureus to colonize the respective wet surfaces. The present studies were therefore aimed at

  8. A systematic review and meta-analysis on Staphylococcus aureus carriage in psoriasis, acne and rosacea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Totté (Joan); W.T. van der Feltz; L.G.M. Bode (Lonneke); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); E.J. Van Zuuren; S.G.M.A. Pasmans (Suzanne)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractStaphylococcus aureus might amplify symptoms in chronic inflammatory skin diseases. This study evaluates skin and mucosal colonization with S. aureus in patients with psoriasis, acne and rosacea. A systematic literature search was conducted. Both odds ratios (OR) for colonization in

  9. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA carriage in a dermatology unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata L. Pacheco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to characterize Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA carriage in a dermatology unit. METHODS: This was a prospective and descriptive study. Over the course of 26 weeks, surveillance cultures were collected weekly from the anterior nares and skin of all patients hospitalized in a 20-bed dermatology unit of a tertiary-care hospital. Samples from healthcare workers (HCWS were cultured at the beginning and end of the study. Colonized patients were put under contact precautions, and basic infection control measures were enforced. Staphylococcus aureus colonization pressure was determined monthly. Colonized and non-colonized patients were compared, and isolates were evaluated for antimicrobial susceptibility, SCCmec type, virulence factors, and type. RESULTS: Of the 142 patients evaluated, 64 (45% were colonized by MRSA (39% hospital acquired; 25% community acquired; 36% indeterminate. Despite isolation precautions, hospital-acquired Staphylococcus aureus occurred in addition to the continuous entry of Staphylococcus aureus from the community. Colonization pressure increased from 13% to 59%, and pemphigus and other bullous diseases were associated with MRSA colonization. Eleven out of 71 HCWs (15% were Staphylococcus aureus carriers, although only one worker carried a persistent clone. Of the hospital-acquired MRSA cases, 14/28 (50% were SCCmec type IV (3 PFGE types, 13 were SCCmec type III (46%, and one had an indeterminate type. These types were also present among the community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus isolates. SSCmec type IV isolates were shown to be more susceptible than type III isolates. There were two cases of bloodstream infection, and the pvl and tst virulence genes were absent from all isolates. CONCLUSIONS: Dermatology patients were colonized by community- and hospital-acquired Staphylococcus aureus. Half of the nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus isolates were SCCmec type IV. Despite the identification of

  10. Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage in a dermatology unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Renata L.; Lobo, Renata D.; Oliveira, Maura S.; Farina, Elthon F.; Santos, Cleide R.; Costa, Silvia F.; Padoveze, Maria Clara; Garcia, Cilmara P.; Trindade, Priscila A.; Quitério, Ligia M.; Rivitti, Evandro A.; Mamizuka, Elsa M.; Levin, Anna S.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to characterize Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage in a dermatology unit. METHODS: This was a prospective and descriptive study. Over the course of 26 weeks, surveillance cultures were collected weekly from the anterior nares and skin of all patients hospitalized in a 20-bed dermatology unit of a tertiary-care hospital. Samples from healthcare workers (HCWS) were cultured at the beginning and end of the study. Colonized patients were put under contact precautions, and basic infection control measures were enforced. Staphylococcus aureus colonization pressure was determined monthly. Colonized and non-colonized patients were compared, and isolates were evaluated for antimicrobial susceptibility, SCCmec type, virulence factors, and type. RESULTS: Of the 142 patients evaluated, 64 (45%) were colonized by MRSA (39% hospital acquired; 25% community acquired; 36% indeterminate). Despite isolation precautions, hospital-acquired Staphylococcus aureus occurred in addition to the continuous entry of Staphylococcus aureus from the community. Colonization pressure increased from 13% to 59%, and pemphigus and other bullous diseases were associated with MRSA colonization. Eleven out of 71 HCWs (15%) were Staphylococcus aureus carriers, although only one worker carried a persistent clone. Of the hospital-acquired MRSA cases, 14/28 (50%) were SCCmec type IV (3 PFGE types), 13 were SCCmec type III (46%), and one had an indeterminate type. These types were also present among the community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus isolates. SSCmec type IV isolates were shown to be more susceptible than type III isolates. There were two cases of bloodstream infection, and the pvl and tst virulence genes were absent from all isolates. CONCLUSIONS: Dermatology patients were colonized by community- and hospital-acquired Staphylococcus aureus. Half of the nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus isolates were SCCmec type IV. Despite the identification of colonized

  11. Molecular characterization and antimicrobial susceptibility of nasal Staphylococcus aureus isolates from a Chinese medical college campus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimei Du

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection occur more commonly among persons living or working in crowded conditions, but characterization of S. aureus colonization within medical communities in China is lacking. A total of 144 (15.4%, 144/935 S. aureus isolates, including 28 (3.0%, 28/935 MRSA isolates, were recovered from the nares of 935 healthy human volunteers residing on a Chinese medical college campus. All S. aureus isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin and linezolid but the majority were resistant to penicillin (96.5%, ampicillin/sulbactam (83.3% and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (93.1%. 82%, (23/28 of the MRSA isolates and 66% (77/116 of the MSSA isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics, and 3 MRSA isolates were resistant to mupirocin--an agent commonly used for nasal decolonization. 16 different sequence types (STs, as well as SCCmec genes II, III, IVd, and V, were represented among MRSA isolates. We also identified, for the first time, two novel STs (ST1778 and ST1779 and 5 novel spa types for MRSA. MRSA isolates were distributed in different sporadic clones, and ST59-MRSA-VId- t437 was found within 3 MRSA isolates. Moreover, one isolate with multidrug resistance belonging to ST398-MRSA-V- t571 associated with animal infections was identified, and 3 isolates distributed in three different clones harbored PVL genes. Collectively, these data indicate a high prevalence of nasal MRSA carriage and molecular heterogeneity of S. aureus isolates among persons residing on a Chinese medical college campus. Identification of epidemic MRSA clones associated with community infection supports the need for more effective infection control measures to reduce nasal carriage and prevent dissemination of MRSA to hospitalized patients and health care workers in this community.

  12. Long-term cortisol levels are not associated with nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manenschijn, L.; Jetten, A.M.; Wamel, W.J.B. van; Tavakol, M.; Koper, J.W.; Akker, E.L.T. van den; Belkum, A. van; Rossum, E.F.C. van

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) colonizes the anterior nares in part of the population and the persistent carrier state is associated with increased infection risk. Knowledge concerning the determinants of S. aureus nasal carriage is limited. Previously, we found that glucocorticoid receptor

  13. Evaluation of bacterial colonization in patients with the diagnosis of mycosis fungoides

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    Bengü Nisa Akay

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Mycosis fungoides (MF is the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL. Bacterial infections are a common complication of MF/Sezary syndrome (SS. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common causes of skin infections in patients with MF/SS. However, the role of infectious agents and their effects on the clinical course is controversial. In this study, we aimed to assess the prevalence of the colonization of bacterial pathogens among individuals with MF/SS in comparison with control subjects. Materials and Methods: Sixty-six patients with MF/SS and 66 healthy control subjects were included in this study. The subjects were swabbed in the nose, throat and axilla and the samples were evaluated according to the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI criteria. Results: The mean age of the patients was 55.9±14.8 years (range: 21-84 years. Forty-eight patients were with ≤stage 2A, 18 were ≥stage 2B SS and MF. No statistically significant difference was observed in the frequency of pathogenic bacteria colonization in the nose and axilla between the two groups. However, in the throat it was statistically higher in MF/SS (p=0.001. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of S.aureus colonization. The frequency of pathogenic bacteria colonization in the throat cultures were significant (p=0.004 for patients with late stage disease compared to those with early stages, but this was not shown in axilla and nose cultures. Conclusion: In this study, bacterial colonization in the throat and nasal carriage of S.aureus were found to be higher in patients with MF/SS. Further studies on the benefits of controlling this problem, possibly with simple and inexpensive methods that might ameliorates the symptoms such as itching, scaling and erythema are needed.

  14. A Double-Blind, Randomized, Controlled Trial of Topical Polysporin Triple Compound Versus Topical Mupirocin for the Eradication of Colonization with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Complex Continuing Care Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S O’Grady

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intranasal mupirocin or Polysporin Triple (PT ointment (polymyxin B, bacitracin, gramicidin, in combination with chlorhexidine body washes, have been used for eradicating methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, but no comparative studies have been done.

  15. Advances in oral nano-delivery systems for colon targeted drug delivery in inflammatory bowel disease: selective targeting to diseased versus healthy tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Susan; Marks, Ellen; Schneider, Jennifer J; Keely, Simon

    2015-07-01

    Colon targeted drug delivery is an active area of research for local diseases affecting the colon, as it improves the efficacy of therapeutics and enables localized treatment, which reduces systemic toxicity. Targeted delivery of therapeutics to the colon is particularly advantageous for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Advances in oral drug delivery design have significantly improved the bioavailability of drugs to the colon; however in order for a drug to have therapeutic efficacy during disease, considerations must be made for the altered physiology of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract that is associated with GI inflammation. Nanotechnology has been used in oral dosage formulation design as strategies to further enhance uptake into diseased tissue within the colon. This review will describe some of the physiological challenges faced by orally administered delivery systems in IBD, the important developments in orally administered nano-delivery systems for colon targeting, and the future advances of this research. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) poses a significant problem for a large number of patients worldwide. Current medical therapy mostly aims at suppressing the active inflammatory episodes. In this review article, the authors described and discussed the various approaches current nano-delivery systems can offer in overcoming the limitations of conventional drug formulations. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus and the ecology of the nasal microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Cindy M; Price, Lance B; Hungate, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    The human microbiome can play a key role in host susceptibility to pathogens, including in the nasal cavity, a site favored by Staphylococcus aureus. However, what determines our resident nasal microbiota-the host or the environment-and can interactions among nasal bacteria determine S. aureus...... colonization? Our study of 46 monozygotic and 43 dizygotic twin pairs revealed that nasal microbiota is an environmentally derived trait, but the host's sex and genetics significantly influence nasal bacterial density. Although specific taxa, including lactic acid bacteria, can determine S. aureus colonization...

  17. Profiling the surfacome of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreisbach, Annette; Hempel, Kristina; Buist, Girbe; Hecker, Michael; Becher, Doerte; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    Staphylococcus aureus is a widespread opportunistic pathogen that can cause a wide variety of life-threatening diseases. Especially for the colonization of human tissues and the development of invasiveness, surface-exposed proteins are of major importance. In the present studies, we optimized a

  18. Nasal carriage of multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nasal Staphylococcus aureus is a major source of community and hospital associated staphylococcal infections. This study determined the prevalence of nasal S. aureus isolates and investigated their antimicrobial resistance profile in healthy volunteers. Methods: Nasal specimens of healthy volunteers in ...

  19. Staphylococcus aureus and the ecology of the nasal microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cindy M.; Price, Lance B.; Hungate, Bruce A.; Abraham, Alison G.; Larsen, Lisbeth A.; Christensen, Kaare; Stegger, Marc; Skov, Robert; Andersen, Paal Skytt

    2015-01-01

    The human microbiome can play a key role in host susceptibility to pathogens, including in the nasal cavity, a site favored by Staphylococcus aureus. However, what determines our resident nasal microbiota—the host or the environment—and can interactions among nasal bacteria determine S. aureus colonization? Our study of 46 monozygotic and 43 dizygotic twin pairs revealed that nasal microbiota is an environmentally derived trait, but the host’s sex and genetics significantly influence nasal bacterial density. Although specific taxa, including lactic acid bacteria, can determine S. aureus colonization, their negative interactions depend on thresholds of absolute abundance. These findings demonstrate that nasal microbiota is not fixed by host genetics and opens the possibility that nasal microbiota may be manipulated to prevent or eliminate S. aureus colonization. PMID:26601194

  20. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus introduced into intensive care units of a University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana M.M. Cavalcanti

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the principal human pathogens that colonize healthy individuals in the community in general, and it is responsible for severe infections in hospitalized patients. Due to an increase in the prevalence of strains of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, combating these microorganisms has become increasingly difficult. A descriptive study was carried out on 231 patients in intensive care at the Oswaldo Cruz University Hospital (HUOC in Recife, Brazil between January and April 2003 to determine the prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA and to evaluate risk factors for colonization by these bacteria when introduced into Intensive Care Units (ICUs. Body secretions were collected from the nostrils, axillary and perineal regions, and from broken skin lesions, of all patients during the first 48 hours following admission to the ICU. Samples were inoculated into blood agar and mannitol-salt-agar culture medium and identified by Gram staining, and by coagulase, DNAse and agglutination (Slidex Staph Test® tests. Growth in Mueller-Hinton agar with 4% sodium chloride and 6mg/L oxacillin was used to identify MRSA. In addition, the latex agglutination test was performed to identify penicillin-binding protein, PBP 2A. The prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA was 87/231 (37.7% and 30/231 (12.98%, respectively. There was no association between any risk factor studied (age, sex, origin of the patient - whether hospital or community, previous hospitalization, use of current or previous antibiotic therapy, corticotherapy and/or immunotherapy, reason for hospitalization and place of hospitalization and the presence of S. aureus. However, a significant association was established between previous hospitalization and the presence of MRSA (RR:1.85; CI:1.00-3.41; p=0.041. The nostrils were the principal site of colonization by both S. aureus (80.4% and MRSA (26.4%, followed by the perineal area, with rates of 27.6% and 12.6%, respectively. If only

  1. Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Sequence Type 398

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mette Theilgaard

    . aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have been associated with hospitals, but during the past decades MRSA has emerged in the community and now a new branch of MRSA has been found in association with livestock (LA-MRSA). A specific lineage (multilocus sequence type 398 (ST398......Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the nares and skin surfaces of several animal species, including man. S. aureus can cause a wide variety of infections ranging from superficial soft tissue and skin infections to severe and deadly systemic infections. Traditionally S...... for LA-MRSA ST398 survival on porcine skin and nasal epithelium ex vivo were identified. These genes could represent targets for de-colonization, which could help prevent further spread and adaption of LA-MRSA ST398. Manuscript III describes the construction of the S. aureus VirulenceFinder database...

  2. Staphylococcus aureus shifts towards commensalism in response to Corynebacterium species

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    Matthew M Ramsey

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus–human interactions result in a continuum of outcomes from commensalism to pathogenesis. S. aureus is a clinically important pathogen that asymptomatically colonizes ~25% of humans as a member of the nostril and skin microbiota, where it resides with other bacteria including commensal Corynebacterium species. Commensal Corynebacterium spp. are also positively correlated with S. aureus in chronic polymicrobial diabetic foot infections, distinct from acute monomicrobial S. aureus infections. Recent work by our lab and others indicates that microbe-microbe interactions between S. aureus and human skin/nasal commensals, including Corynebacterium species, affect S. aureus behavior and fitness. Thus, we hypothesized that S. aureus interactions with Corynebacterium spp. diminish S. aureus virulence. We tested this by assaying for changes in S. aureus gene expression during in vitro mono- versus coculture with Corynebacterium striatum, a common skin and nasal commensal. We observed a broad shift in S. aureus gene transcription during in vitro growth with C. striatum, including increased transcription of genes known to exhibit increased expression during human nasal colonization and decreased transcription of virulence genes. S. aureus uses several regulatory pathways to transition between commensal and pathogenic states. One of these, the quorum signal accessory gene regulator (agr system, was strongly inhibited in response to Corynebacterium spp. Phenotypically, S. aureus exposed to C. striatum exhibited increased adhesion to epithelial cells, reflecting a commensal state, and decreased hemolysin activity, reflecting an attenuation of virulence. Consistent with this, S. aureus displayed diminished fitness in experimental in vivo coinfection with C. striatum when compared to monoinfection. These data support a model in which S. aureus shifts from virulence towards a commensal state when exposed to commensal Corynebacterium species.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus Shifts toward Commensalism in Response to Corynebacterium Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Matthew M.; Freire, Marcelo O.; Gabrilska, Rebecca A.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.; Lemon, Katherine P.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus–human interactions result in a continuum of outcomes from commensalism to pathogenesis. S. aureus is a clinically important pathogen that asymptomatically colonizes ~25% of humans as a member of the nostril and skin microbiota, where it resides with other bacteria including commensal Corynebacterium species. Commensal Corynebacterium spp. are also positively correlated with S. aureus in chronic polymicrobial diabetic foot infections, distinct from acute monomicrobial S. aureus infections. Recent work by our lab and others indicates that microbe–microbe interactions between S. aureus and human skin/nasal commensals, including Corynebacterium species, affect S. aureus behavior and fitness. Thus, we hypothesized that S. aureus interactions with Corynebacterium spp. diminish S. aureus virulence. We tested this by assaying for changes in S. aureus gene expression during in vitro mono- versus coculture with Corynebacterium striatum, a common skin and nasal commensal. We observed a broad shift in S. aureus gene transcription during in vitro growth with C. striatum, including increased transcription of genes known to exhibit increased expression during human nasal colonization and decreased transcription of virulence genes. S. aureus uses several regulatory pathways to transition between commensal and pathogenic states. One of these, the quorum signal accessory gene regulator (agr) system, was strongly inhibited in response to Corynebacterium spp. Phenotypically, S. aureus exposed to C. striatum exhibited increased adhesion to epithelial cells, reflecting a commensal state, and decreased hemolysin activity, reflecting an attenuation of virulence. Consistent with this, S. aureus displayed diminished fitness in experimental in vivo coinfection with C. striatum when compared to monoinfection. These data support a model in which S. aureus shifts from virulence toward a commensal state when exposed to commensal Corynebacterium species. PMID:27582729

  4. Nasal carriage of a single clone of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among kindergarten attendees in northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Shih-Yi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: To evaluate the prevalence and microbiological characterization of community-acquired (CA methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA nasal carriage in a kindergarten. Methods: Point prevalence study. Nasal swabs were collected from healthy children younger than 7 years of age who were attending a kindergarten in Taipei, Taiwan. A parent questionnaire regarding MRSA risk factors was administered simultaneously. All CA-MRSA colonization isolates were archived for subsequent antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular typing. Results: Of the 68 children who participated in the study, 17 (25% had S. aureus isolated from nasal swabs. Nine (13.2% of the 68 children had CA-MRSA carriage, and none of them had any identified risk factors. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed all of the 9 CA-MRSA colonization isolates had uniformly high resistance (100% to both clindamycin and erythromycin, the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin-constitutive phenotype and the ermB gene. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed 8 (88.9% of 9 CA-MRSA colonization isolates were genetically related and multilocus sequence typing revealed all isolates had sequence type 59. All of the colonization isolates carried the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IV, but none were positive for the Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that a single predominant CA-MRSA colonization strain featuring high clindamycin resistance circulated in this kindergarten. Additionally, due to the established transmissibility of colonization isolates, the high prevalence of nasal carriage of CA-MRSA among healthy attendees in kindergartens may indicate the accelerated spread of CA-MRSA in the community.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus: Screening for Nasal Carriers in a Community Setting with Special Reference to MRSA

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    Yukti Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Emergence of MRSA infections among previously healthy persons in community settings (without exposure to health care facilities has been noted recently. MRSA infections are now classified as health care-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA and community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA infections. Its colonization is an important risk factor for subsequent MRSA infection. Aims and Objectives. The aim was to screen patients and health care workers for staphylococcal carriage, identify risk factors for MRSA colonization, and determine the sensitivity pattern. Materials and Methods. A total of 200 subjects were screened for nasal carriage after obtaining verbal consent. These were both healthy subjects attending various outpatient departments and health care workers. Specimens were collected from the anterior nares using premoistened sterile cotton swabs and inoculated onto blood agar and mannitol salt agar and incubated at 37°C for 24–48 h. Results. Staphylococcus aureus colonisation was found to be 12% (n=24. MRSA was identified in 5% (n=10 which represents 41.66% of SA. A total of 10 strains of MRSA were isolated from 200 subjects, giving an overall positivity rate of 5%. Discussion. Staphylococcal colonization was found to be 12% (MRSA 5%. Fluoroquinolone resistance was remarkable whereas all strains were sensitive to vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, quinupristin-dalfopristin.

  6. Epidemiology and population structure of Staphylococcus aureus in various population groups from a rural and semi urban area in Gabon, Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateba Ngoa, Ulysse; Schaumburg, Frieder; Adegnika, Ayola Akim; Kösters, Katrin; Möller, Tina; Fernandes, Jose Francisco; Alabi, Abraham; Issifou, Saadou; Becker, Karsten; Grobusch, Martin Peter; Kremsner, Peter Gottfried; Lell, Bertrand

    2012-10-01

    Little data is available on the epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus in Africa. In the present study we aim at characterizing the population structure of S. aureus in healthy subjects from a rural and a semi-urban area in Lambaréné, Gabon as well as in hospital staff and inpatients. In total, 500 subjects were screened for S. aureus colonization of the nares, axillae and inguinal region. Overall, 146 (29%) were positive. We found 46 different spa types. The most frequent spa types were t084 (35%) and the agr II was the most prevalent subtype of the accessory gene regulator (56%, n=82). Five isolates (3%) were methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Carriage rates of S. aureus in Gabon are comparable to developed countries. MRSA is for the first time described and could pose a significant health threat in this region with limited access to microbiological laboratory facilities and to adequate antimicrobial agents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Bacterial colonization of psoriasis plaques. Is it relevant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Marcus

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial colonization was investigated retrospectively in patients with plaque psoriasis (n=98 inpatient treatments, n=73 patients. At least one pathogen was found in 46% of all cases. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent bacterium. Bacterial colonization of psoriasis plaques could be relevant in individual cases.

  8. Guar gum and hydroxy propyl methylcellulose compressed coated tablets for colonic drug delivery: in vitro and in vivo evaluation in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, F M; Shaker, D S; Nasr, M; Saad, I E; Ragaey, R

    2011-04-01

    The objectives of the present study are to evaluate guar gum in combination with hydroxyl propyl methylcellulose (HPMC) as compression coat for colonic delivery of prednisolone as well as improving the mechanical properties of the compressed coated tablets. The core tablets containing 5 mg prednisolone were compression coated with 125 mg of coating materials consisted of guar gum alone or mixtures of guar gum in combination with different ratios of HPMC. The compressed coated tablets were evaluated for their mechanical properties, in vitro drug release and in vivo performance in human volunteers. The compressed coated tablets with coats containing HPMC exhibited acceptable mechanical properties. In vitro drug release studies in pH 7.4 phosphate-buffered saline medium containing 2% (w/v) rat caecal content have shown that increase in concentration of HPMC in the prepared coats from 10% to 20% resulted in an increase in the release rate. However, further increase in HPMC concentration to constitute 30% caused a reduction in the release rate. Based on the drug release results, tablets coated with coat consisted of 80% guar gum and 20% HPMC were selected for in vivo evaluation. In vivo gamma scintigraphic study on human volunteers using technetium-99m-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid as a tracer was performed. The results showed that tablets remained intact in stomach and small intestine, however partial and complete release of the tracer occurred in the colon. In conclusion, guar gum in combination with HPMC would be successfully used as a carrier for drug delivery to the colon.

  9. Colonic angiodysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallee, C.; Legmann, P.; Garnier, T.; Levesque, M.; Favriel, J.M.

    1984-11-01

    The main clinical, endoscopic and radiographic findings in thirty documented cases of colonic angiodysplasia or vacular ectasia are described. We emphasise the association with colonic diverticulosis and cardiovascular pathology, describe the histological changes, summarize the present physiopathological hypothesis, and consider the various therapeutic approaches.

  10. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a neonatal alpaca

    OpenAIRE

    Stull, Jason W.; Kenney, Daniel G.; Slavić, Durda; Weese, J Scott

    2012-01-01

    A 6-hour-old alpaca was presented for evaluation of respiratory difficulty. As part of routine surveillance, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was identified from a nasal swab taken upon admission to the hospital. No signs of MRSA infection were noted. The MRSA strain recovered was a human epidemic clone that has been associated with horses. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization can occur in camelids, and the potential animal and public health risks require consideration.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis in diverse host environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Divya; Harper, Lamia; Shopsin, Bo; Torres, Victor J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Staphylococcus aureus is an eminent human pathogen that can colonize the human host and cause severe life-threatening illnesses. This bacterium can reside in and infect a wide range of host tissues, ranging from superficial surfaces like the skin to deeper tissues such as in the gastrointestinal tract, heart and bones. Due to its multifaceted lifestyle, S. aureus uses complex regulatory networks to sense diverse signals that enable it to adapt to different environments and modulate virulence. In this minireview, we explore well-characterized environmental and host cues that S. aureus responds to and describe how this pathogen modulates virulence in response to these signals. Lastly, we highlight therapeutic approaches undertaken by several groups to inhibit both signaling and the cognate regulators that sense and transmit these signals downstream. PMID:28104617

  12. Prevalence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in apparently healthy ... Keywords: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Nasal swabs, Multidrug resistance, Rational chemotherapy .... Figure 2: Antibiotic resistance profile of the MRSA isolates. Key: AM-amoxicillin ...

  13. Nasal carriage of methicilli-resistant staphylococcus aureus with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus isolates were collected from anterior nares of fifty healthy adults in Zaria and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns determined. Seventy-two percent (72%) of the isolates were methicillin-resistant S. aureus, while 20% were methicillin-susceptible. The isolates were generally resistant to multiple ...

  14. Staphylococcus aureus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcus aureus (Staph Infection) In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby with ... from your health care provider. What is a staph infection? Staphylococcus aureus (staph) is a type of ...

  15. A Cross-Sectional Study of Colonization Rates with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL and Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Four Swiss Refugee Centres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rein Jan Piso

    Full Text Available The recent crisis of refugees seeking asylum in European countries challenges public health on many levels. Most refugees currently arrive from Syria, Afghanistan, or Eritrea. Data about multidrug resistant bacteria (MDR prevalence are not present for these countries. However, when entering the European heath care systems, data about colonisation rates regarding highly resistant bacterial pathogens are important.We performed a cross-sectional screening in four Swiss refugee centres to determine the colonization rates for MRSA and ESBL- and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. We used pharyngeal, nasal, and inguinal swabs for MRSA and rectal swabs and urine for ESBL and carbapenemase screening using standard microbiological procedures. Whole genome sequencing (WGS was used to determine the relatedness of MRSA isolates with high resolution due to a suspected outbreak.41/261(15.7% refugees were colonized with MRSA. No differences regarding the country of origin were observed. However, in a single centre significantly more were colonized, which was confirmed to be a recent local outbreak. 57/241 (23.7% refugees were colonized with ESBL with significantly higher colonisation in persons originating from the Middle East (35.1%, p<0.001. No carbapenemase producers were detected.The colonisation rate of the refugees was about 10 times higher for MRSA and 2-5 times higher for ESBL compared to the Swiss population. Contact precaution is warranted for these persons if they enter medical care. In cases of infections, MRSA and ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae should be considered regarding antibiotic treatment choices.

  16. [Eradication of Staphylococcus aureus in carrier patients undergoing joint arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbero Allende, José M; Romanyk Cabrera, Juan; Montero Ruiz, Eduardo; Vallés Purroy, Alfonso; Melgar Molero, Virginia; Agudo López, Rosa; Gete García, Luis; López Álvarez, Joaquín

    2015-02-01

    Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a complication with serious repercussions and its main cause is Staphylococcus aureus. The purpose of this study is to determine whether decolonization of S.aureus carriers helps to reduce the incidence of PJI by S.aureus. An S.aureus screening test was performed on nasal carriers in patients undergoing knee or hip arthroplasty between January and December 2011. Patients with a positive test were treated with intranasal mupirocin and chlorhexidine soap 5 days. The incidence of PJI was compared with patients undergoing the same surgery between January and December 2010. A total of 393 joint replacements were performed in 391 patients from the control group, with 416 joint replacements being performed in the intervention group. Colonization study was performed in 382 patients (91.8%), of which 102 were positive (26.7%) and treated. There was 2 PJI due S.aureus compared with 9 in the control group (0.5% vs 2.3%, odds ratio [OR]: 0.2, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.4 to 2.3, P=.04). In our study, the detection of colonization and eradication of S.aureus carriers achieved a significant decrease in PJI due to S.aureus compared to a historical group. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  17. Age- and gender-associated Staphylococcus aureus spa types found among nasal carriers in a general population: the Tromso Staph and Skin Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangvik, Maria; Olsen, Renate Slind; Olsen, Karina; Simonsen, Gunnar Skov; Furberg, Anne-Sofie; Sollid, Johanna U Ericson

    2011-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriers risk autoinfection; however, knowledge about the factors that make specific strains successful colonizers is limited. This study was undertaken to identify the most successful S. aureus clones in nasal carriers and compare their distribution among host groups. The population structure of S. aureus isolates from healthy adults was investigated by spa typing 1,981 isolates from persistent and intermittent nasal carriers participating in a health survey. In the baseline screening (1,113 isolates), the most common spa types were t012 (8.4%), t084 (7.6%), and t065 (4.9%). Three large spa clonal complexes (spa CC012, spa CC065, and spa CC084) comprised 62.4% of the isolates. In multivariate models adjusted for age and smoking status, male sex was associated with higher risk for spa type t084 (odds ratio [OR], 1.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06 to 2.77), and lower risk of spa type t012 (OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.92) colonization. The prevalence of spa type t012 decreased significantly with increasing age (P = 0.03), with a prevalence almost twice as high in the youngest group (age 30 to 44 years, prevalence = 11.1%) as in the oldest group (age, 60 to 87 years; prevalence = 5.6%). Among baseline isolates, spa type t084 had a twofold-higher prevalence among intermittent carriers than among persistent carriers (10.6% versus 5.5%; P = 0.04). In summary, the two most prevalent spa types found in this study were significantly associated with age and/or gender. This may provide valuable clues to the multifactorial mechanisms, among them bacterial factors, involved in nasal colonization with S. aureus.

  18. Age- and Gender-Associated Staphylococcus aureus spa Types Found among Nasal Carriers in a General Population: the Tromsø Staph and Skin Study▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangvik, Maria; Olsen, Renate Slind; Olsen, Karina; Simonsen, Gunnar Skov; Furberg, Anne-Sofie; Sollid, Johanna U. Ericson

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriers risk autoinfection; however, knowledge about the factors that make specific strains successful colonizers is limited. This study was undertaken to identify the most successful S. aureus clones in nasal carriers and compare their distribution among host groups. The population structure of S. aureus isolates from healthy adults was investigated by spa typing 1,981 isolates from persistent and intermittent nasal carriers participating in a health survey. In the baseline screening (1,113 isolates), the most common spa types were t012 (8.4%), t084 (7.6%), and t065 (4.9%). Three large spa clonal complexes (spa CC012, spa CC065, and spa CC084) comprised 62.4% of the isolates. In multivariate models adjusted for age and smoking status, male sex was associated with higher risk for spa type t084 (odds ratio [OR], 1.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06 to 2.77), and lower risk of spa type t012 (OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.92) colonization. The prevalence of spa type t012 decreased significantly with increasing age (P = 0.03), with a prevalence almost twice as high in the youngest group (age 30 to 44 years, prevalence = 11.1%) as in the oldest group (age, 60 to 87 years; prevalence = 5.6%). Among baseline isolates, spa type t084 had a twofold-higher prevalence among intermittent carriers than among persistent carriers (10.6% versus 5.5%; P = 0.04). In summary, the two most prevalent spa types found in this study were significantly associated with age and/or gender. This may provide valuable clues to the multifactorial mechanisms, among them bacterial factors, involved in nasal colonization with S. aureus. PMID:21998436

  19. Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcal Species via the agr Quorum Sensing System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canovas de la Nuez, Jaime; Baldry, Mara; Bojer, Martin S

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are associated with both humans and animals. While most are non-pathogenic colonizers, Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing severe infections. S. aureus virulence is controlled by the agr quorum sensing system responding to secreted auto-inducing pep...

  20. The Staphylococcus aureus α-Acetolactate Synthase ALS Confers Resistance to Nitrosative Stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, Sandra M; de Jong, Anne; Kloosterman, Tomas G; Kuipers, Oscar P; Saraiva, Lígia M

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a worldwide pathogen that colonizes the human nasal cavity and is a major cause of respiratory and cutaneous infections. In the nasal cavity, S. aureus thrives with high concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) produced by the innate immune effectors and has available for growth

  1. Increased Risk of Pneumonia and Bronchiolitis after Bacterial Colonization of the Airways as Neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, Nadja Hawwa; Chawes, Bo Lk; Bisgaard, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: The frequency of pneumonia and bronchiolitis exhibits considerable variation in otherwise healthy children, and suspected risk factors explain only a minor proportion of the variation. We hypothesized that alterations in the airway microbiome in early life may be associated with suscep......Rationale: The frequency of pneumonia and bronchiolitis exhibits considerable variation in otherwise healthy children, and suspected risk factors explain only a minor proportion of the variation. We hypothesized that alterations in the airway microbiome in early life may be associated...... physicians at the center. Analyses were adjusted for covariates associated pneumonia and bronchiolitisand bacterial airway colonization. Measurements and Main Results: Hypopharyngeal aspirates and full clinical follow-up until three years of age were available for 265 children. Of these, 56 (21%) neonates...... were colonized with S.pneumoniae, H.influenzae and/or M.catarrhalis at four weeks of age. Colonization with at least one of these microorganisms, (but not S.aureus), was significantly associated with increased incidence of pneumonia and bronchiolitis (adjusted Incidence Rate Ratio=1.79[1.29-2.48], p-value...

  2. First report in South America of companion animal colonization by the USA1100 clone of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ST30) and by the European clone of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (ST71)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Quitoco, Isidório Mebinda Zuco; Ramundo, Mariana Severo; Silva-Carvalho, Maria Cícera; Souza, Raquel Rodrigues; Beltrame, Cristiana Ossaille; de Oliveira, Táya Figueiredo; Araújo, Rodrigo; Del Peloso, Pedro Fernandez; Coelho, Leonardo Rocchetto; Figueiredo, Agnes Marie Sá

    2013-01-01

    .... In this work we searched for mecA gene among Staphylococcus isolates obtained from nasal microbiota of 130 healthy dogs and cats attended in a veterinary clinic located in the west region of Rio de Janeiro...

  3. Meticillineresistente Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in de gemeenschap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, A. G.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C. M. J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections have been confined to healthcare centres for decades. However, MRSA infections are increasingly seen in young healthy individuals with no exposure to healthcare centres. These community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains differ from

  4. Staphylococcus aureus toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a dangerous pathogen that causes a variety of severe diseases. The virulence of S. aureus is defined by a large repertoire of virulence factors, among which secreted toxins play a preeminent role. Many S. aureus toxins damage biological membranes, leading to cell death. In particular, S. aureus produces potent hemolysins and leukotoxins. Among the latter, some were recently identified to lyse neutrophils after ingestion, representing an especially powerful weapon against bacterial elimination by innate host defense. Furthermore, S. aureus secretes many factors that inhibit the complement cascade or prevent recognition by host defenses. Several further toxins add to this multi-faceted program of S. aureus to evade elimination in the host. This review will give an overview over S. aureus toxins focusing on recent advances in our understanding of how leukotoxins work in receptor-mediated or receptor-independent fashions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Characterization of a mouse-adapted Staphylococcus aureus strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Holtfreter

    Full Text Available More effective antibiotics and a protective vaccine are desperately needed to combat the 'superbug' Staphylococcus aureus. While in vivo pathogenicity studies routinely involve infection of mice with human S. aureus isolates, recent genetic studies have demonstrated that S. aureus lineages are largely host-specific. The use of such animal-adapted S. aureus strains may therefore be a promising approach for developing more clinically relevant animal infection models. We have isolated a mouse-adapted S. aureus strain (JSNZ which caused a severe outbreak of preputial gland abscesses among male C57BL/6J mice. We aimed to extensively characterize this strain on a genomic level and determine its virulence potential in murine colonization and infection models. JSNZ belongs to the MLST type ST88, rare among human isolates, and lacks an hlb-converting phage encoding human-specific immune evasion factors. Naive mice were found to be more susceptible to nasal and gastrointestinal colonization with JSNZ than with the human-derived Newman strain. Furthermore, naïve mice required antibiotic pre-treatment to become colonized with Newman. In contrast, JSNZ was able to colonize mice in the absence of antibiotic treatment suggesting that this strain can compete with the natural flora for space and nutrients. In a renal abscess model, JSNZ caused more severe disease than Newman with greater weight loss and bacterial burden. In contrast to most other clinical isolates, JSNZ can also be readily genetically modified by phage transduction and electroporation. In conclusion, the mouse-adapted strain JSNZ may represent a valuable tool for studying aspects of mucosal colonization and for screening novel vaccines and therapies directed at preventing colonization.

  6. An important role of α-hemolysin in extracellular vesicles on the development of atopic dermatitis induced by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Wook Hong

    Full Text Available Skin barrier disruption and dermal inflammation are key phenotypes of atopic dermatitis (AD. Staphylococcus aureus secretes extracellular vesicles (EVs, which are involved in AD pathogenesis. Here, we evaluated the role of EVs-associated α-hemolysin derived from S. aureus in AD pathogenesis. α-hemolysin production from S. aureus was detected using western blot analyses. The cytotoxic activity of α-hemolysin on HaCaT keratinocytes was evaluated by measuring cell viability after treating cells with soluble and EVs-associated α-hemolysin. To determine the type of cell death, HaCaT keratinocytes were stained with annexin V and 7-AAD. The in vivo effects of α-hemolysin were evaluated by application of soluble and EV-associated α-hemolysin on the mouse skin. The present study showed that increased α-hemolysin was produced by S. aureus colonized on AD patients compared to healthy subjects. α-hemolysin production was also related to AD severity. In addition, EV-associated α-hemolysin was more cytotoxic to HaCaT keratinocytes than soluble α-hemolysin, and α-hemolysin-negative EVs did not induce keratinocyte death. EV-associated α-hemolysin induced necrosis, but soluble α-hemolysin induced apoptosis of keratinocytes. In vivo, skin barrier disruption and epidermal hyperplasia were induced by soluble and EV-associated α-hemolysin. However, AD-like dermal inflammation was only caused by EV-associated α-hemolysin. Moreover, neither skin barrier disruption nor AD-like skin inflammation was induced by α-hemolysin-negative EVs. Taken together, α-Hemolysin secreted from S. aureus, particularly the EV-associated form, induces both skin barrier disruption and AD-like skin inflammation, suggesting that EV-associated α-hemolysin is a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for the control of AD.

  7. An important role of α-hemolysin in extracellular vesicles on the development of atopic dermatitis induced by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Wook; Choi, Eun-Byul; Min, Taek-Ki; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Min-Hye; Jeon, Seong Gyu; Lee, Byung-Jae; Gho, Yong Song; Jee, Young-Koo; Pyun, Bok-Yang; Kim, Yoon-Keun

    2014-01-01

    Skin barrier disruption and dermal inflammation are key phenotypes of atopic dermatitis (AD). Staphylococcus aureus secretes extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are involved in AD pathogenesis. Here, we evaluated the role of EVs-associated α-hemolysin derived from S. aureus in AD pathogenesis. α-hemolysin production from S. aureus was detected using western blot analyses. The cytotoxic activity of α-hemolysin on HaCaT keratinocytes was evaluated by measuring cell viability after treating cells with soluble and EVs-associated α-hemolysin. To determine the type of cell death, HaCaT keratinocytes were stained with annexin V and 7-AAD. The in vivo effects of α-hemolysin were evaluated by application of soluble and EV-associated α-hemolysin on the mouse skin. The present study showed that increased α-hemolysin was produced by S. aureus colonized on AD patients compared to healthy subjects. α-hemolysin production was also related to AD severity. In addition, EV-associated α-hemolysin was more cytotoxic to HaCaT keratinocytes than soluble α-hemolysin, and α-hemolysin-negative EVs did not induce keratinocyte death. EV-associated α-hemolysin induced necrosis, but soluble α-hemolysin induced apoptosis of keratinocytes. In vivo, skin barrier disruption and epidermal hyperplasia were induced by soluble and EV-associated α-hemolysin. However, AD-like dermal inflammation was only caused by EV-associated α-hemolysin. Moreover, neither skin barrier disruption nor AD-like skin inflammation was induced by α-hemolysin-negative EVs. Taken together, α-Hemolysin secreted from S. aureus, particularly the EV-associated form, induces both skin barrier disruption and AD-like skin inflammation, suggesting that EV-associated α-hemolysin is a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for the control of AD.

  8. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukos, Georgios; Sakellari, Dimitra; Arsenakis, Minas; Tsalikis, Lazaros; Slini, Theodora; Konstantinidis, Antonios

    2015-09-01

    To assess the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in plaque and tongue samples from systemically healthy subjects with periodontal health, gingivitis or chronic periodontitis. After screening 720 potentially eligible subjects, 154 systemically healthy participants were ultimately enrolled in the current study. Subgingival samples were taken from the first molars and the tongue and analyzed for the presence of S. aureus and MRSA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), using primers and conditions previously described in the literature. In addition, samples were taken from deep periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis patients. Statistical analysis was performed by applying non-parametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis for clinical parameters, and z-test with Bonferroni corrections for distributions of assessed parameters). All comparisons were set at the 0.05 significance level. S. aureus was detected in 18% of all participants and in 10% of the samples tested. No significant differences were found in its distribution among the three investigated groups (z-test for proportions with Bonferroni corrections, p>0.05). The mecA gene was not present in any of the S. aureus found. S. aureus can be found in the oral environment regardless of the periodontal conditions and therefore should be considered as a member of the transient flora not participating in periodontal pathology. Subgingival sites and tongue surfaces seem to be an unusual habitat of MRSA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wound colonization by microorganisms is most frequently polymicrobial and incidences of high level resistance among bacterial isolates from wounds have been reported. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and extendedspectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Gram-negative bacteria both constitute ...

  10. Long-term carriage, and transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus after discharge from hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. M. Frenay; C.M.J.E. Vandenbroucke-Grauls (Christina); M. J. Molkenboer; J. Verhoef

    1992-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this study was to determine whether patients who become carriers of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) during their stay in hospital, remain colonized after discharge. Thirty-six patients colonized with MRSA during one of three outbreaks at Utrecht

  11. Nickel allergy and relationship with Staphylococcus aureus in atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anna, Bogdali M.; Grazyna, Antoszczyk; Wojciech, Dyga

    2016-01-01

    . aureus in atopic dermatitis. Methods: Nickel allergy was confirmed in atopic patients and excluded in healthy volunteers using patch testing. Infection by S. aureus was tested in atopic patients and healthy volunteers by use of API Staph system. The specific IgE for staphylococcal enterotoxin A and B...

  12. Operon structure of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Broeke-Smits, Nicole J P; Pronk, Tessa E; Jongerius, Ilse; Bruning, Oskar; Wittink, Floyd R; Breit, Timo M; van Strijp, Jos A G; Fluit, Ad C; Boel, C H Edwin

    2010-06-01

    In bacteria, gene regulation is one of the fundamental characteristics of survival, colonization and pathogenesis. Operons play a key role in regulating expression of diverse genes involved in metabolism and virulence. However, operon structures in pathogenic bacteria have been determined only by in silico approaches that are dependent on factors such as intergenic distances and terminator/promoter sequences. Knowledge of operon structures is crucial to fully understand the pathophysiology of infections. Presently, transcriptome data obtained from growth curves in a defined medium were used to predict operons in Staphylococcus aureus. This unbiased approach and the use of five highly reproducible biological replicates resulted in 93.5% significantly regulated genes. These data, combined with Pearson's correlation coefficients of the transcriptional profiles, enabled us to accurately compile 93% of the genome in operon structures. A total of 1640 genes of different functional classes were identified in operons. Interestingly, we found several operons containing virulence genes and showed synergistic effects for two complement convertase inhibitors transcribed in one operon. This is the first experimental approach to fully identify operon structures in S. aureus. It forms the basis for further in vitro regulation studies that will profoundly advance the understanding of bacterial pathophysiology in vivo.

  13. Density interactions among Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus aureus in the nasopharynx of young Peruvian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yu-Wen; Vidal, Jorge E; Grijalva, Carlos G; Bozio, Catherine; Edwards, Kathryn M; Williams, John V; Griffin, Marie R; Verastegui, Hector; Hartinger, Stella M; Gil, Ana I; Lanata, Claudio F; Klugman, Keith P

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus aureus are commonly carried in the nasopharynx of young children, and have been speculated to interact with each other. Although earlier studies used cultures alone to assess these interactions, the addition of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) provides further insight into these interactions. We compared results of culture and qPCR for the detection of these 3 bacteria in 446 nasopharynx samples collected from 360 healthy young children in a prospective cohort study in the Peruvian Andes. Patterns of concurrent bacterial colonization were studied using repeated measures logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations. Spearman correlation coefficients were used to assess correlations among bacterial densities. At a bacterial density 10 colony forming units/mL. In addition, there was a positive association between S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae colonization measured by both culture (odds ratio [OR] 3.11-3.17, P Staphylococcus aureus in carriage with both culture (OR 0.45, P = 0.024) and qPCR (OR 0.61, P < 0.05). The impact of density on detection by culture and the observed density-related interactions support use of qPCR in additional studies to examine vaccine effects on diverse bacterial species.

  14. What’s in a Name? Is Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Just Another S aureus When Treated with Vancomycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    aureus When Treated With Vancomycin? Albert T. McManus, PhD; Arthur D. Mason, Jr, MD; William F. McManus, MD; Basil A. Pruitt, Jr, MD 9 Msethicllln...sensitivity. Methicillin-resistant SA strains were isolated 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 from 319 of the colonized patients. A comparison of the antibi

  15. A basic dynamic transmission model of Staphylococcus aureus in the US population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogea, C; van Effelterre, T; Acosta, C J

    2014-03-01

    We present a basic mathematical model of Staphylococcus aureus transmission in the USA based on natural history of infection and nationally representative data. We employed a Susceptible-Colonized-Infected-Recovered-Susceptible compartmental modelling framework with two different phenotypes of S. aureus: methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant (MRSA). The model is dynamic and accounts for the US population growth. For model calibration/validation, we used published 1999-2005 S. aureus infection data in conjunction with the 2001-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey colonization data. Baseline model projections illustrated how MRSA might continue to expand and gradually replace MSSA over time, in the absence of intervention, if there is strong competition for colonization. The model-based estimate of the basic reproduction number (R0) highlights the need for infection control. We illustrate the potential population-level impact of intervention with a hypothetical S. aureus vaccination component.

  16. Quantitative detection of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae in patients with new influenza A (H1N1)/2009 and influenza A/2010 virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaeyan, Firouzeh; Nahaei, Mohammad Reza; Seifi, Sirus Jedary; Kafil, Hossein Samadi; Sadeghi, Javid

    2015-01-01

    Viral influenza is a seasonal infection associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In the United States more than 35,000 deaths and 200,000 hospitalizations are recorded annually due to influenza. Secondary bacterial infections or co-infections associated with cases of influenza are a leading cause of severe morbidity and mortality, especially among high-risk groups such as the elderly and young children. The aim of the present study was the quantitative detection of S. aureus, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae in a group of patients with seasonal influenza A, influenza A (H1N1) pandemic 2009, and patients with symptoms of respiratory infection, but the negative for H1N1 serving as control group. In total, 625 patients suspected respiratory infection from April 2009 to April 2010 were studied. There were 58 patients with influenza A H1N1 and 567 patients negative for influenza A H1N1. From November 2010 to February 2011, 158 patients with respiratory symptoms were analyzed for seasonal influenza A. There were 25 patients with seasonal influenza A. To check the colonization status among the healthy individuals 62 healthy persons were further investigated. Individual were screened in parallel. The choices of special genes were amplified from clinical specimens using real-time PCR with a cutoff of 10(4) CFU/mL to differentiate colonization from infection in respiratory tract. S. aureus, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae were detected in 12%, 26% and 33% of patients with H1N1, while the corresponding figures were 9%, 19%, and 31% for H1N1 negative patients. Among patients with seasonal influenza A 12% S. aureus, 24% S. pneumoniae, and 32% H. influenzae co-infections were detected, while influenza negative control group yielded 5% S. aureus, 11% S. pneumoniae, and 10% H. influenzae, respectively. The results of this study indicated that the serotype of pandemic H1N1 2009 did not increase incidence of secondary infection with S. aureus, S. pneumoniae and H

  17. Cesarean section changes neonatal gut colonization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, Jakob; Thorsen, Jonathan; Chawes, Bo L

    2016-01-01

    delivery, 12% by means of emergency cesarean section, and 9% by means of elective cesarean section. Birth by means of cesarean section was significantly associated with colonization of the intestinal tract by Citrobacter freundii, Clostridium species, Enterobacter cloacae, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella...... oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus at age 1 week, whereas colonization by Escherichia coli was associated with natural birth. At age 1 month, these differences were less prominent, and at age 1 year, they were not apparent, which was confirmed by means of multivariate data...

  18. Effect of resistant starch on potential biomarkers for colonic cancer risk patients with colonic adenomas : A controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grubben, M. J A L; van den Braak, C.C.M.; Essenberg, M.; Olthof, M.; Tangerman, A.; Katan, M. B.; Nagengast, F.M.

    2001-01-01

    Resistant starch decreases the concentration of secondary bile acids in the feces and the proliferation rate of colonic mucosal cells in healthy volunteers. This may reduce the risk of colon cancer. We investigated 23 patients with recently removed colonic adenoma(s) in a controlled parallel trial.

  19. The microbiome of the middle meatus in healthy adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay R Ramakrishnan

    Full Text Available Rhinitis and rhinosinusitis are multifactorial disease processes in which bacteria may play a role either in infection or stimulation of the inflammatory process. Rhinosinusitis has been historically studied with culture-based techniques, which have implicated several common pathogens in disease states. More recently, the NIH Human Microbiome Project has examined the microbiome at a number of accessible body sites, and demonstrated differences among healthy and diseased patients. Recent DNA-based sinus studies have suggested that healthy sinuses are not sterile, as was previously believed, but the normal sinonasal microbiome has yet to be thoroughly examined. Middle meatus swab specimens were collected from 28 consecutive patients presenting with no signs or symptoms of rhinosinusitis. Bacterial colonization was assessed in these specimens using quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. All subjects were positive for bacterial colonization of the middle meatus. Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Propionibacterium acnes were the most prevalent and abundant microorganisms detected. Rich and diverse bacterial assemblages are present in the sinonasal cavity in the normal state, including opportunistic pathogens typically found in the nasopharynx. This work helps establish a baseline for understanding how the sinonasal microbiome may impact diseases of the upper airways.

  20. Commercial biocides induce transfer of prophage Φ13 from human strains of Staphylococcus aureus to livestock CC398

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Yuanyue; Nielsen, Lene Nørby; Hvitved, Annemette

    2017-01-01

    Human strains of Staphylococcus aureus commonly carry the bacteriophage ΦSa3 that encodes immune evasion factors. Recently, this prophage has been found in livestock-associated, methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) CC398 strains where it may promote human colonization. Here, we have addressed ...

  1. Molecular characterization of nasal methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from workers of an automaker company in southeast Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhanipoor, Mohammad Hossein; Ahmadrajabi, Roya; Karmostaji, Afsaneh; Saffari, Fereshteh

    2017-10-01

    Colonization of methicillin resistant Staphylococccus aureus (MRSA) can occur more commonly in healthy people who live in close together or are in close physical contact with each other. Having knowledge about the molecular characteristics of these strains provides considerable discernment into the epidemiology of this important microorganism. A total of 806 nasal swabs were collected from healthy workers of an automaker company in the southeast of Iran and were analyzed to detect MRSA isolates. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, and detection of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) were performed. The presence of genes encoding Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) and Arginine Catabolic Mobile Element (ACME) were also investigated. Carriage rate of S. aureus was 20%. Among 10 identified MRSA, no acme was found while high prevalence of pvl (60%) was of great concern. Seven different spa types including five new ones were identified. The most frequent sequence type was the novel one; ST 3373 (n = 3), followed by each of ST22, ST88, ST859 (n = 2) and ST1955 (n = 1). MRSA isolates were clustered into two main clonal complexes; CC22 (n = 6) and CC88 (n = 4). Low genetic diversity with the dominance of CC22, SCCmecIV was found. Distribution of previously found hospital-associated MRSA was demonstrated among our isolates. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Human Staphylococcus aureus lineages among Zoological Park residents in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Drougka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a part of the microbiota flora in many animal species. The clonal spread of S. aureus among animals and personnel in a Zoological Park was investigated. Samples were collected from colonized and infected sites among 32 mammals, 11 birds and eight humans. The genes mecA, mecC, lukF/lukS-PV (encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin, PVL and tst (toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 were investigated by PCR. Clones were defined by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST, spa type and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE. Seven S. aureus isolates were recovered from four animals and one from an employee. All were mecA, mecC and tst–negative, whereas, one carried the PVL genes and was isolated from an infected Squirrel monkey. Clonal analysis revealed the occurrence of seven STs, eight PFGE and five spa types including ones of human origin. Even though a variety of genotypes were identified among S. aureus strains colonizing zoo park residents, our results indicate that colonization with human lineages has indeed occurred.

  3. The potent in vitro antioxidant ellagitannins from pomegranate juice are metabolised into bioavailable but poor antioxidant hydroxy-6H-dibenzopyran-6-one derivatives by the colonic microflora of healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdá, Begoña; Espín, Juan Carlos; Parra, Soledad; Martínez, Pedro; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A

    2004-08-01

    The antiatherogenic activity of pomegranate juice has been attributed to its antioxidant polyphenols. The most potent in vitro antioxidant polyphenol from this juice is the ellagitannin punicalagin. However, the bioavailability of ellagitannins, including punicalagin, has not been previously described in humans. The present work aims to evaluate, in healthy humans, the bioavailability and metabolism of pomegranate juice ellagitannins, to assess their effect on several blood parameters (including cardiovascular risk disease markers) and to compare the antioxidant activity of punicalagin with that of the in vivo generated metabolites. Six healthy subjects (four men and two women) consumed 1 L of pomegranate juice daily (5.58 g/L polyphenols, including 4.37 g/L punicalagin isomers) for 5 days. The polyphenols and the in vivo generated metabolites were measured by HPLC-DAD-MS-MS. Fourteen haematological and twenty serobiochemical parameters including LDL, HDL and VLDL as well as cholesterol and triglycerides in each lipoprotein were evaluated. In vitro antioxidant activity of plasma (ABTS and FRAP assays) and urine (ABTS and DPPH) were determined. Neither punicalagin nor ellagic acid present in the juice were detected in both plasma and urine. Three microbial ellagitannin-derived metabolites were detected: 3,8-dihydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one glucuronide, an unidentified aglycone (tentatively, trihydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one) and hydroxy-6-H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran-6-one glucuronide. These metabolites could reach up to 18.6 microM in plasma, although a large inter-individual variability was observed. In urine, the same metabolites and their corresponding aglycones became evident after 1 day of juice consumption. Total urine excretion of metabolites ranged from 0.7 to 52.7% regarding the ingested punicalagin. No relevant effect was observed on any blood parameter. The metabolites did not show significant antioxidant activity compared to punicalagin from pomegranate

  4. Nickel allergy and relationship with Staphylococcus aureus in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdali, Anna M; Anna, Bogdali M; Grazyna, Antoszczyk; Wojciech, Dyga; Aleksander, Obtulowicz; Anna, Bialecka; Andrzej, Kasprowicz; Zofia, Magnowska; Krystyna, Obtulowicz

    2016-01-01

    The increase of nickel air pollution is supposed to frequent side effects of nickel action related to virulence potential of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with nickel allergy in atopic dermatitis. The goal was to investigate the relationship between nickel allergy and infection by S. aureus in atopic dermatitis. Nickel allergy was confirmed in atopic patients and excluded in healthy volunteers using patch testing. Infection by S. aureus was tested in atopic patients and healthy volunteers by use of API Staph system. The specific IgE for staphylococcal enterotoxin A and B were measured. Secretion of IFN-g, IL-2, IL-13 by PBMC under nickel sulfate and the enterotoxins A and B stimulations were studied with ELISpot. We found the increased number of infections by S. aureus in atopic patients with nickel allergy in comparison to atopic patients and healthy volunteers without nickel allergy. The elevated secretion of IL-2 under nickel sulfate stimulation in vitro was exclusively found in atopic patients with nickel allergy infected by S. aureus. Our data suggest that nickel allergy and infection by S. aureus are linked in atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus from the German general population is highly diverse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Karsten; Schaumburg, Frieder; Fegeler, Christian; Friedrich, Alexander W; Köck, Robin

    2017-01-01

    This prospective cohort study evaluates colonization dynamics and molecular characteristics of methicillin-susceptible and - resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA/MRSA) in a German general population. Nasal swabs of 1878 non-hospitalized adults were screened for S. aureus. Participants were screened thrice in intervals of 6-8 months. Isolates were characterized by spa and agr typing, mecA and mecC possession, respectively, and PCRs targeting virulence factors. 40.9% of all participants carried S. aureus at least once while 0.7% of the participants carried MRSA (mainly spa t011). MSSA isolates (n=1359) were associated with 331 different spa types; t084 (7.7%), t091 (6.1%) and t012 (71, 5.2%) were predominant. Of 206 participants carrying S. aureus at all three sampling time points, 14.1% carried the same spa type continuously; 5.3% carried different spa types with similar repeat patterns, but 80.6% carried S. aureus with unrelated spa types. MSSA isolates frequently harboured genes encoding enterotoxins (sec: 16.6%, seg: 63.1%, sei: 64.5%) and toxic shock syndrome toxin (tst: 17.5%), but rarely Panton-Valentine leukocidin (lukS-PV/lukF-PV: 0.2%). MSSA colonizing human nares in the community are clonally highly diverse. Among those constantly carrying S. aureus, clonal lineages changed over time. The proportion of persistent S. aureus carriers was lower than reported elsewhere. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Prior oropharyngeal colonization and ventilator-associated pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Rodrigues Moreira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the relationship between previous colonization of the oropharynx and development of ventilator-associated pneumonia through the classification of genomic fingerprint pattern by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of both oxacillin-resistant and oxacillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus isolates obtained from hospitalized patients in an intensive care unit.

  7. Mupirocin and Chlorhexidine Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus in Patients with Community-Onset Skin and Soft Tissue Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Stephanie A.; Hogan, Patrick G.; Camins, Bernard C.; Ainsworth, Ali J.; Patrick, Carol; Martin, Madeline S.; Krauss, Melissa J.; Rodriguez, Marcela

    2013-01-01

    Decolonization measures, including mupirocin and chlorhexidine, are often prescribed to prevent Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI). The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of high-level mupirocin and chlorhexidine resistance in S. aureus strains recovered from patients with SSTI before and after mupirocin and chlorhexidine administration and to determine whether carriage of a mupirocin- or chlorhexidine-resistant strain at baseline precluded S. aureus eradication. We recruited 1,089 patients with community-onset SSTI with or without S. aureus colonization. In addition to routine care, 483 patients were enrolled in a decolonization trial: 408 received intranasal mupirocin (with or without antimicrobial baths), and 258 performed chlorhexidine body washes. Patients were followed for up to 12 months with repeat colonization cultures. All S. aureus isolates were tested for high-level mupirocin and chlorhexidine resistance. At baseline, 23/1,089 (2.1%) patients carried a mupirocin-resistant S. aureus strain and 10/1,089 (0.9%) patients carried chlorhexidine-resistant S. aureus. Of 4 patients prescribed mupirocin, who carried a mupirocin-resistant S. aureus strain at baseline, 100% remained colonized at 1 month compared to 44% of the 324 patients without mupirocin resistance at baseline (P = 0.041). Of 2 patients prescribed chlorhexidine, who carried a chlorhexidine-resistant S. aureus strain at baseline, 50% remained colonized at 1 month compared to 48% of the 209 patients without chlorhexidine resistance at baseline (P = 1.0). The overall prevalence of mupirocin and chlorhexidine resistance is low in S. aureus isolates recovered from outpatients, but eradication efforts were less successful in patients carrying a mupirocin-resistant S. aureus strain at baseline. PMID:23147738

  8. Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcal Species via the agr Quorum Sensing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Canovas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococci are associated with both humans and animals. While most are non-pathogenic colonizers, Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing severe infections. S. aureus virulence is controlled by the agr quorum sensing system responding to secreted auto-inducing peptides (AIPs sensed by AgrC, a two component histidine kinase. agr loci are found also in other staphylococcal species and for Staphylococcus epidermidis, the encoded AIP represses expression of agr regulated virulence genes in S. aureus. In this study we aimed to better understand the interaction between staphylococci and S. aureus, and show that this interaction may eventually lead to the identification of new anti-virulence candidates to target S. aureus infections. Here we show that culture supernatants of 37 out of 52 staphylococcal isolates representing 17 different species inhibit S. aureus agr. The dog pathogen, Staphylococcus schleiferi, expressed the most potent inhibitory activity and was active against all four agr classes found in S. aureus. By employing a S. aureus strain encoding a constitutively active AIP receptor we show that the activity is mediated via agr. Subsequent cloning and heterologous expression of the S. schleiferi AIP in S. aureus demonstrated that this molecule was likely responsible for the inhibitory activity, and further proof was provided when pure synthetic S. schleiferi AIP was able to completely abolish agr induction of an S. aureus reporter strain. To assess impact on S. aureus virulence, we co-inoculated S. aureus and S. schleiferi in vivo in the Galleria mellonella wax moth larva, and found that expression of key S. aureus virulence factors was abrogated. Our data show that the S. aureus agr locus is highly responsive to other staphylococcal species suggesting that agr is an inter-species communication system. Based on these results we speculate that interactions between S. aureus and other colonizing staphylococci

  9. Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcal Species via the agr Quorum Sensing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canovas, Jaime; Baldry, Mara; Bojer, Martin S.; Andersen, Paal S.; Gless, Bengt H.; Grzeskowiak, Piotr K.; Stegger, Marc; Damborg, Peter; Olsen, Christian A.; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are associated with both humans and animals. While most are non-pathogenic colonizers, Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing severe infections. S. aureus virulence is controlled by the agr quorum sensing system responding to secreted auto-inducing peptides (AIPs) sensed by AgrC, a two component histidine kinase. agr loci are found also in other staphylococcal species and for Staphylococcus epidermidis, the encoded AIP represses expression of agr regulated virulence genes in S. aureus. In this study we aimed to better understand the interaction between staphylococci and S. aureus, and show that this interaction may eventually lead to the identification of new anti-virulence candidates to target S. aureus infections. Here we show that culture supernatants of 37 out of 52 staphylococcal isolates representing 17 different species inhibit S. aureus agr. The dog pathogen, Staphylococcus schleiferi, expressed the most potent inhibitory activity and was active against all four agr classes found in S. aureus. By employing a S. aureus strain encoding a constitutively active AIP receptor we show that the activity is mediated via agr. Subsequent cloning and heterologous expression of the S. schleiferi AIP in S. aureus demonstrated that this molecule was likely responsible for the inhibitory activity, and further proof was provided when pure synthetic S. schleiferi AIP was able to completely abolish agr induction of an S. aureus reporter strain. To assess impact on S. aureus virulence, we co-inoculated S. aureus and S. schleiferi in vivo in the Galleria mellonella wax moth larva, and found that expression of key S. aureus virulence factors was abrogated. Our data show that the S. aureus agr locus is highly responsive to other staphylococcal species suggesting that agr is an inter-species communication system. Based on these results we speculate that interactions between S. aureus and other colonizing staphylococci will significantly

  10. Prevalence of nasal portal of Staphylococcus aureus in disabled children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clotilde Molin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Colonization of the nasal mucosa by Staphylococcus aureus set a carrier state. Which is recognized as a potential source of infection and a high risk factor for subsequent invasive infections. The prevalence of nasal carriage of this germ in disabled children in Paraguay is not known, thus contributing to the knowledge of their frequency and evaluate the profile of sensitivity to common antimicrobials was conducted this study, from May to July 2015.  Objective: to determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage and profile of antimicrobial resistance in disabled children. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study in which 80 nasal swabs of children, who attended the service laboratory of SENADIS (Secretaria Nacional por los Derechos Humanos de las Personas con Discapacidad. The identification and sensitivity of germ was accomplished by conventional testing.  Results: 80 pediatric patients, 46 boys and 34 girls. 18 isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were obtained, corresponding to a prevalence of 22,5%. Susceptibility testing indicated that 14 strains were MSSA (Methicillin – Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and 4 RMSA ( Methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusion: The prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in a population with its own characteristics provides valuable data for the epidemiology, reflecting the need for continued vigilance and take steps to reduce associated infections. The detection of RMAR evidences their progress; it is important to evaluate the empirical treatment to primary care.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus clonal dynamics and virulence factors in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Hans Bredsted; Andersen, KE; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    A prospective cohort study was undertaken to determine the clonal dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection during 1 y in children with atopic dermatitis, and to correlate specific clones, accessory gene regulator (agr) groups, and production of virulence factors with eczema...... activity. Eleven children were examined every 6 wk with swaps taken from active eczema, anterior nose, axillae and perineum, and scoring of eczema activity by severity scoring of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD). Individual S. aureus clonal types were identified and examined for production of superantigens...... SCORAD value. In 11 of 12 cases with two different clones co-colonizing a child the clones belonged to the same agr group. In conclusion, this limited group of children with atopic dermatitis showed highly variable colonization patterns of S. aureus, and communication between strains by use of agr...

  12. Eating Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Eating Healthy Eating Healthy Contact Us Resources Eating Healthy Eating healthy is part of living a healthy life. Healthy eating is a responsibility of our communities, schools, clinics, ...

  13. Extracellular vesicles derived from Staphylococcus aureus induce atopic dermatitis-like skin inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S-W; Kim, M-R; Lee, E-Y; Kim, J H; Kim, Y-S; Jeon, S G; Yang, J-M; Lee, B-J; Pyun, B-Y; Gho, Y S; Kim, Y-K

    2011-03-01

    Recently, we found that Staphylococcus aureus produces extracellular vesicles (EV) that contain pathogenic proteins. Although S. aureus infection has been linked with atopic dermatitis (AD), the identities of the causative agents from S. aureus are controversial. We evaluated whether S. aureus-derived EV are causally related to the pathogenesis of AD. Extracellular vesicles were isolated by the ultracentrifugation of S. aureus culture media. The EV were applied three times per week to tape-stripped mouse skin. Inflammation and immune dysfunction were evaluated 48 h after the final application in hairless mice. Extracellular vesicles-specific IgE levels were measured by ELISA in AD patients and healthy subjects. The in vitro application of S. aureus EV increased the production of pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-6, thymic stromal lymphopoietin, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, and eotaxin) by dermal fibroblasts. The in vivo application of S. aureus EV after tape stripping caused epidermal thickening with infiltration of the dermis by mast cells and eosinophils in mice. These changes were associated with the enhanced cutaneous production of IL-4, IL-5, IFN-γ, and IL-17. Interestingly, the serum levels of S. aureus EV-specific IgE were significantly increased in AD patients relative to healthy subjects. These results indicate that S. aureus EV induce AD-like inflammation in the skin and that S. aureus-derived EV are a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for the control of AD. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Microarray-based identification of human antibodies against Staphylococcus aureus antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloppot, Peggy; Selle, Martina; Kohler, Christian; Stentzel, Sebastian; Fuchs, Stephan; Liebscher, Volkmar; Müller, Elke; Kale, Devika; Ohlsen, Knut; Bröker, Barbara M; Zipfel, Peter F; Kahl, Barbara C; Ehricht, Ralf; Hecker, Michael; Engelmann, Susanne

    2015-12-01

    The mortality rate of patients with Staphylococcus aureus infections is alarming and urgently demands new strategies to attenuate the course of these infections or to detect them at earlier stages. To study the adaptive immune response to S. aureus antigens in healthy human volunteers, a protein microarray containing 44 S. aureus proteins was developed using the ArrayStrip platform technology. Testing plasma samples from 15 S. aureus carriers and 15 noncarriers 21 immunogenic S. aureus antigens have been identified. Seven antigens were recognized by antibodies present in at least 60% of the samples, representing the core S. aureus immunome of healthy individuals. S. aureus-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels were significantly lower in noncarriers than in carriers specifically anti-IsaA, anti-SACOL0479, and anti-SACOL0480 IgGs were found at lower frequencies and quantities. Twenty-two antigens present on the microarray were encoded by all S. aureus carrier isolates. Nevertheless, the immune system of the carriers was responsive to only eight of them and with different intensities. The established protein microarray allows a broad profiling of the S. aureus-specific antibody response and can be used to identify S. aureus antigens that might serve as vaccines or diagnostic markers. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Colonic fermentation influences lower esophageal sphincter function in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piche, Thierry; des Varannes, Stanislas Bruley; Sacher-Huvelin, Sylvie

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Colonic fermentation of carbohydrates is known to influence gastric and esophageal motility in healthy subjects. This study investigated the effects of colonic fermentation induced by oral administration of fructooligosaccharides (FOS) in patients with gastroesophageal reflux d...

  16. Microbiological effect of mupirocin and chlorhexidine for Staphylococcus aureus decolonization in community and nursing home based adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roghmann, Mary-Claire; Lydecker, Alison D; Langenberg, Patricia; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Johnson, J Kristie

    2017-05-01

    To compare the presence of Staphylococcus aureus and pathogenic Gram-negative rods (GNR) in the anterior nares, posterior pharynx and three skin sites in community-based adults and nursing home-based adults before and after treatment with nasal mupirocin and topical chlorhexidine. S. aureus-colonized adults were recruited from the community (n=26) and from nursing homes (n=8). Eligible participants were cultured for S. aureus and GNR during two study visits and then received intranasal mupirocin and topical chlorhexidine for 5days, with a 2-month follow-up period. After decolonization, we found sustained decreases of S. aureus colonization in nose, throat and skin sites over 4-8weeks in both populations. Intranasal mupirocin did not increase GNR colonization in nose or throat. Chlorhexidine did not decrease GNR colonization in skin sites. Decolonization with mupirocin and chlorhexidine leads to a sustained effect on S. aureus colonization without affecting GNR colonization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage in hemodialysis centers of Fez, Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diawara, Idrissa; Bekhti, Khadija; Elhabchi, Driss; Saile, Rachid; Elmdaghri, Naima; Timinouni, Mohammed; Elazhari, Mohamed

    2014-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) nasal carriage may be responsible for some serious infections in hemodialyzed patients. The main target of this study was to estimate the prevalence of S. aureus nasal carriage in hemodialysis outpatients and medical staff in hemodialysis centers specifically in Fez region. The second target is to identify the risks of colonization, resistance pattern of isolates and their virulence toxin genes. Nasal swab specimens were obtained from 143 hemodialyzed outpatients and 32 medical staff from January to June 2012. Each participant completed a short questionnaire. Nasal carriage of S. aureus was demographically related (age, gender, hemodialysis duration), comorbidity (diabetes, malignancy) and exposure to health care (dialysis staff, hospitalization). PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) were used on all the isolates in the research of twelve staphylococcal enterotoxins genes. Also the PCR was used to investigate on the three factors epidermal cell differentiation inhibitors; three exfoliatin toxins; two leukotoxins; the toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 and the hemolysin beta genes. Nasal screening revealed 38.16%, 50% and 18.75% S. aureus carries in chronic, acute hemodialysis patients and medical staff, respectively. Only young participants were likely to be S. aureus carries (p = 0.002). But there were no gender differences between the isolate carriers and non-carriers or some comorbidity factors such as viral hepatitis B and C, HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infections, diabetes, chronic smoking, recent hospitalization or antibiotic therapy. Out of all isolates, only one (1.61%) was methicillin-resistant and Twenty-one (33.87%) had at least two virulence toxin genes. Knowledge and monitoring of antibiotic resistance profile and virulence of S. aureus carriage are essential in the treatment of infections generated by this pathogen, as well as in the control of clonal dissemination and prevent the spread of S. aureus resistance.

  18. Emergence and resurgence of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as a public-health threat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grundmann, Hajo; Aires-de-Sousa, Marta; Boyce, John; Tiemersma, Edine

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a gram-positive bacterium that colonises the skin and is present in the anterior nares in about 25-30% of healthy people.(1) Dependent on its intrinsic virulence or the ability of the host to contain its opportunistic behaviour, S aureus can cause a range of diseases in man.

  19. Accelerated procedure for the enumeration and identification of food-borne Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Lachica, R V

    1980-01-01

    A procedure was developed for accelerating to 29 h the enumeration and identification of both healthy and stressed cells of Staphylococcus aureus in foods. Baird-Parker agar medium was incubated for 24 h; S. aureus was identified within 5 additional h by using a simplified thermonuclease test.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus carriage in selected kindergartens in Klang Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, N A; Ramli, S; Amin, N N Z; Sulaiman, W S W; Isahak, I; Jamaluddin, T Z M T; Salleh, N M

    2016-04-01

    Nasal colonisation of S. aureus in healthy children was 18% to 30%. One to three percent of them were colonised by Methicillin-resistant Staphlycoccus aureus (MRSA). Although MRSA infection has become increasingly reported, population-based S. aureus and MRSA colonisation estimates are lacking. The main objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of S. aureus carriage among children. Nasal samples for S. aureus culture were obtained from 250 children from three kindergartens in the Klang Valley, after consent was obtained from the children and their parents. Swabs were transported in Stuart medium, and inoculated on mannitol-salt agar within four hours of collection. Identification and disk diffusion test were done according to guidelines. Polymerase chain reaction was done on MRSA isolates for the presence of mecA and lukS/FPV genes. Overall prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA carriage were 19.2% (48/250) and 1.6% (4/250) respectively. mecA gene was present in all isolates, 50% isolates carried Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) gene. Sccmec type I was found in 2 isolates and the remaining isolates has Sccmec type V. The prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA carriage were similar to other studies. However, risk of contracting severe infection might be higher due to presence of PVL gene in half of the MRSA isolates.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus α toxin potentiates opportunistic bacterial lung infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Taylor S; Hilliard, Jamese J; Jones-Nelson, Omari; Keller, Ashley E; O'Day, Terrence; Tkaczyk, Christine; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Hamilton, Melissa; Pelletier, Mark; Wang, Qun; Diep, Binh An; Le, Vien T M; Cheng, Lily; Suzich, JoAnn; Stover, C Kendall; Sellman, Bret R

    2016-03-09

    Broad-spectrum antibiotic use may adversely affect a patient's beneficial microbiome and fuel cross-species spread of drug resistance. Although alternative pathogen-specific approaches are rationally justified, a major concern for this precision medicine strategy is that co-colonizing or co-infecting opportunistic bacteria may still cause serious disease. In a mixed-pathogen lung infection model, we find that the Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor α toxin potentiates Gram-negative bacterial proliferation, systemic spread, and lethality by preventing acidification of bacteria-containing macrophage phagosomes, thereby reducing effective killing of both S. aureus and Gram-negative bacteria. Prophylaxis or early treatment with a single α toxin neutralizing monoclonal antibody prevented proliferation of co-infecting Gram-negative pathogens and lethality while also promoting S. aureus clearance. These studies suggest that some pathogen-specific, antibody-based approaches may also work to reduce infection risk in patients colonized or co-infected with S. aureus and disparate drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial opportunists. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. The effect of improved compliance with hygiene guidelines on transmission of Staphylococcus aureus to newborn infants: the Swedish Hygiene Intervention and Transmission of S aureus study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mernelius, Sara; Löfgren, Sture; Lindgren, Per-Eric; Blomberg, Marie; Olhager, Elisabeth; Gunnervik, Christina; Lenrick, Raymond; Thrane, Malena Tiefenthal; Isaksson, Barbro; Matussek, Andreas

    2013-07-01

    Newborn infants are often colonized with Staphylococcus aureus originating from health care workers (HCWs). We therefore use colonization with S aureus of newborn infants to determine the effect of an improved compliance with hygiene guidelines on bacterial transmission. Compliance with hygiene guidelines was monitored prior to (baseline) and after (follow-up) a multimodal hygiene intervention in 4 departments of obstetrics and gynecology. spa typing was used to elucidate transmission routes of S aureus collected from newborn infants, mothers, fathers, staff members, and environment. The compliance with hygiene guidelines increased significantly from baseline to follow-up. The transmission of S aureus from HCWs to infants was however not affected. Fathers had the highest colonization rates. Persistent carriage was indicated in 18% of the HCWs. The most commonly isolated spa type was t084, which was not detected in a previous study from the same geographic area. It is possible to substantially improve the compliance with hygiene guidelines, by using multimodal hygiene intervention. The improved compliance did not decrease the transmission of S aureus from sources outside the own family to newborn infants. Furthermore, we show the establishment of a new spa type (t084), which now is very common in our region. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The evolution of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurenberg, Ruud H; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    2008-01-01

    A broad variety of infections, ranging from minor infections of the skin to post-operative wound infections can be caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The adaptive power of S. aureus to antibiotics leaded, in the early 1960s, to the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The cause of

  4. Pathogenic bacteria colonizing the airways in asymptomatic neonates stimulates topical inflammatory mediator release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Følsgaard, Nilofar Vahman; Schjørring, Susanne; Chawes, Bo Lund Krogsgaard

    2013-01-01

    . Colonization of the hypopharynx with M. catarrhal's, S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus was assessed simultaneously. The association between immune signatures and bacterial colonization or noncolonized controls was analyzed using conventional statistical methods supplemented......Rationale: Bacterial colonization of neonatal airways with the pathogenic bacterial species, Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae, is associated with later development of childhood asthma. Objectives: To study a possible association between colonization....... catarrhalis, P = 1.5 x 10(-9); H. influenzae, P = 5.9 x 10(-7)), and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (M. catarrhalis, P = 1.6 X 10(-11); H. influenzae, P = 2.7 x 10(-7)). S. aureus colonization demonstrated a Th17-promoting profile with elevated IL-17 levels (P = 1.6 x 10(-24)). S. pneumoniae...

  5. Nasal Carriage Rate of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus among Health Care Workers at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, S; Pant, N D; Bhandari, R; Shrestha, K L; Shrestha, C D; Adhikari, N; Poudel, A

    2017-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of nosocomial infections. Due to its multidrug resistant nature; infections due to Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are often very difficult to treat. Colonized health care workers are the important sources of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The objectives of this study were to determine the nasal carriage rate of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among health care workers at Kathmandu Medical College and Teaching Hospital, Nepal and to assess their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. A cross sectional study was conducted among 252 health care workers from July to November 2013. Mannitol salt agar was used to culture the nasal swabs. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains were confirmed by using cefoxitin disc and by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration of oxacillin by agar dilution method. Of 252 healthcare workers, 46(18.3%) were positive for Staphylococcus aureus among which 19(41.3%) were Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriers. Overall rate of nasal carriage of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was 7.5% (19/252).The higher percentages of lab personnel were nasal carriers of S. aureus (31.6%) and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (10.5%).The percentages of nasal carriage of S. aureus (35.7%) and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (14.3%) were highest in the health care workers from post operative department. Higher percentage of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were susceptible toward amikacin (100%) and vancomycin (100%) followed by cotrimoxazole (84.2%). High rates of nasal carriage of S. aureus and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were observed among the healthcare workers, which indicate the need of

  6. Staphylococcus aureus CC398

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Lance B.; Stegger, Marc; Hasman, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Since its discovery in the early 2000s, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 398 (CC398) has become a rapidly emerging cause of human infections, most often associated with livestock exposure. We applied whole-genome sequence typing to characterize a diverse collectio...

  7. A study on antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus in Eritrea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durgadas Govind Naik

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen in skin and soft tissue infections. Methicillin resistant S.aureus (MRSA is prevalent in most of the countries wherever it is sought for. MRSA is one of the important pathogens implicated in hospital acquired infection. The main objectives of this study was to find out the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of S.aureus isolates, the prevalence of methicillin resistant S.aureus (MRSA and nasal carriage rate in healthy hospital staff. Methods:A total of 278 S.aureus strains isolated from clinical specimens were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility and 30 anterior nares swabs from healthy hospital staff were screened for S.aureus organisms using standard methods. Results:High resistance was observed against ampicillin, penicillin and tetracycline. High sensitivity was recorded against amikasin, amoxicillin-c and ciprofloxacin. Of the 278 isolates 26 (9% isolates were methicillin resistant S.aureus (MRSA. 17 % of the hospital staff were positive for nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusion:Our study emphasizes the need for continuous monitoring of the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of S.aureus isolates including MRSA for the selection of appropriate therapy. In Eritrea, from the present findings it appears that the spread of MRSA in community and hospital settings is limited.

  8. Virulence potential of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Buruli ulcer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amissah, Nana Ama; Chlebowicz, Monika A; Ablordey, Anthony; Tetteh, Caitlin S; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip S; Friedrich, Alex W; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Stienstra, Ymkje; Rossen, John W

    2017-06-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. BU wounds may also be colonized with other microorganisms including Staphylococcus aureus. This study aimed to characterize the virulence factors of S. aureus isolated from BU patients. Previously sequenced genomes of 21 S. aureus isolates from BU patients were screened for the presence of virulence genes. The results show that all S. aureus isolates harbored on their core genomes genes for known virulence factors like α-hemolysin, and the α- and β-phenol soluble modulins. Besides the core genome virulence genes, mobile genetic elements (MGEs), i.e. prophages, genomic islands, pathogenicity islands and a Staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) were found to carry different combinations of virulence factors, among them genes that are known to encode factors that promote immune evasion, superantigens and Panton-Valentine Leucocidin. The present observations imply that the S. aureus isolates from BU patients harbor a diverse repertoire of virulence genes that may enhance bacterial survival and persistence in the wound environment and potentially contribute to delayed wound healing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of intestinal dysbiosis on gut colonization by bacterial pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    DJUKOVIC, ANA

    2017-01-01

    The intestinal tract of virtually any metazoan, including mammals, is colonized with a complex microbial community to which we refer as intestinal or gut microbiota. One of the roles of the healthy intestinal microbiota is to protect the host against gut colonization with pathogenic bacteria through a phenomenon known as colonization resistance (CR). Dysbiosis of the intestinal microbiota, usually as a result of an antibiotic treatment, may lead to the disruption of the CR, and subsequent col...

  10. Prevalence and risk factors for Staphylococcus aureus in health care workers at a University Hospital of Recife-PE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Caetano Brandão Ferreira da Silva

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is the main human pathogen that colonizes individuals in general population. The objective of the study was evaluate the epidemiological and sensitivity profile of S. aureus lineage, isolated in health care workers (HCW of a University Hospital in Pernambuco state, Brazil. Biological samples of hands and nasal cavities were sown in agar sheep blood. Colonies under suspicion of being S. aureus were identified using Gram staining, catalase test and coagulase, mannitol-salty agar fermentation and DNAse agar. The resistance to mupirocin was analyzed through the Kirby Bauer technique. In relation to methicillin and vancomycin the determination was by the minimum inhibitory concentration method (E-test. From the 202 HCW evaluated, 52 were colonized by S. aureus (25,7%. The factors associated to the colonization by S. aureus were: age-group, professional category, use of individual protection equipments (frequency and numbers. All S. aureus isolate lineages were sensitive to mupirocin and vancomycin, and three of them were identified as methicillin-resistant. The prevalence of MSSA and MRSA among HCW was considered low and was below the results described in the literature. The isolate S. aureus lineages have shown low resistance profile.

  11. Isolation of Methicillin Resistant - Staphylococcus aureus in Midwifery Students Faculty of Medicine Universitas Padjadjaran September–December 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinee Panirchelvam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methicillin Resistant-Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is resistant bacteria to certain types of beta-lactam antibiotics. Commonly, the MRSA infection is acquired in hospitals, long-term care facilities, or similar institutional settings. Mid-wives are one of the health professional that have a major risk to get MRSA infection and could lead the infection among patients. This research is aimed to identify MRSA among the midwifery students Methods: A descriptive study was conducted from September–December 2012 at the Microbiology laboratory to identify the proportion of MRSA among the mid-wife students from Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Padjadjaran. Twenty-five samples were chosen using simple random sampling based on their registration number. The inclusion criterias were healthy students, and 18 to 22 years old. Both nostrils were sampled with a sterile culture swab on both the subject’s nostrils. Gram staining was done in order to identify the gram positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus. The samples were inaculated in Mannitol salt agar (MSA, incubated for 24 hours and at 37 ̊ C. After 24 hours, catalase and coagulase tests were done. Moreover, for the susceptibility testing, the chosen media for this study was Mueller Hinton Agar (MHA and with 30μg Cefoxitin disk. After incubation, the zone of inhibition of the colony less than ≤ 21mm was considered resistant to methicillin. Results: Colonization of MRSA was about 3 out from 25 samples Conclusions: The MRSA colonization in the anterior nasal does exist in midwife students, a further study with more samples should be conducted.

  12. Density Interactions between Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus aureus in the Nasopharynx of Young Peruvian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yu-Wen; Vidal, Jorge E.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Bozio, Catherine; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Williams, John V.; Griffin, Marie R.; Verastegui, Hector; Hartinger, Stella M.; Gil, Ana I.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Klugman, Keith P.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus aureus are commonly carried in the nasopharynx (NP) of young children, and have been speculated to interact with each other. Although earlier studies used cultures alone to assess these interactions, the addition of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) provides further insight into these interactions. We compared results of culture and qPCR for the detection of these three bacteria in 446 NP samples collected from 360 healthy young children in a prospective cohort study in the Peruvian Andes. Patterns of concurrent bacterial colonization were studied using repeated measures logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations. Spearman correlation coefficients were employed to assess correlations among bacterial densities. At a bacterial density 105 CFU/ml. In addition, there was a positive association between S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae colonization measured by both culture (OR 3.11 – 3.17, p < 0.001) and qPCR (OR 1.95 – 1.97, p < 0.01). The densities of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae, measured by qPCR, were positively correlated (correlation coefficient 0.32, p < 0.001). A negative association was found between the presence of S. pneumoniae and S. aureus in carriage with both culture (OR 0.45, p = 0.024) and qPCR (OR 0.61, p < 0.05). The impact of density on detection by culture and the observed density-related interactions support use of qPCR in additional studies to examine vaccine effects on diverse bacterial species. PMID:22935873

  13. Early stage colon cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2013-01-01

    .... After resection of malignant pedunculated colon polyps or early stage colon cancers, long-term repeated surveillance programs can also lead to detection and removal of asymptomatic high risk advanced...

  14. Colon diverticula - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100158.htm Colon diverticula - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 6 out of 6 Overview The colon, or large intestine, is a muscular tube that ...

  15. Colon cancer - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100157.htm Colon cancer - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The colon, or large intestine, is a muscular tube that ...

  16. Staphylococcus aureus and the oxacillin sensitivity profile in hospitalized people with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pio, Daiana Patrícia Marchetti; Reinato, Lilian Andreia Fleck; Lopes, Letícia Pimenta; Gir, Elucir

    2016-01-01

    Analyze nasal colonization by oxacillin-sensitive and oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in people with HIV/AIDS (PWHA) at days 1 and7 of hospitalization. A prospective observational study conducted in a hospital in the countryside of the state of São Paulo. Nasal swab samples were collected and analyzed through microbiological identification, at days 1 and 7 of hospitalization of PWHA, between August 2011 and January 2014. Data were analyzed via IBM SPSS(r), version 20.0. Nasal secretion samples were collected from 187 (50.1%) PWHA at days 1 and 7 of hospitalization. Of these, Staphylococcus aureus was identified in 64 (34.2%) PWHA. At day 1 of hospitalization, 27 PWHA were identified with Staphylococcus aureus; 27 PWHA presented colonization by Staphylococcus aureus at days 1 and 7, and 10 PWHA only at day 7. Of 64 PWHA colonized by Staphylococcus aureus, the susceptibility profile of isolated Staphylococcus aureus was oxacillin-resistant in 25 PWHA. Analisar a colonização nasal por Staphylococcus aureus sensíveis e resistentes à oxacilina de pessoas vivendo com HIV/aids (PVHA) no primeiro e no sétimo dia de internação hospitalar. Estudo prospectivo observacional realizado em um hospital do interior paulista. Foram coletadas e analisadas, por meio de identificação microbiológica, amostras de swab nasal no primeiro e no sétimo dia de internação hospitalar de PVHA, no período de agosto/2011 e janeiro/2014. A análise dos dados foi realizada por meio do IBM SPSS(r), versão 20.0. Em 187 (50,1%) PVHA foram coletadas amostras de secreção nasal no primeiro e sétimo dia de internação. Destas, em 64 (34,2%) foi identificado Staphylococcus aureus. No primeiro dia de internação observou-se 27 PVHA colonizadas por Staphylococcus aureus; em 27 PVHA houve a persistência da colonização por Staphylococcus aureus no primeiro e no sétimo dia; em 10 PVHA, somente no sétimo dia. Das 64 PVHA colonizadas por Staphylococcus aureus, em 25 o perfil de

  17. "Gesundheit!" sneezing, common colds, allergies, and Staphylococcus aureus dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Werner E; Wallis, Michelle L; Tucker, Brian K; Reboussin, Beth A; Pfaller, Michael A; Hayden, Frederick G; Sherertz, Robert J

    2006-10-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is among the most important pathogens in today's hospital setting. The effects of sneezing on the airborne dispersal of S. aureus and other bacteria were assessed in 11 healthy nasal S. aureus carriers with experimentally induced rhinovirus colds. Airborne dispersal was studied by volumetric air sampling in 2 chamber sessions with and without histamine-induced sneezing. After 2 days of preexposure measurements, volunteers were inoculated with a rhinovirus and monitored for 14 days. Daily quantitative nasal- and skin-culture samples for bacteria and nasal-culture samples for rhinovirus were obtained, cold symptoms were assessed, and volunteer activities were recorded during sessions. All participants developed a cold. Sneezing caused a 4.7-fold increase in the airborne dispersal of S. aureus, a 1.4-fold increase in coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), and a 3.9-fold increase in other bacteria (P Rhinovirus exposure did not change the frequency of sneezing or airborne dispersal. Having respiratory allergies increased the spread of S. aureus by 3.8-fold during sneezing sessions (P effect of dispersing S. aureus.

  18. The potential economic value of a Staphylococcus aureus vaccine among hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yeohan; Tai, Julie H Y; Bartsch, Sarah M; Zimmerman, Richard K; Muder, Robert R; Lee, Bruce Y

    2012-05-21

    Staphylococcus aureus infections are a substantial problem for hemodialysis patients. Several vaccine candidates are currently under development, with hemodialysis patients being one possible target population. To determine the potential economic value of an S. aureus vaccine among hemodialysis patients, we developed a Markov decision analytic computer simulation model. When S. aureus colonization prevalence was 1%, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of vaccination was ≤$25,217/quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Vaccination became more cost-effective as colonization prevalence, vaccine efficacy, or vaccine protection duration increased or vaccine cost decreased. Even at 10% colonization prevalence, a 25% efficacious vaccine costing $100 prevented 29 infections, 21 infection-related hospitalizations, and 9 inpatient deaths per 1000 vaccinated HD patients. Our results suggest that an S. aureus vaccine would be cost-effective (i.e., ICERs ≤ $50,000/QALY) among hemodialysis patients over a wide range of S. aureus prevalence, vaccine costs and efficacies, and vaccine protection durations and delineate potential target parameters for such a vaccine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus induces IL-8 expression through its lipoproteins in the human intestinal epithelial cell, Caco-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seok-Seong; Noh, Su Young; Park, Ok-Jin; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause the intestinal inflammatory diseases. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of S. aureus infection in the intestine. In the present study, we investigated whether S. aureus could stimulate human intestinal epithelial cells triggering inflammation. When the human intestinal epithelial cell-line, Caco-2, and the primary colon cells were stimulated with ethanol-inactivated S. aureus, IL-8 expression was induced in a dose-dependent manner. The inactivated S. aureus preferentially stimulated Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 rather than TLR4. Lipoproteins, lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and peptidoglycan (PGN) are considered as potential TLR2 ligands of S. aureus. Interestingly, S aureus lipoproteins and Pam2CSK4 mimicking Gram-positive bacterial lipoproteins, but not LTA and PGN of S. aureus, significantly induced IL-8 expression in Caco-2 cells. Furthermore, lipoprotein-deficient S. aureus mutant strain failed to induce IL-8 production. Collectively, these results suggest that S. aureus stimulates the human intestinal epithelial cells to induce the chemokine IL-8 production through its lipoproteins, potentially contributing the development of intestinal inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Healthy Places for Healthy People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Describes the Healthy Places for Healthy People technical assistance program that helps communities create walkable, healthy, economically vibrant places by engaging with local health care facility partners

  1. Prevalence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Canadian Inner-City Shelter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom A Szakacs

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA colonization is increasingly of concern in community settings. However, despite a recent outbreak in Calgary, Alberta, data on the prevalence of MRSA in Canadian communities are lacking. Globally, few studies have been performed in high-risk groups such as inner-city populations.

  2. Risk Factors for Nosocomial Bacterremia Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pujol (Miquel); C. Pena; R. Pallares (Roman); J. Ayats (Josefina); J. Ariza (Javier); F. Gudiol (Francesc)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn a prospective surveillance study (February 1990–December 1991) performed at a 1000-bed teaching hospital to identify risk factors for nosocomial methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia, 309 patients were found to be colonized (n=103; 33 %) or infected (n=206; 67

  3. Azoreductase in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wen; Cerniglia, Carl E; Chen, Huizhong

    2009-01-01

    Azoreductase(s) catalyze a NAD(P)H-dependent reaction in bacteria to metabolize azo dyes to colorless aromatic amines. Azoreductases from bacteria represent a novel family of enzymes with little similarity to other reductases. This unit will describe the current methods for measuring azoreductase from Staphylococcus aureus, which has been suggested to serve as a model strain to study the azo dye degradation by human skin microflora.

  4. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: community transmission, pathogenesis, and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Nishiyama, Akihito; Takano, Tomomi; Yabe, Shizuka; Higuchi, Wataru; Razvina, Olga; Shi, Da

    2010-08-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is able to persist not only in hospitals (with a high level of antimicrobial agent use) but also in the community (with a low level of antimicrobial agent use). The former is called hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) and the latter community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA). It is believed MRSA clones are generated from S. aureus through insertion of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec), and outbreaks occur as they spread. Several worldwide and regional clones have been identified, and their epidemiological, clinical, and genetic characteristics have been described. CA-MRSA is likely able to survive in the community because of suitable SCCmec types (type IV or V), a clone-specific colonization/infection nature, toxin profiles (including Pantone-Valentine leucocidin, PVL), and narrow drug resistance patterns. CA-MRSA infections are generally seen in healthy children or young athletes, with unexpected cases of diseases, and also in elderly inpatients, occasionally surprising clinicians used to HA-MRSA infections. CA-MRSA spreads within families and close-contact groups or even through public transport, demonstrating transmission cores. Re-infection (including multifocal infection) frequently occurs, if the cores are not sought out and properly eradicated. Recently, attention has been given to CA-MRSA (USA300), which originated in the US, and is growing as HA-MRSA and also as a worldwide clone. CA-MRSA infection in influenza season has increasingly been noted as well. MRSA is also found in farm and companion animals, and has occasionally transferred to humans. As such, the epidemiological, clinical, and genetic behavior of CA-MRSA, a growing threat, is focused on in this study.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis: a rare cause of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chest pain is a common presenting symptom with a broad differential. Life-threatening cardiac and pulmonary etiologies of chest pain should be evaluated first. However, it is critical to perform a thorough assessment for other sources of chest pain in order to limit morbidity and mortality from less common causes. We present a rare case of a previously healthy 45 year old man who presented with focal, substernal, reproducible chest pain and Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia who was later found to have primary Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus detection in the mouth of housekeepers Detección de Staphylococcus aureus en la boca de trabajadores de la limpieza hospitalaria Detecção de Staphylococcus aureus na boca de trabalhadores da limpeza hospitalar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Drehmer de Almeida Cruz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the prevalence of colonization by Staphylococcus aureus in hospital housekeepers, and their knowledge and beliefs regarding this problem. Three saliva samples were collected and a questionnaire regarding knowledge and beliefs was applied. Of the 92 workers, 63 (68.5% participated in the study; 20 were not and 43 were colonized; 13 by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and 30 by methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Persistent carrier status of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was detected in 15.4% of cases. Low knowledge and perception of occupational risk were observed. The mouth was identified as an important reservoir of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Analyzing knowledge and beliefs, as well as the state of carrier, is an important strategy to be added to educational actions for the prevention of workers' colonization.Este estudio evaluó la prevalencia de la colonización por Staphylococcus aureus en trabajadores de limpieza hospitalaria, y su conocimiento y creencias acerca de la problemática. Fueron recolectadas tres muestras de saliva y aplicado un cuestionario referente al conocimiento y creencias. De 92 trabajadores, 63 (68,5% participaron del estudio; 20 se presentaron no colonizados y 43 colonizados; 13 para Staphylococcus aureus resistente a la meticilina y 30 para Staphylococcus aureus sensibles a la meticilina. El estado de portador persistente por Staphylococcus aureus resistente a la meticilina fue detectado en 15,4% de los casos. Bajo conocimiento y percepción del riesgo ocupacional fueron observados. La boca fue identificada como importante reservatorio de Staphylococcus aureus resistente a la meticilina. Analizar el conocimiento y creencias juntamente con la investigación del estado de portador es una importante estrategia a ser agregada a las acciones educativas para la prevención de la colonización de trabajadores.Este estudo avaliou a prevalência da coloniza

  7. Detection and clinical relevance of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Paul O; Gagnaire, Julie; Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth; Grattard, Florence; Carricajo, Anne; Lucht, Frédéric; Pozzetto, Bruno; Berthelot, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage is a well-defined risk factor of infection with this bacterium. The increased risk of S. aureus infection in nasal carriers is supported by the fact that the strains isolated from both colonization and infection sites are indistinguishable in most of the cases. Persistent nasal carriage seems to be associated with an increased risk of infection and this status could be defined now in clinical routine by using one or two quantitative nasal samples. There is evidence for supporting the detection of nasal carriage of S. aureus in patients undergoing cardiac surgery and in those undergoing hemodialysis in order to implement decolonization measures. More studies are needed to determine which carriers have the highest risk of infection and why decolonization strategies failed to reduce S. aureus infection in some other groups of patients.

  8. Low Fluid Shear Culture of Staphylococcus Aureus Represses hfq Expression and Induces an Attachment-Independent Biofilm Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. Mark; Castro, S. L.; Nickerson, C. A.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The opportunistic pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, experiences fluctuations in fluid shear during infection and colonization of a human host. Colonization frequently occurs at mucus membrane sites such as in the gastrointestinal tract where the bacterium may experience low levels of fluid shear. The response of S. aureus to low fluid shear remains unclear. Methods: S. aureus was cultured to stationary phase using Rotating-Wall Vessel (RWV) bioreactors which produce a physiologically relevant low fluid shear environment. The bacterial aggregates that developed in the RWV were evaluated by electron microscopy as well as for antibiotic resistance and other virulence-associated stressors. Genetic expression profiles for the low-shear cultured S. aureus were determined by microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Planktonic S. aureus cultures in the low-shear environment formed aggregates completely encased in high amounts of extracellular polymeric substances. In addition, these aggregates demonstrated increased antibiotic resistance indicating attachment-independent biofilm formation. Carotenoid production in the low-shear cultured S. aureus was significantly decreased, and these cultures displayed an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and killing by whole blood. The hfq gene, associated with low-shear growth in Gram negative organisms, was also found to be down-regulated in S. aureus. Conclusions: Collectively, this data suggests that S. aureus decreases virulence characteristics in favor of a biofilm-dwelling colonization phenotype in response to a low fluid shear environment. Furthermore, the identification of an Hfq response to low-shear culture in S. aureus, in addition to the previously reported responses in Gram negative organisms, strongly suggests an evolutionarily conserved response to mechanical stimuli among structurally diverse prokaryotes.

  9. Impact of Probiotics for Reducing Infections in Veterans (IMPROVE): Study protocol for a double-blind, randomized controlled trial to reduce carriage of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, Shoshannah; Barker, Anna; Valentine, Susan; Hess, Timothy; Duster, Megan; Safdar, Nasia

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is an organism of great public health importance, causing 20,000 deaths annually. Decolonization of patients with S. aureus may prevent infections, yet current options are limited to antimicrobials that promote antibiotic resistance and can cause adverse side effects. Probiotics have potential to reduce colonization of pathogenic bacteria, representing a promising alternative for S. aureus decolonization, but thus far lack rigorous evaluation. Potential subjects were recruited from inpatient and outpatient settings within a VA medical center and screened for S. aureus gastrointestinal (GI) or extra-GI colonization using swabs at multiple body sites. Positive, eligible, consenting participants were stratified by colonization site and randomized in a 1:1 ratio to 4-weeks of daily placebo or Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus) HN001 probiotic treatment. Blood and stool samples, and treatment adherence reports were collected from each subject throughout the study, along with a final set of swabs at study completion to detect S. aureus carriage. The outcomes of this study are GI or extra-GI carriage by S. aureus at the end of 4weeks of therapy, change in phagocytic activity of polymorphonuclear cells from pre-intervention to post-intervention, and symptomatic S. aureus infection at any site during the study period. 114 participants have been recruited for this study. Analysis of outcomes is underway. This is the first clinical trial to examine the efficacy of L. rhamnosus HN001 for decolonization of S. aureus, and investigates the mechanism by which L. rhamnosus HN001 mediates its effect on S. aureus colonization. ClinicalTrials.govIdentifier NCT01321606. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Staphylococcus aureus infections: transmission within households and the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Justin; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin; Lowy, Franklin D

    2015-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, both methicillin susceptible and resistant, are now major community-based pathogens worldwide. The basis for this is multifactorial and includes the emergence of epidemic clones with enhanced virulence, antibiotic resistance, colonization potential, or transmissibility. Household reservoirs of these unique strains are crucial to their success as community-based pathogens. Staphylococci become resident in households, either as colonizers or environmental contaminants, increasing the risk for recurrent infections. Interactions of household members with others in different households or at community sites, including schools and daycare facilities, have a critical role in the ability of these strains to become endemic. Colonization density at these sites appears to have an important role in facilitating transmission. The integration of research tools, including whole-genome sequencing (WGS), mathematical modeling, and social network analysis, has provided additional insight into the transmission dynamics of these strains. Thus far, interventions designed to reduce recurrent infections among household members have had limited success, likely due to the multiplicity of potential sources for recolonization. The development of better strategies to reduce the number of household-based infections will depend on greater insight into the different factors that contribute to the success of these uniquely successful epidemic clones of S. aureus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Metabolic Stress Drives Keratinocyte Defenses against Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Wickersham

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Human skin is commonly colonized and infected by Staphylococcus aureus. Exactly how these organisms are sensed by keratinocytes has not been clearly delineated. Using a combination of metabolic and transcriptomic methodologies, we found that S. aureus infection is sensed as a metabolic stress by the hypoxic keratinocytes. This induces HIF1α signaling, which promotes IL-1β production and stimulates aerobic glycolysis to meet the metabolic requirements of infection. We demonstrate that staphylococci capable of glycolysis, including WT and agr mutants, readily induce HIF1α responses. In contrast, Δpyk glycolytic mutants fail to compete with keratinocytes for their metabolic needs. Suppression of glycolysis using 2-DG blocked keratinocyte production of IL-1β in vitro and significantly exacerbated the S. aureus cutaneous infection in a murine model. Our data suggest that S. aureus impose a metabolic stress on keratinocytes that initiates signaling necessary to promote both glycolysis and the proinflammatory response to infection.

  12. Predictive characterization of hypothetical proteins in Staphylococcus aureus NCTC 8325.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School, Kuana; Marklevitz, Jessica; K Schram, William; K Harris, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common hospital acquired infections. It colonizes immunocompromised patients and with the number of antibiotic resistant strains increasing, medicine needs new treatment options. Understanding more about the proteins this organism uses would further this goal. Hypothetical proteins are sequences thought to encode a functional protein but for which little to no evidence of that function exists. About half of the genomic proteins in reference strain S. aureus NCTC 8325 are hypothetical. Since annotation of these proteins can lead to new therapeutic targets, a high demand to characterize hypothetical proteins is present. This work examines 35 hypothetical proteins from the chromosome of S. aureus NCTC 8325. Examination includes physiochemical characterization; sequence homology; structural homology; domain recognition; structure modeling; active site depiction; predicted protein-protein interactions; protein-chemical interactions; protein localization; protein stability; and protein solubility. The examination revealed some hypothetical proteins related to virulent domains and protein-protein interactions including superoxide dismutase, O-antigen, bacterial ferric iron reductase and siderophore synthesis. Yet other hypothetical proteins appear to be metabolic or transport proteins including ABC transporters, major facilitator superfamily, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, and GTPases. Progress evaluating some hypothetical proteins, particularly the smaller ones, was incomplete due to limited homology and structural information in public repositories. These data characterizing hypothetical proteins will contribute to the scientific understanding of S. aureus by identifying potential drug targets and aiding in future drug discovery.

  13. Clinical implications of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Richard H

    2011-04-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become an increasingly aggressive and prevalent pathogen in medicine. This pattern has also been noted in obstetrics. This review will delineate the epidemiology and clinical implications of MRSA during pregnancy. Investigations have focused on prevalence of MRSA colonization in obstetrics and the associated morbidity. In addition, some attention has been focused on the neonatal implications of maternal colonization. Overall, the rates of maternal MRSA colonization noted in the United States have been low, in the range of 0.5-4%. The clinical impact of MRSA colonization among pregnant women has also been estimated to be modest. Roughly 357 invasive MRSA infections per 100,000 live births in the United States occur on an annual basis. It is however important to note that published estimates likely underestimate the full scope of MRSA in pregnancy given the lack of formal reporting, importance of related neonatal colonization and morbidity, the complicated treatment implications in pregnant women, the recognized high pathogenicity of MRSA infections, and propensity for recurrent infections among community-acquired MRSA strains. MRSA is an increasingly important pathogen in modern healthcare and in the obstetric population. Continued surveillance and research remains a top priority.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Carriage among Beefpacking Workers in a Midwestern United States Slaughterhouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibler, Jessica H; Jordan, Jeanne A; Brownstein, Kirsten; Lander, Lina; Price, Lance B; Perry, Melissa J

    2016-01-01

    Occupational contact with livestock is an established risk factor for exposure to livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), particularly among industrial swine workers. While S. aureus is known to infect cattle, livestock-associated S. aureus carriage among workers in the beef production chain has received limited attention. Beefpacking workers, who slaughter, butcher and process cattle, have intensified exposure to potentially infectious animal materials and may be at risk of livestock-associated S. aureus exposure. We conducted a cross-sectional study of beefpacking workers (n = 137) at an industrial slaughterhouse in the Midwestern United States to evaluate prevalence and characteristics of S. aureus nasal colonization, specifically the absence of the scn gene to identify putative association with livestock, antibiotic susceptibility, presence of Panton-Valentin leukocidin (PVL) genes lukS-PV and lukF-PV, and spa type. Overall prevalence of S. aureus nasal carriage was 27.0%. No workers carried livestock-associated MRSA. Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus isolates (MSSA) recovered from five workers (3.6%) lacked the scn gene and were considered putative livestock-associated S. aureus (pLA-SA). Among pLA-SA isolates, spa types t338, t748, t1476 and t2379 were identified. To our knowledge, these spa types have not previously been identified as associated with livestock. Prevalence of human-adapted MRSA carriage in workers was 3.6%. MRSA isolates were identified as spa types t002, t008 and t024, and four of five MRSA isolates were PVL-positive. To date, this is the first study to indicate that industrial beefpacking workers in the United States may be exposed to livestock-associated S. aureus, notably MSSA, and to spa types not previously identified in livestock and livestock workers. Occupational exposure to livestock-associated S. aureus in the beef production chain requires further epidemiologic investigation.

  15. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage among patients and healthcare workers in a hospital in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Talib, Hassanain; Yean, Chan Yean; Hasan, Habsah; Nik Zuraina, N M N; Ravichandran, Manickam

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage is a common source of nosocomial infection and colonization. The aim of the present study was to assess the burden of methicillin-resistant S. aureus nasal carriage, its association with factors of interest including its genetic relationships. The prevalence of S. aureus nasal carriage was found to be 28.7%. This study showed that patients with a history of previous antibiotic intake, nasogastric tube, and longer hospitalization had a significantly high risk of being MRSA nasal carriers. The genetic relationship of all 34 nasal MRSA isolates revealed four major clusters of isolates, and there was a relationship between MRSA isolated from inpatients and healthcare workers.

  16. The Frequency of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Endocervix of Infertile Women in Northwest Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhi Mohammad Taghi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Infertility is one of the major social issues. Due to the asymptomatic cervical infection associated with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, the majority of patients remain undiagnosed. The present study intended to assess the frequency of S. aureus isolated from infertile women’s endocervix in northwest Iran. Materials and Methods In a descriptive cross sectional study, specimens were randomly collected during vagina examination using a sterile speculum and swabbing. After performance of antibiotic susceptibility testing, polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to identify methicillin-resistance S. aureus (MRSA and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1. Results About 26 (26% and 9 (9% women’s urogenital tracts were colonized by S. aureus and Candida spp., respectively, of which three (11.5% patients were infected with fungi and S. aureus, simultaneously. Antibiotic susceptibility results showed high activity of vancomycin and co-trimoxazole on isolates. Regarding PCR results, mecA sequences were detected in 7 (26.9% strains, whilst the tst gene encoding TSST-1 was not detected in any of clinical strains. Conclusion The prevalence of S. aureus was very high in infertile women. Therefore, it demands all patients undergoing infertility treatment to be investigated thoroughly for this type of infection.

  17. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus in Goose Feces from State Parks in Northeast Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapaliya, Dipendra; Dalman, Mark; Kadariya, Jhalka; Little, Katie; Mansell, Victoria; Taha, Mohammed Y; Grenier, Dylan; Smith, Tara C

    2017-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can colonize a range of species. Although numerous studies have isolated pathogenic bacteria from wild birds, very little is known regarding S. aureus and their potential to spread methicillin-resistant (MRSA) strains. The objective of this study was to determine the presence and molecular characteristics of S. aureus in geese fecal samples collected from ten state parks across Northeast Ohio (NEO). A total of 182 fecal samples from Canada geese (Branta canadensis) were collected in April 2015. Isolates were characterized using multi-locus sequence (MLST) and spa typing, as well as PCR to detect the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), mecA, and scn genes. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was done via Vitek-2 system. The overall contamination by S. aureus in fecal samples was 7.1% (13/182); 7/182 (3.8%) were MRSA and 6/182 (3.3%) were methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). One isolate was positive for PVL. A total of eight different spa types were observed. MLST included ST5, ST8, ST291, ST298, and ST2111. One (7.7%) MSSA isolate was multi-drug resistant. The S. aureus contamination in NEO state parks ranged from 0% (park 1, 4, 8, 9) to 35% (7/20) (park 5). Parks 2, 3, 6, and 7 had 5% (1/20) positive. The results of this study indicate that the feces of geese collected at various state parks in NEO may harbor S. aureus.

  18. Healthy pets, healthy people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S K; Feinstein, L H; Heidmann, P

    1999-08-01

    Zoonoses, diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans, can pose serious health risks to immunocompromised people. Although pets can carry zoonoses, owning and caring for animals can benefit human health. Information exists about preventing transmission of zoonoses, but not all physicians and veterinarians provide adequate and accurate information to immunocompromised pet owners. This disease prevention/health promotion project provides physicians and veterinarians with information, created specifically to share with patients and clients, about the health risks and benefits of pet ownership. Further, "Healthy Pets, Healthy People" encourages communication between veterinarians, physicians, clients, and patients and can serve as a model program for a nation-wide effort to aid health professionals in making recommendations about pet ownership for immunocompromised people.

  19. Healthy Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes to your lifestyle. By taking steps toward healthy living, you can help reduce your risk of ... Get the screening tests you need Maintain a healthy weight Eat a variety of healthy foods, and ...

  20. Outbreak of Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infections Among a Collegiate Football Team

    OpenAIRE

    Romano, Russ; Lu, Doanh; Holtom, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Context: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was once primarily a hospital-acquired organism, but now community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) is causing outbreaks among otherwise healthy sport participants.

  1. Role of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in chronic urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashimav Deb Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the role of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in patients suffering from chronic urticaria. Method: All total 82 patients were included for this study. Study group comprised 57 patients with chronic urticaria and the control group comprised 25 healthy volunteers. Nasal swab specimens were taken from all the 82 patients for bacterial culture and antimicrobial sensitivity. Patients with chronic urticaria who had positive growth for S. aureus were treated with sensitive antimicrobial agent. Nasal swab specimens were taken again from all the patients who received antimicrobial therapy to ensure complete eradication of S. aureus. All patients were followed up for a period of 6 weeks after the treatment. Urticarial activity was measured with the help of urticarial activity score. Results: S. aureus was detected in swab specimens from the nasal cavity in 32 patients in the study group and 7 patients in the control group. In the study group, after the antimicrobial treatment, 9 patients (28.12% had complete recovery from urticaria during the follow-up period; 4 patients (12.5% showed partial recovery from urticaria while the remaining patients (59.37% continued to suffer from urticaria. Conclusion: This study showed that nasal carriage of S. aureus can act as an etiological factor in chronic urticaria.

  2. Risk factors of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among health care staff in a teaching hospital in central Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Humaidan, Ohoud S; El-Kersh, Talat A; Al-Akeel, Raid A

    2015-09-01

    To investigate possible risk factors of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) nasal carriage associated with various health troubles among healthcare workers (HCWs) at King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH). This prospective study was conducted between May 2012 and January 2013 in KKUH, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A total of 200 nasal swabs were collected from HCWs. Identification was carried out based on morphology, Gram stain, catalase and coagulase test, Staphaurex PlusH test, chromogenic medium, oxacillin, and cefoxitin test using disc diffusion method. Characterization was carried out using disk diffusion method and E-test. Polymerase chain reaction was carried out to confirm using GeneXpert® Dx System (Cepheid) to detect mecA gene. Among the 200 isolates, 80 (40%) were S. aureus carriers, and 36 (18%) of all HCWs were identified as MRSA carriers. There was a significant difference of S. aureus according to gender with male carriers (p=0.012), occupation particularly among nurses (p=0.006), and duration of working years in the hospital among 4-6 years group (p=0.002). Moreover, none of the risk factors assessed were significantly associated with the carriage rate of MRSA (p greater than 0.05). The current study revealed that nursing staff was the potential colonizers of S. aureus and MRSA compared with other HCWs. Regular screening of carriers is required for prevention of nosocomial infections.

  3. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a new zoonotic agent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Burkhard; Orendi, Ulrike; Much, Peter; Höger, Gerda; Ruppitsch, Werner; Krziwanek, Karina; Metz-Gercek, Sigrid; Mittermayer, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of infection in hospitals and the community. One third of the general population is colonized by the bacterium, constituting a risk factor for acquisition of infection with this pathogen. Worldwide, the increasing antibiotic resistance of S. aureus complicates treatment of infection and control measures. Soon after the introduction of methicillin, the first isolates resistant to this antibiotic were reported and named methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). During the past decade a major change in MRSA epidemiology has been observed: whereas in the past MRSA was almost exclusively regarded a hospital pathogen, the advent of community-acquired MRSA has led to infections in people without hospital-related risk factors. Recent evidence has also identified a link between colonization of livestock and MRSA carriage and infections in people who work with animals. Screening of pigs and pig farmers in the Netherlands revealed high prevalence of MRSA sequence type (ST) 398 and it has become clear that the emergence of ST398 is not just a Dutch problem, as reports on livestock colonization and human infections are appearing worldwide. In Austria, the ST398 lineage has been detected in dust samples from pig breeding facilities and in food samples. Since the first Austrian detection of this emerging lineage in 2006, 21 human isolates, partially associated with infections, have been observed. MRSA has to be regarded as a new emerging zoonotic agent and livestock may constitute a growing reservoir of the ST398 lineage. More information is needed so that control measures to reduce the impact of the emerging MRSA ST398 lineage on public health can be developed and implemented.

  4. Identification of Bacillus spp. colonizing the nasal mucosa of healthy adults living in the suburban area using the matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosikowska Urszula

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus spp. can be regarded as a rare component of the nasal mucosa microflora. The aim of this study was to identify Bacillus spp. from the nasal mucosa of healthy adults living in the suburban area near Lublin using the matrix-assisted laser desorptionionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS system.

  5. Staphylococcus epidermidis Esp degrades specific proteins associated with Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation and host-pathogen interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Shinya; Iwamoto, Takeo; Takada, Koji; Okuda, Ken-Ichi; Tajima, Akiko; Iwase, Tadayuki; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu

    2013-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus exhibits a strong capacity to attach to abiotic or biotic surfaces and form biofilms, which lead to chronic infections. We have recently shown that Esp, a serine protease secreted by commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis, disassembles preformed biofilms of S. aureus and inhibits its colonization. Esp was expected to degrade protein determinants of the adhesive and cohesive strength of S. aureus biofilms. The aim of this study was to elucidate the substrate specificity and target proteins of Esp and thereby determine the mechanism by which Esp disassembles S. aureus biofilms. We used a mutant Esp protein (Esp(S235A)) with defective proteolytic activity; this protein did not disassemble the biofilm formed by a clinically isolated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain, thereby indicating that the proteolytic activity of Esp is essential for biofilm disassembly. Esp degraded specific proteins in the biofilm matrix and cell wall fractions, in contrast to proteinase K, which is frequently used for testing biofilm robustness and showed no preference for proteolysis. Proteomic and immunological analyses showed that Esp degrades at least 75 proteins, including 11 biofilm formation- and colonization-associated proteins, such as the extracellular adherence protein, the extracellular matrix protein-binding protein, fibronectin-binding protein A, and protein A. In addition, Esp selectively degraded several human receptor proteins of S. aureus (e.g., fibronectin, fibrinogen, and vitronectin) that are involved in its colonization or infection. These results suggest that Esp inhibits S. aureus colonization and biofilm formation by degrading specific proteins that are crucial for biofilm construction and host-pathogen interaction.

  6. α-Hemolysin activity of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus predicts ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulik, Lukas; Malafa, Stefan; Hudcova, Jana; Rouha, Harald; Henics, Bence Z; Craven, Donald E; Sonnevend, Agnes M; Nagy, Eszter

    2014-11-15

    Colonization of lower airways by Staphylococcus aureus is a risk factor for the development of ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis (VAT) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). However, little is known about the virulence factors of methicillin-sensitive and -resistant S. aureus (MSSA and MRSA) that may influence host colonization and progression to VAT and VAP. We evaluated MRSA and MSSA endotracheal aspirates (ETA) for genotype and α-hemolysin activity in relation to the development of VAT and VAP. Serial S. aureus ETA isolates from ventilated patients were analyzed for methicillin resistance, molecular type by Multi-Locus Sequence Typing and spa-typing, and α-hemolysin activity by semiquantitative analysis of hemolysis on sheep blood agar and quantitative measurement of cytolysis of human lung epithelial cells. The virulence of selected strains was assessed in mice by intranasal challenge. We detected S. aureus from ETA samples in a quarter of the 231 ventilated patients analyzed; one-third of them developed VAP. VAP patients (n = 15) were mainly infected by MSSA strains (87%), whereas colonized individuals (n = 18) not progressing to disease mainly carried MRSA strains (68%). MSSA isolates from colonized or VAT patients exhibited significantly lower α-hemolysin activity than those from VAP cases; however, no such relationship was found with MRSA strains. α-Hemolysin activity of S. aureus isolates was predictive for virulence in mouse pneumonia model. MSSA strains with strong blood agar hemolysis and high α-hemolysin activity are markers for VAP, but not VAT, and might be considered in differential diagnosis and initiation of therapy.

  7. Solonamide B Inhibits Quorum Sensing and Reduces Staphylococcus aureus Mediated Killing of Human Neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anita; Månsson, Maria; Bojer, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to be a serious human pathogen, and particularly the spread of community associated (CA)-MRSA strains such as USA300 is a concern, as these strains can cause severe infections in otherwise healthy adults. Recently, we reported...... that a cyclodepsipeptide termed Solonamide B isolated from the marine bacterium, Photobacterium halotolerans strongly reduces expression of RNAIII, the effector molecule of the agr quorum sensing system. Here we show that Solonamide B interferes with the binding of S. aureus autoinducing peptides (AIPs) to sensor......A controlled virulence gene expression in S. aureus....

  8. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae interaction and response to pneumococcal vaccination: Myth or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss-Mandel, Aylana; Regev-Yochay, Gili

    2016-01-01

    S. aureus and S. pneumoniae are both common pathogens that are also carried by a large proportion of healthy individuals in the nasal and nasopharyngeal spaces. A negative association between carriage of S. aureus and S. pneumoniae has been reported in children in various epidemiologic studies from different geographical regions. Most studies found that the negative association between S. pneumoniae and S. aureus was significant only for carriage of vaccine-type S. pneumoniae strains. In this review, we summarize the various suggested mechanisms of this suggested bacterial interference, and the clinical implications reported following PCV introduction to date in various geographical regions.

  9. Concentration of airborne Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and MSSA), total bacteria, and endotoxins in pig farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masclaux, Frederic G; Sakwinska, Olga; Charrière, Nicole; Semaani, Eulalia; Oppliger, Anne

    2013-06-01

    Pigs are very often colonized by Staphylococcus aureus and transmission of such pig-associated S. aureus to humans can cause serious medical, hygiene, and economic problems. The transmission route of zoonotic pathogens colonizing farm animals to humans is not well established and bioaerosols could play an important role. The aim of this study was to assess the potential occupational risk of working with S. aureus-colonized pigs in Switzerland. We estimated the airborne contamination by S. aureus in 37 pig farms (20 nursery and 17 fattening units; 25 in summer, 12 in winter). Quantification of total airborne bacterial DNA, airborne Staphylococcus sp. DNA, fungi, and airborne endotoxins was also performed. In this experiment, the presence of cultivable airborne methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) CC398 in a pig farm in Switzerland was reported for the first time. Airborne methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) was found in ~30% of farms. The average airborne concentration of DNA copy number of total bacteria and Staphylococcus sp. measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction was very high, respectively reaching values of 75 (± 28) × 10(7) and 35 (± 9.8) × 10(5) copy numbers m(-3) in summer and 96 (± 19) × 10(8) and 40 (± 12) × 10(6) copy numbers m(-3) in winter. Total mean airborne concentrations of endotoxins (1298 units of endotoxin m(-3)) and fungi (5707 colony-forming units m(-3)) exceeded the Swiss recommended values and were higher in winter than in summer. In conclusion, Swiss pig farmers will have to tackle a new emerging occupational risk, which could also have a strong impact on public health. The need to inform pig farmers about biological occupational risks is therefore crucial.

  10. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of Unconjugated and Conjugated Bile Salts on Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thippeswamy H. Sannasiddappa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bile salts are potent antimicrobial agents and are an important component of innate defenses in the intestine, giving protection against invasive organisms. They play an important role in determining microbial ecology of the intestine and alterations in their levels can lead to increased colonization by pathogens. We have previously demonstrated survival of the opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus in the human colonic model. Thus investigating the interaction between S. aureus and bile salts is an important factor in understanding its ability to colonize in the host intestine. Harnessing bile salts may also give a new avenue to explore in the development of therapeutic strategies to control drug resistant bacteria. Despite this importance, the antibacterial activity of bile salts on S. aureus is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the antibacterial effects of the major unconjugated and conjugated bile salts on S. aureus. Several concentration-dependent antibacterial mechanisms were found. Unconjugated bile salts at their minimum inhibitory concentration (cholic and deoxycholic acid at 20 and 1 mM, respectively killed S. aureus, and this was associated with increased membrane disruption and leakage of cellular contents. Unconjugated bile salts (cholic and deoxycholic acid at 8 and 0.4 mM, respectively and conjugated bile salts (glycocholic and taurocholic acid at 20 mM at their sub inhibitory concentrations were still able to inhibit growth through disruption of the proton motive force and increased membrane permeability. We also demonstrated that unconjugated bile salts possess more potent antibacterial action on S. aureus than conjugated bile salts.

  11. Learning about Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Top of page Is there a test for hereditary colon cancer? Gene testing can identify individuals who carry the more ... looking for mutations in four of the five genes identified that are associated with ... Colon Cancer Currently, NHGRI is not conducting clinical research studies ...

  12. CT Findings of Colonic Complications Associated with Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Won; Shin, Hyeong Cheol; Kim, Il Young; Kim, Young Tong; Kim, Chang Jin [Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    A broad spectrum of colonic complications can occur in patients with colon cancer. Clinically, some of these complications can obscure the presence of underlying malignancies in the colon and these complications may require emergency surgical management. The complications of the colon that can be associated with colon cancer include obstruction, perforation, abscess formation, acute appendicitis, ischemic colitis and intussusception. Although the majority of these complications only rarely occur, familiarity with the various manifestations of colon cancer complications will facilitate making an accurate diagnosis and administering prompt management in these situations. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to review the CT appearance of the colonic complications associated with colon cancer.

  13. Detection of Methicillin Resistance and Various Virulence Factors in Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Nasal Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Türk Dağı

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococus aureus can be found as a commensal on skin and nasal flora or it may cause local and invasive infections. S. aureus has a large number of virulence factors. Aims: To investigate the methicillin resistance and frequency of various virulence factors in S. aureus nasal isolates. Study Design: Descriptive study. Methods: Nasal samples collected from university students were cultured in media. S. aureus was identified by conventional methods and the Staphyloslide latex test (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, USA. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were conducted, and the methicillin resistance was determined. The mecA, nuc, pvl and staphylococcal toxin genes were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: S. aureus was isolated in 104 of 600 (17.3% nasal samples. In total, 101 (97.1% S. aureus isolates were methicillin-sensitive and the remaining 3 (2.9% were methicillin-resistant. Furthermore, all but five isolates carried at least one staphylococcal enterotoxin gene, with seg being predominant. The tst and eta genes were determined in 29 (27.9%, and 3 (2.9% isolates, respectively. None of the S. aureus isolates harbored see, etb, and pvl genes. Conclusion: A moderate rate of S. aureus carriage and low frequency of MRSA were detected in healthy students. S. aureus isolates had a high prevalence of staphylococcal enterotoxin genes and the tst gene. In this study, a large number of virulence factors were examined in S. aureus nasal isolates, and the data obtained from this study can be used for monitoring the prevalence of virulence genes in S. aureus strains isolated from nasal carriers.

  14. Understanding your colon cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon cancer - prevention; Colon cancer - screening ... We do not know what causes colon cancer, but we do know some of the things that may increase the risk of getting it, such as: Age. Your risk increases ...

  15. Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in European Wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monecke, Stefan; Gavier-Widén, Dolores; Hotzel, Helmut; Peters, Martin; Guenther, Sebastian; Lazaris, Alexandros; Loncaric, Igor; Müller, Elke; Reissig, Annett; Ruppelt-Lorz, Antje; Shore, Anna C.; Walter, Birgit; Coleman, David C.; Ehricht, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a well-known colonizer and cause of infection among animals and it has been described from numerous domestic and wild animal species. The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular epidemiology of S. aureus in a convenience sample of European wildlife and to review what previously has been observed in the subject field. 124 S. aureus isolates were collected from wildlife in Germany, Austria and Sweden; they were characterized by DNA microarray hybridization and, for isolates with novel hybridization patterns, by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The isolates were assigned to 29 clonal complexes and singleton sequence types (CC1, CC5, CC6, CC7, CC8, CC9, CC12, CC15, CC22, CC25, CC30, CC49, CC59, CC88, CC97, CC130, CC133, CC398, ST425, CC599, CC692, CC707, ST890, CC1956, ST2425, CC2671, ST2691, CC2767 and ST2963), some of which (ST2425, ST2691, ST2963) were not described previously. Resistance rates in wildlife strains were rather low and mecA-MRSA isolates were rare (n = 6). mecC-MRSA (n = 8) were identified from a fox, a fallow deer, hares and hedgehogs. The common cattle-associated lineages CC479 and CC705 were not detected in wildlife in the present study while, in contrast, a third common cattle lineage, CC97, was found to be common among cervids. No Staphylococcus argenteus or Staphylococcus schweitzeri-like isolates were found. Systematic studies are required to monitor the possible transmission of human- and livestock-associated S. aureus/MRSA to wildlife and vice versa as well as the possible transmission, by unprotected contact to animals. The prevalence of S. aureus/MRSA in wildlife as well as its population structures in different wildlife host species warrants further investigation. PMID:27992523

  16. Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in European Wildlife.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Monecke

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a well-known colonizer and cause of infection among animals and it has been described from numerous domestic and wild animal species. The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular epidemiology of S. aureus in a convenience sample of European wildlife and to review what previously has been observed in the subject field. 124 S. aureus isolates were collected from wildlife in Germany, Austria and Sweden; they were characterized by DNA microarray hybridization and, for isolates with novel hybridization patterns, by multilocus sequence typing (MLST. The isolates were assigned to 29 clonal complexes and singleton sequence types (CC1, CC5, CC6, CC7, CC8, CC9, CC12, CC15, CC22, CC25, CC30, CC49, CC59, CC88, CC97, CC130, CC133, CC398, ST425, CC599, CC692, CC707, ST890, CC1956, ST2425, CC2671, ST2691, CC2767 and ST2963, some of which (ST2425, ST2691, ST2963 were not described previously. Resistance rates in wildlife strains were rather low and mecA-MRSA isolates were rare (n = 6. mecC-MRSA (n = 8 were identified from a fox, a fallow deer, hares and hedgehogs. The common cattle-associated lineages CC479 and CC705 were not detected in wildlife in the present study while, in contrast, a third common cattle lineage, CC97, was found to be common among cervids. No Staphylococcus argenteus or Staphylococcus schweitzeri-like isolates were found. Systematic studies are required to monitor the possible transmission of human- and livestock-associated S. aureus/MRSA to wildlife and vice versa as well as the possible transmission, by unprotected contact to animals. The prevalence of S. aureus/MRSA in wildlife as well as its population structures in different wildlife host species warrants further investigation.

  17. Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in European Wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monecke, Stefan; Gavier-Widén, Dolores; Hotzel, Helmut; Peters, Martin; Guenther, Sebastian; Lazaris, Alexandros; Loncaric, Igor; Müller, Elke; Reissig, Annett; Ruppelt-Lorz, Antje; Shore, Anna C; Walter, Birgit; Coleman, David C; Ehricht, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a well-known colonizer and cause of infection among animals and it has been described from numerous domestic and wild animal species. The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular epidemiology of S. aureus in a convenience sample of European wildlife and to review what previously has been observed in the subject field. 124 S. aureus isolates were collected from wildlife in Germany, Austria and Sweden; they were characterized by DNA microarray hybridization and, for isolates with novel hybridization patterns, by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The isolates were assigned to 29 clonal complexes and singleton sequence types (CC1, CC5, CC6, CC7, CC8, CC9, CC12, CC15, CC22, CC25, CC30, CC49, CC59, CC88, CC97, CC130, CC133, CC398, ST425, CC599, CC692, CC707, ST890, CC1956, ST2425, CC2671, ST2691, CC2767 and ST2963), some of which (ST2425, ST2691, ST2963) were not described previously. Resistance rates in wildlife strains were rather low and mecA-MRSA isolates were rare (n = 6). mecC-MRSA (n = 8) were identified from a fox, a fallow deer, hares and hedgehogs. The common cattle-associated lineages CC479 and CC705 were not detected in wildlife in the present study while, in contrast, a third common cattle lineage, CC97, was found to be common among cervids. No Staphylococcus argenteus or Staphylococcus schweitzeri-like isolates were found. Systematic studies are required to monitor the possible transmission of human- and livestock-associated S. aureus/MRSA to wildlife and vice versa as well as the possible transmission, by unprotected contact to animals. The prevalence of S. aureus/MRSA in wildlife as well as its population structures in different wildlife host species warrants further investigation.

  18. Prevalence and Molecular Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus among Residents of Seven Nursing Homes in Shanghai.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhang

    Full Text Available Residents in nursing homes (NHs always represent potential reservoirs for Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. To our knowledge, there is no epidemiological information up till now that describes the prevalence and molecular characteristics of S. aureus in nursing home residents in Shanghai, China.Four hundred and ninety-one unique residents from 7 NHs were enrolled in this study. Specimens were collected among these residents including 491 nasal swabs, 487 axillary swabs and 119 skin swabs. S. aureus isolated and identified from the swabs was characterized according to antimicrobial susceptibility profiling, toxin gene prevalence, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST, spa and SCCmec typing.Among the 491 residents screened, S. aureus was isolated in 109 residents from 90 nasal swabs (90/491, 18.3%, 29 axillary swabs (29/487, 6.0%, and 22 skin swabs (22/119, 18.5%. Sixty-eight MRSA isolates were detected in 52 residents from 41 nasal carriers, 15 axillary carriers and 12 skin carriers. The overall prevalence rate of S. aureus and MRSA colonization was 22.2% and 10.6% respectively. Ten residents presented S. aureus in all three sample types and 12 residents presented S. aureus in two of the three sample types collected. Molecular analysis revealed CC1 (29.1% to be the dominant clone in this study, followed by CC398 (19.9%, CC188 (13.5% and CC5 (12.8%. The most common spa type was t127 (22.0%, followed by t14383 (12.8% and t002 (10.6%.A high prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA colonization was revealed in nursing home residents in Shanghai. CC1 was the most common clonal complex and t127 was the most common spa type among NH residents. The data provides an important baseline for future surveillance of S. aureus in NHs in Shanghai and other highly urbanized regions in China. Implementation of infection control strategies must be given high priority in NHs to fight such high prevalence of both MRSA and methicillin

  19. Prevalence and Molecular Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus among Residents of Seven Nursing Homes in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji; Gu, Fei-Fei; Zhao, Sheng-Yuan; Xiao, Shu-Zhen; Wang, Yan-Chun; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Ni, Yu-Xing; Han, Li-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Residents in nursing homes (NHs) always represent potential reservoirs for Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). To our knowledge, there is no epidemiological information up till now that describes the prevalence and molecular characteristics of S. aureus in nursing home residents in Shanghai, China. Four hundred and ninety-one unique residents from 7 NHs were enrolled in this study. Specimens were collected among these residents including 491 nasal swabs, 487 axillary swabs and 119 skin swabs. S. aureus isolated and identified from the swabs was characterized according to antimicrobial susceptibility profiling, toxin gene prevalence, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa and SCCmec typing. Among the 491 residents screened, S. aureus was isolated in 109 residents from 90 nasal swabs (90/491, 18.3%), 29 axillary swabs (29/487, 6.0%), and 22 skin swabs (22/119, 18.5%). Sixty-eight MRSA isolates were detected in 52 residents from 41 nasal carriers, 15 axillary carriers and 12 skin carriers. The overall prevalence rate of S. aureus and MRSA colonization was 22.2% and 10.6% respectively. Ten residents presented S. aureus in all three sample types and 12 residents presented S. aureus in two of the three sample types collected. Molecular analysis revealed CC1 (29.1%) to be the dominant clone in this study, followed by CC398 (19.9%), CC188 (13.5%) and CC5 (12.8%). The most common spa type was t127 (22.0%), followed by t14383 (12.8%) and t002 (10.6%). A high prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA colonization was revealed in nursing home residents in Shanghai. CC1 was the most common clonal complex and t127 was the most common spa type among NH residents. The data provides an important baseline for future surveillance of S. aureus in NHs in Shanghai and other highly urbanized regions in China. Implementation of infection control strategies must be given high priority in NHs to fight such high prevalence of both MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S

  20. The occurrence and comparative phenotypic characteristics of Staphylococcus spp. from healthy and diseased, household and shelter dogs, based on routine biochemical diagnostic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprowicz, Andrzej; Białecka, Anna; Białecka, Joanna; Godzisz, Izabela; Barabasz, Wiesław; Jaworska, Olga; Małachowa, Natalia; Miedzobrodzki, Jacek

    2011-01-01

    To determine the staphylococcal colonization pattern in healthy and diseased dogs, living in two particular environments, a number of microbiological samples were taken. Overall, twenty dogs, either healthy or with infected skin lesions, were examined. In each case bacterial swabs were collected from the nasal mucosa, ear, perineum, lumbo-sacralis triangle, and from the infection sites if such were present. A total number of 104 isolates representing different staphylococcal species were isolated and identified using routine biochemical methods applied in diagnostic laboratories. Among 17 isolated staphylococcal species, Staphylococcus intermedius was the most common species isolated from both healthy or diseased dogs living either in animal shelter or household environments. The pattern of Staphylococcus sp. colonization differs considerably for animals living in the two tested habitats. In particular, S. aureus MRSA and MSSA isolates were detected only in infected skin lesion samples from animals that dwelled in the animal shelter. As could be expected, S. intermedius was found to be a predominant causative agent in canine skin infections. In our study, we demonstrated that S. intermedius in its carrier-state, inhabits mainly the mucosal membrane of the nasal vestibule. It was also found in the samples taken from the skin, the lumbo-sacralis triangle and perineum, but was rarely isolated from the ears.

  1. Differential Analysis of the Nasal Microbiome of Pig Carriers or Non-Carriers of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Espinosa-Gongora

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is presently regarded as an emerging zoonotic agent due to the spread of specific methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA clones in pig farms. Studying the microbiota can be useful for the identification of bacteria that antagonize such opportunistic veterinary and zoonotic pathogen in animal carriers. The aim of this study was to determine whether the nasal microbiome of pig S. aureus carriers differs from that of non-carriers. The V3-V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced from nasal swabs of 44 S. aureus carriers and 56 non-carriers using the 454 GS FLX titanium system. Carriers and non-carriers were selected on the basis of quantitative longitudinal data on S. aureus carriage in 600 pigs sampled at 20 Danish herds included in two previous studies in Denmark. Raw sequences were analysed with the BION meta package and the resulting abundance matrix was analysed using the DESeq2 package in R to identify operational taxonomic units (OTUs with differential abundance between S. aureus carriers and non-carriers. Twenty OTUs were significantly associated to non-carriers, including species with known probiotic potential and antimicrobial effect such as lactic acid-producing isolates described among Leuconostoc spp. and some members of the Lachnospiraceae family, which is known for butyrate production. Further 5 OTUs were significantly associated to carriage, including known pathogenic bacteria such as Pasteurella multocida and Klebsiella spp. Our results show that the nasal microbiome of pigs that are not colonized with S. aureus harbours several species/taxa that are significantly less abundant in pig carriers, suggesting that the nasal microbiota may play a role in the individual predisposition to S. aureus nasal carriage in pigs. Further research is warranted to isolate these bacteria and assess their possible antagonistic effect on S. aureus for the pursuit of new strategies to control MRSA in pig farming.

  2. Differential Analysis of the Nasal Microbiome of Pig Carriers or Non-Carriers of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Larsen, Niels; Schønning, Kristian; Fredholm, Merete; Guardabassi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is presently regarded as an emerging zoonotic agent due to the spread of specific methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clones in pig farms. Studying the microbiota can be useful for the identification of bacteria that antagonize such opportunistic veterinary and zoonotic pathogen in animal carriers. The aim of this study was to determine whether the nasal microbiome of pig S. aureus carriers differs from that of non-carriers. The V3-V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced from nasal swabs of 44 S. aureus carriers and 56 non-carriers using the 454 GS FLX titanium system. Carriers and non-carriers were selected on the basis of quantitative longitudinal data on S. aureus carriage in 600 pigs sampled at 20 Danish herds included in two previous studies in Denmark. Raw sequences were analysed with the BION meta package and the resulting abundance matrix was analysed using the DESeq2 package in R to identify operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with differential abundance between S. aureus carriers and non-carriers. Twenty OTUs were significantly associated to non-carriers, including species with known probiotic potential and antimicrobial effect such as lactic acid-producing isolates described among Leuconostoc spp. and some members of the Lachnospiraceae family, which is known for butyrate production. Further 5 OTUs were significantly associated to carriage, including known pathogenic bacteria such as Pasteurella multocida and Klebsiella spp. Our results show that the nasal microbiome of pigs that are not colonized with S. aureus harbours several species/taxa that are significantly less abundant in pig carriers, suggesting that the nasal microbiota may play a role in the individual predisposition to S. aureus nasal carriage in pigs. Further research is warranted to isolate these bacteria and assess their possible antagonistic effect on S. aureus for the pursuit of new strategies to control MRSA in pig farming.

  3. Fatal pneumoni med Panton-Valentine-leukocidinproducerende Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Peter Hedelund; Dessau, Ram Benny; Warnecke, Mads

    2010-01-01

    We describe a case of fatal pneumonia in a previously healthy 14-year-old boy. The patient was severely affected at the time of admission with high fever, tachypnea, tachycardia and peripheral cyanosis. The condition worsened despite treatment with antibiotics as well as respiratory and pressure ...... support. Acidosis and critical leucopenia supervened and the patient died just short of 24 hours after admission. Subsequent bacterial cultivation showed Panton-Valentine Leucocidin-producing Staphylococcus aureus....

  4. Fetal microchimerism in breast and colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, M; Biggar, R J; Stamper, Casey L

    2011-01-01

    microchimerism predicts risk for developing breast cancer is unknown. FMc was evaluated in buffy coat cells from presumed healthy women who later developed breast cancer or colon cancer, a cancer in which prior pregnancy appears protective but has different associations with endocrine risk factors. METHODS......1574 Background: Cells acquired by a woman from her baby that durably persist in her blood and tissues is known as fetal microchimerism (FMc). In women with breast cancer, frequency and quantity of FMc in blood and breast tissue is reduced compared to healthy women. Whether the absence of fetal....... DNA from repository buffy coat specimens was tested for male FMc with quantitative PCR targeting the DYS14gene on the Y chromosome. For this analysis, 89 women who developed breast cancer and 67 women who developed colon cancer were evaluable for FMc. Results were compared to 272 women who remained...

  5. Induction of Staphylococcus aureus-specific IgA and agglutination potency in milk of cows by mucosal immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempelmans Plat-Sinnige, Marjan J; Verkaik, Nelianne J; van Wamel, Willem J B; de Groot, Nanda; Acton, Dennis S; van Belkum, Alex

    2009-06-19

    Lactating cows were immunized with inactivated Staphylococcus aureus strains and concentrated culture supernatants. Application of a repeated mucosal immunization scheme resulted in significant levels of S. aureus-specific IgA in milk of dairy cows. Average IgA titers against whole cell S. aureus increased during the first 10 weeks of immunization after which a plateau level was reached and maintained during lactation. Immune whey agglutinated both bovine and human S. aureus strains including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains and recognized extracted S. aureus proteins on Western blot. ELISAs to quantify milk IgA reactive with a number of S. aureus virulence proteins (e.g. enterotoxins, microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) and immune modulating proteins) and cell wall components, demonstrated the polyclonality of the IgA. Correlations observed between agglutination and specific IgA titers for whey and for purified IgA suggested functionality of the induced antibodies. Milk from immunized cows may provide a way of producing potentially therapeutic polyclonal antibodies against S. aureus colonization and infection.

  6. Sonography in Colonic Diverticulitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Mi Yun; Choi, Byung Hun; Kim, Keum Won; Kwon, Kwi Ryun; Lim, Myung Ah; Kim, Sung Soo; Choi, Chang Ho [Sunlin Presbyterian Hospital, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-15

    To evaluate the sonographic findings and the diagnostic value of colonic diverticulitis. We evaluated the sonograms of 26 patients with colonic diverticulitis retrospectively. The final diagnosis was based on the pathologic interpretation of a surgical specimen (5 cases), clinical course (21 cases), on barium enema (12 cases) and colonoscopy (1 case). Twenty-five patients had acute diverticulitis in the cecum and 1 patient in the descending colon. On sonography, an oval or short tubular focus which protruded from the colonic wall was seen in 23 patients (88%) and the longest diameter were from 0.5 cm to 3 cm (mean 1.4cm). The lesions were echogenic in 8 cases and hypoechoic in 17 cases. Segmental thickening of the colonic wall was seen in 13 patients (50%), of these, protruding focus was seen in 92%. Pericolic abscess located inposterolateral and medial portion to the colon was seen in 11 patients (42%). Infiltration in pericolic fat(50%), enlargement of pericolic lymph nodes (27%) and small pericolic fluid (8%) were also seen. Our results show that ultrasonography is useful technique in the diagnosis of colonic diverticulitis and in the differentiation from acute appendicitis

  7. Staphylococcus aureus paplitimas hospitalizavimo laikotarpiu

    OpenAIRE

    Maželienė, Žaneta; Kaukėnienė, Renata; Antuševas, Aleksandras; Pavilonis, Alvydas

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus strains among hospitalized patients at the beginning of their hospitalization and during their treatment and the resistance of strains to antibiotics, and to evaluate epidemiologic characteristics of these strains. Patients and methods. Sixty-one patients treated at the Department of Cardiac, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery were examined. Identification of Staphylococcus aureus strains was performed using plasmacoagulase and DNase ...

  8. Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) isolates of swine origin form robust biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization of livestock animals is common and prevalence rates for pigs have been reported to be as high as 49%. One hypothesis to explain the high prevalence of MRSA in swine herds is the ability of these organisms to exist as biofilms. To invest...

  9. Food compounds inhibit Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and the toxicity of Staphylococcus Enterotoxin A (SEA) associated with atopic dermatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atopic dermatitis or eczema is characterized by skin rashes and itching is an inflammatory disease that affects 10-20% of children and 1-3% of adults. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are present on the skin of nearly all patients with atopic dermatitis. Antibiotics that suppress colonization of S. au...

  10. Detection of alpha-toxin and other virulence factors in biofilms of staphylococcus aureus on polystyrene and a human epidermalmodel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. den Reijer (Martijn); J.A. Haisma (Janneke); N. Lemmens-den Toom (Nicole); J. Willemse (José); R.A. Koning; J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); D.H. Dekkers (Dick); E.J. Rijkers; A. El Ghalbzouri (Abdoelwaheb); P.H. Nibbering (Peter); W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground & Aim: The ability of Staphylococcus aureus to successfully colonize (a)biotic surfaces may be explained by biofilm formation and the actions of virulence factors. The aim of the present study was to establish the presence of 52 proteins, including virulence factors such as

  11. Predischarge postpartum methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection and group B streptococcus carriage at the individual and hospital levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parriott, Andrea M.; Brown, Joelle M.; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2014-01-01

    We sought to characterize the relationship between individual group B streptococcus (GBS) colonization and pre-discharge postpartum methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in United States women delivering at term. We also sought to examine the association between hospital GBS

  12. Evidence for Human Adaptation and Foodborne Transmission of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper; Stegger, Marc; Andersen, Paal S.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the evolution and epidemiology of a novel live-stock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain, which colonizes and infects urban-dwelling Danes even without a Danish animal reservoir. Genetic evidence suggests both poultry and human adaptation, with poultry meat...

  13. An Act of Colonization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anders Bo

    When Gideon Welles, U.S. Secretary of the Navy, sat down to write his diary entry on September 26, 1862, his thoughts turned once more to colonization. President Lincoln was an ardent proponent of colonization, “the government-promoted settlement of black Americans in Africa or some other locatio...... in the island of St. Croix,” and the Lincoln administration’s continued exploration of colonization arrangements in subsequent years, no further negotiations were carried out at that time and no laborers in American custody were shipped to St. Croix. This paper attempts to answer why....

  14. Human Colon-Derived Soluble Factors Modulate Gut Microbiota Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Hevia, Arancha; Bernardo, David; Montalvillo, Enrique; Al-Hassi, Hafid O.; Fernández-Salazar, Luis; Garrote, Jose A.; Milani, Christian; Ventura, Marco; Arranz, Eduardo; Knight, Stella C.; Margolles, Abelardo; Sánchez, Borja

    2015-01-01

    The commensal microbiota modulates immunological and metabolic aspects of the intestinal mucosa contributing to development of human gut diseases including inflammatory bowel disease. The host/microbiota interaction often referred to as a crosstalk, mainly focuses on the effect of the microbiota on the host neglecting effects that the host could elicit on the commensals. Colonic microenvironments from three human healthy controls (obtained from the proximal and distal colon, both in resting c...

  15. Immunological role of nasal staphylococcus aureus carriage in patients with persistent allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Yousif Atia

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Nasal carriage of staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus exerts immunomodulatory effect in patients with atopic dermatitis and it may contribute to airway inflammation and allergic response in patients with allergic rhinitis. We Aim to investigate the frequency of nasal S.aureus carriage in patients with persistent allergic rhinitis and its possible influence on their symptoms and immune markers. We chosed 20 non smoker patients with house dust mite (HDM allergy causing allergic rhinitis and 20 non smoker healthy subjects matched for age and sex. For all subjects rhinoscopy was done, skin prick test, nasal culture for S.aureus, nasal interleukin 4,nasal total IgE, serum total IgE and serum specific IgE(SSIgE for HDM. Nasal S.aureus was detected in 16/20 patients (80% and 5/20 (25% in healthy subjects with highly significant statistical difference plt0.01. Correlation of nasal staph.aureus count and different systemic and local immune markers revealed highly significant positive correlation between nasal S.aureus count and serum total IgE (r = 0.78, plt0.01 and significant positive correlation with SSIgE (HDM (r = 0.53, plt0.05, nasal total IgE (r = 0.39, plt0.05 and nasal IL-4 (r = 0.55, plt0.05. Nasal staph.aureus actively modulated the immune reaction in persistent allergic rhinitis patients by promoting local IgE production, so we recommend early detection and treatment of S.aureus carriage in patients

  16. Quantification and variability in colonic volume with a novel magnetic resonance imaging method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, M; Sandberg, Thomas Holm; Poulsen, Jakob Lykke

    2015-01-01

    /ascending colon, transverse, descending, and rectosigmoid colon) between two observations (separated by 52 ± 10) days was assessed in 25 healthy males and the effect of defecation on segmental colorectal volumes was studied in another seven healthy males. KEY RESULTS: No significant differences between the two...... observations were detected for any segments (All p > 0.05). Inter-individual variability varied across segments from low correlation in cecum/ascending colon (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.44) to moderate correlation in the descending colon (ICC = 0.61) and high correlation in the transverse...

  17. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus in post-earthquake northern Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Marnie E; Mediavilla, Jose; Chen, Liang; Sonnenfeld, Julian; Pierce, Logan; Shannon, Alexander; Boucher, Helen; Pearlmutter, Mark; Kreiswirth, Barry; Kuo, Yen-Hong; Previl, Harold; Rojtman, Albert

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of nasal carriage is important in predicting staphylococcal infection, and no information exists regarding the endemicity of Staphylococcus aureus in Haiti. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of S. aureus nasal screening in an acute care, a subacute rehabilitation, and a community setting, with a brief medical and epidemiological history. PCR-positive S. aureus screening nasal cultures underwent molecular analysis for spa type, SCCmec type, and virulence genes (Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST), and arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME)), and were evaluated for antibiotic susceptibility using commercial tests. Overall carriage rates of 8.4% methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and 2.8% methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were identified, with a high rate of tetracycline resistance. TSST and PVL genes were identified in MSSA. MRSA isolates contained no virulence markers. Unique MSSA phenotypes (i.e., linezolid-resistant, vancomycin-sensitive/daptomycin non-susceptible) were identified, as were two PVL-positive ST152 MSSA colonization isolates, previously geographically limited to Africa. We found a low S. aureus carriage rate with complete vancomycin susceptibility and high tetracycline resistance, which has important public health implications with regard to treatment. Additionally, the finding of PVL-positive MSSA isolates, including the expansion of a previously described limited 'divergent' clone, ST152, warrants further evaluation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. The Staphylococcus aureus α-Acetolactate Synthase ALS Confers Resistance to Nitrosative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M. Carvalho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a worldwide pathogen that colonizes the human nasal cavity and is a major cause of respiratory and cutaneous infections. In the nasal cavity, S. aureus thrives with high concentrations of nitric oxide (NO produced by the innate immune effectors and has available for growth slow-metabolizing free hexoses, such as galactose. Here, we have used deep sequencing transcriptomic analysis (RNA-Seq and 1H-NMR to uncover how S. aureus grown on galactose, a major carbon source present in the nasopharynx, survives the deleterious action of NO. We observed that, like on glucose, S. aureus withstands high concentrations of NO when using galactose. Data indicate that this resistance is, most likely, achieved through a distinct metabolism that relies on the increased production of amino acids, such as glutamate, threonine, and branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs. Moreover, we found that under NO stress the S. aureus α-acetolactate synthase (ALS enzyme, which converts pyruvate into α-acetolactate, plays an important role. ALS is proposed to prevent intracellular acidification, to promote the production of BCAAs and the activation of the TCA cycle. Additionally, ALS is shown to contribute to the successful infection of murine macrophages. Furthermore, ALS contributes to the resistance of S. aureus to beta-lactam antibiotics such as methicillin and oxacillin.

  19. Primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: congruence with antimicrobial resistance found in commensal Staphylococcus aureus in the community

    OpenAIRE

    van Bijnen, Evelien ME; Paget, W John; den Heijer, Casper DJ; Stobberingh, Ellen E; Bruggeman, Cathrien A; Schellevis, François G

    2014-01-01

    Background Over 90% of antibiotics for human use in Europe are prescribed in primary care. We assessed the congruence between primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections and commensal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antimicrobial resistance levels in community-dwelling persons. Methods The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in S. aureus was analysed by taking nose swabs from healthy primary care patients in nine European countries (total N = 32,032). Primary care treatment gui...

  20. Primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections in Europe: congruence with antimicrobial resistance found in commensal Staphylococcus aureus in the community

    OpenAIRE

    Bijnen, E.M. van; Paget, W.J.; Heijer, C. den; Stobberingh, E.E.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.; team, A.s.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over 90% of antibiotics for human use in Europe are prescribed in primary care. We assessed the congruence between primary care treatment guidelines for skin infections and commensal Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) antimicrobial resistance levels in community-dwelling persons. METHODS: The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in S. aureus was analysed by taking nose swabs from healthy primary care patients in nine European countries (total N = 32,032). Primary care treatment g...

  1. Persistence of nasal colonization with human pathogenic bacteria and associated antimicrobial resistance in the German general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Köck

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nares represent an important bacterial reservoir for endogenous infections. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of nasal colonization by different important pathogens, the associated antimicrobial susceptibility and risk factors. We performed a prospective cohort study among 1878 nonhospitalized volunteers recruited from the general population in Germany. Participants provided nasal swabs at three time points (each separated by 4–6 months. Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacteriaceae and important nonfermenters were cultured and subjected to susceptibility testing. Factors potentially influencing bacterial colonization patterns were assessed. The overall prevalence of S. aureus, Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermenters was 41.0, 33.4 and 3.7%, respectively. Thirteen participants (0.7% were colonized with methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Enterobacteriaceae were mostly (>99% susceptible against ciprofloxacin and carbapenems (100%. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing isolates were not detected among Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Several lifestyle- and health-related factors (e.g. household size, travel, livestock density of the residential area or occupational livestock contact, atopic dermatitis, antidepressant or anti-infective drugs were associated with colonization by different microorganisms. This study unexpectedly demonstrated high nasal colonization rates with Enterobacteriaceae in the German general population, but rates of antibiotic resistance were low. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus carriage was rare but highly associated with occupational livestock contact.

  2. Understanding Antegrade Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery Understanding Antegrade Colonic Enema (ACE) Surgery Antegrade colonic enema surgery (ACE) or Malone ... Print Full Article What is antegrade colonic enema (ACE) surgery? Antegrade colonic enema surgery (ACE) or Malone ...

  3. Healthy Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weight Gain Losing Weight Getting Started Improving Your Eating Habits Keeping It Off Healthy Eating for a Healthy ... or "program". It's about lifestyle changes in daily eating and exercise habits. Success Stories They did it. So can you! ...

  4. Healthy Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... recreational water activities like swimming, also helps promote healthy living. Often, water’s vital role is most apparent during an emergency or disaster. We launched the Healthy Water website to provide answers to your water- ...

  5. Phenotypic variation of colonic motor functions in chronic constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Karthik; Bharucha, Adil E; Camilleri, Michael; Rhoten, Deborah; Bakken, Timothy; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2010-01-01

    Colonic motor disturbances in chronic constipation (CC) are heterogeneous and incompletely understood; the relationship between colonic transit and motor activity is unclear. We sought to characterize the phenotypic variability in chronic constipation. Fasting and postprandial colonic tone and phasic activity and pressure-volume relationships were assessed by a barostat manometric assembly in 35 healthy women and 111 women with CC who had normal colon transit (NTC; n = 25), slow transit (STC; n = 19), and defecatory disorders with normal (DD-normal; n = 34) or slow transit (DD-slow; n = 33). Logistic regression models assessed whether motor parameters could discriminate among these groups. Among CC, phenotypes were characterized by principal components analysis of these measurements. Compared with 10th percentile values in healthy subjects, fasting and/or postprandial colonic tone and/or compliance were reduced in 40% with NTC, 47% with STC, 53% with DD-normal, and 42% with DD-slow transit. Compared with healthy subjects, compliance was reduced (P motor dysfunctions, even in NTC. Colonic motor assessments allow chronic constipation to be characterized into phenotypes. Further studies are needed to evaluate the relationship among these phenotypes, enteric neuropathology, and response to treatment in CC. Copyright 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mucinous adenocarcinoma of colon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zamir, Naima; Ahmed, Soofia; Akhtar, Jamshed

    2010-01-01

    .... Underlying colorectal carcinoma is a rare cause and carries a poor prognosis. We report two cases of mucinous adenocarcinoma of colon, one in a 9 years old male and other in a female of 12 years...

  7. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from retail chicken carcasses and pet workers in Northwest Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanning, Irene; Gilmore, David; Pendleton, Sean; Fleck, Scott; Clement, Ashley; Park, Si Hong; Scott, Erin; Ricke, Steven C

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can be carried on the skin and nasal passages of humans and animals as a commensal. A case of human methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection resulting from contact with pork has been reported. Poultry carcasses are sold at retail with the skin intact, but pork and beef typically are not. Thus, the risk of methicillin-resistant S. aureus human infection from whole raw poultry carcasses may be greater than that of exposure from pork or beef. The objective of this study was to isolate and characterize S. aureus from whole retail poultry carcasses and compare the isolates to S. aureus isolates from humans. A total of 25 S. aureus isolates were collected from 222 whole poultry carcasses. The isolates were characterized phenotypically with antibiotic resistance disc diffusion assays and genotypically using multilocus sequence typing. A total of 17 S. aureus isolates obtained from healthy humans were included and characterized in the same way as the poultry isolates. Staphylococcus spp. were recovered from all poultry carcasses. Only 25 poultry carcasses (11.2%) were contaminated with S. aureus. Of these 25 isolates, 36% were resistant to at least one of the antibiotics tested and 20% were resistant to two or more antibiotics tested. However, 100% of the human isolates were resistant to at least one of the antibiotics and 94% were resistant to two or more antibiotics. The results of the multilocus sequence typing indicate that most of the isolates grouped according to source. These results indicate a low prevalence of S. aureus present in poultry, and the isolates were not phenotypically similar to human isolates. The low number of S. aureus isolates from this study indicates that chicken carcasses would appear to not be a significant source of this bacterium.

  8. Whole-genome regulation analysis of histone H3 lysin 27 trimethylation in subclinical mastitis cows infected by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yanghua; Song, Minyan; Zhang, Yi; Li, Xizhi; Song, Jiuzhou; Zhang, Yuan; Yu, Ying

    2016-08-08

    S. aureus is one of the major etiological agents causing bovine subclinical mastitis. The regulatory effects of H3K27me3 on gene expression in subclinical S. aureus mastitis cows are unknown. This study aimed to profile genome-wide transcriptional changes regulated by H3K27me3 in bovine lymphocytes applied in subclinical S. aureus mastitis cows and healthy controls. A total of 61 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected in subclinical S. aureus mastitis cows compared to the healthy controls, of which 25 DEGs are up-regulated and the rest are down-regulated genes in subclinical S.aureus mastitis cows. The up-regulated genes are mainly involved in the Jak-STAT signaling pathway, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, and T cell receptor-signaling pathway, while the down-regulated genes are related to metabolism pathways. Combination analysis of histone methylation and gene expression revealed that H3K27 trimethylation levels in silent genes were higher in subclinical S. aureus mastitis cattle than in healthy cows. The key regions of H3K27me3 target genes related to subclinical S. aureus mastitis were the upstream 2 kb regions of the DEGs relative to transcription start site (TSS). The current study provides a novel insight into the interaction between S. aureus and lymphocytes in lactating cows by histone H3 methylation regulation. The differentially expressed genes in bovine lymphocytes regulated by H3K27me3 on upstream 2 kb regions (IL10, PTX3 and etc.) may relate to S. aureus mastitis susceptibility and could be considered as key candidate genes for anti- S. aureus mastitis study and breeding.

  9. Rapid control of a methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak in a medical surgical intensive care unit (ICU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Anjum; Lampitoc, Marianita; Salaripour, Maryam; McKernan, Patricia; Devlin, Roslyn; Muller, Matthew P

    2009-01-01

    Outbreaks of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the intensive care unit setting can be prolonged and difficult to control. This report describes the rapid control of an outbreak of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a 24-bed open-concept medical surgical intensive care unit with a baseline methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus acquisition rate of 1.5 cases per 1000 patient days. This institution's infection control policy mandates an outbreak investigation if two cases of hospital-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization or infection are identified in an intensive care unit within a four-week period. In July 2007, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was identified in the sputum of two patients within a one-week period. Screening of all patients in the intensive care unit identified one additional case and a fourth case was identified from a clinical specimen before control measures were implemented. Initial control measures included healthcare worker education, enhanced surveillance, patient cohorting, and enhanced environmental cleaning. Despite these measures, three more cases occurred. All patients were then placed in contact isolation, healthcare workers were screened, and the nursing staff was cohorted. After two weeks without a case, two additional cases were identified. Decolonization of all positive patients was initiated. No further cases occurred over a five-week period and the outbreak was declared over. The outbreak resulted in nine cases of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization (n = 8) or infection (n = 1) over an 11-week period. Only one of 175 healthcare workers was colonized and it was not the outbreak strain. Early detection and the stepwise addition of infection control measures resulted in the rapid control of an outbreak of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a medical surgical intensive care unit without unit closure. A low threshold of suspicion and

  10. Metastatic Spreading of Community Acquired Staphylococcus aureus Bacteraemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 29-year-old woman presented to the Fondazione IRCCS “Cà Granda” Ospedale Maggiore, a tertiary care university hospital in Milan (Italy, with skin lesions, fever, myalgia, joint pain and swelling, and a one-week history of low back pain. The diagnosis was Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus bacteraemia spreading to skin, bones, and joints and a lumbosacral epidural abscess L5-S2. Neither initial focus nor predisposing conditions were apparent. The antibiotic therapy was prolonged for six-weeks with the resolution of fever, skin lesions, articular inflammation, and the epidural abscess. Community-acquired S. aureus infections can affect patients without traditional healthcare-associated risk factors, and community acquisition is a risk-factor for the development of complications. Raised awareness of S. aureus bacteraemia, also in patients without healthcare-associated risk factors, is important in the diagnosis, management, and control of this infection, because failure to recognise patients with serious infection and lack of understanding of empirical antimicrobial selection are associated with a high mortality rate in otherwise healthy people.

  11. Variation in Candida albicans EFG1 expression enables host-dependent changes in colonizing fungal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Jessica V; Kumamoto, Carol A

    2012-01-01

    To understand differences in host-Candida albicans interactions that occur during colonization of healthy or compromised hosts, production of phenotypic variants and colonization of healthy or immunodeficient mice by C. albicans were studied. We showed that activity of the transcription factor Efg1p exhibited cell-to-cell variability and identified Efg1p as a major regulator of colonization. In C. albicans populations colonizing the murine gastrointestinal tract, average expression of EFG1 differed depending on the immune status of the host. We propose that cellular heterogeneity in Efg1p activity allows the C. albicans colonizing population to differ depending on the immune status of the host, because selective pressure from a healthy host alters the composition of the population. These data are the first demonstration that differences in host immune status are associated with differences in gene expression in colonizing C. albicans cells. Altered gene expression in organisms colonizing immunocompromised hosts may begin the transition of C. albicans from a commensal to a pathogen. In healthy people, the fungus Candida albicans colonizes the gastrointestinal tract and other sites without producing obvious pathology. In an immunocompromised patient, the organism can cause serious disease. The demonstration that the expression and activity of the C. albicans transcription factor Efg1p differs during colonization of healthy or immunocompromised mice shows that the organism adjusts its physiology when colonizing different hosts. Further, the effects of a healthy host on a heterogeneous C. albicans population containing cells with different levels of Efg1p activity show that selective pressure in the host can change the makeup of the population, allowing the population to respond to host immune status. The ability to sense host status may be key to the ability of C. albicans to colonize as a harmless commensal in some hosts but become a deadly pathogen in others.

  12. Active immunization with an octa-valent Staphylococcus aureus antigen mixture in models of S. aureus bacteremia and skin infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne van den Berg

    Full Text Available Proteomic studies with different Staphylococcus aureus isolates have shown that the cell surface-exposed and secreted proteins IsaA, LytM, Nuc, the propeptide of Atl (pro-Atl and four phenol-soluble modulins α (PSMα are invariantly produced by this pathogen. Therefore the present study was aimed at investigating whether these proteins can be used for active immunization against S. aureus infection in mouse models of bacteremia and skin infection. To this end, recombinant His-tagged fusions of IsaA, LytM, Nuc and pro-Atl were isolated from Lactococcus lactis or Escherichia coli, while the PSMα1-4 peptides were chemically synthesized. Importantly, patients colonized by S. aureus showed significant immunoglobulin G (IgG responses against all eight antigens. BALB/cBYJ mice were immunized subcutaneously with a mixture of the antigens at day one (5 μg each, and boosted twice (25 μg of each antigen with 28 days interval. This resulted in high IgG responses against all antigens although the response against pro-Atl was around one log lower compared to the other antigens. Compared to placebo-immunized mice, immunization with the octa-valent antigen mixture did not reduce the S. aureus isolate P load in blood, lungs, spleen, liver, and kidneys in a bacteremia model in which the animals were challenged for 14 days with a primary load of 3 × 10(5 CFU. Discomfort scores and animal survival rates over 14 days did not differ between immunized mice and placebo-immunized mice upon bacteremia with S. aureus USA300 (6 × 10(5 CFU. In addition, this immunization did not reduce the S. aureus isolate P load in mice with skin infection. These results show that the target antigens are immunogenic in both humans and mice, but in the used animal models do not result in protection against S. aureus infection.

  13. An immunological assay for identification of potential biofilm-associated antigens of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waryah, Charlene Babra; Gogoi-Tiwari, Jully; Wells, Kelsi; Mukkur, Trilochan

    2016-11-01

    Attachment of bacterial pathogens to the niche tissue in the host is the first step in biofilm formation leading to colonization and establishment of infection in the host. While the most common method used for determining the potential role of a bacterial antigen in biofilm formation has been demonstration of loss of this property using specific knockout mutants, it is an expensive and a laborious procedure. This study describes an alternative immunological assay for identification of attachment antigens of Staphylococcus aureus, potentially important in the development of an effective vaccine against infections caused by this pathogen. The method is based upon the concept of inhibition of attachment of S. aureus to PEGs coated with virulence antigen-specific antibodies. Antibodies used for validation of this assay were specific for ClfA, FnBPA, SdrD, PNAG and α-toxin, accredited biofilm-associated antigens of S. aureus.

  14. Adhesion, invasion and evasion: the many functions of the surface proteins of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Timothy J.; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Ganesh, Vannakambadi K.; Höök, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important opportunistic pathogen and persistently colonizes about 20% of the human population. Its surface is ‘decorated’ with proteins that are covalently anchored to the cell wall peptidoglycan. Structural and functional analysis has identified four distinct classes of surface proteins, of which microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) are the largest class. These surface proteins have numerous functions, including adhesion to and invasion of host cells and tissues, evasion of immune responses and biofilm formation. Thus, cell wall-anchored proteins are essential virulence factors for the survival of S. aureus in the commensal state and during invasive infections, and targeting them with vaccines could combat S. aureus infections. PMID:24336184

  15. Adhesion, invasion and evasion: the many functions of the surface proteins of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Timothy J; Geoghegan, Joan A; Ganesh, Vannakambadi K; Höök, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important opportunistic pathogen and persistently colonizes about 20% of the human population. Its surface is 'decorated' with proteins that are covalently anchored to the cell wall peptidoglycan. Structural and functional analysis has identified four distinct classes of surface proteins, of which microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) are the largest class. These surface proteins have numerous functions, including adhesion to and invasion of host cells and tissues, evasion of immune responses and biofilm formation. Thus, cell wall-anchored proteins are essential virulence factors for the survival of S. aureus in the commensal state and during invasive infections, and targeting them with vaccines could combat S. aureus infections.

  16. Epidemiology and population structure of Staphylococcus aureus in various population groups from a rural and semi urban area in Gabon, Central Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ateba Ngoa, Ulysse; Schaumburg, Frieder; Adegnika, Ayola Akim; Kösters, Katrin; Möller, Tina; Fernandes, Jose Francisco; Alabi, Abraham; Issifou, Saadou; Becker, Karsten; Grobusch, Martin Peter; Kremsner, Peter Gottfried; Lell, Bertrand

    2012-01-01

    Little data is available on the epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus in Africa. In the present study we aim at characterizing the population structure of S. aureus in healthy subjects from a rural and a semi-urban area in Lambarene, Gabon as well as in hospital staff and inpatients. In total, 500

  17. Prevalence of ST9 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus among Pigs and Pig Handlers in Malaysia▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neela, Vasanthakumari; Mohd Zafrul, Arif; Mariana, Nor Shamsudin; van Belkum, Alex; Liew, Yun Khoon; Rad, Ehsanollah Ghaznavi

    2009-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) of sequence type 398 (ST398) has frequently been detected in pigs and pig handlers. However, in Malaysia, sampling 360 pigs and 90 pig handlers from 30 farms identified novel ST9-spa type t4358-staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type V MRSA strains that were found to transiently colonize more than 1% of pigs and 5.5% of pig handlers. PMID:19812280

  18. Alpha-Toxin Is Required for Biofilm Formation by Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Caiazza, Nicky C.; O'Toole, G. A.

    2003-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common pathogen associated with nosocomial infections. It can persist in clinical settings and gain increased resistance to antimicrobial agents through biofilm formation. We have found that alpha-toxin, a secreted, multimeric, hemolytic toxin encoded by the hla gene, plays an integral role in biofilm formation. The hla mutant was unable to fully colonize plastic surfaces under both static and flow conditions. Based on microscopy studies, we propose that alpha-hemol...

  19. Effects of propolis on Streptococcus mutans, Actinomyces naeslundii and Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Park, YK; Koo, MH; Ikegaki, M; Cury, JA; Rosalen, PL

    1998-01-01

    It is known that formation of dental caries is caused by the colonization and accumulation of oral microorganisms and extracellular polysaccharides which are synthesized from sucrose by glucosyltransferases of Streptococcus mutans. Actinomyces naeslundii and Staphylococcus aureus are associated with human root caries and some oral mucosa infections, respectively. In this research Streptococcus mutans Ingbritt 1600 exhibiting glucosyltransferase activity was used to test whether different etha...

  20. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus pada Penderita Dermatitis Atopik dan Sensitivitasnya terhadap Mupirosin Dibandingkan dengan Gentamisin

    OpenAIRE

    Keni Istasaputri M.; Endang Sutedja; Oki Suwarsa; Sunarjati Sudigdoadi

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is found in moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (AD) and is multiresistant against topical antibiotic. Gentamycin is widely used while mupirocin is the first line therapy to eliminate MRSA. This research is intended to observe the colonization of MSRA case in AD patients and its sensitivity to mupirocin compared to gentamycin in Dermato-venereology Clinic Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. An analytical cross sectional survey was in...

  1. State of cavity microbiota of the colon in breastfed children with acute enterocolitis with infection of breast milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.I. Sydorchuk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite the significant progress made in the field of acute enterocolitis in children, many questions of etiology, pathogenesis, microecological relations, formation of intestinal dysbacteriosis/dysbiosis and taxonomic composition and population level of major, additional and accidental microbiota of intestinal microbiocenosis and other issues of enterocolitis require study, taking into account bacteriological and immunological researches of today. This is especially related to the children one to six months of age (who are breastfed with enterocolitis. Normally, breast milk is sterile, but during the inflammatory process in breast, it can be infected, so the disease have a threat to a child fed with this milk, and there is a threat to the life of the mother. The first reaction to such feeding will be from a side of cavity microbiota of the colon that characterizes the relevance of study of the colon microbiota in infants suffering from enterocolitis. Materials and methods. Contents of colon cavity of 53 children one to six months of age with enterocolitis (control — 35 children, who were breastfed, and, in fact, breast milk, by which the children were fed, underwent bacteriological and mycological examination. Results. To reveal the mechanisms of contamination of the colon in children one to six months of age, in patients with acute enterocolitis there has been used ecological method that revealed the specific characteristics of coexistence of taxons in ecosystem “host-microbiota” and identified the direction of disorders of colon microecology on the background of acute enterocolitis in children, who were fed by breast milk infected with bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus. The results of bacteriological studies have shown that in 49 (92.45 % patients Staphylococcus aureus was isolated and identified, and in 4 (7.55 % women — Staphylococcus epidermidis. Population level of the selected strains was 3.0–7.0 lg CFU/ml (M

  2. Molecular Typing of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Patients with Autosomal Dominant Hyper IgE Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inka Sastalla

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant hyper IgE syndrome (AD-HIES is a primary immunodeficiency caused by a loss-of-function mutation in the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3. This immune disorder is clinically characterized by increased susceptibility to cutaneous and sinopulmonary infections, in particular with Candida and Staphylococcus aureus. It has recently been recognized that the skin microbiome of patients with AD-HIES is altered with an overrepresentation of certain Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive staphylococci. However, these alterations have not been characterized at the species- and strain-level. Since S. aureus infections are influenced by strain-specific expression of virulence factors, information on colonizing strain characteristics may provide insights into host-pathogen interactions and help guide management strategies for treatment and prophylaxis. The aim of this study was to determine whether the immunodeficiency of AD-HIES selects for unique strains of colonizing S. aureus. Using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST, protein A (spa typing, and PCR-based detection of toxin genes, we performed a detailed analysis of the S. aureus isolates (n = 13 found on the skin of twenty-one patients with AD-HIES. We found a low diversity of sequence types, and an abundance of strains that expressed methicillin resistance, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, and staphylococcal enterotoxins K and Q (SEK, SEQ. Our results indicate that patients with AD-HIES may often carry antibiotic-resistant strains that harbor key virulence factors.

  3. Application of a Novel "Pan-Genome"-Based Strategy for Assigning RNAseq Transcript Reads to Staphylococcus aureus Strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Chaves-Moreno

    Full Text Available Understanding the behaviour of opportunistic pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus in their natural human niche holds great medical interest. With the development of sensitive molecular methods and deep-sequencing technology, it is now possible to robustly assess the global transcriptome of bacterial species in their human habitat. However, as the genomes of the colonizing strains are often not available compiling the pan-genome for the species of interest may provide an effective method to reliably and rapidly compile the transcriptome of a bacterial species. The pan-genome of S. aureus and its associated core and accessory components were compiled based on 25 genomes and comprises a total of 65,557 proteins clustering into 4,198 Orthologous Groups (OGs. The generated gene catalogue was used to assign RNAseq-derived sequence reads to S. aureus in a variety of in vitro and in vivo samples. In all cases, the number of reads that could be assigned to S. aureus was greater using the OG database than using a reference genome. Growth of two S. aureus strains in synthetic nasal medium confirmed that both strains experienced strong iron starvation. Traits such as purine metabolism appeared to be more affected in a typical nasal colonizer than in a strain representative of the S. aureus USA300 lineage. Mapping sequencing reads from a metatranscriptome generated from the human anterior nares allowed the identification of genes highly expressed by S. aureus in vivo. The OG database generated in this study represents a useful tool to obtain a snapshot of the functional attributes of S. aureus under different in vitro and in vivo conditions. The approach proved to be advantageous to assign sequencing reads to bacterial strains when RNAseq data is derived from samples where strain information and/or the corresponding genome/s are unavailable.

  4. Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Transmission in a Ghanaian Burn Unit: The Importance of Active Surveillance in Resource-Limited Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Ama Amissah

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:Staphylococcus aureus infections in burn patients can lead to serious complications and death. The frequency of S. aureus infection is high in low- and middle-income countries presumably due to limited resources, misuse of antibiotics and poor infection control. The objective of the present study was to apply population genomics to precisely define, for the first time, the transmission of antibiotic resistant S. aureus in a resource-limited setting in sub-Saharan Africa.Methods:Staphylococcus aureus surveillance was performed amongst burn patients and healthcare workers during a 7-months survey within the burn unit of the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Ghana.Results: Sixty-six S. aureus isolates (59 colonizing and 7 clinical were obtained from 31 patients and 10 healthcare workers. Twenty-one of these isolates were ST250-IV methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. Notably, 25 (81% of the 31 patients carried or were infected with S. aureus within 24 h of admission. Genome comparisons revealed six distinct S. aureus clones circulating in the burn unit, and demonstrated multiple transmission events between patients and healthcare workers. Further, the collected S. aureus isolates exhibited a wide range of genotypic resistances to antibiotics, including trimethoprim (21%, aminoglycosides (33%, oxacillin (33%, chloramphenicol (50%, tetracycline (59% and fluoroquinolones (100%.Conclusion: Population genomics uncovered multiple transmission events of S. aureus, especially MRSA, within the investigated burn unit. Our findings highlight lapses in infection control and prevention, and underscore the great importance of active surveillance to protect burn victims against multi-drug resistant pathogens in resource-limited settings.

  5. Prevalence of and risk factors associated with the presence of Staphylococcus aureus in the chronic wounds of patients treated in primary health care settings in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Patricia Lino Pereira-Franchi

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: Wounds can be colonized by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. METHODS: We evaluated the prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA in the wounds of patients treated at Basic Health Units in Brazil and identified risk factors associated with their presence. RESULTS: The prevalence rates of S. aureus and MRSA were 51.5% and 8.7%, respectively. There was a correlation between the presence of S. aureus in wounds and nostrils (p<0.01. A positive association was detected between S. aureus infection and previous benzylpenicillin use (p=0.02. No associations were observed for MRSA. CONCLUSIONS: Multidrug-resistant pathogens are present in primary healthcare settings in Brazil.

  6. Scintigraphic measurement of colonic transit in patients with idiopathic constipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, K. H.; Kim, C. K. [College of Medicine, Wonkwang Univ., Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate usefulness of scintigraphic measurement of total and regional colonic transit in patients with idiopathic constipation. 25 patients who were complained chronic constipation underwent scintigraphic measurement of the total and regional colon transit. Of them 10 patients were diagnosed as idiopathic constipation, none of whom had evidence of abnormal function of the pelvic floor. Ten healthy volunteers were also studied. 67 Gallium-labelled Amberlite resin particles were ingested in a coated capsule with methacrylate that dispersed in the ileocecal region. Images were obtained using a gamma camera at regular intervals for the 2, 4, 8, 24, and 48 hours after the initial counting of the radioactivity in the cecum. We determined the geometric center in four regions of interest in the colon (ascending, transverse, descending, and rectosigmoid). Ten patients with colonic inertia showed significant retention of solid residue in the ascending and transverse colon over a 48-hour period. The median values for the healthy subjects at 2, 4, 8, and 24, and 48 hours were 1.44{+-}0.2 (midway through ascending), 1.71{+-}0.45 (midway through transverse), 2.64{+-}0.95 (midway through descending), 3.94{+-}0.89 (midway through rectosigmoid), and 4.52{+-}0.76 (midway through the stool compartment). On the contrary, the values of ten patients with colonic inertia were 1.0{+-}0.0 (midway through ascending), 1.0{+-}0.0 (midway through ascending). 1.02 {+-}0.06 (midway through ascending), 1.70{+-}0.36 (midway through transverse), and 2.33{+-}0.31(midway through descending) at the same time (p<0.001). In patients with idiopathic constipation is characterized by exaggerated reservoir factions of the ascending and transverse colons. Scintigraphy using 67 Gallium-labelled pellets seems to be a useful tool to demonstrate the delayed colonic transit in patients with colonic inertia.

  7. [Protein toxins of Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsutdinov, A F; Tiurin, Iu A

    2014-01-01

    Main scientific-research studies regarding protein bacterial toxins of the most widespread bacteria that belong to Staphylococcus spp. genus and in particular the most pathogenic species for humans--Staphylococcus aureus, are analyzed. Structural and biological properties of protein toxins that have received the name of staphylococcus pyrogenic toxins (PTSAg) are presented. Data regarding genetic regulation of secretion and synthesis of these toxins and 3 main regulatory genetic systems (agr--accessory gene regulator, xpr--extracellular protein regulator, sar--staphylococcal accessory regulator) that coordinate synthesis of the most important protein toxins and enzymes for virulence of S. aureus, are presented.

  8. Attempts to control clothes-borne infection in a burn unit, 2. Clothing routines in clinical use and the epidemiology of cross-colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransjö, U.

    1979-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that cross-contamination in a burn unit is mainly clothes-borne. New barrier garments have been designed and tried experimentally. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of different clothing routines on cross-contamination. In a long-term study, the rates and routes of colonizations with Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus groups A, B, C, F, and G and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were examined. The exogenous colonization rates were, with S. aureus 77%, with Streptococcus species 52% and with Ps. aeruginosa 32%. The colonization rate with Ps. aeruginosa was higher in patients with larger burns. Patients dispersed Streptococcus and Ps. aeruginosa as well as S. aureus into the air of their rooms in considerable amounts, but dispersers were not more important as sources of cross-colonization than non-dispersers. In comparison of clothing routines, there was no difference in overall colonization rates. The newly designed barrier garment that was made from apparently particle-tight material did not reduce the transfer of bacteria from patient to patient. A less rigid routine than that previously used did not increase the risk of cross-contamination. A thorough change of barrier dress after close contact nursing delayed the first exogenous S. aureus colonization from day 6 to day 14 after admission. This routine might be recommended for clinical use. Otherwise, methods must be developed for adequate selection of materials intended for barrier garments. Images Plate 1 PMID:109498

  9. Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Carriage among Surgical personnel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the most common causes of both community and hospital acquired bacterial infection. There is strong correlation between S aureus nasal carriage and disease progress. Nasal carriage is high among health care workers. Inappropriate usage of antibiotic may

  10. Nasal Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus and Antibiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus has been demonstrated to be a major risk factor for invasive S. aureus infections in various population including children. The extent of S. aureus carriage in Sierra Leonean children is largely unknown. To determine the prevalence and pattern of antibiotic susceptibility of nasal S.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus transmission : clinical and molecular aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemendaal, A.L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen in nosocomial infections. Up to 30% of UCI related infections are caused by S. aureus. In this thesis we explore both clinical and molecular aspects of patient-to-patient transmission of S. aureus. We performed a European ICU study exploring infection

  12. Vancomycin Sensitivity of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (MRSA), resistant to all antibiotics including Vancomycin, has been reported in Japan, USA, Canada and Brazil. Hence, the main objective of this study was to evaluate the possible presence of Vancomycin resistant or intermediate S.aureus in Karachi. A total of 850 ...

  13. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowash, Madeleine G.; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has changed the landscape of S. aureus infections around the globe. Initially recognized for its ability to cause disease in young and healthy individuals without healthcare exposures as well as for its distinct genotype and phenotype, this original description no longer fully encompasses the diversity of CA-MRSA as it continues to expand its niche. Using four case studies, we highlight a wide range of the clinical presentations and challenges of CA-MRSA. Based on these cases we further explore the globally polygenetic background of CA-MRSA with a special emphasis on generally less characterized populations. PMID:24085688

  14. CT findings of colonic diverticulitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Shigeru; Ohba, Satoru [Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Medical School; Mizutani, Masaru [and others

    1998-11-01

    Although colonic diverticulitis has no indication for operation, but in some mistaken cases were operated with a diagnosis of acute appendicitis. We evaluated the CT findings of colonic diverticulitis about 19 cases and of asymptomatic colonic diverticula about 15 cases retrospectively. Diagnosis was confirmed of barium enema and operation. CT are complementary methods of examination that can delineated the range of thickening of the colon and the extension of inflammatory changes around the colon. We also believe that CT findings of colonic diverticulitis are useful for differentiating from a diagnosis of appendicitis. (author)

  15. Recent trend of colonic diverticulosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yae Soon; Lee, Sung Woo; Han, Chang Yul; Lee, Kwan Seh [Inje Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-08-15

    Colonic Diverticulosis is once thought to be a rare disease in Korea compared with western countries, but the incidence has been increasing with passage of time. Authors reviewed 151 cases of colon study with new double contrast method performed from November, 1986 to March, 1987 at Paik Hospital Inje college. The results were as follow: 1. The colonic diverticulosis was found in 39 cases out of 151 colon study (25.8%). 2. Colonic Diverticulosis were located at right and transvercolon in 54% and left and sigmoid colon in 18%. 3. Increasing occurrence in younger age group predilection; 4th decade was observed.

  16. Healthy Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the Flu Vaccine? Eating Disorders Arrhythmias Healthy Eating KidsHealth > For Parents > Healthy Eating Print A A A What's in this article? ... best strategies to improve nutrition and encourage smart eating habits: Have regular family meals . Serve a variety ...

  17. Healthy Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... there are many healthy ways to cope with stress. A diabetes educator will help you find healthy ways to ... you figure out a plan for coping with stress, here: English Version Spanish Version In This Section Living with Diabetes How a Diabetes Educator Can Help You Been ...

  18. Colonic transit time is related to bacterial metabolism and mucosal turnover in the gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roager, Henrik Munch; Hansen, Lea Benedicte Skov; Bahl, Martin Iain

    2016-01-01

    time in humans, assessed using radio-opaque markers, is associated with overall gut microbial composition, diversity and metabolism. We find that a long colonic transit time associates with high microbial richness and is accompanied by a shift in colonic metabolism from carbohydrate fermentation...... does not per se imply a healthy gut microbial ecosystem and points at colonic transit time as a highly important factor to consider in microbiome and metabolomics studies.......Little is known about how colonic transit time relates to human colonic metabolism and its importance for host health, although a firm stool consistency, a proxy for a long colonic transit time, has recently been positively associated with gut microbial richness. Here, we show that colonic transit...

  19. Stress Responses in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aures are prominent members of the normal flora of humans and animals, but are also a major cause of mild and severe infections. To persist and disseminate in the human host, and to survive in environmental settings, such as hospitals, S. aureus have developed a plethora of cellular...

  20. Filaments in curved streamlines: rapid formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm streamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minyoung Kevin; Drescher, Knut; Pak, On Shun; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-06-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated conglomerates of bacteria that are highly resistant to antibiotics. These bacterial communities can cause chronic infections in humans by colonizing, for example, medical implants, heart valves, or lungs. Staphylococcus aureus, a notorious human pathogen, causes some of the most common biofilm-related infections. Despite the clinical importance of S. aureus biofilms, it remains mostly unknown how physical effects, in particular flow, and surface structure influence biofilm dynamics. Here we use model microfluidic systems to investigate how environmental factors, such as surface geometry, surface chemistry, and fluid flow affect biofilm development of S. aureus. We discovered that S. aureus rapidly forms flow-induced, filamentous biofilm streamers, and furthermore if surfaces are coated with human blood plasma, streamers appear within minutes and clog the channels more rapidly than if the channels are uncoated. To understand how biofilm streamer filaments reorient in flows with curved streamlines to bridge the distances between corners, we developed a mathematical model based on resistive force theory of slender filaments. Understanding physical aspects of biofilm formation of S. aureus may lead to new approaches for interrupting biofilm formation of this pathogen.

  1. Filaments in curved flow: Rapid formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm streamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Young; Drescher, Knut; Pak, On Shun; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated conglomerates of bacteria that are highly resistant to antibiotics. These bacterial communities can cause chronic infections in humans by colonizing, for example, medical implants, heart valves, or lungs. Staphylococcus aureus, a notorious human pathogen, causes some of the most common biofilm-related infections. Despite the clinical importance of S. aureus biofilms, it remains mostly unknown how physical effects, in particular flow, and surface structure influence biofilm dynamics. Here we use model microfluidic systems to investigate how environmental factors, such as surface geometry, surface chemistry, and fluid flow affect biofilm development in S. aureus.We discovered that S. aureus rapidly forms flow-induced, filamentous biofilm streamers, and furthermore if surfaces are coated with human blood plasma, streamers appear within minutes and clog the channels more rapidly than if the channels are uncoated. To understand how biofilm streamer filaments reorient in curved flow to bridge the distances between corners, we developed a mathematical model based on resistive force theory and slender filaments. Understanding physical aspects of biofilm formation in S. aureus may lead to new approaches for interrupting biofilm formation of this pathogen.

  2. Genetic Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Retail Meat in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raji, Muhabat A; Garaween, Ghada; Ehricht, Ralf; Monecke, Stefan; Shibl, Atef M; Senok, Abiola

    2016-01-01

    Limited data exist from the Gulf Cooperation Council states on the prevalence and population dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus colonizing livestock or contaminating retail meat. This study was designed to determine the presence and genetic characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from raw retail meat sold in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Over a period of 9 months, different raw retail meat types were aseptically processed using the double broth enrichment technique, characteristic colonies from chromogenic and mannitol salt agar were further identified using conventional methods. Susceptibility to 9 antibiotics was determined using the disc diffusion technique. Interpretation of inhibition zone was done according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Molecular characterization was carried out using the StaphyType DNA microarray technology. Twenty-five meat samples yielded Staphylococcus aureus isolates. Camel meat had the highest contamination rate with Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (20%) and Methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (28%), while poultry meat had the least contamination rate with MRSA (4%). The MRSA isolates were grouped into 4 clonal complexes (CCs) namely CC1-MRSA-IV/SCCfus (n = 2), CC15-MRSA-V/SCCfus (n = 4), CC80-MRSA-IV/PVL+ (n = 5), and CC88-MRSA-IV/PVL+ (n = 2). All CC15-MRSA-V/SCCfus isolates were obtained from camel meat. This is the first study to demonstrate the novel CC15-MRSA-V/SCCfus in retail camel meat. We recommend that surveillance studies should be incorporated in public health and food hygiene programs.

  3. Candidate genes on murine chromosome 8 are associated with susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus infection in mice and are involved with Staphylococcus aureus septicemia in humans.

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    Qin Yan

    Full Text Available We previously showed that chromosome 8 of A/J mice was associated with susceptibility to S. aureus infection. However, the specific genes responsible for this susceptibility are unknown. Chromosome substitution strain 8 (CSS8 mice, which have chromosome 8 from A/J but an otherwise C57BL/6J genome, were used to identify the genetic determinants of susceptibility to S. aureus on chromosome 8. Quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping of S. aureus-infected N2 backcross mice (F1 [C8A] × C57BL/6J identified a locus 83180780-88103009 (GRCm38/mm10 on A/J chromosome 8 that was linked to S. aureus susceptibility. All genes on the QTL (n~ 102 were further analyzed by three different strategies: 1 different expression in susceptible (A/J and resistant (C57BL/6J mice only in response to S. aureus, 2 consistently different expression in both uninfected and infected states between the two strains, and 3 damaging non-synonymous SNPs in either strain. Eleven candidate genes from the QTL region were significantly differently expressed in patients with S. aureus infection vs healthy human subjects. Four of these 11 genes also exhibited significantly different expression in S. aureus-challenged human neutrophils: Ier2, Crif1, Cd97 and Lyl1. CD97 ligand binding was evaluated within peritoneal neutrophils from A/J and C57BL/6J. CD97 from A/J had stronger CD55 but weaker integrin α5β1 ligand binding as compared with C57BL/6J. Because CD55/CD97 binding regulates immune cell activation and cytokine production, and integrin α5β1 is a membrane receptor for fibronectin, which is also bound by S. aureus, strain-specific differences could contribute to susceptibility to S. aureus. Down-regulation of Crif1 with siRNA was associated with increased host cell apoptosis among both naïve and S. aureus-infected bone marrow-derived macrophages. Specific genes in A/J chromosome 8, including Cd97 and Crif1, may play important roles in host defense against S. aureus.

  4. Alpha-Toxin Promotes Mucosal Biofilm Formation by Staphylococcus aureus

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    Michele J Anderson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus causes numerous diseases in humans ranging from the mild skin infections to serious, life-threatening, superantigen-mediated Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS. S. aureus may also be asymptomatically carried in the anterior nares, vagina or on the skin, which serve as reservoirs for infection. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis clonal type USA200 is the most widely disseminated colonizer and a major cause of TSS. Our prior studies indicated that α-toxin was a major epithelial proinflammatory exotoxin produced by TSS S. aureus USA200 isolates. It also facilitated the penetration of TSS Toxin-1 (TSST-1 across vaginal mucosa. However, the majority of menstrual TSS isolates produce low α-toxin due to a nonsense point mutation at codon 113, designated hly, suggesting mucosal adaptation. The aim of this study was to characterize the differences between TSS USA200 strains [high (hla+ and low (hly+ α-toxin producers] in their abilities to infect and disrupt vaginal mucosal tissue. A mucosal model was developed using ex vivo porcine vaginal mucosa, LIVE/DEAD® staining and confocal microscropy to characterize biofilm formation and tissue viability of TSS USA 200 isolates CDC587 and MN8, which contain the α-toxin pseudogene (hly, MNPE (hla+ and MNPE isogenic hla knockout (hlaKO. All TSS strains grew to similar bacterial densities (1-5 x 108 CFU on the mucosa and were proinflammatory over 3 days. However, MNPE formed biofilms with significant reductions in the mucosal viability whereas neither CDC587, MN8 (hly+, or MNPE hlaKO, formed biofilms and were less cytotoxic. The addition of exogenous, purified α-toxin to MNPE hlaKO restored the biofilm phenotype. Our studies suggest α-toxin affects S. aureus phenotypic growth on vaginal mucosa, by promoting tissue disruption and biofilm formation; and α–toxin mutants (hly are not benign colonizers, but rather form a different type of infection, which we have termed high density pathogenic

  5. Assessment of nasal carriage of staphylococcus aureus in patients with acne vulgaris

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    Betül Demir

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Systemic antibiotics, such as tetracycline and doxycycline are used in the treatment of inflammatory forms of moderate acne, or acne that is resistant to topical treatment. Oral isotretinoin treatment is the most effective treatment option in severe papulopustular and nodular forms of acne. Dose-related nasal carrier state of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus, has been reported in 90% of patients using isotretinoin. Long-term oral and/or topical antibiotic use in the treatment of acne causes changes in antibiotic susceptibility and emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA pathogens. The present retrospective study examined the colonization rates of S. aureus in patients who had an increase in acneiform lesions while taking medications for the treatment of acne and whose nasal swap samples were obtained and also investigated their relationship with treatment options. Materials and Methods: A total of 86 patients with moderate acne who attended our dermatology outpatient clinic with the complaints of acne and in whom nasal swap samples were obtained due to increased pustules during acne therapy. The patients were divided into three groups according to the treatment methods as patients receiving topical treatment, patients treated with oral doxycycline, and patients treated with oral isotretinoin. The results of the cultures were evaluated in three groups: no growth, methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA, and MRSAisolated. Results: 39.5% culture positivity (S. aureus were determined in 34 patients. Thirty two (94.1% culture positivity were MSSA, and 2 (5.9% culture positivity were MRSA. Twenty nine (58% culture positivity were found in the patients using the oral isotretinoin. There was statistically significant culture positivity in the patients using oral isotretinoin compared to patients receiving other treatments (p<0.001. Conclusion: We observed that S. aureus colonization increased in patients using systemic

  6. Colonization, mouse-style

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    Searle Jeremy B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several recent papers, including one in BMC Evolutionary Biology, examine the colonization history of house mice. As well as background for the analysis of mouse adaptation, such studies offer a perspective on the history of movements of the humans that accidentally transported the mice. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/10/325

  7. Nosocomial transmission of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Danish Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetem, David J; Westh, Henrik; Boye, Kit

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has changed the epidemiology of MRSA infections worldwide. In contrast to hospital-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA), CA-MRSA more frequently affects healthy individuals, both with and without recent healthcare...

  8. Community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in south Florida hospital and recreational environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strains of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a frequent human pathogen, may also be found in the flora of healthy persons and in the environments that they frequent. Strains of MRSA circulating in the community classified as USA 300 are now found not only in the community but also...

  9. Nosocomial transmission of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Danish Hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hetem, D.J.; Westh, H.; Boye, K.; Jarlov, J.O.; Bonten, M.J.M.; Bootsma, M.C.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830305

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has changed the epidemiology of MRSA infections worldwide. In contrast to hospital-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA), CA-MRSA more frequently affects healthy individuals, both with and without recent

  10. Intracellular persisting Staphylococcus aureus is the major pathogen in recurrent tonsillitis.

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    Andreas E Zautner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The two major indications for tonsillectomy are recurrent tonsillitis (RT and peritonsillar abscess (PTA. Unlike PTAs, which are primarily treated surgically, RT is often cured by tonsillectomy only after a series of failed drug therapy attempts. Although the bacteriological background of RT has been studied, the reason for the lack of success of conservative therapeutic approaches is not well understood. METHODS: In a prospective study, tonsil specimens from 130 RT patients and 124 PTA patients were examined for the presence of extra- and intracellular bacteria using antibiotic protection assays. Staphylococcus aureus isolates from RT patients were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, spa-typing and MSCRAMM-gene-PCR. Their ability for biofilm formation was tested and their cell invasiveness was confirmed by a flow cytometric invasion assay (FACS, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and immunohistochemistry. FINDINGS: S. aureus was the predominant species (57.7% in RT patients, whereas Streptococcus pyogenes was most prevalent (20.2% in PTA patients. Three different assays (FACS, FISH, antibiotic protection assay showed that nearly all RT-associated S. aureus strains were located inside tonsillar cells. Correspondingly, the results of the MSCRAMM-gene-PCRs confirmed that 87% of these S. aureus isolates were invasive strains and not mere colonizers. Based upon PFGE analyses of genomic DNA and on spa-gene typing the vast majority of the S. aureus isolates belonged to different clonal lineages. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that intracellular residing S. aureus is the most common cause of RT and indicate that S. aureus uses this location to survive the effects of antibiotics and the host immune response. A German translation of the Abstract is provided as supplementary material (Abstract S1.

  11. Investigation of Nasal Staphylococcus Aureus Carriage in Intensive Care Unit and Operating Room Staff

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    Mehmet Uluğ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study, we aimed to investigate the prevalence of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in our hospital staff, and antibiotic susceptibility of these strains to methicillin and some other antibiotics. Methods: In this study, involving personnel working in operating room, neonatal and intensive care units of our hospital, nose cavity swab samples were taken from 81 subjects using cotton swabs soaked into serum physiologic. Single colony inoculation was performed on 5% sheep blood agar. The samples were incubated at 37oC for 24 hours. The Catalase and coagulase tests were performed on the strains which showed gram-positive cocci. We evaluated antimicrobial susceptibility of all S. aureus strains to oxacillin and several other antibiotics by disc diffusion method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI recommendations.. Results: Nasal S. aureus carrier was detected in 21 subjects (25.9%. Among all S. aureus isolated from nasal area, nine (11.1% were methicillin-resistance and 12 (14.8% were methicillin-susceptible S. aureus. When the occupation was considered, the carriage rates were 20.8% among doctors, 25% among auxiliary health-care workers and 29.7% among health-care workers other than doctors. There was no significant difference in carriage rate between these groups (p=0.239. The isolated strains showed no resistance to mupirocin and teicoplanin. Intranasal administration of mupirocin to all carriers for five days resulted in elimination of staphylococci with a success rate of 100%. Conclusion: According to these results, we assume that the nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant S. aureus is not an important issue in our hospital. However, it was concluded that topical mupirocin is an effective agent to be used securely in the elimination of S. aureus colonization in nasal carriers. (The Me di - cal Bul le tin of Ha se ki 2012; 50: 48-52

  12. Mechanisms linking dietary fiber, gut microbiota and colon cancer prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that dietary fiber plays an important role in colon cancer prevention. These findings may relate to the ability of fiber to reduce the contact time of carcinogens within the intestinal lumen and to promote healthy gut microbiota, which mod...

  13. External coating of colonic anastomoses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Achiam, Michael Patrick; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Colon anastomotic leakage remains both a frequent and serious complication in gastrointestinal surgery. External coating of colonic anastomoses has been proposed as a means to lower the rate of this complication. The aim of this review was to evaluate existing studies on external coating of colonic...

  14. Control of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak in a day-care institution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Ulrik; Jensen, ET; Larsen, AR

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in two institutions for multi-handicapped children in Copenhagen. The aim of the study was to determine whether it was possible to eradicate MRSA in a setting with multi-handicapped children and staff where...... there was a high degree of physical interaction. This was a prospective interventional uncontrolled cohort study that took place from January 2003 to March 2005. All individuals in close contact with the two institutions and/or in close contact with an MRSA-colonized subject from the outbreak were included...... in the study: 38 children, 60 staff members and 12 close relatives of colonized subjects. Infection control measures included screening all individuals. When MRSA infection or colonization was found, an attempt was made to eradicate MRSA, staff education was undertaken and attempts were made to determine...

  15. S. pneumoniae isolados da nasofaringe de crianças sadias e com pneumonia: taxa de colonização e suscetibilidade aos antimicrobianos Nasopharyngeal isolates of S. pneumoniae from healthy carriers and children with pneumonia: colonization rates and antimicrobial susceptibility

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    Luís C. Rey

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: comparar as taxas de colonização e a resistência antimicrobiana de pneumococos em nasofaringe de crianças sadias e com pneumonia. Métodos: estudo de tipo transversal. As crianças sadias foram recrutadas em centros de vacinação (CV e creches públicas (CP, selecionados aleatoriamente, e aquelas com pneumonia em emergências pediátricas. Foram utilizados swabs flexíveis de alginato para a colheita do material de nasofaringe. O isolamento e a identificação dos pneumococos seguiram procedimentos padronizados. As concentrações inibitórias mínimas (CIM foram determinadas por microdiluição em placas. Resultados: foram estudadas 911 crianças, 429 sadias (60% portadoras de pneumococo, sendo 72% destas recrutadas em CP e 49% em CV e 482 com pneumonia (50% de portadoras (p=0,002. De 441 isolados com CIM determinadas, 198 (45% apresentavam resistência intermediária, e 16 (4% apresentavam resistência plena à penicilina. As taxas de resistência dos pneumococos isolados de portadores sadios e com pneumonia, respectivamente, foram: penicilina 48% (CV 37% e CP 55% e 50% (p>0,05; eritromicina: 28% e 19% (p=0,05; cotrimoxazol 81% e 76% (p>0,05; cloranfenicol 6% e 7% (p>0,05, rifampicina 5% e 3% (p>0,05, ceftriaxone 2 e 4% (p>0,05 e vancomicina 0%, para ambos grupos. Foi constatada associação entre as resistências do pneumococo à penicilina, eritromicina e ao cotrimoxazol. Conclusões: a taxa de portador de pneumococos foi maior em crianças sadias do que naquelas com pneumonia. As resistências dos pneumococos à penicilina e ao cotrimoxazol foram elevadas, sobretudo entre os usuários de creches públicas.Objectives: to compare colonization rates and antimicrobial resistance of nasopharyngeal pneumococci in healthy carriers and children with pneumonia. Methods: a cross-sectional study. Healthy subjects of this study were selected from randomly chosen immunization centers and day-care centers, and those with pneumonia were

  16. Staphylococcus aureus-induced G2/M phase transition delay in host epithelial cells increases bacterial infective efficiency.

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    Ludmila Alekseeva

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a highly versatile, opportunistic pathogen and the etiological agent of a wide range of infections in humans and warm-blooded animals. The epithelial surface is its principal site of colonization and infection. In this work, we investigated the cytopathic effect of S. aureus strains from human and animal origins and their ability to affect the host cell cycle in human HeLa and bovine MAC-T epithelial cell lines. S. aureus invasion slowed down cell proliferation and induced a cytopathic effect, resulting in the enlargement of host cells. A dramatic decrease in the number of mitotic cells was observed in the infected cultures. Flow cytometry analysis revealed an S. aureus-induced delay in the G2/M phase transition in synchronous HeLa cells. This delay required the presence of live S. aureus since the addition of the heat-killed bacteria did not alter the cell cycle. The results of Western blot experiments showed that the G2/M transition delay was associated with the accumulation of inactive cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1, a key inducer of mitosis entry, and with the accumulation of unphosphorylated histone H3, which was correlated with a reduction of the mitotic cell number. Analysis of S. aureus proliferation in asynchronous, G1- and G2-phase-enriched HeLa cells showed that the G2 phase was preferential for bacterial infective efficiency, suggesting that the G2 phase delay may be used by S. aureus for propagation within the host. Taken together, our results divulge the potential of S. aureus in the subversion of key cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, and shed light on the biological significance of S. aureus-induced host cell cycle alteration.

  17. High nasal carriage rate of Staphylococcus aureus containing Panton-Valentine leukocidin- and EDIN-encoding genes in community and hospital settings in Burkina Faso

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    Abdoul-Salam OUEDRAOGO

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study were to investigate the rate of S. aureus nasal carriage and molecular characteristics in hospital and community settings in Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso. Nasal samples (n=219 were collected from 116 healthy volunteers and 103 hospitalized patients in July and August 2014. Samples were first screened using CHROMagar Staph aureus chromogenic agar plates, and S. aureus strains were identified by mass spectrometry. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested using the disk diffusion method on Müller-Hinton agar. All S. aureus isolates were genotyped using DNA microarray. Overall, the rate of S. aureus nasal carriage was 32.9% (72/219, 29% in healthy volunteers and 37% in hospital patients. Among the S. aureus isolates, only four methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA strains were identified and all in hospital patients (3.9%. The 72 S. aureus isolates from nasal samples belonged to 16 different clonal complexes, particularly to CC 152-MSSA (22 clones and CC1-MSSA (nine clones. Two clones were significantly associated with community settings: CC1-MSSA and CC45-MSSA. The MRSA strains belonged to the ST88-MRSA-IV or the CC8-MRSA-V complex. A very high prevalence of toxinogenic strains 52,2% (36/69, containing Panton-Valentine leucocidin- and EDIN-encoding genes, was identified among the S. aureus isolates in community and hospital settings. This study provides the first characterization of S. aureus clones and their genetic characteristics in Burkina Faso. Altogether, it highlights the low prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, high diversity of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus clones and high frequency of toxinogenic S. aureus strains.

  18. Association of biofilm production with colonization among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seong Yeol; Baek, Won-Ki; Kim, Hyun Ah

    2017-03-01

    The pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii is increasingly causing healthcare-associated infections worldwide, particularly in intensive care units. Biofilm formation, a factor contributing to the virulence of A. baumannii, is associated with long-term persistence in hospital environments. The present study investigates the clinical impact of biofilm production on colonization and acquisition after patient admission. Forty-nine A. baumannii isolates were obtained between August and November 2013 from Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu, Korea. All isolates were obtained from sputum samples of new patients infected or colonized by A. baumannii. The microtiter plate assay was used to determine biofilm formation. Twenty-four A. baumannii isolates (48%) demonstrated enhanced biofilm formation capacity than that of the standard A. baumannii strain (ATCC 19606). All isolates were resistant to carbapenem, 38 isolates (77%) were collected from patients in an intensive care unit, and 47 isolates (95%) were from patients who had been exposed to antibiotics in the previous month. The median duration of colonization was longer for biofilm-producing isolates than that of the biofilm non-biofilm producing isolates (18 days vs. 12 days, p < 0.05). Simultaneous colonization with other bacteria was more common for biofilm-producing isolates than that for the non-biofilm producing isolates. The most prevalent co-colonizing bacteria was Staphylococcus aureus. Biofilm-producing isolates seem to colonize the respiratory tract for longer durations than the non-biofilm producing isolates. During colonization, biofilm producers promote co-colonization by other bacteria, particularly S. aureus. Additional research is required to determine possible links between biofilm formation and nosocomial infection.

  19. Regional outbreak of staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome in healthy children

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    Hyun Jeong Do

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS is a relatively uncommon superficial blistering skin disease that is due to Staphylococcus aureus. We had experienced a regional outbreak of SSSS over 3 years in healthy children. Methods : We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of those patients diagnosed as SSSS. Most of neonatal cases were nosocomial infections and excluded from the analysis. The clinical features, laboratory findings, the isolation and antibiotic resistance of S. aureus, the antibiotic management and other supportive treatments were analyzed. Results : Fifty-five patients with SSSS were admitted to our hospital from October 2001 to September 2004. The median age of patients was 3.0 years. Of the 55 patients, 9 were the generalized type, 13 were the intermediate type and 33 were the scarletiniform rash. All the patients were living in neighborhood of the Jinju area. S. aureus were isolated from 9 of the patients and all of the isolated S. aureus were methicillin resistant. All the patients except two were treated with intravenous flocloxacillin or nafcillin and/or cefotaxime. All the patients recovered during the follow-up period of 2 to 3 weeks. Conclusion : We experienced a regional outbreak of SSSS in previous healthy children. Further study for finding the carriers of S. aureus caused SSSS and preventing the spread of this disease is needed. Additionally, guidelines for treating SSSS due to methicillin resistant S. aureus should be established.

  20. Healthy Ageing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. C.P. van der Schans

    2015-01-01

    Presentatie gehouden bij de bijeenkomst voor het Regionaal Genootschap Fysiotherapie Het Noorden op 10 februari te Marum, over het belang van fysieke activiteit voor healthy ageing en de rol van de fysiotherapeut hierin

  1. A STUDY ON NASAL CARRIAGE OF MRSA AND ITS ANTIMICRO BIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERN IN HEALTHY INDIVIDUALS AND HOSPITALISED PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Bharathi; Jyothi Padmaja

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen in hospi tal associated infections as well as in community acqui red infections. About 20-40% of healthy persons carry Staphylococci in the nose. Most dreadly strains of S.aureus are Methicillin resistant S.aureus (MRSA) strains. Till recent time s these MRSA strains were restricted to hospitals only as Health care associated MRSA (HA-MR SA). But now these...

  2. Skin and soft tissue infections in intercontinental travellers and the import of multi-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurjadi, D; Friedrich-Jänicke, B; Schäfer, J; Van Genderen, P J J; Goorhuis, A; Perignon, A; Neumayr, A; Mueller, A; Kantele, A; Schunk, M; Gascon, J; Stich, A; Hatz, C; Caumes, E; Grobusch, M P; Fleck, R; Mockenhaupt, F P; Zanger, P

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is emerging globally. Treatment of infections is complicated by increasing antibiotic resistance. We collected clinical data and swabs of returnees with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) at 13 travel-clinics in Europe (www.staphtrav.eu). Sixty-two percent (196/318) SSTI patients had S. aureus-positive lesions, of which almost two-thirds (122/196) were Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) positive. PVL was associated with disease severity, including hospitalization for SSTI (OR 5.2, 95% CI 1.5-18.2). In returnees with SSTI, longer travel and more intense population contact were risk factors for nasal colonization with PVL-positive S. aureus. Imported S. aureus frequently proved resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (21%), erythromycin (21%), tetracycline (20%), ciprofloxacin (13%), methicillin (12%) and clindamycin (8%). Place of exposure was significantly (p Europe and were predominantly (71%) acquired in Latin America. Multi-resistance to non-β-lactams were present in 24% of imports and associated with travel to South Asia (ORcrude 5.3, 95% CI 2.4-11.8), even after adjusting for confounding by genotype (ORadjusted 3.8, 95% 1.5-9.5). Choosing randomly from compounds recommended for the empiric treatment of severe S. aureus SSTI, 15% of cases would have received ineffective antimicrobial therapy. These findings call for the development of regionally stratified guidance on the antibiotic management of severe imported S. aureus disease and put the infected and colonized traveller at the centre of interventions against the global spread of multi-resistant S. aureus. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Whole genome analysis of epidemiologically closely related Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

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    Maarten Schijffelen

    Full Text Available The change of the bacteria from colonizers to pathogens is accompanied by a drastic change in expression profiles. These changes may be due to environmental signals or to mutational changes. We therefore compared the whole genome sequences of four sets of S. aureus isolates. Three sets were from the same patients. The isolates of each pair (S1800/S1805, S2396/S2395, S2398/S2397, an isolate from colonization and an isolate from infection, respectively were obtained within <30 days of each other and the isolate from infection caused skin infections. The isolates were then compared for differences in gene content and SNPs. In addition, a set of isolates from a colonized pig and a farmer from the same farm at the same time (S0462 and S0460 were analyzed. The isolates pair S1800/S1805 showed a difference in a prophage, but these are easily lost or acquired. However, S1805 contained an integrative conjugative element not present in S1800. In addition, 92 SNPs were present in a variety of genes and the isolates S1800 and S1805 were not considered a pair. Between S2395/S2396 two SNPs were present: one was in an intergenic region and one was a synonymous mutation in a putative membrane protein. Between S2397/S2398 only one synonymous mutation in a putative lipoprotein was found. The two farm isolates were very similar and showed 12 SNPs in genes that belong to a number of different functional categories. However, we cannot pinpoint any gene that explains the change from carrier status to infection. The data indicate that differences between the isolate from infection and the colonizing isolate for S2395/S2396 and S2397/S2398 exist as well as between isolates from different hosts, but S1800/S1805 are not clonal.

  4. Identification of Infantile Diarrhea Caused by Breast Milk-Transmitted Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhong; Pan, Wei-Guang; Xian, Wei-Yi; Cheng, Hang; Zheng, Jin-Xin; Hu, Qing-Hua; Yu, Zhi-Jian; Deng, Qi-Wen

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a well-known organism which is responsible for a variety of human infectious diseases including skin infections, pneumonia, bacteremia, and endocarditis. Few of the microorganisms can be transmitted from mother to the newborn or infant by milk breastfeeding. This study aims to identify transmission of S. aureus from healthy, lactating mothers to their infants by breastfeeding. Stool specimens of diarrheal infants and breast milk of their mother (totally three pairs) were collected and six Staphylococcus aureus isolates were cultured positively. Homology and molecular characters of isolated strains were tested using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, and multilocus sequence typing. Furthermore, toxin genes detection was also performed. Each pair of isolates has the same PFGE type and spa type. Four Sequence types (STs) were found among all the isolates; they are ST15, ST188, and ST59, respectively. Among the strains, seb, sec, and tst genes were found, and all were negative for pvl gene. The homology of the S. aureus strains isolated from the infants' stool and the mothers' milk was genetically demonstrated, which indicated that breastfeeding may be important in the transmission of S. aureus infection, and the character of S. aureus needed to be further evaluated.

  5. Epidemiology and antibiotic sensitivity of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage in children in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laub, Krisztina; Tóthpál, Adrienn; Kardos, Szilvia; Dobay, Orsolya

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage rate in healthy children all over Hungary and to specify some risk factors, the antibiotic resistance patterns of the bacteria, and their genetic relatedness. In total, 878 children (aged 3-6 years) were screened at 21 day-care centers in 16 different cities in Hungary, between February 2009 and December 2011. Samples taken from both nostrils were cultured on blood agar, and suspected S. aureus isolates were identified by β-hemolysis, catalase positivity, clump test, and nucA PCR. Methicillin-resistant strains were screened by mecA and mecC PCR. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by agar dilution or gradient test strips. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used for genotyping. S. aureus carriage rate was found to be 21.3%, which correlates well with international data. We found no statistically significant correlation between the gender or the sibling status and S. aureus carriage. All isolates were sensitive to oxacillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and mupirocin. The resistance rates for erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, gentamicin, and tetracycline were 7.5%, 0.5%, 1.1%, 3.7%, and 4.3%, respectively. The isolates showed very high genetic diversity. In summary, carried S. aureus isolates are more sensitive to antibiotics compared with clinical isolates in Hungary, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus carriage rate is very low yet.

  6. Isolation of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus from pet dogs and cats: a public health implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-moein, Khaled A; Samir, Ahmed

    2011-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a globally distributed bacterium causing wide variety of illnesses in humans, which attributed to its ability to produce wide array of virulence factors, including enterotoxins that are responsible for staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks. The current study was carried out to investigate the prevalence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus among pet dogs and cats and its public health implication. For this purpose, nasal, oral, and wound swabs were collected from 70 dogs and 47 cats, whereas nasal swabs were collected from 26 human contacts. All samples were examined for the presence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus by isolation of S. aureus in culture media and then tested by specific ELISA kits to detect the produced toxins in bacterial cultures. The prevalence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus was 10% and 2.1% for pet dogs and cats, respectively, whereas the nasal carriage rate in human contacts was 7.7%. The majority of animal isolates were obtained from mouth of the apparently healthy animals. All types of staphylococcal enterotoxins were detected in both animal and human isolates. High prevalence of enterotoxigenic S. aureus among pet dogs highlights the possibility of zoonotic transmission to human contacts leading to nasal and/or hand carriage of such strains; thus, pet animals may be incriminated in the epidemiology of household staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks.

  7. Nasal Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Associated Post-surgical Wounds Infections

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    Ikpeme, E. M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization is an important risk factor for developing a wide range of infections in clinical setting. This study was aimed at determining the extent of staphylococcal carriages including methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in post-surgical patients and employees in a tertiary health facility. Methodology and Results: Between April and July 2010, 240 post-surgical patients and 80 hospital personnel at the University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar were enrolled in the present study. All subjects consented to participation in the study and those who had previous medical history or treatment on antibiotic in the last six months prior to enrolment were noted. Nasal specimens collected from carrier and post-surgical sites in individuals (15-63 years who were hospitalized for at least 21 days were immediately placed in Staurts’ transport medium and kept at 4 °C before being analyzed accordingly and screened for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Out of a total number of 320 subjects examined within a period of 4 months 144 (45% were carriers of Staphylococcus aureus and 55 (38% of these were MRSA. Demographic and clinical data of subjects indicated more male carriers (60.7% confined to older age groups above 35 years. There was a significant difference (p> 0.05 in Staphylococcus aureus carriage for subjects with recent medical history of hospitalization or treatment with antibiotics. There also appears to be a considerable association (50.9% between nasal carriage status and autoinfection of post-surgical wounds. A good proportion of all strains tested were resistant to commonly used antibiotics. Approximately 89% of MRSA were resistant to penicillin. Resistant rate against other antibiotics was largely below 30%. Conclusion, significance and impact of study: An improved understanding of nasal carriage is needed to foster development of new strategies to reduce colonization and

  8. Predictors of colonization with Staphylococcus species among patients scheduled for cardiac and orthopedic interventions at tertiary care hospitals in north-eastern Germany-a prevalence screening study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidhart, S; Zaatreh, S; Klinder, A; Redanz, S; Spitzmüller, R; Holtfreter, S; Warnke, P; Alozie, A; Henck, V; Göhler, A; Ellenrieder, M; AbouKoura, M; Divchev, D; Gümbel, D; Napp, M; Steinhoff, G; Nienaber, C; Ekkernkamp, A; Mittelmeier, W; Güthoff, C; Podbielski, A; Stengel, D; Bader, R

    2017-12-21

    As methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization and infection in humans are a global challenge. In Mecklenburg and Western Pomerania (Germany) 1,517 patients who underwent surgical interventions were systematically screened for MRSA and MSSA colonization on the day of hospital admission and discharge. Demographic data, risk factors and colonization status of the (i) nose, (ii) throat, (iii) groin, and (iv) thorax or site of surgical intervention were determined. Of the 1,433 patients who were included for further evaluation, 331 (23.1%) were colonized with MSSA, while only 17 (1.2%) were MRSA carriers on the day of hospital admission. A combination of nose, throat and groin swabs returned a detection rate of 98.3% for MSSA/MRSA. Trauma patients had lower prevalence of MRSA/MSSA (OR 0.524, 95% CI: 0.37-0.75; p < 0.001) than patients with intended orthopedic interventions. Males showed significantly higher nasal S. aureus carrier rates than females (odds ratio (OR) = 1.478; 95% CI: 1.14-1.92; p = 0.003). Nasal S. aureus colonization was less frequent among male smokers as compared to non-smokers (chi2 = 16.801; phi = 0.154; p < 0.001). Age, gender and smoking had a significant influence on S. aureus colonization. Combining at least three different swabbing sites should be considered for standard screening procedure to determine S. aureus colonization at patients scheduled for cardiac or orthopedic interventions at tertiary care hospitals.

  9. Bacterial colonization of colonic crypt mucous gel and disease activity in ulcerative colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowan, Fiachra

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To optimize total bacterial 16S rRNA quantification in microdissected colonic crypts in healthy controls and patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and to characterize the findings with disease activity. BACKGROUND: Microscopic and molecular techniques have recently converged to allow bacterial enumeration in remote anatomic locations [eg, crypt-associated mucous gel (CAMG)]. The aims of this study were to combine laser capture microdissection (LCM) and 16S rRNA-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to determine total bacterial copy number in CAMG both in health and in UC and to characterize the findings with disease activity. METHODS: LCM was used to microdissect CAMG from colonic mucosal biopsies from controls (n = 20) and patients with acute (n = 10) or subacute (n = 10) UC. Pan-bacterial 16S rRNA copy number per millimeter square in samples from 6 locations across the large bowel was obtained by qPCR using Desulfovibrio desulfuricans as a reference strain. Copy numbers were correlated with the UC disease activity index (UCDAI) and the simple clinical colitis activity index (SCCAI). RESULTS: Bacterial colonization of CAMG was detectable in all groups. Copy numbers were significantly reduced in acute UC. In subacute colitis, there was a positive correlation between copy number and UCDAI and SCCAI in the ascending, transverse and sigmoid colon. CONCLUSIONS: This study describes a sensitive method of quantitatively assessing bacterial colonization of the colonic CAMG. A positive correlation was found between CAMG bacterial load and subacute disease activity in UC, whereas detectable bacterial load was reduced in acute UC.

  10. Sonographic Features of Colonic Diverticulitis

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    Jeong, Yu Mee; Ko, Young Tae; Lim, Joo Won; Lee, Dong Ho; Yoon, Yup [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-15

    To evaluate sonographic features, location of diverticulum, and usefulness of sonography as a primary diagnostic tool. Sonographic findings of 28 patients with acute diverticulitis were reviewed. The diagnosis was made by surgery (11 patients), barium enema (20 patients), colonoscopy (3 patients), or CT (2 patients). There were 13 men and 15 women with ages ranging from 23 to 71 years old (mean, 33 years old). Sonographic abnormalities were seen in the cecum in 12 patients, both the cecum and ascending colon in seven, the ascending colon in six, the descending colon in two, and the transverse colon in one. On sonography, segmental thickening of the colonic wall was the most common finding, seen in 16 patients. The second most common finidngs were pericolic omental thickening and pericolic localized fluid collection (15 patients). Pericolic inflammatory mass of varying echogenicity (10 patients), out pouching hyper echoic foci beyond the lumen of the colon into or beyond the thickened wall (5 patients), contracture of the colon (5 patients), slightly thickened terminal ileum (1 patient), and local enlargement of ileocecal lymph node (1 patient) were also seen. Most diverticulitis occurred in the right colon. The useful sonographic findings in acute diverticulitis were echogenic foci of the diverticulum in the thickened colonic wall, focally and eccentrically thickened colonic wall, and localized omental thickening or fluid collection. In cases of pericecal fluid collection, appendicitis or colonic diverticulitis can be considered as a differential diagnosis

  11. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a primer for dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klevens, R Monina; Gorwitz, Rachel J; Collins, Amy S

    2008-10-01

    In 2005 in the United States, an estimated 94,370 new, invasive infections and 18,650 deaths were associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); most of these infections were in people with exposures in health care settings. MRSA also has emerged as a community-based pathogen, causing primarily skin infections that are not life-threatening, but occasionally causing more severe and invasive infections. The authors describe the history of MRSA; identify populations at greatest risk of experiencing MRSA colonization and infection; compare characteristics of MRSA infections occurring in health care and community settings; and summarize strategies, based on U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations and the literature, to prevent transmission of MRSA in dental offices. Standard infection control precautions should be enforced strictly in all ambulatory care settings, including dental offices, to prevent facility-based transmission of MRSA and other infectious agents.

  12. Pseudomembranous colitis secondary to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressly, Kalynn B; Hill, Emilie; Shah, Kairav J

    2016-05-10

    A 37-year-old woman with a history of type II diabetes and Crohn's disease, status postcholecystectomy, presented with a >2-week history of cramping abdominal pain, nausea, non-bloody/non-bilious emesis and, later, diarrhoea. A flexible sigmoidoscopy was performed, revealing that 'a segmental pseudomembrane was found from rectum to sigmoid colon'. Clostridium difficile PCR on the stool was repeated twice and resulted negative both times. A food history prior to onset of symptoms was consistent with Staphylococcal food poisoning and a stool culture was positive for heavy growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and the absence of enteric flora. The patient was successfully treated with oral vancomycin. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Characterization and comparison of 2 distinct epidemic community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clones of ST59 lineage.

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    Chih-Jung Chen

    Full Text Available Sequence type (ST 59 is an epidemic lineage of community-associated (CA methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA isolates. Taiwanese CA-MRSA isolates belong to ST59 and can be grouped into 2 distinct clones, a virulent Taiwan clone and a commensal Asian-Pacific clone. The Taiwan clone carries the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL genes and the staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec VT, and is frequently isolated from patients with severe disease. The Asian-Pacific clone is PVL-negative, carries SCCmec IV, and a frequent colonizer of healthy children. Isolates of both clones were characterized by their ability to adhere to respiratory A549 cells, cytotoxicity to human neutrophils, and nasal colonization of a murine and murine sepsis models. Genome variation was determined by polymerase chain reaction of selected virulence factors and by multi-strain whole genome microarray. Additionally, the expression of selected factors was compared between the 2 clones. The Taiwan clone showed a much higher cytotoxicity to the human neutrophils and caused more severe septic infections with a high mortality rate in the murine model. The clones were indistinguishable in their adhesion to A549 cells and persistence of murine nasal colonization. The microarray data revealed that the Taiwan clone had lost the ø3-prophage that integrates into the β-hemolysin gene and includes staphylokinase- and enterotoxin P-encoding genes, but had retained the genes for human immune evasion, scn and chps. Production of the virulence factors did not differ significantly in the 2 clonal groups, although more α-toxin was expressed in Taiwan clone isolates from pneumonia patients. In conclusion, the Taiwan CA-MRSA clone was distinguished by enhanced virulence in both humans and an animal infection model. The evolutionary acquisition of PVL, the higher expression of α-toxin, and possibly the loss of a large portion of the β-hemolysin-converting prophage likely