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Sample records for aureus biofilm-embedded bacterin

  1. 9 CFR 113.115 - Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterin-Toxoid... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.115 Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterin-Toxoid. Staphylococcus... Staphylococcus aureus which has been inactivated and is nontoxic. Each serial of biological product containing...

  2. New Derivatives of Pyridoxine Exhibit High Antibacterial Activity against Biofilm-Embedded Staphylococcus Cells

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    Airat R. Kayumov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis often form rigid biofilms on tissues and inorganic surfaces. In the biofilm bacterial cells are embedded in a self-produced polysaccharide matrix and thereby are inaccessible to biocides, antibiotics, or host immune system. Here we show the antibacterial activity of newly synthesized cationic biocides, the quaternary ammonium, and bisphosphonium salts of pyridoxine (vitamin B6 against biofilm-embedded Staphylococci. The derivatives of 6-hydroxymethylpyridoxine were ineffective against biofilm-embedded S. aureus and S. epidermidis at concentrations up to 64 μg/mL, although all compounds tested exhibited low MICs (2 μg/mL against planktonic cells. In contrast, the quaternary ammonium salt of pyridoxine (N,N-dimethyl-N-((2,2,8-trimethyl-4H-[1,3]dioxino[4,5-c]pyridin-5-ylmethyloctadecan-1-aminium chloride (3 demonstrated high biocidal activity against both planktonic and biofilm-embedded bacteria. Thus, the complete death of biofilm-embedded S. aureus and S. epidermidis cells was obtained at concentrations of 64 and 16 μg/mL, respectively. We suggest that the quaternary ammonium salts of pyridoxine are perspective to design new synthetic antibiotics and disinfectants for external application against biofilm-embedded cells.

  3. Effect of montanide adjuvanted staphylococcus aureus bacterin-toxiod on prevalence and incidence of mastitis in cows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousif, A.; Muhmmad, G.; Masood, M.Z.; Rahman, S.U.; Siddique, M.

    2009-01-01

    The current study was conducted to investigate the prevalence and incidence of mastitis associated with Montanide adjuvanted Staphylococcus aureus bacterin toxiod in dairy cows in Faisalabad (Punjab, Pakistan). A total of 60 mastitis free dairy cows, in first and second month of lactation, were selected on the basis of results determined by California mastitis test and Surf field mastitis test. The animals were randomly divided into three groups (C1, C2, and C3) each containing twenty cows. The vaccine was administered twice with four weeks interval at the rate of 5 ml intramuscularly in the neck region in all the animals of group C1 and C2. Levamisole HCl (Nilverm at the rate, ICI, Pakistan) at the rate 2.5 mg per kg weight was given orally to animals of group C2 after first and second injections of vaccine, while the animals in group C3 were kept as control (non-vaccinated and non-medicated with levamisole HCl). Prevalence and incidence rates were determined at 1st, 30th , 60th , 120th and 180th days post-vaccination. The results showed that maximum numbers of quarters were found positive in group C3 with maximum cumulative prevalence (27.5%) while minimum (11.25%) was recorded in group C2 followed by vaccinated group (13.75 %). There was no significant variation in cumulative incidence between the vaccinated and vaccinated plus levamisole HCl group. (author)

  4. 9 CFR 113.107 - Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin. 113... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.107 Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin. Clostridium Haemolyticum Bacterin shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium haemolyticum which has been inactivated...

  5. 9 CFR 113.121 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin. 113... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.121 Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin. Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin shall be prepared from a culture of Pasteurella multocida strains other than avian which have been...

  6. 9 CFR 113.101 - Leptospira Pomona Bacterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leptospira Pomona Bacterin. 113.101... Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.101 Leptospira Pomona Bacterin. Leptospira Pomona Bacterin shall be produced from a culture of Leptospira pomona which has been inactivated and is nontoxic. Each serial of...

  7. 9 CFR 113.103 - Leptospira Canicola Bacterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leptospira Canicola Bacterin. 113.103... Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.103 Leptospira Canicola Bacterin. Leptospira Canicola Bacterin shall be produced from a culture of Leptospira canicola which has been inactivated and is nontoxic. Each serial of...

  8. 9 CFR 113.104 - Leptospira Grippotyphosa Bacterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leptospira Grippotyphosa Bacterin. 113... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.104 Leptospira Grippotyphosa Bacterin. Leptospira Grippotyphosa Bacterin shall be produced from a culture of Leptospira grippotyphosa which has been inactivated...

  9. 9 CFR 113.105 - Leptospira Hardjo Bacterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leptospira Hardjo Bacterin. 113.105... Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.105 Leptospira Hardjo Bacterin. Leptospira Hardjo Bacterin shall be produced from a culture of Leptospira hardjo which has been inactivated and is nontoxic. Each serial of...

  10. 9 CFR 113.123 - Salmonella Dublin Bacterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Salmonella Dublin Bacterin. 113.123... Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.123 Salmonella Dublin Bacterin. Salmonella Dublin Bacterin shall be prepared from a culture of Salmonella dublin which has been inactivated and is nontoxic. Each serial of...

  11. 9 CFR 113.122 - Salmonella Choleraesuis Bacterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Salmonella Choleraesuis Bacterin. 113... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.122 Salmonella Choleraesuis Bacterin. Salmonella Choleraesuis Bacterin shall be prepared from a culture of Salmonella choleraesuis which has been inactivated and is...

  12. 9 CFR 113.120 - Salmonella Typhimurium Bacterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Salmonella Typhimurium Bacterin. 113... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.120 Salmonella Typhimurium Bacterin. Salmonella Typhimurium Bacterin shall be prepared from a culture of Salmonella typhimurium which has been inactivated and is...

  13. 9 CFR 113.102 - Leptospira Icterohaemorrhagiae Bacterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leptospira Icterohaemorrhagiae... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.102 Leptospira Icterohaemorrhagiae Bacterin. Leptospira Icterohaemorrhagiae Bacterin shall be produced from a culture of Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae which has been...

  14. 9 CFR 113.119 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Bacterin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Bacterin. 113.119 Section 113.119 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... ability of the bacterin being tested (Unknown) to protect mice shall be compared with a Standard Reference...

  15. Chitosan-adjuvanted Mycoplasma gallisepticum bacterin via intraocular administration enhances Mycoplasma gallisepticum protection in commercial layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limsatanun, A; Sasipreeyajan, J; Pakpinyo, S

    2018-02-15

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) causes respiratory signs and economic losses in the poultry industry. MG vaccination is one of the effective prevention and control measures that have been used around the world. Our previous study demonstrated that chitosan-adjuvanted MG bacterin could effectively reduce pathological lesions induced by MG and that chitosan could be used as an adjuvant in MG bacterin. The present study determining the efficacy of MG bacterins against the Thai MG strain was based on vaccine programs. Seven groups (25 layers/group) were received MG bacterins containing 0.5% chitosan or a commercial bacterin via intramuscular (IM) or intraocular (IO) route at 6 and 10 wk of age. Sham-negative and sham-positive controls were groups 1 and 2, respectively. Group 3: IM route of chitosan bacterin followed by IM route of chitosan bacterin; group 4: commercial bacterin via IM route followed by chitosan bacterin via IO route; group 5: commercial bacterin via IM route followed by commercial bacterin via IM route; group 6: chitosan bacterin via IM followed by chitosan bacterin via IO route; and group 7: chitosan bacterin via IO route followed by chitosan bacterin via IO route were determined. At 16 wk of age, all groups, excluding group 1, were challenged intratracheally with 0.1 mL containing Thai MG strain 107 colony-forming unit. At 17, 18, and 20 wk of age, 5 birds in each group were bled for serological testing and swabbed at the choanal cleft for the quantitative real-time PCR assay, the euthanized and necropsied. The results showed that birds vaccinated with a commercial intramuscular bacterin followed by an intraocularly chitosan adjuvant bacterin showed the best protection against the MG challenge. The study indicated that chitosan could be the effective mucosal adjuvant and increased the effectiveness of MG bacterin.

  16. 9 CFR 113.110 - Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin-Toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin... REQUIREMENTS Inactivated Bacterial Products § 113.110 Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin-Toxoid. Clostridium Botulinum Type C Bacterin-Toxoid shall be produced from a culture of Clostridium botulinum Type C which has...

  17. Global 3D Imaging of Yersinia ruckeri Bacterin Uptake in Rainbow Trout Fry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Maki; Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Raida, Martin Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia ruckeri is the causative agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM) in rainbow trout, and the first commercially available fish vaccine was an immersion vaccine against ERM consisting of Y. ruckeri bacterin. The ERM immersion vaccine has been successfully used in aquaculture farming of salmonids for more than 35 years. The gills and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are believed to be the portals of antigen uptake during waterborne vaccination against ERM; however, the actual sites of bacterin uptake are only partly understood. In order to obtain insight into bacterin uptake during waterborne vaccination, optical projection tomography (OPT) together with immunohistochemistry (IHC) was applied to visualize bacterin uptake and processing in whole rainbow trout fry. Visualization by OPT revealed that the bacterin was initially taken up via gill lamellae from within 30 seconds post vaccination. Later, bacterin uptake was detected on other mucosal surfaces such as skin and olfactory bulb from 5 to 30 minutes post vaccination. The GI tract was found to be filled with a complex of bacterin and mucus at 3 hours post vaccination and the bacterin remained in the GI tract for at least 24 hours. Large amounts of bacterin were present in the blood, and an accumulation of bacterin was found in filtering lymphoid organs such as spleen and trunk kidney where the bacterin accumulates 24 hours post vaccination as demonstrated by OPT and IHC. These results suggest that bacterin is taken up via the gill epithelium in the earliest phases of the bath exposure and from the GI tract in the later phase. The bacterin then enters the blood circulatory system, after which it is filtered by spleen and trunk kidney, before finally accumulating in lymphoid organs where adaptive immunity against ERM is likely to develop. PMID:25658600

  18. Global 3D imaging of Yersinia ruckeri bacterin uptake in rainbow trout fry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otani, Maki; Villumsen, Kasper Rømer; Koppang, Erling Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia ruckeri is the causative agent of enteric redmouth disease (ERM) in rainbow trout, and the first commercially available fish vaccine was an immersion vaccine against ERM consisting of Y. ruckeri bacterin. The ERM immersion vaccine has been successfully used in aquaculture farming...... waterborne vaccination, optical projection tomography (OPT) together with immunohistochemistry (IHC) was applied to visualize bacterin uptake and processing in whole rainbow trout fry. Visualization by OPT revealed that the bacterin was initially taken up via gill lamellae from within 30 seconds post...... vaccination. Later, bacterin uptake was detected on other mucosal surfaces such as skin and olfactory bulb from 5 to 30 minutes post vaccination. The GI tract was found to be filled with a complex of bacterin and mucus at 3 hours post vaccination and the bacterin remained in the GI tract for at least 24 hours...

  19. ERM booster vaccination of Rainbow trout using diluted bacterin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jacob Günther; Henriksen, Niels H.; Buchmann, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    under laboratory conditions extend the protection period. The present field study investigated the applicability of the method under practical farming conditions (freshwater earth ponds supplied by stream water). Primary immersion vaccination of trout (3–4 g) for 30 s in Y. ruckeri bacterin (diluted 1......Enteric Red Mouth Disease ERM caused by Yersinia ruckeri infection is associated with morbidity and mortality in salmonid farming but immersion vaccination of fry may confer some protection for a number of months. Revaccination of rainbow trout, even by use of diluted ERM immersion vaccine, can......:10) in April 2015 was followed 3 months later (July 2015) by 1 h bathing of rainbow trout in bacterin (diluted 1:650 or 1:1700) in order to evaluate if this time saving vaccination methodology can improve immunity and protection. Trout were subjected in farms to natural Y. ruckeri exposure in June and July...

  20. Cross-protection between experimental anti-leptospirosis bacterins

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    Cristina Corsi Dib

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the existence of cross-protection between two anti-leptospirosis monovalent experimental bacterins produced with two strains of Leptospira serogroup Pomona: Fromm strain of serovar Kennewicky, isolated from pigs in the United States, and strain GR6 of serovar Pomona isolated from pigs in Brazil. Both were added of aluminum hydroxide as an adjuvant. Experimental bacterins were tested with the hamster potency test in order to assess protection provided against the disease and against the establishment of kidney infection. Controls were polyvalent commercial vaccine produced with Leptospira strains isolated outside Brazil, which included a representative of Pomona serovar, or Sorensen solution added of aluminum hydroxide adjuvant. The challenge was performed with cross-strains of serogroup Pomona tested in accordance with international standards established for the potency test. After 21 days of the challenge, survivors were killed to evaluate the condition of Leptospira renal carrier. Experimental bacterins protected hamsters against homologous and heterologous strains, demonstrating the existence of cross-protection. The commercial vaccine protected the hamsters challenged with both strains, but there was a high proportion of animals diagnosed as renal carriers when the challenge was performed with strain GR6, isolated from pigs in Brazil.

  1. Efficacy of Linezolid and Fosfomycin in Catheter-Related Biofilm Infection Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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    Dong Chai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As long-standing clinical problems, catheter-related infections and other chronic biofilm infections are more difficult to treat due to the high antibiotic resistance of biofilm. Therefore, new treatments are needed for more effective bacteria clearance. In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial activities of several common antibiotics alone and their combinations against biofilm-embedded methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections, both in vitro and in vivo. In brief, fosfomycin, levofloxacin, and rifampin alone or in combination with linezolid were tested in vitro against planktonic and biofilm-embedded MRSA infection in three MRSA stains. The synergistic effects between linezolid and the other three antibiotics were assessed by fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI and time-kill curves, where the combination of linezolid plus fosfomycin showed the best synergistic effect in all strains. For further evaluation in vivo, we applied the combination of linezolid and fosfomycin in a catheter-related biofilm rat model and found that viable bacteria counts in biofilm were significantly reduced after treatment (P<0.05. In summary, we have shown here that the combination of linezolid and fosfomycin treatment had improved therapeutic effects on biofilm-embedded MRSA infection both in vitro and in vivo, which provided important basis for new clinical therapy development.

  2. Efficacy of Linezolid and Fosfomycin in Catheter-Related Biofilm Infection Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Dong; Liu, Xu; Wang, Rui; Bai, Yan; Cai, Yun

    2016-01-01

    As long-standing clinical problems, catheter-related infections and other chronic biofilm infections are more difficult to treat due to the high antibiotic resistance of biofilm. Therefore, new treatments are needed for more effective bacteria clearance. In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial activities of several common antibiotics alone and their combinations against biofilm-embedded methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, both in vitro and in vivo. In brief, fosfomycin, levofloxacin, and rifampin alone or in combination with linezolid were tested in vitro against planktonic and biofilm-embedded MRSA infection in three MRSA stains. The synergistic effects between linezolid and the other three antibiotics were assessed by fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) and time-kill curves, where the combination of linezolid plus fosfomycin showed the best synergistic effect in all strains. For further evaluation in vivo, we applied the combination of linezolid and fosfomycin in a catheter-related biofilm rat model and found that viable bacteria counts in biofilm were significantly reduced after treatment (P linezolid and fosfomycin treatment had improved therapeutic effects on biofilm-embedded MRSA infection both in vitro and in vivo, which provided important basis for new clinical therapy development.

  3. Efficacy of a Commercial Bacterin in Protecting Strain 13 Guinea Pigs against Bordetella bronchiseptica Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    aid in controlling canine infectious tracheobronchitis (13). Bacterium: A frozen (-70°C) stock culture of a guLnea pig isolate of B. bronchiseptica...A199 157 EFFICACY OF A COWMRCIAL BACTERIN IN PROTECTING SRT 13 GUINEA PIGS AGA WU) ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH INST OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES FORT DETRIC C J...3.’ RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER TYPO El CQF 4. TI S.TP FREPORT & PERIOD COVERE6 Efficacy of a Commercial Bacterin In Pathotogv Infectious Study

  4. Cross neutralizing antibodies in hamsters vaccinated with leptospiral bacterins produced with three serovars of serogroup Sejroe

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    Rosana Tabata

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Three leptospiral bacterins, produced with different serovars of Serogroup Sejroe, namely the hardjo (bacterin A, wolffi (bacterin B and guaricura (bacterin C, were evaluated in male hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus by comparing the agglutinating and neutralizing antibodies titers using microscopic agglutination (MAT and in vitro growth inhibition (GIT tests. The immunization schedule was based on two 1.0 mL doses of non-diluted formalininactivated whole culture bacterin given through subcutaneous route with 10-day interval. The challenge was performed ten days after the second vaccine dose, when the animals were inoculated with 0.2 mL of non-inactivated cultures of each serovar through intraperitoneal route. On the 21st post-challenge day (PCD, all animals were bled and their sera were joined in pools (n=8 and tested by MAT and GIT. All vaccinated and control animals presented no clinical signs of leptospirosis after the challenge, but the serovar guaricura was isolated from the kidneys of control animals on the 21st PCD. The MAT results showed cross agglutinins between serovars hardjo and wolffi, and between wolffi and guaricura. The GIT results revealed the presence of cross neutralizing antibodies between serovars wolffi or guaricura against hardjo, wolffi and guaricura. It was found that the tested strain of serovar hardjo did not produce detectable levels of neutralizing antibodies, indicating its poor immunogenicity.

  5. The Effect of Tsukamurella inchonensis Bacterin on the Immune Response Against Influenza and Newcastle Disease Vaccines in Broiler Chickens

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    Forough Talazadeh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In poultry production, improving immunity is very important to prevent infectious diseases. One solution to improve the immunity of animals and to decrease their susceptibility to infectious disease is administration of immunostimulants. Surveys have indicated that some bacteria can work as immunomodulators such as Mycobacterium vaccae and can promote Th1-mediated mechanisms, and switch off pre-existing Th2 preponderance (1. Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of Tsukamurella inchonensis bacterin on the immune response against Influenza and Newcastle disease vaccine in broiler chickens . Materials and Methods: A total of 170 day-old broiler chicks were purchased and divided randomly into 5 equal groups. Chickens of group A received 106 bacterin subcutaneously on two days before vaccination against Newcastle disease and avian influenza. Chickens of group B received 106 bacterin subcutaneously on six days after the first injection of bacterin. Chickens of group C received 106bacterin subcutaneously on six days after the second injection of bacterin. Chickens of group D, vaccinated against Newcastle disease and avian influenza but did not receive bacterin. Chickens of group E, did not vaccinate against Newcastle disease and avian influenza and did not receive bacterin. All groups except group E, were vaccinated with live Newcastle vaccine and AI-ND killed vaccine (subtype H9N2. Blood samples were collected and antibody titer against Newcastle disease vaccine and avian influenza vaccine was determined by HI test. Results: The results of present study showed that receiving of Tsukamurella inchonensis bacterin for 3 times, significantly increased the specific antibody response to avian influenza subtype H9N2 vaccine. Also about Newcastle vaccine, significantly increased the specific antibody response to Newcastle vaccine at 21 and 28 days after vaccination. Conclusions: Receiving of Tsukamurella inchonensis bacterin

  6. Booster immersion vaccination using diluted Yersinia ruckeri bacterin confers protection against ERM in rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Mohammad, Rezkar Jaafar; Skov, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    A single immersion vaccination of rainbow trout fry using a Yersinia ruckeri bacterin confers immunity to reinfection but only for a shorter period. A longer protective period is needed in practical trout farming and we have shown that booster vaccination prolongs immunity. Due to economic...... considerations and management practices it is not possible to immersion vaccinate large trout (20–30 g) with the recommended high bacterin concentration. We here demonstrate that booster vaccination using dilutions of the bacterin (1:100, 1:1000 and 1:2000) with increased exposure time (1 h, 2 h) confers...... such a practice will not challenge farm management and economy. Increased antibody levels were recorded after challenge of vaccinated fish but not after immersion vaccination alone which suggests that immersion induces priming of memory cells....

  7. 9 CFR 113.118 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Isolate, Type 3. 113.118 Section 113.118 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... Isolate, Type 3. Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 3, shall be prepared from culture of Pasteurella multocida, avian isolate, Type 3 (Little and Lyons classification), which have been inactivated...

  8. 9 CFR 113.117 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Isolate, Type 1. 113.117 Section 113.117 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... Isolate, Type 1. Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 1, shall be prepared from cultures of Pasteurella multocida, avian isolate, Type 1 (Little and Lyons classification), which have been inactivated...

  9. 9 CFR 113.116 - Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Isolate, Type 4. 113.116 Section 113.116 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... Isolate, Type 4. Pasteurella Multocida Bacterin, Avian Isolate, Type 4 shall be prepared from cultures of Pasteurella multocida, avian isolate, Type 4 (Little and Lyons classification), which have been inactivated...

  10. Association between increased antibody level and protection in Yersinia ruckeri bacterin immersion vaccinated rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raida, Martin Kristian; Nylén, Jørgen; Holten-Andersen, Lars

    A key hallmark of the vertebrate adaptive immune system is the generation of antigen-specific antibodies from B cells. Fish are the most primitive gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates) possessing an adaptive immune system. Vaccination of rainbow trout against enteric redmouth disease (ERM) by immersion...... significant increase in plasma antibody titers following immersion vaccination and significantly reduced mortality during Y. ruckeri challenge. Rainbow trout were immersion-vaccinated, using either a commercial ERM vaccine (AquaVacTM ERM vet) or an experimental Y. ruckeri bacterin. Half of the trout...... increased the survival. The present work has shown that immersion vaccination with Y. ruckeri bacterin induced significant protection, and that the increase of specific antibodies is part of the protective mechanism behind the successful immersion vaccination against ERM....

  11. Antimicrobial blue light inactivation of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yucheng; Dai, Tianhong; Gu, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Background: With the increasing emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial strains, there is a pressing need for the development of alternative treatment for infections. Antimicrobial blue light (aBL) has provided a simple and effective approach. Methods: We first investigated the effectiveness of aBL (415 nm) inactivation of USA300 LAClux (a communityacquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain) both in the planktonic and biofilm forms. The survival of the bacteria in suspensions was determined by serial dilution and that of the biofilm-embedded bacteria was determined by bioluminescence quantification. Using a mouse model of thermal burn infected with USA300 LAClux, we further assessed the effectiveness of aBL for treating localized infections. Bioluminescence imaging was performed to monitor in real time bacterial viability in vivo. Results: In vitro study showed that, for the planktonic counterpart of the bacteria or the 24-h-old biofilms, an irradiance of 55 mW/cm2 for 60 min resulted in a 4.61 log10 or 2.56 log10 inactivation, respectively. In vivo study using infected mouse burns demonstrated that a 2.56-log10 inactivation was achieved after 100-mW/cm2 irradiation for 62 min. Conclusions: aBL is a potential alternative approach for treating Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

  12. Evaluation of a Serpens species bacterin for treatment of digital dermatitis in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Andrew P; Alley, Mark L; Smith, Geof W

    2012-12-01

    Digital dermatitis is a major cause of lameness in many dairy herds and represents a detriment to milk production, reproductive efficiency, productive lifespan and welfare. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic use of a Serpens species bacterin in a dairy herd known to have a significant prevalence of lameness due to digital dermatitis. Seventy-six mature lactating Holsteins were enrolled in this study. Group 1 (n=38) received three injections of a Serpens species bacterin at four-week intervals (weeks 0, 4, and 8) while group 2 (n=38) received only adjuvant. Blood samples were obtained prior to the first injection at week 0 and again at week 12 to evaluate antibody responses. Locomotion and digital dermatitis lesion measurements were performed at weeks 0, 12 and 18. Although Serpens-associated antibody titers increased from week 0 to 12 in vaccinated cows; the prevalence of digital dermatitis, the percentage of cows identified as clinically lame and the average width of digital dermatitis lesions did not differ from week 0 to 12 or from week 0 to 18 between groups. The results of this study indicate a lack of any clinical efficacy associated with vaccination in this herd, although inoculation with the bacterin did stimulate a measurable antibody response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. EXPERIMENTAL TRIALS OF LIVE ATTENUATED AND INACTIVATED STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS VACCINES IN RABBITS

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    A. SHAKOOR, M. ATHAR, G. MUHAMMAD, S. U. RAHMAN1, A. A. BUTT2, I. HUSSAIN 2 AND R. AHMAD3

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted as a preliminary step on the rabbits for comparative efficacy of different vaccines of Staphylococcus aureus. Typical alpha-beta Staph. aureus species from a clinically affected mastitic buffalo was isolated. After proper identification based on cultural and morphological characteristics and API-Staph Trac system, a selected Staph. aureus isolate was used to prepare four different mastitis vaccines (Bacterin, oil-adjuvanted, dextran sulphate adjuvanted and live attenuated after confirmation for pathogenicity and antigenicity, followed by its safety and sterility evaluation. Vaccines were tried in 25 rabbits divided into 5 equal groups. A separate vaccine was administered s/c @ 0.2 ml per animal and boosted at 15 days later. It was found that IHA antibody titers were higher (GMT 32-128 in live attenuated, dextran sulphate adjuvanted (GMT 32-128 and oil-adjuvanted (GMT 16-64 than the bacterin treated (GMT 16-32 group. All the vaccines showed an apparent immune response than the unvaccinated control group.

  14. Antimicrobial Effects of Sulfonyl Derivative of 2(5H-Furanone against Planktonic and Biofilm Associated Methicillin-Resistant and -Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad S. Sharafutdinov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The gram-positive opportunistic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causatives of a variety of diseases including skin and skin structure infection or nosocomial catheter-associated infections. The biofilm formation that is an important virulence factor of this microorganism renders the antibiotic therapy ineffective, because biofilm-embedded bacteria exhibit strongly increased tolerance to antimicrobials. Here, we describe a novel 3-chloro-5(S-[(1R,2S,5R-2-isopropyl-5-methylcyclohexyloxy]-4-[4-methylphenylsulfonyl]-2(5H-furanone (F105, possessing a sulfonyl group and l-menthol moiety. Minimal inhibitory and bactericidal concentration values (MIC and MBC of F105 were 10 and 40 mg/L, respectively, suggesting F105 biocidal properties. F105 exhibits pronounced activity against biofilm-embedded S. aureus and increases the efficacy of aminoglycosides (amikacin, gentamicin, and kanamycin and benzalkonium chloride with fractional inhibitory concentration index values of 0.33–0.44 and 0.29, respectively, suggesting an alternative external treatment option, e.g., for wound infections. Moreover, low concentrations (0.5–1.3 mg/L of F105 reduced the MICs of these antimicrobials twofold. By using confocal laser scanning microscopy and CFU counting, we show explicitly that F105 also restores the antimicrobial activity of gentamicin and ampicillin against S. aureus biofilms by several orders of magnitude. Biofilm structures were not destroyed but sterilized, with embedded cells being almost completely killed at twofold MBC. While F105 is quite toxic (CC50/MBC ratio 0.2, our data suggest that the F105 chemotype might be a promising starting point for the development of complex topical agents for combined anti-staphylococcal biofilm-therapies restoring the efficacy of some antibiotics against difficult to treat S. aureus biofilm.

  15. Enhanced Aeromonas salmonicida bacterin uptake and side effects caused by low frequency sonophoresis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo, Cristóbal; Makosch, Katarzyna; Jung, Rainer; Kohlmann, Klaus; Knopf, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    Low frequency sonophoresis (LFS) has been recognized as one of the most advanced technologies in transdermal delivery of substances, due to the modification of the stratum corneum lipid bilayer, in focal skin applications in mammals. Based on these findings, LFS has been suggested as a potential technology to be used for enhancement in immersion fish vaccination. In contrast to mammals where LFS is applied to discrete regions of the skin, in fish the whole individual needs to be exposed for practical purposes. The current study evaluated the impact of LFS at 37 kHz on the uptake of an Aeromonas salmonicida bacterin and side effects of the treatment in rainbow trout. Quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) and immunohistochemistry were used to examine the bacterin uptake into skin and gill tissue. Side effects were assessed by behavioural examination, histology and blood serum analysis. The sonication intensity of 171 mW/cm² was enough for increasing skin permeability, but caused heavy erratic swimming and gill haemorrhages. Sonication intensities as low as 105 mW/cm² did not modify skin permeability and enhanced the bacterin uptake into the gill tissue by factor 15 compared to conventional immersion. Following sonication, the gill permeability for the bacterin decreased after 20 min and 120 min by factor 3 and 2, respectively. However, during sonication, erratic swimming of the fish raised some concerns. Further reduction of the sonication intensity to 57 mW/cm² did not induce erratic swimming, and the bacterin uptake into the gill tissue was still increased by factor 3. In addition, a decreasing albumin-globulin ratio in the serum of the rainbow trout within 40 min revealed that LFS leads to an inflammatory response. Consequently, based on both increased bacterin uptake and the inflammatory response, low intensity LFS has the potential to enhance vaccine immunity without significant side effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biomimetics for Treating Biofilm-Embedded Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS host defense proteins, antimicrobial peptides, host...ICAAC - Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy; Sep 9–12, 2012; San Francisco, CA (c) Presentations Number of Presentations... fungus by specifically disrupting their membranes rather than binding to specific molecular targets. Importantly, this mechanism is associated with a

  17. Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduino, Jean Marie; Kaye, Keith S; Reed, Shelby D; Peter, Senaka A; Sexton, Daniel J; Chen, Luke F; Hardy, N Chantelle; Tong, Steven Yc; Smugar, Steven S; Fowler, Vance G; Anderson, Deverick J

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common and most important pathogen following knee and hip arthroplasty procedures. Understanding the epidemiology of invasive S. aureus infections is important to quantify this serious complication. This nested retrospective cohort analysis included adult patients who had undergone insertion of knee or hip prostheses with clean or clean-contaminated wound class at 11 hospitals between 2003-2006. Invasive S. aureus infections, non-superficial incisional surgical site infections (SSIs) and blood stream infections (BSIs), were prospectively identified following each procedure. Prevalence rates, per 100 procedures, were estimated. 13,719 prosthetic knee (62%) and hip (38%) insertion procedures were performed. Of 92 invasive S. aureus infections identified, SSIs were more common (80%) than SSI and BSI (10%) or BSI alone (10%). The rate of invasive S. aureus infection/100 procedures was 0.57 [95% CI: 0.43-0.73] for knee insertion and 0.83 [95% CI: 0.61-1.08] for hip insertion. More than half (53%) were methicillin-resistant. Median time-to-onset of infection was 34 and 26 days for knee and hip insertion, respectively. Infection was associated with higher National Healthcare Safety Network risk index (p ≤ 0.0001). Post-operative invasive S. aureus infections were rare, but difficult-to-treat methicillin-resistant infections were relatively common. Optimizing preventative efforts may greatly reduce the healthcare burden associated with S. aureus infections.

  18. Commercial bacterins did not induce detectable levels of antibodies in mice against Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae antigens strongly recognized by swine immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Fisch

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzootic Pneumonia (EP caused by Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae results in major economic losses to the swine industry. Hence, the identification of factors that provide protection against EP could help to develop effective vaccines. One such factor that provides partial protection are bacterins. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify the induction of antibodies against fifteen M. hyopneumoniae antigens, strongly recognized by the swine immune system during natural infection, in mice vaccinated with six commercial bacterins. Each group of mice was inoculated with one bacterin, and seroconversion was assessed by indirect ELISA using recombinant antigens and M. hyopneumoniae 7448 whole cell extract. Sera from one inoculated group recognized antigen MHP_0067, and sera from four inoculated groups recognized antigens MHP_0513 and MHP_0580. None of the bacterins was able to induce seroconversion against the twelve remaining antigens. This absence of a serological response could be attributed to the lack of antigen expression in M. hyopneumoniae strains used in bacterin production. Additionally the partial protection provided by these vaccines could be due to low expression or misfolding of antigens during vaccine preparation. Therefore, the supplementation of bacterins with these recombinant antigens could be a potential alternative in the development of more effective vaccines.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrocola, Giampiero; Nobile, Giulia; Rindi, Simonetta; Speziale, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils, complement system and skin collectively represent the main elements of the innate immune system, the first line of defense of the host against many common microorganisms. Bacterial pathogens have evolved strategies to counteract all these defense activities. Specifically, Staphylococcus aureus , a major human pathogen, secretes a variety of immune evasion molecules including proteases, which cleave components of the innate immune system or disrupt the integrity of extracellular matrix and intercellular connections of tissues. Additionally, S. aureus secretes proteins that can activate host zymogens which, in turn, target specific defense components. Secreted proteins can also inhibit the anti-bacterial function of neutrophils or complement system proteases, potentiating S. aureus chances of survival. Here, we review the current understanding of these proteases and modulators of host proteases in the functioning of innate immunity and describe the importance of these mechanisms in the pathology of staphylococcal diseases.

  20. Bactericidal Effect of a Photoresponsive Carbon Monoxide-Releasing Nonwoven against Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger-Strobel, Mareike; Gläser, Steve; Makarewicz, Oliwia; Wyrwa, Ralf; Weisser, Jürgen; Pletz, Mathias W; Schiller, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading pathogen in skin and skin structure infections, including surgical and traumatic infections that are associated with biofilm formation. Because biofilm formation is accompanied by high phenotypic resistance of the embedded bacteria, they are almost impossible to eradicate by conventional antibiotics. Therefore, alternative therapeutic strategies are of high interest. We generated nanostructured hybrid nonwovens via the electrospinning of a photoresponsive carbon monoxide (CO)-releasing molecule [CORM-1, Mn2(CO)10] and the polymer polylactide. This nonwoven showed a CO-induced antimicrobial activity that was sufficient to reduce the biofilm-embedded bacteria by 70% after photostimulation at 405 nm. The released CO increased the concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the biofilms, suggesting that in addition to inhibiting the electron transport chain, ROS might play a role in the antimicrobial activity of CORMs on S. aureus The nonwoven showed increased cytotoxicity on eukaryotic cells after longer exposure, most probably due to the released lactic acid, that might be acceptable for local and short-time treatments. Therefore, CO-releasing nonwovens might be a promising local antimicrobial therapy against biofilm-associated skin wound infections. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, P; Praveen Krishna, V; Bharath, D; Lavanya, Raajaraam; Vairaprakash, Pothiappan; Adline Princy, S

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a widely acknowledged Gram-positive pathogen for forming biofilm and virulence gene expressions by quorum sensing (QS), a cell to cell communication process. The quorum regulator SarA of S. aureus up-regulates the expression of many virulence factors including biofilm formation to mediate pathogenesis and evasion of the host immune system in the late phases of growth. Thus, inhibiting the production or blocking SarA protein might influence the down-regulation of biofilm and virulence factors. In this context, here we have synthesized 2-[(Methylamino)methyl]phenol, which was specifically targeted toward the quorum regulator SarA through in silico approach in our previous study. The molecule has been evaluated in vitro to validate its antibiofilm activity against clinical S. aureus strains. In addition, antivirulence properties of the inhibitor were confirmed with the observation of a significant reduction in the expression of representative virulence genes like fnbA, hla and hld that are governed under S. aureus QS. Interestingly, the SarA targeted inhibitor showed negligible antimicrobial activity and markedly reduced the minimum inhibitory concentration of conventional antibiotics when used in combination making it a more attractive lead for further clinical tests.

  2. Lichen Aureus

    OpenAIRE

    A J Kanwar; Surrinder Kaur; Arti Nanda S; B D Radotra

    1989-01-01

    A 23-year-old male presented with with-defined orange-brown patches on the lower legs of 6 months duration. The lesions were I and had been largely asymptomatic. The clinical picture and histopathology were consistent with lichen aureus.

  3. Bronchoalveolar lavage is an ideal tool in evaluation of local immune response of pigs vaccinated with Pasteurella multocida bacterin vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiney George

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL technique in evaluating the local immune response of pig immunized with Pasteurella multocida bacterin vaccine. Materials and Methods: Weaned piglets were immunized with formalin-inactivated P52 strain of P. multocida bacterin and evaluated for pulmonary immune response in BAL fluid. BAL was performed before vaccination and at different post vaccination days. The BAL fluid was assayed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to study the development of P. multocida specific antibody isotypes and also evaluated for different cell populations using standard protocol. Results: The average recovery percentage of BAL fluid varies from 58.33 to 61.33 in vaccinated and control group of piglets. The BAL fluid of vaccinated pigs showed increase in antibody titer up to 60th days post vaccination (8.98±0.33, IgG being the predominant isotype reached maximum titer of 6.12±0.20 on 45th days post vaccination, followed by IgM and a meager concentration of IgA could be detected. An increased concentration of the lymphocyte population and induction of plasma cells was detected in the BAL fluid of vaccinated pigs. Conclusion: Though intranasal vaccination with P. multocida plain bacterin vaccine could not provoke a strong immune response, but is promising as lymphocyte population was increased and plasma cells were detected. BAL can be performed repeatedly up to 3/4 months of age in pigs to study pulmonary immune response without affecting their health.

  4. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS MASTITIS VACCINES ON THE MILK YIELD, FAT, PROTEIN AND SOMATIC CELL COUNT IN BUFFALOES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. SHAKOOR, M. ATHAR, G. MUHAMMAD, S. U. RAHMAN1, A. A. BUTT2, I. HUSSAIN1 AND R. AHMAD3

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Four Staph. aureus mastitis vaccines were evaluated in five different groups of non-mastitic healthy pregnant buffaloes. These vaccines [live attenuated (Group B1, simple bacterin (Group B2, dextran sulphate adjuvanted (Group B3 and oil adjuvanted (Group B4] were administered to 20 non-mastitic healthy pregnant buffaloes, while the group 5 was kept as unvaccinated control. Each vaccine was administered twice @ 5 ml IM at 60 and 30 days pre-partum. The effect of these vaccines on milk yield, fat, protein, and somatic cell count was studied till 4th month post partum. There was a significant difference in the milk yield, fat and protein percentage between the vaccinated and non-vaccinated groups, while difference of these parameters among the vaccinated groups of buffaloes was non significant. All the vaccines reduced the somatic cell count significantly as compared to control group. Linear somatic cell count scouring method indicated the highest milk loss/lactation in the control group (1086 litres, followed by bacterin (703 litres, dextran sulphate (549 litres, live attenuated (526 litres and oil based (577 litres vaccines.

  5. Effect of orally administered vibrio bacterin on immunity, survival and growth in tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) grow-out culture ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, A K; Gopal, C; Solanki, H G; Ravisankar, T; Patil, P K

    2017-12-01

    Vibriosis is one of the important diseases causing economic loss to the shrimp industry worldwide. The present study reports field observations on the immune stimulatory effect of vibrio bacterin in commercial tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) grow-out culture ponds (n = 62) which were grouped under three stocking densities; low (6-8 nos per m 2 ), medium (9-11 nos per m 2 ) and high (12-14 nos per m 2 ). The bacterin was administered in feed as a top dressing at final concentration equivalent to 2 × 10 8 CFU per kilogram feed twice a week throughout the culture period. In 20 representative ponds, total haemocyte count and prophenoloxidase activity in shrimp were significantly (P vibrio bacterin improves the immunity, reduces anatomical deformities and enhances the production in commercial shrimp culture operations. Administration of vibrio bacterin in feed as a top dressing induced immune stimulation as indicated by higher levels of total haemocyte count and prophenoloxidase. Further reduction in percentage of animals with anatomical deformities suggests the protection against subclinical bacterial infections. The overall improvement in the production parameters like, average daily gain, survival, feed conversation ratio and production in different shrimp stocking densities under commercial farming conditions suggested the possible development of an immune stimulant product based on the inactivated vibrio bacteria for improved health and production in Penaeus monodon shrimp farming. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Influence of horn flies (Haematobia irritans) on teat skin condition, intramammary infection, and serum anti-S. aureus antibody titres in holstein heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryman, V E; Nickerson, S C; Hurley, D J; Berghaus, R D; Kautz, F M

    2013-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus remains a major mastitis-causing pathogen in growing dairy heifers, resulting in damage to developing milk secretory tissue. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of horn flies as vectors in the spread of S. aureus among dairy heifers immunized with a S. aureus bacterin. We analyzed the prevalence of mastitis among quarters, evaluated teat skin condition (as a result of biting flies) prior to and after insecticide administration, and measured serum anti-S. aureus antibody titres monthly after vaccination. Response to S. aureus immunization was poor; however, titres increased 2- to 3-fold during the period when fly populations increased drastically and teat skin condition worsened, especially front quarter teat condition. Presence of flies and the resulting teat lesions were associated with a high level of S. aureus mastitis. Use of an insecticidal pour-on reduced fly populations and healed teat lesions, but existing cases of mastitis required antibiotic therapy. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd.

  7. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae bacterin for domestic sheep (Ovis aries).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Jessie C; Lahmers, Kevin K; Barrington, George M; Parish, Steven M; Kilzer, Katherine; Baker, Katherine; Besser, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Mortality from epizootic pneumonia is hindering re-establishment of bighorn sheep populations in western North America. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, a primary agent of this disease, is frequently carried asymptomatically by the domestic sheep and goats that constitute the reservoir of this agent for transmission to bighorn sheep. Our long-term objective is to reduce the risk of M. ovipneumoniae infection of bighorn sheep; one approach to this objective is to control the pathogen in its reservoir hosts. The safety and immunogenicity of M. ovipneumoniae for domestic sheep was evaluated in three experimental immunization protocols: 1) live M. ovipneumoniae (50 ug protein); 2) killed M. ovipneumoniae (50 ug whole cell protein) in oil adjuvant; and 3) killed M. ovipneumoniae (250 ug whole cell protein) in oil adjuvant. Immunogenicity was assessed by two serum antibody measures: competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) (experiments 1-3) and serum growth inhibition (Experiment 3). Passive immunogenicity was also assessed in the third experiment using the same assays applied to blood samples obtained from the lambs of immunized ewes. Adverse reactions to immunization were generally minor, but local reactions were regularly observed at immunization sites with bacterins in oil adjuvants. No evidence of M. ovipneumoniae specific antibody responses were observed in the first or second experiments and no resistance to colonization was observed in the first experiment. However, the ewes in the third experiment developed strong cELISA serum antibody responses and significant serum M. ovipneumoniae inhibition activity, and these responses were passively transferred to their lambs. The results of these trials indicate that immunization with relatively large antigenic mass combined with an adjuvant is capable of inducing strong active antibody responses in ewes and passively immunizing lambs.

  8. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae bacterin for domestic sheep (Ovis aries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie C Ziegler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mortality from epizootic pneumonia is hindering re-establishment of bighorn sheep populations in western North America. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, a primary agent of this disease, is frequently carried asymptomatically by the domestic sheep and goats that constitute the reservoir of this agent for transmission to bighorn sheep. Our long-term objective is to reduce the risk of M. ovipneumoniae infection of bighorn sheep; one approach to this objective is to control the pathogen in its reservoir hosts. METHODS: The safety and immunogenicity of M. ovipneumoniae for domestic sheep was evaluated in three experimental immunization protocols: 1 live M. ovipneumoniae (50 ug protein; 2 killed M. ovipneumoniae (50 ug whole cell protein in oil adjuvant; and 3 killed M. ovipneumoniae (250 ug whole cell protein in oil adjuvant. Immunogenicity was assessed by two serum antibody measures: competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA (experiments 1-3 and serum growth inhibition (Experiment 3. Passive immunogenicity was also assessed in the third experiment using the same assays applied to blood samples obtained from the lambs of immunized ewes. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Adverse reactions to immunization were generally minor, but local reactions were regularly observed at immunization sites with bacterins in oil adjuvants. No evidence of M. ovipneumoniae specific antibody responses were observed in the first or second experiments and no resistance to colonization was observed in the first experiment. However, the ewes in the third experiment developed strong cELISA serum antibody responses and significant serum M. ovipneumoniae inhibition activity, and these responses were passively transferred to their lambs. The results of these trials indicate that immunization with relatively large antigenic mass combined with an adjuvant is capable of inducing strong active antibody responses in ewes and passively immunizing lambs.

  9. Effects of colistin on biofilm matrices of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger-Strobel, Mareike; Stein, Claudia; Forstner, Christina; Makarewicz, Oliwia; Pletz, Mathias W

    2017-04-01

    Biofilms are the preferred environment of micro-organisms on various surfaces such as catheters and heart valves, are associated with numerous difficult-to-treat and recurrent infections, and confer an extreme increase in antibiotic tolerance to most compounds. The aim of this study was to evaluate how colistin affects both the extracellular biofilm matrix and the embedded bacteria in biofilms of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a species with intrinsic resistance to colistin, and colistin-susceptible Escherichia coli. Biofilms of MRSA and E. coli were treated with different concentrations of colistin. The minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) and the effectiveness of colistin at reducing the planktonic fraction were defined as the remaining viable bacteria measured as CFU/mL. In addition, biofilm-embedded cells were LIVE/DEAD-stained and were analysed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Quantification of the biofilm CLSM images was conducted using an open-access in-house algorithm (qBA). In contrast to MRSA, E. coli biofilms and planktonic cells were significantly reduced by colistin in a concentration-dependent manner. Nevertheless, colistin has been shown to exert a matrix-reducing effect following treatment both in laboratory strains and clinical isolates of MRSA and E. coli. Because exposure to colistin rapidly triggered the emergence of highly resistant clones, monotherapy with colistin should be applied with caution. These results suggest that colistin destabilises the biofilm matrix structure even in species with intrinsic colistin resistance, such as S. aureus, leading to the release of planktonic cells that are more susceptible to antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of agglutinating and neutralizing antibodies to serovar hardjo in sows immunized with two commercial whole culture polivalent anti-leptospira bacterins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Francisco Rafael Martins; Pinheiro, Sônia Regina; Morais, Zenaide Maria; Gonçales, Amane Paldês; de Azevedo, Sérgio Santos; Bernardi, Fernanda; Camargo, Sebastião Rodrigues; Vasconcellos, Silvio Arruda

    2008-07-01

    It was performed the comparison of the intensity and duration of agglutinating and neutralizing antibodies to serovar Hardjo in swines vaccinated with two commercial anti-leptospira bacterins. Sows no reactive to 24 Leptospira sp serovars in the microscopic agglutination test (MAT) were divided in three groups: Group A (n=08): received two vaccine A doses with 30 days interval, Group B (n=08) two vaccine B doses with 30 days interval and Group C (n=08): control no vaccinated against leptospirosis.Blood samples were collected each 30 days during six months following the first vaccination. The sera were tested by MAT and growth inhibition test (GIT) to serovar Hardjo in order to evaluate respectively agglutinating and neutralizing antibodies. It was found that neutralizing antibodies persisted for a longer time than the agglutinating ones and that the absence of agglutinating antibodies does not means in the absence of the neutralizing. The peaks of agglutinating antibodies was obtained at least 30 days earlier than that produced by neutralizing. The duration of both kinds of antibodies measured differed between the two bacterines tested. The period for inducing neutralizing antibodies against serovar Hardjo indicated that gilts must be immunized with two doses of whole culture anti-leptospira bacterines applied 30 days each other at least 90 days before the first mating. For the maintenance of hight levels of neutralizing antibodies the revaccinations must be performed every six months after the first vaccination.

  11. The gill is a major organ for antibody secreting cell production following direct immersion of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax, L.) in a Photobacterium damselae ssp. piscicida bacterin: an ontogenetic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, dos N.M.S.; Taverne-Thiele, J.J.; Barnes, A.C.; Muiswinkel, van W.B.; Ellis, A.E.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.

    2001-01-01

    Extremely high numbers of antibody secreting cells (ASC) were observed in the gills of sea bass fry immunised at three different age/sizes (initial weight of 0?1, 2 and 5 g) by direct immersion in a Photobacterium damselae spp. piscicida bacterin. The relatively low ASC production in the head kidney

  12. The influence of concentration of inactivated Edwardsiella tarda bacterin and immersion time on antigen uptake and expression of immune-related genes in Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yang; Tang, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Xiuzhen; Xing, Jing; Zhan, Wenbin

    2017-02-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated that the immune response of Japanese flounder was associated with the concentration of formalin-inactivated Edwardsiella tarda and immersion time. In order to further investigate the influence of immersion vaccine dose and bath time on the antigen uptake, formalin-killed Edwardsiella tarda bacterin was prepared and adjusted to four concentrations (10 9 , 10 8 , 10 7 , 10 6  cfu ml -1 ) for 30, 60 and 90 min immersion in Japanese flounder model, respectively. Absolute quantitative real-time PCR was employed to examine the bacterin uptake in gill, skin, spleen and kidney at 3 and 6 h post vaccination. The results showed that the antigen uptaken in gills and skin were significant higher than spleen and kidney, and the antigen amounts in gill and skin both declined from 3 to 6 h, whereas the antigen amounts in spleen and kidney gradually increased. Significant higher antigen amounts were detected in 10 9 -30, 10 9 -60, 10 8 -60, 10 8 -90 and 10 8 -90 groups than other groups (P immersion with formalin-inactivated E. tarda, especially under 10 8 -60 min condition could efficiently enhance the antigen uptake and the expression of immune-related genes, which provided evidences for an enhanced vaccination effects under an optimized combination of vaccine dose and immersion time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The evolution of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurenberg, Ruud H; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    2008-01-01

    A broad variety of infections, ranging from minor infections of the skin to post-operative wound infections can be caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The adaptive power of S. aureus to antibiotics leaded, in the early 1960s, to the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The cause of

  14. Staphylococcus aureus Transcriptome Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mäder, Ulrike; Nicolas, Pierre; Depke, Maren

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen that colonizes about 20% of the human population. Intriguingly, this Gram-positive bacterium can survive and thrive under a wide range of different conditions, both inside and outside the human body. Here, we investigated the transcriptional adaptation of...

  15. Binary typing of staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.B. van Leeuwen (Willem)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes the development. application and validation of straindifferentiating DNA probes for the characterization of Staphylococcus aureus strains in a system. that yields a binary output. By comparing the differential hybridization of these DNA probes to staphylococcal

  16. Oral administration of bovine milk from cows hyperimmunized with intestinal bacterin stimulates lamina propria T lymphocytes to produce Th1-biased cytokines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Lin, Lianjie; Yin, Chunming; Othtani, Satoru; Aoyama, Katsuhiko; Lu, Changlong; Sun, Xun; Yoshikai, Yasunobu

    2014-03-28

    The goal of this study was to examine the effects of oral administration of bovine milk from cows hyperimmunized with a proprietary bacterin (immune milk "Sustaina") on mucosal immunity in the intestine of adult mice. C57BL/6 mice were orally given immune or control milk for two weeks, and then lymphocyte population and the cytokine production in lamina propria of colon in normal mice and mice induced colitis by dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) were detected. We found that the levels of IFN-γ and IL-10 increased, but the levels of IL-17A and IL-4, decreased in lamina propria of colon in immune milk-fed mice as compared with those in control milk-fed mice. Interestingly, oral administration of immune milk partially improved the acute colitis induced by DSS. The levels of TNF-α and IFN-γ increased, but IL-6, IL-17A and IL-4 decreased in lamina propria (LP) of colon in immune milk-fed mice with DSS-induced colitis. Our results suggest that immune milk may stimulate CD4+ T cells to polarize towards a Th1 type response, but contrarily suppress Th17 and Th2 cells responses in large intestinal LP of mice. The results indicate that this kind of immune milk has is able to promote the maintainance of intestinal homeostasis and enhance protection against infection, and could alleviate the symptoms of acute colitis in mice.

  17. Oral Administration of Bovine Milk from Cows Hyperimmunized with Intestinal Bacterin Stimulates Lamina Propria T Lymphocytes to Produce Th1-Biased Cytokines in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Wang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to examine the effects of oral administration of bovine milk from cows hyperimmunized with a proprietary bacterin (immune milk “Sustaina” on mucosal immunity in the intestine of adult mice. C57BL/6 mice were orally given immune or control milk for two weeks, and then lymphocyte population and the cytokine production in lamina propria of colon in normal mice and mice induced colitis by dextran sulphate sodium (DSS were detected. We found that the levels of IFN-γ and IL-10 increased, but the levels of IL-17A and IL-4, decreased in lamina propria of colon in immune milk-fed mice as compared with those in control milk-fed mice. Interestingly, oral administration of immune milk partially improved the acute colitis induced by DSS. The levels of TNF-α and IFN-γ increased, but IL-6, IL-17A and IL-4 decreased in lamina propria (LP of colon in immune milk-fed mice with DSS-induced colitis. Our results suggest that immune milk may stimulate CD4+ T cells to polarize towards a Th1 type response, but contrarily suppress Th17 and Th2 cells responses in large intestinal LP of mice. The results indicate that this kind of immune milk has is able to promote the maintainance of intestinal homeostasis and enhance protection against infection, and could alleviate the symptoms of acute colitis in mice.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus Bacteraemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Price

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB is commonly complicated by metastatic infection or relapse after treatment. Objectives. The study aim was to determine the role of bacterial, host, and management factors in development of complicated SAB. Methods. A prospectively-conducted observational study gathered data on predisposition, management and outcome of 100 consecutive SAB cases. Antibiotic susceptibilities and genetic lineage of bacterial isolates were determined. Further clinical and microbiological data were gathered on two retrospective series from 1999–2000 (n=57 and 2004 (n=116. Results. In the prospective cases, 27% met our definition of complicated disease. Expressed as RR and 95% CI, complicated disease was associated with diabetes (1.58, 1.00–2.48, injecting-drug use (5.48, 0.88–33.49, community-onset of symptoms (1.4, 1.02–1.92, and symptom duration ≥48 hours prior to starting effective antibiotic therapy (2.10, 1.22–3.61. Uncomplicated disease was associated with the presence of a central line (0.69, 0.55–0.88 and prompt removal of a primary focus (0.71, 0.57–0.90. Neither methicillin resistance nor genetic lineage was associated with complicated disease, but methicillin resistance was associated with higher mortality. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that clinical rather than microbial factors are the major determinants of SAB outcome and underscores the importance of early treatment.

  19. Antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus in suppurative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1299, p<0.05) and Methicillin resistance was confirmed by PCR. Conclusion: Staphylococcus aureus is highly prevalent and more resistant in inpatients. There is a higher risk of acquiring drug resistant staphylococcus aureus infection in ...

  20. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; Hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA); Staph - MRSA; Staphylococcal - MRSA ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). www.cdc.gov/mrsa/index.html . Updated ...

  1. Antimicrobial resistant coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    Isolates of coagulase positive S. aureus resistance to 10 antimicrobials was determined by disc diffusion method. Staphylococcus .... Table 1: Antimicrobial resistance of coagulase positive Staphylococcus. aureus isolates from chickens in Maiduguri,. Nigeria. Antimicrobials .... on Danish poultry and pig farms. Preventive.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus transmission : clinical and molecular aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemendaal, A.L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen in nosocomial infections. Up to 30% of UCI related infections are caused by S. aureus. In this thesis we explore both clinical and molecular aspects of patient-to-patient transmission of S. aureus. We performed a European ICU study exploring infection

  3. Vancomycin Sensitivity of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (MRSA), resistant to all antibiotics including Vancomycin, has been reported in Japan, USA, Canada and Brazil. Hence, the main objective of this study was to evaluate the possible presence of Vancomycin resistant or intermediate S.aureus in Karachi. A total of 850 ...

  4. Prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus is the leading overall cause otf nosocomial infections with increasing resistance to β lactam antibiotics. This study was carried out to study the current resistant/susceptibility pattern of S. aureus to β lactam antibiotics and prevalence of Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in the studied population.

  5. Prevention of Healthcare Associated Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G.M. Bode (Lonneke)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ S. aureus colonizes the skin and mucosae of a proportion of the human population. Carriers of S. aureus are at increased risk of developing infections with this pathogen. The aim of this thesis was to add to the prevention of healthcare associated S. aureus

  6. Characterization of Seven Outbreaks of Hemorrhagic Hepatopathy Syndrome in Commercial Pullets Following the Administration of a Salmonella Enteritidis Bacterin in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnaccini, S; Shivaprasad, H L; Cutler, G; Bland, M; Meng, X J; Kenney, S P; Bickford, A A; Cooper, G; Charlton, B; Sentíes-Cué, C G

    2016-03-01

    Between April 2013 and April 2015, seven flocks belonging to three different major commercial egg producers inCalifornia experienced a mild increase in mortality 2 to 3 wk after administration of Salmonella Enteritidis bacterins. Strains of chickens involved were H&N (flock A1, A2, B2, C1, C2, and C3) and Lohmann white (flock B1). Vaccination was administered individually through injection either in the breast muscles or subcutis in the legs between 11 and 18 wk of age in all flocks. Clinical signs ranged from inapparent to lameness, reluctance to walk, greenish diarrhea, and retching-like symptoms. The mortality ranged from 0.16% to 1.38% per week, with the highest peaks occurring usually 2 to 3 wk postvaccination, and then declined rapidly. Postmortem examinations revealed enlarged livers with disseminated hemorrhages and pale foci of necrosis. Also, severe extensive hemorrhages in the intestine, heart, and proventriculus were observed in a few birds. Various degrees of productive, exudative giant cell granulomatous myositis were observed invading deeply the muscles and subcutis at the site of vaccination. The myositis was always associated with optically empty vacuoles positive for neutral lipids by Oil Red O stain. Droplets of Oil Red O material were also noticed in the affected livers and intestines. Congo red stain highlighted the presence of amyloid in moderate to severe amounts in the breast muscles and moderate amounts in livers, spleens, and intestines. Salmonella antigens were detected in the injection sites and livers by immunohistochemical staining. No viruses or toxic substances were recovered from the liver, spleen, intestine, and pectoral muscles, and the few bacteria isolated were interpreted as secondary postmortem invaders. In addition, livers and bile tested for hepatitis E virus were negative by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction.

  7. ESCHERICHIA COLI AND STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The bio-effects of the ethanol extracts from the leaf and stem of Momordica charantia were studied with the view to ascertain the medical usefulness ascribed to the plant by the locals. The plant parts, stem and leaf, revealed remarkable activity against Escherichia coli and Staphlococcus aureus. The leaves ...

  8. Stress Responses in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aures are prominent members of the normal flora of humans and animals, but are also a major cause of mild and severe infections. To persist and disseminate in the human host, and to survive in environmental settings, such as hospitals, S. aureus have developed a plethora of cellular...

  9. Staphylococcus aureus and hand eczema severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haslund, P; Bangsgaard, N; Jarløv, J O

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of bacterial infections in hand eczema (HE) remains to be assessed. OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with HE compared with controls, and to relate presence of S. aureus, subtypes and toxin production to severity of HE. METHODS......: Bacterial swabs were taken at three different visits from the hand and nose in 50 patients with HE and 50 controls. Staphylococcus aureus was subtyped by spa typing and assigned to clonal complexes (CCs), and isolates were tested for exotoxin-producing S. aureus strains. The Hand Eczema Severity Index...... was used for severity assessment. RESULTS: Staphylococcus aureus was found on the hands in 24 patients with HE and four controls (P aureus was found to be related to increased severity of the eczema (P aureus types on the hands...

  10. Staphylococcus aureus transmission : clinical and molecular aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Bloemendaal, A.L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen in nosocomial infections. Up to 30% of UCI related infections are caused by S. aureus. In this thesis we explore both clinical and molecular aspects of patient-to-patient transmission of S. aureus. We performed a European ICU study exploring infection prevention measures and their influence on transmission. We developed a experimental transmission model in animals, showing a difference in spread and colonization persistence between MSSA and MRSA. Next...

  11. Population structure of Staphylococcus aureus in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    The present PhD research was aimed at analysing the population structure of Staphylococcus aureus in China. Between 2000 and 2005 we found that patients from a single Chinese hospital showed increasing trends in antimicrobial resistance. Among methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), resistance against rifampicin doubled to 68%. Staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) is frequent in China. Two predominant S. aureus lineages, ST6 and ST943, were identified causing outbreaks of SFP in Southern China...

  12. Relationship and susceptibility profile of Staphylococcus aureus infection diabetic foot ulcers with Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Aza Bahadeen

    2013-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the main cause of diabetic foot infection with the patient's endogenous flora as the principal source. Nasal carriage of S. aureus has been identified as an important risk factor for the acquisition of diabetic foot infections. The study assessment the associations of S. aureus with methicillin resistant S. aureus were isolation from diabetic foot infection and nasal carriage of the same patients and their antibiotic susceptibility profile. Diagnosis of S. aureus and methicillin resistant S. aureus were carried out by using standard procedures. Antibiotic sensitivity profiles were determent by breakpoint dilution method. Out of 222 S. aureus isolation, 139 (62.61%) were isolated from the diabetic foot and 83 (37.39%) from the nasal carriage. Seventy one (30.87%) of the patients were S. aureus infection diabetic foot with nasal carriage. Among diabetic foot infection and nasal carriage patients, 40.85% of S. aureus were considered as methicillin resistant S. aureus. Rifampicin (96.40%) and Levofloxacin (91.44%) were active against S. aureus. Patients at strong risk for methicillin resistant S. aureus nasal carriage and subsequent diabetic foot infection with high resistance to antibiotics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterisation of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia at Tygerberg hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orth, H.; Dreyer, Z.S.; Makgotlho, E.; Oosthuysen, W.; Sinha, B.; Wasserman, E.

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate the local epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia, we characterised blood culture isolates using molecular methods and prospectively collected clinical data to determine the occurrence of community-acquired, methicillinresistant S. aureus (MRSA). Consecutive S. aureus blood

  14. Evaluation of Two New Chromogenic Media, CHROMagar MRSA and S. aureus ID, for Identifying Staphylococcus aureus and Screening Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Hedin, Göran; Fang, Hong

    2005-01-01

    Thirty-nine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates with diverse genetic backgrounds and two reference strains were correctly identified as S. aureus on CHROMagar MRSA and S. aureus ID media. Growth inhibition on CHROMagar MRSA was noted. A combination of cefoxitin disk and S. aureus ID was found suitable for rapid MRSA screening.

  15. Antimicrobial resistant coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus is an Important agent of food poisoning. In many countries, it is the main bacterial organism responsible for diseases caused by exotoxin production and direct invasion with systemic dissemination. In poultry, S. aureus is associated with many clinical syndromes including tenosynovitis, omphalitis, ...

  16. Population structure of Staphylococcus aureus in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    The present PhD research was aimed at analysing the population structure of Staphylococcus aureus in China. Between 2000 and 2005 we found that patients from a single Chinese hospital showed increasing trends in antimicrobial resistance. Among methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), resistance

  17. Nasal carriage of Meticillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gemeda

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major causes of community and hospital acquired infections. The emergence of methicillin resistant strains of. Staphylococcus aureus in the hospitals and the community is a serious health problem. The aim of this study was to determine the nasal carriage and ...

  18. Immunogenicity of toxins during Staphylococcus aureus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Verkaik (Nelianne); O. Dauwalder (Olivier); K. Antri (Kenza); I. Boubekri (Ilhem); C.P. de Vogel (Corné); C. Badiou (Cédric); M. Bes (Michèle); F. Vandenesch (François); M. Tazir (Mohammed); H. Hooijkaas (Herbert); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); J. Etienne (Jerome); G. Lina (Gérard); N. Ramdani-Bouguessa (Nadjia); W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAB - BACKGROUND: Toxins are important Staphylococcus aureus virulence factors, but little is known about their immunogenicity during infection. Here, additional insight is generated. METHODS: Serum samples from 206 S. aureus-infected patients and 201 hospital-admitted control subjects

  19. Nasal Carriage of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major causes of community and hospital acquired infections. The emergence of methicillin resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus in the hospitals and the community is a serious health problem. The aim of this study was to determine the nasal carriage and ...

  20. METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS (MRSA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nosocomial infections caused by methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus often pose therapeutic dilemma to the clinicians because of the multi resistant nature of these strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Outbreaks of both nosocomial and community acquired infections are also frequent and difficult to control.

  1. The T Cell Response to Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröker, Barbara M.; Mrochen, Daniel; Péton, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a dangerous pathogen and a leading cause of both nosocomial and community acquired bacterial infection worldwide. However, on the other hand, we are all exposed to this bacterium, often within the first hours of life, and usually manage to establish equilibrium and coexist with it. What does the adaptive immune system contribute toward lifelong control of S. aureus? Will it become possible to raise or enhance protective immune memory by vaccination? While in the past the S. aureus-specific antibody response has dominated this discussion, the research community is now coming to appreciate the role that the cellular arm of adaptive immunity, the T cells, plays. There are numerous T cell subsets, each with differing functions, which together have the ability to orchestrate the immune response to S. aureus and hence to tip the balance between protection and pathology. This review summarizes the state of the art in this dynamic field of research. PMID:26999219

  2. Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob; Penadés, José R; Ingmer, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a serious human pathogen with remarkable adaptive powers. Antibiotic-resistant clones rapidly emerge mainly by acquisition of antibiotic-resistance genes from other S. aureus strains or even from other genera. Transfer is mediated by a diverse complement of mobile genetic...... of plasmids that can be transferred by conjugation and the efficiency with which transduction occurs. Here, we review the main routes of antibiotic resistance gene transfer in S. aureus in the context of its biology as a human commensal and a life-threatening pathogen. Staphylococcus aureus cells...... are effective in exchanging mobile genetic elements, including antibiotic-resistance genes.During colonization or infection of host organisms, the exchange appears to be particularly effective.Bacteriophage-mediated transfer involves both transduction and autotransduction, which may enable lysogenic S. aureus...

  3. Staphylococcus aureus resistente a vancomicina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Andrés Rodríguez

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Revisar la evolución y mecanismos moleculares de la resistencia de Staphylococcus aureus a vancomicina. Fuente de los datos. Se consultó la base de datos MEDLINE y se seleccionaron artículos tipo reportes de caso, estudios bioquímicos, de microscopía electrónica y biología molecular pertinentes. Síntesis. Después de casi 40 años de eficacia ininterrumpida de la vancomicina, en 1997 se reportaron los primeros casos de fracaso terapéutico debido a cepas de Staphylococcus aureus con resistencia intermedia, denominadas VISA (concentración inhibitoria mínima, CIM, 8 a 16 ?g/ml, así como a cepas con resistencia heterogénea hVISA (CIM global = 4 ?g/ml, pero con subpoblaciones VISA, en las cuales la resistencia está mediada por engrosamiento de la pared celular y disminución de su entrecruzamiento, lo que afecta la llegada del antibiótico al blanco principal, los monómeros del peptidoglicano en la membrana plasmática. En 2002 se aisló la primera de las 3 cepas reportadas hasta la fecha con resistencia total al antibiótico, denominadas VRSA (CIM>32 ?g/ml, en las que se encontró el transposón Tn1546 proveniente de Enterococcus spp, responsable del reemplazo de la terminación D-Ala-D-Ala por D-Ala-Dlactato en los precursores de la pared celular con pérdida de la afinidad por el glicopéptido. Conclusiones. La resistencia a vancomicina es una realidad en S. aureus, mediada en el caso de VISA por alteraciones en la pared celular que atrapan el antibiótico antes de llegar al sitio de acción, y en el caso de VRSA, por transferencia desde Enterococcus spp. de genes que llevan a la modificación del blanco molecular.

  4. Exfoliative Toxins of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Bukowski

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen of humans and livestock. It causes a diverse array of diseases, ranging from relatively harmless localized skin infections to life-threatening systemic conditions. Among multiple virulence factors, staphylococci secrete several exotoxins directly associated with particular disease symptoms. These include toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1, enterotoxins, and exfoliative toxins (ETs. The latter are particularly interesting as the sole agents responsible for staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS, a disease predominantly affecting infants and characterized by the loss of superficial skin layers, dehydration, and secondary infections. The molecular basis of the clinical symptoms of SSSS is well understood. ETs are serine proteases with high substrate specificity, which selectively recognize and hydrolyze desmosomal proteins in the skin. The fascinating road leading to the discovery of ETs as the agents responsible for SSSS and the characterization of the molecular mechanism of their action, including recent advances in the field, are reviewed in this article.

  5. [Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancak, Banu

    2011-07-01

    After the report of first case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in 1961, MRSA become a major problem worldwide. Over the last decade MRSA strains have emerged as serious pathogens in nosocomial and community settings. Glycopeptides (vancomycin and teicoplanin) are still the current mainstay of therapy for infections caused by MRSA. In the last decade dramatic changes have occurred in the epidemiology of MRSA infections. The isolates with reduced susceptibility and in vitro resistance to vancomycin have emerged. Recently, therapeutic alternatives such as quinupristin/dalfopristin, linezolid, tigecycline and daptomycin have been introduced into clinical practice for treating MRSA infections. Nevertheless, these drugs are only approved for certain indication and resistance has already been reported. In this review, the new information on novel drugs for treating MRSA infections and the resistance mechanisms of these drugs were discussed.

  6. Comparative Efficacy of Ceftaroline with Linezolid against Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafeez, Amira; Munir, Tehmina; Rehman, Sabahat; Najeeb, Sara; Gilani, Mehreen; Latif, Mahwish; Ansari, Maliha; Saad, Nadia

    2015-04-01

    To compare the in vitro antimicrobial efficacy of ceftaroline with linezolid against Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Quasi-experimental study. Microbiology Department, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, from January to December 2013. Clinical samples from respiratory tract, blood, pus and various catheter tips routinely received in the Department of Microbiology, Army Medical College, Rawalpindi were innoculated on blood and MacConkey agar. Staphylococcus aureus was identified by colony morphology, Gram reaction, catalase test and coagulase test. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus detection was done by modified Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method using cefoxitin disc (30 μg) and the isolates were considered methicillin resistant if the zone of inhibition around cefoxitin disc was ≤ 21 mm. Bacterial suspensions of 56 Staphylococcus aureus isolates and 50 MRSA isolates were prepared, which were standardized equal to 0.5 McFarland's turbidity standard and inoculated on Mueller-Hinton agar plates followed by application of ceftaroline and linezolid disc (Oxoid, UK), according to manufacturer's instructions. The plates were then incubated at 37 °C aerobically for 18 - 24 hours. Diameters of inhibition zone were measured and interpretated as per Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Out of 106 isolates all of the 56 Staphylococcus aureus (100%) were sensitive to ceftaroline and linezolid. However, out of 50 methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, 48 (96%) were sensitive to ceftaroline whereas, 49 (98%) were sensitive to linezolid. Ceftaroline is equally effective as linezolid against Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

  7. 29 ORIGINAL ARTICLE METHICILLIN RESISTANT S. AUREUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    AKTH) were subjected to methicillin susceptibility testing, while including susceptibility testing to other antibiotics by the disc diffusion methods. Result: Out of 185 S. aureus isolates tested, 53(28.6%) were found to be methicillin resistant.

  8. Community-associated Staphylococcus aureus infections: pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Marios Karvouniaris; Demosthenes Makris; Epaminondas Zakynthinos

    2010-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an emerging health problem with distinct epidemiology. CA-MRSA colonization and infection is associated with risk factors different from healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection. CA-MRSA strains pre­sent different characteristics to healthcare associated strains in terms of microbiology as well. Moreover, infection as a result of CA-MRSA may be associated with severe infections, in particular ...

  9. Silkworm Apolipophorin Protein Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Virulence*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Yuichi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2011-01-01

    Silkworm hemolymph inhibits hemolysin production by Staphylococcus aureus. We purified a factor in the silkworm hemolymph responsible for this inhibitory activity. The final fraction with the greatest specific activity contained 220- and 74-kDa proteins. Determination of the N-terminal amino acid sequence revealed that the 220- and 74-kDa proteins were apolipophorin I and apolipophorin II, respectively, indicating that the factor was apolipophorin (ApoLp). The purified ApoLp fraction showed decreased expression of S. aureus hla encoding α-hemolysin, hlb encoding β-hemolysin, saeRS, and RNAIII, which activate the expression of these hemolysin genes. Injection of an anti-ApoLp antibody into the hemolymph increased the sensitivity of silkworms to the lethal effect of S. aureus. Hog gastric mucin, a mammalian homologue of ApoLp, decreased the expression of S. aureus hla and hlb. These findings suggest that ApoLp in the silkworm hemolymph inhibits S. aureus virulence and contributes to defense against S. aureus infection and that its activity is conserved in mammalian mucin. PMID:21937431

  10. Is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus replacing methicillin-susceptible S. aureus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Lipsitch, Marc; Regev-Yochay, Gili

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive research on the emergence of and treatments for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), prior studies have not rigorously evaluated the impact of methicillin resistance on the overall incidence of S. aureus infections. Yet, there are direct clinical and research implications of determining whether methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) infection rates remain stable in the face of increasing MRSA prevalence or whether MSSA will be replaced over time. A synthesis of prior studies indicates that the emergence of healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) and community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) has led to an increase in the overall incidence of S. aureus infections, with MRSA principally adding to, rather than replacing, MSSA. However, colonization with CA-MRSA may at least partially replace colonization with MSSA. So far, evidence indicates that MSSA still accounts for many infections. Therefore, eradication of MRSA alone is not sufficient to address the public health burden of S. aureus. PMID:21737459

  11. Prevalence of infective endocarditis in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Høst, Ulla; Arpi, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Aims Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis (IE) is a critical medical condition associated with a high morbidity and mortality. In the present study, we prospectively evaluated the importance of screening with echocardiography in an unselected S. aureus bacteraemia (SAB) population. Methods...

  12. Mode of action of Buddleja cordata verbascoside against Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, J G; de Liverant, J G; Martínez, A; Martínez, G; Muñoz, J L; Arciniegas, A; Romo de Vivar, A

    1999-07-01

    We evaluate the mode of action of verbascoside obtained from Buddleja cordata against Staphylococcus aureus by killing kinetics and incorporation of precursors methods. Verbascoside induced lethal effect on S. aureus, by affecting protein synthesis and inhibiting leucine incorporation.

  13. Necrotizing fasciitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, A; Weinberger, M; Fishman, M; Samra, Z; Pitlik, S D

    1998-02-01

    Two patients with rapidly progressive necrotizing fasciitis of a lower extremity due to Staphylococcus aureus as a single pathogen are described. In both patients the portal of entry was attributed to needle puncture (intra-articular injection and intravenous catheter, respectively), followed by bacteremia. Necrotizing fasciitis occurred in a site remote from the needle puncture, suggesting metastatic infection. One patient developed toxic shock syndrome and the other a sunburn-like rash and erythematous mucosae with strawberry tongue. One patient died, and the other required above-knee amputation due to secondary infectious complications. Staphylococcus aureus may mimic the presentation of invasive group A streptococcal infections. A history of needle puncture should alert the physician to the possibility of Staphylococcus aureus infection.

  14. Pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomer, Lena; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus , a Gram-positive bacterium colonizing nares, skin, and the gastrointestinal tract, frequently invades the skin, soft tissues, and bloodstreams of humans. Even with surgical and antibiotic therapy, bloodstream infections are associated with significant mortality. The secretion of coagulases, proteins that associate with and activate the host hemostatic factor prothrombin, and the bacterial surface display of agglutinins, proteins that bind polymerized fibrin, are key virulence strategies for the pathogenesis of S. aureus bloodstream infections, which culminate in the establishment of abscess lesions. Pathogen-controlled processes, involving a wide spectrum of secreted factors, are responsible for the recruitment and destruction of immune cells, transforming abscess lesions into purulent exudate, with which staphylococci disseminate to produce new infectious lesions or to infect new hosts. Research on S. aureus bloodstream infections is a frontier for the characterization of protective vaccine antigens and the development of immune therapeutics aiming to prevent disease or improve outcomes. PMID:26925499

  15. Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis in diverse host environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Divya; Harper, Lamia; Shopsin, Bo; Torres, Victor J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Staphylococcus aureus is an eminent human pathogen that can colonize the human host and cause severe life-threatening illnesses. This bacterium can reside in and infect a wide range of host tissues, ranging from superficial surfaces like the skin to deeper tissues such as in the gastrointestinal tract, heart and bones. Due to its multifaceted lifestyle, S. aureus uses complex regulatory networks to sense diverse signals that enable it to adapt to different environments and modulate virulence. In this minireview, we explore well-characterized environmental and host cues that S. aureus responds to and describe how this pathogen modulates virulence in response to these signals. Lastly, we highlight therapeutic approaches undertaken by several groups to inhibit both signaling and the cognate regulators that sense and transmit these signals downstream. PMID:28104617

  16. Staphylococcus aureus spa type t437

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glasner, C; Pluister, G; Westh, H

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) belonging to the multilocus sequence type clonal complex 59 (MLST CC59) is the predominant community-associated MRSA clone in Asia. This clone, which is primarily linked with the spa type t437, has so far only been reported in low numbers among...... included. Most isolates were shown to be monophyletic with 98% of the isolates belonging to the single MLVA complex 621, to which nearly all included isolates from China also belonged. More importantly, all MLST-typed isolates belonged to CC59. Our study implies that the European S. aureus t437 population...... large epidemiological studies in Europe. Nevertheless, the overall numbers identified in some Northern European reference laboratories have increased during the past decade. To determine whether the S. aureus t437 clone is present in other European countries, and to assess its genetic diversity across...

  17. Evolution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus towards increasing resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strommenger, Birgit; Bartels, Mette Damkjær; Kurt, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate the evolutionary history of Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex (CC) 8, which encompasses several globally distributed epidemic lineages, including hospital-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and the highly prevalent community-associated MRSA clone USA300.......To elucidate the evolutionary history of Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex (CC) 8, which encompasses several globally distributed epidemic lineages, including hospital-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and the highly prevalent community-associated MRSA clone USA300....

  18. Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Stefania; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Lindsay, Jodi A

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews recent findings on the global epidemiology of healthcare-acquired/associated (HA), community-acquired/associated (CA) and livestock-associated (LA) meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and aims to reach a consensus regarding the harmonisation of typing methods...... health. Continuous efforts to understand the changing epidemiology of S. aureus infection in humans and animals are therefore necessary, not only for appropriate antimicrobial treatment and effective infection control but also to monitor the evolution of the species. The group made several consensus...

  19. Nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strains of Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from the anterior nares of healthy pupils and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns were determined. 116 isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (100%) were biochemically characterized as coagulase positive S. aureus. Susceptibility profile of the isolates revealed that 15(14.85%) ...

  20. A pig model of acute Staphylococcus aureus induced pyemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O. L.; Iburg, T.; Aalbæk, B.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Sepsis caused by Staphylococcus aureus constitutes an important cause of morbidity and mortality in humans, and the incidence of this disease-entity is increasing. In this paper we describe the initial microbial dynamics and lesions in pigs experimentally infected with S. aureus....... aureus isolated from man and an extension of the timeframe aiming at inducing sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock....

  1. Multidrug-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in US Meat and Poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Andrew E; Contente-Cuomo, Tania; Buchhagen, Jordan; Liu, Cindy M; Watson, Lindsey; Pearce, Kimberly; Foster, Jeffrey T; Bowers, Jolene; Driebe, Elizabeth M; Engelthaler, David M; Keim, Paul S; Price, Lance B

    2011-05-01

    We characterized the prevalence, antibiotic susceptibility profiles, and genotypes of Staphylococcus aureus among US meat and poultry samples (n = 136). S. aureus contaminated 47% of samples, and multidrug resistance was common among isolates (52%). S. aureus genotypes and resistance profiles differed significantly among sample types, suggesting food animal-specific contamination.

  2. Methicillin-Susceptible, Vancomycin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Panesso , Diana; Planet , Paul J.; Diaz , Lorena; Hugonnet , Jean-Emannuel; Tran , Truc T.; Narechania , Apurva; Munita , José M.; Rincon , Sandra; Carvajal , Lina P.; Reyes , Jinnethe; Londono , Alejandra; Smith , Hannah; Sebra , Robert; Deikus , Gintaras; Weinstock , George M

    2015-01-01

    International audience; We report characterization of a methicillin-susceptible, vancomycin-resistant bloodstream isolate of Staphylococcus aureus recovered from a patient in Brazil. Emergence of vancomycin resistance in methicillin-susceptible S. aureus would indicate that this resistance trait might be poised to disseminate more rapidly among S. aureus and represents a major public health threat.

  3. The sensitivity status of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community acquired Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from various infectious sites in two private laboratories in Kano-city, Nigeria. A total of 247 (11%) Staphylococcu aureus isolates were recovered from all infectious sites except cerebro-spinal fluid. The least Staphylococcus aureus isolates were found in urine ...

  4. Staphylococcus aureus entrance into the dairy chain: Tracking S. aureus from dairy cow to cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Kümmel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important contagious mastitis pathogens in dairy cattle. Due to its zoonotic potential, control of S. aureus is not only of great economic importance in the dairy industry but also a significant public health concern. The aim of this study was to decipher the potential of bovine udder associated S. aureus as reservoir for S. aureus contamination in dairy production and processing. From 18 farms, delivering their milk to an alpine dairy plant for the production of smeared semi-hard and hard cheese. 1176 quarter milk (QM samples of all cows in lactation (n = 294 and representative samples form bulk tank milk (BTM of all farms were surveyed for coagulase positive (CPS and coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS. Furthermore, samples from different steps of the cheese manufacturing process were tested for CPS and CNS. As revealed by chemometric-assisted FTIR spectroscopy and molecular subtyping (spa typing and multi locus sequence typing, dairy cattle represent indeed an important, yet underreported, entrance point of S. aureus into the dairy chain. Our data clearly show that certain S. aureus subtypes are present in primary production as well as in the cheese processing at the dairy plant. However, although a considerable diversity of S. aureus subtypes was observed in QM and BTM at the farms, only certain S. aureus subtypes were able to enter and persist in the cheese manufacturing at the dairy plant and could be isolated from cheese until day fourteen of ripening. Farm strains belonging to the FTIR cluster B1 and B3, which show genetic characteristics (t2953, ST8, enterotoxin profile: sea/sed/sej of the recently described S. aureus genotype B, most successfully contaminated the cheese production at the dairy plant. Thus our study fosters the hypothesis that genotype B S. aureus represent a specific challenge in control of S. aureus in the dairy chain that requires effective clearance strategies and hygienic

  5. Polyclonal antibodies production against Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-01

    Feb 1, 2010 ... why the detection and the counting of S. aureus or of the. Staphylococuses with a positive coagulase, keep their interest in alimentary microbiology and the enterotoxins staphylococcies dried dosage remains the unique means to define the food innocuousness. The standard methods of cultivation used to ...

  6. Antimicrobial resistant coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADEYEYE

    ISSN 2315-6201). Suleiman/Sokoto Journal of Veterinary Sciences (2013). 11(1): 51-55. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/sokjvs.v11i1.8. Antimicrobial resistant coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus from chickens in Maiduguri,Nigeria. A Suleiman.

  7. Misidentification of methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: Misidentification of nosocomial S. aureus as MRSA is a serious problem in Libyan hospitals. There is an urgent need for the proper training of microbiology laboratory technicians in standard antimicrobial susceptibility procedures and the implementation of quality control programs in microbiology laboratories ...

  8. OCCURRENCE AND ANTIBIOGRAM OF Staphylococcus aureus IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    ABSTRACT. A total of 160 dairy products comprising of 80 each of fresh milk and 'Nono' (Fermented and defatted) were collected. The samples were cultured and identified by routine bacteriological methods. Prevalence of S.aureus (8.75%) in the products was; for fresh milk 3.75% and 'Nono'. 5%. The susceptibility profile ...

  9. Fibronectin enhances transfection of Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, N E; Bergdoll, M S; Pattee, P A

    1985-01-01

    The factor in normal sera primarily responsible for the enhancement of transfection (and transformation) of Staphylococcus aureus was identified as fibronectin. Serum samples which were depleted of fibronectin by affinity chromatography showed a marked decrease in enhancing activity. Fibronectin isolated from sera of several animal species demonstrated enhancing activity.

  10. METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS (MRSA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The methicillin disc diffusion method for the detection of methicillin resistance and the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion for antibiotic susceptibility tests, were used. The MRSA prevalence rate was 34.7% (51/147) of all Staphylococcus aureus isolates. Forty-five isolates were associated with infections and 6 were colonizing strains.

  11. Meticillineresistente Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in de gemeenschap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, A. G.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C. M. J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections have been confined to healthcare centres for decades. However, MRSA infections are increasingly seen in young healthy individuals with no exposure to healthcare centres. These community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains differ from

  12. Staphylococcus aureus resistente a la meticilina (SARM)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-10-22

    Datos importantes sobre las infecciones por SARM en Estados Unidos, en las escuelas y los entornos médicos. (Title: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)Created: 10/2007).  Created: 10/22/2007 by National Center for Preparedness, Detection, and Control of Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 11/9/2007.

  13. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Leif Percival; Nielsen, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Even though methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common cause of nosocomial infections, it may often be difficult to evaluate the exact route of transmission. METHODS: In this study, we describe four cases of nosocomial transmission of MRSA in a hospital with a low...

  14. Resistance patterns of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred (200) strains of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa were isolated from clinical samples collected from patients in Murtala Muhammad Specialist Hospital and Infectious Diseases Hospital, Kano. The confirmed isolates were tested for resistance to quinolones by the agar disk diffusion susceptibility test and the agar ...

  15. Human Staphylococcus aureus lineages among Zoological Park ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The genes mecA, mecC, lukF/lukS-PV (encoding Panton- Valentine leukocidin, PVL) and tst (toxic shock syndrome toxin-1) were investigated by PCR. Clones were defined by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST), spa type and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Seven S. aureus isolates were recovered from four ...

  16. Microbial population of Staphyloccous aureus from inanimate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The isolation of Staphylococus aureus from inanimate objects in a General hospital in Rivers State was studied. Swabs were obtained from different sources comprising of; toilet seat, floor, switch, side rail bed, side rail chair, door handle, sink tap, bed spread, pillow case, and locker using the swab technique. High frequency ...

  17. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization rates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) colonization was 9% and it was only isolated from clinical students and HCWs. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed that 90.5% of the 63 strains isolated from all volunteers were ampicillin resistant. Three multi-resistant strains to three antibiotics or more were identified; two from ...

  18. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukos, Georgios; Sakellari, Dimitra; Arsenakis, Minas; Tsalikis, Lazaros; Slini, Theodora; Konstantinidis, Antonios

    2015-09-01

    To assess the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in plaque and tongue samples from systemically healthy subjects with periodontal health, gingivitis or chronic periodontitis. After screening 720 potentially eligible subjects, 154 systemically healthy participants were ultimately enrolled in the current study. Subgingival samples were taken from the first molars and the tongue and analyzed for the presence of S. aureus and MRSA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), using primers and conditions previously described in the literature. In addition, samples were taken from deep periodontal pockets of chronic periodontitis patients. Statistical analysis was performed by applying non-parametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis for clinical parameters, and z-test with Bonferroni corrections for distributions of assessed parameters). All comparisons were set at the 0.05 significance level. S. aureus was detected in 18% of all participants and in 10% of the samples tested. No significant differences were found in its distribution among the three investigated groups (z-test for proportions with Bonferroni corrections, p>0.05). The mecA gene was not present in any of the S. aureus found. S. aureus can be found in the oral environment regardless of the periodontal conditions and therefore should be considered as a member of the transient flora not participating in periodontal pathology. Subgingival sites and tongue surfaces seem to be an unusual habitat of MRSA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Relationship between Vancomycin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Vancomycin-Intermediate S. aureus, High Vancomycin MIC, and Outcome in Serious S. aureus Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Natasha E.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Howden, Benjamin P.

    2012-01-01

    Vancomycin has been used successfully for over 50 years for the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections, particularly those involving methicillin-resistant S. aureus. It has proven remarkably reliable, but its efficacy is now being questioned with the emergence of strains of S. aureus that display heteroresistance, intermediate resistance, and, occasionally, complete vancomycin resistance. More recently, an association has been established between poor outcome and infections with strain...

  20. Genetic diversity of Staphylococcus aureus in Buruli ulcer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Ama Amissah

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Previous studies have shown that wounds of BU patients are colonized with M. ulcerans and several other microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus, which may interfere with wound healing. The present study was therefore aimed at investigating the diversity and topography of S. aureus colonizing BU patients during treatment.We investigated the presence, diversity, and spatio-temporal distribution of S. aureus in 30 confirmed BU patients from Ghana during treatment. S. aureus was isolated from nose and wound swabs, and by replica plating of wound dressings collected bi-weekly from patients. S. aureus isolates were characterized by multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat fingerprinting (MLVF and spa-typing, and antibiotic susceptibility was tested.Nineteen (63% of the 30 BU patients tested positive for S. aureus at least once during the sampling period, yielding 407 S. aureus isolates. Detailed analysis of 91 isolates grouped these isolates into 13 MLVF clusters and 13 spa-types. Five (26% S. aureus-positive BU patients carried the same S. aureus genotype in their anterior nares and wounds. S. aureus isolates from the wounds of seven (37% patients were distributed over two different MLVF clusters. Wounds of three (16% patients were colonized with isolates belonging to two different genotypes at the same time, and five (26% patients were colonized with different S. aureus types over time. Five (17% of the 30 included BU patients tested positive for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA.The present study showed that the wounds of many BU patients were contaminated with S. aureus, and that many BU patients from the different communities carried the same S. aureus genotype during treatment. This calls for improved wound care and hygiene.

  1. Field evaluation of piglet vaccination with a Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae bacterin as compared to a ready-to-use product including porcine circovirus 2 and M. hyopneumoniae in a conventional French farrow-to-finish farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duivon, Didier; Corrégé, Isabelle; Hémonic, Anne; Rigaut, Martial; Roudaut, David; Jolie, Rika

    2018-01-01

    A controlled randomized trial was performed on a well-managed conventional French 180-sow farm. The trial compared the growth performances of piglets vaccinated at weaning (single shot) either with a commercial monovalent Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae bacterin vaccine or with a commercial bivalent vaccine (Porcilis® PCV M Hyo) against M. hyopneumoniae and porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2). The farm's porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome status was stable, and most diseases (enzootic pneumonia, atrophic rhinitis, post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome) were controlled by routine vaccination. During the post-weaning phase, the growth performances of the piglets vaccinated with the bivalent vaccine were not significantly different from those vaccinated with the monovalent vaccine. However, during the fattening phase the group vaccinated with the bivalent vaccine had a significantly improved ADG (+34 g/d, p  = 0. 047), resulting in a 5-day earlier shipment to slaughter. The group also had a shorter and lower PCV2 load in serum during the fattening period, and an improved lung lesions score. In both groups, three pigs died during the peak PCV2 viraemia (16-23 weeks of age). Immunohistochemistry of the lymph nodes showed that in the group vaccinated with the bivalent vaccine, none of these pigs had PCV2-like lesions, while 2 out of the 3 from the other group did. Results suggest that the added PCV2 valence in the vaccination protocol helps countering the negative impact of subclinical PCV2 infection on growth. The calculated return on investment of the added PCV2 vaccine valence was €1.7 extra revenue per slaughtered pig (€ 39 additional revenue per sow and per year), despite the fact that the cost of the bivalent vaccine was higher than the monovalent M. hyopneumoniae vaccine. In this healthy conventional sow farm, the combined M. hyopneumoniae and PCV2 vaccination was efficacious, convenient to administer and profitable.

  2. Stilbenes reduce Staphylococcus aureus hemolysis, biofilm formation, and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kayeon; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Ryu, Shi Yong; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2014-09-01

    Stilbenoids have a broad range of beneficial health effects. On the other hand, the emergence of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus presents a worldwide problem that requires new antibiotics or nonantibiotic strategies. S. aureus produces α-hemolysin (a pore-forming cytotoxin) that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of sepsis and pneumonia. Furthermore, the biofilms formed by S. aureus constitute a mechanism of antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we investigated the hemolytic and antibiofilm activities of 10 stilbene-related compounds against S. aureus. trans-Stilbene and resveratrol at 10 μg/mL were found to markedly inhibit human blood hemolysis by S. aureus, and trans-stilbene also inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation without affecting its bacterial growth. Furthermore, trans-stilbene and resveratrol attenuated S. aureus virulence in vivo in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which is normally killed by S. aureus. Transcriptional analysis showed that trans-stilbene repressed the α-hemolysin hla gene and the intercellular adhesion locus (icaA and icaD) in S. aureus, and this finding was in line with observed reductions in virulence and biofilm formation. In addition, vitisin B, a stilbenoid tetramer, at 1 μg/mL was observed to significantly inhibit human blood hemolysis by S. aureus.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus shifts towards commensalism in response to Corynebacterium species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew M Ramsey

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus–human interactions result in a continuum of outcomes from commensalism to pathogenesis. S. aureus is a clinically important pathogen that asymptomatically colonizes ~25% of humans as a member of the nostril and skin microbiota, where it resides with other bacteria including commensal Corynebacterium species. Commensal Corynebacterium spp. are also positively correlated with S. aureus in chronic polymicrobial diabetic foot infections, distinct from acute monomicrobial S. aureus infections. Recent work by our lab and others indicates that microbe-microbe interactions between S. aureus and human skin/nasal commensals, including Corynebacterium species, affect S. aureus behavior and fitness. Thus, we hypothesized that S. aureus interactions with Corynebacterium spp. diminish S. aureus virulence. We tested this by assaying for changes in S. aureus gene expression during in vitro mono- versus coculture with Corynebacterium striatum, a common skin and nasal commensal. We observed a broad shift in S. aureus gene transcription during in vitro growth with C. striatum, including increased transcription of genes known to exhibit increased expression during human nasal colonization and decreased transcription of virulence genes. S. aureus uses several regulatory pathways to transition between commensal and pathogenic states. One of these, the quorum signal accessory gene regulator (agr system, was strongly inhibited in response to Corynebacterium spp. Phenotypically, S. aureus exposed to C. striatum exhibited increased adhesion to epithelial cells, reflecting a commensal state, and decreased hemolysin activity, reflecting an attenuation of virulence. Consistent with this, S. aureus displayed diminished fitness in experimental in vivo coinfection with C. striatum when compared to monoinfection. These data support a model in which S. aureus shifts from virulence towards a commensal state when exposed to commensal Corynebacterium species.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus Shifts toward Commensalism in Response to Corynebacterium Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Matthew M.; Freire, Marcelo O.; Gabrilska, Rebecca A.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.; Lemon, Katherine P.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus–human interactions result in a continuum of outcomes from commensalism to pathogenesis. S. aureus is a clinically important pathogen that asymptomatically colonizes ~25% of humans as a member of the nostril and skin microbiota, where it resides with other bacteria including commensal Corynebacterium species. Commensal Corynebacterium spp. are also positively correlated with S. aureus in chronic polymicrobial diabetic foot infections, distinct from acute monomicrobial S. aureus infections. Recent work by our lab and others indicates that microbe–microbe interactions between S. aureus and human skin/nasal commensals, including Corynebacterium species, affect S. aureus behavior and fitness. Thus, we hypothesized that S. aureus interactions with Corynebacterium spp. diminish S. aureus virulence. We tested this by assaying for changes in S. aureus gene expression during in vitro mono- versus coculture with Corynebacterium striatum, a common skin and nasal commensal. We observed a broad shift in S. aureus gene transcription during in vitro growth with C. striatum, including increased transcription of genes known to exhibit increased expression during human nasal colonization and decreased transcription of virulence genes. S. aureus uses several regulatory pathways to transition between commensal and pathogenic states. One of these, the quorum signal accessory gene regulator (agr) system, was strongly inhibited in response to Corynebacterium spp. Phenotypically, S. aureus exposed to C. striatum exhibited increased adhesion to epithelial cells, reflecting a commensal state, and decreased hemolysin activity, reflecting an attenuation of virulence. Consistent with this, S. aureus displayed diminished fitness in experimental in vivo coinfection with C. striatum when compared to monoinfection. These data support a model in which S. aureus shifts from virulence toward a commensal state when exposed to commensal Corynebacterium species. PMID:27582729

  5. Aspartate inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hang; Wang, Mengyue; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation renders Staphylococcus aureus highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and host defenses. Four D-amino acids (D-Leu, D-Met, D-Trp and D-Tyr) have been reported to be able to inhibit biofilm formation and disassemble established S. aureus biofilms. We report here for the first time that both D- and L-isoforms of aspartate (Asp) inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation on tissue culture plates. Similar biofilm inhibition effects were also observed against other staphylococcal strains, including S. saprophyticus, S. equorum, S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus. It was found that Asp at high concentrations (>10 mM) inhibited the growth of planktonic N315 cells, but at subinhibitory concentrations decreased the cellular metabolic activity without influencing cell growth. The decreased cellular metabolic activity might be the reason for the production of less protein and DNA in the matrix of the biofilms formed in the presence of Asp. However, varied inhibition efficacies of Asp were observed for biofilms formed by clinical staphylococcal isolates. There might be mechanisms other than decreasing the metabolic activity, e.g. the biofilm phenotypes, affecting biofilm formation in the presence of Asp. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. [Change in drug resistance of Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Liu, Yan; Luo, Yan-Ping; Liu, Chang-Ting

    2013-11-01

    To analyze the change in drug resistance of Staphylococcus aureus (SAU) in the PLA general hospital from January 2008 to December 2012, and to provide solid evidence to support the rational use of antibiotics for clinical applications. The SAU strains isolated from clinical samples in the hospital were collected and subjected to the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion test. The results were assessed based on the 2002 American National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) guidelines. SAU strains were mainly isolated from sputum, urine, blood and wound excreta and distributed in penology, neurology wards, orthopedics and surgery ICU wards. Except for glycopeptide drugs, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) had a higher drug resistance rate than those of the other drugs and had significantly more resistance than methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (P resistance, we discovered a gradual increase in drug resistance to fourteen test drugs during the last five years. Drug resistance rate of SAU stayed at a higher level over the last five years; moreover, the detection ratio of MRSA keeps rising year by year. It is crucial for physicians to use antibiotics rationally and monitor the change in drug resistance in a dynamic way.

  7. Immunopathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus pulmonary infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Dane; Prince, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common human pathogen highly evolved as both a component of the commensal flora and as a major cause of invasive infection. Severe respiratory infection due to staphylococci has been increasing due to the prevalence of more virulent USA300 CA-MRSA strains in the general population. The ability of S. aureus to adapt to the milieu of the respiratory tract has facilitated its emergence as a respiratory pathogen. Its metabolic versatility, the ability to scavenge iron, coordinate gene expression, and the horizontal acquisition of useful genetic elements have all contributed to its success as a component of the respiratory flora, in hospitalized patients, as a complication of influenza and in normal hosts. The expression of surface adhesins facilitates its persistence in the airways. In addition, the highly sophisticated interactions of the multiple S. aureus virulence factors, particularly the α-hemolysin and protein A, with diverse immune effectors in the lung such as ADAM10, TNFR1, EGFR, immunoglobulin, and complement all contribute to the pathogenesis of staphylococcal pneumonia. PMID:22037948

  8. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauchaza, Kathrine; Madzimbamuto, Farai D; Waner, Seymour

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Africa is sparsely documented. In Zimbabwe there is no routine patient or specimen screening for MRSA. The aim of this study was to document the presence and epidemiology of MRSA in Zimbabwe. The study was done in one private sector laboratory with a national network that serves both public and private hospitals. The sample population included in-patients and outpatients, all ages, both genders, all races and only one positive specimen per patient was counted. Specimens testing positive for Staphylococcus aureus in this laboratory were further tested for MRSA using cefoxitin, by standard laboratory procedures. Data was collected from 1(st) June 2013 to 31(st) May 2014. MRSA was positive in 30 of 407 [7.0%] cases of Stapylococcus aureus reported from the laboratory. All age groups were affected from neonates to geriatrics. All specimens had similar antibiotic susceptibility pattern. Resistance was high for most widely used drugs in Zimbabwe with high sensitivity to vancomycin, linezolid and teicoplanin. Although there are no recent reports in the literature of the presence of MRSA in Zimbabwe, this study documented a 7.0% prevalence. Resistance to common antibiotics is high and antibiotic oversight is required to control the emergence of resistance to these few expensive drugs. Study was supported by Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care funds.

  9. Magnetic nanoparticle targeted hyperthermia of cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Ho; Yamayoshi, Itsukyo; Mathew, Steven; Liln, Hubert; Nayfach, Joseph; Simon, Scott I.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of wound infections that do not adequately respond to standard-of-care antimicrobial treatment has been increasing. To address this challenge, a novel antimicrobial magnetic thermotherapy platform has been developed in which a high-amplitude, high-frequency, alternating magnetic field (AMF) is used to rapidly heat magnetic nanoparticles that are bound to Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The antimicrobial efficacy of this platform was evaluated in the treatment of both an in vitro culture model of S. aureus biofilm and a mouse model of cutaneous S. aureus infection. We demonstrated that an antibody-targeted magnetic nanoparticle bound to S. aureus was effective at thermally inactivating S. aureus and achieving accelerated wound healing without causing tissue injury. PMID:23149904

  10. Beta-lactam Resistance and Novel Therapeutics for Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Liana

    2014-01-01

    Abstractβ-Lactam Resistance and Novel Therapeutics for Staphylococcus aureus byLiana Celene ChanDoctor of Philosophy in Infectious Diseases & ImmunityUniversity of California, BerkeleyProfessor George Sensabaugh, Chair Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen capable of causing disease in otherwise healthy individuals. It causes mostly skin and soft tissue infections but can cause more invasive diseases. Treatment for S. aureus has become a problem due to increasing resistanc...

  11. Comparison of five tests for identification of Staphylococcus aureus from clinical samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Luijendijk (Ad); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); J.A.J.W. Kluytmans (Jan); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractFive different laboratory tests for the identification of Staphylococcus aureus were compared. Analyses of 271 presumptive S. aureus strains, supplemented with 59 well-defined methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates, were performed. Only the

  12. Food poisoning and Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argudín, María Ángeles; Mendoza, María Carmen; Rodicio, María Rosario

    2010-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces a wide variety of toxins including staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs; SEA to SEE, SEG to SEI, SER to SET) with demonstrated emetic activity, and staphylococcal-like (SEl) proteins, which are not emetic in a primate model (SElL and SElQ) or have yet to be tested (SElJ, SElK, SElM to SElP, SElU, SElU2 and SElV). SEs and SEls have been traditionally subdivided into classical (SEA to SEE) and new (SEG to SElU2) types. All possess superantigenic activity and are encoded by accessory genetic elements, including plasmids, prophages, pathogenicity islands, vSa genomic islands, or by genes located next to the staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) implicated in methicillin resistance. SEs are a major cause of food poisoning, which typically occurs after ingestion of different foods, particularly processed meat and dairy products, contaminated with S. aureus by improper handling and subsequent storage at elevated temperatures. Symptoms are of rapid onset and include nausea and violent vomiting, with or without diarrhea. The illness is usually self-limiting and only occasionally it is severe enough to warrant hospitalization. SEA is the most common cause of staphylococcal food poisoning worldwide, but the involvement of other classical SEs has been also demonstrated. Of the new SE/SEls, only SEH have clearly been associated with food poisoning. However, genes encoding novel SEs as well as SEls with untested emetic activity are widely represented in S. aureus, and their role in pathogenesis may be underestimated.

  13. Curcumin Reverse Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Hyun Mun

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin, a natural polyphenolic flavonoid extracted from the rhizome of Curcuma longa L., was shown to possess superior potency to resensitize methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA to antibiotics. Previous studies have shown the synergistic activity of curcumin with β-lactam and quinolone antibiotics. Further, to understand the anti-MRSA mechanism of curcumin, we investigated the potentiated effect of curcumin by its interaction in diverse conditions. The mechanism of anti-MRSA action of curcumin was analyzed by the viability assay in the presence of detergents, ATPase inhibitors and peptidoglycan (PGN from S. aureus, and the PBP2a protein level was analyzed by western blotting. The morphological changes in the curcumin-treated MRSA strains were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. We analyzed increased susceptibility to MRSA isolates in the presence of curcumin. The optical densities at 600 nm (OD600 of the suspensions treated with the combinations of curcumin with triton X-100 and Tris were reduced to 63% and 59%, respectively, compared to curcumin without treatment. N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD and sodium azide (NaN3 were reduced to 94% and 55%, respectively. When peptidoglycan (PGN from S. aureus was combined with curcumin, PGN (0–125 μg/mL gradually blocked the antibacterial activity of curcumin (125 μg/mL; however, at a concentration of 125 µg/mL PGN, it did not completely block curcumin. Curcumin has a significant effect on the protein level of PBP2a. The TEM images of MRSA showed damage of the cell wall, disruption of the cytoplasmic contents, broken cell membrane and cell lysis after the treatment of curcumin. These data indicate a remarkable antibacterial effect of curcumin, with membrane permeability enhancers and ATPase inhibitors, and curcumin did not directly bind to PGN on the cell wall. Further, the antimicrobial action of curcumin involved in the PBP2a-mediated resistance mechanism was

  14. Staphylococcus aureus: resistance pattern and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Naghavi-Behzad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has emerged as a nosocomial pathogen of major worldwide importance and is an increasingly frequent cause of community-acquired infections. In this study, different risk factors and MRSA resistance pattern were investigated. Methods: In a 24 months period, all of the patients who were confined to bed in the surgery ward were included in the study. Then they were assessed to find out as if they had MRSA infection when hospitalized and once when they were discharged. Almost 48 h after admission, when patients were discharged, social and medical histories were acquired. Acquired samples were examined. Results: During the present study of 475 patients, 108 patients (22.8% had S. aureus. About frequency of antibiotic resistance among collected S. aureus colonies, erythromycin resistance, was the most frequent antibiotic resistance, also resistance to vancomycin was 0.4% that was the least. Only hospitalization duration had statistically significant correlation with antibiotic resistance, also resistance to erythromycin had statistically significant relation with history of surgery and alcohol consumption. Of all 34 MRSA species, 22 (64.7% samples were resistant to erythromycin, 17 (50.0% resistant to cefoxitin, 5 (14.7% resistant to mupirocin, 1 (2.9% resistant to vancomycin and 1 (2.9% resistant to linezolid. Conclusion: The results of the current study show that among hospitalized patients, there is resistance against methicillin. Since based on results of the study there is resistance against oxacillin and erythromycin in most cases, administering appropriate antibiotics have an important role in minimizing the resistance burden among bacterial species.

  15. Revisiting Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waness, Abdelkarim

    2010-01-01

    Within less than 50 years, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) made a tremendous impact worldwide. It is not limited to medical facilities and healthcare institutions anymore. Indeed since two decades, cases of MRSA infections arising from the community among apparently healthy individuals are increasing. In this paper, I will present a case of community-associated MRSA sepsis followed by a comprehensive review about the history, pathogenesis, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, therapeutic options, contributing factors, growing cost and other pertinent elements of this newly evolving epidemic of MRSA infections.

  16. Revisiting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waness Abdelkarim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Within less than 50 years, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA made a tremendous impact worldwide. It is not limited to medical facilities and healthcare institutions anymore. Indeed since two decades, cases of MRSA infections arising from the community among apparently healthy individuals are increasing. In this paper, I will present a case of community-associated MRSA sepsis followed by a comprehensive review about the history, pathogenesis, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, therapeutic options, contributing factors, growing cost and other pertinent elements of this newly evolving epidemic of MRSA infections.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus bacteriuria as a prognosticator for outcome of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinstein Robert A

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When Staphylococcus aureus is isolated in urine, it is thought to usually represent hematogenous spread. Because such spread might have special clinical significance, we evaluated predictors and outcomes of S. aureus bacteriuria among patients with S. aureus bacteremia. Methods A case-control study was performed at John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County among adult inpatients during January 2002-December 2006. Cases and controls had positive and negative urine cultures, respectively, for S. aureus, within 72 hours of positive blood culture for S. aureus. Controls were sampled randomly in a 1:4 ratio. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were done. Results Overall, 59% of patients were African-American, 12% died, 56% of infections had community-onset infections, and 58% were infected with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA. Among 61 cases and 247 controls, predictors of S. aureus bacteriuria on multivariate analysis were urological surgery (OR = 3.4, p = 0.06 and genitourinary infection (OR = 9.2, p = 0.002. Among patients who died, there were significantly more patients with bacteriuria than among patients who survived (39% vs. 17%; p = 0.002. In multiple Cox regression analysis, death risks in bacteremic patients were bacteriuria (hazard ratio 2.9, CI 1.4-5.9, p = 0.004, bladder catheter use (2.0, 1.0-4.0, p = 0.06, and Charlson score (1.1, 1.1-1.3, p = 0.02. Neither length of stay nor methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection was a predictor of S. aureus bacteriuria or death. Conclusions Among patients with S. aureus bacteremia, those with S. aureus bacteriuria had 3-fold higher mortality than those without bacteriuria, even after adjustment for comorbidities. Bacteriuria may identify patients with more severe bacteremia, who are at risk of worse outcomes.

  18. The prevalence and resistivity pattern of Staphylococcus Aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on reported cases of increased multi-antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus, this study investigates the prevalence and resistivity pattern of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from ear and nasal swabs of apparently healthy students. A total of 100 samples comprising 50 nasal and 50 ear swabs, were collected ...

  19. Intercenter reproducibility of binary typing for Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Willem B.; Snoeijers, Sandor; van der Werken-Libregts, Christel; Tuip, Anita; van der Zee, Anneke; Egberink, Diane; de Proost, Monique; Bik, Elisabeth; Lunter, Bjorn; Kluytmans, Jan; Gits, Etty; van Duyn, Inge; Heck, Max; van der Zwaluw, Kim; Wannet, Wim; Noordhoek, Gerda T.; Mulder, Sije; Renders, Nicole; Boers, Miranda; Zaat, Sebastiaan; van der Riet, Daniëlle; Kooistra, Mirjam; Talens, Adriaan; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; van der Reyden, Tanny; Veenendaal, Dick; Bakker, Nancy; Cookson, Barry; Lynch, Alisson; Witte, Wolfgang; Cuny, Christa; Blanc, Dominique; Vernez, Isabelle; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Fiett, Janusz; Struelens, Marc; Deplano, Ariane; Landegent, Jim; Verbrugh, Henri A.; van Belkum, Alex

    2002-01-01

    The reproducibility of the binary typing (BT) protocol developed for epidemiological typing of Staphylococcus aureus was analyzed in a biphasic multicenter study. In a Dutch multicenter pilot study, 10 genetically unique isolates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were characterized by the BT

  20. Identification of the ClpX Regulon in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Ingmer, Hanne

    Staphyloccous aureus is a major human pathogen capable of causing a wide spectrum of infections ranging from superficial wound infections to life-threatening endocarditis and toxic shock syndrome. Essential for S. aureus virulence is a large number of cell-surface-associated proteins and secreted...

  1. Staphylococcus aureus strategies to evade the host acquired immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, Oliver; Medina, Eva

    2017-09-15

    Staphylococcus aureus poses a significant public-health problem. Infection caused by S. aureus can manifest as acute or long-lasting persistent diseases that are often refractory to antibiotic and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To develop more effective strategies for preventing or treating these infections, it is crucial to understand why the immune response is incapable to eradicate the bacterium. When S. aureus first infect the host, there is a robust activation of the host innate immune responses. Generally, S. aureus can survive this initial interaction due to the expression of a wide array of virulence factors that interfere with the host innate immune defenses. After this initial interaction the acquired immune response is the arm of the host defenses that will try to clear the pathogen. However, S. aureus is capable of maintaining infection in the host even in the presence of a robust antigen-specific immune response. Thus, understanding the mechanisms underlying the ability of S. aureus to escape immune surveillance by the acquired immune response will help uncover potentially important targets for the development of immune-based adjunctive therapies and more efficient vaccines. There are several lines of evidence that lead us to believe that S. aureus can directly or indirectly disable the acquired immune response. This review will discuss the different immune evasion strategies used by S. aureus to modulate the different components of the acquired immune defenses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Toxicity test and bacteriophage typing of Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toxicity test and bacteriophage typing of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from food contact surfaces and foods prepared by families in Zaria, Nigeria. ... contamination of products by toxigenic strains of organisms. Keywords: Staphylococcus aureus, enterotoxin production, phage typing, haemolysis and food poisoning ...

  3. Nasal carriage of Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nasal carriage of Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus with reduced Vancomycin susceptibility (MRSA-RVS) by healthy adults in Zaria, Nigeria. ... Abstract. Staphylococcus aureus isolates were collected from anterior nares of fifty healthy adults in Zaria and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns determined. 72% of the ...

  4. Daya Hambat Ekstrak Aloe Vera terhadap pertumbuhan Staphylococcus Aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmat, drg.Sp,Pros

    2011-01-01

    Dari hasil penelitian , maka dapat disimpulkan bahwa ekstrak Aloe Vera dapat menghambat pertumbuhan bakteri Stafhylococcus aureus, dan kadar hambat minimal ekstrak Aloe Vera adalah pada konsentrasi 25%. Tujuan Penelitan Ini adalah untuk mengetahui efektifitas ekstrak Aloe vera dalam menghambat pertumbuhan bakteri Stafhylococcus aureus dan daya hambat menimal, (DHM) terhadap pertumbuhan bakteri tersebut. Metode yang digunakan adalah pertumbuhan ekstrak Aloe vera, penegnceran ekstrak , pemur...

  5. Virulence potential of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Buruli ulcer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amissah, Nana Ama; Chlebowicz, Monika A.; Ablordey, Anthony; Tetteh, Caitlin S.; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Friedrich, Alex W.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Stienstra, Ymkje; Rossen, John W.

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. BU wounds may also be colonized with other microorganisms including Staphylococcus aureus. This study aimed to characterize the virulence factors of S. aureus isolated from BU patients.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in children: a formidable foe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus remains one of the most common causes of bacteraemia in children. In order to evade and overcome the immune responses of its host and any antimicrobial therapies aimed at destroying it, this organism, through various mechanisms, continues to evolve. Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia is a ...

  7. Brands Of Ampiclox Against Clinical Strains Of Staphylococcus aureus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... relevant factor in the antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus. Consequently the antibiogram and susceptibility of 20 clinical strains and a control strain (NCTC 6571) of Staphylococcus aureus to 10 different brands of ampiclox were determined by disk diffusion and tube broth dilution methods. The control strain was

  8. Nasal carriage of Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus isolates were collected from anterior nares of fifty healthy adults in Zaria and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns determined. 72% of the isolates were methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The isolates were generally resistant to multiple antibiotics including Chloramphenicol (78% resistance), Penicillin ...

  9. A Survey of Antibiotic Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Strains from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of antibiotic resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains from clinical specimens was carried out. A total of 100 different clinical specimens were investigated with a yield of 48 Staphylococcus aureus isolates. A high resistance of 95.8% to penicillin, 89.6% to ampicillin, 87.5% to tetracycline, and 75.0% to ...

  10. Detection of some virulence factors in Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pathogens that can cause mastitis, Staphylococcus aureus is probably the most lethal agent because it causes chronic and deep infection in the mammary glands that is extremely difficult to be cured. The present study was to detect some of the virulence factors in the S. aureus isolated from 360 mastitis milk samples in ...

  11. Toxins and adhesion factors associated with Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus is a causative agent of acute and infectious diarrhoea. In Africa, there is no sufficient information on the virulence and the degree of factors produced by its diarrhoea-isolated strains. Clinical features and virulence factors produced by S. aureus isolated from diarrhoeal-patients admitted at the ...

  12. Nasal carriage of multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nasal Staphylococcus aureus is a major source of community and hospital associated staphylococcal infections. This study determined the prevalence of nasal S. aureus isolates and investigated their antimicrobial resistance profile in healthy volunteers. Methods: Nasal specimens of healthy volunteers in ...

  13. Nasal carriage of methicilli-resistant staphylococcus aureus with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus isolates were collected from anterior nares of fifty healthy adults in Zaria and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns determined. Seventy-two percent (72%) of the isolates were methicillin-resistant S. aureus, while 20% were methicillin-susceptible. The isolates were generally resistant to multiple ...

  14. Detection and identification of Staphylococcus aureus in raw milk by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus causes foodborne diseases if consumed in contaminated milk products. Rapid detection and characterization of foodborne pathogen S. aureus is crucial for epidemiological investigations and food safety surveillance. It is still a challenge to detect and identify bacterial pathogens quickly and ...

  15. Beta Lactamase production by Staphylococcus aureus from children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus from children aged 5 years and below with sporadic diarrhoea were tested for their ability to produce beta-lactamase enzyme. Of the 95 isolates tested 79 (83.2%) were beta-lactamase-producing strains. The study confirms that majority of clinical isolates of S. aureus from diarrhoeic ...

  16. Pneumonia and new methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garnier, Fabien; Tristan, Anne; François, Bruno; Etienne, Jerome; Delage-Corre, Manuella; Martin, Christian; Liassine, Nadia; Wannet, Wim; Denis, François; Ploy, Marie-Cécile

    2006-01-01

    Necrotizing pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus strains carrying the Panton-Valentin leukocidin gene is a newly described disease entity. We report a new fatal case of necrotizing pneumonia. An S. aureus strain with an agr1 allele and of a new sequence type 377 was recovered, representing a

  17. Prevalence of Methicillin–Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major bacterial pathogen that causes different community and hospital-acquired infections. Over time, strains of S. aureus have become resistant to different antibiotics including penicillinase-resistant penicillins. Having data on the local antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of this pathogen is ...

  18. Maternal-neonatal outcome with Staphylococcus aureus rectovaginal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanim, Nibal; Alchyib, Omrou; Morrish, Donald; Tompkins, David; Julliard, Kell; Visconti, Ernest; Hoskins, Iffath A

    2011-01-01

    To estimate prevalence of rectovaginal colonization by Staphylococcus aureus among pregnant women with group B streptococcus (GBS) screening results and its association with maternal and infant outcomes. Cultures that detected both group B streptococcus (GBS) and S. aureus were obtained at > or = 35 weeks of gestation. Computerized database search and chart review determined invasive neonatal infection and maternal outcomes at the time of delivery through 6 months postpartum. A total of 6,626 GBS screening cultures met study criteria, and 769 (11.6%) GBS isolates and 67 (1.0%) S. aureus were identified. No maternal S. aureus-related outcomes were found. The rate of maternal methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization was 0.1% (7 in 6,626). GBS-positive patients were twice as likely to be colonized with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus than GBS-negative patients. GBS-positive culture rates differed significantly by primary language: Spanish 10.0%, English 13.7%, Russian 26.9%, Cantonese 13.2%, Mandarin 11.5%, Arabic 15.9%, and other 17.8%. In our population, S. aureus colonization percentage (1.0%) was lower than the 7.5-8.2% reported by other medical centers, as was overall GBS carriage rate. S. aureus did not predispose to maternal or infant morbidity or mortality up to 6 months postpartum.

  19. Prevalence and risk factors for Staphylococcus aureus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and risk factors for Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin‑resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage inpatients in a tertiary care hospital's chest clinic in Turkey. ... of the participants and risk factors for carriage. Fisher's exact test, univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used. A P < 0.05 ...

  20. Antibiotic resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Abia State of Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The S. aureus. isolates varied in their antibiotic susceptibility pattern when tested for their sensitivity to 16 antibiotics. Eighty percent of the isolates were resistant to more than one antimicrobial agent. All the isolates showed resistance to nalidixic acid and 100% sensitivity to rifampicin. Key words: Staphylococcus aureus, ...

  1. Antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from fresh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The resistance pattern of the 55 S. aureus isolates showed that all the isolates were resistant to two or more antibiotics. Multidrug resistance was detected in 96.4% of the isolates. All the S. aureus were resistant to penicillin 55 (100.0%) rates of resistance to ampicillin (90.9%; n=50), tetracycline (81.8%; n=45) and ...

  2. Staphylococcus aureus ST398 from slaughter pigs in northeast China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Xiaomei; Yu, Xiaojie; Tao, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Binghua; Dong, Rui; Xue, Chengyu; Grundmann, Hajo; Zhang, Jianzhong

    To describe the prevalence and population structure of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria that colonize pigs at slaughterhouses in northeastern China, nose swabs were collected from pigs in two slaughterhouses in Harbin, Heilongjiang Province, China in 2009.S. aureus isolates were characterized by

  3. Prevalence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in apparently healthy ... treatment failures is vital. Keywords: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Nasal swabs, Multidrug resistance, Rational .... defined as resistance to three or more classes of antibiotics other than the ...

  4. Distribution of capsular and surface polysaccharide serotypes of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Eiff, Christof; Taylor, Kimberly L; Mellmann, Alexander; Fattom, Ali I; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Peters, Georg; Becker, Karsten

    Because of its ability to cause serious and fatal infections, Staphylococcus aureus remains one of the most feared microorganisms. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has long been a common pathogen in healthcare facilities, but within the past decade, it has emerged as a problematic pathogen in

  5. Staphylococcus aureus from the German general population is highly diverse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, Karsten; Schaumburg, Frieder; Fegeler, Christian; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Kock, Robin

    Objectives: This prospective cohort study evaluates colonization dynamics and molecular characteristics of methicillin-susceptible and - resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA/MRSA) in a German general population. Methods: Nasal swabs of 1878 non-hospitalized adults were screened for S. aureus.

  6. Invasive Staphylococcus aureus infection in an African adolescent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Staphylococcus aureus remains an important cause of mortality, in the community and health care set-ups. S. aureus strains with genes encoding lethal toxins and culture negative sepsis augment the diagnostic challenge in resource limited settings. With a growing rate of resistance to the causative bacteria and atypical ...

  7. Selective biosensing of Staphylococcus aureus using chitosan quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhamid, Hani Nasser; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2018-01-01

    Selective biosensing of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) using chitosan modified quantum dots (CTS@CdS QDs) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide is reported. The method is based on the intrinsic positive catalase activity of S. aureus. CTS@CdS quantum dots provide high dispersion in aqueous media with high fluorescence emission. Staphylococcus aureus causes a selective quenching of the fluorescence emission of CTS@CdS QDs in the presence of H2O2 compared to other pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The intrinsic enzymatic character of S. aureus (catalase positive) offers selective and fast biosensing. The present method is highly selective for positive catalase species and requires no expensive reagents such as antibodies, aptamers or microbeads. It could be extended for other species that are positive catalase.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus vs. Osteoblast: Relationship and Consequences in Osteomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josse, Jérôme; Velard, Frédéric; Gangloff, Sophie C.

    2015-01-01

    Bone cells, namely osteoblasts and osteoclasts work in concert and are responsible for bone extracellular matrix formation and resorption. This homeostasis is, in part, altered during infections by Staphylococcus aureus through the induction of various responses from the osteoblasts. This includes the over-production of chemokines, cytokines and growth factors, thus suggesting a role for these cells in both innate and adaptive immunity. S. aureus decreases the activity and viability of osteoblasts, by induction of apoptosis-dependent and independent mechanisms. The tight relationship between osteoclasts and osteoblasts is also modulated by S. aureus infection. The present review provides a survey of the relevant literature discussing the important aspects of S. aureus and osteoblast interaction as well as the ability for antimicrobial peptides to kill intra-osteoblastic S. aureus, hence emphasizing the necessity for new anti-infectious therapeutics. PMID:26636047

  9. A porcine model of haematogenous brain infectionwith staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Lærke Boye; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Nielsen, Ole Lerberg

    2012-01-01

    A PORCINE MODEL OF HAEMATOGENOUS BRAIN INFECTION WITH STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS Astrup Lærke1, Agerholm Jørgen1, Nielsen Ole1, Jensen Henrik1, Leifsson Páll1, Iburg Tine2. 1: Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark boye@life.ku.dk 2: National Veterinary Institute......, Uppsala, Sweden Introduction Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) is a common cause of sepsis and brain abscesses in man and a frequent cause of porcine pyaemia. Here we present a porcine model of haematogenous S. aureus-induced brain infection. Materials and Methods Four pigs had two intravenous catheters...... inserted surgically, one in a. carotis communis and one in v. jugularis externa. All pigs received 106 CFU/kg body weight S. aureus through the arterial catheter. Bacteria were either suspended in isotonic saline infused at constant flow for 60 minutes (two pigs) or given as a bolus injection of autologoue...

  10. Survival of Staphylococcus aureus on fomites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Alicia; Nastri, Natalia; Bernat, Maria; Brusca, Maria; Turcot, Liliana; Nastri, Maria; Rosa, Alcira C

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate duration of survival of Staphylococcus aureus on contaminated standardized fomites, such as sterilization paper (SP) and polyester previously sterilized in a steam autoclave, and to determine the potential inhibitory effects of the substrates (fabrics used to manufacture garments and special wrapping paper used in the dental setting) using the bacteriostasis test. The test was performed on two types of sterile standardized samples (T1 and T2). Sterility of the samples was validated following the protocol in use at the Department of Microbiology, after which the samples were inoculated with 50 microl of a calibrated suspension of Staphylococcus aureus (reference strain ATCC 25923) in the exponential growth phase, in a final concentration of 10(7) cfu/ml and 10(6) cfu/ml). The samples were incubated at 27 degrees C and survival and concentration of microorganisms attached to the surface of the substrates was determined at the following experimental time points: immediately post-contamination, and 3 hours, 24 hours, 3 days, and 7 days post-contamination. Recovery was determined and expressed as a percentage; the bacteriostasis test was performed and showed negative results. Our results suggest that the quantity of recovered microorganisms varies according to the type of substrate and that there is a relation between survival and incubation time of the inoculated substrate serving as an artificial niche.

  11. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: the superbug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Giuseppe; Leone, Sebastiano; Lauria, Francesco N; Nicastri, Emanuele; Wenzel, Richard P

    2010-10-01

    Over the last decade, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains have emerged as serious pathogens in the nosocomial and community setting. Hospitalization costs associated with MRSA infections are substantially greater than those associated with methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) infections, and MRSA has wider economic effects that involve indirect costs to the patient and to society. In addition, there is some evidence suggesting that MRSA infections increase morbidity and the risk of mortality. Glycopeptides are the backbone antibiotics for the treatment of MRSA infections. However, several recent reports have highlighted the limitations of vancomycin, and its role in the management of serious infections is now being reconsidered. Several new antimicrobials demonstrate in vitro activity against MRSA and other Gram-positive bacteria. Data from large surveys indicate that linezolid, daptomycin, and tigecycline are almost universally active against MRSA. This review will briefly discuss the epidemiology, costs, outcome, and therapeutic options for the management of MRSA infections. Copyright © 2010 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nasal Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carriage among college student athletes in northern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Kai Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Of 259 college students in northern Taiwan surveyed, nasal carriage rate of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA was 22.4% and 1.54%, respectively and no significant difference was found between athlete students and non-athlete students. Three of four MRSA isolates belonged to sequence type 59, the endemic community clone.

  13. The molecular changing mechanism of Ampicillin-Sulbactam resistant Staphylococcus aureus towards Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieke Hemiawati Satari

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the molecular changing of S.aureus, which is resistant to Ampicillin-Sulbactam and then become resistant to Methicillin as a result of improper dosage. The study was conducted by isolating Ampicillin-Sulbactam resistant and Methicillin Resistant S.aureus (MRSA, afterwards an amplification process was performed by PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction. to isolate the betalactamase enzyme regulator and PBP 2a genes. The result of this research showed that there were a deletion of few amino acids from the regulator gene, and a suspicion that the DNA sequence had been substituted from PBP 2 gene into PBP 2a (gen mec. This process had formed MRSA.

  14. Evaluating vancomycin susceptibility in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimica MJ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Marcelo J Mimica, Alessandra Navarini Department of Pathology, Division of Microbiology, Santa Casa de São Paulo School of Medicine, São Paulo, BrazilWe read the report by Phillips et al1 with great interest and would like to discuss it in comparison with our previous published data on the subject.2,3We have also studied a number of Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates (n=125, comparing different vancomycin susceptibility tests, including microdilution, Etest® (bio-Mérieux, Marcy-l’Étoile, France, and brain heart infusion vancomycin screening plates. We found only one isolate with reduced susceptibility with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC =4 mg/L when tested with Etest and 2 mg/L when tested with microdilution.2,3 Our results showed a tendency of higher lethality when higher MICs were present, even within the susceptible range,3 as some previous studies have shown.4,5Concordant to Phillips et al1 and other authors,6,7 we also reported a poor correlation between different tests. Comparing Etest and microdilution (approximating an Etest MIC value between two twofold dilutions up to the highest value, 58% of the isolates had similar MICs, whereas 38% had an MIC by Etest one dilution higher than microdilution. One isolate had an Etest MIC twofold higher and four isolates an Etest MIC onefold lower than microdilution.2However, in our study, a brain heart infusion screening plate with 2.0 mg/L of vancomycin showed a sensitivity of 100% to detect isolates with an MIC ≥2.0 by Etest and 91% to detect an MIC ≥2.0 by microdilution, making this test an interesting option for initial screening of S. aureus isolates for reduced vancomycin susceptibility. Specificities were 63% and 38%, respectively, which would still make necessary the further testing with an MIC method, but in a much smaller number of isolates.2 This approach would be suitable for a large number of laboratories throughout the world where the routine MIC testing of all

  15. Epic Immune Battles of History: Neutrophils vs. Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Fermin E.; Borgogna, Timothy R.; Patel, Delisha M.; Sward, Eli W.; Voyich, Jovanka M.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in human blood and the first line of defense after bacteria have breached the epithelial barriers. After migration to a site of infection, neutrophils engage and expose invading microorganisms to antimicrobial peptides and proteins, as well as reactive oxygen species, as part of their bactericidal arsenal. Ideally, neutrophils ingest bacteria to prevent damage to surrounding cells and tissues, kill invading microorganisms with antimicrobial mechanisms, undergo programmed cell death to minimize inflammation, and are cleared away by macrophages. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a prevalent Gram-positive bacterium that is a common commensal and causes a wide range of diseases from skin infections to endocarditis. Since its discovery, S. aureus has been a formidable neutrophil foe that has challenged the efficacy of this professional assassin. Indeed, proper clearance of S. aureus by neutrophils is essential to positive infection outcome, and S. aureus has developed mechanisms to evade neutrophil killing. Herein, we will review mechanisms used by S. aureus to modulate and evade neutrophil bactericidal mechanisms including priming, activation, chemotaxis, production of reactive oxygen species, and resolution of infection. We will also highlight how S. aureus uses sensory/regulatory systems to tailor production of virulence factors specifically to the triggering signal, e.g., neutrophils and defensins. To conclude, we will provide an overview of therapeutic approaches that may potentially enhance neutrophil antimicrobial functions. PMID:28713774

  16. Molecular typing of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, S M; Emele, F E; Nwaokorie, F O; Idika, N; Umeizudike, A K; Emeka-Nwabunnia, I; Hanson, B M; Nair, R; Wardyn, S E; Smith, T C

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA) are a major concern in densely populated urban areas. Initial studies of S. aureus in Nigeria indicated existence of antibiotic-resistant S. aureus strains in clinical and community settings. 73 biological samples (40 throat, 23 nasal, 10 wound) were collected from patients and healthcare workers in three populations in Nigeria: Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, and Owerri General Hospital. S. aureus was isolated from 38 of 73 samples (52%). Of the 38 S. aureus samples, 9 (24%) carried the Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene (PVL) while 16 (42%) possessed methicillin resistance genes (mecA). Antibiotic susceptibility profiles indicated resistance to several broad-spectrum antibiotics. Antibiotic-resistant S. aureus isolates were recovered from clinical and community settings in Nigeria. Insight about S. aureus in Nigeria may be used to improve antibiotic prescription methods and minimize the spread of antibiotic-resistant organisms in highly populated urban communities similar to Lagos, Nigeria. Copyright © 2014 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Silver nanoparticles for the inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Ortiz-Gila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Existe un gran ecosistema microbiano en la cavidad oral donde Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus se puede encontrar, causando patologías orales tales como quelitis angular, las paperas y la mucositis estafilocócica. Estas enfermedades producidas por S. aureus en la cavidad oral son consecuencia de los factores de virulencia, toxinas y multiresistencia a los antibióticos, lo que contribuye a la infección. La colonización en la cavidad oral por S. aureus en pacientes sanos es de 24% a 36%. Sin embargo, la incidencia aumenta a 48% en pacientes con prótesis debido a la formación de biofilms en la superficie de las dentaduras postizas. Actualmente, no existe ningún tratamiento para infecciones orales sin el uso de antibióticos. Investigaciones recientes indican que las nanopartículas de plata (AgNPs son un material o estrategia para eliminar S. aureus debido a su efecto antibacteriano. Sin embargo, el mecanismo del efecto inhibidor de los iones de Ag sobre S. aureus es sólo parcialmente conocida y muy poco se ha informado. Por lo tanto, el propósito de la presente revisión sistemática es determinar las estrategias y retos de la utilización de biomateriales antimicrobianos con AgNPs frente a las infecciones orales de S. aureus.

  18. The changing epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laupland, K.B.; Lyytikäinen, O.; Søgaard, Mette

    2013-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect ABSTRACT: Although the epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) has been changing, international comparisons are lacking. We sought to determine the incidence of S. aureus BSI and assess trends over time and by region. Population-based surveillance...... episodes of S. aureus BSI were identified. The overall annual incidence rate for S. aureus BSI was 26.1 per 100 000 population, and those for methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were 24.2 and 1.9 per 100 000, respectively. Although the overall incidence...... of community-onset MSSA BSI (15.0 per 100 000) was relatively similar across regions, the incidence rates of hospital-onset MSSA (9.2 per 100 000), community-onset MRSA (1.0 per 100 000) and hospital-onset MRSA (0.8 per 100 000) BSI varied substantially. Whereas the overall incidence of S. aureus BSI did...

  19. Root cause analysis of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Nadia; Mehdi, Naima; Izhar, Mateen

    2015-10-01

    To find the important risk factors and sources of bacteraemia in patients suffering from methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia. The descriptive study was carried out at Shaikh Zayed Hospital, Lahore, from October 2010 to August 2011. Blood cultures were processed to isolate methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus. A questionnaire was completed by the participating patients suffering from bacteraemia. Information about risk factors present at the time and risk factors that served as the source of bacteraemia were noted. Total 4058 blood cultures were processed and 669(16.5%) were positive. Of them, 194(29%) cultures were found to be positive for staphylococci. Out of these 194 blood cultures, coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated from 117(60%), and 77(40%) were positive for S. aureus. Out of these 77 samples, 26(34%) were found to be methicillin-sensitive staphylococcus aureus and 51(66%) were methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus. The overall frequency of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus was 1.25%; 7.62% out of positive blood culture; 26.28% out of total staphylococci; and 66% out of total S. aureus. As for the source of infection, central venous pressure line 11(21.6%), post-influenza pneumonia 9(17.6%), peripheral intravenous line 8(15.7%) and dialysis line 7(13.7%) were major reasons. Taking care of aseptic measures while insertion, frequent change and early removal of the central venous and dialysis lines is of critical significance.

  20. Transmission of Staphylococcus aureus between mothers and infants in an African setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaumburg, F.; Alabi, A. S.; Mombo-Ngoma, G.; Kaba, H.; Zoleko, R. M.; Diop, D. A.; Mackanga, J.-R.; Basra, A.; Gonzalez, R.; Menendez, C.; Grobusch, M. P.; Kremsner, P. G.; Köck, R.; Peters, G.; Ramharter, M.; Becker, K.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus colonization is a risk factor for invasive disease. There is a need to understand S. aureus colonization in infancy as the burden of S. aureus infections in infants is high. We aimed to investigate the transmission of S. aureus between mothers and their newborns during the

  1. Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcal Species via the agr Quorum Sensing System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canovas de la Nuez, Jaime; Baldry, Mara; Bojer, Martin S

    2016-01-01

    between staphylococci and S. aureus, and show that this interaction may eventually lead to the identification of new anti-virulence candidates to target S. aureus infections. Here we show that culture supernatants of 37 out of 52 staphylococcal isolates representing 17 different species inhibit S. aureus...... of compounds that can be applied as anti-virulence therapy for combating S. aureus infections....

  2. Clinical significance of Staphylococcus aureus bacteriuria in a nationwide study of adults with S. aureus bacteraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgeirsson, Hilmir; Kristjansson, Mar; Kristinsson, Karl G; Gudlaugsson, Olafur

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical significance of Staphylococcus aureus bacteriuria (SABU) in adults with S. aureus bacteraemia (SAB). All individuals ≥18 years old diagnosed with SAB in Iceland between December 1st 2003 and November 30th 2008 were retrospectively identified. Data was collected from medical records. Concomitant SABU was defined as growth of S. aureus in a urine sample taken within 24 h of the index blood culture. SABU was seen in 27 of 166 (16.3%) SAB patients having urine cultured before administration of antibiotics, but after excluding those with SAB of urinary tract origin SABU was seen in 16 of 152 (10.5%). In this latter cohort SABU was independently associated with having endocarditis (RR 6.68; 95% CI 1.53-17.3) and admission to intensive-care unit (RR 2.84; 95% CI 1.25-4.44), while for having complicated SAB the RR was 1.56 (95% CI 0.96-1.80). No correlation was seen with mortality or relapse rates. SABU appears to be secondary to SAB in some cases while it is the primary infection causing SAB in others. In patients with SAB of non-urinary tract origin SABU should probably be regarded as distant haematogenous seeding and a marker of deep tissue dissemination, thus affecting general management and treatment duration. Copyright © 2011 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Transmission of Staphylococcus aureus from mothers to newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshem, Eyal; Maayan-Metzger, Ayala; Rahav, Galia; Dolitzki, Mordechai; Kuint, Jacob; Roytman, Yulia; Goral, Aviva; Novikov, Ilya; Fluss, Ronen; Keller, Nathan; Regev-Yochay, Gili

    2012-04-01

    The study objective was to define the risk factors and the route of Staphylococcus aureus transmission between mother and newborn. Women at late pregnancy were screened for nasal and vaginal S. aureus colonization. Newborns were screened for nasal, auricular, umbilical, and rectal colonization at birth and before discharge. Carrier mothers and their newborns were rescreened at 1 month. Pulse-field gel electrophoresis was used to assess strain genetic relatedness. Of the 208 women screened, 34% were colonized with S. aureus. Overall, by 72-100 hours after birth, the cumulative incidence of S. aureus acquisition was 42.6/100 newborns of carrier mothers versus 7.4/100 newborns of noncarrier mothers (adjusted risk ratio = 5.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.3-13.9). The risk to acquire a maternal strain was significantly higher than nonmaternal strain (adjusted risk ratio = 1.5; 95% CI, 1.3-1.9); Newborns to carrier mothers were also at a risk to acquire nonmaternal S. aureus strains compared with newborns to noncarrier mothers (adjusted risk ratio = 2.9; 95% CI, 1.6-5.4). The cumulative incidence of S. aureus acquisition was similar among newborns delivered by cesarean versus vaginal delivery (24.5 vs. 23.0/100 cases). At 1-month follow-up, the cumulative incidence of S. aureus acquisition reached 69.7/100 newborns of carrier mothers.Genetically identical strains were isolated in 32/40 (80%) mother-newborn pairs, among these, the source of the newborn strain was a maternal nasal strain in 29/32 (90%). Newborns of carrier mothers are at risk to acquire S. aureus colonization. Most newborns of carrier mothers are colonized within the first month of life. Horizontal transmission from the mother is probably the major source for S. aureus carriage in newborns.

  4. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Ethiopia: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshetie, Setegn; Tarekegn, Fentahun; Moges, Feleke; Amsalu, Anteneh; Birhan, Wubet; Huruy, Kahsay

    2016-11-21

    The burden of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus is a major public health concern worldwide; however the overall epidemiology of multidrug resistant strains is neither coordinated nor harmonized, particularly in developing countries including Ethiopia. Therefore, the aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the burden of methicillin resistant Staphylococcos aureus and its antibiotic resistance pattern in Ethiopia at large. PubMed, Google Scholar, and lancet databases were searched and a total of 20 studies have been selected for meta-analysis. Six authors have independently extracts data on the prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus among clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus. Statistical analysis was achieved by using Open meta-analyst (version 3.13) and Comprehensive meta-analysis (version 3.3) softwares. The overall prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and its antibiotic resistance pattern were pooled by using the forest plot, table and figure with 95% CI. The pooled prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was 32.5% (95% CI, 24.1 to 40.9%). Moreover, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains were found to be highly resistant to penicillin, ampicillin, erythromycin, and amoxicillin, with a pooled resistance ratio of 99.1, 98.1, 97.2 and 97.1%, respectively. On the other hand, comparably low levels of resistance ratio were noted to vancomycin, 5.3%. The overall burden of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus is considerably high, besides these strains showed extreme resistance to penicillin, ampicillin, erythromycin and amoxicillin. In principle, appropriate use of antibiotics, applying safety precautions are the key to reduce the spread of multidrug resistant strains, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in particular.

  5. Molecular coordination of Staphylococcus aureus cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterell, Bryony E; Walther, Christa G; Fenn, Samuel J; Grein, Fabian; Wollman, Adam JM; Leake, Mark C; Olivier, Nicolas; Cadby, Ashley; Mesnage, Stéphane; Jones, Simon

    2018-01-01

    The bacterial cell wall is essential for viability, but despite its ability to withstand internal turgor must remain dynamic to permit growth and division. Peptidoglycan is the major cell wall structural polymer, whose synthesis requires multiple interacting components. The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is a prolate spheroid that divides in three orthogonal planes. Here, we have integrated cellular morphology during division with molecular level resolution imaging of peptidoglycan synthesis and the components responsible. Synthesis occurs across the developing septal surface in a diffuse pattern, a necessity of the observed septal geometry, that is matched by variegated division component distribution. Synthesis continues after septal annulus completion, where the core division component FtsZ remains. The novel molecular level information requires re-evaluation of the growth and division processes leading to a new conceptual model, whereby the cell cycle is expedited by a set of functionally connected but not regularly distributed components. PMID:29465397

  6. Staphylococcus aureus and the ecology of the nasal microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Cindy M; Price, Lance B; Hungate, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    The human microbiome can play a key role in host susceptibility to pathogens, including in the nasal cavity, a site favored by Staphylococcus aureus. However, what determines our resident nasal microbiota-the host or the environment-and can interactions among nasal bacteria determine S. aureus......, their negative interactions depend on thresholds of absolute abundance. These findings demonstrate that nasal microbiota is not fixed by host genetics and opens the possibility that nasal microbiota may be manipulated to prevent or eliminate S. aureus colonization....

  7. Bovine Staphylococcus aureus: Subtyping, evolution, and zoonotic transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, R; Cosandey, A; Luini, M; Artursson, K; Bardiau, M; Breitenwieser, F; Hehenberger, E; Lam, Th; Mansfeld, M; Michel, A; Mösslacher, G; Naskova, J; Nelson, S; Podpečan, O; Raemy, A; Ryan, E; Salat, O; Zangerl, P; Steiner, A; Graber, H U

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is globally one of the most important pathogens causing contagious mastitis in cattle. Previous studies using ribosomal spacer (RS)-PCR, however, demonstrated in Swiss cows that Staph. aureus isolated from bovine intramammary infections are genetically heterogeneous, with Staph. aureus genotype B (GTB) and GTC being the most prominent genotypes. Furthermore, Staph. aureus GTB was found to be contagious, whereas Staph. aureus GTC and all the remaining genotypes were involved in individual cow disease. In addition to RS-PCR, other methods for subtyping Staph. aureus are known, including spa typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). They are based on sequencing the spa and various housekeeping genes, respectively. The aim of the present study was to compare the 3 analytic methods using 456 strains of Staph. aureus isolated from milk of bovine intramammary infections and bulk tanks obtained from 12 European countries. Furthermore, the phylogeny of animal Staph. aureus was inferred and the zoonotic transfer of Staph. aureus between cattle and humans was studied. The analyzed strains could be grouped into 6 genotypic clusters, with CLB, CLC, and CLR being the most prominent ones. Comparing the 3 subtyping methods, RS-PCR showed the highest resolution, followed by spa typing and MLST. We found associations among the methods but in many cases they were unsatisfactory except for CLB and CLC. Cluster CLB was positive for clonal complex (CC)8 in 99% of the cases and typically positive for t2953; it is the cattle-adapted form of CC8. Cluster CLC was always positive for tbl 2645 and typically positive for CC705. For CLR and the remaining subtypes, links among the 3 methods were generally poor. Bovine Staph. aureus is highly clonal and a few clones predominate. Animal Staph. aureus always evolve from human strains, such that every human strain may be the ancestor of a novel animal-adapted strain. The zoonotic transfer of IMI- and milk-associated strains

  8. Simple method for correct enumeration of Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, J.; Cohn, M. T.; Petersen, A.

    2016-01-01

    culture. When grown in such liquid cultures, the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is characterized by its aggregation of single cells into clusters of variable size. Here, we show that aggregation during growth in the laboratory standard medium tryptic soy broth (TSB) is common among clinical...... and laboratory S. aureus isolates and that aggregation may introduce significant bias when applying standard enumeration methods on S. aureus growing in laboratory batch cultures. We provide a simple and efficient sonication procedure, which can be applied prior to optical density measurements to give...

  9. Identification of the ClpX Regulon in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Lotte; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Ingmer, Hanne

    Staphyloccous aureus is a major human pathogen capable of causing a wide spectrum of infections ranging from superficial wound infections to life-threatening endocarditis and toxic shock syndrome. Essential for S. aureus virulence is a large number of cell-surface-associated proteins and secreted...... we show here that almost 400 genes (15%) are influenced by the clpX deletion. Furthermore, ClpX not only regulates many virulence factors, but rather serves as a global regulator of central functions for S. aureus lifestyle and pathogenicity....

  10. Staphylococcus aureus intestinal colonization is associated with increased frequency of S. aureus on skin of hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donskey Curtis J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intestinal colonization by Staphylococcus aureus among hospitalized patients has been associated with increased risk of staphylococcal infection and could potentially contribute to transmission. We hypothesized that S. aureus intestinal colonization is associated with increased frequency of S. aureus on patients' skin and nearby environmental surfaces. Methods Selected inpatients were cultured weekly for S. aureus from stool, nares, skin (groin and axilla, and environmental surfaces (bed rail and bedside table. Investigator's hands were cultured after contacting the patients' skin and the environmental surfaces. Results Of 71 subjects, 32 (45.1% had negative nares and stool cultures, 23 (32.4% had positive nares and stool cultures, 13 (18.3% were nares carriers only, and 3 (4.2% were stool carriers only. Of the 39 patients with S. aureus carriage, 30 (76.9% had methicillin-resistant isolates. In comparison to nares colonization only, nares and intestinal colonization was associated with increased frequency of positive skin cultures (41% versus 77%; p = 0.001 and trends toward increased environmental contamination (45% versus 62%; p = 0.188 and acquisition on investigator's hands (36% versus 60%; p = 0.057. Patients with negative nares and stool cultures had low frequency of S. aureus on skin and the environment (4.8% and 11.3%, respectively. Conclusion We found that hospitalized patients with S. aureus nares and/or stool carriage frequently had S. aureus on their skin and on nearby environmental surfaces. S. aureus intestinal colonization was associated with increased frequency of positive skin cultures, which could potentially facilitate staphylococcal infections and nosocomial transmission.

  11. In silico analysis for identifying potential vaccine candidates against Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Delfani, Somayeh; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Mobarez, Ashraf Mohabati; Emaneini, Mohammad; Amani, Jafar; Sedighian, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important causes of nosocomial and community-acquired infections. The increasing incidence of multiple antibiotic-resistant S. aureus strains and the emergence of vancomycin resistant S. aureus strains have placed renewed interest on alternative means of prevention and control of infection. S. aureus produces a variety of virulence factors, so a multi-subunit vaccine will be more successful for preventing S. aureus infections than a mono-subuni...

  12. Host- and tissue-specific pathogenic traits of Staphylococcus aureus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.B. van Leeuwen (Willem); D.C. Melles (Damian); A. Alaidan (Alwaleed); M. Al-Ahdal (Mohammed); H.A.M. Boelens (Hélène); S.V. Snijders (Susan); H.F.L. Wertheim (Heiman); E. van Duijkeren (Engeline); J.K. Peeters (Justine); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); R.F.J. Gorkink (Raymond); G. Simons (Guus); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); A.F. van Belkum (Alex)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractComparative genomics were used to assess genetic differences between Staphylococcus aureus strains derived from infected animals versus colonized or infected humans. A total of 77 veterinary isolates were genetically characterized by high-throughput amplified fragment length polymorphism

  13. A porcine model of haematogenous brain infectionwith staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Lærke Boye; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen; Nielsen, Ole Lerberg

    2012-01-01

    thromboemboli (two pigs). The venous catheter was used for blood sampling before, during and after inoculation. The pigs were euthanized either 24 or 48 hours after inoculation. The brains were collected and examined histologically. Results We describe unifocal suppurative encephalitis 48 hours after......, Uppsala, Sweden Introduction Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) is a common cause of sepsis and brain abscesses in man and a frequent cause of porcine pyaemia. Here we present a porcine model of haematogenous S. aureus-induced brain infection. Materials and Methods Four pigs had two intravenous catheters...... inserted surgically, one in a. carotis communis and one in v. jugularis externa. All pigs received 106 CFU/kg body weight S. aureus through the arterial catheter. Bacteria were either suspended in isotonic saline infused at constant flow for 60 minutes (two pigs) or given as a bolus injection of autologoue...

  14. CHROMOSOME SET AND SOME PROBLEMS OF CANIS AUREUS IN CAUCASICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Dzuev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For the first time in the present resort chromosome set and some problems of Canis aureus ecology is described taking into account the structure of hail high altitude zone of mountain ecosystem.

  15. Improving Diagnosis and Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus Infections : Experimental Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van den Berg (Sanne)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a variety of infections, ranging from mild skin infections like furuncles and impetigo, to severe, lifethreatening infections including endocarditis, osteomyelitis and pneumonia. Invasive infections are

  16. Truncated Autoinducing Peptide Conjugates Selectively Recognize and Kill Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchikama, Kyoji; Shimamoto, Yasuhiro; Anami, Yasuaki

    2017-06-09

    The accessory gene regulator (agr) of Staphylococcus aureus coordinates various pathogenic events and is recognized as a promising therapeutic target for virulence control. S. aureus utilizes autoinducing peptides (AIPs), cyclic-peptide signaling molecules, to mediate the agr system. Despite the high potency of synthetic AIP analogues in agr inhibition, the potential of AIP molecules as a delivery vehicle for antibacterial agents remains unexplored. Herein, we report that truncated AIP scaffolds can be fused with fluorophore and cytotoxic photosensitizer molecules without compromising their high agr inhibitory activity, binding affinity to the receptor AgrC, or cell specificity. Strikingly, a photosensitizer-AIP conjugate exhibited 16-fold greater efficacy in a S. aureus cell-killing assay than a nontargeting analogue. These findings highlight the potential of truncated AIP conjugates as useful chemical tools for in-depth biological studies and as effective anti-S. aureus agents.

  17. Nickel allergy and relationship with Staphylococcus aureus in atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anna, Bogdali M.; Grazyna, Antoszczyk; Wojciech, Dyga

    2016-01-01

    Background: The increase of nickel air pollution is supposed to frequent side effects of nickel action related to virulence potential of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with nickel allergy in atopic dermatitis. The goal was to investigate the relationship between nickel allergy and infection by S....... aureus in atopic dermatitis. Methods: Nickel allergy was confirmed in atopic patients and excluded in healthy volunteers using patch testing. Infection by S. aureus was tested in atopic patients and healthy volunteers by use of API Staph system. The specific IgE for staphylococcal enterotoxin A and B...... were measured. Secretion of IFN-g, IL-2, IL-13 by PBMC under nickel sulfate and the enterotoxins A and B stimulations were studied with ELISpot. Results: We found the increased number of infections by S. aureus in atopic patients with nickel allergy in comparison to atopic patients and healthy...

  18. Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus: Live-in and let die

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eFraunholz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus uses a plethora of virulence factors to accomodate a diversity of niches in its human host. Aside from the classical manifestations of S. aureus-induced diseases, the pathogen also invades and survives within mammalian host cells. The survival strategies of the pathogen are as diverse as strains or host cell types used. S. aureus is able to replicate in the phagosome or freely in the cytoplasm of its host cells. It escapes the phagosome of professional and non-professional phagocytes, subverts autophagy, induces cell death mechanisms such as apoptosis and pyronecrosis, and even can induce anti-apoptotic programs in phagocytes. The focus of this review is to present a guide to recent research outlining the variety of intracellular fates of S. aureus.

  19. THE EVOLUTION OF NEW HOSPITAL STRAINS OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    JEVONS, M P; PARKER, M T

    1964-05-01

    The emergence of new groups of strains of Staph. aureus as important causes of endemic hospital infection in Great Britain has been followed by the phage typing method. Experiments are reported which suggest the possible origin of one of them.

  20. A Closer Look at the Transcriptome of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, N.J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Tight regulation of genes upon changing environments is important in establishing and maintaining infections by pathogens. In Staphylococcus aureus, gene expression and particularly controlled expression of various groups of genes dependent on growth and environmental conditions is essential for

  1. An Improved Medium for Growing Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    Note An improved medium for growing Staphylococcus aureus biofilm Ping Chen, Johnathan J. Abercrombie, Nicole R. Jeffrey, Kai P. Leung ⁎ Microbiology...Branch, US Army Dental and Trauma Research Detachment, Institute of Surgical Research, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, United States a b s t r a c ta r t...Keywords: Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Human plasma Microfluidic A medium (Brain Heart Infusion plus 10% human plasma) was developed, tested, and

  2. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a neonatal alpaca

    OpenAIRE

    Stull, Jason W.; Kenney, Daniel G.; Slavić, Durda; Weese, J. Scott

    2012-01-01

    A 6-hour-old alpaca was presented for evaluation of respiratory difficulty. As part of routine surveillance, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was identified from a nasal swab taken upon admission to the hospital. No signs of MRSA infection were noted. The MRSA strain recovered was a human epidemic clone that has been associated with horses. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus colonization can occur in camelids, and the potential animal and public health risks require consideration.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus in the community: colonization versus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections have increased dramatically in the community, yet S. aureus nasal colonization has remained stable. The objectives of this study were to determine if S. aureus colonization is a useful proxy measure to study disease transmission and infection in community settings, and to identify potential community reservoirs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Randomly selected households in Northern Manhattan, completed a structured social network questionnaire and provided nasal swabs that were typed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis to identify S. aureus colonizing strains. The main outcome measures were: 1 colonization with S. aureus; and 2 recent serious skin infection. Risk factor analyses were conducted at both the individual and the household levels; logistic regression models identified independent risks for household colonization and infection. RESULTS: 321 surveyed households contained 914 members. The S. aureus prevalence was 25% and MRSA was 0.4%. More than 40% of households were colonized. Recent antibiotic use was the only significant correlate for household colonization (p = .002. Seventy-eight (24% households reported serious skin infection. In contrast with colonization, five of the six risk factors that increased the risk of skin infection in the household at the univariate level remained independently significant in multivariable analysis: international travel, sports participation, surgery, antibiotic use and towel sharing. S. aureus colonization was not significantly associated with serious skin infection in any analysis. Among multiperson households with more than one person colonized, 50% carried the same strain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The lack of association between S. aureus nasal colonization and serious skin infection underscores the need to explore alternative venues or body sites that may be crucial to transmission. Moreover, the magnitude of colonization and

  4. Proportions of Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Patients with Surgical Site Infections in Mainland China: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhirong; Wang, Jing; Wang, Weiwei; Zhang, Yuelun; Han, Lizhong; Zhang, Yuan; Nie, Xiaolu; Zhan, Siyan

    2015-01-01

    Background Sufficient details have not been specified for the epidemiological characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among surgical site infections (SSIs) in mainland China. This systematic review aimed to estimate proportions of S. aureus and MRSA in SSIs through available published studies. Methods PubMed, Embase and four Chinese electronic databases were searched to identify relevant primary studies published between 2007...

  5. Photoreactivation of ultraviolet-irradiation damage in Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adkins, B. Jr.; Allen, W.E.

    1982-01-01

    This study reports the capacity of Staphylococcus aureus strain 7 - 8 to undergo photoenzymatic repair of UV-irradiation induced damage and compares it to the photoreactivation (PR) response of Escherichia coli strain B. Staphylococcus aureaus showed greater inhibition by UV irradiation than E. coli, consistent with its higher adenine and thymine content of DNA. Staphylococcus aureus showed an enhanced rate of photoreactivation with no lag in initiation of the PR response at low PR doses compared to E. coli. Maximum PR capacity of both cultures was about equal and occurred in cultures incubated at 23 - 25 0 . The PR responses at 11 - 12 and 35 - 37 0 for S. aureus and E. coli differed although both were capable of PR at each of these temperatures. The PR response of E. coli was directly related to the dosage of PR light (J/m 2 ); however, the photoenzymatic capacity of S. aureus was not directly responsive to continued decrease in light intensity. The capacity of S. aureus to undergo liquid holding recovery (LHR) occurred at 23 - 25 0 (not at 11 - 12 0 or 35 - 37 0 ), whereas E. coli underwent LHR at 11 - 12 0 and 23 - 25 0 but not at 35 - 37 0 . The LHR response of S. aureus was somewhat more effective than E. coli and did not show the direct response to increased liquid-holding period as did E. coli. (author)

  6. Nickel allergy and relationship with Staphylococcus aureus in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdali, Anna M; Anna, Bogdali M; Grazyna, Antoszczyk; Wojciech, Dyga; Aleksander, Obtulowicz; Anna, Bialecka; Andrzej, Kasprowicz; Zofia, Magnowska; Krystyna, Obtulowicz

    2016-01-01

    The increase of nickel air pollution is supposed to frequent side effects of nickel action related to virulence potential of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with nickel allergy in atopic dermatitis. The goal was to investigate the relationship between nickel allergy and infection by S. aureus in atopic dermatitis. Nickel allergy was confirmed in atopic patients and excluded in healthy volunteers using patch testing. Infection by S. aureus was tested in atopic patients and healthy volunteers by use of API Staph system. The specific IgE for staphylococcal enterotoxin A and B were measured. Secretion of IFN-g, IL-2, IL-13 by PBMC under nickel sulfate and the enterotoxins A and B stimulations were studied with ELISpot. We found the increased number of infections by S. aureus in atopic patients with nickel allergy in comparison to atopic patients and healthy volunteers without nickel allergy. The elevated secretion of IL-2 under nickel sulfate stimulation in vitro was exclusively found in atopic patients with nickel allergy infected by S. aureus. Our data suggest that nickel allergy and infection by S. aureus are linked in atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Pheno- and Genotyping of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates of Sheep Origin

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    Jana Mašlanková

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of genes encoding virulence factors in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from raw sheep milk, sheep cheese and Bryndza cheese. Genes encoding staphylococcal enterotoxin (sea, seb, sec, sed and see, toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (tst, exfoliative toxins (eta and etb and collagen-binding protein (cna were detected. In a total of 79 S. aureus isolates all assessed toxins encoding genes were found, except for see, eta and etb. Overall, 75.9% of S. aureus isolates were found to be positive for one or more toxin genes. The sec gene was found most frequently (24.1%, followed by tst (22.8%, seb (13.9%, sed (10.1% and sea (5.1%. The cna gene was detected in 55.7% of S. aureus isolates. Based on tandem repeats in coa gene, five coa types were observed, further divided into 16 subtypes based on their RFLP pattern. Similarly tandem repeats in spa gene divided S. aureus isolates into 7 types. In the parallel antibiotic resistance study, 69.6% isolates were resistant to at least one of the 11 tested antibiotics. The pheno- and genotyping of S. aureus isolates of sheep origin presented in this work update the epidemiological data in Slovakia.

  8. Resistance to Antimicrobials Mediated by Efflux Pumps in Staphylococcus aureus

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    Isabel Couto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Resistance mediated by efflux has been recognized in Staphylococcus aureus in the last few decades, although its clinical relevance has only been recognized recently. The existence of only a few studies on the individual and overall contribution of efflux to resistance phenotypes associated with the need of well-established methods to assess efflux activity in clinical isolates contributes greatly to the lack of solid knowledge of this mechanism in S. aureus. This study aims to provide information on approaches useful to the assessment and characterization of efflux activity, as well as contributing to our understanding of the role of efflux to phenotypes of antibiotic resistance and biocide tolerance in S. aureus clinical isolates. The results described show that efflux is an important contributor to fluoroquinolone resistance in S. aureus and suggest it as a major mechanism in the early stages of resistance development. We also show that efflux plays an important role on the reduced susceptibility to biocides in S. aureus, strengthening the importance of this long neglected resistance mechanism to the persistence and proliferation of antibiotic/biocide-resistant S. aureus in the hospital environment.

  9. What’s in a Name? Is Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Just Another S aureus When Treated with Vancomycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    of test to detect methicilin - resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureua. J Clin their longer hospitalizations and more severe injuries, had Microbiot...10u f DMRMM STAUXN PLIPoove to lo pu~bi~c releaseB - - 1 C6 01 In SWhat’s in a Name? Is Methicillin- Resistant <Staphylococcus aureus Just Another S... resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, hospital and the community, infections caused by these new principally resistant to penicilllnase

  10. ANTISTAPHYBASE: database of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and essential oils (EOs) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouhir, Abdelmajid; Taieb, Malek; Lamine, Mohamed Ashraf; Cherif, Ammar; Jridi, Taoufik; Mahjoubi, Basma; Mbarek, Sarra; Fliss, Ismail; Nefzi, Adel; Sebei, Khaled; Ben Hamida, Jeannette

    2017-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus are major pathogens. The antimicrobial peptides and essential oils (EOs) display narrow- or broad-spectrum activity against bacteria including these strains. A centralized resource, such as a database, designed specifically for anti-S. aureus/anti-methicillin-resistant S. aureus antimicrobial peptides and EOs is therefore needed to facilitate the comprehensive investigation of their structure/activity associations and combinations. The database ANTISTAPHYBASE is created to facilitate access to important information on antimicrobial peptides and essential peptides against methicillin-resistant S. aureus and S. aureus. At the moment, the database contains 596 sequences of antimicrobial peptides produced by diverse organisms and 287 essential oil records. It permits a quick and easy search of peptides based on their activity as well as their general, physicochemical properties and literature data. These data are very useful to perform further bioinformatic or chemometric analysis and would certainly be useful for the development of new drugs for medical use. The ANTISTAPHYBASE database is freely available at: https://www.antistaphybase.com/ .

  11. Staphylococcus aureus helicase but not Escherichia coli helicase stimulates S. aureus primase activity and maintains initiation specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepsell, Scott A; Larson, Marilynn A; Griep, Mark A; Hinrichs, Steven H

    2006-07-01

    Bacterial primases are essential for DNA replication due to their role in polymerizing the formation of short RNA primers repeatedly on the lagging-strand template and at least once on the leading-strand template. The ability of recombinant Staphylococcus aureus DnaG primase to utilize different single-stranded DNA templates was tested using oligonucleotides of the sequence 5'-CAGA (CA)5 XYZ (CA)3-3', where XYZ represented the variable trinucleotide. These experiments demonstrated that S. aureus primase synthesized RNA primers predominately on templates containing 5'-d(CTA)-3' or TTA and to a much lesser degree on GTA-containing templates, in contrast to results seen with the Escherichia coli DnaG primase recognition sequence 5'-d(CTG)-3'. Primer synthesis was initiated complementarily to the middle nucleotide of the recognition sequence, while the third nucleotide, an adenosine, was required to support primer synthesis but was not copied into the RNA primer. The replicative helicases from both S. aureus and E. coli were tested for their ability to stimulate either S. aureus or E. coli primase. Results showed that each bacterial helicase could only stimulate the cognate bacterial primase. In addition, S. aureus helicase stimulated the production of full-length primers, whereas E. coli helicase increased the synthesis of only short RNA polymers. These studies identified important differences between E. coli and S. aureus related to DNA replication and suggest that each bacterial primase and helicase may have adapted unique properties optimized for replication.

  12. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus fomite survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Christa; Davis, Diane L

    2009-01-01

    To assess survival of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on fomites encountered by health students. Three suspensions of MRSA were made to mimic lab splashes: a 0.5 McFarland trypticase soy broth, whole blood with 50 colony forming units/mL and body fluid/serum with 2000 colony forming units/mL. These were seeded onto three environmental surfaces (glass, vinyl floor tile, and countertop) and wet swabbed for 60 days. High touch areas of student stethoscopes were also wet swabbed. MRSA selective CHROMagar was used to identify organism survival. Salisbury University, Salisbury MD PARTICIPANTS: Salisbury University nursing and respiratory therapy students who volunteered to have their stethoscopes swabbed anonymously. Detection of pink colonies on MRSA-selective CHROMagar. MRSA in 0.5 McFarland broth lived for > or =60 days on all surfaces. MRSA in blood was undetectable on any surface, and MRSA in serum survived 41 days on glass, 45 days on tile, and > or =60 days on countertop. Five of thirty-three stethoscopes (15%) tested were positive for MRSA. Previous studies showed fomite survival of MRSA for about two weeks using contact plate sampling and MRSA on 7.4% of stethoscopes. We showed longer MRSA survival times by wet swab sampling and a higher stethoscope contamination rate. As expected, higher organism loads survived longer.

  13. Predictors of Mortality in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Slade O.; Vaska, Vikram L.; Espedido, Björn A.; Paterson, David L.; Gosbell, Iain B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is an important infection with an incidence rate ranging from 20 to 50 cases/100,000 population per year. Between 10% and 30% of these patients will die from SAB. Comparatively, this accounts for a greater number of deaths than for AIDS, tuberculosis, and viral hepatitis combined. Multiple factors influence outcomes for SAB patients. The most consistent predictor of mortality is age, with older patients being twice as likely to die. Except for the presence of comorbidities, the impacts of other host factors, including gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and immune status, are unclear. Pathogen-host interactions, especially the presence of shock and the source of SAB, are strong predictors of outcomes. Although antibiotic resistance may be associated with increased mortality, questions remain as to whether this reflects pathogen-specific factors or poorer responses to antibiotic therapy, namely, vancomycin. Optimal management relies on starting appropriate antibiotics in a timely fashion, resulting in improved outcomes for certain patient subgroups. The roles of surgery and infectious disease consultations require further study. Although the rate of mortality from SAB is declining, it remains high. Future international collaborative studies are required to tease out the relative contributions of various factors to mortality, which would enable the optimization of SAB management and patient outcomes. PMID:22491776

  14. Pharmacotherapeutic options for treating Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiol, Carlota; Cuervo, Guillermo; Shaw, Evelyn; Pujol, Miquel; Carratalà, Jordi

    2017-12-01

    Case-fatality rates for Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) remain unacceptably high and have improved only modestly in recent decades. Treatment of SAB is still a clinical challenge, especially if methicillin-resistant strains are involved. New drugs with anti-staphylococcal activity are currently available, and their role as alternatives to standard therapies is being investigated. Areas covered: In this review, we give an update of the current available antibiotics for the treatment of SAB. We provide information regarding the pharmacological characteristics, the accepted indications, and the most important adverse events of the old and new anti-staphylococcal agents, as well as the existing evidence on their use for the treatment of SAB. Expert opinion: The management of patients with SAB is very complex and needs a multidisciplinary approach. There are currently new available options for the treatment of methicillin-resistant SAB. However, more data from clinical trials are needed to assign specific roles to each antibiotic and to include them in the new antibacterial armamentarium. The role of combination therapy for the treatment of increasingly complex patients with SAB deserves thorough investigation.

  15. METICILIN REZISTENTNI STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS (MRSA (in bosnian

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    Jasmin Dizdarević

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Zbog visokog stepena adaptibilnosti i postojanja velikog broja vrsta, stafilokoke spadaju u grupu široko rasprostranjenih mikroorganizama. Ove bakterije se gotovo redovno mogu naći na koži, krznu i dlaci, te sluznicama nosne šupljine i ždrijela različitih životinja i ljudi. Pojava otpornosti stafilokoka na različite grupe antibiotika, kao i potreba za boljim razumjevanjem mehanizma stafilokokne antibiotske rezistencije, predstavljaju ozbiljan izazov za efikasniju borbu sa ovim globalnim problemom. Meticilin-oksacilin rezistencija danas predstavlja poseban problem u veterinarskoj i humanoj medicini. Ekonomski gubici izazvani stafilokoknim infekcijama u stočarskoj proizvodnji širom svijeta, jedan su od najvažnijih veterinarskih problema. Visok stepen morbiditeta i dugotrajna liječenja oboljelih životinja, dodatno intenziviraju i aktualiziraju ovu problematiku. Posebnu grupu meticilin-oksacilin rezistentnih stafilokoka predstavljaju stafilokokni sojevi povezani sa stokom LA-MRSA (eng. Livestock-associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Zbog činjenice da je moguć prenos ovih mikroorganizama sa životinja na ljude, ali i obratno, koagulaza pozitivne stafilokoke zauzimaju posebno mjesto u javnom zdravstvu općenito.

  16. Comparison of agglutinating and neutralizing antibodies to serovar hardjo in sows immunized with two commercial whole culture polivalent anti-leptospira bacterins Comparação de anticorpos aglutinantes e neutralizantes do sorovar hardjo em fêmeas suínas imunizadas com duas bacterinas anti- leptospira comerciais

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    Francisco Rafael Martins Soto

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available It was performed the comparison of the intensity and duration of agglutinating and neutralizing antibodies to serovar Hardjo in swines vaccinated with two commercial anti-leptospira bacterins. Sows no reactive to 24 Leptospira sp serovars in the microscopic agglutination test (MAT were divided in three groups: Group A (n=08: received two vaccine A doses with 30 days interval, Group B (n=08 two vaccine B doses with 30 days interval and Group C (n=08: control no vaccinated against leptospirosis.Blood samples were collected each 30 days during six months following the first vaccination. The sera were tested by MAT and growth inhibition test (GIT to serovar Hardjo in order to evaluate respectively agglutinating and neutralizing antibodies. It was found that neutralizing antibodies persisted for a longer time than the agglutinating ones and that the absence of agglutinating antibodies does not means in the absence of the neutralizing. The peaks of agglutinating antibodies was obtained at least 30 days earlier than that produced by neutralizing. The duration of both kinds of antibodies measured differed between the two bacterines tested. The period for inducing neutralizing antibodies against serovar Hardjo indicated that gilts must be immunized with two doses of whole culture anti-leptospira bacterines applied 30 days each other at least 90 days before the first mating. For the maintenance of hight levels of neutralizing antibodies the revaccinations must be performed every six months after the first vaccination.Foi efetuada a comparação entre a intensidade e duração dos níveis de anticorpos neutralizantes e aglutinantes para o sorovar Hardjo em fêmeas suínas vacinadas com duas bacterinas comerciais anti-leptospirose. Animais caracterizados como não reatores para 24 sorovares de Leptospira sp pelo teste de soroaglutinação microscópica (SAM e que nunca haviam sido vacinados contra a leptospirose foram divididos em três grupos: grupo A (n

  17. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in diabetic foot infections

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    Estrella Cervantes-García

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is one of the major pathogens causing chronic infections. The ability of S. aureus to acquire resistance to a diverse range of antimicrobial compounds results in limited treatment options, particularly in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. A mechanism by which S. aureus develops reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials is through the formation of small colony variants (SCVs. Infections by SCVs of S. aureus are an upcoming problem due to difficulties in laboratory diagnosis and resistance to antimicrobial therapy. Methods: A prospective study was performed on 120 patients diagnosed with both type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. The study was carried out from July 2012 to December 2013 in Hospital General de Mexico. The samples were cultured in blood agar, mannitol salt agar, and MacConkey agar media, and incubated at 37°C in aerobic conditions. Results: We describe the first known cases of diabetic foot infections caused by MRSA-SCVs in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. In all of our cases, the patients had not received any form of gentamicin therapy. Conclusions: The antibiotic therapy commonly used in diabetic patients with infected diabetic foot ulcers fails in the case of MRSA-SCVs because the intracellular location protects S. aureus-SCVs from the host's defenses and also helps them resist antibiotics. The cases studied in this article add to the spectrum of persistent and relapsing infections attributed to MRSA-SCVs and emphasizes that these variants may also play a relevant role in diabetic foot infections.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus from the German general population is highly diverse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Karsten; Schaumburg, Frieder; Fegeler, Christian; Friedrich, Alexander W; Köck, Robin

    2017-01-01

    This prospective cohort study evaluates colonization dynamics and molecular characteristics of methicillin-susceptible and - resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA/MRSA) in a German general population. Nasal swabs of 1878 non-hospitalized adults were screened for S. aureus. Participants were screened thrice in intervals of 6-8 months. Isolates were characterized by spa and agr typing, mecA and mecC possession, respectively, and PCRs targeting virulence factors. 40.9% of all participants carried S. aureus at least once while 0.7% of the participants carried MRSA (mainly spa t011). MSSA isolates (n=1359) were associated with 331 different spa types; t084 (7.7%), t091 (6.1%) and t012 (71, 5.2%) were predominant. Of 206 participants carrying S. aureus at all three sampling time points, 14.1% carried the same spa type continuously; 5.3% carried different spa types with similar repeat patterns, but 80.6% carried S. aureus with unrelated spa types. MSSA isolates frequently harboured genes encoding enterotoxins (sec: 16.6%, seg: 63.1%, sei: 64.5%) and toxic shock syndrome toxin (tst: 17.5%), but rarely Panton-Valentine leukocidin (lukS-PV/lukF-PV: 0.2%). MSSA colonizing human nares in the community are clonally highly diverse. Among those constantly carrying S. aureus, clonal lineages changed over time. The proportion of persistent S. aureus carriers was lower than reported elsewhere. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) at ambient freshwater beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Lisa R.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Johnson, Heather E.; Brennan, Angela K.; Isaacs, Natasha M.; Spencer, Chelsea

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are a threat to human health worldwide, and although detected at marine beaches, they have been largely unstudied at freshwater beaches. Genes indicating S. aureus (SA; femA) and methicillin resistance (mecA) were detected at 11 and 12 of 13 US Great Lakes beaches and in 18% or 27% of 287 recreational water samples, respectively. Eight beaches had mecA + femA (potential MRSA) detections. During an intensive study, higher bather numbers, staphylococci concentrations, and femA detections were found in samples collected after noon than before noon. Local population density, beach cloud cover, and beach wave height were significantly correlated with SA or MRSA detection frequency. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene, associated with community-acquired MRSA, was detected in 12 out of 27 potential MRSA samples. The femA gene was detected less frequently at beaches that met US enterococci criteria or EU enterococci ‘excellent’ recreational water quality, but was not related to Escherichia coli-defined criteria. Escherichia coli is often the only indicator used to determine water quality at US beaches, given the economic and healthcare burden that can be associated with infections caused by SA and MRSA, monitoring of recreational waters for non-fecal bacteria such as staphylococci and/or SA may be warranted.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus: nuevos y antiguos antimicrobianos Staphylococcus aureus: new and old antimicrobial agents

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    B. Perazzi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del trabajo fue evaluar la sensibilidad a antiguos y nuevos antimicrobianos de aislamientos de Staphylococcus aureus resistentes a la oxacilina, de origen hospitalario (SAOR-H y adquiridos en la comunidad (SAOR-AC, y también en aislamientos sensibles a la oxacilina (SAOS. Se estudió en forma prospectiva la concentración inhibitoria mínima a diversos antimicrobianos en 118 aislamientos consecutivos por dilución seriada en agar según las indicaciones del CLSI. En los aislamientos de SAOR sin resistencia acompañante se determinó la presencia de los genes mec A, leucocidina de Panton Valentine (LPV y γ-hemolisina por PCR, y del cassette SCC mec por PCR múltiple. De los 118 aislamientos estudiados, 44 fueron SAOR-H, 16 SAOR-AC y 58 SAOS. Los aislamientos de SAOR-H presentaron resistencia simultánea a eritromicina, clindamicina, gentamicina, ciprofloxacina, levofloxacina y moxifloxacina, y todos fueron sensibles a tigeciclina (TIG, vancomicina, teicoplanina y linezolid (LZD. Los aislamientos de SAOR-AC fueron resistentes solamente a OXA y sensibles a todos los antimicrobianos ensayados. En todos ellos se detectaron los genes mec A, LPV, γ-hemolisina y el cassette SCC mec IV. En SAOS y en SAOR-AC todos los antimicrobianos no ß-lactámicos ensayados presentaron excelente actividad in vitro, mientras que en SAOR-H sólo los antiguos antimicrobianos como glucopéptidos, doxiciclina, rifampicina y trimetoprima-sulfametoxazol presentaron buena actividad in vitro, al igual que LZD y TIG entre los nuevos antimicrobianos. El fenotipo de SAOR sin resistencia acompañante fue altamente predictivo de SAOR-AC, ya que fue confirmado por presentar el cassette SCC mec IV.The objective of the study was to evaluate the susceptibility to old and new antimicrobial agents against hospital-acquired oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-ORSA, community-acquired oxacillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-ORSA, and oxacillin-susceptible S. aureus (OSSA

  1. Gastrointestinal dissemination and transmission of Staphylococcus aureus following bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernbauer, Elisabeth; Maurer, Katie; Torres, Victor J; Shopsin, Bo; Cadwell, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Mutations that alter virulence and antibiotic susceptibility arise and persist during Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. However, an experimental system demonstrating transmission following bacteremia has been lacking, and thus implications of within-host adaptation for between-host transmission are unknown. We report that S. aureus disseminates to the gastrointestinal tract of mice following intravenous injection and readily transmits to cohoused naive mice. Both intestinal dissemination and transmission were linked to the production of virulence factors based on gene deletion studies of the sae and agr two-component systems. Furthermore, antimicrobial selection for antibiotic-resistant S. aureus displaced susceptible S. aureus from the intestine of infected hosts, which led to the preferential transmission and dominance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria among cohoused untreated mice. These findings establish an animal model to investigate gastrointestinal dissemination and transmission of S. aureus and suggest that adaptation during the course of systemic infection has implications beyond the level of a single host. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in Shrimps in Tehran during 2013

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    Mohammad Mehdi Soltan Dallal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background During fishing and transport, preservation and quality of fish products are importantas well as storage to prevent the growth of pathogenic and toxin producing bacteria.Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of sea food-borne diseases worldwidedue to contamination of food by preformed enterotoxins. The aim of this study was to compare theprevalence and contamination of S. aureus in marine and farmed shrimps in Tehran fishery center.Methods: A total of 300 samples, including 150 marine, 150 farmed shrimps were selected duringSeptember 2013 to December 2014. Isolation and identification of S. aureus from isolated sampleswere carried out according to conventional methods, and antibiotic susceptibility test wasperformed by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method.Results: The results of this study showed that 30% of marine and 20% off armed shrimps werecontaminated with S. aureus. The highest resistance was observed with penicillin and ampicillin,whereas 100% were sensitive to vancomycin, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, and rifampin.Conclusions: Due to relatively high contamination of shrimp by S. aureus more attention shouldbe given during processing and manufacturing.

  3. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in Shrimps in Tehran during 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Soltan Dallal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background During fishing and transport, preservation and quality of fish products are importantas well as storage to prevent the growth of pathogenic and toxin producing bacteria.Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of sea food-borne diseases worldwidedue to contamination of food by preformed enterotoxins. The aim of this study was to compare theprevalence and contamination of S. aureus in marine and farmed shrimps in Tehran fishery center.Methods: A total of 300 samples, including 150 marine, 150 farmed shrimps were selected duringSeptember 2013 to December 2013. Isolation and identification of S. aureus from isolated sampleswere carried out according to conventional methods, and antibiotic susceptibility test wasperformed by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion methodResults: The results of this study showed that 30% of marine and 20% off armed shrimps werecontaminated with S. aureus. The highest resistance was observed with penicillin and ampicillin,whereas 100% were sensitive to vancomycin, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, and rifampin.Conclusions: Due to relatively high contamination of shrimp by S. aureus more attention shouldbe given during processing and manufacturing.

  4. Role of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in chronic urticaria

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    Ashimav Deb Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the role of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in patients suffering from chronic urticaria. Method: All total 82 patients were included for this study. Study group comprised 57 patients with chronic urticaria and the control group comprised 25 healthy volunteers. Nasal swab specimens were taken from all the 82 patients for bacterial culture and antimicrobial sensitivity. Patients with chronic urticaria who had positive growth for S. aureus were treated with sensitive antimicrobial agent. Nasal swab specimens were taken again from all the patients who received antimicrobial therapy to ensure complete eradication of S. aureus. All patients were followed up for a period of 6 weeks after the treatment. Urticarial activity was measured with the help of urticarial activity score. Results: S. aureus was detected in swab specimens from the nasal cavity in 32 patients in the study group and 7 patients in the control group. In the study group, after the antimicrobial treatment, 9 patients (28.12% had complete recovery from urticaria during the follow-up period; 4 patients (12.5% showed partial recovery from urticaria while the remaining patients (59.37% continued to suffer from urticaria. Conclusion: This study showed that nasal carriage of S. aureus can act as an etiological factor in chronic urticaria.

  5. The Bicomponent Pore-Forming Leucocidins of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Francis

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability to produce water-soluble proteins with the capacity to oligomerize and form pores within cellular lipid bilayers is a trait conserved among nearly all forms of life, including humans, single-celled eukaryotes, and numerous bacterial species. In bacteria, some of the most notable pore-forming molecules are protein toxins that interact with mammalian cell membranes to promote lysis, deliver effectors, and modulate cellular homeostasis. Of the bacterial species capable of producing pore-forming toxic molecules, the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most notorious. S. aureus can produce seven different pore-forming protein toxins, all of which are believed to play a unique role in promoting the ability of the organism to cause disease in humans and other mammals. The most diverse of these pore-forming toxins, in terms of both functional activity and global representation within S. aureus clinical isolates, are the bicomponent leucocidins. From the first description of their activity on host immune cells over 100 years ago to the detailed investigations of their biochemical function today, the leucocidins remain at the forefront of S. aureus pathogenesis research initiatives. Study of their mode of action is of immediate interest in the realm of therapeutic agent design as well as for studies of bacterial pathogenesis. This review provides an updated perspective on our understanding of the S. aureus leucocidins and their function, specificity, and potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:24847020

  6. Virulence potential of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Buruli ulcer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amissah, Nana Ama; Chlebowicz, Monika A; Ablordey, Anthony; Tetteh, Caitlin S; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip S; Friedrich, Alex W; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Stienstra, Ymkje; Rossen, John W

    2017-06-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. BU wounds may also be colonized with other microorganisms including Staphylococcus aureus. This study aimed to characterize the virulence factors of S. aureus isolated from BU patients. Previously sequenced genomes of 21 S. aureus isolates from BU patients were screened for the presence of virulence genes. The results show that all S. aureus isolates harbored on their core genomes genes for known virulence factors like α-hemolysin, and the α- and β-phenol soluble modulins. Besides the core genome virulence genes, mobile genetic elements (MGEs), i.e. prophages, genomic islands, pathogenicity islands and a Staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) were found to carry different combinations of virulence factors, among them genes that are known to encode factors that promote immune evasion, superantigens and Panton-Valentine Leucocidin. The present observations imply that the S. aureus isolates from BU patients harbor a diverse repertoire of virulence genes that may enhance bacterial survival and persistence in the wound environment and potentially contribute to delayed wound healing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  7. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from tonsillectomized adult patients with recurrent tonsillitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkowska, Marta; Garbacz, Katarzyna; Stromkowski, Józef

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus strains from 118 tonsillectomized adults due to recurrent tonsillitis (RT). The study included strains isolated from the tonsillar surface prior to tonsillectomy, recovered from the tonsillar core at the time of surgery, and from the posterior throat 2-4 weeks after the procedure. Susceptibility of isolates to 19 antibiotics was tested in line with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. Irrespective of the stage, the most commonly isolated bacteria were gram-positive cocci, and among them S. aureus. The tonsillar core was the most common site of S. aureus isolation (30.5%), followed by the tonsillar surface (10.8%) and the posterior pharynx (5.9%). This difference turned out to be statistically significant (p Staphylococcus aureus seems to be the most common pathogen isolated from patients tonsillectomized due to RT. Staphylococcal isolates associated with RT are present mostly within the tonsillar core and susceptible to most antibiotics. They are typically isolated from patients between 21 and 30 years of age. Tonsillectomy results in less frequent isolation of S. aureus strains. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Eradication of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Infections Using Synthetic Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapotoczna, Marta; Forde, Éanna; Hogan, Siobhan; Humphreys, Hilary; O'Gara, James P; Fitzgerald-Hughes, Deirdre; Devocelle, Marc; O'Neill, Eoghan

    2017-03-15

    Here, we demonstrate that antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an effective antibiofilm treatment when applied as catheter lock solutions (CLSs) against S. aureus biofilm infections. The activity of synthetic AMPs (Bac8c, HB43, P18, Omiganan, WMR, Ranalexin, and Polyphemusin) was measured against early and mature biofilms produced by methicillin-resistant S. aureus and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates from patients with device-related infections grown under in vivo-relevant biofilm conditions. The cytotoxic and hemolytic activities of the AMPs against human cells and their immunomodulatory potential in human blood were also characterized. The D-Bac8c2,5Leu variant emerged as the most effective AMP during in vitro studies and was also highly effective in eradicating S. aureus biofilm infection when used in a CLS rat central venous catheter infection model. These data support the potential use of D-Bac8c2,5Leu, alone or in combination with other AMPs, in the treatment of S. aureus intravenous catheter infections. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Molecular and mathematical epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus uberis mastitis in dairy herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zadoks, Ruth Nicolet

    2002-01-01

    Mastitis is the most common and costly production disease affecting dairy cows. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus uberis are two major mastitis-causing pathogens. Staphylococcus aureus is traditionally classified as contagious pathogen, while Streptococcus uberis is classified as environmental

  10. Effect of temperature on antibacterial activity of lidocaine to Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taki, Y; Seki, K; Ikigai, H; Nishihara, S; Ueno, H; Murota, K; Masuda, S

    1988-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the antibacterial activity of lidocaine to Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated in vitro. At 10 C at which S. aureus organisms do not grow and might be metabolically inactive, the antibacterial activity of lidocaine to S. aureus was not observed in a concentration of 1%, which was quite antibacterial to S. aureus at 37 C. On the other hand, at 40 C a conspicuously increased antibacterial activity to S. aureus of lidocaine was observed in a concentration of 0.25% which was not antibacterial to S. aureus organisms at 37 C. Similar results were obtained when P. aeruginosa organisms were examined in place of S. aureus, although P. aeruginosa was found to be less susceptible to lidocaine than S. aureus. The clinical significance of the thermal effect on the antibacterial activity of lidocaine was discussed in brief.

  11. Mupirocin prophylaxis against nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus infections in nonsurgical patients: a randomized study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Vos (Margreet); A. Ott (Alewijn); A. Voss (Andreas); J.A.J.W. Kluytmans (Jan); C.M.J.E. Vandenbroucke-Grauls (Christina); M.H.M. Meester (Marlene); P.H.J. van Keulen (Peter); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); H.F.L. Wertheim (Heiman)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage is a major risk factor for nosocomial S. aureus infection. Studies show that intranasal mupirocin can prevent nosocomial surgical site infections. No data are available on the efficacy of mupirocin in nonsurgical

  12. In vitro mecA gene transfer among Staphylococcus aureus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    2012-01-05

    resistant Staphylococcus aureus. (MRSA). INTRODUCTION. Staphylococcus aureus has been recognized as a bacterium that can cause a broad spectrum of diseases and is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide.

  13. Antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from dairy cows and genetic diversity of resistant isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent and major contagious mastitis bacterial pathogen. The antibiotic treatment cure rates vary considerably from 4% to 92%. Staphylococcus aureus readily becomes resistant to antibiotics, resulting in persistent noncurable intramammary infection that usually results i...

  14. Quality control of direct molecular diagnostics for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van Belkum (Alex); H.G.M. Niesters (Bert); W.G. MacKay (William); W.B. van Leeuwen (Willem)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractTen samples containing various amounts of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), and combinations thereof were distributed to 51 laboratories for molecular diagnostics testing.

  15. External quality assessment of the molecular diagnostics and genotyping of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. te Witt (René); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); W.G. MacKay (William); P.S. Wallace; W.B. van Leeuwen (Willem)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractTwo multicentre external quality assessments (EQA) for the molecular detection and genotyping of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were arranged. Firstly, 11 samples containing various amounts of inactivated MRSA strains, meticillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA),

  16. Quality control of direct molecular diagnostics for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Belkum, Alex; Niesters, Hubert G M; MacKay, William G; van Leeuwen, Willem B

    Ten samples containing various amounts of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE), and combinations thereof were distributed to 51 laboratories for molecular diagnostics testing. Samples containing

  17. High Prevalence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus among Patients with Septic Arthritis Caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Wu, Chung-Da; Cheng, Shun-Chien; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Tseng, Chi-Chou; Chan, Huan-Tee; Chen, Po-Yih; Chao, Chien-Ming

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the clinical characteristics of patients with septic arthritis caused by Staphylococcus aureus and tried to identify the risk factors for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) arthritis. Between January 2008 and December 2011, patients with septic arthritis caused by S. aureus were identified from the computerized databases of a regional hospital and a medical center in southern Taiwan. The medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 93 patients with S. aureus arthritis were identified, and MRSA arthritis was found in 38 (40.9%) cases. The mean age of the patients was 58 years, and 86 (92.5%) episodes were classified as community-acquired infections. Diabetes mellitus (n = 41, 44.1%) was the most common underlying disease, followed by chronic kidney disease and liver cirrhosis. Patients with MRSA arthritis were more frequently elderly and found in the setting of healthcare-associated infection than patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) infections. No other significant differences in clinical manifestations and outcomes were noted between these two groups of patients. Overall, the in-hospital mortality rate was 5.4%, and diabetes mellitus was the only risk factor for mortality. MRSA is emerging in the setting of community-acquired septic arthritis. MRSA septic arthritis is more likely to develop in the elderly and in healthcare-associated infections than MSSA septic arthritis.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus strains in primiparous and multiparous cows in six herds with a high prevalence of Staph. aureus intramammary infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenhagen, Bernd-Alois; Scheibe, Nicole; Zucker, Bert-Andree; Köster, Gudrun; Heuwieser, Wolfgang

    2007-11-01

    The proportion of different strains of Staphylococcus aureus was tested in four groups of lactating dairy cows in six herds with a high overall prevalence of Staph. aureus using random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR. Group 1 included primiparous cows in early lactation (250 days in milk). Groups 3 and 4 were multiparous cows in the respective stages of lactation. Eight cows from each group on each farm were tested. Overall quarter prevalence of Staph. aureus ranged from 23.4 to 32.0% in the herds. Of the 130 isolates included in the analysis 86.9% were high prevalence strains (more than three isolates per herd), while 13.1% were strains that were only identified in one or two samples. Low prevalence strains were found in all six herds. The proportion of low prevalence strains was higher in multiparous than in primiparous cows (odds ratio, OR 4.4, 1.2-16.6). It is concluded that low prevalence Staph. aureus strains are common even in herds with a high prevalence of Staph. aureus and that their frequency is lower in primiparous cows than in older cows.

  19. Immuno-targeting of Staphylococcus aureus via surface remodeling complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabulski, Mary J; Pidgeon, Sean E; Pires, Marcos M

    2017-10-01

    Agents with novel mechanisms of action are needed to complement traditional antibiotics. Towards these goals, we have exploited the surface-homing properties of vancomycin to tag the surface of Gram-positive pathogens with immune cell attractants in two unique modes. First, vancomycin was conjugated to the small molecule hapten 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) to promote bacterial opsonization. Second, we built on these results by improving the tagging specificity and mechanism of incorporation by coupling it to a sortase A substrate peptide. We demonstrated, for the first time, that the surface of Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus ) can be metabolically labeled in live Caenorhabditis elegans hosts. These constructs represent a class of promising narrow-spectrum agents that target S. aureus for opsonization and establish a new surface labeling modality in live host organisms, which should be a powerful tool in dissecting features of host-pathogen interactions.

  20. [Resistance to antibiotics of Staphylococcus aureus responsible of osteoarticular infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, J; Bergeret, M

    2007-10-01

    Osteo-articular infections represent the majority of invasive Staphylococcus aureus infections in children. It is demonstrated that, independently of the resistance or susceptibility to methicillin, the production of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) by S. aureus enhanced the severity of the disease. However, an increase of the rate of community acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) has been reported in osteo-articular infections. These CA-MRSA are the most often susceptible to the other antibiotics. SCCmec elements of type IV or V associated with the PVL coding genes seem to be molecular markers of CA-MRSA. The risk factors of acquisition of these strains are the young age of children and the overcrowding. It is now established that CA-MRSA are pathogens present all over the world. It thus became necessary to look after the epidemiology of these virulent strains.

  1. New epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus infection in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C-J; Huang, Y-C

    2014-07-01

    Not only is Asia the most populous region in the world, but inappropriate therapy, including self-medication with over-the-counter antimicrobial agents, is a common response to infectious diseases. The high antibiotic selective pressure among the overcrowded inhabitants creates an environment that is suitable for the rapid development and efficient spread of numerous multidrug-resistant pathogens. Indeed, Asia is among the regions with the highest prevalence rates of healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) and community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) in the world. Most hospitals in Asia are endemic for multidrug-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), with an estimated proportion from 28% (in Hong Kong and Indonesia) to >70% (in Korea) among all clinical S. aureus isolates in the early 2010s. Isolates with reduced susceptibility or a high level of resistance to glycopeptides have also been increasingly identified in the past few years. In contrast, the proportion of MRSA among community-associated S. aureus infections in Asian countries varies markedly, from 35%. Two pandemic HA-MRSA clones, namely multilocus sequence type (ST) 239 and ST5, are disseminated internationally in Asia, whereas the molecular epidemiology of CA-MRSA in Asia is characterized by clonal heterogeneity, similar to that in Europe. In this review, the epidemiology of S. aureus in both healthcare facilities and communities in Asia is addressed, with an emphasis on the prevalence, clonal structure and antibiotic resistant profiles of the MRSA strains. The novel MRSA strains from livestock animals have been considered to constitute a public health threat in western countries. The emerging livestock-associated MRSA strains in Asia are also included in this review. © 2014 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  2. Methicillin and vancomycin resistant S. aureus in hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Sood Loomba

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available S. aureus is the major bacterial cause of skin, soft tissue and bone infections, and one of the commonest causes of healthcare-associated bacteremia. Hospital-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA carriage is associated with an increased risk of infection, morbidity and mortality. Screening of high-risk patients at the time of hospital admission and decolonization has proved to be an important factor in an effort to reduce nosocomial transmission. The electronic database Pub Med was searched for all the articles on "Establishment of MRSA and the emergence of vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA." The search included case reports, case series and reviews. All the articles were cross-referenced to search for any more available articles. A total of 88 references were obtained. The studies showed a steady increase in the number of vancomycin-intermediate and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus. Extensive use of vancomycin creates a selective pressure that favors the outgrowth of rare, vancomycin-resistant clones leading to heterogenous vancomycin intermediate S. aureus hVISA clones, and eventually, with continued exposure, to a uniform population of vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA clones. However, the criteria for identifying hVISA strains have not been standardized, complicating any determination of their clinical significance and role in treatment failures. The spread of MRSA from the hospital to the community, coupled with the emergence of VISA and VRSA, has become major concern among healthcare providers. Infection-control measures, reliable laboratory screening for resistance, appropriate antibiotic prescribing practices and avoidance of blanket treatment can prevent long-term emergence of resistance.

  3. UJI BIOAKTIVITAS FORBAZOL E TERHADAP HAMBATAN PERTUMBUHAN PADA STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Putu Ristiati

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Forbazol E dapat disintesis dari 1-(p-tosil pirol-2-karbonil klorida dan fenasil amonium klorida dengan rendeman cukup tinggi melalui empat tahap reaksi yaitu : pertama, reaksi penggabungan; kedua, siklodehidrasi; ketiga,hidrolisis; dan keempat, klorinasi. Staphylococcus aureus merupakan bakteri gram positif. Untuk itu perlu diteliti : (a forbazol E dapat menghambat pertumbuhan S. aureus ; (b konsentrasi forbazol E 75 mg/L akan menimbulkan hambatan pertumbuhan S. aureus lebih tinggi dari konsentrasi 37,5 mg/L. Penelitian eksperimental ini menggunakan rancangan the randomized- posttest-only control group design dan melibatkan 9 sampel pada kelompok kontrol, 9 sampel pada kelompok perlakuan I dan 9 sampel pada perlakuan II. Data yang diperoleh dianalisis dengan menggunakan uji anova pada taraf signifikansi 5%. Hasil penelitian membuktikan forbazol E dapat menghambat pertumbuhan, pemberian  forbazol E pada  pada kelompok perlakuan II dengan konsentrasi 75 mg/L menimbulkan    hambatan     pertumbuhan    S. aureus lebih    tinggi dibandingkan dengan kelompok perlakuan I dengan konsentrasi 37,5 mg/L (p<0,05, uji lanjutan dengan uji beda nyata terkecil (BNT pada taraf  signifikansi  5% diperoleh  bahwa  hambatan  pertumbuhan S. aureus pada kelompok perlakuan II (75 mg/L berbeda bermakna dengan kelompok perlakuan I (37,5 mg/L (p<0,05. Bertolak dari pembahasan di atas dapat disimpulkan bahwa bioaktivitas forbazol E dapat menghambat pertumbuhan   S. aureus.

  4. Transfer of resistance plasmids from Staphylococcus epidermidis to Staphylococcus aureus: evidence for conjugative exchange of resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Forbes, B A; Schaberg, D R

    1983-01-01

    The ability of Staphylococcus epidermidis to transfer antimicrobial resistance to Staphylococcus aureus was tested by mixed culture on filter membranes. Two of six clinical isolates examined were able to transfer resistance to S. aureus strains 879R4RF, RN450RF, and UM1385RF. Subsequent S.aureus transconjugants resulting from matings with S. epidermidis donors were able to serve as donors to other S. aureus strains at similar frequencies. Cell-free and mitomycin C-induced filtrates of donors ...

  5. Capturing of staphylococcus aureus onto an interface containing graft chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.; Furusaki, Shintaro; Saito, Kyoichi; Sugo, Takanobu; Makuuchi, Keizo.

    1995-01-01

    A microbial-cell-capturing material was prepared by radiation-induced grafting of glycidyl methacrylate onto a polyethylene-based fiber before the introduction of diethylamine. The prepared fiber was tested against a Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli solution. The results showed that the grafted-type fiber had a capturing rate constant 1000-fold higher than the commercial crosslinked-type bead for S. aureus and that an activation energy of 39 kJ/mol was obtained for the microbial-cell-capturing action. (author)

  6. Multidrug efflux pumps in Staphylococcus aureus and their clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Soojin

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is rapidly spreading among bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that causes a variety of diseases in humans. For the last two decades, bacterial multidrug efflux pumps have drawn attention due to their potential association with clinical multidrug resistance. Numerous researchers have demonstrated efflux-mediated resistance in vitro and in vivo and found novel multidrug transporters using advanced genomic information about bacteria. This article aims to provide a concise summary of multidrug efflux pumps and their important clinical implications, focusing on recent findings concerning S. aureus efflux pumps.

  7. Response of Staphylococcus Aureus to a Spaceflight Analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, S. L.; Ott, C. M.

    2010-01-01

    The decreased gravity of the spaceflight environment creates quiescent, low fluid shear conditions. This environment can impart considerable effects on the physiology of microorganisms as well as their interactions with potential hosts. Using the rotating wall vessel (RWV), as a spaceflight analogue, the consequence of low fluid shear culture on microbial pathogenesis has provided a better understanding of the risks to the astronaut crew from infectious microorganisms. While the outcome of low fluid shear culture has been investigated for several bacterial pathogens, little has been done to understand how this environmental factor affects Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus is an opportunistic human pathogen which presents a high level of infection risk to the crew, as it has been isolated from both the space shuttle and International Space Station. Given that approximately forty percent of the population are carriers of the bacteria, eradication of this organism from in flight environments is impractical. These reasons have lead to us to assess the response of S. aureus to a reduced fluid shear environment. Culture in the RWV demonstrated that S. aureus grown under the low-shear condition had lower cell concentrations after 10 hours when compared to the control culture. Furthermore, the low-shear cultured bacteria displayed a reduction in carotenoid production, pigments responsible for their yellow/gold coloration. When exposed to various environmental stressors, post low-shear culture, a decrease in the ability to survive oxidative assault was observed compared to control cultures. The low fluid shear environment also resulted in a decrease in hemolysin secretion, a staphylococcal toxin responsible for red blood cell lysis. When challenged by the immune components present in human whole blood, low-shear cultured S. aureus demonstrated significantly reduced survival rates as compared to the control culture. Assays to determine the duration of these alterations

  8. Substituted dihydronaphthalenes as efflux pump inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thota, Niranjan; Reddy, Mallepally V; Kumar, Ashwani

    2010-01-01

    A new series of 3-(substituted-3,4-dihydronaphthyl)-2-propenoic acid amides has been prepared through convergent synthetic strategies and tested in combination with ciprofloxacin against NorA overexpressing Staphylococcus aureus 1199B as test strain for potentiating of the drug activity. Out of 24...... compounds evaluated, 12 compounds potentiated the activity of ciprofloxacin and resulted in 2-16 fold reduction in the MIC (4-0.5 microg/mL) of the drug. The failure of these efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) to potentiate the activity of ciprofloxacin when tested against NorA knock out S. aureus SA-K1758...

  9. Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis: a rare cause of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chest pain is a common presenting symptom with a broad differential. Life-threatening cardiac and pulmonary etiologies of chest pain should be evaluated first. However, it is critical to perform a thorough assessment for other sources of chest pain in order to limit morbidity and mortality from less common causes. We present a rare case of a previously healthy 45 year old man who presented with focal, substernal, reproducible chest pain and Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia who was later found to have primary Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis.

  10. Brain infection following experimental Staphylococcus aureus sepsis in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Lærke Boye; Iburg, Tine Moesgaard; Nielsen, Ole Lerberg

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Sepsis is a major problem in humans and both the incidence and mortality is increasing. Multiple microabcesses can be found in the brain of septic patients. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of sepsis and brain abscesses. S. aureus is also a frequent cause...... pigs were kept as controls. The pigs were euthanized in groups of four at either 6, 12, 24 or 48 h post infection. The brain was collected from all the animals and examined histologically. Results: All the inoculated pigs developed sepsis and 7 out of 12 animals had microabscesses in the prosencephalon...

  11. Sensitivity test of staphylococcus aureus against extract tinospora crispa

    OpenAIRE

    Lucia Ratna Winata Muslimin

    2017-01-01

    A bacterium such as Staphylococcus aureus ( S.aureus) produces a kind of toxic protein which can disrupt intestinal wall. Livestock reacts to these toxins by pumping lots of water into the intestine in order to rinse or flush these toxins. As a result, the livestock have diarrhea as a body response to remove the toxin in the digestive system. In the presence of these problems, farmers take a measure such as using antibiotics freely. Among farmers, antibiotics are often used freely without kn...

  12. Individual predisposition to Staphylococcus aureus colonization in pigs based on quantification, carriage dynamics and serological profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gongora, Carmen Espinosa; Dahl, Jan; Elvstrøm, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on Staphylococcus aureus in pigs focused on livestock-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and had qualitative cross-sectional design. This study aimed to elucidate frequency, load and stability of S. aureus nasal carriage in pigs over time and investigated possible...

  13. Staphylococcus aureus ST398 gene expression profiling during ex vivo colonization of porcine nasal epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tulinski, P.; Duim, B.; Wittink, F.R.; Jonker, M.J.; Breit, T.M.; van Putten, J.P.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Fluit, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus is a common human and animal opportunistic pathogen. In humans nasal carriage of S. aureus is a risk factor for various infections. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus ST398 is highly prevalent in pigs in Europe and North America. The mechanism of successful pig

  14. Staphylococcus aureus ST398 gene expression profiling during ex vivo colonization of porcine nasal epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tulinski, P.; Duim, B.; Wittink, F.R.; Jonker, M.J.; Breit, T.M.; Van Putten, J.P.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Fluit, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is a common human and animal opportunistic pathogen. In humans nasal carriage of S. aureus is a risk factor for various infections. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus ST398 is highly prevalent in pigs in Europe and North America. The mechanism of successful pig

  15. Staphylococcus aureus ST398 gene expression profiling during ex vivo colonization of porcine nasal epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tulinski, Pawel; Duim, Birgitta; Wittink, Floyd R; Jonker, Martijs J; Breit, Timo M; van Putten, Jos P; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Fluit, Ad C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is a common human and animal opportunistic pathogen. In humans nasal carriage of S. aureus is a risk factor for various infections. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus ST398 is highly prevalent in pigs in Europe and North America. The mechanism of successful pig

  16. Long-term cortisol levels are not associated with nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Manenschijn (Laura); A.M. Jetten; W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem); M. Tavakol (Mehri); E.L.T. van den Akker (Erica); J.W. Koper (Jan); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); E.F.C. van Rossum (Liesbeth)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractStaphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) colonizes the anterior nares in part of the population and the persistent carrier state is associated with increased infection risk. Knowledge concerning the determinants of S. aureus nasal carriage is limited. Previously, we found that glucocorticoid

  17. Genotypic characterisation of Staphylococcus aureus isolates causing bacteraemia at Tygerberg hospital, western cape province, South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orth, H.; Salaam-Dreyer, Z.; Makgotlho, E.; Sinha, B.; Wasserman, E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: There is a paucity of studies on the genotypic characterisation of invasive S. aureus strains and the incidence of communityacquired methicillin resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) infections in South Africa. In this study we characterized S. aureus isolates from bacteraemia episodes using

  18. Utility of prior screening for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in predicting resistance of S. aureus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFadden, Derek R; Elligsen, Marion; Robicsek, Ari; Ricciuto, Daniel R; Daneman, Nick

    2013-10-15

    Screening for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is intended to reduce nosocomial spread by identifying patients colonized by MRSA. Given the widespread use of this screening, we evaluated its potential clinical utility in predicting the resistance of clinical isolates of S. aureus. We conducted a 2-year retrospective cohort study that included patients with documented clinical infection with S. aureus and prior screening for MRSA. We determined test characteristics, including sensitivity and specificity, of screening for predicting the resistance of subsequent S. aureus isolates. Of 510 patients included in the study, 53 (10%) had positive results from MRSA screening, and 79 (15%) of infecting isolates were resistant to methicillin. Screening for MRSA predicted methicillin resistance of the infecting isolate with 99% (95% confidence interval [CI] 98%-100%) specificity and 63% (95% CI 52%-74%) sensitivity. When screening swabs were obtained within 48 hours before isolate collection, sensitivity increased to 91% (95% CI 71%-99%) and specificity was 100% (95% CI 97%-100%), yielding a negative likelihood ratio of 0.09 (95% CI 0.01-0.3) and a negative predictive value of 98% (95% CI 95%-100%). The time between swab and isolate collection was a significant predictor of concordance of methicillin resistance in swabs and isolates (odds ratio 6.6, 95% CI 1.6-28.2). A positive result from MRSA screening predicted methicillin resistance in a culture-positive clinical infection with S. aureus. Negative results on MRSA screening were most useful for excluding methicillin resistance of a subsequent infection with S. aureus when the screening swab was obtained within 48 hours before collection of the clinical isolate.

  19. Population structure analyses of Staphylococcus aureus at Tygerberg Hospital, South Africa, reveals a diverse population, a high prevalence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes, and unique local methicillin-resistant S. aureus clones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosthuysen, W. F.; Orth, H.; Lombard, C. J.; Sinha, B.; Wasserman, E.

    Studies reporting on the population structure of Staphylococcus aureus in South Africa have focused only on methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). This study describes the population structure of S. aureus, including methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolated from patients at Tygerberg

  20. A study of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage, antibacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-12-30

    Dec 30, 2014 ... Aim: This study was to determine the virulence encoding genes, and the antibiotic resistance patterns of the. Staphylococcus aureus isolates, which .... Gram stain, catalase activity, tube coagulase test). All. S. aureusisolates were tested for ... with the use of lysozyme (20 mg/ml, Sigma) in the cell lysis step.

  1. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus among food handlers and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Food handlers have been recognized to play a major role in the transmission of food borne diseases; contributing significantly to the global incidence and burden of the diseases. This study therefore, assesses the nasal carriage of staphylococcus aureus among food handlers and restaurant workers in Ekpoma, Edo State, ...

  2. Efficacy of extended cefquinome treatment of clinical Staphylococcus aureus mastitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, J. M.; Cox, P.; Schukken, Y. H.; Lam, T. J G M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/14686820X

    2013-01-01

    Clinical Staphylococcus aureus mastitis is difficult to cure. Extended antimicrobial treatment is often advocated as a practical approach to improve cure rates; however, scientific evidence of this hypothesis is lacking. A multi-centered, nonblinded, randomized, positive-controlled clinical trial

  3. Microstructures as IR-sensors with Staphylococcus aureus bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikova, T. V.; Danilov, P. A.; Gonchukov, S. A.; Yermachenko, V. M.; Ionin, A. A.; Khmelnitskii, R. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Nguyen, T. T. H.; Rudenko, A. A.; Saraeva, I. N.; Svistunova, T. S.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2017-09-01

    Using a micro-hole grating in a supported silver film as a laser-fabricated novel optical platform for surface-enhanced IR absoprtion/reflection spectroscopy, characteristic absorption bands of Staphylococcus aureus, especially - its buried carotenoid fragments - were detected in FT-IR spectra with 10-fold analytical enhancement, paving the way to spectral express-identification of the pathogenic microorganisms.

  4. Staphylococcus aureus redirects central metabolism to increase iron availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Friedman

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis is significantly influenced by the iron status of the host. However, the regulatory impact of host iron sources on S. aureus gene expression remains unknown. In this study, we combine multivariable difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry with multivariate statistical analyses to systematically cluster cellular protein response across distinct iron-exposure conditions. Quadruplicate samples were simultaneously analyzed for alterations in protein abundance and/or post-translational modification state in response to environmental (iron chelation, hemin treatment or genetic (Deltafur alterations in bacterial iron exposure. We identified 120 proteins representing several coordinated biochemical pathways that are affected by changes in iron-exposure status. Highlighted in these experiments is the identification of the heme-regulated transport system (HrtAB, a novel transport system which plays a critical role in staphylococcal heme metabolism. Further, we show that regulated overproduction of acidic end-products brought on by iron starvation decreases local pH resulting in the release of iron from the host iron-sequestering protein transferrin. These findings reveal novel strategies used by S. aureus to acquire scarce nutrients in the hostile host environment and begin to define the iron and heme-dependent regulons of S. aureus.

  5. Detection and identification of Staphylococcus aureus in raw milk by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-04-12

    Apr 12, 2010 ... bacterial pathogens, S. aureus probe, Staphylococcus spp. probe, nucleic acid fixture positive controls and positive experimental control ... bacterial pathogens by which raw milk is contaminated in most cases, can result in ... benign skin infections to life-threatening endocarditis and toxic shock syndrome ...

  6. [Staphylococcus aureus methicillin-resistant community acquired neonatal orbital cellulitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, M Guadalupe; Castro, Graciela; Mansilla, Celeste; Kaldzielski, Carina; Salas, Gisela; Rosanova, María Teresa; Berberian, Griselda

    2013-04-01

    Orbital cellulitis typically occurs in older children, but it can occasionally affect infants and neonates. Staphylococcus aureus is the main pathogen isolated. Outcome depends on an adequate initial approach. We report three neonates with orbital cellulitis caused by community-associated MRSA.

  7. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pork production shower facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leedom Larson, Kerry R; Harper, Abby L; Hanson, Blake M; Male, Michael J; Wardyn, Shylo E; Dressler, Anne E; Wagstrom, Elizabeth A; Tendolkar, Shaliesh; Diekema, Daniel J; Donham, Kelley J; Smith, Tara C

    2011-01-01

    As methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been found in pigs, we sought to determine if MRSA is present in pork production shower facilities. In two production systems tested, 3% and 26% of shower samples were positive for MRSA. spa types identified included t034, t189, t753, and t1746.

  8. Bats are rare reservoirs of Staphylococcus aureus complex in Gabon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Jana; Gmeiner, Markus; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Matsiégui, Pierre-Blaise; Schaer, Juliane; Eckerle, Isabella; Weber, Natalie; Matuschewski, Kai; Bletz, Stefan; Schaumburg, Frieder

    2017-01-01

    The colonization of afro-tropical wildlife with Staphylococcus aureus and the derived clade Staphylococcus schweitzeri remains largely unknown. A reservoir in bats could be of importance since bats and humans share overlapping habitats. In addition, bats are food sources in some African regions and can be the cause of zoonotic diseases. Here, we present a cross-sectional survey employing pharyngeal swabs of captured and released bats (n=133) in a forest area of Gabon. We detected low colonization rates of S. aureus (4-6%) and S. schweitzeri (4%) in two out of four species of fruit bats, namely Rousettus aegyptiacus and Micropteropus pusillus, but not in insectivorous bats. Multilocus sequence typing showed that S. aureus from Gabonese bats (ST2984, ST3259, ST3301, ST3302) were distinct from major African human associated clones (ST15, ST121, ST152). S. schweitzeri from bats (ST1697, ST1700) clustered with S. schweitzeri from other species (bats, monkeys) from Nigeria and Côte d'Ivoire. In conclusion, colonization rates of bats with S. aureus and S. schweitzeri were low in our study. Phylogenetic analysis supports an intense geographical dispersal of S. schweitzeri among different mammalian wildlife hosts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Toxic bovine mastitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus in twin cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüegsegger; Corti; Sihto; Johler

    2014-11-01

    In this report, we describe two cases of bovine toxic mastitis associated with S. aureus and we provide DNA microarray based characterization data of the strain causing the disease. Both cows had recently calved and suffered from anorexia, pyrexia, and an elevated heart rate. In both animals, at least one mammary gland was swollen, hardened, sensitive to touch, and produced brownish or bloody secretions. The clinical state of the animals deteriorated quickly and both cows had to be euthanized within 48 hours after presentation. The S. aureus strain, which was isolated from the mastitis milk of both cows, was assigned to spa type t267, agr type I, capsule type 5 and CC97, a clonal complex recently identified as the evolutionary origin of two emerging clones of human epidemic community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The strain did not harbour any genes conferring resistance to antimicrobial agents and we did not detect any genes coding for enterotoxins, toxic shock syndrome toxin, or exfoliative toxins. Taking into consideration that twin cows were affected by this rare disease, we suggest that host factors may play a crucial role in toxic mastitis associated with S. aureus.

  10. Multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    implicated as a cause of long-term survival pathogens in the environment [4]. High capability of S. aureus to .... spreadsheet (Microsoft Corp, Redmond, WA,. USA) for analysis. Using SPSS 16.0 statistical .... Sambrok, J.A. Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual. 3rd ed. New York; Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press;.

  11. Surveillance for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Battambang, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbain, Joel T; Viscount, Helen B

    2002-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and humanitarian missions are increasing worldwide. The prevalence of MRSA in the populations served may be unknown. A BRAVA (Blast Resuscitlation and Victim Assistance) mission was conducted at Battambang, Cambodia that included microbiology support. No MRSA was detected in our patients despite the reported increase in MRSA in Asia. Continued investigation is warranted for future missions.

  12. Oxacillin resistant Staphlococcus aureus among HIV infected and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is need for an informed choice in administration of appropriate antibiotics in order to minimise treatment failures due to the multidrug resistance and Vanvomycin intermediate S. aureus (VISA) strains. Molecular epidemiology of MRSA strains in understanding new and emerging trends is recommended.

  13. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage and antibiotic susceptibility patterns in patients admitted to critical care units in a central hospital in Harare Zimbabwe. Design: A cross sectional study of patients admitted to Critical Care Units (CCUs), to determine the ...

  14. co-occurrence of candida albicans and staphylococcus aureus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-01-31

    Jan 31, 2014 ... Mcloughlin, R.M. (2013). Staphylococcus aureus colonisation: modulation of host immune response and impact on human vaccine design. Front. Immunol.; 4:507. Cannon, R.D., Holmes, A.R., Mason, A.B. and. Monk, B.C. (1995). Oral Candida: clearance, colonization, or candidiasis? J. Dent. Res.; 74: 1152 ...

  15. Whole Genome Analysis of Epidemiologically Closely Related Staphylococcus aureus Isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Schijffelen (Maarten); S.R. Konstantinov (Sergey); G. Lina (Gérard); I. Spiliopoulou (Iris); E. van Duijkeren (Engeline); E.C. Brouwer (Ellen); A.C. Fluit (Ad)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe change of the bacteria from colonizers to pathogens is accompanied by a drastic change in expression profiles. These changes may be due to environmental signals or to mutational changes. We therefore compared the whole genome sequences of four sets of S. aureus isolates. Three sets

  16. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Saudi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In recent years, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcucs aureus (MRSA) have become a truly global challenge. Systemic review and meta-analysis was performed to summarize the prevalence of MRSA in different regions of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). A search of the PubMed, Google and Google Scholar databases for ...

  17. Detection of some virulence factors in Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-21

    Jun 21, 2010 ... region gene, 22 samples contained X region coding gene protein A, 3 sample contained Toxic shock syndrome toxin gene (tst), ..... Vandenesch F, Moghazeh S (1995). The agr P2 operon: an autocatalytic sensory transduction system in Staphylococcus aureus. Mol. Gen. Genet. 248: 446-458. Novick RP ...

  18. Prevalence and risk factors for Staphylococcus aureus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-05

    Sep 5, 2015 ... factors for colonization with methicillin‑resistant Staphylococcus aureus at the time of hospital admission. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2003;24:409‑14. 16. Lu PL, Chin LC, Peng CF, Chiang YH, Chen TP, Ma L, et al. Risk factors and molecular analysis of community methicillin‑resistant Staphylococcus ...

  19. Coordination of Chromosome Segregation and Cell Division in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L. Bottomley

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Productive bacterial cell division and survival of progeny requires tight coordination between chromosome segregation and cell division to ensure equal partitioning of DNA. Unlike rod-shaped bacteria that undergo division in one plane, the coccoid human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus divides in three successive orthogonal planes, which requires a different spatial control compared to rod-shaped cells. To gain a better understanding of how this coordination between chromosome segregation and cell division is regulated in S. aureus, we investigated proteins that associate with FtsZ and the divisome. We found that DnaK, a well-known chaperone, interacts with FtsZ, EzrA and DivIVA, and is required for DivIVA stability. Unlike in several rod shaped organisms, DivIVA in S. aureus associates with several components of the divisome, as well as the chromosome segregation protein, SMC. This data, combined with phenotypic analysis of mutants, suggests a novel role for S. aureus DivIVA in ensuring cell division and chromosome segregation are coordinated.

  20. Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia at two academic hospitals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective study of patients with SAB seen from November 1999 to October 2002 was conducted at two academic hospitals in Johannesburg to determine mortality rates (death within 14 days of submission of blood culture) in patients bacteraemic with methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) and resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and to ...

  1. Distribution of mecA gene amongst Staphylococcus aureus isolates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    pathogenicity of S. aureus infections is associated with various bacterial surface components (e.g., capsular polysaccharide and protein A), including those recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (e.g., clumping factor and fibronectin binding protein), and to extracellular proteins (e.g., coagulase, hemolysins, enterotoxins ...

  2. Antibiotic susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ability to produce -lactamase enzyme was also screened for as well as their susceptibility to vancomycin using the tube dilution broth method. Urine, wound swabs and endocervical swabs were the major sources of S. aureus accounting for 27.77%, 19.19% and 13.80% of the total isolates respectively. Resistance profiling ...

  3. Mechanisms of resistance to daptomycin in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Casanova, N; Siller Ruiz, M; Muñoz Bellido, J L

    2017-12-01

    Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide active against multidrug-resistant Gram-positives, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and S. aureus with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin. It is 4-8 fold as active as vancomycin against methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and MRSA, and retains most of this activity against S. aureus with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin. The mechanism of action of daptomycin is not fully understood. Daptomycin binds to the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, leading to depolarization due to the loss of potassium ions from the cytoplasm. Daptomycin non-susceptibility is unusual in the clinical setting. Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain daptomycin-resistance, most of them associated to changes in composition, charge and fluidity of the cell wall. The mprF mutations, which lead to an increase in the lysyl-phosphatidyl glycerol production, and rpoB and rpoC mutations (rpo genes encode for bacterial RNA polymerase subunits) have been proposed as associated to daptomycin-resistance, but a number of mutations in other genes ( walK, cls, ggrA…) have been proposed.

  4. Antibacterial properties of Mangifera indica on Staphylococcus aureus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibacterial activity of Mangifera indica stem bark extracts was determined using disk diffusion, agar and broth dilution methods. In disk diffusion method, inhibition zone sizes were used to determine the susceptibility of S. aureus to the extracts. The results showed that the stem-bark extracts of M. indica have antimicrobial ...

  5. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. There is little information regarding the presence and characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), an important nosocomial pathogen, in rural African hospitals. Objectives. To determine the prevalence of MRSA colonisation in patients admitted to a rural hospital with tuberculosis (TB) ...

  6. An Interdisciplinary Experiment: Azo-Dye Metabolism by "Staphylococcus Aureus"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklesby, Kayleigh; Smith, Robert; Sharp, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    An interdisciplinary and engaging practical is detailed which offers great versatility in the study of a qualitative and quantitative metabolism of azo-dyes by "Staphylococcus aureus". This practical has broad scope for adaptation in the number and depth of variables to allow a focused practical experiment or small research project. Azo-dyes are…

  7. Global trend of Methicillin-resistant Staphlococcus aureus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Following its first recognition in early 1960s, the increasing incidence of nosocomial and community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections has become a global problem. The emergence of multiple-drug resistant MRSA strains and dissemination of epidemic antibiotic clones ...

  8. Vaccine Protection of Leukopenic Mice against Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Sabine; Gough, Portia; Kim, Hwan Keun; Schneewind, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The risk for Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) is increased in immunocompromised individuals, including patients with hematologic malignancy and/or chemotherapy. Due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains, designated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), staphylococcal BSI in cancer patients is associated with high mortality; however, neither a protective vaccine nor pathogen-specific immunotherapy is currently available. Here, we modeled staphylococcal BSI in leukopenic CD-1 mice that had been treated with cyclophosphamide, a drug for leukemia and lymphoma patients. Cyclophosphamide-treated mice were highly sensitive to S. aureus BSI and developed infectious lesions lacking immune cell infiltrates. Virulence factors of S. aureus that are key for disease establishment in immunocompetent hosts—α-hemolysin (Hla), iron-regulated surface determinants (IsdA and IsdB), coagulase (Coa), and von Willebrand factor binding protein (vWbp)—are dispensable for the pathogenesis of BSI in leukopenic mice. In contrast, sortase A mutants, which cannot assemble surface proteins, display delayed time to death and increased survival in this model. A vaccine with four surface antigens (ClfA, FnBPB, SdrD, and SpAKKAA), which was identified by genetic vaccinology using sortase A mutants, raised antigen-specific immune responses that protected leukopenic mice against staphylococcal BSI. PMID:25183728

  9. Architecture of a Species: Phylogenomics of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planet, Paul J; Narechania, Apurva; Chen, Liang; Mathema, Barun; Boundy, Sam; Archer, Gordon; Kreiswirth, Barry

    2017-02-01

    A deluge of whole-genome sequencing has begun to give insights into the patterns and processes of microbial evolution, but genome sequences have accrued in a haphazard manner, with biased sampling of natural variation that is driven largely by medical and epidemiological priorities. For instance, there is a strong bias for sequencing epidemic lineages of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) over sensitive isolates (methicillin-sensitive S. aureus: MSSA). As more diverse genomes are sequenced the emerging picture is of a highly subdivided species with a handful of relatively clonal groups (complexes) that, at any given moment, dominate in particular geographical regions. The establishment of hegemony of particular clones appears to be a dynamic process of successive waves of replacement of the previously dominant clone. Here we review the phylogenomic structure of a diverse range of S. aureus, including both MRSA and MSSA. We consider the utility of the concept of the 'core' genome and the impact of recombination and horizontal transfer. We argue that whole-genome surveillance of S. aureus populations could lead to better forecasting of antibiotic resistance and virulence of emerging clones, and a better understanding of the elusive biological factors that determine repeated strain replacement. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. A study of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage, antibacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: This study was to determine the virulence encoding genes, and the antibiotic resistance patterns of the Staphylococcus aureus isolates, which were isolated from the nasal samples of chest clinic patients. Materials and Methods: The nasal samples of the in‑patients (431) and out‑patients (1857) in Kayseri Training and ...

  11. The Pre - Eminence of Staphylococcus Aureus as The Causative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A range of infections is caused by Staphylococcal organisms prominent among them are nosocomial superficial infections manifesting as abscesses, furuncles, and wound infections. The study objective is to determine the degree to which Staphylococcus aureus is a cause of such lesions in a tertiary health care institution ...

  12. Occurrence and antibiogram of Staphylococcus aureus in dairy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fermented and defatted) were collected. The samples were cultured and identified by routine bacteriological methods. Prevalence of S.aureus (8.75%) in the products was; for fresh milk 3.75% and 'Nono' 5%. The susceptibility profile of the isolates ...

  13. Increased risk of arterial thromboembolic events after Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejer, N; Gotland, N; Uhre, M L

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: An association between infection and arterial thromboembolic events (ATE) has been suggested. Here we examined the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke and other ATE after Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB). METHODS: Danish register-based nation-wide observational cohort study...

  14. Antibiotic sensitivity pattern of Staphylococcus aureus from clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The importance of Staphylococcus aureus as a persistent nosocomial and community acquired pathogen has become a global health concern. It has a remarkable capability of evolving different mechanisms of resistance to most antimicrobial agents. The aim of the present study is to establish the incidence of ...

  15. Enterotoxicity of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from beans pudding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    36 samples of beans pudding from selected sources were analysed for Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus using standard protocols aimed at assessing its bacteriological quality. Samples obtained from restaurant showed slightly lower value for total plate count (1.3 x 104 - 1.6 x 106 cfu/gm) compared to samples ...

  16. Pyrazole Based Inhibitors against Enzymes of Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagadeesan, G.; Vijayakuma, Vinodhkumar; Palayam, Malathy

    2015-01-01

    agents. The current study focuses on molecular docking and dynamics studies of pyrazole derivatives against Nucleosidase and DNA gyrase B of Staphylococcus aureus. Molecular docking and dynamics studies reveal that some of these derivatives show better binding abilities than some of the current drugs...

  17. Pitfalls in the routine diagnosis of Staphylococcus aureus | Bello ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred isolates of Presumed Staphylococcus aureus from routine clinical specimens, collected from two government hospitals in Abha, Saudi Arabia, had their identity verified. We used the tube coagulase test as our gold standard. Twenty (10%) of the isolates were mis-identified. Reliance by the two laboratories on ...

  18. Multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To study the prevalence of resistant strains of S. aureus isolated from surfaces, beds and various equipment of an Iranian hospital emergency ward. Methods: Two hundred swab samples were collected from the surfaces, beds, trolleys, surgical equipment and diagnostic medical devices in emergency ward.

  19. Methicilin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at Jos University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A prospective surveillance of Methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was carried out at Jos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria, over a one year period. This study highlights the continuos importance of MRSA in causing both hospital and to a less extent community acquired infections. Out of the 180 ...

  20. Genetic variation and relationship in Staphylococcus aureus isolates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... into two major groups, the first comprises of mildly and weakly virulence, while the other group are the highly virulence Staphylococci. The results demonstrated that the RAPD technique may be of great use in the classification of Staphylococcus aureus. African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 4 (7), pp. 611-614, 2005 ...

  1. Cloxacillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Children's Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-06-29

    Jun 29, 1974 ... methicillin and cloxacillin were sought and their incidence determined. Annear1 demonstrated that the incubation of cultures of. Staph. aureus at temperatures below 37°C accentuated the difference between sensitive and resistant strains for methi- cillin and to a lesser extent for other antibiotics. Hewitt et al ...

  2. Occurrence of Methicilin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    VO Ogunleye, AO Ogunleye, ATP Ajuwape, KA Akande, AI Adetosoye ... Taking into consideration the danger associated with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, the findings from this study underscores the need for public enlightenment of both the hospital workers and the general public on the risk associated with ...

  3. antibacterial properties of mangifera indica on staphylococcus aureus.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    activity. Keywords: Staphylococcus aureus, antimicrobial activity, MIC, Phytochemical screening, MBC. INTRODUCTION. Plant derived products like gums, oils and extracts have been used for therapeutic purpose before the introduction of modern drugs (1; 2) and continues to provide health coverage for over eighty percent.

  4. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Dutch soccer team.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijsdens, Xander W; Lier, Ans M C van; Kregten, Eric van; Verhoef, Liesbeth; Santen-Verheuvel, Marga G van; Spalburg, Emile; Wannet, Wim J B

    2006-01-01

    An outbreak of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus occurred among members and close contacts of a soccer team. Typing of the isolates showed the outbreak was caused by the well-known European ST80-IV strain. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an outbreak of this

  5. spa typing for epidemiological surveillance of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallin, Marie; Friedrich, Alexander W; Struelens, Marc J; Caugant, Dominique A.

    2009-01-01

    The spa typing method is based on sequencing of the polymorphic X region of the protein A gene (spa), present in all strains of Staphylococcus aureus. The X region is constituted of a variable number of 24-bp repeats flanked by well-conserved regions. This single-locus sequence-based typing method

  6. Molecular Basis of Virulence in Staphylococcus aureus Mastitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maréchal, Caroline; Seyffert, Nubia; Jardin, Julien; Hernandez, David; Jan, Gwenaël; Rault, Lucie; Azevedo, Vasco; François, Patrice; Schrenzel, Jacques; van de Guchte, Maarten; Even, Sergine; Berkova, Nadia; Thiéry, Richard; Fitzgerald, J. Ross

    2011-01-01

    Background S. aureus is one of the main pathogens involved in ruminant mastitis worldwide. The severity of staphylococcal infection is highly variable, ranging from subclinical to gangrenous mastitis. This work represents an in-depth characterization of S. aureus mastitis isolates to identify bacterial factors involved in severity of mastitis infection. Methodology/Principal Findings We employed genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic approaches to comprehensively compare two clonally related S. aureus strains that reproducibly induce severe (strain O11) and milder (strain O46) mastitis in ewes. Variation in the content of mobile genetic elements, iron acquisition and metabolism, transcriptional regulation and exoprotein production was observed. In particular, O11 produced relatively high levels of exoproteins, including toxins and proteases known to be important in virulence. A characteristic we observed in other S. aureus strains isolated from clinical mastitis cases. Conclusions/Significance Our data are consistent with a dose-dependant role of some staphylococcal factors in the hypervirulence of strains isolated from severe mastitis. Mobile genetic elements, transcriptional regulators, exoproteins and iron acquisition pathways constitute good targets for further research to define the underlying mechanisms of mastitis severity. PMID:22096559

  7. Staphylococcus aureus in mastitic crossbreed cows and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of bovine mastitis associated with Staphylococcus aureus varied significantly (p<0.05) between breed, lactation stage, parity and age. It was higher (n= 49, 56.9%) in Zebu-Jersey than Zebu-Holstein Frisian (n= 25, 37.3%) crossbred cows. Staphyloccocal mastitis is a major health problem in dairy farm of ...

  8. Incidence of staphylococcus aureus in locally produced fresh milk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates the incidence of the bacterial organism Staphylococcus, aureus in locally produced fresh milk (nono). The fresh milk was obtained from the Damaturu main market, Yobe state of Nigeria. Petri dishes were washed and allowed to dry. They were then sterilized in hot air oven at 130°C for two hours and ...

  9. Human Staphylococcus aureus lineages among Zoological Park residents in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Drougka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a part of the microbiota flora in many animal species. The clonal spread of S. aureus among animals and personnel in a Zoological Park was investigated. Samples were collected from colonized and infected sites among 32 mammals, 11 birds and eight humans. The genes mecA, mecC, lukF/lukS-PV (encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin, PVL and tst (toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 were investigated by PCR. Clones were defined by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST, spa type and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE. Seven S. aureus isolates were recovered from four animals and one from an employee. All were mecA, mecC and tst–negative, whereas, one carried the PVL genes and was isolated from an infected Squirrel monkey. Clonal analysis revealed the occurrence of seven STs, eight PFGE and five spa types including ones of human origin. Even though a variety of genotypes were identified among S. aureus strains colonizing zoo park residents, our results indicate that colonization with human lineages has indeed occurred.

  10. Methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and their antibiotic sensitivity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: One hundred and eighty five (185) S. aureus isolates from various clinical specimens obtained over a 12-month period in the Microbiology Department of Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital (AKTH) were subjected to methicillin susceptibility testing, while including susceptibility testing to other antibiotics by the disc ...

  11. Distribution of mecA gene amongst Staphylococcus aureus isolates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Antibiotics susceptibility testing including methicillin sensitivity testing, beta lactamase testing, PCR for detection of mecA gene, and minimum inhibitory concentrations to methicillin were carried out on all the 194 isolates of S. aureus. Among the 194 strains, 40 (20.6%) were MRSA using 10 µg methicillin disc. PCR analysis.

  12. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of each duplicate swab sample was inoculated directly onto chocolate agar, incubated for 24 hours at 37oc while the other swab was used to make a smear for Gram staining. All isolates were identified using standard microbiological methods. Staphylococcus aureus isolates were screened for methicillin resistance ...

  13. Psoriasis and staphylococcus aureus skin colonization in Moroccan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Psoriatic lesions are rarely complicated by recurrent infections. The aim of our study is to determine skin colonisation and nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with psoriasis and in healthy persons. Patients and methods: a comparative study that include 33 patients with psoriasis and 33 healthy persons.

  14. Prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wound colonization by microorganisms is most frequently polymicrobial and incidences of high level resistance among bacterial isolates from wounds have been reported. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and extendedspectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Gram-negative bacteria both constitute ...

  15. Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus : a review of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus : a review of the molecular epidemiology, clinical significance and laboratory detection methods. ... Added to this burden is the emergence of more virulent strains of community-associated MRSA (CAMRSA) which at the turn of the century, has been increasingly reported to ...

  16. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Iranian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from Iranian restaurant food samples: Panton-Valentine Leukocidin, SCCmec phenotypes and antimicrobial resistance. ... TetK (80.72 %), linA (67.46 %), aadA1 (62.65 %), and msrA (55.42 %) were the most frequently identified resistance genes. SCCmec V (57.83%) ...

  17. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Pig Farming

    OpenAIRE

    Voss, Andreas; Loeffen, Frans; Bakker, Judith; Klaassen, Corne; Wulf, Mireille

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a study among a group of 26 regional pig farmers to determine the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus prevalence rate and found it was >760 times greater than the rate of patients admitted to Dutch hospitals. While spa-type t108 is apparently a more widespread clone among pig farmers and their environment, we did find other spa-types.

  18. Transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to household contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.P.N. Mollema (Femke); J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); M.D. Behrendt (Myra); N. Vaessen (Norbert); W. Lodder; W. Hendriks; H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); A. Voss (Andreas)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe frequency of and risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission from a MRSA index person to household contacts were assessed in this prospective study. Between January 2005 and December 2007, 62 newly diagnosed MRSA index persons (46 patients and 16

  19. Staphylococcus aureus in mastitic crossbreed cows and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross sectional study was conducted in dairy farms of Addis Ababa city from. November 2011 to April 2012 to estimate the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and its associated risk factors in mastitic dairy cows. Milk samples were collected from 153 (50 clinical and 103 subclinical) mastitic lactating crossbred cows and.

  20. Multiple drug resistance Staphylococcus aureus isolated in foods of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: StaphylococcuS. aureus is the most important agent, which is known to cause a wide range of diseases in both human and animals. Extended use and misuse of antibiotics in agriculture, stock farming and in the treatment of human diseases, has contributed to the rapid increase of the number of bacteria that ...

  1. Antibiotic sensitivity pattern of Staphylococcus aureus from clinical

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2011-01-26

    Jan 26, 2011 ... Table 3 shows the antibiotic sensitivity and resistance pattern of Staphylococcus aureus to various antibiotics. The highest frequency of sensitivity was observed with Levofloxacin 150(100%) followed by Ciprofloxacin 90(78.9%). The least was observed with Penicillin 6(7.1%). The number of strains tested ...

  2. Survival of Esherichia coli 0157:H7, Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The survival or inhibition of foodborne pathogens in different fermented products are well documented. This prompted the study to evaluate survival of Esherichia coli O157:H7, Staphylococcus aureus, Shigella flexneri and Salmonella spp. in two Ethiopian traditional fermented low-alcohol beverages, Shamita and Borde.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus nasopharyngeal carriage in rural and urban northern Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nguyen, Kinh; Zhang, Tianying; Thi Vu, Bich Ngoc; Dao, Trinh Tuyet; Tran, Toan Khanh; Thi Nguyen, Diep Ngoc; Thi Tran, Huong Kieu; Thi Nguyen, Chuc Kim; Fox, Annette; Horby, Peter; Wertheim, Heiman

    2014-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common human pathogen that can colonise the respiratory tract and cause infection. Here we investigate the risk factors associated with nasopharyngeal carriage of S. aureus (including methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA]) in Vietnam. Between February and June 2012, nasal and pharyngeal swabs for S. aureus culture, and demographic and socioeconomic data were taken from 1016 participants in urban and rural northern Vietnam, who were randomly selected from pre-specified age strata. Overall S. aureus prevalence was 303/1016 (29.8%; adjusted for age: 33.8%). Carriage in the main cohort was found to be associated with younger age (≤5 years [OR 3.13, CI 1.62-6.03]; 6-12 [OR 6.87, CI 3.95-11.94]; 13-19 [OR 6.47, CI 3.56-11.74]; 20-29 [OR 4.73, CI 2.40-9.31]; 30-59 [OR 1.74, CI 1.04-2.92); with ≥60 as reference), living in an urban area (OR 1.36, CI 1.01-1.83) and antibiotics use (OR 0.69, CI 0.49-0.96). MRSA was detected in 80/1016 (7.9%). Being aged ≤5 years (OR 4.84, CI 1.47-15.97); 6-12 (OR 10.21, CI 3.54-29.50); 20-29 (OR 4.01, CI 1.09-14.77) and wealth (>3/5 wealth index, OR 1.63 CI 1.01-2.62) were significant risk factors for MRSA carriage. Nasopharyngeal carriage of S. aureus is present in one-third of the Vietnamese population, and is more prevalent among children. Pharyngeal carriage is more common than nasal carriage. Risk factors for S. aureus (including MRSA) carriage are identified in the community. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  4. Bacteriocins of Non-aureus Staphylococci Isolated from Bovine Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Domonique A; Barkema, Herman W; Naushad, Sohail; De Buck, Jeroen

    2017-09-01

    Non- aureus staphylococci (NAS), the bacteria most commonly isolated from the bovine udder, potentially protect the udder against infection by major mastitis pathogens due to bacteriocin production. In this study, we determined the inhibitory capability of 441 bovine NAS isolates (comprising 26 species) against bovine Staphylococcus aureus Furthermore, inhibiting isolates were tested against a human methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolate using a cross-streaking method. We determined the presence of bacteriocin clusters in NAS whole genomes using genome mining tools, BLAST, and comparison of genomes of closely related inhibiting and noninhibiting isolates and determined the genetic organization of any identified bacteriocin biosynthetic gene clusters. Forty isolates from 9 species ( S. capitis , S. chromogenes , S. epidermidis , S. pasteuri , S. saprophyticus , S. sciuri , S. simulans , S. warneri , and S. xylosus ) inhibited growth of S. aureus in vitro , 23 isolates of which, from S. capitis , S. chromogenes , S. epidermidis , S. pasteuri , S. simulans , and S. xylosus , also inhibited MRSA. One hundred five putative bacteriocin gene clusters encompassing 6 different classes (lanthipeptides, sactipeptides, lasso peptides, class IIa, class IIc, and class IId) in 95 whole genomes from 16 species were identified. A total of 25 novel bacteriocin precursors were described. In conclusion, NAS from bovine mammary glands are a source of potential bacteriocins, with >21% being possible producers, representing potential for future characterization and prospective clinical applications. IMPORTANCE Mastitis (particularly infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus ) costs Canadian dairy producers $400 million/year and is the leading cause of antibiotic use on dairy farms. With increasing antibiotic resistance and regulations regarding use, there is impetus to explore bacteriocins (bacterially produced antimicrobial peptides) for treatment and prevention of bacterial

  5. Bacteriocins of Non-aureus Staphylococci Isolated from Bovine Milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Domonique A.; Barkema, Herman W.; Naushad, Sohail

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Non-aureus staphylococci (NAS), the bacteria most commonly isolated from the bovine udder, potentially protect the udder against infection by major mastitis pathogens due to bacteriocin production. In this study, we determined the inhibitory capability of 441 bovine NAS isolates (comprising 26 species) against bovine Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, inhibiting isolates were tested against a human methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolate using a cross-streaking method. We determined the presence of bacteriocin clusters in NAS whole genomes using genome mining tools, BLAST, and comparison of genomes of closely related inhibiting and noninhibiting isolates and determined the genetic organization of any identified bacteriocin biosynthetic gene clusters. Forty isolates from 9 species (S. capitis, S. chromogenes, S. epidermidis, S. pasteuri, S. saprophyticus, S. sciuri, S. simulans, S. warneri, and S. xylosus) inhibited growth of S. aureus in vitro, 23 isolates of which, from S. capitis, S. chromogenes, S. epidermidis, S. pasteuri, S. simulans, and S. xylosus, also inhibited MRSA. One hundred five putative bacteriocin gene clusters encompassing 6 different classes (lanthipeptides, sactipeptides, lasso peptides, class IIa, class IIc, and class IId) in 95 whole genomes from 16 species were identified. A total of 25 novel bacteriocin precursors were described. In conclusion, NAS from bovine mammary glands are a source of potential bacteriocins, with >21% being possible producers, representing potential for future characterization and prospective clinical applications. IMPORTANCE Mastitis (particularly infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus) costs Canadian dairy producers $400 million/year and is the leading cause of antibiotic use on dairy farms. With increasing antibiotic resistance and regulations regarding use, there is impetus to explore bacteriocins (bacterially produced antimicrobial peptides) for treatment and prevention of bacterial infections

  6. Antibiotic resistance and molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyedara Omotayo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen causing a wide range of infections in the hospital and community setting. In order to have adequate information for treatment of S. aureus infections, it is crucial to understand the trends in the antibiotic-resistance patterns. In addition, the occurrence and changes in types of S. aureus, clonal identities, and their geographic spread is essential for the establishment of adequate infection control programmes. In this study, 68 S. aureus isolates obtained from clinical and non-clinical sources in Nigeria between January and April 2009 were characterized using phenotypic and molecular methods. Results All the S. aureus isolates were susceptible to teicoplanin, vancomycin, phosphomycin, fusidic acid, rifampicin, daptomycin, mupirocin, linezolid and tigecycline. Sixteen percent of the isolates were resistant to oxacillin, while 55% and 72% of isolates were resistant to tetracycline and trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole (cotrimoxazole, respectively (Table 1. There was excellent correlation between the broth microdilution assay and detection of antibiotic resistance genes by the multiplex PCR, in the determination of S. aureus resistance to erythromycin, gentamicin, methicillin and tetracycline. A total of 28 spa types were identified in the study, and the predominant spa type among the methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA isolates was t084 (13 isolates. The t037-ST241-SCCmecIII type was the only clone identified in Maiduguri (North-East Nigeria while in South-West Nigeria, diversity among the MRSA isolates (t451-ST8-SCCmecV; t008-ST94-SCCmecIV; t002-ST5-SCCmecV; t064-ST8-SCCmecV was observed. The toxin genes seh and etd were detected in isolates affiliated with clonal complexes CC1, CC80 and sequence type ST25, respectively. The proportion of PVL-positive isolates among MSSA was high (40%. Most of the PVL-positive MSSA isolates were obtained from wound infections and associated

  7. Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in European Wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monecke, Stefan; Gavier-Widén, Dolores; Hotzel, Helmut; Peters, Martin; Guenther, Sebastian; Lazaris, Alexandros; Loncaric, Igor; Müller, Elke; Reissig, Annett; Ruppelt-Lorz, Antje; Shore, Anna C; Walter, Birgit; Coleman, David C; Ehricht, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a well-known colonizer and cause of infection among animals and it has been described from numerous domestic and wild animal species. The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular epidemiology of S. aureus in a convenience sample of European wildlife and to review what previously has been observed in the subject field. 124 S. aureus isolates were collected from wildlife in Germany, Austria and Sweden; they were characterized by DNA microarray hybridization and, for isolates with novel hybridization patterns, by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The isolates were assigned to 29 clonal complexes and singleton sequence types (CC1, CC5, CC6, CC7, CC8, CC9, CC12, CC15, CC22, CC25, CC30, CC49, CC59, CC88, CC97, CC130, CC133, CC398, ST425, CC599, CC692, CC707, ST890, CC1956, ST2425, CC2671, ST2691, CC2767 and ST2963), some of which (ST2425, ST2691, ST2963) were not described previously. Resistance rates in wildlife strains were rather low and mecA-MRSA isolates were rare (n = 6). mecC-MRSA (n = 8) were identified from a fox, a fallow deer, hares and hedgehogs. The common cattle-associated lineages CC479 and CC705 were not detected in wildlife in the present study while, in contrast, a third common cattle lineage, CC97, was found to be common among cervids. No Staphylococcus argenteus or Staphylococcus schweitzeri-like isolates were found. Systematic studies are required to monitor the possible transmission of human- and livestock-associated S. aureus/MRSA to wildlife and vice versa as well as the possible transmission, by unprotected contact to animals. The prevalence of S. aureus/MRSA in wildlife as well as its population structures in different wildlife host species warrants further investigation.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus phage types and their correlation to antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehndiratta P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Context: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most devastating human pathogen. The organism has a differential ability to spread and cause outbreak of infections. Characterization of these strains is important to control the spread of infection in the hospitals as well as in the community. Aim: To identify the currently existing phage groups of Staphylococcus aureus, their prevalence and resistance to antibiotics. Materials and Methods: Study was undertaken on 252 Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from clinical samples. Strains were phage typed and their resistance to antibiotics was determined following standard microbiological procedures. Statistical Analysis: Chi square test was used to compare the antibiotic susceptibility between methicillin resistant Staph. aureus (MRSA and methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA strains. Results: Prevalence of MRSA and MSSA strains was found to be 29.36% and 70.65% respectively. Of these 17.56% of MRSA and 40.44% of MSSA strains were community acquired. All the MSSA strains belonging to phage type 81 from the community were sensitive to all the antibiotics tested including clindamycin and were resistant to penicillin. Forty five percent strains of phage group III and 39% of non-typable MRSA strains from the hospital were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Conclusion: The study revealed that predominant phage group amongst MRSA strains was phage group III and amongst MSSA from the community was phage group NA (phage type 81. MSSA strains isolated from the community differed significantly from hospital strains in their phage type and antibiotic susceptibility. A good correlation was observed between community acquired strains of phage type 81 and sensitivity to gentamycin and clindamycin.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus Keratitis: A Review of Hospital Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Sherine Jue; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Ma, David H. K.; Lin, Hsin-Chiung; Yeh, Lung-Kun; Chen, Phil Y. F.; Chen, Hung-Chi; Chuang, Chih-Chun; Chang, Chee-Jen; Hsiao, Ching-Hsi

    2013-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is an important public health issue. The study aimed to characterize the patient demographics, clinical features, antibiotic susceptibility, and clinical outcomes of keratitis caused by S. aureus, and to make a comparison between MRSA and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. Methodology/Principal findings Patients (n = 59) with culture-proven S. aureus keratitis treated in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2010, were included in our study. Patients' demographic and clinical data were retrospectively reviewed. Twenty-six MRSA (44%) and 33 MSSA (56%) isolates were collected. The MRSA keratitis was significantly more common among the patients with healthcare exposure (P = 0.038), but 46.2% (12/26) of patients with MRSA keratitis were considered to have community-associated infections. All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin. MRSA isolates were significantly more resistant to clindamycin, erythromycin, and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. Ocular surface disease was a significant risk factor for MRSA keratitis (P = 0.011). Visual outcome did not differ significantly between the MRSA and MSSA groups. However, age (B = 0.01, P = 0.035, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.001–0.019) and visual acuity at presentation (B = 0.749, Pkeratitis, especially for MRSA infections. Advanced age and poor visual acuity at presentation are important prognostic indicators for poor visual outcome in S. aureus keratitis. Oxacillin resistance may not be a significant prognostic indicator. PMID:24244625

  10. In vitro activity of ivermectin against Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoaib Ashraf

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ivermectin is an endectocide against many parasites. Though being a macrocyclic lactone, its activity against bacteria has been less known, possibly due to the fact that micromolar concentrations at tissue levels are required to achieve a therapeutic effect. Among pathogenic bacteria of major medical significance, Staphylococcus aureus cause a number of diseases in a wide variety of hosts including humans and animals. It has been attributed as one of the most pathogenic organisms. The emergence of methicillin resistance has made the treatment of S. aureus even more difficult as it is now resistant to most of the available antibiotics. Thus, search for alternate anti-staphylococcal agents requires immediate attention. Methods Twenty-one clinical isolates of S. aureus were isolated from bovine milk collected from Lahore and Faisalabad Pakistan. Different anthelmintics including levamisole, albendazole and ivermectin were tested against S. aureus to determine their minimum inhibitory concentrations. This was followed-up by growth curve analysis, spot assay and time-kill kinetics. Results The results showed that ivermectin but not levamisole or albendazole exhibited a potent anti-staphylococcal activity at the concentrations of 6.25 and 12.5 μg/ml against two isolates. Interestingly, one of the isolate was sensitive while the other was resistant to methicillin/cefoxitin. Conclusions Our novel findings indicate that ivermectin has an anti-bacterial effect against certain S. aureus isolates. However, to comprehend why ivermectin did not inhibit the growth of all Staphylococci needs further investigation. Nevertheless, we have extended the broad range of known pharmacological effects of ivermectin. As pharmacology and toxicology of ivermectin are well known, its further development as an anti-staphylococcal agent is potentially appealing.

  11. Methicillin resistant S. aureus in human and bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Mark A; Zadoks, Ruth N

    2011-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a ubiquitous organism that causes a variety of diseases including mastitis in cattle and humans. High-level resistance of S. aureus to β-lactams conferred by a mecA gene encoding a modified penicillin binding protein (PBP2a) was first observed in the early 1960's. These methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) have been responsible for both hospital acquired infections (HA-MRSA) and, more recently, community acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA). A small number of human MRSA mastitis cases and outbreaks in maternity or neonatal units have been reported which are generally the result of CA-MRSA. The establishment of the sequence type 398 (ST398) in farm animals, primarily pigs, in the early 2000's has provided a reservoir of infection for humans and dairy cattle, particularly in continental Europe, described as livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA). Prior to the emergence of ST398 there were sporadic reports of MRSA in bovine milk and cases of mastitis, often caused by strains from human associated lineages. Subsequently, there have been several reports describing bovine udder infections caused by ST-398 MRSA. Recently, another group of LA-MRSA strains was discovered in humans and dairy cattle in Europe. This group carries a divergent mecA gene and includes a number of S. aureus lineages (CC130, ST425, and CC1943) that were hitherto thought to be bovine-specific but are now also found as carriage or clinical isolates in humans. The emergence of MRSA in dairy cattle may be associated with contact with other host species, as in the case of ST398, or with the exchange of genetic material between S. aureus and coagulase negative Staphylococcus species, which are the most common species associated with bovine intramammary infections and commonly carry antimicrobial resistance determinants.

  12. Diversity of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in European Wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monecke, Stefan; Gavier-Widén, Dolores; Hotzel, Helmut; Peters, Martin; Guenther, Sebastian; Lazaris, Alexandros; Loncaric, Igor; Müller, Elke; Reissig, Annett; Ruppelt-Lorz, Antje; Shore, Anna C.; Walter, Birgit; Coleman, David C.; Ehricht, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a well-known colonizer and cause of infection among animals and it has been described from numerous domestic and wild animal species. The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular epidemiology of S. aureus in a convenience sample of European wildlife and to review what previously has been observed in the subject field. 124 S. aureus isolates were collected from wildlife in Germany, Austria and Sweden; they were characterized by DNA microarray hybridization and, for isolates with novel hybridization patterns, by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The isolates were assigned to 29 clonal complexes and singleton sequence types (CC1, CC5, CC6, CC7, CC8, CC9, CC12, CC15, CC22, CC25, CC30, CC49, CC59, CC88, CC97, CC130, CC133, CC398, ST425, CC599, CC692, CC707, ST890, CC1956, ST2425, CC2671, ST2691, CC2767 and ST2963), some of which (ST2425, ST2691, ST2963) were not described previously. Resistance rates in wildlife strains were rather low and mecA-MRSA isolates were rare (n = 6). mecC-MRSA (n = 8) were identified from a fox, a fallow deer, hares and hedgehogs. The common cattle-associated lineages CC479 and CC705 were not detected in wildlife in the present study while, in contrast, a third common cattle lineage, CC97, was found to be common among cervids. No Staphylococcus argenteus or Staphylococcus schweitzeri-like isolates were found. Systematic studies are required to monitor the possible transmission of human- and livestock-associated S. aureus/MRSA to wildlife and vice versa as well as the possible transmission, by unprotected contact to animals. The prevalence of S. aureus/MRSA in wildlife as well as its population structures in different wildlife host species warrants further investigation. PMID:27992523

  13. Characterization of a mouse-adapted Staphylococcus aureus strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Holtfreter

    Full Text Available More effective antibiotics and a protective vaccine are desperately needed to combat the 'superbug' Staphylococcus aureus. While in vivo pathogenicity studies routinely involve infection of mice with human S. aureus isolates, recent genetic studies have demonstrated that S. aureus lineages are largely host-specific. The use of such animal-adapted S. aureus strains may therefore be a promising approach for developing more clinically relevant animal infection models. We have isolated a mouse-adapted S. aureus strain (JSNZ which caused a severe outbreak of preputial gland abscesses among male C57BL/6J mice. We aimed to extensively characterize this strain on a genomic level and determine its virulence potential in murine colonization and infection models. JSNZ belongs to the MLST type ST88, rare among human isolates, and lacks an hlb-converting phage encoding human-specific immune evasion factors. Naive mice were found to be more susceptible to nasal and gastrointestinal colonization with JSNZ than with the human-derived Newman strain. Furthermore, naïve mice required antibiotic pre-treatment to become colonized with Newman. In contrast, JSNZ was able to colonize mice in the absence of antibiotic treatment suggesting that this strain can compete with the natural flora for space and nutrients. In a renal abscess model, JSNZ caused more severe disease than Newman with greater weight loss and bacterial burden. In contrast to most other clinical isolates, JSNZ can also be readily genetically modified by phage transduction and electroporation. In conclusion, the mouse-adapted strain JSNZ may represent a valuable tool for studying aspects of mucosal colonization and for screening novel vaccines and therapies directed at preventing colonization.

  14. Heme Recognition By a Staphylococcus Aureus IsdE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, J.C.; Vermeiren, C.L.; Heinrichs, D.E.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-06-03

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen and a leading cause of hospital acquired infections. Because the free iron concentration in the human body is too low to support growth, S. aureus must acquire iron from host sources. Heme iron is the most prevalent iron reservoir in the human body and a predominant source of iron for S. aureus. The iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) system removes heme from host heme proteins and transfers it to IsdE, the cognate substrate-binding lipoprotein of an ATP-binding cassette transporter, for import and subsequent degradation. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the soluble portion of the IsdE lipoprotein in complex with heme. The structure reveals a bi-lobed topology formed by an N- and C-terminal domain bridged by a single {alpha}-helix. The structure places IsdE as a member of the helical backbone metal receptor superfamily. A six-coordinate heme molecule is bound in the groove established at the domain interface, and the heme iron is coordinated in a novel fashion for heme transporters by Met{sup 78} and His{sup 229}. Both heme propionate groups are secured by H-bonds to IsdE main chain and side chain groups. Of these residues, His{sup 299} is essential for IsdE-mediated heme uptake by S. aureus when growth on heme as a sole iron source is measured. Multiple sequence alignments of homologues from several other Gram-positive bacteria, including the human pathogens pyogenes, Bacillus anthracis, and Listeria monocytogenes, suggest that these other systems function equivalently to S. aureus IsdE with respect to heme binding and transport.

  15. Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Clinical Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sirin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the antibiotic susceptibilities of S.aureus strains isolated from various clinical specimens between the years 2011-2014 and to investigate the changes of these susceptibilities over the years. Material and Method: Identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of the strains were performed by Vitek 2 compact automated system (bioMérieux, France. The strains found to be intermediate susceptible to vancomycin and teicoplanin were also tested by E-test method. Results: S.aureus strains (n=1442 were most commonly isolated from wound, urine and blood samples. The isolation rates of methicillin-resistant S.aureus (MRSA in hospitalized patients were significantly higher than the isolation rates of MRSA in outpatients. All strains were susceptible to vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid and tigecycline. The total of four years resistance rates of MRSA strains to erythromycin, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gentamicin, co-trimoxazole, fusidic acid were significantly higher than the resistance rates of methicillin-sensitive S.aureus (MSSA. The changes in the rates of antibiotic resistance were not statistically significant in MSSA strains over the years, and statistically significant decrease was found in erythromycin, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin and gentamicin resistance in MRSA strains. Discussion: Glycopeptides, linezolid and tigecycline were the most effective antibiotics against S.aureus strains. It was considered as necessary to detect antimicrobial resistance profiles by effective surveillance studies and monitor the changes occurred over the years in order to prevent the development of resistance and control of infections.

  16. Lugol's solution eradicates Staphylococcus aureus biofilm in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grønseth, Torstein; Vestby, Lene K; Nesse, Live L; Thoen, Even; Habimana, Olivier; von Unge, Magnus; Silvola, Juha T

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the antibacterial efficacy of Lugol's solution, acetic acid, and boric acid against Staphylococcus aureus biofilm. The efficacy of Lugol's solution 1%, 0.1%, and 0.05%, acetic acid 5% or boric acid 4.7% for treatment of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm in vitro was tested using 30 clinical strains. Susceptibility in the planktonic state was assessed by disk diffusion test. Antiseptic effect on bacteria in biofilm was evaluated by using a Biofilm-oriented antiseptic test (BOAT) based on metabolic activity, a biofilm bactericidal test based on culturing of surviving bacteria and confocal laser scanning microscopy combined with LIVE/DEAD staining. In the planktonic state, all tested S. aureus strains were susceptible to Lugol's solution and acetic acid, while 27 out of 30 tested strains were susceptible to boric acid. In biofilm the metabolic activity was significantly reduced following exposure to Lugol's solution and 5% acetic acid, while boric acid exposure led to no significant changes in metabolic activities. In biofilm, biocidal activity was observed for Lugol's solution 1% (30/30), 0.1% (30/30), and 0.05% (26/30). Acetic acid and boric acid showed no bactericidal activity in this test. Confocal laser scanning microscopy, assessed in 4/30 strains, revealed significantly fewer viable biofilm bacteria with Lugol's solution (1% p Lugol's solution 1.0% and 0.1% effectively eradicated S. aureus in biofilm and could be an alternative to conventional topical antibiotics where S. aureus biofilm is suspected such as external otitis, pharyngitis and wounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalor, Stephen J.; Leech, John M.; O’Keeffe, Kate M.; Mac Aogáin, Micheál; O’Halloran, Dara P.; Lacey, Keenan A.; Tavakol, Mehri; Hearnden, Claire H.; Fitzgerald-Hughes, Deirdre; Humphreys, Hilary; Fennell, Jérôme P.; van Wamel, Willem J.; Foster, Timothy J.; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Lavelle, Ed C.; Rogers, Thomas R.; McLoughlin, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we demonstrated that prior exposure to S. aureus enhanced IFNγ responses upon subsequent infection, while adoptive transfer of S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells was protective in naïve mice. Translating these findings, we found that S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells were also significantly expanded during human S. aureus bloodstream infection (BSI). These Th1 cells were CD45RO+, indicative of a memory phenotype. Thus, exposure to S. aureus induces memory Th1 cells in mice and humans, identifying Th1 cells as potential S. aureus vaccine targets. Consequently, we developed a model vaccine comprising staphylococcal clumping factor A, which we demonstrate to be an effective human T cell antigen, combined with the Th1-driving adjuvant CpG. This novel Th1-inducing vaccine conferred significant protection during S. aureus infection in mice. This study notably advances our understanding of S. aureus cellular immunity, and demonstrates for the first time that a correlate of S. aureus protective immunity identified in mice may be relevant in humans. PMID:26539822

  18. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brown, Aisling F

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we demonstrated that prior exposure to S. aureus enhanced IFNγ responses upon subsequent infection, while adoptive transfer of S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells was protective in naïve mice. Translating these findings, we found that S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells were also significantly expanded during human S. aureus bloodstream infection (BSI). These Th1 cells were CD45RO+, indicative of a memory phenotype. Thus, exposure to S. aureus induces memory Th1 cells in mice and humans, identifying Th1 cells as potential S. aureus vaccine targets. Consequently, we developed a model vaccine comprising staphylococcal clumping factor A, which we demonstrate to be an effective human T cell antigen, combined with the Th1-driving adjuvant CpG. This novel Th1-inducing vaccine conferred significant protection during S. aureus infection in mice. This study notably advances our understanding of S. aureus cellular immunity, and demonstrates for the first time that a correlate of S. aureus protective immunity identified in mice may be relevant in humans.

  19. Antibiotic-mediated selection of quorum-sensing-negative Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulander, Wilhelm Erik Axel; Varming, Anders Nissen; Bæk, Kristoffer Torbjørn

    2012-01-01

    -acquired S. aureus infections and suggest that the adaptability of S. aureus to antibiotics involves the agr locus. IMPORTANCE: Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequently isolated pathogen in intensive care units and a common cause of nosocomial infections, resulting in a high degree of morbidity......Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal that at times turns into a serious bacterial pathogen causing life-threatening infections. For the delicate control of virulence, S. aureus employs the agr quorum-sensing system that, via the intracellular effector molecule RNAIII, regulates virulence gene...... increases the agr-mediated fitness cost by inducing the expression of RNAIII. Thus, the extensive use of antibiotics in hospitals may explain why agr-negative variants are frequently isolated from hospital-acquired S. aureus infections but rarely found among community-acquired S. aureus strains. Importantly...

  20. Staphylococcus aureus colonization in atopic eczema and its association with filaggrin gene mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M. L.; Edslev, S. M.; Andersen, P. S.

    2017-01-01

    was to assess differences in S. aureus colonization in patients with AD with and without filaggrin gene mutations. The secondary aim was to assess disease severity in relation to S. aureus colonization. Exploratory analyses were performed to investigate S. aureus genetic lineages in relation to filaggrin gene...... were characterized with respect to disease severity (Scoring Atopic Dermatitis) and FLG mutations (n = 88). Fisher's exact test was used to analyse differences in S. aureus colonization in relation to FLG mutations. Results: Of the 101 patients included, 74 (73%) were colonized with S. aureus....... Of the colonized patients, 70 (95%) carried only one CC type in all three different sampling sites. In lesional skin, S. aureus was found in 24 of 31 patients with FLG mutations vs. 24 of 54 wild-type patients (P = 0·0004). Staphylococcus aureusCC1 clonal lineage was more prevalent in patients with FLG mutations...

  1. Risk factors for Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization in Danish middle-aged and elderly twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Larsen, Lisbeth Aagaard; Fowler, V G

    2013-01-01

    on S. aureus carriage in Danish middle-aged and elderly twins, which indicated no significant heritability that could account for the observed S. aureus carriage. In the present study, we performed a questionnaire-based study of S. aureus colonization on the same cohort of 2,196 Danish middle......-aged and elderly twins to identify specific risk factors for S. aureus nasal colonization, including analyzing the paired twins (n = 478) that were discordant for S. aureus colonization. We found associations between risk factors and S. aureus nasal colonization among middle-aged and elderly twins, including age......, male gender, psoriasis, and atopic diseases. Also, present living on a farm is clearly associated with S. aureus colonization, while smoking had a borderline statistically significant protective effect....

  2. Prevalence and resistance of commensal Staphylococcus aureus, including meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a European cross-sectional study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijer, C.D.J. den; Bijnen, E.M.E. van; Paget, W.J.; Pringle, M.; Goossen, H.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Information on the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus resistance has mainly been obtained from invasive strains, although the commensal flora is considered an important reservoir of resistance. Within ‘The Appropriateness of prescribing antibiotics in primary health care in Europe with

  3. Shedding of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from adult and pediatric bathers in marine waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinigalliano Christopher D

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus including methicillin resistant S. aureus, MRSA, are human colonizing bacteria that commonly cause opportunistic infections primarily involving the skin in otherwise healthy individuals. These infections have been linked to close contact and sharing of common facilities such as locker rooms, schools and prisons Waterborne exposure and transmission routes have not been traditionally associated with S. aureus infections. Coastal marine waters and beaches used for recreation are potential locations for the combination of high numbers of people with close contact and therefore could contribute to the exposure to and infection by these organisms. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the amount and characteristics of the shedding of methicillin sensitive S. aureus, MSSA and MRSA by human bathers in marine waters. Results Nasal cultures were collected from bathers, and water samples were collected from two sets of pools designed to isolate and quantify MSSA and MRSA shed by adults and toddlers during exposure to marine water. A combination of selective growth media and biochemical and polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to identify and perform limited characterization of the S. aureus isolated from the water and the participants. Twelve of 15 MRSA isolates collected from the water had identical genetic characteristics as the organisms isolated from the participants exposed to that water while the remaining 3 MRSA were without matching nasal isolates from participants. The amount of S. aureus shed per person corresponded to 105 to 106 CFU per person per 15-minute bathing period, with 15 to 20% of this quantity testing positive for MRSA. Conclusions This is the first report of a comparison of human colonizing organisms with bacteria from human exposed marine water attempting to confirm that participants shed their own colonizing MSSA and MRSA into their bathing milieu. These findings clearly

  4. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has greater risk of transmission in the operating room than methicillin-sensitive S aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Randy W; Dexter, Franklin; Robinson, Alysha D M

    2018-01-04

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a pathogenic S aureus strain characteristic associated with increased patient morbidity and mortality. The health care system needs to understand MRSA transmissibility in all settings to improve basic preventive measures to generate sustained reductions in invasive MRSA infections. Our primary aim was to compare intraoperative transmissibility of MRSA versus methicillin-sensitive S aureus (MSSA) isolates. S aureus isolates (N = 173) collected from 274 randomly selected operating room environments (first and second case of the day in each operating room, a case pair) at 3 hospitals underwent systematic-phenotypic and genomic processing to identify clonally related transmission events. Confirmed transmission events were defined as at least 2 S aureus isolates obtained from ≥2 distinct intraoperative reservoirs sampled within or between cases in a study unit that were epidemiologically and clonally related. We explored the relationship between clonal transmission and methicillin resistance with Poisson regression analysis. We identified 58 clonal transmission events. MRSA isolates were associated with increased risk of clonal transmission compared with MSSA isolates (adjusted incidence risk ratio [IRR], 1.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-2.49; P = .010; unadjusted IRR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.23-2.77; P = .003, respectively). MRSA isolates are associated with increased risk of intraoperative transmission. Future work should examine the impact of the attenuation of intraoperative MRSA transmission on the incidence of invasive MRSA infections. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigation of biofilm formation in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassat, James E; Lee, Chia Y; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2007-01-01

    As with many other bacterial species, the most commonly used method to assess staphylococcal biofilm formation in vitro is the microtiter plate assay. This assay is particularly useful for comparison of multiple strains including large-scale screens of mutant libraries. When such screens are applied to the coagulase-negative staphylococci in general, and Staphylococcus epidermidis in particular, they are relatively straightforward by comparison with microtiter plate assays used to assess biofilm formation in other bacterial species. However, in the case of clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, we have found it necessary to employ specific modifications including precoating of the wells of the microtiter plate with plasma proteins and supplementation of the medium with both salt and glucose. In this chapter, we describe the microtiter plate assay in the specific context of clinical isolates of S. aureus and the use of these modifications. A second in vitro method, which also is generally dependent on coating with plasma proteins and supplementation of the growth medium, is the use of flow cells. In this method, bacteria are allowed to attach to a surface and then monitored with respect to their ability to remain attached to the substrate and differentiate into mature biofilms under the constant pressure of fluid shear force. Although flow cells are not applicable to large-scale screens, we have found that they provide a more reproducible and accurate assessment of the capacity of S. aureus clinical isolates to form a biofilm. They also provide a means of analyzing structural differences in biofilm architecture and isolating bacteria and/or spent media for analysis of physiological and metabolic changes associated with the adaptive response to growth in a biofilm. While a primary focus of this chapter is on the use of in vitro assays to assess biofilm formation in clinical isolates of S. aureus, it is important to

  6. Echocardiographic findings predict in-hospital and 1-year mortality in left-sided native valve Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Trine K.; Park, Lawrence; Tong, Steven Y C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus left-sided native valve infective endocarditis (LNVIE) has higher complication and mortality rates compared with endocarditis from other pathogens. Whether echocardiographic variables can predict prognosis in S aureus LNVIE is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS......: Consecutive patients with LNVIE, enrolled between January 2000 and September 2006, in the International Collaboration on Endocarditis were identified. Subjects without S aureus IE were matched to those with S aureus IE by the propensity of having S aureus. Survival differences were determined using log...

  7. Extracellular vesicles derived from Staphylococcus aureus induce atopic dermatitis-like skin inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S-W; Kim, M-R; Lee, E-Y; Kim, J H; Kim, Y-S; Jeon, S G; Yang, J-M; Lee, B-J; Pyun, B-Y; Gho, Y S; Kim, Y-K

    2011-03-01

    Recently, we found that Staphylococcus aureus produces extracellular vesicles (EV) that contain pathogenic proteins. Although S. aureus infection has been linked with atopic dermatitis (AD), the identities of the causative agents from S. aureus are controversial. We evaluated whether S. aureus-derived EV are causally related to the pathogenesis of AD. Extracellular vesicles were isolated by the ultracentrifugation of S. aureus culture media. The EV were applied three times per week to tape-stripped mouse skin. Inflammation and immune dysfunction were evaluated 48 h after the final application in hairless mice. Extracellular vesicles-specific IgE levels were measured by ELISA in AD patients and healthy subjects. The in vitro application of S. aureus EV increased the production of pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-6, thymic stromal lymphopoietin, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, and eotaxin) by dermal fibroblasts. The in vivo application of S. aureus EV after tape stripping caused epidermal thickening with infiltration of the dermis by mast cells and eosinophils in mice. These changes were associated with the enhanced cutaneous production of IL-4, IL-5, IFN-γ, and IL-17. Interestingly, the serum levels of S. aureus EV-specific IgE were significantly increased in AD patients relative to healthy subjects. These results indicate that S. aureus EV induce AD-like inflammation in the skin and that S. aureus-derived EV are a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for the control of AD. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia at a tertiary children's hospital in Cape Town, South Africa.

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    Reené Naidoo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen in paediatric patients with bloodstream infections. The epidemiology of S. aureus bacteraemia, however, has not been well documented in children in South Africa. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted at a children's hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, to investigate the epidemiology of S. aureus bacteraemia from 2007-2011. The incidence, clinical presentation, risk factors, management and outcomes of methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA and methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA bacteraemia were compared. RESULTS: Over the five year study period, 365 episodes of S. aureus bacteraemia were identified. The annual incidence was 3.28 cases per 1000 hospital admissions. MRSA was responsible for 26% of S. aureus bacteraemia and 72% of nosocomial infections. Only six possible cases of community-acquired MRSA infections were described. MSSA bacteraemia was more likely to present as pulmonary and bone or joint infections, while bacteraemia without a source was the most common presentation with MRSA.  Infants, children with malnutrition, and residents of long-term care facilities were at highest risk for MRSA bacteraemia. The overall case fatality rate for S. aureus bacteraemia was 8.8% over five years, with MRSA being the only significant risk factor for mortality. CONCLUSION: The incidence of S. aureus bacteraemia and MRSA bacteraemia in children has remained stable over the past five years. MRSA is a predominantly nosocomial pathogen in children with S. aureus bacteraemia in Cape Town, South Africa.

  9. Antimicrobial potential of Pakistani medicinal plants against multi-drug resistance Staphylococcus aureus

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    Rahat Ejaz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine resistance patterns of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus isolated from different areas of Pakistan and to identify antimicrobial agents against multi-drug resistant S. aureus strains. Methods: A total of 67 samples (sewerage, nasal and milk were collected from different farm areas of Pakistan to identify local strains of S. aureus. Sixteen out of 67 samples were positive for S. aureus. Only 6 out of 16 S. aureus strains showed resistance to antibiotics. Then the antibacterial effect of 29 medicinal plants was evaluated on these S. aureus isolates and a standard S. aureus strain ATCC 25923. The solvents used for the extraction of plants were acetone, dimethyl sulfoxide and methanol. The in vitro antibacterial activity was performed using agar disc diffusion method. Moreover, minimum inhibitory concentration of effective medicinal plant extracts was identified through micro-dilution method to find out their 50% inhibitory concentration. Results: Plant extracts of 5 medicinal plants (Psidium guajava, Nigella sativa, Piper nigrum, Valeriana jatamansi, and Cucurbita pepo exhibited antibacterial activity against locally isolated multidrug resistant strains of S. aureus. The minimum inhibitory concentration of these extracts was ranged from 0.328 to 5.000 mg/mL. Conclusions: Plant extracts of Psidium guajava, Piper nigrum seed, Valeriana jatamansi, Cucurbita pepo and Nigella sativa showed significant in vitro antibacterial activity and thus, such findings may serve as valuable contribution in the treatment of infection and may contribute to the development of potential antimicrobial agents against multi drug resistant strains of S. aureus

  10. Performance of the Chromogenic Medium CHROMagar Staph Aureus and the Staphychrom Coagulase Test in the Detection and Identification of Staphylococcus aureus in Clinical Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carricajo, Anne; Treny, Axel; Fonsale, Nathalie; Bes, Michele; Reverdy, Marie Elisabeth; Gille, Yves; Aubert, Gerald; Freydiere, Anne Marie

    2001-01-01

    CHROMagar Staph aureus (CSAM) (CHROMagar Microbiology, Paris, France) is a new chromogenic medium designed to enable detection of colonies of Staphylococcus aureus by their pink color. A total of 775 specimens were cultured in parallel on CHROMagar Staph aureus and conventional media. Among the 267 S. aureus strains recovered on at least one medium, 263 were isolated on CSAM medium (sensitivity, 98.5%), and 245 (sensitivity, 91.8%) were isolated on conventional media. The specificity of presumptive identification of S. aureus on the basis of pink colony color on CSAM medium was 97% (493 of 508). This specificity increased to 100% when coagulase detection with the Staphychrom coagulase test was added and to 98.8% when S. aureus surface components were detected by agglutination in the Pastorex Staph Plus test. Susceptibility testing of 67 S. aureus strains, performed in parallel on pink CSAM colonies and on colonies grown on blood agar, gave similar results. Thus, rapid and accurate recognition and identification of S. aureus isolates were achieved with CSAM as the primary isolation medium, followed by the staphylocoagulase Staphychrom test. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (disk-diffusion method or ATB STAPH System) can be performed directly on pink CSAM colonies. PMID:11427572

  11. Prevalence and resistance of commensal Staphylococcus aureus, including meticillin-resistant S aureus, in nine European countries: a cross-sectional study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijer, C.D.J. den; Bijnen, E.M.E. van; Paget, W.J.; Pringle, M.; Goossen, H.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Schellevis, F.G.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Information about the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus resistance to antimicrobial drugs has mainly been obtained from invasive strains, although the commensal microbiota is thought to be an important reservoir of resistance. We aimed to compare the prevalence of nasal S aureus

  12. Ocorrência de Staphylococcus aureus em queijo tipo "frescal" Occurrence of Staphylococcus aureus in cheese made in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvaldo Sampaio de Almeida Filho

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a ocorrência de Staphylococcus aureus em uma amostra de queijo tipo Minas "frescal" comercializado na cidade de Poços de Caldas, MG, de modo a obter subsídios que permitam avaliar o risco potencial que este produto pode representar para a saúde da população consumidora. MÉTODOS: Foi investigada a presença e o número de cepas de Staphylococcus aureus em 80 amostras de queijo tipo Minas "frescal" produzido artesanalmente e comercializado na cidade de Poços de Caldas, MG, Brasil. RESULTADOS: Os resultados obtidos evidenciaram a presença de S. aureus em 40 (50,0% amostras, cujas contagens revelaram valores médios em torno de 10(5/g. CONCLUSÕES: Tais achados parecem ser extremamente preocupantes, pois além de se situarem acima do limite máximo de 10³/g estabelecido pelo Ministério da Saúde, estes valores mostraram-se muito próximos dos requeridos para a produção de enterotoxinas em quantidades suficientes para a ocorrência de surtos de intoxicação alimentar estafilocócica.OBJECTIVE: To verify the occurrence of Staphylococcus aureus in a sample of cheese sold in a city of the Southeastern region of Brazil and assess the potential risk for the consumers. METHODS: Eighty samples of homemade cheese sold in a city of the southern region of Brazil were evaluated for the presence and the most probable number of Staphylococcus aureus agents. RESULTS: The study revealed the presence of S. aureus in 40 samples (50.0%, with a mean count of 10(5/g. CONCLUSION: These results are worrisome because the Health Ministry has established a safety threshold of 10³/g, and the values obtained are close to the number of bacteria able to produce enough enterotoxins to cause a foodborne disease outbreak.

  13. Low efficacy of tobramycin in experimental Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, C. J.; Christophersen, L. J.; Trøstrup, H.

    2015-01-01

    The empiric treatment of infective endocarditis (IE) varies widely and, in some places, a regimen of penicillin in combination with an aminoglycoside is administered. The increasing incidence of Staphylococcus aureus IE, poor tissue penetration by aminoglycosides and low frequency of penicillin...... into untreated (n = 22) or tobramycin-treated (n = 13) groups. The treatment group received tobramycin once-daily. Animals were evaluated at 1 day post infection (DPI), 2 DPI or 3 DPI. Quantitative bacteriology and cytokine expression were measured for valves, myocardium and serum. A decrease of bacterial load...... was observed at 2 DPI (p ≤ 0.001) but not at 3 DPI. Tobramycin as functional monotherapy only reduced bacterial load and inflammation transiently, and was insufficient in most cases of S. aureus IE....

  14. Treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M Luna

    Full Text Available The global spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA means it is now a pathogen of worldwide public health concern. Within Latin America, MRSA is highly prevalent, with the proportion of S. aureus isolates that are methicillin-resistant on the rise, yet resources for managing the infection are limited. While several guidelines exist for the treatment of MRSA infections, many are written for the North American or European setting and need adaptation for use in Latin America. In this article, we aim to emphasize the importance of appropriate treatment of MRSA in the healthcare and community settings of Latin America. We present a summary of the available guidelines and antibiotics, and discuss particular considerations for clinicians treating MRSA in Latin America

  15. Neutrophil evasion strategies by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Megan L; Surewaard, Bas G J

    2018-03-01

    Humans are well equipped to defend themselves against bacteria. The innate immune system employs diverse mechanisms to recognize, control and initiate a response that can destroy millions of different microbes. Microbes that evade the sophisticated innate immune system are able to escape detection and could become pathogens. The pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus are particularly successful due to the development of a wide variety of virulence strategies for bacterial pathogenesis and they invest significant efforts towards mechanisms that allow for neutrophil evasion. Neutrophils are a primary cellular defense and can rapidly kill invading microbes, which is an indispensable function for maintaining host health. This review compares the key features of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus in epidemiology, with a specific focus on virulence mechanisms utilized to evade neutrophils in bacterial pathogenesis. It is important to understand the complex interactions between pathogenic bacteria and neutrophils so that we can disrupt the ability of pathogens to cause disease.

  16. Cataract surgery during active methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour AM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ahmad M Mansour,1,2 Haytham I Salti11Department of Ophthalmology, American University of Beirut, 2Rafic Hariri University Hospital, Beirut, LebanonAbstract: We present two patients with active, foul-smelling, methicillin-resistant ­Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA wounds of the forehead and sternum following craniotomy or open heart surgery. Both had debilitating cataracts and were told by the infectious diseases team that cataract surgery is very risky. Both underwent sequential bilateral phacoemulsification with no sign of infection. Patients with active MRSA wound infections may safely undergo cataract surgery with additional precautions observed intraoperatively (good wound construction and postoperatively (topical antibiotics and close observation. Banning such surgeries can unnecessarily jeopardize the lifestyles of such patients.Keywords: cataract, infection, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, phacoe­mulsification

  17. Staphylococcus aureus Infections: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, Clinical Manifestations, and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Joshua S.; Eichenberger, Emily; Holland, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that causes a wide range of clinical infections. It is a leading cause of bacteremia and infective endocarditis as well as osteoarticular, skin and soft tissue, pleuropulmonary, and device-related infections. This review comprehensively covers the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and management of each of these clinical entities. The past 2 decades have witnessed two clear shifts in the epidemiology of S. aureus infections: first, a growing number of health care-associated infections, particularly seen in infective endocarditis and prosthetic device infections, and second, an epidemic of community-associated skin and soft tissue infections driven by strains with certain virulence factors and resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. In reviewing the literature to support management strategies for these clinical manifestations, we also highlight the paucity of high-quality evidence for many key clinical questions. PMID:26016486

  18. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Hawaii, 2000–2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sarah Y.; Ayers, Tracy L.; Miller, F. DeWolfe; MacFadden, Ralph; Nakata, Michele; Lee, Myra Ching; Effler, Paul V.

    2005-01-01

    The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has generated considerable concern among medical and public health professionals. We used a statewide, population-based antimicrobial resistance surveillance system to examine epidemiologic trends for MRSA from outpatients and inpatients in Hawaii. Pediatric and adult patient populations were compared to assess characteristics of MRSA isolates specific for each group. From 2000 to 2002, 8,206 (26%) of 31,482 total S. aureus isolates were MRSA. During this period, the proportion of MRSA isolates increased in both outpatient and inpatient clinical settings (p0.05). Although MRSA isolates from adults demonstrated high resistance to most non–β-lactams, most MRSA isolates from pediatric outpatients remained susceptible to most non–β-lactams. PMID:16102308

  19. Cavity Forming Pneumonia Due to Staphylococcus aureus Following Dengue Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Nobuyuki; Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Tachikawa, Natsuo; Amano, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Yohei; Kosuge, Youko

    2015-11-01

    While visiting Malaysia, a 22-year-old previously healthy Japanese man developed myalgia, headache, and fever, leading to a diagnosis of classical dengue fever. After improvement and returning to Japan after a five day hospitalization, he developed productive cough several days after defervescing from dengue. Computed tomography (CT) thorax scan showed multiple lung cavities. A sputum smear revealed leukocytes with phagocytized gram-positive cocci in clusters, and grew an isolate Staphylococcus aureus sensitive to semi-synthetic penicillin; he was treated successfully with ceftriaxone and cephalexin. This second reported case of pneumonia due to S. aureus occurring after dengue fever, was associated both with nosocomial exposure and might have been associated with dengue-associated immunosuppression. Clinicians should pay systematic attention to bacterial pneumonia following dengue fever to establish whether such a connection is causally associated. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  20. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowash, Madeleine G.; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has changed the landscape of S. aureus infections around the globe. Initially recognized for its ability to cause disease in young and healthy individuals without healthcare exposures as well as for its distinct genotype and phenotype, this original description no longer fully encompasses the diversity of CA-MRSA as it continues to expand its niche. Using four case studies, we highlight a wide range of the clinical presentations and challenges of CA-MRSA. Based on these cases we further explore the globally polygenetic background of CA-MRSA with a special emphasis on generally less characterized populations. PMID:24085688

  1. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in human milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FR Novak

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We collected and analyzed 500 samples of human milk, from five Brazilian cities (100 from each to detect methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA producing enterotoxins. We found 57 strains of MRSA, and the mecA gene, responsible for resistance, was detected in all of them using a specific molecular probe. We examined 40 strains for the presence of four enterotoxins, after selecting a subset that included all strains from each region, except for the largest sample, from which 10 were randomly selected. Among these two presented enterotoxin B, and growth in human colostrum and trypicase soy broth. After 5 h of incubation at 37°C, population sizes were already higher than 9.4 x 105 UFC/ml and enterotoxin was released into culture medium and colostrum. Our results stress the importance of hygiene, sanitary measures, and appropriate preservation conditions to avoid the proliferation of S. aureus in human milk.

  2. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in the obstetric setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriebs, Jan M

    2008-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an increasingly prevalent pathogen, both in the community and in hospitalized patients. The virulence of MRSA, coupled with its resistance to many frequently prescribed antibiotics, requires increased vigilance in the assessment and diagnosis of skin and soft tissue infections. This article reviews the epidemiology of MRSA and focuses on treatment of MRSA when it is diagnosed during pregnancy.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus in locally produced white cheese in Tirana market

    OpenAIRE

    ELVIRA BELI; RENIS MAÇI; SONILA ÇOÇOLI; HALIT MEMOÇI

    2014-01-01

    Cheese has nutritional value, its consumption is very common in Albania, but is also excellent medium for bacterial growth, source of bacterial infection, particularly when it is produced from raw poor quality or unpasteurized milk. Microbial safety of cheeses may be enhanced by usage good quality raw milk, pasteurized milk, following GMP in aim to prevent cross-contamination. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence and amount of Staphylococcus aureus in white cheeses, as an Albani...

  4. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus survival on hospital fomites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Robert; Mehta, Sanjay; Weed, Diane; Price, Connie Savor

    2006-11-01

    We examined the duration of survival of 2 strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on 3 types of hospital fomites. MRSA survived for 11 days on a plastic patient chart, more than 12 days on a laminated tabletop, and 9 days on a cloth curtain. Irregular surfaces may help harbor organisms in the environment. In addition to contact precautions, MRSA containment during an outbreak should include concurrent environmental decontamination.

  5. Novel rat tail discitis model using bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostian, Phillip A; Karnes, Jonathan M; Cui, Shari; Robinson, Lisa J; Daffner, Scott D; Witt, Michelle R; Emery, Sanford E

    2017-09-01

    Management of spondylodiscitis is a challenging clinical problem requiring medical and surgical treatment strategies. The purpose of this study was to establish a rat model of spondylodiscitis that utilizes bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), thus permitting in vivo surveillance of infection intensity. Inocula of the bioluminescent S. aureus strain XEN36 were created in concentrations of 10 2 CFU/0.1 ml, 10 4  CFU/0.1 ml, and 10 6  CFU/0.1 ml. Three groups of rats were injected with the bacteria in the most proximal intervertebral tail segment. The third most proximal tail segment was injected with saline as a control. Bioluminescence was measured at baseline, 3 days, and weekly for a total of 6 weeks. Detected bioluminescence for each group peaked at day 3 and returned to baseline in 21 days. The average intensity was highest for the experimental group injected with the most concentrated bacterial solution (10 6  CFU/0.1 ml). Radiographic analysis revealed loss of intervertebral disc space and evidence of osseous bridging. Saline-injected spaces exhibited no decrease in intervertebral spacing as compared to distal sites. Histologic analysis revealed neutrophilic infiltrates, destruction of the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus, destruction of vertebral endplates, and osseous bridging. Saline-injected discs exhibited preserved annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus on histology. This study demonstrates that injection of bioluminescent S. aureus into the intervertebral disc of a rat tail is a viable animal model for spondylodiscitis research. This model allows for real-time, in vivo quantification of infection intensity, which may decrease the number of animals required for infection studies of the intervertebral disc. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2075-2081, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Acute toxicity of ammonia to blue tilapia, Oreochromis aureus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The acute toxicity of blue tilapia, Oreochromis aureus (3.28 ± 0.36 g in body weight, 61.84 ± 2.08 mm in body length) exposed to environmental un-ionized ammonia at different salinities (1, 8, 12, 16 and 20 ppt) was assessed via a series of static exposure trials. Median lethal concentrations of 24 h of exposure were ...

  7. Applying Convergent Immunity to Innovative Vaccines Targeting Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Michael R.; Filler, Scott G.; Schmidt, Clint S.; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Edwards, John E.; Hennessey, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent perspectives forecast a new paradigm for future “third generation” vaccines based on commonalities found in diverse pathogens or convergent immune defenses to such pathogens. For Staphylococcus aureus, recurring infections and a limited success of vaccines containing S. aureus antigens imply that native antigens induce immune responses insufficient for optimal efficacy. These perspectives exemplify the need to apply novel vaccine strategies to high-priority pathogens. One such approach can be termed convergent immunity, where antigens from non-target organisms that contain epitope homologs found in the target organism are applied in vaccines. This approach aims to evoke atypical immune defenses via synergistic processes that (1) afford protective efficacy; (2) target an epitope from one organism that contributes to protective immunity against another; (3) cross-protect against multiple pathogens occupying a common anatomic or immunological niche; and/or (4) overcome immune subversion or avoidance strategies of target pathogens. Thus, convergent immunity has a potential to promote protective efficacy not usually elicited by native antigens from a target pathogen. Variations of this concept have been mainstays in the history of viral and bacterial vaccine development. A more far-reaching example is the pre-clinical evidence that specific fungal antigens can induce cross-kingdom protection against bacterial pathogens. This trans-kingdom protection has been demonstrated in pre-clinical studies of the recombinant Candida albicans agglutinin-like sequence 3 protein (rAls3) where it was shown that a vaccine containing rAls3 provides homologous protection against C. albicans, heterologous protection against several other Candida species, and convergent protection against several strains of S. aureus. Convergent immunity reflects an intriguing new approach to designing and developing vaccine antigens and is considered here in the context of vaccines to target S

  8. Fatal pneumoni med Panton-Valentine-leukocidinproducerende Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabøl, Peter Hedelund; Dessau, Ram Benny; Warnecke, Mads

    2010-01-01

    We describe a case of fatal pneumonia in a previously healthy 14-year-old boy. The patient was severely affected at the time of admission with high fever, tachypnea, tachycardia and peripheral cyanosis. The condition worsened despite treatment with antibiotics as well as respiratory and pressure ...... support. Acidosis and critical leucopenia supervened and the patient died just short of 24 hours after admission. Subsequent bacterial cultivation showed Panton-Valentine Leucocidin-producing Staphylococcus aureus....

  9. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in North-east Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajana Pastuović

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this 5-year study was to determine the frequency and antibiotic susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA-related infections at Osijek Clinical Hospital. Materials and methods. A total of 1987 staphylococci-infected clinical isolates were collected and analysed at the Microbiology Department of the Public Health Institute of Osijek-Baranja County. Results. Between 2008 and 2012, the average rate of MRSA-related infections in staphylococci-infected patients was 27.4%. The proportion of MRSArelated infections on all Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus isolates from clinical specimens showed a decreasing trend, from 32.6% in 2008 to 25.5% in 2012. MRSA-related infections were mostly detected in wound swabs (50.6% and aspirates (28.8% of patients hospitalized in the surgical (49.8% and intensive care units (27.9%. MRSA-related infection showed an increase compared to S. aureus-infections in samples of wounds and aspirates in 2011 and 2012 (57.9%/34.9% and 35.2%/16.3%, respectively. The majority of strains of MRSA-related infections were resistant to several antibiotics, including erythromycin and clindamycin, where susceptibility were less than 10%. All MRSA isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid. Therefore, antibiotic therapies for MRSA infections include vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid, but microbiological diagnostics need to be performed in order to know when the use of glycopeptides and oxazolidinones is indicated. Conclusion. Our results suggest that appropriate prevention measures, combined with the more rational use of antibiotics are crucial to reduce the spread of MRSA-related infection in healthcare settings. Further monitoring is necessary of the incidence and antibiotic susceptibility of MRSA-related infections in our community.

  10. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus colonization in renal transplant patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lamblet,Luiz Carlos Ribeiro; Barbosa,Dulce Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization in renal transplant patients and to identify the related risk factors. Method Swabs were used to collect nasal samples from 160 patients who had undergone a transplant within the previous year at the Kidney and Hypertension Hospital. The ‘National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards’ norms were followed for the collection, isolation, identification and sensitivity measurements. Results The...

  11. Applying Convergent Immunity to Innovative Vaccines Targeting Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Yeaman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent perspectives forecast a new paradigm for future 3rd generation vaccines based on commonalities found in diverse pathogens or convergent immune defenses to such pathogens. For Staphylococcus aureus, recurring infections and a limited success of vaccines containing S. aureus antigens imply that native antigens induce immune responses insufficient for optimal efficacy. These perspectives exemplify the need to apply novel vaccine strategies to high priority pathogens. One such approach can be termed convergent immunity, where antigens from non-target organisms that contain epitope homologues found in the target organism are applied in vaccines. This approach aims to evoke atypical immune defenses via synergistic processes that 1 afford protective efficacy; 2 target an epitope from one organism that contributes to protective immunity against another; 3 cross-protect against multiple pathogens occupying a common anatomic or immunologic niche; and/or 4 overcome immune subversion or avoidance strategies of target pathogens. Thus, convergent immunity has a potential to promote protective efficacy not usually elicited by native antigens from a target pathogen. Variations of this concept have been mainstays in the history of viral and bacterial vaccine development. A more far-reaching example is the pre–clinical evidence that specific fungal antigens can induce cross-kingdom protection against bacterial pathogens. This trans-kingdom protection has been demonstrated in preclinical studies of the recombinant Candida albicans agglutinin-like sequence 3 protein (rAls3 where it was shown that a vaccine containing rAls3 provides homologous protection against C. albicans, heterologous protection against several other Candida species, and convergent protection against several strains of S. aureus. Convergent immunity reflects an intriguing new approach to designing and developing vaccine antigens and is considered here in the context of vaccines to target

  12. Applying Convergent Immunity to Innovative Vaccines Targeting Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaman, Michael R; Filler, Scott G; Schmidt, Clint S; Ibrahim, Ashraf S; Edwards, John E; Hennessey, John P

    2014-01-01

    Recent perspectives forecast a new paradigm for future "third generation" vaccines based on commonalities found in diverse pathogens or convergent immune defenses to such pathogens. For Staphylococcus aureus, recurring infections and a limited success of vaccines containing S. aureus antigens imply that native antigens induce immune responses insufficient for optimal efficacy. These perspectives exemplify the need to apply novel vaccine strategies to high-priority pathogens. One such approach can be termed convergent immunity, where antigens from non-target organisms that contain epitope homologs found in the target organism are applied in vaccines. This approach aims to evoke atypical immune defenses via synergistic processes that (1) afford protective efficacy; (2) target an epitope from one organism that contributes to protective immunity against another; (3) cross-protect against multiple pathogens occupying a common anatomic or immunological niche; and/or (4) overcome immune subversion or avoidance strategies of target pathogens. Thus, convergent immunity has a potential to promote protective efficacy not usually elicited by native antigens from a target pathogen. Variations of this concept have been mainstays in the history of viral and bacterial vaccine development. A more far-reaching example is the pre-clinical evidence that specific fungal antigens can induce cross-kingdom protection against bacterial pathogens. This trans-kingdom protection has been demonstrated in pre-clinical studies of the recombinant Candida albicans agglutinin-like sequence 3 protein (rAls3) where it was shown that a vaccine containing rAls3 provides homologous protection against C. albicans, heterologous protection against several other Candida species, and convergent protection against several strains of S. aureus. Convergent immunity reflects an intriguing new approach to designing and developing vaccine antigens and is considered here in the context of vaccines to target S

  13. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA in India: Prevalence & susceptibility pattern

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    Indian Network for Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance (INSAR group, India

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is endemic in India and is a dangerous pathogen for hospital acquired infections. This study was conducted in 15 Indian tertiary care centres during a two year period from January 2008 to December 2009 to determine the prevalence of MRSA and susceptibility pattern of S. aureus isolates in India. Methods: All S. aureus isolates obtained during the study period in the participating centres were included in the study. Each centre compiled their data in a predefined template which included data of the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, location of the patient and specimen type. The data in the submitted templates were collated and analysed. Results: A total of 26310 isolates were included in the study. The overall prevalence of methicillin resistance during the study period was 41 per cent. Isolation rates for MRSA from outpatients, ward inpatients and ICU were 28, 42 and 43 per cent, respectively in 2008 and 27, 49 and 47 per cent, respectively in 2009. The majority of S. aureus isolates was obtained from patients with skin and soft tissue infections followed by those suffering from blood stream infections and respiratory infections. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was low in both MSSA (53% and MRSA (21%. MSSA isolates showed a higher susceptibility to gentamicin, co-trimoxazole, erythromycin and clindamycin as compared to MRSA isolates. No isolate was found resistant to vancomycin or linezolid. Interpretation & conclusions: The study showed a high level of MRSA in our country. There is a need to study epidemiology of such infections. Robust antimicrobial stewardship and strengthened infection control measures are required to prevent spread and reduce emergence of resistance.

  14. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in North-east Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuović, Tajana; Perić, Magdalena; Bošnjak, Zinka; Ružman, Nataša; Majić, Patricia Reisz; Talapko, Jasminka; Atalić, Vlasta; Loci-Zvocak, Snježana; Vuković, Dubravka

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this 5-year study was to determine the frequency and antibiotic susceptibility of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-related infections at Osijek Clinical Hospital. A total of 1987 staphylococci-infected clinical isolates were collected and analysed at the Microbiology Department of the Public Health Institute of Osijek-Baranja County. Between 2008 and 2012, the average rate of MRSA-related infections in staphylococci-infected patients was 27.4%. The proportion of MRSA-related infections on all Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) isolates from clinical specimens showed a decreasing trend, from 32.6% in 2008 to 25.5% in 2012. MRSA-related infections were mostly detected in wound swabs (50.6%) and aspirates (28.8%) of patients hospitalized in the surgical (49.8%) and intensive care units (27.9%). MRSA-related infection showed an increase compared to S. aureus-infections in samples of wounds and aspirates in 2011 and 2012 (57.9%/34.9% and 35.2%/16.3%, respectively). The majority of strains of MRSA-related infections were resistant to several antibiotics, including erythromycin and clindamycin, where susceptibility were less than 10%. All MRSA isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid. Therefore, antibiotic therapies for MRSA infections include vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid, but microbiological diagnostics need to be performed in order to know when the use of glycopeptides and oxazolidinones is indicated. Our results suggest that appropriate prevention measures, combined with the more rational use of antibiotics are crucial to reduce the spread of MRSA-related infection in healthcare settings. Further monitoring is necessary of the incidence and antibiotic susceptibility of MRSA-related infections in our community. Copyright © 2015 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  15. Proportions of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in patients with surgical site infections in mainland China: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhirong; Wang, Jing; Wang, Weiwei; Zhang, Yuelun; Han, Lizhong; Zhang, Yuan; Nie, Xiaolu; Zhan, Siyan

    2015-01-01

    Sufficient details have not been specified for the epidemiological characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among surgical site infections (SSIs) in mainland China. This systematic review aimed to estimate proportions of S. aureus and MRSA in SSIs through available published studies. PubMed, Embase and four Chinese electronic databases were searched to identify relevant primary studies published between 2007 and 2012. Meta-analysis was conducted on the basis of logit-transformed metric for proportions of S. aureus and MRSA, followed by pre-defined subgroup meta-analysis. Random-effects meta-regression was also conducted to explore the impact of possible factors on S. aureus proportions. 106 studies were included, of which 38 studies involved MRSA. S. aureus accounted for 19.1% (95%CI 17.2-21.0%; I(2) = 84.1%) of all isolates in SSIs, which was roughly parallel to 18.5% in the United States (US) (P-value = 0.57) but significantly exceeded those calculated through the surveillance system in China (P-valueMRSA accounted for 41.3% (95%CI 36.5-46.3%; I(2) = 64.6%) of S. aureus, significantly lower than that in the US (P-value = 0.001). MRSA was sensitive to vancomycin (522/522) and linezolid (93/94), while 79.9% (95%CI 67.4-88.4%; I(2) = 0%) and 92.0% (95%CI 80.2-97.0%; I(2) = 0%) of MRSA was resistant to clindamycin and erythromycin respectively. The overall proportion of S. aureus among SSIs in China was similar to that in the US but seemed higher than those reported through the Chinese national surveillance system. Proportions of S. aureus SSIs may vary with different surgery types. Commonly seen in SSIs, MRSA tended to be highly sensitive to vancomycin and linezolid but mostly resistant to clindamycin and erythromycin.

  16. Prevalence and characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization among a community-based diabetes population in Foshan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jialing; Xu, Ping; Peng, Yang; Lin, Dongxin; Ou, Qianting; Zhang, Ting; Bai, Chan; Ye, Xiaohua; Zhou, Junli; Yao, Zhenjiang

    2017-05-01

    Evidence suggests that diabetes might cause an increase in colonization of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in community settings. We carried out a cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence and influencing factors of S. aureus and MRSA nasal colonization among a community-based diabetes population, and to identify the characteristics of the isolated strains. A total of 956 participants from 11 community settings were included in the study. Of the 529 diabetes participants, 46 were colonized with S. aureus and 22 were colonized with MRSA. Of the 427 non-diabetes participants, 25 were colonized with S. aureus and 12 were colonized with MRSA. Men (odds ratio 0.45, 95% confidence interval 0.20-0.99, P = 0.047) were less likely to have S. aureus nasal colonization, and those with well-controlled blood glucose (odds ratio 2.04, 95% confidence interval 1.01-4.13, P = 0.047) among the diabetes population were more likely to have S. aureus nasal colonization. The proportion of multidrug-resistant S. aureus strains in the diabetes population (52.17%) was higher than that in the non-diabetes population (28.00%; χ 2 = 3.848, P = 0.050). The most common clonal complex type and Staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec type of MRSA in diabetes population was clonal complex 5 (40.91%) and type IV (27.27%), respectively. The proportion of Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene in MRSA strains was 17.65%. There was great sequence type diversity in MRSA strains. The prevalence of MRSA in the community-based diabetes population was moderate, and the high proportions of multidrug-resistant S. aureus strains and diverse molecular characteristics in the diabetes population should be noticed. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Persister formation in Staphylococcus aureus is associated with ATP depletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conlon, Brian P.; Rowe, Sarah E.; Gandt, Autumn Brown; Nuxoll, Austin S.; Donegan, Niles P.; Zalis, Eliza A.; Clair, Geremy; Adkins, Joshua N.; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Lewis, Kim

    2016-04-18

    Persisters are dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are tolerant to killing by antibiotics1. Persisters are associated with chronic bacterial infection and antibiotic treatment failure. In Escherichia coli, toxin/antitoxin (TA) modules are responsible for persister formation. The mechanism of persister formation in Gram positive bacteria is unknown. Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen, responsible for a variety of chronic and relapsing infections such as osteomyelitis, endocarditis and infections of implanted devices. Deleting TA modules in S. aureus did not affect the level of persisters. Here we show that S. aureus persisters are produced due to a stochastic entrance to stationary phase accompanied by a drop in intracellular ATP. Cells expressing stationary state markers are present throughout the growth phase, increasing in frequency with cell density. Cell sorting revealed that expression of stationary markers was associated with a 100-1000 fold increased likelihood of survival to antibiotic challenge. We find that the antibiotic tolerance of these cells is due to a drop in intracellular ATP. The ATP level of the cell is predictive of bactericidal antibiotic efficacy and explains bacterial tolerance to antibiotic treatment.

  18. Ocorrência de Staphylococcus aureus em queijo tipo "frescal"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Filho Edvaldo Sampaio de

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a ocorrência de Staphylococcus aureus em uma amostra de queijo tipo Minas "frescal" comercializado na cidade de Poços de Caldas, MG, de modo a obter subsídios que permitam avaliar o risco potencial que este produto pode representar para a saúde da população consumidora. MÉTODOS: Foi investigada a presença e o número de cepas de Staphylococcus aureus em 80 amostras de queijo tipo Minas "frescal" produzido artesanalmente e comercializado na cidade de Poços de Caldas, MG, Brasil. RESULTADOS: Os resultados obtidos evidenciaram a presença de S. aureus em 40 (50,0% amostras, cujas contagens revelaram valores médios em torno de 10(5/g. CONCLUSÕES: Tais achados parecem ser extremamente preocupantes, pois além de se situarem acima do limite máximo de 10³/g estabelecido pelo Ministério da Saúde, estes valores mostraram-se muito próximos dos requeridos para a produção de enterotoxinas em quantidades suficientes para a ocorrência de surtos de intoxicação alimentar estafilocócica.

  19. Nanoscale Plasma Coating Inhibits Formation of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanxi; Jones, John E; Yu, Haiqing; Yu, Qingsong; Christensen, Gordon D; Chen, Meng; Sun, Hongmin

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus commonly infects medical implants or devices, with devastating consequences for the patient. The infection begins with bacterial attachment to the device, followed by bacterial multiplication over the surface of the device, generating an adherent sheet of bacteria known as a biofilm. Biofilms resist antimicrobial therapy and promote persistent infection, making management difficult to futile. Infections might be prevented by engineering the surface of the device to discourage bacterial attachment and multiplication; however, progress in this area has been limited. We have developed a novel nanoscale plasma coating technology to inhibit the formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. We used monomeric trimethylsilane (TMS) and oxygen to coat the surfaces of silicone rubber, a material often used in the fabrication of implantable medical devices. By quantitative and qualitative analysis, the TMS/O2 coating significantly decreased the in vitro formation of S. aureus biofilms; it also significantly decreased in vivo biofilm formation in a mouse model of foreign-body infection. Further analysis demonstrated TMS/O2 coating significantly changed the protein adsorption, which could lead to reduced bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. These results suggest that TMS/O2 coating can be used to effectively prevent medical implant-related infections. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Predictors of Staphylococcus aureus Colonization and Results after Decolonization

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    Tennison L. Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Protocols for the screening and decolonization of Staphylococcus aureus prior to total joint arthroplasty (TJA have become widely adopted. The goals of this study were to determine: (1 whether implementation of a screening protocol followed by decolonization with mupirocin/vancomycin and chlorhexidine reduces the risk of revision compared with no screening protocol (i.e., chlorhexidine alone and (2 whether clinical criteria could reliably predict colonization with MSSA and/or MRSA. Electronic medical records of primary patients undergoing TJA that were screened (n=3,927 and were not screened (n=1,751 for Staphylococcus aureus at least 4 days prior to surgery, respectively, were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received chlorhexidine body wipes preoperatively. Patients carrying MSSA and MRSA were treated preoperatively with mupirocin and vancomycin, respectively, along with the standard preoperative antibiotics and chlorhexidine body wipes. Screened patients were 50% less likely to require revision due to prosthetic joint infection compared to those not screened (p=0.04. Multivariate regression models were poorly accurate in predicting colonization with MSSA (AUC = 0.58 and MRSA (AUC = 0.62. These results support the routine screening and decolonization of S. aureus prior to TJA.

  1. Nerve alterations showing autophagy in 2 patients with lichen aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihara, Makoto; Makino, Teruhiko; Shimizu, Tadamichi; Mochizuki, Takashi

    2018-02-22

    Lichen aureus is a rare, chronic, persistent purpuric dermatosis clinically characterized by striking yellow- to bronze-colored lesions. Histologically, lichen aureus differs from other pigmented purpuric dermatoses in containing dense, band-like infiltrates closely associated with the epidermis. This report describes 2 patients with lichen aureus, a 20-year-old woman with a lesion on her right arm and a 51-year-old man with a lesion on the right side of his groin. Skin biopsy specimens revealed almost identical findings in both patients, including dense band-like infiltrates containing lymphocytes, histiocytes with hemosiderin deposits scattered extravasated red blood cells and nerve alterations at the dermo-epidermal interface. The nerves within the lesions were filled with granules, which stained positive with antibody to microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3, suggesting autophagy within the nerves. These altered nerves were present only in areas of band-like dermal lymphocytic infiltration. Electron microscopy of the lesions showed the accumulation of autophagosomes in Schwann cells. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Beta-hemolysin promotes skin colonization by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Yuki; Baba, Tadashi; Sekine, Miwa; Fukuda, Minoru; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2013-03-01

    Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus is a characteristic feature of several inflammatory skin diseases and is often followed by epidermal damage and invasive infection. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of skin colonization by a virulent community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strain, MW2, using a murine ear colonization model. MW2 does not produce a hemolytic toxin, beta-hemolysin (Hlb), due to integration of a prophage, Sa3mw, inside the toxin gene (hlb). However, we found that strain MW2 bacteria that had successfully colonized murine ears included derivatives that produced Hlb. Genome sequencing of the Hlb-producing colonies revealed that precise excision of prophage Sa3mw occurred, leading to reconstruction of the intact hlb gene in their chromosomes. To address the question of whether Hlb is involved in skin colonization, we constructed MW2-derivative strains with and without the Hlb gene and then subjected them to colonization tests. The colonization efficiency of the Hlb-producing mutant on murine ears was more than 50-fold greater than that of the mutant without hlb. Furthermore, we also showed that Hlb toxin had elevated cytotoxicity for human primary keratinocytes. Our results indicate that S. aureus Hlb plays an important role in skin colonization by damaging keratinocytes, in addition to its well-known hemolytic activity for erythrocytes.

  3. [Genotypic and phenotypic analysis of hemolysis in foodborne Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peinan; Lü, Guoping; Xu, Baohong

    2012-11-01

    To establish a multiplex PCR method for detecting genes of (alpha-hemolysin (hla), beta-hemolysin (hlb), hemolysin and 16S rDNA, and to learn the distribution of three hemolysin genes and the characteristics of hemolytic phenotype in 148 foodborne Staphylococcus aureus strains, and to classify the strains with cluster analysis. The multiplex PCR method was established and used to detect the genes of alpha-hemolysin, beta-hemolysin, hemolysin and 16S rDNA. The blood agar method was used to detect the characteristics of hemolytic phenotype. The experiment data was analyed with SPSS16.0. 131 strains were positive for hla gene (88.51%), 90 hlb gene (60.81%), 28 hemolysin gene (18.92%). 131 strains had the characteristics of hemolysis (88.51%), while the hemolysis were negative in 17 strains (11.49%). With the clustering factors of the hemolysin genotype and hemolytic phenotype, 148 strains were classified into 12 types from type A to type L with 100% similarity. Among them, type A contained 58 strains (39.19%), type B 37 (25.00%), type C 18 (12.16%). This multiplex PCR method is fast, convenient and specific, and could be used for high-throughput screening of hemolysin genes in S. aureus. Most of the foodborne Staphylococcus aureus strains carrying the hla gene mainly belong to type A and type B.

  4. Ocorrência de Staphylococcus aureus em queijo tipo "frescal"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edvaldo Sampaio de Almeida Filho

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a ocorrência de Staphylococcus aureus em uma amostra de queijo tipo Minas "frescal" comercializado na cidade de Poços de Caldas, MG, de modo a obter subsídios que permitam avaliar o risco potencial que este produto pode representar para a saúde da população consumidora. MÉTODOS: Foi investigada a presença e o número de cepas de Staphylococcus aureus em 80 amostras de queijo tipo Minas "frescal" produzido artesanalmente e comercializado na cidade de Poços de Caldas, MG, Brasil. RESULTADOS: Os resultados obtidos evidenciaram a presença de S. aureus em 40 (50,0% amostras, cujas contagens revelaram valores médios em torno de 10(5/g. CONCLUSÕES: Tais achados parecem ser extremamente preocupantes, pois além de se situarem acima do limite máximo de 10³/g estabelecido pelo Ministério da Saúde, estes valores mostraram-se muito próximos dos requeridos para a produção de enterotoxinas em quantidades suficientes para a ocorrência de surtos de intoxicação alimentar estafilocócica.

  5. Synthetic peptide inhibitors of DNA replication in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Kjelstrup, Susanne

    of clinically important pathogens and is essential for bacterial proliferation. The bacterial replication apparatus fulfill the requirements for a good drug target. The replisome of S. aureus consists of 5 different subunits (2, PolC2, 4, δ and δ`) who’s organization depends on multiple protein......-protein interactions. Centrally in the replisome is the -clamp where to multiple proteins binds through a conserved motif. We have identified the protein-protein interactions in the replisome of S. aureus by use of a bacterial two-hybrid system. A reverse bacterial two-hybrid system (R-BTH) based on Pyr......N (), DnaB and DnaX (). Three peptides identified as inhibitors of DnaN have been purified. Two of these peptides inhibited growth as well as DNA replication in S. aureus. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the peptides was approximately 50 g/ml. Overexpression of DnaN reduced the inhibitory...

  6. Investigational drugs to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Cuong; Yeh, Anthony J; Cheung, Gordon YC; Otto, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Staphylococcus aureus remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. This is to a large extent due to antibiotic-resistant strains, in particular methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). While the toll of invasive MRSA infections appears to decrease in U.S. hospitals, the rate of community-associated MRSA infections remains constant and there is a surge of MRSA in many other countries. This situation calls for continuing if not increased efforts to find novel strategies to combat MRSA infections. Areas covered This review will provide an overview of current investigational antibiotics in clinical development (up to phase II), and of therapeutic antibodies and alternative drugs against S. aureus in preclinical and clinical development, including a short description of the mechanism of action and a presentation of microbiological and clinical data. Expert opinion Increased recent antibiotic development efforts and results from pathogenesis research have led to several new antibiotics and alternative drugs, as well as a more informed selection of targets for vaccination efforts against MRSA. This developing portfolio of novel anti-staphylococcal drugs will hopefully provide us with additional and more efficient ways to combat MRSA infections in the near future and prevent us from running out of treatment options, even if new resistances arise. PMID:26536498

  7. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus colonization in renal transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Ribeiro Lamblet

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective to evaluate the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization in renal transplant patients and to identify the related risk factors. Method Swabs were used to collect nasal samples from 160 patients who had undergone a transplant within the previous year at the Kidney and Hypertension Hospital. The ‘National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards’ norms were followed for the collection, isolation, identification and sensitivity measurements. Results There was a 9.4% (15 prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization, of which one (6.7% was resistant to oxacillin. It was possible to identify as an associated risk factor a wait of more than one year for accessing dialysis prior to the transplant (p=0.029. Conclusion Given the high morbidity and mortality rates that this microorganism causes in the target population, other studies should be carried out, and pre- and post-transplant screening should occur in order to develop strategies that improve the prevention and control of the spread of Staphylococcus aureus.

  8. Severe Rhabdomyolysis Associated with Staphylococcus aureus Acute Endocarditis Requiring Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravry, Céline; Fedou, Anne-Laure; Dubos, Maria; Denes, Éric; Etchecopar, Caroline; Barraud, Olivier; Vignon, Philippe; François, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Rhabdomyolysis has multiple etiologies with unclear mechanisms; however, rhabdomyolysis caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection is rare. A case report of severe rhabdomyolysis in a patient who presented with endocarditis caused by methicillin-susceptible S. aureus and review of relevant literature. The patient had a history of cardiac surgery for tetralogy of Fallot. He was admitted to the hospital because of fever and digestive symptoms. Respiratory and hemodynamic status deteriorated rapidly, leading to admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) for mechanical ventilation and vasopressor support. Laboratory tests disclosed severe rhabdomyolysis with a serum concentration of creatine kinase that peaked at 49,068 IU/L; all blood cultures grew methicillin-susceptible S. aureus. Antibiotic therapy was amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ciprofloxacin, and gentamicin initially and was changed subsequently to oxacillin, clindamycin, and gentamicin. Transesophageal echocardiography showed vegetation on the pulmonary valve, thus confirming the diagnosis of acute endocarditis. Viral testing and computed tomography (CT) scan ruled out any obvious alternative etiology for rhabdomyolysis. Bacterial analysis did not reveal any specificity of the staphylococcal strain. The patient improved with antibiotics and was discharged from the ICU on day 26. He underwent redux surgery for valve replacement on day 53. Staphylococcal endocarditis should be suspected in cases of severe unexplained rhabdomyolysis with acute infectious symptoms.

  9. Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcal Species via the agr Quorum Sensing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Canovas

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococci are associated with both humans and animals. While most are non-pathogenic colonizers, Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing severe infections. S. aureus virulence is controlled by the agr quorum sensing system responding to secreted auto-inducing peptides (AIPs sensed by AgrC, a two component histidine kinase. agr loci are found also in other staphylococcal species and for Staphylococcus epidermidis, the encoded AIP represses expression of agr regulated virulence genes in S. aureus. In this study we aimed to better understand the interaction between staphylococci and S. aureus, and show that this interaction may eventually lead to the identification of new anti-virulence candidates to target S. aureus infections. Here we show that culture supernatants of 37 out of 52 staphylococcal isolates representing 17 different species inhibit S. aureus agr. The dog pathogen, Staphylococcus schleiferi, expressed the most potent inhibitory activity and was active against all four agr classes found in S. aureus. By employing a S. aureus strain encoding a constitutively active AIP receptor we show that the activity is mediated via agr. Subsequent cloning and heterologous expression of the S. schleiferi AIP in S. aureus demonstrated that this molecule was likely responsible for the inhibitory activity, and further proof was provided when pure synthetic S. schleiferi AIP was able to completely abolish agr induction of an S. aureus reporter strain. To assess impact on S. aureus virulence, we co-inoculated S. aureus and S. schleiferi in vivo in the Galleria mellonella wax moth larva, and found that expression of key S. aureus virulence factors was abrogated. Our data show that the S. aureus agr locus is highly responsive to other staphylococcal species suggesting that agr is an inter-species communication system. Based on these results we speculate that interactions between S. aureus and other colonizing staphylococci

  10. Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcal Species via the agr Quorum Sensing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canovas, Jaime; Baldry, Mara; Bojer, Martin S.; Andersen, Paal S.; Gless, Bengt H.; Grzeskowiak, Piotr K.; Stegger, Marc; Damborg, Peter; Olsen, Christian A.; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are associated with both humans and animals. While most are non-pathogenic colonizers, Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing severe infections. S. aureus virulence is controlled by the agr quorum sensing system responding to secreted auto-inducing peptides (AIPs) sensed by AgrC, a two component histidine kinase. agr loci are found also in other staphylococcal species and for Staphylococcus epidermidis, the encoded AIP represses expression of agr regulated virulence genes in S. aureus. In this study we aimed to better understand the interaction between staphylococci and S. aureus, and show that this interaction may eventually lead to the identification of new anti-virulence candidates to target S. aureus infections. Here we show that culture supernatants of 37 out of 52 staphylococcal isolates representing 17 different species inhibit S. aureus agr. The dog pathogen, Staphylococcus schleiferi, expressed the most potent inhibitory activity and was active against all four agr classes found in S. aureus. By employing a S. aureus strain encoding a constitutively active AIP receptor we show that the activity is mediated via agr. Subsequent cloning and heterologous expression of the S. schleiferi AIP in S. aureus demonstrated that this molecule was likely responsible for the inhibitory activity, and further proof was provided when pure synthetic S. schleiferi AIP was able to completely abolish agr induction of an S. aureus reporter strain. To assess impact on S. aureus virulence, we co-inoculated S. aureus and S. schleiferi in vivo in the Galleria mellonella wax moth larva, and found that expression of key S. aureus virulence factors was abrogated. Our data show that the S. aureus agr locus is highly responsive to other staphylococcal species suggesting that agr is an inter-species communication system. Based on these results we speculate that interactions between S. aureus and other colonizing staphylococci will significantly

  11. Molecular Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Transmitted between Patients with Buruli Ulcer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Ama Amissah

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer (BU is a skin infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The wounds of most BU patients are colonized with different microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus.This study investigated possible patient-to-patient transmission events of S. aureus during wound care in a health care center. S. aureus isolates from different BU patients with overlapping visits to the clinic were whole-genome sequenced and analyzed by a gene-by-gene approach using SeqSphere(+ software. In addition, sequence data were screened for the presence of genes that conferred antibiotic resistance.SeqSphere(+ analysis of whole-genome sequence data confirmed transmission of methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA and methicillin susceptible S. aureus among patients that took place during wound care. Interestingly, our sequence data show that the investigated MRSA isolates carry a novel allele of the fexB gene conferring chloramphenicol resistance, which had thus far not been observed in S. aureus.

  12. The dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus intramammary infection in nine Danish dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, H. D.; Sloth, K. H.; Elsberg, C.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the diversity of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine intramammary infections (IMI) in nine dairy herds, and compare these with isolates from other sites on the cows by phage- and ribotyping. Whether colonisation of milkers with S. aureus could...... be a source of infection for bovine IMI was investigated. In addition, 100 epidemiologically unrelated S. aureus isolates from asymptomatic human carriers were also phage- and ribotyped to compare the human and bovine reservoir of S. aureus in Denmark. A total of 625 S. aureus isolates from bovine IMI, bovine......, there was a close correspondence between ribo- and phage types of S. aureus isolated from bovine intramammmary infections and skin lesions. Isolates from milking personnel, however, were not identical to any of the predominant intramammary strains. Furthermore, several of the isolates from milking personnel showed...

  13. Flavone reduces the production of virulence factors, staphyloxanthin and α-hemolysin, in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Park, Joo-Hyeon; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2012-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of nosocomial infections due to its resistance to diverse antibiotics. This bacterium produces a large number of extracellular virulence factors that are closely associated with specific diseases. In this study, diverse plant flavonoids were investigated to identify a novel anti-virulence compound against two S. aureus strains. Flavone, a backbone compound of flavonoids, at subinhibitory concentration (50 μg/mL), markedly reduced the production of staphyloxanthin and α-hemolysin. This staphyloxanthin reduction rendered the S. aureus cells 100 times more vulnerable to hydrogen peroxide in the presence of flavone. In addition, flavone significantly decreased the hemolysis of human red blood by S. aureus, and the transcriptional level of α-hemolysin gene hla and a global regulator gene sae in S. aureus cells. This finding supported the usefulness of flavone as a potential antivirulence agent against antibiotic-resistant S. aureus.

  14. Diosmetin inhibits the expression of alpha-hemolysin in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shui; Zhou, Xuan; Li, Wenhua; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Bing; Li, Gen; Liu, Bowen; Deng, Xuming; Peng, Liping

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant human pathogen that causes a wide range of diseases. Alpha-hemolysin (Hla), a pore-forming cytotoxin that is produced by most S. aureus strains, can cause tissue injury and plays a critical role in the virulence of this pathogen. In the present study, we discovered that diosmetin, a natural flavonoid that occurs primarily in citrus fruits and exhibits little anti-S. aureus activity, could diminish the production of Hla in culture supernatants in a concentration-dependent manner. The analysis of cytotoxicity in the co-culture system of S. aureus and A549 epithelial cells showed that such inhibition confers significant protection against S. aureus-mediated injury. Our results suggested that diosmetin has the potential to be a new anti-virulence drug for S. aureus infection, particularly for the targeting of Hla.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus Sequences from Osteomyelitic Specimens of a Pathological Bone Collection from Pre-Antibiotic Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lena Flux

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen causing osteomyelitis, amongst other diseases, and its methicillin-resistant form (MRSA in particular poses a huge threat to public health. To increase our knowledge of the origin and evolution of S. aureus, genetic studies of historical microorganisms may be beneficial. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether osteomyelitic skeletal material (autopsy specimens collected from the mid 19th century until the 1920s is suitable for detecting historical S. aureus DNA sequences. We established a PCR-based analysis system targeting two specific genes of S. aureus (nuc and fib. We successfully amplified the historical S. aureus nuc and fib sequences for six and seven pre-antibiotic, osteomyelitic bone specimens, respectively. These results encourage further investigations of historical S. aureus genomes that may increase our understanding of pathogen evolution in relation to anthropogenically introduced antibiotics.

  16. One-year mortality in coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Snygg-Martin, Ulrika; Olaison, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate in-hospital mortality and 12-month mortality in patients with coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) compared to Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infective endocarditis (IE). We used a prospective cohort study of 66 consecutive CoNS and 170 S. aureus IE...... patients, collected at 2 tertiary university hospitals in Copenhagen (Denmark) and at 1 tertiary university hospital in Gothenburg (Sweden). Median (range) C-reactive protein at admission was higher in patients with S. aureus IE (150 mg/l (1-521) vs 94 mg/l (6-303); p...% of patients with S. aureus IE (p =0.05). In conclusion, CoNS IE was associated with a long diagnostic delay and high in-hospital mortality, whereas post-discharge prognosis was better in this group of patients compared to patients with IE due to S. aureus....

  17. Fresh garlic extract inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation under chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panan Ratthawongjirakul

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are the leading aetiological pathogens of nosocomial infections worldwide. These bacteria form biofilms on both biotic and abiotic surfaces causing biofilm-associated infections. Within the biofilm, these bacteria might develop persistent and antimicrobial resistant characteristics resulting in chronic infections and treatment failures. Garlic exhibits broad pharmaceutical properties and inhibitory activities against S. aureus. We investigated the effects of aqueous fresh garlic extract on biofilm formation in S. aureus ATCC25923 and MRSA strains under chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic conditions. The viable bacteria and biofilm levels were quantified through colony count and crystal violet staining, respectively. The use of fresh garlic extract under both conditions significantly inhibited biofilm formation in S. aureus strains ATCC25923 and MRSA. Garlic could be developed as either a prophylactic or therapeutic agent to manage S. aureus biofilm-associated infections.

  18. Development of a multicomponent Staphylococcus aureus vaccine designed to counter multiple bacterial virulence factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Annaliesa S.; Miller, Alita A.; Donald, Robert G.K.; Scully, Ingrid L.; Nanra, Jasdeep S.; Cooper, David; Jansen, Kathrin U.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of healthcare-associated infections and is responsible for a substantial burden of disease in hospitalized patients. Despite increasingly rigorous infection control guidelines, the prevalence and corresponding negative impact of S. aureus infections remain considerable. Difficulties in controlling S. aureus infections as well as the associated treatment costs are exacerbated by increasing rates of resistance to available antibiotics. Despite ongoing efforts over the past 20 years, no licensed S. aureus vaccine is currently available. However, learnings from past clinical failures of vaccine candidates and a better understanding of the immunopathology of S. aureus colonization and infection have aided in the design of new vaccine candidates based on multiple important bacterial pathogenesis mechanisms. This review outlines important considerations in designing a vaccine for the prevention of S. aureus disease in healthcare settings. PMID:22922765

  19. Treatment of infections due to resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstead, Gregory M; Cadena, Jose; Javeri, Heta

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews data on the treatment of infections caused by drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). This review covers findings reported in the English language medical literature up to January of 2013. Despite the emergence of resistant and multidrug-resistant S. aureus, we have seven effective drugs in clinical use for which little resistance has been observed: vancomycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, linezolid, tigecycline, telavancin, ceftaroline, and daptomycin. However, vancomycin is less effective for infections with MRSA isolates that have a higher MIC within the susceptible range. Linezolid is probably the drug of choice for the treatment of complicated MRSA skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs); whether it is drug of choice in pneumonia remains debatable. Daptomycin has shown to be non-inferior to either vancomycin or β-lactams in the treatment of staphylococcal SSTIs, bacteremia, and right-sided endocarditis. Tigecycline was also non-inferior to comparator drugs in the treatment of SSTIs, but there is controversy about whether it is less effective than other therapeutic options in the treatment of more serious infections. Telavancin has been shown to be non-inferior to vancomycin in the treatment of SSTIs and pneumonia, but has greater nephrotoxicity. Ceftaroline is a broad-spectrum cephalosporin with activity against MRSA; it is non-inferior to vancomycin in the treatment of SSTIs. Clindamycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, doxycycline, rifampin, moxifloxacin, and minocycline are oral anti-staphylococcal agents that may have utility in the treatment of SSTIs and osteomyelitis, but the clinical data for their efficacy is limited. There are also several drugs with broad-spectrum activity against Gm-positive organisms that have reached the phase II and III stages of clinical testing that will hopefully be approved for clinical use in the upcoming years: oritavancin, dalbavancin, omadacycline

  20. Subinhibitory concentrations of perilla oil affect the expression of secreted virulence factor genes in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazhang Qiu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pathogenicity of staphylococcus aureus is dependent largely upon its ability to secrete a number of virulence factors, therefore, anti-virulence strategy to combat S. aureus-mediated infections is now gaining great interest. It is widely recognized that some plant essential oils could affect the production of staphylococcal exotoxins when used at subinhibitory concentrations. Perilla [Perilla frutescens (L. Britton], a natural medicine found in eastern Asia, is primarily used as both a medicinal and culinary herb. Its essential oil (perilla oil has been previously demonstrated to be active against S. aureus. However, there are no data on the influence of perilla oil on the production of S. aureus exotoxins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of perilla oil against S. aureus strains. Hemolysis, tumour necrosis factor (TNF release, Western blot, and real-time RT-PCR assays were performed to evaluate the effects of subinhibitory concentrations of perilla oil on exotoxins production in S. aureus. The data presented here show that perilla oil dose-dependently decreased the production of α-toxin, enterotoxins A and B (the major staphylococcal enterotoxins, and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1 in both methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The production of α-toxin, SEA, SEB, and TSST-1 in S. aureus was decreased by perilla oil. These data suggest that perilla oil may be useful for the treatment of S. aureus infections when used in combination with β-lactam antibiotics, which can increase exotoxins production by S. aureus at subinhibitory concentrations. Furthermore, perilla oil could be rationally applied in food systems as a novel food preservative both to inhibit the growth of S. aureus and to repress the production of exotoxins, particularly staphylococcal enterotoxins.

  1. Association Between Contact Sports and Colonization with Staphylococcus aureus in a Prospective Cohort of Collegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Truque, Natalia; Saye, Elizabeth J; Soper, Nicole; Saville, Benjamin R; Thomsen, Isaac; Edwards, Kathryn M; Creech, C Buddy

    2017-05-01

    Athletes have a higher risk of infection with Staphylococcus aureus than the general population. Most studies in athletes have included primarily male contact sports participants and have not assessed S. aureus carriage over time. We aimed to examine the epidemiology and risk factors of S. aureus carriage in a cohort of male and female collegiate athletes. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 377 varsity collegiate athletes from August 2008 to April 2010. A baseline questionnaire ascertained risk factors for colonization. Nasal and oropharyngeal swabs were obtained at enrollment and monthly thereafter to detect S. aureus colonization. The primary outcome was S. aureus colonization, both with methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant S. aureus, as defined by bacterial culture and molecular confirmation. Secondary outcomes were time to colonization with S. aureus and carriage profile, defined as non-carrier, intermittent carrier, or persistent carrier. Overall, 224 contact sports and 153 non-contact sports athletes were enrolled. Contact sports athletes had a higher risk of carrying S. aureus over time: They had higher odds of being colonized with MRSA (OR 2.36; 95 % CI 1.13-4.93) and they tended to carry S. aureus for longer periods of time (intermittent carriage OR 3.60; 95 % CI 2.02-6.40; persistent carriage OR 2.39; 95 % CI 1.21-4.72). Athletes engaged in contact sports also acquired S. aureus more quickly (HR 1.61; 95 % CI 1.02-2.55). Staphylococcus aureus carriage was common in contact sports athletes. These findings suggest that efforts to prevent transmission of S. aureus among athletes should be focused on contact sports teams.

  2. The combination of osthole with baicalin protects mice from Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shui; Liu, Bowen; Luo, Zhao-Qing; Qiu, Jiaming; Zhou, Xuan; Li, Gen; Zhang, Bing; Deng, Xuming; Yang, Zhenguo; Wang, Jianfeng

    2017-01-01

    We reported the inhibition of α-Hemolysin (Hla) production in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 by osthole and further investigated the combination of osthole and baicalin in the treatment of staphylococcal pneumonia. Using cytotoxicity assays and a mouse model of intranasal lung infection, we evaluated the effect of combined therapy. Our results suggest that the combination of osthole and baicalin alleviated S. aureus-mediated A549 cell injury and protected mice from S. aureus pneumonia.

  3. Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus Invasion into Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells by Contact with Live Lactobacillus casei

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchard, Damien S.; Rault, Lucie; Berkova, Nadia; Le Loir, Yves; Even, Sergine

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen that is responsible for mastitis in dairy herds. S. aureus mastitis is difficult to treat and prone to recurrence despite antibiotic treatment. The ability of S. aureus to invade bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC) is evoked to explain this chronicity. One sustainable alternative to treat or prevent mastitis is the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as mammary probiotics. In this study, we tested the ability of Lactobacillus casei strains to prevent...

  4. Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus invasion into bovine mammary epithelial cells by contact with live Lactobacillus casei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Damien S; Rault, Lucie; Berkova, Nadia; Le Loir, Yves; Even, Sergine

    2013-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen that is responsible for mastitis in dairy herds. S. aureus mastitis is difficult to treat and prone to recurrence despite antibiotic treatment. The ability of S. aureus to invade bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC) is evoked to explain this chronicity. One sustainable alternative to treat or prevent mastitis is the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as mammary probiotics. In this study, we tested the ability of Lactobacillus casei strains to prevent invasion of bMEC by two S. aureus bovine strains, RF122 and Newbould305, which reproducibly induce acute and moderate mastitis, respectively. L. casei strains affected adhesion and/or internalization of S. aureus in a strain-dependent manner. Interestingly, L. casei CIRM-BIA 667 reduced S. aureus Newbould305 and RF122 internalization by 60 to 80%, and this inhibition was confirmed for two other L. casei strains, including one isolated from bovine teat canal. The protective effect occurred without affecting bMEC morphology and viability. Once internalized, the fate of S. aureus was not affected by L. casei. It should be noted that L. casei was internalized at a low rate but survived in bMEC cells with a better efficiency than that of S. aureus RF122. Inhibition of S. aureus adhesion was maintained with heat-killed L. casei, whereas contact between live L. casei and S. aureus or bMEC was required to prevent S. aureus internalization. This first study of the antagonism of LAB toward S. aureus in a mammary context opens avenues for the development of novel control strategies against this major pathogen.

  5. Inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus Invasion into Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells by Contact with Live Lactobacillus casei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Damien S.; Rault, Lucie; Berkova, Nadia; Le Loir, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen that is responsible for mastitis in dairy herds. S. aureus mastitis is difficult to treat and prone to recurrence despite antibiotic treatment. The ability of S. aureus to invade bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC) is evoked to explain this chronicity. One sustainable alternative to treat or prevent mastitis is the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) as mammary probiotics. In this study, we tested the ability of Lactobacillus casei strains to prevent invasion of bMEC by two S. aureus bovine strains, RF122 and Newbould305, which reproducibly induce acute and moderate mastitis, respectively. L. casei strains affected adhesion and/or internalization of S. aureus in a strain-dependent manner. Interestingly, L. casei CIRM-BIA 667 reduced S. aureus Newbould305 and RF122 internalization by 60 to 80%, and this inhibition was confirmed for two other L. casei strains, including one isolated from bovine teat canal. The protective effect occurred without affecting bMEC morphology and viability. Once internalized, the fate of S. aureus was not affected by L. casei. It should be noted that L. casei was internalized at a low rate but survived in bMEC cells with a better efficiency than that of S. aureus RF122. Inhibition of S. aureus adhesion was maintained with heat-killed L. casei, whereas contact between live L. casei and S. aureus or bMEC was required to prevent S. aureus internalization. This first study of the antagonism of LAB toward S. aureus in a mammary context opens avenues for the development of novel control strategies against this major pathogen. PMID:23183972

  6. Epidemiology of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus colonization in healthy Venezuelan children

    OpenAIRE

    Quintero, B.; Araque, M.; van der Gaast-de Jongh, C.; Escalona, F.; Correa, M.; Morillo-Puente, S.; Vielma, S.; Hermans, P. W. M.

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. We investigated both the colonization and co-colonization characteristics for these pathogens among 250 healthy children from 2 to 5?years of age in Merida, Venezuela, in 2007. The prevalence of S. pneumoniae colonization, S. aureus colonization, and S. pneumoniae?S. aureus co-colonization was 28%, 56%, and 16%, respectively. Pneumococcal serotypes 6B (14%), 19F (12%), 23F (12%), 15 (9%), 6...

  7. Application of molecular techniques in the study of Staphylococcus aureus clonal evolution - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Marcos Vivoni

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important agent of healthcare-associated and community-acquired infections. A major characteristic of this microorganism is the ability to develop resistance to antimicrobial agents. Several molecular techniques have been applied for the characterization of S. aureus in epidemiological studies. In the present review, we discuss the application of molecular techniques for typing S. aureus strains and describe the nomenclature and evolution of epidemic clones of this important pathogen.

  8. Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus isolates in a hospital of shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Ouyang, Lin; Luo, Lingfei; Liu, Jiqian; Song, Chiping; Li, Cuizhen; Yan, Hongjing; Wang, Ping

    2017-01-24

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are now common both in the health care setting and in the community. Active surveillance is critical for MRSA control and prevention. Specimens of patients (200 patients with 1119 specimens) as well as medical staff and hospital setting (1000 specimens) were randomly sampled in a level 2 hospital in Shanghai from September 2011 to August 2012. Isolation, cultivation and identification of S. aureus were performed. Totally, 67 S. aureus strains were isolated. 32 S. aureus strains were isolated from patient samples; 13 (13/32, 40.6%) of the 32 S. aureus isolates were MRSA; sputum sample and patients in the department of general internal medicine were the most frequent specimen and patient group for S. aureus strains isolation. Remaining 35 S. aureus strains were isolated from the medical staff and hospital setting; 20 (20/35, 57.1%) of the 35 S. aureus isolates were MRSA; specimens sampled from doctors and nurses' hands and nose and hospital facilities were the most frequent samples to isolate S. aureus. Resistant and virulent genes detection showed that, all 33 MRSA strains were mecA positive which accounts for 49.3% of the 67 S. aureus strains; 38 isolates were Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene positive which accounts for 56.7% of the 67 S. aureus strains; and 17 (17/67, 25.4%) isolates are mecA and PVL genes dual positive. Multidrug-resistant strains of MRSA and PVL positive S. aureus are common in patients, medical staff and hospital setting, the potential health threat is worthy of our attention.

  9. Hospitalizations and Deaths Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, United States, 1999?2005

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Eili; Smith, David L.; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2007-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections with Staphylococcus aureus, especially methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections, are a major cause of illness and death and impose serious economic costs on patients and hospitals. However, the recent magnitude and trend of these infections have not been reported. We used national hospitalization and resistance data to estimate the annual number of hospitalizations and deaths associated with S. aureus and MRSA from 1999 through 2005. During this period, t...

  10. Myricetin protects Galleria mellonella against Staphylococcus aureus infection and inhibits multiple virulence factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nogueira-Silva, L; Da Hora, G. C.A.; Soares, Goncalo Teofilo Afonso Pinheiro

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen related to a variety of life-threatening infections but for which antimicrobial resistance is liming the treatment options. We report here that myricetin, but not its glycosylated form, can remarkably decrease the production of several S. aureus ...... in the Galleria mellonella model. The present findings reveal the potential of Myr as an alternative multi-target antivirulence candidate to control S. aureus pathogenicity....

  11. A pilot study to isolate Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S aureus from environmental surfaces in the home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Elizabeth; Duty, Susan; Callahan, Maureen

    2008-08-01

    The major sources of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA), in the home are colonized or infected individuals and pets, such as cats and dogs; however, the occurrence of MRSA on surfaces in healthy homes is not well documented. A convenience sample comprising 35 homes of health care and non-health care workers, each with a child in diapers and either a cat or dog in the home, was recruited from the Boston area between January and April 2006. In each home, a total of 32 surfaces were sampled in kitchens, bathrooms, and living areas. S aureus was found in 34 of the 35 homes (97%) and was isolated from all surfaces in 1 or more homes, with the exception of the kitchen chopping board and the child training potty. MRSA was isolated from 9 of 35 homes (26%) and was found on a variety of household surfaces, including the kitchen and bathroom sinks, countertops, kitchen faucet handle, kitchen drain, dish sponge/cloth, dish towel, tub, infant high chair tray, and pet food dish. A positive correlation was indicated for the presence of a cat and the isolation of MRSA from surfaces. This study has shown the presence of MRSA at hand-contact surfaces in healthy homes. This provides further evidence for the potential for infection transmission via inanimate surfaces and underscores the need for good hygiene practice in the home.

  12. Role of Nasal Staphylococcus aureus Carriage in Transmission among Contact Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, K; Tagami, K

    2015-12-01

    Among athletes, Staphylococcus aureus is thought to be transmitted by close physical contact with carriers. Nevertheless, evidence is limited with regard to both the tracking of individual strains and the role of S. aureus on the skin's surface. We investigated its transmission using molecular genotyping and the presence of S. aureus on the skin during exercise. In the first study, nasal samples were obtained from 172 athletes over a period of up to one year. The 200 strains of S. aureus collected from these athletes were genotyped, and transmission of S. aureus was detected by phage open reading frame typing (POT). In the second study, the presence of S. aureus on the skin's surface was compared between nasal carriers (n=9) and non-nasal carriers (n=9), who had participated in the first study. In the first study, 10 cases of transmission were confirmed. In the second study, exercise-induced sweating increased S. aureus isolates from the skin's surface (before vs. after exercise: 5.2±5.4 vs. 41.7±40.6 CFU/ml) in nasal carriers. In 5 of 9 nasal carriers, S. aureus isolates from the skin's surface were clonally identical to those from the nares. These results identify a major route of S. aureus transmission among athletes and provide insight into the role played by exercise-induced sweating in nasal carriers. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Mechanism of activation of human basophils by Staphylococcus aureus Cowan 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Marone, G; Tamburini, M; Giudizi, M G; Biagiotti, R; Almerigogna, F; Romagnani, S

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the capacity of Staphylococcus aureus Cowan 1 and S. aureus Wood 46 to induce histamine release from human basophils in vitro. S. aureus Cowan 1 (10(5) to 10(7)/ml), which synthesizes protein A (Staph A), stimulated the release of histamine from basophils, whereas S. aureus Wood 46 (10(5) to 2 X 10(7)/ml), which does not synthesize Staph A, did not induce histamine secretion. Soluble Staph A (10(-3) to 10 micrograms/ml), but not staphylococcal enterotoxin A, induced histamine ...

  14. Conjugative transfer of R-plasmids from Streptococcus faecalis to Staphylococcus aureus.

    OpenAIRE

    Schaberg, D R; Clewell, D B; Glatzer, L

    1982-01-01

    R-plasmids originally isolated from Streptococcus pyogenes(pAC1,pAM15346), Streptococcus agalactiae(pIP501), and Streptococcus faecalis(pAM beta 1) were shown to be self-transferable on filter membranes from S. faecalis JH2-2 to Staphylococcus aureus recipients. The nonconjugative plasmid pAM alpha 1 was mobilized into S. aureus by pAM beta 1. Once in S. aureus, conjugative R-plasmids could be transferred to a second S. aureus recipient or back into S. faecalis. Determinants for chloramphenic...

  15. Staphylococcus aureus in Some Brazilian Dairy Industries: Changes of Contamination and Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dittmann, Karen Kiesbye; Chaul, Luiza T.; Lee, Sarah H. I.

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a major food-poisoning pathogen, is a common contaminant in dairy industries worldwide, including in Brazil. We determined the occurrence of S. aureus in five dairies in Brazil over 8 months. Of 421 samples, 31 (7.4%) were positive for S. aureus and prevalence varied from 0.......8% of strains being sensitive to all antibiotic classes and no Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains were found. The enterotoxin-encoding genes involved in food-poisoning, e.g., sea, sed, see, and seg were targeted by PCR. The two toxin-encoding genes, sed and see, were not detected. Only three strains...

  16. Staphylococcus aureus and the oral cavity: an overlooked source of carriage and infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, M G; Smith, A J; Akram, A N; Jackson, M; Robertson, D; Edwards, G

    2015-01-01

    The role of intraoral Staphylococcus aureus in disease and cross-infection sources is controversial. We present a 10-year retrospective analysis of laboratory data reporting isolation of S aureus from oral and perioral clinical specimens. A review of laboratory records for specimens where S aureus was isolated were collated and analyzed from January 1998-December 2007 at the Oral Microbiology Laboratory, Glasgow Dental Hospital. There were 11,312 specimens submitted to the laboratory over the study time period. S aureus was isolated from 1,986 specimens (18%). Of these, 1,782 (90%) were methicillin-sensitive S aureus (MSSA), and 204 (10%) were methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA). The most common specimen type from which MSSA was isolated was an oral rinse, whereas for MRSA this was a tongue swab. Most of the MRSA isolates were EMRSA-15 or EMRSA-16 lineage. These findings suggest that S aureus continues to be a frequent isolate in the oral cavity and perioral region. The oral cavity should be considered a source of S aureus in terms of cross-infection and dissemination to other body sites. The role of S aureus in the pathogenesis of certain oral diseases should also be considered as part of a differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. spa type distribution in Staphylococcus aureus originating from pigs, cattle and poultry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Henrik; Moodley, A.; Guardabassi, L.

    2010-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) of clonal complex 398 (CC398) is emerging globally among production animals such as cattle, pigs and poultry as well as among humans. However, little is known about the prevalence of CC398 among methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) or the relative clonal...... distribution of S. aureus isolated from these three animal reservoirs. To study this, we have analyzed a random sample of S. aureus consisting of 296 epidemiologically unrelated isolates from infections and colonisation of pigs, cattle and poultry. These were examined and compared by spa and multi...

  18. Inhibition of colony-spreading activity of Staphylococcus aureus by secretion of δ-hemolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omae, Yosuke; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2012-05-04

    Staphylococcus aureus spreads on the surface of soft agar, a phenomenon we termed "colony spreading." Here, we found that S. aureus culture supernatant inhibited colony spreading. We purified δ-hemolysin (Hld, δ-toxin), a major protein secreted from S. aureus, as a compound that inhibits colony spreading. The culture supernatants of hld-disrupted mutants had 30-fold lower colony-spreading inhibitory activity than those of the parent strain. Furthermore, hld-disrupted mutants had higher colony-spreading ability than the parent strain. These results suggest that S. aureus negatively regulates colony spreading by secreting δ-hemolysin.

  19. Inhibition of Colony-spreading Activity of Staphylococcus aureus by Secretion of δ-Hemolysin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omae, Yosuke; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus spreads on the surface of soft agar, a phenomenon we termed “colony spreading.” Here, we found that S. aureus culture supernatant inhibited colony spreading. We purified δ-hemolysin (Hld, δ-toxin), a major protein secreted from S. aureus, as a compound that inhibits colony spreading. The culture supernatants of hld-disrupted mutants had 30-fold lower colony-spreading inhibitory activity than those of the parent strain. Furthermore, hld-disrupted mutants had higher colony-spreading ability than the parent strain. These results suggest that S. aureus negatively regulates colony spreading by secreting δ-hemolysin. PMID:22411996

  20. Topography of distinct Staphylococcus aureus types in chronic wounds of patients with epidermolysis bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kooi-Pol, Magdalena M; Sadaghian Sadabad, Mehdi; Duipmans, José C; Sabat, Artur J; Stobernack, Tim; Omansen, Till F; Westerhout-Pluister, Gerlinde N; Jonkman, Marcel F; Harmsen, Hermie J M; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2013-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is known to interfere with wound healing and represents a significant risk factor for wound infections and invasive disease. It is generally assumed that one individual is predominantly colonized by one S. aureus type. Nevertheless, patients with the genetic blistering disease epidermolysis bullosa (EB) often carry multiple S. aureus types. We therefore investigated whether different S. aureus types are present in individual wounds of EB patients and, if so, how they are spatially distributed. The staphylococcal topography in chronic wounds was mapped by replica-plating of used bandages and subsequent typing of S. aureus isolates. Individual chronic wounds of five patients contained up to six different S. aureus types. Unexpectedly, distinct S. aureus types formed micro-colonies that were located in close proximity and sometimes even overlapped. While some adjacent S. aureus isolates were closely related, others belonged to distinct molecular complexes. We conclude that the general assumption that one individual is predominantly colonized by one type of S. aureus does not apply to chronic wounds of EB patients. We consider this observation important, not only for EB patients, but also for other patients with chronic wounds in view of the potential risk for severe staphylococcal infections.

  1. Acid sphingomyelinase inhibition protects mice from lung edema and lethal Staphylococcus aureus sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Huiming; Li, Cao; Kadow, Stephanie; Henry, Brian D; Steinmann, Jörg; Becker, Katrin Anne; Riehle, Andrea; Beckmann, Natalie; Wilker, Barbara; Li, Pin-Lan; Pritts, Timothy; Edwards, Michael J; Zhang, Yang; Gulbins, Erich; Grassmé, Heike

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary edema associated with increased vascular permeability is a severe complication of Staphylococcus aureus-induced sepsis and an important cause of human pathology and death. We investigated the role of the mammalian acid sphingomyelinase (Asm)/ceramide system in the development of lung edema caused by S. aureus. Our findings demonstrate that genetic deficiency or pharmacologic inhibition of Asm reduced lung edema in mice infected with S. aureus. The Asm/ceramide system triggered the formation of superoxide, resulting in degradation of tight junction proteins followed by lung edema. Treatment of infected mice with amitriptyline, a potent inhibitor of Asm, protected mice from lung edema caused by S. aureus, but did not reduce systemic bacterial numbers. In turn, treatment with antibiotics reduced bacterial numbers but did not protect mice from lung edema. In contrast, only the combination of antibiotics and amitriptyline inhibited both pulmonary edema and bacteremia protecting mice from lethal sepsis and lung dysfunction suggesting the combination of both drugs as novel treatment option for sepsis. Antibiotics are often insufficient to cure S. aureus-induced sepsis. S. aureus induces lung edema via the Asm/ceramide system. Genetic deficiency of Asm inhibits lung dysfunction upon infection with S. aureus. Pharmacologic inhibition of Asm reduces lung edema induced by S. aureus. Antibiotics plus amitriptyline protect mice from lung edema and lethal S. aureus sepsis.

  2. Construction of Stable Fluorescent Reporter Plasmids for Use in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle D. Rodriguez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Here, the genes encoding three different fluorescent proteins were cloned into the stably maintained Staphylococcus aureus shuttle vector pKK30. The resulting plasmids were transformed into two S. aureus strains; SH1000 and RN4220. Stability assays illustrated that the three recombinant plasmids retained near 100% maintenance in vitro for 160 generations. S. aureus strain SH1000 expressing green fluorescent protein was then inoculated in an ovine model and in vivo stability for 6 days was demonstrated. In essence, these reporter plasmids represent a useful set of tools for dynamic imaging studies in S. aureus. These three reporter plasmids are available through BEI Resources.

  3. Concomitant genotyping revealed diverse spreading between methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus in central Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Cheng-Mao; Lin, Chien-Yu; Ho, Mao-Wang; Lin, Hsiao-Chuan; Peng, Ching-Tien; Lu, Jang-Jih

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a versatile bacterium, which can lead to various infectious diseases. Various molecular typing methods are applied to the evolution and epidemiology surveys of S. aureus, mostly for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). However, methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) is still an important pathogen, but their molecular typing is evaluated infrequently. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, and detection of five virulent genes for 95 MRSA and 56 MSSA isolates (July-December 2008 and July 2008-December 2009, respectively) during an overlapping period were performed. More diversity was found in MSSA isolates (23 pulsotypes and 25 spa types, excluding 4 new-type and 1 nontypable isolates for spa typing) than in MRSA isolates (19 pulsotypes and 16 spa types, excluding 1 new-type and 1 nontypable isolates for spa typing). By spa typing, t002 (n = 30), t037 (n = 23), t437 (n = 21), t234 (n = 3), t1081 (n = 3), and t1094 (n = 3) were the six major MRSA clones. For MSSA isolates, t189 (n = 13), t437 (n = 4), t084 (n = 3), t213 (n = 3), t701 (n = 3), and t7200 (n = 3) were the six major types. Combining PFGE and spa typing, there were five combinations (pulsotype + spa type) that contained both MRSA and MSSA isolates (pulsotype 9-t437, pulsotype 15-t037, pulsotype 19-t002, pulsotype 21-t002, and pulsotype 28-t1081). For all 151 S. aureus or 95 MRSA isolates, the PFGE typing had more discrimination power, but spa typing had larger discrimination index for 56 MSSA isolates. In conclusion, there were different predominant MRSA and MSSA clones clinically. Continuing longitudinal tracking of molecular typing is necessary for elucidating the evolution of this important clinical pathogen. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Dissemination of antibiotic resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant S aureus strains isolated from hospital effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Santi M; Ghosh, Ananta K; Pati, Bikas R

    2015-12-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) and methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) strains were examined in hospital effluents. Most S aureus strains are resistant to methicillin (MRSA), followed by tetracycline. Approximately 15% of MRSA strains are also resistant to vancomycin (VRSA). All VRSA strains developed a VanR/VanS-regulated 2-component system of VanA-type resistance in their genome. Results indicate that there is a possibility of developing resistance to aminoglycosides by VRSA strains in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization Among Household Contacts of Patients With Skin Infections: Risk Factors, Strain Discordance, and Complex Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Loren G.; Eells, Samantha J.; Taylor, Alexis R.; David, Michael Z.; Ortiz, Nancy; Zychowski, Diana; Kumar, Neha; Cruz, Denise; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Daum, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The USA300 methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) genetic background has rapidly emerged as the predominant cause of community-associated S. aureus infections in the U.S. However, epidemiologic characteristics of S. aureus household transmission are poorly understood. Methods. We performed a cross-sectional study of adults and children with S. aureus skin infections and their household contacts in Los Angeles and Chicago. Subjects were surveyed for S. aureus colonization of the nares, oropharynx, and inguinal region and risk factors for S. aureus disease. All isolates underwent genetic typing. Results. We enrolled 1162 persons (350 index patients and 812 household members). The most common infection isolate characteristic was ST8/SCCmec IV, PVL+ MRSA (USA300) (53%). S. aureus colonized 40% (137/350) of index patients and 50% (405/812) of household contacts. A nares-only survey would have missed 48% of S. aureus and 51% of MRSA colonized persons. Sixty-five percent of households had >1 S. aureus genetic background identified and 26% of MRSA isolates in household contacts were discordant with the index patients' infecting MRSA strain type. Factors independently associated (P transmissible among household members compared with other S. aureus genetic backgrounds. Strain distribution was complex; >1 S. aureus genetic background was present in many households. S. aureus decolonization strategies may need to address extra-nasal colonization and the consequences of eradicating S. aureus genetic backgrounds infrequently associated with infection. PMID:22474221

  6. Occurrence and antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus in bulk tank milk and milk filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Bogdanovičová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on the monitoring of Staphylococcus aureus prevalence in raw milk and milk filters, its antibiotic resistance and detection of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Samples of raw cow´s milk and milk filters were collected in the period from 2012 till 2014, from 50 dairy farms in the Czech Republic. The total of 261 samples (164 samples of raw milk and 97 milk filters were cultivated on Baird-Parker agar. Both the typical and atypical colonies were examined by plasmacoagulase test and PCR method was used for detection of species specific fragment SA442 and mecA gene. Standard disk diffusion method was used to determinate resistance to antimicrobial agents. The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus was detected on 25 farms (50%. The antimicrobial resistance showed differences between the farms. Total of 58 samples were positive for Staphylococcus aureus, of which were 37 (14.2% isolated from raw milk samples and 21 (8.1% from milk filters. From these samples we isolated 62 Staphylococcus aureus strains, 41 isolates bacteria S. aureus from raw milk (66.1% and 21 isolates S. aureus from milk filters (33.9%. The presence of antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus isolates was low, most of them were resistant to amoxicilin. According to the results obtained by the PCR method for the methicillin - resistant S. aureus (MRSA, the mecA gene was present in 6 strains (9.7%, 4 isolates obtained from milk samples (6.5% and 2 isolates from milk filters (3.2%.  These isolates can be considered as a possible source of resistance genes, which can be spread through the food chain. Nowadays, a globally unfavourable increasing trend of prevalence of methicillin resistant staphylococci strains especially Staphylococcus aureus is being observed worldwide. The improper hygiene and poor farm management practices contributed to the presence of S. aureus in the milk. This may have contributed to the high level of S. aureus isolated

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Alters Staphylococcus aureus Sensitivity to Vancomycin in a Biofilm Model of Cystic Fibrosis Infection

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    Giulia Orazi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The airways of cystic fibrosis (CF patients have thick mucus, which fosters chronic, polymicrobial infections. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are two of the most prevalent respiratory pathogens in CF patients. In this study, we tested whether P. aeruginosa influences the susceptibility of S. aureus to frontline antibiotics used to treat CF lung infections. Using our in vitro coculture model, we observed that addition of P. aeruginosa supernatants to S. aureus biofilms grown either on epithelial cells or on plastic significantly decreased the susceptibility of S. aureus to vancomycin. Mutant analyses showed that 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide (HQNO, a component of the P. aeruginosa Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS system, protects S. aureus from the antimicrobial activity of vancomycin. Similarly, the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin also contribute to the ability of P. aeruginosa to protect S. aureus from vancomycin, as did growth under anoxia. Under our experimental conditions, HQNO, P. aeruginosa supernatant, and growth under anoxia decreased S. aureus growth, likely explaining why this cell wall-targeting antibiotic is less effective. P. aeruginosa supernatant did not confer additional protection to slow-growing S. aureus small colony variants. Importantly, P. aeruginosa supernatant protects S. aureus from other inhibitors of cell wall synthesis as well as protein synthesis-targeting antibiotics in an HQNO- and siderophore-dependent manner. We propose a model whereby P. aeruginosa causes S. aureus to shift to fermentative growth when these organisms are grown in coculture, leading to reduction in S. aureus growth and decreased susceptibility to antibiotics targeting cell wall and protein synthesis.

  8. Incidence, trends and demographics of Staphylococcus aureus infections in Auckland, New Zealand, 2001–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background New Zealand has a higher incidence of Staphylococcus aureus disease than other developed countries, with significant sociodemographic variation in incidence rates. In contrast to North America, the majority of disease is due to methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), although relatively little is known about the comparative demographics of MSSA and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections in New Zealand. Methods Our objectives were to describe the trends, incidence and patient demographics of all S. aureus infections in patients presenting to our institution between 2001 and 2011, and compare the epidemiology of MSSA and MRSA infections. We identified all patients with S. aureus infections over the study period. A unique S. aureus infection was defined as the first positive S. aureus culture taken from the same patient within a thirty-day period. Standard definitions were used to classify episodes into community- or healthcare-associated S. aureus infection. Results There were 16,249 S. aureus infections over the study period. The incidence increased significantly over the study period from 360 to 412 per 100,000 population (P < 0.001), largely driven by an increase in community-associated non-invasive MSSA infections. When compared with MSSA infections, patients with non-multiresistant MRSA infections were more likely to be older, have hospital-onset infections and be Māori or Pacific Peoples. Conclusions Our work provides valuable baseline data on the epidemiology and trends of S. aureus infections in New Zealand. The significant increase in community-associated S. aureus infections is of public health importance. Future studies should investigate the reasons underlying this concerning trend. PMID:24299298

  9. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm removal by targeting biofilm-associated extracellular proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir K Shukla

    2017-01-01

    Methods: Biofilm assay was done in 96-well microtitre plate to evaluate the effect of proteinase K on biofilms of bovine mastitis S. Aureus isolates. Extracellular polymeric substances were extracted and evaluated for their composition (protein, polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, before and after the proteinase K treatment. Results: Biofilm assay showed that 2 μg/ml proteinase K significantly inhibited biofilm development in bap-positive S. aureus V329 as well as other S. aureus isolates (SA7, SA10, SA33, SA352, but not in bap-mutant M556 and SA392 (a weak biofilm-producing strain. Proteinase K treatment on S. aureus planktonic cells showed that there was no inhibition of planktonic growth up to 32 μg/ml of proteinase K. Proteinase K treatment on 24 h old preformed biofilms showed an enhanced dispersion of bap-positive V329 and SA7, SA10, SA33 and SA352 biofilms; however, proteinase K did not affect the bap-mutant S. aureus M556 and SA392 biofilms. Biofilm compositions study before and after proteinase K treatment indicated that Bap might also be involved in eDNA retention in the biofilm matrix that aids in biofilm stability. When proteinase K was used in combination with antibiotics, a synergistic effect in antibiotic efficacy was observed against all biofilm-forming S. aureus isolates. Interpretation & conclusions: Proteinase K inhibited biofilms growth in S. aureus bovine mastitis isolates but did not affect their planktonic growth. An enhanced dispersion of preformed S. aureus biofilms was observed on proteinase K treatment. Proteinase K treatment with antibiotics showed a synergistic effect against S. aureus biofilms. The study suggests that dispersing S. aureus by protease can be of use while devising strategies againstS. aureus biofilms.

  10. Detection of Methicillin Resistance and Various Virulence Factors in Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Nasal Carriers

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    Hatice Türk Dağı

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococus aureus can be found as a commensal on skin and nasal flora or it may cause local and invasive infections. S. aureus has a large number of virulence factors. Aims: To investigate the methicillin resistance and frequency of various virulence factors in S. aureus nasal isolates. Study Design: Descriptive study. Methods: Nasal samples collected from university students were cultured in media. S. aureus was identified by conventional methods and the Staphyloslide latex test (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, USA. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were conducted, and the methicillin resistance was determined. The mecA, nuc, pvl and staphylococcal toxin genes were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: S. aureus was isolated in 104 of 600 (17.3% nasal samples. In total, 101 (97.1% S. aureus isolates were methicillin-sensitive and the remaining 3 (2.9% were methicillin-resistant. Furthermore, all but five isolates carried at least one staphylococcal enterotoxin gene, with seg being predominant. The tst and eta genes were determined in 29 (27.9%, and 3 (2.9% isolates, respectively. None of the S. aureus isolates harbored see, etb, and pvl genes. Conclusion: A moderate rate of S. aureus carriage and low frequency of MRSA were detected in healthy students. S. aureus isolates had a high prevalence of staphylococcal enterotoxin genes and the tst gene. In this study, a large number of virulence factors were examined in S. aureus nasal isolates, and the data obtained from this study can be used for monitoring the prevalence of virulence genes in S. aureus strains isolated from nasal carriers.

  11. Livestock-associated Staphylococcus aureus on Polish pig farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczkowska, Aneta; Żmudzki, Jacek; Marszałek, Natalia; Orczykowska-Kotyna, Monika; Komorowska, Iga; Nowak, Agnieszka; Grzesiak, Anna; Czyżewska-Dors, Ewelina; Dors, Arkadiusz; Pejsak, Zygmunt; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Wyszomirski, Tomasz; Empel, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Background Livestock-associated Staphylococcus aureus (LA-SA) draws increasing attention due to its particular ability to colonize farm animals and be transmitted to people, which in turn leads to its spread in the environment. The aim of the study was to determine the dissemination of LA-SA on pig farms selected throughout Poland, characterize the population structure of identified S. aureus, and assess the prevalence of LA-SA carriage amongst farmers and veterinarians being in contact with pigs. Methods and findings The study was conducted on 123 pig farms (89 farrow-to-finish and 34 nucleus herds), located in 15 out of 16 provinces of Poland. Human and pig nasal swabs, as well as dust samples were analyzed. S. aureus was detected on 79 (64.2%) farms from 14 provinces. Amongst these farms LA-SA-positive farms dominated (71/79, 89.9%, 95% CI [81.0%, 95.5%]). The prevalence of LA-MRSA-positive farms was lower than LA-MSSA-positive (36.6% of LA-SA-positive farms, 95% CI [25.5%, 48.9%] vs. 74.6%, 95% CI [62.9%, 84.2%]). In total, 190 S. aureus isolates were identified: 72 (38%) MRSA and 118 (62%) methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), of which 174 (92%) isolates were classified to three livestock-associated lineages: CC398 (73%), CC9 (13%), and CC30/ST433 (6%). All CC398 isolates belonged to the animal clade. Four LA-MRSA clones were detected: ST433-IVa(2B) clone (n = 8, 11%), described to the best of our knowledge for the first time, and three ST398 clones (n = 64, 89%) with the most prevalent being ST398-V(5C2&5)c, followed by ST398-V(5C2), and ST398-IVa(2B). Nasal carriage of LA-SA by pig farmers was estimated at 13.2% (38/283), CC398 carriage at 12.7% (36/283) and ST398-MRSA carriage at 3.2% (9/283), whereas by veterinarians at 21.1% (8/38), 18.4% (7/38) and 10.5% (4/38), respectively. Conclusions The prevalence of LA-MRSA-positive pig farms in Poland has increased considerably since 2008, when the first MRSA EU baseline survey was conducted in Europe. On

  12. Livestock-associated Staphylococcus aureus on Polish pig farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroczkowska, Aneta; Żmudzki, Jacek; Marszałek, Natalia; Orczykowska-Kotyna, Monika; Komorowska, Iga; Nowak, Agnieszka; Grzesiak, Anna; Czyżewska-Dors, Ewelina; Dors, Arkadiusz; Pejsak, Zygmunt; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Wyszomirski, Tomasz; Empel, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Livestock-associated Staphylococcus aureus (LA-SA) draws increasing attention due to its particular ability to colonize farm animals and be transmitted to people, which in turn leads to its spread in the environment. The aim of the study was to determine the dissemination of LA-SA on pig farms selected throughout Poland, characterize the population structure of identified S. aureus, and assess the prevalence of LA-SA carriage amongst farmers and veterinarians being in contact with pigs. The study was conducted on 123 pig farms (89 farrow-to-finish and 34 nucleus herds), located in 15 out of 16 provinces of Poland. Human and pig nasal swabs, as well as dust samples were analyzed. S. aureus was detected on 79 (64.2%) farms from 14 provinces. Amongst these farms LA-SA-positive farms dominated (71/79, 89.9%, 95% CI [81.0%, 95.5%]). The prevalence of LA-MRSA-positive farms was lower than LA-MSSA-positive (36.6% of LA-SA-positive farms, 95% CI [25.5%, 48.9%] vs. 74.6%, 95% CI [62.9%, 84.2%]). In total, 190 S. aureus isolates were identified: 72 (38%) MRSA and 118 (62%) methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), of which 174 (92%) isolates were classified to three livestock-associated lineages: CC398 (73%), CC9 (13%), and CC30/ST433 (6%). All CC398 isolates belonged to the animal clade. Four LA-MRSA clones were detected: ST433-IVa(2B) clone (n = 8, 11%), described to the best of our knowledge for the first time, and three ST398 clones (n = 64, 89%) with the most prevalent being ST398-V(5C2&5)c, followed by ST398-V(5C2), and ST398-IVa(2B). Nasal carriage of LA-SA by pig farmers was estimated at 13.2% (38/283), CC398 carriage at 12.7% (36/283) and ST398-MRSA carriage at 3.2% (9/283), whereas by veterinarians at 21.1% (8/38), 18.4% (7/38) and 10.5% (4/38), respectively. The prevalence of LA-MRSA-positive pig farms in Poland has increased considerably since 2008, when the first MRSA EU baseline survey was conducted in Europe. On Polish pig farms CC398 of the animal clade

  13. Staphylococcus aureus α-Toxin: Nearly a Century of Intrigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berube, Bryan J.; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus secretes a number of host-injurious toxins, among the most prominent of which is the small β-barrel pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin. Initially named based on its properties as a red blood cell lytic toxin, early studies suggested a far greater complexity of α-hemolysin action as nucleated cells also exhibited distinct responses to intoxication. The hemolysin, most aptly referred to as α-toxin based on its broad range of cellular specificity, has long been recognized as an important cause of injury in the context of both skin necrosis and lethal infection. The recent identification of ADAM10 as a cellular receptor for α-toxin has provided keen insight on the biology of toxin action during disease pathogenesis, demonstrating the molecular mechanisms by which the toxin causes tissue barrier disruption at host interfaces lined by epithelial or endothelial cells. This review highlights both the historical studies that laid the groundwork for nearly a century of research on α-toxin and key findings on the structural and functional biology of the toxin, in addition to discussing emerging observations that have significantly expanded our understanding of this toxin in S. aureus disease. The identification of ADAM10 as a proteinaceous receptor for the toxin not only provides a greater appreciation of truths uncovered by many historic studies, but now affords the opportunity to more extensively probe and understand the role of α-toxin in modulation of the complex interaction of S. aureus with its human host. PMID:23888516

  14. Repurposing salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs to combat drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajmohan Rajamuthiah

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that has become the leading cause of hospital acquired infections in the US. Repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved drugs for antimicrobial therapy involves lower risks and costs compared to de novo development of novel antimicrobial agents. In this study, we examined the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available anthelmintic drugs. The FDA approved drug niclosamide and the veterinary drug oxyclozanide displayed strong in vivo and in vitro activity against methicillin resistant S. aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC: 0.125 and 0.5 μg/ml respectively; minimum effective concentration: ≤ 0.78 μg/ml for both drugs. The two drugs were also effective against another Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecium (MIC 0.25 and 2 μg/ml respectively, but not against the Gram-negative species Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter aerogenes. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of niclosamide and oxyclozanide were determined against methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid or daptomycin resistant S. aureus clinical isolates, with MICs at 0.0625-0.5 and 0.125-2 μg/ml for niclosamide and oxyclozanide respectively. A time-kill study demonstrated that niclosamide is bacteriostatic, whereas oxyclozanide is bactericidal. Interestingly, oxyclozanide permeabilized the bacterial membrane but neither of the anthelmintic drugs exhibited demonstrable toxicity to sheep erythrocytes. Oxyclozanide was non-toxic to HepG2 human liver carcinoma cells within the range of its in vitro MICs but niclosamide displayed toxicity even at low concentrations. These data show that the salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs niclosamide and oxyclozanide are suitable candidates for mechanism of action studies and further clinical evaluation for treatment of staphylococcal infections.

  15. Repurposing salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs to combat drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Conery, Annie L; Kim, Wooseong; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Kwon, Bumsup; Ausubel, Frederick M; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterium that has become the leading cause of hospital acquired infections in the US. Repurposing Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs for antimicrobial therapy involves lower risks and costs compared to de novo development of novel antimicrobial agents. In this study, we examined the antimicrobial properties of two commercially available anthelmintic drugs. The FDA approved drug niclosamide and the veterinary drug oxyclozanide displayed strong in vivo and in vitro activity against methicillin resistant S. aureus (minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC): 0.125 and 0.5 μg/ml respectively; minimum effective concentration: ≤ 0.78 μg/ml for both drugs). The two drugs were also effective against another Gram-positive bacteria Enterococcus faecium (MIC 0.25 and 2 μg/ml respectively), but not against the Gram-negative species Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter aerogenes. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of niclosamide and oxyclozanide were determined against methicillin, vancomycin, linezolid or daptomycin resistant S. aureus clinical isolates, with MICs at 0.0625-0.5 and 0.125-2 μg/ml for niclosamide and oxyclozanide respectively. A time-kill study demonstrated that niclosamide is bacteriostatic, whereas oxyclozanide is bactericidal. Interestingly, oxyclozanide permeabilized the bacterial membrane but neither of the anthelmintic drugs exhibited demonstrable toxicity to sheep erythrocytes. Oxyclozanide was non-toxic to HepG2 human liver carcinoma cells within the range of its in vitro MICs but niclosamide displayed toxicity even at low concentrations. These data show that the salicylanilide anthelmintic drugs niclosamide and oxyclozanide are suitable candidates for mechanism of action studies and further clinical evaluation for treatment of staphylococcal infections.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus α-Toxin: Nearly a Century of Intrigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan J. Berube

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus secretes a number of host-injurious toxins, among the most prominent of which is the small β-barrel pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin. Initially named based on its properties as a red blood cell lytic toxin, early studies suggested a far greater complexity of α-hemolysin action as nucleated cells also exhibited distinct responses to intoxication. The hemolysin, most aptly referred to as α-toxin based on its broad range of cellular specificity, has long been recognized as an important cause of injury in the context of both skin necrosis and lethal infection. The recent identification of ADAM10 as a cellular receptor for α-toxin has provided keen insight on the biology of toxin action during disease pathogenesis, demonstrating the molecular mechanisms by which the toxin causes tissue barrier disruption at host interfaces lined by epithelial or endothelial cells. This review highlights both the historical studies that laid the groundwork for nearly a century of research on α-toxin and key findings on the structural and functional biology of the toxin, in addition to discussing emerging observations that have significantly expanded our understanding of this toxin in S. aureus disease. The identification of ADAM10 as a proteinaceous receptor for the toxin not only provides a greater appreciation of truths uncovered by many historic studies, but now affords the opportunity to more extensively probe and understand the role of α-toxin in modulation of the complex interaction of S. aureus with its human host.

  17. Clinical Risk Factors for Infective Endocarditis in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Vincent Bryan D; Chapagain, Bikash; Joshi, Astha; Brennessel, Debra J

    2017-02-01

    Crucial to the management of staphylococcal bacteremia is an accurate evaluation of associated endocarditis, which has both therapeutic and prognostic implications. Because the clinical presentation of endocarditis can be nonspecific, the judicious use of echocardiography is important in distinguishing patients at high risk of developing endocarditis. In the presence of high-risk clinical features, an early transesophageal echocardiogram is warranted without prior transthoracic echocardiography. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical risk factors for staphylococcal infective endocarditis that might warrant earlier transesophageal echocardiography and to describe the incidence of endocarditis in cases of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. A retrospective case-control study was conducted by means of chart review of 91 patients consecutively admitted to a community hospital from January 2009 through January 2013. Clinical risk factors of patients with staphylococcal bacteremia were compared with risk factors of patients who had definite diagnoses of infective endocarditis. There were 69 patients with bacteremia alone (76%) and 22 patients with endocarditis (24%), as verified by echocardiography. Univariate analysis showed that diabetes mellitus ( P =0.024), the presence of an automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator/pacemaker ( P =0.006) or a prosthetic heart valve ( P =0.003), and recent hospitalization ( P =0.048) were significantly associated with developing infective endocarditis in patients with S. aureus bacteremia. The incidence of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus bacteremia was similar in the bacteremia and infective-endocarditis groups ( P =0.437). In conclusion, identified high-risk clinical factors in the presence of bacteremia can suggest infective endocarditis. Early evaluation with transesophageal echocardiography might well be warranted.

  18. Mobilization of Genomic Islands of Staphylococcus aureus by Temperate Bacteriophage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Bo Youn; Park, Joo Youn; Robinson, D. Ashley; Thomas, Jonathan C.; Park, Yong Ho; Thornton, Justin A.; Seo, Keun Seok

    2016-01-01

    The virulence of Staphylococcus aureus, in both human and animal hosts, is largely influenced by the acquisition of mobile genetic elements (MGEs). Most S. aureus strains carry a variety of MGEs, including three genomic islands (νSaα, νSaβ, νSaγ) that are diverse in virulence gene content but conserved within strain lineages. Although the mobilization of pathogenicity islands, phages and plasmids has been well studied, the mobilization of genomic islands is poorly understood. We previously demonstrated the mobilization of νSaβ by the adjacent temperate bacteriophage ϕSaBov from strain RF122. In this study, we demonstrate that ϕSaBov mediates the mobilization of νSaα and νSaγ, which are located remotely from ϕSaBov, mostly to recipient strains belonging to ST151. Phage DNA sequence analysis revealed that chromosomal DNA excision events from RF122 were highly specific to MGEs, suggesting sequence-specific DNA excision and packaging events rather than generalized transduction by a temperate phage. Disruption of the int gene in ϕSaBov did not affect phage DNA excision, packaging, and integration events. However, disruption of the terL gene completely abolished phage DNA packing events, suggesting that the primary function of temperate phage in the transfer of genomic islands is to allow for phage DNA packaging by TerL and that transducing phage particles are the actual vehicle for transfer. These results extend our understanding of the important role of bacteriophage in the horizontal transfer and evolution of genomic islands in S. aureus. PMID:26953931

  19. Colonization of nursing professionals by Staphylococcus aureus La colonización de los profesionales de enfermería por Staphylococcus aureus A colonização dos profissionais de enfermagem por Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josely Pinto de Moura

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the presence of Staphylococcus aureus in the saliva of the nursing team of a teaching hospital in the interior of São Paulo State. Three saliva samples were collected from 351 individuals with an interval of two months between each collection. All ethical aspects were considered. In 867 (82.3% cultures there was no identification of Staphylococcus aureus in the saliva, in 88 (17.7% cultures Staphylococcus aureus was isolated, 26 (2.5% of which were resistant to methicillin. The prevalence of professionals colonized by Staphylococcus aureus was 41.0% (144/351, of which 7.1% (25/351 were characterized as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Transient carriers represented 81.2% and persistent carriers 18.8%. Resistance to mupirocin was 73.1% of MRSA and 9.3% of MSSA. The results demonstrate that it is the nurse and nursing technician that are the professional categories most susceptible to MRSA. Broader discussion on the thematic and interventions are needed.Se trata de un estudio transversal que tuvo como objetivo investigar la presencia de Staphylococcus aureus en la saliva del equipo de enfermería de un hospital escuela del interior del estado de Sao Paulo. Fueron recolectadas tres muestras de saliva de 351 individuos con intervalo de dos meses. Todos los aspectos éticos fueron contemplados. En 867 (82,3% culturas no hubo identificación de Staphylococcus aureus en la saliva, en 88 (17,7% culturas fue aislado Staphylococcus aureus, siendo 26 (2,5% resistentes a la meticilina. La prevalencia de profesionales colonizados por Staphylococcus aureus fue de 41,0% (144/351, de los cuales 7,1% (25/351 fueron caracterizados como Staphylococcus aureus resistentes a la meticilina. Los portadores transitorios representaron 81,2% y los persistentes 18,8%. La resistencia a la mupirocina fue de 73,1% entre los resistentes a la meticilina y 9,3% en los sensibles a la meticilina. Los resultados

  20. Staphylococcus aureus detection in the mouth of housekeepers Detección de Staphylococcus aureus en la boca de trabajadores de la limpieza hospitalaria Detecção de Staphylococcus aureus na boca de trabalhadores da limpeza hospitalar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Drehmer de Almeida Cruz

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the prevalence of colonization by Staphylococcus aureus in hospital housekeepers, and their knowledge and beliefs regarding this problem. Three saliva samples were collected and a questionnaire regarding knowledge and beliefs was applied. Of the 92 workers, 63 (68.5% participated in the study; 20 were not and 43 were colonized; 13 by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and 30 by methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Persistent carrier status of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was detected in 15.4% of cases. Low knowledge and perception of occupational risk were observed. The mouth was identified as an important reservoir of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Analyzing knowledge and beliefs, as well as the state of carrier, is an important strategy to be added to educational actions for the prevention of workers' colonization.Este estudio evaluó la prevalencia de la colonización por Staphylococcus aureus en trabajadores de limpieza hospitalaria, y su conocimiento y creencias acerca de la problemática. Fueron recolectadas tres muestras de saliva y aplicado un cuestionario referente al conocimiento y creencias. De 92 trabajadores, 63 (68,5% participaron del estudio; 20 se presentaron no colonizados y 43 colonizados; 13 para Staphylococcus aureus resistente a la meticilina y 30 para Staphylococcus aureus sensibles a la meticilina. El estado de portador persistente por Staphylococcus aureus resistente a la meticilina fue detectado en 15,4% de los casos. Bajo conocimiento y percepción del riesgo ocupacional fueron observados. La boca fue identificada como importante reservatorio de Staphylococcus aureus resistente a la meticilina. Analizar el conocimiento y creencias juntamente con la investigación del estado de portador es una importante estrategia a ser agregada a las acciones educativas para la prevención de la colonización de trabajadores.Este estudo avaliou a prevalência da coloniza

  1. Preoperative Staphylococcus Aureus Screening and Targeted Decolonization in Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Manoj K; Magruder, Jonathan T; Crawford, Todd C; Gardner, Julia M; Duquaine, Damon; Sussman, Marc S; Maragakis, Lisa L; Whitman, Glenn J

    2017-10-01

    We assessed the impact of preoperative Staphylococcus aureus screening and targeted decolonization on the incidence of postoperative methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) colonization, intensive care unit MRSA transmission, and surgical site infections in cardiac surgery patients. We reviewed medical records for all adult patients during two periods: preintervention (January 2007 to April 2010) and intervention (January 2011 to December 2014). In the intervention period, we performed nasal screening for methicillin-sensitive S aureus and MRSA using polymerase chain reaction within 30 days of the operation. Colonized patients received intranasal mupirocin twice daily and chlorhexidine baths daily for 5 days; patients colonized with MRSA also received prophylactic vancomycin plus cefazolin with contact isolation precautions. Nasal surveillance for MRSA was performed on intensive care unit admission and weekly thereafter. Multivariable logistic regression models were constructed to determine risk factors for postoperative MRSA colonization, and surgical site infections and the impact of our screening program was assessed in these models. Poisson regression was used to assess MRSA transmission. Comparing 2,826 preintervention and 4,038 intervention patients, cases differed in age, diabetes mellitus, preoperative infection, preoperative length of stay, and bypass time (all p ≤ 0.03). Intervention patients had risk-adjusted reductions in MRSA colonization (odds ratio 0.53, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.37 to 0.76, p transmission (incidence rate ratio 0.29, 95% CI: 0.13 to 0.65, p = 0.002), and surgical site infections (odds ratio 0.58, 95% CI: 0.40 to 0.86, p = 0.007). Increased duration of preoperative decolonization therapy was associated with decreased postoperative MRSA colonization (odds ratio 0.73, 95% CI: 0.53 to 1.00, p = 0.05). Preoperative S aureus screening with targeted decolonization was associated with reduced MRSA colonization, transmission, and

  2. Monitoring of abdominal Staphylococcus aureus infection using magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromrey, M L; Göhler, A; Friedrich, N

    2017-01-01

    To establish a routine workflow for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of mice infected with bacterial biosafety level 2 pathogens and to generate a mouse model for systemic infection with Staphylococcus aureus suitable for monitoring by MRI. A self-contained acrylic glass animal bed...... visualized using a standard T2-weighted scan. Infection monitoring was performed for each animal by measurements at 1, 3, and 7 days after infection. Intravenous pathogen application led to a dose-dependent decrease in survival probability (p = 0.03). In the group with the highest infectious dose the 7-day...

  3. Epidemic Increase in Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, Henrik; Boye, Kit; Bartels, Mette Damkjær

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We have found an epidemic increase in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Copenhagen. The increase has a complex background and involves hospitals, nursing homes and persons nursed in their own home. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We found 33 MRSA patients in 2003 and 121...... in 2004. All isolates have been spa-typed and epidemiologic information collected. RESULTS: The number of MRSA cases has a doubling time of about six months. The epidemic has been caused by many different MRSA types and 31 staphylococcus protein A genotypes (spa types). MRSA has caused several hospital...

  4. Local circulating clones of Staphylococcus aureus in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita, Jeannete; Barba, Pedro; Ortega-Paredes, David; Mora, Marcelo; Rivadeneira, Sebastián

    The spread of pandemic Staphylococcus aureus clones, mainly methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), must be kept under surveillance to assemble an accurate, local epidemiological analysis. In Ecuador, the prevalence of the USA300 Latin American variant clone (USA300-LV) is well known; however, there is little information about other circulating clones. The aim of this work was to identify the sequence types (ST) using a Multiple-Locus Variable number tandem repeat Analysis 14-locus genotyping approach. We analyzed 132 S. aureus strains that were recovered from 2005 to 2013 and isolated in several clinical settings in Quito, Ecuador. MRSA isolates composed 46.97% (62/132) of the study population. Within MRSA, 37 isolates were related to the USA300-LV clone (ST8-MRSA-IV, Panton-Valentine Leukocidin [PVL] +) and 10 were related to the Brazilian clone (ST239-MRSA-III, PVL-). Additionally, two isolates (ST5-MRSA-II, PVL-) were related to the New York/Japan clone. One isolate was related to the Pediatric clone (ST5-MRSA-IV, PVL-), one isolate (ST45-MRSA-II, PVL-) was related to the USA600 clone, and one (ST22-MRSA-IV, PVL-) was related to the epidemic UK-EMRSA-15 clone. Moreover, the most prevalent MSSA sequence types were ST8 (11 isolates), ST45 (8 isolates), ST30 (8 isolates), ST5 (7 isolates) and ST22 (6 isolates). Additionally, we found one isolate that was related to the livestock associated S. aureus clone ST398. We conclude that in addition to the high prevalence of clone LV-ST8-MRSA-IV, other epidemic clones are circulating in Quito, such as the Brazilian, Pediatric and New York/Japan clones. The USA600 and UK-EMRSA-15 clones, which were not previously described in Ecuador, were also found. Moreover, we found evidence of the presence of the livestock associated clone ST398 in a hospital environment. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthetic peptide inhibitors of DNA replication in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Kjelstrup, Susanne

    F counterselection was developed to directly select for compounds able to disrupt selected interactions. We have subsequently constructed a cyclic peptide library for intracellular synthesis of cyclic peptides using known technology. Several cyclic peptides were able to interfere with oligomerization of Dna......N (), DnaB and DnaX (). Three peptides identified as inhibitors of DnaN have been purified. Two of these peptides inhibited growth as well as DNA replication in S. aureus. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the peptides was approximately 50 g/ml. Overexpression of DnaN reduced the inhibitory...... effect of the peptides confirming the target of the peptides....

  6. Antibacterial activity of alimentary plants against Staphylococcus aureus growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, C; Anesini, C

    1994-01-01

    Alimentary plants were screened for antibacterial activity against a penicillin G resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus. Twenty-five samples of plant material corresponding to 21 species from 13 families were used. Both aqueous and ethanol extracts were obtained from them. Antibacterial activity was determined by the agar-well diffusion method, using cephazolin as a standard antibiotic. Seventeen ethanol extracts were found active. Eugenia caryophyllata (clavo de olor*) flowers, Myristica fragans (nuez moscada*) seeds, Theobroma cacao (cacao*) seed bark, Triticum sp (trigo*) fruit, Zea mays (maíz*) fruit and Piper nigrum (pimienta*) ripe fruit produced some of the more active extracts (* = Argentine vulgar names).

  7. Serious infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Helen; Miller, Loren G; Razonable, Raymund R

    2010-09-15

    Although first identified just >4 decades ago, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has undergone rapid evolutionary changes and epidemiologic expansion to become a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections worldwide. Increasing resistance to vancomycin among MRSA strains in conjunction with availability of new antibiotics, including daptomycin and linezolid, have increased treatment choices but made clinical treatment decisions more challenging. This article describes the clinical features and management issues of 2 challenging-to-treat manifestations of MRSA infection, bacteremia and/or endocarditis and osteomyelitis. It also presents a brief review of community-associated MRSA infections and preventive strategies directed against MRSA.

  8. Typing of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from milk cows ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enfin, le gène de résistance à la méthicil ine a été retrouvé dans 2,75% des souches isolées. L'analyse de l'association entre les gènes de virulence et la présence de mammites subcliniques a montré l'importance des gènes spa, lukD et sej. Une bonne sensibilité de S. aureus a été notée à la plupart des antibiotiques ...

  9. Molecular mechanisms of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, M A; Liñares, J; Martín, R

    1997-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are among the most common nosocomial pathogens. The most significant mechanism of resistance to methicillin in this-species is the acquisition of a genetic determinant (mecA gene). However, resistance seems to have a more complex molecular basis, since additional chromosomal material is involved in such resistance. Besides, overproduction of penicillinase and/or alterations in the PBPs can contribute to the formation of resistance phenotypes. Genetic and environmental factors leading to MRSA are reviewed.

  10. Analisis Cemaran Staphylococcus aureus pada Gelas, Darah Segar, dan Jamu dengan Ramuan Darah Ular Kobra Jawa (Naja sputatrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roza Azizah Primatika

    2017-01-01

    rerata cemaran Staphylococcus aureus menunjukkan tidak ada perbedaan antara swab gelas, darah dan ramuan darah ular kobra. Walaupun demikian, jamu yang mengandung darah ular kobra berpotensi mengandung Staphylococcus aureus yang membahayakan konsumen.

  11. Human-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from a subtropical recreational marine beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reports of Staphylococcus aureus detected in marine environments have occurred since the early 1990’s. This investigation sought to isolate and characterize S. aureus from marine waters and sand at a subtropical recreational beach, with and without bathers present, in order to investigate possible s...

  12. Neonatal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus is not associated with development of atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, L; Halkjaer, L B; Agner, T

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus in atopic skin has been associated with exacerbation of eczema. Objectives To investigate a possible association between neonatal colonization with S. aureus and the risk of atopic dermatitis (AD) during the first 3 years of life. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study...

  13. Inhibition of the ATP Synthase Eliminates the Intrinsic Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus towards Polymyxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Nøhr-Meldgaard, Katrine; Bojer, Martin Saxtorph

    2017-01-01

    , linezolid, daptomycin, and oxacillin were unchanged. ATP synthase activity is known to be inhibited by oligomycin A, and the presence of this compound increased polymyxin B-mediated killing of S. aureus Our results demonstrate that the ATP synthase contributes to intrinsic resistance of S. aureus towards...

  14. Staphylococcus aureus complex from animals and humans in three remote African regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaumburg, Frieder; Pauly, Maude; Anoh, Etile; Mossoun, Arsene; Wiersma, Lidewij; Schubert, Grit; Flammen, Arnaud; Alabi, Abraham S.; Muyembe-Tamfum, Jean-Jacques; Grobusch, Martin P.; Karhemere, Stomy; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Couacy-Hymann, Emmanuel; Kremsner, Peter G.; Mellmann, Alexander; Becker, Karsten; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Peters, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus schweitzeri has been recently considered to be a highly divergent Staphylococcus aureus clade and usually colonises nonhuman primates and bats in sub-Saharan Africa. Its transmissibility to humans remains unclear. We therefore investigated the transmission of S. aureus and S.

  15. High genetic diversity of Staphylococcus aureus strains colonizing patients with epidermolysis bullosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi-Pol, Magdalena M.; Veenstra-Kyuchukova, Yanka K.; Duipmans, Jose C.; Pluister, Gerlinde N.; Schouls, Leo M.; de Neeling, Albert J.; Grundmann, Hajo; Jonkman, Marcel F.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    Patients with the blistering disease, epidermolysis bullosa (EB), frequently suffer from chronic wounds that become colonized by pathogenic bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus. To determine S.similar to aureus colonization rates in patients with EB, swabs were collected from the anterior nares,

  16. Molecular Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Transmitted between Patients with Buruli Ulcer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amissah, Nana Ama; Chlebowicz, Monika A.; Ablordey, Anthony; Sabat, Artur J.; Tetteh, Caitlin S.; Prah, Isaac; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Friedrich, Alex W.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Rossen, John W.; Stienstra, Ymkje

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a skin infection caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The wounds of most BU patients are colonized with different microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus. Methodology This study investigated possible patient-to-patient transmission events of S. aureus during

  17. Killing of Staphylococcus aureus via Magnetic Hyperthermia Mediated by Magnetotactic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changyou; Chen, Linjie; Yi, Yong; Chen, Chuanfang

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common hospital and household pathogen. Given the emergence of antibiotic-resistant derivatives of this pathogen resulting from the use of antibiotics as general treatment, development of alternative therapeutic strategies is urgently needed. Here, we assess the feasibility of killing S. aureus cells in vitro and in vivo through magnetic hyperthermia mediated by magnetotactic bacteria that possess magnetic nanocrystals and demonstrate magnetically steered swimming. The S. aureus suspension was added to magnetotactic MO-1 bacteria either directly or after coating with anti-MO-1 polyclonal antibodies. The suspensions were then subjected to an alternating magnetic field (AMF) for 1 h. S. aureus viability was subsequently assessed through conventional plate counting and flow cytometry. We found that approximately 30% of the S. aureus cells mixed with uncoated MO-1 cells were killed after AMF treatment. Moreover, attachment between the magnetotactic bacteria and S. aureus increased the killing efficiency of hyperthermia to more than 50%. Using mouse models, we demonstrated that magnetic hyperthermia mediated by antibody-coated magnetotactic MO-1 bacteria significantly improved wound healing. These results collectively demonstrated the effective eradication of S. aureus both in vitro and in vivo, indicating the potential of magnetotactic bacterium-mediated magnetic hyperthermia as a treatment for S. aureus-induced skin or wound infections. PMID:26873320

  18. Natural Antibodies in Normal Human Serum Inhibit Staphylococcus aureus Capsular Polysaccharide Vaccine Efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Skurnik, David; Kropec, Andrea; Roux, Damien; Theilacker, Christian; Huebner, Johannes; Pier, Gerald B.

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies to Staphylococcus aureus capsular polysaccharides (CP) and poly-N-acetyl glucosamine (PNAG) antigens interfere in protection. Active immunization of mice failed to overcome interference. Natural nonprotective antibodies to PNAG in normal human serum may prevent effective vaccination against S. aureus CP antigens.

  19. The therapeutic effect of Chlorogenic acid against Staphylococcus aureus infection through Sortase A inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin eWang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and wide spread of multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus requires the development of new therapeutic agents with alternative modes of action. Anti-virulence strategies are hoped to meet that need. Sortase A (SrtA has attracted great interest as a potential drug target to treat infections caused by S. aureus, as many of the surface proteins displayed by SrtA function as virulence factors by mediating bacterial adhesion to specific organ tissues, invasion of host cells, and evasion of the host-immune responses. It has been suggested that inhibitors of SrtA might be promising candidates for the treatment and/or prevention of S. aureus infections. In this study, we report that Chlorogenic acid (CHA, a natural compound that lacks significant anti–S. aureus activity, inhibit the activity of SrtA in vitro (IC50=33.86±5.55μg/ml and the binding of S. aureus to fibrinogen (Fg. Using molecular dynamics simulations and mutagenesis assays, we further demonstrate that CHA binds to the binding sites of C184 and G192 in the SrtA. In vivo studies demonstrated that CHA prevent mice from S. aureus-induced renal abscess, resulting in a significant survival advantage. These findings indicate that CHA is a promising therapeutic compound against SrtA during S. aureus infections.

  20. Direct detection of nasal Staphylococcus aureus carriage via helicase-dependent isothermal amplification and chip hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frech Georges C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Staphylococcus aureus constitutes one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections. One out of every three individuals naturally carries S. aureus in their anterior nares, and nasal carriage is associated with a significantly higher infection rate in hospital settings. Nasal carriage can be either persistent or intermittent, and it is the persistent carriers who, as a group, are at the highest risk of infection and who have the highest nasal S. aureus cell counts. Prophylactic decolonization of S. aureus from patients’ noses is known to reduce the incidence of postsurgical infections, and there is a clear rationale for rapid identification of nasal S. aureus carriers among hospital patients. Findings A molecular diagnostic assay was developed which is based on helicase-dependent target amplification and amplicon detection by chip hybridization to a chip surface, producing a visible readout. Nasal swabs from 70 subjects were used to compare the molecular assay against culturing on “CHROMagar Staph aureus” agar plates. The overall relative sensitivity was 89%, and the relative specificity was 94%. The sensitivity rose to 100% when excluding low-count subjects (S. aureus colony-forming units per swab. Conclusions This molecular assay is much faster than direct culture and has sensitivity that is appropriate for identification of high-count (>100 S. aureus colony-forming units per swab nasal S. aureus carriers who are at greatest risk for nosocomial infections.

  1. Clonal structure of Staphylococcus aureus colonizing children with sickle cell anaemia and healthy controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaumburg, F.; Biallas, B.; Alabi, A. S.; Grobusch, M. P.; Feugap, E. N.; Lell, B.; Mellmann, A.; Peters, G.; Kremsner, P. G.; Becker, K.; Adegnika, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Children with sickle cell anaemia (SCA) might carry hospital-associated bacterial lineages due to frequent hospital stays and antibiotic treatments. In this study we compared Staphylococcus aureus from SCA patients (n=73) and healthy children (n=143) in a cross-sectional study in Gabon. S. aureus

  2. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus causing orbital cellulitis in Australian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaska, Vikram L; Grimwood, Keith; Gole, Glen A; Nimmo, Graeme R; Paterson, David L; Nissen, Michael D

    2011-11-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has only emerged recently as a cause of serious ocular infections in several different countries. At a tertiary pediatric hospital in Brisbane, Australia, community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus orbital cellulitis was first noted in 2009. Since then, it has caused 4 of 9 such infections.

  3. In vitro characterization of representative clinical South African Staphylococcus aureus isolates from various clonal lineages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosthuysen, W F; Orth, H; Lombard, C. J.; Sinha, B; Wasserman, E

    Data concerning the virulence and pathogenesis of South African strains of Staphylococcus aureus are limited. We investigated host-pathogen interactions of randomly selected clinical S. aureus isolates representing various clones. We characterized the ability of isolates to adhere to fibronectin,

  4. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay for the Rapid Detection of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Ting Lim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, is an important human pathogen that produces a variety of toxins and causes a wide range of infections, including soft-tissue infections, bacteremia, and staphylococcal food poisoning. A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay targeting the arcC gene of S. aureus was developed and evaluated with 119 S. aureus and 25 non-S. aureus strains. The usefulness of the assay was compared with the PCR method that targets spa and arcC genes. The optimal temperature for the LAMP assay was 58.5°C with a detection limit of 2.5 ng/μL and 102 CFU/mL when compared to 12.5 ng/μL and 103 CFU/mL for PCR (spa and arcC. Both LAMP and PCR assays were 100% specific, 100% sensitive, 100% positive predictive value (PPV, and 100% negative predictive value (NPV. When tested on 30 spiked blood specimens (21 MRSA, eight non-S. aureus and one negative control, the performance of LAMP and PCR was comparable: 100% specific, 100% sensitive, 100% PPV, and 100% NPV. In conclusion, the LAMP assay was equally specific with a shorter detection time when compared to PCR in the identification of S. aureus. The LAMP assay is a promising alternative method for the rapid identification of S. aureus and could be used in resource-limited laboratories and fields.

  5. Influence of antibiotic pressure on bacterial bioluminescence, with emphasis on Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daghighi, Seyedmojtaba; Sjollema, Jelmer; Harapanahalli, Akshay; Dijkstra, Rene J. B.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is used for longitudinal evaluation of bacteria in live animals. Clear relations exist between bacterial numbers and their bioluminescence. However, bioluminescence images of Staphylococcus aureus Xen29, S. aureus Xen36 and Escherichia coli Xen14 grown on tryptone soy agar in

  6. Systemic Staphylococcus aureus infection mediated by Candida albicans hyphal invasion of mucosal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlecht, L.M.; Peters, B.M.; Krom, B.P.; Freiberg, J.A.; Hänsch, G.M.; Filler, S.G.; Jabra-Rizk, M.A.; Shirtliff, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus are often co-isolated in cases of biofilm-associated infections. C. albicans can cause systemic disease through morphological switch from the rounded yeast to the invasive hyphal form. Alternatively, systemic S. aureus infections arise from seeding through

  7. Nigribactin, a Novel Siderophore from Vibrio nigripulchritudo, Modulates Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Gene Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anita; Månsson, Maria; Wietz, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a serious human pathogen that employs a number of virulence factors as part of its pathogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to explore marine bacteria as a source of compounds that modulate virulence gene expression in S. aureus. During the global marine Galathe...

  8. Host adaptation of bovine Staphylococcus aureus seems associated with bacteriological cure after lactational antimicrobial treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borne, van den B.H.P.; Nielen, M.; Schaik, van G.; Melchior, M.B.; Lam, T.J.G.M.; Zadoks, R.N.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide range of diseases in multiple species. Some sequence types (ST) are observed in a variety of hosts, whereas other strains are mainly associated with bovine mastitis, suggesting host adaptation. We propose that host adaptation of Staph. aureus may influence

  9. Inhibitory effects of flavonoids on biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus that overexpresses efflux protein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Laênia Angélica Andrade; Dos Santos Rodrigues, Jéssica Bezerra; Magnani, Marciane; de Souza, Evandro Leite; de Siqueira-Júnior, José P

    2017-06-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of glycone (myricitrin, hesperidin and phloridzin) and aglycone flavonoids (myricetin, hesperetin and phloretin) in inhibiting biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus RN4220 and S. aureus SA1199B that overexpress the msrA and norA efflux protein genes, respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC 50 - defined as the lowest concentration that resulted in ≥50% inhibition of biofilm formation) of flavonoids were determined using microdilution in broth procedures. The flavonoids showed MIC >1024 μg/mL against S. aureus RN4220 and S. aureus SA1199B; however, these compounds at lower concentrations (1-256 μg/mL) showed inhibitory effects on biofilm formation by these strains. Aglycone flavonoids showed lower MBIC 50 values than their respective glycone forms. The lowest MBIC 50 values (1 and 4 μg/mL) were observed against S. aureus RN4220. Myricetin, hesperetin and phloretin exhibited biofilm formation inhibition >70% for S. aureus RN4220, and lower biofilm formation inhibition against S. aureus SA1199B. These results indicate that sub-MICs of the tested flavonoids inhibit biofilm formation by S. aureus strains that overexpress efflux protein genes. These effects are more strongly established by aglycone flavonoids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Future challenges and treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia with emphasis on MRSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Fowler, Vance G; Skov, Robert

    2011-01-01

    . Compounding this problem is the growing prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and the dwindling efficacy of vancomycin, long the treatment of choice for this pathogen. Despite the recent availability of several new antibiotics for S. aureus, new strategies for treatment and prevention...

  11. Mupirocin prophylaxis against nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus infections in nonsurgical patients: a randomized study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wertheim, H.F.; Vos, A.M.C.; Ott, A.; Voss, A.; Kluytmans, J.A.J.W.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C.M.; Meester, M.; Keulen, P.H. van; Verbrugh, H.A.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage is a major risk factor for nosocomial S. aureus infection. Studies show that intranasal mupirocin can prevent nosocomial surgical site infections. No data are available on the efficacy of mupirocin in nonsurgical patients. OBJECTIVE: To assess the

  12. Mupirocin prophylaxis against nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus infections in nonsurgical patients: a randomized study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wertheim, Heiman F. L.; Vos, Margreet C.; Ott, Alewijn; Voss, Andreas; Kluytmans, Jan A. J. W.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Meester, Marlene H. M.; van Keulen, Peter H. J.; Verbrugh, Henri A.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage is a major risk factor for nosocomial S. aureus infection. Studies show that intranasal mupirocin can prevent nosocomial surgical site infections. No data are available on the efficacy of mupirocin in nonsurgical patients. OBJECTIVE: To assess the

  13. Antibacterial activity of some commonly used food commodities against escherichia coli, salmonella typhi and staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, A.; Ansari, A.

    2009-01-01

    The activity of commonly used spices and salt, sugar and pickles against Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi and staphlococcus aureus was tested. The antibacterial activity was found to be in descending order like coriander>pickles>salt and sugar>clove>black pepper>red chilli against S. typhi and garlic>clove>onion>ginger against S. aureus. (author)

  14. The adhesive and immunomodulating properties of the multifunctional Staphylococcus aureus protein Eap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harraghy, Niamh; Hussain, Muzaffar; Haggar, Axana; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Sinha, Bhanu; Herrmann, Mathias; Flock, Jan-Ingmar

    2003-01-01

    Adherence of Staphylococcus aureus to the host tissue is an important step in the initiation of pathogenesis. At least 10 adhesins produced by S. aureus have been described and it is becoming clear that the expression of these adhesins and their interactions with eukaryotic cells involve complex

  15. Nosocomial Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterimia among Nasal Carriers of Methicillin- Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pujol (Miquel); C. Pena; R. Pallares (Roman); J. Ariza (Javier); J. Ayats (Josefina); M.A. Dominguez; F. Gudiol (Francesc)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractObjectives To determine the relevance of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus, either methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) or methicillinresistant (MRSA), as a risk factor for the development of nosocomial S aureus bacteremia during an MRSA outbreak. patients and methods: In this prospective

  16. The molecular evolution of hospital- and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurenberg, Ruud H; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause a wide variety of infections, ranging from minor skin infections to post-operative wound infections. Its adaptive power to antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in the beginning of the 1960s. Resistance to methicillin and

  17. Patients with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Infection – 21st Century Lepers

    OpenAIRE

    Mozzillo, Kristin L.; Ortiz, Nancy; Miller, Loren G.

    2010-01-01

    In the recent past, there has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, especially community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) infections. Many media descriptions of MRSA are sensational and focus on its potential for severe disease and contagiousness.

  18. Subinhibitory concentrations of punicalagin reduces expression of virulence-related exoproteins by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Su-Hyun; Kong, Ryong; Seo, Yun-Soo; Zhou, Tian; Kang, Ok-Hwa; Shin, Dong-Won; Kwon, Dong-Yeul

    2016-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces a number of virulence factors. The major virulence factors exhibited by S aureus include various antigens, enzymes, cytotoxins and exotoxins (e.g. hemolysins, enterotoxins and toxic shock syndrome toxin). In this report, we show the influence of punicalagin on the secretion of exoprotein from S aureus by western blotting, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) release assay and quantitative RT-PCR. When added to S aureus cultures at an OD600 of 0.9, graded subinhibitory concentrations of punicalagin reduced the production of α-toxin, SEA and SEB in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a dose-dependent manner. Consistently, punicalagin reduced TNF-inducing activity by S aureus culture supernatants. Here, the transcriptional level of agr (accessory gene regulator) in S aureus was inhibited by punicalagin, suggesting that the reduced transcription may affect the secretion of exotoxins. These findings suggest that the expression of α-toxin and enterotoxins in S aureus is sensitive to the action of punicalagin, which may be an advantageous candidate in the treatment of toxigenic staphylococcal disease. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Requirement of the agr Locus for Colony Spreading of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsompanidou, Eleni; Sibbald, Mark J. J. B.; Chlebowicz, Monika A.; Dreisbach, Annette; Back, Jaap Willem; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Buist, Girbe; Denham, Emma L.

    The important human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is known to spread on soft agar plates. Here, we show that colony spreading of S. aureus involves the agr quorum-sensing system. This finding can be related to the agr-dependent expression of biosurfactants, such as phenol-soluble modulins,

  20. Development of a Standard Test to Assess the Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Cells to Disinfectants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luppens, S.B.I.; Reij, M.W.; Heijden, van der R.W.; Rombouts, F.M.; Abee, T.

    2002-01-01

    A standardized disinfectant test for Staphylococcus aureus cells in biofilms was developed. Two disinfectants, the membrane-active compound benzalkonium chloride (BAC) and the oxidizing agent sodium hypochlorite, were used to evaluate the biofilm test. S. aureus formed biofilms on glass, stainless

  1. A systematic review and meta-analysis on Staphylococcus aureus carriage in psoriasis, acne and rosacea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Totté (Joan); W.T. van der Feltz; L.G.M. Bode (Lonneke); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); E.J. Van Zuuren; S.G.M.A. Pasmans (Suzanne)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractStaphylococcus aureus might amplify symptoms in chronic inflammatory skin diseases. This study evaluates skin and mucosal colonization with S. aureus in patients with psoriasis, acne and rosacea. A systematic literature search was conducted. Both odds ratios (OR) for colonization in

  2. Occurrence and distribution of Staphylococcus aureus lineages among zoo animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gongora, Carmen Espinosa; Chrobak, Dorota; Moodley, Arshnee

    2012-01-01

    the occurrence and genotypic diversity of S. aureus in a range of animal species kept at the Copenhagen Zoo. We sampled 146 animals belonging to 25 mammalian species and 21 reptiles belonging to six species. A total of 59 S. aureus isolates were found in 10 of the 25 mammalian species tested. All isolates were...

  3. Non-spa-typeable clinical Staphylococcus aureus strains are naturally occurring protein A mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baum, Cathrin; Haslinger-Löffler, Bettina; Westh, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen responsible for increasing the prevalence of community- and hospital-acquired infections. Protein A (SpA) is a key virulence factor of S. aureus and is highly conserved. Sequencing of the variable-number tandem-repeat region of SpA (spa typing) prov...

  4. Topography of Distinct Staphylococcus aureus Types in Chronic Wounds of Patients with Epidermolysis Bullosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooi-Pol, Magdalena M.; Sadaghian Sadabad, Mehdi; Duipmans, Jose C.; Sabat, Artur J.; Stobernack, Tim; Omansen, Till F.; Westerhout-Pluister, Gerlinde N.; Jonkman, Marcel F.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2013-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is known to interfere with wound healing and represents a significant risk factor for wound infections and invasive disease. It is generally assumed that one individual is predominantly colonized by one S. aureus type. Nevertheless, patients with the

  5. Killing of Staphylococcus aureus via Magnetic Hyperthermia Mediated by Magnetotactic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changyou; Chen, Linjie; Yi, Yong; Chen, Chuanfang; Wu, Long-Fei; Song, Tao

    2016-02-12

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common hospital and household pathogen. Given the emergence of antibiotic-resistant derivatives of this pathogen resulting from the use of antibiotics as general treatment, development of alternative therapeutic strategies is urgently needed. Here, we assess the feasibility of killing S. aureus cells in vitro and in vivo through magnetic hyperthermia mediated by magnetotactic bacteria that possess magnetic nanocrystals and demonstrate magnetically steered swimming. The S. aureus suspension was added to magnetotactic MO-1 bacteria either directly or after coating with anti-MO-1 polyclonal antibodies. The suspensions were then subjected to an alternating magnetic field (AMF) for 1 h. S. aureus viability was subsequently assessed through conventional plate counting and flow cytometry. We found that approximately 30% of the S. aureus cells mixed with uncoated MO-1 cells were killed after AMF treatment. Moreover, attachment between the magnetotactic bacteria and S. aureus increased the killing efficiency of hyperthermia to more than 50%. Using mouse models, we demonstrated that magnetic hyperthermia mediated by antibody-coated magnetotactic MO-1 bacteria significantly improved wound healing. These results collectively demonstrated the effective eradication of S. aureus both in vitro and in vivo, indicating the potential of magnetotactic bacterium-mediated magnetic hyperthermia as a treatment for S. aureus-induced skin or wound infections. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Brown (Aisling F.); A.G. Murphy (Alison G.); S.J. Lalor (Stephen J.); J.M. Leech (John M.); K.M. O’Keeffe (Kate M.); M. Mac Aogáin (Micheál); D.P. O’Halloran (Dara P.); K.A. Lacey (Keenan A.); M. Tavakol (Mehri); C.H. Hearnden (Claire H.); D. Fitzgerald-Hughes (Deirdre); H. Humphreys (Hilary); J.P. Fennell (Jérôme P.); W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem); T.J. Foster (Timothy J.); J.A. Geoghegan (Joan A.); E.C. Lavelle (Ed C.); T.R. Rogers (Thomas R.); R.M. McLoughlin (Rachel M.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we

  7. Triple-acting antimicrobial treatment for drug-resistant and intracellular Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multi-drug resistant bacteria are a persistent problem in modern health care, food safety and animal health. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over-used conventional antibiotics. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a notorious pathogen for both animal and human health with multi-d...

  8. Draft genome sequences of 14 Staphylococcus aureus ST5 isolates from California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcus aureus is a bacteria that can cause disease in humans and animals. S. aureus bacteria can transfer or exchange segments of genetic material with other bacteria. These segments are known as mobile genetic elements and in some instances they can encode for factors that increase the abil...

  9. Complete genome sequences of two Staphylococcus aureus ST5 isolates from California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcus aureus is a bacteria that can cause disease in humans and animals. S. aureus bacteria can transfer or exchange segments of genetic material with other bacteria. These segments are known as mobile genetic elements and in some instances they can encode for factors that increase the abil...

  10. Targeting Staphylococcus aureus Toxins: A Potential form of Anti-Virulence Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Cin; Neoh, Hui-min; Nathan, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen and the leading cause of a wide range of severe clinical infections. The range of diseases reflects the diversity of virulence factors produced by this pathogen. To establish an infection in the host, S. aureus expresses an inclusive set of virulence factors such as toxins, enzymes, adhesins, and other surface proteins that allow the pathogen to survive under extreme conditions and are essential for the bacteria’s ability to spread through tissues. Expression and secretion of this array of toxins and enzymes are tightly controlled by a number of regulatory systems. S. aureus is also notorious for its ability to resist the arsenal of currently available antibiotics and dissemination of various multidrug-resistant S. aureus clones limits therapeutic options for a S. aureus infection. Recently, the development of anti-virulence therapeutics that neutralize S. aureus toxins or block the pathways that regulate toxin production has shown potential in thwarting the bacteria’s acquisition of antibiotic resistance. In this review, we provide insights into the regulation of S. aureus toxin production and potential anti-virulence strategies that target S. aureus toxins. PMID:26999200

  11. Physicochemical characterization of Staphylococcus aureus-lysing LysK enzyme in complexes with polycationic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcus aureus causes many serious visceral, skin, and respiratory diseases. About 90% of clinical strains are multi-drug resistant, but the use of bacteriophage lytic enzymes offers a viable alternative to antibiotic therapy. LysK, the phage K endolysin can lyse S. aureus when purified and ...

  12. High genetic diversity among community-associated Staphylococcus aureus in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolo, Joana; Miragaia, Maria; Turlej-Rogacka, Agata

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have addressed the epidemiology of community-associated Staphylococcus aureus (CA-SA) in Europe; nonetheless, a comprehensive perspective remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to describe the population structure of CA-SA and to shed light on the origin of methicillin-resistant S....... aureus (MRSA) in this continent....

  13. The complex biology and contribution of Staphylococcus aureus in atopic dermatitis, current and future therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, L; Hijnen, D J; Sellman, B R; Mustelin, T; Sleeman, M A; May, R D; Strickland, I

    2017-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex, chronic inflammatory skin disorder affecting more than 10% of U.K. children and is a major cause of occupation-related disability. A subset of patients, particularly those with severe AD, are persistently colonized with Staphylococcus aureus and exacerbation of disease is commonly associated with this bacterium by virtue of increased inflammation and allergic sensitization, aggravated by skin barrier defects. Understanding the complex biology of S. aureus is an important factor when developing new drugs to combat infection. Staphylococcus aureus generates exoproteins that enable invasion and dissemination within the host skin but can also damage the skin and activate the host immune system. Antibiotics are often used by dermatologists to aid clearance of S. aureus; however, these are becoming less effective and chronic usage is discouraged with the emergence of multiple antibiotic-resistant strains. New ways to target S. aureus using monoclonal antibodies and vaccines are now being developed. This review will attempt to evaluate the key biology of S. aureus, current treatment of S. aureus infections in AD and recent advances in developing new anti-S. aureus therapies that have potential in severe AD. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  14. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in community-acquired pyoderma in children in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umashankar Nagaraju

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: MRSA in community-acquired pyoderma in children was 6.5% and nasal colonization with S. aureus was 59.7% in our study. High resistance to commonly used antimicrobials in methicillin-sensitive S. aureus was also observed. Judicious use of antimicrobials is essential to control the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance.

  15. Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" on Campus: A New Challenge to College Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, H. Richard

    2008-01-01

    As new drugs to control bacterial pathogens are developed, the organisms evolve to survive. "Staphylococcus aureus", a common organism, has steadily developed resistance to antibiotics. For more than 40 years, resistant "S. aureus" presented a formidable problem to hospitalized patients; in the past decade, however, it has begun to appear outside…

  16. Methicillin-resistant and -susceptible Staphylococcus aureus sequence type 398 in pigs and humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belkum, A. van; Melles, D.C.; Peeters, J.K.; Leeuwen, W.B. van; Duijkeren, E. van; Huijsdens, X.W.; Spalburg, E.; Neeling, A.J. de; Verbrugh, H.A.

    2008-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus sequence type 398 (ST398 MRSA) was identified in Dutch pigs and pig farmers. ST398 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus circulates among humans at low frequency (0.2%) but was isolated in 3 human cases of bacteremia (2.1%; p = 0.026). Although its natural

  17. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus": Considerations for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aniltta; Letizia, MariJo

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) is a disease-causing organism that has been present in hospital settings since the 1960s. However, a genetically distinct strain of MRSA, called community-acquired methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA), has emerged in recent years in community settings among healthy…

  18. Carriage frequency, diversity and methicillin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus in Danish small ruminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Jacob; Gongora, Carmen Espinosa; Stamphøj, Inga

    2013-01-01

    The ecology of Staphylococcus aureus in animals has recently gained attention by the research community due to the emergence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA). We investigated carriage frequency and clonal diversity of S. aureus in 179 sheep and 17 goats in Denmark using...

  19. Emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in different animal species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuny, Christiane; Friedrich, Alexander; Kozytska, Svetlana; Layer, Franziska; Nübel, Ulrich; Ohlsen, Knut; Strommenger, Birgit; Walther, Birgit; Wieler, Lothar; Witte, Wolfgang

    The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in animals such as horses, pet animals and productive livestock has raised questions of a probable human origin and in more general of host specificity of S. aureus. Particular clonal lineages are obviously specific for humans (e.g.

  20. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Associated with Food Poisoning in Shenzhen, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, Xiaomei; Wang, Bing; Tao, Xiaoxia; Hu, Qinghua; Cui, Zhigang; Zhang, Jianzhong; Lin, Yiman; You, Yuanhai; Shi, Xiaolu; Grundmann, Hajo

    To characterize isolates of Staphylococcus aureus that were associated with staphylococcal food poisoning between 2006 and 2009 in Shenzhen, Southern China, a total of 52 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from 11 outbreaks were analyzed by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, and