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Sample records for aureus clone st228

  1. Molecular characterization of resistance to Rifampicin in an emerging hospital-associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone ST228, Spain

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    Liñares Josefina

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA has been endemic in Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, Barcelona, since 1990. During the 1990-95 period the Iberian clone (ST-247; SCCmec-I was dominant. Isolates of clonal complex 5 (ST-125; SCCmec-IV gradually replaced the Iberian clone from 1996 to 2003. A new multiresistant MRSA phenotype showing rifampicin resistance emerged in 2004 and rapidly increased from 25% in 2004 to 45% in 2006. The aims of this study were i the molecular characterisation of rifampicin resistant MRSA isolates, ii the study of the rifampicin resistance expression by disk diffusion, microdilution and E-test, and iii the analysis of the rpoB gene mutations involved in rifampicin resistance. Results A sample of representative 108 rifampicin-resistant MRSA isolates belonged to a single PFGE genotype, ST-228, SCCmec type I and spa type t041. Of 108 isolates, 104 (96% had a low-level rifampicin resistance (MICs, 2 to 4 mg/L and 4 a high-level rifampicin resistance (MICs, 128 - ≥ 256 mg/L. Disk diffusion and E-test methods failed to identify a low-level rifampicin resistance in 20 and 12 isolates, respectively. A low-level rifampicin resistance was associated with amino acid substitution 481His/Asn in the beta-subunit of RNA polymerase. Isolates with a high-level rifampicin resistance carried additional mutations in the rpoB gene. Conclusions The emergence of MRSA clone ST228-SCCmecI, related to the Southern Germany clone, involved a therapeutical challenge for treating serious MRSA infections. Decreased susceptibility to rifampicin in MRSA strains of ST228-SCCmecI was associated with one or two specific mutations in the rpoB gene. One fifth of isolates with low-level rifampicin-resistance were missed by the diffusion methods.

  2. Local circulating clones of Staphylococcus aureus in Ecuador.

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    Zurita, Jeannete; Barba, Pedro; Ortega-Paredes, David; Mora, Marcelo; Rivadeneira, Sebastián

    The spread of pandemic Staphylococcus aureus clones, mainly methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), must be kept under surveillance to assemble an accurate, local epidemiological analysis. In Ecuador, the prevalence of the USA300 Latin American variant clone (USA300-LV) is well known; however, there is little information about other circulating clones. The aim of this work was to identify the sequence types (ST) using a Multiple-Locus Variable number tandem repeat Analysis 14-locus genotyping approach. We analyzed 132 S. aureus strains that were recovered from 2005 to 2013 and isolated in several clinical settings in Quito, Ecuador. MRSA isolates composed 46.97% (62/132) of the study population. Within MRSA, 37 isolates were related to the USA300-LV clone (ST8-MRSA-IV, Panton-Valentine Leukocidin [PVL] +) and 10 were related to the Brazilian clone (ST239-MRSA-III, PVL-). Additionally, two isolates (ST5-MRSA-II, PVL-) were related to the New York/Japan clone. One isolate was related to the Pediatric clone (ST5-MRSA-IV, PVL-), one isolate (ST45-MRSA-II, PVL-) was related to the USA600 clone, and one (ST22-MRSA-IV, PVL-) was related to the epidemic UK-EMRSA-15 clone. Moreover, the most prevalent MSSA sequence types were ST8 (11 isolates), ST45 (8 isolates), ST30 (8 isolates), ST5 (7 isolates) and ST22 (6 isolates). Additionally, we found one isolate that was related to the livestock associated S. aureus clone ST398. We conclude that in addition to the high prevalence of clone LV-ST8-MRSA-IV, other epidemic clones are circulating in Quito, such as the Brazilian, Pediatric and New York/Japan clones. The USA600 and UK-EMRSA-15 clones, which were not previously described in Ecuador, were also found. Moreover, we found evidence of the presence of the livestock associated clone ST398 in a hospital environment. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Survey of community-associated-methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Slovenia: identification of community-associated and livestock-associated clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermota, U; Mueller-Premru, M; Švent-Kučina, N; Petrovič, Ž; Ribič, H; Rupnik, M; Janežič, S; Zdovc, I; Grmek-Košnik, I

    2015-09-01

    The epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Slovenia is poorly documented. The aim of this study was to investigate susceptibility patterns, virulence gene profile and clonality among MRSA isolates with positive screened resistance phenotype for CA-MRSA collected from patients in Slovenia, from January 2010 to December 2010. We included only MRSA isolates that were resistant to cefoxitin and oxacillin, and susceptible to at least two of the following four antibiotics: ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin or gentamicin (presumptive CA-MRSA). Altogether 151 isolates fulfilled our screening phenotypic definition, 126 MRSA isolates were classified as CA-MRSA and 25 as HA-MRSA. Thirty-six per cent of them were resistant to ciprofloxacin, 24% to clindamycin, 33% to erythromycin and 13% to gentamicin. The mecA gene was detected in 150 isolates, while the mecC gene only in 1 isolate. The MRSA isolates were classified to 19 different clones. The most prevalent sequence types were ST5 (26.4%), ST45 (25.2%), ST22 (10.6%), ST398 (9.9%), ST8 (5.9%), ST7 (4.6%), ST1 (3.9%), ST152/377 (3.3%), ST228 (2.6%) and ST2883 (1.3%). The ST6, ST9, ST30, ST72, ST88, ST111, ST130, ST225 and ST772 were identified sporadically. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene was detected in 13 (8.6%) isolates that belonged to ST5, ST7, ST8, ST22, ST72, ST88, ST 152/377 and ST772. Our results show high variability of CA-MRSA circulating in Slovenia and also the presence of LA-MRSA clones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Pneumonia and new methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garnier, Fabien; Tristan, Anne; François, Bruno; Etienne, Jerome; Delage-Corre, Manuella; Martin, Christian; Liassine, Nadia; Wannet, Wim; Denis, François; Ploy, Marie-Cécile

    2006-01-01

    Necrotizing pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus strains carrying the Panton-Valentin leukocidin gene is a newly described disease entity. We report a new fatal case of necrotizing pneumonia. An S. aureus strain with an agr1 allele and of a new sequence type 377 was recovered, representing a

  5. [Consolidation of a Staphylococcus aureus multiresistant clone not related to the Iberian in a hospital from Mallorca].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Gopegui, Enrique; Oliver, Antonio; Galmés, Margarita Isabel; Hidalgo, Olga; Pérez, José L

    2005-03-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was seldom isolated in our hospital until the first outbreak in 1999. A recently documented increase in antibiotic multiresistance in MRSA strains in our setting prompted the design of this molecular epidemiology study to investigate the basis for this tendency. All MRSA isolates from clinical samples of patients admitted from July 2002 to June 2003 were studied. Susceptibility testing was performed by disk diffusion. Clonal relatedness of MRSA isolates was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results were compared with data from MRSA isolates from patients admitted to the hospital in 1999-2000. MRSA was isolated in 110 patients (30% of patients with S. aureus-positive cultures). PFGE detected three major clones (in 93% of patients), all of which had been present in 1999-2000, although in different proportions. Whereas the predominant clone in 1999 was clone A (clone A 63%, clone B 20%), clone B was now found to predominate (clone B 58%, clone A 19%). None of these major clones were related to the five pandemic clones, including the Iberian clone, but two of them seemed to be related to the two most prevalent clones in Spain at this time. The new predominant clone was more resistant than the others, and showed uniform resistance to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin, and gentamicin. In recent years, a formerly predominant MRSA clone has been replaced by a multiresistant S. aureus clone that is unrelated to the Iberian clone.

  6. Phylogeographic variation in recombination rates within a global clone of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo-Ramirez, Santiago; Corander, Jukka; Marttinen, Pekka

    2012-01-01

    by employing a recently developed Bayesian approach, BRATNextGen, for detecting recombination on an expanded NGS dataset of the globally disseminated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clone ST239. RESULTS: The data confirm strong geographical clustering at continental, national and city scales...

  7. Livestock Origin for a Human Pandemic Clone of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spoor, Laura E.; McAdam, Paul R.; Weinert, Lucy A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The importance of livestock as a source of bacterial pathogens with the potential for epidemic spread in human populations is unclear. In recent years, there has been a global increase in community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections of healthy...... of emergent clones of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) that originated in livestock and switched to humans, followed by host-adaptive evolution and epidemic spread in global human populations. Our findings demonstrate that livestock can act as a reservoir for the emergence of new human...... humans, but an understanding of the different evolutionary origins of CA-MRSA clones and the basis for their recent expansion is lacking. Here, using a high-resolution phylogenetic approach, we report the discovery of two emergent clones of human epidemic CA-MRSA which resulted from independent livestock...

  8. Staphylococcus aureus spa type t437 : identification of the most dominant community-associated clone from Asia across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glasner, C; Pluister, G; Westh, H; Arends, J P; Empel, J; Giles, E; Laurent, F; Layer, F; Marstein, L; Matussek, A; Mellmann, A; Pérez-Vásquez, M; Ungvári, E; Yan, X; Žemličková, H; Grundmann, H; van Dijl, J M

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) belonging to the multilocus sequence type clonal complex 59 (MLST CC59) is the predominant community-associated MRSA clone in Asia. This clone, which is primarily linked with the spa type t437, has so far only been reported in low numbers among

  9. Cloning and Expression of Nano Body Gene against Enterotoxin B of Staphylococcus Aureus

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    Zahra Tavassoli

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Staphylococcus aureus bacteria causes many different diseases by secretion of various enterotoxins. Therefore, it is necessary to develop ways that facilitate the detection of enterotoxins. Nowadays, immunochemical methods which are based on monoclonal antibody technology are used. The heavy chain antibodies that are called VHH or Nano body were found in blood serum of the Camelidae family. The unique properties of this antibody such as their binding to small molecules like toxins make them attractive candidates for the development of immunodiagnostic tests. The present study was done to achieve a VHH molecules against Staphylococcus enterotoxin B. Materials & Methods: Freighting phage library for isolate private Nano bodies against enterotoxin B was done in previous works. Next, pCANTAB 5E vector that consists VHH, extracted from E.coli bacteria strain xl1blue, and after doing PCR process with relative primers, sub cloning in pET21a(+ as an expression vector with cut sites NdeI and XhoI was done. Transformation in E.coli bacteria strain BL21(DE3 was done. Then, the cells effected with IPTG and producing time, and other terms were optimized. Finally, the expression of the protein with SDS-PAGE and western blot techniques was evaluated. Result: For proving cloning of nano body gene in pET21a (+ vector, nucleotide sequence of gene was analyzed, and transforming to E.coli bacteria strain BL21(DE3 was successful. After inspiration, active protein in cell was seen by SDS-PAGE technique and proved by western blot. Conclusion: cloning, sub cloning, and nonabody expression were surveyed in this research. Production of this protein can help to develop new therapeutic methods and produce vaccine against enterotoxin B of Staphylococcus aureus

  10. Insights into Alpha-Hemolysin (Hla) Evolution and Expression among Staphylococcus aureus Clones with Hospital and Community Origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Ana; Nielsen, Jesper B; Boye, Kit

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alpha-hemolysin (Hla) is a major virulence factor in the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus infection, being active against a wide range of host cells. Although hla is ubiquitous in S. aureus, its genetic diversity and variation in expression in different genetic backgrounds...... is not known. We evaluated nucleotide sequence variation and gene expression profiles of hla among representatives of hospital (HA) and community-associated (CA) S. aureus clones. METHODS: 51 methicillin-resistant S. aureus and 22 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus were characterized by PFGE, spa typing, MLST...... and SCCmec typing. The internal regions of hla and the hla promoter were sequenced and gene expression was assessed by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Alpha-hemolysin encoding- and promoter sequences were diverse, with 12 and 23 different alleles, respectively. Based on phylogenetic analysis, we suggest that hla may have...

  11. Staphylococcus aureus spa type t437: identification of the most dominant community-associated clone from Asia across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasner, C; Pluister, G; Westh, H; Arends, J P; Empel, J; Giles, E; Laurent, F; Layer, F; Marstein, L; Matussek, A; Mellmann, A; Pérez-Vásquez, M; Ungvári, E; Yan, X; Žemličková, H; Grundmann, H; van Dijl, J M

    2015-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) belonging to the multilocus sequence type clonal complex 59 (MLST CC59) is the predominant community-associated MRSA clone in Asia. This clone, which is primarily linked with the spa type t437, has so far only been reported in low numbers among large epidemiological studies in Europe. Nevertheless, the overall numbers identified in some Northern European reference laboratories have increased during the past decade. To determine whether the S. aureus t437 clone is present in other European countries, and to assess its genetic diversity across Europe, we analysed 147 S. aureus t437 isolates from 11 European countries collected over a period of 11 years using multiple locus variable number tandem repeat fingerprinting/analysis (MLVF/MLVA) and MLST. Additionally 16 S. aureus t437 isolates from healthy carriers and patients from China were included. Most isolates were shown to be monophyletic with 98% of the isolates belonging to the single MLVA complex 621, to which nearly all included isolates from China also belonged. More importantly, all MLST-typed isolates belonged to CC59. Our study implies that the European S. aureus t437 population represents a genetically tight cluster, irrespective of the year, country and site of isolation. This underpins the view that S. aureus CC59 has been introduced into several European countries, not being restricted to particular geographical regions or specific host environments. The European S. aureus t437 isolates thus bear the general hallmarks of a high-risk clone. Copyright © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A field guide to pandemic, epidemic and sporadic clones of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monecke, Stefan

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have become a truly global challenge. In addition to the long-known healthcare-associated clones, novel strains have also emerged outside of the hospital settings, in the community as well as in livestock. The emergence and spread of virulent clones expressing Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is an additional cause for concern. In order to provide an overview of pandemic, epidemic and sporadic strains, more than 3,000 clinical and veterinary isolates of MRSA mainly from Germany, the United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Malta, Abu Dhabi, Hong Kong, Australia, Trinidad & Tobago as well as some reference strains from the United States have been genotyped by DNA microarray analysis. This technique allowed the assignment of the MRSA isolates to 34 distinct lineages which can be clearly defined based on non-mobile genes. The results were in accordance with data from multilocus sequence typing. More than 100 different strains were distinguished based on affiliation to these lineages, SCCmec type and the presence or absence of PVL. These strains are described here mainly with regard to clinically relevant antimicrobial resistance- and virulence-associated markers, but also in relation to epidemiology and geographic distribution. The findings of the study show a high level of biodiversity among MRSA, especially among strains harbouring SCCmec IV and V elements. The data also indicate a high rate of genetic recombination in MRSA involving SCC elements, bacteriophages or other mobile genetic elements and large-scale chromosomal replacements.

  13. A Field Guide to Pandemic, Epidemic and Sporadic Clones of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monecke, Stefan; Coombs, Geoffrey; Shore, Anna C.; Coleman, David C.; Akpaka, Patrick; Borg, Michael; Chow, Henry; Ip, Margaret; Jatzwauk, Lutz; Jonas, Daniel; Kadlec, Kristina; Kearns, Angela; Laurent, Frederic; O'Brien, Frances G.; Pearson, Julie; Ruppelt, Antje; Schwarz, Stefan; Scicluna, Elizabeth; Slickers, Peter; Tan, Hui-Leen; Weber, Stefan; Ehricht, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have become a truly global challenge. In addition to the long-known healthcare-associated clones, novel strains have also emerged outside of the hospital settings, in the community as well as in livestock. The emergence and spread of virulent clones expressing Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is an additional cause for concern. In order to provide an overview of pandemic, epidemic and sporadic strains, more than 3,000 clinical and veterinary isolates of MRSA mainly from Germany, the United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Malta, Abu Dhabi, Hong Kong, Australia, Trinidad & Tobago as well as some reference strains from the United States have been genotyped by DNA microarray analysis. This technique allowed the assignment of the MRSA isolates to 34 distinct lineages which can be clearly defined based on non-mobile genes. The results were in accordance with data from multilocus sequence typing. More than 100 different strains were distinguished based on affiliation to these lineages, SCCmec type and the presence or absence of PVL. These strains are described here mainly with regard to clinically relevant antimicrobial resistance- and virulence-associated markers, but also in relation to epidemiology and geographic distribution. The findings of the study show a high level of biodiversity among MRSA, especially among strains harbouring SCCmec IV and V elements. The data also indicate a high rate of genetic recombination in MRSA involving SCC elements, bacteriophages or other mobile genetic elements and large-scale chromosomal replacements. PMID:21494333

  14. Evolution and Molecular Characterization of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Epidemic and Sporadic Clones in Cordoba, Argentina

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    Sola, Claudia; Cortes, Paulo; Saka, Hector A.; Vindel, Ana; Bocco, José Luis

    2006-01-01

    Since 1999, a new, epidemic, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain, named the “Cordobes clone,” has emerged in Argentina and coexists with the pandemic Brazilian clone. The purpose of this study was to determine the stability over time of the new clone and to investigate its evolutionary relationship with epidemic international MRSA lineages and with other MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) major clones distributed in this region. One hundred three MRSA isolates recovered in 2001 from Cordoba, Argentina, hospitals and 31 MSSA strains collected from 1999 to 2002 were analyzed by their antibiotic resistance patterns, phage typing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Additionally, representative members of most MRSA defined genotypes (A, B, C, E, K, and I) were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and spaA and SCCmec typing. The most prevalent MSSA pulsotypes were also analyzed by MLST. Our results support the displacement of the Brazilian clone (sequence type [ST] 239, spaA type WGKAOMQ, SCCmec type IIIA) by the Cordobes clone (ST5, spaA type TIMEMDMGMGMK, SCCmec type I) in the hospital environment. MRSA and MSSA isolates shared only ST5. The data support the origin of the Cordobes clone as a member of a lineage that includes the pediatric and New York/Japan international clones and that is genetically related to the British EMRSA-3 strain. Interestingly, the pediatric clone, isolated from most community-acquired infections in Cordoba, was characterized by ST100, a single-locus variant of ST5 and a new variant of SCCmec type related to SCCmec type IVc. PMID:16390969

  15. Insights into alpha-hemolysin (Hla evolution and expression among Staphylococcus aureus clones with hospital and community origin.

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    Ana Tavares

    Full Text Available Alpha-hemolysin (Hla is a major virulence factor in the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus infection, being active against a wide range of host cells. Although hla is ubiquitous in S. aureus, its genetic diversity and variation in expression in different genetic backgrounds is not known. We evaluated nucleotide sequence variation and gene expression profiles of hla among representatives of hospital (HA and community-associated (CA S. aureus clones.51 methicillin-resistant S. aureus and 22 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus were characterized by PFGE, spa typing, MLST and SCCmec typing. The internal regions of hla and the hla promoter were sequenced and gene expression was assessed by RT-PCR.Alpha-hemolysin encoding- and promoter sequences were diverse, with 12 and 23 different alleles, respectively. Based on phylogenetic analysis, we suggest that hla may have evolved together with the S. aureus genetic background, except for ST22, ST121, ST59 and ST93. Conversely, the promoter region showed lack of co-evolution with the genetic backgrounds. Four non-synonymous amino acid changes were identified close to important regions of hla activity. Amino acid changes in the RNAIII binding site were not associated to hla expression. Although expression rates of hla were in general strain-specific, we observed CA clones showed significantly higher hla expression (p = 0.003 when compared with HA clones.We propose that the hla gene has evolved together with the genetic background. Overall, CA genetic backgrounds showed higher levels of hla expression than HA, and a high strain-to-strain variation of gene expression was detected in closely related strains.

  16. Insights into alpha-hemolysin (Hla) evolution and expression among Staphylococcus aureus clones with hospital and community origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Ana; Nielsen, Jesper B; Boye, Kit; Rohde, Susanne; Paulo, Ana C; Westh, Henrik; Schønning, Kristian; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Miragaia, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-hemolysin (Hla) is a major virulence factor in the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus infection, being active against a wide range of host cells. Although hla is ubiquitous in S. aureus, its genetic diversity and variation in expression in different genetic backgrounds is not known. We evaluated nucleotide sequence variation and gene expression profiles of hla among representatives of hospital (HA) and community-associated (CA) S. aureus clones. 51 methicillin-resistant S. aureus and 22 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus were characterized by PFGE, spa typing, MLST and SCCmec typing. The internal regions of hla and the hla promoter were sequenced and gene expression was assessed by RT-PCR. Alpha-hemolysin encoding- and promoter sequences were diverse, with 12 and 23 different alleles, respectively. Based on phylogenetic analysis, we suggest that hla may have evolved together with the S. aureus genetic background, except for ST22, ST121, ST59 and ST93. Conversely, the promoter region showed lack of co-evolution with the genetic backgrounds. Four non-synonymous amino acid changes were identified close to important regions of hla activity. Amino acid changes in the RNAIII binding site were not associated to hla expression. Although expression rates of hla were in general strain-specific, we observed CA clones showed significantly higher hla expression (p = 0.003) when compared with HA clones. We propose that the hla gene has evolved together with the genetic background. Overall, CA genetic backgrounds showed higher levels of hla expression than HA, and a high strain-to-strain variation of gene expression was detected in closely related strains.

  17. Horses in Denmark Are a Reservoir of Diverse Clones of Methicillin-Resistant and -Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Md Zohorul; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Damborg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Denmark is a country with high prevalence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex (CC) 398 in pigs. Even though pig farming is regarded as the main source of human infection or colonization with MRSA CC398, 10-15% of the human cases appear not to ...... that these animals are exposed to MRSA and MSSA clones that are likely to originate from livestock and humans, respectively....... isolates was t127 (CC1), which was detected in 12 horses from 11 farms and represents the most common S. aureus clone isolated from human bacteremia cases in Denmark. Among the 17 MRSA carriers, 10 horses from three farms carried CC398 t011 harboring the immune evasion cluster (IEC), four horses from two......-adapted clone in Europe and were closely related to human t011 isolates fromthree Danish equine veterinarians, whereas t034 isolates belonged to pig-adapted clones. Our study confirms that horses carry an equine-specific clone of MRSA CC398 that can be transmitted to veterinary personnel, and reveals...

  18. Virulence of Endemic Nonpigmented Northern Australian Staphylococcus aureus Clone (Clonal Complex 75, S. argenteus) Is Not Augmented by Staphyloxanthin

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Steven Y. C.; Sharma-Kuinkel, Batu K.; Thaden, Joshua T.; Whitney, Adeline R.; Yang, Soo-Jin; Mishra, Nagendra N.; Rude, Thomas; Lilliebridge, Rachael A.; Selim, Maria A.; Ahn, Sun Hee; Holt, Deborah C.; Giffard, Philip M.; Bayer, Arnold S.; DeLeo, Frank R.; Fowler, Vance G.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 75 (herein referred to as S. argenteus) lacks the carotenoid pigment operon, crtOPQMN, responsible for production of the putative virulence factor, staphyloxanthin. Although a common cause of community-onset skin infections among Indigenous populations in northern Australia, this clone is infrequently isolated from hospital-based patients with either bacteremic or nonbacteremic infections. We hypothesized that S. argenteus would have attenuated virulence c...

  19. Virulence of endemic nonpigmented northern Australian Staphylococcus aureus clone (clonal complex 75, S. argenteus) is not augmented by staphyloxanthin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Steven Y C; Sharma-Kuinkel, Batu K; Thaden, Joshua T; Whitney, Adeline R; Yang, Soo-Jin; Mishra, Nagendra N; Rude, Thomas; Lilliebridge, Rachael A; Selim, Maria A; Ahn, Sun Hee; Holt, Deborah C; Giffard, Philip M; Bayer, Arnold S; Deleo, Frank R; Fowler, Vance G

    2013-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 75 (herein referred to as S. argenteus) lacks the carotenoid pigment operon, crtOPQMN, responsible for production of the putative virulence factor, staphyloxanthin. Although a common cause of community-onset skin infections among Indigenous populations in northern Australia, this clone is infrequently isolated from hospital-based patients with either bacteremic or nonbacteremic infections. We hypothesized that S. argenteus would have attenuated virulence compared to other S. aureus strains due to its staphyloxanthin "deficiency." Compared to prototypical S. aureus strains, S. argenteus was more susceptible to oxidative stress and neutrophil killing in vitro and had reduced virulence in murine sepsis and skin infection models. Transformation with pTX-crtOPQMN resulted in staphyloxanthin expression and increased resistance to oxidative stress in vitro. However, neither resistance to neutrophil killing nor in vivo virulence was increased. Thus, reduced virulence of S. argenteus in these models is due to mechanisms unrelated to lack of staphyloxanthin production.

  20. Molecular Cloning, Expression and Peroxidase Conjugation of Staphylococcus aureus Protein A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfi Abad Shapouri, Masoud Reza; Mahmoodi, Pezhman; Gharibi, Dariush; Ghorbanpoor, Masoud; Yaghoubi, Sara; Rezaei, Elham; Rashno, Mohammad; Mehravar, Neda

    2016-01-01

    Background Staphylococcal protein A (SPA) is a cell wall component of Staphylococcus aureus that binds to different IgG subclasses of human and several animal species. This bacterial protein can be used as an antibody detector in various immunological assays or as an isolation reagent for the purification of antibody molecules via immuno-chromatography procedures. Objectives Molecular cloning and expression of SPA followed by the purification and conjugation of the recombinant protein to peroxidase enzyme. Material and Methods Encoding DNA fragment of SPA was amplified and inserted into a prokaryotic plasmid vector for the expression of recombinant SPA fused to a maltose binding protein (MBP). The recombinant protein was purified using amylose resin column chromatography and conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme. Finally, the reactivity of the recombinant SPA was examined against human IgG molecules in ELISA. Results The results indicated that the recombinant peroxidase-conjugated SPA has a good recognition capacity for human IgG molecules and it was able to produce significant OD values after reacting with human IgG molecules at a concentration up to 0.06 μg.well-1. Conclusions This recombinant protein can be very useful in all research laboratories and may decrease some of the expenses, e.g. those for preparing conjugated anti-antibodies. PMID:28959340

  1. Cloning

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    Cloning describes the processes used to create an exact genetic replica of another cell, tissue or organism. ... named Dolly. There are three different types of cloning: Gene cloning, which creates copies of genes or ...

  2. Emergence and spread of a new community-genotype methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Perez, Javier; Reyes, Niradiz; Marquez-Ortiz, Ricaurte Alejandro; Rebollo, Juan; Pinzón, Hernando; Tovar, Catalina; Moreno-Castañeda, Jaime; Corredor, Zayda Lorena; Castro, Betsy Esperanza; Moncada, Maria Victoria; Vanegas, Natasha

    2017-01-31

    Community-genotype methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CG-MRSA) clones are a global concern due to their resistance and increased virulence and their ability to cause infections both hospitalized patients and healthy people in the community. Here, we characterize 32 isolates of a new CG-MRSA clone. These isolates were identified in four cities in Colombia, South America. The isolates were recovered from four different epidemiological and prospective studies that were conducted in several regions of Colombia. Molecular characterizations included multilocus sequence typing; pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; SCCmec, agr and spa typing; and whole-genome sequencing. All isolates belonged to ST923 (clonal complex 8), harbouring SCCmec IVa and a spa type t1635 and lacking an arginine catabolism mobile element. The isolates were classified as COL923, were resistant to at least one non-beta-lactam antibiotic, and exhibited high frequencies (>60%) of resistance to macrolides and tetracycline. Using whole-genome sequencing, we found that this new clone harbours novel prophage 3 and beta-island structures and a slightly different pathogenicity island 5. Moreover, isolates belonging to the COL923 clone are grouped in a different clade than USA300 and USA300-LV. Our results show the emergence and spread of the COL923 clone in different cities in Colombia. This clone is resistant to several antibiotics and possesses new structures in its mobile genetic elements.

  3. Characterization and comparison of 2 distinct epidemic community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clones of ST59 lineage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Jung Chen

    Full Text Available Sequence type (ST 59 is an epidemic lineage of community-associated (CA methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA isolates. Taiwanese CA-MRSA isolates belong to ST59 and can be grouped into 2 distinct clones, a virulent Taiwan clone and a commensal Asian-Pacific clone. The Taiwan clone carries the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL genes and the staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec VT, and is frequently isolated from patients with severe disease. The Asian-Pacific clone is PVL-negative, carries SCCmec IV, and a frequent colonizer of healthy children. Isolates of both clones were characterized by their ability to adhere to respiratory A549 cells, cytotoxicity to human neutrophils, and nasal colonization of a murine and murine sepsis models. Genome variation was determined by polymerase chain reaction of selected virulence factors and by multi-strain whole genome microarray. Additionally, the expression of selected factors was compared between the 2 clones. The Taiwan clone showed a much higher cytotoxicity to the human neutrophils and caused more severe septic infections with a high mortality rate in the murine model. The clones were indistinguishable in their adhesion to A549 cells and persistence of murine nasal colonization. The microarray data revealed that the Taiwan clone had lost the ø3-prophage that integrates into the β-hemolysin gene and includes staphylokinase- and enterotoxin P-encoding genes, but had retained the genes for human immune evasion, scn and chps. Production of the virulence factors did not differ significantly in the 2 clonal groups, although more α-toxin was expressed in Taiwan clone isolates from pneumonia patients. In conclusion, the Taiwan CA-MRSA clone was distinguished by enhanced virulence in both humans and an animal infection model. The evolutionary acquisition of PVL, the higher expression of α-toxin, and possibly the loss of a large portion of the β-hemolysin-converting prophage likely

  4. Infections Caused By Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus European Clone (ST80 In Slovenia Between 2006 And 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dermota Urška

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the existing literature, a heterogeneous sequence type (ST or clones of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA circulate in Europe. In Europe, the European clone that belongs to sequence type ST80 is predominant.

  5. Characterization of the Brazilian endemic clone of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA from hospitals throughout Brazil

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    Oliveira Geraldo A.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to characterize patterns of the Brazilian endemic clone of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA from hospitals throughout Brazil. We studied 83 MRSA strains isolated from patients hospitalized in 27 public and private hospitals in 19 cities located in 14 Brazilian states from September, 1995, to June, 1997. The MRSA strains were typed using antibiograms, bacteriophage typing and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. The analysis of genomic DNA by PFGE showed that 65 isolates presented the same PFGE pattern. This pattern was present in all of the hospitals studied indicating the presence of an endemic MRSA clone widely disseminated throughout Brazilian hospitals (BEC. All isolates belonging to the BEC proved to be resistant to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, lincomycin, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, and tetracycline. Variable susceptibility to these drugs was found only in isolates belonging to clones other than the BEC. The results show that, among MRSA, the BEC is common in Brazil. The best method for mapping changes in the frequency of this clone among MRSA is pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Use of molecular mapping is an important tool for monitoring the spread of potentially dangerous microbes.

  6. Characterization of the Brazilian endemic clone of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA from hospitals throughout Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo A. Oliveira

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to characterize patterns of the Brazilian endemic clone of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA from hospitals throughout Brazil. We studied 83 MRSA strains isolated from patients hospitalized in 27 public and private hospitals in 19 cities located in 14 Brazilian states from September, 1995, to June, 1997. The MRSA strains were typed using antibiograms, bacteriophage typing and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. The analysis of genomic DNA by PFGE showed that 65 isolates presented the same PFGE pattern. This pattern was present in all of the hospitals studied indicating the presence of an endemic MRSA clone widely disseminated throughout Brazilian hospitals (BEC. All isolates belonging to the BEC proved to be resistant to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, lincomycin, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, and tetracycline. Variable susceptibility to these drugs was found only in isolates belonging to clones other than the BEC. The results show that, among MRSA, the BEC is common in Brazil. The best method for mapping changes in the frequency of this clone among MRSA is pulsed field gel electrophoresis. Use of molecular mapping is an important tool for monitoring the spread of potentially dangerous microbes.

  7. Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as the liver, brain and heart. Other consequences include premature aging and problems with the immune system. Another potential ... cell dies. This is part of the natural aging process that seems to happen in all cell types. As a consequence, clones created from a cell taken from an ...

  8. A timescale for evolution, population expansion, and spatial spread of an emerging clone of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Nübel

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the lack of fossil evidence, the timescales of bacterial evolution are largely unknown. The speed with which genetic change accumulates in populations of pathogenic bacteria, however, is a key parameter that is crucial for understanding the emergence of traits such as increased virulence or antibiotic resistance, together with the forces driving pathogen spread. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a common cause of hospital-acquired infections. We have investigated an MRSA strain (ST225 that is highly prevalent in hospitals in Central Europe. By using mutation discovery at 269 genetic loci (118,804 basepairs within an international isolate collection, we ascertained extremely low diversity among European ST225 isolates, indicating that a recent population bottleneck had preceded the expansion of this clone. In contrast, US isolates were more divergent, suggesting they represent the ancestral population. While diversity was low, however, our results demonstrate that the short-term evolutionary rate in this natural population of MRSA resulted in the accumulation of measurable DNA sequence variation within two decades, which we could exploit to reconstruct its recent demographic history and the spatiotemporal dynamics of spread. By applying Bayesian coalescent methods on DNA sequences serially sampled through time, we estimated that ST225 had diverged since approximately 1990 (1987 to 1994, and that expansion of the European clade began in 1995 (1991 to 1999, several years before the new clone was recognized. Demographic analysis based on DNA sequence variation indicated a sharp increase of bacterial population size from 2001 to 2004, which is concordant with the reported prevalence of this strain in several European countries. A detailed ancestry-based reconstruction of the spatiotemporal dispersal dynamics suggested a pattern of frequent transmission of the ST225 clone among hospitals within Central Europe. In addition

  9. Genome comparisons of two Taiwanese community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST59 clones support the multi-origin theory of CA-MRSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ye; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Chen, Chih-Jung; Chen, Chyi-Liang; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2017-10-01

    Sequence type (ST) 59 is an epidemic lineage of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) in Asia. Two ST59 clones are prevalent in Taiwan: the Taiwan clone (TW) causes severe infections, whereas the Asian-Pacific clone (AP) is usually commensal. In this study, we sequenced the genome and transcriptome of the representative strains of these two clones and found their differences to focus on three mobile genetic elements: TW carries SCCmec Type V T , Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL)-encoding prophage ΦSa2, whereas AP carries SCCmec Type IV and staphylokinase (SAK)-encoding prophage ΦSa3. The anti-virulent role of SAK was confirmed using murine skin and bloodstream infection models. ΦSa3 usually integrates into the hlb gene, but in AP was found to be integrated at the genomic island νSaβ. The mutation of the attB site "TGTATCCAAACTGG" to "TGTATCCGAATTGG" led to a failure in the integration of ΦSa3 in hlb, prompting atypical integration at other sites. The sak gene possessed remarkably different patterns of distribution among the different STs of S. aureus. We conclude that the atypical integration of ΦSa3 may help S. aureus adapt to the human host habitat and that the subsequent loss of ΦSa3 contributes toward the development of a virulent CA-MRSA lineage for wider horizontal transmission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical manifestations and outcome of skin infections caused by the community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone ST80-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giudice, P; Bes, M; Hubiche, T; Roudière, L; Blanc, V; Lina, G; Vandenesch, F; Etienne, J

    2011-02-01

    Several Panton-Valentin leukocidin-positive clones of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) are spreading worldwide. The European clone ST80-IV is the main CA-MRSA clone in Europe. There is no reported study of the specific clinical manifestations and outcome of skin infections caused by the clone ST80-IV, using strict definitions of skin diseases. Single-centre observational prospective cohort of S. aureus skin infections caused by the clone ST80-IV. From November 1999 to October 2009, we diagnosed skin infections due to the clone ST80-IV in 20 patients (median age 28 years, median 27; range 1-66). All the isolates had all the following characteristics: lukPV, etd and edin gene-positive, agr 3 allele, spa-type t044 and ST80. All the isolates were resistant to beta-lactam agents, kanamycin, tetracycline and fusidic acid. During the study period, the 20 patients had the following manifestations: 19 primary abscesses (18 single abscess and one patient with two), eight furuncles, four folliculitis, one case of cellulitis, one wound infection and one felon. Surgical treatment and drainage was required for all the primary abscesses. The infections occurred mainly in the perineal area (50%). No secondary infections occurred in family members. Despite strict hygiene measures, systemic antibiotics and nasal mupirocine, four patients (20%) had recurrent skin infections over a period of a few months to 6 years. The CA-MRSA clone ST80-IV is responsible for suppurative skin infections such as furuncles and abscesses, which can recur over a period of several years. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Staphylococcus aureus strain M1, a unique t024-ST8-IVa Danish methicillin-resistant i>S.> aureus clone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larner-Svensson, Hanna; Worning, Peder; Bartels, Mette

    2013-01-01

    We report the genome sequence, in five contigs, of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolate designated M1. This clinical isolate was from the index patient of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak in Copenhagen, Denmark, that started in 2003. This strain is se...

  12. The dissemination of ST80-SCCmec-IV community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone in Kuwait hospitals

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    Sarkhoo Eiman

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA is a global healthcare problem. The purpose of this study was to characterize CA-MRSA clones and their distribution in Kuwait hospitals. Methods In total, 135 CA-MRSA isolates, carrying the SCCmec IV or V genetic elements, isolated in eight hospitals were characterized using antibiogram, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing, and carriage of genes for Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL, capsular polysaccharides types (cap 5 and 8, accessory genes regulators (agr, Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (tst. Results They were susceptible to vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid but resistant to kanamycin (62%, fusidic acid (42.2%, tetracycline (39.3%, erythromycin and clindamycin (21.5%, gentamicin (5.9%, streptomycin (6.7%, trimethoprim (5.9%, mupirocin (6.6% and cadmium acetate (82.2%. They consisted of 10 pulsotypes with the majority belonging to PFGE type I (51.1%, type II (22.2%, type IV (13.3% and type III (3.7%. They belonged to 10 sequence types (ST comprising ST80 (51.1%, ST30 (22.2%, ST5 (14.1%, ST1 (4.45, ST6 (3.7%, ST88 (1.5%, ST834 (1.5%, ST8 (0.7%, ST46 (0.7% and ST950 (0.7%. Genes for PVL, cap 8, cap 5 and agr III, agr I and agr II were detected in 61.5%, 77.3%, 20.7% and 62.2%, 17% and 8.1% of the isolates respectively. Nine (6.7% isolates contained tst while 103 isolates were positive for SE genes with sei (63.0%, seg (41.5% and sed (29.6% as the common SE genes. Conclusions ST80-SCCmecIV was the most common CA-MRSA clone in Kuwait hospitals presenting new challenges for infection control.

  13. Distinct Bacteriophages Encoding Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) among International Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clones Harboring PVL▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boakes, E.; Kearns, A. M.; Ganner, M.; Perry, C.; Hill, R. L.; Ellington, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Genetically diverse community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) can harbor a bacteriophage encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) lysogenized into its chromosome (prophage). Six PVL phages (ΦPVL, Φ108PVL, ΦSLT, ΦSa2MW, ΦSa2USA, and ΦSa2958) are known, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PVL genes have been reported. We sought to determine the distribution of lysogenized PVL phages among MRSA strains with PVL (PVL-MRSA strains), the PVL gene sequences, and the chromosomal phage insertion sites in 114 isolates comprising nine clones of PVL-MRSA that were selected for maximal underlying genetic diversity. The six PVL phages were identified by PCR; ΦSa2USA was present in the highest number of different lineages (multilocus sequence type clonal complex 1 [CC1], CC5, CC8, and sequence type 93 [ST93]) (n = 37 isolates). Analysis of 92 isolates confirmed that PVL phages inserted into the same chromosomal insertion locus in CC22, -30, and -80 but in a different locus in isolates of CC1, -5, -8, -59, and -88 and ST93 (and CC22 in two isolates). Within the two different loci, specific attachment motifs were found in all cases, although some limited inter- and intralineage sequence variation occurred. Overall, lineage-specific relationships between the PVL phage, the genes that encode the toxin, and the position at which the phage inserts into the host chromosome were identified. These analyses provide important insights into the microepidemiology of PVL-MRSA, will prove a valuable adjunct in outbreak investigation, and may help predict the emergence of new strains. PMID:21106787

  14. Complete substitution of the Brazilian endemic clone by other methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus lineages in two public hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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    Raiane Cardoso Chamon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important cause of bloodstream infections. Therefore, the main purpose of this work was to characterize a collection of 139 S. aureus isolates from bloodstream infections in two public hospitals in relation to their antimicrobial susceptibility profile, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec types, and clonal relationship. Methicillin resistance and resistance to other 12 agents were accessed by the disk diffusion test. Minimum inhibitory concentration to mupirocin was also determined. The SCCmec types were accessed by multiplex PCR, and the clonal relationship was determined by pulsed field gel electrophoresis method and restriction modification system characterization. Besides, multilocus sequence typing was performed for representative methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates. The military hospital showed a dissemination of the New York/Japan (USA100/ST5/CC5/SCCmecII lineage associated to multidrug resistance, including mupirocin resistance, and the teaching hospital presented polyclonal and non-multidrug resistant MRSA isolates. Complete substitution of the Brazilian endemic clone by other lineages was found in both hospitals. These findings can highlight differences in policy control and prevention of infections used in the hospitals and a change in the epidemiological profile of MRSA in Brazilian hospitals, with the replacement of BEC, a previously well-established clone, by other lineages.

  15. High prevalence of colonization with Staphylococcus aureus clone USA300 at multiple body sites among sexually transmitted disease clinic patients: an unrecognized reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miko, Benjamin A; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin; Gelman, Amanda; Lee, Caroline J; Hafer, Cory A; Sullivan, Sean B; Shi, Qiuhu; Miller, Maureen; Zenilman, Jonathan; Lowy, Franklin D

    2012-10-01

    Extranasal colonization is increasingly recognized as an important reservoir for Staphylococcus aureus among high-risk populations. We conducted a cross-sectional study of multiple body site colonization among 173 randomly selected STD clinic patients in Baltimore, Maryland. Staphylococcal carriage at extranasal sites, including the oropharynx, groin, rectum, and genitals, was common among study subjects. The USA300 clone was particularly associated with multiple sites of colonization compared with non-USA300 strains (p = .01). Given their high burden of multi-site colonization and confluence of established staphylococcal risk factors, STD clinic patients may represent a community-based reservoir for S. aureus and be well suited for innovative infection control initiatives. Copyright © 2012 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Emergence and Dissemination of a Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Panton-Valentine Leucocidin-Positive Staphylococcus aureus Clone Sharing the Sequence Type 5 Lineage with the Most Prevalent Nosocomial Clone in the Same Region of Argentina▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Claudia; Saka, Hector A.; Vindel, Ana; Bocco, José Luis

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological surveillance for community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus revealed prevalences of 33% and 13% in pediatric and adult patients, respectively, in Cordoba, Argentina, in 2005. This study describes for the first time the emergence and dissemination of the sequence type 5 (ST5) lineage as the most prevalent clone (89%) (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type I-ST5-staphylococcal cassette chromosome type IVa-spa type 311) harboring the Panton-Valentine leukocidin and enterotoxin A genes. PMID:18322068

  17. Adaptive Change Inferred from Genomic Population Analysis of the ST93 Epidemic Clone of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinear, Timothy P.; Holt, Kathryn E.; Chua, Kyra; Stepnell, Justin; Tuck, Kellie L.; Coombs, Geoffrey; Harrison, Paul Francis; Seemann, Torsten; Howden, Benjamin P.

    2014-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has emerged as a major public health problem around the world. In Australia, ST93-IV[2B] is the dominant CA-MRSA clone and displays significantly greater virulence than other S. aureus. Here, we have examined the evolution of ST93 via genomic analysis of 12 MSSA and 44 MRSA ST93 isolates, collected from around Australia over a 17-year period. Comparative analysis revealed a core genome of 2.6 Mb, sharing greater than 99.7% nucleotide identity. The accessory genome was 0.45 Mb and comprised additional mobile DNA elements, harboring resistance to erythromycin, trimethoprim, and tetracycline. Phylogenetic inference revealed a molecular clock and suggested that a single clone of methicillin susceptible, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) positive, ST93 S. aureus likely spread from North Western Australia in the early 1970s, acquiring methicillin resistance at least twice in the mid 1990s. We also explored associations between genotype and important MRSA phenotypes including oxacillin MIC and production of exotoxins (α-hemolysin [Hla], δ-hemolysin [Hld], PSMα3, and PVL). High-level expression of Hla is a signature feature of ST93 and reduced expression in eight isolates was readily explained by mutations in the agr locus. However, subtle but significant decreases in Hld were also noted over time that coincided with decreasing oxacillin resistance and were independent of agr mutations. The evolution of ST93 S. aureus is thus associated with a reduction in both exotoxin expression and oxacillin MIC, suggesting MRSA ST93 isolates are under pressure for adaptive change. PMID:24482534

  18. Replacement of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clones in Hungary over time : a 10-year surveillance study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conceicao, T.; Aires-de-Sousa, M.; Fuzi, M.; Toth, A.; Paszti, J.; Ungvari, E.; van Leeuwen, W. B.; van Belkum, A.; Grundmann, H.; de Lencastre, H.

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Hungary has been increasing and is now close to 20% among invasive isolates of S. aureus. In order to understand the evolution of MRSA in Hungary, two collections of isolates were studied: 22 representatives of a collection of

  19. Rapid containment of nosocomial transmission of a rare community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) clone, responsible for the Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome (SSSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamanna, Onofrio; Bongiorno, Dafne; Bertoncello, Lisa; Grandesso, Stefano; Mazzucato, Sandra; Pozzan, Giovanni Battista; Cutrone, Mario; Chirico, Michela; Baesso, Flavia; Brugnaro, Pierluigi; Cafiso, Viviana; Stefani, Stefania; Campanile, Floriana

    2017-01-06

    The aims of this study were to identify the source and the transmission pathway for a Staphylococcal Scalded Skin Syndrome (SSSS) outbreak in a maternity setting in Italy over 2 months, during 2014; to implement appropriate control measures in order to prevent the epidemic spread within the maternity ward; and to identify the Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) epidemic clone. Epidemiological and microbiological investigations, based on phenotyping and genotyping methods, were performed. All neonates involved in the outbreak underwent clinical and microbiological investigations to detect the cause of illness. Parents and healthcare workers were screened for Staphylococcus aureus to identify asymptomatic carriers. The SSSS outbreak was due to the cross-transmission of a rare clone of ST5-CA-MRSA-SCCmecV-spa type t311, exfoliative toxin A-producer, isolated from three neonates, one mother (from her nose and from dermatological lesions due to pre-existing hand eczema) and from a nurse (colonized in her nose by this microorganism). The epidemiological and microbiological investigation confirmed these as two potential carriers. A rapid containment of these infections was obtained only after implementation of robust swabbing of mothers and healthcare workers. The use of molecular methodologies for typing was able to identify all carriers and to trace the transmission.

  20. The dominant Australian community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone ST93-IV [2B] is highly virulent and genetically distinct.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyra Y L Chua

    Full Text Available Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA USA300 has spread rapidly across North America, and CA-MRSA is also increasing in Australia. However, the dominant Australian CA-MRSA strain, ST93-IV [2B] appears distantly related to USA300 despite strikingly similar clinical and epidemiological profiles. Here, we compared the virulence of a recent Australian ST93 isolate (JKD6159 to other MRSA, including USA300, and found that JKD6159 was the most virulent in a mouse skin infection model. We fully sequenced the genome of JKD6159 and confirmed that JKD6159 is a distinct clone with 7616 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs distinguishing this strain from all other S. aureus genomes. Despite its high virulence there were surprisingly few virulence determinants. However, genes encoding α-hemolysin, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL and α-type phenol soluble modulins were present. Genome comparisons revealed 32 additional CDS in JKD6159 but none appeared to encode new virulence factors, suggesting that this clone's enhanced pathogenicity could lie within subtler genome changes, such as SNPs within regulatory genes. To investigate the role of accessory genome elements in CA-MRSA epidemiology, we next sequenced three additional Australian non-ST93 CA-MRSA strains and compared them with JKD6159, 19 completed S. aureus genomes and 59 additional S. aureus genomes for which unassembled genome sequence data was publicly available (82 genomes in total. These comparisons showed that despite its distinctive genotype, JKD6159 and other CA-MRSA clones (including USA300 share a conserved repertoire of three notable accessory elements (SSCmecIV, PVL prophage, and pMW2. This study demonstrates that the genetically distinct ST93 CA-MRSA from Australia is highly virulent. Our comparisons of geographically and genetically diverse CA-MRSA genomes suggest that apparent convergent evolution in CA-MRSA may be better explained by the rapid

  1. Genetic diversity of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from burn patients in Iran: ST239-SCCmec III/t037 emerges as the major clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Bahramian, Mahnaz; Satarzadeh Tabrizi, Mahboobeh; Udo, Edet E; Figueiredo, Agnes Marie Sá; Fazeli, Maryam; Goudarzi, Hossein

    2017-04-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as a major cause of infection in health care, hospital and community settings is a global health concern. The purpose of this study was to determine the antibiotic susceptibility pattern and distribution of circulating molecular types of MRSA in a burn hospital in Tehran, the capital of Iran. During a 10-month study period, 106 Staphylococcus aureus isolates were assessed. Isolates were subjected to susceptibility testing using the disk diffusion method and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) for detection of mecA, fem and nuc genes. The presence of PVL and tst encoding genes were determined by PCR method. All the MRSA isolates were genotyped by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, SCCmec typing and agr typing. The presence of mecA gene was confirmed in all the Staphylococcus aureus isolates. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed a high resistance rate (90.6%) to ampicillin, tetracycline, and erythromycin. The rates of resistance to remaining antibiotics tested varied between 18.9% and 84.9%. The high- level of resistance to mupirocin was confirmed in 19.8% of MRSA strains isolated from burn patients. Multi-drug resistance was observed in 90.6% of isolates. Sixteen of the 106 MRSA isolates (15.1%) harbored PVL-encoding genes. The majority of our MRSA strains carried SCCmec III (71.7%). ST239-SCCmec III/t037 (34%) was the most common genotype followed by ST239-SCCmec III/t030 (24.5%), ST15-SCCmec IV/t084 (15.1%), ST22-SCCmec IV/t790 (13.2%), and ST239-SCCmec III/t631 (13.2%). Mupirocin resistant MRSA isolates belonged to ST15-SCCmec IV/t084 (40%), ST22-SCCmec IV/t790 (23.3%), ST239-SCCmec III/t631 (20%), and ST239-SCCmec III/t030 (16.7%) clones. The results showed that genetically diverse strains of MRSA are circulating in our burn hospitals with relatively high prevalence of ST239-SCCmec III/t037 clone. The findings support the need for regular surveillance of MRSA to determine the distribution of

  2. ST2249-MRSA-III: a second major recombinant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone causing healthcare infection in the 1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, G R; Steen, J A; Monecke, S; Ehricht, R; Slickers, P; Thomas, J C; Appleton, S; Goering, R V; Robinson, D A; Coombs, G W

    2015-05-01

    Typing of healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from Australia in the 1970s revealed a novel clone, ST2249-MRSA-III (CC45), present from 1973 to 1979. This clone was present before the Australian epidemic caused by the recombinant clone, ST239-MRSA-III. This study aimed to characterize the genome of ST2249-MRSA-III to establish its relationship to other MRSA clones. DNA microarray analysis was conducted and a draft genome sequence of ST2249 was obtained. The recombinant structure of the ST2249 genome was revealed by comparisons to publicly available ST239 and ST45 genomes. Microarray analysis of genomic DNA of 13 ST2249 isolates showed gross similarities with the ST239 chromosome in a segment around the origin of replication and with ST45 for the remainder of the chromosome. Recombination breakpoints were precisely determined by the changing pattern of nucleotide polymorphisms in the genome sequence of ST2249 isolate SK1585 compared with ST239 and ST45. One breakpoint was identified to the right of oriC, between sites 1014 and 1065 of the gene D484_00045. Another was identified to the left of oriC, between sites 1185 and 1248 of D484_01632. These results indicate that ST2249 inherited approximately 35.3% of its chromosome from an ST239-like parent and 64.7% from an ST45-like parent. ST2249-MRSA-III resulted from a major recombination between parents that resemble ST239 and ST45. Although only limited Australian archival material is available, the oldest extant isolate of ST2249 predates the oldest Australian isolate of ST239 by 3 years. It is therefore plausible that these two recombinant clones were introduced into Australia separately. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Horses in Denmark Are a Reservoir of Diverse Clones of Methicillin-Resistant and -Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Md Zohorul; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Damborg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Denmark is a country with high prevalence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex (CC) 398 in pigs. Even though pig farming is regarded as the main source of human infection or colonization with MRSA CC398, 10-15% of the human cases appear...... not to be linked to pigs. Following the recent reports of MRSA CC398 in horses in other European countries and the lack of knowledge on S. aureus carriage in this animal species, we carried out a study to investigate whether horses constitute a reservoir of MRSA CC398 in Denmark, and to gain knowledge...... identification by MALDI-TOF MS and MRSA confirmation by standard PCR-based methods, S. aureus and MRSA were detected in 54 (13%) and 17 (4%) horses originating from 30 (40%) and 7 (9%) farms, respectively. Based on spa typing, MSSA differed genetically from MRSA isolates. The spa type prevalent among MSSA...

  4. New patterns of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clones, community-associated MRSA genotypes behave like healthcare-associated MRSA genotypes within hospitals, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Ana L; Gagetti, Paula; Lamberghini, Ricardo; Faccone, Diego; Lucero, Celeste; Vindel, Ana; Tosoroni, Dario; Garnero, Analía; Saka, Hector A; Galas, Marcelo; Bocco, José L; Corso, Alejandra; Sola, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) burden is increasing worldwide in hospitals [healthcare-associated (HA)-MRSA] and in communities [community-associated (CA)-MRSA]. However, the impact of CA-MRSA within hospitals remains limited, particularly in Latin America. A countrywide representative survey of S. aureus infections was performed in Argentina by analyzing 591 clinical isolates from 66 hospitals in a prospective cross-sectional, multicenter study (Nov-2009). This work involved healthcare-onset infections-(HAHO, >48 hospitalization hours) and community-onset (CO) infections [including both, infections (HACO) in patients with healthcare-associated risk-factors (HRFs) and infections (CACO) in those without HRFs]. MRSA strains were genetically typed as CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA genotypes (CA-MRSAG and HA-MRSAG) by SCCmec- and spa-typing, PFGE, MLST and virulence genes profile by PCR. Considering all isolates, 63% were from CO-infections and 55% were MRSA [39% CA-MRSAG and 16% HA-MRSAG]. A significantly higher MRSA proportion among CO- than HAHO-S. aureus infections was detected (58% vs 49%); mainly in children (62% vs 43%). The CA-MRSAG/HA-MRSAG have accounted for 16%/33% of HAHO-, 39%/13% of HACO- and 60.5%/0% of CACO-infections. Regarding the epidemiological associations identified in multivariate models for patients with healthcare-onset CA-MRSAG infections, CA-MRSAG behave like HA-MRSAG within hospitals but children were the highest risk group for healthcare-onset CA-MRSAG infections. Most CA-MRSAG belonged to two major clones: PFGE-type N-ST30-SCCmecIVc-t019-PVL(+) and PFGE-type I-ST5-IV-SCCmecIVa-t311-PVL(+) (45% each). The ST5-IV-PVL(+)/ST30-IV-PVL(+) clones have caused 31%/33% of all infections, 20%/4% of HAHO-, 43%/23% of HACO- and 35%/60% of CACO- infections, with significant differences by age groups (children/adults) and geographical regions. Importantly, an isolate belonging to USA300-0114-(ST8-SCCmecIVa-spat008-PVL(+)-ACME(+)) was detected

  5. A timescale for evolution, population expansion, and spatial spread of an emerging clone of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nübel, Ulrich; Dordel, Janina; Kurt, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    or antibiotic resistance, together with the forces driving pathogen spread. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common cause of hospital-acquired infections. We have investigated an MRSA strain (ST225) that is highly prevalent in hospitals in Central Europe. By using mutation discovery...

  6. Two distinct clones of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with the same USA300 pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profile: a potential pitfall for identification of USA300 community-associated MRSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Rhod; Goering, Richard; Stegger, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) characterized as USA300 by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis identified two distinct clones. One was similar to community-associated USA300 MRSA (ST8-IVa, t008, and Panton-Valentine leukocidin positive). The second (ST8-IVa, t024...

  7. Chlorhexidine whole-body washing of patients reduces methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and has a direct effect on the distribution of the ST5-MRSA-II (New York/Japan) clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Meza, Maria Elena; Mendoza-Olazarán, Soraya; Echániz-Aviles, Gabriela; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; Martínez-Reséndez, Michel Fernando; Valero-Moreno, Vanessa; Garza-González, Elvira

    2017-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonizes the skin of hospitalized patients and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. To prevent colonization and infection by S. aureus, better disinfection practices are required. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of chlorhexidine whole-body washing on hospital-acquired S. aureus infections among intensive care unit (ICU) patients in a tertiary hospital in Mexico. The study was conducted over 18 months to evaluate the effect of 2 % chlorhexidine gluconate (CXG) whole-body washing of ICU adult patients on chlorhexidine and antibiotic resistance, biofilm production and clonal distribution of S. aureus in a tertiary care hospital. Minimum inhibitory concentrations for CXG, antibiotic susceptibility and biofilm production by S. aureus isolates were determined. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and PCR for Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) were used for molecular typing of MRSA isolates.Results/Key findings. We included 158 isolates. A reduction in antibiotic resistance in the study period was observed for clindamycin, levofloxacin, norfloxacin, oxacillin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. None of the isolates showed reduced susceptibility to CXG. Most of the isolates were non-biofilm producers (147/158). The most commonly identified clone was a descendant of the ST5-MRSA-II (New York/Japan) clone. This clone decreased during the intervention period and reappeared markedly in the post-intervention period. During the post-intervention period, two isolates were related with the clone ST8-MRSA-IV (also known as USA300). Our findings suggest that the CXG bathing favored the reduction of healthcare-associated MRSA isolates and a temporary reduction of the predominant ST5-MRSA-II (New York/Japan) clone.

  8. An uncommon presentation for a severe invasive infection due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone USA300 in Italy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tronci Mirella

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has been considered for many years a typical nosocomial pathogen. Recently MRSA has emerged as a frequent cause of infections in the community. More commonly, community-acquired (CA-MRSA is a cause of infections of the skin and soft-tissues, but life-threatening infections such as necrotizing pneumonia and sepsis can occasionally occur. Case presentation This report describes an uncommon presentation of invasive CA-MRSA infection in an adolescent without known risk factors. The presentation was typical for bacterial meningitis, but the clinical findings also revealed necrotizing pneumonia. Following the development of deep venous thrombosis, the presence of an inherited trombophilic defect (factor V Leiden was detected. The patient was successfully treated with an antibiotic combination including linezolid and with anticoagulant therapy. CA-MRSA was isolated from both cerebrospinal fluid and blood. The isolates were resistant to oxacillin and other beta-lactam antibiotics and susceptible to the other antibiotics tested including erythromycin. Molecular typing revealed that the strains contained the Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes and type IV SCCmec, and were ST8, spa type t008, and agr type 1. This genetic background is identical to that of the USA300 clone. Conclusion This report highlights that meningitis can be a new serious presentation of CA-MRSA infection. CA-MRSA strains with the genetic background of the USA300 clone are circulating in Italy and are able to cause severe infections.

  9. An uncommon presentation for a severe invasive infection due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone USA300 in Italy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Piero; Parisi, Gabriella; Monaco, Monica; Crea, Francesca; Spanu, Teresa; Ranno, Orazio; Tronci, Mirella; Pantosti, Annalisa

    2008-04-30

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been considered for many years a typical nosocomial pathogen. Recently MRSA has emerged as a frequent cause of infections in the community. More commonly, community-acquired (CA)-MRSA is a cause of infections of the skin and soft-tissues, but life-threatening infections such as necrotizing pneumonia and sepsis can occasionally occur. This report describes an uncommon presentation of invasive CA-MRSA infection in an adolescent without known risk factors. The presentation was typical for bacterial meningitis, but the clinical findings also revealed necrotizing pneumonia. Following the development of deep venous thrombosis, the presence of an inherited thrombophilic defect (factor V Leiden) was detected. The patient was successfully treated with an antibiotic combination including linezolid and with anticoagulant therapy. CA-MRSA was isolated from both cerebrospinal fluid and blood. The isolates were resistant to oxacillin and other beta-lactam antibiotics and susceptible to the other antibiotics tested including erythromycin. Molecular typing revealed that the strains contained the Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes and type IV SCCmec, and were ST8, spa type t008, and agr type 1. This genetic background is identical to that of the USA300 clone. This report highlights that meningitis can be a new serious presentation of CA-MRSA infection. CA-MRSA strains with the genetic background of the USA300 clone are circulating in Italy and are able to cause severe infections.

  10. Multilocus Sequence Typing and Staphylococcal Protein A Typing Revealed Novel and Diverse Clones of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Seafood and the Aquatic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugadas, V; Toms, C Joseph; Reethu, Sara A; Lalitha, K V

    2017-03-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been a global health concern since the 1960s, and isolation of this pathogen from food-producing animals has been increasing. However, little information is available on the prevalence of MRSA and its clonal characteristics in seafood and the aquatic environment. In this study, 267 seafood and aquatic environment samples were collected from three districts of Kerala, India. Staphylococcal protein A (spa) typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was performed for 65 MRSA strains isolated from 20 seafood and aquatic environment samples. The MRSA clonal profiles were t657-ST772, t002-ST5, t334-ST5, t311-ST5, t121-ST8, t186-ST88, t127-ST1, and two non-spa assignable strains. Whole spa gene sequence analysis along with MLST confirmed one strain as t711-ST6 and another as a novel MRSA clone identified for the first time in seafood and the aquatic environment with a t15669 spa type and a new MLST profile of ST420-256-236-66-82-411-477. The MRSA strains were clustered into five clonal complexes based on the goeBURST algorithm, indicating high diversity among MRSA strains in seafood and the aquatic environment. The novel clone formed a separate clonal complex with matches to three loci. This study recommends large-scale spa typing and MLST of MRSA isolates from seafood and the aquatic environment to determine the prevalence of new MRSA clones. This monitoring process can be useful for tracing local spread of MRSA isolates into the seafood production chain in a defined geographical area.

  11. Poultry-Like pA+ Biotype of Staphylococcus aureus CC346/084 Clone in Human Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechowicz, Lidia; Garbacz, Katarzyna

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was (1) to analyse the prevalence of P-like pA+ biotype of S. aureus in material from healthy and diseased individuals, not employed at slaughterhouses or meat processing plants, and (2) to analyse the relatedness of these strains and their genetic variability. The study included 344 strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from hospitalized patients with staphylococcal infections and from healthy carriers. The biotypes of S. aureus were determined on the basis of fibrinolysin and β-haemolysin production, coagulation of bovine plasma, and type of growth on crystal violet agar. Additionally, the strains were tested for the synthesis of protein A in order to distinguish between P-like pA+ and poultry biotypes. Fibrinolysin gene (sak) and methicillin resistance (mecA) were detected by means of PCR. The clonal structure of studied strains was analysed using pulsed field gel electrophoresis and sequencing of spa gene. Finally, the strains were typed with a basic set of 23 bacteriophages. The strains belonging to P-like pA+ biotype corresponded to nearly 20 % of all the studied strains. In contrast to the human biotype, they formed one clonal complex, spa-CC346/084. The P-like pA+ biotype strains did not synthesize fibrinolysin, lacked the sak gene, and showed susceptibility to methicillin. In contrast to the human biotype strains, they belonged mostly to phage group II. The P-like pA+ biotype strains, previously described solely in meat products and meat industry workers, can be also present in hospitalized patients and extra-hospital carriers. These strains form a single, fibrinolysin-negative, clonal complex t084/CC346.

  12. Heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate susceptibility in a community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus epidemic clone, in a case of Infective Endocarditis in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vindel Ana

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-Associated Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA has traditionally been related to skin and soft tissue infections in healthy young patients. However, it has now emerged as responsible for severe infections worldwide, for which vancomycin is one of the mainstays of treatment. Infective endocarditis (IE due to CA-MRSA with heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate susceptibility-(h-VISA has been recently reported, associated to an epidemic USA 300 CA-MRSA clone. Case Presentation We describe the occurrence of h-VISA phenotype in a case of IE caused by a strain belonging to an epidemic CA-MRSA clone, distinct from USA300, for the first time in Argentina. The isolate h-VISA (SaB2 was recovered from a patient with persistent bacteraemia after a 7-day therapy with vancomycin, which evolved to fatal case of IE complicated with brain abscesses. The initial isolate-(SaB1 was fully vancomycin susceptible (VSSA. Although MRSA SaB2 was vancomycin susceptible (≤2 μg/ml by MIC (agar and broth dilution, E-test and VITEK 2, a slight increase of MIC values between SaB1 and SaB2 isolates was detected by the four MIC methods, particularly for teicoplanin. Moreover, Sab2 was classified as h-VISA by three different screening methods [MHA5T-screening agar, Macromethod-E-test-(MET and by GRD E-test] and confirmed by population analysis profile-(PAP. In addition, a significant increase in cell-wall thickness was revealed for SaB2 by electron microscopy. Molecular typing showed that both strains, SaB1 and SaB2, belonged to ST5 lineage, carried SCCmecIV, lacked Panton-Valentine leukocidin-(PVL genes and had indistinguishable PFGE patterns (subtype I2, thereby confirming their isogenic nature. In addition, they were clonally related to the epidemic CA-MRSA clone (pulsotype I detected in our country. Conclusions This report demonstrates the ability of this epidemic CA-MRSA clone, disseminated in some regions of Argentina, to

  13. USA300-related methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone is the predominant cause of community and hospital MRSA infections in Colombian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Ortiz, Ricaurte Alejandro; Álvarez-Olmos, Martha I; Escobar Pérez, Javier Antonio; Leal, Aura Lucia; Castro, Betsy Esperanza; Mariño, Ana Cristina; Barrero, Esther Rocio; Mujica, Sandra Celina; Gaines, Sebastián; Vanegas, Natasha

    2014-08-01

    Community-genotype methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CG-MRSA) isolates are known to be more virulent and clinically aggressive in children. The goal of the present study was characterize the molecular epidemiology of MRSA isolates causing infections in Colombian children. An observational and prospective study was conducted between April 2009 and June 2011 at 15 hospitals in Bogotá, Colombia. A detailed epidemiological profile was made of 162 children infected with MRSA. The isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, molecular characterization including 21 virulence genes, SCCmec, spa and agr typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among all isolates included in the study, 85.8% were obtained from patients whose infectious process was initiated in the community; of these, 69,8% occurred in patients without healthcare-associated risk factors. The molecular characterization of the isolates showed a high proportion (95.1%) containing a community-genotype profile with a high prevalence of SCCmec type IV, PVL-positives, and also related to CC8. Most CG-MRSA isolates (143, 92.9%) were genetically related to the pandemic clone USA300, differing by the presence of SCCmec IVc and the absence of the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME). An increase in the frequency of CG-MRSA infections has been reported worldwide. In this study we found that almost all MRSA infections in our pediatric population were caused by community-genotype isolates, supporting the success of the CG-MRSA clones. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Dissemination of multiple MRSA clones among community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections from Japanese children with impetigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisata, Ken; Ito, Teruyo; Matsunaga, Nobuaki; Komatsu, Mitsutaka; Jin, Jingxun; Li, Shanshuang; Watanabe, Shinya; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2011-10-01

    The proportion of MRSA strains that cause skin and soft infections has recently increased. In 3 months we have characterized 17 MRSA strains isolated from children with impetigo at a Japanese hospital. Seventeen MRSA strains belonged to 7 clones defined by clonal complex (CC) in MLST genotype and type of SCCmec, which were rarely identified among healthcare-associated MRSA: CC 91-SCCmecIIb (4 strains); CC91-SCCmecIIn (2 strains); CC91-SCCmecIVa (2 strains); CC91-SCCmecV (4 strains); CC88-SCCmecIVg (3 strains); CC1-SCCmecIVc (1 strain); and CC5-SCCmecIVn (1 strain). Although one strain belonged to CC5, which has been commonly identified in healthcare-associated MRSA, it did not carry type II SCCmec, but carried type IV SCCmec. Fourteen of the 17 strains carried exfoliative toxin a or b gene, and none carried Panton-Valentine leukocidine gene. Furthermore, we determined the entire nucleotide sequences of two type V SCCmec elements carried by strains JCSC5952, a CC91 strain, and TSGH17, a Taiwanese CC59 strain. The structure of SCCmecJCSC5952 was more than 99% homologous in nucleotide identity with those of Taiwanese PVL-positive ST59 MRSA strains TSGH17 and PM1, which were designated as type V (5C2&5). Identification of multiple MRSA clones distinct from those disseminating at the hospital suggests that MRSA strains might be emerging in the community from MSSA strains by acquiring SCCmec elements on various occasions. Carriage of the similar type V(5C2&5) SCCmec element by strains of distinct genetic backgrounds, CC91 and CC59, suggested horizontal transfer of the SCCmec element.

  15. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clones with high-level mupirocin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Domínguez, María; Seral, Cristina; Potel, Carmen; Sáenz, Yolanda; Álvarez, Maximiliano; Torres, Carmen; Castillo, Francisco Javier

    2016-06-01

    A high proportion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered in one year period showed high-level mupirocin-resistance (HLMUPR-MRSA) in our environment (27.2%). HLMUPR-MRSA isolates were mainly collected from skin and soft tissue samples, and diabetes was the main related comorbidity condition. These isolates were more frequently found in vascular surgery. HLMUPR-MRSA was more resistant to aminoglycosides than mupirocin-susceptible MRSA, linked to the presence of bifunctional and/or nucleotidyltransferase enzymes with/without macrolide resistance associated with the msr(A) gene. Most of HLMUPR-MRSA isolates belonged to ST125/t067. Nine IS257-ileS2 amplification patterns (p3 was the most frequent) were observed in HLMUPR-MRSA isolates, suggesting the presence of several mupirocin-resistance-carrying plasmids in our environment and promoting the emergence of mupirocin resistance. The presence of the same IS257-ileS2 amplification pattern p3 in 65% of HLMUPR-MRSA, all of them ST125/t067, suggests a clonal spread in our hospital and community environment which could explain the high prevalence of HLMUPR-MRSA during the study period. An outbreak situation or an increase in mupirocin consumption was not observed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA in Italy

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    Borbone Sonia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of our study was to trace the dynamic changes of hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA lineages in Italy, comparing the genotypic backgrounds of contemporary isolates over a period of 17 years, with those of a sample of early MRSA strains from 1980. In total, 301 non-repetitive MRSA clinical isolates, recovered from 19 Italian hospitals between 1990 and 2007 were selected and analyzed for their antibiotic resistance, typed by PFGE and SCCmec, grouped into clonal-types and further characterized using Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST. A sample of fifteen early MRSA strains from 1980 was also used for comparison. The most interesting feature was the recent increase of ST228-MRSA-I (formerly the Italian clone; PFGE E over the period 2000–2007 (57%, when compared to the period 1990–1999 (29%, and its stability to date, associated with a decrease of the highly epidemic ST247-MRSA-IA (formerly the Iberian clone; PFGE A, (23% from 1990 to 1999, 6% from 2000 to 2007. ST1-MRSA-I (1 out of 2 strains carrying ccrA2B2, ST8-MRSA-I (4 strains, ST15-MRSA-I (1 out of 4 carrying ccrA2B2 and ST30-MRSA-I (2 out of 5 carrying no ccrAB-types and ccrC were the predominant earliest STs among the MRSA strains in 1980. A temporal shift in the susceptibility levels to glycopeptides was observed: strains with vancomycin MIC of ≥ 2 mg/L increased from 19.4% to 35.5%. In conclusion, we describe the alternation of MRSA clones that occurred in hospitals from 1990 to 2007 and the increase of the glycopeptide MIC levels, reflecting a worldwide trend. We document the detection of ST1, ST8, ST15 and ST30 in the 1980 isolates; we hypothesize their possible latency and their appearance as the current CA-MRSA clones.

  17. Development of a novel matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrum (MALDI-TOF-MS)-based typing method to identify meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, O; Tanaka, S; Nagasawa, Z; Hanaki, H; Shobuike, T; Miyamoto, H

    2015-06-01

    Mass spectrum analysis enables species- and subspecies-level identification, and can be used as an epidemiological tool in outbreak management. However, its reliability at clonal level has yet to be established. To establish a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass-spectrum-based method that enables bacterial clone identification with accuracy equivalent to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis/phage open-reading frame typing (PFGE/POT). Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was used in this study. Mass spectra were obtained from a standard strain of S. aureus (ATCC29213) and 57 clinically isolated strains, categorized according to POT. Peaks associated with MRSA clone identification (N = 67) were extracted. Based on this peak information, the feasibility of MRSA clone identification was examined by cluster analysis. In addition to the 58 strains used for peak extraction, mass spectrum analysis of 24 clinically isolated outbreak strains revealed that peak data could be used for successful identification of clones. These typing results were fully consistent with the PFGE and POT results. This novel method enables simple and rapid typing with accuracy equivalent to PFGE/POT. This method would be suited to rapid outbreak analysis, offering accurate information to combat infectious diseases. Copyright © 2015 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative Genomics of Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Shows the Emergence of Clone ST8-USA300 in Geneva, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Dach, Elodie; Diene, Seydina M; Fankhauser, Carolina; Schrenzel, Jacques; Harbarth, Stephan; François, Patrice

    2016-05-01

    Previous investigations of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(CA-MRSA) isolates have revealed a wide diversity of genetic backgrounds, with only sporadic occurrence of ST8-USA300, in Geneva, Switzerland. We conducted a molecular epidemiologic analysis to identify the origin of a sudden increase of ST8 PVL-positive isolates in Geneva during 2013. On the basis of prospective CA-MRSA surveillance, we collected colonizing and infecting ST8-USA300 isolates and compared them to non-ST8 CA-MRSA isolates. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) was performed for each isolate of this collection, and discriminating molecular features were linked to patient data. In 2013, 22 isolates with the ST8-USA300 profile were identified among 46 cases of CA-MRSA. WGS revealed 2 groups of strains that differed by the type of the SCCmec IV element encoded and whether they harbored an arginine catabolism mobile element (ACME) locus. ACME-negative strains were mainly isolated from patients traveling in or originating from South America. Single-nucleotide polymorphism positions in isolate groups were used to infer their common ancestor, determine their geographical origin, and trace their relatedness. WGS allowed the identification of transmission events and revealed that the increased prevalence of USA300 CA-MRSA isolates resulted from multiple importation events from the Americas but not from local clonal expansion of a successful clone. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. The emerging ST8 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone in the community in Japan: associated infections, genetic diversity, and comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwao, Yasuhisa; Ishii, Rumiko; Tomita, Yusuke; Shibuya, Yasuhiro; Takano, Tomomi; Hung, Wei-chun; Higuchi, Wataru; Isobe, Hirokazu; Nishiyama, Akihito; Yano, Mio; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Ogata, Kikuyo; Okubo, Takeshi; Khokhlova, Olga; Ho, Pak-leung; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2015-07-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has become a major concern worldwide. In the United States, ST8 CA-MRSA with SCCmecIVa (USA300) has been predominant, affecting the entire United States. In this study, we investigated Japanese ST8 CA-MRSA with new SCCmecIV1 (designated ST8 CA-MRSA/J), which has emerged in Japan since 2003. Regarding community spread and infections, ST8 CA-MRSA/J spread in 16.2-34.4% as a major genotype in the community in Japan, and was associated with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), colitis, and invasive infections (sepsis, epidural abscesses, and necrotizing pneumonia), including influenza prodrome cases and athlete infections, similar to USA300. It spread to even public transport and Hong Kong through a Japanese family. Regarding genetic diversity, ST8 CA-MRSA/J included ST and spa variants and was classified into at least three pulsed-field gel electrophoresis types, ST8 Jα to γ. Of those, ST8 Jβ was associated with severe invasive infections. As for genomics, ST8 CA-MRSA/J showed high similarities to USA300, but with marked diversity in accessory genes; e.g., ST8 CA-MRSA/J possessed enhanced cytolytic peptide genes of CA-MRSA, but lacked the Panton-Valentine leukocidin phage and arginine catabolic mobile element, unlike USA300. The unique features of ST8 CA-MRSA/J included a novel mosaic SaPI (designated SaPIj50) carrying the toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 gene with high expression; the evolution included salvage (through recombination) of hospital-acquired MRSA virulence. The data suggest that ST8 CA-MRSA/J has become a successful native clone in Japan, in association with not only SSTIs but also severe invasive infections (posing a threat), requiring attention.

  20. Antimicrobial activity of ceftaroline against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates collected in 2013-2014 at the Geneva University Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrey, D O; François, P; Manzano, C; Bonetti, E J; Harbarth, S; Schrenzel, J; Kelley, W L; Renzoni, A

    2017-02-01

    Ceftaroline is a broad-spectrum antibiotic with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. Ceftaroline susceptibility of an MRSA set archived between 1994 and 2003 in the Geneva University Hospitals detected a high percentage (66 %) of ceftaroline resistance in clonotypes ST228 and ST247 and correlated with mutations in PBP2a. The ceftaroline mechanism of action is based on the inhibition of PBP2a; thus, the identification of PBP2a mutations of recently circulating clonotypes in our institution was investigated. We analyzed ceftaroline susceptibility in MRSA isolates (2013 and 2014) and established that resistant strains correlated with PBP2a mutations and specific clonotypes. Ninety-six MRSA strains were analyzed from independent patients and were isolated from blood cultures (23 %), deep infections (38.5 %), and superficial (skin or wound) infections (38.5 %). This sample showed a ceftaroline minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) range between 0.25 and 2 μg/ml and disk diameters ranging from 10 to 30 mm, with a majority of strains showing diameters ≥20 mm. Based on the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) breakpoints, 76 % (73/96) of isolates showed susceptibility to ceftaroline. Nevertheless, we still observed 24 % (23/96) of resistant isolates (MIC = 2 μg/ml). All resistant isolates were assigned to clonotype ST228 and carried the N146K mutation in PBP2a. Only two ST228 isolates showed ceftaroline susceptibility. The decreasing percentage of ceftaroline-resistant isolates in our hospital can be explained by the decline of ST228 clonotype circulating in our hospital since 2008. We present evidence that ceftaroline is active against recent MRSA strains from our hospital; however, the presence of PBP2a variants in particular clonotypes may affect ceftaroline efficacy.

  1. Characteristics of hospital patients colonized with livestock-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) CC398 versus other MRSA clones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köck, R; Siam, K; Al-Malat, S; Christmann, J; Schaumburg, F; Becker, K; Friedrich, A W

    2011-01-01

    Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) associated with the clonal complex (CC) 398 has emerged among livestock and humans exposed to these animals. MRSA CC398 has so far contributed relatively little to spread of MRSA and the burden of disease in the healthcare setting. This study aimed

  2. Evolution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus towards increasing resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strommenger, Birgit; Bartels, Mette Damkjær; Kurt, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate the evolutionary history of Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex (CC) 8, which encompasses several globally distributed epidemic lineages, including hospital-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and the highly prevalent community-associated MRSA clone USA300....

  3. Pre-Use Susceptibility to Ceftaroline in Clinical Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Germany: Is There a Non-Susceptible Pool to be Selected?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Strommenger

    Full Text Available Ceftaroline is a new cephalosporin active against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Based on a representative collection of clinical S. aureus isolates from Germany, supplemented with isolates of clonal lineages ST228 and ST239, we demonstrate the in-vitro susceptibility towards ceftaroline prior to its introduction into clinical use for a total of 219 isolates. Susceptibility testing was performed by broth microdilution, disc diffusion and Etest, respectively. Results were interpreted according to EUCAST guidelines and showed considerable variance in dependence on clonal affiliation of the isolates tested. Among isolates of widespread hospital-associated lineages we found a high proportion of clinical isolates with MICs close to the EUCAST breakpoint (MIC50/90 1.0/1.5 mg/L; currently, interpretation of these "borderline" MICs is complicated by a lack of concordant susceptibility testing methods and reasonable breakpoint determination. Isolates of clonal lineages ST228 and ST239 demonstrated increased MIC50/90 values of 2.5/3.33 mg/L. Sequencing of mecA revealed no association of resistance to a specific mecA polymorphism, but rather reveals two regions in the non-penicillin-binding domain of PbP2a which displayed different combinations of mutations putatively involved in resistance development. This study provides national baseline data to (i adjust susceptibility testing methods and current breakpoints to clinical and epidemiological requirements, (ii evaluate current breakpoints with respect to therapeutic outcome and (iii monitor further resistance evolution.

  4. Nasal carriage of a single clone of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among kindergarten attendees in northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Shih-Yi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: To evaluate the prevalence and microbiological characterization of community-acquired (CA methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA nasal carriage in a kindergarten. Methods: Point prevalence study. Nasal swabs were collected from healthy children younger than 7 years of age who were attending a kindergarten in Taipei, Taiwan. A parent questionnaire regarding MRSA risk factors was administered simultaneously. All CA-MRSA colonization isolates were archived for subsequent antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular typing. Results: Of the 68 children who participated in the study, 17 (25% had S. aureus isolated from nasal swabs. Nine (13.2% of the 68 children had CA-MRSA carriage, and none of them had any identified risk factors. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed all of the 9 CA-MRSA colonization isolates had uniformly high resistance (100% to both clindamycin and erythromycin, the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin-constitutive phenotype and the ermB gene. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed 8 (88.9% of 9 CA-MRSA colonization isolates were genetically related and multilocus sequence typing revealed all isolates had sequence type 59. All of the colonization isolates carried the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IV, but none were positive for the Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that a single predominant CA-MRSA colonization strain featuring high clindamycin resistance circulated in this kindergarten. Additionally, due to the established transmissibility of colonization isolates, the high prevalence of nasal carriage of CA-MRSA among healthy attendees in kindergartens may indicate the accelerated spread of CA-MRSA in the community.

  5. Cambios a lo largo del tiempo en la distribución de los complejos de clones dominantes de Staphylococcus aureus resistente a la meticilina en Medellín, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Ocampo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. Parte del éxito de Staphylococcus aureus resistente a la meticilina (SARM como patógeno se debe a la rápida diseminación de linajes pandémicos con perfiles variables de virulencia y sensibilidad antimicrobiana. En Colombia se han identificado clones asociados al hospital como el pediátrico (CC5-ST5-SCCmecIV, el brasilero (CC8-ST239-SCCmecIII y el chileno/cordobés (CC5-ST5-SCCmecI. Asimismo, se describió el USA300 (CC8-ST8-SCCmecIV, tradicionalmente asociado a la comunidad, causante de infecciones hospitalarias. Objetivo. Describir el comportamiento en el tiempo de los clones de SARM provenientes de un hospital universitario de Medellín en aislamientos recolectados con una década de diferencia. Materiales y métodos. Se analizaron 398 aislamientos de SARM, 67 recolectados en 1994 y 331 recolectados entre 2008 y 2010. La identificación y la sensibilidad a la meticilina se confirmaron mediante los genes nuc y mecA. La caracterización molecular incluyó la tipificación de spa, SCCmec, la electroforesis en gel de campo pulsado (Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis, PFGE, y la tipificación por secuenciación de locus múltiples (Multilocus Sequence Typing, MLST. Resultados. Al analizar los aislamientos de SARM de 1994 se encontró que pertenecían a un único linaje, el CC5-SCCmecIV, mientras que los aislamientos de 2008 a 2010 presentaron dos linajes dominantes: el CC8-SCCmecIVc, con cepas de los tipos spa t008 y t1610, estrechamente relacionadas con el clon USA 300, y el CC5-SCCmecI, con las de tipo spa t149, relacionadas con el clon chileno; no se detectaron cepas del linaje encontrado en 1994. Conclusiones. En este estudio se demuestra una dinámica en el tiempo de las cepas de S. aureus, y se señala la importancia de la vigilancia local y la difusión de los resultados, sobre todo en países como el nuestro, donde SARM es prevalente y la comprensión de su epidemiología es limitada.

  6. Nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among Swiss veterinary health care providers: detection of livestock- and healthcare-associated clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettstein Rosenkranz, K; Rothenanger, E; Brodard, I; Collaud, A; Overesch, G; Bigler, B; Marschall, J; Perreten, V

    2014-07-01

    We screened a total of 340 veterinarians (including general practitioners, small animal practitioners, large animal practitioners, veterinarians working in different veterinary services or industry), and 29 veterinary assistants for nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) at the 2012 Swiss veterinary annual meeting. MRSA isolates (n = 14) were detected in 3.8 % (95 % CI 2.1 - 6.3 %) of the participants whereas MRSP was not detected. Large animal practitioners were carriers of livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA) ST398-t011-V (n = 2), ST398-t011-IV (n = 4), and ST398-t034-V (n = 1). On the other hand, participants working with small animals harbored human healthcare-associated MRSA (HCA-MRSA) which belonged to epidemic lineages ST225-t003-II (n = 2), ST225-t014-II (n = 1), ST5-t002-II (n = 2), ST5-t283-IV (n = 1), and ST88-t186-IV (n = 1). HCA-MRSA harbored virulence factors such as enterotoxins, β-hemolysin converting phage and leukocidins. None of the MRSA isolates carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). In addition to the methicillin resistance gene mecA, LA-MRSA ST398 isolates generally contained additional antibiotic resistance genes conferring resistance to tetracycline [tet(M) and tet(K)], trimethoprim [dfrK, dfrG], and the aminoglycosides gentamicin and kanamycin [aac(6')-Ie - aph(2')-Ia]. On the other hand, HCA-MRSA ST5 and ST225 mainly contained genes conferring resistance to the macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B antibiotics [erm(A)], to spectinomycin [ant(9)-Ia], amikacin and tobramycin [ant(4')-Ia], and to fluoroquinolones [amino acid substitutions in GrlA (S84L) and GyrA (S80F and S81P)]. MRSA carriage may represent an occupational risk and veterinarians should be aware of possible MRSA colonization and potential for developing infection or for transmitting these strains. Professional exposure to animals should be reported upon hospitalization and before medical

  7. Staphylococcus aureus spa type t437

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glasner, C; Pluister, G; Westh, H

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) belonging to the multilocus sequence type clonal complex 59 (MLST CC59) is the predominant community-associated MRSA clone in Asia. This clone, which is primarily linked with the spa type t437, has so far only been reported in low numbers among...

  8. Genotyping of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman reveals the dominance of Panton–Valentine leucocidin-negative ST6-IV/t304 clone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.E. Udo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and distribution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA genotypes circulating at a tertiary hospital in the Sultanate of Oman. A total of 79 MRSA isolates were obtained from different clinical samples and investigated using antibiogram, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec, Spa typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST. The isolates were susceptible to linezolid, vancomycin, teicoplanin, tigecycline and mupirocin but were resistant to tetracycline (30.4%, erythromycin (26.6%, clindamycin (24.1%, trimethoprim (19.0%, ciprofloxacin (17.7%, fusidic acid (15.2% and gentamicin (12.7%. Molecular typing revealed 19 PFGE patterns, 26 Spa types and 21 sequence types. SCCmec-IV (86.0% was the dominant SCCmec type, followed by SCCmec-V (10.1%. SCCmec-III (2.5% and SCCmec-II (1.3% were less common. ST6-IV/t304 (n = 30 and ST1295-IV/t690 (n = 12 were the dominant genotypes followed by ST772-V/t657 (n = 5, ST30-IV/t019/t021 (n = 5, ST22-IV/t852 (n = 4, ST80-IV/t044 (n = 3 and 18 single genotypes that were isolated sporadically. On the basis of SCCmec typing and MLST, 91.2% of the isolates were classified as community-associated MRSA and 8.8% of the isolates (consisting of four ST22-IV/t852, one ST239-III/t632, one ST5-III/t311 and one ST5-II/t003 were classified as healthcare-associated MRSA. The study has revealed the dominance of a Panton–Valentine leucocidin-negative ST6-IV/t304 clone and provided insights into the distribution of antibiotic resistance in MRSA at the tertiary hospital in Oman. It also highlights the importance of surveillance in detecting the emergence of new MRSA clones in a healthcare facility.

  9. What is Cloning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donate Home Cloning What is Cloning What is Cloning Clones are organisms that are exact genetic copies. ... clones made through modern cloning technologies. How Is Cloning Done? Many people first heard of cloning when ...

  10. Differences between "classical" risk factors for infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infections caused by multiple clones of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IV MRSA strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Paula M; Trindade, Priscila A; Garcia, Tamara O; Pacheco, Renata L; Costa, Silvia F; Reinert, Cristina; Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Mamizuka, Elsa M; Garcia, Cilmara P; Levin, Anna S

    2009-02-01

    To identify risk factors associated with nosocomial bloodstream infections caused by multiple clones of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IV strain of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). An unmatched case-control study (at a ratio of 1:2) performed during the period from October 2002 through September 2003. A 2,000-bed tertiary care teaching hospital affiliated with the University of São Paulo in São Paulo, Brazil. Case patients (n=30) were defined either as patients who had a bloodstream infection due to SCCmec type IV MRSA diagnosed at least 48 hours after hospital admission or as neonates with the infection who were born in the hospital. Control patients (n=60) were defined as patients with SCCmec type III MRSA infection diagnosed at least 48 hours after hospital admission. Genes encoding virulence factors were studied in the isolates recovered from case patients, and molecular typing of the SCCmec type IV MRSA isolates was also done by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. In multivariate analysis, the following 3 variables were significantly associated with having a nosocomial bloodstream infection caused by SCCmec type IV strains of MRSA: an age of less than 1 year, less frequent use of a central venous catheter (odds ratio [OR], 0.07 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.02-0.28]; p= .025), and female sex. A second analysis was performed that excluded the case and control patients from the neonatal unit, and, in multivariate analysis, the following variables were significantly associated with having a nosocomial bloodstream infection caused by SCCmec type IV strains of MRSA: less frequent use of a central venous catheter (OR, 0.12 [95% CI, 0.03-0.55]; p= .007), lower Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score on admission (OR, 0.14 [95% CI, 0.03-0.61]; p= .009), less frequent surgery (OR, 0.21 [95% CI, 0.06-0.83]; p= .025), and female sex (OR, 5.70 [95% CI, 1.32-24.66]; p= .020). Of

  11. The nosocomial transmission rate of animal-associated ST398 meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bootsma, M.C.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830305; Wassenberg, M.W.M.; Trapman, J.P.; Bonten, M.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    The global epidemiology of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is characterized by different clonal lineages with different epidemiological behaviour. There are pandemic hospital clones (hospital-associated (HA-)MRSA), clones mainly causing community-acquired infections

  12. The nosocomial transmission rate of animal-associated ST398 meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bootsma, M.C.J.; Wassenberg, M.W.M.; Trapman, J.P.; Bonten, M.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    The global epidemiology of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is characterized by different clonal lineages with different epidemiological behaviour. There are pandemic hospital clones (hospital-associated (HA-)MRSA), clones mainly causing community-acquired infections

  13. Genome-Wide Analysis of Ruminant Staphylococcus aureus Reveals Diversification of the Core Genome▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Zakour, Nouri L; Sturdevant, Daniel E.; Even, Sergine; Guinane, Caitriona M.; Barbey, Corinne; Alves, Priscila D.; Cochet, Marie-Françoise; Gautier, Michel; Otto, Michael; Fitzgerald, J. Ross; Le Loir, Yves

    2008-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes disease in humans and a wide array of animals. Of note, S. aureus mastitis of ruminants, including cows, sheep, and goats, results in major economic losses worldwide. Extensive variation in genome content exists among S. aureus pathogenic clones. However, the genomic variation among S. aureus strains infecting different animal species has not been well examined. To investigate variation in the genome content of human and ruminant S. aureus, we carried out whole-ge...

  14. Academic Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally…

  15. Predominance of Three Closely Related Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clones Carrying a Unique ccrC-Positive SCCmec type III and the Emergence of spa t304 and t690 SCCmec type IV pvl+MRSA Isolates in Kinta Valley, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wai-Yew; Choo, Quok-Cheong; Chew, Choy-Hoong

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the epidemiology and clonality of 175 nonrepetitive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from clinical specimens collected between 2011 and 2012 in Kinta Valley in Malaysia. Molecular tools such as polymerase chain reaction, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and staphylococcal protein A (spa) typing were used. Our study revealed the predominance of three closely related ermA + SCCmec type III pulsotypes belonging to spa type t037 (Brazilian-Hungarian clone), which were deficient in the locus F, but positive for the ccrC gene in majority (65.7%) of the MRSA infections in this region. The first evidence of SCCmec type II MRSA in the country, belonging to spa type t2460, was also noted. Although the carriage of pvl gene was uncommon (8.6%) and mostly confined to either SCCmec type IV or SCCmec type V isolates, most of these isolates belonged to spa types t345 or t657, which are associated with the Bengal-Bay CA-MRSA clone. Interestingly, spa t304 and t690 SCCmec type IV pvl + were also detected among the MRSA isolates. Data from this study show the rise of uncommon clones among MRSA isolates in Malaysia.

  16. Nasal Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage among college student athletes in northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Kai Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Of 259 college students in northern Taiwan surveyed, nasal carriage rate of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA was 22.4% and 1.54%, respectively and no significant difference was found between athlete students and non-athlete students. Three of four MRSA isolates belonged to sequence type 59, the endemic community clone.

  17. Why Clone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to clone agricultural animals, such as cattle and pigs, that are efficient producers of high-quality milk ... risks involved. Visit Teach.Genetics Cite this page Feedback Disclaimer Permissions Policy Privacy Policy Copyright © University of ...

  18. Molecular Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus among Patients with Skin and Soft Tissue Infections in Two Chinese Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Fei Gu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The livestock ST398 was the most common clone among patients with S. aureus SSTIs in Jiangsu Province, China. Surveillance and further studies on the important livestock ST398 clone in human infections are necessarily requested.

  19. Cloning, clones and clonal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzatto, L

    2000-01-01

    In the past, cloning has been familiar to plant breeders because many plants can be easily reproduced in this way, bypassing the lengthy process of cross-fertilisation. Recently, the concept of cloning has become popular in human biology and medicine on two accounts. First, individual genes can be cloned from the enormous complexity of the DNA that makes up the human genetic material. It is expected that, within a few years, all the estimated 100,000 human genes will be isolated by this approach. This should make it possible to identify all the genes that determine the individual characteristics of human beings, including those responsible for causing human diseases or for making people more or less susceptible to pick up diseases from the environment. Cloned genes made into pharmaceutical products are already in use for treating a variety of diseases, from hormonal deficiencies to certain types of anaemia.

  20. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Geneva, Switzerland, 1993–2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbarth, Stephan; Huyghe, Antoine; Renzi, Gesuele; Bento, Manuela; Gervaix, Alain; Pittet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Molecular characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains different from those of an endemic healthcare-associated clone was conducted over 13 years in Geneva, Switzerland. We demonstrated strain diversity, including clones rarely found in Europe. Local epidemiology of community-associated MRSA is diverse and is evolving by importation and transmission of new strains. PMID:18258126

  1. Human Staphylococcus aureus lineages among Zoological Park ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clones were defined by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST), spa type and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Seven S. aureus isolates were recovered from four animals and one from an employee. All were mecA, mecC and tst–negative, whereas, one carried the PVL genes and was isolated from an infected ...

  2. Staphylococcus aureus 'Down Under': contemporary epidemiology of S. aureus in Australia, New Zealand, and the South West Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, D A; Coombs, G W; Nimmo, G R

    2014-07-01

    The clinical and molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus disease has changed considerably over the past two decades, particularly with the emergence and spread of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) clones. Indeed, some of the first global descriptions of CA-MRSA were from remote indigenous communities in Western Australia, and from Pacific Peoples in New Zealand. The epidemiology of S. aureus infections in the South West Pacific has several unique features, largely because of the relative geographical isolation and unique indigenous communities residing in this region. In particular, a number of distinct CA-MRSA clones circulate in Australia and New Zealand, such as sequence type (ST) 93 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) (Queensland clone) and clonal complex 75 S. aureus (Staphylococcus argenteus) in Australia, and ST30 MRSA (Southwest Pacific clone) in New Zealand. In addition, there is a disproportionate burden of S. aureus disease in indigenous paediatric populations, particularly in remote Aboriginal communities in Australia, and in Pacific Peoples and Maori in New Zealand. In this review, we provide a contemporary overview of the clinical and molecular epidemiology of S. aureus disease in the South West Pacific region, with a particular focus on features distinct to this region. © 2014 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  3. Human Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-20

    research group, headed by Douglas Melton and Kevin Eggan, submitted their proposal to a Harvard committee composed of ethicists, scientists and public...United States. Although the company offered no proof of its claim, Dr . Brigette Boisselier, Managing Director of Clonaid, stated that genetic tests would...a year of the Dolly announcement, concerns over human cloning were heightened when Dr . Richard Seed, a Chicago scientist, announced on January 7

  4. Risk factors for Staphylococcus aureus surgical site infection during an outbreak in patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Manal A; Williams, Victoria R; Plourde, Suzanne; Callery, Sandra; Simor, Andrew E; Vearncombe, Mary

    2013-06-01

    This study examined the epidemiology of an outbreak of Staphylococcus aureus surgical site infections (SSI) after cardiovascular surgery, and analyzed risk factors for S aureus SSIs. This was a retrospective case-control study to determine risk factors for S aureus SSI in 38 patients who developed S aureus SSI during the outbreak period, compared with age-, sex-, and procedure-matched controls. S aureus strains were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A total of 38 patients had S aureus SSI. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis identified transmission of 3 S aureus clones (2 MSSA clones and 1 MRSA clone). Twenty-one health care workers were carriers of outbreak strains. In multivariate analysis, the significant risk factors for S aureus SSI were previous cardiac surgery (odds ratio, 7.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-52.16) and long procedure duration (odds ratio, 1.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.00-2.21). This outbreak demonstrates evidence of nosocomial transmission of 3 clones of S aureus in the setting of incomplete compliance with recommended standard perioperative infection control measures, associated with a high prevalence of staff carriage of the predominant outbreak strains. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a neonatal alpaca

    OpenAIRE

    Stull, Jason W.; Kenney, Daniel G.; Slavić, Durda; Weese, J Scott

    2012-01-01

    A 6-hour-old alpaca was presented for evaluation of respiratory difficulty. As part of routine surveillance, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was identified from a nasal swab taken upon admission to the hospital. No signs of MRSA infection were noted. The MRSA strain recovered was a human epidemic clone that has been associated with horses. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization can occur in camelids, and the potential animal and public health risks require consideration.

  6. In vitro characterization of representative clinical South African Staphylococcus aureus isolates from various clonal lineages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosthuysen, W F; Orth, H; Lombard, C. J.; Sinha, B; Wasserman, E

    Data concerning the virulence and pathogenesis of South African strains of Staphylococcus aureus are limited. We investigated host-pathogen interactions of randomly selected clinical S. aureus isolates representing various clones. We characterized the ability of isolates to adhere to fibronectin,

  7. Application of molecular techniques in the study of Staphylococcus aureus clonal evolution - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Marcos Vivoni

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important agent of healthcare-associated and community-acquired infections. A major characteristic of this microorganism is the ability to develop resistance to antimicrobial agents. Several molecular techniques have been applied for the characterization of S. aureus in epidemiological studies. In the present review, we discuss the application of molecular techniques for typing S. aureus strains and describe the nomenclature and evolution of epidemic clones of this important pathogen.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcus aureus (Staph Infection) In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby with ... from your health care provider. What is a staph infection? Staphylococcus aureus (staph) is a type of ...

  9. Human cloning 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, David L; Weston, Gareth; Pera, Martin F; Rombauts, Luk; Trounson, Alan O

    2002-05-01

    This review summaries human cloning from a clinical perspective. Natural human clones, that is, monozygotic twins, are increasing in the general community. Iatrogenic human clones have been produced for decades in infertile couples given fertility treatment such as ovulation induction. A clear distinction must be made between therapeutic cloning using embryonic stem cells and reproductive cloning attempts. Unlike the early clinical years of in vitro fertilization, with cloning there is no animal model that is safe and dependable. Until there is such a model, 'Dolly'-style human cloning is medically unacceptable.

  10. High Level Expression and Purification of Atl, the Major Autolytic Protein of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet K. Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major human and animal pathogen. Autolysins regulate the growth, turnover, cell lysis, biofilm formation, and the pathogenicity of S. aureus. Atl is the major autolysin in S. aureus. The biochemical and structural studies of staphylococcal Atl have been limited due to difficulty in cloning, high level overexpression, and purification of this protein. This study describes successful cloning, high level over-expression, and purification of two forms of fully functional Atl proteins. These pure proteins can be used to study the functional and structural properties of this important protein.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus clonal dynamics and virulence factors in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Hans; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    , toxins, and were assigned to agr groups. S. aureus colonization patterns ranged from rare colonization over transient colonization to persistent colonization by a single clone or a dynamic exchange of up to five clones. Production of no single virulence factor including superantigens and toxins...

  12. Staphylococcus aureus toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a dangerous pathogen that causes a variety of severe diseases. The virulence of S. aureus is defined by a large repertoire of virulence factors, among which secreted toxins play a preeminent role. Many S. aureus toxins damage biological membranes, leading to cell death. In particular, S. aureus produces potent hemolysins and leukotoxins. Among the latter, some were recently identified to lyse neutrophils after ingestion, representing an especially powerful weapon against bacterial elimination by innate host defense. Furthermore, S. aureus secretes many factors that inhibit the complement cascade or prevent recognition by host defenses. Several further toxins add to this multi-faceted program of S. aureus to evade elimination in the host. This review will give an overview over S. aureus toxins focusing on recent advances in our understanding of how leukotoxins work in receptor-mediated or receptor-independent fashions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Cloning of observables

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraro, Alessandro; Galbiati, Matteo; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce the concept of cloning for classes of observables and classify cloning machines for qubit systems according to the number of parameters needed to describe the class under investigation. A no-cloning theorem for observables is derived and the connections between cloning of observables and joint measurements of noncommuting observables are elucidated. Relationships with cloning of states and non-demolition measurements are also analyzed.

  14. Cloning, high-level expression, purification and characterization of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The staphylokinase (Sak) is emerging as an important thrombolytic agent for the treatment of patients suffering from cardiovascular disease. Hence in this study, we reported the cloning, high-level expression, purification and characterization of the Sak variant SakøC from Staphylococcus aureus QT08 in Escherichia coli ...

  15. Global trend of Methicillin-resistant Staphlococcus aureus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Following its first recognition in early 1960s, the increasing incidence of nosocomial and community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections has become a global problem. The emergence of multiple-drug resistant MRSA strains and dissemination of epidemic antibiotic clones ...

  16. Construction of Stable Fluorescent Reporter Plasmids for Use in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle D. Rodriguez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Here, the genes encoding three different fluorescent proteins were cloned into the stably maintained Staphylococcus aureus shuttle vector pKK30. The resulting plasmids were transformed into two S. aureus strains; SH1000 and RN4220. Stability assays illustrated that the three recombinant plasmids retained near 100% maintenance in vitro for 160 generations. S. aureus strain SH1000 expressing green fluorescent protein was then inoculated in an ovine model and in vivo stability for 6 days was demonstrated. In essence, these reporter plasmids represent a useful set of tools for dynamic imaging studies in S. aureus. These three reporter plasmids are available through BEI Resources.

  17. Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream isolates collected in a Dutch University Hospital between 1999 and 2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nulens, Eric; Stobberingh, Ellen E; van Dessel, Helke; Sebastian, Silvie; van Tiel, Frank H; Beisser, Patrick S; Deurenberg, Ruud H

    We observed that, between 1999 and 2006, up to 50% of the methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bloodstream isolates in our hospital had a genetic background common to endemic methicillin-resistant S. aureus clones (clonal complex 5 [CC5], CC8, CC22, CC30, and CC45). Furthermore,

  18. Methicillin and vancomycin resistant S. aureus in hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Sood Loomba

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available S. aureus is the major bacterial cause of skin, soft tissue and bone infections, and one of the commonest causes of healthcare-associated bacteremia. Hospital-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA carriage is associated with an increased risk of infection, morbidity and mortality. Screening of high-risk patients at the time of hospital admission and decolonization has proved to be an important factor in an effort to reduce nosocomial transmission. The electronic database Pub Med was searched for all the articles on "Establishment of MRSA and the emergence of vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA." The search included case reports, case series and reviews. All the articles were cross-referenced to search for any more available articles. A total of 88 references were obtained. The studies showed a steady increase in the number of vancomycin-intermediate and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus. Extensive use of vancomycin creates a selective pressure that favors the outgrowth of rare, vancomycin-resistant clones leading to heterogenous vancomycin intermediate S. aureus hVISA clones, and eventually, with continued exposure, to a uniform population of vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA clones. However, the criteria for identifying hVISA strains have not been standardized, complicating any determination of their clinical significance and role in treatment failures. The spread of MRSA from the hospital to the community, coupled with the emergence of VISA and VRSA, has become major concern among healthcare providers. Infection-control measures, reliable laboratory screening for resistance, appropriate antibiotic prescribing practices and avoidance of blanket treatment can prevent long-term emergence of resistance.

  19. Empirical Results on Cloning and Clone Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Cloning means the use of copy-paste as method in developing software artefacts. This practice has several problems, such as unnecessary increase of these artefacts, and thereby increased comprehension and change efforts, as well as potential inconsistencies. The automatic detection of clones has been a topic for research for several years now and we have made huge progress in terms of precision and recall. This led to a series of empirical analyses we have performed on the effects and the amo...

  20. Staphylococcus aureus Central Nervous System Infections in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Jesus G; Cain, Alexandra N; Mason, Edward O; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Hultén, Kristina G

    2017-10-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus are uncommon in pediatric patients. We review the epidemiology, clinical features and treatment in 68 patients with a S. aureus CNS infection evaluated at Texas Children's Hospital. Cases of CNS infection in children with positive cerebrospinal fluid cultures or spinal epidural abscess (SEA) for S. aureus at Texas Children's Hospital from 2001 to 2013 were reviewed. Seventy cases of S. aureus CNS infection occurred in 68 patients. Forty-nine cases (70%) were secondary to a CNS device, 5 (7.1%) were postoperative meningitis, 9 (12.8%) were hematogenous meningitis and 7 (10%) were SEAs. Forty-seven (67.2%) were caused by methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and 23 (32.8%) by methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Community-acquired infections were more often caused by MRSA that was clone USA300/pvl. Most patients were treated with nafcillin (MSSA) or vancomycin (MRSA) with or without rifampin. Among patients with MRSA infection, 50% had a serum vancomycin trough obtained with the median level being 10.6 μg/mL (range: 5.4-15.7 μg/mL). Only 1 death was associated with S. aureus infection. The epidemiology of invasive of S. aureus infections continues to evolve with MSSA accounting for most of the infections in this series. The majority of cases were associated with neurosurgical procedures; however, hematogenous S. aureus meningitis and SEA occurred as community-acquired infections in patients without predisposing factors. Patients with MRSA CNS infections had a favorable response to vancomycin, but the beneficial effect of combination therapy or targeting vancomycin trough concentrations of 15-20 μg/mL remains unclear.

  1. High nasal carriage rate of Staphylococcus aureus containing Panton-Valentine leukocidin- and EDIN-encoding genes in community and hospital settings in Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoul-Salam OUEDRAOGO

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study were to investigate the rate of S. aureus nasal carriage and molecular characteristics in hospital and community settings in Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso. Nasal samples (n=219 were collected from 116 healthy volunteers and 103 hospitalized patients in July and August 2014. Samples were first screened using CHROMagar Staph aureus chromogenic agar plates, and S. aureus strains were identified by mass spectrometry. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested using the disk diffusion method on Müller-Hinton agar. All S. aureus isolates were genotyped using DNA microarray. Overall, the rate of S. aureus nasal carriage was 32.9% (72/219, 29% in healthy volunteers and 37% in hospital patients. Among the S. aureus isolates, only four methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA strains were identified and all in hospital patients (3.9%. The 72 S. aureus isolates from nasal samples belonged to 16 different clonal complexes, particularly to CC 152-MSSA (22 clones and CC1-MSSA (nine clones. Two clones were significantly associated with community settings: CC1-MSSA and CC45-MSSA. The MRSA strains belonged to the ST88-MRSA-IV or the CC8-MRSA-V complex. A very high prevalence of toxinogenic strains 52,2% (36/69, containing Panton-Valentine leucocidin- and EDIN-encoding genes, was identified among the S. aureus isolates in community and hospital settings. This study provides the first characterization of S. aureus clones and their genetic characteristics in Burkina Faso. Altogether, it highlights the low prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, high diversity of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus clones and high frequency of toxinogenic S. aureus strains.

  2. Statement on Human Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as our understanding of this technology advances. Support Stem Cell Research (including Research Cloning) AAAS supports stem cell research, including the use of nuclear transplantation techniques (also ...

  3. Gateway Recombinational Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece-Hoyes, John S; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2018-01-02

    The Gateway recombinatorial cloning system was developed for cloning multiple DNA fragments in parallel (e.g., in 96-well formats) in a standardized manner using the same enzymes. Gateway cloning is based on the highly specific integration and excision reactions of bacteriophage λ into and out of the Escherichia coli genome. Because the sites of recombination (" att " sites) are much longer (25-242 bp) than restriction sites, they are extremely unlikely to occur by chance in DNA fragments. Therefore, the same recombination enzyme can be used to robustly clone many different fragments of variable size in parallel reactions. © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus clonal dynamics and virulence factors in children with atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, Hans Bredsted; Andersen, KE; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    A prospective cohort study was undertaken to determine the clonal dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection during 1 y in children with atopic dermatitis, and to correlate specific clones, accessory gene regulator (agr) groups, and production of virulence factors with eczema...... activity. Eleven children were examined every 6 wk with swaps taken from active eczema, anterior nose, axillae and perineum, and scoring of eczema activity by severity scoring of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD). Individual S. aureus clonal types were identified and examined for production of superantigens...... SCORAD value. In 11 of 12 cases with two different clones co-colonizing a child the clones belonged to the same agr group. In conclusion, this limited group of children with atopic dermatitis showed highly variable colonization patterns of S. aureus, and communication between strains by use of agr...

  5. Molecular Characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus Causing Bovine Mastitis between 2014 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianming; Lu, Huiying; Wang, Xing; Gao, Qianqian; Dai, Yingxin; Shang, Jun; Li, Min

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is highly pathogenic and can cause diseases in both humans and domestic animals. In animal species, including ruminants, S. aureus may cause severe or sub-clinical mastitis. This study aimed to investigate the molecular profile, antimicrobial resistance, and genotype/phenotype correlation of 212 S. aureus isolates recovered from cases of bovine mastitis from 2014 to 2015 in the Shanghai and Zhejiang areas of China. Nineteen sequence types (STs) were determined by multi-locus sequence typing, while the dominant ST was ST97, followed by ST520, ST188, ST398, ST7, and ST9. Within 14 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates and 198 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates, ST97 was the predominant MSSA clone and ST9-MRSA-SCCmecXII-spa t899 was the most common MRSA clone. The MRSA strains showed much higher rates of resistance to multiple antibiotics than did MSSA strains. Compared with other MSSA strains, MSSA ST398 was more resistant to clindamycin, erythromycin, and ciprofloxacin. No isolates were resistant to vancomycin, teicoplanin, or linezolid. The molecular profiles of the virulence genes varied in different strains. ST520 strains carried seg-sei-sem-sen-seo genes, and ST9 and ST97 harbored sdrD-sdrE genes. Virulence phenotype analysis showed diversity in different clones. Biofilm formation ability was significantly enhanced in ST188 and ST7, and red blood cell lysis capacity was relatively strong in all S. aureus strains of animal origin except ST7. Our results indicate that MSSA was the predominant S. aureus strain causing bovine mastitis in eastern regions of China. However, the presence of multidrug resistant and toxigenic MRSA clone ST9 suggests that comprehensive surveillance of S. aureus infection should be implemented in the management of animal husbandry products.

  6. Cloning-free CRISPR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbab, Mandana; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Geijsen, Niels; Sherwood, Richard I

    2015-01-01

    We present self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR), a technology that allows for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genomic mutation and site-specific knockin transgene creation within several hours by circumventing the need to clone a site-specific single-guide RNA (sgRNA) or knockin homology construct for each

  7. Bovine Staphylococcus aureus: Subtyping, evolution, and zoonotic transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, R; Cosandey, A; Luini, M; Artursson, K; Bardiau, M; Breitenwieser, F; Hehenberger, E; Lam, Th; Mansfeld, M; Michel, A; Mösslacher, G; Naskova, J; Nelson, S; Podpečan, O; Raemy, A; Ryan, E; Salat, O; Zangerl, P; Steiner, A; Graber, H U

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is globally one of the most important pathogens causing contagious mastitis in cattle. Previous studies using ribosomal spacer (RS)-PCR, however, demonstrated in Swiss cows that Staph. aureus isolated from bovine intramammary infections are genetically heterogeneous, with Staph. aureus genotype B (GTB) and GTC being the most prominent genotypes. Furthermore, Staph. aureus GTB was found to be contagious, whereas Staph. aureus GTC and all the remaining genotypes were involved in individual cow disease. In addition to RS-PCR, other methods for subtyping Staph. aureus are known, including spa typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). They are based on sequencing the spa and various housekeeping genes, respectively. The aim of the present study was to compare the 3 analytic methods using 456 strains of Staph. aureus isolated from milk of bovine intramammary infections and bulk tanks obtained from 12 European countries. Furthermore, the phylogeny of animal Staph. aureus was inferred and the zoonotic transfer of Staph. aureus between cattle and humans was studied. The analyzed strains could be grouped into 6 genotypic clusters, with CLB, CLC, and CLR being the most prominent ones. Comparing the 3 subtyping methods, RS-PCR showed the highest resolution, followed by spa typing and MLST. We found associations among the methods but in many cases they were unsatisfactory except for CLB and CLC. Cluster CLB was positive for clonal complex (CC)8 in 99% of the cases and typically positive for t2953; it is the cattle-adapted form of CC8. Cluster CLC was always positive for tbl 2645 and typically positive for CC705. For CLR and the remaining subtypes, links among the 3 methods were generally poor. Bovine Staph. aureus is highly clonal and a few clones predominate. Animal Staph. aureus always evolve from human strains, such that every human strain may be the ancestor of a novel animal-adapted strain. The zoonotic transfer of IMI- and milk-associated strains

  8. Cloning, killing, and identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, J

    1999-01-01

    One potentially valuable use of cloning is to provide a source of tissues or organs for transplantation. The most important objection to this use of cloning is that a human clone would be the sort of entity that it would be seriously wrong to kill. I argue that entities of the sort that you and I essentially are do not begin to exist until around the seventh month of fetal gestation. Therefore to kill a clone prior to that would not be to kill someone like you or me but would be only to prevent one of us from existing. And even after one of us begins to exist, the objections to killing it remain comparatively weak until its psychological capacities reach a certain level of maturation. These claims support the permissibility of killing a clone during the early stages of its development in order to use its organs for transplantation. PMID:10226909

  9. Differential Analysis of the Nasal Microbiome of Pig Carriers or Non-Carriers of Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Larsen, Niels; Schonning, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is presently regarded as an emerging zoonotic agent due to the spread of specific methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clones in pig farms. Studying the microbiota can be useful for the identification of bacteria that antagonize such opportunistic veterinary and zoonotic...... these bacteria and assess their possible antagonistic effect on S. aureus for the pursuit of new strategies to control MRSA in pig farming....... pathogen in animal carriers. The aim of this study was to determine whether the nasal microbiome of pig S. aureus carriers differs from that of non-carriers. The V3-V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced from nasal swabs of 44 S. aureus carriers and 56 non-carriers using the 454 GS FLX titanium...

  10. Staphylococcus aureus in Some Brazilian Dairy Industries: Changes of Contamination and Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dittmann, Karen Kiesbye; Chaul, Luiza T.; Lee, Sarah H. I.

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a major food-poisoning pathogen, is a common contaminant in dairy industries worldwide, including in Brazil. We determined the occurrence of S. aureus in five dairies in Brazil over 8 months. Of 421 samples, 31 (7.4%) were positive for S. aureus and prevalence varied from 0.......8% of strains being sensitive to all antibiotic classes and no Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains were found. The enterotoxin-encoding genes involved in food-poisoning, e.g., sea, sed, see, and seg were targeted by PCR. The two toxin-encoding genes, sed and see, were not detected. Only three strains...... (4.5%) harbored seg and two of these also harbored sea. Despite the isolates being Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA), the presence of CC1 clones in the processing environment, including some harboring enterotoxin encoding genes, is of concern and hygiene must have high priority to reduce...

  11. Different Clonal Complexes of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Are Disseminated in the Euregio Meuse-Rhine Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deurenberg, Ruud H.; Vink, Cornelis; Oudhuis, Guy J.; Mooij, Jascha E.; Driessen, Christel; Coppens, Guy; Craeghs, Jos; De Brauwer, Els; Lemmen, Sebastian; Wagenvoort, Hans; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Scheres, Jacques; Stobberingh, Ellen E.

    2005-01-01

    The Euregio Meuse-Rhine (EMR) is formed by the border regions of Belgium, Germany, and The Netherlands. Cross-border health care requires infection control measures, in particular since the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) differs among the three countries. To investigate the dissemination of MRSA in the EMR, 152 MRSA isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), SCCmec typing, and multilocus sequence typing. PFGE revealed major clonal groups A, G, L, and Q, suggesting dissemination of MRSA in the EMR. Group A harbored mainly SCCmec type III and sequence types (STs) 239 and 241. The majority of the strains from group G harbored SCCmec type I and ST8 and ST247, whereas most strains from group L carried either SCCmec type IV or type I. Within group L, ST8 and ST228 were found, belonging to clonal complexes 8 and 5, respectively. Most strains from group Q included SCCmec type II and were sequence typed as ST225. Both ST225-MRSA-II and ST241-MRSA-III were novel findings in Germany. In addition, the SCCmec type of two isolates has not been described previously. One strain was classified as SCCmec type III but harbored the pls gene and the dcs region. Another strain was characterized as SCCmec type IV but lacked the dcs region. In addition, one isolate harbored both SCCmec type V and Panton-Valentine leukocidin. Finally, the SCCmec type of the strains was found to be correlated with the antibiotic susceptibility pattern. PMID:16189107

  12. BIOETHICS AND HUMAN CLONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Kaluđerović

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors analyze the process of negotiating and beginning of the United Nations Declaration on Human Cloning as well as the paragraphs of the very Declaration. The negotiation was originally conceived as a clear bioethical debate that should have led to a general agreement to ban human cloning. However, more often it had been discussed about human rights, cultural, civil and religious differences between people and about priorities in case of eventual conflicts between different value systems. In the end, a non-binding Declaration on Human Cloning had been adopted, full of numerous compromises and ambiguous formulations, that relativized the original intention of proposer states. According to authors, it would have been better if bioethical discussion and eventual regulations on cloning mentioned in the following text had been left over to certain professional bodies, and only after the public had been fully informed about it should relevant supranational organizations have taken that into consideration.

  13. Main: Clone Detail [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Clone Detail Mapping Pseudomolecule data detail Detail information Mapping to the T...IGR japonica Pseudomolecules kome_mapping_pseudomolecule_data_detail.zip kome_mapping_pseudomolecule_data_detail ...

  14. Unified Approach to Universal Cloning and Phase-Covariant Cloning

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jia-Zhong; Yu, Zong-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the problem of approximate quantum cloning when the quantum state is between two latitudes on the Bloch's sphere. We present an analytical formula for the optimized 1-to-2 cloning. The formula unifies the universal quantum cloning (UQCM) and the phase covariant quantum cloning.

  15. Enzyme free cloning for high throughput gene cloning and expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, R.N.; Daniëls, M.; Kaptein, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074334603; Folkers, G.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/162277202

    2006-01-01

    Structural and functional genomics initiatives significantly improved cloning methods over the past few years. Although recombinational cloning is highly efficient, its costs urged us to search for an alternative high throughput (HTP) cloning method. We implemented a modified Enzyme Free Cloning

  16. The evolution of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurenberg, Ruud H; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    2008-01-01

    A broad variety of infections, ranging from minor infections of the skin to post-operative wound infections can be caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The adaptive power of S. aureus to antibiotics leaded, in the early 1960s, to the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The cause of

  17. Development and identification of fully human scFv-Fcs against Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nian, Siji; Wu, Tong; Ye, Yingchun; Wang, Xu; Xu, Wenfeng; Yuan, Qing

    2016-04-29

    Staphylococcus aureus, a gram-positive pathogen, causes many human infections. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) is the most common drug-resistance bacteria. Nearly all MRSA bacteria are resistant to several drugs. Specific antibodies are the main components of the host's humoral immunity, and play a significant role in the process of the host's resistance to bacterial infection. A single-chain variable fragment (scFv) library was constructed using mRNA from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of S. aureus infected volunteers. After the scFv library DNA was transformed into Escherichia coli TG1, ~1.7 × 10(7) independent clones with full-length scFv inserts. The scFv library was screened by phage display for three rounds using S. aureus as an antigen. The single clones were chosen at random and the scFvs were expressed for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assessment. Approximately 50 % of the clones were positive with good binding activity to S. aureus. To improve the stability of scFvs, scFv-fragment crystallizable regions (-Fcs) were constructed and expressed in E. coli DH5α. The expressed scFv-Fcs were purified and identified by western blot. These antibodies were further characterized and analyzed for bioactivity. The results showed that the expression level and folding of scFv-Fcs induced at 25 °C without isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) were higher than that induced at 32 °C with 1.0 mmol/L IPTG. scFv-Fcs had good bioactivity and could specifically bind with S. aureus. scFv-Fcs against S. aureus were successfully constructed and are good candidates for the development of future adjunctive therapy for severe S. aureus infections.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus CC398

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Lance B.; Stegger, Marc; Hasman, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Since its discovery in the early 2000s, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 398 (CC398) has become a rapidly emerging cause of human infections, most often associated with livestock exposure. We applied whole-genome sequence typing to characterize a diverse collectio...

  19. Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcal Species via the agr Quorum Sensing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Canovas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococci are associated with both humans and animals. While most are non-pathogenic colonizers, Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing severe infections. S. aureus virulence is controlled by the agr quorum sensing system responding to secreted auto-inducing peptides (AIPs sensed by AgrC, a two component histidine kinase. agr loci are found also in other staphylococcal species and for Staphylococcus epidermidis, the encoded AIP represses expression of agr regulated virulence genes in S. aureus. In this study we aimed to better understand the interaction between staphylococci and S. aureus, and show that this interaction may eventually lead to the identification of new anti-virulence candidates to target S. aureus infections. Here we show that culture supernatants of 37 out of 52 staphylococcal isolates representing 17 different species inhibit S. aureus agr. The dog pathogen, Staphylococcus schleiferi, expressed the most potent inhibitory activity and was active against all four agr classes found in S. aureus. By employing a S. aureus strain encoding a constitutively active AIP receptor we show that the activity is mediated via agr. Subsequent cloning and heterologous expression of the S. schleiferi AIP in S. aureus demonstrated that this molecule was likely responsible for the inhibitory activity, and further proof was provided when pure synthetic S. schleiferi AIP was able to completely abolish agr induction of an S. aureus reporter strain. To assess impact on S. aureus virulence, we co-inoculated S. aureus and S. schleiferi in vivo in the Galleria mellonella wax moth larva, and found that expression of key S. aureus virulence factors was abrogated. Our data show that the S. aureus agr locus is highly responsive to other staphylococcal species suggesting that agr is an inter-species communication system. Based on these results we speculate that interactions between S. aureus and other colonizing staphylococci

  20. Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcal Species via the agr Quorum Sensing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canovas, Jaime; Baldry, Mara; Bojer, Martin S.; Andersen, Paal S.; Gless, Bengt H.; Grzeskowiak, Piotr K.; Stegger, Marc; Damborg, Peter; Olsen, Christian A.; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are associated with both humans and animals. While most are non-pathogenic colonizers, Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing severe infections. S. aureus virulence is controlled by the agr quorum sensing system responding to secreted auto-inducing peptides (AIPs) sensed by AgrC, a two component histidine kinase. agr loci are found also in other staphylococcal species and for Staphylococcus epidermidis, the encoded AIP represses expression of agr regulated virulence genes in S. aureus. In this study we aimed to better understand the interaction between staphylococci and S. aureus, and show that this interaction may eventually lead to the identification of new anti-virulence candidates to target S. aureus infections. Here we show that culture supernatants of 37 out of 52 staphylococcal isolates representing 17 different species inhibit S. aureus agr. The dog pathogen, Staphylococcus schleiferi, expressed the most potent inhibitory activity and was active against all four agr classes found in S. aureus. By employing a S. aureus strain encoding a constitutively active AIP receptor we show that the activity is mediated via agr. Subsequent cloning and heterologous expression of the S. schleiferi AIP in S. aureus demonstrated that this molecule was likely responsible for the inhibitory activity, and further proof was provided when pure synthetic S. schleiferi AIP was able to completely abolish agr induction of an S. aureus reporter strain. To assess impact on S. aureus virulence, we co-inoculated S. aureus and S. schleiferi in vivo in the Galleria mellonella wax moth larva, and found that expression of key S. aureus virulence factors was abrogated. Our data show that the S. aureus agr locus is highly responsive to other staphylococcal species suggesting that agr is an inter-species communication system. Based on these results we speculate that interactions between S. aureus and other colonizing staphylococci will significantly

  1. agr-dependent bacterial interference has no impact on long-term colonization of Staphylococcus aureus during persistent airway infection of cystic fibrosis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kahl, Barbara C; Becker, Karsten; Friedrich, Alexander W; Clasen, Julia; Sinha, Bhanu; Von Eiff, Christof; Peters, Georg

    2003-01-01

    The agr specificity group distribution of persistent Staphylococcus aureus clones recovered from the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients did not differ from that of isolates recovered from various clinical infections and healthy nasal carriers. The success of CF clones in terms of

  2. Update to the multiplex PCR strategy for assignment of mec element types in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milheiriço, Catarina; Oliveira, Duarte C; de Lencastre, Hermínia

    2007-09-01

    Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing is important for the identification and definition of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clones, and for routine purposes, multiplex PCR assays are the most adequate for SCCmec typing. Here, we describe an update to the multiplex PCR strategy for SCCmec typing that we described in 2002 so that SCCmec types IV and V may be properly identified.

  3. Transmissibility of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ST398) in Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassenberg, M. W. M.; Bootsma, M. C. J.; Troelstra, A.; Kluytmans, J. A. J. W.; Bonten, M. J. M.

    P>We quantified nosocomial transmission rates of sequence type (ST) 398 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (an emerging livestock-associated MRSA clone) and non-ST398 MRSA isolates in patients hospitalized without infection control measures in 51 Dutch hospitals. Identification of

  4. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus in post-earthquake northern Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marnie E. Rosenthal

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: We found a low S. aureus carriage rate with complete vancomycin susceptibility and high tetracycline resistance, which has important public health implications with regard to treatment. Additionally, the finding of PVL-positive MSSA isolates, including the expansion of a previously described limited ‘divergent’ clone, ST152, warrants further evaluation.

  5. Molecular epidemiological characteristics and clonal genetic diversity of Staphylococcus aureus with different origins in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Guoxiang; Bao, Guangyu; Jiao, Xinan

    2014-07-01

    To understand the intrinsic links and epidemic features of Staphylococcus aureus, isolates of this bacterium were collected from different origins in China. A total of 503 isolates from different sources were tested for the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and types of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) elements. Of these isolates, 250 were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Results showed that MRSA isolates account for 21.67% and have five types. SCCmec type I, II, and III isolates were all from humans, while SCCmec type IV, V, and untypeable MRSA isolates were from clinical origin, pigs, raw milk, or environments. The results by MLST showed considerable molecular heterogeneity in 52 different sequence types (STs) including 16 novel STs, which yielded 7 clonal complexes (CCs) and 5 doublets (Ds). The results from these analyses showed that hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA), rather than community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA), remained the major pathogenic bacterium in the clinical setting. CA-MRSA infections have been increasing and forming new pandemic clones. CC630, CC239, D9, and D398 were important clones in this study. CC630 was a new epidemic CA clone circulating among humans, environments, and animals. CC239 was a HA-MRSA-III pandemic clone of clinical origin. The D9 clone was a livestock-associated (LA) clone, which up to now, has spread only in livestock and has not been found in humans that live in Jiangsu province. In Europe and America, there are many reports of the ST398-LA-clone in pigs and in humans who are in contact with pigs. However, various studies in China, including this one, indicate that the ST398 clone could be a CA clone rather than an LA clone. This clone also has been infecting humans for about 2 decades.

  6. Targeting Staphylococcus aureus Toxins: A Potential form of Anti-Virulence Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Cin; Neoh, Hui-min; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen and the leading cause of a wide range of severe clinical infections. The range of diseases reflects the diversity of virulence factors produced by this pathogen. To establish an infection in the host, S. aureus expresses an inclusive set of virulence factors such as toxins, enzymes, adhesins, and other surface proteins that allow the pathogen to survive under extreme conditions and are essential for the bacteria’s ability to spread through tissues. Expression and secretion of this array of toxins and enzymes are tightly controlled by a number of regulatory systems. S. aureus is also notorious for its ability to resist the arsenal of currently available antibiotics and dissemination of various multidrug-resistant S. aureus clones limits therapeutic options for a S. aureus infection. Recently, the development of anti-virulence therapeutics that neutralize S. aureus toxins or block the pathways that regulate toxin production has shown potential in thwarting the bacteria’s acquisition of antibiotic resistance. In this review, we provide insights into the regulation of S. aureus toxin production and potential anti-virulence strategies that target S. aureus toxins. PMID:26999200

  7. Inverse fusion PCR cloning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Spiliotis

    Full Text Available Inverse fusion PCR cloning (IFPC is an easy, PCR based three-step cloning method that allows the seamless and directional insertion of PCR products into virtually all plasmids, this with a free choice of the insertion site. The PCR-derived inserts contain a vector-complementary 5'-end that allows a fusion with the vector by an overlap extension PCR, and the resulting amplified insert-vector fusions are then circularized by ligation prior transformation. A minimal amount of starting material is needed and experimental steps are reduced. Untreated circular plasmid, or alternatively bacteria containing the plasmid, can be used as templates for the insertion, and clean-up of the insert fragment is not urgently required. The whole cloning procedure can be performed within a minimal hands-on time and results in the generation of hundreds to ten-thousands of positive colonies, with a minimal background.

  8. Optimal asymptotic cloning machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiribella, Giulio; Yang, Yuxiang

    2014-06-01

    We pose the question whether the asymptotic equivalence between quantum cloning and quantum state estimation, valid at the single-clone level, still holds when all clones are examined globally. We conjecture that the answer is affirmative and present a large amount of evidence supporting our conjecture, developing techniques to derive optimal asymptotic cloners and proving their equivalence with estimation in virtually all scenarios considered in the literature. Our analysis covers the case of arbitrary finite sets of states, arbitrary families of coherent states, arbitrary phase- and multiphase-covariant sets of states, and two-qubit maximally entangled states. In all these examples we observe that the optimal asymptotic cloners enjoy a universality property, consisting in the fact that scaling of their fidelity does not depend on the specific details of the input states, but only on the number of free parameters needed to specify them.

  9. Bacteriophage-based latex agglutination test for rapid identification of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idelevich, Evgeny A; Walther, Thomas; Molinaro, Sonja; Li, Xuehua; Xia, Guoqing; Wieser, Andreas; Peters, Georg; Peschel, Andreas; Becker, Karsten

    2014-09-01

    Rapid diagnosis is essential for the management of Staphylococcus aureus infections. A host recognition protein from S. aureus bacteriophage phiSLT was recombinantly produced and used to coat streptavidin latex beads to develop a latex agglutination test (LAT). The diagnostic accuracy of this bacteriophage-based test was compared with that of a conventional LAT, Pastorex Staph-Plus, by investigating a clinical collection of 86 S. aureus isolates and 128 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) from deep tissue infections. All of the clinical S. aureus isolates were correctly identified by the bacteriophage-based test. While most of the CoNS were correctly identified as non-S. aureus isolates, 7.9% of the CoNS caused agglutination. Thus, the sensitivity of the bacteriophage-based LAT for identification of S. aureus among clinical isolates was 100%, its specificity was 92.1%, its positive predictive value (PPV) was 89.6%, and its negative predictive value (NPV) was 100%. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of the Pastorex LAT for the identification of S. aureus were 100%, 99.2%, 98.9%, and 100%, respectively. Among the additionally tested 35 S. aureus and 91 non-S. aureus staphylococcal reference and type strains, 1 isolate was false negative by each system; 13 and 8 isolates were false positive by the bacteriophage-based and Pastorex LATs, respectively. The ability of the phiSLT protein to detect S. aureus was dependent on the presence of wall teichoic acid (WTA) and corresponded to the production of ribitol phosphate WTA, which is found in most S. aureus clones but only a small minority of CoNS. Bacteriophage-based LAT identification is a promising strategy for rapid pathogen identification. Finding more specific bacteriophage proteins would increase the specificity of this novel diagnostic approach. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Staphylococcus aureus AMRF1 (ST22) and AMRF2 (ST672), Ocular Methicillin-Resistant Isolates

    KAUST Repository

    Velusamy, Nithya

    2014-03-20

    Sequence type 22 (ST22) and ST672 are the two major emerging clones of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in India. ST672 strains were found to cause severe ocular infections. We report the draft genome sequences of two emerging strains of methicillin-resistant S. aureus, AMRF1 (ST22) and AMRF2 (ST672), isolated from patients with ocular infections.

  11. Azoreductase in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wen; Cerniglia, Carl E; Chen, Huizhong

    2009-01-01

    Azoreductase(s) catalyze a NAD(P)H-dependent reaction in bacteria to metabolize azo dyes to colorless aromatic amines. Azoreductases from bacteria represent a novel family of enzymes with little similarity to other reductases. This unit will describe the current methods for measuring azoreductase from Staphylococcus aureus, which has been suggested to serve as a model strain to study the azo dye degradation by human skin microflora.

  12. The Cloning of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Judith E.; Dobson, Russell L.

    1981-01-01

    Proposes that the U.S. school system purports to prize human variability, but many educators are engaged in activities that seek to homogenize students. Describes these activities, including diagnosis, labeling, ability grouping, and positive reinforcement. Presents suggestions for counselors to combat sources of cloning and self-validation. (RC)

  13. Applications of quantum cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomarico, E.; Sanguinetti, B.; Sekatski, P.; Zbinden, H.; Gisin, N.

    2011-10-01

    Quantum Cloning Machines (QCMs) allow for the copying of information, within the limits imposed by quantum mechanics. These devices are particularly interesting in the high-gain regime, i.e., when one input qubit generates a state of many output qubits. In this regime, they allow for the study of certain aspects of the quantum to classical transition. The understanding of these aspects is the root of the two recent applications that we will review in this paper: the first one is the Quantum Cloning Radiometer, a device which is able to produce an absolute measure of spectral radiance. This device exploits the fact that in the quantum regime information can be copied with only finite fidelity, whereas when a state becomes macroscopic, this fidelity gradually increases to 1. Measuring the fidelity of the cloning operation then allows to precisely determine the absolute spectral radiance of the input optical source. We will then discuss whether a Quantum Cloning Machine could be used to produce a state visible by the naked human eye, and the possibility of a Bell Experiment with humans playing the role of detectors.

  14. Self-Cloning CRISPR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbab, M.; Sherwood, R. I.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9-gene editing has emerged as a revolutionary technology to easily modify specific genomic loci by designing complementary sgRNA sequences and introducing these into cells along with Cas9. Self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR) uses a self-cleaving palindromic sgRNA plasmid (sgPal) that

  15. Secure the Clones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Thomas; Kirchner, Florent; Pichardie, David

    Exchanging mutable data objects with untrusted code is a delicate matter because of the risk of creating a data space that is accessible by an attacker. Consequently, secure programming guidelines for Java stress the importance of using defensive copying before accepting or handing out references to an internal mutable object. However, implementation of a copy method (like clone()) is entirely left to the programmer. It may not provide a sufficiently deep copy of an object and is subject to overriding by a malicious sub-class. Currently no language-based mechanism supports secure object cloning. This paper proposes a type-based annotation system for defining modular copy policies for class-based object-oriented programs. A copy policy specifies the maximally allowed sharing between an object and its clone. We present a static enforcement mechanism that will guarantee that all classes fulfill their copy policy, even in the presence of overriding of copy methods, and establish the semantic correctness of the overall approach in Coq. The mechanism has been implemented and experimentally evaluated on clone methods from several Java libraries.

  16. A Seminar on Human Cloning: Cloning in Reproductive Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Illmensee, Karl

    2001-01-01

    This review article summarizes the historical development of mammalian cloning, presents current advances and presumed risk factors in the field of reproductive cloning, discusses possible clinical applications of therapeutic and diagnostic cloning and outlines prospective commercial trends in pharmacytical cloning. Predictable progress in biotechnology and stem cell engineering should prove to be advantageous for patients' health and for novel benefits in reproductive and regenerative medicine.

  17. New epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus infection in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C-J; Huang, Y-C

    2014-07-01

    Not only is Asia the most populous region in the world, but inappropriate therapy, including self-medication with over-the-counter antimicrobial agents, is a common response to infectious diseases. The high antibiotic selective pressure among the overcrowded inhabitants creates an environment that is suitable for the rapid development and efficient spread of numerous multidrug-resistant pathogens. Indeed, Asia is among the regions with the highest prevalence rates of healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) and community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) in the world. Most hospitals in Asia are endemic for multidrug-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), with an estimated proportion from 28% (in Hong Kong and Indonesia) to >70% (in Korea) among all clinical S. aureus isolates in the early 2010s. Isolates with reduced susceptibility or a high level of resistance to glycopeptides have also been increasingly identified in the past few years. In contrast, the proportion of MRSA among community-associated S. aureus infections in Asian countries varies markedly, from 35%. Two pandemic HA-MRSA clones, namely multilocus sequence type (ST) 239 and ST5, are disseminated internationally in Asia, whereas the molecular epidemiology of CA-MRSA in Asia is characterized by clonal heterogeneity, similar to that in Europe. In this review, the epidemiology of S. aureus in both healthcare facilities and communities in Asia is addressed, with an emphasis on the prevalence, clonal structure and antibiotic resistant profiles of the MRSA strains. The novel MRSA strains from livestock animals have been considered to constitute a public health threat in western countries. The emerging livestock-associated MRSA strains in Asia are also included in this review. © 2014 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  18. Multilocus Sequence Typing And Antibiotic Resistance Of Staphylococcus Aureus Isolated From The Brazilian Dairy Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dittmann, Karen Kiesbye; Chaul, Luiza; Lee, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of food poisoning due to enterotoxin production. This is particularly an issue in the dairy industry, where S. aureus can contaminate the product e.g. from raw milk or the handlers. In Brazil, soft cheese is mainly produced in small dairy plants where good...... hygiene practices can be limited. The aim of this study was to determine if Brazilian dairy plants were contaminated by S. aureus, and if any clones were persistent. Four dairy plants were sampled during 8 months (398 samples in total). S. aureus (n=66) was found in all the dairy plants...... was the dominant CC in the investigated dairy plants. However, there were no indications of re-occurring (persistent) STs in the plants. The potential health risk of the isolates was assessed by antibiotic resistance and hemolytic activity screening. Resistance levels were low, and all of the isolates were...

  19. Molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical Staphylococcus aureus from healthcare institutions in Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egyir, Beverly; Guardabassi, Luca; Sørum, Marit

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and clonal diversity of clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Ghana. A total of 308 S. aureus isolates from six healthcare institutions located across Northern, Central and Southern Ghana were......-positive S. aureus in Africa, low prevalence of antimicrobial resistance and high diversity of MRSA lineages in Ghana compared to developed countries and other African countries. The detection of known pandemic MRSA clones in the absence of routine MRSA identification in most Ghanaian clinical microbiology...... characterized by antibiotyping, spa typing and PCR detection of Panton Valentine leukocin (PVL) genes. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were confirmed by PCR detection of mecA gene and further characterized by SCCmec and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance...

  20. Carriage frequency, diversity and methicillin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus in Danish small ruminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Jacob; Gongora, Carmen Espinosa; Stamphøj, Inga

    2013-01-01

    . This study provides novel data about the occurrence of S. aureus in small ruminants, revealing high carriage frequency and diversity in these animals. The finding of mecC in ovine ST130 isolates suggests that sheep may be a reservoir of this new emerging MRSA clone of suspected animal origin. Inclusion......The ecology of Staphylococcus aureus in animals has recently gained attention by the research community due to the emergence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA). We investigated carriage frequency and clonal diversity of S. aureus in 179 sheep and 17 goats in Denmark using...... spa typing and MLST. S. aureus was detected in 74 sheep (41%) and 11 goats (64%). The isolates belonged to 26 spa types (including six novel spa types) and 12 STs (including three novel STs). The most common lineage was ST133, which was found in 65% sheep and 55% goats. MRSA was found in three animals...

  1. The First Human Cloned Embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibelli, Jose B.; Lanza, Robert P.; West, Michael D.; Ezzell, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process known as parthenogenesis which produces cloned, early-stage embryos and human embryos generated only from eggs. Speculates that this technology puts therapeutic cloning within reach. (DDR)

  2. [Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Lei, An-Min; Hua, Jin-Lian; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning have widespread and attractive prospects in animal agriculture and biomedical applications. We reviewed that the quality of oocytes and nuclear reprogramming of somatic donor cells were the main reasons of the common abnormalities in cloned animals and the low efficiency of cloning and showed the problems and outlets in therapeutic cloning, such as some basic problems in nuclear transfer affected clinical applications of therapeutic cloning. Study on isolation and culture of nuclear transfer embryonic stem (ntES) cells and specific differentiation of ntES cells into important functional cells should be emphasized and could enhance the efficiency. Adult stem cells could help to cure some great diseases, but could not replace therapeutic cloning. Ethics also impeded the development of therapeutic cloning. It is necessary to improve many techniques and reinforce the research of some basic theories, then somatic nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning may apply to agriculture reproduction and benefit to human life better.

  3. Animal Cloning and Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Animal Cloning and Food Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... on clones of livestock animals to evaluate the safety of food from these animals. The resulting report, called a ...

  4. Human Staphylococcus aureus lineages among Zoological Park residents in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Drougka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a part of the microbiota flora in many animal species. The clonal spread of S. aureus among animals and personnel in a Zoological Park was investigated. Samples were collected from colonized and infected sites among 32 mammals, 11 birds and eight humans. The genes mecA, mecC, lukF/lukS-PV (encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin, PVL and tst (toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 were investigated by PCR. Clones were defined by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST, spa type and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE. Seven S. aureus isolates were recovered from four animals and one from an employee. All were mecA, mecC and tst–negative, whereas, one carried the PVL genes and was isolated from an infected Squirrel monkey. Clonal analysis revealed the occurrence of seven STs, eight PFGE and five spa types including ones of human origin. Even though a variety of genotypes were identified among S. aureus strains colonizing zoo park residents, our results indicate that colonization with human lineages has indeed occurred.

  5. HUMAN CLONING AND FDA REGULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Vosk, Ted

    1998-01-01

    In the February 27, 1997 issue of the journal Nature scientists from Scotland's Roslin Institute reported their successful efforts to clone an adult sheep using differentiated somatic cells from the animal. The clone, named Dolly, was the first instance of the successful cloning of an adult mammal. The shock waves created by the possible ramifications of this development were immediately felt around the world. For the first time, the cloning of an adult human being was no longer being conside...

  6. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA carriage in a dermatology unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata L. Pacheco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to characterize Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA carriage in a dermatology unit. METHODS: This was a prospective and descriptive study. Over the course of 26 weeks, surveillance cultures were collected weekly from the anterior nares and skin of all patients hospitalized in a 20-bed dermatology unit of a tertiary-care hospital. Samples from healthcare workers (HCWS were cultured at the beginning and end of the study. Colonized patients were put under contact precautions, and basic infection control measures were enforced. Staphylococcus aureus colonization pressure was determined monthly. Colonized and non-colonized patients were compared, and isolates were evaluated for antimicrobial susceptibility, SCCmec type, virulence factors, and type. RESULTS: Of the 142 patients evaluated, 64 (45% were colonized by MRSA (39% hospital acquired; 25% community acquired; 36% indeterminate. Despite isolation precautions, hospital-acquired Staphylococcus aureus occurred in addition to the continuous entry of Staphylococcus aureus from the community. Colonization pressure increased from 13% to 59%, and pemphigus and other bullous diseases were associated with MRSA colonization. Eleven out of 71 HCWs (15% were Staphylococcus aureus carriers, although only one worker carried a persistent clone. Of the hospital-acquired MRSA cases, 14/28 (50% were SCCmec type IV (3 PFGE types, 13 were SCCmec type III (46%, and one had an indeterminate type. These types were also present among the community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus isolates. SSCmec type IV isolates were shown to be more susceptible than type III isolates. There were two cases of bloodstream infection, and the pvl and tst virulence genes were absent from all isolates. CONCLUSIONS: Dermatology patients were colonized by community- and hospital-acquired Staphylococcus aureus. Half of the nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus isolates were SCCmec type IV. Despite the identification of

  7. Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage in a dermatology unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Renata L.; Lobo, Renata D.; Oliveira, Maura S.; Farina, Elthon F.; Santos, Cleide R.; Costa, Silvia F.; Padoveze, Maria Clara; Garcia, Cilmara P.; Trindade, Priscila A.; Quitério, Ligia M.; Rivitti, Evandro A.; Mamizuka, Elsa M.; Levin, Anna S.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to characterize Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage in a dermatology unit. METHODS: This was a prospective and descriptive study. Over the course of 26 weeks, surveillance cultures were collected weekly from the anterior nares and skin of all patients hospitalized in a 20-bed dermatology unit of a tertiary-care hospital. Samples from healthcare workers (HCWS) were cultured at the beginning and end of the study. Colonized patients were put under contact precautions, and basic infection control measures were enforced. Staphylococcus aureus colonization pressure was determined monthly. Colonized and non-colonized patients were compared, and isolates were evaluated for antimicrobial susceptibility, SCCmec type, virulence factors, and type. RESULTS: Of the 142 patients evaluated, 64 (45%) were colonized by MRSA (39% hospital acquired; 25% community acquired; 36% indeterminate). Despite isolation precautions, hospital-acquired Staphylococcus aureus occurred in addition to the continuous entry of Staphylococcus aureus from the community. Colonization pressure increased from 13% to 59%, and pemphigus and other bullous diseases were associated with MRSA colonization. Eleven out of 71 HCWs (15%) were Staphylococcus aureus carriers, although only one worker carried a persistent clone. Of the hospital-acquired MRSA cases, 14/28 (50%) were SCCmec type IV (3 PFGE types), 13 were SCCmec type III (46%), and one had an indeterminate type. These types were also present among the community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus isolates. SSCmec type IV isolates were shown to be more susceptible than type III isolates. There were two cases of bloodstream infection, and the pvl and tst virulence genes were absent from all isolates. CONCLUSIONS: Dermatology patients were colonized by community- and hospital-acquired Staphylococcus aureus. Half of the nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus isolates were SCCmec type IV. Despite the identification of colonized

  8. spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from healthy humans, pigs and dogs in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakweba, Abdul Sekemani; Muhairwa, Amandus Pachificus; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Guardabassi, Luca; Mtambo, Madundo M A; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-02-28

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in humans and animals. Here we report for the first time the prevalence of nasal carriage, spa typing and antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus in a Tanzanian livestock community. Nasal swabs were taken from 100 humans, 100 pigs and 100 dogs in Morogoro Municipal. Each swab was enriched in Mueller Hinton broth with 6.5% NaCl and subcultured on chromogenic agar for S. aureus detection. Presumptive S. aureus colonies were confirmed to the species level by nuc PCR and analysed by spa typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined by disc diffusion method. S. aureus was isolated from 22% of humans, 4% of pigs and 11% of dogs. A total of 21 spa types were identified: 13, 7 and 1 in human, dogs, and pigs, respectively. Three spa types (t314, t223 and t084) were shared between humans and dogs. A novel spa type (t10779) was identified in an isolate recovered from a colonized human. Antimicrobials tested revealed resistance to ampicillin in all isolates, moderate resistances to other antimicrobials with tetracycline resistance being the most frequent. S. aureus carrier frequencies in dogs and humans were within the expected range and low in pigs. The S. aureus spa types circulating in the community were generally not shared by different hosts and majority of types belonged to known clones. Besides ampicillin resistance, moderate levels of antimicrobial resistance were observed irrespective of the host species from which the strains were isolated.

  9. Recombinational Cloning Using Gateway and In-Fusion Cloning Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throop, Andrea L.; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The comprehensive study of protein structure and function, or proteomics, depends on the obtainability of full-length cDNAs in species-specific expression vectors and subsequent functional analysis of the expressed protein. Recombinational cloning is a universal cloning technique based on site-specific recombination that is independent of the insert DNA sequence of interest, which differentiates this method from the classical restriction enzyme-based cloning methods. Recombinational cloning enables rapid and efficient parallel transfer of DNA inserts into multiple expression systems. This unit summarizes strategies for generating expression-ready clones using the most popular recombinational cloning technologies, including the commercially available Gateway® (Life Technologies) and In-Fusion® (Clontech) cloning technologies. PMID:25827088

  10. Molecular epidemiology of heteroresistant vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Conrado de Oliveira Silveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTTo determine the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of 12 Staphylococcus aureus isolates presenting heteroresistance to vancomycin in laboratories of two cities in Santa Catarina, southern Brazil. Epidemiological data, including the city of isolation, health institution, and date of isolation were considered, as well as the associated clinical specimen. For molecular characterization, we analyzed the staphylococcal cassette chromosome types, the erm gene presence, and the genomic diversity of isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The 12 isolates of S. aureus were previously confirmed as heteroresistance to vancomycin using the population analysis profile-area under curve. Regarding genetic variability, two clones were detected: the main one (clone A composed of four isolates and the clones B, with two isolates. For clone A, two isolates presented identical band patterns and were related to the same hospital, with an interval of 57 days between their isolation. The other isolates of this clone showed no epidemiological link between them because they were isolated in different hospitals and had no temporal relationship. The other clone showed no detectable epidemiological relationship. The heteroresistance to vancomycin recovered in Santa Catarina State from 2009 to 2012 had, in general, heterogeneous genomic patterns based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis results, which is in accordance with the fact that these isolates had little or no epidemiological relationship among them. Due to the characteristic phenotypic instability and often prolonged vancomycin therapy for selection, clonal spread is not as common as for other resistance mechanisms disseminated through horizontal gene transfer.

  11. Molecular epidemiology of heteroresistant vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Conrado de Oliveira Silveira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To determine the epidemiological and molecular characteristics of 12 Staphylococcus aureus isolates presenting heteroresistance to vancomycin in laboratories of two cities in Santa Catarina, southern Brazil. Epidemiological data, including the city of isolation, health institution, and date of isolation were considered, as well as the associated clinical specimen. For molecular characterization, we analyzed the staphylococcal cassette chromosome types, the erm gene presence, and the genomic diversity of isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The 12 isolates of S. aureus were previously confirmed as heteroresistance to vancomycin using the population analysis profile–area under curve. Regarding genetic variability, two clones were detected: the main one (clone A composed of four isolates and the clones B, with two isolates. For clone A, two isolates presented identical band patterns and were related to the same hospital, with an interval of 57 days between their isolation. The other isolates of this clone showed no epidemiological link between them because they were isolated in different hospitals and had no temporal relationship. The other clone showed no detectable epidemiological relationship. The heteroresistance to vancomycin recovered in Santa Catarina State from 2009 to 2012 had, in general, heterogeneous genomic patterns based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis results, which is in accordance with the fact that these isolates had little or no epidemiological relationship among them. Due to the characteristic phenotypic instability and often prolonged vancomycin therapy for selection, clonal spread is not as common as for other resistance mechanisms disseminated through horizontal gene transfer.

  12. Three concepts of cloning in human beings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ke-Hui

    2005-07-01

    Human cloning, organ cloning and tissue cloning are various types of cloning that occur at different levels with different methodologies. According to three standards of terminology for an embryo (fertilization through germ cells, development in the uterus and having the potential to produce a human life), tissue cloning and type I organ cloning will not produce an embryo. In contrast, human cloning and type II organ cloning will produce an embryo. Thus, only non-germinal tissue cloning and type I organ cloning are beyond the ethical question and will not change human beings as a species. Using cloned tissues to make new tissues or organs is promising for the future of medicine.

  13. Optimally cloned binary coherent states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, C. R.; Leuchs, G.; Marquardt, Ch.; Andersen, U. L.

    2017-10-01

    Binary coherent state alphabets can be represented in a two-dimensional Hilbert space. We capitalize this formal connection between the otherwise distinct domains of qubits and continuous variable states to map binary phase-shift keyed coherent states onto the Bloch sphere and to derive their quantum-optimal clones. We analyze the Wigner function and the cumulants of the clones, and we conclude that optimal cloning of binary coherent states requires a nonlinearity above second order. We propose several practical and near-optimal cloning schemes and compare their cloning fidelity to the optimal cloner.

  14. Cloning-free CRISPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Arbab

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We present self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR, a technology that allows for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genomic mutation and site-specific knockin transgene creation within several hours by circumventing the need to clone a site-specific single-guide RNA (sgRNA or knockin homology construct for each target locus. We introduce a self-cleaving palindromic sgRNA plasmid and a short double-stranded DNA sequence encoding the desired locus-specific sgRNA into target cells, allowing them to produce a locus-specific sgRNA plasmid through homologous recombination. scCRISPR enables efficient generation of gene knockouts (∼88% mutation rate at approximately one-sixth the cost of plasmid-based sgRNA construction with only 2 hr of preparation for each targeted site. Additionally, we demonstrate efficient site-specific knockin of GFP transgenes without any plasmid cloning or genome-integrated selection cassette in mouse and human embryonic stem cells (2%–4% knockin rate through PCR-based addition of short homology arms. scCRISPR substantially lowers the bar on mouse and human transgenesis.

  15. Phenotypic and genetic characteristics of fluoroquinolone- and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Flores, Antonio; Potel-Alvarellos, Carmen; Otero-Fernández, Susana; Álvarez-Fernández, Maximiliano

    2017-07-20

    Fluoroquinolone resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has increased in recent years. The objective of this study was to characterise two MRSA populations, one susceptible to fluoroquinolones and other resistant identifying the clonal types and the differential characteristics of both MRSA populations. Molecular typing using PFGE, MLST, spa and SSCmec was performed on 192 MRSA strains isolated from 2009 to 2011, 49 only oxacillin-resistant (OX-R) and 143 oxacillin and levofloxacin-resistant (OX-R-LEV-R). Mutations that conferred resistance to fluoroquinolones, hypermutable phenotypes and the presence of eight microbial surface components recognising adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) were also studied. A statistically significant increase in the OX-R-LEV-R phenotype was observed (p<0.05). The most common clone of the OX-R isolates was sequence type (ST) 8 (32.6%), followed by ST72 (26.5%) and ST5 (26.5%). In the OX-R-LEV-R phenotype, the ST5 clone was the most common (65.7%), followed by ST72 (15.4%), and ST125 (12.6%). All isolates except the ST398 clone carried the SCCmecIVc. Clones ST5, ST72, ST125, and ST30 had hypermutable phenotypes. The ST72 clone and the ST30 clone in the OX-R phenotype harboured the highest number of MSCRAMMs. ST5 and ST72 clones were the most frequent clones identified in OX-R-LEV-R phenotype. Both clones showed a hypermutable phenotype that favours their selection as the fluoroquinolone resistant clones. The genetic relationships identified indicate that OX-R-LEV-R clones have evolved from OX-R MRSA clones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  16. Antibiotic resistance and molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyedara Omotayo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen causing a wide range of infections in the hospital and community setting. In order to have adequate information for treatment of S. aureus infections, it is crucial to understand the trends in the antibiotic-resistance patterns. In addition, the occurrence and changes in types of S. aureus, clonal identities, and their geographic spread is essential for the establishment of adequate infection control programmes. In this study, 68 S. aureus isolates obtained from clinical and non-clinical sources in Nigeria between January and April 2009 were characterized using phenotypic and molecular methods. Results All the S. aureus isolates were susceptible to teicoplanin, vancomycin, phosphomycin, fusidic acid, rifampicin, daptomycin, mupirocin, linezolid and tigecycline. Sixteen percent of the isolates were resistant to oxacillin, while 55% and 72% of isolates were resistant to tetracycline and trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole (cotrimoxazole, respectively (Table 1. There was excellent correlation between the broth microdilution assay and detection of antibiotic resistance genes by the multiplex PCR, in the determination of S. aureus resistance to erythromycin, gentamicin, methicillin and tetracycline. A total of 28 spa types were identified in the study, and the predominant spa type among the methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA isolates was t084 (13 isolates. The t037-ST241-SCCmecIII type was the only clone identified in Maiduguri (North-East Nigeria while in South-West Nigeria, diversity among the MRSA isolates (t451-ST8-SCCmecV; t008-ST94-SCCmecIV; t002-ST5-SCCmecV; t064-ST8-SCCmecV was observed. The toxin genes seh and etd were detected in isolates affiliated with clonal complexes CC1, CC80 and sequence type ST25, respectively. The proportion of PVL-positive isolates among MSSA was high (40%. Most of the PVL-positive MSSA isolates were obtained from wound infections and associated

  17. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization among patients and their parents /guardian in an Iranian referral hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourakbari, Babak; Khodabandeh, Mahmoud; Mahmoudi, Shima; Sabouni, Farah; Aziz-Ahari, Alireza; Bahador, Abbas; Keshavarz Valian, Sepideh; Hosseinpour Sadeghi, Reihaneh; Mamishi, Setareh

    2017-06-01

    Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in the nose appears to play a key role in the epidemiology and pathogenesis of infection. It is important to investigate the genetic relatedness of S. aureus and MRSA clones in different geographic regions. The aim of this study was to assess the nasal carriage rate of S. aureus, including MRSA strains in both hospitalized children and general adult population (parents/guardian). In addition, antibiotic susceptibility pattern and molecular diversity of S. aureus in both population was evaluated in an Iranian referral pediatrics Hospital. All samples were obtained through nasal screening of patients and general adult population at admission and discharge day. The prevalence, resistance, and molecular diversity of all S. aureus isolates were examined. In the current study, nasal carriage of S. aureus and Staphylococcus non aureus was identified in 384 (26%) and 1004 (68%) of the study population. The prevalence of MRSA nasal carriage in children and adults was 6.6% (29 out of 438) and 2.8% (29 out of 1046), respectively. Among S. aureus strains isolated obtained from patients and general adult population at admission day, high sensitivity to most of the antibiotics such as vancomycin (100%), rifampin (95%), linezolid (94%), quinupristin/dalfopristin (94%), minocycline (94%), chloramphenicol (89%), gentamycin (87%), amikacin (87%), clindamycin (86%) and moxifloxacin (83%) was seen. The most resistance antibiotics were penicillin (96-98%) and methicillin (44-47%). The susceptibility patterns of nasal S. aureus strains isolated at discharge day was not statistically different from S. aureus isolates obtained at admission day. Admission S. aureus isolated strains of 77 patients (64%) were similar to the isolated S. aureus strains of discharge, while S. aureus isolated strains of 43 patients (36%) was not similar to the strain of discharge (had similarity of less than 70%). High prevalence of nasal carriage of S. aureus and

  18. Ethical issues in animal cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiester, Autumn

    2005-01-01

    The issue of human reproductive cloning has recently received a great deal attention in public discourse. Bioethicists, policy makers, and the media have been quick to identify the key ethical issues involved in human reproductive cloning and to argue, almost unanimously, for an international ban on such attempts. Meanwhile, scientists have proceeded with extensive research agendas in the cloning of animals. Despite this research, there has been little public discussion of the ethical issues raised by animal cloning projects. Polling data show that the public is decidedly against the cloning of animals. To understand the public's reaction and fill the void of reasoned debate about the issue, we need to review the possible objections to animal cloning and assess the merits of the anti-animal cloning stance. Some objections to animal cloning (e.g., the impact of cloning on the population of unwanted animals) can be easily addressed, while others (e.g., the health of cloned animals) require more serious attention by the public and policy makers.

  19. Differential Analysis of the Nasal Microbiome of Pig Carriers or Non-Carriers of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Espinosa-Gongora

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is presently regarded as an emerging zoonotic agent due to the spread of specific methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA clones in pig farms. Studying the microbiota can be useful for the identification of bacteria that antagonize such opportunistic veterinary and zoonotic pathogen in animal carriers. The aim of this study was to determine whether the nasal microbiome of pig S. aureus carriers differs from that of non-carriers. The V3-V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced from nasal swabs of 44 S. aureus carriers and 56 non-carriers using the 454 GS FLX titanium system. Carriers and non-carriers were selected on the basis of quantitative longitudinal data on S. aureus carriage in 600 pigs sampled at 20 Danish herds included in two previous studies in Denmark. Raw sequences were analysed with the BION meta package and the resulting abundance matrix was analysed using the DESeq2 package in R to identify operational taxonomic units (OTUs with differential abundance between S. aureus carriers and non-carriers. Twenty OTUs were significantly associated to non-carriers, including species with known probiotic potential and antimicrobial effect such as lactic acid-producing isolates described among Leuconostoc spp. and some members of the Lachnospiraceae family, which is known for butyrate production. Further 5 OTUs were significantly associated to carriage, including known pathogenic bacteria such as Pasteurella multocida and Klebsiella spp. Our results show that the nasal microbiome of pigs that are not colonized with S. aureus harbours several species/taxa that are significantly less abundant in pig carriers, suggesting that the nasal microbiota may play a role in the individual predisposition to S. aureus nasal carriage in pigs. Further research is warranted to isolate these bacteria and assess their possible antagonistic effect on S. aureus for the pursuit of new strategies to control MRSA in pig farming.

  20. Differential Analysis of the Nasal Microbiome of Pig Carriers or Non-Carriers of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Larsen, Niels; Schønning, Kristian; Fredholm, Merete; Guardabassi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is presently regarded as an emerging zoonotic agent due to the spread of specific methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clones in pig farms. Studying the microbiota can be useful for the identification of bacteria that antagonize such opportunistic veterinary and zoonotic pathogen in animal carriers. The aim of this study was to determine whether the nasal microbiome of pig S. aureus carriers differs from that of non-carriers. The V3-V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced from nasal swabs of 44 S. aureus carriers and 56 non-carriers using the 454 GS FLX titanium system. Carriers and non-carriers were selected on the basis of quantitative longitudinal data on S. aureus carriage in 600 pigs sampled at 20 Danish herds included in two previous studies in Denmark. Raw sequences were analysed with the BION meta package and the resulting abundance matrix was analysed using the DESeq2 package in R to identify operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with differential abundance between S. aureus carriers and non-carriers. Twenty OTUs were significantly associated to non-carriers, including species with known probiotic potential and antimicrobial effect such as lactic acid-producing isolates described among Leuconostoc spp. and some members of the Lachnospiraceae family, which is known for butyrate production. Further 5 OTUs were significantly associated to carriage, including known pathogenic bacteria such as Pasteurella multocida and Klebsiella spp. Our results show that the nasal microbiome of pigs that are not colonized with S. aureus harbours several species/taxa that are significantly less abundant in pig carriers, suggesting that the nasal microbiota may play a role in the individual predisposition to S. aureus nasal carriage in pigs. Further research is warranted to isolate these bacteria and assess their possible antagonistic effect on S. aureus for the pursuit of new strategies to control MRSA in pig farming.

  1. Cloning and occurrence of czrC, a gene conferring cadmium and zinc resistance in MRSA CC398 Isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaco, Lina; Hasman, Henrik; Stegger, Marc

    2010-01-01

    determinant, czrC, by PCR. The cloning of czrC confirmed that the zinc chloride and cadmium acetate MICs for isogenic constructs carrying this gene were increased compared to those for S. aureus RN4220. No difference in susceptibility to sodium arsenate, copper sulfate, or silver nitrate was observed. Seventy...

  2. Introduction of plasmid DNA into an ST398 livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRS926 is a livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strain of sequence type (ST) 398. In order to facilitate in vitro and in vivo studies of this strain, we sought to tag it with a fluorescent marker. We cloned a codon-optimized gene for TurboGFP into a shuttle vector...

  3. Phylogenetic Analysis of Staphylococcus aureus CC398 Reveals a Sub-Lineage Epidemiologically Associated with Infections in Horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdelbary, Mohamed M. H.; Wittenberg, Anne; Cuny, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    -allelic polymorphisms, and phylogenetic analyses revealed that an epidemic sub-clone within CC398 (dubbed 'clade (C)') has spread within and between equine hospitals, where it causes nosocomial infections in horses and colonises the personnel. While clade (C) was strongly associated with S. aureus from horses...

  4. Lessons learned from cloning dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M J; Oh, H J; Kim, G A; Park, J E; Park, E J; Jang, G; Ra, J C; Kang, S K; Lee, B C

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this article is to review dog cloning research and to suggest its applications based on a discussion about the normality of cloned dogs. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was successfully used for production of viable cloned puppies despite limited understanding of in vitro dog embryo production. Cloned dogs have similar growth characteristics to those born from natural fertilization, with no evidence of serious adverse effects. The offspring of cloned dogs also have similar growth performance and health to those of naturally bred puppies. Therefore, cloning in domestic dogs can be applied as an assisted reproductive technique to conserve endangered species, to treat sterile canids or aged dogs, to improve reproductive performance of valuable individuals and to generate disease model animals. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Human cloning and child welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, J; Harris, J

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an objection to human cloning which appeals to the welfare of the child. This objection varies according to the sort of harm it is expected the clone will suffer. The three formulations of it that we will consider are: 1. Clones will be harmed by the fearful or prejudicial attitudes people may have about or towards them (H1); 2. Clones will be harmed by the demands and expectations of parents or genotype donors (H2); 3. Clones will be harmed by their own awareness of their origins, for example the knowledge that the genetic donor is a stranger (H3). We will show why these three versions of the child welfare objection do not necessarily supply compelling reasons to ban human reproductive cloning. The claim that we will develop and defend in the course of our discussion is that even if it is the case that a cloned child will suffer harms of the type H1-H3, it is none the less permissible to conceive by cloning so long as these cloning-induced welfare deficits are not such as to blight the existence of the resultant child, whoever this may be. PMID:10226914

  6. Emergence of Nasal Carriage of ST80 and ST152 PVL+ Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Livestock in Algeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Agabou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The spread of toxinogenic Staphylococcus aureus is a public health problem in Africa. The objectives of the study were to investigate the rate of S. aureus nasal carriage and molecular characteristics of these strains in livestock and humans in three Algerian provinces. Nasal samples were collected from camels, horses, cattle, sheep and monkeys, as well as humans in contact with them. S. aureus isolates were genotyped using DNA microarray. The rate of S. aureus nasal carriage varied between species: camels (53%, humans and monkeys (50%, sheep (44.2%, horses (15.2% and cattle (15%. Nine methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA isolates (7.6% were identified, isolated from camels and sheep. The S. aureus isolates belonged to 15 different clonal complexes. Among them, PVL+ (Panton–Valentine Leukocidin isolates belonging to ST80-MRSA-IV and ST152-MSSA were identified in camels (n = 3, 13% and sheep (n = 4, 21.1%. A high prevalence of toxinogenic animal strains was noted containing TSST-1- (22.2%, EDINB- (29.6% and EtD- (11.1% encoding genes. This study showed the dispersal of the highly human pathogenic clones ST152-MSSA and ST-80-MRSA in animals. It suggests the ability of some clones to cross the species barrier and jump between humans and several animal species.

  7. Emergence of Nasal Carriage of ST80 and ST152 PVL+ Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Livestock in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agabou, Amir; Ouchenane, Zouleikha; Ngba Essebe, Christelle; Khemissi, Salim; Chehboub, Mohamed Tedj Eddine; Chehboub, Ilyes Bey; Sotto, Albert; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe

    2017-09-25

    The spread of toxinogenic Staphylococcus aureus is a public health problem in Africa. The objectives of the study were to investigate the rate of S. aureus nasal carriage and molecular characteristics of these strains in livestock and humans in three Algerian provinces. Nasal samples were collected from camels, horses, cattle, sheep and monkeys, as well as humans in contact with them. S. aureus isolates were genotyped using DNA microarray. The rate of S. aureus nasal carriage varied between species: camels (53%), humans and monkeys (50%), sheep (44.2%), horses (15.2%) and cattle (15%). Nine methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates (7.6%) were identified, isolated from camels and sheep. The S. aureus isolates belonged to 15 different clonal complexes. Among them, PVL+ (Panton-Valentine Leukocidin) isolates belonging to ST80-MRSA-IV and ST152-MSSA were identified in camels (n = 3, 13%) and sheep (n = 4, 21.1%). A high prevalence of toxinogenic animal strains was noted containing TSST-1- (22.2%), EDINB- (29.6%) and EtD- (11.1%) encoding genes. This study showed the dispersal of the highly human pathogenic clones ST152-MSSA and ST-80-MRSA in animals. It suggests the ability of some clones to cross the species barrier and jump between humans and several animal species.

  8. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in minas frescal cheese: evaluation of classic enterotoxin genes, antimicrobial resistance and clonal diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Alice Gonçalves Martins; Marques, Leila Márcia Peres; Gomes, Marcel da Silva Amorim; Beltrão, Jhonathan Campos do Couto; Pinheiro, Marcos Gabriel; Esper, Luciana Maria Ramires; Paula, Geraldo Renato de; Teixeira, Lenise Arneiro; Aguiar-Alves, Fábio

    2017-12-15

    This study aimed to investigate classical enterotoxin (sea to see) and mecA genes, by polymerase chain reaction and anitimicrobial susceptibility, by disk diffusion test of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from minas frescal cheese (MFC). All methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates were investigated for the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes and clonal diversity. Thirty-one S. aureus were isolated from four MFC samples. Seven (22.6%) S. aureus carried mecA gene and two of them carried enterotoxin genes seb/sec and sea/seb. Five (16.1%) S. aureus isolates showed induced resistance to clindamycin and nine (29%) were resistant to multiple -antibiotics (MDR), among these, six were MRSA. No MRSA isolates presented the PVL genes. Four MRSA were grouped into three clones and three isolates were not typable by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. MRSA isolates showed, by multilocus sequence typing, sequence types ST1, ST5, ST72 and ST4304 (new ST) and S. aureus protein A (spa type) t127, t568 and t2703. These data suggest that MFC may constitute a risk to the consumer because of its potential for staphylococcal food poisoning; however it might, also, become one of MRSA and MDR strains disseminator, including clones usually found in the hospital environment. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Genome-wide analysis of ruminant Staphylococcus aureus reveals diversification of the core genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Zakour, Nouri L; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Even, Sergine; Guinane, Caitriona M; Barbey, Corinne; Alves, Priscila D; Cochet, Marie-Françoise; Gautier, Michel; Otto, Michael; Fitzgerald, J Ross; Le Loir, Yves

    2008-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes disease in humans and a wide array of animals. Of note, S. aureus mastitis of ruminants, including cows, sheep, and goats, results in major economic losses worldwide. Extensive variation in genome content exists among S. aureus pathogenic clones. However, the genomic variation among S. aureus strains infecting different animal species has not been well examined. To investigate variation in the genome content of human and ruminant S. aureus, we carried out whole-genome PCR scanning (WGPS), comparative genomic hybridizations (CGH), and the directed DNA sequence analysis of strains of human, bovine, ovine, and caprine origin. Extensive variation in genome content was discovered, including host- and ruminant-specific genetic loci. Ovine and caprine strains were genetically allied, whereas bovine strains were heterogeneous in gene content. As expected, mobile genetic elements such as pathogenicity islands and bacteriophages contributed to the variation in genome content between strains. However, differences specific for ruminant strains were restricted to regions of the conserved core genome, which contained allelic variation in genes encoding proteins of known and unknown function. Many of these proteins are predicted to be exported and could play a role in host-pathogen interactions. The genomic regions of difference identified by the whole-genome approaches adopted in the current study represent excellent targets for studies of the molecular basis of S. aureus host adaptation.

  10. Clonal distribution of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus on handles of handheld shopping baskets in supermarkets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumachi, E; Kato, F; Hisatsune, J; Tsuruda, K; Uehara, Y; Seo, H; Sugai, M

    2011-02-01

    Shopping carts and handheld shopping baskets in supermarkets are subject to accidental bacterial contamination through contacts with a variety of food. We investigated the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus on the handles of handheld shopping baskets in four supermarkets distantly located in Osaka district, Japan. Fifty two strains of Staph. aureus were isolated from 760 basket handles. Among these, six strains were positive for staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) production, representing 12% of total. This SEB producer ratio is considerably higher than among Staph. aureus isolated from nasal swabs of the supermarket workers (2%) and from independently collected clinical specimens (4%). These SEB-producing Staph. aureus strains from the basket handles are clonal and belong to ST12. Coagulase typing showed that they are in group VII, which is the most common cause of food poisoning in Japan. Biofilm assays indicated that SEB gene (seb)-positive strains including this clone produced a significantly higher amount of biofilm than seb-negative strains. The frequent isolation of seb-positive Staph. aureus on shopping basket handles raises the possibility that they could be a hidden reservoir for Staph. aureus with a potential to cause food poisoning and draws attention to the importance of shopping basket sanitation. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus in post-earthquake northern Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Marnie E; Mediavilla, Jose; Chen, Liang; Sonnenfeld, Julian; Pierce, Logan; Shannon, Alexander; Boucher, Helen; Pearlmutter, Mark; Kreiswirth, Barry; Kuo, Yen-Hong; Previl, Harold; Rojtman, Albert

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge of nasal carriage is important in predicting staphylococcal infection, and no information exists regarding the endemicity of Staphylococcus aureus in Haiti. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of S. aureus nasal screening in an acute care, a subacute rehabilitation, and a community setting, with a brief medical and epidemiological history. PCR-positive S. aureus screening nasal cultures underwent molecular analysis for spa type, SCCmec type, and virulence genes (Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST), and arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME)), and were evaluated for antibiotic susceptibility using commercial tests. Overall carriage rates of 8.4% methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and 2.8% methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were identified, with a high rate of tetracycline resistance. TSST and PVL genes were identified in MSSA. MRSA isolates contained no virulence markers. Unique MSSA phenotypes (i.e., linezolid-resistant, vancomycin-sensitive/daptomycin non-susceptible) were identified, as were two PVL-positive ST152 MSSA colonization isolates, previously geographically limited to Africa. We found a low S. aureus carriage rate with complete vancomycin susceptibility and high tetracycline resistance, which has important public health implications with regard to treatment. Additionally, the finding of PVL-positive MSSA isolates, including the expansion of a previously described limited 'divergent' clone, ST152, warrants further evaluation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Staphylococcus aureus infections: transmission within households and the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Justin; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin; Lowy, Franklin D

    2015-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, both methicillin susceptible and resistant, are now major community-based pathogens worldwide. The basis for this is multifactorial and includes the emergence of epidemic clones with enhanced virulence, antibiotic resistance, colonization potential, or transmissibility. Household reservoirs of these unique strains are crucial to their success as community-based pathogens. Staphylococci become resident in households, either as colonizers or environmental contaminants, increasing the risk for recurrent infections. Interactions of household members with others in different households or at community sites, including schools and daycare facilities, have a critical role in the ability of these strains to become endemic. Colonization density at these sites appears to have an important role in facilitating transmission. The integration of research tools, including whole-genome sequencing (WGS), mathematical modeling, and social network analysis, has provided additional insight into the transmission dynamics of these strains. Thus far, interventions designed to reduce recurrent infections among household members have had limited success, likely due to the multiplicity of potential sources for recolonization. The development of better strategies to reduce the number of household-based infections will depend on greater insight into the different factors that contribute to the success of these uniquely successful epidemic clones of S. aureus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus paplitimas hospitalizavimo laikotarpiu

    OpenAIRE

    Maželienė, Žaneta; Kaukėnienė, Renata; Antuševas, Aleksandras; Pavilonis, Alvydas

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus strains among hospitalized patients at the beginning of their hospitalization and during their treatment and the resistance of strains to antibiotics, and to evaluate epidemiologic characteristics of these strains. Patients and methods. Sixty-one patients treated at the Department of Cardiac, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery were examined. Identification of Staphylococcus aureus strains was performed using plasmacoagulase and DNase ...

  14. [The discrete horror of cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibourg, Ricardo A

    2009-01-01

    The author raises the topic of cloning after the decision of the Argentine government, which concerned for the "dignity of the human person", passed a decree of need and urgency, No. 200/97 (Annex), prohibiting cloning experiments with human beings. Therefore, considering that the topic is so terribly urgent and necessary, the author feels it is timely to consider it.

  15. Molecular characterization and antimicrobial susceptibility of nasal Staphylococcus aureus isolates from a Chinese medical college campus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimei Du

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection occur more commonly among persons living or working in crowded conditions, but characterization of S. aureus colonization within medical communities in China is lacking. A total of 144 (15.4%, 144/935 S. aureus isolates, including 28 (3.0%, 28/935 MRSA isolates, were recovered from the nares of 935 healthy human volunteers residing on a Chinese medical college campus. All S. aureus isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin and linezolid but the majority were resistant to penicillin (96.5%, ampicillin/sulbactam (83.3% and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (93.1%. 82%, (23/28 of the MRSA isolates and 66% (77/116 of the MSSA isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics, and 3 MRSA isolates were resistant to mupirocin--an agent commonly used for nasal decolonization. 16 different sequence types (STs, as well as SCCmec genes II, III, IVd, and V, were represented among MRSA isolates. We also identified, for the first time, two novel STs (ST1778 and ST1779 and 5 novel spa types for MRSA. MRSA isolates were distributed in different sporadic clones, and ST59-MRSA-VId- t437 was found within 3 MRSA isolates. Moreover, one isolate with multidrug resistance belonging to ST398-MRSA-V- t571 associated with animal infections was identified, and 3 isolates distributed in three different clones harbored PVL genes. Collectively, these data indicate a high prevalence of nasal MRSA carriage and molecular heterogeneity of S. aureus isolates among persons residing on a Chinese medical college campus. Identification of epidemic MRSA clones associated with community infection supports the need for more effective infection control measures to reduce nasal carriage and prevent dissemination of MRSA to hospitalized patients and health care workers in this community.

  16. Genetic transformation of Streptococcus pneumoniae by DNA cloned into the single-stranded bacteriophage f1.

    OpenAIRE

    Barany, F; Boeke, J D

    1983-01-01

    A Staphylococcus aureus plasmid derivative, pFB9, coding for erythromycin and chloramphenicol resistance was cloned into the filamentous Escherichia coli phage f1. Recombinant phage-plasmid hybrids, designated plasmids, were isolated from E. coli and purified by transformation into Streptococcus pneumoniae. Single-stranded DNA was prepared from E. coli cells infected with two different plasmids, fBB101 and fBB103. Introduction of fully or partially single-stranded DNA into Streptococcus pneum...

  17. [Scientific ethics of human cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Carlos Y

    2005-01-01

    True cloning is fission, budding or other types of asexual reproduction. In humans it occurs in monozygote twinning. This type of cloning is ethically and religiously good. Human cloning can be performed by twinning (TWClo) or nuclear transfer (NTClo). Both methods need a zygote or a nuclear transferred cell, obtained in vitro (IVTec). They are under the IVTec ethics. IVTecs use humans (zygotes, embryos) as drugs or things; increase the risk of malformations; increase development and size of abnormalities and may cause long-term changes. Cloning for preserving extinct (or almost extinct) animals or humans when sexual reproduction is not possible is ethically valid. The previous selection of a phenotype in human cloning violates some ethical principles. NTClo for reproductive or therapeutic purposes is dangerous since it increases the risk for nucleotide or chromosome mutations, de-programming or re-programming errors, aging or malignancy of the embryo cells thus obtained.

  18. Hyperexpression of α-hemolysin explains enhanced virulence of sequence type 93 community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Kyra Y L; Monk, Ian R; Lin, Ya-Hsun; Seemann, Torsten; Tuck, Kellie L; Porter, Jessica L; Stepnell, Justin; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Davies, John K; Stinear, Timothy P; Howden, Benjamin P

    2014-02-10

    The community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) ST93 clone is becoming dominant in Australia and is clinically highly virulent. In addition, sepsis and skin infection models demonstrate that ST93 CA-MRSA is the most virulent global clone of S. aureus tested to date. While the determinants of virulence have been studied in other clones of CA-MRSA, the basis for hypervirulence in ST93 CA-MRSA has not been defined. Here, using a geographically and temporally dispersed collection of ST93 isolates we demonstrate that the ST93 population hyperexpresses key CA-MRSA exotoxins, in particular α-hemolysin, in comparison to other global clones. Gene deletion and complementation studies, and virulence comparisons in a murine skin infection model, showed unequivocally that increased expression of α-hemolysin is the key staphylococcal virulence determinant for this clone. Genome sequencing and comparative genomics of strains with divergent exotoxin profiles demonstrated that, like other S. aureus clones, the quorum sensing agr system is the master regulator of toxin expression and virulence in ST93 CA-MRSA. However, we also identified a previously uncharacterized AraC/XylS family regulator (AryK) that potentiates toxin expression and virulence in S. aureus. These data demonstrate that hyperexpression of α-hemolysin mediates enhanced virulence in ST93 CA-MRSA, and additional control of exotoxin production, in particular α-hemolysin, mediated by regulatory systems other than agr have the potential to fine-tune virulence in CA-MRSA.

  19. Identification of the immunodominant regions of Staphylococcus aureus fibronectin-binding protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Qian-Fei; Cai, Chang-Zhi; Ding, Hong-Lei; Wu, Yi; Yang, Liu-Yang; Feng, Qiang; Yang, Hui-Jie; Wei, Zhen-Bo; Zeng, Hao; Zou, Quan-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen responsible for a diverse spectrum of human diseases and a leading cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections. Development of a vaccine against this pathogen is an important goal. The fibronectin binding protein A (FnBPA) of S. aureus is one of multifunctional 'microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules' (MSCRAMMs). It is one of the most important adhesin molecules involved in the initial adhesion steps of S. aureus infection. It has been studied as potential vaccine candidates. However, FnBPA is a high-molecular-weight protein of 106 kDa and difficulties in achieving its high-level expression in vitro limit its vaccine application in S. aureus infection diseases control. Therefore, mapping the immunodominant regions of FnBPA is important for developing polyvalent subunit fusion vaccines against S. aureus infections. In the present study, we cloned and expressed the N-terminal and C-terminal of FnBPA. We evaluated the immunogenicity of the two sections of FnBPA and the protective efficacy of the two truncated fragments vaccines in a murine model of systemic S. aureus infection. The results showed recombinant truncated fragment F130-500 had a strong immunogenicity property and survival rates significantly increased in the group of mice immunized with F130-500 than the control group. We futher identified the immunodominant regions of FnBPA. The mouse antisera reactions suggest that the region covering residues 110 to 263 (F1B110-263) is highly immunogenic and is the immunodominant regions of FnBPA. Moreover, vaccination with F1B110-263 can generate partial protection against lethal challenge with two different S. aureus strains and reduced bacterial burdens against non-lethal challenge as well as that immunization with F130-500. This information will be important for further developing anti- S. aureus polyvalent subunit fusion vaccines.

  20. Animal cloning: problems and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, D N

    2005-04-01

    An efficient animal cloning technology would provide many new opportunities for livestock agriculture, human medicine, and animal conservation. Nuclear cloning involves the production of animals that are genetically identical to the donor cells used in a technique known as nuclear transfer (NT). However, at present it is an inefficient process: in cattle, only around 6% of the embryos transferred to the reproductive tracts of recipient cows result in healthy, longterm surviving clones. Of concern are the high losses throughout gestation, during birth and in the post-natal period through to adulthood. Many of the pregnancy losses relate to failure of the placenta to develop and function correctly. Placental dysfunction may also have an adverse influence on postnatal health. These anomalies are probably due to incorrect epigenetic reprogramming of the donor genome following NT, leading to inappropriate patterns of gene expression during the development of clones. Whilst some physiological tests on surviving clones suggest normality, other reports indicate a variety of post-natal clone-associated abnormalities. This variability in outcome may reflect species-specific and/or cloning methodological differences. Importantly, to date it appears that these clone-associated phenotypes are not transmitted to offspring following sexual reproduction. This indicates that they represent epigenetic errors, rather than genetic errors, which are corrected during gametogenesis. Whilst this needs confirmation at the molecular level, it provides initial confidence in the first application of NT in agriculture, namely, the production of small numbers of cloned sires from genetically elite bulls, for natural mating, to effectively disseminate genetic gain. In addition to the animal welfare concerns with the technology, the underlying health of the animals and the consequential effect on food safety are critical aspects that require investigation to gain regulatory and consumer

  1. Community-acquired necrotizing pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in San Antonio de Areco, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Fernández

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is the first cause of skin and soft tissue infections, but can also produce severe diseases such as bacteremia, osteomyelitis and necrotizing pneumonia. Some S. aureus lineages have been described in cases of necrotizing pneumonia worldwide, usually in young, previously healthy patients. In this work, we describe a fatal case of necrotizing pneumonia due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus clone ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in an immunocompetent adult patient.

  2. Human cloning: can it be made safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhind, Susan M; Taylor, Jane E; De Sousa, Paul A; King, Tim J; McGarry, Michelle; Wilmut, Ian

    2003-11-01

    There are continued claims of attempts to clone humans using nuclear transfer, despite the serious problems that have been encountered in cloning other mammals. It is known that epigenetic and genetic mechanisms are involved in clone failure, but we still do not know exactly how. Human reproductive cloning is unethical, but the production of cells from cloned embryos could offer many potential benefits. So, can human cloning be made safe?

  3. Quantum Cloning Machines and the Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Heng; Wang, Yi-Nan; Jing, Li; Yue, Jie-Dong; Shi, Han-Duo; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Mu, Liang-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    No-cloning theorem is fundamental for quantum mechanics and for quantum information science that states an unknown quantum state cannot be cloned perfectly. However, we can try to clone a quantum state approximately with the optimal fidelity, or instead, we can try to clone it perfectly with the largest probability. Thus various quantum cloning machines have been designed for different quantum information protocols. Specifically, quantum cloning machines can be designed to analyze the securit...

  4. Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Transmission in a Ghanaian Burn Unit: The Importance of Active Surveillance in Resource-Limited Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Ama Amissah

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:Staphylococcus aureus infections in burn patients can lead to serious complications and death. The frequency of S. aureus infection is high in low- and middle-income countries presumably due to limited resources, misuse of antibiotics and poor infection control. The objective of the present study was to apply population genomics to precisely define, for the first time, the transmission of antibiotic resistant S. aureus in a resource-limited setting in sub-Saharan Africa.Methods:Staphylococcus aureus surveillance was performed amongst burn patients and healthcare workers during a 7-months survey within the burn unit of the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Ghana.Results: Sixty-six S. aureus isolates (59 colonizing and 7 clinical were obtained from 31 patients and 10 healthcare workers. Twenty-one of these isolates were ST250-IV methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. Notably, 25 (81% of the 31 patients carried or were infected with S. aureus within 24 h of admission. Genome comparisons revealed six distinct S. aureus clones circulating in the burn unit, and demonstrated multiple transmission events between patients and healthcare workers. Further, the collected S. aureus isolates exhibited a wide range of genotypic resistances to antibiotics, including trimethoprim (21%, aminoglycosides (33%, oxacillin (33%, chloramphenicol (50%, tetracycline (59% and fluoroquinolones (100%.Conclusion: Population genomics uncovered multiple transmission events of S. aureus, especially MRSA, within the investigated burn unit. Our findings highlight lapses in infection control and prevention, and underscore the great importance of active surveillance to protect burn victims against multi-drug resistant pathogens in resource-limited settings.

  5. Genomic information on multidrug-resistant livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 isolated from a Brazilian patient with cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Danielle F; Cohen, Renata WF; Rocha, Géssica A; Albano, Rodolpho M; Marques, Elizabeth A; Leão, Robson S

    2017-01-01

    Alarmingly, the isolation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been increasing among patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). During a previous molecular characterisation of MRSA isolates obtained from patients with CF from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, one isolate was identified as the ST398 clone, a livestock-associated (LA) MRSA. In this study, we report the draft genome sequence of an LA-MRSA ST398 clone isolated from a patient with CF. PMID:28076471

  6. Limitations on Cloning in Classical Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Fenyes, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we show that a result precisely analogous to the traditional quantum no-cloning theorem holds in classical mechanics. This classical no-cloning theorem does not prohibit classical cloning, we argue, because it is based on a too-restrictive definition of cloning. Using a less popular, more inclusive definition of cloning, we give examples of classical cloning processes. We also prove that a cloning machine must be at least as complicated as the object it is supposed to clone.

  7. Therapeutic cloning in the mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombaerts, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear transfer technology can be applied to produce autologous differentiated cells for therapeutic purposes, a concept termed therapeutic cloning. Countless articles have been published on the ethics and politics of human therapeutic cloning, reflecting the high expectations from this new opportunity for rejuvenation of the aging or diseased body. Yet the research literature on therapeutic cloning, strictly speaking, is comprised of only four articles, all in the mouse. The efficiency of derivation of embryonic stem cell lines via nuclear transfer is remarkably consistent among these reports. However, the efficiency is so low that, in its present form, the concept is unlikely to become widespread in clinical practice. PMID:12949262

  8. Human therapeutic cloning (NTSC): applying research from mammalian reproductive cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Andrew J; Wood, Samuel H; Trounson, Alan O

    2006-01-01

    Human therapeutic cloning or nuclear transfer stem cells (NTSC) to produce patient-specific stem cells, holds considerable promise in the field of regenerative medicine. The recent withdrawal of the only scientific publications claiming the successful generation of NTSC lines afford an opportunity to review the available research in mammalian reproductive somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) with the goal of progressing human NTSC. The process of SCNT is prone to epigenetic abnormalities that contribute to very low success rates. Although there are high mortality rates in some species of cloned animals, most surviving clones have been shown to have normal phenotypic and physiological characteristics and to produce healthy offspring. This technology has been applied to an increasing number of mammals for utility in research, agriculture, conservation, and biomedicine. In contrast, attempts at SCNT to produce human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been disappointing. Only one group has published reliable evidence of success in deriving a cloned human blastocyst, using an undifferentiated hESC donor cell, and it failed to develop into a hESC line. When optimal conditions are present, it appears that in vitro development of cloned and parthenogenetic embryos, both of which may be utilized to produce hESCs, may be similar to in vitro fertilized embryos. The derivation of ESC lines from cloned embryos is substantially more efficient than the production of viable offspring. This review summarizes developments in mammalian reproductive cloning, cell-to-cell fusion alternatives, and strategies for oocyte procurement that may provide important clues facilitating progress in human therapeutic cloning leading to the successful application of cell-based therapies utilizing autologous hESC lines.

  9. Birth of clones of the world's first cloned dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Geon A; Setyawan, Erif Maha Nugraha; Choi, Yoo Bin; Lee, Seok Hee; Petersen-Jones, Simon M; Ko, CheMyong J; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2017-11-10

    Animal cloning has gained popularity as a method to produce genetically identical animals or superior animals for research or industrial uses. However, the long-standing question of whether a cloned animal undergoes an accelerated aging process is yet to be answered. As a step towards answering this question, we compared longevity and health of Snuppy, the world's first cloned dog, and its somatic cell donor, Tai, a male Afghan hound. Briefly, both Snuppy and Tai were generally healthy until both developed cancer to which they succumbed at the ages of 10 and 12 years, respectively. The longevity of both the donor and the cloned dog was close to the median lifespan of Afghan hounds which is reported to be 11.9 years. Here, we report creation of 4 clones using adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells from Snuppy as donor cells. Clinical and molecular follow-up of these reclones over their lives will provide us with a unique opportunity to study the health and longevity of cloned animals compared with their cell donors.

  10. Prevalence and Molecular Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus among Residents of Seven Nursing Homes in Shanghai.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhang

    Full Text Available Residents in nursing homes (NHs always represent potential reservoirs for Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. To our knowledge, there is no epidemiological information up till now that describes the prevalence and molecular characteristics of S. aureus in nursing home residents in Shanghai, China.Four hundred and ninety-one unique residents from 7 NHs were enrolled in this study. Specimens were collected among these residents including 491 nasal swabs, 487 axillary swabs and 119 skin swabs. S. aureus isolated and identified from the swabs was characterized according to antimicrobial susceptibility profiling, toxin gene prevalence, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST, spa and SCCmec typing.Among the 491 residents screened, S. aureus was isolated in 109 residents from 90 nasal swabs (90/491, 18.3%, 29 axillary swabs (29/487, 6.0%, and 22 skin swabs (22/119, 18.5%. Sixty-eight MRSA isolates were detected in 52 residents from 41 nasal carriers, 15 axillary carriers and 12 skin carriers. The overall prevalence rate of S. aureus and MRSA colonization was 22.2% and 10.6% respectively. Ten residents presented S. aureus in all three sample types and 12 residents presented S. aureus in two of the three sample types collected. Molecular analysis revealed CC1 (29.1% to be the dominant clone in this study, followed by CC398 (19.9%, CC188 (13.5% and CC5 (12.8%. The most common spa type was t127 (22.0%, followed by t14383 (12.8% and t002 (10.6%.A high prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA colonization was revealed in nursing home residents in Shanghai. CC1 was the most common clonal complex and t127 was the most common spa type among NH residents. The data provides an important baseline for future surveillance of S. aureus in NHs in Shanghai and other highly urbanized regions in China. Implementation of infection control strategies must be given high priority in NHs to fight such high prevalence of both MRSA and methicillin

  11. Prevalence and Molecular Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus among Residents of Seven Nursing Homes in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji; Gu, Fei-Fei; Zhao, Sheng-Yuan; Xiao, Shu-Zhen; Wang, Yan-Chun; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Ni, Yu-Xing; Han, Li-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Residents in nursing homes (NHs) always represent potential reservoirs for Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). To our knowledge, there is no epidemiological information up till now that describes the prevalence and molecular characteristics of S. aureus in nursing home residents in Shanghai, China. Four hundred and ninety-one unique residents from 7 NHs were enrolled in this study. Specimens were collected among these residents including 491 nasal swabs, 487 axillary swabs and 119 skin swabs. S. aureus isolated and identified from the swabs was characterized according to antimicrobial susceptibility profiling, toxin gene prevalence, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa and SCCmec typing. Among the 491 residents screened, S. aureus was isolated in 109 residents from 90 nasal swabs (90/491, 18.3%), 29 axillary swabs (29/487, 6.0%), and 22 skin swabs (22/119, 18.5%). Sixty-eight MRSA isolates were detected in 52 residents from 41 nasal carriers, 15 axillary carriers and 12 skin carriers. The overall prevalence rate of S. aureus and MRSA colonization was 22.2% and 10.6% respectively. Ten residents presented S. aureus in all three sample types and 12 residents presented S. aureus in two of the three sample types collected. Molecular analysis revealed CC1 (29.1%) to be the dominant clone in this study, followed by CC398 (19.9%), CC188 (13.5%) and CC5 (12.8%). The most common spa type was t127 (22.0%), followed by t14383 (12.8%) and t002 (10.6%). A high prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA colonization was revealed in nursing home residents in Shanghai. CC1 was the most common clonal complex and t127 was the most common spa type among NH residents. The data provides an important baseline for future surveillance of S. aureus in NHs in Shanghai and other highly urbanized regions in China. Implementation of infection control strategies must be given high priority in NHs to fight such high prevalence of both MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S

  12. [Protein toxins of Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsutdinov, A F; Tiurin, Iu A

    2014-01-01

    Main scientific-research studies regarding protein bacterial toxins of the most widespread bacteria that belong to Staphylococcus spp. genus and in particular the most pathogenic species for humans--Staphylococcus aureus, are analyzed. Structural and biological properties of protein toxins that have received the name of staphylococcus pyrogenic toxins (PTSAg) are presented. Data regarding genetic regulation of secretion and synthesis of these toxins and 3 main regulatory genetic systems (agr--accessory gene regulator, xpr--extracellular protein regulator, sar--staphylococcal accessory regulator) that coordinate synthesis of the most important protein toxins and enzymes for virulence of S. aureus, are presented.

  13. Human cloning and 'posthuman' society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Russell

    2005-01-01

    Since early 1997, when the creation of Dolly the sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer was announced in Nature, numerous government reports, essays, articles and books have considered the ethical problems and policy issues surrounding human reproductive cloning. In this article, I consider what response a modern liberal society should give to the prospect of human cloning, if it became safe and practical. Some opponents of human cloning have argued that permitting it would place us on a slippery slope to a repugnant future society, comparable to that portrayed in Aldous Huxley's novel, Brave New World. I conclude that, leaving aside concerns about safety, none of the psychological or social considerations discussed in this article provides an adequate policy justification for invoking the state's coercive powers to prevent human cloning.

  14. Human Cloning: Let's Discuss It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taras, Loretta; Stavroulakis, Anthea M.; Ortiz, Mary T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes experiences with holding discussions on cloning at a variety of levels in undergraduate biology courses. Discusses teaching methods used and student reactions to the discussions. Contains 12 references. (WRM)

  15. Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Carriage among Surgical personnel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the most common causes of both community and hospital acquired bacterial infection. There is strong correlation between S aureus nasal carriage and disease progress. Nasal carriage is high among health care workers. Inappropriate usage of antibiotic may

  16. Nasal Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus and Antibiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus has been demonstrated to be a major risk factor for invasive S. aureus infections in various population including children. The extent of S. aureus carriage in Sierra Leonean children is largely unknown. To determine the prevalence and pattern of antibiotic susceptibility of nasal S.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus transmission : clinical and molecular aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemendaal, A.L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen in nosocomial infections. Up to 30% of UCI related infections are caused by S. aureus. In this thesis we explore both clinical and molecular aspects of patient-to-patient transmission of S. aureus. We performed a European ICU study exploring infection

  18. Vancomycin Sensitivity of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (MRSA), resistant to all antibiotics including Vancomycin, has been reported in Japan, USA, Canada and Brazil. Hence, the main objective of this study was to evaluate the possible presence of Vancomycin resistant or intermediate S.aureus in Karachi. A total of 850 ...

  19. Comparison of screening methods to identify methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, G; Weist, K; Swidsinski, S; Kegel, M; Rüden, H

    1997-04-01

    Screening methods to identify methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were compared using 96 isolates representing 17 distinct clones. The sensitivity of four commercial agglutination tests was determined in comparison to the tube coagulation test, and the results related to the presence of the coagulase gene. The broth screening test, agar dilution test and disc diffusion test were carried out, and the results related to the presence of the mecA gene. Mannitol salt agar and Iso-Sensitest agar with varying salt supplements were used. All agglutination tests had high rates of detection of Staphylococcus aureus (95.8-99.0%). Resistance in mecA gene-positive Staphylococcus aureus isolates was correctly detected by the oxacillin broth test, the agar dilution test and the disc diffusion test on mannitol salt agar, whereas on Iso-Sensitest agar detection rates were lower (between 68.5% and 94.4%, depending on the salt supplement). Incubation of the Iso-Sensitest plates for 48 hours significantly improved the rate of detection of resistance, but increased the major error rate up to 71.4%. MecA gene-positive Staphylococcus aureus isolates not detected by the disc diffusion test on Iso-Sensitest agar had significantly lower oxacillin minimal inhibitory concentration values and were significantly less resistant to a variety of antibiotics. Thus, mannitol salt agar might be a suitable medium for use in the disc diffusion and agar dilution test to detect resistance to oxacillin in Staphylococcus aureus.

  20. Islamic perspectives on human cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mahmoud

    2007-01-01

    The present paper seeks to assess various views from Islamic jurists relating to human cloning, which is one of the controversial topics in the recent past. Taking Islamic jurisprudence principles, such as the rule of necessity for self preservation and respect for human beings, the rule of la darar wa la dirar ('the necessity to refrain from causing harm to oneself and others') and the rule of usr wa haraj, one may indicate that if human cloning could not be prohibited, as such, it could still be opposed because it gives way to various harmful consequences, which include family disorder, chaos in the clone's family relationships, physical and mental diseases for clones and suffering of egg donors and surrogate mothers. However with due attention to the fact that the reasons behind the prohibition of abortion only restrict the destruction of human embryos in their post-implantation stages, human cloning for biomedical research and exploitation of stem cells from cloned embryos at the blastocyst stage for therapeutic purposes would be acceptable.

  1. Cloning goes to the movies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormick, Craig

    2006-10-01

    Public attitude research conducted by Biotechnology Australia shows that one of the major sources of information on human reproductive cloning is movies. Traditionally, understanding of new and emerging technologies has come through the mass media but human cloning, being so widely addressed through the popular culture of movies, is more effectively defined by Hollywood than the news media or science media. But how well are the science and social issues of cloning portrayed in box office hits such as The Island, Multiplicity, Star Wars: Attack of the Clones and Jurassic Park? These movies have enormous reach and undoubted influence, and are therefore worth analyzing in some detail. This study looks at 33 movies made between 1971 and 2005 that address human reproductive cloning, and it categorizes the films based on their genre and potential influence. Yet rather than simply rating the quality of the science portrayed, the study compares the key messages in these movies with public attitudes towards cloning, to examine the correlations.

  2. Artificial cloning of domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Carol L

    2015-07-21

    Domestic animals can be cloned using techniques such as embryo splitting and nuclear transfer to produce genetically identical individuals. Although embryo splitting is limited to the production of only a few identical individuals, nuclear transfer of donor nuclei into recipient oocytes, whose own nuclear DNA has been removed, can result in large numbers of identical individuals. Moreover, clones can be produced using donor cells from sterile animals, such as steers and geldings, and, unlike their genetic source, these clones are fertile. In reality, due to low efficiencies and the high costs of cloning domestic species, only a limited number of identical individuals are generally produced, and these clones are primarily used as breed stock. In addition to providing a means of rescuing and propagating valuable genetics, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) research has contributed knowledge that has led to the direct reprogramming of cells (e.g., to induce pluripotent stem cells) and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation during embryonic development. In this review, I provide a broad overview of the historical development of cloning in domestic animals, of its application to the propagation of livestock and transgenic animal production, and of its scientific promise for advancing basic research.

  3. Molecular epidemiology of community-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biber, A; Parizade, M; Taran, D; Jaber, H; Berla, E; Rubin, C; Rahav, G; Glikman, D; Regev-Yochay, G

    2015-08-01

    Data on community-associated (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Israel are scarce. The objective of this study was to characterize the major CA-MRSA clones in Israel. All clinical MRSA isolates detected in the community during a period of 2.5 years (2011-2013) from individuals insured by a major health maintenance organization in Israel were collected, with additional data from medical records. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns and staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) typing were determined. SCCmec IV and V isolates were further typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, and detection of a panel of toxin genes. MRSA were detected in 280 patients, mostly from skin infections. Patients with SCCmec IV (n = 120, 43 %) were younger (p Israel, approximately 20 % are typical CA-MRSA clones, mainly USA300 and a local clone, t991.

  4. Point surveillance of Staphylococcus aureus carriage among medical staff in Infectious Diseases Hospital, Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Tz; Udo, E E; Grover, S

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the carriage of Staphylococcus aureus among doctors and nurses in Infectious Diseases Hospital, Kuwait, following the detection of 3 cases of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). A total of 260 nasal and throat swabs were obtained from 19 doctors and 111 nurses and cultured for the carriage of S. aureus. Forty-three S. aureus were identified based on their growth characteristics on mannitol-salt agar, catalase and tube coagulase and DNA hydrolysis. The isolates were tested for susceptibility to antibacterial agents and typed by phage typing; plasmid analysis and pulsed-field electrophoresis were carried out to determine their relatedness. Of the 19 doctors, 4 (21%) had nasal carriage while only 1 of them had a throat carriage. Sixteen (14.4%) nurses carried S. aureus in their noses and 20 (18%) in their throats. The combined nasal carriage rate for both doctors and nurses was 15.8%, and combined throat carriage was 16.6%. None of them carried MRSA. The isolates were resistant to penicillin G (90%), tetracycline (23.3%), erythromycin (9.3%) and cadmium (100%). Typing of the isolates showed a variety of phage types, plasmid and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns. None of the doctors or nurses carried MRSA. Typing of the methicillin-susceptible strains that they carried demonstrated that the S. aureus were different, indicating an absence of a dominant clone capable of spreading. It is important to maintain a low carriage of S. aureus among health-care workers. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Dynamic pattern and genotypic diversity of Staphylococcus aureus nasopharyngeal carriage in healthy pre-school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumental, S; Deplano, A; Jourdain, S; De Mendonça, R; Hallin, M; Nonhoff, C; Rottiers, S; Vergison, A; Denis, O

    2013-07-01

    It is common wisdom that persistent carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is more frequent in young children than in adults. The objectives of this study were to assess the S. aureus temporal carriage pattern among a healthy community of pre-school children, with concomitant description of genotype diversity, toxin-encoding genes and antibiotic resistance. Among 333 children 3-6 years of age, S. aureus nasopharyngeal carriage was assessed over one school year by culture of three sequential nasopharyngeal aspirates. Identification, methicillin resistance and toxin production profile were determined by PCR. Genotyping was performed by spa sequencing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Out of 830 samples collected, 286 (34%) yielded S. aureus from 185 carriers (55%). Based on consecutive genotype analysis, only 40/268 (15%) children could be classified as persistent carriers, and the remaining 118 (44%) showed intermittent carriage. spa typing revealed 82 types clustered into 13 spa clonal complexes (CCs). Fourteen strains isolated from 11 (3%) children were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), half of these strains belonged to the commonly hospital-associated spa t008-ST8-SCCmec IV. Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) were genotypically more diverse. Toxic shock syndrome toxin and egc1/2 complexes were highly prevalent (24%). Contrastingly, Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) was carried only by three MSSA strains (0.6% of children). Exfoliative toxins were detected in 10 (3.5%) MSSA strains, of which 5 were related to the impetigo clone CC121. Although S. aureus nasopharyngeal carriage was high among healthy pre-school children, persistent carriage seems to be less frequent than previously reported. The prevalence of MRSA carriage was 3%, but was not associated with PVL.

  6. Towards Clone Detection in UML Domain Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2010-01-01

    , we discuss how model clones arise by analyzing several practical scenarios. We propose a formal definition of models and clones, that allows us to specify a generic clone detection algorithm. Through a thorough analysis of the detail structure of sample UML domain models, recommendations for clone...

  7. Stress Responses in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aures are prominent members of the normal flora of humans and animals, but are also a major cause of mild and severe infections. To persist and disseminate in the human host, and to survive in environmental settings, such as hospitals, S. aureus have developed a plethora of cellular...

  8. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from inpatients with infected diabetic foot ulcers in an Algerian University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djahmi, N; Messad, N; Nedjai, S; Moussaoui, A; Mazouz, D; Richard, J-L; Sotto, A; Lavigne, J-P

    2013-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common pathogen cultured from diabetic foot infection (DFI). The consequence of its spread to soft tissue and bony structures is a major causal factor for lower-limb amputation. The objective of the study was to explore ecological data and epidemiological characteristics of S. aureus strains isolated from DFI in an Algerian hospital setting. Patients were included if they were admitted for DFI in the Department of Diabetology at the Annaba University Hospital from April 2011 to March 2012. Ulcers were classified according to the Infectious Diseases Society of America/International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot classification system. All S. aureus isolates were analysed. Using oligonucleotide arrays, S. aureus resistance and virulence genes were determined and each isolate was affiliated to a clonal complex. Among the 128 patients, 277 strains were isolated from 183 samples (1.51 isolate per sample). Aerobic Gram-negative bacilli were the most common isolated organisms (54.9% of all isolates). The study of ecological data highlighted the extremely high rate of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) (58.5% of all isolates). The situation was especially striking for S. aureus [(85.9% were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)], Klebsiella pneumonia (83.8%) and Escherichia coli (60%). Among the S. aureus isolates, 82.2% of MRSA belonged to ST239, one of the most worldwide disseminated clones. Ten strains (13.7%) belonged to the European clone PVL+ ST80. ermA, aacA-aphD, aphA, tetM, fosB, sek, seq, lukDE, fnbB, cap8 and agr group 1 genes were significantly associated with MRSA strains (p Algeria. ©2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection ©2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  9. Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates causing skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xue-qing

    2010-05-01

    . ST239-MRSA-SCCmecIII and ST1018-MRSA-SCCmecIII clones were found to be main clones and spread between community and hospital. Conclusion S. aureus isolates causing SSTIs showed considerable molecular heterogeneity and harbored high prevalence of PVL genes. Clonal spread was responsible for the dissemination of the isolates of S. aureus associated with SSTIs.

  10. Preliminary treatment of bovine mastitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus, with trx-SA1, recombinant endolysin of S. aureus bacteriophage IME-SA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jindai; Zeng, Zhiliang; Mai, Kaijie; Yang, Yu; Feng, Jiaqi; Bai, Yang; Sun, Baoli; Xie, Qingmei; Tong, Yigang; Ma, Jingyun

    2016-08-15

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become a great threat to human and animal health and there is an urgent need to develop novel antibacterial agents to control this pathogen. The objective of this study was to obtain an active recombinant endolysin from the novel bacteriophage (IME-SA1), and conduct an efficacy trial of its effectiveness against bovine mastitis. We isolated a phage that was virulent and specific for S. aureus with an optimal multiplicity of infection of 0.01. Electron microscopy revealed that IME-SA1 was a member of the family Myoviridae, with an isometric head (98nm) and a long contractile tail (200nm). Experimental lysis experiments indicated the phage had an incubation period of 20min with a burst size of 80. When host bacteria were in early exponential growth stages, a multiplicity of infection of 0.01 resulted in a complete bacterial lysis after 9h. The endolysin gene (804bp) was cloned into the pET-32a bacterial expression vector and recombinant endolysin Trx-SA1 was successfully obtained with molecular size of about 47kDa. Preliminary results of therapeutic trials in cow udders showed that Trx-SA1 could effectively control mild clinical mastitis caused by S. aureus. The endolysin Trx-SA1 might be an alternative treatment strategy for infections caused by S. aureus, including MRSA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Rise and subsequent decline of community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST30-IVc in Copenhagen, Denmark through an effective search and destroy policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, M D; Kristoffersen, K; Boye, K

    2010-01-01

    The number of patients with community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has increased rapidly in Copenhagen, Denmark since 2003. Patients with the typical Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive CA-MRSA clone ST30-IVc were contacted with the aim of treating MRSA carriers...

  12. Staphylococcus aureus complex from animals and humans in three remote African regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumburg, Frieder; Pauly, Maude; Anoh, Etile; Mossoun, Arsene; Wiersma, Lidewij; Schubert, Grit; Flammen, Arnaud; Alabi, Abraham S; Muyembe-Tamfum, Jean-Jacques; Grobusch, Martin P; Karhemere, Stomy; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Kremsner, Peter G; Mellmann, Alexander; Becker, Karsten; Leendertz, Fabian H; Peters, Georg

    2015-04-01

    Staphylococcus schweitzeri has been recently considered to be a highly divergent Staphylococcus aureus clade and usually colonises nonhuman primates and bats in sub-Saharan Africa. Its transmissibility to humans remains unclear. We therefore investigated the transmission of S. aureus and S. schweitzeri among humans, domestic animals, and wildlife in three remote African regions. A cross-sectional study on nasal and pharyngeal colonisation in humans (n = 1288) and animals (n = 698) was performed in Côte d'Ivoire, Gabon, and Democratic Republic of Congo (DR Congo). Isolates were subjected to spa typing and multilocus sequence typing. Antimicrobial susceptibility and selected virulence factors were tested. S. schweitzeri was found in monkeys from all study sites but no transmission to humans was evident, despite frequent contact of humans with wildlife. In contrast, human-associated S. aureus sequence types (ST1, ST6, ST15) were detected in domestic animals and nonhuman primates, pointing toward a human-to-monkey transmission in the wild. The proportion of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) among all S. aureus was 0% (Gabon), 1.7% (DR Congo), and 5.3% (Côte d'Ivoire). The majority of MRSA isolates belonged to the African clone ST88. In conclusion, we did not find any evidence for a transmission of S. schweitzeri from animals to humans. However, such a transmission might remain possible due to the close phylogenetic relation of humans and nonhuman primates. The ST88-MRSA clone was widespread in Côte d'Ivoire but not in Gabon and DR Congo. Copyright © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Specific and selective probes for Staphylococcus aureus from phage-displayed random peptide libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Plano, Laura M; Carnazza, Santina; Messina, Grazia M L; Rizzo, Maria Giovanna; Marletta, Giovanni; Guglielmino, Salvatore P P

    2017-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen causing health care-associated and community-associated infections. Early diagnosis is essential to prevent disease progression and to reduce complications that can be serious. In this study, we selected, from a 9-mer phage peptide library, a phage clone displaying peptide capable of specific binding to S. aureus cell surface, namely St.au9IVS5 (sequence peptide RVRSAPSSS).The ability of the isolated phage clone to interact specifically with S. aureus and the efficacy of its bacteria-binding properties were established by using enzyme linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA). We also demonstrated by Western blot analysis that the most reactive and selective phage peptide binds a 78KDa protein on the bacterial cell surface. Furthermore, we observed selectivity of phage-bacteria-binding allowing to identify clinical isolates of S. aureus in comparison with a panel of other bacterial species. In order to explore the possibility of realizing a selective bacteria biosensor device, based on immobilization of affinity-selected phage, we have studied the physisorbed phage deposition onto a mica surface. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the organization of phage on mica surface and then the binding performance of mica-physisorbed phage to bacterial target was evaluated during the time by fluorescent microscopy. The system is able to bind specifically about 50% of S. aureus cells after 15' and 90% after one hour. Due to specificity and rapidness, this biosensing strategy paves the way to the further development of new cheap biosensors to be used in developing countries, as lab-on-chip (LOC) to detect bacterial agents in clinical diagnostics applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus in Some Brazilian Dairy Industries: Changes of Contamination and Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Karen K.; Chaul, Luíza T.; Lee, Sarah H. I.; Corassin, Carlos H.; Fernandes de Oliveira, Carlos A.; Pereira De Martinis, Elaine C.; Alves, Virgínia F.; Gram, Lone; Oxaran, Virginie

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a major food-poisoning pathogen, is a common contaminant in dairy industries worldwide, including in Brazil. We determined the occurrence of S. aureus in five dairies in Brazil over 8 months. Of 421 samples, 31 (7.4%) were positive for S. aureus and prevalence varied from 0 to 63.3% between dairies. Sixty-six isolates from the 31 samples were typed by Multi-Locus Sequence Typing to determine if these isolates were persistent or continuously reintroduced. Seven known sequence types (STs), ST1, ST5, ST30, ST97, ST126, ST188 and ST398, and four new ST were identified, ST3531, ST3540, ST3562 and ST3534. Clonal complex (CC) 1 (including the four new ST), known as an epidemic clone, was the dominant CC. However, there were no indications of persistence of particular ST. The resistance toward 11 antibiotic compounds was assessed. Twelve profiles were generated with 75.8% of strains being sensitive to all antibiotic classes and no Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains were found. The enterotoxin-encoding genes involved in food-poisoning, e.g., sea, sed, see, and seg were targeted by PCR. The two toxin-encoding genes, sed and see, were not detected. Only three strains (4.5%) harbored seg and two of these also harbored sea. Despite the isolates being Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA), the presence of CC1 clones in the processing environment, including some harboring enterotoxin encoding genes, is of concern and hygiene must have high priority to reduce contamination. PMID:29123505

  15. Genomic analysis of ST88 community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Kpeli

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background The emergence and evolution of community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA strains in Africa is poorly understood. However, one particular MRSA lineage called ST88, appears to be rapidly establishing itself as an “African” CA-MRSA clone. In this study, we employed whole genome sequencing to provide more information on the genetic background of ST88 CA-MRSA isolates from Ghana and to describe in detail ST88 CA-MRSA isolates in comparison with other MRSA lineages worldwide. Methods We first established a complete ST88 reference genome (AUS0325 using PacBio SMRT sequencing. We then used comparative genomics to assess relatedness among 17 ST88 CA-MRSA isolates recovered from patients attending Buruli ulcer treatment centres in Ghana, three non-African ST88s and 15 other MRSA lineages. Results We show that Ghanaian ST88 forms a discrete MRSA lineage (harbouring SCCmec-IV [2B]. Gene content analysis identified five distinct genomic regions enriched among ST88 isolates compared with the other S. aureus lineages. The Ghanaian ST88 isolates had only 658 core genome SNPs and there was no correlation between phylogeny and geography, suggesting the recent spread of this clone. The lineage was also resistant to multiple classes of antibiotics including β-lactams, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. Discussion This study reveals that S. aureus ST88-IV is a recently emerging and rapidly spreading CA-MRSA clone in Ghana. The study highlights the capacity of small snapshot genomic studies to provide actionable public health information in resource limited settings. To our knowledge this is the first genomic assessment of the ST88 CA-MRSA clone.

  16. [Mystery and problems of cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, V A

    2010-01-01

    The attention of investigators is attracted to the fact that, in spite of great efforts in mammalian cloning, advances that have been made in this area of research are not great, and cloned animals have developmental pathologies often incompatible with life and/or reproduction ability. It is yet not clear what technical or biological factors underlie this, and how they are connected or interact with each other, which is more realistic strategically. There is a great number of articles dealing with the influence of cloning with the nuclear transfer on genetic and epigenetic reprogramming of donor cells. At the same time we can see the practical absence of analytical investigations concerning the technology of cloning as such, its weak points, and possible sources of cellular trauma in the course of microsurgery of nuclear transfer or twinning. This article discusses step by step several nuclear transfer techniques and the methods of dividing early preimplanted embryos for twinning with the aim to reveal possible sources of cell damage during micromanipulation that may have negative influence on the development of cloned organisms. Several new author's technologies based on the study of cell biophysical characteristics are described, which allow one to avoid cellular trauma during manipulation and minimize the possibility of cell damage at any rate.

  17. [Cloning and law in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julesz, Máté

    2015-03-01

    Reproductive human cloning is prohibited in Hungary, as in many other countries. Therapeutic human cloning is not prohibited, just like in many other countries. Stem cell therapy is also allowed. Article III, paragraph (3) of the Hungarian basic law (constitution) strictly forbids total human cloning. Article 1 of the Additional Protocol to the Oviedo Convention, on the Prohibition of Cloning Human Beings (1998) stipulates that any intervention seeking to create a human being genetically identical to another human being, whether living or dead, is prohibited. In Hungary, according to Article 174 of the Criminal Code, total human cloning constitutes a crime. Article 180, paragraph (3) of the Hungarian Act on Health declares that embryos shall not be brought about for research purposes; research shall be conducted only on embryos brought about for reproductive purposes when this is authorized by the persons entitled to decide upon its disposal, or when the embryo is damaged. Article 180, paragraph (5) of the Hungarian Act on Health stipulates that multiple individuals who genetically conform to one another shall not be brought about. According to Article 181, paragraph (1) of the Hungarian Act on Health, an embryo used for research shall be kept alive for not longer than 14 days, not counting the time it was frozen for storage and the time period of research.

  18. Clinical features and molecular characteristics of childhood community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in a medical center in northern Taiwan, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Kai; Huang, Chun-Yen; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2017-07-05

    Since first reported in 2002, the rate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among childhood community-associated (CA) S. aureus infection in Taiwan increased significantly up to 2005. There have been no reports on this issue since then. We prospectively collected clinical S. aureus isolates from the patients MRSA were further characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCCmec) typing, and multilocus sequence typing. A total of 409 S. aureus isolates were included, and 260 (63.6%) were MRSA. The proportion of MRSA among all S. aureus isolates in 2012 increased significantly (p MRSA isolates, 86.2% were identified from pus or wound. Nine pulsotypes were identified with two major types (type D, 119 (65.7%); type C, 27 (14.9%). Most of the isolates carried either SCCmec IV (66 isolates, 36%) or V T (112 isolates, 62%). 128 isolates (71%) carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes. Clonal complex (CC) 59 accounted for 146 isolates (80.7%) of two major pulsotypes, CC45 for 19 isolates, ST30 for 6 isolates and ST8 (USA 300) for 4 isolates. In addition to penicillin (100%), most isolates were resistant to erythromycin (81%) and clindamycin (79.3%). Around two-thirds of childhood community-associated S. aureus infections in northern Taiwan were MRSA. Though CC59 is still the prevalent community clone, several new clones emerged in northern Taiwan.

  19. Public perceptions of animal cloning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsøe, Erling; Vincentsen, Ulla; Andersen, Ida-Elisabeth

    What was from the outset meant to be a survey testing predefined categories of ethical positions related to new biotechnologies with animal cloning as an example was subsequently developed into a process of broader involvement of groups of citizens in the issue. The survey was conducted at meetings...... in four different cities in Denmark. The participants were introduced to animal cloning and after that they filled out the questionnaire. Finally, the issue was discussed in focus groups. The process as a whole was run in a dialogue oriented way. Through the information they received in combination...... with reflecting on the survey questions the participants were well prepared for discussions in the focus groups. This approach made it possible, on the one hand to get a measure of the citizen's perceptions of the ethical aspects of animal cloning, but also to go deeper into their own thoughts of the issue...

  20. The topsy-turvy cloning law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassington, Iain; Oultram, Stuart

    2011-03-01

    In debates about human cloning, a distinction is frequently drawn between therapeutic and reproductive uses of the technology. Naturally enough, this distinction influences the way that the law is framed. The general consensus is that therapeutic cloning is less morally problematic than reproductive cloning--one can hold this position while holding that both are morally unacceptable--and the law frequently leaves the way open for some cloning for the sake of research into new therapeutic techniques while banning it for reproductive purposes. We claim that the position adopted by the law has things the wrong way around: if we accept a moral distinction between therapeutic and reproductive cloning, there are actually more reasons to be morally worried about therapeutic cloning than about reproductive cloning. If cloning is the proper object of legal scrutiny, then, we ought to make sure that we are scrutinising the right kind of clone.

  1. Expression of Four Methionine Sulfoxide Reductases in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus possesses three MsrA enzymes (MsrA1, MsrA2, MsrA3 that reduce the S-epimer of methionine sulfoxide (MetO and an MsrB enzyme that reduces R-MetO. The four msr genes are expressed from three different promoters. The msrA1/msrB genes are coexpressed. To determine the expression pattern of msr genes, three independent reporter strains were constructed where msr promoter was cloned in front of a promoterless lacZ and the resulting construct was integrated in the chromosome. Using these strains, it was determined that the msrA1/B expression is significantly higher in S. aureus compared to msrA2 or msrA3. Expression of msrA1/B was highest during stationary phase growth, but the expression of msrA2 and msrA3 was highest during the early to midexponential growth phase. Expression of msrA1/B was induced by oxacillin and the expression of msrA3 was upregulated by salt. Expression of msrA2 remained unchanged under all tested conditions.

  2. Adhesive polypeptides of Staphylococcus aureus identified using a novel secretion library technique in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holm Liisa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial adhesive proteins, called adhesins, are frequently the decisive factor in initiation of a bacterial infection. Characterization of such molecules is crucial for the understanding of bacterial pathogenesis, design of vaccines and development of antibacterial drugs. Because adhesins are frequently difficult to express, their characterization has often been hampered. Alternative expression methods developed for the analysis of adhesins, e.g. surface display techniques, suffer from various drawbacks and reports on high-level extracellular secretion of heterologous proteins in Gram-negative bacteria are scarce. These expression techniques are currently a field of active research. The purpose of the current study was to construct a convenient, new technique for identification of unknown bacterial adhesive polypeptides directly from the growth medium of the Escherichia coli host and to identify novel proteinaceous adhesins of the model organism Staphylococcus aureus. Results Randomly fragmented chromosomal DNA of S. aureus was cloned into a unique restriction site of our expression vector, which facilitates secretion of foreign FLAG-tagged polypeptides into the growth medium of E. coli ΔfliCΔfliD, to generate a library of 1663 clones expressing FLAG-tagged polypeptides. Sequence and bioinformatics analyses showed that in our example, the library covered approximately 32% of the S. aureus proteome. Polypeptides from the growth medium of the library clones were screened for binding to a selection of S. aureus target molecules and adhesive fragments of known staphylococcal adhesins (e.g coagulase and fibronectin-binding protein A as well as polypeptides of novel function (e.g. a universal stress protein and phosphoribosylamino-imidazole carboxylase ATPase subunit were detected. The results were further validated using purified His-tagged recombinant proteins of the corresponding fragments in enzyme-linked immunoassay and

  3. Surgimiento y diseminación de Staphylococcus aureus meticilinorresistente Staphylococcus aureus methicillin-resistant: emergence and dissemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elena Velázquez-Meza

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Las infecciones nosocomiales ocasionadas por cepas de Staphylococcus aureus meticilinorresistentes (SAMR son un problema de salud importante en todo el mundo. Este microorganismo produce una gran variedad de infecciones incluyendo osteomielitis, endocarditis invasora, artritis séptica y septicemia. La multirresistencia es un factor que influye en la persistencia de los SAMR dentro del ámbito hospitalario. La introducción de técnicas de tipificación molecular dentro de las investigaciones epidemiológicas ha provisto nuevas herramientas para conocer el origen y las vías de diseminación de este microorganismo. Una de las conclusiones importantes que han surgido de este tipo de estudios es que un número pequeño de clonas son las responsables de las infecciones estafilocócicas en todo el mundo.Nosocomial infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is an important health problem worldwide. This microorganism causes a variety of clinical infections, including osteomyelitis, invasive endocarditis, septic arthritis and septicemia. Antimicrobial resistance is a factor that influences the persistence of MRSA in the hospital environment. The introduction of molecular typing techniques in epidemiological investigations has provided new tools for identifying the microorganism's origin and routes of dissemination. One of the most important conclusions that have resulted from these types of studies is that a small number of clones are responsible for most of the staphylococcal infections throughout the world.

  4. Colonização microbiana precoce de pacientes identificados por triagem neonatal para fibrose cística, com ênfase em Staphylococcus aureus Early microbial colonization of cystic fibrosis patients identified by neonatal screening, with emphasis on Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena A. P. H. M. Souza

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar prospectivamente a colonização bacteriana de pacientes com fibrose cística identificados por triagem neonatal. Avaliar a suscetibilidade a antimicrobianos e caracterizar molecularmente as cepas de Staphylococcus aureus isoladas da orofaringe dos pacientes no período do estudo. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 25 pacientes com fibrose cística, identificados por tripsina imunorreativa e com diagnóstico confirmado por duas ou mais provas de suor, atendidos regularmente no ambulatório de fibrose cística do Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Federal do Paraná. Foram coletadas amostras de orofaringe com swab e cultivadas por métodos rotineiros; as colônias bacterianas foram identificadas fenotipicamente e testadas quanto à suscetibilidade a antimicrobianos. Os isolados de S. aureus foram submetidos a tipagem molecular por eletroforese em campo pulsado. RESULTADOS: De um total de 234 amostras de orofaringe, S. aureus foi isolado em maior número (76% dos pacientes, 42% das amostras, seguido de Pseudomonas aeruginosa (36% dos pacientes, 16% das amostras e Haemophilus spp. (76% dos pacientes; 19% das amostras. Dos 19 pacientes colonizados com S. aureus, foram obtidos 73 isolados, 18 oxacilina-resistentes (24,6%, isolados de dois pacientes, com perfis eletroforéticos idênticos ao do clone brasileiro. Os demais isolados oxacilina-sensíveis distribuíram-se entre 18 perfis eletroforéticos distintos. CONCLUSÃO: Observou-se uma maior prevalência de S. aureus, com isolamento mais precoce em relação aos outros patógenos pesquisados. Os isolados multissensíveis distribuíram-se em clones distintos, caracterizando a não transmissibilidade entre as cepas comunitárias. Os S. aureus resistentes a oxacilina isolados apresentaram perfis eletroforéticos idênticos, provavelmente adquiridos no ambiente hospitalar. P. aeruginosa foi pouco freqüente na população estudada.OBJECTIVES: To assess bacterial colonization prospectively

  5. Positional cloning of deafness genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, H.; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    The identification of the majority of the known causative genes involved in nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (NSHL) started with linkage analysis as part of a positional cloning procedure. The human and mouse genome projects in combination with technical developments on genotyping,

  6. Clonal distribution and possible microevolution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains in a teaching hospital in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Xin Ee Tan; Hui-min Neoh; Salasawati Hussin; Noraziah Mohamad Zin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To genotypically characterize methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from medical and surgical wards in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) in 2009. Methods: MRSA strains were collected and molecularly typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results: PFGE typing on 180 MRSA isolated in UKMMC identified 5 pulsotypes (A-E) and 6 singletons, where pulsotypes B and C were suspected to be divergent clones originating from a ...

  7. Quantum cloning machines and the applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Heng; Wang, Yi-Nan; Jing, Li; Yue, Jie-Dong; Shi, Han-Duo; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Mu, Liang-Zhu

    2014-11-01

    No-cloning theorem is fundamental for quantum mechanics and for quantum information science that states an unknown quantum state cannot be cloned perfectly. However, we can try to clone a quantum state approximately with the optimal fidelity, or instead, we can try to clone it perfectly with the largest probability. Thus various quantum cloning machines have been designed for different quantum information protocols. Specifically, quantum cloning machines can be designed to analyze the security of quantum key distribution protocols such as BB84 protocol, six-state protocol, B92 protocol and their generalizations. Some well-known quantum cloning machines include universal quantum cloning machine, phase-covariant cloning machine, the asymmetric quantum cloning machine and the probabilistic quantum cloning machine. In the past years, much progress has been made in studying quantum cloning machines and their applications and implementations, both theoretically and experimentally. In this review, we will give a complete description of those important developments about quantum cloning and some related topics. On the other hand, this review is self-consistent, and in particular, we try to present some detailed formulations so that further study can be taken based on those results.

  8. Quantum cloning machines and the applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Heng, E-mail: hfan@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang, Yi-Nan; Jing, Li [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yue, Jie-Dong [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Shi, Han-Duo; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Mu, Liang-Zhu [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-11-20

    No-cloning theorem is fundamental for quantum mechanics and for quantum information science that states an unknown quantum state cannot be cloned perfectly. However, we can try to clone a quantum state approximately with the optimal fidelity, or instead, we can try to clone it perfectly with the largest probability. Thus various quantum cloning machines have been designed for different quantum information protocols. Specifically, quantum cloning machines can be designed to analyze the security of quantum key distribution protocols such as BB84 protocol, six-state protocol, B92 protocol and their generalizations. Some well-known quantum cloning machines include universal quantum cloning machine, phase-covariant cloning machine, the asymmetric quantum cloning machine and the probabilistic quantum cloning machine. In the past years, much progress has been made in studying quantum cloning machines and their applications and implementations, both theoretically and experimentally. In this review, we will give a complete description of those important developments about quantum cloning and some related topics. On the other hand, this review is self-consistent, and in particular, we try to present some detailed formulations so that further study can be taken based on those results.

  9. Identification and Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Strains with an Incomplete Hemolytic Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haifang; Zheng, Yi; Gao, Huasheng; Xu, Ping; Wang, Min; Li, Aiqing; Miao, Minhui; Xie, Xiaofang; Deng, Yimai; Zhou, Huiqin; Du, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common pathogen causing both hospital and community-acquired infections. Hemolysin is one of the important virulence factors for S. aureus and causes the typical β-hemolytic phenotype which is called complete hemolytic phenotype as well. Recently, S. aureus with an incomplete hemolytic phenotype (SIHP) was isolated from clinical samples. To study the microbiologic characteristics of SIHP, the special hemolytic phenotype of SIHP was verified on the sheep blood agar plates supplied by different manufacturers. Expression of hemolysin genes hla, hlb, hlgC, and hld of SIHP was detected by qRT-PCR and it was showed that expression of hlb in SIHP was obviously increased compared to the control S. aureus strains with complete hemolytic phenotype (SCHP), while the expression of hla, hlgC, and hld in SIHP was significantly decreased. In addition, the α-hemolysin encoded by gene hla was decreased obviously in SIHP compared to SCHP by western blot. All 60 SIHP strains were identified to be the methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and moreover these SIHP strains all contains mecA gene. The virulence gene tst were all present in SIHP, and the intracellular survival ability of SIHP was much greater than that of the gene tst negative S. aureus. We also found that IL-2, IL-6, and IL-17A secreted in the supernatant of SIHP infected macrophages increased significantly compared to tst negative control strains infected ones. MLST analysis showed that all of SIHP strains were classified into ST5 clone. To our knowledge, this study firstly showed that SIHP strains are a kind of methicillin resistant strains which express β-hemolysin highly and possess a potential high virulence, and it was suggested that SIHP should be paid more attention in hospital. PMID:27917374

  10. Identification and Characterization ofStaphylococcus aureusStrains with an Incomplete Hemolytic Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haifang; Zheng, Yi; Gao, Huasheng; Xu, Ping; Wang, Min; Li, Aiqing; Miao, Minhui; Xie, Xiaofang; Deng, Yimai; Zhou, Huiqin; Du, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common pathogen causing both hospital and community-acquired infections. Hemolysin is one of the important virulence factors for S. aureus and causes the typical β-hemolytic phenotype which is called complete hemolytic phenotype as well. Recently, S. aureus with an incomplete hemolytic phenotype (SIHP) was isolated from clinical samples. To study the microbiologic characteristics of SIHP, the special hemolytic phenotype of SIHP was verified on the sheep blood agar plates supplied by different manufacturers. Expression of hemolysin genes hla, hlb, hlgC , and hld of SIHP was detected by qRT-PCR and it was showed that expression of hlb in SIHP was obviously increased compared to the control S. aureus strains with complete hemolytic phenotype (SCHP), while the expression of hla, hlgC , and hld in SIHP was significantly decreased. In addition, the α-hemolysin encoded by gene hla was decreased obviously in SIHP compared to SCHP by western blot. All 60 SIHP strains were identified to be the methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and moreover these SIHP strains all contains mecA gene. The virulence gene tst were all present in SIHP, and the intracellular survival ability of SIHP was much greater than that of the gene tst negative S. aureus . We also found that IL-2, IL-6, and IL-17A secreted in the supernatant of SIHP infected macrophages increased significantly compared to tst negative control strains infected ones. MLST analysis showed that all of SIHP strains were classified into ST5 clone. To our knowledge, this study firstly showed that SIHP strains are a kind of methicillin resistant strains which express β-hemolysin highly and possess a potential high virulence, and it was suggested that SIHP should be paid more attention in hospital.

  11. ENTEROTOXIGENIC STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS IN SHEEP RAW MILK

    OpenAIRE

    G. Giacinti; Amatiste, S.; A. Tammaro; D. Sagrafoli; G. Giangolini; R. Rosati

    2011-01-01

    A total of 366 raw milk samples from 30 sheep farms were examined quantitatively for Staphylococcus aureus. Enterotoxin production by strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated was investigated. S. aureus was detected in 19 farms (63,3%). The ability to synthetise enterotoxins was found in ten strains (52,6%). Production of staphylococcal enterotoxins C (SEC) was recorded in 6 (60%) and production of SEC together with staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in 4 (40%) staphylococcal isolates. Raw m...

  12. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among animals: current overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires-de-Sousa, M

    2017-06-01

    Currently, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a universal threat. After being well established in the healthcare setting, it has emerged in the community among people with no risk factors for MRSA acquisition, therefore imposing a new threat. The subsequent detection of MRSA colonizing or infecting animals as well as in food of animal origin was of major concern, revealing new reservoirs for MRSA. The major MRSA clonal lineages circulating in the different settings, i.e. in hospitals, in the community and among animals, are described here, differentiating between clones colonizing companion and food-chain animals. Particular attention is given to the widely spread livestock-associated MRSA clonal complex (CC) 398, which is mainly associated with professional exposure but may be of high pathogenicity. The recent detection of a mecA homologue, designated mecC, with a wide geographical distribution in Europe, and including a large diversity of hosts (food-chain, companion and wildlife animals and also detected in water samples) adds to the threat. Domestication as well as globalization of the livestock industry have intensified exchanges between human and animal bacteria. We report here several cases of transmission of MRSA between companion or food-chain animals and humans, as well as some MRSA clones of human origin that have adapted to new animal hosts eventually by losing useless virulence factors or acquiring new mobile genetic elements. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Immunomodulation and Disease Tolerance to Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most frequent pathogens that causes severe morbidity and mortality throughout the world. S. aureus can infect skin and soft tissues or become invasive leading to diseases such as pneumonia, endocarditis, sepsis or toxic shock syndrome. In contrast, S. aureus is also a common commensal microbe and is often part of the human nasal microbiome without causing any apparent disease. In this review, we explore the immunomodulation and disease tolerance mechanisms that promote commensalism to S. aureus.

  14. S. aureus colonization at ICU admission as a risk factor for developing S. aureus ICU pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paling, Fleur P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413968669; Wolkewitz, Martin; Bode, Lonneke G M; Klein Klouwenberg, Peter M C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/33706864X; Ong, David S Y; Depuydt, Pieter; de Bus, Liesbet; Sifakis, Frangiscos; Bonten, Marc J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337; Kluijtmans, Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323262139

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the incidence of intensive care unit (ICU) acquired pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and its association with S. aureus colonization at ICU admission. METHODS: This was a post-hoc analysis of two cohort studies in critically ill patients. The primary

  15. Relationship and susceptibility profile of Staphylococcus aureus infection diabetic foot ulcers with Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Aza Bahadeen

    2013-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the main cause of diabetic foot infection with the patient's endogenous flora as the principal source. Nasal carriage of S. aureus has been identified as an important risk factor for the acquisition of diabetic foot infections. The study assessment the associations of S. aureus with methicillin resistant S. aureus were isolation from diabetic foot infection and nasal carriage of the same patients and their antibiotic susceptibility profile. Diagnosis of S. aureus and methicillin resistant S. aureus were carried out by using standard procedures. Antibiotic sensitivity profiles were determent by breakpoint dilution method. Out of 222 S. aureus isolation, 139 (62.61%) were isolated from the diabetic foot and 83 (37.39%) from the nasal carriage. Seventy one (30.87%) of the patients were S. aureus infection diabetic foot with nasal carriage. Among diabetic foot infection and nasal carriage patients, 40.85% of S. aureus were considered as methicillin resistant S. aureus. Rifampicin (96.40%) and Levofloxacin (91.44%) were active against S. aureus. Patients at strong risk for methicillin resistant S. aureus nasal carriage and subsequent diabetic foot infection with high resistance to antibiotics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Energy Values of Nine Populus Clones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry F. Strong

    1980-01-01

    Compares calorific values for components of nine Populus clones. The components include stem wood, stem bark, and branches. Also compares calorific values for clones of balsam poplar and black cottonwood parentages.

  17. Human reproductive cloning: a conflict of liberties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havstad, Joyce C

    2010-02-01

    Proponents of human reproductive cloning do not dispute that cloning may lead to violations of clones' right to self-determination, or that these violations could cause psychological harms. But they proceed with their endorsement of human reproductive cloning by dismissing these psychological harms, mainly in two ways. The first tactic is to point out that to commit the genetic fallacy is indeed a mistake; the second is to invoke Parfit's non-identity problem. The argument of this paper is that neither approach succeeds in removing our moral responsibility to consider and to prevent psychological harms to cloned individuals. In fact, the same commitment to personal liberty that generates the right to reproduce by means of cloning also creates the need to limit that right appropriately. Discussion of human reproductive cloning ought to involve a careful and balanced consideration of both the relevant aspects of personal liberty - the parents' right to reproductive freedom and the cloned child's right to self-determination.

  18. Pyoderma outbreak among kindergarten families: Association with a Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-producing S. aureus strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leistner, Rasmus; Kola, Axel; Gastmeier, Petra; Krüger, Renate; Hoppe, Pia-Alice; Schneider-Burrus, Sylke; Zuschneid, Irina; Wischnewski, Nicoletta; Bender, Jennifer; Layer, Franziska; Niebank, Michaela; Scheibenbogen, Carmen; Hanitsch, Leif G

    2017-01-01

    We report on an outbreak of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) among kindergarten families. We analyzed the transmission route and aimed to control the outbreak. The transmission route was investigated by nasal screening for Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-producing Staphylococcus aureus (PVL-SA), subsequent microbiological investigation including whole genome sequencing and a questionnaire-based analysis of epidemiological information. The control measures included distribution of outbreak information to all individuals at risk and implementation of a Staphylococcus aureus decontamination protocol. Individuals from 7 of 19 families were either colonized or showed signs of SSTI such as massive abscesses or eye lid infections. We found 10 PVL-SA isolates in 9 individuals. In the WGS-analysis all isolates were found identical with a maximum of 17 allele difference. The clones were methicillin-susceptible but cotrimoxazole resistant. In comparison to PVL-SAs from an international strain collection, the outbreak clone showed close genetical relatedness to PVL-SAs from a non-European country. The questionnaire results showed frequent travels of one family to this area. The results also demonstrated likely transmission via direct contact between families. After initiation of Staphylococcus aureus decontamination no further case was detected. Our outbreak investigation showed the introduction of a PVL-SA strain into a kindergarten likely as a result of international travel and further transmission by direct contact. The implementation of a Staphylococcus aureus decontamination protocol was able to control the outbreak.

  19. Pyoderma outbreak among kindergarten families: Association with a Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL-producing S. aureus strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasmus Leistner

    Full Text Available We report on an outbreak of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI among kindergarten families. We analyzed the transmission route and aimed to control the outbreak.The transmission route was investigated by nasal screening for Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL-producing Staphylococcus aureus (PVL-SA, subsequent microbiological investigation including whole genome sequencing and a questionnaire-based analysis of epidemiological information. The control measures included distribution of outbreak information to all individuals at risk and implementation of a Staphylococcus aureus decontamination protocol.Individuals from 7 of 19 families were either colonized or showed signs of SSTI such as massive abscesses or eye lid infections. We found 10 PVL-SA isolates in 9 individuals. In the WGS-analysis all isolates were found identical with a maximum of 17 allele difference. The clones were methicillin-susceptible but cotrimoxazole resistant. In comparison to PVL-SAs from an international strain collection, the outbreak clone showed close genetical relatedness to PVL-SAs from a non-European country. The questionnaire results showed frequent travels of one family to this area. The results also demonstrated likely transmission via direct contact between families. After initiation of Staphylococcus aureus decontamination no further case was detected.Our outbreak investigation showed the introduction of a PVL-SA strain into a kindergarten likely as a result of international travel and further transmission by direct contact. The implementation of a Staphylococcus aureus decontamination protocol was able to control the outbreak.

  20. Subpopulations of Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 121 are associated with distinct clinical entities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Kurt

    Full Text Available We investigated the population structure of Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex CC121 by mutation discovery at 115 genetic housekeeping loci from each of 154 isolates, sampled on five continents between 1953 and 2009. In addition, we pyro-sequenced the genomes from ten representative isolates. The genome-wide SNPs that were ascertained revealed the evolutionary history of CC121, indicating at least six major clades (A to F within the clonal complex and dating its most recent common ancestor to the pre-antibiotic era. The toxin gene complement of CC121 isolates was correlated with their SNP-based phylogeny. Moreover, we found a highly significant association of clinical phenotypes with phylogenetic affiliations, which is unusual for S. aureus. All isolates evidently sampled from superficial infections (including staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, bullous impetigo, exfoliative dermatitis, conjunctivitis clustered in clade F, which included the European epidemic fusidic-acid resistant impetigo clone (EEFIC. In comparison, isolates from deep-seated infections (abscess, furuncle, pyomyositis, necrotizing pneumonia were disseminated in several clades, but not in clade F. Our results demonstrate that phylogenetic lineages with distinct clinical properties exist within an S. aureus clonal complex, and that SNPs serve as powerful discriminatory markers, able to identify these lineages. All CC121 genomes harboured a 41-kilobase prophage that was dissimilar to S. aureus phages sequenced previously. Community-associated MRSA and MSSA from Cambodia were extremely closely related, suggesting this MRSA arose in the region.

  1. Effective and efficient model clone detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2015-01-01

    automatically (“MDD-style”) or hand-crafted following the blueprint defined by the model (“MBSD-style”). Unfortunately, however, model clones are much less well studied than code clones. In this paper, we present a clone detection algorithm for UML domain models. Our approach covers a much greater variety...

  2. A single-copy galK promoter cloning vector suitable for cloning strong promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandanell, Gert; Court, Donald L.; Hammer, Karin

    1986-01-01

    We report the construction of lambda galK promoter cloning vectors for cloning and characterization of strong promoters. This phage, which contains a unique HindIII cloning site, was applied to the cloning and analysis of transcription initiations of the regulatory region of the deo-operon of...

  3. Evaluation of Two New Chromogenic Media, CHROMagar MRSA and S. aureus ID, for Identifying Staphylococcus aureus and Screening Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Hedin, Göran; Fang, Hong

    2005-01-01

    Thirty-nine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates with diverse genetic backgrounds and two reference strains were correctly identified as S. aureus on CHROMagar MRSA and S. aureus ID media. Growth inhibition on CHROMagar MRSA was noted. A combination of cefoxitin disk and S. aureus ID was found suitable for rapid MRSA screening.

  4. Molecular characteristics and virulence factors in methicillin-susceptible, resistant, and heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus from central-southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cailin; Chen, Zhong-ju; Sun, Ziyong; Feng, Xianju; Zou, Mingxiang; Cao, Wei; Wang, Shanmei; Zeng, Ji; Wang, Yue; Sun, Mingyue

    2015-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of nosocomial infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (hVISA), and compare the antimicrobial susceptibility, molecular characteristic, and virulence factors in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), MRSA, and hVISA from central-southern China. A total of 184 S. aureus were isolated from sterile body fluids. All isolates were subjected to population analysis profiling for the identification of hVISA phenotype and polymerase chain reaction analysis for genotyping and 31 virulence genes. The prevalence of MRSA isolates was 41.8% in central-southern China. Of 77 MRSA isolates, 17 (22.1%) were identified as hVISA. The most common MRSA and MSSA clones were ST239-MRSA-SCCmecIII-t030-agr-I (55.8%) and ST188-MSSA-t189-agr-I (20.6%), respectively. The frequency of carriage of pvl, hemolysins, tst, and staphylococcal enterotoxin genes among MSSA isolates was significantly higher than that for MRSA isolates (p aureus isolates; the virulence genes were more diverse and frequent among MSSA isolates than among MRSA isolates. Furthermore, the distribution of some virulence genes was correlated with the different S. aureus CCs. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Clonal expansion during Staphylococcus aureus infection dynamics reveals the effect of antibiotic intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth McVicker

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To slow the inexorable rise of antibiotic resistance we must understand how drugs impact on pathogenesis and influence the selection of resistant clones. Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen with populations of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in hospitals and the community. Host phagocytes play a crucial role in controlling S. aureus infection, which can lead to a population "bottleneck" whereby clonal expansion of a small fraction of the initial inoculum founds a systemic infection. Such population dynamics may have important consequences on the effect of antibiotic intervention. Low doses of antibiotics have been shown to affect in vitro growth and the generation of resistant mutants over the long term, however whether this has any in vivo relevance is unknown. In this work, the population dynamics of S. aureus pathogenesis were studied in vivo using antibiotic-resistant strains constructed in an isogenic background, coupled with systemic models of infection in both the mouse and zebrafish embryo. Murine experiments revealed unexpected and complex bacterial population kinetics arising from clonal expansion during infection in particular organs. We subsequently elucidated the effect of antibiotic intervention within the host using mixed inocula of resistant and sensitive bacteria. Sub-curative tetracycline doses support the preferential expansion of resistant microorganisms, importantly unrelated to effects on growth rate or de novo resistance acquisition. This novel phenomenon is generic, occurring with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA in the presence of β-lactams and with the unrelated human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The selection of resistant clones at low antibiotic levels can result in a rapid increase in their prevalence under conditions that would previously not be thought to favor them. Our results have key implications for the design of effective treatment regimes to limit the spread of antimicrobial

  6. Molecular Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus Skin and Soft Tissue Infections in the Lao People's Democratic Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeap, Alicia D; Woods, Kate; Dance, David A B; Pichon, Bruno; Rattanavong, Sayaphet; Davong, Viengmon; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Newton, Paul N; Shetty, Nandini; Kearns, Angela M

    2017-08-01

    This is the first report of the molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus from skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) in Laos. We selected a random sample of 96 S. aureus SSTI isolates received by the Microbiology Laboratory, Mahosot Hospital, Vientiane, between July 2012 and June 2014, including representation from seven referral hospitals. Isolates underwent susceptibility testing by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute methods, spa typing and DNA microarray analysis, with whole genome sequencing for rare lineages. Median patient age was 19.5 years (interquartile range 2-48.5 years); 52% (50) were female. Forty-three spa types, representing 17 lineages, were identified. Fifty-eight percent (56) of all isolates encoded Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), representing six lineages: half of these patients had abscesses and three had positive blood cultures. The dominant lineage was CC121 (39; 41%); all but one isolate encoded PVL and 49% (19) were from children under five. Staphyococcus argenteus was identified in six (6%) patients; mostly adults > 50 years and with diabetes. Six isolates (6%) belonged to rare lineage ST2885; two possibly indicate cross-infection in a neonatal unit. One isolate from a previously undescribed lineage, ST1541, was identified. Antibiotic resistance was uncommon except for penicillin (93; 97%) and tetracycline (48; 50%). Seven (7%) isolates were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), belonging to ST239-MRSA-III, CC59-MRSA-V(T) Taiwan Clone, ST2250-MRSA-IV, ST2885-MRSA-V and CC398-MRSA-V. Globally widespread CC5 and CC30 were absent. There are parallels in S. aureus molecular epidemiology between Laos and neighboring countries and these data highlight the prominence of PVL and suggest infiltration of MRSA clones of epidemic potential from surrounding countries.

  7. El envejecimiento de los clones

    OpenAIRE

    Trippi, Victorio S.

    2007-01-01

    El envejecimiento de los clones se observa en plantas que muestran crecimiento definido por un determinismo genético, cuando se multiplican con tejidos que evolucionan hacia el crecimiento reproductivo. Las plantas fuertemente influenciadas por el ambiente, pueden mostrar fenómenos de senescencia cuando la condición de ambiente determina el crecimiento reproductivo. Los cambios asociados con la edad resultan de alteraciones del citoplasma como un tipo de diferenciación cel...

  8. Therapeutic and reproductive cloning: a critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowring, Finn

    2004-01-01

    This article is a critical examination of the science and ethics of human cloning. It summarises the key scientific milestones in the development of nuclear transplantation, explains the importance of cloning to research into the medical potential of embryonic stem cells, and discusses the well-worn distinction between 'therapeutic' and 'reproductive' cloning. Suggesting that this distinction will be impossible to police, it goes on to consider the ethics of full human cloning. It is concluded that it represents an unacceptable form of parental despotism, and that the genetic engineering and cloning of future human beings will fracture the foundations of modern humanism.

  9. Relative prevalence of methicilline resistant Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In our region, although methicillin resistance increased in S. aureus strains, because of the unavailability and the high cost of alternative antibiotics, gentamycin is still suggested as an alternative for treatment of S. aureus infections. These results however indicate that vancomycin seemed to be the only antimicrobial agent ...

  10. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization rates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carriers of Staphylococcus aureus have an important role in its dissemination. The colonization rates of S. aureus in anterior nose nares from 210 healthy volunteers (70 from the non-hospital adult personnel in the community, 68 from clinical students and 72 from healthcare workers “HCWs” in 6 hospitals) in the eastern ...

  11. METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS (MRSA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nosocomial infections caused by methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus often pose therapeutic dilemma to the clinicians because of the multi resistant nature of these strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Outbreaks of both nosocomial and community acquired infections are also frequent and difficult to control.

  12. (allium sativum) on staphylococcus aureus conjunctivites

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. Bacterial conjunctivitis is common usually self-limiting. The most common causative organisms are staphylococcus epidermis and staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Bacterial conjunctivitis is rarely sight threatening. However, accurate diagnosis and prompt treatment at the primary level is important as it ...

  13. Nasal Carriage of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major causes of community and hospital acquired infections. The emergence of methicillin resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus in the hospitals and the community is a serious health problem. The aim of this study was to determine the nasal carriage and ...

  14. Antimicrobial resistant coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus is an Important agent of food poisoning. In many countries, it is the main bacterial organism responsible for diseases caused by exotoxin production and direct invasion with systemic dissemination. In poultry, S. aureus is associated with many clinical syndromes including tenosynovitis, omphalitis, ...

  15. Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been recognized as important nosocomial pathogens worldwide. S aureus may induce clinically manifested diseases, or the host may remain completely asymptomatic. Methods: a cross-sectional hospital-based study was conducted from October 2012 ...

  16. Immunogenicity of toxins during Staphylococcus aureus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Verkaik (Nelianne); O. Dauwalder (Olivier); K. Antri (Kenza); I. Boubekri (Ilhem); C.P. de Vogel (Corné); C. Badiou (Cédric); M. Bes (Michèle); F. Vandenesch (François); M. Tazir (Mohammed); H. Hooijkaas (Herbert); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); J. Etienne (Jerome); G. Lina (Gérard); N. Ramdani-Bouguessa (Nadjia); W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAB - BACKGROUND: Toxins are important Staphylococcus aureus virulence factors, but little is known about their immunogenicity during infection. Here, additional insight is generated. METHODS: Serum samples from 206 S. aureus-infected patients and 201 hospital-admitted control subjects

  17. Nasal carriage of Meticillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gemeda

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major causes of community and hospital acquired infections. The emergence of methicillin resistant strains of. Staphylococcus aureus in the hospitals and the community is a serious health problem. The aim of this study was to determine the nasal carriage and ...

  18. Antimicrobial resistant coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Sokoto Journal of Veterinary Sciences, Volume 11 (Number 1). June, 2013. 51 ... Staphylococcus aureus is an Important agent of food poisoning. In many ..... enterotoxicity of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the hands and nasal cavities of flight catering employees. Journal of Food. Protection, 11, 1487–1491. Hill JE ...

  19. Prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in the studied population. Clinical isolates of S. aureus strains were collected from Medical Microbiology Unit of University College Hospital, Ibadan between May and October, 2012. The isolates were confirmed through growth on Mannitol Salt Agar (MSA) and tube coagulase test.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus and healthcare-associated infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekkelenkamp, M.B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304817716

    2011-01-01

    Many medical procedures breach or suppress patients’ natural defences, leaving them vulnerable to infections which would not occur in healthy humans: “healthcare-associated infections”. Healthcare-associated infections caused by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) are probably the most

  1. Cloning expeditions: risky but rewarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Harvey

    2013-12-01

    In the 1980s, a good part of my laboratory was using the then-new recombinant DNA techniques to clone and characterize many important cell surface membrane proteins: GLUT1 (the red cell glucose transporter) and then GLUT2 and GLUT4, the red cell anion exchange protein (Band 3), asialoglycoprotein receptor subunits, sucrase-isomaltase, the erythropoietin receptor, and two of the subunits of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor. These cloned genes opened many new fields of basic research, including membrane insertion and trafficking of transmembrane proteins, signal transduction by many members of the cytokine and TGF-β families of receptors, and the cellular physiology of glucose and anion transport. They also led to many insights into the molecular biology of several cancers, hematopoietic disorders, and diabetes. This work was done by an exceptional group of postdocs and students who took exceptionally large risks in developing and using novel cloning technologies. Unsurprisingly, all have gone on to become leaders in the fields of molecular cell biology and molecular medicine.

  2. Cloning Expeditions: Risky but Rewarding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In the 1980s, a good part of my laboratory was using the then-new recombinant DNA techniques to clone and characterize many important cell surface membrane proteins: GLUT1 (the red cell glucose transporter) and then GLUT2 and GLUT4, the red cell anion exchange protein (Band 3), asialoglycoprotein receptor subunits, sucrase-isomaltase, the erythropoietin receptor, and two of the subunits of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor. These cloned genes opened many new fields of basic research, including membrane insertion and trafficking of transmembrane proteins, signal transduction by many members of the cytokine and TGF-β families of receptors, and the cellular physiology of glucose and anion transport. They also led to many insights into the molecular biology of several cancers, hematopoietic disorders, and diabetes. This work was done by an exceptional group of postdocs and students who took exceptionally large risks in developing and using novel cloning technologies. Unsurprisingly, all have gone on to become leaders in the fields of molecular cell biology and molecular medicine. PMID:24061478

  3. Staphylococcus aureus and hand eczema severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haslund, P; Bangsgaard, N; Jarløv, J O

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of bacterial infections in hand eczema (HE) remains to be assessed. OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with HE compared with controls, and to relate presence of S. aureus, subtypes and toxin production to severity of HE. METHODS......: Bacterial swabs were taken at three different visits from the hand and nose in 50 patients with HE and 50 controls. Staphylococcus aureus was subtyped by spa typing and assigned to clonal complexes (CCs), and isolates were tested for exotoxin-producing S. aureus strains. The Hand Eczema Severity Index...... was used for severity assessment. RESULTS: Staphylococcus aureus was found on the hands in 24 patients with HE and four controls (P

  4. The T Cell Response to Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara M. Bröker

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is a dangerous pathogen and a leading cause of both nosocomial and community acquired bacterial infection worldwide. However, on the other hand, we are all exposed to this bacterium, often within the first hours of life, and usually manage to establish equilibrium and coexist with it. What does the adaptive immune system contribute toward lifelong control of S. aureus? Will it become possible to raise or enhance protective immune memory by vaccination? While in the past the S. aureus-specific antibody response has dominated this discussion, the research community is now coming to appreciate the role that the cellular arm of adaptive immunity, the T cells, plays. There are numerous T cell subsets, each with differing functions, which together have the ability to orchestrate the immune response to S. aureus and hence to tip the balance between protection and pathology. This review summarizes the state of the art in this dynamic field of research.

  5. ENTEROTOXIGENIC STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS IN SHEEP RAW MILK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Giacinti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 366 raw milk samples from 30 sheep farms were examined quantitatively for Staphylococcus aureus. Enterotoxin production by strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated was investigated. S. aureus was detected in 19 farms (63,3%. The ability to synthetise enterotoxins was found in ten strains (52,6%. Production of staphylococcal enterotoxins C (SEC was recorded in 6 (60% and production of SEC together with staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA in 4 (40% staphylococcal isolates. Raw milk products are vulnerable to contamination by S. aureus. Strategies to reduce the occurrence of S. aureus in bulk milk are of particular importance on farms where milk is used for raw milk products.

  6. Operon structure of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Broeke-Smits, Nicole J P; Pronk, Tessa E; Jongerius, Ilse; Bruning, Oskar; Wittink, Floyd R; Breit, Timo M; van Strijp, Jos A G; Fluit, Ad C; Boel, C H Edwin

    2010-06-01

    In bacteria, gene regulation is one of the fundamental characteristics of survival, colonization and pathogenesis. Operons play a key role in regulating expression of diverse genes involved in metabolism and virulence. However, operon structures in pathogenic bacteria have been determined only by in silico approaches that are dependent on factors such as intergenic distances and terminator/promoter sequences. Knowledge of operon structures is crucial to fully understand the pathophysiology of infections. Presently, transcriptome data obtained from growth curves in a defined medium were used to predict operons in Staphylococcus aureus. This unbiased approach and the use of five highly reproducible biological replicates resulted in 93.5% significantly regulated genes. These data, combined with Pearson's correlation coefficients of the transcriptional profiles, enabled us to accurately compile 93% of the genome in operon structures. A total of 1640 genes of different functional classes were identified in operons. Interestingly, we found several operons containing virulence genes and showed synergistic effects for two complement convertase inhibitors transcribed in one operon. This is the first experimental approach to fully identify operon structures in S. aureus. It forms the basis for further in vitro regulation studies that will profoundly advance the understanding of bacterial pathophysiology in vivo.

  7. Frequent emergence and limited geographic dispersal of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nubel, U.; Roumagnac, P.; Feldkamp, M.

    2008-01-01

    A small number of clonal lineages dominates the global population structure of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), resulting in the concept that MRSA has emerged on a few occasions after penicillinase-stable beta-lactam antibiotics were introduced to clinical practice, followed...... by intercontinental spread of individual clones. We investigated the evolutionary history of an MRSA clone (ST5) by mutation discovery at 108 loci (46 kb) within a global collection of 135 isolates. The SNPs that were ascertained define a radial phylogenetic structure within ST5 consisting of at least 5 chains...... show that import has occurred on at least 23 occasions within this single sequence type and that the progeny of such recombinant strains usually are distributed locally rather than globally. These results provide strong evidence that geographical spread of MRSA over long distances and across cultural...

  8. Novel sequence types (STs) of Staphylococcus aureus isolates causing clinical and subclinical mastitis in flocks of sheep in the northeast of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Lara M; de Almeida, Mayra Zilta P R B; de Mendonça, Carla L; Mamizuka, Elsa M

    2011-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important infectious mastitis causative agents in small ruminants. In order to know the distribution of Staph. aureus strains associated with infectious mastitis in flocks of sheep in the northeast of Brazil and establish whether these clones are related to the strains distributed internationally, this study analysed the genetic diversity of Staph. aureus isolates from cases of clinical and subclinical mastitis in ewes by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). In this research, 135 ewes with mastitis from 31 sheep flocks distributed in 15 districts were examined. Staph. aureus was isolated from sheep milk in 9 (29%) out of 31 herds located in 47% of the districts surveyed. MLST analysis allowed the identification of four STs (ST750, ST1728, ST1729 and ST1730). The last three with their respective novel alleles (glp-220; pta-182 and yqil-180) were recently reported in the Staph. aureus MLST database (http://www.mlst.net). Each novel allele showed only a nucleotide different from those already described. The occurrence of CC133 (ST750 and ST1729) in this study is in agreement with other reports that only a few clones of Staph. aureus seem to be responsible for most cases of mastitis in dairy farms and that some of these clones may have broad geographic distribution. However, the prevalence of CC5 (ST1728 and ST1730)--an important group related to cases of colonization or infection in humans--differs from previous studies by its widespread occurrence and may suggest human contamination followed by selective pressures of the allelic diversifications presented for these STs.

  9. Structural and Functional analysis of Staphylococcus aureus NADP-dependent IDH and its comparison with Bacterial and Human NADPdependent IDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Uppu Venkateswara; Swarupa, Vimjam; Yeswanth, Sthanikam; Kumar, Pasupuleti Santhosh; Kumar, Easambadi Siva; Reddy, Kalikiri Mahesh Kumar; Kumar, Yellapu Nanda; Rani, Vangavaragu Jhansi; Chaudhary, Abhijit; Sarma, Potukuchi Venkata Gurunadha Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus a natural inhabitant of nasopharyngeal tract mainly survives as biofilms and possess complete Krebs cycle which plays major role in its pathogenesis. This TCA cycle is regulated by Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) we have earlier cloned, sequenced (HM067707), expressed and characterized this enzyme from S. aureus ATCC12600. We have observed only one type of IDH in all the strains of S. aureus which dictates the flow of carbon thereby controlling the virulence and biofilm formation, this phenomenon is variable among bacteria. Therefore in the present study comparative structural and functional analysis of IDH was undertaken. As the crystal structure of S. aureus IDH was not available therefore using the deduced amino sequence of complete gene the 3D structure of IDH was built in Modeller 9v8. The PROCHECK and ProSAweb analysis showed the built structure was close to the crystal structure of Bacillus subtilis. This structure when superimposed with other bacterial IDH structures exhibited extensive structural variations as evidenced from the RMSD values correlating with extensive sequential variations. Only 24% sequence identity was observed with both human NADP dependent IDHs (PDB: 1T09 and 1T0L) and the structural comparative studies indicated extensive structural variations with an RMSD values of 14.284Å and 10.073Å respectively. Docking of isocitrate to both human IDHs and S. aureus IDH structures showed docking scores of -11.6169 and -10.973 respectively clearly indicating higher binding affinity of isocitrate to human IDH.

  10. Molecular epidemiology and identification of a Staphylococcus aureus clone causing food poisoning outbreaks in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato'o, Yusuke; Omoe, Katsuhiko; Naito, Ikunori; Ono, Hisaya K; Nakane, Akio; Sugai, Motoyuki; Yamagishi, Norio; Hu, Dong-Liang

    2014-07-01

    Molecular characterization of isolates from staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) outbreaks in Japan showed that the dominant lineage causing SFP outbreaks is clonal complex 81 (CC81), a single-locus variant of sequence type 1, coagulase type VII, positive for sea and/or seb, and positive for seh. Among various CC lineages producing staphylococcal enterotoxin A, CC81 showed the highest toxin productivity. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Cloning Sequencing and Structural Manipulation of the Enterotoxin D and E Genes from Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-01

    Therefore, the production of SED by KSI1410 in deferrated medium was analyzed. The amount of SED made in deferrated TSB was the same as that made in untreated...which contains a single disulfide loop is sequestered within the cell wall and passes slowly into the extracellujar medium . Furthermore, in the case of...TPYGEYEvEILQPFGAGVr,-J. OJLK0NG VI).(iSPAK i 160 170 ISO 190 200 G71QKDQL~ YPD <N R C. LT LRGLRY rVPN 210 220 230 240 250 eG , J HQI PGVG Gl-v’ I INEKNE

  12. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: community transmission, pathogenesis, and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Nishiyama, Akihito; Takano, Tomomi; Yabe, Shizuka; Higuchi, Wataru; Razvina, Olga; Shi, Da

    2010-08-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is able to persist not only in hospitals (with a high level of antimicrobial agent use) but also in the community (with a low level of antimicrobial agent use). The former is called hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) and the latter community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA). It is believed MRSA clones are generated from S. aureus through insertion of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec), and outbreaks occur as they spread. Several worldwide and regional clones have been identified, and their epidemiological, clinical, and genetic characteristics have been described. CA-MRSA is likely able to survive in the community because of suitable SCCmec types (type IV or V), a clone-specific colonization/infection nature, toxin profiles (including Pantone-Valentine leucocidin, PVL), and narrow drug resistance patterns. CA-MRSA infections are generally seen in healthy children or young athletes, with unexpected cases of diseases, and also in elderly inpatients, occasionally surprising clinicians used to HA-MRSA infections. CA-MRSA spreads within families and close-contact groups or even through public transport, demonstrating transmission cores. Re-infection (including multifocal infection) frequently occurs, if the cores are not sought out and properly eradicated. Recently, attention has been given to CA-MRSA (USA300), which originated in the US, and is growing as HA-MRSA and also as a worldwide clone. CA-MRSA infection in influenza season has increasingly been noted as well. MRSA is also found in farm and companion animals, and has occasionally transferred to humans. As such, the epidemiological, clinical, and genetic behavior of CA-MRSA, a growing threat, is focused on in this study.

  13. Hybrid sequencing approach applied to human fecal metagenomic clone libraries revealed clones with potential biotechnological applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Džunková

    Full Text Available Natural environments represent an incredible source of microbial genetic diversity. Discovery of novel biomolecules involves biotechnological methods that often require the design and implementation of biochemical assays to screen clone libraries. However, when an assay is applied to thousands of clones, one may eventually end up with very few positive clones which, in most of the cases, have to be "domesticated" for downstream characterization and application, and this makes screening both laborious and expensive. The negative clones, which are not considered by the selected assay, may also have biotechnological potential; however, unfortunately they would remain unexplored. Knowledge of the clone sequences provides important clues about potential biotechnological application of the clones in the library; however, the sequencing of clones one-by-one would be very time-consuming and expensive. In this study, we characterized the first metagenomic clone library from the feces of a healthy human volunteer, using a method based on 454 pyrosequencing coupled with a clone-by-clone Sanger end-sequencing. Instead of whole individual clone sequencing, we sequenced 358 clones in a pool. The medium-large insert (7-15 kb cloning strategy allowed us to assemble these clones correctly, and to assign the clone ends to maintain the link between the position of a living clone in the library and the annotated contig from the 454 assembly. Finally, we found several open reading frames (ORFs with previously described potential medical application. The proposed approach allows planning ad-hoc biochemical assays for the clones of interest, and the appropriate sub-cloning strategy for gene expression in suitable vectors/hosts.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus resistente a vancomicina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Andrés Rodríguez

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Revisar la evolución y mecanismos moleculares de la resistencia de Staphylococcus aureus a vancomicina. Fuente de los datos. Se consultó la base de datos MEDLINE y se seleccionaron artículos tipo reportes de caso, estudios bioquímicos, de microscopía electrónica y biología molecular pertinentes. Síntesis. Después de casi 40 años de eficacia ininterrumpida de la vancomicina, en 1997 se reportaron los primeros casos de fracaso terapéutico debido a cepas de Staphylococcus aureus con resistencia intermedia, denominadas VISA (concentración inhibitoria mínima, CIM, 8 a 16 ?g/ml, así como a cepas con resistencia heterogénea hVISA (CIM global = 4 ?g/ml, pero con subpoblaciones VISA, en las cuales la resistencia está mediada por engrosamiento de la pared celular y disminución de su entrecruzamiento, lo que afecta la llegada del antibiótico al blanco principal, los monómeros del peptidoglicano en la membrana plasmática. En 2002 se aisló la primera de las 3 cepas reportadas hasta la fecha con resistencia total al antibiótico, denominadas VRSA (CIM>32 ?g/ml, en las que se encontró el transposón Tn1546 proveniente de Enterococcus spp, responsable del reemplazo de la terminación D-Ala-D-Ala por D-Ala-Dlactato en los precursores de la pared celular con pérdida de la afinidad por el glicopéptido. Conclusiones. La resistencia a vancomicina es una realidad en S. aureus, mediada en el caso de VISA por alteraciones en la pared celular que atrapan el antibiótico antes de llegar al sitio de acción, y en el caso de VRSA, por transferencia desde Enterococcus spp. de genes que llevan a la modificación del blanco molecular.

  15. Dynamics of acquisition and loss of carriage of Staphylococcus aureus strains in the community: The effect of clonal complex☆☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ruth R.; Walker, A. Sarah; Godwin, Heather; Fung, Rowena; Votintseva, Antonina; Bowden, Rory; Mant, David; Peto, Timothy E.A.; Crook, Derrick W.; Knox, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage increases infection risk. However, few studies have investigated S. aureus acquisition/loss over >1 year, and fewer still used molecular typing. Methods 1123 adults attending five Oxfordshire general practices had nasal swabs taken. 571 were re-swabbed after one month then every two months for median two years. All S. aureus isolates were spa-typed. Risk factors were collected from interviews and medical records. Results 32% carried S. aureus at recruitment (<1% MRSA). Rates of spa-type acquisition were similar in participants S. aureus positive (1.4%/month) and negative (1.8%/month, P = 0.13) at recruitment. Rates were faster in those carrying clonal complex (CC)15 (adjusted (a)P = 0.03) or CC8 (including USA300) (aP = 0.001) at recruitment versus other CCs. 157/274 (57%) participants S. aureus positive at recruitment returning ≥12 swabs carried S. aureus consistently, of whom 135 carried the same spa-type. CC22 (including EMRSA-15) was more prevalent in long-term than intermittent spa-type carriers (aP = 0.03). Antibiotics transiently reduced carriage, but no other modifiable risk factors were found. Conclusions Both transient and longer-term carriage exist; however, the approximately constant rates of S. aureus gain and loss suggest that ‘never’ or truly ‘persistent’ carriage are rare. Long-term carriage varies by strain, offering new explanations for the success of certain S. aureus clones. PMID:24393651

  16. Exfoliative Toxins of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Bukowski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen of humans and livestock. It causes a diverse array of diseases, ranging from relatively harmless localized skin infections to life-threatening systemic conditions. Among multiple virulence factors, staphylococci secrete several exotoxins directly associated with particular disease symptoms. These include toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1, enterotoxins, and exfoliative toxins (ETs. The latter are particularly interesting as the sole agents responsible for staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS, a disease predominantly affecting infants and characterized by the loss of superficial skin layers, dehydration, and secondary infections. The molecular basis of the clinical symptoms of SSSS is well understood. ETs are serine proteases with high substrate specificity, which selectively recognize and hydrolyze desmosomal proteins in the skin. The fascinating road leading to the discovery of ETs as the agents responsible for SSSS and the characterization of the molecular mechanism of their action, including recent advances in the field, are reviewed in this article.

  17. Rapid bench identification of methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A multicenter comparative evaluation of Alere PBP2a Culture Colony Test (Alere) Versus Slidex MRSA detection (bioMérieux).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasse, Jason; Dupieux, Céline; Caillon, Jocelyne; Lanotte, Philippe; Lamy, Brigitte; Aissa, Nejla; Bemer, Pascale; Mereghetti, Laurent; Michon, Anne-Laure; Lozniewski, Alain; Bes, Michèle; Trouillet-Assant, Sophie; Laurent, Frédéric

    2016-08-01

    Using 30 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus representative of the most prevalent clones circulating in France, the performance of the Alere™ PBP2a Culture Colony Test (CCT) and the Slidex(®) MRSA detection kit (SMD) were compared in 5 different labs. CCT demonstrated better performance and was easier to conduct in routine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility, virulence determinant carriage and molecular characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with skin and soft tissue infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangyou Yu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the antimicrobial susceptibility, carriage of virulence determinants and molecular characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs may provide further insights related to clinical outcomes with these infections. From January 2012 to September 2013, a total of 128 non-duplicate S. aureus isolates were recovered from patients with SSTIs. All 128 S. aureus SSTI isolates carried at least five virulence genes tested. Virulence genes detected among at least 70% of all tested isolates included hld (100%, hla (95.3%, icaA (96.9%, clf (99.2%, sdrC (79.7%, sdrD (70.3%, and sdrE (72.7%. The prevalence of MRSA isolates with 10 virulence genes tested (54.4%, 31/56 was significantly higher than that among MSSA isolates (35.2%, 25/71 (p 80.0% of sdrC and sdrD, CC59 isolates had lower prevalence of these two virulence genes. All CC59 isolates were susceptible to gentamicin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, while CC5 and CC7 isolates had resistance rates to these two antimicrobials of 25.4% and 20.9%, and 40.0% and 40.0%, respectively. The resistance rates for tetracycline, clindamycin, and erythromycin among CC5 isolates were lower than among CC7 and CC59 isolates. In conclusion, the molecular typing of S. aureus SSTI isolates in the present study showed considerable heterogeneity. ST7 and ST630 became prevailing clones. Different S. aureus clones causing SSTIs were associated with specific antimicrobial resistance and virulence gene profiles.

  19. Towards Clone Detection in UML Domain Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Code clones (i.e., duplicate fragments of code) have been studied for long, and there is strong evidence that they are a major source of software faults. Anecdotal evidence suggests that this phenomenon occurs similarly in models, suggesting that model clones are as detrimental to model quality...... as they are to code quality. However, programming language code and visual models have significant differences that make it difficult to directly transfer notions and algorithms developed in the code clone arena to model clones. In this article, we develop and propose a definition of the notion of “model clone” based...... on the thorough analysis of practical scenarios. We propose a formal definition of model clones, specify a clone detection algorithm for UML domain models, and implement it prototypically. We investigate different similarity heuristics to be used in the algorithm, and report the performance of our approach. While...

  20. Cloning cattle: the methods in the madness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oback, Björn; Wells, David N

    2007-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is much more widely and efficiently practiced in cattle than in any other species, making this arguably the most important mammal cloned to date. While the initial objective behind cattle cloning was commercially driven--in particular to multiply genetically superior animals with desired phenotypic traits and to produce genetically modified animals-researchers have now started to use bovine SCNT as a tool to address diverse questions in developmental and cell biology. In this paper, we review current cattle cloning methodologies and their potential technical or biological pitfalls at any step of the procedure. In doing so, we focus on one methodological parameter, namely donor cell selection. We emphasize the impact of epigenetic and genetic differences between embryonic, germ, and somatic donor cell types on cloning efficiency. Lastly, we discuss adult phenotypes and fitness of cloned cattle and their offspring and illustrate some of the more imminent commercial cattle cloning applications.

  1. A 5-year Survey Reveals Increased Susceptibility to Glycopeptides for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Patients in a Chinese Burn Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei Jiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections are prevalent in burn wards, and are especially serious in S. aureus bacteremia (SAB patients. Glycopeptides and daptomycin are effective against MRSA infections, but MIC creeps can reduce their efficacy. Our object was to perform a molecular epidemiological investigation of S. aureus isolates in our burn center and to evaluate MICs for antimicrobials against SAB-associated MRSA isolates. A total of 259 S. aureus isolates, obtained from August 2011 to July 2016, were used in this study. Multiple molecular typing was used for molecular epidemiological analysis. E-tests were used to determine MICs of vancomycin, teicoplanin, and daptomycin for SAB-associated MRSA isolates. MIC values were stratified by collection date or source and compared. Spearman's test was used to analyze MICs correlations amongst tested antimicrobials. ST239-MRSA-III-t030-agrI clone was found to be dominant in both SAB and non-SAB patients, and significantly more in SAB patients (P < 0.0001. SAB-MRSA isolates exhibited decreased MICs for vancomycin, teicoplanin, and daptomycin during the 5-year period. Compared to those isolated from catheters or wounds, SAB-MRSA isolates from the bloodstream were less susceptible to vancomycin and daptomycin, but more susceptible to teicoplanin. MICs Correlation was found only between vancomycin and daptomycin in MRSA isolates from the bloodstream (rho = 0.250, P = 0.024. In conclusion, our results suggest that MRSA infections are still serious problems in burn centers. In contrast to most other studies, we observed increased susceptibility to glycopeptides and daptomycin against SAB-associated MRSA in our center from 2011 to 2016, suggesting the use of glycopeptides does not lead to MIC creeps. Isolates from different sites of the body may exhibit different levels of susceptibility and change trend over time for different antimicrobials, antimicrobials selection for MRSA

  2. Telomeres and the ethics of human cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allhoff, Fritz

    2004-01-01

    In search of a potential problem with cloning, I investigate the phenomenon of telomere shortening which is caused by cell replication; clones created from somatic cells will have shortened telomeres and therefore reach a state of senescence more rapidly. While genetic intervention might fix this problem at some point in the future, I ask whether, absent technological advances, this biological phenomenon undermines the moral permissibility of cloning.

  3. AN APPROACH FOR CLONE DETECTION IN DOCUMENTATION REUSE

    OpenAIRE

    D. V. Lutsiv; D. V. Koznov; H. A. Basit; E. L. Ouh; M. N. Smirnov; K. Y. Romanovsky

    2014-01-01

    The paper focuses on the searching method for repetitions in DocBook/DRL or plain text documents. An algorithm has been designed based on software clone detection. The algorithm supports filtering results: clones are rejected if clone length in the group is less than 5 symbols, intersection of clone groups is eliminated, meaningfulness clones are removed, the groups containing clones consisting only of XML are eliminated. Remaining search is supported: found clones are extracted from the docu...

  4. Human cloning: Eastern Mediterranean Region perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdur Rab, M; Khayat, M H

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in genomics and biotechnology have ushered in a new era in health development. Therapeutic cloning possesses enormous potential for revolutionizing medical and therapeutic techniques. Cloning technology, however, is perceived as having the potential for reproductive cloning, which raises serious ethical and moral concerns. It is important that the Islamic countries come to a consensus on this vital issue. Developing science and technology for better health is a religious and moral obligation. There is an urgent need for Muslim scholars to discuss the issue of stem cell research and cloning rationally; such dialogue will not only consider the scientific merits but also the moral, ethical and legal implications.

  5. Metabolomic phenotyping of a cloned pig model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callesen Henrik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pigs are widely used as models for human physiological changes in intervention studies, because of the close resemblance between human and porcine physiology and the high degree of experimental control when using an animal model. Cloned animals have, in principle, identical genotypes and possibly also phenotypes and this offer an extra level of experimental control which could possibly make them a desirable tool for intervention studies. Therefore, in the present study, we address how phenotype and phenotypic variation is affected by cloning, through comparison of cloned pigs and normal outbred pigs. Results The metabolic phenotype of cloned pigs (n = 5 was for the first time elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR-based metabolomic analysis of multiple bio-fluids including plasma, bile and urine. The metabolic phenotype of the cloned pigs was compared with normal outbred pigs (n = 6 by multivariate data analysis, which revealed differences in the metabolic phenotypes. Plasma lactate was higher for cloned vs control pigs, while multiple metabolites were altered in the bile. However a lower inter-individual variability for cloned pigs compared with control pigs could not be established. Conclusions From the present study we conclude that cloned and normal outbred pigs are phenotypically different. However, it cannot be concluded that the use of cloned animals will reduce the inter-individual variation in intervention studies, though this is based on a limited number of animals.

  6. Metabolomic phenotyping of a cloned pig model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Pigs are widely used as models for human physiological changes in intervention studies, because of the close resemblance between human and porcine physiology and the high degree of experimental control when using an animal model. Cloned animals have, in principle, identical genotypes and possibly also phenotypes and this offer an extra level of experimental control which could possibly make them a desirable tool for intervention studies. Therefore, in the present study, we address how phenotype and phenotypic variation is affected by cloning, through comparison of cloned pigs and normal outbred pigs. Results The metabolic phenotype of cloned pigs (n = 5) was for the first time elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic analysis of multiple bio-fluids including plasma, bile and urine. The metabolic phenotype of the cloned pigs was compared with normal outbred pigs (n = 6) by multivariate data analysis, which revealed differences in the metabolic phenotypes. Plasma lactate was higher for cloned vs control pigs, while multiple metabolites were altered in the bile. However a lower inter-individual variability for cloned pigs compared with control pigs could not be established. Conclusions From the present study we conclude that cloned and normal outbred pigs are phenotypically different. However, it cannot be concluded that the use of cloned animals will reduce the inter-individual variation in intervention studies, though this is based on a limited number of animals. PMID:21859467

  7. Species-specific challenges in dog cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, G A; Oh, H J; Park, J E; Kim, M J; Park, E J; Jo, Y K; Jang, G; Kim, M K; Kim, H J; Lee, B C

    2012-12-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is now an established procedure used in cloning of several species. SCNT in dogs involves multiple steps including the removal of the nuclear material, injection of a donor cell, fusion, activation of the reconstructed oocytes and finally transfer to a synchronized female recipient. There are therefore many factors that contribute to cloning efficiency. By performing a retrospective analysis of 2005-2012 published papers regarding dog cloning, we define the optimum procedure and summarize the specific feature for dog cloning. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Quantum cloning disturbed by thermal Davies environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajka, Jerzy; Łuczka, Jerzy

    2016-06-01

    A network of quantum gates designed to implement universal quantum cloning machine is studied. We analyze how thermal environment coupled to auxiliary qubits, `blank paper' and `toner' required at the preparation stage of copying, modifies an output fidelity of the cloner. Thermal environment is described in terms of the Markovian Davies theory. We show that such a cloning machine is not universal any more but its output is independent of at least a part of parameters of the environment. As a case study, we consider cloning of states in a six-state cryptography's protocol. We also briefly discuss cloning of arbitrary input states.

  9. Human cloning and our sense of self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Dan W

    2002-04-12

    This Viewpoint formulates and responds to three lines of argument concerning human reproductive cloning's potential to undermine our sense of self or identity. First, cloning would undermine our sense of individuality or uniqueness. But it could only undermine our genetic uniqueness, not our full individuality. Second, cloning would undermine the value or worth of human beings. But it would not make individuals replaceable or of any less moral worth. Third, a clone's freedom or autonomy to construct his or her own life would be undermined by the presence of an earlier twin. But only a mistaken belief in genetic determinism supports this feared loss of freedom.

  10. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resistant Staphylococcus aureus; Hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA); Staph - MRSA; Staphylococcal - MRSA ... Most staph germs are spread by skin-to-skin contact (touching). A doctor, nurse, other health care provider, or ...

  11. Community acquired Staphylococcus aureus meningitis in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Keizerweerd, Gabriella D.; de Gans, Jan; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; van de Beek, Diederik

    2009-01-01

    We present 9 patients with community acquired Staphylococcus aureus meningitis. Foci of infection outside the central nervous system were present in 8 (89%) patients, mostly endocarditis and pneumonia. Cardiorespiratory complications occurred frequently and 6 patients died (67%). Identification and

  12. Misidentification of methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Libya using current testing methods. Methods: One hundred and seventy S. aureus isolates previously identified as MRSA were obtained from three hospitals in Tripoli. All isolates were reidentified by culturing on mannitol salt agar, API 20 ...

  13. Characterization of the Epidemic European Fusidic Acid-Resistant Impetigo Clone of Staphylococcus aureus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, A. J.; Larsen, A. R.; Skov, R.; Henriksen, A. S.; Chopra, I.

    2007-01-01

    Resistance to the antibiotic fusidic acid in European strains of Staphylococcus aureus causing impetigo has increased in recent years. This increase appears to have resulted from clonal expansion of a strain we have designated the epidemic European fusidic acid-resistant impetigo clone (EEFIC), which carries the fusidic acid resistance determinant fusB on its chromosome. To understand better the properties of the EEFIC responsible for its success, we have performed detailed phenotypic and genotypic characterization of this clone. Molecular typing revealed the EEFIC to be ST123, spa type t171, and agr type IV and therefore unrelated to earlier prevalent fusB+ strains found in the United Kingdom. EEFIC strains exhibited resistance to fusidic acid, penicillin, and, in some cases, erythromycin, which are all used in the treatment of impetigo. PCR analysis of the EEFIC and complete DNA sequencing of the 39.3 Kb plasmid it harbors identified genes encoding several toxins previously implicated in impetigo (exfoliative toxins A and B and EDIN-C). The location of fusB was mapped on the chromosome and found to be associated with a novel 16.6-kb genomic island integrated downstream of groEL. Although this element is related to classical staphylococcal pathogenicity islands, it does not encode any known virulence factors and consequently has been designated SaRIfusB (for “S. aureus resistance island carrying fusB”). PMID:17344365

  14. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in public transportation vehicles (buses): another piece to the epidemiologic puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Jonathan K; van Balen, Joany; Crawford, John Mac; Wilkins, John R; Lee, Jiyoung; Nava-Hoet, Rocio C; Hoet, Armando E

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about the occurrence and epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in public transportation in the United States. This research sought to determine the background prevalence and phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of MRSA strains circulating on buses from a large, metropolitan transportation agency. Electrostatic wipes were used to collect 237 surface samples from 40 buses randomly selected from July-October 2010. Six samples were collected from each bus immediately postservice and before any cleaning and disinfection. Positive isolates were analyzed for antibiotic resistance, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; and potential epidemiologic factors were examined. Of the buses, 68% (27/40) were contaminated with S aureus, and 63% (25/40) were contaminated with MRSA. Seats and seat rails were the surfaces most frequently contaminated, followed by the back door and stanchions. Most (62.9%) of the MRSA isolates were classified as community-associated MRSA clones (SCCmec type IV), and 22.9% were health care-associated MRSA clones (SCCmec type II). Of the MRSA strains, 65% (5/20) were multidrug resistant. MRSA was frequently isolated from commonly touched surfaces in buses serving both hospital and community routes. Phenotypic and genotypic analysis demonstrated that buses may be effective mixing vessels for MRSA strains of both community and health care-associated origin. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Silkworm Apolipophorin Protein Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Virulence*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Yuichi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2011-01-01

    Silkworm hemolymph inhibits hemolysin production by Staphylococcus aureus. We purified a factor in the silkworm hemolymph responsible for this inhibitory activity. The final fraction with the greatest specific activity contained 220- and 74-kDa proteins. Determination of the N-terminal amino acid sequence revealed that the 220- and 74-kDa proteins were apolipophorin I and apolipophorin II, respectively, indicating that the factor was apolipophorin (ApoLp). The purified ApoLp fraction showed decreased expression of S. aureus hla encoding α-hemolysin, hlb encoding β-hemolysin, saeRS, and RNAIII, which activate the expression of these hemolysin genes. Injection of an anti-ApoLp antibody into the hemolymph increased the sensitivity of silkworms to the lethal effect of S. aureus. Hog gastric mucin, a mammalian homologue of ApoLp, decreased the expression of S. aureus hla and hlb. These findings suggest that ApoLp in the silkworm hemolymph inhibits S. aureus virulence and contributes to defense against S. aureus infection and that its activity is conserved in mammalian mucin. PMID:21937431

  16. Future and applications of cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trounson, Alan O

    2006-01-01

    The birth of viable offspring from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in mammals caused a major re-examination of the understanding of the commitment of cells to specific tissue lineages during differentiation. The questions of whether cells undergo dedifferentiation or transdifferentiation during the development of offspring and how these changes are controlled is a source of ongoing debate that is yet to be resolved. Irrespective of the outcome of this debate, it is clear that cloning using SCNT has a place and purpose in the future of research and animal breeding. The future uses of SCNT could include the production of transgenic mice, the production of transgenic livestock and assisting with the re-establishment of endangered species. Human medicine also would benefit from future use of SCNT because it would allow the production of patient-specific embryonic stem cells.

  17. A single copy integration vector that integrates at an engineered site on the Staphylococcus aureus chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Mei G

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-copy integration vectors based upon the site-specific recombination systems of bacteriophage are invaluable tools in the study of bacterial pathogenesis. The utility of such vectors is often limited, however, by the fact that integration often results in the inactivation of bacterial genes or has undesirable effects on gene transcription. The aim of this study is to develop an integration vector that does not have a detectable effect on gene transcription upon integration. Findings We have developed a single-copy integration system that enables the cloning vector to integrate at a specific engineered site, within an untranscribed intergenic region, in the chromosome of Staphylococcus aureus. This system is based on the lysogenic phage L54a site-specific recombination system in which the L54a phage (attP and chromosome (attB attachment sites, which share an 18-bp identical core sequence, were modified with identical mutations. The integration vector, pLL102, was constructed to contain the modified L54a attP site (attP2 that was altered at 5 nucleotide positions within the core sequence. In the recipient strain, the similarly modified attB site (attB2 was inserted in an intergenic region devoid of detectable transcription read-through. Integration of the vector, which is unable to replicate in S. aureus extrachromosomally, was achieved by providing the L54a integrase gene in a plasmid in the recipient. We showed that pLL102 integrated specifically at the engineered site rather than at the native L54a attB site and that integration did not have a significant effect on transcription of genes immediately upstream or downstream of the integration site. Conclusions In this work, we describe an E. coli-S. aureus shuttle vector that can be used to introduce any cloned gene into the S. aureus chromosome at a select site without affecting gene expression. The vector should be useful for genetic manipulation of S. aureus and for

  18. First report of sasX-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaminami, Hidemasa; Ito, Teruyo; Han, Xiao; Ito, Ayumu; Matsuo, Miki; Uehara, Yuki; Baba, Tadashi; Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Noguchi, Norihisa

    2017-09-01

    SasX is a known virulence factor of Staphylococcus aureus involved in colonisation and immune evasion of the bacterium. The sasX gene, which is located on the ϕSPβ prophage, is frequently found in the sequence type (ST) 239 S. aureus lineage, which is the predominant healthcare-associated clone in Asian countries. In Japan, ST239 clones have rarely been identified, and sasX-positive strains have not been reported to date. Here, we report the first identification of 18 sasX-positive methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains in Japanese hospitals between 2009 and 2011. All sasX-positive isolates belonged to an ST239-staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type III (ST239-III) lineage. However, we were unable to identify additional sasX-positive MRSA strains from 2012 to 2016, indicating that the small epidemic of sasX-positive isolates observed in this study was temporary. The sequence surrounding sasX in the strain TOHH628 lacked 51 genes that encode phage packaging and structural proteins, and no bacteriophage was induced by mitomycin C. Additionally, in the TOHH628 strain, the region (64.6 kb) containing sasX showed high identity to the ϕSPβ-like element (71.3 kb) of the Taiwanese MRSA strain Z172. The data strongly suggest that the present sasX-positive isolates found in Japanese hospitals were transmitted incidentally from other countries. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Geographic distribution of Staphylococcus aureus causing invasive infections in Europe: a molecular-epidemiological analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajo Grundmann

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important human pathogens and methicillin-resistant variants (MRSAs are a major cause of hospital and community-acquired infection. We aimed to map the geographic distribution of the dominant clones that cause invasive infections in Europe.In each country, staphylococcal reference laboratories secured the participation of a sufficient number of hospital laboratories to achieve national geo-demographic representation. Participating laboratories collected successive methicillin-susceptible (MSSA and MRSA isolates from patients with invasive S. aureus infection using an agreed protocol. All isolates were sent to the respective national reference laboratories and characterised by quality-controlled sequence typing of the variable region of the staphylococcal spa gene (spa typing, and data were uploaded to a central database. Relevant genetic and phenotypic information was assembled for interactive interrogation by a purpose-built Web-based mapping application. Between September 2006 and February 2007, 357 laboratories serving 450 hospitals in 26 countries collected 2,890 MSSA and MRSA isolates from patients with invasive S. aureus infection. A wide geographical distribution of spa types was found with some prevalent in all European countries. MSSA were more diverse than MRSA. Genetic diversity of MRSA differed considerably between countries with dominant MRSA spa types forming distinctive geographical clusters. We provide evidence that a network approach consisting of decentralised typing and visualisation of aggregated data using an interactive mapping tool can provide important information on the dynamics of MRSA populations such as early signalling of emerging strains, cross border spread, and importation by travel.In contrast to MSSA, MRSA spa types have a predominantly regional distribution in Europe. This finding is indicative of the selection and spread of a limited number of clones within health care

  20. The ethics of human reproductive cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Carson

    2005-03-01

    This article addresses the question of whether human reproductive cloning could be ethically justifiable in at least some cases involving infertile couples who would choose cloning as a way to have a genetically related child. At present, the risk of congenital anomalies constitutes a compelling argument against human reproductive cloning. The article explores whether reproductive cloning could be ethically justifiable if, at some future time, cloning becomes possible without an elevated risk of anomalies. It is argued that freedom to use cloning is a form of procreative freedom and, as such, deserves respect. All of the objections that have been raised against human reproductive cloning fall under three main categories: those that appeal to the interests of the child, those based on consequences for society, and those arising from teleological views. Objections that appeal to the child's interests are, in turn, of two main kinds: consequentialist and deontological. All of these types of objections are examined, and it is found that each involves serious problems that prevent it from being a reasonable objection in the context of the infertility cases considered. It is concluded that human reproductive cloning would be ethically justifiable in at least some cases involving infertile couples, provided that it could be performed without an elevated risk of anomalies.

  1. What's so bad about human cloning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitowitz, Yitzchok

    2002-12-01

    There appears to be a consensus in the general community that reproductive cloning is an immoral technology that should be banned. It may, however, be argued, at least from the perspective of the Jewish tradition, that reproductive cloning has many positive benefits. It is thus essential that one carefully weigh the costs and the benefits before deciding on a definitive course of action.

  2. Computerized adaptive testing with item cloning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glas, Cornelis A.W.; van der Linden, Willem J.

    2003-01-01

    To increase the number of items available for adaptive testing and reduce the cost of item writing, the use of techniques of item cloning has been proposed. An important consequence of item cloning is possible variability between the item parameters. To deal with this variability, a multilevel item

  3. Recombination-assisted megaprimer (RAM) cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Jacques; Alvarez, Emilia; Alvarez, Pedro J.J.

    2014-01-01

    No molecular cloning technique is considered universally reliable, and many suffer from being too laborious, complex, or expensive. Restriction-free cloning is among the simplest, most rapid, and cost-effective methods, but does not always provide successful results. We modified this method to enhance its success rate through the use of exponential amplification coupled with homologous end-joining. This new method, recombination-assisted megaprimer (RAM) cloning, significantly extends the application of restriction-free cloning, and allows efficient vector construction with much less time and effort when restriction-free cloning fails to provide satisfactory results. The following modifications were made to the protocol:•Limited number of PCR cycles for both megaprimer synthesis and the cloning reaction to reduce error propagation.•Elimination of phosphorylation and ligation steps previously reported for cloning methods that used exponential amplification, through the inclusion of a reverse primer in the cloning reaction with a 20 base pair region of homology to the forward primer.•The inclusion of 1 M betaine to enhance both reaction specificity and yield. PMID:26150930

  4. Challenges in regulating farm animal cloning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunning, Jennifer; Hartlev, Mette; Gamborg, Christian

    Report from the project Cloning in Public: A specific support action within the 6th framework programme, priority 5: Food quality and safety......Report from the project Cloning in Public: A specific support action within the 6th framework programme, priority 5: Food quality and safety...

  5. Cloning of endangered mammalian species: any progress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Pasqualino; Galli, Cesare; Ptak, Grazyna

    2007-05-01

    Attempts through somatic cell nuclear transfer to expand wild populations that have shrunk to critical numbers is a logical extension of the successful cloning of mammals. However, although the first mammal was cloned 10 years ago, nuclear reprogramming remains phenomenological, with abnormal gene expression and epigenetic deregulation being associated with the cloning process. In addition, although cloning of wild animals using host oocytes from different species has been successful, little is known about the implication of partial or total mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in cloned embryos, fetuses and offspring. Finally, there is a need for suitable foster mothers for inter-intra specific cloned embryos. Considering these issues, the limited success achieved in cloning endangered animals is not surprising. However, optimism comes from the rapid gain in the understanding of the molecular clues underlying nuclear reprogramming. If it is possible to achieve a controlled reversal of the differentiated state of a cell then it is probable that other issues that impair the cloning of endangered animals, such as the inter-intra species oocyte or womb donor, will be overcome in the medium term.

  6. Cloning of partial putative gonadotropin hormone receptor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Equus asinus. –. 71·0. –. Macaca fascicularis. –. 83·9. –. Gallus gallus. –. 74·2. –. Canis familiaris. –. –. 74·2. Drosophila melanogaster. –. 61·3. –. Figure 2. Structure of the cloned insert. (a) Diagrammatic representation of the cloned DNA fragment; arrangement of the PCR products are illustrated with primers. Letters 'F' and.

  7. Cloning and superluminal signaling£

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is possible, we can then have (usable) superluminal signaling [8]. The basic principle behind no exact cloning is the principle of no-signaling (i.e., no superluminal signaling). Allowing no-signaling, Gisin [7] has reproduced the 1. 2 optimal universal symmetric cloning machine of Buzek and Hillery [2] for qubits. We shall ...

  8. Metabolomic phenotyping of af cloned pig model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Morten Rahr; Christensen, Kirstine Lykke; Hedemann, Mette Skou

    2011-01-01

    outbred pigs. Results The metabolic phenotype of cloned pigs (n = 5) was for the first time elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic analysis of multiple bio-fluids including plasma, bile and urine. The metabolic phenotype of the cloned pigs was compared with normal outbred pigs (n...

  9. Virulence Strategies of the Dominant USA300 Lineage of Community Associated Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurlow, Lance R.; Joshi, Gauri S.; Richardson, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) poses a serious threat to worldwide health. Historically, MRSA clones have strictly been associated with hospital settings and most hospital-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) disease resulted from a limited number of virulent clones. Recently, MRSA has spread into the community causing disease in otherwise healthy people with no discernible contact with healthcare environments. These community-associated (CA-MRSA) are phylogenetically distinct from traditional HA-MRSA clones and CA-MRSA strains seem to exhibit hyper virulence and more efficient host:host transmission. Consequently, CA-MRSA clones belonging to the USA300 lineage have become dominant sources of MRSA infections in North America. The rise of this successful USA300 lineage represents an important step in the evolution of emerging pathogens and a great deal of effort has been exerted to understand how these clones evolved. Here we review much of the recent literature aimed at illuminating the source of USA300 success and broadly categorize these findings into three main categories: newly acquired virulence genes, altered expression of common virulence determinants and alterations in protein sequence that increase fitness. We argue that none of these evolutionary events alone account for the success of USA300, but rather their combination may be responsible for the rise and spread of CA-MRSA. PMID:22309135

  10. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus spa Type t002 Outbreak in Horses and Staff at a Veterinary Teaching Hospital after Its Presumed Introduction by a Veterinarian

    OpenAIRE

    Steinman, Amir; Masarwa, Samira; Tirosh-Levy, Sharon; Gleser, Dan; Kelmer, Gal; Adler, Amos; Carmeli, Yehuda; Schwaber, Mitchell J.

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection and colonization, involving MRSA strains which differ from common human health care-associated clones, have become serious emerging conditions in equine veterinary hospitals. In 2010, MRSA spa type t535 caused an outbreak involving both horses and personnel in a veterinary teaching hospital in Israel. Since then, surveillance continued, and occasional MRSA isolation occurred. Two years later, MRSA of another spa type, t002, was isol...

  11. [Human cloning in Muslim and Arab law].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldeeb Abu-Sahlieh, Sami A

    2009-01-01

    Cloning is a modern medical procedure that Muslim religious authorities treat en resorting to the general principles established by classical Muslim law based on the Koran and the Sunnah of Muhhamad as the messenger of God. In this regard, human beings are not capable of deciding what is or what is not lawful without resorting to divine norms. Cloning clashes with several principles. Firstly, the principle of the respect for life in relation to surpernumeraries, but Muslim authors are not in unanimous agreement on the determination of the moment at which life begins. Secondly, is the respect of progeny: cloning could only take place between a married couple. But even if these two principles are respected, cloning poses two major problems: the diversity of species expounded by the Koran and the Sunnah and a lack of interest. Which explains the quasi-unanimous opposition of Muslim writings regarding cloning.

  12. "Goodbye Dolly?" The ethics of human cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J

    1997-01-01

    The ethical implications of human clones have been much alluded to, but have seldom been examined with any rigour. This paper examines the possible uses and abuses of human cloning and draws out the principal ethical dimensions, both of what might be done and its meaning. The paper examines some of the major public and official responses to cloning by authorities such as President Clinton, the World Health Organisation, the European parliament, UNESCO, and others and reveals their inadequacies as foundations for a coherent public policy on human cloning. The paper ends by defending a conception of reproductive rights of "procreative autonomy" which shows human cloning to be not inconsistent with human rights and dignity. PMID:9451604

  13. Epidemiological and molecular characterization of community and hospital acquired Staphylococcus aureus strains prevailing in Shenyang, Northeastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Dan Sun

    Full Text Available In order to obtain adequate information for the treatment of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections, it is crucial to identify trends in epidemiological and antimicrobial resistance patterns of local S. aureus strains. Community and hospital acquired S. aureus isolates (n = 202 were characterized using staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec typing, pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE analysis, spa typing and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC determination. The prevalence of the Panton-Valentine leukocidine (pvl and several antibiotic resistance genes among the isolates were also detected by PCR. All of the S. aureus isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, daptomycin and linezolid. Three hospital isolates were resistant to teicoplanin while 14 showed intermediate resistance to teicoplanin. The resistance patterns of community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA isolates to other antimicrobials were similar to those of hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA isolates except for clindamycin and gentamicin. There was excellent correlation between phenotypes and genotypes in the determination of S. aureus resistance to erythromycin, gentamicin, and tetracycline. The SCCmec type II and SCCmec type IV were the predominant types detected in hospital and community isolates, respectively. The most frequently encountered spa types were t002 and t030 both in HA-and CA-MRSA isolates. Pulsotype A was the most predominant pulsotype identified among the isolates tested, followed by pulsotype B. Seventy-two hospital isolates (19 HA-MRSA and 53 HA-MSSA and 10 CA-MRSA were positive for the pvl gene. This study shows that the combination of susceptibility testing and various molecular methods has provided useful information on the antibiotic resistance and molecular diversity of S. aureus in a specific region of China. The high proportion of pvl positive MSSA and MRSA isolates observed in this study indicates that adequate measures are needed to

  14. Changes in the molecular epidemiological characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Alison J; Della-Latta, Phyllis; Huard, Richard; Wu, Fann; Graham, Phillip L; Carp, Diane; Saiman, Lisa

    2010-06-01

    To determine whether the molecular epidemiological characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) had changed in a level III neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Retrospective review of medical records. Level III NICU of a university-affiliated children's hospital in New York, New York. Case patients were neonates hospitalized in the NICU who were colonized or infected with MRSA. Rates of colonization and infection with MRSA during the period from 2000 through 2008 were assessed. Staphylococcal chromosomal cassette (SCC) mecA analysis and genotyping for S. aureus encoding protein A (spa) were performed on representative MRSA isolates from each clonal pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. Endemic MRSA infection and colonization occurred throughout the study period, which was punctuated by 4 epidemiologic investigations during outbreak periods. During the study period, 93 neonates were infected and 167 were colonized with MRSA. Surveillance cultures were performed for 1,336 neonates during outbreak investigations, and 115 (8.6%) neonates had MRSA-positive culture results. During 2001-2004, healthcare-associated MRSA clones, carrying SCC mec type II, predominated. From 2005 on, most MRSA clones were community-associated MRSA with SCC mec type IV, and in 2007, USA300 emerged as the principal clone. Molecular analysis demonstrated a shift from healthcare-associated MRSA (2001-2004) to community-associated MRSA (2005-2008).

  15. Molecular epidemiology of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Africa: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulgader, Shima M.; Shittu, Adebayo O.; Nicol, Mark P.; Kaba, Mamadou

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are a serious global problem, with considerable impact on patients and substantial health care costs. This systematic review provides an overview on the clonal diversity of MRSA, as well as the prevalence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-positive MRSA in Africa. A search on the molecular characterization of MRSA in Africa was conducted by two authors using predefined terms. We screened for articles published in English and French through to October 2014 from five electronic databases. A total of 57 eligible studies were identified. Thirty-four reports from 15 countries provided adequate genotyping data. CC5 is the predominant clonal complex in the healthcare setting in Africa. The hospital-associated MRSA ST239/ST241-III [3A] was identified in nine African countries. This clone was also described with SCCmec type IV [2B] in Algeria and Nigeria, and type V [5C] in Niger. In Africa, the European ST80-IV [2B] clone was limited to Algeria, Egypt and Tunisia. The clonal types ST22-IV [2B], ST36-II [2A], and ST612-IV [2B] were only reported in South Africa. No clear distinctions were observed between MRSA responsible for hospital and community infections. The community clones ST8-IV [2B] and ST88-IV [2B] were reported both in the hospital and community settings in Angola, Cameroon, Gabon, Ghana, Madagascar, Nigeria, and São Tomé and Príncipe. The proportion of PVL-positive MRSA carriage and/or infections ranged from 0.3 to 100% in humans. A number of pandemic clones were identified in Africa. Moreover, some MRSA clones are limited to specific countries or regions. We strongly advocate for more surveillance studies on MRSA in Africa. PMID:25983721

  16. Genotypic Characterization of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Pigs and Retail Foods in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Feng; Baloch, Zulqarnain; Zhang, Cun Shan; Ma, Ke; Peng, Zi Xin; Yan, Shao Fei; Hu, Yu Jie; Gan, Xin; Dong, Yin Ping; Bai, Yao; Li, Feng Qin; Yan, Xiao Mein; Ma, Ai Guo; Xu, Jin

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the genotypic diversity of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from pigs and retail foods from different geographical areas in China and further to study the routes and rates of transmission of this pathogen from animals to food. Seventy-one MRSA isolates were obtained from pigs and retail foods and then characterized by multi-locus sequencing typing (MLST), spa typing, multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. All isolated MRSA exhibited multi-drug resistance (MDR). Greater diversity was found in food-associated MRSA (7 STs, 8 spa types, and 10 MLVA patterns) compared to pig-associated MRSA (3 STs, 1 spa type, and 6 MLVA patterns). PFGE patterns were more diverse for pig-associated MRSA than those of food-associated isolates (40 vs. 11 pulse types). Among the pig-associated isolates, CC9-ST9-t899-MC2236 was the most prevalent clone (96.4%), and CC9-ST9-t437-MC621 (20.0%) was the predominant clone among the food-associated isolates. The CC9-ST9 isolates showed significantly higher antimicrobial resistance than other clones. Interestingly, CC398-ST398-t034 clone was identified from both pig- and food-associated isolates. Of note, some community- and hospital-associated MRSA strains (t030, t172, t1244, and t4549) were also identified as food-associated isolates. CC9-ST9-t899-MC2236-MDR was the most predominant clone in pigs, but significant genetic diversity was observed in food-associated MRSA. Our results demonstrate the great need for improved surveillance of MRSA in livestock and food and effective prevention strategies to limit MDR-MRSA infections in China. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  17. AQUA Cloning: A Versatile and Simple Enzyme-Free Cloning Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes M Beyer

    Full Text Available Assembly cloning is increasingly replacing conventional restriction enzyme and DNA-ligase-dependent cloning methods for reasons of efficiency and performance. Here, we describe AQUA (advanced quick assembly, a simple and versatile seamless assembly cloning approach. We demonstrate the applicability and versatility of AQUA Cloning in selected proof-of-principle applications including targeted insertion-, deletion- and site-directed point-mutagenesis, and combinatorial cloning. Furthermore, we show the one pot de novo assembly of multiple DNA fragments into a single circular plasmid encoding a complex light- and chemically-regulated Boolean A NIMPLY B logic operation. AQUA Cloning harnesses intrinsic in vivo processing of linear DNA fragments with short regions of homology of 16 to 32 bp mediated by Escherichia coli. It does not require any kits, enzymes or preparations of reagents and is the simplest assembly cloning protocol to date.

  18. Spread of the epidemic European fusidic acid-resistant impetigo clone (EEFIC) in general practice patients in the south of The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnders, M I A; Wolffs, P F G; Hopstaken, R M; den Heyer, M; Bruggeman, C A; Stobberingh, E E

    2012-05-01

    We evaluated the susceptibility to fusidic acid, mupirocin and retapamulin of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from nasal and wound swabs. The susceptibility to the three agents of S. aureus isolated from general patients in the south of The Netherlands with a skin or soft tissue infection was determined between January 2007 and December 2008. Fusidic acid-resistant isolates were tested for the presence of fusidic acid-resistant genes and compared with the epidemic European fusidic acid-resistant impetigo clone (EEFIC). Fusidic acid resistance was found in 23% of the nasal and 35% of the wound isolates, the majority (~90%) being fusB positive. Most of the isolates belonged to spa type t171 and were isolated from younger patients. One isolate was retapamulin resistant (MIC 8 mg/L) and two were mupirocin resistant. The EEFIC clone was relatively highly prevalent among the isolated S. aureus. The usefulness of fusidic acid as first-line agent for the treatment of impetigo is questionable. As mupirocin is used in The Netherlands for eradication of methicillin-resistant S. aureus, it is not an alternative; retapamulin might be useful, but further in vivo studies are warranted.

  19. Characterization of community acquired Staphylococcus aureus associated with skin and soft tissue infection in Beijing: high prevalence of PVL+ ST398.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjiang Zhao

    Full Text Available Adult community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (CA-MSSA skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI in China is not well described. A prospective cohort of adults with SSTI was established between January 2009 and August 2010 at 4 hospitals in Beijing. Susceptibility testing and molecular typing, including multilocus sequence typing, spa, agr typing, and toxin detection were assessed for all S. aureus isolates. Overall, 501 SSTI patients were enrolled. Cutaneous abscess (40.7% was the most common infection, followed by impetigo (6.8% and cellulitis (4.8%. S. aureus accounted for 32.7% (164/501 of SSTIs. Five isolates (5/164, 3.0% were CA-MRSA. The most dominant ST in CA-MSSA was ST398 (17.6%. The prevalence of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (pvl gene was 41.5% (66/159 in MSSA. Female, younger patients and infections requiring incision or drainage were more commonly associated with pvl-positive S. aureus (P<0.03; sec gene was more often identified in CC5 (P<0.03; seh gene was more prevalent in CC1 (P = 0.001. Importantly, ST59 isolates showed more resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline, and needed more surgical intervention. In conclusion, CA-MRSA infections were rare among adult SSTI patients in Beijing. Six major MSSA clones were identified and associated with unique antimicrobial susceptibility, toxin profiles, and agr types. A high prevalence of livestock ST398 clone (17.1% of all S. aureus infections was found with no apparent association to animal contact.

  20. Remitting infections due to community-acquired Panton-Valentine leukocidin-producing Staphylococcus aureus in the Milan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, Sara Giordana; Pagani, Cristina; Longhi, Erika; Di Cristo, Valentina; Di Gregorio, Annamaria; Mancon, Alessandro; Zerbi, Pietro; Gervasoni, Cristina; Gismondo, Maria Rita; Riva, Agostino

    2017-09-05

    One of the most important Staphylococcus aureus virulence factors is Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). We describe an outbreak of recurrent cutaneous PVL infections in different members of three family clusters. Molecular investigations were performed to confirm the presence of the mecA and PVL genes and to assign the SCCmec type, sequence type (ST) and clonal relatedness. A strain of PVL-producing methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was responsible for infection in two related families (A and B), and a third family (C) was infected with PVL-producing methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA). Molecular investigations revealed the same clone of community-acquired (CA)-MRSA, PVL positive ST8, and SCCmec IV in families A and B and CA-MSSA PVL positive ST15 in family C. S. aureus PVL may give rise to recurrent uncontrolled infections that are difficult to eradicate, and close family contacts are at high risk for transmission. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Purification and characterization of the Staphylococcus aureus bacillithiol transferase BstA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Varahenage R; Newton, Gerald L; Parnell, Jonathan M; Komives, Elizabeth A; Pogliano, Kit

    2014-09-01

    Gram-positive bacteria in the phylum Firmicutes synthesize the low molecular weight thiol bacillithiol rather than glutathione or mycothiol. The bacillithiol transferase YfiT from Bacillus subtilis was identified as a new member of the recently discovered DinB/YfiT-like Superfamily. Based on structural similarity using the Superfamily program, we have determined 30 of 31 Staphylococcus aureus strains encode a single bacillithiol transferase from the DinB/YfiT-like Superfamily, while the remaining strain encodes two proteins. We have cloned, purified, and confirmed the activity of a recombinant bacillithiol transferase (henceforth called BstA) encoded by the S. aureus Newman ORF NWMN_2591. Moreover, we have studied the saturation kinetics and substrate specificity of this enzyme using in vitro biochemical assays. BstA was found to be active with the co-substrate bacillithiol, but not with other low molecular weight thiols tested. BstA catalyzed bacillithiol conjugation to the model substrates monochlorobimane, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, and the antibiotic cerulenin. Several other molecules, including the antibiotic rifamycin S, were found to react directly with bacillithiol, but the addition of BstA did not enhance the rate of reaction. Furthermore, cells growing in nutrient rich medium exhibited low BstA activity. BstA is a bacillithiol transferase from S. aureus that catalyzes the detoxification of cerulenin. Additionally, we have determined that bacillithiol itself might be capable of directly detoxifying electrophilic molecules. BstA is an active bacillithiol transferase from S. aureus Newman and is the first DinB/YfiT-like Superfamily member identified from this organism. Interestingly, BstA is highly divergent from B. subtilis YfiT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A genomic portrait of the emergence, evolution, and global spread of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pandemic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holden, Matthew T G; Hsu, Li-Yang; Kurt, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics in association with high-density clinical care has driven the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria that are adapted to thrive in hospitalized patients. Of particular concern are globally disseminated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clones...... to analyze the genome sequences for 193 S. aureus isolates, we were able to show that the current pandemic population of EMRSA-15 descends from a health-care-associated MRSA epidemic that spread throughout England in the 1980s, which had itself previously emerged from a primarily community...... of pathogen genome sequencing as a diagnostic tool. We document the genetic changes associated with adaptation to the hospital environment and with increasing drug resistance over time, and how MRSA evolution likely has been influenced by country-specific drug use regimens....

  3. Human embryo cloning prohibited in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Athena

    2005-12-01

    Since the birth of Dolly (the cloned sheep) in 1997, debates have arisen on the ethical and legal questions of cloning-for-biomedical-research (more commonly termed "therapeutic cloning") and of reproductive cloning using human gametes. Hong Kong enacted the Human Reproductive Technology Ordinance (Cap 561) in 2000. Section 15(1)(e) of this Ordinance prohibits the "replacing of the nucleus of a cell of an embryo with a nucleus taken from any other cell," i.e., nucleus substitution. Section 15(1)(f) prohibits the cloning of any embryo. The scope of the latter, therefore, is arguably the widest, prohibiting all cloning techniques such as cell nucleus replacement, embryo splitting, parthenogenesis, and cloning using stem cell lines. Although the Human Reproductive Technology Ordinance is not yet fully operative, this article examines how these prohibitions may adversely impact on basic research and the vision of the Hong Kong scientific community. It concludes that in light of recent scientific developments, it is time to review if the law offers a coherent set of policies in this area.

  4. Serial cloning of pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer: restoration of phenotypic normality during serial cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seong-Keun; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Park, Jong-Yi; Choi, Yun-Jung; Bang, Jae-Il; Hwang, Kyu-Chan; Cho, Eun-Jeong; Sohn, Sea-Hwan; Uhm, Sang Jun; Koo, Deog-Bon; Lee, Kyung-Kwang; Kim, Teoan; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2007-12-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (scNT) is a useful way to create cloned animals. However, scNT clones exhibit high levels of phenotypic instability. This instability may be due to epigenetic reprogramming and/or genomic damage in the donor cells. To test this, we produced transgenic pig fibroblasts harboring the truncated human thrombopoietin (hTPO) gene and used them as donor cells in scNT to produce first-generation (G1) cloned piglets. In this study, 2,818 scNT embryos were transferred to 11 recipients and five G1 piglets were obtained. Among them, a clone had a dimorphic facial appearance with severe hypertelorism and a broad prominent nasal bridge. The other clones looked normal. Second-generation (G2) scNT piglets were then produced using ear cells from a G1 piglet that had an abnormal nose phenotype. We reasoned that, if the phenotypic abnormality of the G1 clone was not present in the G2 and third-generation (G3) clones, or was absent in the G2 clones but reappeared in the G3 clones, the phenotypic instability of the G1 clone could be attributed to faulty epigenetic reprogramming rather than to inherent/accidental genomic damage to the donor cells. Blastocyst rates, cell numbers in blastocyst, pregnancy rates, term placenta weight and ponderal index, and birth weight between G1 and G2 clones did not differ, but were significantly (P clones and could not find any significant differences in the methylation patterns between G1 and G2 clones. Indeed, we failed to detect the phenotypic abnormality in the G2 and G3 clones. Thus, the phenotypic abnormality of the G1 clone is likely to be due to epigenetic dysregulation. Additional observations then suggested that expression of the hTPO gene in the transgenic clones did not appear to be the cause of the phenotypic abnormality in the G1 clones and that the abnormality was acquired by only a few of the G1 clone's cells during its gestational development. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  5. Sequence diversity in the A domain of Staphylococcus aureus fibronectin-binding protein A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speziale Pietro

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA mediates adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus to fibronectin, fibrinogen and elastin. We previously reported that S. aureus strain P1 encodes an FnBPA protein where the fibrinogen/elastin-binding domain (A domain is substantially divergent in amino acid sequence from the archetypal FnBPA of S. aureus NCTC8325, and that these variations created differences in antigenicity. In this study strains from multilocus sequence types (MLST that spanned the genetic diversity of S.aureus were examined to determine the extent of FnBPA A domain variation within the S. aureus population and its effect on ligand binding and immuno-crossreactivity. Results Seven different isotype forms (I – VII of the FnBPA A domain were identified which were between 66 to 76% identical in amino acid sequence in any pair-wise alignment. The fnbA allelic variants in strains of different multilocus sequence type were identified by DNA hybridization using probes specific for sequences encoding the highly divergent N3 sub-domain of different isotypes. Several isotypes were not restricted to specific clones or clonal complexes but were more widely distributed. It is highly likely that certain fnbA genes have been transferred horizontally. Residues lining the putative ligand-binding trench were conserved, which is consistent with the ability of each A domain isotype to bind immobilized fibrinogen and elastin by the dock-latch-lock mechanism. Variant amino acid residues were mapped on a three-dimensional model of the FnBPA A domain and were predicted to be surface-exposed. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the recombinant isotype I A domain bound that protein with a 4 – 7 fold higher apparent affinity compared to the A domains of isotypes II – VII, while some monoclonal antibodies generated against the isotype I A domain showed reduced or no binding to the other isotypes. Conclusion The FnBPA A domain occurs in at least 7

  6. Identification and Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Strains with an Incomplete Hemolytic Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifang Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus. We also found that IL-2, IL-6 and IL-17A secreted in the supernatant of SIHP infected macrophages increased significantly compared to tst negative control strains infected ones. MLST analysis showed that all of SIHP strains were classified into ST5 clone. To our knowledge, this study firstly showed that SIHP strains are

  7. Range Expansion and the Origin of USA300 North American Epidemic Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challagundla, Lavanya; Luo, Xiao; Tickler, Isabella A.; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Sordelli, Daniel O.; Brown, Eric L.; Skov, Robert; Larsen, Anders Rhod; Reyes, Jinnethe; Robledo, Iraida E.; Vazquez, Guillermo J.; Rivera, Raul; Fey, Paul D.; Stevenson, Kurt; Wang, Shu-Hua; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Mediavilla, Jose R.; Arias, Cesar A.; Planet, Paul J.; Nolan, Rathel L.; Tenover, Fred C.; Goering, Richard V.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The USA300 North American epidemic (USA300-NAE) clone of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has caused a wave of severe skin and soft tissue infections in the United States since it emerged in the early 2000s, but its geographic origin is obscure. Here we use the population genomic signatures expected from the serial founder effects of a geographic range expansion to infer the origin of USA300-NAE and identify polymorphisms associated with its spread. Genome sequences from 357 isolates from 22 U.S. states and territories and seven other countries are compared. We observe two significant signatures of range expansion, including decreases in genetic diversity and increases in derived allele frequency with geographic distance from the Pennsylvania region. These signatures account for approximately half of the core nucleotide variation of this clone, occur genome wide, and are robust to heterogeneity in temporal sampling of isolates, human population density, and recombination detection methods. The potential for positive selection of a gyrA fluoroquinolone resistance allele and several intergenic regions, along with a 2.4 times higher recombination rate in a resistant subclade, is noted. These results are the first to show a pattern of genetic variation that is consistent with a range expansion of an epidemic bacterial clone, and they highlight a rarely considered but potentially common mechanism by which genetic drift may profoundly influence bacterial genetic variation. PMID:29295910

  8. Simplified cryopreservation of porcine cloned blastocysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Yutao; Zhang, Yunhai; Li, Juan

    2007-01-01

    )â€"handmade cloning (HMC)â€"to establish a simplified and efficient cryopreservation system for porcine cloned embryos. In Experiment 1, zonae pellucidae of oocytes were partially digested with pronase, followed by centrifugation to polarize lipid particles. Ninety percent (173/192) oocytes were successfully......). Our results prove that porcine embryos produced from delipated oocytes by PA or HMC can be cryopreserved effectively by ultrarapid vitrification. Further experiments are required to assess the in vivo developmental competence of the cloned-vitrified embryos  ...

  9. Mode of action of Buddleja cordata verbascoside against Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, J G; de Liverant, J G; Martínez, A; Martínez, G; Muñoz, J L; Arciniegas, A; Romo de Vivar, A

    1999-07-01

    We evaluate the mode of action of verbascoside obtained from Buddleja cordata against Staphylococcus aureus by killing kinetics and incorporation of precursors methods. Verbascoside induced lethal effect on S. aureus, by affecting protein synthesis and inhibiting leucine incorporation.

  10. Prevalence of infective endocarditis in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Høst, Ulla; Arpi, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Aims Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis (IE) is a critical medical condition associated with a high morbidity and mortality. In the present study, we prospectively evaluated the importance of screening with echocardiography in an unselected S. aureus bacteraemia (SAB) population. Methods...

  11. Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis in diverse host environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Divya; Harper, Lamia; Shopsin, Bo; Torres, Victor J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Staphylococcus aureus is an eminent human pathogen that can colonize the human host and cause severe life-threatening illnesses. This bacterium can reside in and infect a wide range of host tissues, ranging from superficial surfaces like the skin to deeper tissues such as in the gastrointestinal tract, heart and bones. Due to its multifaceted lifestyle, S. aureus uses complex regulatory networks to sense diverse signals that enable it to adapt to different environments and modulate virulence. In this minireview, we explore well-characterized environmental and host cues that S. aureus responds to and describe how this pathogen modulates virulence in response to these signals. Lastly, we highlight therapeutic approaches undertaken by several groups to inhibit both signaling and the cognate regulators that sense and transmit these signals downstream. PMID:28104617

  12. Mastite com lesões sistêmicas por Staphylococus aureus subesp. aureus em coelhos Mastitis with systemic lesions due to Staphylococus aureus subesp. aureus in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Davi Traverso

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Em uma criação composta por 1800 coelhos, 33% das matrizes apresentaram mastite e lesões cutâneas crostosas e purulentas. Estes animais apresentavam-se entre 10 a- 12 meses de idade e em segunda parição. Quinze coelhos afetados foram sacrificados e necropsiados. Na necropsia, além das lesões cutâneas haviam microabscessos em diversos órgãos. Das amostras coletadas isolou-se Staphylococcus aureus subesp. aureus. S. aureus subesp. aureus também foi isolado de "swab" nasal coletado do tratador encarregado de fazer o diagnóstico de gestação nas coelhas. Histologicamente, havia formação de múltiplos abscessos, presença de bactérias gram positivas em vasos sangüíneos e linfáticos, além de êmbolos bacterianos nos tecidos. Nas mamas, observou-se tecido glandular normal associado a abscessos multifocais delimitados.At a commercial rabbitry which was composed of 1800 New Zealand White rabbits, 30% of the does had presented mastitis and purulent cutaneal lesions. The age of the animals ranged from 10 to 12 months and were at the second parturition. At necropsy, microabscesses were observed in several organs. Bacteriological samples collected from affected animals resulted Staphylococcus aureus subesp. aureus.. Additionally, the same agent has been isolated from a nasal swab collected from the person responsible for the pregnancy diagnosis. Histologically, there were multiple abscesses, gram positive bacteria within blood and lymphatic vessels, and bacterial emboli scattered in the tissues. In the mammas, normal glandular tissue associated with multifocal abscesses were observed.

  13. Human cloning and the myth of disenchantment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Laurențiu, Staicu

    2012-01-01

    This study has a twofold objective: firstly, it aims to examine the main types of argument that have been formulated against human cloning, to identify their presuppositions and to evaluate their strength...

  14. Cloning and molecular characterization of glyceraldehyde-3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cloning and molecular characterization of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene from thermotolerant mushroom, Lentinus polychrous. ... sequence of the L. polychrous GAPDH-encoded protein shared significant sequence identity with other GAPDH proteins from basidiomycetes. Phylogenetic analysis ...

  15. DNA microarrays : a molecular cloning manual

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sambrook, Joseph; Bowtell, David

    2002-01-01

    .... This manual, designed to extend and to complement the information in the best-selling Molecular Cloning, is a synthesis of the expertise and experience of more than 30 contributors all innovators in a fast moving field...

  16. Cloning and characterization of new bioluminescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Ballou, Byron T.; Dagnal, Erich; Bryan, Bruce

    1999-07-01

    Over the past two years Prolume has undertaken a comprehensive program to clone luciferases and associated 'green fluorescent proteins' (GFPs) from marine animals that use coelenterazine as the luciferin. To data we have cloned several bioluminescent proteins, including two novel copepod luciferases and two anthozoan GFPs. These four proteins have sequences that differ greatly form previously cloned analogous proteins; the sequence diversity apparently is due to independent evolutionary origins and unusual evolutionary constraints. Thus coelenterazine-based bioluminescent systems may also manifest a variety of useful properties. We discuss form this taxonomic perspective the initial biochemical and spectral characterization of our cloned proteins. Emphasis is placed on the anthozoan luciferase-GFP systems, whose efficient resonance energy transfer has elicited much current interest.

  17. Meat and Milk Compositions of Bovine Clones

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    X. Cindy Tian; Chikara Kubota; Kunihito Sakashita; Yoshiaki Izaike; Ryoichi Okano; Norio Tabara; Carol Curchoe; Lavina Jacob; Yuqin Zhang; Sadie Smith; Charles Bormann; Jie Xu; Masumi Sato; Sheila Andrew; Xiangzhong Yang; R. Michael Roberts

    2005-01-01

    ...? Here, we provide data on >100 parameters that compare the composition of meat and milk from beef and dairy cattle derived from cloning to those of genetic- and breed-matched control animals from conventional reproduction...

  18. Antibiotic resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Abia State of Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 70 ear and nasal swab samples collected from 35 persons, 16-hospital population and 19 non-hospital population was examined for presence of Staphylococcus aureus. Eighty percent of the population studied were found to be carriers of S. aureus. Of the 28 positive cases, 35.7% were carriers of S. aureus. in ...

  19. Nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strains of Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from the anterior nares of healthy pupils and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns were determined. 116 isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (100%) were biochemically characterized as coagulase positive S. aureus. Susceptibility profile of the isolates revealed that 15(14.85%) ...

  20. 21 CFR 866.3700 - Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. 866... Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents. (a) Identification. Staphylococcus aureus serological reagents are... diagnosis of disease caused by this bacterium belonging to the genus Staphylococcus and provides...

  1. 9 CFR 113.115 - Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterin-Toxoid... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.115 Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterin-Toxoid. Staphylococcus... Staphylococcus aureus which has been inactivated and is nontoxic. Each serial of biological product containing...

  2. Immunological role of nasal staphylococcus aureus carriage in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2008-10-30

    Oct 30, 2008 ... Nasal carriage of staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) exerts immunomodulatory effects in patients with atopic dermatitis and it may contribute to airway inflammation and allergic response in patients with allergic rhinitis. We investigated the frequency of nasal S. aureus carriage in patients with perennial ...

  3. The sensitivity status of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community acquired Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from various infectious sites in two private laboratories in Kano-city, Nigeria. A total of 247 (11%) Staphylococcu aureus isolates were recovered from all infectious sites except cerebro-spinal fluid. The least Staphylococcus aureus isolates were found in urine ...

  4. Antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from fresh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three Hundred and Sixty fresh cow milk samples were collected from settled Fulani herds in Kaduna State and examined for S. aureus and their antibiotic resistance. Fifty five samples (15.3%) were positive for S. aureus. The occurrence of S. aureus was statistically significant (P<0.005) based on locations. Statistical ...

  5. Endangered wolves cloned from adult somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Oh, Hyun Ju; Yuda, Fibrianto; Kim, Hye Jin; Hwang, Woo Suk; Hossein, Mohammad Shamim; Kim, Joung Joo; Shin, Nam Shik; Kang, Sung Keun; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2007-01-01

    Over the world, canine species, including the gray wolf, have been gradually endangered or extinct. Many efforts have been made to recover and conserve these canids. The aim of this study was to produce the endangered gray wolf with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for conservation. Adult ear fibroblasts from a female gray wolf (Canis lupus) were isolated and cultured in vitro as donor cells. Because of limitations in obtaining gray wolf matured oocytes, in vivo matured canine oocytes obtained by flushing the oviducts from the isthmus to the infundibulum were used. After removing the cumulus cells, the oocyte was enucleated, microinjected, fused with a donor cell, and activated. The reconstructed cloned wolf embryos were transferred into the oviducts of the naturally synchronized surrogate mothers. Two pregnancies were detected by ultrasonography at 23 days of gestation in recipient dogs. In each surrogate dog, two fetal sacs were confirmed by early pregnancy diagnosis at 23 days, but only two cloned wolves were delivered. The first cloned wolf was delivered by cesarean section on October 18, 2005, 60 days after embryo transfer. The second cloned wolf was delivered on October 26, 2005, at 61 days postembryo transfer. Microsatellite analysis was performed with genomic DNA from the donor wolf, the two cloned wolves, and the two surrogate female recipients to confirm the genetic identity of the cloned wolves. Analysis of 19 microsatellite loci confirmed that the cloned wolves were genetically identical to the donor wolf. In conclusion, we demonstrated live birth of two cloned gray wolves by nuclear transfer of wolf somatic cells into enucleated canine oocyte, indicating that SCNT is a practical approach for conserving endangered canids.

  6. Emotional reactions to human reproductive cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Extant surveys of people's attitudes towards human reproductive cloning focus on moral judgements alone, not emotional reactions or sentiments. This is especially important given that some (especially Leon Kass) have argued against such cloning on the ground that it engenders widespread negative emotions, like disgust, that provide a moral guide. To provide some data on emotional reactions to human cloning, with a focus on repugnance, given its prominence in the literature. This brief mixed-method study measures the self-reported attitudes and emotions (positive or negative) towards cloning from a sample of participants in the USA. Most participants condemned cloning as immoral and said it should be illegal. The most commonly reported positive sentiment was by far interest/curiosity. Negative emotions were much more varied, but anxiety was the most common. Only about a third of participants selected disgust or repugnance as something they felt, and an even smaller portion had this emotion come to mind prior to seeing a list of options. Participants felt primarily interested and anxious about human reproductive cloning. They did not primarily feel disgust or repugnance. This provides initial empirical evidence that such a reaction is not appropriately widespread. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Reproductive cloning combined with genetic modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, C

    2005-11-01

    Although there is widespread opposition to reproductive cloning, some have argued that its use by infertile couples to have genetically related children would be ethically justifiable. Others have suggested that lesbian or gay couples might wish to use cloning to have genetically related children. Most of the main objections to human reproductive cloning are based on the child's lack of unique nuclear DNA. In the future, it may be possible safely to create children using cloning combined with genetic modifications, so that they have unique nuclear DNA. The genetic modifications could be aimed at giving such children genetic characteristics of both members of the couple concerned. Thus, cloning combined with genetic modification could be appealing to infertile, lesbian, or gay couples who seek genetically related children who have genetic characteristics of both members. In such scenarios, the various objections to human reproductive cloning that are based on the lack of genetic uniqueness would no longer be applicable. The author argues that it would be ethically justifiable for such couples to create children in this manner, assuming these techniques could be used safely.

  8. CloneAssistant 1.0: a stand-alone software for automated cloning primer design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chaogang; Meng, Yijun; Lv, Shaolei; Zhong, Wei; Wang, Zheyu; Chen, Ming

    2010-11-01

    "CloneAssistant 1.0" is a stand-alone software compatible with the current Windows operating systems, which can automatically design cloning primers with full consideration of the sequence information of vectors and genes, cloning strategies, the principles of primer design, reading frames, position effects, and enzymatic reaction conditions for users. Five internal XML (extensible markup language) databases [restriction enzymes, plasmids, universal buffers, PCR (polymerase chain reaction) protection bases, and an MCS (multiple cloning site) double digest interference database] were established to serve as the basic support for "CloneAssistant 1.0". The primer pairs designed are sorted according to the difficulty of the follow-up experiments. Once a primer pair is selected by the user, detailed experimental guidance for this primer pair will be provided. In addition, "CloneAssistant 1.0" can be used for restriction map analysis, ORF (open reading frame) finding, sequence alignment and complementary analysis, translation, restriction enzyme and universal buffer queries, and isocaudamer analysis. "CloneAssistant 1.0" makes gene clone design much easier, and it can be freely downloaded from http://bis.zju.edu.cn/clone. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Birth of viable puppies derived from breeding cloned female dogs with a cloned male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J E; Hong, S G; Kang, J T; Oh, H J; Kim, M K; Kim, M J; Kim, H J; Kim, D Y; Jang, G; Lee, B C

    2009-09-15

    Since the establishment of production of viable cloned dogs by somatic cell nucleus transfer, great concern has been given to the reproductive abilities of these animals (Canis familiaris). Therefore, we investigated reproductive activity of cloned dogs by (1) performing sperm analysis using computer-assisted sperm analysis and early embryonic development, (2) assessing reproductive cycling by measuring serum progesterone (P4) levels and performing vaginal cytology, and (3) breeding cloned dogs using artificial insemination. Results showed that most parameters of sperm motility in a cloned male dog were within the reference range, and in vivo-matured oocytes from a noncloned female were successfully fertilized by spermatozoa from a cloned male dog and develop normally to the 8-cell stage. Three cloned female dogs displayed normal patterns of P4 levels and morphologic changes of the vaginal epithelium. Two cloned female dogs became pregnant using semen from a cloned male dog and successfully delivered 10 puppies by natural labor. In conclusion, these data demonstrated that both cloned male and female dogs are fertile, and their puppies are currently alive and healthy with normal growth patterns.

  10. Do Clones Dream of Love? Images of Clones in Popular Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Antonijević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fantasies about clones, cyborgs and androids have become part and parcel of the mythology of modern times – the mythologies of the biotechnological era in which the achievements of genetic engineering have inflamed fears of possible abuse of scientific knowledge and the consequences of such abuse. The paper considers the phenomenon of reproductive cloning of human beings as it is represented in popular culture, especially film as it is one of the most important sources of representations and constructions of ideas about clones. After the introductory consideration of this phenomenon in scientific, ethical and media debates which are imbued with rejection of reproductive cloning, I have analyzed the different uses of the clone motif in selected movies. I have examined the structure and content of the genre formula of "social melodrama" which is present in films about clones, and have analyzed the mythical patterns pertaining to the topic of cloning, such as the myth of immortality, the myth of twins, the myth of the uniqueness of human kind etc. Ultimately, the nature and origins of the fear of clones and disgust that clones cause have been examined, and it has been shown that they mostly boil down to the fear of the dehumanization of human beings, the fear of the loss of difference and the transgression of biological, sociocultural and metaphysical boundaries.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus entrance into the dairy chain: Tracking S. aureus from dairy cow to cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Kümmel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important contagious mastitis pathogens in dairy cattle. Due to its zoonotic potential, control of S. aureus is not only of great economic importance in the dairy industry but also a significant public health concern. The aim of this study was to decipher the potential of bovine udder associated S. aureus as reservoir for S. aureus contamination in dairy production and processing. From 18 farms, delivering their milk to an alpine dairy plant for the production of smeared semi-hard and hard cheese. 1176 quarter milk (QM samples of all cows in lactation (n = 294 and representative samples form bulk tank milk (BTM of all farms were surveyed for coagulase positive (CPS and coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS. Furthermore, samples from different steps of the cheese manufacturing process were tested for CPS and CNS. As revealed by chemometric-assisted FTIR spectroscopy and molecular subtyping (spa typing and multi locus sequence typing, dairy cattle represent indeed an important, yet underreported, entrance point of S. aureus into the dairy chain. Our data clearly show that certain S. aureus subtypes are present in primary production as well as in the cheese processing at the dairy plant. However, although a considerable diversity of S. aureus subtypes was observed in QM and BTM at the farms, only certain S. aureus subtypes were able to enter and persist in the cheese manufacturing at the dairy plant and could be isolated from cheese until day fourteen of ripening. Farm strains belonging to the FTIR cluster B1 and B3, which show genetic characteristics (t2953, ST8, enterotoxin profile: sea/sed/sej of the recently described S. aureus genotype B, most successfully contaminated the cheese production at the dairy plant. Thus our study fosters the hypothesis that genotype B S. aureus represent a specific challenge in control of S. aureus in the dairy chain that requires effective clearance strategies and hygienic

  12. Staphylococcus aureus Entrance into the Dairy Chain: Tracking S. aureus from Dairy Cow to Cheese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kümmel, Judith; Stessl, Beatrix; Gonano, Monika; Walcher, Georg; Bereuter, Othmar; Fricker, Martina; Grunert, Tom; Wagner, Martin; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important contagious mastitis pathogens in dairy cattle. Due to its zoonotic potential, control of S. aureus is not only of great economic importance in the dairy industry but also a significant public health concern. The aim of this study was to decipher the potential of bovine udder associated S. aureus as reservoir for S. aureus contamination in dairy production and processing. From 18 farms, delivering their milk to an alpine dairy plant for the production of smeared semi-hard and hard cheese. one thousand hundred seventy six one thousand hundred seventy six quarter milk (QM) samples of all cows in lactation (n = 294) and representative samples form bulk tank milk (BTM) of all farms were surveyed for coagulase positive (CPS) and coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS). Furthermore, samples from different steps of the cheese manufacturing process were tested for CPS and CNS. As revealed by chemometric-assisted FTIR spectroscopy and molecular subtyping (spa typing and multi locus sequence typing), dairy cattle represent indeed an important, yet underreported, entrance point of S. aureus into the dairy chain. Our data clearly show that certain S. aureus subtypes are present in primary production as well as in the cheese processing at the dairy plant. However, although a considerable diversity of S. aureus subtypes was observed in QM and BTM at the farms, only certain S. aureus subtypes were able to enter and persist in the cheese manufacturing at the dairy plant and could be isolated from cheese until day 14 of ripening. Farm strains belonging to the FTIR cluster B1 and B3, which show genetic characteristics (t2953, ST8, enterotoxin profile: sea/sed/sej) of the recently described S. aureus genotype B, most successfully contaminated the cheese production at the dairy plant. Thus, our study fosters the hypothesis that genotype B S. aureus represent a specific challenge in control of S. aureus in the dairy chain that requires

  13. Public perceptions of farm animal cloning in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Jesper

    This report presents a picture of European opinion on farm animal cloning. In the report, both agricultural and biomedical applications of farm animal cloning are considered. With the arrival of Dolly, animal cloning became an integral part of the biotech debate, but this debate did not isolate...... animal cloning as a single issue....

  14. Cloning: Past, Present, and the Exciting Future. Breakthroughs in Bioscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Berardino, Marie A.

    This document explores the history of cloning by focusing on Dolly the Sheep, one of the first large animal clonings. The disadvantages and advantages of transgenic clones are discussed as well as the future implications of cloning from the perspective of human health. (Contains 10 resources.) (YDS)

  15. AN APPROACH FOR CLONE DETECTION IN DOCUMENTATION REUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Lutsiv

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the searching method for repetitions in DocBook/DRL or plain text documents. An algorithm has been designed based on software clone detection. The algorithm supports filtering results: clones are rejected if clone length in the group is less than 5 symbols, intersection of clone groups is eliminated, meaningfulness clones are removed, the groups containing clones consisting only of XML are eliminated. Remaining search is supported: found clones are extracted from the documentation, and clone search is repeated. One step is proved to be enough. Adaptive reuse technique of Paul Bassett – Stan Jarzabek has been implemented. A software tool has been developed on the basis of the algorithm. The tool supports setting parameters for repetitions detection and visualization of the obtained results. The tool is integrated into DocLine document development environment, and provides refactoring of documents using found clones. The Clone Miner clone detection utility is used for clones search. The method has been evaluated for Linux Kernel Documentation (29 documents, 25000 lines. Five semantic kinds of clones have been selected: terms (abbreviations, one word and two word terms, hyperlinks, license agreements, functionality description, and code examples. 451 meaningful clone groups have been found, average clone length is 4.43 tokens, and average number of clones in a group is 3.56.

  16. Antibiograms of Staphylococcus Aureus and Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While there was no bacterial growth after 48hrs incubation recorded for group one, only 5(13.9%) samples yielded growth of Staphylococcus aureus for group two with 31(86.1%) yielding no bacterial growth. All group three samples yielded profuse growth of which 11(36.7%) yielded Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

  17. Staphylococcus aureus resistente a la meticilina (SARM)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-10-22

    Datos importantes sobre las infecciones por SARM en Estados Unidos, en las escuelas y los entornos médicos. (Title: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)Created: 10/2007).  Created: 10/22/2007 by National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 11/9/2007.

  18. Profiling the surfacome of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreisbach, Annette; Hempel, Kristina; Buist, Girbe; Hecker, Michael; Becher, Doerte; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    Staphylococcus aureus is a widespread opportunistic pathogen that can cause a wide variety of life-threatening diseases. Especially for the colonization of human tissues and the development of invasiveness, surface-exposed proteins are of major importance. In the present studies, we optimized a

  19. Resistance patterns of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred (200) strains of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa were isolated from clinical samples collected from patients in Murtala Muhammad Specialist Hospital and Infectious Diseases Hospital, Kano. The confirmed isolates were tested for resistance to quinolones by the agar disk diffusion susceptibility test and the agar ...

  20. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Leif Percival; Nielsen, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Even though methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common cause of nosocomial infections, it may often be difficult to evaluate the exact route of transmission. METHODS: In this study, we describe four cases of nosocomial transmission of MRSA in a hospital with a low...

  1. Antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus in suppurative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus, a mainly acquired hospital infection is responsible for many suppurative lesions and has demonstrated the ability of developing resistance to many antimicrobial agents leading to life threatening infections and long hospital stay. Objective: To determined the prevalence and antibiotic ...

  2. Polyclonal antibodies production against Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-01

    Feb 1, 2010 ... The main aim of this project is to produce polyclonal antibodies directed against the Staphylococcus aureus protein A and their use to appreciate bacteriological analysis of milk quality. In this context, an immunization produce was set up to test and detect in a batch of animals the convenient responder to.

  3. Meticillineresistente Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in de gemeenschap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, A. G.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C. M. J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections have been confined to healthcare centres for decades. However, MRSA infections are increasingly seen in young healthy individuals with no exposure to healthcare centres. These community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains differ from

  4. Staphylococcus aureus infections; Lead by the nose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.F.L. Wertheim (Heiman)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAn overview and the latest insights regarding S. aureus nasal carriage, associated risks of developing infections and possible preventive measures, will be given in Chapter 2. Since mupirocin efficacy studies in preventing nosocomial infections have only been performed in surgical and

  5. Microbial population of Staphyloccous aureus from inanimate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High frequency of S. aureus was observed in toilet seat with perecentage distribution of 78%, followed by floor with percentage distribution of 70% and locker with percentage distribution of 65% and the lowest frequency occurence was observed in switch with percentage distribution of 30%. Frequency occurrence of S.

  6. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukos, Georgios; Sakellari, Dimitra; Arsenakis, Minas; Tsalikis, Lazaros; Slini, Theodora; Konstantinidis, Antonios

    2015-09-01

    To assess the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in plaque and tongue samples from systemically healthy subjects with periodontal health, gingivitis or chronic periodontitis. After screening 720 potentially eligible subjects, 154 systemically healthy participants were ultimately enrolled in the current study. Subgingival samples were taken from the first molars and the tongue and analyzed for the presence of S. aureus and MRSA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), using primers and conditions previously described in the literature. In addition, samples were taken from deep periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis patients. Statistical analysis was performed by applying non-parametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis for clinical parameters, and z-test with Bonferroni corrections for distributions of assessed parameters). All comparisons were set at the 0.05 significance level. S. aureus was detected in 18% of all participants and in 10% of the samples tested. No significant differences were found in its distribution among the three investigated groups (z-test for proportions with Bonferroni corrections, p>0.05). The mecA gene was not present in any of the S. aureus found. S. aureus can be found in the oral environment regardless of the periodontal conditions and therefore should be considered as a member of the transient flora not participating in periodontal pathology. Subgingival sites and tongue surfaces seem to be an unusual habitat of MRSA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from faecal samples of the Straw-Coloured Fruit Bat (Eidolon helvum in Obafemi Awolowo University (OAU, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akobi Babatunji

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bats (Chiroptera are one of the most diverse groups of mammals which carry out important ecological and agricultural functions that are beneficial to humans. However, they are increasingly recognized as natural vectors for a number of zoonotic pathogens and favourable hosts for zoonotic infections. Large populations of the Straw-Coloured Fruit Bat (Eidolon helvum colonize the main campus of the Obafemi Awolowo University (OAU, Ile-Ife, Nigeria, but the public health implications of faecal contamination and pollution by these flying mammals is unknown. This study characterized S. aureus obtained from faecal samples of these migratory mammals with a view to determining the clonal types of the isolates, and to investigate the possibility of these flying animals as potential reservoir for zoonotic S. aureus infections. Results One hundred and seven (107 S. aureus isolates were recovered from 560 faecal samples in eleven roosting sites from January 2008 to February 2010. A large proportion of the isolates were susceptible to antibiotics, and molecular characterization of 70 isolates showed that 65 (92.9% were assigned in coagulase type VI, while accessory gene typing classified 69 isolates into the following: type I (12; 17.1%, type II (3; 4.3%, type III (1; 1.4% and type IV (53; 75.7%. On the whole, the isolates were grouped in five (A-E main genotypes. Of the ten representative isolates selected for multilocus sequence typing (MLST, nine isolates were assigned with new sequence types: ST1725, ST1726, ST1727, ST2463-ST2467 and ST2470. Phylogenetic analysis provided evidence that S. aureus isolates in group C were closely related with ST1822 and associated clones identified in African monkeys, and group D isolates with ST75, ST883 and ST1223. The two groups exhibited remarkable genetic diversity compared to the major S. aureus clade. Conclusions Antibiotic resistance in faecal S. aureus isolates of E. helvum is low and multiple

  8. Phenomenon of Cloning and specificity of its usage

    OpenAIRE

    Yusubova, Zyliya; Zeremskaya, Yuliya Aleksandrovna

    2017-01-01

    Cloning is studied by different branches of science. Medicine is interested in cloning because of its ability to transplant special tissues and organs, genetics - with the purpose of studying heredity and succession, sociology deals with moral and ethic aspects of the phenomenon. The paper is devoted to the study of cloning, its special features and usage in different spheres of social life. The article represents main types of cloning, specificity of vegetative and animal cloning and problem...

  9. Cloning mice and men: prohibiting the use of iPS cells for human reproductive cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Bernard; Parham, Lindsay; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cedars, Marcelle; Conklin, Bruce; Fisher, Susan; Gates, Elena; Giudice, Linda; Halme, Dina Gould; Hershon, William; Kriegstein, Arnold; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Wagner, Richard

    2010-01-08

    The use of iPSCs and tetraploid complementation for human reproductive cloning would raise profound ethical objections. Professional standards and laws that ban human reproductive cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer should be revised to also forbid it by other methods, such as iPSCs via tetraploid complementation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Update on the First Cloned Dog and Outlook for Canine Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Goo; Lee, ByeongChun

    2015-10-01

    As man's best friend, dogs have an important position in human society. Ten years ago, we reported the first cloned dog, and his birth has raised various scientific issues, such as those related to health, reproduction, and life span. He has developed without any unique health issues. In this article, we summarize and present perspectives on canine cloning.

  11. Benefits and problems with cloning animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L C; Bordignon, V; Babkine, M; Fecteau, G; Keefer, C

    2000-01-01

    Animal cloning is becoming a useful technique for producing transgenic farm animals and is likely to be used to produce clones from valuable adults. Other applications will also undoubtedly be discovered in the near future, such as for preserving endangered breeds and species. Although cloning promises great advantages for commerce and research alike, its outcome is not always certain due to high pregnancy losses and high morbidity and mortality during the neonatal period. Research into the mechanisms involved in the reprogramming of the nucleus is being conducted throughout the world in an attempt to better understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in correcting these problems. Although the cause of these anomalies remains mostly unknown, similar phenotypes have been observed in calves derived through in vitro fertilization, suggesting that culture conditions are involved in these phenomena. In the meantime, veterinarians and theriogenologists have an important role to play in improving the efficiency of cloning by finding treatments to assure normal gestation to term and to develop preventative and curative care for cloned neonates. Images Figure 1. PMID:11143925

  12. Elephant grass clones for silage production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rerisson José Cipriano dos Santos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ensiling warm-season grasses often requires wilting due to their high moisture content, and the presence of low-soluble sugars in these grasses usually demands the use of additives during the ensiling process. This study evaluated the bromatological composition of the fodder and silage from five Pennisetum sp. clones (IPA HV 241, IPA/UFRPE Taiwan A-146 2.114, IPA/UFRPE Taiwan A-146 2.37, Elephant B, and Mott. The contents of 20 Polyvinyl chloride (PVC silos, which were opened after 90 days of storage, were used for the bromatological analysis and the evaluation of the pH, nitrogen, ammonia, buffer capacity, soluble carbohydrates, and fermentation coefficients. The effluent losses, gases and dry matter recovery were also calculated. Although differences were observed among the clones (p < 0.05 for the concentrations of dry matter, insoluble nitrogen in acid detergents, insoluble nitrogen in neutral detergents, soluble carbohydrates, fermentation coefficients, and in vitro digestibility in the forage before ensiling, no differences were observed for most of these variables after ensiling. All of the clones were efficient in the fermentation process. The IPA/UFRPE TAIWAN A-146 2.37 clone, however, presented a higher dry matter concentration and the best fermentation coefficient, resulting in a better silage quality, compared to the other clones.

  13. [Infections caused by multi-resistant Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus spp.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantón, Rafael; Ruiz-Garbajosa, Patricia

    2013-10-01

    Methicillin -resistant Staphylocccus aureus (MRSA) and multirresistant entorococci are still problematic in nosocomial infections and new challenges have emerged for their containment. MRSA has increased the multiresistant profile; it has been described vancomycin and linezolid resistant isolates and isolates with decreased daptomycin susceptibility. Moreover, new clones (ST398) have emerged, initially associated with piggeries, and new mec variants (mecC) with livestock origin that escape to the detection with current molecular methods based on mecA gene have been detected. In enterococci, linzeolid resistant isolates and isolates with deceased susceptibility to daptomycin have been described. Moreover, ampicillin resistant Enterococcus faecium due to β-lactamase production has been recently found in Europe. Control of MRSA isolates and multiresistant enteroccocci should combined antibiotic stewardship strategies and epidemiological measures, including detection of colonized patients in order to reduce colonization pressure and their transmission. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Isolation and molecular characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from public transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwao, Yasuhisa; Yabe, Shizuka; Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Nishiyama, Akihito; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) not only causes disease in hospitals, but also in the community. The characteristics of MRSA transmission in the environment remain uncertain. In this study, MRSA were isolated from public transport in Tokyo and Niigata, Japan. Of 349 trains examined, eight (2.3%) were positive for MRSA. The MRSA isolated belonged to sequence types (STs) 5, 8, 88, and 89, and included community infection-associated ST8 MRSA (with novel type IV staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec) and the ST5 New York/Japan hospital clone. The data indicate that public transport could contribute to the spread of community-acquired MRSA, and awareness of this mode of transmission is necessary. © 2012 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  15. Scientific hazards of human reproductive 'cloning'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lorraine E

    2003-05-01

    The scientific and clinical professional societies and associations covering the remit of Human Fertility are unanimously opposed to human reproductive 'cloning'. This article describes the main scientific objections to human reproductive 'cloning'. Data collected from numerous studies in a range of animal species indicate a high incidence of fetal defects, a stillbirth rate typically of more than 90% and a lack of adequate information on postnatal development. These concerns are exacerbated by misconceptions about the current ability to screen preimplantation embryos for 'cloning-induced' defects. Scientists and clinicians are sometimes treated with mistrust in the eyes of the public and media over such issues, perhaps because scientific information is not as well communicated as it might be. The duty of reproductive specialists is to convey the limits of their knowledge on this issue to the public and policymakers.

  16. Human reproductive cloning and reasons for deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, D A

    2008-08-01

    Human reproductive cloning provides the possibility of genetically related children for persons for whom present technologies are ineffective. I argue that the desire for genetically related children is not, by itself, a sufficient reason to engage in human reproductive cloning. I show this by arguing that the value underlying the desire for genetically related children implies a tension between the parent and the future child. This tension stems from an instance of a deprivation and violates a general principle of reasons for deprivation. Alternative considerations, such as a right to procreative autonomy, do not appear helpful in making the case for human reproductive cloning merely on the basis of the desire for genetically related children.

  17. Quantum Nonadiabatic Cloning of Entangled Coherent States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmaylov, Artur F; Joubert-Doriol, Loïc

    2017-04-20

    We propose a systematic approach to the basis set extension for nonadiabatic dynamics of entangled combination of nuclear coherent states (CSs) evolving according to the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP). The TDVP provides a rigorous framework for fully quantum nonadiabatic dynamics of closed systems; however, the quality of results strongly depends on available basis functions. Starting with a single nuclear CS replicated vertically on all electronic states, our approach clones this function when replicas of the CS on different electronic states experience increasingly different forces. Created clones move away from each other (decohere), extending the basis set. To determine a moment for cloning, we introduce generalized forces based on derivatives that maximally contribute to a variation of the total quantum action and thus account for entanglement of all basis functions.

  18. Ultra-low background DNA cloning system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Goto

    Full Text Available Yeast-based in vivo cloning is useful for cloning DNA fragments into plasmid vectors and is based on the ability of yeast to recombine the DNA fragments by homologous recombination. Although this method is efficient, it produces some by-products. We have developed an "ultra-low background DNA cloning system" on the basis of yeast-based in vivo cloning, by almost completely eliminating the generation of by-products and applying the method to commonly used Escherichia coli vectors, particularly those lacking yeast replication origins and carrying an ampicillin resistance gene (Amp(r. First, we constructed a conversion cassette containing the DNA sequences in the following order: an Amp(r 5' UTR (untranslated region and coding region, an autonomous replication sequence and a centromere sequence from yeast, a TRP1 yeast selectable marker, and an Amp(r 3' UTR. This cassette allowed conversion of the Amp(r-containing vector into the yeast/E. coli shuttle vector through use of the Amp(r sequence by homologous recombination. Furthermore, simultaneous transformation of the desired DNA fragment into yeast allowed cloning of this DNA fragment into the same vector. We rescued the plasmid vectors from all yeast transformants, and by-products containing the E. coli replication origin disappeared. Next, the rescued vectors were transformed into E. coli and the by-products containing the yeast replication origin disappeared. Thus, our method used yeast- and E. coli-specific "origins of replication" to eliminate the generation of by-products. Finally, we successfully cloned the DNA fragment into the vector with almost 100% efficiency.

  19. Stilbenes reduce Staphylococcus aureus hemolysis, biofilm formation, and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kayeon; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Ryu, Shi Yong; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2014-09-01

    Stilbenoids have a broad range of beneficial health effects. On the other hand, the emergence of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus presents a worldwide problem that requires new antibiotics or nonantibiotic strategies. S. aureus produces α-hemolysin (a pore-forming cytotoxin) that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of sepsis and pneumonia. Furthermore, the biofilms formed by S. aureus constitute a mechanism of antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we investigated the hemolytic and antibiofilm activities of 10 stilbene-related compounds against S. aureus. trans-Stilbene and resveratrol at 10 μg/mL were found to markedly inhibit human blood hemolysis by S. aureus, and trans-stilbene also inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation without affecting its bacterial growth. Furthermore, trans-stilbene and resveratrol attenuated S. aureus virulence in vivo in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which is normally killed by S. aureus. Transcriptional analysis showed that trans-stilbene repressed the α-hemolysin hla gene and the intercellular adhesion locus (icaA and icaD) in S. aureus, and this finding was in line with observed reductions in virulence and biofilm formation. In addition, vitisin B, a stilbenoid tetramer, at 1 μg/mL was observed to significantly inhibit human blood hemolysis by S. aureus.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus shifts towards commensalism in response to Corynebacterium species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew M Ramsey

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus–human interactions result in a continuum of outcomes from commensalism to pathogenesis. S. aureus is a clinically important pathogen that asymptomatically colonizes ~25% of humans as a member of the nostril and skin microbiota, where it resides with other bacteria including commensal Corynebacterium species. Commensal Corynebacterium spp. are also positively correlated with S. aureus in chronic polymicrobial diabetic foot infections, distinct from acute monomicrobial S. aureus infections. Recent work by our lab and others indicates that microbe-microbe interactions between S. aureus and human skin/nasal commensals, including Corynebacterium species, affect S. aureus behavior and fitness. Thus, we hypothesized that S. aureus interactions with Corynebacterium spp. diminish S. aureus virulence. We tested this by assaying for changes in S. aureus gene expression during in vitro mono- versus coculture with Corynebacterium striatum, a common skin and nasal commensal. We observed a broad shift in S. aureus gene transcription during in vitro growth with C. striatum, including increased transcription of genes known to exhibit increased expression during human nasal colonization and decreased transcription of virulence genes. S. aureus uses several regulatory pathways to transition between commensal and pathogenic states. One of these, the quorum signal accessory gene regulator (agr system, was strongly inhibited in response to Corynebacterium spp. Phenotypically, S. aureus exposed to C. striatum exhibited increased adhesion to epithelial cells, reflecting a commensal state, and decreased hemolysin activity, reflecting an attenuation of virulence. Consistent with this, S. aureus displayed diminished fitness in experimental in vivo coinfection with C. striatum when compared to monoinfection. These data support a model in which S. aureus shifts from virulence towards a commensal state when exposed to commensal Corynebacterium species.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus Shifts toward Commensalism in Response to Corynebacterium Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Matthew M.; Freire, Marcelo O.; Gabrilska, Rebecca A.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.; Lemon, Katherine P.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus–human interactions result in a continuum of outcomes from commensalism to pathogenesis. S. aureus is a clinically important pathogen that asymptomatically colonizes ~25% of humans as a member of the nostril and skin microbiota, where it resides with other bacteria including commensal Corynebacterium species. Commensal Corynebacterium spp. are also positively correlated with S. aureus in chronic polymicrobial diabetic foot infections, distinct from acute monomicrobial S. aureus infections. Recent work by our lab and others indicates that microbe–microbe interactions between S. aureus and human skin/nasal commensals, including Corynebacterium species, affect S. aureus behavior and fitness. Thus, we hypothesized that S. aureus interactions with Corynebacterium spp. diminish S. aureus virulence. We tested this by assaying for changes in S. aureus gene expression during in vitro mono- versus coculture with Corynebacterium striatum, a common skin and nasal commensal. We observed a broad shift in S. aureus gene transcription during in vitro growth with C. striatum, including increased transcription of genes known to exhibit increased expression during human nasal colonization and decreased transcription of virulence genes. S. aureus uses several regulatory pathways to transition between commensal and pathogenic states. One of these, the quorum signal accessory gene regulator (agr) system, was strongly inhibited in response to Corynebacterium spp. Phenotypically, S. aureus exposed to C. striatum exhibited increased adhesion to epithelial cells, reflecting a commensal state, and decreased hemolysin activity, reflecting an attenuation of virulence. Consistent with this, S. aureus displayed diminished fitness in experimental in vivo coinfection with C. striatum when compared to monoinfection. These data support a model in which S. aureus shifts from virulence toward a commensal state when exposed to commensal Corynebacterium species. PMID:27582729

  2. Cloning arbuscule-related genes from mycorrhizas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burleigh, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Until recently little was known about the identity of the genes expressed in the arbuscules of mycorrhizas, due in part to problems associated with cloning genes from the tissues of an obligate symbiont. However, the combination of advanced molecular techniques, innovative use of the materials...... available and fortuitous cloning has resulted in the recent identification of a number of arbuscule-related genes. This article provides a brief summary of the genes involved in arbuscule development, function and regulation, and the techniques used to study them. Molecular techniques include differential...

  3. Reproduction: widespread cloning in echinoderm larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaves, Alexandra A; Palmer, A Richard

    2003-09-11

    Asexual reproduction by free-living invertebrate larvae is a rare and enigmatic phenomenon and, although it is known to occur in sea stars and brittle stars, it has not been detected in other echinoderms despite more than a century of intensive study. Here we describe spontaneous larval cloning in three species from two more echinoderm classes: a sea cucumber (Holothuroidea), a sand dollar and a sea urchin (Echinoidea). Larval cloning may therefore be an ancient ability of echinoderms and possibly of deutero-stomes - the group that includes echinoderms, acorn worms, sea squirts and vertebrates.

  4. Isolation, molecular characteristics and disinfection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from ICU units in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Guilherme B; Souza, Simone G; Lob O, Tassia N; Da Silva, Danilo C C; Sousa, Daniel S; Oliveira, Pollianna S; Santos, Verena M; Amorim, Aline T; Farias, S Vio T; Cruz, Mariluze P; Yatsuda, Regiane; Marques, Lucas M

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to isolate S. aureus strains resistant to antibiotics, characterize the genotype profiles of resistance staphylococci, and evaluate the efficacy of antiseptic agents and disinfectants used in two public hospitals of Vitoria da Conquista, Bahia, Brazil. Clinical samples were obtained from ICU environments and equipment surfaces in two public hospitals in Vitoria da Conquista. Broth cultures were plated onto mannitol salt agar, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by the broth microdilution method according to CLSI. MRSA strains were submitted to PCR for detecting the mecA gene. PCR products were purified and sequenced for SCCmec type identification. Moreover, the strains were tested for efficacy of different disinfectant solutions. S. aureus were isolated from 31 and 67 sites in each hospital, respectively. Among the isolates from hospital 1, 07 (22.6%) were resistant to oxacillin while 28 (41.8%) were resistant in hospital 2. Thirty-one were positive for the mecA gene. All isolates showed SCCmec type III genotype characteristics of the Brazilian epidemic clone. In disinfectant tests, sodium hypochlorite (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0%), 2% chlorhexidine gluconate, quaternary ammonium, peracetic acid and formaldehyde were effective against the isolates tested. The strains showed higher resistance to vinegar (4% acetic acid), alcohol and glutaraldehyde. The findings of this study should assist in reducing the occurrence of nosocomial infections and therefore the morbidity, mortality and socio-economic burden caused by prolonged hospitalization.

  5. First description of PVL-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in wild boar meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraushaar, Britta; Fetsch, Alexandra

    2014-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important food-borne pathogen due to the ability of enterotoxigenic strains to produce staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) in food. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) is also an important pathogen for humans, causing severe and hard to treat diseases in hospitals and in the community due to its multiresistance against antimicrobials. In particular, strains harbouring genes encoding for the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) toxin are of concern from a public health perspective as they are usually capable of causing severe skin and soft tissue infections (sSSTIs) and occasionally necrotizing pneumonia which is associated with high mortality. This is the first report on the detection of MRSA with genes encoding for PVL in wild boar meat. Among the 28 MRSA isolated from wild boar meat in the course of a national monitoring programme in Germany, seven harboured PVL-encoding genes. Six of the isolates were identical according to the results of spa-, MLST-, microarray- and PFGE-typing. They could be assigned to the epidemic MRSA clone USA300. Epidemiological investigations revealed that people handling the food were the most likely common source of contamination with these MRSA. These findings call again for suitable hygienic measures at all processing steps of the food production chain. The results of the study underline that monitoring along the food chain is essential to closely characterise the total burden of MRSA for public health. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Nationwide molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus responsible for horse infections in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérin, François; Fines-Guyon, Marguerite; Meignen, Pierrick; Delente, Géraldine; Fondrinier, Caroline; Bourdon, Nancy; Cattoir, Vincent; Léon, Albertine

    2017-05-03

    The epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated in horse infections is not well documented, especially in France. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of MRSA isolates in horse infections from 2007 to 2013 in France and to characterize phenotypically and genotypically this collection. Out of 1393 S. aureus horse isolates, 85 (6.1%) were confirmed to be MRSA. Interestingly, the prevalence of MRSA significantly increased from 2007-2009 to 2010-2013 (0.7 vs. 9.5%, P MRSA strains belonged mainly since not all belong to two sequence types (STs): ST398 (53/85, 62.4%) and ST8 (28/85, 32.9%). It is worth to note that all ST398 MRSA isolates were detected in the period 2010-2013. Other molecular typing methods were also used, such SCC mec analysis, spa typing and rep-PCR (Diversilab, bioMérieux). All these four techniques were in good agreement, with spa typing and rep-PCR being more discriminative than MLST and SCC mec typing. This study is the first epidemiological study in France with extensive characterization of MRSA isolates associated with horse infections in stud farms. It shows that there is a significant increase of MRSA prevalence between 2007 and 2013, which mainly results from the spread of ST398 clones. It also highlights the importance of horses as a potential reservoir of important antimicrobial resistance genes.

  7. Screening and characterization of Staphylococcus aureus from ophthalmology clinic surfaces: a proposed surveillance tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reem, Rachel E.; Van Balen, Joany; Hoet, Armando E.; Cebulla, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To screen environmental surfaces of an outpatient ophthalmic clinic for methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA); to identify the most commonly contaminated surfaces; and to phenotype and genotype all collected isolates Design A single institution, one-year prospective environmental study Methods Commonly touched surfaces from examination rooms and common areas were targeted and sampled on a quarterly basis for one year. Samples were collected using electrostatic cloths and swabs. S. aureus was isolated using non-selective and selective media. Morphological characteristics and standard biological testing were used to confirm staphylococcal species. S. aureus isolates were phenotypically (Kirby-Bauer method) and genotypically characterized (mecA confirmation, SCCmec typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis). Dendrogram analysis was used to establish genetic relatedness between the isolates. Results Of 112 total samples, 27 (24%) and 5 (4%) were MSSA- and MRSA-positive, respectively. Both community-associated (SCCmec IV, USA300) and hospital-associated (SCCmec II, USA100) MRSA isolates were found. No single surface remained consistently positive with the same isolate over time and molecular analysis demonstrated high levels of diversity among isolates. Doorknobs, slit-lamp head/chinrests, and computer keyboards were frequently contaminated. Conclusions The proposed surveillance protocol successfully allowed the detection of both MSSA and MRSA contaminating important high-touch surfaces in a representative ophthalmology clinic. Frequently contaminated surfaces must be targeted for routine cleaning and disinfection as a there is a constant introduction of clones over time. Hence, other clinics may consider implementing and adapting surveillance tools, as the one here described, to help them control these important nosocomial pathogens. PMID:24412125

  8. Clonal diversity of Staphylococcus aureus originating from the small ruminants goats and sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porrero, M Concepción; Hasman, Henrik; Vela, Ana I; Fernández-Garayzábal, Jose F; Domínguez, Lucas; Aarestrup, Frank M

    2012-04-23

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen in humans and many animal species. The prevalence of different clonal types in animal species remains largely unknown. We analyzed 267 S. aureus from intramammary infections in goats (47) and sheep (220) by spa typing, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and antimicrobial susceptibility. The most frequent spa types in goats were t337 (N=9), t759 (N=6) and t1534 (N=5). Sheep isolates mainly belonged to spa types t1534 (N=72), t2678 (N=29) and t3576 (N=20). Eighteen novel spa-types were observed; two from goat strains, 13 from sheep and three in both species. The majority of the goat strains grouped in MLST CC133 (N=10) and ST522 (N=10), followed by CC9 (N=9), while the majority of the sheep strains were of ST522 (N=108) followed by CC133 (N=86) and CC130 (N=11). Nine new MLST types were detected; three in goat and sheep isolates (ST1739, ST1758 and ST1780), two identified in goats only (ST1740 and ST2061) and four in sheep only (ST1742, ST1743, ST1781 and ST2011). Strains showed resistance below 20% against penicillin and tetracycline; a strong association between CC-types and penicillin resistance was observed. No resistance was detected to cefoxitin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, rifampicin and vancomycin. This study suggests that ST522 is the most common S. aureus clone associated with small ruminants followed by CC133. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. MRSA and multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in U.S. retail meats, 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Beilei; Mukherjee, Sampa; Hsu, Chih-Hao; Davis, Johnnie A; Tran, Thu Thuy T; Yang, Qianru; Abbott, Jason W; Ayers, Sherry L; Young, Shenia R; Crarey, Emily T; Womack, Niketta A; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F

    2017-04-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been detected in retail meats, although large-scale studies are scarce. We conducted a one-year survey in 2010-2011 within the framework of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System. Among 3520 retail meats collected from eight U.S. states, 982 (27.9%) contained S. aureus and 66 (1.9%) were positive for MRSA. Approximately 10.4% (107/1032) of S. aureus isolates, including 37.2% (29/78) of MRSA, were multidrug-resistant (MDRSA). Turkey had the highest MRSA prevalence (3.5%), followed by pork (1.9%), beef (1.7%), and chicken (0.3%). Whole-genome sequencing was performed for all 66 non-redundant MRSA. Among five multilocus sequence types identified, ST8 (72.7%) and ST5 (22.7%) were most common and livestock-associated MRSA ST398 was assigned to one pork isolate. Eleven spa types were represented, predominately t008 (43.9%) and t2031 (22.7%). All four types of meats harbored t008, whereas t2031 was recovered from turkey only. The majority of MRSA (84.8%) possessed SCCmec IV and 62.1% harbored Panton-Valentine leukocidin. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that all ST8 MRSA belonged to the predominant human epidemic clone USA300, and others included USA100 and USA200. We conclude that a diverse MRSA population was present in U.S. retail meats, albeit at low prevalence. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Staphylococcus epidermidis ΔSortase A strain elicits protective immunity against Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chao; Wang, Jun; Hu, Yifang; Wang, Peng; Zou, Lili

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are two of the most significant opportunistic human pathogens, causing medical implant and nosocomial infections worldwide. These bacteria contain surface proteins that play crucial roles in multiple biological processes. It has become apparent that they have evolved a number of unique mechanisms by which they can immobilise proteins on their surface. Notably, a conserved cell membrane-anchored enzyme, sortase A (SrtA), can catalyse the covalent attachment of precursor bacterial cell wall-attached proteins to peptidoglycan. Considering its indispensable role in anchoring substrates to the cell wall and its effects on virulence, SrtA has attracted great attention. In this study, a 549-bp gene was cloned from a pathogenic S. epidermidis strain, YC-1, which shared high identity with srtA from other Staphylococcus spp. A mutant strain, YC-1ΔsrtA, was then constructed by allelic exchange mutagenesis. The direct survival rate assay suggested that YC-1ΔsrtA had a lower survival capacity in healthy mice blood compare with the wild-type strain, indicating that the deletion of srtA affects the virulence and infectious capacity of S. epidermidis YC-1. YC-1ΔsrtA was then administered via intraperitoneal injection and it provided a relative percent survival value of 72.7 % in mice against S. aureus TC-1 challenge. These findings demonstrate the possbility that YC-1ΔsrtA might be used as a live attenuated vaccine to produce cross-protection against S. aureus.

  11. Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Stefania; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Lindsay, Jodi A

    2012-01-01

    decisions with regard to harmonisation of typing methods. A stratified, three-level organisation of testing laboratories was proposed: local; regional; and national. The functions of, and testing methodology used by, each laboratory were defined. The group consensus was to recommend spa and staphylococcal......This article reviews recent findings on the global epidemiology of healthcare-acquired/associated (HA), community-acquired/associated (CA) and livestock-associated (LA) meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and aims to reach a consensus regarding the harmonisation of typing methods...... health. Continuous efforts to understand the changing epidemiology of S. aureus infection in humans and animals are therefore necessary, not only for appropriate antimicrobial treatment and effective infection control but also to monitor the evolution of the species. The group made several consensus...

  12. Mechanisms of Gentamicin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Three clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to gentamicin and other aminoglycosides have been examined for antibiotic modifying enzymes. The strains contain a number of these enzymes, most of them similar to those commonly found in aminoglycoside-resistant gram-negative strains. All three strains (and a transductant derived from one of them) contain two enzymes mediating gentamicin resistance, an aminoglycoside 6′-N-acetyltransferase and a novel enzyme, gentamicin phosphotransferase. PMID:836013

  13. [Staphylococcus aureus in bulk milk samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benda, P; Vyletĕlová, M

    1995-07-01

    In the years 1993-1994 the occurrence of Staphylococcus aureus was investigated in bulk milk samples in the area where a Baby Food Factory at Zábreh in Moravia is located, and in Bruntál, Zlín and Policka districts. Evaluation of the results was based on ECC Directive 92/46, while the dynamics of S. aureus presence was followed for the whole period of observation as well as in the particular seasons. A total of 4,485 samples was processed. Out of these, 50.7% contained less than 100 CFU/ml of S. aureus, 41.4% contained 100-500 CFU/ml, 6.73% 500-2,000 CFU/ml and 1.14% contained more than 2,000 CFU/ml (Fig. 1). The samples were divided into three categories: private new-established farms, cooperative and State-owned enterprises in the area of the Zábĕh Factory and others (Zlín, Bruntál and Policka districts). There were highly significant differences in the content of staphylococci (P = 0.01%) between the three categories of samples. Ninety-eight percent of samples from private farms, 96% samples from the Zábreh Factory area and 85% of the other samples comply with the regulation EEC 92/64 (Tab. I) for raw cow's milk for the manufacture of products "made with raw milk" whose manufacturing process does not involve any heat treatment (Fig. 2). The occurrence of S. aureus in the Zábreh Factory area shows an expressive seasonal dynamics (P = 0.005%) with maximum values in winter months (December-March) and minimum values in summer months (July-October)-Fig. 3. The same relationship can be seen on more extensive data files for the particular producers (Fig. 4).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. [Change in drug resistance of Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Liu, Yan; Luo, Yan-Ping; Liu, Chang-Ting

    2013-11-01

    To analyze the change in drug resistance of Staphylococcus aureus (SAU) in the PLA general hospital from January 2008 to December 2012, and to provide solid evidence to support the rational use of antibiotics for clinical applications. The SAU strains isolated from clinical samples in the hospital were collected and subjected to the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion test. The results were assessed based on the 2002 American National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) guidelines. SAU strains were mainly isolated from sputum, urine, blood and wound excreta and distributed in penology, neurology wards, orthopedics and surgery ICU wards. Except for glycopeptide drugs, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) had a higher drug resistance rate than those of the other drugs and had significantly more resistance than methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (P resistance, we discovered a gradual increase in drug resistance to fourteen test drugs during the last five years. Drug resistance rate of SAU stayed at a higher level over the last five years; moreover, the detection ratio of MRSA keeps rising year by year. It is crucial for physicians to use antibiotics rationally and monitor the change in drug resistance in a dynamic way.

  15. Immunopathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus pulmonary infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Dane; Prince, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common human pathogen highly evolved as both a component of the commensal flora and as a major cause of invasive infection. Severe respiratory infection due to staphylococci has been increasing due to the prevalence of more virulent USA300 CA-MRSA strains in the general population. The ability of S. aureus to adapt to the milieu of the respiratory tract has facilitated its emergence as a respiratory pathogen. Its metabolic versatility, the ability to scavenge iron, coordinate gene expression, and the horizontal acquisition of useful genetic elements have all contributed to its success as a component of the respiratory flora, in hospitalized patients, as a complication of influenza and in normal hosts. The expression of surface adhesins facilitates its persistence in the airways. In addition, the highly sophisticated interactions of the multiple S. aureus virulence factors, particularly the α-hemolysin and protein A, with diverse immune effectors in the lung such as ADAM10, TNFR1, EGFR, immunoglobulin, and complement all contribute to the pathogenesis of staphylococcal pneumonia. PMID:22037948

  16. Comparison of the BBL CHROMagar Staph aureus agar medium to conventional media for detection of Staphylococcus aureus in respiratory samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flayhart, Diane; Lema, Clara; Borek, Anita; Carroll, Karen C

    2004-08-01

    Screening for Staphylococcus aureus has become routine in certain patient populations. This study is the first clinical evaluation of the BBL CHROMagar Staph aureus agar (CSA) medium (BD Diagnostics, Sparks, Md.) for detection of S. aureus in nasal surveillance cultures and in respiratory samples from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. S. aureus colonies appear mauve on CSA. Other organisms are inhibited or produce a distinctly different colony color. S. aureus was identified from all media by slide coagulase, exogenous DNase, and mannitol fermentation assays. Susceptibility testing was performed using the agar dilution method. A total of 679 samples were evaluated. All samples were inoculated onto CSA. Nasal surveillance cultures were inoculated onto sheep blood agar (SBA) (BD Diagnostics), and samples from CF patients were inoculated onto mannitol salt agar (MSA) (BD Diagnostics). Of the 679 samples cultured, 200 organisms produced a mauve color on CSA (suspicious for S. aureus) and 180 were positive for S. aureus on SBA or MSA. Of 200 CSA-positive samples 191 were identified as S. aureus. Nine mauve colonies were slide coagulase negative and were subsequently identified as Staphylococcus lugdunensis (one), Staphylococcus epidermidis (three), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (one), and Corynebacterium species (four). CSA improved the ability to detect S. aureus by recovering 12 S. aureus isolates missed by conventional media. Of the 192 S. aureus isolates recovered, 122 were methicillin susceptible and 70 were methicillin resistant. Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of CSA in this study were 99.5 and 98%, respectively. There was no difference in the performance of the slide coagulase test or in susceptibility testing performed on S. aureus recovered from CSA compared to SBA or MSA. Our data support the use of CSA in place of standard culture media for detection of S. aureus in heavily contaminated respiratory samples.

  17. Magnetic nanoparticle targeted hyperthermia of cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Ho; Yamayoshi, Itsukyo; Mathew, Steven; Liln, Hubert; Nayfach, Joseph; Simon, Scott I.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of wound infections that do not adequately respond to standard-of-care antimicrobial treatment has been increasing. To address this challenge, a novel antimicrobial magnetic thermotherapy platform has been developed in which a high-amplitude, high-frequency, alternating magnetic field (AMF) is used to rapidly heat magnetic nanoparticles that are bound to Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The antimicrobial efficacy of this platform was evaluated in the treatment of both an in vitro culture model of S. aureus biofilm and a mouse model of cutaneous S. aureus infection. We demonstrated that an antibody-targeted magnetic nanoparticle bound to S. aureus was effective at thermally inactivating S. aureus and achieving accelerated wound healing without causing tissue injury. PMID:23149904

  18. Changes in the gut microbiota of cloned and non-cloned control pigs during development of obesity: gut microbiota during development of obesity in cloned pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rebecca; Andersen, Anders Daniel; Mølbak, Lars

    2013-01-01

    suitable for a diet-intervention study. Cloning of pigs may be an attractive way to reduce genetic influences when investigating the effect of diet and obesity on different physiological sites. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the changes in the composition of the gut microbiota of cloned vs.......0001) and in non-cloned control pigs (r=0.9, Pcomposition or variability of the fecal microbiota between the cloned pigs or between cloned and non-cloned control......Background Obesity induced by a high-caloric diet has previously been associated with changes in the gut microbiota in mice and in humans. In this study, pigs were cloned to minimize genetic and biological variation among the animals with the aim of developing a controlled metabolomic model...

  19. Cloning and characterization of functional keratinassociated protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) 5-4 which belongs to keratin-associated protein (KRTAP) type 5 family has two major groups: high/ultrahigh cysteine (HS) and high glycine-tyrosine (HGT). Based on bioinformatic prediction, we experimentally cloned a fragment containingan open reading frame of 1849 bp from maize, ...

  20. Cloning and molecular characterization of glyceraldehyde-3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-05-31

    May 31, 2010 ... gene encoding this enzyme has been cloned and charac- terized in several filamentous fungi such as Cryphonectria parasitica (Choi and Nuss, 1990), L. edodes (Hirano et al.,. 1999), M. circinelloides (Wolff and Arnau, 2002), Phaeo- sphaeria nodorum (Ueng et al., 2003), Pleurotus sajor- caju (Jeong et al., ...

  1. Information cloning of harmonic oscillator coherent states

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We show that in the case of unknown harmonic oscillator coherent states it is possible to achieve what we call perfect information cloning. By this we mean that it is still possible to make arbitrary number of copies of a state which has exactly the same information content as the original unknown coherent state.

  2. Cloning, expression, purification and antigenic evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Streptococcus pyogenes produce an extracellular hyaluronidase which is associated with the spread of the organism during infection. Enzyme hyaluronidase is capable of degrading hyaluronic acid. The aim of the present study was to clone and express antigenic regions of the hylA of S.pyogenes in Escherichia coli.

  3. Cloning and characterization of functional keratin- associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-04-10

    Apr 10, 2012 ... Full Length Research Paper. Cloning and characterization of functional keratin- associated protein 5-4 gene in maize. Lin Yang, Feng-Ling Fu, Long-Qun Deng, Shu-Feng Zhou, Tai-Ming Yong and Wan-Chen Li*. Maize Research Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130, P.R. ...

  4. No-cloning of quantum steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ching-Yi; Lambert, Neill; Liao, Teh-Lu; Nori, Franco; Li, Che-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering allows two parties to verify their entanglement, even if one party’s measurements are untrusted. This concept has not only provided new insights into the nature of non-local spatial correlations in quantum mechanics, but also serves as a resource for one-sided device-independent quantum information tasks. Here, we investigate how EPR steering behaves when one-half of a maximally entangled pair of qudits (multidimensional quantum systems) is cloned by a universal cloning machine. We find that EPR steering, as verified by a criterion based on the mutual information between qudits, can only be found in one of the copy subsystems but not both. We prove that this is also true for the single-system analogue of EPR steering. We find that this restriction, which we term ‘no-cloning of quantum steering’, elucidates the physical reason why steering can be used to secure sources and channels against cloning-based attacks when implementing quantum communication and quantum computation protocols.

  5. Information cloning of harmonic oscillator coherent states

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We show that in the case of unknown harmonic oscillator coherent statesit is possible to achieve what we call perfect information cloning. By this we mean that it is still possible to make arbitrary number of copies of a state which has exactly the same information content as the original unknown coherent state. By making use ...

  6. Cloning of partial putative gonadotropin hormone receptor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Glycoprotein hormone receptor; gonadotropin receptor; Labeo rohita; luteinizing hormone receptor; mariner transposon; PCR cloning. Abstract. A search for the presence of mariner-like elements in the Labeo rohita genome by polymerase chain reaction led to the amplification of a partial DNA sequence coding ...

  7. Cloning, expression, purification and antigenic evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-31

    Jan 31, 2012 ... Key word: Hyaluronidase gene, cloning, expression of recombinant gene, antigenic region. INTRODUCTION. Group A streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes) is an important species of gram-positive pathogenic extra- cellular bacteria. This bacteria can produce wide range of infectious diseases like ...

  8. Cloning and expression of Phanerochaete chrysosporium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    The Phanerochaete chrysosporium ME446 cbhI.2 cDNA was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli ... demonstrated that two types of mRNA are produced for ... and Technology, Manchester, UK. A 2000-fold-diluted antiserum was able to detect 10 pg of the synthetic CBH peptide. cbhI.2 gene. The sequence data for P.

  9. Metabolomic phenotyping of a cloned pig model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Morten Rahr; Christensen, Kirstine Lykke; Hedemann, Mette Skou

    2011-01-01

    Background Pigs are widely used as models for human physiological changes in intervention studies, because of the close resemblance between human and porcine physiology and the high degree of experimental control when using an animal model. Cloned animals have, in principle, identical genotypes...

  10. Construction of a New Fusion Protein Vector Associated to Fibronectin Binding Protein A and Clumping Factor A derived from Staphylococcus aureus NCTC8325

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Faghri

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of many nosocomial and community acquired infections. According to many reports, antibiotic therapy can not guarantee the eradication of S. aureus infections. Thus designing an adhesin based vaccine could restrain the S. aureus infections. This study designed for construction of a new fusion protein vaccine against S. aureus infections based on adhesin molecules fibronectin binding protein A (FnBPA and clumping factor A (ClfA. Materials and Methods Bioinformatic experiments were performed using Oligo analyzer and DNAMAN softwares. The fragments corresponding to fnbA binding domain and a C-terminal fragment from clfA were amplified from S. aureus NCTC8325 genomic DNA. Purified PCR products and the vector, pET15b, were digested with NcoI and BamHI. The digested PCR products were hybridized together and then ligated to digested vector. Finally incomplete construct was assembled by Taq DNA polymerase. To quick confirmation of cloning procedure the new construct designated pfnbA-clfA was digested with NcoI and BamHI. To further verification, the product was sent for sequencing. Results The data based on bioinformatic analysis showed no homology between fusion protein and human proteins. Digestion of new vector with NcoI and BamHI confirmed the ligation of fusion protein sequence into pET15b. Sequencing results verified the integrity of target sequences. Conclusion This study is the first effort to construct a new fusion protein vector based on S. aureus adhesins using a new design. This project is being continued to study the expression and biological activity of the fusion protein in a cell culture model.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage in hemodialysis centers of Fez, Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    Idrissa Diawara; Khadija Bekhti; Driss Elhabchi; Rachid Saile; Naima Elmdaghri; Mohammed Timinouni; Mohamed Elazhari

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) nasal carriage may be responsible for some serious infections in hemodialyzed patients. The main target of this study was to estimate the prevalence of S. aureus nasal carriage in hemodialysis outpatients and medical staff in hemodialysis centers specifically in Fez region. The second target is to identify the risks of colonization, resistance pattern of isolates and their virulence toxin genes. Patients and Methods Nasal swab specim...

  12. New method for early detection of two random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD groups of Staphylococcus aureus causing bovine mastitis infection in Paraná State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dicezar Gonçalves

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to develop a fast and accurate molecular approach to allow early detection of two RAPD groups of S. aureus causing bovine mastitis. Seventy five S. aureus isolates from infected animals were characterized by RAPD. Genomic fragments isolated from the unique bands present in either group were cloned and sequenced. Based on the DNA sequences, specific primers were designed to allow for the simultaneous detection of either group by multiplex PCR of S. aureus DNA isolated from clinical and subclinical bovine mastitis. Results showed that these proposed primers set could be used to detect various clinical and subclinical S. aureus isolates as well as the detection of the microorganism in bulk milk. Their use as a specific method for effective and early diagnostic tool for S. aureus infection in dairy herds is suggested.Esta pesquisa objetivou o desenvolvimento de técnica rápida e eficiente para diagnosticar precocemente diferentes linhagens de S. aureus causadoras de mastite bovina. Como resultados da metodologia empregada, foram isoladas duas linhagens destas bactérias que causam diferentes tipos de mastite bovina. Os fragmentos de DNA genômico caracterizando ambas as linhagens, por meio de RAPD foram inseridos em vetor plasmidial pGEM e clonados por meio de clones T10 F1 de Escherichia coli. As seqüências obtidas permitiram desenhar iniciadores específicos para o reconhecimento de ambas as linhagens, os quais foram testados com amostras de S. aureus e com outras linhagens próximas. O diagnóstico por meios moleculares, pode ser realizado diretamente de amostras coletadas de rebanhos leiteiros assim como dos equipamentos de ordenha. A significância deste estudo consiste em um rápido e acurado método para localizar animais infectados, representando importante ferramenta no manejo do rebanho, na redução de custos com tratamentos e, rápida recuperação de rebanhos infectados.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus spa type t267, clonal ancestor of bovine subclinical mastitis in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, S D; Velu, D; Bhuvana, M; Krithiga, N; Banerjee, A; Shome, R; Rahman, H; Ghosh, S K; Shome, B R

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the virulence determinants and genetic diversity of Staphylococcus aureus from bovine subclinical mastitis milk. PCR detection of virulence genes was performed for 173 Staph. aureus from bovine subclinical mastitis milk. Further, genetic diversity was analysed by agr and spa typing followed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) of selected isolates. Screening of virulence genes (n = 19) showed the adherence genes viz. fnbA, clfA, fnbB and cna in 98·8, 97·1, 68·8 and 28·3 percentage of isolates, respectively, and 80 strains (46·24%) positive for enterotoxin genes were distributed as 23 toxinotypes, of which, 5 genotypes contained a single gene and the rest comprised of multiple toxin genes. Out of agr type-1 (87·3%), 74·2 per cent belonged to the three predominant spa types. Of 27 spa types, 11 were identified for the first time. The predominant spa types were t267 (N =44), t359 (N = 42) and t6877 (N =29), which together accounts to 66·5 per cent of isolates. PFGE analysis of isolates (N = 45) covering all the spa types revealed mostly similar or closely related pulsotypes. Local emergence of spa type t6877 in herd-dependant manner was observed. spa sequence-based phylogenetic analysis suggested t267 as the ancestral clone of t359, t6877 and other spa types except two. Heterogenous virulence profile of the isolates had no significant association with the genotype. High prevalence of agr group I reaffirms their association with persistent subclinical mastitis. The spa type t267 appears to be the ancestral clone endemic in the region causing subclinical mastitis. In addition, few new spa types have emerged in the geographic region. Gives an insight into the genetic and evolutionary behaviour of Staph. aureus associated with bovine subclinical mastitis in India. The study would pave the way for devising effective control strategy for bovine mastitis in Indian context. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. A porcine model of haematogenous brain infectionwith staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Lærke Boye; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Nielsen, Ole Lerberg

    2012-01-01

    A PORCINE MODEL OF HAEMATOGENOUS BRAIN INFECTION WITH STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS Astrup Lærke1, Agerholm Jørgen1, Nielsen Ole1, Jensen Henrik1, Leifsson Páll1, Iburg Tine2. 1: Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark boye@life.ku.dk 2: National Veterinary Institute......, Uppsala, Sweden Introduction Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) is a common cause of sepsis and brain abscesses in man and a frequent cause of porcine pyaemia. Here we present a porcine model of haematogenous S. aureus-induced brain infection. Materials and Methods Four pigs had two intravenous catheters...

  15. Penetration of antibiotics through Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singh, Rachna; Ray, Pallab; Das, Anindita; Sharma, Meera

    2010-01-01

    This study was carried out to elucidate the role of reduced antibiotic penetration in the resistance of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms to different antibiotics. The biofilms...

  16. Comparison of five tests for identification of Staphylococcus aureus from clinical samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Luijendijk (Ad); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); J.A.J.W. Kluytmans (Jan); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractFive different laboratory tests for the identification of Staphylococcus aureus were compared. Analyses of 271 presumptive S. aureus strains, supplemented with 59 well-defined methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates, were performed. Only the

  17. A dual-site gateway cloning system for simultaneous cloning of two genes for plant transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboulela, Mostafa; Tanaka, Yuji; Nishimura, Kohji; Mano, Shoji; Kimura, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi

    2017-07-01

    Analyses of the subcellular localization of proteins and protein-protein interaction networks are essential to uncover the molecular basis of diverse biological processes in plants. To this end, we have created a Gateway cloning-compatible vector system, named dual-site (DS) Gateway cloning system to allow simple cloning of two expression cassettes in a binary vector and to express them simultaneously in plant cells. In the DS Gateway cloning system, (i) a moderate constitutive nopaline synthase promoter (Pnos), which is much suitable for localization analysis, is used to guide each expression cassette, (ii) four series of vectors with different plant resistance markers are established, (iii) N-terminal fusion with 6 fluorescent proteins and 7 epitope tags is available, (iv) both N- and C-terminal fusions with split enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) are possible for efficient detection of protein-protein interactions using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay. The usefulness of the DS Gateway cloning system has been demonstrated by the analysis of the expression and the subcellular localization patterns of two Golgi proteins in stable expression system using A. thaliana, and by the analyses of interactions between subunits of coat protein complex II (COPII) both in transient and stable expression systems using Japanese leek and A. thaliana, respectively. The DS Gateway cloning system provides a multipurpose, efficient expression tool in gene function analyses and especially suitable for investigating interactions and subcellular localization of two proteins in living plant cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Assessment of genetic diversity in different clones of Dalbergia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-13

    cluster II consisted maximum of twelve clones followed by cluster I (11 clones) and cluster VI (7 clones) whereas clusters. IV, VII and VIII consisted .... Bhatinda Branch Canal 70-71 L/S, Malerkotla, Sangrur, Punjab. 30° 12' N.

  19. Technological Literacy and Human Cloning. Resources in Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how technology educators can deal with advances in human genetics, specifically, cloning. Includes a definition and history of cloning, discusses its benefits, and looks at social concerns and arguments for and against human cloning. Includes classroom activities and websites. (Contains 10 references.) (JOW)

  20. Distribution of quantum Fisher information in asymmetric cloning machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xing; Yao, Yao; Zhou, Lei-Ming; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2014-12-08

    An unknown quantum state cannot be copied and broadcast freely due to the no-cloning theorem. Approximate cloning schemes have been proposed to achieve the optimal cloning characterized by the maximal fidelity between the original and its copies. Here, from the perspective of quantum Fisher information (QFI), we investigate the distribution of QFI in asymmetric cloning machines which produce two nonidentical copies. As one might expect, improving the QFI of one copy results in decreasing the QFI of the other copy. It is perhaps also unsurprising that asymmetric phase-covariant cloning outperforms universal cloning in distributing QFI since a priori information of the input state has been utilized. However, interesting results appear when we compare the distributabilities of fidelity (which quantifies the full information of quantum states), and QFI (which only captures the information of relevant parameters) in asymmetric cloning machines. Unlike the results of fidelity, where the distributability of symmetric cloning is always optimal for any d-dimensional cloning, we find that any asymmetric cloning outperforms symmetric cloning on the distribution of QFI for d ≤ 18, whereas some but not all asymmetric cloning strategies could be worse than symmetric ones when d > 18.

  1. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression of WAG-2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gel Extraction kit (Qiagen, Shanghai, China). Purified PCR products were cloned in a pMD20T vector following the man- ufacturer's instructions (Takara, Dalian, China). Transfor- mants were plated on LB agar containing ampicillin. Clones. Table 1. Primers and probes for WAG-2 cloning and expression from Ae. tauschii.

  2. Molecular cloning of endochitinase 33 (ECH33) gene from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... This study was conducted to screen for the presence of ech33 gene in 80 isolates of Trichoderma. Furthermore, using gene specific primers, ech33 gene were cloned into pTZ57R/T from T. harzanium. IABT1068. The clone was confirmed through PCR amplification and restriction analysis. The clones.

  3. A Gateway MultiSite recombination cloning toolkit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena K Petersen

    Full Text Available The generation of DNA constructs is often a rate-limiting step in conducting biological experiments. Recombination cloning of single DNA fragments using the Gateway system provided an advance over traditional restriction enzyme cloning due to increases in efficiency and reliability. Here we introduce a series of entry clones and a destination vector for use in two, three, and four fragment Gateway MultiSite recombination cloning whose advantages include increased flexibility and versatility. In contrast to Gateway single-fragment cloning approaches where variations are typically incorporated into model system-specific destination vectors, our Gateway MultiSite cloning strategy incorporates variations in easily generated entry clones that are model system-independent. In particular, we present entry clones containing insertions of GAL4, QF, UAS, QUAS, eGFP, and mCherry, among others, and demonstrate their in vivo functionality in Drosophila by using them to generate expression clones including GAL4 and QF drivers for various trp ion channel family members, UAS and QUAS excitatory and inhibitory light-gated ion channels, and QUAS red and green fluorescent synaptic vesicle markers. We thus establish a starter toolkit of modular Gateway MultiSite entry clones potentially adaptable to any model system. An inventory of entry clones and destination vectors for Gateway MultiSite cloning has also been established (www.gatewaymultisite.org.

  4. Early selection of Eucalyptus clones in retrospective nursery test ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Within the framework of the eucalyptus breeding programme in the Congo, two retrospective tests were conducted using mature clones in the field and young cuttings under nursery conditions with two hybrids: 13 clones of Eucalyptus tereticornis* Eucalyptus grandis for the test TC 82-1B and 17 clones of Eucalyptus ...

  5. A Gateway MultiSite recombination cloning toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Lena K; Stowers, R Steven

    2011-01-01

    The generation of DNA constructs is often a rate-limiting step in conducting biological experiments. Recombination cloning of single DNA fragments using the Gateway system provided an advance over traditional restriction enzyme cloning due to increases in efficiency and reliability. Here we introduce a series of entry clones and a destination vector for use in two, three, and four fragment Gateway MultiSite recombination cloning whose advantages include increased flexibility and versatility. In contrast to Gateway single-fragment cloning approaches where variations are typically incorporated into model system-specific destination vectors, our Gateway MultiSite cloning strategy incorporates variations in easily generated entry clones that are model system-independent. In particular, we present entry clones containing insertions of GAL4, QF, UAS, QUAS, eGFP, and mCherry, among others, and demonstrate their in vivo functionality in Drosophila by using them to generate expression clones including GAL4 and QF drivers for various trp ion channel family members, UAS and QUAS excitatory and inhibitory light-gated ion channels, and QUAS red and green fluorescent synaptic vesicle markers. We thus establish a starter toolkit of modular Gateway MultiSite entry clones potentially adaptable to any model system. An inventory of entry clones and destination vectors for Gateway MultiSite cloning has also been established (www.gatewaymultisite.org).

  6. Market share for semen and cloned embryos in dairy herds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de I.J.M.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Use of cloned embryos from desirable genotypes (commercial clone lines) enables faster dissemination of superior genetics to dauy producers. Under optimal purchasing strategies of milk producers, the annual proportion of replacement cows from commercial clone lines indicates the market share of

  7. Animal and human Staphylococcus aureus associated clonal lineages and high rate of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius novel lineages in Spanish kennel dogs: predominance of S. aureus ST398.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Torres, Carmen; Benito, Daniel; Lozano, Carmen; Zarazaga, Myriam

    2013-10-25

    Methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MSSP) are gaining interest to track the evolution of emerging methicillin-resistant strains in animals and humans. We focused on the characterization of the methicillin-susceptible coagulase-positive staphylococci (MSCoPS) recovered from nasal samples of 98 healthy kennel-dogs. Isolates were typed by spa, agr, MLST and SmaI/ApaI-PFGE. Antimicrobial resistance and virulence profiles were investigated. Presence of the human-associated Immune-Evasion-Cluster (IEC) genes was analyzed in MSSA. Twenty-four MSSA, 16 MSSP and one MS Staphylococcus schleiferi subspecies coagulans were obtained. Thirteen spa-types and 12 sequence-types (STs) were detected among MSSA, with ST398 predominance (7/24, 29.2%). MSSA isolates were enclosed within 6 clonal complexes (no. of isolates): CC5 (8), CC398 (7), CC88 (4), CC45 (2), CC133 (1), and CC22 (1), and one singleton. High clonal diversity was observed among MSSP, and 14 STs (10 of them new) were detected. Twelve (50%) MSSA and 12 (75%) MSSP isolates showed resistance to at least one of the tested antimicrobials, with low MSSA penicillin resistance (5 isolates) and high MSSP tetracycline resistance (9 isolates). MSSA isolates ST398, ST133, ST1 and ST2329[new] were susceptible to all antimicrobials and were the only ones lacking the scn, chp and/or sak IEC genes. High diversity of enterotoxin genes was detected among non-ST398/ST133 MSSA isolates. MSSP showed a more homogeneous virulence genes profile. Our results give evidence that dogs can be S. aureus carriers of not only typical human associated lineages but also lineages commonly detected among other animal species. Continue surveillance on CoPS in dogs is required to unveil their role in the dissemination of clones adapted to other animal species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Impact of target site distribution for Type I restriction enzymes on the evolution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gareth A; Houston, Patrick J; White, John H; Chen, Kai; Stephanou, Augoustinos S; Cooper, Laurie P; Dryden, David T F; Lindsay, Jodi A

    2013-08-01

    A limited number of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clones are responsible for MRSA infections worldwide, and those of different lineages carry unique Type I restriction-modification (RM) variants. We have identified the specific DNA sequence targets for the dominant MRSA lineages CC1, CC5, CC8 and ST239. We experimentally demonstrate that this RM system is sufficient to block horizontal gene transfer between clinically important MRSA, confirming the bioinformatic evidence that each lineage is evolving independently. Target sites are distributed randomly in S. aureus genomes, except in a set of large conjugative plasmids encoding resistance genes that show evidence of spreading between two successful MRSA lineages. This analysis of the identification and distribution of target sites explains evolutionary patterns in a pathogenic bacterium. We show that a lack of specific target sites enables plasmids to evade the Type I RM system thereby contributing to the evolution of increasingly resistant community and hospital MRSA.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation at the physiologic glucose concentration depends on the S. aureus lineage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, Sander; Deurenberg, Ruud H; Boumans, Marie-Louise L; Beisser, Patrick S; Neef, Cees; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since bacteria embedded in biofilms are far more difficult to eradicate than planktonic infections, it would be useful to know whether certain Staphylococcus aureus lineages are especially involved in strong biofilm formation. For this reason, in vitro biofilm formation of 228 clinical

  10. Staphylococcus aureus: resistance pattern and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Naghavi-Behzad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has emerged as a nosocomial pathogen of major worldwide importance and is an increasingly frequent cause of community-acquired infections. In this study, different risk factors and MRSA resistance pattern were investigated. Methods: In a 24 months period, all of the patients who were confined to bed in the surgery ward were included in the study. Then they were assessed to find out as if they had MRSA infection when hospitalized and once when they were discharged. Almost 48 h after admission, when patients were discharged, social and medical histories were acquired. Acquired samples were examined. Results: During the present study of 475 patients, 108 patients (22.8% had S. aureus. About frequency of antibiotic resistance among collected S. aureus colonies, erythromycin resistance, was the most frequent antibiotic resistance, also resistance to vancomycin was 0.4% that was the least. Only hospitalization duration had statistically significant correlation with antibiotic resistance, also resistance to erythromycin had statistically significant relation with history of surgery and alcohol consumption. Of all 34 MRSA species, 22 (64.7% samples were resistant to erythromycin, 17 (50.0% resistant to cefoxitin, 5 (14.7% resistant to mupirocin, 1 (2.9% resistant to vancomycin and 1 (2.9% resistant to linezolid. Conclusion: The results of the current study show that among hospitalized patients, there is resistance against methicillin. Since based on results of the study there is resistance against oxacillin and erythromycin in most cases, administering appropriate antibiotics have an important role in minimizing the resistance burden among bacterial species.

  11. Curcumin Reverse Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Hyun Mun

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic flavonoid extracted from the rhizome of Curcuma longa L., was shown to possess superior potency to resensitize methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA to antibiotics. Previous studies have shown the synergistic activity of curcumin with β-lactam and quinolone antibiotics. Further, to understand the anti-MRSA mechanism of curcumin, we investigated the potentiated effect of curcumin by its interaction in diverse conditions. The mechanism of anti-MRSA action of curcumin was analyzed by the viability assay in the presence of detergents, ATPase inhibitors and peptidoglycan (PGN from S. aureus, and the PBP2a protein level was analyzed by western blotting. The morphological changes in the curcumin-treated MRSA strains were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. We analyzed increased susceptibility to MRSA isolates in the presence of curcumin. The optical densities at 600 nm (OD600 of the suspensions treated with the combinations of curcumin with triton X-100 and Tris were reduced to 63% and 59%, respectively, compared to curcumin without treatment. N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD and sodium azide (NaN3 were reduced to 94% and 55%, respectively. When peptidoglycan (PGN from S. aureus was combined with curcumin, PGN (0–125 μg/mL gradually blocked the antibacterial activity of curcumin (125 μg/mL; however, at a concentration of 125 µg/mL PGN, it did not completely block curcumin. Curcumin has a significant effect on the protein level of PBP2a. The TEM images of MRSA showed damage of the cell wall, disruption of the cytoplasmic contents, broken cell membrane and cell lysis after the treatment of curcumin. These data indicate a remarkable antibacterial effect of curcumin, with membrane permeability enhancers and ATPase inhibitors, and curcumin did not directly bind to PGN on the cell wall. Further, the antimicrobial action of curcumin involved in the PBP2a-mediated resistance mechanism was

  12. Cytoplasmic peptidoglycan intermediate levels in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Harika; Ayon, Navid J; Gutheil, William G

    2016-02-01

    Intracellular cytoplasmic peptidoglycan (PG) intermediate levels were determined in Staphylococcus aureus during log-phase growth in enriched media. Levels of UDP-linked intermediates were quantitatively determined using ion pairing LC-MS/MS in negative mode, and amine intermediates were quantitatively determined stereospecifically as their Marfey's reagent derivatives in positive mode. Levels of UDP-linked intermediates in S. aureus varied from 1.4 μM for UDP-GlcNAc-Enolpyruvyate to 1200 μM for UDP-MurNAc. Levels of amine intermediates (L-Ala, D-Ala, D-Ala-D-Ala, L-Glu, D-Glu, and L-Lys) varied over a range of from 860 μM for D-Ala-D-Ala to 30-260 mM for the others. Total PG was determined from the D-Glu content of isolated PG, and used to estimate the rate of PG synthesis (in terms of cytoplasmic metabolite flux) as 690 μM/min. The total UDP-linked intermediates pool (2490 μM) is therefore sufficient to sustain growth for 3.6 min. Comparison of UDP-linked metabolite levels with published pathway enzyme characteristics demonstrates that enzymes on the UDP-branch range from >80% saturation for MurA, Z, and C, to <5% saturation for MurB. Metabolite levels were compared with literature values for Escherichia coli, with the major difference in UDP-intermediates being the level of UDP-MurNAc, which was high in S. aureus (1200 μM) and low in E. coli (45 μM). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  13. Crystal structure of Staphylococcus aureus Cas9

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Cong, Le; Yan, Winston X.; Ran, F. Ann; Zetsche, Bernd; Li, Yinqing; Kurabayashi, Arisa; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Zhang, Feng; Nureki, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    The RNA-guided DNA endonuclease Cas9 cleaves double-stranded DNA targets with a protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) and complementarity to the guide RNA. Recently, we harnessed Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9), which is significantly smaller than Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9), to facilitate efficient in vivo genome editing. Here, we report the crystal structures of SaCas9 in complex with a single guide RNA (sgRNA) and its double-stranded DNA targets, containing the 5′-TTGAAT-3′ PAM and...

  14. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in a single large Minnesota medical center in 2015 as assessed using MLST, core genome MLST and spa typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Hwa; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Uhl, James R; Cunningham, Scott A; Chia, Nicholas; Jeraldo, Patricio R; Sampathkumar, Priya; Nelson, Heidi; Patel, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bacteremia in hospitalized patients. Whether or not S. aureus bacteremia (SAB) is associated with clonality, implicating potential nosocomial transmission, has not, however, been investigated. Herein, we examined the epidemiology of SAB using whole genome sequencing (WGS). 152 SAB isolates collected over the course of 2015 at a single large Minnesota medical center were studied. Staphylococcus protein A (spa) typing was performed by PCR/Sanger sequencing; multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and core genome MLST (cgMLST) were determined by WGS. Forty-eight isolates (32%) were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The isolates encompassed 66 spa types, clustered into 11 spa clonal complexes (CCs) and 10 singleton types. 88% of 48 MRSA isolates belonged to spa CC-002 or -008. Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates were more genotypically diverse, with 61% distributed across four spa CCs (CC-002, CC-012, CC-008 and CC-084). By MLST, there was 31 sequence types (STs), including 18 divided into 6 CCs and 13 singleton STs. Amongst MSSA isolates, the common MLST clones were CC5 (23%), CC30 (19%), CC8 (15%) and CC15 (11%). Common MRSA clones were CC5 (67%) and CC8 (25%); there were no MRSA isolates in CC45 or CC30. By cgMLST analysis, there were 9 allelic differences between two isolates, with the remaining 150 isolates differing from each other by over 40 alleles. The two isolates were retroactively epidemiologically linked by medical record review. Overall, cgMLST analysis resulted in higher resolution epidemiological typing than did multilocus sequence or spa typing.

  15. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in a single large Minnesota medical center in 2015 as assessed using MLST, core genome MLST and spa typing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Hwa Park

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bacteremia in hospitalized patients. Whether or not S. aureus bacteremia (SAB is associated with clonality, implicating potential nosocomial transmission, has not, however, been investigated. Herein, we examined the epidemiology of SAB using whole genome sequencing (WGS. 152 SAB isolates collected over the course of 2015 at a single large Minnesota medical center were studied. Staphylococcus protein A (spa typing was performed by PCR/Sanger sequencing; multilocus sequence typing (MLST and core genome MLST (cgMLST were determined by WGS. Forty-eight isolates (32% were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. The isolates encompassed 66 spa types, clustered into 11 spa clonal complexes (CCs and 10 singleton types. 88% of 48 MRSA isolates belonged to spa CC-002 or -008. Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA isolates were more genotypically diverse, with 61% distributed across four spa CCs (CC-002, CC-012, CC-008 and CC-084. By MLST, there was 31 sequence types (STs, including 18 divided into 6 CCs and 13 singleton STs. Amongst MSSA isolates, the common MLST clones were CC5 (23%, CC30 (19%, CC8 (15% and CC15 (11%. Common MRSA clones were CC5 (67% and CC8 (25%; there were no MRSA isolates in CC45 or CC30. By cgMLST analysis, there were 9 allelic differences between two isolates, with the remaining 150 isolates differing from each other by over 40 alleles. The two isolates were retroactively epidemiologically linked by medical record review. Overall, cgMLST analysis resulted in higher resolution epidemiological typing than did multilocus sequence or spa typing.

  16. Recent progress and problems in animal cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Y; Kato, Y

    2002-01-01

    It is remarkable that mammalian somatic cell nuclei can form whole individuals if they are transferred to enucleated oocytes. Advancements in nuclear transfer technology can now be applied for genetic improvement and increase of farm animals, rescue of endangered species, and assisted reproduction and tissue engineering in humans. Since July 1998, more than 200 calves have been produced by nuclear transfer of somatic cell nuclei in Japan, but half of them were stillborn or died within several months of parturition. Morphologic abnormalities have also been observed in cloned calves and embryonic stem cell-derived mice. In this review, we discuss the present situation and problems with animal cloning and the possibility for its application to human medicine.

  17. Micropropagation of an elite Darjeeling tea clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, T; Sen, S K

    1992-03-01

    Shoot cultures of Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntz var. T-78, an elite Darjeeling tea clone, were established from cotyledonary nodes and shoot tips of germinated seedlings as well as from nodal explants of field grown plants. Shoot multiplication rate ranged from 4x in nodal explants to 35x in cotyledonary nodes after 18 weeks of culture. Rooting was achieved in 80-90% micro-shoots by either placing them on an inductive medium for 10 d and then transferring shoots to hormone-free medium, or by treating micro-shoots with a chronic dose of IBA (500 mg/l) for 30-40 min. Rooted plants were established in soil under glasshouse condition at 60% frequency after hardening phase of 4-6 weeks. The regenerated plants show a constant chromosome number of 2n=30 and are morphologically true to type. This procedure can be applied for conservation and utilisation of an elite clone of Darjeeling tea.

  18. Gamer's Facial Cloning for Online Interactive Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Sattar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtual illustration of a human face is essential to enhance the mutual interaction in a cyber community. In this paper we propose a solution to solve two bottlenecks in facial analysis and synthesis for an interactive system of human face cloning for non-expert users of computer games. Tactical maneuvers of the gamer make single camera acquisition system unsuitable to analyze and track the face due to its large lateral movements. For an improved facial analysis system, we propose to acquire the facial images from multiple cameras and analyze them by multiobjective 2.5D Active Appearance Model (MOAAM. Facial morphological dissimilarities between a human face and an avatar make the facial synthesis quite complex. To successfully clone or retarget the gamer facial expressions and gestures on to an avatar, we introduce a simple mathematical link between their appearances. Results obtained validate the efficiency, accuracy and robustness achieved.

  19. A cohort study of the Copenhagen CF Centre eradication strategy against Staphylococcus aureus in patients with CF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalbøge, Christina Schjellerup; Pressler, Tacjana; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen in CF. Centre prevalence of intermittent colonization and chronic S. aureus infections and the effectiveness of an anti-S. aureus eradication strategy was assessed.......Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen in CF. Centre prevalence of intermittent colonization and chronic S. aureus infections and the effectiveness of an anti-S. aureus eradication strategy was assessed....

  20. Generating in vivo cloning vectors for parallel cloning of large gene clusters by homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongmin Lee

    Full Text Available A robust method for the in vivo cloning of large gene clusters was developed based on homologous recombination (HR, requiring only the transformation of PCR products into Escherichia coli cells harboring a receiver plasmid. Positive clones were selected by an acquired antibiotic resistance, which was activated by the recruitment of a short ribosome-binding site plus start codon sequence from the PCR products to the upstream position of a silent antibiotic resistance gene in receiver plasmids. This selection was highly stringent and thus the cloning efficiency of the GFPuv gene (size: 0.7 kb was comparable to that of the conventional restriction-ligation method, reaching up to 4.3 × 10(4 positive clones per μg of DNA. When we attempted parallel cloning of GFPuv fusion genes (size: 2.0 kb and carotenoid biosynthesis pathway clusters (sizes: 4 kb, 6 kb, and 10 kb, the cloning efficiency was similarly high regardless of the DNA size, demonstrating that this would be useful for the cloning of large DNA sequences carrying multiple open reading frames. However, restriction analyses of the obtained plasmids showed that the selected cells may contain significant amounts of receiver plasmids without the inserts. To minimize the amount of empty plasmid in the positive selections, the sacB gene encoding a levansucrase was introduced as a counter selection marker in receiver plasmid as it converts sucrose to a toxic levan in the E. coli cells. Consequently, this method yielded completely homogeneous plasmids containing the inserts via the direct transformation of PCR products into E. coli cells.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus bacteriuria as a prognosticator for outcome of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinstein Robert A

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When Staphylococcus aureus is isolated in urine, it is thought to usually represent hematogenous spread. Because such spread might have special clinical significance, we evaluated predictors and outcomes of S. aureus bacteriuria among patients with S. aureus bacteremia. Methods A case-control study was performed at John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County among adult inpatients during January 2002-December 2006. Cases and controls had positive and negative urine cultures, respectively, for S. aureus, within 72 hours of positive blood culture for S. aureus. Controls were sampled randomly in a 1:4 ratio. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were done. Results Overall, 59% of patients were African-American, 12% died, 56% of infections had community-onset infections, and 58% were infected with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA. Among 61 cases and 247 controls, predictors of S. aureus bacteriuria on multivariate analysis were urological surgery (OR = 3.4, p = 0.06 and genitourinary infection (OR = 9.2, p = 0.002. Among patients who died, there were significantly more patients with bacteriuria than among patients who survived (39% vs. 17%; p = 0.002. In multiple Cox regression analysis, death risks in bacteremic patients were bacteriuria (hazard ratio 2.9, CI 1.4-5.9, p = 0.004, bladder catheter use (2.0, 1.0-4.0, p = 0.06, and Charlson score (1.1, 1.1-1.3, p = 0.02. Neither length of stay nor methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection was a predictor of S. aureus bacteriuria or death. Conclusions Among patients with S. aureus bacteremia, those with S. aureus bacteriuria had 3-fold higher mortality than those without bacteriuria, even after adjustment for comorbidities. Bacteriuria may identify patients with more severe bacteremia, who are at risk of worse outcomes.

  2. Keeping up with the cloneses--issues in human cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, B E

    1999-01-01

    The advent of cloning animals has created a maelstrom of social concern about the "ethical issues" associated with the possibility of cloning humans. When the "ethical concerns" are clearly examined, however, many of them turn out to be less matters of rational ethics than knee-jerk emotion, religious bias, or fear of that which is not understood. Three categories of real and spurious ethical concerns are presented and discussed: 1) that cloning is intrinsically wrong, 2) that cloning must lead to bad consequences, and 3) that cloning harms the organism generated. The need for a rational ethical framework for discussing biotechnological advances is presented and defended.

  3. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus among healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chong Seng; Yin, Chow Suet; Bakar, Afra Abu; Sakewi, Zamberi; Naing, Nyi Nyi; Jamal, Farida; Othman, Norlijah

    2006-12-01

    Data on the carriage rate and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of Staphylococcus aureus strains prevalent in the community are not available for many developing countries including Malaysia. To estimate the extent of community S. aureus transmission, in particular methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), the prevalence of S. aureus nasal colonization in a population of healthy adults was determined. Factors associated with S. aureus nasal carriage and antibiotic sensitivity patterns of the isolates were also analyzed. A cross-sectional study involving 346 adults was conducted. Nasal swabs were examined for the presence of S. aureus. Epidemiological information concerning risk factors for nasal carriage was also obtained. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using the disk diffusion method according to the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards guidelines. MRSA strains isolated were further subjected to pulse-field gel electrophoresis analysis. The prevalence of S. aureus nasal carriage was 23.4%. The findings also revealed that ex-smokers (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08-6.32, p=0.033) and oral contraceptive users (95% CI 1.12-21.67, p=0.035) were more likely to harbor S. aureus. One person was colonized with MRSA, which was different from the hospital strain. MRSA nasal colonization was found to be low outside of the health care environment. Smokers and oral contraceptive users have high nasal carrier rates.

  4. Beta Lactamase production by Staphylococcus aureus from children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus from children aged 5 years and below with sporadic diarrhoea were tested for their ability to produce beta-lactamase enzyme. Of the 95 isolates tested 79 (83.2%) were beta-lactamase-producing strains. The study confirms that majority of clinical isolates of S. aureus from diarrhoeic ...

  5. Staphylococcus aureus strategies to evade the host acquired immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, Oliver; Medina, Eva

    2017-09-15

    Staphylococcus aureus poses a significant public-health problem. Infection caused by S. aureus can manifest as acute or long-lasting persistent diseases that are often refractory to antibiotic and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To develop more effective strategies for preventing or treating these infections, it is crucial to understand why the immune response is incapable to eradicate the bacterium. When S. aureus first infect the host, there is a robust activation of the host innate immune responses. Generally, S. aureus can survive this initial interaction due to the expression of a wide array of virulence factors that interfere with the host innate immune defenses. After this initial interaction the acquired immune response is the arm of the host defenses that will try to clear the pathogen. However, S. aureus is capable of maintaining infection in the host even in the presence of a robust antigen-specific immune response. Thus, understanding the mechanisms underlying the ability of S. aureus to escape immune surveillance by the acquired immune response will help uncover potentially important targets for the development of immune-based adjunctive therapies and more efficient vaccines. There are several lines of evidence that lead us to believe that S. aureus can directly or indirectly disable the acquired immune response. This review will discuss the different immune evasion strategies used by S. aureus to modulate the different components of the acquired immune defenses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Intercenter reproducibility of binary typing for Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Willem B.; Snoeijers, Sandor; van der Werken-Libregts, Christel; Tuip, Anita; van der Zee, Anneke; Egberink, Diane; de Proost, Monique; Bik, Elisabeth; Lunter, Bjorn; Kluytmans, Jan; Gits, Etty; van Duyn, Inge; Heck, Max; van der Zwaluw, Kim; Wannet, Wim; Noordhoek, Gerda T.; Mulder, Sije; Renders, Nicole; Boers, Miranda; Zaat, Sebastiaan; van der Riet, Daniëlle; Kooistra, Mirjam; Talens, Adriaan; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; van der Reyden, Tanny; Veenendaal, Dick; Bakker, Nancy; Cookson, Barry; Lynch, Alisson; Witte, Wolfgang; Cuny, Christa; Blanc, Dominique; Vernez, Isabelle; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Fiett, Janusz; Struelens, Marc; Deplano, Ariane; Landegent, Jim; Verbrugh, Henri A.; van Belkum, Alex

    2002-01-01

    The reproducibility of the binary typing (BT) protocol developed for epidemiological typing of Staphylococcus aureus was analyzed in a biphasic multicenter study. In a Dutch multicenter pilot study, 10 genetically unique isolates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were characterized by the BT

  7. Duplex Identification of Staphylococcus aureus by Aptamer and Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tianjun; Wang, Libo; Zhao, Kexu; Ge, Yu; He, Meng; Li, Gang

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the top common pathogen causing infections and food poisoning. Identification of S. aureus is crucial for the disease diagnosis and regulation of food hygiene. Herein, we report an aptamer-AuNPs based method for duplex identification of S. aureus. Using AuNPs as an indicator, SA23, an aptamer against S. aureus, can well identify its target from Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Furthermore, we find citrate-coated AuNPs can strongly bind to S. aureus, but not bind to Salmonella enterica and Proteus mirabilis, which leads to different color changes in salt solution. This colorimetric response is capable of distinguishing S. aureus from S. enteritidis and P. mirabilis. Thus, using the aptasensor and AuNPs together, S. aureus can be accurately identified from the common pathogens. This duplex identification system is a promising platform for simple visual identification of S. aureus. Additionally, in the aptasensing process, bacteria are incubated with aptamers and then be removed before the aptamers adding to AuNPs, which may avoid the interactions between bacteria and AuNPs. This strategy can be potentially applied in principle to detect other cells by AuNPs-based aptasensors.

  8. Heterogeneity of the humoral immune response following Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Verkaik (Nelianne); H.A.M. Boelens (Hélène); C.P. de Vogel (Corné); M. Tavakol (Mehri); L.G.M. Bode (Lonneke); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractExpanding knowledge on the humoral immune response in Staphylococcus aureus-infected patients is a mandatory step in the development of vaccines and immunotherapies. Here, we present novel insights into the antibody responses following S. aureus bacteremia. Fifteen bacteremic patients

  9. Detection of some virulence factors in Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pathogens that can cause mastitis, Staphylococcus aureus is probably the most lethal agent because it causes chronic and deep infection in the mammary glands that is extremely difficult to be cured. The present study was to detect some of the virulence factors in the S. aureus isolated from 360 mastitis milk samples in ...

  10. Staphylococcus aureus from the German general population is highly diverse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, Karsten; Schaumburg, Frieder; Fegeler, Christian; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Kock, Robin

    Objectives: This prospective cohort study evaluates colonization dynamics and molecular characteristics of methicillin-susceptible and - resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA/MRSA) in a German general population. Methods: Nasal swabs of 1878 non-hospitalized adults were screened for S. aureus.

  11. Invasive Staphylococcus aureus infection in an African adolescent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus remains an important cause of mortality, in the community and health care set-ups. S. aureus strains with genes encoding lethal toxins and culture negative sepsis augment the diagnostic challenge in resource limited settings. With a growing rate of resistance to the causative bacteria and atypical ...

  12. Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in children: a formidable foe

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus remains one of the most common causes of bacteraemia in children. In order to evade and overcome the immune responses of its host and any antimicrobial therapies aimed at destroying it, this organism, through various mechanisms, continues to evolve. Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia is a ...

  13. Identification of the ClpX Regulon in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Ingmer, Hanne

    Staphyloccous aureus is a major human pathogen capable of causing a wide spectrum of infections ranging from superficial wound infections to life-threatening endocarditis and toxic shock syndrome. Essential for S. aureus virulence is a large number of cell-surface-associated proteins and secreted...

  14. Nasal carriage of multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nasal Staphylococcus aureus is a major source of community and hospital associated staphylococcal infections. This study determined the prevalence of nasal S. aureus isolates and investigated their antimicrobial resistance profile in healthy volunteers. Methods: Nasal specimens of healthy volunteers in ...

  15. Detection and identification of Staphylococcus aureus in raw milk by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus causes foodborne diseases if consumed in contaminated milk products. Rapid detection and characterization of foodborne pathogen S. aureus is crucial for epidemiological investigations and food safety surveillance. It is still a challenge to detect and identify bacterial pathogens quickly and ...

  16. Toxins and adhesion factors associated with Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus is a causative agent of acute and infectious diarrhoea. In Africa, there is no sufficient information on the virulence and the degree of factors produced by its diarrhoea-isolated strains. Clinical features and virulence factors produced by S. aureus isolated from diarrhoeal-patients admitted at the ...

  17. Staphylococcus aureus ST398 from slaughter pigs in northeast China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Xiaomei; Yu, Xiaojie; Tao, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Binghua; Dong, Rui; Xue, Chengyu; Grundmann, Hajo; Zhang, Jianzhong

    To describe the prevalence and population structure of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria that colonize pigs at slaughterhouses in northeastern China, nose swabs were collected from pigs in two slaughterhouses in Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China in 2009.S. aureus isolates were characterized by

  18. Prevalence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in apparently healthy ... Keywords: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Nasal swabs, Multidrug resistance, Rational chemotherapy .... Figure 2: Antibiotic resistance profile of the MRSA isolates. Key: AM-amoxicillin ...

  19. Nasal carriage of methicilli-resistant staphylococcus aureus with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus isolates were collected from anterior nares of fifty healthy adults in Zaria and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns determined. Seventy-two percent (72%) of the isolates were methicillin-resistant S. aureus, while 20% were methicillin-susceptible. The isolates were generally resistant to multiple ...

  20. Prevalence of Methicillin–Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major bacterial pathogen that causes different community and hospital-acquired infections. Over time, strains of S. aureus have become resistant to different antibiotics including penicillinase-resistant penicillins. Having data on the local antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of this pathogen is ...

  1. Detection of some virulence factors in Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-21

    Jun 21, 2010 ... present study was to detect some of the virulence factors in the S. aureus isolated from 360 mastitis milk samples in ... Key words: Bovine mastitis, Staphylococcus aureus, virulence factors, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Iran. INTRODUCTION ..... staphylococcal hemolysins. Zentralbl Bakteriol Orig A.

  2. Virulence potential of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Buruli ulcer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amissah, Nana Ama; Chlebowicz, Monika A.; Ablordey, Anthony; Tetteh, Caitlin S.; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Friedrich, Alex W.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Stienstra, Ymkje; Rossen, John W.

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. BU wounds may also be colonized with other microorganisms including Staphylococcus aureus. This study aimed to characterize the virulence factors of S. aureus isolated from BU patients.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus in mastitic crossbreed cows and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and its associated risk factors in Addis Ababa City,. Ethiopia ... and wide spread livestock diseases (Mohammed Ahmed et al., 2004). Mastitis .... Legesse Garedew et al.,. Table 2: Risk factors associated with the occurrence of Staphylococcus aureus in mastitic cows. Risk factor. Total animals S. aureus positives. X2 p-value.

  4. Daya Hambat Ekstrak Aloe Vera terhadap pertumbuhan Staphylococcus Aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmat, drg.Sp,Pros

    2011-01-01

    Dari hasil penelitian , maka dapat disimpulkan bahwa ekstrak Aloe Vera dapat menghambat pertumbuhan bakteri Stafhylococcus aureus, dan kadar hambat minimal ekstrak Aloe Vera adalah pada konsentrasi 25%. Tujuan Penelitan Ini adalah untuk mengetahui efektifitas ekstrak Aloe vera dalam menghambat pertumbuhan bakteri Stafhylococcus aureus dan daya hambat menimal, (DHM) terhadap pertumbuhan bakteri tersebut. Metode yang digunakan adalah pertumbuhan ekstrak Aloe vera, penegnceran ekstrak , pemur...

  5. Maternal-neonatal outcome with Staphylococcus aureus rectovaginal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanim, Nibal; Alchyib, Omrou; Morrish, Donald; Tompkins, David; Julliard, Kell; Visconti, Ernest; Hoskins, Iffath A

    2011-01-01

    To estimate prevalence of rectovaginal colonization by Staphylococcus aureus among pregnant women with group B streptococcus (GBS) screening results and its association with maternal and infant outcomes. Cultures that detected both group B streptococcus (GBS) and S. aureus were obtained at > or = 35 weeks of gestation. Computerized database search and chart review determined invasive neonatal infection and maternal outcomes at the time of delivery through 6 months postpartum. A total of 6,626 GBS screening cultures met study criteria, and 769 (11.6%) GBS isolates and 67 (1.0%) S. aureus were identified. No maternal S. aureus-related outcomes were found. The rate of maternal methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization was 0.1% (7 in 6,626). GBS-positive patients were twice as likely to be colonized with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus than GBS-negative patients. GBS-positive culture rates differed significantly by primary language: Spanish 10.0%, English 13.7%, Russian 26.9%, Cantonese 13.2%, Mandarin 11.5%, Arabic 15.9%, and other 17.8%. In our population, S. aureus colonization percentage (1.0%) was lower than the 7.5-8.2% reported by other medical centers, as was overall GBS carriage rate. S. aureus did not predispose to maternal or infant morbidity or mortality up to 6 months postpartum.

  6. Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus on armpits of secondary school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of carriage of Staphylococcus aureus on armpits and factors affecting it was carried out on 50 students from Community Secondary School, Oroworokwu, Port Harcourt and 50 University of Port Harcourt students. Samples were inoculated onto mannitol salt agar plates and coagulate positive S. aureus isolates were ...

  7. Emergence of clones in sexual populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, Richard A.; Vucelja, Marija; Mezard, Mark; Shraiman, Boris I.

    2013-01-01

    In sexual population, recombination reshuffles genetic variation and produces novel combinations of existing alleles, while selection amplifies the fittest genotypes in the population. If recombination is more rapid than selection, populations consist of a diverse mixture of many genotypes, as is observed in many populations. In the opposite regime, which is realized for example in the facultatively sexual populations that outcross in only a fraction of reproductive cycles, selection can amplify individual genotypes into large clones. Such clones emerge when the fitness advantage of some of the genotypes is large enough that they grow to a significant fraction of the population despite being broken down by recombination. The occurrence of this ‘clonal condensation’ depends, in addition to the outcrossing rate, on the heritability of fitness. Clonal condensation leads to a strong genetic heterogeneity of the population which is not adequately described by traditional population genetics measures, such as linkage disequilibrium. Here we point out the similarity between clonal condensation and the freezing transition in the random energy model of spin glasses. Guided by this analogy we explicitly calculate the probability, Y, that two individuals are genetically identical as a function of the key parameters of the model. While Y is the analog of the spin-glass order parameter, it is also closely related to rate of coalescence in population genetics: two individuals that are part of the same clone have a recent common ancestor.

  8. Cloning humans? Biological, ethical, and social considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Francisco J

    2015-07-21

    There are, in mankind, two kinds of heredity: biological and cultural. Cultural inheritance makes possible for humans what no other organism can accomplish: the cumulative transmission of experience from generation to generation. In turn, cultural inheritance leads to cultural evolution, the prevailing mode of human adaptation. For the last few millennia, humans have been adapting the environments to their genes more often than their genes to the environments. Nevertheless, natural selection persists in modern humans, both as differential mortality and as differential fertility, although its intensity may decrease in the future. More than 2,000 human diseases and abnormalities have a genetic causation. Health care and the increasing feasibility of genetic therapy will, although slowly, augment the future incidence of hereditary ailments. Germ-line gene therapy could halt this increase, but at present, it is not technically feasible. The proposal to enhance the human genetic endowment by genetic cloning of eminent individuals is not warranted. Genomes can be cloned; individuals cannot. In the future, therapeutic cloning will bring enhanced possibilities for organ transplantation, nerve cells and tissue healing, and other health benefits.

  9. Activity of Debio1452, a FabI inhibitor with potent activity against Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp., including multidrug-resistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamm, Robert K; Rhomberg, Paul R; Kaplan, Nachum; Jones, Ronald N; Farrell, David J

    2015-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are responsible for a wide variety of human infections. The investigational antibacterial Debio1450 (previously AFN-1720), a prodrug of Debio1452 (previously AFN-1252), specifically targets staphylococci without significant activity against other Gram-positive or Gram-negative species. Debio1452 inhibits FabI, an enzyme critical to fatty acid biosynthesis in staphylococci. The activity of Debio1452 against CoNS, methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), including significant clones, was determined. A globally diverse collection of 574 patient isolates from 35 countries was tested that included CoNS (6 species, 103 strains), MSSA (154 strains), MRSA (163 strains), and molecularly characterized strains (including spa-typed MRSA clones; 154 strains). The isolates were tested for susceptibility by CLSI broth microdilution methods against Debio1452 and 10 comparators. The susceptibility rates for the comparators were determined using CLSI and EUCAST breakpoint criteria. All S. aureus and CoNS strains were inhibited by Debio1452 concentrations of ≤ 0.12 and ≤ 0.5 μg/ml, respectively. The MIC50s for MSSA, MRSA, and molecularly characterized MRSA strains were 0.004 μg/ml, and the MIC90s ranged from 0.008 to 0.03 μg/ml. The MICs were higher for the CoNS isolates (MIC50/90, 0.015/0.12 μg/ml). Among S. aureus strains, resistance was common for erythromycin (61.6%), levofloxacin (49.0%), clindamycin (27.6%), tetracycline (15.7%), and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (7.0%). Debio1452 demonstrated potent activity against MSSA, MRSA, and CoNS. Debio1452 showed significantly greater activity overall (MIC50, 0.004 μg/ml) than the other agents tested against these staphylococcal species, which included dominant MRSA clones and strains resistant to currently utilized antimicrobial agents. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Selective biosensing of Staphylococcus aureus using chitosan quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2018-01-01

    Selective biosensing of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) using chitosan modified quantum dots (CTS@CdS QDs) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide is reported. The method is based on the intrinsic positive catalase activity of S. aureus. CTS@CdS quantum dots provide high dispersion in aqueous media with high fluorescence emission. Staphylococcus aureus causes a selective quenching of the fluorescence emission of CTS@CdS QDs in the presence of H2O2 compared to other pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The intrinsic enzymatic character of S. aureus (catalase positive) offers selective and fast biosensing. The present method is highly selective for positive catalase species and requires no expensive reagents such as antibodies, aptamers or microbeads. It could be extended for other species that are positive catalase.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus vs. Osteoblast: Relationship and Consequences in Osteomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josse, Jérôme; Velard, Frédéric; Gangloff, Sophie C.

    2015-01-01

    Bone cells, namely osteoblasts and osteoclasts work in concert and are responsible for bone extracellular matrix formation and resorption. This homeostasis is, in part, altered during infections by Staphylococcus aureus through the induction of various responses from the osteoblasts. This includes the over-production of chemokines, cytokines and growth factors, thus suggesting a role for these cells in both innate and adaptive immunity. S. aureus decreases the activity and viability of osteoblasts, by induction of apoptosis-dependent and independent mechanisms. The tight relationship between osteoclasts and osteoblasts is also modulated by S. aureus infection. The present review provides a survey of the relevant literature discussing the important aspects of S. aureus and osteoblast interaction as well as the ability for antimicrobial peptides to kill intra-osteoblastic S. aureus, hence emphasizing the necessity for new anti-infectious therapeutics. PMID:26636047

  12. Characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Sequence Type 398

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mette Theilgaard

    . aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have been associated with hospitals, but during the past decades MRSA has emerged in the community and now a new branch of MRSA has been found in association with livestock (LA-MRSA). A specific lineage (multilocus sequence type 398 (ST398......Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the nares and skin surfaces of several animal species, including man. S. aureus can cause a wide variety of infections ranging from superficial soft tissue and skin infections to severe and deadly systemic infections. Traditionally S...... for LA-MRSA ST398 survival on porcine skin and nasal epithelium ex vivo were identified. These genes could represent targets for de-colonization, which could help prevent further spread and adaption of LA-MRSA ST398. Manuscript III describes the construction of the S. aureus VirulenceFinder database...

  13. Ethical issues regarding human cloning: a nursing perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinç, Leyla

    2003-05-01

    Advances in cloning technology and successful cloning experiments in animals raised concerns about the possibility of human cloning in recent years. Despite many objections, this is not only a possibility but also a reality. Human cloning is a scientific revolution. However, it also introduces the potential for physical and psychosocial harm to human beings. From this point of view, it raises profound ethical, social and health related concerns. Human cloning would have an impact on the practice of nursing because it could result in the creation of new physiological and psychosocial conditions that would require nursing care. The nursing profession must therefore evaluate the ethics of human cloning, in particular the potential role of nurses. This article reviews the ethical considerations of reproductive human cloning, discusses the main reasons for concern, and reflects a nursing perspective regarding this issue.

  14. U.S. consumers attitudes toward farm animal cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Kathleen R; Lusk, Jayson L

    2011-10-01

    In January 2008, the United States Food and Drug Administration concluded "meat and milk from cattle, swine, and goat clones or their offspring are as safe to eat as food we eat from those species now" (U.S. FDA, 2010). However, cloning remains a very controversial topic. A web-based survey administered by Knowledge Networks was used to determine U.S. consumers' awareness of and attitudes toward meat and milk from cloned cattle. Findings reveal consumers do not differentiate much between products from cloned animals and products from non-cloned animals. Overall consumers are concerned that animal cloning is an unnatural process and that it will lead to human cloning. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [DNA methylation and development abnormalities in cloned animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong-Rong; Li, Xiang-Yun

    2007-09-01

    Most cloned animals by nuclear transfer were dead before their births, and only a few can develop to their late gestation or adulthood. Although some cloned offsprings can survive, they often have some development disfigurements and abnormal phenotypes in various degrees. DNA methylation is an important modifiable manner of epigenetic dominating the correct expression of gene. It is a main instrument of regulating genome function and plays a prominent part in the embryonic normal development. Through researching the pattern of DNA methylation, we found that there were many abnormal DNA methylation patterns in cloned animals, which might be the primary reasons for inducing premature death of cloned embryos and development abnormalities of cloned animals. This article discusses the function of DNA methylation, the aberrant DNA methylation patterns in cloned animals, and the reasons of inducing abnormal DNA methylation in cloned animals.

  16. Rapid Identification of Staphylococcus aureus Directly from Bactec Blood Culture Broth by the BinaxNOW S. aureus Test

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Qinfang; Eichelberger, Karen; Kirby, James E.

    2014-01-01

    The BinaxNOW Staphylococcus aureus testing showed sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predicative values of 97.6%, 100%, 100%, and 98.4%, respectively, for identification of S. aureus from Bactec blood culture broth. Importantly, the test performed equally well on aerobic and anaerobic culture broth.

  17. Identification of a PVL-negative SCCmec-IVa sub-lineage of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus CC80 lineage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edslev, Sofie Marie; Westh, Henrik Torkil; Andersen, Paal Skytt

    2018-01-01

    of the CC80 S. aureus lineage was conducted from whole-genome sequences of 217 isolates (23 MSSA and 194 MRSA) from 22 countries. All isolates were further genetically characterized in regard to resistance determinants and PVL carriage, and epidemiological data was obtained for selected isolates. RESULTS......OBJECTIVES: Community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) isolates belonging to clonal complex 80 (CC80) are recognized as the European CA-MRSA. The prevailing European CA-MRSA clone carries a type IVc staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) and expresses Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). Recently......, a significant increase of PVL-negative CC80 MRSA has been observed in Denmark. The aim of this study was to examine the genetics and the epidemiology of these, and to compare them to the European CA-MRSA clone in order to understand the emergence of PVL-negative CC80 MRSA. METHODS: Phylogenetic analysis...

  18. Retrospective study of necrotizing fasciitis and characterization of its associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changchien Chih-Hsuan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has emerged as a prevalent pathogen of necrotizing fasciitis (NF in Taiwan. A four-year NF cases and clinical and genetic differences between hospital acquired (HA- and community-acquired (CA-MRSA infection and isolates were investigated. Methods A retrospective study of 247 NF cases in 2004-2008 and antimicrobial susceptibilities, staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec types, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE patterns, virulence factors, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST of 16 NF-associated MRSA in 2008 were also evaluated. Results In 247 cases, 42 microbial species were identified. S. aureus was the major prevalent pathogen and MRSA accounted for 19.8% of NF cases. Most patients had many coexisting medical conditions, including diabetes mellitus, followed by hypertension, chronic azotemia and chronic hepatic disease in order of decreasing prevalence. Patients with MRSA infection tended to have more severe clinical outcomes in terms of amputation rate (p S. aureus or non-S. aureus infection. NF patients infected by HA-MRSA had a significantly higher amputation rate, comorbidity, C-reactive protein level, and involvement of lower extremity than those infected by CA-MRSA. In addition to over 90% of MRSA resistant to erythromycin and clindamycin, HA-MRSA was more resistant than CA-MRSA to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (45.8% vs. 4%. ST59/pulsotype C/SCCmec IV and ST239/pulsotype A/SCCmec III isolates were the most prevalent CA- and HA-MRSA, respectively in 16 isolates obtained in 2008. In contrast to the gene for γ-hemolysin found in all MRSA, the gene for Panton-Valentine leukocidin was only identified in ST59 MRSA isolates. Other three virulence factors TSST-1, ETA, and ETB were occasionally identified in MRSA isolates tested. Conclusion NF patients with MRSA infection, especially HA-MRSA infection, had more severe clinical outcomes than those infected by

  19. [Genetic polymorphism of clones and their seed progeny in the scotch pine clone plantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshikov, I I; Demkovich, A E

    2010-01-01

    Genetic variation at 12 allozyme loci (10 of them being polymorphic ones) has been studied in the archive-clone plantation of 23 Pinus sylvestris plus-trees and their seed progeny in the south-east of Ukraine. More than a half of clones had 4-8 heterozygous loci, whereas their seed progeny was marked by a lower variation than maternal trees. Seed progeny was obtained at a high outcrossing rate (t(m) = 95%). The clone progeny was characterized by a high percentage of abnormal allele segregation in megagametophytes. There was also a high frequency of significant deviation in distribution of seed embryo genotypes from the theoretically expected one according to the Hardy-Weinberg law.

  20. Boron mobility in eucalyptus clones Mobilidade de Boro em clones de eucalipto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Freitas Brilhante de São José

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the magnitude of B mobility in eucalyptus may help to select clones that are more efficient for B use and to design new practices of B fertilization. This study consisted of five experiments with three eucalyptus clones (129, 57 and 58 where the response to and mobility of B were evaluated. Results indicated that clone 129 was less sensitive to B deficiency than clones 68 and 57, apparently due to its ability to translocate B previously absorbed via root systems to younger tissues when B in solution became limiting. Translocation also occurred when B was applied as boric acid only once to a single mature leaf, resulting in higher B concentration in roots, stems and younger leaves. The growth of B-deficient plants was also recovere by a single foliar application of B to a mature leaf. This mobility was greater, when foliar-applied B was supplied in complexed (boric acid + manitol than in non-complexed form (boric acid alone. When the root system of clone 129 was split in two solution compartments, B supplied to one root compartment was translocated to the shoot and back to the roots in the other compartment, improving the B status and growth. Thus, it appears that B is relatively mobile in eucalyptus, especially in clone 129, and its higher mobility could be due to the presence of an organic compound such as manitol, able to complex B.O entendimento da magnitude da mobilidade de B no eucalipto é importante, devido a sua utilidade para a seleção de clones mais eficiente para esse micronutriente, além da projeção de novas práticas de fertilização de B. Este estudo envolveu cinco experimentos com três clones de eucalipto (129, 57 e 68, em que foram avaliadas a resposta e a mobilidade de B. Os resultados indicaram que o clone 129 foi menos sensível à deficiência de B do que os clones 68 e 57, aparentemente, em razão da sua maior habilidade de translocar B, previamente absorvido via sistema radicular, para tecidos jovens

  1. Should we clone human beings? Cloning as a source of tissue for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savulescu, J

    1999-01-01

    The most publicly justifiable application of human cloning, if there is one at all, is to provide self-compatible cells or tissues for medical use, especially transplantation. Some have argued that this raises no new ethical issues above those raised by any form of embryo experimentation. I argue that this research is less morally problematic than other embryo research. Indeed, it is not merely morally permissible but morally required that we employ cloning to produce embryos or fetuses for the sake of providing cells, tissues or even organs for therapy, followed by abortion of the embryo or fetus. PMID:10226910

  2. Human cloning: category, dignity, and the role of bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, Evelyne

    2003-10-01

    Human cloning has been simultaneously a running joke for massive worldwide publicity of fringe groups like the Raelians, and the core issue of an international movement at the United Nations in support of a treaty to ban the use of cloning techniques to produce a child (so called reproductive cloning). Yet, even though debates on human cloning have greatly increased since the birth of Dolly, the clone sheep, in 1997, we continue to wonder whether cloning is after all any different from other methods of medically assisted reproduction, and what exactly makes cloning an 'affront to the dignity of humans.' Categories we adopt matter mightily as they inform but can also misinform and lead to mistaken and unproductive decisions. And thus bioethicists have a responsibility to ensure that the proper categories are used in the cloning debates and denounce those who try to win the ethical debate through well-crafted labels rather than well-reasoned argumentations. But it is as important for bioethicists to take a position on broad issues such as human cloning and species altering interventions. One 'natural question' would be, for example, should there be an international treaty to ban human reproductive cloning?

  3. Procreative liberty, enhancement and commodification in the human cloning debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapshay, Sandra

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to scrutinize a contemporary standoff in the American debate over the moral permissibility of human reproductive cloning in its prospective use as a eugenic enhancement technology. I shall argue that there is some significant and under-appreciated common ground between the defenders and opponents of human cloning. Champions of the moral and legal permissibility of cloning support the technology based on the right to procreative liberty provided it were to become as safe as in vitro fertilization and that it be used only by adults who seek to rear their clone children. However, even champions of procreative liberty oppose the commodification of cloned embryos, and, by extension, the resulting commodification of the cloned children who would be produced via such embryos. I suggest that a Kantian moral argument against the use of cloning as an enhancement technology can be shown to be already implicitly accepted to some extent by champions of procreative liberty on the matter of commodification of cloned embryos. It is in this argument against commodification that the most vocal critics of cloning such as Leon Kass and defenders of cloning such as John Robertson can find greater common ground. Thus, I endeavor to advance the debate by revealing a greater degree of moral agreement on some fundamental premises than hitherto recognized.

  4. High-dimensional quantum cloning and applications to quantum hacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Fickler, Robert; Boyd, Robert W; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2017-02-01

    Attempts at cloning a quantum system result in the introduction of imperfections in the state of the copies. This is a consequence of the no-cloning theorem, which is a fundamental law of quantum physics and the backbone of security for quantum communications. Although perfect copies are prohibited, a quantum state may be copied with maximal accuracy via various optimal cloning schemes. Optimal quantum cloning, which lies at the border of the physical limit imposed by the no-signaling theorem and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, has been experimentally realized for low-dimensional photonic states. However, an increase in the dimensionality of quantum systems is greatly beneficial to quantum computation and communication protocols. Nonetheless, no experimental demonstration of optimal cloning machines has hitherto been shown for high-dimensional quantum systems. We perform optimal cloning of high-dimensional photonic states by means of the symmetrization method. We show the universality of our technique by conducting cloning of numerous arbitrary input states and fully characterize our cloning machine by performing quantum state tomography on cloned photons. In addition, a cloning attack on a Bennett and Brassard (BB84) quantum key distribution protocol is experimentally demonstrated to reveal the robustness of high-dimensional states in quantum cryptography.

  5. Identification of gene clusters associated with host adaptation and antibiotic resistance in Chinese Staphylococcus aureus isolates by microarray-based comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Henan; Zhao, Chunjiang; Chen, Hongbin; Zhang, Feifei; He, Wenqiang; Wang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Qi; Yang, Ruifu; Zhou, Dongsheng; Wang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    A comparative genomic microarray comprising 2,457 genes from two whole genomes of S. aureus was employed for the comparative genome hybridization analysis of 50 strains of divergent clonal lineages, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), and swine strains in China. Large-scale validation was confirmed via polymerase chain reaction in 160 representative clinical strains. All of the 50 strains were clustered into seven different complexes by phylogenetic tree analysis. Thirteen gene clusters were specific to different S. aureus clones. Ten gene clusters, including seven known (vSa3, vSa4, vSaα, vSaβ, Tn5801, and phage ϕSa3) and three novel (C8, C9, and C10) gene clusters, were specific to human MRSA. Notably, two global regulators, sarH2 and sarH3, at cluster C9 were specific to human MRSA, and plasmid pUB110 at cluster C10 was specific to swine MRSA. Three clusters known to be part of SCCmec, vSa4 or Tn5801, and vSaα as well as one novel gene cluster C12 with homology with Tn554 of S. epidermidis were identified as MRSA-specific gene clusters. The replacement of ST239-spa t037 with ST239-spa t030 in Beijing may be a result of its acquisition of vSa4, phage ϕSa1, and ϕSa3. In summary, thirteen critical gene clusters were identified to be contributors to the evolution of host specificity and antibiotic resistance in Chinese S. aureus.

  6. Clinical outcomes and treatment approach for community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berla-Kerzhner, E; Biber, A; Parizade, M; Taran, D; Rahav, G; Regev-Yochay, G; Glikman, D

    2017-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections are increasingly documented worldwide. We recently identified two major CA-MRSA clones in Israel: USA300 and t991. Here, we assessed clinical outcomes by CA-MRSA clones and the physicians' treatment approach to CA-MRSA infections. All community-onset, clinical MRSA isolates detected during 2011-2013 by Maccabi Healthcare Services were collected and characterized phenotypically and genotypically; data were collected retrospectively from electronic medical records. Of 309 patients with MRSA infections, 64 were identified as CA-MRSA (21 %). Of the CA-MRSA infections, 72 % had skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), 38 % were Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)+, the major clone being USA300 (n = 13, 54 %). Of PVL- isolates (n = 40, 62 %), t991 was the major clone. Age was the only predictor for PVL+ CA-MRSA infection (p MRSA had higher incidence of SSTI recurrences (1.061 vs. 0.647 events per patient/per year, p MRSA. USA300 was more common among adults, while t991 was more common among children (p = 0.002). The physician's referral to culture results and susceptibility were the only predictors of appropriate antibiotic therapy (p MRSA isolates caused significantly more recurrences of SSTIs and increased the need for drainage compared with PVL- isolates. Physicians' awareness of CA-MRSA as a cause of SSTIs in the community was suboptimal. Culturing of pus-producing SSTIs is crucial for providing adequate antimicrobials and elucidating MRSA epidemiology.

  7. The decline of the impetigo epidemic caused by the epidemic European fusidic acid-resistant impetigo clone: an 11.5-year population-based incidence study from a community in Western Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rørtveit, Sverre; Skutlaberg, Dag Harald; Langeland, Nina; Rortveit, Guri

    2014-12-01

    From around the year 2000, Northern Europe experienced a rise in impetigo caused by Staphylococcus aureus resistant to fusidic acid. A single clone of S. aureus was found to be the bacterial pathogen involved in the impetigo outbreak in Norway, Sweden, the UK and Ireland, termed 'the epidemic European fusidic acid-resistant impetigo clone' (EEFIC). We have followed the incidence of impetigo during the years 2001-2012 based on all patients in general practice in the island community of Austevoll, Western Norway. We previously reported a marked decline of impetigo incidence in Austevoll, from 0.0260 cases per person-year in 2002 to 0.0038 in 2009. This article explores indications of an end to the impetigo epidemic caused by the EEFIC clone. All four general practitioners (GPs) in the community (mean population = 4400) were asked to diagnose impetigo in a uniform way and to take bacterial specimens from all impetigo cases. Phenotypic characteristics of specimen bacteria were determined for the whole period and molecular analyses were performed on isolates in the period 2008-2012. We observed a further decline in incidence of impetigo in Austevoll in the study period. The proportion of fusidic acid-resistant S. aureus isolates decreased during the period 2002-2012, with a mean of 80% in the epidemic years of 2002-2004, 55% in 2005-2009, and 6% in 2010-2012. In total, 44 S. aureus isolates from impetigo were subject to molecular analyses in the period 2008-2012, and 11 were found to be related to the EEFIC. All EEFIC isolates were found in 2008-2009, with no new isolates in 2010-2012. There is an apparent end to the impetigo epidemic related to the EEFIC in this population in Western Norway.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus carriage in selected kindergartens in Klang Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, N A; Ramli, S; Amin, N N Z; Sulaiman, W S W; Isahak, I; Jamaluddin, T Z M T; Salleh, N M

    2016-04-01

    Nasal colonisation of S. aureus in healthy children was 18% to 30%. One to three percent of them were colonised by Methicillin-resistant Staphlycoccus aureus (MRSA). Although MRSA infection has become increasingly reported, population-based S. aureus and MRSA colonisation estimates are lacking. The main objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of S. aureus carriage among children. Nasal samples for S. aureus culture were obtained from 250 children from three kindergartens in the Klang Valley, after consent was obtained from the children and their parents. Swabs were transported in Stuart medium, and inoculated on mannitol-salt agar within four hours of collection. Identification and disk diffusion test were done according to guidelines. Polymerase chain reaction was done on MRSA isolates for the presence of mecA and lukS/FPV genes. Overall prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA carriage were 19.2% (48/250) and 1.6% (4/250) respectively. mecA gene was present in all isolates, 50% isolates carried Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) gene. Sccmec type I was found in 2 isolates and the remaining isolates has Sccmec type V. The prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA carriage were similar to other studies. However, risk of contracting severe infection might be higher due to presence of PVL gene in half of the MRSA isolates.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus infections following knee and hip prosthesis insertion procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduino, Jean Marie; Kaye, Keith S; Reed, Shelby D; Peter, Senaka A; Sexton, Daniel J; Chen, Luke F; Hardy, N Chantelle; Tong, Steven Yc; Smugar, Steven S; Fowler, Vance G; Anderson, Deverick J

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common and most important pathogen following knee and hip arthroplasty procedures. Understanding the epidemiology of invasive S. aureus infections is important to quantify this serious complication. This nested retrospective cohort analysis included adult patients who had undergone insertion of knee or hip prostheses with clean or clean-contaminated wound class at 11 hospitals between 2003-2006. Invasive S. aureus infections, non-superficial incisional surgical site infections (SSIs) and blood stream infections (BSIs), were prospectively identified following each procedure. Prevalence rates, per 100 procedures, were estimated. 13,719 prosthetic knee (62%) and hip (38%) insertion procedures were performed. Of 92 invasive S. aureus infections identified, SSIs were more common (80%) than SSI and BSI (10%) or BSI alone (10%). The rate of invasive S. aureus infection/100 procedures was 0.57 [95% CI: 0.43-0.73] for knee insertion and 0.83 [95% CI: 0.61-1.08] for hip insertion. More than half (53%) were methicillin-resistant. Median time-to-onset of infection was 34 and 26 days for knee and hip insertion, respectively. Infection was associated with higher National Healthcare Safety Network risk index (p ≤ 0.0001). Post-operative invasive S. aureus infections were rare, but difficult-to-treat methicillin-resistant infections were relatively common. Optimizing preventative efforts may greatly reduce the healthcare burden associated with S. aureus infections.

  10. Epic Immune Battles of History: Neutrophils vs. Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermin E. Guerra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in human blood and the first line of defense after bacteria have breached the epithelial barriers. After migration to a site of infection, neutrophils engage and expose invading microorganisms to antimicrobial peptides and proteins, as well as reactive oxygen species, as part of their bactericidal arsenal. Ideally, neutrophils ingest bacteria to prevent damage to surrounding cells and tissues, kill invading microorganisms with antimicrobial mechanisms, undergo programmed cell death to minimize inflammation, and are cleared away by macrophages. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is a prevalent Gram-positive bacterium that is a common commensal and causes a wide range of diseases from skin infections to endocarditis. Since its discovery, S. aureus has been a formidable neutrophil foe that has challenged the efficacy of this professional assassin. Indeed, proper clearance of S. aureus by neutrophils is essential to positive infection outcome, and S. aureus has developed mechanisms to evade neutrophil killing. Herein, we will review mechanisms used by S. aureus to modulate and evade neutrophil bactericidal mechanisms including priming, activation, chemotaxis, production of reactive oxygen species, and resolution of infection. We will also highlight how S. aureus uses sensory/regulatory systems to tailor production of virulence factors specifically to the triggering signal, e.g., neutrophils and defensins. To conclude, we will provide an overview of therapeutic approaches that may potentially enhance neutrophil antimicrobial functions.

  11. Silver nanoparticles for the inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Ortiz-Gila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Existe un gran ecosistema microbiano en la cavidad oral donde Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus se puede encontrar, causando patologías orales tales como quelitis angular, las paperas y la mucositis estafilocócica. Estas enfermedades producidas por S. aureus en la cavidad oral son consecuencia de los factores de virulencia, toxinas y multiresistencia a los antibióticos, lo que contribuye a la infección. La colonización en la cavidad oral por S. aureus en pacientes sanos es de 24% a 36%. Sin embargo, la incidencia aumenta a 48% en pacientes con prótesis debido a la formación de biofilms en la superficie de las dentaduras postizas. Actualmente, no existe ningún tratamiento para infecciones orales sin el uso de antibióticos. Investigaciones recientes indican que las nanopartículas de plata (AgNPs son un material o estrategia para eliminar S. aureus debido a su efecto antibacteriano. Sin embargo, el mecanismo del efecto inhibidor de los iones de Ag sobre S. aureus es sólo parcialmente conocida y muy poco se ha informado. Por lo tanto, el propósito de la presente revisión sistemática es determinar las estrategias y retos de la utilización de biomateriales antimicrobianos con AgNPs frente a las infecciones orales de S. aureus.

  12. [Eradication of Staphylococcus aureus in carrier patients undergoing joint arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbero Allende, José M; Romanyk Cabrera, Juan; Montero Ruiz, Eduardo; Vallés Purroy, Alfonso; Melgar Molero, Virginia; Agudo López, Rosa; Gete García, Luis; López Álvarez, Joaquín

    2015-02-01

    Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a complication with serious repercussions and its main cause is Staphylococcus aureus. The purpose of this study is to determine whether decolonization of S.aureus carriers helps to reduce the incidence of PJI by S.aureus. An S.aureus screening test was performed on nasal carriers in patients undergoing knee or hip arthroplasty between January and December 2011. Patients with a positive test were treated with intranasal mupirocin and chlorhexidine soap 5 days. The incidence of PJI was compared with patients undergoing the same surgery between January and December 2010. A total of 393 joint replacements were performed in 391 patients from the control group, with 416 joint replacements being performed in the intervention group. Colonization study was performed in 382 patients (91.8%), of which 102 were positive (26.7%) and treated. There was 2 PJI due S.aureus compared with 9 in the control group (0.5% vs 2.3%, odds ratio [OR]: 0.2, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.4 to 2.3, P=.04). In our study, the detection of colonization and eradication of S.aureus carriers achieved a significant decrease in PJI due to S.aureus compared to a historical group. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  13. The changing epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laupland, K.B.; Lyytikäinen, O.; Søgaard, Mette

    2013-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect ABSTRACT: Although the epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) has been changing, international comparisons are lacking. We sought to determine the incidence of S. aureus BSI and assess trends over time and by region. Population-based surveillance...... episodes of S. aureus BSI were identified. The overall annual incidence rate for S. aureus BSI was 26.1 per 100 000 population, and those for methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were 24.2 and 1.9 per 100 000, respectively. Although the overall incidence...... of community-onset MSSA BSI (15.0 per 100 000) was relatively similar across regions, the incidence rates of hospital-onset MSSA (9.2 per 100 000), community-onset MRSA (1.0 per 100 000) and hospital-onset MRSA (0.8 per 100 000) BSI varied substantially. Whereas the overall incidence of S. aureus BSI did...

  14. Epic Immune Battles of History: Neutrophils vs. Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Fermin E.; Borgogna, Timothy R.; Patel, Delisha M.; Sward, Eli W.; Voyich, Jovanka M.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in human blood and the first line of defense after bacteria have breached the epithelial barriers. After migration to a site of infection, neutrophils engage and expose invading microorganisms to antimicrobial peptides and proteins, as well as reactive oxygen species, as part of their bactericidal arsenal. Ideally, neutrophils ingest bacteria to prevent damage to surrounding cells and tissues, kill invading microorganisms with antimicrobial mechanisms, undergo programmed cell death to minimize inflammation, and are cleared away by macrophages. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a prevalent Gram-positive bacterium that is a common commensal and causes a wide range of diseases from skin infections to endocarditis. Since its discovery, S. aureus has been a formidable neutrophil foe that has challenged the efficacy of this professional assassin. Indeed, proper clearance of S. aureus by neutrophils is essential to positive infection outcome, and S. aureus has developed mechanisms to evade neutrophil killing. Herein, we will review mechanisms used by S. aureus to modulate and evade neutrophil bactericidal mechanisms including priming, activation, chemotaxis, production of reactive oxygen species, and resolution of infection. We will also highlight how S. aureus uses sensory/regulatory systems to tailor production of virulence factors specifically to the triggering signal, e.g., neutrophils and defensins. To conclude, we will provide an overview of therapeutic approaches that may potentially enhance neutrophil antimicrobial functions. PMID:28713774

  15. Disruption of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms with Enzymatic Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-29

    NAVAL MEDICAL RESEARCH UNIT SAN ANTONIO Disruption of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms with Enzymatic...Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus MSSA Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus OD Optical density PBS Phosphate-buffered saline SEM... Staphylococcus aureus biofilm model that mimics wound-like conditions and employ this model to evaluate the anti-biofilm activity of four enzymatic compounds

  16. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning)," last published in Fertil Steril 2000;74:873-6. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Insights on bovine genetic engineering and cloning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana F. Bressan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Transgenic technology has become an essential tool for the development of animal biotechnologies, and animal cloning through somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT enabled the generation of genetically modified animals utilizing previously modified and selected cell lineages as nuclei donors, assuring therefore the generation of homogeneous herds expressing the desired modification. The present study aimed to discuss the use of SCNT as an important methodology for the production of transgenic herds, and also some recent insights on genetic modification of nuclei donors and possible effects of gene induction of pluripotency on SCNT.

  18. Quantum correlations support probabilistic pure state cloning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roa, Luis, E-mail: lroa@udec.cl [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Alid-Vaccarezza, M.; Jara-Figueroa, C. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Klimov, A.B. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Guadalajara, Avenida Revolución 1500, 44420 Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico)

    2014-02-01

    The probabilistic scheme for making two copies of two nonorthogonal pure states requires two auxiliary systems, one for copying and one for attempting to project onto the suitable subspace. The process is performed by means of a unitary-reduction scheme which allows having a success probability of cloning different from zero. The scheme becomes optimal when the probability of success is maximized. In this case, a bipartite state remains as a free degree which does not affect the probability. We find bipartite states for which the unitarity does not introduce entanglement, but does introduce quantum discord between some involved subsystems.

  19. Clinical significance of Staphylococcus aureus bacteriuria in a nationwide study of adults with S. aureus bacteraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgeirsson, Hilmir; Kristjansson, Mar; Kristinsson, Karl G; Gudlaugsson, Olafur

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical significance of Staphylococcus aureus bacteriuria (SABU) in adults with S. aureus bacteraemia (SAB). All individuals ≥18 years old diagnosed with SAB in Iceland between December 1st 2003 and November 30th 2008 were retrospectively identified. Data was collected from medical records. Concomitant SABU was defined as growth of S. aureus in a urine sample taken within 24 h of the index blood culture. SABU was seen in 27 of 166 (16.3%) SAB patients having urine cultured before administration of antibiotics, but after excluding those with SAB of urinary tract origin SABU was seen in 16 of 152 (10.5%). In this latter cohort SABU was independently associated with having endocarditis (RR 6.68; 95% CI 1.53-17.3) and admission to intensive-care unit (RR 2.84; 95% CI 1.25-4.44), while for having complicated SAB the RR was 1.56 (95% CI 0.96-1.80). No correlation was seen with mortality or relapse rates. SABU appears to be secondary to SAB in some cases while it is the primary infection causing SAB in others. In patients with SAB of non-urinary tract origin SABU should probably be regarded as distant haematogenous seeding and a marker of deep tissue dissemination, thus affecting general management and treatment duration. Copyright © 2011 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of donor fibroblast cell type and transferred cloned embryo number on the efficiency of pig cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zicong; Shi, Junsong; Liu, Dewu; Zhou, Rong; Zeng, Haiyu; Zhou, Xiu; Mai, Ranbiao; Zeng, Shaofen; Luo, Lvhua; Yu, Wanxian; Zhang, Shouquan; Wu, Zhenfang

    2013-02-01

    Currently, cloning efficiency in pigs is very low. Donor cell type and number of cloned embryos transferred to an individual surrogate are two major factors that affect the successful rate of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in pigs. This study aimed to compare the influence of different donor fibroblast cell types and different transferred embryo numbers on recipients' pregnancy rate and delivery rate, the average number of total clones born, clones born alive and clones born healthy per litter, and the birth rate of healthy clones (=total number of healthy cloned piglets born /total number of transferred cloned embryos). Three types of donor fibroblasts were tested in large-scale production of cloned pigs, including fetal fibroblasts (FFBs) from four genetically similar Western swine breeds of Pietrain (P), Duroc (D), Landrace (L), and Yorkshire (Y), which are referred to as P,D,LY-FFBs, adult fibroblasts (AFBs) from the same four breeds, which are designated P,D,L,Y-AFBs, and AFBs from a Chinese pig breed of Laiwu (LW), which is referred to as LW-AFBs. Within each donor fibroblast cell type group, five transferred cloned embryo number groups were tested. In each embryo number group, 150-199, 200-249, 250-299, 300-349, or 350-450 cloned embryos were transferred to each individual recipient sow. For the entire experiment, 92,005 cloned embryos were generated from nearly 115,000 matured oocytes and transferred to 328 recipients; in total, 488 cloned piglets were produced. The results showed that the mean clones born healthy per litter resulted from transfer of embryos cloned from LW-AFBs (2.53 ± 0.34) was similar with that associated with P,D,L,Y-FFBs (2.72 ± 0.29), but was significantly higher than that resulted from P,D,L,Y-AFBs (1.47 ± 0.18). Use of LW-AFBs as donor cells for SCNT resulted in a significantly higher pregnancy rate (72.00% vs. 59.30% and 48.11%) and delivery rate (60.00% vs. 45.93% and 35.85%) for cloned embryo recipients, and a