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Sample records for aureus biofilm formation

  1. Aspartate inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hang; Wang, Mengyue; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation renders Staphylococcus aureus highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and host defenses. Four D-amino acids (D-Leu, D-Met, D-Trp and D-Tyr) have been reported to be able to inhibit biofilm formation and disassemble established S. aureus biofilms. We report here for the first time that both D- and L-isoforms of aspartate (Asp) inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation on tissue culture plates. Similar biofilm inhibition effects were also observed against other staphylococcal strains, including S. saprophyticus, S. equorum, S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus. It was found that Asp at high concentrations (>10 mM) inhibited the growth of planktonic N315 cells, but at subinhibitory concentrations decreased the cellular metabolic activity without influencing cell growth. The decreased cellular metabolic activity might be the reason for the production of less protein and DNA in the matrix of the biofilms formed in the presence of Asp. However, varied inhibition efficacies of Asp were observed for biofilms formed by clinical staphylococcal isolates. There might be mechanisms other than decreasing the metabolic activity, e.g. the biofilm phenotypes, affecting biofilm formation in the presence of Asp.

  2. Aspartate inhibits Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hang; Wang, Mengyue; Yu, Junping; Wei, Hongping

    2015-04-01

    Biofilm formation renders Staphylococcus aureus highly resistant to conventional antibiotics and host defenses. Four D-amino acids (D-Leu, D-Met, D-Trp and D-Tyr) have been reported to be able to inhibit biofilm formation and disassemble established S. aureus biofilms. We report here for the first time that both D- and L-isoforms of aspartate (Asp) inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation on tissue culture plates. Similar biofilm inhibition effects were also observed against other staphylococcal strains, including S. saprophyticus, S. equorum, S. chromogenes and S. haemolyticus. It was found that Asp at high concentrations (>10 mM) inhibited the growth of planktonic N315 cells, but at subinhibitory concentrations decreased the cellular metabolic activity without influencing cell growth. The decreased cellular metabolic activity might be the reason for the production of less protein and DNA in the matrix of the biofilms formed in the presence of Asp. However, varied inhibition efficacies of Asp were observed for biofilms formed by clinical staphylococcal isolates. There might be mechanisms other than decreasing the metabolic activity, e.g. the biofilm phenotypes, affecting biofilm formation in the presence of Asp. PMID:25687923

  3. Investigation of biofilm formation in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Cassat, James E; Smeltzer, Mark S; Lee, Chia Y

    2014-01-01

    Invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are often characterized by recalcitrance to antimicrobial therapy, which is a function not only of widespread antimicrobial resistance among clinical isolates, but also the capacity to form biofilms. Biofilms consist of ordered populations of bacterial colonies encased in a polysaccharide and/or proteinaceous matrix. This unique physiologic adaptation limits penetration of antimicrobial molecules and innate immune effectors to the infectious focus, increasing the likelihood of treatment failure and progression to chronic infection. Investigation of mechanisms of biofilm formation and dispersal, as well as the physiologic adaptations to the biofilm lifestyle, is therefore critical to developing new therapies to combat MRSA infections. In this chapter, we describe two in vitro methods for the investigation of staphylococcal biofilm formation, a microtiter plate-based assay of biofilm formation under static conditions and a flow cell-based assay of biofilm formation under fluid shear. We also detail an in vivo murine model of catheter-associated biofilm formation that is amenable to imaging and microbiologic analyses. Special consideration is given to the conditions necessary to support biofilm formation by clinical isolates of S. aureus. PMID:24085698

  4. Nanoscale Plasma Coating Inhibits Formation of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm.

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    Xu, Yuanxi; Jones, John E; Yu, Haiqing; Yu, Qingsong; Christensen, Gordon D; Chen, Meng; Sun, Hongmin

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus commonly infects medical implants or devices, with devastating consequences for the patient. The infection begins with bacterial attachment to the device, followed by bacterial multiplication over the surface of the device, generating an adherent sheet of bacteria known as a biofilm. Biofilms resist antimicrobial therapy and promote persistent infection, making management difficult to futile. Infections might be prevented by engineering the surface of the device to discourage bacterial attachment and multiplication; however, progress in this area has been limited. We have developed a novel nanoscale plasma coating technology to inhibit the formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. We used monomeric trimethylsilane (TMS) and oxygen to coat the surfaces of silicone rubber, a material often used in the fabrication of implantable medical devices. By quantitative and qualitative analysis, the TMS/O2 coating significantly decreased the in vitro formation of S. aureus biofilms; it also significantly decreased in vivo biofilm formation in a mouse model of foreign-body infection. Further analysis demonstrated TMS/O2 coating significantly changed the protein adsorption, which could lead to reduced bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. These results suggest that TMS/O2 coating can be used to effectively prevent medical implant-related infections.

  5. Staphylokinase Control of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and Detachment Through Host Plasminogen Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiecinski, Jakub; Peetermans, Marijke; Liesenborghs, Laurens; Na, Manli; Björnsdottir, Halla; Zhu, Xuefeng; Jacobsson, Gunnar; Johansson, Bengt R; Geoghegan, Joan A; Foster, Timothy J; Josefsson, Elisabet; Bylund, Johan; Verhamme, Peter; Jin, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, a leading cause of persistent infections, are highly resistant to immune defenses and antimicrobial therapies. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of fibrin and staphylokinase (Sak) to biofilm formation. In both clinical S. aureus isolates and laboratory strains, high Sak-producing strains formed less biofilm than strains that lacked Sak, suggesting that Sak prevents biofilm formation. In addition, Sak induced detachment of mature biofilms. This effect depended on plasminogen activation by Sak. Host-derived fibrin, the main substrate cleaved by Sak-activated plasminogen, was a major component of biofilm matrix, and dissolution of this fibrin scaffold greatly increased susceptibility of biofilms to antibiotics and neutrophil phagocytosis. Sak also attenuated biofilm-associated catheter infections in mouse models. In conclusion, our results reveal a novel role for Sak-induced plasminogen activation that prevents S. aureus biofilm formation and induces detachment of existing biofilms through proteolytic cleavage of biofilm matrix components.

  6. Alpha-Toxin Promotes Mucosal Biofilm Formation by Staphylococcus aureus

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    Michele J Anderson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus causes numerous diseases in humans ranging from the mild skin infections to serious, life-threatening, superantigen-mediated Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS. S. aureus may also be asymptomatically carried in the anterior nares, vagina or on the skin, which serve as reservoirs for infection. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis clonal type USA200 is the most widely disseminated colonizer and a major cause of TSS. Our prior studies indicated that α-toxin was a major epithelial proinflammatory exotoxin produced by TSS S. aureus USA200 isolates. It also facilitated the penetration of TSS Toxin-1 (TSST-1 across vaginal mucosa. However, the majority of menstrual TSS isolates produce low α-toxin due to a nonsense point mutation at codon 113, designated hly, suggesting mucosal adaptation. The aim of this study was to characterize the differences between TSS USA200 strains [high (hla+ and low (hly+ α-toxin producers] in their abilities to infect and disrupt vaginal mucosal tissue. A mucosal model was developed using ex vivo porcine vaginal mucosa, LIVE/DEAD® staining and confocal microscropy to characterize biofilm formation and tissue viability of TSS USA 200 isolates CDC587 and MN8, which contain the α-toxin pseudogene (hly, MNPE (hla+ and MNPE isogenic hla knockout (hlaKO. All TSS strains grew to similar bacterial densities (1-5 x 108 CFU on the mucosa and were proinflammatory over 3 days. However, MNPE formed biofilms with significant reductions in the mucosal viability whereas neither CDC587, MN8 (hly+, or MNPE hlaKO, formed biofilms and were less cytotoxic. The addition of exogenous, purified α-toxin to MNPE hlaKO restored the biofilm phenotype. Our studies suggest α-toxin affects S. aureus phenotypic growth on vaginal mucosa, by promoting tissue disruption and biofilm formation; and α–toxin mutants (hly are not benign colonizers, but rather form a different type of infection, which we have termed high density pathogenic

  7. Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus isolates from skin and soft tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiecinski, Jakub; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Jin, Tao

    2015-05-01

    Many diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus are associated with biofilm formation. However, the ability of S. aureus isolates from skin and soft tissue infections to form biofilms has not yet been investigated. We tested 160 isolates from patients with various skin infections for biofilm-forming capacity in different growth media. All the isolates formed biofilms, the extent of which depended on the type of growth medium. The thickest biofilms were formed when both plasma and glucose were present in the broth; in this case, S. aureus incorporated host fibrin into the biofilm's matrix. There were no differences in the biofilm formation between isolates from different types of skin infections, except for a particularly good biofilm formation by isolates from diabetic wounds and a weaker biofilm formation by isolates from impetigo. In conclusion, biofilm formation is a universal behavior of S. aureus isolates from skin infections. In some cases, such as in diabetic wounds, a particularly strong biofilm formation most likely contributes to the chronic and recurrent character of the infection. Additionally, as S. aureus apparently uses host fibrin as part of the biofilm structure, we suggest that plasma should be included more frequently in in vitro biofilm studies.

  8. Extracellular DNA facilitates the formation of functional amyloids in Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

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    Schwartz, Kelly; Ganesan, Mahesh; Payne, David E; Solomon, Michael J; Boles, Blaise R

    2016-01-01

    Persistent staphylococcal infections often involve surface-associated communities called biofilms. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm development is mediated by the co-ordinated production of the biofilm matrix, which can be composed of polysaccharides, extracellular DNA (eDNA) and proteins including amyloid fibers. The nature of the interactions between matrix components, and how these interactions contribute to the formation of matrix, remain unclear. Here we show that the presence of eDNA in S. aureus biofilms promotes the formation of amyloid fibers. Conditions or mutants that do not generate eDNA result in lack of amyloids during biofilm growth despite the amyloidogeneic subunits, phenol soluble modulin peptides, being produced. In vitro studies revealed that the presence of DNA promotes amyloid formation by PSM peptides. Thus, this work exposes a previously unacknowledged interaction between biofilm matrix components that furthers our understanding of functional amyloid formation and S. aureus biofilm biology.

  9. Effect of Biosynthesized Silver Nanoparticles on Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Quenching and Prevention of Biofilm Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pratik R. Chaudhari∗; Shalaka A. Masurkar; Vrishali B. Shidore; Suresh P. Kamble

    2012-01-01

    The development of green experimental processes for the synthesis of nanoparticles is a need in the field of nanotechnology. The synthesis of silver nanoparticles was achieved using Bacillus cereus supernatant and 1 mM silver nitrate. 100 mM glucose was found to quicken the rate of reaction of silver nanoparticles synthesis. UV-visible spectrophotometric analysis was carried out to assess the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The synthesized silver nanoparticles were further characterized by using Nanoparticle Tracking Analyzer (NTA), Transmission Electron Microscope and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectra. These silver nanoparticles showed enhanced quorum quenching activity against Staphylococcus aureus biofilm and prevention of biofilm formation which can be seen under inverted microscope (40 X). The synergistic effect of silver nanoparticles along with antibiotics in biofilm quenching was found to be effective. In the near future, silver nanoparticles could be used in the treatment of infections caused by highly antibiotic resistant biofilm.

  10. A coverslip-based technique for evaluating Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on human plasma

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    Jennifer N Walker

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability of the opportunistic pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, to form biofilms is increasingly being viewed as an important contributor to chronic infections. In vitro methods for analyzing S. aureus biofilm formation have focused on bacterial attachment and accumulation on abiotic surfaces, such as in microtiter plate and flow cell assays. Microtiter plates provide a rapid measure of relative biomass levels, while flow cells have limited experimental throughput but are superior for confocal microscopy biofilm visualization. Although these assays have proven effective at identifying mechanisms involved in cell attachment and biofilm accumulation, the significance of these assays in vivo remains unclear. Studies have shown that when medical devices are implanted they are coated with host factors, such as matrix proteins, that facilitate S. aureus attachment and biofilm formation. To address the challenge of integrating existing biofilm assay features with a biotic surface, we have established an in vitro biofilm technique utilizing UV-sterilized coverslips coated with human plasma. The substratum more closely resembles the in vivo state and provides a platform for S. aureus to establish a robust biofilm. Importantly, these coverslips are amenable to confocal microscopy imaging to provide a visual reference of the biofilm growth stage, effectively merging the benefits of the microtiter and flow cell assays. We confirmed the approach using clinical S. aureus isolates and mutants with known biofilm phenotypes. Altogether, this new biofilm assay can be used to assess the function of S. aureus virulence factors associated with biofilm formation and for monitoring the efficacy of biofilm treatment modalities.

  11. Filaments in curved flow: Rapid formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm streamers

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    Kim, Min Young; Drescher, Knut; Pak, On Shun; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated conglomerates of bacteria that are highly resistant to antibiotics. These bacterial communities can cause chronic infections in humans by colonizing, for example, medical implants, heart valves, or lungs. Staphylococcus aureus, a notorious human pathogen, causes some of the most common biofilm-related infections. Despite the clinical importance of S. aureus biofilms, it remains mostly unknown how physical effects, in particular flow, and surface structure influence biofilm dynamics. Here we use model microfluidic systems to investigate how environmental factors, such as surface geometry, surface chemistry, and fluid flow affect biofilm development in S. aureus.We discovered that S. aureus rapidly forms flow-induced, filamentous biofilm streamers, and furthermore if surfaces are coated with human blood plasma, streamers appear within minutes and clog the channels more rapidly than if the channels are uncoated. To understand how biofilm streamer filaments reorient in curved flow to bridge the distances between corners, we developed a mathematical model based on resistive force theory and slender filaments. Understanding physical aspects of biofilm formation in S. aureus may lead to new approaches for interrupting biofilm formation of this pathogen.

  12. Filaments in curved streamlines: rapid formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm streamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minyoung Kevin; Drescher, Knut; Pak, On Shun; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-06-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated conglomerates of bacteria that are highly resistant to antibiotics. These bacterial communities can cause chronic infections in humans by colonizing, for example, medical implants, heart valves, or lungs. Staphylococcus aureus, a notorious human pathogen, causes some of the most common biofilm-related infections. Despite the clinical importance of S. aureus biofilms, it remains mostly unknown how physical effects, in particular flow, and surface structure influence biofilm dynamics. Here we use model microfluidic systems to investigate how environmental factors, such as surface geometry, surface chemistry, and fluid flow affect biofilm development of S. aureus. We discovered that S. aureus rapidly forms flow-induced, filamentous biofilm streamers, and furthermore if surfaces are coated with human blood plasma, streamers appear within minutes and clog the channels more rapidly than if the channels are uncoated. To understand how biofilm streamer filaments reorient in flows with curved streamlines to bridge the distances between corners, we developed a mathematical model based on resistive force theory of slender filaments. Understanding physical aspects of biofilm formation of S. aureus may lead to new approaches for interrupting biofilm formation of this pathogen.

  13. Nuclease modulates biofilm formation in community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Megan R Kiedrowski

    Full Text Available Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA is an emerging contributor to biofilm-related infections. We recently reported that strains lacking sigma factor B (sigB in the USA300 lineage of CA-MRSA are unable to develop a biofilm. Interestingly, when spent media from a USA300 sigB mutant was incubated with other S. aureus strains, biofilm formation was inhibited. Following fractionation and mass spectrometry analysis, the major anti-biofilm factor identified in the spent media was secreted thermonuclease (Nuc. Considering reports that extracellular DNA (eDNA is an important component of the biofilm matrix, we investigated the regulation and role of Nuc in USA300. The expression of the nuc gene was increased in a sigB mutant, repressed by glucose supplementation, and was unaffected by the agr quorum-sensing system. A FRET assay for Nuc activity was developed and confirmed the regulatory results. A USA300 nuc mutant was constructed and displayed an enhanced biofilm-forming capacity, and the nuc mutant also accumulated more high molecular weight eDNA than the WT and regulatory mutant strains. Inactivation of nuc in the USA300 sigB mutant background partially repaired the sigB biofilm-negative phenotype, suggesting that nuc expression contributes to the inability of the mutant to form biofilm. To test the generality of the nuc mutant biofilm phenotypes, the mutation was introduced into other S. aureus genetic backgrounds and similar increases in biofilm formation were observed. Finally, using multiple S. aureus strains and regulatory mutants, an inverse correlation between Nuc activity and biofilm formation was demonstrated. Altogether, our findings confirm the important role for eDNA in the S. aureus biofilm matrix and indicates Nuc is a regulator of biofilm formation.

  14. Biofilm Formation in Staphylococcus Aureus and its Relation to Phenotypic and Genotypic Criteria

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    Hasannejad Bibalan, M. (MSc

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Biofilm is a complex microbial community embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix. We aimed to study the extent of biofilm formation by S. Areas isolates and its relation to some phenotypic and genotypic criteria. Material and Methods: One hundred-fifty strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from Gorgan were studied. Microtiter plate assay method was used for investigation of biofilm formation.The biofilm formation of strains were recorded and its relation to accessory gene regulator (agr and antibiotic resistance were assessed by X2 test. Results: Eighty-four isolates (56% were able to form biofilm. The strength of biofilm formation in agr group I was more than that of other groups. The biofilm formation among S. Areas isolated from the wound and urine (both with 75 % had the highest capability. Methicillin-resistant isolates had a greater ability to biofilm formation. Conclusion: Methicillin resistant isolates had a greater ability to biofilm formation. Given the importance and treatment related problems of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA especially Community Acquired-Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (CA-MRSA, it is a necessity to control or remove the biofilm formation alongside antibiotic treatment.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus autoinducer-2 quorum sensing decreases biofilm formation in an icaR-dependent manner

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    Yu Dan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen that causes biofilm-associated infection in humans. Autoinducer 2 (AI-2, a quorum-sensing (QS signal for interspecies communication, has a wide range of regulatory functions in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, but its exact role in biofilm formation in S. aureus remains unclear. Results Here we demonstrate that mutation of the AI-2 synthase gene luxS in S. aureus RN6390B results in increased biofilm formation compared with the wild-type (WT strain under static, flowing and anaerobic conditions and in a mouse model. Addition of the chemically synthesized AI-2 precursor in the luxS mutation strain (ΔluxS restored the WT phenotype. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that AI-2 activated the transcription of icaR, a repressor of the ica operon, and subsequently a decreased level of icaA transcription, which was presumably the main reason why luxS mutation influences biofilm formation. Furthermore, we compared the roles of the agr-mediated QS system and the LuxS/AI-2 QS system in the regulation of biofilm formation using the ΔluxS strain, RN6911 and the Δagr ΔluxS strain. Our data indicate a cumulative effect of the two QS systems on the regulation of biofilm formation in S. aureus. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that AI-2 can decrease biofilm formation in S. aureus via an icaR-activation pathway. This study may provide clues for therapy in S. aureus biofilm-associated infection.

  16. Detection of Intracellular Adhesion (ica Gene and Biofilm Formation Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Clinical Blood Cultures

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    Mohsen Mirzaee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In fact the biofilms are composed of bacterial cells living inmulticellular structures such as tissues and organs embedded within a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS. Ability to attach and biofilm formation are the most important virulence factors Staphylococcus aureus isolates. The aims of this study were to detect intracellular adhesion (ica locus and its relation to the biofilm formation phenotype in clinical isolates of S. aureus isolated from bloodcultures.Methods: A total of 31 clinical S. aureus isolates were collected from Loghman Hospital of Tehran, Iran. In vitro biofilm formation ability was determined by microliter tissue culture plates. All clinical isolates were examined for determination the ica locus by using PCR method.Results: Twelve (38.7% of the isolates were strong biofilm producers. The results showed that 18(80.6% of the isolates carried icaD gene, whereas the prevalence of icaA, icaB and icaC were 51.6%, 45.1% and 77.4% respectively.Conclusions: S. aureus clinical isolates have different ability to form biofilm. This may be caused by the differences in the expression of biofilm related genes, genetic make-up and physiological conditions.

  17. Effect of biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm quenching and prevention of biofilm formation.

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    Masurkar, S A; Chaudhari, P R; Shidore, V B; Kamble, S P

    2012-09-01

    The development of green experimental processes for the synthesis of nanoparticles is a need in the field of nanotechnology. In the present study, the authors reported rapid synthesis of silver nanoparticles using fresh leaves extract of Cymbopogan citratus (lemongrass) with increased stability. The synthesised silver nanoparticles were found to be stable for several months. UV-visible spectrophotometric analysis was carried out to assess the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The synthesised silver nanoparticles were further characterised by using nanoparticle tracking analyser (NTA), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectra (EDX). The NTA results showed that the mean size was found to be 32 nm. Silver nanoparticles with controlled size and shape were observed under TEM micrograph. The EDX of the nanoparticles confirmed the presence of elemental silver. These silver nanoparticles showed enhanced quorum quenching activity against Staphylococcus aureus biofilm and prevention of biofilm formation which can be seen under inverted microscope (40X). In the near future, silver nanoparticles synthesised using green methods may be used in the treatment of infections caused by a highly antibiotic resistant biofilm.

  18. Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and Invasion into Human Epithelial Cells

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    Monnappa, Ajay K.; Dwidar, Mohammed; Seo, Jeong Kon; Hur, Jin-Hoe; Mitchell, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100 is a predatory bacterium that attacks many Gram-negative human pathogens. A serious drawback of this strain, however, is its ineffectiveness against Gram-positive strains, such as the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Here we demonstrate that the extracellular proteases produced by a host-independent B. bacteriovorus (HIB) effectively degrade/inhibit the formation of S. aureus biofilms and reduce its virulence. A 10% addition of HIB supernatant caused a 75% or greater reduction in S. aureus biofilm formation as well as 75% dispersal of pre-formed biofilms. LC-MS-MS analyses identified various B. bacteriovorus proteases within the supernatant, including the serine proteases Bd2269 and Bd2321. Tests with AEBSF confirmed that serine proteases were active in the supernatant and that they impacted S. aureus biofilm formation. The supernatant also possessed a slight DNAse activity. Furthermore, treatment of planktonic S. aureus with the supernatant diminished its ability to invade MCF-10a epithelial cells by 5-fold but did not affect the MCF-10a viability. In conclusion, this study illustrates the hitherto unknown ability of B. bacteriovorus to disperse Gram-positive pathogenic biofilms and mitigate their virulence.

  19. Baicalein Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and the Quorum Sensing System In Vitro

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    Wang, Ke; Hou, Changchun; Cai, Shuangqi; Huang, Yingying; Du, Zhongye; Huang, Hong; Kong, Jinliang; Chen, Yiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formed by Staphylococcus aureus significantly enhances antibiotic resistance by inhibiting the penetration of antibiotics, resulting in an increasingly serious situation. This study aimed to assess whether baicalein can prevent Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation and whether it may have synergistic bactericidal effects with antibiotics in vitro. To do this, we used a clinically isolated strain of Staphylococcus aureus 17546 (t037) for biofilm formation. Virulence factors were detected following treatment with baicalein, and the molecular mechanism of its antibiofilm activity was studied. Plate counting, crystal violet staining, and fluorescence microscopy revealed that 32 μg/mL and 64 μg/mL baicalein clearly inhibited 3- and 7-day biofilm formation in vitro. Moreover, colony forming unit count, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy showed that vancomycin (VCM) and baicalein generally enhanced destruction of biofilms, while VCM alone did not. Western blotting and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses (RTQ-PCR) confirmed that baicalein treatment reduced staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) and α-hemolysin (hla) levels. Most strikingly, real-time qualitative polymerase chain reaction data demonstrated that 32 μg/mL and 64 μg/mL baicalein downregulated the quorum-sensing system regulators agrA, RNAIII, and sarA, and gene expression of ica, but 16 μg/mL baicalein had no effect. In summary, baicalein inhibited Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation, destroyed biofilms, increased the permeability of vancomycin, reduced the production of staphylococcal enterotoxin A and α-hemolysin, and inhibited the quorum sensing system. These results support baicalein as a novel drug candidate and an effective treatment strategy for Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-associated infections. PMID:27128436

  20. Baicalein Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and the Quorum Sensing System In Vitro.

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    Yan Chen

    Full Text Available Biofilm formed by Staphylococcus aureus significantly enhances antibiotic resistance by inhibiting the penetration of antibiotics, resulting in an increasingly serious situation. This study aimed to assess whether baicalein can prevent Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation and whether it may have synergistic bactericidal effects with antibiotics in vitro. To do this, we used a clinically isolated strain of Staphylococcus aureus 17546 (t037 for biofilm formation. Virulence factors were detected following treatment with baicalein, and the molecular mechanism of its antibiofilm activity was studied. Plate counting, crystal violet staining, and fluorescence microscopy revealed that 32 μg/mL and 64 μg/mL baicalein clearly inhibited 3- and 7-day biofilm formation in vitro. Moreover, colony forming unit count, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy showed that vancomycin (VCM and baicalein generally enhanced destruction of biofilms, while VCM alone did not. Western blotting and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses (RTQ-PCR confirmed that baicalein treatment reduced staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA and α-hemolysin (hla levels. Most strikingly, real-time qualitative polymerase chain reaction data demonstrated that 32 μg/mL and 64 μg/mL baicalein downregulated the quorum-sensing system regulators agrA, RNAIII, and sarA, and gene expression of ica, but 16 μg/mL baicalein had no effect. In summary, baicalein inhibited Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation, destroyed biofilms, increased the permeability of vancomycin, reduced the production of staphylococcal enterotoxin A and α-hemolysin, and inhibited the quorum sensing system. These results support baicalein as a novel drug candidate and an effective treatment strategy for Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-associated infections.

  1. Baicalein Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and the Quorum Sensing System In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Liu, Tangjuan; Wang, Ke; Hou, Changchun; Cai, Shuangqi; Huang, Yingying; Du, Zhongye; Huang, Hong; Kong, Jinliang; Chen, Yiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formed by Staphylococcus aureus significantly enhances antibiotic resistance by inhibiting the penetration of antibiotics, resulting in an increasingly serious situation. This study aimed to assess whether baicalein can prevent Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation and whether it may have synergistic bactericidal effects with antibiotics in vitro. To do this, we used a clinically isolated strain of Staphylococcus aureus 17546 (t037) for biofilm formation. Virulence factors were detected following treatment with baicalein, and the molecular mechanism of its antibiofilm activity was studied. Plate counting, crystal violet staining, and fluorescence microscopy revealed that 32 μg/mL and 64 μg/mL baicalein clearly inhibited 3- and 7-day biofilm formation in vitro. Moreover, colony forming unit count, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy showed that vancomycin (VCM) and baicalein generally enhanced destruction of biofilms, while VCM alone did not. Western blotting and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses (RTQ-PCR) confirmed that baicalein treatment reduced staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) and α-hemolysin (hla) levels. Most strikingly, real-time qualitative polymerase chain reaction data demonstrated that 32 μg/mL and 64 μg/mL baicalein downregulated the quorum-sensing system regulators agrA, RNAIII, and sarA, and gene expression of ica, but 16 μg/mL baicalein had no effect. In summary, baicalein inhibited Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation, destroyed biofilms, increased the permeability of vancomycin, reduced the production of staphylococcal enterotoxin A and α-hemolysin, and inhibited the quorum sensing system. These results support baicalein as a novel drug candidate and an effective treatment strategy for Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-associated infections. PMID:27128436

  2. Gentamicin release from polymethylmethacrylate bone cements and Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Belt, H; Neut, D; Schenk, W; van Horn, [No Value; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    2000-01-01

    We measured the formation of a Staphylococcus aureus biofilm in vitro on unloaded and gentamicin-loaded bone cements (CMW3 and Palaces R) and related the formation to antibiotic release rates. All experiments were done in triplicate. Microbial growth on gentamicin-loaded cements occurred despite the

  3. Biofilm formation on tympanostomy tubes depends on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus genetic lineage.

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    Jotić, Ana; Božić, Dragana D; Milovanović, Jovica; Pavlović, Bojan; Ješić, Snežana; Pelemiš, Mijomir; Novaković, Marko; Ćirković, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation has been implicated in the high incidence of persistent otorrhoea after tympanostomy tube insertion. The aim of the study was to investigate whether biofilm formation on tympanostomy tubes depends on the genetic profile of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. Capacity of biofilm formation on fluoroplastic tympanostomy tubes (TTs) was tested on 30 MRSA strains. Identification and methicillin resistance were confirmed by PCR for nuc and mecA genes. Strains were genotypically characterised (SCCmec, agr and spa typing). Biofilm formation was tested in microtiter plate and on TTs. Tested MRSA strains were classified into SCCmec type I (36.7 %), III (23.3 %), IV (26.7 %) and V (13.3 %), agr type I (50 %), II (36.7 %) and III (13.3 %), and 5 clonal complexes (CCs). All tested MRSA strains showed ability to form biofilm on microtiter plate. Capacity of biofilm formation on TTs was as following: 13.3 % of strains belonged to the category of no biofilm producers, 50 % to the category of weak biofilm producers and 36.7 % to moderate biofilm producers. There was a statistically significant difference between CC, SCCmec and agr types and the category of biofilm production on TTs tubes (p biofilm, and CC8 and agrI type with a low amount of biofilm. Biofilm formation by MRSA on TTs is highly dependent on genetic characteristics of the strains. Therefore, MRSA genotyping may aid the determination of the possibility of biofilm-related post-tympanostomy tube otorrhea.

  4. SarA positively controls bap-dependent biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus.

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    Trotonda, María Pilar; Manna, Adhar C; Cheung, Ambrose L; Lasa, Iñigo; Penadés, José R

    2005-08-01

    The biofilm-associated protein Bap is a staphylococcal surface protein involved in biofilm formation. We investigated the influence of the global regulatory locus sarA on bap expression and Bap-dependent biofilm formation in three unrelated Staphylococcus aureus strains. The results showed that Bap-dependent biofilm formation was diminished in the sarA mutants by an agr-independent mechanism. Complementation studies using a sarA clone confirmed that the defect in biofilm formation was due to the sarA mutation. As expected, the diminished capacity to form biofilms in the sarA mutants correlated with the decreased presence of Bap in the bacterial surface. Using transcriptional fusion and Northern analysis data, we demonstrated that the sarA gene product acts as an activator of bap expression. Finally, the bap promoter was characterized and the transcriptional start point was mapped by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique. As expected, we showed that purified SarA protein binds specifically to the bap promoter, as determined by gel shift and DNase I footprinting assays. Based on the previous studies of others as well as our work demonstrating the role for SarA in icaADBC and bap expression, we propose that SarA is an essential regulator controlling biofilm formation in S. aureus.

  5. Inhibition of Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation with a class of TAGE-triazole conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huigens, Robert W; Rogers, Steven A; Steinhauer, Andrew T; Melander, Christian

    2009-02-21

    A chemically diverse library of TAGE-triazole conjugates was synthesized utilizing click chemistry on the TAGE scaffold. This library of small molecules was screened for anti-biofilm activity and found to possess the ability of inhibiting biofilm formation against Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. One such compound in this library demonstrated the most potent inhibitory effect against Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation that has been displayed by any 2-aminoimidazole derivative. PMID:19194596

  6. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on different gentamicin-loaded polymethylmethacrylate bone cements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Belt, H; Neut, D; Schenk, W; van Horn, [No Value; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ

    2001-01-01

    In this in vitro study, the formation of a Staphylococcus aureus biofilm on six gentamicin-loaded bone cements (CMW1, CMW3, CMW Endurance, CMW2000, Palacos. and Palamed) was determined in a modified Robbins device over a 3 days time span and related with previously (Van de Belt et al., Biomaterials

  7. Effect of negative pressure on growth, secretion and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tongtong; Wang, Guoqi; Yin, Peng; Li, Zhirui; Zhang, Licheng; Liu, Jianheng; Li, Ming; Zhang, Lihai; Han, Li; Tang, Peifu

    2015-10-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has gained popularity in the management of contaminated wounds as an effective physical therapy, although its influence on the bacteria in the wounds remains unclear. In this study, we attempted to explore the effect of negative pressure conditions on Staphylococcus aureus, the most frequently isolated pathogen during wound infection. S. aureus was cultured in Luria-Bertani medium at subatmospheric pressure of -125 mmHg for 24 h, with the bacteria grown at ambient pressure as the control. The application of negative pressure was found to slow down the growth rate and inhibit biofilm development of S. aureus, which was confirmed by static biofilm assays. Furthermore, decreases in the total amount of virulence factors and biofilm components were observed, including α-hemolysin, extracellular adherence protein, polysaccharide intercellular adhesin and extracellular DNA. With quantitative RT-PCR analysis, we also revealed a significant inhibition in the transcription of virulence and regulatory genes related to wound infections and bacterial biofilms. Together, these findings indicated that negative pressure could inhibit the growth, virulence and biofilm formation of S. aureus. A topical subatmospheric pressure condition, such as NPWT, may be a potential antivirulence and antibiofilm strategy in the field of wound care. PMID:26272011

  8. Characterization of the effect of serum and chelating agents on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation; chelating agents augment biofilm formation through clumping factor B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Nabil Mathew

    Staphylococcus aureus is the causative agent of a diverse array of acute and chronic infections, and some these infections, including infective endocarditis, joint infections, and medical device-associated bloodstream infections, depend upon its capacity to form tenacious biofilms on surfaces. Inserted medical devices such as intravenous catheters, pacemakers, and artificial heart valves save lives, but unfortunately, they can also serve as a substrate on which S. aureus can form a biofilm, attributing S. aureus as a leading cause of medical device-related infections. The major aim of this work was take compounds to which S. aureus would be exposed during infection and to investigate their effects on its capacity to form a biofilm. More specifically, the project investigated the effects of serum, and thereafter of catheter lock solutions on biofilm formation by S. aureus. Pre-coating polystyrene with serum is frequently used as a method to augment biofilm formation. The effect of pre-coating with serum is due to the deposition of extracellular matrix components onto the polystyrene, which are then recognized by MSCRAMMs. We therefore hypothesized that the major component of blood, serum, would induce biofilm formation. Surprisingly, serum actually inhibited biofilm formation. The inhibitory activity was due to a small molecular weight, heat-stable, non-proteinaceous component/s of serum. Serum-mediated inhibition of biofilm formation may represent a previously uncharacterized aspect of host innate immunity that targets the expression of a key bacterial virulence factor: the ability to establish a resistant biofilm. Metal ion chelators like sodium citrate are frequently chosen to lock intravenous catheters because they are regarded as potent inhibitors of bacterial biofilm formation and viability. We found that, while chelating compounds abolished biofilm formation in most strains of S. aureus, they actually augmented the phenotype in a subset of strains. We

  9. Novel application for the prevention and treatment of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traba, Christian

    Formation of bacterial biofilms at solid-liquid interfaces creates numerous problems in both industrial and biomedical sciences. In this dissertation, the application of plasma from two very different facets was studied. In part one, the susceptibility of pre-formed Staphylococcus aureus biofilms on biomaterials to different plasmas was investigated. It was found that the distinct chemical/physical properties of plasmas generated from oxygen, nitrogen, and argon all demonstrated very potent but very different anti-biofilm mechanisms of action. An in depth analysis of these results show: 1) different reactive species produced in each plasma demonstrate specific activity, and 2) the commonly associated etching effect could be manipulated and even controlled, depending on experimental conditions and the discharge gas. These studies provide insights into the anti-biofilm mechanisms of plasma as well as the effects of different reactive species on biofilm inactivation. Under experimental parameters, bacterial cells in Staphylococcus aureus biofilms were killed (>99.9%) by plasmas within minutes of exposure and no bacteria nor biofilm re-growth from discharge gas treated biofilms was observed throughout the life-span of the re-growth experiment. The decontamination ability of plasmas for the treatment of biofilm related infections on biomedical materials was confirmed and novel applications involving the use of low power argon and oxygen for the treatment of biofilm contaminated biomaterials and indwelling devices is proposed. The second facet of this dissertation explores the interaction between biofilm forming Staphylococcus aureus bacteria on different antibacterial/anti-biofilm surfaces. The antibiotic-free anti-fouling surfaces constructed in this study were generated from the plasma-assisted graft polymerization technique. These sophisticated surfaces were stable, biocompatible and capable of preventing biofilm formation on biomaterials and medical devices. Under

  10. Reducing Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on stainless steel 316L using functionalized self-assembled monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruszewski, Kristen M., E-mail: kruszewskik@duq.edu [Duquesne University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States); Nistico, Laura, E-mail: lnistico@wpahs.org [Allegheny General Hospital, Center for Genomic Sciences, Allegheny-Singer Research Institute, 320 East North Avenue, 11th floor, South Tower, Pittsburgh, PA 15212 (United States); Longwell, Mark J., E-mail: mlongwel@wpahs.org [Allegheny General Hospital, Center for Genomic Sciences, Allegheny-Singer Research Institute, 320 East North Avenue, 11th floor, South Tower, Pittsburgh, PA 15212 (United States); Hynes, Matthew J., E-mail: mjhynes@go.wustl.edu [Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Chemistry, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Maurer, Joshua A., E-mail: maurer@wustl.edu [Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Chemistry, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Hall-Stoodley, Luanne, E-mail: L.Hall-Stoodley@soton.ac.uk [Southampton Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Facility/NIHR Respiratory BRU, University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, Tremona Road, Southampton, Hampshire SO16 6YD (United Kingdom); Gawalt, Ellen S., E-mail: gawalte@duq.edu [Duquesne University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, 600 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Stainless steel 316L (SS316L) is a common material used in orthopedic implants. Bacterial colonization of the surface and subsequent biofilm development can lead to refractory infection of the implant. Since the greatest risk of infection occurs perioperatively, strategies that reduce bacterial adhesion during this time are important. As a strategy to limit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on SS316L, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used to modify the SS316L surface. SAMs with long alkyl chains terminated with hydrophobic (− CH{sub 3}) or hydrophilic (oligoethylene glycol) tail groups were used to form coatings and in an orthogonal approach, SAMs were used to immobilize gentamicin or vancomycin on SS316L for the first time to form an “active” antimicrobial coating to inhibit early biofilm development. Modified SS316L surfaces were characterized using surface infrared spectroscopy, contact angles, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy. The ability of SAM-modified SS316L to retard biofilm development by Staphylococcus aureus was functionally tested using confocal scanning laser microscopy with COMSTAT image analysis, scanning electron microscopy and colony forming unit analysis. Neither hydrophobic nor hydrophilic SAMs reduced biofilm development. However, gentamicin-linked and vancomycin-linked SAMs significantly reduced S. aureus biofilm formation for up to 24 and 48 h, respectively. - Highlights: ► SS316L was modified with glycol terminated SAMs in order to reduce biofilm growth. ► Antibiotics gentamicin and vancomycin were immobilized on SS316L via SAMs. ► Only the antibiotic modifications reduced biofilm development on SS316L.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA Growth and Biofilm Formation after Treatment with Antibiotics and SeNPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristyna Cihalova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a dangerous pathogen resistant to β-lactam antibiotics. Due to its resistance, it is difficult to manage the infections caused by this strain. We examined this issue in terms of observation of the growth properties and ability to form biofilms in sensitive S. aureus and MRSA after the application of antibiotics (ATBs—ampicillin, oxacillin and penicillin—and complexes of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs with these ATBs. The results suggest the strong inhibition effect of SeNPs in complexes with conventional ATBs. Using the impedance method, a higher disruption of biofilms was observed after the application of ATB complexes with SeNPs compared to the group exposed to ATBs without SeNPs. The biofilm formation was intensely inhibited (up to 99% ± 7% for S. aureus and up to 94% ± 4% for MRSA after application of SeNPs in comparison with bacteria without antibacterial compounds whereas ATBs without SeNPs inhibited S. aureus up to 79% ± 5% and MRSA up to 16% ± 2% only. The obtained results provide a basis for the use of SeNPs as a tool for the treatment of bacterial infections, which can be complicated because of increasing resistance of bacteria to conventional ATB drugs.

  12. Anti-biofilm formation of a novel stainless steel against Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nan, Li; Yang, Ke [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Ren, Guogang, E-mail: g.g.ren@herts.ac.uk [University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium frequently found proliferating on metal surfaces such as stainless steels used in healthcare and food processing facilities. Past research has shown that a novel Cu-bearing 304 type stainless steel (304CuSS) exhibits excellent antibacterial ability (i.e. against S. aureus) in a short time period (24 h.). This work was dedicated to investigate the 304CuSS's inhibition ability towards the S. aureus biofilm formation for an extended period of 7 days after incubation. It was found that the antibacterial rate of the 304CuSS against sessile bacterial cells reached over 99.9% in comparison with the 304SS. The thickness and sizes of the biofilms on the 304SS surfaces increased markedly with period of contact, and thus expected higher risk of bio-contamination, indicated by the changes of surface free energy between biofilm and the steel surfaces. The results demonstrated that the 304CuSS exhibited strong inhibition on the growth and adherence of the biofilms. The surface free energy of the 304CuSS after contact with sessile bacterial cells was much lower than that of the 304SS towards the same culture times. The continuously dissolved Cu{sup 2+} ions well demonstrated the dissolution ability of Cu-rich precipitates after exposure to S. aureus solution, from 3.1 ppm (2 days) to 4.5 ppm (7 days). For this to occur, a hypothesis mechanism might be established for 304CuSS in which the Cu{sup 2+} ions were released from Cu-rich phases that bond with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of the microorganisms. And these inhibited the activities of cell protein/enzymes and effectively prevented planktonic bacterial cells attaching to the 304CuSS metal surface.

  13. Anti-biofilm formation of a novel stainless steel against Staphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium frequently found proliferating on metal surfaces such as stainless steels used in healthcare and food processing facilities. Past research has shown that a novel Cu-bearing 304 type stainless steel (304CuSS) exhibits excellent antibacterial ability (i.e. against S. aureus) in a short time period (24 h.). This work was dedicated to investigate the 304CuSS's inhibition ability towards the S. aureus biofilm formation for an extended period of 7 days after incubation. It was found that the antibacterial rate of the 304CuSS against sessile bacterial cells reached over 99.9% in comparison with the 304SS. The thickness and sizes of the biofilms on the 304SS surfaces increased markedly with period of contact, and thus expected higher risk of bio-contamination, indicated by the changes of surface free energy between biofilm and the steel surfaces. The results demonstrated that the 304CuSS exhibited strong inhibition on the growth and adherence of the biofilms. The surface free energy of the 304CuSS after contact with sessile bacterial cells was much lower than that of the 304SS towards the same culture times. The continuously dissolved Cu2+ ions well demonstrated the dissolution ability of Cu-rich precipitates after exposure to S. aureus solution, from 3.1 ppm (2 days) to 4.5 ppm (7 days). For this to occur, a hypothesis mechanism might be established for 304CuSS in which the Cu2+ ions were released from Cu-rich phases that bond with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of the microorganisms. And these inhibited the activities of cell protein/enzymes and effectively prevented planktonic bacterial cells attaching to the 304CuSS metal surface

  14. Characterization of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase from Staphylococcus aureus ATCC12600 and its involvement in biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yeswanth

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Staphylococcus aureus purine metabolism plays a crucial role in the formation of biofilm which is a key pathogenic factor. The present study is aimed in the characterization of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH from Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 12600. Methods: IMPDH gene was amplified using primers designed from IMPDH gene sequence of S. aureus reported in the database. Then polymerase chain reaction (PCR product was cloned in the Sma I site of M13mp18 and expressed in Escherichia coli JM109. The recombinant IMPDH (rIMPDH was overexpressed with 1 mM isopropyl beta-D-1- thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG; Michaelis constant (Km, maximum enzyme velocity (Vmax and catalytic constant (Kcat of expressed IMPDH were determined. Results: The enzyme kinetics of IMPDH grown under aerobic conditions showed a Km of 43.71±1.56 µM, Vmax of 0.247±0.84/µM/mg/min and Kcat of 2.74±0.015/min while in anaerobic conditions the kinetics showed Km of 42.81±3.154/ µM, Vmax of 0.378±0.036 µM/mg/min and Kcat of 4.78±0.021 /min, indicating elevated levels of IMPDH activity under anaerobic conditions. Three-folds increased activity in the presence of 1 mM adenosine triphosphate (ATP correlated with biofilm formation. The kinetics of pure rIMPDH were close to the native IMPDH of S. aureus ATCC12600 and the enzyme showed single band in sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a molecular weight of 53 KDa. Conclusions: Elevated activity of IMPDH was observed in S. aureus grown under anaerobic conditions and this was correlated with the biofilm formation indicating the linkage between purine metabolism and pathogenesis.

  15. Presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa influences biofilm formation and surface protein expression of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Ting, Yen Peng

    2015-11-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa can individually colonize and infect their hosts, the commensalistic effect of the two is more tenacious and lethal. In this study, it was shown that in co-culture with P. aeruginosa, a sub-population of S. aureus exhibited improved resistance to kanamycin by selection of small colony variant (SCV) phenotype. Additionally, biofilm formation by the two bacteria was denser in the co-culture, compared with biofilm formed in individual pure cultures. Using Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) force spectroscopy for single cells, it was demonstrated that S. aureus cultured in the presence of P. aeruginosa bound more tenaciously to substrates. Surface-shaved peptides were isolated and identified using ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight and a homology search program spider. Results indicated that serine-rich adhesin, extracellular matrix binding protein and other putative adhesion proteins could be responsible for the enhanced attachment of S. aureus in the co-culture. Besides, several other proteins were differentially expressed, indicating the occurrence of a range of other interactions. Of particular interest was a multidrug resistant protein named ABC transporter permease which is known to expel xenobiotics out of the cells. Positive regulation of this protein could be involved in the SCV selection of S. aureus in the co-culture. PMID:25925222

  16. Novel inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus virulence gene expression and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibao Ma

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen and one of the more prominent pathogens causing biofilm related infections in clinic. Antibiotic resistance in S. aureus such as methicillin resistance is approaching an epidemic level. Antibiotic resistance is widespread among major human pathogens and poses a serious problem for public health. Conventional antibiotics are either bacteriostatic or bacteriocidal, leading to strong selection for antibiotic resistant pathogens. An alternative approach of inhibiting pathogen virulence without inhibiting bacterial growth may minimize the selection pressure for resistance. In previous studies, we identified a chemical series of low molecular weight compounds capable of inhibiting group A streptococcus virulence following this alternative anti-microbial approach. In the current study, we demonstrated that two analogs of this class of novel anti-virulence compounds also inhibited virulence gene expression of S. aureus and exhibited an inhibitory effect on S. aureus biofilm formation. This class of anti-virulence compounds could be a starting point for development of novel anti-microbial agents against S. aureus.

  17. Biofilm formation and genotyping of Staphylococcus aureus bovine mastitis isolates: Evidence for lack of penicillin-resistance in Agr-type II strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melchior, M.B.; Osch, M.H.J.; Graat, R.; Duijkeren, van E.; Mevius, D.J.; Nielen, M.; Gaastra, W.; Fink, J.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing evidence for a role of biofilm formation in bovine mastitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus led to further investigations on biofilm formation by S. aureus isolates from mastitis in two growth media (TSBg and bovine milk serum). The ability of 99 S. aureus strains that were recently i

  18. Biofilm formation and genotyping of Staphylococcus aureus bovine mastitis isolates: evidence for lack of penicillin-resistance in Agr-type II strains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melchior, M.B.; van Osch, M.H.J.; Graat, R.M.; van Duijkeren, E.; Mevius, D.J.; Nielen, M.; Gaastra, W.; Fink-Gremmels, J.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing evidence for a role of biofilm formation in bovine mastitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus led to further investigations on biofilm formation by S. aureus isolates from mastitis in two growth media (TSBg and bovine milk serum). The ability of 99 S. aureus strains that were recently i

  19. Staphylococcus aureus sarA regulates inflammation and colonization during central nervous system biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica N Snowden

    Full Text Available Infection is a frequent and serious complication following the treatment of hydrocephalus with CSF shunts, with limited therapeutic options because of biofilm formation along the catheter surface. Here we evaluated the possibility that the sarA regulatory locus engenders S. aureus more resistant to immune recognition in the central nervous system (CNS based on its reported ability to regulate biofilm formation. We utilized our established model of CNS catheter-associated infection, similar to CSF shunt infections seen in humans, to compare the kinetics of bacterial titers, cytokine production and inflammatory cell influx elicited by wild type S. aureus versus an isogenic sarA mutant. The sarA mutant was more rapidly cleared from infected catheters compared to its isogenic wild type strain. Consistent with this finding, several pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-17, CXCL1, and IL-1β were significantly increased in the brain following infection with the sarA mutant versus wild type S. aureus, in agreement with the fact that the sarA mutant displayed impaired biofilm growth and favored a planktonic state. Neutrophil influx into the infected hemisphere was also increased in the animals infected with the sarA mutant compared to wild type bacteria. These changes were not attributable to extracellular protease activity, which is increased in the context of SarA mutation, since similar responses were observed between sarA and a sarA/protease mutant. Overall, these results demonstrate that sarA plays an important role in attenuating the inflammatory response during staphylococcal biofilm infection in the CNS via a mechanism that remains to be determined.

  20. High Glucose Concentration Promotes Vancomycin-Enhanced Biofilm Formation of Vancomycin-Non-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus in Diabetic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Yu Hsu

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that vancomycin treatment increased acquisition of eDNA and enhanced biofilm formation of drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus through a cidA-mediated autolysis mechanism. Recently we found that such enhancement became more significant under a higher glucose concentration in vitro. We propose that besides improper antibiotic treatment, increased glucose concentration environment in diabetic animals may further enhance biofilm formation of drug-resistant S. aureus. To address this question, the diabetic mouse model infected by vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA was used under vancomycin treatment. The capacity to form biofilms was evaluated through a catheter-associated biofilm assay. A 10- and 1000-fold increase in biofilm-bound bacterial colony forming units was observed in samples from diabetic mice without and with vancomycin treatment, respectively, compared to healthy mice. By contrast, in the absence of glucose vancomycin reduced propensity to form biofilms in vitro through the increased production of proteases and DNases from VRSA. Our study highlights the potentially important role of increased glucose concentration in enhancing biofilm formation in vancomycin-treated diabetic mice infected by drug-resistant S. aureus.

  1. In vitro biofilm formation by methicillin susceptible and resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from cystic fibrosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta Lambiase

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common pathogens isolated from respiratory tracts of Cystic Fibrosis patients (CF. The infection by this pathogen starts in early infancy, often preceding chronic infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The infection and colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are, by then, events very frequent among CF patients and this bacterial isolation leads to complications in therapeutic management because of the limited treatment options. Strains of Staphylococcus aureus are able to produce biofilms on natural or synthetic surfaces. Biofilms are sophisticated communities of matrix-encased bacteria and infections by biofilm-producing bacteria are particularly problematic because sessile bacteria can often withstand host immune responses and are generally much more tolerant to antibiotics. The first aim of this work is to evaluate the ability of MRSA strains isolated from respiratory secretions of CF patients to develop biofilms in comparison with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA strains obtained from respiratory secretions of CF patients.Therefore, our second aim is to evaluate the environmental influence on this ability. To evaluate the development of biofilm on solid matrix and the possible environmental influence,we applied the method described by Christensen et al. We found that a significantly higher number of MRSA strains were biofilm positive compared with MSSA strains (p<0.05.The presence of glucose did not influence the ability to form biofilm in our MRSA strains (p=0.165. MSSA strains are not strong biofilm-producers, but, when grown in TSB added with 0.25% glucose, the number of biofilm-forming strains increases, as expected. These data suggest a possible association between methicillin-resistance and biofilm formation.

  2. Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus from food contact surfaces in a meat-based broth and sensitivity to sanitizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Leite de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the capacity of adhesion, the detachment kinetic and the biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus isolated from food services on stainless steel and polypropylene surfaces (2 x 2 cm when cultivated in a meat-based broth at 28 and 7 ºC. It was also to study the efficacy of the sanitizers sodium hypochlorite (250 mg/L and peracetic acid (30 mg/L in inactivating the bacterial cells in the preformed biofilm. S. aureus strains adhered in high numbers regardless the assayed surface kind and incubation temperature over 72 h. Cells detachment of surfaces revealed high persistence over the incubation period. Number of cells needed for biofilm formation was noted at all experimental systems already after 3 days. Peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite were not efficient in completely removing the cells of S. aureus adhered on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces. From these results, the assayed strains revealed high capacity to adhere and form biofilm on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces under different growth conditions. Moreover, the cells in biofilm matrix were resistant for total removal when submitted to the exposure to sanitizers.

  3. Combined use of Bacteriophage K and a novel Bacteriophage to reduce Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alves, D.R.; Gaudion, A.; Bean, J.E.;

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are major causes of impairment of wound healing and patient morbidity. One of the most common and aggressive wound pathogens is Staphylococcus aureus, displaying a large repertoire of virulence factors and commonly reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, such as the spread of methicillin-......-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Bacteriophages are obligate parasites of bacteria. They multiply intracellularly and lyse their bacterial host, releasing their progeny. We isolated a novel phage, DRA88, which has a ...

  4. Comparison of methods for the detection of biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine subclinical mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliana de Castro Melo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation is considered to be a selective advantage for Staphylococcus aureus mastitis isolates by facilitating bacterial persistence in the udder. It requires attachment to mammary epithelium, proliferation and accumulation of cells in multilayers. The objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of three techniques for the detection of S. aureus biofilm-positive strains. Two phenotypic tests, including growth on microtitre plates and Congo red agar, were compared with a PCR technique using 94 S. aureus strains obtained from cows with subclinical mastitis from two farms in the state of São Paulo. These strains were characterised by in vitro slime production on Congo red agar, biofilm formation on microtitre plates and the presence of the icaA and icaD genes. The results revealed that 85% of the isolates tested produced slime on the Congo red agar, 98.9% of the isolates produced biofilms in vitro by adhering to sterile 96-well "U" bottom polystyrene tissue culture plates, and 95.7% of the isolates carried the icaA and icaD genes. The results of the phenotypic tests for biofilm formation were compared with those of the molecular analysis, and the sensitivity and specificity of the Congo red agar test were 88.9% and 100%, respectively, while those of the microtitre plate test were 100% and 25%, respectively. When the phenotypic methods for the detection of biofilm producers, namely growth on microtitre plates and Congo red agar, were compared, the sensitivity and specificity were 86% and 100%, respectively. Therefore, growth on Congo red agar and the microtitre plate test are methods that could be used to determine whether an isolate has the potential for biofilm production.

  5. Staphylococcus aureus isolated from handmade sweets: Biofilm formation, enterotoxigenicity and antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroning, Isabela Schneid; Iglesias, Mariana Almeida; Sehn, Carla Pohl; Valente Gandra, Tatiane Kuka; Mata, Marcia Magalhães; da Silva, Wladimir Padilha

    2016-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the second most important pathogen involved in foodborne outbreaks in Brazil. Because of their widespread distribution and biofilm forming ability, handmade sweets are easily contaminated with S. aureus. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS) from handmade sweets produced in Pelotas City/Brazil. The virulence potential was checked by evaluating the presence of the staphylococcal enterotoxin genes, icaA and icaD genes, the biofilm forming potential and antimicrobial resistance of the isolates. It was find just S. aureus among the CPS isolates. All the S. aureus isolates had biofilm forming ability on stainless steel and more than half of them on polystyrene surfaces. The majority of the isolates carried the icaA (66.6%) and icaD (58.4%) genes and some of them had the genes encoding enterotoxins A (33.4%) and B (16.6%). Furthermore, the majority of the isolates (83%) were resistant to at least one of the tested antimicrobials and multidrug resistance was observed in 8.4% of the isolates. The isolates had virulence potential, and half of them were enterotoxigenic. In addition, the ability of all the isolates to produce biofilms highlights the danger posed by these potentially virulent microorganisms persisting in food manufacturing environments. PMID:27217365

  6. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms: recent developments in biofilm dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Jessica L; Horswill, Alexander R

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections and represents a significant burden on the healthcare system. S. aureus attachment to medical implants and host tissue, and the establishment of a mature biofilm, play an important role in the persistence of chronic infections. The formation of a biofilm, and encasement of cells in a polymer-based matrix, decreases the susceptibility to antimicrobials and immune defenses, making these infections difficult to eradicate. During infection, dispersal of cells from the biofilm can result in spread to secondary sites and worsening of the infection. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the pathways behind biofilm dispersal in S. aureus, with a focus on enzymatic and newly described broad-spectrum dispersal mechanisms. Additionally, we explore potential applications of dispersal in the treatment of biofilm-mediated infections.

  7. Propionibacterium acnes biofilm - A sanctuary for Staphylococcus aureus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyner, Harmony; Patel, Robin

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of combined culture of Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus on biofilm formation under different oxygen concentrations. We measured planktonic growth and biofilm formation of P. acnes and S. aureus alone and together under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Both P. acnes and S. aureus grew under anaerobic conditions. When grown under anaerobic conditions, P. acnes with or without S. aureus formed a denser biomass biofilm than did S. aureus alone. Viable S. aureus was recovered from a16-day old combined P. acnes and S. aureus biofilm, but not a monomicrobial S. aureus biofilm.

  8. A comparison of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on cobalt-chrome and titanium-alloy spinal implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Shalin S; Aruni, Wilson; Inceoglu, Serkan; Akpolat, Yusuf T; Botimer, Gary D; Cheng, Wayne K; Danisa, Olumide A

    2016-09-01

    The use of cobalt chrome (CoCr) implants in spinal surgery has become increasingly popular. However, there have been no studies specifically comparing biofilm formation on CoCr with that of titanium-alloy spinal implants. The objective of this study was to compare the difference in propensity for biofilm formation between these two materials, as it specifically relates to spinal rods. Staphylococcus aureus subsp. Aureus (ATCC 6538) were incubated with two different types of spinal rods composed of either CoCr or titanium-alloy. The spinal rods were then subject to a trypsin wash to allow for isolation of the colonized organism and associated biofilms. The associated optical density values (OD) from the bacterial isolates were obtained and the bacterial solutions were plated on brain-heart infusion agar plates and the resultant colony-forming units (CFU) were counted. The OD values for the titanium-alloy rods were 1.105±0.096nm (mean±SD) and 1.040±0.026nm at 48hours and 96hours, respectively. In contrast, the OD values for the CoCr rods were 1.332±0.161nm and 1.115±0.207nm at 48 and 96hours, respectively (pbiofilm formation compared to titanium-alloy implants. PMID:27396378

  9. Reducing Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation on stainless steel 316L using functionalized self-assembled monolayers

    OpenAIRE

    Kruszewski, Kristen M; Nistico, Laura; Mark J Longwell; Hynes, Matthew J; Maurer, Joshua A; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne; Gawalt, Ellen S.

    2013-01-01

    Stainless steel 316L (SS316L) is a common material used in orthopedic implants. Bacterial colonization of the surface and subsequent biofilm development can lead to refractory infection of the implant. Since the greatest risk of infection occurs perioperatively, strategies that reduce bacterial adhesion during this time are important. As a strategy to limit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on SS316L, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used to modify the SS316L surface. SAMs with lo...

  10. Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Biofilm Formation Over A Separated Flow Region Under Steady And Pulsatile Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salek, M. Mehdi; Martinuzzi, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Several researchers have observed that the formation, morphology and susceptibility of bacterial biofilms are affected by the local hydrodynamic condition and, in particular, shear stresses acting on the fluid-biofilm interface. A backwards facing step (BFS) experimental model has been widely utilized as an in vitro model to examine and characterize the effect of flow separation and recirculation zones comparable to those present within various medical devices as well as those observed in vivo. The specific geometry of BFS covers a vide range of flow features observed in physiological or environmental conditions. The hypothesis of this study is that the flow behavior and structures can effectively contribute to the transport and attachment of cells and affecting the morphology of adhered colonies as well as suspended structures (i.e. biofilm streamers). Hence, the formation of the recirculation region occurring within a backward facing step (BFS) under steady and pulsatile conditions as well as three-dimensional flow structures arising close to the side walls are investigated to correlate to biofilms behavior. This hypothesis is investigated using a backward facing step incorporated into a flow cell under steady and pulsatile flow regimes to study the growth of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) UC18 as the study microorganism.

  11. Femtosecond laser surface texturing of titanium as a method to reduce the adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Alexandre; Elie, Anne-Marie; Plawinski, Laurent; Serro, Ana Paula; Botelho do Rego, Ana Maria; Almeida, Amélia; Urdaci, Maria C.; Durrieu, Marie-Christine; Vilar, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the possibility of using femtosecond laser surface texturing as a method to reduce the colonization of Grade 2 Titanium alloy surfaces by Staphylococcus aureus and the subsequent formation of biofilm. The laser treatments were carried out with a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system with a central wavelength of 1030 nm and a pulse duration of 500 fs. Two types of surface textures, consisting of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) and nanopillars, were produced. The topography, chemical composition and phase constitution of these surfaces were investigated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was assessed by the sessile drop method using water and diiodomethane as testing liquids. The response of S. aureus put into contact with the laser treated surfaces in controlled conditions was investigated by epifluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy 48 h after cell seeding. The results achieved show that the laser treatment reduces significantly the bacterial adhesion to the surface as well as biofilm formation as compared to a reference polished surfaces and suggest that femtosecond laser texturing is a simple and promising method for endowing dental and orthopedic titanium implants with antibacterial properties, reducing the risk of implant-associated infections without requiring immobilized antibacterial substances, nanoparticles or coatings.

  12. Effect of Cinnamomum burmannii Nees ex Bl. and Massoia aromatica Becc. Essential Oils on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Utami Tunjung Pratiwi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Biofilms are communities of microorganisms that can be found in almost every habitat. They can be attached to a surface and protected by an extracellular matrix of biomolecules that substantially protect microorganisms from environmental effects. The aim of this research is to explore the potency of essential oils from Cinnamomum burmannii Nees ex Bl. and Massoia aromatica Becc. against planktonic growth and biofilm formation of, two opportunistic pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I. Essential oil from C. burmannii  and M. aromatica showed a 50% inhibition of  P. aeruginosa and S. aureus planktonic growth (PMIC50 at concentration of 0.12 % v/v. Essential oil from C. burmannii and M.  aromatica showed capability to inhibit 50% (MBIC50 of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus biofilm formation at concentration of 0.03 % v/v, whereas higher concentration (0.12 % v/v was needed by C. burmannii and M. aromatica oil to disrupt 50% of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus established biofilm. The analysis by GC-MS showed cinnamic aldehyde (92.02 % to be the major component of C. burmannii essential oil, whereas Massoialactone (92.05 % was the main constituent of M. aromatica essential oil. The results obtained in this study have made the oil of C. burmannii and M. aromatica oil as an interesting source for antibiofilm agents in the development of new strategies to treat infections caused by P. aeruginosa and  S. aureus biofilm.Industrial Relevance. Instead of freely swimming in solution (planktonic, in nature microbial tends to adhere to surfaces, and develop microbial biofilms. Microbial biofilms are exhibits resistance to both antimicrobial drugs and the host defence systems, which often results in persistent and difficult-to-treat infections. This makes the discovery of anti-infective agents which are active against planktonic and biofilm microbial represents an important goal. Plant is an interesting source for finding

  13. Impact of Vancomycin on sarA-Mediated Biofilm Formation: Role in Persistent Endovascular Infections Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelhady, W; Bayer, A S; Seidl, K; Moormeier, D E; Bayles, K W; Cheung, A.; Yeaman, M R; Xiong, Y Q

    2014-01-01

    Background. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of endovascular infections. The staphylococcal accessory regulator A locus (sarA) is a major virulence determinant that may potentially impact methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) persistence in such infections via its influence on biofilm formation. Methods. Two healthcare-associated MRSA isolates from patients with persistent bacteremia and 2 prototypical community-acquired MRSA strains, as well as their respective isogenic sar...

  14. Evaluation of biofilm formation using milk in a flow cell model and microarray characterization of Staphylococcus aureus strains from bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snel, G G M; Malvisi, M; Pilla, R; Piccinini, R

    2014-12-01

    It was hypothesized that biofilm could play an important role in the establishment of chronic Staphylococcus aureus bovine mastitis. The in vitro evaluation of biofilm formation can be performed either in closed/static or in flow-based systems. Efforts have been made to characterize the biofilm-forming ability of S. aureus mastitis isolates, however most authors used static systems and matrices other than UHT milk. It is not clear whether such results could be extrapolated to the mammary gland environment. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the biofilm-forming ability of S. aureus strains from subclinical bovine mastitis using the static method and a flow-based one. One hundred and twelve strains were tested by the classic tissue culture plate assay (TCP) and 30 out of them were also tested by a dynamic semi-quantitative assay using commercial UHT milk as culture medium (Milk Flow Culture, MFC) or Tryptic Soy Broth as control medium (TS Flow Culture, TSFC). Only 6 (20%) strains formed biofilm in milk under flow conditions, while 36.6% were considered biofilm-producers in TCP, and 93.3% produced biofilm in TSFC. No agreement was found between TCP, MFC and TSFC results. The association between strain genetic profile, determined by microarray, and biofilm-forming ability in milk was evaluated. Biofilm formation in MFC was significantly associated with the presence of those genes commonly found in bovine-associated strains, assigned to clonal complexes typically detected in mastitis. Based on our results, biofilm-forming potential of bovine strains should be critically analysed and tested applying conditions similar to mammary environment. PMID:25448449

  15. Prevalence of Panton-Valentine leucocidin and phenotypic and genotypic characterization of biofilm formation among Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from children with adenoid hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emaneini, Mohammad; Khoramrooz, Seyed Sajjad; Shahsavan, Shadi; Dabiri, Hossein; Jabalameli, Fereshteh

    2015-12-01

    Adenoids as a first line of host defense against respiratory microbes play an important role in majority of upper airway infectious and noninfectious illnesses. Bacterial pathogen can colonize on the adenoid tissue and probably act as a reservoir for them. To determine phenotypic and genotypic characterization of biofilm forming capacity of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from children with adenoid hypertrophy and prevalence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene we collected 17 consecutive, clinically significant S. aureus isolates from children with adenoid hypertrophy undergoing adenoidectomy with one or more of the upper airway obstruction symptoms, nasal obstruction, mouth breathing, snoring, or sleep apnea. Biofilm formation was evaluated by colorimetric microtiter plate's assay. Gene encoding PVL and adhesion- or biofilm formation-encoding genes were targeted by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. According to the results, all strains produced biofilm. Seven (41.2%) isolates produced strong biofilm whereas 7 (41.2%) isolates produced week and 3 (17.6%) isolates produced medium biofilm. Regarding the adhesion- or biofilm formation-encoding genes, 16 (94.1%) isolates were positive for the gene eno, 13(76.4%) for icaA, 13 (76.4%) for icaD, 10 (58.8%) for fib, 10 (58.8%) for fnbB, 4(23.5%) for can, and 1(5.8%) for fnbA. The high prevalence of genes encoding biofilms and adhesins and phenotypic ability to form a biofilm by S. aureus strains emphasizes the pathogenic character of strains isolated from children with adenoid hypertrophy.

  16. EFFECT OF ULTRASOUND RADIATION ON FORMED BIOFILMS AND ABILITY TO THEIR FORMATION IN S.AUREUS

    OpenAIRE

    Mishina M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Microbiological research of the clinical material receivedfrom with inflammatory processes was carried on that todetect ability to form biofilms and to study effect of low-intensity ultrasound radiation on formed biofilms and theiraggregation ability. Performed research showed that ultrasound radiation of low intensity could destroy biofilms and inhibit ability of microorganisms to form secondary biofilms.

  17. Nisin Incorporated With 2,3-Dihydroxybenzoic Acid in Nanofibers Inhibits Biofilm Formation by a Methicillin-Resistant Strain of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahire, Jayesh J; Dicks, Leon M T

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of nisin, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) and a combination of nisin and DHBA incorporated into nanofibers prepared from poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLLA) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) on biofilm formation of a methicillin-resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (strain Xen 31). Biofilm formation decreased by 88% after 24 h of exposure to nanofibers containing nisin and DHBA (NDF), compared to a 63% decrease when exposed to nanofibers containing only DHBA (DF) and a 3% decrease when exposed to nanofibers containing only nisin (NF). Planktonic cell numbers of biofilms exposed to nanofibers without nisin or DHBA (CF) and NF increased from no detectable OD(595nm) readings to 0.35 and 0.3, respectively, within the first 8 h of exposure, followed by a steady decline over the following 16 h. Planktonic cells of biofilms treated with DF increased from no detectable OD(595nm) readings to 0.05 after 8 h of exposure and remained more-or-less constant for the duration of the experiment. Planktonic cells of biofilms exposed to NDF increased from OD(595nm) 0.03 after 8 h of exposure and to 0.2 over the following 16 h. Biofilm formation increased with increasing concentrations of FeCl3·6H2O, which suggests that iron is required for S. aureus Xen 31 to form a biofilm. However, when exposed to NDF, biofilm formation decreased significantly in the presence of increasing concentrations of iron. This suggests that NDF may be used to prevent biofilm formation of MRSA and control infection.

  18. DNaseⅠ对金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜形成的影响%Effect of DNase I on biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐巧玲; 孙凤军; 冯伟; 刘晓; 刘亚巍

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of DNase I on biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus. Methods The growth curve of S. aureus was detected using a spectrophotometer. The adhesion of S. aureus was analyzed using flat colony counting method, and the biofilm formation was assayed using the 96-well crystal violet staining method. Results Exposure to different concentrations of DNase I did not obviously affect the growth of S. aureus but significantly inhibit the formation of bacterial biofilms in a dose-dependent manner. DNase I inhibited the adhesion of S. aureus at different growth stages. When combined with antibiotics, DNase I resulted in a significant decrease in the established biofilm biomass compared to antibiotics or DNase I used alone. Conclusion DNase I can effectively inhibit biofilm formation of S. aureus and enhance the inhibitory effect of antibiotics against S. aureus biofilms.%目的:研究DNase I对金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜形成的影响。方法采用分光光度计法检测金黄色葡萄球菌的生长曲线,菌落计数法分析金黄色葡萄球菌的粘附能力,96孔板结晶紫染色法检测金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜的形成。结果不同浓度DNase I对金黄色葡萄球菌的生长无影响,然而能显著抑制细菌生物膜的形成,并呈浓度依赖性。此外,DNase I能抑制不同生长期金黄色葡萄球菌的粘附性。与抗菌药物和DNase I单独应用相比,DNase I和抗菌药物联合应用更能显著抑制和分解金黄色葡萄球菌成熟生物膜。结论 DNase I可以有效抑制金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜的形成,并能增强抗菌药物对金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜的抑制作用。

  19. Crystal Violet and XTT Assays on Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhenbo; Liang, Yanrui; Lin, Shiqi; Chen, Dingqiang; Li, Bing; Li, Lin; Deng, Yang

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. Aureus) is a common food-borne pathogenic microorganism. Biofilm formation remains the major obstruction for bacterial elimination. The study aims at providing a basis for determining S. aureus biofilm formation. 257 clinical samples of S. aureus isolates were identified by routine analysis and multiplex PCR detection and found to contain 227 MRSA, 16 MSSA, 11 MRCNS, and 3 MSCNS strains. Two assays for quantification of S. aureus biofilm formation, the crystal violet (CV) assay and the XTT (tetrazolium salt reduction) assay, were optimized, evaluated, and further compared. In CV assay, most isolates formed weak biofilm 74.3 %), while the rest formed moderate biofilm (23.3 %) or strong biofilm (2.3 %). However, most isolates in XTT assay showed weak metabolic activity (77.0 %), while the rest showed moderate metabolic activity (17.9 %) or high metabolic activity (5.1 %). In this study, we found a distinct strain-to-strain dissimilarity in terms of both biomass formation and metabolic activity, and it was concluded from this study that two assays were mutual complementation rather than being comparison. PMID:27324342

  20. Biofilm-formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates from subclinical mastitis in conditions mimicking the udder environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seixas, R; Varanda, D; Bexiga, R; Tavares, L; Oliveira, M

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus is the genus most commonly isolated from bovine mastitis in many countries. It may express several virulence factors including biofilm formation, which may protect the bacterial community from antimicrobials' action, preventing these compounds from reaching its interior, where they reach subinhibitory concentrations (subMIC). Most biofilm production assays are performed in static conditions, while studies regarding antimicrobial resistance usually do not resemble the udder environment because they are performed at high concentrations. In this study we evaluated the influence of dynamic conditions and media, including Mueller Hinton Broth (MHB) and UHT whole milk (WM), as well as the effect of subMIC concentrations of five different antimicrobial agents on biofilm formation by staphylococci isolated from subclinical mastitis. Results suggest that dynamic conditions and media may influence biofilm formation and revealed that milking simulation may significantly increase biofilm production. Sub-MIC concentrations decrease biofilm formation in MHB but increase in WM, suggesting a protective role of milk against antimicrobial compounds' action. Therefore, in vitro conditions that simulate the udder environment and in vivo conditions should be included as one of the parameters in evaluation of biofilm producing strains, in order to provide more reliable results. PMID:26812821

  1. Delta-toxin production deficiency in Staphylococcus aureus: a diagnostic marker of bone and joint infection chronicity linked with osteoblast invasion and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valour, F; Rasigade, J-P; Trouillet-Assant, S; Gagnaire, J; Bouaziz, A; Karsenty, J; Lacour, C; Bes, M; Lustig, S; Bénet, T; Chidiac, C; Etienne, J; Vandenesch, F; Ferry, T; Laurent, F

    2015-06-01

    Biofilm formation, intra-osteoblastic persistence, small-colony variants (SCVs) and the dysregulation of agr, the major virulence regulon, are possibly involved in staphylococcal bone and joint infection (BJI) pathogenesis. We aimed to investigate the contributions of these mechanisms among a collection of 95 Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates from 64 acute (67.4%) and 31 chronic (32.6%) first episodes of BJI. The included isolates were compared for internalization rate, cell damage and SCV intracellular emergence using an ex vivo model of human osteoblast infection. Biofilm formation was assessed in a microbead immobilization assay (BioFilm Ring test). Virulence gene profiles were assessed by DNA microarray. Seventeen different clonal complexes were identified among the screened collection. The staphylococcal internalization rate in osteoblasts was significantly higher for chronic than acute BJI isolates, regardless of the genetic background. Conversely, no differences regarding cytotoxicity, SCV emergence, biofilm formation and virulence gene distribution were observed. Additionally, agr dysfunction, detected by the lack of delta-toxin production using whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) analysis (n = 15; 15.8%), was significantly associated with BJI chronicity, osteoblast invasion and biofilm formation. These findings provide new insights into MSSA BJI pathogenesis, suggesting the correlation between chronicity and staphylococcal osteoblast invasion. This adaptive mechanism, along with biofilm formation, is associated with agr dysfunction, which can be routinely assessed by delta-toxin detection using MALDI-TOF spectrum analysis, possibly providing clinicians with a diagnostic marker of BJI chronicity at the time of diagnosis.

  2. Early application of negative pressure wound therapy to acute wounds contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus: An effective approach to preventing biofilm formation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tongtong; Zhang, Lihai; Han, Li; Wang, Guoqi; Yin, Peng; Li, Zhirui; Zhang, Licheng; Guo, Qi; Liu, DaoHong; Tang, PeiFu

    2016-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been demonstrated to be effective at preventing biofilm-associated infections; however, its role in biofilm prevention is unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of NPWT on biofilm prevention when rapidly initiated following wound contamination. Full-thickness dermal wounds (8 mm) were created in rabbit ears and inoculated with green fluorescent protein-labeled Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). At 6 h following inoculation, continuous NPWT a...

  3. Biofilm Testing and Effects of Environmental Factors on the Biofilm Formation of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates%金黄色葡萄球菌分离株的菌膜测定及其影响因素

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李琼琼; 胡瑜; 姚晓敏; 史贤明; 张建华

    2011-01-01

    采用96孔细胞培养板法,对10株不同来源的金黄色葡萄球菌分离株的菌膜形成能力进行调查,并研究外部环境因素对金黄色葡萄球菌菌膜形成的影响.首先以金黄色葡萄球菌标准菌株ATCC6538为模式菌株,确定了亲水性细胞培养板、培养48 h为适宜的菌膜体外培养条件.在此条件下测定了10株分离株的菌膜形成量,并研究了不同培养温度(25~46℃)和不同营养条件(葡萄糖和氯化钠)对菌膜形成的影响.结果显示,体外培养条件下,金黄色葡萄球菌普遍可以形成菌膜,10株菌中仅1株为菌膜阴性,不同菌株菌膜形成能力差异较大;较高的培养温度有利于菌膜的形成,有3株菌在46℃时菌膜形成量达到最大;0.5%葡萄糖和1%氯化钠的添加可显著改变各菌株的菌膜形成,葡萄糖倾向于促进临床分离株菌膜形成量的增加,而氯化钠倾向于促进食品分离株菌膜形成量的增加.这一结果,可以为实际环境中菌膜的预防及控制提供指导和方向,同时也说明金黄色葡萄球菌的菌膜形成存在着不同的调控模式.%10 strains of Staphylococcus aureus were cultured on the microtitre 96-well plate to investigate the biofilm characteristics and the effect of the environmental factors in the biofilm formation. The optimized incubation conditions including the application of the hydrophilic microtitre plates and 48 h of culture time were established using ATCC6538 as the standard strain. The biofilm production of 10 S. Aureus isolates was determined,and the effect of culturing temperature (25~46 ℃) and nutrients (glucose and NaCl) on the biofilm formation was also investigated. The results showed that the biofilm was usually synthesized in the majority of S. Aureus strains and only 1 out of 10 isolates was found negative (without mature biofilm). Significant differences of the capability in the biofilm formation were indicated among different strains. Higher

  4. Pattern differentiation in co-culture biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Markussen, Trine;

    2011-01-01

    important for understanding of biofilm physiology and the treatment of biofilm-related infectious diseases. Here, we have investigated interactions of two of the major bacterial species of cystic fibrosis lung microbial communities -Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus- when grown in co......-culture biofilms. By growing co-culture biofilms of S. aureus with P. aeruginosa mutants in a flow-chamber system and observing them using confocal laser scanning microscopy, we show that wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1 facilitates S. aureus microcolony formation. In contrast, P. aeruginosa mucA and rpoN mutants do...... not facilitate S. aureus microcolony formation and tend to outcompete S. aureus in co-culture biofilms. Further investigations reveal that extracellular DNA (eDNA) plays an important role in S. aureus microcolony formation and that P. aeruginosa type IV pili are required for this process, probably through...

  5. 同源性金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜形成能力比较%Biofilm formation ability of homologous Staphylococcus aureus strains : a comparative study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔晋亮; 张东伟; 陈一强; 闫萍; 蔡双启; 简丽娟

    2013-01-01

    目的 比较临床分离同源性金黄色葡萄球菌(SAU)的黏附及生物被膜(BF)形成能力差异.方法 刚果红平板法定性能形成BF的菌株;建立SAU的BF体外静置模型,分别于建模第1、3、7天,采用结晶紫染色方法,比较临床分离同源性SAU的黏附及BF形成能力差异.结果 临床分离10株同源性SAU中,刚果红平板法定性可全部形成BF;SAU 17546的黏附及形成早期BF能力最强(P<0.001),而SAU 17422最弱(P<0.001);形成成熟BF能力,仍以SAU 17546最强(P<0.001),但SAU 17642与17546比较,两者极近似(P =0.495);SAU 17422形成BF能力最弱,但是与17431、18541-2、18558、18565、18719等菌株差异无统计学意义.结论 刚果红平板法可定性SAU形成BF菌株,同源性SAU黏附及形成BF的能力存在差异.%OBJECTIVE To compare the adhesion and the abilities of biofilm formation of the homologous clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus. METHODS Congo red plate method was used to detect strains The in vitro biofilm model of S. aureus was established, and the crystal violet staining biofilm semi-quantitative method was employed to compare the adhesion and biofilm formation abilities of the homologous S. aureus. RESULTS Totally 10 strains of homologous S. aureus were biofilm formation-positive, which were isolated from the clinic. The ability of adhesion and early biofilm formation of S. aureus 17546 was the strongest (P<0. 001), but S. aureus 17422's was the weakest (P<0. 001). As for the formation ability of the mature biofilm, S. aureus 17546 was the most powerful (P<0. 001), S. aureus 17642 was extremely similar to strain 17546(P=0. 495). the biofilm formation ability of S. aureus 17422 was the weakest, but as compared with S. aureus 17431, S. aureus 18541-2, S. aureus 18558, S. aureus 18565 and S. aureus 18719, the difference was not statistically significant. CONCLUSION Congo red plate method can detect the S. aureus strains of BF formation. All the homologous S

  6. Streptokinase Treatment Reverses Biofilm-Associated Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nis Pedersen; Zobek, Natalia; Dreier, Cindy;

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus is a serious complication to the use of medical implants. A central part of the pathogenesis relies on S. aureus’ ability to adhere to host extracellular matrix proteins, which adsorb to medical implants and stimulate biofilm formation. Being coagulase...... positive, S. aureus furthermore induces formation of fibrin fibers from fibrinogen in the blood. Consequently, we hypothesized that fibrin is a key component of the extracellular matrix of S. aureus biofilms under in vivo conditions, and that the recalcitrance of biofilm infections can be overcome...... by combining antibiotic treatment with a fibrinolytic drug. We quantified S. aureus USA300 biofilms grown on peg-lids in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth with 0%–50% human plasma. Young (2 h) and mature (24 h) biofilms were then treated with streptokinase to determine if this lead to dispersal. Then...

  7. Adhesion and biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus from food processing plants as affected by growth medium, surface type and incubation temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloísa Maria Ângelo Jerônimo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the effect of different growth media [BHI broth, BHI broth plus glucose (10 g/100 mL and BHI broth plus NaCl (5 g/100 mL] and incubation temperatures (28 or 37 ºC on the adherence, detachment and biofilm formation on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces (2 x 2 cm coupons for a prolonged period (24-72 h by some strains of Staphylococcus aureus (S3, S28 and S54 from food processing plants. The efficacy of the sanitizers sodium hypochlorite (250 mg/mL and peracetic acid (30 mg/mL in reducing the number of viable bacterial cells in a preformed biofilm was also evaluated. S. aureus strains adhered in highest numbers in BHI broth, regardless of the type of surface or incubation temperature. Cell detachment from surfaces revealed high persistence over the incubation period. The number of cells needed for biofilm formation was noted in all experimental systems after 3 days. Peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite were not efficient in completely removing the cells of S. aureus adhered onto polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces. From these results, the assayed strains revealed high capacities to adhere and form biofilms on polypropylene and stainless steel surfaces under the different growth conditions, and the cells in biofilm matrixes were resistant to total removal when exposed to the sanitizers sodium hypochlorite and peracetic acid.Este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar o efeito de diferentes meios de crescimento [caldo BHI, caldo BHI adicionado de glucose (10 g/100 mL e caldo BHI adicionado de NaCl (5 g/100 mL] e temperaturas de incubação (28 e 37 ºC sobre a adesão, separação e formação de biofilme sobre superfícies (2 x 2 cm de polipropileno e aço inoxidável durante longo tempo de incubação (24-72 h por parte de cepas de Staphylococcus aureus (S3, S58 e S54 isoladas de plantas de processamento de alimentos. Também foi avaliada a eficácia dos sanitizantes hipoclorito de sódio (250 mg/mL e ácido perac

  8. Streptokinase Treatment Reverses Biofilm-Associated Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Nis Pedersen; Zobek, Natalia; Dreier, Cindy; Haaber, Jakob; Ingmer, Hanne; Larsen, Ole Halfdan; Meyer, Rikke L.

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus is a serious complication to the use of medical implants. A central part of the pathogenesis relies on S. aureus’ ability to adhere to host extracellular matrix proteins, which adsorb to medical implants and stimulate biofilm formation. Being coagulase positive, S. aureus furthermore induces formation of fibrin fibers from fibrinogen in the blood. Consequently, we hypothesized that fibrin is a key component of the extracellular matrix of S. aureus biofilms under in vivo conditions, and that the recalcitrance of biofilm infections can be overcome by combining antibiotic treatment with a fibrinolytic drug. We quantified S. aureus USA300 biofilms grown on peg-lids in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth with 0%–50% human plasma. Young (2 h) and mature (24 h) biofilms were then treated with streptokinase to determine if this lead to dispersal. Then, the minimal biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) of 24 h old biofilms was measured for vancomycin and daptomycin alone or in combination with 10 µg/mL rifampicin in the presence or absence of streptokinase in the antibiotic treatment step. Finally, biofilms were visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Addition of human plasma stimulated biofilm formation in BHI in a dose-dependent manner, and biofilms could be partially dispersed by streptokinase. The biofilms could be eradicated with physiologically relevant concentrations of streptokinase in combination with rifampicin and vancomycin or daptomycin, which are commonly used antibiotics for treatment of S. aureus infections. Fibronolytic drugs have been used to treat thromboembolic events for decades, and our findings suggest that their use against biofilm infections has the potential to improve the efficacy of antibiotics in treatment of S. aureus biofilm infections. PMID:27681928

  9. Meningococcal biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappann, M.; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Claus, H.;

    2006-01-01

    We show that in a standardized in vitro flow system unencapsulated variants of genetically diverse lineages of Neisseria meningitidis formed biofilms, that could be maintained for more than 96 h. Biofilm cells were resistant to penicillin, but not to rifampin or ciprofloxacin. For some strains......, microcolony formation within biofilms was observed. Microcolony formation in strain MC58 depended on a functional copy of the pilE gene encoding the pilus subunit pilin, and was associated with twitching of cells. Nevertheless, unpiliated pilE mutants formed biofilms showing that attachment and accumulation......X alleles was identified among genetically diverse meningococcal strains. PilX alleles differed in their propensity to support autoaggregation of cells in suspension, but not in their ability to support microcolony formation within biofilms in the continuous flow system....

  10. Formação de biofilme em aço inoxidável por Aeromonas hydrophila e Staphylococcus aureus usando leite e diferentes condições de cultivo Biofilm formation by Aeromonas hydrophila and Staphylococcus aureus on stainless steel using milk and different conditions of cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleube Andrade Boari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desta pesquisa consistiu em avaliar a formação de biofilme em aço inoxidável por Aeromonas hydrophila e Staphylococcus aureus usando leite e diferentes condições de cultivo. As variáveis em estudo consistem no cultivo monoespécie e combinado, dos referidos microrganismos e nas temperaturas de 4, 7 e 18 °C. Recipientes contendo 1000 mL de leite, densidade populacional de 10(5 UFC.mL-1 de cada microrganismo e 10 cupons de aço inoxidável (10 × 20 mm foram lacrados e armazenados, sob agitação de 60 rpm, por um período de 10 dias. As análises ocorreram a cada 48 horas. Células sésseis de A.hydrophila e S. aureus foram enumeradas através do plaqueamento seletivo em ágar m-Aeromonas selective e Baird-Parker, respectivamente. Estudos sobre o tempo de geração, enumeração de células planctônicas e observação dos cupons através da microscopia eletrônica de varredura foram conduzidos. S. aureus, em monocultivo, formou biofilme a 18 °C e a 7 °C. Para 4 °C, foi observado um processo de adesão. A presença de A. hydrophila reduziu o desempenho de S. aureus. Nesta condição de cultivo multiespécie houve formação de biofilme a 18 °C. A. hydrophila, tanto em monocultivo quanto em presença de S. aureus, formou biofilme em todas as condições pesquisadas.The aim of this research was to verify the capability of biofilm formation on stainless steel by Aeromonas hydrophila and Staphylococcus aureus using milk and different conditions of cultivation. The variables consisted in mono and multi-species cultivation of these microorganisms and in the temperatures of 4, 7 and 18 °C. Containers containing 1000 mL of milk, population density of 10(5 CFU.mL-1 of each microorganism, and ten suspended chips of stainless steel AISI 304 (10 × 20 mm were used to seal up and storage, under 60 rpm of agitation for 10 days. The analyses were conducted every 48 hours. Sessile cells of A. hydrophila and S. aureus and were enumerated

  11. Formation of biofilms by Staphylococcus aureus on stainless steel and glass surfaces and its resistance to some selected chemical sanitizers Formação de biofilme por Staphylococcus aureus na superfície de aço inoxidável e vidro e sua resistência a alguns sanificantes químicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Cristina Marques

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this work were to verify the capability of Staphylococcus aureus of forming bio-film on stainless steel and glass surfaces; to evaluate the efficiency of sodium dichloroisocyanurate, hydrogen peroxide and peracetic acid in inactivating Staphylococcus aureus cells adhered onto these surfaces; and to visualize biofilm development by scanning electron microscopy before and after sanitizer treatment. The surfaces studied consisted of 10x20mm chips immersed in Petri dishes containing BHI broth inoculated with S. aureus ATCC 25923. Biofilm formation was observed after 15-day incubation, when the cells were removed using the swab technique, followed by Baird Parker agar plating. Also, the efficiency of the chemical sanitizers on the chip surfaces was tested and the non-removed cells were counted on the Baird-Parker agar. After biofilm formation and use of sanitizers, the chips were respectively observed by scanning electronic microscopy following a pre-existing protocol. The obtained results showed biofilm formation on both surfaces, with bacterial count in the order of 10(7 CFU/cm² on and 10(8 CFU/cm² on stainless steel and glass surfaces, respectively. Peracetic acid was the most efficient in removing adhered cells, presenting 5.26 and 4.5 decimal reduction for adhered cells on stainless steel and glass surfaces, respectively.Os objetivos deste trabalho foram verificar a capacidade de Staphylococcus aureus formar biofilme nas superfícies de aço inoxidável e vidro, avaliar a eficiência do dicloroisocianurato de sódio, peróxido de hidrogênio e ácido peracético na inativação de células de S. aureus aderidas e visualização por microscopia eletrônica de varredura, o desenvolvimento antes e depois do tratamento das superfícies com os sanificantes. As superfícies foram cupons 10x200mm imersos em placas de Petri contendo caldo BHI inoculado com cultura de Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. A formação de biofilme foi

  12. Eradication of Staphylococcus aureus Catheter-Related Biofilm Infections Using ML:8 and Citrox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, S; Zapotoczna, M; Stevens, N T; Humphreys, H; O'Gara, J P; O'Neill, E

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococci are a leading cause of catheter-related infections (CRIs) due to biofilm formation. CRIs are typically managed by either device removal or systemic antibiotics, often in combination with catheter lock solutions (CLSs). CLSs provide high concentrations of the antimicrobial agent at the site of infection. However, the most effective CLSs against staphylococcal biofilm-associated infections have yet to be determined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and suitability of two newly described antimicrobial agents, ML:8 and Citrox, as CLSs against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. ML:8 (1% [vol/vol]) and Citrox (1% [vol/vol]), containing caprylic acid and flavonoids, respectively, were used to treat S. aureus biofilms grown in vitro using newly described static and flow biofilm assays. Both agents reduced biofilm viability >97% after 24 h of treatment. Using a rat model of CRI, ML:8 was shown to inactivate early-stage S. aureus biofilms in vivo, while Citrox inactivated established, mature in vivo biofilms. Cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity of ML:8 and Citrox were equivalent to those of other commercially available CLSs. Neither ML:8 nor Citrox induced a cytokine response in human whole blood, and exposure of S. aureus to either agent for 90 days was not associated with any increase in resistance. Taken together, these data reveal the therapeutic potential of these agents for the treatment of S. aureus catheter-related biofilm infections. PMID:27458213

  13. Antimicrobial Resistance, Biofilm Formation and mecA Characterization of Methicillin-Susceptible S. aureus and Non-S. aureus of Beef Meat Origin in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Kamelia M; Amer, Aziza M; Badr, Jihan M; Helmy, Nashwa M; Elhelw, Rehab A; Orabi, Ahmed; Bakry, Magdy; Saad, Aalaa S A

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have been found in various farm animal species throughout the world. Yet, methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), methicillin-susceptible non-S. aureus (MS-NSA), and methicillin-resistant non-S. aureus (MR-NSA) were not investigated. Therefore, we persued to determine the diversity in their phenotypic virulence assay, phenotypic antimicrobial resistance profile and molecular characterization in one of the food chains in Egypt. Samples were collected during 2013 from beef meat at retail. Twenty seven isolates comprising five species (S. hyicus, S. aureus, S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans, S. intermedius, and S. lentus) were characterized for their antibiotic resistance phenotypic profile and antibiotic resistance genes (mecA, cfr, gyrA, gyrB, and grlA). Out of the 27 Staphylococcus isolates only one isolate was resistant to the 12 antibiotics representing nine classes. Raw beef meat sold across the Great Cairo zone, contains 66.7% of MRS, with highest prevalence was reported in S. aureus (66.7%), while the MRS non-S. aureus strains constituted 66.7% from which S. hyicus (60%), S. intermedius (33.3%), S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans (100%), and S. lentus (100%) were MRS. Seven S. aureus, six S. hyicus, four S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans, three S. intermedius, and one S. lentus isolates although being resistant to oxacillin yet, 11/27 (40.7%) carried the mecA gene. At the same time, the cfr gene was present in 2 of the nine S. aureus isolates, and totally undetectable in S. hyicus, S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans, S. intermedius, and S. lentus. Although, global researches largely focused into MRSA and MR-NSA in animals on pigs, the analysis of our results stipulates, that buffaloes and cattle could be MRSA dispersers and that this theme is not specific to pigs. Detection of MSSA virulence determinants is a must, as although oxacillin resistance may be absent yet, the MSSA may carry the virulence determinants which

  14. Effects of Low-Dose Amoxicillin on Staphylococcus aureus USA300 Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynek, Kevin D; Callahan, Mary T; Shimkevitch, Anton V; Farmer, Jackson T; Endres, Jennifer L; Marchand, Mélodie; Bayles, Kenneth W; Horswill, Alexander R; Kaplan, Jeffrey B

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies showed that sub-MIC levels of β-lactam antibiotics stimulate biofilm formation in most methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. Here, we investigated this process by measuring the effects of sub-MIC amoxicillin on biofilm formation by the epidemic community-associated MRSA strain USA300. We found that sub-MIC amoxicillin increased the ability of USA300 cells to attach to surfaces and form biofilms under both static and flow conditions. We also found that USA300 biofilms cultured in sub-MIC amoxicillin were thicker, contained more pillar and channel structures, and were less porous than biofilms cultured without antibiotic. Biofilm formation in sub-MIC amoxicillin correlated with the production of extracellular DNA (eDNA). However, eDNA released by amoxicillin-induced cell lysis alone was evidently not sufficient to stimulate biofilm. Sub-MIC levels of two other cell wall-active agents with different mechanisms of action-d-cycloserine and fosfomycin-also stimulated eDNA-dependent biofilm, suggesting that biofilm formation may be a mechanistic adaptation to cell wall stress. Screening a USA300 mariner transposon library for mutants deficient in biofilm formation in sub-MIC amoxicillin identified numerous known mediators of S. aureus β-lactam resistance and biofilm formation, as well as novel genes not previously associated with these phenotypes. Our results link cell wall stress and biofilm formation in MRSA and suggest that eDNA-dependent biofilm formation by strain USA300 in low-dose amoxicillin is an inducible phenotype that can be used to identify novel genes impacting MRSA β-lactam resistance and biofilm formation. PMID:26856828

  15. Functionalized polyanilines disrupt Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizdavic-Nikolaidis, Marija R; Pagnon, Joanne C; Ali, Naseem; Sum, Reuben; Davies, Noel; Roddam, Louise F; Ambrose, Mark

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the antimicrobial effects of functionalized polyanilines (fPANIs) against stationary phase cells and biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus using homopolymer of sulfanilic acid (poly-SO3H) as a model. The chemically synthesized poly-SO3H was characterized using Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopies. The molecular weight (Mw) and elemental analysis of homopolymer poly-SO3H were also examined. We found that poly-SO3H was bactericidal against stationary phase cells of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus at a concentration of 20 mgml(-1). Surprisingly, we discovered that the same concentration (20 mgml(-1)) of poly-SO3H significantly disrupted and killed bacterial cells present in pre-established forty-eight hour static biofilms of these organisms, as shown by crystal violet and bacterial live/dead fluorescence staining assays. In support of these data, poly-SO3H extensively diminished the expression of bacterial genes related to biofilm formation in stationary phase cells of P. aeruginosa, and seemed to greatly reduce the amount of the quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) able to be recovered from biofilms of this organism. Furthermore, we found that poly-SO3H was able to effectively penetrate and kill cells in biofilms formed by the P. aeruginosa (AESIII) isolate derived from the sputum of a cystic fibrosis patient. Taken together, the results of the present study emphasise the broad antimicrobial activities of fPANI, and suggest that they could be developed further and used in some novel ways to construct medical devices and/or industrial equipment that are refractory to colonization by biofilm-forming bacteria.

  16. Functionalized polyanilines disrupt Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizdavic-Nikolaidis, Marija R; Pagnon, Joanne C; Ali, Naseem; Sum, Reuben; Davies, Noel; Roddam, Louise F; Ambrose, Mark

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the antimicrobial effects of functionalized polyanilines (fPANIs) against stationary phase cells and biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus using homopolymer of sulfanilic acid (poly-SO3H) as a model. The chemically synthesized poly-SO3H was characterized using Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopies. The molecular weight (Mw) and elemental analysis of homopolymer poly-SO3H were also examined. We found that poly-SO3H was bactericidal against stationary phase cells of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus at a concentration of 20 mgml(-1). Surprisingly, we discovered that the same concentration (20 mgml(-1)) of poly-SO3H significantly disrupted and killed bacterial cells present in pre-established forty-eight hour static biofilms of these organisms, as shown by crystal violet and bacterial live/dead fluorescence staining assays. In support of these data, poly-SO3H extensively diminished the expression of bacterial genes related to biofilm formation in stationary phase cells of P. aeruginosa, and seemed to greatly reduce the amount of the quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) able to be recovered from biofilms of this organism. Furthermore, we found that poly-SO3H was able to effectively penetrate and kill cells in biofilms formed by the P. aeruginosa (AESIII) isolate derived from the sputum of a cystic fibrosis patient. Taken together, the results of the present study emphasise the broad antimicrobial activities of fPANI, and suggest that they could be developed further and used in some novel ways to construct medical devices and/or industrial equipment that are refractory to colonization by biofilm-forming bacteria. PMID:26496473

  17. Individual Constituents from Essential Oils Inhibit Biofilm Mass Production by Multi-Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Espina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus represents a problem in both the medical field and the food industry, because the biofilm structure provides protection to embedded cells and it strongly attaches to surfaces. This circumstance is leading to many research programs seeking new alternatives to control biofilm formation by this pathogen. In this study we show that a potent inhibition of biofilm mass production can be achieved in community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA and methicillin-sensitive strains using plant compounds, such as individual constituents (ICs of essential oils (carvacrol, citral, and (+-limonene. The Crystal Violet staining technique was used to evaluate biofilm mass formation during 40 h of incubation. Carvacrol is the most effective IC, abrogating biofilm formation in all strains tested, while CA-MRSA was the most sensitive phenotype to any of the ICs tested. Inhibition of planktonic cells by ICs during initial growth stages could partially explain the inhibition of biofilm formation. Overall, our results show the potential of EOs to prevent biofilm formation, especially in strains that exhibit resistance to other antimicrobials. As these compounds are food additives generally recognized as safe, their anti-biofilm properties may lead to important new applications, such as sanitizers, in the food industry or in clinical settings.

  18. Individual Constituents from Essential Oils Inhibit Biofilm Mass Production by Multi-Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espina, Laura; Pagán, Rafael; López, Daniel; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus represents a problem in both the medical field and the food industry, because the biofilm structure provides protection to embedded cells and it strongly attaches to surfaces. This circumstance is leading to many research programs seeking new alternatives to control biofilm formation by this pathogen. In this study we show that a potent inhibition of biofilm mass production can be achieved in community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive strains using plant compounds, such as individual constituents (ICs) of essential oils (carvacrol, citral, and (+)-limonene). The Crystal Violet staining technique was used to evaluate biofilm mass formation during 40 h of incubation. Carvacrol is the most effective IC, abrogating biofilm formation in all strains tested, while CA-MRSA was the most sensitive phenotype to any of the ICs tested. Inhibition of planktonic cells by ICs during initial growth stages could partially explain the inhibition of biofilm formation. Overall, our results show the potential of EOs to prevent biofilm formation, especially in strains that exhibit resistance to other antimicrobials. As these compounds are food additives generally recognized as safe, their anti-biofilm properties may lead to important new applications, such as sanitizers, in the food industry or in clinical settings. PMID:26102069

  19. Modulation of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Matrix by Subinhibitory Concentrations of Clindamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilcher, Katrin; Andreoni, Federica; Dengler Haunreiter, Vanina; Seidl, Kati; Hasse, Barbara; Zinkernagel, Annelies S

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilms are extremely difficult to treat. They provide a protected niche for the bacteria, rendering them highly recalcitrant toward host defenses as well as antibiotic treatment. Bacteria within a biofilm are shielded from the immune system by the formation of an extracellular polymeric matrix, composed of polysaccharides, extracellular DNA (eDNA), and proteins. Many antibiotics do not readily penetrate biofilms, resulting in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics. Here, we show that subinhibitory concentrations of clindamycin triggered a transcriptional stress response in S. aureus via the alternative sigma factor B (σ(B)) and upregulated the expression of the major biofilm-associated genes atlA, lrgA, agrA, the psm genes, fnbA, and fnbB Our data suggest that subinhibitory concentrations of clindamycin alter the ability of S. aureus to form biofilms and shift the composition of the biofilm matrix toward higher eDNA content. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying biofilm assembly and dispersal in response to subinhibitory concentrations of clinically relevant antibiotics such as clindamycin is critical to further optimize antibiotic treatment strategies of biofilm-associated S. aureus infections. PMID:27458233

  20. Effects of Subinhibitory Concentrations of Ceftaroline on Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA Biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Lázaro-Díez

    Full Text Available Ceftaroline (CPT is a novel cephalosporin with in vitro activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Ceftaroline exhibits a level of binding affinity for PBPs in S. aureus including PBP2a of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. The aims of this study were to investigate the morphological, physiological and molecular responses of MRSA clinical strains and MRSA biofilms to sub-MICs (1/4 and 1/16 MIC of ceftaroline by using transmission, scanning and confocal microscopy. We have also used quantitative Real-Time PCR to study the effect of sub-MICs of ceftaroline on the expression of the staphylococcal icaA, agrA, sarA and sasF genes in MRSA biofilms. In one set of experiments, ceftaroline was able to inhibit biofilm formation in all strains tested at MIC, however, a strain dependent behavior in presence of sub-MICs of ceftaroline was shown. In a second set of experiments, destruction of preformed biofilms by addition of ceftaroline was evaluated. Ceftaroline was able to inhibit biofilm formation at MIC in all strains tested but not at the sub-MICs. Destruction of preformed biofilms was strain dependent because the biofilm formed by a matrix-producing strain was resistant to a challenge with ceftaroline at MIC, whereas in other strains the biofilm was sensitive. At sub-MICs, the impact of ceftaroline on expression of virulence genes was strain-dependent at 1/4 MIC and no correlation between ceftaroline-enhanced biofilm formation and gene regulation was established at 1/16 MIC. Our findings suggest that sub-MICs of ceftaroline enhance bacterial attachment and biofilm formation by some, but not all, MRSA strains and, therefore, stress the importance of maintaining effective bactericidal concentrations of ceftaroline to fight biofilm-MRSA related infections.

  1. In Vitro Activities of Telavancin and Vancomycin against Biofilm-Producing Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, and Enterococcus faecalis Strains▿

    OpenAIRE

    LaPlante, Kerry L.; Mermel, Leonard A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the activities of telavancin and vancomycin against biofilm-producing Staphylococcus and Enterococcus strains. At clinically attainable concentrations, telavancin was active against bacteria embedded in biofilm (minimal biofilm eradication concentration [MBEC], 0.125 to 2 μg/ml) and inhibited biofilm formation at concentrations below the MIC. Vancomycin did not demonstrate the same activity (MBEC, ≥512 μg/ml) against Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. Telavancin ...

  2. The use of desiccation to treat Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-infected wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eugene; Long, Sarah A; Seth, Akhil K; Geringer, Matthew; Xu, Wei; Chavez-Munoz, Claudia; Leung, Kai; Hong, Seok Jong; Galiano, Robert D; Mustoe, Thomas A

    2016-03-01

    Chronic wounds colonized with biofilm present a major burden to our healthcare system. While the current paradigm for wound healing is to maintain a moist environment, we sought to evaluate the effects of desiccation, and the ability of honey to desiccate wounds, on wound healing characteristics in Staphylococcus aureus biofilm wounds. In vivo biofilm wound healing after exposure to open-air desiccation, honey, molasses, and saline was analyzed using a rabbit ear model of S. aureus biofilm wounds previously developed by our group. Wound morphology was examined using scanning electron microscopy and granulation tissue deposition was measured using light microscopy with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Viable bacterial counts in rabbit ear biofilm wounds and scabs were measured using a drop dilution method. In vitro S. aureus growth curves were established using tryptic soy broth containing honey and glycerol. Gene expression analysis of rabbit ear wounds was performed using reverse transcription quantitative PCR. Rabbit ear S. aureus biofilm wounds exposed to open-air desiccation, honey, and molasses developed a dry scab, which displaced the majority of biofilm bacteria off of the wound bed. Wounds treated with open-air desiccation, honey, and molasses expressed lower levels of the inflammatory markers tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β at postoperative day 12 compared with wounds treated with saline, and had increased levels of granulation tissue formation. In vitro growth of S. aureus in tryptic soy broth was inhibited by the presence of honey to a greater extent than by the presence of osmolality-matched glycerol. Desiccation of chronic wounds colonized with biofilm via exposure to open air or honey leads to improved wound healing by decreasing bacterial burden and inflammation, and increasing granulation tissue formation. The ability of honey to help heal chronic wounds is at least in part due to its ability to desiccate bacterial biofilm, but other

  3. Frequency of biofilm formation in toothbrushes and wash basin junks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulazeez A Abubakar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biofilms are known to be resistant to several antibiotics once they are allowed to form on any surface. Aim: To investigate the biofilm forming ability of some bacterial isolates in toothbrushes and wash basin junks. Materials and Methods: A total of 606 students of Federal University of Technology, Yola were provided with new toothbrushes, which were collected after 1 month of usage and screened for biofilm formation. Another 620 swabs were collected from the wash basins of Federal Medical Centre, Specialist Hospital, Federal University of Technology, and students′ hostels in Yola and from some residence in Jimeta, Yola Metropolis; they were all screened for biofilm formation. Results: A total of 38.3% biofilm formation rate was recorded. Three types of bacterial isolates were identified in the biofilms of toothbrushes and wash basin junks, namely Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa at the prevalence rate of 48.0%, 29.1%, and 22.6%, respectively. Overall, 83.3% of the toothbrush biofilm were identified from female students, while 16.7% were from their male counterparts. Statistically, the frequency of biofilm formation showed a significant difference by gender (X 2 = 10.242, P 0.05. Conclusion: This study identified three microorganisms namely S. aureus, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa that were involved in wash basin junk biofilm formation. The findings also showed that occurrence of biofilm in females′ toothbrushes were significantly higher than in males′ (X 2 = 10.242, P < 0.05.

  4. Manuka-type honeys can eradicate biofilms produced by Staphylococcus aureus strains with different biofilm-forming abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Lu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic wounds are a major global health problem. Their management is difficult and costly, and the development of antibiotic resistance by both planktonic and biofilm-associated bacteria necessitates the use of alternative wound treatments. Honey is now being revisited as an alternative treatment due to its broad-spectrum antibacterial activity and the inability of bacteria to develop resistance to it. Many previous antibacterial studies have used honeys that are not well characterized, even in terms of quantifying the levels of the major antibacterial components present, making it difficult to build an evidence base for the efficacy of honey as an antibiofilm agent in chronic wound treatment. Here we show that a range of well-characterized New Zealand manuka-type honeys, in which two principle antibacterial components, methylglyoxal and hydrogen peroxide, were quantified, can eradicate biofilms of a range of Staphylococcus aureus strains that differ widely in their biofilm-forming abilities. Using crystal violet and viability assays, along with confocal laser scanning imaging, we demonstrate that in all S. aureus strains, including methicillin-resistant strains, the manuka-type honeys showed significantly higher anti-biofilm activity than clover honey and an isotonic sugar solution. We observed higher anti-biofilm activity as the proportion of manuka-derived honey, and thus methylglyoxal, in a honey blend increased. However, methylglyoxal on its own, or with sugar, was not able to effectively eradicate S. aureus biofilms. We also demonstrate that honey was able to penetrate through the biofilm matrix and kill the embedded cells in some cases. As has been reported for antibiotics, sub-inhibitory concentrations of honey improved biofilm formation by some S. aureus strains, however, biofilm cell suspensions recovered after honey treatment did not develop resistance towards manuka-type honeys. New Zealand manuka-type honeys, at the concentrations

  5. Manuka-type honeys can eradicate biofilms produced by Staphylococcus aureus strains with different biofilm-forming abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Turnbull, Lynne; Burke, Catherine M; Liu, Michael; Carter, Dee A; Schlothauer, Ralf C; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Harry, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a major global health problem. Their management is difficult and costly, and the development of antibiotic resistance by both planktonic and biofilm-associated bacteria necessitates the use of alternative wound treatments. Honey is now being revisited as an alternative treatment due to its broad-spectrum antibacterial activity and the inability of bacteria to develop resistance to it. Many previous antibacterial studies have used honeys that are not well characterized, even in terms of quantifying the levels of the major antibacterial components present, making it difficult to build an evidence base for the efficacy of honey as an antibiofilm agent in chronic wound treatment. Here we show that a range of well-characterized New Zealand manuka-type honeys, in which two principle antibacterial components, methylglyoxal and hydrogen peroxide, were quantified, can eradicate biofilms of a range of Staphylococcus aureus strains that differ widely in their biofilm-forming abilities. Using crystal violet and viability assays, along with confocal laser scanning imaging, we demonstrate that in all S. aureus strains, including methicillin-resistant strains, the manuka-type honeys showed significantly higher anti-biofilm activity than clover honey and an isotonic sugar solution. We observed higher anti-biofilm activity as the proportion of manuka-derived honey, and thus methylglyoxal, in a honey blend increased. However, methylglyoxal on its own, or with sugar, was not able to effectively eradicate S. aureus biofilms. We also demonstrate that honey was able to penetrate through the biofilm matrix and kill the embedded cells in some cases. As has been reported for antibiotics, sub-inhibitory concentrations of honey improved biofilm formation by some S. aureus strains, however, biofilm cell suspensions recovered after honey treatment did not develop resistance towards manuka-type honeys. New Zealand manuka-type honeys, at the concentrations they can be applied

  6. Detection of biofilm formation and biofilm-associated genes of Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolation%金黄色葡萄球菌临床分离株生物膜形成能力及其相关基因的检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘红; 罗欲承; 赵建忠; 段秀杰; 邵世和

    2012-01-01

    目的:检测临床分离金黄色葡萄球菌(金葡菌)的生物膜形成能力及其相关基因.方法:用半定量微量平板法检测临床分离的92株金葡菌生物膜形成能力,并通过扫描电镜观察生物膜形态,用PCR法来检测生物膜形成的相关基因ica和sarA.结果:92株临床分离金葡菌菌株均可形成生物膜,PCR结果显示100%的分离株均含有sarA基因,78株(84.78%)含有ica基因.结论:临床分离的金葡菌都具有形成生物膜的能力,生物膜形成的相关基因ica和sarA的携带率较高.%Objective; To detect biofilm formation and biofilm-associated genes of S. aureus clinical iso-lation. Methods; The biofilm formation was determined by semi-quantitative microplate assay and scanning electron microscopy method , and both ica and sarA genes were detected by PCR in 92 strains of S. aureus clinical isolation. Results; All of 92 strains in this study could form biofilm , and carry the sarA gene; 78 strains (84. 78% ) carried the ica gene. Conclusion; The S. aureus clinical isolations had the ability of biofilm formation, and the gene of ica and sarA were prevalent in S. aureus.

  7. Effect of Low Concentration of EDTA on Biofilm Formation of Staphylococcus aureus%低浓度乙二胺四乙酸对金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜形成的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭志华; 胡婷婷; 单玲玲

    2012-01-01

    The effect of low concentration of EDTA on bio? Im formation of Staphylococcus aureus was studied. The results showed that 0. 2 mmol/L EDTA could effectively inhibit bio? lm formation of Staphylococcus aureus. EDTA could only influence the early stages of biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus. The inhibition of biofilm with EDTA could not be completely blocked by Ba2+ , but it could be blocked by Fe2+ , Ca2+ , and Mg2 + . Even high concentrations of EDTA could not influence the mature biofilm. EDTA could inhibit the adhesion between cells.%研究了低浓度乙二胺四乙酸(EDTA)对食源性病原菌金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜形成的影响.实验结果表明,0.2mmoL/L的EDTA可有效抑制金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜形成;EDTA只能影响金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜形成的早期阶段;Ba2+不能完全阻断EDTA抑制生物被膜生成,Fe2+、Ca2+、Mg2+可以阻断EDTA抑制生物被膜的效应;即使是高浓度的EDTA也不能影响成熟的细胞被膜数量;EDTA能抑制细胞之间的粘附作用.

  8. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria can attach to any surface in contact with water and proliferate into complex communities enclosed in an adhesive matrix, these communities are called biofilms. The matrix makes the biofilm difficult to remove by physical means, and bacteria in biofilm can survive treatment with many...... antibiotics, disinfectants and cleaning agents. Biofilms are therefore very difficult to eradicate, and an attractive approach to limit biofilm formation is to reduce bacterial adhesion. In this thesis it was shown that lowering the surface roughness had a greater effect on bacterial retention compared....... The ability to form biofilms, the amount of eDNA produced, and the importance of eDNA for biofilm formation or stability did not correlate and varied from strain to strain. Finally, a method was developed for immobilization of living bacteria for analysis by atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM is used...

  9. Direct Electrical Current Reduces Bacterial and Yeast Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ruiz-Ruigomez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New strategies are needed for prevention of biofilm formation. We have previously shown that 24 hr of 2,000 µA of direct current (DC reduces Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation in vitro. Herein, we examined the effect of a lower amount of DC exposure on S. epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Propionibacterium acnes, and Candida albicans biofilm formation. 12 hr of 500 µA DC decreased S. epidermidis, S. aureus, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on Teflon discs by 2, 1, 1, and 2 log10 cfu/cm2, respectively (p<0.05. Reductions in S. epidermidis, S. aureus, and E. coli biofilm formation were observed with as few as 12 hr of 200 µA DC (2, 2 and 0.4 log10 cfu/cm2, resp.; a 1 log10 cfu/cm2 reduction in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation was observed at 36 hr. 24 hr of 500 µA DC decreased C. albicans biofilm formation on Teflon discs by 2 log10 cfu/cm2. No reduction in P. acnes biofilm formation was observed. 1 and 2 log10 cfu/cm2 reductions in E. coli and S. epidermidis biofilm formation on titanium discs, respectively, were observed with 12 hr of exposure to 500 µA. Electrical current is a potential strategy to reduce biofilm formation on medical biomaterials.

  10. Role of biofilm-associated protein bap in the pathogenesis of bovine Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucarella, Carme; Tormo, M Angeles; Ubeda, Carles; Trotonda, M Pilar; Monzón, Marta; Peris, Critòfol; Amorena, Beatriz; Lasa, Iñigo; Penadés, José R

    2004-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of intramammary infections, which frequently become chronic, associated with the ability of the bacteria to produce biofilm. Here, we report a relationship between the ability to produce chronic bovine mastitis and biofilm formation. We have classified bovine mastitis S. aureus isolates into three groups based on the presence of particular genetic elements required for biofilm formation: group 1 (ica(+) bap(+)), group 2 (ica(+), bap negative), and group 3 (ica negative, bap negative). Overall, animals naturally infected with group 1 and 2 isolates had a lower milk somatic cell count than those infected with isolates of group 3. In addition, Bap-positive isolates were significantly more able to colonize and persist in the bovine mammary gland in vivo and were less susceptible to antibiotic treatments when forming biofilms in vitro. Analysis of the structural bap gene revealed the existence of alternate forms of expression of the Bap protein in S. aureus isolates obtained under field conditions throughout the animal's life. The presence of anti-Bap antibodies in serum samples taken from animals with confirmed S. aureus infections indicated the production of Bap during infection. Furthermore, disruption of the ica operon in a bap-positive strain had no effect on in vitro biofilm formation, a finding which strongly suggested that Bap could compensate for the deficiency of the PIA/PNAG product (a biofilm matrix polysaccharide). Altogether, these results demonstrate that, in the bovine intramammary gland, the presence of Bap may facilitate a biofilm formation connected with the persistence of S. aureus.

  11. Efficacy of antibacterial bioactive glass S53P4 against S. aureus biofilms grown on titanium discs in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coraça-Huber, Débora C; Fille, Manfred; Hausdorfer, Johann; Putzer, David; Nogler, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of different sizes of bioactive glass S53P4 against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms grown on metal discs in vitro. S. aureus biofilms were cultivated on titanium discs. BAG-S53P4 (0.5-0.8 mm and Glass beads (0.5 mm) were used as a control. After each interval, the pH from each sample was measured. Colony forming units were counted for the biofilm recovery verification. In parallel, we tested the activity of bioactive glass against S. aureus planktonic cells. We found that BAG-S53P4 can suppress S. aureus biofilm formation on titanium discs in vitro. The suppression rate of biofilm cells by BAG-S53P4 glass S53P4 has potential to be used as bone substitute for the resolution of infection complications in joint replacement surgeries and treatment of chronic osteomyelitis.

  12. Combining biofilm matrix measurements with biomass and viability assays in susceptibility assessments of antimicrobials against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogman, Malena Elise; Vuorela, Pia Maarit; Fallarero, Adyary

    2012-09-01

    Despite that three types of assays (measuring biofilm viability, biomass, or matrix) are described to assess anti-biofilm activity, they are rarely used together. As infections can easily reappear if the matrix is not affected after antibiotic treatments, our goal was to explore the simultaneous effects of antibiotics on the viability, biomass and matrix of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms (ATCC 25923). Viability and biomass were quantified using resazurin and crystal violet staining sequentially in the same plate, while matrix staining was conducted with a wheat germ agglutinin-Alexa Fluor 488 fluorescent conjugate. Establishment of the detection limits and linearity ranges allowed concluding that all three methods were able to estimate biofilm formation in a similar fashion. In a susceptibility study with 18-h biofilms, two model compounds (penicillin G and ciprofloxacin) caused a reduction on the viability and biomass accompanied by an increase or not changed levels of the matrix, respectively. This response pattern was also proven for S. aureus Newman, S. epidermidis and E. coli biofilms. A classification of antibiotics based on five categories according to their effects on viability and matrix has been proposed earlier. Our data suggests a sixth group, represented by penicillin, causing decrease in bacterial viability but showing stimulatory effects on the matrix. Further, if effects on the matrix are not taken into account, the long-term chemotherapeutic effect of antibiotics can be jeopardized in spite of the positive effects on biofilms viability and biomass. Thus, measuring all these three endpoints simultaneously provide a more complete and accurate picture.

  13. 桃柁酚对金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜及icaA表达的抑制作用%Inhibitory effects of totarol on biofilm formation and icaA expression of Staphylococcus aureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓红; 于录; 刘丽慧; 申凤鸽; 邢明勋; 袁鹏; 宋晓平

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the inhibitory effects of totarol on icaA expression and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus,minimum inhibitory concentrations and minimum bactericidal concentrations of to- tarol were determined for 10 strains of S. aureus grown in suspension and biofilm using microbroth dilution method. Inhibition of totarol on biofilm formation was observed by using laser scanning confocal micro- scope. Real-time RT-PCR analysis was performed to determine the effect of totarol on the expression of the biofilm-related genes. The effect of polysaccharide intercellular adhesin on biofilm formation was studied using dot-blot assay. Totarol showed antimicrobial activity against both planktonic and biofilm cultures of S. aureus strains,with minimum inhibitory concentrations ranged from 1 to 2 μg/mL and 4 to 16μg/mL, respectively. Laser scanning confocal microscopy images indicated that totarol was able to detach and kill existing biofilms. Totarol may have an influence on agrA and sarA, inhibit icaA, and then inhibit polysaccharide intercellular adhesin. Thus, totarol was an effective antimicrobial agent to combat S. aureus biofilms.%为研究桃柁酚对金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜及icaA表达的抑制作用,用微量肉汤稀释法测定桃柁酚对10株金黄色葡萄球菌浮游菌和生物膜的最小抑菌浓度和最小杀菌浓度,并利用激光共聚焦显微镜观察桃柁酚抑制生物膜的情况;通过实时荧光定量RT—PCR技术检测桃柁酚对细菌生物膜形成过程中相关基因的水平变化;采用斑点免疫印迹法检测细胞间多糖黏附素在生物膜形成过程中的作用。结果显示,桃柁酚对金黄色葡萄球菌浮游菌和生物膜的最小抑菌浓度值范围分别为1~2μg/mL和4~16μg/mL;能杀灭和清除已形成的生物膜;桃柁酚可通过影响agr和sar调控系统,抑制细胞间多糖黏附素合成基因icaA的表达进而抑制细胞间多糖黏附素的合成。表明

  14. Dispersal of Bap-mediated Staphylococcus aureus biofilm by proteinase K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Shukla, Sudhir; Rao, Toleti Subba

    2013-02-01

    The dominant role of biofilm-associated protein (Bap) in Staphylococcus aureus biofilm development prompted us to investigate Bap as a potential target for proteinase-mediated biofilm dispersion. Biofilm assay in microtitre plates showed that proteinase K hampered the early adhesion of cells as well as biofilm development. Proteinase K treatment of 24- and 48-h-old biofilms showed enhanced dispersion of bap-positive S. aureus biofilm; however, proteinase K did not affect the bap-negative S. aureus biofilm. When antibiotics were used in combination with proteinase K, significant enhancement in antibiotic action was noticed against bap-positive S. aureus biofilm. This study establishes that antibiotics in combination with proteinase K can be used for controlling S. aureus biofilms in whose development Bap surface protein has a major role. We propose that Bap protein could be a potential target for therapeutic control of S. aureus infections (for example, bovine mastitis).

  15. Biofilm formation and microbial corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, R.; Porcella, D.

    1992-07-01

    Biofilms-colonies of microorganisms growing on surfaces - can greatly accelerate the corrosion rates of metals and alloys in utility water systems. Fundamental EPRI research is showing how mechanisms of biofilm formation, interactions between bacterial species, and metabolic activities control such biofilm properties as corrosive potential This research is identifying methods to control biofilm development and prevent microbially influenced corrosion. The results should also apply to the control of other processes involving biological consortia, including the bioremediation of contaminated groundwater and soil and the biodesulfurization of coal.

  16. (+)-Dehydroabietic Acid, an Abietane-Type Diterpene, Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallarero, Adyary; Skogman, Malena; Kujala, Janni; Rajaratnam, Mohanathas; Moreira, Vânia M.; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Vuorela, Pia

    2013-01-01

    Potent drugs are desperately needed to counteract bacterial biofilm infections, especially those caused by gram-positive organisms, such as Staphylococcus aureus. Moreover, anti-biofilm compounds/agents that can be used as chemical tools are also needed for basic in vitro or in vivo studies aimed at exploring biofilms behavior and functionability. In this contribution, a collection of naturally-occurring abietane-type diterpenes and their derivatives was tested against S. aureus biofilms using a platform consisting of two phenotypic assays that have been previously published by our group. Three active compounds were identified: nordehydroabietylamine (1), (+)-dehydroabietic acid (2) and (+)-dehydroabietylamine (3) that prevented biofilm formation in the low micromolar range, and unlike typical antibiotics, only 2 to 4-fold higher concentrations were needed to significantly reduce viability and biomass of existing biofilms. Compound 2, (+)-dehydroabietic acid, was the most selective towards biofilm bacteria, achieving high killing efficacy (based on log Reduction values) and it was best tolerated by three different mammalian cell lines. Since (+)-dehydroabietic acid is an easily available compound, it holds great potential to be used as a molecular probe in biofilms-related studies as well as to serve as inspirational chemical model for the development of potent drug candidates. PMID:23739682

  17. (+-Dehydroabietic Acid, an Abietane-Type Diterpene, Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Vuorela

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Potent drugs are desperately needed to counteract bacterial biofilm infections, especially those caused by gram-positive organisms, such as Staphylococcus aureus. Moreover, anti-biofilm compounds/agents that can be used as chemical tools are also needed for basic in vitro or in vivo studies aimed at exploring biofilms behavior and functionability. In this contribution, a collection of naturally-occurring abietane-type diterpenes and their derivatives was tested against S. aureus biofilms using a platform consisting of two phenotypic assays that have been previously published by our group. Three active compounds were identified: nordehydroabietylamine (1, (+-dehydroabietic acid (2 and (+-dehydroabietylamine (3 that prevented biofilm formation in the low micromolar range, and unlike typical antibiotics, only 2 to 4-fold higher concentrations were needed to significantly reduce viability and biomass of existing biofilms. Compound 2, (+-dehydroabietic acid, was the most selective towards biofilm bacteria, achieving high killing efficacy (based on log Reduction values and it was best tolerated by three different mammalian cell lines. Since (+-dehydroabietic acid is an easily available compound, it holds great potential to be used as a molecular probe in biofilms-related studies as well as to serve as inspirational chemical model for the development of potent drug candidates.

  18. Factors contributing to the biofilm-deficient phenotype of Staphylococcus aureus sarA mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura H Tsang

    Full Text Available Mutation of sarA in Staphylococcus aureus results in a reduced capacity to form a biofilm, but the mechanistic basis for this remains unknown. Previous transcriptional profiling experiments identified a number of genes that are differentially expressed both in a biofilm and in a sarA mutant. This included genes involved in acid tolerance and the production of nucleolytic and proteolytic exoenzymes. Based on this we generated mutations in alsSD, nuc and sspA in the S. aureus clinical isolate UAMS-1 and its isogenic sarA mutant and assessed the impact on biofilm formation. Because expression of alsSD was increased in a biofilm but decreased in a sarA mutant, we also generated a plasmid construct that allowed expression of alsSD in a sarA mutant. Mutation of alsSD limited biofilm formation, but not to the degree observed with the corresponding sarA mutant, and restoration of alsSD expression did not restore the ability to form a biofilm. In contrast, concomitant mutation of sarA and nuc significantly enhanced biofilm formation by comparison to the sarA mutant. Although mutation of sspA had no significant impact on the ability of a sarA mutant to form a biofilm, a combination of protease inhibitors (E-64, 1-10-phenanthroline, and dichloroisocoumarin that was shown to inhibit the production of multiple extracellular proteases without inhibiting growth was also shown to enhance the ability of a sarA mutant to form a biofilm. This effect was evident only when all three inhibitors were used concurrently. This suggests that the reduced capacity of a sarA mutant to form a biofilm involves extracellular proteases of all three classes (serine, cysteine and metalloproteases. Inclusion of protease inhibitors also enhanced biofilm formation in a sarA/nuc mutant, with the combined effect of mutating nuc and adding protease inhibitors resulting in a level of biofilm formation with the sarA mutant that approached that of the UAMS-1 parent strain. These results

  19. Formation of biofilms under phage predation: considerations concerning a biofilm increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinidoust, Zeinab; Tufenkji, Nathalie; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2013-01-01

    Bacteriophages are emerging as strong candidates for combating bacterial biofilms. However, reports indicating that host populations can, in some cases, respond to phage predation by an increase in biofilm formation are of concern. This study investigates whether phage predation can enhance the formation of biofilm and if so, if this phenomenon is governed by the emergence of phage-resistance or by non-evolutionary mechanisms (eg spatial refuge). Single-species biofilms of three bacterial pathogens (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus) were pretreated and post-treated with species-specific phages. Some of the phage treatments resulted in an increase in the levels of biofilm of their host. It is proposed that the phenotypic change brought about by acquiring phage resistance is the main reason for the increase in the level of biofilm of P. aeruginosa. For biofilms of S. aureus and S. enterica Typhimurium, although resistance was detected, increased formation of biofilm appeared to be a result of non-evolutionary mechanisms.

  20. Modulation of eDNA release and degradation affects Staphylococcus aureus biofilm maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan E Mann

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated a role for Staphylococcus aureus cidA-mediated cell lysis and genomic DNA release in biofilm adherence. The current study extends these findings by examining both temporal and additional genetic factors involved in the control of genomic DNA release and degradation during biofilm maturation. Cell lysis and DNA release were found to be critical for biofilm attachment during the initial stages of development and the released DNA (eDNA remained an important matrix component during biofilm maturation. This study also revealed that an lrgAB mutant exhibits increased biofilm adherence and matrix-associated eDNA consistent with its proposed role as an inhibitor of cidA-mediated lysis. In flow-cell assays, both cid and lrg mutations had dramatic effects on biofilm maturation and tower formation. Finally, staphylococcal thermonuclease was shown to be involved in biofilm development as a nuc mutant formed a thicker biofilm containing increased levels of matrix-associated eDNA. Together, these findings suggest a model in which the opposing activities of the cid and lrg gene products control cell lysis and genomic DNA release during biofilm development, while staphylococcal thermonuclease functions to degrade the eDNA, possibly as a means to promote biofilm dispersal.

  1. 食源性金黄色葡萄球菌的生物被膜形成能力及其基质组成研究%Formation ability and matrix composition of food-borne Staphylococcus aureus biofilm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石文琪; 桑亚新; 于宏伟; 孙纪录

    2015-01-01

    为了控制食品生产环境中金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜污染,对分离自河北省不同食物样品的33株金黄色葡萄球菌的生物被膜形成能力及其基质组成进行了研究。首先,使用微效价板培养生物被膜,结果表明,在培养24和48 h后,分别有13和16个菌株形成了强弱不同的生物被膜,其中,生牛乳来源的菌株产生物被膜能力较强。然后,分别使用蛋白酶K和DNase Ⅰ处理不同菌株的生物被膜,结果表明,在所有菌株的生物被膜基质中,都含有蛋白质和DNA组分,但是在大多数菌株的生物被膜基质中,蛋白质是一种重要的组分,而DNA不是一种主要组分。%In order to make scientific strategies to control the pollution of Staphylococcus au‐reus biofilm in the environment of food production ,the biofilm formation ability and matrix composition of 33 S .aureus isolates from food samples of Hebei province were studied .First‐ly ,the strains were cultivated in microtiter plates to form biofilms ,and it was found that 13 and 16 strains formed biofilms after cultivation for 24 h and 48 h ,respectively .Among them , the strains from raw milk had stronger biofilm forming ability .Then ,the preformed biofilms were treated with proteinase K and DNase I ,respectively .The results showed that there were protein and DNA components in the biofilm matrix of all the strains .However ,protein was an important component but DNA was not a major component in the biofilm matrix of most strains .

  2. Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm and Planktonic cultures differentially impact gene expression, mapk phosphorylation, and cytokine production in human keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olerud John E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many chronic diseases, such as non-healing wounds are characterized by prolonged inflammation and respond poorly to conventional treatment. Bacterial biofilms are a major impediment to wound healing. Persistent infection of the skin allows the formation of complex bacterial communities termed biofilm. Bacteria living in biofilms are phenotypically distinct from their planktonic counterparts and are orders of magnitude more resistant to antibiotics, host immune response, and environmental stress. Staphylococcus aureus is prevalent in cutaneous infections such as chronic wounds and is an important human pathogen. Results The impact of S. aureus soluble products in biofilm-conditioned medium (BCM or in planktonic-conditioned medium (PCM on human keratinocytes was investigated. Proteomic analysis of BCM and PCM revealed differential protein compositions with PCM containing several enzymes involved in glycolysis. Global gene expression of keratinocytes exposed to biofilm and planktonic S. aureus was analyzed after four hours of exposure. Gene ontology terms associated with responses to bacteria, inflammation, apoptosis, chemotaxis, and signal transduction were enriched in BCM treated keratinocytes. Several transcripts encoding cytokines were also upregulated by BCM after four hours. ELISA analysis of cytokines confirmed microarray results at four hours and revealed that after 24 hours of exposure, S. aureus biofilm induced sustained low level cytokine production compared to near exponential increases of cytokines in planktonic treated keratinocytes. The reduction in cytokines produced by keratinocytes exposed to biofilm was accompanied by suppressed phosphorylation of MAPKs. Chemical inhibition of MAPKs did not drastically reduce cytokine production in BCM-treated keratinocytes suggesting that the majority of cytokine production is mediated through MAPK-independent mechanisms. Conclusions Collectively the results indicate that S

  3. Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Planktonic and Biofilm Cells of Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Adilson; Cataneli Pereira, Valéria; Pinheiro, Luiza; Moraes Riboli, Danilo Flávio; Benini Martins, Katheryne; Ribeiro de Souza da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance profile of planktonic and biofilm cells of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). Two hundred Staphylococcus spp. strains were studied, including 50 S. aureus and 150 CoNS strains (50 S. epidermidis, 20 S. haemolyticus, 20 S. warneri, 20 S. hominis, 20 S. lugdunensis, and 20 S. saprophyticus). Biofilm formation was investigated by adherence to polystyrene plates. Positive strains were submitted to the broth microdilution method to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for planktonic and biofilm cells and the minimal bactericidal concentration for biofilm cells (MBCB). Forty-nine Staphylococcus spp. strains (14 S. aureus, 13 S. epidermidis, 13 S. saprophyticus, 3 S. haemolyticus, 1 S. hominis, 3 S. warneri, and 2 S. lugdunensis) were biofilm producers. These isolates were evaluated regarding their resistance profile. Determination of planktonic cell MIC identified three (21.4%) S. aureus strains that were resistant to oxacillin and six (42.8%) that were resistant to erythromycin. Among the CoNS, 31 (88.6%) strains were resistant to oxacillin, 14 (40%) to erythromycin, 18 (51.4%) to gentamicin, and 8 (22.8%) to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. None of the planktonic isolates were resistant to vancomycin or linezolid. MICs were 2-, 4-, 8-, and up to 16-fold higher for biofilm cells than for planktonic cells. This observation was more common for vancomycin and erythromycin. The MBCB ranged from 8 to >256 µg/mL for oxacillin, 128 to >128 µg/mL for vancomycin, 256 to >256 µg/mL for erythromycin and gentamicin, >64 µg/mL for linezolid, and 32/608 to >32/608 µg/mL for sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. The results showed considerably higher MICs for S. aureus and CoNS biofilm cells compared to planktonic cells. Analysis of MBCM confirmed that even high concentrations of vancomycin were unable to eliminate the biofilms of S. aureus and CoNS species

  4. Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Planktonic and Biofilm Cells of Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson de Oliveira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance profile of planktonic and biofilm cells of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS. Two hundred Staphylococcus spp. strains were studied, including 50 S. aureus and 150 CoNS strains (50 S. epidermidis, 20 S. haemolyticus, 20 S. warneri, 20 S. hominis, 20 S. lugdunensis, and 20 S. saprophyticus. Biofilm formation was investigated by adherence to polystyrene plates. Positive strains were submitted to the broth microdilution method to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC for planktonic and biofilm cells and the minimal bactericidal concentration for biofilm cells (MBCB. Forty-nine Staphylococcus spp. strains (14 S. aureus, 13 S. epidermidis, 13 S. saprophyticus, 3 S. haemolyticus, 1 S. hominis, 3 S. warneri, and 2 S. lugdunensis were biofilm producers. These isolates were evaluated regarding their resistance profile. Determination of planktonic cell MIC identified three (21.4% S. aureus strains that were resistant to oxacillin and six (42.8% that were resistant to erythromycin. Among the CoNS, 31 (88.6% strains were resistant to oxacillin, 14 (40% to erythromycin, 18 (51.4% to gentamicin, and 8 (22.8% to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. None of the planktonic isolates were resistant to vancomycin or linezolid. MICs were 2-, 4-, 8-, and up to 16-fold higher for biofilm cells than for planktonic cells. This observation was more common for vancomycin and erythromycin. The MBCB ranged from 8 to >256 µg/mL for oxacillin, 128 to >128 µg/mL for vancomycin, 256 to >256 µg/mL for erythromycin and gentamicin, >64 µg/mL for linezolid, and 32/608 to >32/608 µg/mL for sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. The results showed considerably higher MICs for S. aureus and CoNS biofilm cells compared to planktonic cells. Analysis of MBCM confirmed that even high concentrations of vancomycin were unable to eliminate the biofilms of S. aureus and Co

  5. Antimicrobial Resistance Profile of Planktonic and Biofilm Cells of Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Adilson; Cataneli Pereira, Valéria; Pinheiro, Luiza; Moraes Riboli, Danilo Flávio; Benini Martins, Katheryne; Ribeiro de Souza da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance profile of planktonic and biofilm cells of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). Two hundred Staphylococcus spp. strains were studied, including 50 S. aureus and 150 CoNS strains (50 S. epidermidis, 20 S. haemolyticus, 20 S. warneri, 20 S. hominis, 20 S. lugdunensis, and 20 S. saprophyticus). Biofilm formation was investigated by adherence to polystyrene plates. Positive strains were submitted to the broth microdilution method to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for planktonic and biofilm cells and the minimal bactericidal concentration for biofilm cells (MBCB). Forty-nine Staphylococcus spp. strains (14 S. aureus, 13 S. epidermidis, 13 S. saprophyticus, 3 S. haemolyticus, 1 S. hominis, 3 S. warneri, and 2 S. lugdunensis) were biofilm producers. These isolates were evaluated regarding their resistance profile. Determination of planktonic cell MIC identified three (21.4%) S. aureus strains that were resistant to oxacillin and six (42.8%) that were resistant to erythromycin. Among the CoNS, 31 (88.6%) strains were resistant to oxacillin, 14 (40%) to erythromycin, 18 (51.4%) to gentamicin, and 8 (22.8%) to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. None of the planktonic isolates were resistant to vancomycin or linezolid. MICs were 2-, 4-, 8-, and up to 16-fold higher for biofilm cells than for planktonic cells. This observation was more common for vancomycin and erythromycin. The MBCB ranged from 8 to >256 µg/mL for oxacillin, 128 to >128 µg/mL for vancomycin, 256 to >256 µg/mL for erythromycin and gentamicin, >64 µg/mL for linezolid, and 32/608 to >32/608 µg/mL for sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. The results showed considerably higher MICs for S. aureus and CoNS biofilm cells compared to planktonic cells. Analysis of MBCM confirmed that even high concentrations of vancomycin were unable to eliminate the biofilms of S. aureus and CoNS species

  6. Hydrodynamics of catheter biofilm formation

    CERN Document Server

    Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar; Rodriguez-Perez, Daniel; Martinez-Escobar, Sergio; Fernandez-Barbero, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model is proposed to describe one of the most critical problems in intensive medical care units: the formation of biofilms inside central venous catheters. The incorporation of approximate solutions for the flow-limited diffusion equation leads to the conclusion that biofilms grow on the internal catheter wall due to the counter-stream diffusion of blood through a very thin layer close to the wall. This biological deposition is the first necessary step for the subsequent bacteria colonization.

  7. Effects of Fermented Sumach on the Formation of Slime Layer of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahra Kırmusaoğlu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is one of the most commonly isolated bacterial pathogens in hospitals, and the most frequent cause of nosocomial infections. Nosocomial staphylococcal foreign-body infections related to biofilm formation are a serious threat, demanding new therapeutic and preventive strategies. Implantation of intravenous catheters and surgical implantation of prosthetic implants carry a risk of infection. In order to prevent all these effects of biofilms, a study was designed to observe the possible antibacterial effect of sumach (Rhus coriaria on the biofilm formation of S. aureus. Material and Methods: The influence of varying concentrations of sumach on the formation of biofilms by 13 strains of Staphylococcus aureus was tested by a microelisa assay. Results: The significant differences between varying concentrations of sumach (0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 µl/ml were observed in four methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and nine methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA (p<0.05. In bacteria, a dose-related decrease in the formation of slime, which is a major virulence factor of staphylococcal infections, was observed. Conclusion: In our study, using 0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 µl/ml of sumach, thirteen strains lost, 17%, 22%, 28% and 48% respectively of their capacity to produce biofilms. Sumach, which is a herbal product, can decrease the formation of biofilm, which is a major virulence factor in staphylococcal infections.

  8. Effects of patterned topography on biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Ravikumar

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a population of bacteria attached to each other and irreversibly to a surface, enclosed in a matrix of self-secreted polymers, among others polysaccharides, proteins, DNA. Biofilms cause persisting infections associated with implanted medical devices and hospital acquired (nosocomial) infections. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are the most common type of nosocomial infections accounting for up to 40% of all hospital acquired infections. Several different strategies, including use of antibacterial agents and genetic cues, quorum sensing, have been adopted for inhibiting biofilm formation relevant to CAUTI surfaces. Each of these methods pertains to certain types of bacteria, processes and has shortcomings. Based on eukaryotic cell topography interaction studies and Ulva linza spore studies, topographical surfaces were suggested as a benign control method for biofilm formation. However, topographies tested so far have not included a systematic variation of size across basic topography shapes. In this study patterned topography was systematically varied in size and shape according to two approaches 1) confinement and 2) wetting. For the confinement approach, using scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy, orienting effects of tested topography based on staphylococcus aureus (s. aureus) (SH1000) and enterobacter cloacae (e. cloacae) (ATCC 700258) bacterial models were identified on features of up to 10 times the size of the bacterium. Psuedomonas aeruginosa (p. aeruginosa) (PAO1) did not show any orientational effects, under the test conditions. Another important factor in medical biofilms is the identification and quantification of phenotypic state which has not been discussed in the literature concerning bacteria topography characterizations. This was done based on antibiotic susceptibility evaluation and also based on gene expression analysis. Although orientational effects occur, phenotypically no difference

  9. Development of a Standard Test to Assess the Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Cells to Disinfectants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luppens, S.B.I.; Reij, M.W.; Heijden, van der R.W.; Rombouts, F.M.; Abee, T.

    2002-01-01

    A standardized disinfectant test for Staphylococcus aureus cells in biofilms was developed. Two disinfectants, the membrane-active compound benzalkonium chloride (BAC) and the oxidizing agent sodium hypochlorite, were used to evaluate the biofilm test. S. aureus formed biofilms on glass, stainless s

  10. Bactericidal Effect of a Photoresponsive Carbon Monoxide-Releasing Nonwoven against Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger-Strobel, Mareike; Gläser, Steve; Makarewicz, Oliwia; Wyrwa, Ralf; Weisser, Jürgen; Pletz, Mathias W; Schiller, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading pathogen in skin and skin structure infections, including surgical and traumatic infections that are associated with biofilm formation. Because biofilm formation is accompanied by high phenotypic resistance of the embedded bacteria, they are almost impossible to eradicate by conventional antibiotics. Therefore, alternative therapeutic strategies are of high interest. We generated nanostructured hybrid nonwovens via the electrospinning of a photoresponsive carbon monoxide (CO)-releasing molecule [CORM-1, Mn2(CO)10] and the polymer polylactide. This nonwoven showed a CO-induced antimicrobial activity that was sufficient to reduce the biofilm-embedded bacteria by 70% after photostimulation at 405 nm. The released CO increased the concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the biofilms, suggesting that in addition to inhibiting the electron transport chain, ROS might play a role in the antimicrobial activity of CORMs on S. aureus The nonwoven showed increased cytotoxicity on eukaryotic cells after longer exposure, most probably due to the released lactic acid, that might be acceptable for local and short-time treatments. Therefore, CO-releasing nonwovens might be a promising local antimicrobial therapy against biofilm-associated skin wound infections.

  11. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Correlation of Cefquinome against Experimental Catheter-associated Biofilm Infection due to Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng eZhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm formations play an important role in Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis and contribute to antibiotic treatment failures in biofilm-associated infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD profiles of cefquinome against an experimental catheter-related biofilm model due to S. aureus, including three clinical isolates and one non-clinical isolate. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC, minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC, biofilm bactericidal concentration (BBC, minimal biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC and biofilm prevention concentration (BPC and in vitro time-kill curves of cefquinome were studied in both planktonic and biofilm cells of study S. aureus strains. The in vivo post-antibiotic effects (PAEs, PK profiles and efficacy of cefquinome were performed in the catheter-related biofilm infection model in murine. A sigmoid Emax model was utilized to determine the PK/PD index that best described the dose-response profiles in the model.The MICs and MBICs of cefquinome for the four S. aureus strains were 0.5 and 16μg/mL, respectively. The BBCs (32-64 μg/mL and MBECs (64-256 μg/mL of these study strains were much higher than their corresponding BPC values (1-2 μg/mL. Cefquinome showed time-dependent killing both on planktonic and biofilm cells, but produced much shorter PAEs in biofilm infections. The best-correlated PK/PD parameters of cefquinome for planktonic and biofilm cells were the duration of time that the free drug level exceeded the MIC (fT>MIC, R2=96.2% and the MBIC (fT>MBIC, R2=94.7%, respectively. In addition, the AUC24h/MBIC of cefquinome also significantly correlated with the anti-biofilm outcome in this model (R2=93.1%. The values of AUC24h/MBIC for biofilm-static and 1-log10-unit biofilm-cidal activity were 22.8 h and 35.6 h; respectively. These results indicate that the PK/PD profiles of cefquinome could be used as valuable guidance for effective

  12. Transcriptional and functional analysis of the effects of magnolol: inhibition of autolysis and biofilms in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dacheng Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The targeting of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm structures are now gaining interest as an alternative strategy for developing new types of antimicrobial agents. Magnolol (MOL shows inhibitory activity against S. aureus biofilms and Triton X-100-induced autolysis in vitro, although there are no data regarding the molecular mechanisms of MOL action in bacteria. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The molecular basis of the markedly reduced autolytic phenotype and biofilm inhibition triggered by MOL were explored using transcriptomic analysis, and the transcription of important genes were verified by real-time RT-PCR. The inhibition of autolysis by MOL was evaluated using quantitative bacteriolytic assays and zymographic analysis, and antibiofilm activity assays and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to elucidate the inhibition of biofilm formation caused by MOL in 20 clinical isolates or standard strains. The reduction in cidA, atl, sle1, and lytN transcript levels following MOL treatment was consistent with the induced expression of their autolytic repressors lrgA, lrgB, arlR, and sarA. MOL generally inhibited or reversed the expression of most of the genes involved in biofilm production. The growth of S. aureus strain ATCC 25923 in the presence of MOL dose-dependently led to decreases in Triton X-100-induced autolysis, extracellular murein hydrolase activity, and the amount of extracellular DNA (eDNA. MOL may impede biofilm formation by reducing the expression of cidA, a murein hydrolase regulator, to inhibit autolysis and eDNA release, or MOL may directly repress biofilm formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: MOL shows in vitro antimicrobial activity against clinical and standard S. aureus strains grown in planktonic and biofilm cultures, suggesting that the structure of MOL may potentially be used as a basis for the development of drugs targeting biofilms.

  13. Regulatory Mutations Impacting Antibiotic Susceptibility in an Established Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Danielle N; Beenken, Karen E; Lantz, Tamara L; Meeker, Daniel G; Lynn, William B; Mills, Weston B; Spencer, Horace J; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2016-01-11

    We previously determined the extent to which mutations of different Staphylococcus aureus regulatory loci impact biofilm formation as assessed under in vitro conditions. Here we extend these studies to determine the extent to which those regulatory loci that had the greatest effect on biofilm formation also impact antibiotic susceptibility. The experiments were done under in vitro and in vivo conditions using two clinical isolates of S. aureus (LAC and UAMS-1) and two functionally diverse antibiotics (daptomycin and ceftaroline). Mutation of the staphylococcal accessory regulator (sarA) or sigB was found to significantly increase susceptibilities to both antibiotics and in both strains in a manner that could not be explained by changes in the MICs. The impact of a mutation in sarA was comparable to that of a mutation in sigB and greater than the impact observed with any other mutant. These results suggest that therapeutic strategies targeting sarA and/or sigB have the greatest potential to facilitate the ability to overcome the intrinsic antibiotic resistance that defines S. aureus biofilm-associated infections.

  14. 临床分离耐甲氧西林金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜表型检测及其相关基因分析%Detection of biofilm formation and analysis of biofilm-associated genes of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in clinical isolates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄惟彬; 黄静; 朱家馨; 杨海玲; 吴文斌

    2015-01-01

    Objective To detect biofilm formation and biofilm-associated genes of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in clinical isolates. Methods The biofilm were determined by microtiter plate assay (MPA) and congo red agar (CRA) and the biofilm-associated genes icaA,sarA,fnbA,fnbB were detected by PCR in 33 strains of MRSA in clinical isolates. Results Of the 33 MRSA isolates, 29(87.9%) were MPA positive, 16(48.5%) were CRA positive; The icaA gene was present in 39.4% of isolated strains. Furthermore, 69.7% of strains harboured the sarA gene, 39.4% were fnbA positive and 75.8% were fnbB positive. As many as 87.9% strains had the ability to form biofilm in vitro. 44.8% of MRSA formed biofilm in ica-dependent mechanism and 55.2% of MRSA isolates formed biofilm in ica-independent mechanism. Of the biofilm positive MRSA, 75.9% were sarA positive, 37.9% were fnbA positive and 79.3% were fnbB positive. Conclusion Most of the MRSA strains formed biofilm in ica-independent mechanism. fnbB and sarA gene shows higher frequency among the biofilm-associated genes of MRSA, it may infer that most of the MRSA strains biofilm formation are fnbB-mediated. Meanwhile, sarA may be a positive regulator of fnbB, and thus drives the biofilm formation.%目的:探讨耐甲氧西林金黄色葡萄球菌(MRSA)生物膜表型与其相关基因的关系。方法:收集33株临床分离的MRSA菌株并对其进行结晶紫半定量黏附实验及刚果红琼脂实验,同时用PCR方法对菌株的生物膜相关基因icaA、sarA、fnbA、fnbB进行检测。结果:33株MRSA中,结晶紫半定量黏附实验阳性有29株,即MRSA生物膜形成率为87.9%;刚果红琼脂实验阳性有16株(48.5%);icaA、sarA、fnbA、fnbB检出率分别为39.4%(13株)、69.7%(23株)、39.4%(13株)、75.8%(25株)。其中通过ica依赖途径形成生物膜的有44.8%,icaA非依赖途径的有55.2%。在生物膜阳性的29

  15. Influence of sub-inhibitory antibiotics and flow condition on Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 biofilm development and biofilm growth rate: BioTimer assay as a study model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlutti, Francesca; Frioni, Alessandra; Natalizi, Tiziana; Pantanella, Fabrizio; Valenti, Piera

    2014-11-01

    Staphylococcus biofilm exhibits high antibiotic resistance and therapeutic doses of antibiotics are often sub-inhibitory. Whereas data are available on the effect of sub-inhibitory antibiotics on matrix formation, little is known on their influence on biofilm population. Here, using BioTimer Assay (BTA), a method developed to quantify biofilm population, the influence of sub-inhibitory gentamicin, ofloxacin and azithromycin on Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538 biofilm population in flow with respect to static condition was assessed. Antibiotics and flow condition increased biofilm population even if at different extent, depending on the antibiotic molecule. The greatest bacterial population was found in biofilm developed under flow condition in the presence of azithromycin. A significant increase in biofilm matrix was recorded for biofilm developed in the presence of antibiotics in flow with respect to static condition. The growth rates (GRs) of 24-h biofilm developed under the influence of antibiotics and flow condition were also evaluated using BTA and a specific mathematical model. Antibiotics and flow condition affected the GRs of 24-h biofilm even if at different extent. The lowest GR value was recorded for biofilm developed under flow condition in the presence of ofloxacin. Although further studies are needed, our data indicate that antibiotics and flow condition influenced biofilm development by increasing both bacterial population and matrix formation and affected the GRs of the developed biofilm. To the best of our knowledge, BTA is unique in allowing the calculation of the GRs of biofilm and it may be considered to be a useful study model to evaluate the activity of antibiofilm molecules. PMID:24865865

  16. Efficacy of clarithromycin on biofilm formation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius

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    DiCicco Matthew

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical site infections (SSIs caused by biofilm-forming methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP have emerged as the most common hospital-acquired infections in companion animals. No methods currently exist for the therapeutic remediation of SSIs caused by MRSP in biofilms. Clarithromycin (CLA has been shown to prevent biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus. This study aims to assess the in vitro activity of CLA in eradicating MRSP biofilm formation on various materials. Results Quantitative assay results (P = 0.5126 suggest that CLA does not eradicate MRSP biofilm formation on polystyrene after 4 – 24 h growth periods. Scanning electron micrographs confirmed that CLA did not eradicate MRSP biofilm formed on orthopaedic implants. Conclusions By determining the in vitro characteristics and activities of MRSP isolates alone and against antibiotics, in vitro models of biofilm related infections can be made. In vitro data suggests that CLA does not effectively eradicate S. pseudintermedius biofilms in therapeutic doses.

  17. Effects of Some Food Additives on Biofilm Formation of Food-Borne Staphylococcus aureus%食品添加剂对食源性金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢丽斯; 张文艳; 许佳晶; 刘彦兰; 黄宝威; 张宏梅

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effect of food additives on biofilm formation (BF), Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) from spoiled food were isolated and identified. BF of this strain was tested in 96-well microplates in the presence of food additives. The results showed that BF of the strains was inhibited by low concentrations of preservatives (potassium sorbate and sodium benzoate). No biofilm was formed when the concentration of anticorrosive reached 0.4 g/L or higher. The BF inhibiting capacity of potassium sorbate was much greater than that of sodium benzoate. Generally, glycol mannate sulfate had greater BF inhibiting action than diacylglycerol at concentrations of 2--4g/L. Glycol mannate sulfate and diacylglycerol had maximum BF inhibiting capacity at concentrations of 3 g/L and 4 g/L, respectively. For sucrose ester emulsifier, SE7 and SE13 inhibited BF at concentrations of 0.3 -- 4 g/L, while SE11 inhibited BF at all concentrations tested. Nonionic surfactants such as Span-60 and Tween-80 showed different effects on BF of S.aureus, which might be related to their amphipathic property. In summary, all these tested food additives had inhibitory effect on biof'flm formation of food-borne S. aureus. This study will provide references for the prevention and control of bacteria biofilm formation.%从腐败食品分离筛选金黄色葡萄球菌,研究食品添加剂对金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜的影响。按国标方法鉴定金黄色葡萄球菌。在不同质量浓度的防腐剂和乳化剂作用的情况下,用96孔板法检测金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜形成情况。结果表明:在添加低质量浓度防腐剂山梨酸钾和苯甲酸钠后,金黄色葡萄球菌成膜能力受抑制,当两者质量浓度均≥0.4g/L时无成膜作用,且山梨酸钾抑制成膜趋势比苯甲酸钠明显;添加单甘酯后,质量浓度3g/L成膜率最低,而双甘酯质量浓度4g/L成膜率最低,两者比较,在质量浓度2

  18. Extended biofilm susceptibility assay for Staphylococcus aureus bovine mastitis isolates: evidence for association between genetic makeup and biofilm susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, M B; van Osch, M H J; Lam, T J G M; Vernooij, J C M; Gaastra, W; Fink-Gremmels, J

    2011-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most prevalent causes of bovine mastitis. The antimicrobial treatment of this disease is currently based on antimicrobial susceptibility tests according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute standards. However, various authors have shown a discrepancy between the results of this standard susceptibility test and the actual cure rate of the applied antimicrobial treatment. Increasing evidence suggests that in vivo biofilm formation by Staph. aureus, which is not assessed in the antimicrobial susceptibility tests, is associated with this problem, resulting in disappointing cure rates, especially for infections of longer duration. Previous data obtained with a limited number of strains showed that the extended biofilm antimicrobial susceptibility (EBS) assay reveals differences between strains, which cannot be derived from a standard susceptibility test or from a 24-h biofilm susceptibility test. The objective of this study was to test a collection of Staph. aureus bovine mastitis strains in the EBS assay and to model the effect of antimicrobial exposure, duration of antimicrobial exposure, and genotype profile of the strains on antimicrobial susceptibility. With the results from a previous study with the same collection of strains, the effect of genotype represented by accessory gene regulator gene (agr-type), the presence of insertional sequence 257 (IS257), intercellular adhesion (ica), and the β-lactamase (blaZ) gene were entered as explanatory factors in a logistic regression model. The agr locus of Staph. aureus controls the expression of most of the virulence factors, represses the transcription of several cell wall-associated proteins, and activates several exoproteins during the post-exponential phase. The IS257 gene has been related to biofilm formation in vitro and was found earlier in 50% of the agr-type 2 strains. The ica gene cluster encodes for the production of an extracellular polysaccharide adhesin, termed

  19. Bap: a family of surface proteins involved in biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, Iñigo; Penadés, José R

    2006-03-01

    A group of surface proteins sharing several structural and functional features is emerging as an important element in the biofilm formation process of diverse bacterial species. The first member of this group of proteins was identified in a Staphylococcus aureus mastitis isolate and was named Bap (biofilm-associated protein). As common structural features, Bap-related proteins: (i) are present on the bacterial surface; (ii) show a high molecular weight; (iii) contain a core domain of tandem repeats; (iv) confer upon bacteria the capacity to form a biofilm; (v) play a relevant role in bacterial infectious processes; and (vi) can occasionally be contained in mobile elements. This review summarizes recent studies that have identified and assigned roles to Bap-related proteins in biofilm biology and virulence.

  20. Detection of alpha-toxin and other virulence factors in biofilms of staphylococcus aureus on polystyrene and a human epidermalmodel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Den Reijer (P. Martijn); J.A. Haisma (Janneke); N. Lemmens-den Toom; J. Willemse (José); R.A. Koning; J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); D.H. Dekkers (Dick); E.J. Rijkers; A. El Ghalbzouri (Abdoelwaheb); P.H. Nibbering (Peter); W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground & Aim: The ability of Staphylococcus aureus to successfully colonize (a)biotic surfaces may be explained by biofilm formation and the actions of virulence factors. The aim of the present study was to establish the presence of 52 proteins, including virulence factors such as al

  1. Antimicrobial activity of zinc and titanium dioxide nanoparticles against biofilm-producing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesline, A.; John, Neetu P.; Narayanan, P. M.; Vani, C.; Murugan, Sevanan

    2015-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the major nosocomial pathogens responsible for a wide spectrum of infections and the emergence of bacterial resistance to antibiotics has lead to treatment drawbacks towards large number of drugs. Formation of biofilms is the main contributing factor to antibiotic resistance. The development of reliable processes for the synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles is an important aspect of nanotechnology today. Zinc oxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles comprise well-known inhibitory and bactericidal effects. Emergence of antimicrobial resistance by pathogenic bacteria is a major health problem in recent years. This study was designed to determine the efficacy of zinc and titanium dioxide nanoparticles against biofilm producing methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Biofilm production was detected by tissue culture plate method. Out of 30 MRSA isolates, 22 isolates showed strong biofilm production and 2 showed weak and moderate biofilm formation. Two strong and weak biofilm-producing methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates were subjected to antimicrobial activity using commercially available zinc and titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Thus, the nanoparticles showed considerably good activity against the isolates, and it can be concluded that they may act as promising, antibacterial agents in the coming years.

  2. Antimicrobial Activity of Selected Phytochemicals against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and Their Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Monte

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria can be resistant to multiple antibiotics and we are fast approaching a time when antibiotics will not work on some bacterial infections. New antimicrobial compounds are urgently necessary. Plants are considered the greatest source to obtain new antimicrobials. This study aimed to assess the antimicrobial activity of four phytochemicals—7-hydroxycoumarin (7-HC, indole-3-carbinol (I3C, salicylic acid (SA and saponin (SP—against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, either as planktonic cells or as biofilms. These bacteria are commonly found in hospital-acquired infections. Some aspects on the phytochemicals mode of action, including surface charge, hydrophobicity, motility and quorum-sensing inhibition (QSI were investigated. In addition, the phytochemicals were combined with three antibiotics in order to assess any synergistic effect. 7-HC and I3C were the most effective phytochemicals against E. coli and S. aureus. Both phytochemicals affected the motility and quorum-sensing (QS activity, which means that they can play an important role in the interference of cell-cell interactions and in biofilm formation and control. However, total biofilm removal was not achieved with any of the selected phytochemicals. Dual combinations between tetracycline (TET, erythromycin (ERY and ciprofloxacin (CIP and I3C produced synergistic effects against S. aureus resistant strains. The overall results demonstrates the potential of phytochemicals to control the growth of E. coli and S. aureus in both planktonic and biofilm states. In addition, the phytochemicals demonstrated the potential to act synergistically with antibiotics, contributing to the recycling of old antibiotics that were once considered ineffective due to resistance problems.

  3. Rifampicin-containing combinations are superior to combinations of vancomycin, linezolid and daptomycin against Staphylococcus aureus biofilm infection in vivo and in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Nis Pedersen; Skovdal, Sandra M; Meyer, Rikke L;

    2016-01-01

    and in combination againstStaphylococcus aureus.We tested vancomycin, linezolid, daptomycin and tigecycline alone and in combination with rifampicin, vancomycin, linezolid and daptomycin againstS. aureusIn vitro, biofilm formation dramatically reduced susceptibility by a factor of 500-2000.In vivo, antibiotic...

  4. Natural biofilm formation with Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portier, Emilie; Héchard, Yann

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation could be studied in various conditions. Most of the studies with Legionella pneumophila used monospecies biofilm in culture media. In some cases, it is important to study bacteria in conditions more close to environmental conditions. In this paper, we describe protocols to produce natural biofilms from river water that were spiked with L. pneumophila. PMID:23150397

  5. Capsular polysaccharide of Group B Streptococcus mediates biofilm formation in the presence of human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fan Di; Mallet, Adeline; Caliot, Elise; Gao, Cherry; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick; Dramsi, Shaynoor

    2015-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is an asymptomatic colonizer of human mucosal surfaces that is responsible for sepsis and meningitis in neonates. Bacterial persistence and pathogenesis often involves biofilm formation. We previously showed that biofilm formation in medium supplemented with glucose is mediated by the PI-2a pilus. Here, biofilm formation was tested in cell culture medium supplemented with human plasma. GBS strains were able to form biofilms in these conditions unlike Group A Streptococcus (GAS) or Staphylococcus aureus. Analysis of mutants impaired for various surface components revealed that the GBS capsule is a key component in this process.

  6. Efficacy of combined vancomycin and fosfomycin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in biofilms in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Shi

    Full Text Available Infection by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is a life-threatening condition, and formation of biofilms can lead to treatment failure in a clinical setting. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the in vivo bactericidal effects of a combination of vancomycin (VAN and fosfomycin (FOS against MRSA in a rat carboxymethyl cellulose-pouch biofilm model. The results of the time-kill assay showed that the combination therapy was capable of killing at low minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC (½ × MIC VAN +1 × MIC FOS and 1 × MIC VAN + 1 × MIC FOS. In the in vivo study, a synergistically bactericidal effect was observed when using the combination therapy on MRSA embedded in the mature biofilm model. In comparison with the untreated control group and the groups receiving either VAN or FOS alone, the rats treated with combination therapy had lower MRSA colony counts in exudates from the pouch, lower white blood cell and neutrophil counts, and C-reactive protein (CRP in peripheral blood. Furthermore, histological analysis of the pouch wall indicated combination therapy resulted in disappearance of biofilm-like structures, marked decrease in necrosis, and formation of granular tissue. In conclusion, the combination of VAN with FOS had a synergistic bactericidal effect on chronic MRSA infection embedded in biofilm, providing an alternative approach to treating this condition.

  7. Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA isolates of swine origin form robust biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy L Nicholson

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA colonization of livestock animals is common and prevalence rates for pigs have been reported to be as high as 49%. Mechanisms contributing to the persistent carriage and high prevalence rates of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA strains in swine herds and production facilities have not been investigated. One explanation for the high prevalence of MRSA in swine herds is the ability of these organisms to exist as biofilms. In this report, the ability of swine LA-MRSA strains, including ST398, ST9, and ST5, to form biofilms was quantified and compared to several swine and human isolates. The contribution of known biofilm matrix components, polysaccharides, proteins and extracellular DNA (eDNA, was tested in all strains as well. All MRSA swine isolates formed robust biofilms similar to human clinical isolates. The addition of Dispersin B had no inhibitory effect on swine MRSA isolates when added at the initiation of biofilm growth or after pre-established mature biofilms formed. In contrast, the addition of proteinase K inhibited biofilm formation in all strains when added at the initiation of biofilm growth and was able to disperse pre-established mature biofilms. Of the LA-MRSA strains tested, we found ST398 strains to be the most sensitive to both inhibition of biofilm formation and dispersal of pre-formed biofilms by DNaseI. Collectively, these findings provide a critical first step in designing strategies to control or eliminate MRSA in swine herds.

  8. Detection of Alpha-Toxin and Other Virulence Factors in Biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus on Polystyrene and a Human Epidermal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens-den Toom, N. A.; Willemse, J.; Koning, R. A.; Demmers, J. A. A.; Dekkers, D. H. W.; Rijkers, E.; El Ghalbzouri, A.; Nibbering, P. H.; van Wamel, W.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aim The ability of Staphylococcus aureus to successfully colonize (a)biotic surfaces may be explained by biofilm formation and the actions of virulence factors. The aim of the present study was to establish the presence of 52 proteins, including virulence factors such as alpha-toxin, during biofilm formation of five different (methicillin resistant) S. aureus strains on Leiden human epidermal models (LEMs) and polystyrene surfaces (PS) using a competitive Luminex-based assay. Results All five S. aureus strains formed biofilms on PS, whereas only three out of five strains formed biofilms on LEMs. Out of the 52 tested proteins, six functionally diverse proteins (ClfB, glucosaminidase, IsdA, IsaA, SACOL0688 and nuclease) were detected in biofilms of all strains on both PS and LEMs. At the same time, four toxins (alpha-toxin, gamma-hemolysin B and leukocidins D and E), two immune modulators (formyl peptide receptor-like inhibitory protein and Staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 1), and two other proteins (lipase and LytM) were detectable in biofilms by all five S. aureus strains on LEMs, but not on PS. In contrast, fibronectin-binding protein B (FnbpB) was detectable in biofilms by all S. aureus biofilms on PS, but not on LEMs. These data were largely confirmed by the results from proteomic and transcriptomic analyses and in case of alpha-toxin additionally by GFP-reporter technology. Conclusion Functionally diverse virulence factors of (methicillin-resistant) S. aureus are present during biofilm formation on LEMs and PS. These results could aid in identifying novel targets for future treatment strategies against biofilm-associated infections. PMID:26741798

  9. Detection of Alpha-Toxin and Other Virulence Factors in Biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus on Polystyrene and a Human Epidermal Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P M den Reijer

    Full Text Available The ability of Staphylococcus aureus to successfully colonize (abiotic surfaces may be explained by biofilm formation and the actions of virulence factors. The aim of the present study was to establish the presence of 52 proteins, including virulence factors such as alpha-toxin, during biofilm formation of five different (methicillin resistant S. aureus strains on Leiden human epidermal models (LEMs and polystyrene surfaces (PS using a competitive Luminex-based assay.All five S. aureus strains formed biofilms on PS, whereas only three out of five strains formed biofilms on LEMs. Out of the 52 tested proteins, six functionally diverse proteins (ClfB, glucosaminidase, IsdA, IsaA, SACOL0688 and nuclease were detected in biofilms of all strains on both PS and LEMs. At the same time, four toxins (alpha-toxin, gamma-hemolysin B and leukocidins D and E, two immune modulators (formyl peptide receptor-like inhibitory protein and Staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 1, and two other proteins (lipase and LytM were detectable in biofilms by all five S. aureus strains on LEMs, but not on PS. In contrast, fibronectin-binding protein B (FnbpB was detectable in biofilms by all S. aureus biofilms on PS, but not on LEMs. These data were largely confirmed by the results from proteomic and transcriptomic analyses and in case of alpha-toxin additionally by GFP-reporter technology.Functionally diverse virulence factors of (methicillin-resistant S. aureus are present during biofilm formation on LEMs and PS. These results could aid in identifying novel targets for future treatment strategies against biofilm-associated infections.

  10. Pattern formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parsek, Matthew R.; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria are capable of forming elaborate multicellular communities called biofilms. Pattern formation in biofilms depends on cell proliferation and cellular migration in response to the available nutrients and other external cues, as well as on self-generated intercellular signal molecules...... and the production of an extracellular matrix that serves as a structural 'scaffolding' for the biofilm cells. Pattern formation in biofilms allows cells to position themselves favorably within nutrient gradients and enables buildup and maintenance of physiologically distinct subpopulations, which facilitates...... survival of one or more subpopulations upon environmental insult, and therefore plays an important role in the innate tolerance displayed by biofilms toward adverse conditions....

  11. 尿路感染分离金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜形成能力及相关基因的分析%Analysis of biofilm formation ability and related genes of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from urinary tract infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙凤军; 洪海; 冯伟; 孙艺璇; 夏培元

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨尿路感染分离金黄色葡萄球菌的生物膜形成能力及相关基因分布,为预防和治疗临床感染提供理论基础。方法采用标准琼脂平板倍比稀释法检测最小抑菌浓度,菌落计数法检测细菌黏附能力,96孔板结晶紫染色法检测细菌生物膜形成能力,生物膜相关基因检测采用PCR扩增法。结果11株金黄色葡萄球菌临床株对青霉素和红霉素耐药率较高,而对万古霉素和呋喃妥因全部敏感。所有菌株都有较强的黏附能力,而生物膜形成能力一般。其中10株菌株扩增出icaAD和icaBC基因。结论尿路感染金黄色葡萄球菌的黏附能力和生物膜形成能力具有菌株差异性,ica是金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜形成的重要基因。%Objective To study the biofilm formation ability and related gene distribution of Staphylococcus (S .) aureus iso‐lated from urinary tract infections to provide the theoretical basis for the prevention and treatment of clinical infection .Methods The minimal inhibitory concentration was detected using the agar double dilution method .The bacterial adhesion ability was deter‐mined by flat colony counting method .The biofilm formation ability was analyzed by the 96‐well crystal violet staining method .The biofilm‐associated genes were detected by PCR amplification .Results Eleven clinical strains of S .aureus were high resistant to pen‐icillin and erythromycin ,whereas were all sensitive to vancomycin and nitrofurantoin .All the isolates had a strong ability of adhe‐sion ,but the biofilm formation ability was weak .Among them ,the icaAD and icaBC genes were amplified in 10 S .aureus isolates . Conclusion The adhesion ability and biofilm formation ability of S .aureus isolated from urinary tract infections have the strain differences ,and ica is an important gene of S .aureus biofilm formation .

  12. Pathology and biofilm formation in a porcine model of staphylococcal osteomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, L K; Koch, J; Frees, D;

    2012-01-01

    A porcine model was used to examine the potential of human and porcine Staphylococcus aureus isolates to induce haematogenously spread osteomyelitis. Pigs were inoculated in the right femoral artery with one of the following S. aureus strains: S54F9 (from a porcine lung abscess; n = 3 animals), N...... dependent on the strain of bacteria inoculated and on the formation of a biofilm....... with colonies of S. aureus as demonstrated immunohistochemically. By peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization bacterial aggregates were demonstrated to be embedded in an opaque matrix, indicating that the bacteria had formed a biofilm. Development of experimental osteomyelitis was therefore...

  13. Cadmium Modulates Biofilm Formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Xueqing; Santos, Regiane R.; Fink-Gremmels, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of cadmium exposure on Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 35984) biofilm formation. Bacteria were cultured in the absence or presence of different concentrations (0-50 mu M) of cadmium. Biofilm formation and bacterial viability were assessed. Quantitativ

  14. Prevalence of Adhesion and Regulation of Biofilm-Related Genes in Different Clones of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Sahab Atshan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical information about genotypically different clones of biofilm-producing Staphylococcus aureus is largely unknown. We examined whether different clones of methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MSSA and MRSA differ with respect to staphylococcal microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs in biofilm formation. The study used 60 different types of spa and determined the phenotypes, the prevalence of the 13 MSCRAMM, and biofilm genes for each clone. The current investigation was carried out using a modified Congo red agar (MCRA, a microtiter plate assay (MPA, polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Clones belonging to the same spa type were found to have similar properties in adheringto thepolystyrene microtiter plate surface. However, their ability to produce slime on MCRA medium was different. PCR experiments showed that 60 clones of MSSA and MRSA were positive for 5 genes (out of 9 MSCRAMM genes. icaADBC genes were found to be present in all the 60 clones tested indicating a high prevalence, and these genes were equally distributed among the clones associated with MSSA and those with MRSA. The prevalence of other MSCRAMM genes among MSSA and MRSA clones was found to be variable. MRSA and MSSA gene expression (MSCRAMM and icaADBC was confirmed by RT-PCR.

  15. Chlorhexidine Digluconate Effects on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation in Some Field Isolates of Animal Bacterial Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahimi, Azizollah; Hemati, Majid; Habibian Dehkordi, Saeed; Bahadoran, Shahab; Khoshnood, Sheida; Khubani, Shahin; Dokht Faraj, Mahdi; Hakimi Alni, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: To study chlorhexidine digluconate disinfectant effects on planktonic growth and biofilm formation in some bacterial field isolates from animals. Objectives: The current study investigated chlorhexidine digluconate effects on planktonic growth and biofilm formation in some field isolates of veterinary bacterial pathogens. Materials and Methods: Forty clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Salmonella serotypes, Staphylococcus. aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae (10 isolates for ea...

  16. Evaluation of Various Metallic Coatings on Steel to Mitigate Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Ikigai

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In marine environments and water systems, it is easy for many structures to form biofilms on their surfaces and to be deteriorated due to the corrosion caused by biofilm formation by bacteria. The authors have investigated the antibacterial effects of metallic elements in practical steels so far to solve food-related problems, using Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. However, from the viewpoint of material deterioration caused by bacteria and their antifouling measures, we should consider the biofilm behavior as aggregate rather than individual bacterium. Therefore, we picked up Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudoalteromonas carageenovara in this study, since they easily form biofilms in estuarine and marine environments. We investigated what kind of metallic elements could inhibit the biofilm formation at first and then discussed how the thin films of those inhibitory elements on steels could affect biofilm formation. The information would lead to the establishment of effective antifouling measures against corrosion in estuarine and marine environments.

  17. Cellular chain formation in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Klemm, Per

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report on a novel structural phenotype in Escherichia coli biofilms: cellular chain formation. Biofilm chaining in E. coli K-12 was found to occur primarily by clonal expansion, but was not due to filamentous growth. Rather, chain formation was the result of intercellular......; type I fimbriae expression significantly reduced cellular chain formation, presumably by steric hindrance. Cellular chain formation did not appear to be specific to E coli K-12. Although many urinary tract infection (UTI) isolates were found to form rather homogeneous, flat biofilms, three isolates...

  18. Inhibition of Biofilm Formation Using Novel Nanostructured Surfaces Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Biofilms are ubiquitous in the environment. Few surfaces resist biofilm formation, most promote it. Biofilm formation poses problems in water systems as they can...

  19. Biofilm formation in a hot water system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagh, L.K.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Arvin, Erik;

    2002-01-01

    The biofilm formation rate was measured in situ in a hot water system in an apartment building by specially designed sampling equipment, and the net growth of the suspended bacteria was measured by incubation of water samples with the indigeneous bacteria. The biofilm formation rate reached......, in the sludge, or in the water from the distribution system was negligible. This indicated that bacterial growth took place on the inner surfaces in the hot water system and biofilm formation and detachment of bacteria could account for most of the suspended bacteria actually measured in hot water. Therefore...

  20. Low Fluid Shear Culture of Staphylococcus Aureus Represses hfq Expression and Induces an Attachment-Independent Biofilm Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. Mark; Castro, S. L.; Nickerson, C. A.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The opportunistic pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, experiences fluctuations in fluid shear during infection and colonization of a human host. Colonization frequently occurs at mucus membrane sites such as in the gastrointestinal tract where the bacterium may experience low levels of fluid shear. The response of S. aureus to low fluid shear remains unclear. Methods: S. aureus was cultured to stationary phase using Rotating-Wall Vessel (RWV) bioreactors which produce a physiologically relevant low fluid shear environment. The bacterial aggregates that developed in the RWV were evaluated by electron microscopy as well as for antibiotic resistance and other virulence-associated stressors. Genetic expression profiles for the low-shear cultured S. aureus were determined by microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Planktonic S. aureus cultures in the low-shear environment formed aggregates completely encased in high amounts of extracellular polymeric substances. In addition, these aggregates demonstrated increased antibiotic resistance indicating attachment-independent biofilm formation. Carotenoid production in the low-shear cultured S. aureus was significantly decreased, and these cultures displayed an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and killing by whole blood. The hfq gene, associated with low-shear growth in Gram negative organisms, was also found to be down-regulated in S. aureus. Conclusions: Collectively, this data suggests that S. aureus decreases virulence characteristics in favor of a biofilm-dwelling colonization phenotype in response to a low fluid shear environment. Furthermore, the identification of an Hfq response to low-shear culture in S. aureus, in addition to the previously reported responses in Gram negative organisms, strongly suggests an evolutionarily conserved response to mechanical stimuli among structurally diverse prokaryotes.

  1. Femtosecond Laser Patterning of the Biopolymer Chitosan for Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Estevam-Alves

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Controlling microbial growth is crucial for many biomedical, pharmaceutical and food industry applications. In this paper, we used a femtosecond laser to microstructure the surface of chitosan, a biocompatible polymer that has been explored for applications ranging from antimicrobial action to drug delivery. The influence of energy density on the features produced on chitosan was investigated by optical and atomic force microscopies. An increase in the hydrophilic character of the chitosan surface was attained upon laser micromachining. Patterned chitosan films were used to observe Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923 biofilm formation, revealing an increase in the biofilm formation in the structured regions. Our results indicate that fs-laser micromachining is an attractive option to pattern biocompatible surfaces, and to investigate basic aspects of the relationship between surface topography and bacterial adhesion.

  2. Femtosecond Laser Patterning of the Biopolymer Chitosan for Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevam-Alves, Regina; Ferreira, Paulo Henrique Dias; Coatrini, Andrey C.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.; Fontana, Carla Raquel; Mendonca, Cleber Renato

    2016-01-01

    Controlling microbial growth is crucial for many biomedical, pharmaceutical and food industry applications. In this paper, we used a femtosecond laser to microstructure the surface of chitosan, a biocompatible polymer that has been explored for applications ranging from antimicrobial action to drug delivery. The influence of energy density on the features produced on chitosan was investigated by optical and atomic force microscopies. An increase in the hydrophilic character of the chitosan surface was attained upon laser micromachining. Patterned chitosan films were used to observe Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) biofilm formation, revealing an increase in the biofilm formation in the structured regions. Our results indicate that fs-laser micromachining is an attractive option to pattern biocompatible surfaces, and to investigate basic aspects of the relationship between surface topography and bacterial adhesion. PMID:27548153

  3. Femtosecond Laser Patterning of the Biopolymer Chitosan for Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevam-Alves, Regina; Ferreira, Paulo Henrique Dias; Coatrini, Andrey C; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Fontana, Carla Raquel; Mendonca, Cleber Renato

    2016-01-01

    Controlling microbial growth is crucial for many biomedical, pharmaceutical and food industry applications. In this paper, we used a femtosecond laser to microstructure the surface of chitosan, a biocompatible polymer that has been explored for applications ranging from antimicrobial action to drug delivery. The influence of energy density on the features produced on chitosan was investigated by optical and atomic force microscopies. An increase in the hydrophilic character of the chitosan surface was attained upon laser micromachining. Patterned chitosan films were used to observe Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) biofilm formation, revealing an increase in the biofilm formation in the structured regions. Our results indicate that fs-laser micromachining is an attractive option to pattern biocompatible surfaces, and to investigate basic aspects of the relationship between surface topography and bacterial adhesion. PMID:27548153

  4. Vancomycin and maltodextrin affect structure and activity of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiamco, Mia Mae; Atci, Erhan; Khan, Qaiser Farid; Mohamed, Abdelrhman; Renslow, Ryan S; Abu-Lail, Nehal; Fransson, Boel A; Call, Douglas R; Beyenal, Haluk

    2015-12-01

    Hyperosmotic agents such as maltodextrin negatively impact bacterial growth through osmotic stress without contributing to drug resistance. We hypothesized that a combination of maltodextrin (osmotic agent) and vancomycin (antibiotic) would be more effective against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms than either alone. To test our hypothesis, S. aureus was grown in a flat plate flow cell reactor. Confocal laser scanning microscopy images were analyzed to quantify changes in biofilm structure. We used dissolved oxygen microelectrodes to quantify how vancomycin and maltodextrin affected the respiration rate and oxygen penetration into the biofilm. We found that treatment with vancomycin or maltodextrin altered biofilm structure. The effect on the structure was significant when they were used simultaneously to treat S. aureus biofilms. In addition, vancomycin treatment increased the oxygen respiration rate, while maltodextrin treatment caused an increase and then a decrease. An increased maltodextrin concentration decreased the diffusivity of the antibiotic. Overall, we conclude that (1) an increased maltodextrin concentration decreases vancomycin diffusion but increases the osmotic effect, leading to the optimum treatment condition, and (2) the combination of vancomycin and maltodextrin is more effective against S. aureus biofilms than either alone. Vancomycin and maltodextrin act together to increase the effectiveness of treatment against S. aureus biofilm growth.

  5. Analysis of in vitro biofilm formation and biofilm-associated genes of high-level mupirocin-resistant,methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates%高水平莫匹罗星耐药MRSA体外生物膜形成能力及相关基因检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘庆中; 韩立中; 孙景勇; 李彬; 倪语星

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the ability of in vitro biofilm formation of high-level mupirocin-resistant, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MuH MRSA) isolates and the prevalence of biofilm-associated genes. Methods MuH MRSA isolates were screened by mupirocin disc diffusion, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)amplification of mupA gene from 803 clinical MRSA isolates obtained from Shanghai and Wenzhou. The biofilm-forming ability of MuH MRSA was tested using a spectrophotometric quantitative assay. The biofilm-associated genes (icaA, icaD, agr,sarA, sasG, bap and ccpA) were amplified by PCR. Results A total of 53 strains of MuH MRSA were identified. Only 5 (9. 4%, 5/53) were able to form biofilm. The icaD gene and agr operon were identified in all the MuH MRSA strains. The genes icaA, sarA, sasG and ccpA were harbored by 83.0%, 86.8%,84. 9% and 92.5% of the isolates, respectively. However, the bap gene was only hosted by one isolate. Conclusions Most biofilm-associated determinants were prevalent in MuH MRSA isolates. However, only agr operon was the gene which might affect the biofilm-forming ability of this pathogen.%目的 了解高水平莫匹罗星耐药甲氧西林耐药金葡菌(MuH MRSA)体外生物膜形成能力及介导生物膜形成相关基因的分布.方法 对分离自上海和浙江省温州地区5所教学医院的803 株临床分离MRSA进行莫匹罗星纸片扩散法检测最低抑菌浓度(MIC),mupA基因PCR扩增筛选MuH MRSA,分光光度计检测MuH MRSA菌株体外生物膜的形成能力,PCR扩增生物膜形成相关基因(icaA、icaD、agr、sarA、sasG、bap和ccpA).结果 共筛选出53株MuH MRSA,其中仅5株(9.4%,5/53)具有体外形成生物膜的能力;基因检测显示,icaD和agr基因存在于全部MuH MRSA菌株中,而icaA、sarA、sasG和ccpA基因则分别存在于83.0%、86.8%、84.9%和92.5%的菌株中,仅有1株细菌携带bap基因.结论 大部分生物膜形

  6. Crenarchaeal biofilm formation under extreme conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Koerdt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Biofilm formation has been studied in much detail for a variety of bacterial species, as it plays a major role in the pathogenicity of bacteria. However, only limited information is available for the development of archaeal communities that are frequently found in many natural environments. METHODOLOGY: We have analyzed biofilm formation in three closely related hyperthermophilic crenarchaeotes: Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, S. solfataricus and S. tokodaii. We established a microtitre plate assay adapted to high temperatures to determine how pH and temperature influence biofilm formation in these organisms. Biofilm analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that the three strains form very different communities ranging from simple carpet-like structures in S. solfataricus to high density tower-like structures in S. acidocaldarius in static systems. Lectin staining indicated that all three strains produced extracellular polysaccharides containing glucose, galactose, mannose and N-acetylglucosamine once biofilm formation was initiated. While flagella mutants had no phenotype in two days old static biofilms of S. solfataricus, a UV-induced pili deletion mutant showed decreased attachment of cells. CONCLUSION: The study gives first insights into formation and development of crenarchaeal biofilms in extreme environments.

  7. Dissecting the contribution of Staphylococcus aureus α-phenol-soluble modulins to biofilm amyloid structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Patrizia; Pallares, Irantzu; Navarro, Susanna; Ventura, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is recognized as one of the most frequent causes of biofilm-associated infections. The recently discovered phenol soluble modulins (PSMs) are small α-helical amphipathic peptides that act as the main molecular effectors of staphylococcal biofilm maturation, promoting the formation of an extracellular fibril structure with amyloid-like properties. Here, we combine computational, biophysical and in cell analysis to address the specific contribution of individual PSMs to biofilm structure. We demonstrate that despite their highly similar sequence and structure, contrary to what it was previously thought, not all PSMs participate in amyloid fibril formation. A balance of hydrophobic/hydrophilic forces and helical propensity seems to define the aggregation propensity of PSMs and control their assembly and function. This knowledge would allow to target specifically the amyloid properties of these peptides. In this way, we show that Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the principal polyphenol in green tea, prevents the assembly of amyloidogenic PSMs and disentangles their preformed amyloid fibrils. PMID:27708403

  8. Differential Protection from Tobramycin by Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Davenport, Emily K.; Douglas R. Call; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-01

    We investigated biofilms of two pathogens, Acinetobacter baumannii and Staphylococcus aureus, to characterize mechanisms by which the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) found in biofilms can protect bacteria against tobramycin exposure. To do so, it is critical to study EPS-antibiotic interactions in a homogeneous environment without mass transfer limitations. Consequently, we developed a method to grow biofilms, harvest EPS, and then augment planktonic cultures with isolated EPS and tob...

  9. NaOCl effect on biofilm produced by Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the milking environment and mastitis infected cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliana de Castro Melo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms constitute a physical barrier, protecting the encased bacteria from detergents and sanitizers. The objective of this work was to analyze the effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl against strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from raw milk of cows with subclinical mastitis and Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the milking environment (blowers and milk conducting tubes. The results revealed that, in the presence of NaOCl (150ppm, the number of adhered cells of the twelve S. aureus strains was significantly reduced. When the same strains were evaluated in biofilm condition, different results were obtained. It was found that, after a contact period of five minutes with NaOCl (150ppm, four strains (two strains from milk , one from the blowers and one from a conductive rubber were still able to grow. Although with the increasing contact time between the bacteria and the NaOCl (150ppm, no growth was detected for any of the strains. Concerning the efficiency of NaOCl on total biofilm biomass formation by each S. aureus strain, a decrease was observed when these strains were in contact with 150 ppm NaOCl for a total period of 10 minutes. This study highlights the importance of a correct sanitation protocol of all the milk processing units which can indeed significantly reduce the presence of microorganisms, leading to a decrease of cow´s mastitis and milk contamination.

  10. Crenarchaeal Biofilm Formation under Extreme Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Koerdt; Julia Gödeke; Jürgen Berger; Thormann, Kai M.; Sonja-Verena Albers

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biofilm formation has been studied in much detail for a variety of bacterial species, as it plays a major role in the pathogenicity of bacteria. However, only limited information is available for the development of archaeal communities that are frequently found in many natural environments. METHODOLOGY: We have analyzed biofilm formation in three closely related hyperthermophilic crenarchaeotes: Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, S. solfataricus and S. tokodaii. We established a microtitr...

  11. Specific Antibodies to Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Are Present in Serum from Pigs with Osteomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Kruse; Jensen, Henrik Elvang; Koch, Janne;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Achilles heel in osteomyelitis is that bacteria, primarily Staphylococcus aureus, grow as a biofilm in the bone lesions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the present study, we explored the serum level of specific antibodies to S. aurues biofilm in porcine models of osteomyelitis. RESULTS...... (IL 6) levels was also seen. CONCLUSION: The observed biofilm-specific antibody response represents a T-helper cell 17 (Th17) response and potentially a T-helper cell 1 (Th1) response. This is in agreement with previous studies in mice and rabbits speculating that S. aureus induces a Th1- and Th17...

  12. IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda

  13. 维药刺山柑抑制金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜的研究%Effect the biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus by Xinjiang Cap-paris spinosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐琦; 吴晔华; 王晓梅; 李雪亮; 谢天宇; 马梦佳; 杨学安; 薛志琴

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of Capparis spinosa. extract on Staphylococcus aureus’biofilm (BF) in vitro, and provide the experimental basis of clinical application. Methods The Capparis spinosa. extract by alcohol extraction was obtained, and the different polarity extracts was obtained by extraction with petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and n-butanol; the Staphylococcus aureus BF in v itro was induced by 96-well plates, the determination of the tube double dilution method was used to measure the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) in different extracts/extraction from Cap-paris spinosa., the impact of BF formation for Staphylococcus aureus was evaluated. At the same time, the evaluation of its scavenging effect on mature BF was done by detecting the impact of Uyghur medicine Capparis spinosa. extract on the number of living bacterium in mature BF. Results The MIC for Staphylococcus aureus in Capparis spinosa. alcohol extract, petroleum ether extraction, ethyl acetate extracts were 52.50, 50.00, 45.00, 46.25 mg/mL, respectively. When the concentration reached 26.26, 23.13, 25.00, 22.50 mg/mL, alcohol extraction, ethyl acetate and n-butanol samples could inhibit the formation of BF, the number of living bacterium was significantly less than the blank control group, the difference was statistically significant (P0.05), the role of clearing BF of the high concentration of alcohol extract and n-bu-tanol extract was stronger in 24 h, compared with the blank control group, there was significant difference (P 0.05). Conclusion Capparis spinosa. alcohol extract ethyl, ethyl acetate and n-butanol samples can effevtively inhibit the BF’s formation of Staphy-lococcus aureus in vitro. It can also destroy the mature BF.%目的:研究维药刺山柑提取及萃取物对金黄色葡萄球菌体外培养生物膜(BF)形成及清除作用的影响,为进一步开发维药刺山柑的应用价值及临床辅助治疗耐药性感染提供实

  14. Iron and Acinetobacter baumannii Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Gentile

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen, responsible for infection outbreaks worldwide. The pathogenicity of this bacterium is mainly due to its multidrug-resistance and ability to form biofilm on abiotic surfaces, which facilitate long-term persistence in the hospital setting. Given the crucial role of iron in A. baumannii nutrition and pathogenicity, iron metabolism has been considered as a possible target for chelation-based antibacterial chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of iron restriction on A. baumannii growth and biofilm formation using different iron chelators and culture conditions. We report substantial inter-strain variability and growth medium-dependence for biofilm formation by A. baumannii isolates from veterinary and clinical sources. Neither planktonic nor biofilm growth of A. baumannii was affected by exogenous chelators. Biofilm formation was either stimulated by iron or not responsive to iron in the majority of isolates tested, indicating that iron starvation is not sensed as an overall biofilm-inducing stimulus by A. baumannii. The impressive iron withholding capacity of this bacterium should be taken into account for future development of chelation-based antimicrobial and anti-biofilm therapies.

  15. Evaluation of Antibiotics Active against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Based on Activity in an Established Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, Daniel G; Beenken, Karen E; Mills, Weston B; Loughran, Allister J; Spencer, Horace J; Lynn, William B; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2016-10-01

    We used in vitro and in vivo models of catheter-associated biofilm formation to compare the relative activity of antibiotics effective against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the specific context of an established biofilm. The results demonstrated that, under in vitro conditions, daptomycin and ceftaroline exhibited comparable activity relative to each other and greater activity than vancomycin, telavancin, oritavancin, dalbavancin, or tigecycline. This was true when assessed using established biofilms formed by the USA300 methicillin-resistant strain LAC and the USA200 methicillin-sensitive strain UAMS-1. Oxacillin exhibited greater activity against UAMS-1 than LAC, as would be expected, since LAC is an MRSA strain. However, the activity of oxacillin was less than that of daptomycin and ceftaroline even against UAMS-1. Among the lipoglycopeptides, telavancin exhibited the greatest overall activity. Specifically, telavancin exhibited greater activity than oritavancin or dalbavancin when tested against biofilms formed by LAC and was the only lipoglycopeptide capable of reducing the number of viable bacteria below the limit of detection. With biofilms formed by UAMS-1, telavancin and dalbavancin exhibited comparable activity relative to each other and greater activity than oritavancin. Importantly, ceftaroline was the only antibiotic that exhibited greater activity than vancomycin when tested in vivo in a murine model of catheter-associated biofilm formation. These results emphasize the need to consider antibiotics other than vancomycin, most notably, ceftaroline, for the treatment of biofilm-associated S. aureus infections, including by the matrix-based antibiotic delivery methods often employed for local antibiotic delivery in the treatment of these infections.

  16. Combinatorial approaches with selected phytochemicals to increase antibiotic efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Ana Cristina; Saavedra, Maria José; Simões, Lúcia C; Simões, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Combinations of selected phytochemicals (reserpine, pyrrolidine, quinine, morin and quercetin) with antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, tetracycline and erythromycin) were tested on the prevention and control of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. The phytochemicals were also studied for their ability to avoid antibiotic adaptation and to inhibit antibiotic efflux pumps. Morin, pyrrolidine and quercetin at subinhibitory concentrations had significant effects in biofilm prevention and/or control when applied alone and combined with antibiotics. Synergism between antibiotics and phytochemicals was found especially against biofilms of NorA overexpressing strain S. aureus SA1199B. This strain when growing with subinhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin developed increased tolerance to this antibiotic. However, this was successfully reversed by quinine and morin. In addition, reserpine and quercetin showed significant efflux pump inhibition. The overall results demonstrate the role of phytochemicals in co-therapies to promote more efficient treatments and decrease antimicrobial resistance to antibiotics, with substantial effects against S. aureus in both planktonic and biofilm states. PMID:27643487

  17. Fractal analysis of Xylella fastidiosa biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, A. L. D.; Lorite, G. S.; Rodrigues, C. M.; Souza, A. A.; Cotta, M. A.

    2009-07-01

    We have investigated the growth process of Xylella fastidiosa biofilms inoculated on a glass. The size and the distance between biofilms were analyzed by optical images; a fractal analysis was carried out using scaling concepts and atomic force microscopy images. We observed that different biofilms show similar fractal characteristics, although morphological variations can be identified for different biofilm stages. Two types of structural patterns are suggested from the observed fractal dimensions Df. In the initial and final stages of biofilm formation, Df is 2.73±0.06 and 2.68±0.06, respectively, while in the maturation stage, Df=2.57±0.08. These values suggest that the biofilm growth can be understood as an Eden model in the former case, while diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) seems to dominate the maturation stage. Changes in the correlation length parallel to the surface were also observed; these results were correlated with the biofilm matrix formation, which can hinder nutrient diffusion and thus create conditions to drive DLA growth.

  18. Staphylococcal biofilm formation on the surface of three different calcium phosphate bone grafts: a qualitative and quantitative in vivo analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furustrand Tafin, Ulrika; Betrisey, Bertrand; Bohner, Marc; Ilchmann, Thomas; Trampuz, Andrej; Clauss, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Differences in physico-chemical characteristics of bone grafts to fill bone defects have been demonstrated to influence in vitro bacterial biofilm formation. Aim of the study was to investigate in vivo staphylococcal biofilm formation on different calcium phosphate bone substitutes. A foreign-body guinea-pig infection model was used. Teflon cages prefilled with β-tricalcium phosphate, calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite, or dicalcium phosphate (DCP) scaffold were implanted subcutaneously. Scaffolds were infected with 2 × 10(3) colony-forming unit of Staphylococcus aureus (two strains) or S. epidermidis and explanted after 3, 24 or 72 h of biofilm formation. Quantitative and qualitative biofilm analysis was performed by sonication followed by viable counts, and microcalorimetry, respectively. Independently of the material, S. aureus formed increasing amounts of biofilm on the surface of all scaffolds over time as determined by both methods. For S. epidermidis, the biofilm amount decreased over time, and no biofilm was detected by microcalorimetry on the DCP scaffolds after 72 h of infection. However, when using a higher S. epidermidis inoculum, increasing amounts of biofilm were formed on all scaffolds as determined by microcalorimetry. No significant variation in staphylococcal in vivo biofilm formation was observed between the different materials tested. This study highlights the importance of in vivo studies, in addition to in vitro studies, when investigating biofilm formation of bone grafts.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates: Antibiotic Susceptibility, Molecular Characteristics, and Ability to Form Biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Indrawattana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodic monitoring of Staphylococcus aureus characteristics in a locality is imperative as their drug-resistant variants cause treatment problem. In this study, antibiograms, prevalence of toxin genes (sea-see, seg-ser, seu, tsst-1, eta, etb, and etd, PFGE types, accessory gene regulator (agr groups, and ability to form biofilm of 92 S. aureus Thailand clinical isolates were investigated. They were classified into 10 drug groups: groups 1–7 (56 isolates were methicillin resistant (MRSA and 8–10 (36 isolates were methicillin sensitive (MSSA. One isolate did not have any toxin gene, 4 isolates carried one toxin gene (seq, and 87 isolates had two or more toxin genes. No isolate had see, etb, or tsst-1; six isolates had eta or etd. Combined seg-sei-sem-sen-seo of the highly prevalent egc locus was 26.1%. The seb, sec, sel, seu, and eta associated significantly with MSSA; sek was more in MRSA. The sek-seq association was 52.17% while combined sed-sej was not found. Twenty-three PFGE types were revealed, no association of toxin genes with PFGE types. All four agr groups were present; agr group 1 was predominant (58.70% but agr group 2 strains carried more toxin genes and were more frequent toxin producers. Biofilm formation was found in 72.83% of the isolates but there was no association with antibiograms. This study provides insight information on molecular and phenotypic markers of Thailand S. aureus clinical isolates which should be useful for future active surveillance that aimed to control a spread of existing antimicrobial resistant bacteria and early recognition of a newly emerged variant.

  20. Carotenoid Formation by Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Ray K.; White, David C.

    1970-01-01

    The carotenoid pigments of Staphylococcus aureus U-71 were identified as phytoene; ζ-carotene; δ-carotene; phytofluenol; a phytofluenol-like carotenoid, rubixanthin; and three rubixanthin-like carotenoids after extraction, saponification, chromatographic separation, and determination of their absorption spectra. There was no evidence of carotenoid esters or glycoside ethers in the extract before saponification. During the aerobic growth cycle the total carotenoids increased from 45 to 1,000 nmoles per g (dry weight), with the greatest increases in the polar, hydroxylated carotenoids. During the anaerobic growth cycle, the total carotenoids increased from 20 nmoles per g (dry weight) to 80 nmoles per g (dry weight), and only traces of the polar carotenoids were formed. Light had no effect on carotenoid synthesis. About 0.14% of the mevalonate-2-14C added to the culture was incorporated into the carotenoids during each bacterial doubling. The total carotenoids did not lose radioactivity when grown in the absence of 14C for 2.5 bacterial doublings. The total carotenoids did not lose radioactivity when grown in the absence of 14C for 2.5 bacterial doublings. The incorporation and turnover of 14C indicated the carotenes were sequentially desaturated and hydroxylated to form the polar carotenoids. PMID:5423369

  1. 68Ga-labeled phage-display selected peptides as tracers for positron emission tomography imaging of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-associated infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karin M; Kyneb, Majbritt H; Alstrup, Aage K O;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of skin and deep-sited infections, often associated with the formation of biofilms. Early diagnosis and initiated therapy is essential to prevent disease progression and to reduce complications that can be serious. Imaging techniques are helpful...... combining anatomical with functional data in order to describe and characterize site, extent and activity of the disease. The purpose of the study was to identify and (68)Ga-label peptides with affinity for S. aureus biofilm and evaluate their potential as bacteria-specific positron emission tomography (PET......) imaging agents. METHODS: Phage-displayed dodecapeptides were selected using an in vitro grown S. aureus biofilm as target. One cyclic (A8) and two linear (A9, A11) dodecapeptides were custom synthesized with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N″,N‴-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) conjugated via a lysine linker...

  2. Liposome-encapsulated ISMN: a novel nitric oxide-based therapeutic agent against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Jardeleza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus in its biofilm form has been associated with recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis with significant resistance to conventional therapies. This study aims to determine if liposomal-encapsulation of a precursor of the naturally occurring antimicrobial nitric oxide (NO enhances its desired anti-biofilm effects against S. aureus, in the hope that improving its efficacy can provide an effective topical agent for future clinical use. METHODOLOGY: S. aureus ATCC 25923 biofilms were grown in-vitro using the Minimum Biofilm Eradication Concentration (MBEC device and exposed to 3 and 60 mg/mL of the NO donor isosorbide mononitrate (ISMN encapsulated into different anionic liposomal formulations based on particle size (unilamellar ULV, multilamellar MLV and lipid content (5 and 25 mM at 24 h and 5 min exposure times. Biofilms were viewed using Live-Dead Baclight stain and confocal scanning laser microscopy and quantified using the software COMSTAT2. RESULTS: At 3 and 60 mg/mL, ISMN-ULV liposomes had comparable and significant anti-biofilm effects compared to untreated control at 24 h exposure (p = 0.012 and 0.02 respectively. ULV blanks also had significant anti-biofilm effects at both 24 h and 5 min exposure (p = 0.02 and 0.047 respectively. At 5 min exposure, 60 mg/mL ISMN-MLV liposomes appeared to have greater anti-biofilm effects compared to pure ISMN or ULV particles. Increasing liposomal lipid content improved the anti-biofilm efficacy of both MLV and ULVs at 5 min exposure. CONCLUSION: Liposome-encapsulated "nitric oxide" is highly effective in eradicating S. aureus biofilms in-vitro, giving great promise for use in the clinical setting to treat this burdensome infection. Further studies however are needed to assess its safety and efficacy in-vivo before clinical translation is attempted.

  3. Microfluidic Approaches to Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Deung Park

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilms—aggregations of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substrates (EPS—are an important subject of research in the fields of biology and medical science. Under aquatic conditions, bacterial cells form biofilms as a mechanism for improving survival and dispersion. In this review, we discuss bacterial biofilm development as a structurally and dynamically complex biological system and propose microfluidic approaches for the study of bacterial biofilms. Biofilms develop through a series of steps as bacteria interact with their environment. Gene expression and environmental conditions, including surface properties, hydrodynamic conditions, quorum sensing signals, and the characteristics of the medium, can have positive or negative influences on bacterial biofilm formation. The influences of each factor and the combined effects of multiple factors may be addressed using microfluidic approaches, which provide a promising means for controlling the hydrodynamic conditions, establishing stable chemical gradients, performing measurement in a high-throughput manner, providing real-time monitoring, and providing in vivo-like in vitro culture devices. An increased understanding of biofilms derived from microfluidic approaches may be relevant to improving our understanding of the contributions of determinants to bacterial biofilm development.

  4. Effect of biosurfactants on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in a BioFlux channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz De Rienzo, M A; Stevenson, P S; Marchant, R; Banat, I M

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have indicated that biosurfactants play a role both in maintaining channels between multicellular structures in biofilms and in dispersal of cells from biofilms. A combination of caprylic acid (0.01 % v/v) together with rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v) was applied to biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 9144 and a mixed culture under BioFlux flowthrough conditions and caused disruption of the biofilms. The biofilms were also treated with a combination of rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v) and sophorolipids (0.01 %). Control treatments with PBS 1× had no apparent effect on biofilm disruption. The Gram-positive bacterium (S. aureus ATCC 9144) was more sensitive than P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442 in terms of disruption and viability as shown by Live/Dead staining. Disruption of biofilms of P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442 was minimal. Oxygen consumption by biofilms, after different treatments with biosurfactants, confirms that sophorolipid on its own is unable to kill/inhibit cells of P. aeruginosa ATCC 15442, and even when used in combination with rhamnolipids, under static conditions, no decrease in the cell viability was observed. Cells in biofilms exposed to mono-rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v) showed behaviour typical of exposure to bacteriostatic compounds, but when exposed to di-rhamnolipids (0.04 % v/v), they displayed a pattern characteristic of bactericidal compounds. PMID:26825819

  5. [The biological kinetics of biofilms of clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa separated from patients with bronchopulmonary complications under traumatic disease of spinal cord].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul'ianov, V Iu; Opredelentseva, S V; Shvidenko, I G; Norkin, I A; Korshunov, G V; Gladkova, E V

    2014-08-01

    The capacity and intensity of formation of microbial biofilms was analyzed in 24 strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in static conditions of cultivation during 24, 48, 72 and 96 yours. The microorganisms were separated from patients with bronchopulmonary infectious complications in acute and early periods of traumatic disease of spinal cord.

  6. Commensal Protection of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobials by Candida albicans Biofilm Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Eric F.; Tsui, Christina; Kucharíková, Sona; Andes, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biofilm-associated polymicrobial infections, particularly those involving fungi and bacteria, are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality and tend to be challenging to treat. Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus specifically are considered leading opportunistic fungal and bacterial pathogens, respectively, mainly due to their ability to form biofilms on catheters and indwelling medical devices. However, the impact of mixed-species biofilm growth on therapy remains largely understudied. In this study, we investigated the influence of C. albicans secreted cell wall polysaccharides on the response of S. aureus to antibacterial agents in biofilm. Results demonstrated significantly enhanced tolerance for S. aureus to drugs in the presence of C. albicans or its secreted cell wall polysaccharide material. Fluorescence confocal time-lapse microscopy revealed impairment of drug diffusion through the mixed biofilm matrix. Using C. albicans mutant strains with modulated cell wall polysaccharide expression, exogenous supplementation, and enzymatic degradation, the C. albicans-secreted β-1,3-glucan cell wall component was identified as the key matrix constituent providing the bacteria with enhanced drug tolerance. Further, antibody labeling demonstrated rapid coating of the bacteria by the C. albicans matrix material. Importantly, via its effect on the fungal biofilm matrix, the antifungal caspofungin sensitized the bacteria to the drugs. Understanding such symbiotic interactions with clinical relevance between microbial species in biofilms will greatly aid in overcoming the limitations of current therapies and in defining potential new targets for treating polymicrobial infections. PMID:27729510

  7. Actinomyces naeslundii in initial dental biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dige, I; Raarup, M K; Nyengaard, J R; Kilian, M; Nyvad, B

    2009-07-01

    The combined use of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) offers new opportunities for analysis of the spatial relationships and temporal changes of specific members of the microbiota of intact dental biofilms. The purpose of this study was to analyse the patterns of colonization and population dynamics of Actinomyces naeslundii compared to streptococci and other bacteria during the initial 48 h of biofilm formation in the oral cavity. Biofilms developed on standardized glass slabs mounted in intra-oral appliances worn by ten individuals for 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. The biofilms were subsequently labelled with probes against A. naeslundii (ACT476), streptococci (STR405) or all bacteria (EUB338), and were analysed by CLSM. Labelled bacteria were quantified by stereological tools. The results showed a notable increase in the number of streptococci and A. naeslundii over time, with a tendency towards a slower growth rate for A. naeslundii compared with streptococci. A. naeslundii was located mainly in the inner part of the multilayered biofilm, indicating that it is one of the species that attaches directly to the acquired pellicle. The participation of A. naeslundii in the initial stages of dental biofilm formation may have important ecological consequences. PMID:19406899

  8. Biofilm formation of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Esteban; Halliday-Wimmonds, Iona; Kearney, Michael T; Hansen, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno) is an emergent fish pathogen in both marine and fresh water environments. The bacterium is suspected to persist in the environment even without the presence of a suitable fish host. In the present study, the influence of different abiotic factors such as salinity and temperature were used to study the biofilm formation of different isolates of Fno including intracellular growth loci C (iglC)and pathogenicity determinant protein A (pdpA) knockout strains. Finally, we compared the susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm to three disinfectants used in the aquaculture and ornamental fish industry, namely Virkon®, bleach and hydrogen peroxide. The data indicates that Fno is capable of producing biofilms within 24 h where both salinity as well as temperature plays a role in the growth and biofilm formation of Fno. Mutations in theiglC or pdpA, both known virulence factors, do not appear to affect the capacity of Fno to produce biofilms, and the minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum biocidal concentration for the three disinfectants were lower than the minimum biofilm eradication concentration values. This information needs to be taken into account if trying to eradicate the pathogen from aquaculture facilities or aquariums.

  9. Biofilm formation of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Esteban; Halliday-Simmonds, Iona; Francis, Stewart; Kearney, Michael T; Hansen, John D

    2015-12-31

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno) is an emergent fish pathogen in both marine and fresh water environments. The bacterium is suspected to persist in the environment even without the presence of a suitable fish host. In the present study, the influence of different abiotic factors such as salinity and temperature were used to study the biofilm formation of different isolates of Fno including intracellular growth loci C (iglC) and pathogenicity determinant protein A (pdpA) knockout strains. Finally, we compared the susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm to three disinfectants used in the aquaculture and ornamental fish industry, namely Virkon(®), bleach and hydrogen peroxide. The data indicates that Fno is capable of producing biofilms within 24 h where both salinity as well as temperature plays a role in the growth and biofilm formation of Fno. Mutations in the iglC or pdpA, both known virulence factors, do not appear to affect the capacity of Fno to produce biofilms, and the minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum biocidal concentration for the three disinfectants were lower than the minimum biofilm eradication concentration values. This information needs to be taken into account if trying to eradicate the pathogen from aquaculture facilities or aquariums. PMID:26507830

  10. Implications of Biofilm Formation on Urological Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadieux, Peter A.; Wignall, Geoffrey R.; Carriveau, Rupp; Denstedt, John D.

    2008-09-01

    Despite millions of dollars and several decades of research targeted at their prevention and eradication, biofilm-associated infections remain the major cause of urological device failure. Numerous strategies have been aimed at improving device design, biomaterial composition, surface properties and drug delivery, but have been largely circumvented by microbes and their plethora of attachment, host evasion, antimicrobial resistance, and dissemination strategies. This is not entirely surprising since natural biofilm formation has been going on for millions of years and remains a major part of microorganism survival and evolution. Thus, the fact that biofilms develop on and in the biomaterials and tissues of humans is really an extension of this natural tendency and greatly explains why they are so difficult for us to combat. Firstly, biofilm structure and composition inherently provide a protective environment for microorganisms, shielding them from the shear stress of urine flow, immune cell attack and some antimicrobials. Secondly, many biofilm organisms enter a metabolically dormant state that renders them tolerant to those antibiotics and host factors able to penetrate the biofilm matrix. Lastly, the majority of organisms that cause biofilm-associated urinary tract infections originate from our own oral cavity, skin, gastrointestinal and urogenital tracts and therefore have already adapted to many of our host defenses. Ultimately, while biofilms continue to hold an advantage with respect to recurrent infections and biomaterial usage within the urinary tract, significant progress has been made in understanding these dynamic microbial communities and novel approaches offer promise for their prevention and eradication. These include novel device designs, antimicrobials, anti-adhesive coatings, biodegradable polymers and biofilm-disrupting compounds and therapies.

  11. Anti-biofilm, anti-hemolysis, and anti-virulence activities of black pepper, cananga, myrrh oils, and nerolidol against Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kayeon; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Soon-Il; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2014-11-01

    The long-term usage of antibiotics has resulted in the evolution of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Unlike antibiotics, anti-virulence approaches target bacterial virulence without affecting cell viability, which may be less prone to develop drug resistance. Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that produces diverse virulence factors, such as α-toxin, which is hemolytic. Also, biofilm formation of S. aureus is one of the mechanisms of its drug resistance. In this study, anti-biofilm screening of 83 essential oils showed that black pepper, cananga, and myrrh oils and their common constituent cis-nerolidol at 0.01 % markedly inhibited S. aureus biofilm formation. Furthermore, the three essential oils and cis-nerolidol at below 0.005 % almost abolished the hemolytic activity of S. aureus. Transcriptional analyses showed that black pepper oil down-regulated the expressions of the α-toxin gene (hla), the nuclease genes, and the regulatory genes. In addition, black pepper, cananga, and myrrh oils and cis-nerolidol attenuated S. aureus virulence in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. This study is one of the most extensive on anti-virulence screening using diverse essential oils and provides comprehensive data on the subject. This finding implies other beneficial effects of essential oils and suggests that black pepper, cananga, and myrrh oils have potential use as anti-virulence strategies against persistent S. aureus infections.

  12. Synergistic activity between an antimicrobial polyacrylamide and daptomycin versus Staphylococcus aureus biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siala, Wafi; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Taresco, Vincenzo; Piozzi, Antonella; Francolini, Iolanda

    2016-07-01

    Antibiotic resistance of bacteria growing in biofilms compared to their planktonic counterparts enhances the difficulty to eradicate biofilm-associated infections. In the last decade, combination antibiotic therapy has emerged as an attractive strategy for treating biofilm infections, even if in most of tolerant biofilms the optimal combinations are still unknown. In this study, an antimicrobial cationic polyacrylamide was used in combination with daptomycin or moxifloxacin against mature biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates to examine a possible improvement of the antibiofilm activity of the two antibiotics. The polymer did not have an effect on moxifloxacin but significantly increased the antibiofilm efficacy of daptomycin. These findings are presumably related to the different mechanism of action of the two drugs. In summary, our data highlighted the ability of polycations to increase daptomycin antibiofilm activity providing a potential strategy to eradicate biofilms in industrial or medical settings. PMID:27154750

  13. Bap-dependent biofilm formation by pathogenic species of Staphylococcus: evidence of horizontal gene transfer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormo, M Angeles; Knecht, Erwin; Götz, Friedrich; Lasa, Iñigo; Penadés, José R

    2005-07-01

    The biofilm-associated protein (Bap) is a surface protein implicated in biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus isolated from chronic mastitis infections. The bap gene is carried in a putative composite transposon inserted in SaPIbov2, a mobile staphylococcal pathogenicity island. In this study, bap orthologue genes from several staphylococcal species, including Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus chromogenes, Staphylococcus xylosus, Staphylococcus simulans and Staphylococcus hyicus, were identified, cloned and sequenced. Sequence analysis comparison of the bap gene from these species revealed a very high sequence similarity, suggesting the horizontal gene transfer of SaPIbov2 amongst them. However, sequence analyses of the flanking region revealed that the bap gene of these species was not contained in the SaPIbov2 pathogenicity island. Although they did not contain the icaADBC operon, all the coagulase-negative staphylococcal isolates harbouring bap were strong biofilm producers. Disruption of the bap gene in S. epidermidis abolished its capacity to form a biofilm, whereas heterologous complementation of a biofilm-negative strain of S. aureus with the Bap protein from S. epidermidis bestowed the capacity to form a biofilm on a polystyrene surface. Altogether, these results demonstrate that Bap orthologues from coagulase-negative staphylococci induce an alternative mechanism of biofilm formation that is independent of the PIA/PNAG exopolysaccharide.

  14. In vitro production of biofilm in a flow cell system in a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus and determination of efficiency of ciprofloxacin against them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soham Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microorganisms develop biofilm on various medical devices. The process is particularly relevant in public health since biofilm associated organisms are much more resistant to antibiotics and have a potential to cause infections in patients with indwelling medical devices. Materials and Methods: To determine the efficiency of an antibiotic against the biofilm it is inappropriate to use traditional technique of determining Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC on the free floating laboratory phenotype. Thus we have induced formation of biofilm in two strains (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which showed heavy growth of biofilm in screening by Tube method in a flow cell system and determined their antibiotic susceptibility against ciprofloxacin by agar dilution method in the range (0.25 mg/ml to 8 mg/ml. The MIC value of ciprofloxacin for the biofilm produced organism was compared with its free form and a standard strain as control on the same plates. Observations: Both the biofilm produced strains showed a higher resistance (MIC > 8 mg/ml than its free form, which were 2 μg/ml for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 4 mg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus. Thus biofilm can pose a threat in the patient treatment.

  15. 江香薷挥发油的化学成分分析及其对金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜的抑制作用%Chemical Composition Analysis of Essential Oil from Mosla chinensis Maxim. cv. Jiangxiangru and Inhibitory Activity of the Oil and Its Major Constituents on Biofilm Formation of Staphylococcus aureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李知敏; 王妹; 彭亮

    2016-01-01

    目的:研究江香薷挥发油的化学成分及其对金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜的影响。方法:运用气相色谱-质谱(gas chromatography-mass spectrometry,GC-MS)技术鉴定江香薷挥发油的化学成分,并对其中相对含量较大的8种化学成分的金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜抑制作用进行研究。结果:GC-MS分析鉴定出29种成分,其中相对含量比较大的成分为百里香酚、香荆芥酚、对聚伞花素、γ-松油烯、百里香酚乙酸酯、α-石竹烯、3-蒈烯和香荆芥酚乙酸酯。江香薷挥发油对金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜形成的抑制率可达91.3%,对成熟的金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜清除率为78.5%,香荆芥酚、3-蒈烯、香荆芥酚乙酸酯和α-石竹烯对金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜的形成抑制作用显著,其中3-蒈烯的抑制率最高,为93.9%,而对聚伞花素和百里香酚乙酸酯对成熟的金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜清除作用比较明显。结论:江香薷挥发油对金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜形成有较强的抑制作用,也具有一定的成熟金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜清除作用,这可能是江香薷挥发油中多种化学成分共同作用的结果。%Objective: To analyze the chemical composition of the essential oil from Mosla chinensis Maxim. cv. Jiangxiangru and to examine the inhibition of the oil and its main components on the biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus. Methods: The chemical composition analysis was carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The inhibitory effects of the essential oil and its eight main components were examined against the biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus. Results: A total of 29 chemical compositions were identified in the essential oil. Its main components were thymol, carvacrol, p-cymene, γ-terpenene, thymyl acetate, α-caryophyllene, 3-carene, and carvacryl acetate. The percentage inhibition of the biofilm formation

  16. Rifampicin fails to eradicate mature biofilm formed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keli Cristine Reiter

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Antimicrobial activity on biofilms depends on their molecular size, positive charges, permeability coefficient, and bactericidal activity. Vancomycin is the primary choice for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection treatment; rifampicin has interesting antibiofilm properties, but its effectivity remains poorly defined. METHODS: Rifampicin activity alone and in combination with vancomycin against biofilm-forming MRSA was investigated, using a twofold serial broth microtiter method, biofilm challenge, and bacterial count recovery. RESULTS: Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimal bactericidal concentration for vancomycin and rifampicin ranged from 0.5 to 1mg/l and 0.008 to 4mg/l, and from 1 to 4mg/l and 0.06 to 32mg/l, respectively. Mature biofilms were submitted to rifampicin and vancomycin exposure, and minimum biofilm eradication concentration ranged from 64 to 32,000 folds and from 32 to 512 folds higher than those for planktonic cells, respectively. Vancomycin (15mg/l in combination with rifampicin at 6 dilutions higher each isolate MIC did not reach in vitro biofilm eradication but showed biofilm inhibitory capacity (1.43 and 0.56log10 CFU/ml reduction for weak and strong biofilm producers, respectively; p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: In our setting, rifampicin alone failed to effectively kill biofilm-forming MRSA, demonstrating stronger inability to eradicate mature biofilm compared with vancomycin.

  17. Phase-variable expression of the biofilm-associated protein (Bap) in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormo, M Angeles; Ubeda, Carles; Martí, Miguel; Maiques, Elisa; Cucarella, Carme; Valle, Jaione; Foster, Timothy J; Lasa, Iñigo; Penadés, José R

    2007-06-01

    A process of phase variation is described that affects the expression of Bap (biofilm-associated protein) in Staphylococcus aureus. Upon subculture of the Bap-positive S. aureus strain V329 on Congo red agar, spontaneous smooth biofilm-negative colonies appeared at a low frequency (5 x 10(-4)). Northern blot analysis of these variants with a bap-specific gene probe showed that transcription of the bap gene did not occur. However, DNA typing, Southern blot hybridization and DNA sequencing did not show any differences between the parent V329 strain and the biofilm-negative variants. The biofilm-negative phenotype reverted to wild-type at a similar frequency upon subculture of Bap-negative variants in liquid media. Experimental infection of ovine mammary glands with Bap-negative variants showed that phase variation occurred in vivo, because Bap-expressing, biofilm-positive revertants were isolated from infected mammary glands. The absence of Bap correlated with increased adherence to fibrinogen and fibronectin. It is possible that S. aureus can detach from a biofilm by switching to a Bap-negative state.

  18. Macroscopic amyloid fiber formation by staphylococcal biofilm associated SuhB protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Anirudha; Bhattacharyya, Sudipta; Kundu, Anirban; Dutta, Debabrata; Das, Amit Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal and opportunistic pathogen that causes lethal infections. Biofilm forming ability of S. aureus enhances its virulence since biofilm provides the bacteria protective shield against antibiotics and host immunity. Polysaccharide independent biofilm formation by several virulent S. aureus strains have been identified recently, where protein components substitute polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) involved in bacterial cell attachment. The suhB gene has been reported to be essential in staphylococcal PIA-independent biofilm formation. Overexpression of staphylococcal SuhB (SasuhB) in E. coli produces extracellular macroscopic fibers made of recombinant SaSuhB protein. The amyloidic nature of the fiber is evaluated by high resolution electron microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction and amyloid specific dyes, such as Congo red and thioflavin-T binding assay. The fibers appear to be sticky in nature and bind a large number of bacterial cells. The results suggest the possible role of SaSuhB-fibers as a structural component as well as an adhesin in biofilm matrix. PMID:27497060

  19. Chemically Specific Cellular Imaging of Biofilm Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herberg, J L; Schaldach, C; Horn, J; Gjersing, E; Maxwell, R

    2006-02-09

    This document and the accompanying manuscripts summarize the technical accomplishments for our one-year LDRD-ER effort. Biofilm forming microbes have existed on this planet for billions of years and make up 60% of the biological mass on earth. Such microbes exhibit unique biochemical pathways during biofilm formation and play important roles in human health and the environment. Microbial biofilms have been directly implicated in, for example, product contamination, energy losses, and medical infection that cost the loss of human lives and billions of dollars. In no small part due to the lack of detailed understanding, biofilms unfortunately are resistant to control, inhibition, and destruction, either through treatment with antimicrobials or immunological defense mechanisms of the body. Current biofilm research has concentrated on the study of biofilms in the bulk. This is primarily due to the lack of analytical and physical tools to study biofilms non-destructively, in three dimensions, and on the micron or sub-micron scale. This has hindered the development of a clear understanding of either the early stage mechanisms of biofilm growth or the interactions of biofilms with their environment. Enzymatic studies have deduced a biochemical reaction that results in the oxidation of reduced sulfur species with the concomitant reduction of nitrate, a common groundwater pollutant, to dinitrogen gas by the bacterium, Thiobacillus denitrificans (TD). Because of its unique involvement in biologically relevant environmental pathways, TD is scheduled for genome sequencing in the near future by the DOE's Joint Genome Institute and is of interest to DOE's Genomes to Life Program. As our ecosystem is exposed to more and more nitrate contamination large scale livestock and agricultural practices, a further understanding of biofilm formation by organisms that could alleviate these problems is necessary in order to protect out biosphere. However, in order to study this

  20. Enzymatic degradation of in vitro Staphylococcus aureus biofilms supplemented with human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Chase M; Burton, Tarea; Kirui, Dickson K; Millenbaugh, Nancy J

    2016-01-01

    Enzymatic debridement is a therapeutic strategy used clinically to remove necrotic tissue from wounds. Some of the enzymes utilized for debridement have been tested against bacterial pathogens, but the effectiveness of these agents in dispersing clinically relevant biofilms has not been fully characterized. Here, we developed an in vitro Staphylococcus aureus biofilm model that mimics wound-like conditions and employed this model to investigate the antibiofilm activity of four enzymatic compounds. Human plasma at concentrations of 0%-50% was supplemented into growth media and used to evaluate biofilm biomass accumulation over 24 hours and 48 hours in one methicillin-sensitive and five methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus. Supplementation of media with 10% human plasma resulted in the most robust biofilms in all six strains. The enzymes α-amylase, bromelain, lysostaphin, and papain were then tested against S. aureus biofilms cultured in 10% human plasma. Quantification of biofilms after 2 hours and 24 hours of treatment using the crystal violet assay revealed that lysostaphin decreased biomass by up to 76%, whereas α-amylase, bromelain, and papain reduced biomass by up to 97%, 98%, and 98%, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the dispersal agents detached the biofilm exopolysaccharide matrix and bacteria from the growth surface. Lysostaphin caused less visible dispersal of the biofilms, but unlike the other enzymes, induced morphological changes indicative of bacterial cell damage. Overall, our results indicate that use of enzymes may be an effective means of eradicating biofilms and a promising strategy to improve treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. PMID:27175088

  1. Enzymatic degradation of in vitro Staphylococcus aureus biofilms supplemented with human plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watters CM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chase M Watters,1,2 Tarea Burton,1 Dickson K Kirui,1 Nancy J Millenbaugh1 1Maxillofacial Injury and Disease Department, Naval Medical Research Unit San Antonio, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, TX, USA; 2Wound Infections Department, Naval Medical Research Center, Silver Spring, MD, USA Abstract: Enzymatic debridement is a therapeutic strategy used clinically to remove necrotic tissue from wounds. Some of the enzymes utilized for debridement have been tested against bacterial pathogens, but the effectiveness of these agents in dispersing clinically relevant biofilms has not been fully characterized. Here, we developed an in vitro Staphylococcus aureus biofilm model that mimics wound-like conditions and employed this model to investigate the antibiofilm activity of four enzymatic compounds. Human plasma at concentrations of 0%–50% was supplemented into growth media and used to evaluate biofilm biomass accumulation over 24 hours and 48 hours in one methicillin-sensitive and five methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus. Supplementation of media with 10% human plasma resulted in the most robust biofilms in all six strains. The enzymes α-amylase, bromelain, lysostaphin, and papain were then tested against S. aureus biofilms cultured in 10% human plasma. Quantification of biofilms after 2 hours and 24 hours of treatment using the crystal violet assay revealed that lysostaphin decreased biomass by up to 76%, whereas a-amylase, bromelain, and papain reduced biomass by up to 97%, 98%, and 98%, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the dispersal agents detached the biofilm exopolysaccharide matrix and bacteria from the growth surface. Lysostaphin caused less visible dispersal of the biofilms, but unlike the other enzymes, induced morphological changes indicative of bacterial cell damage. Overall, our results indicate that use of enzymes may be an effective means of eradicating biofilms and a promising strategy to improve

  2. L-Tryptophan prevents Escherichia coli biofilm formation and triggers biofilm degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Junji; Furukawa, Soichi; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2012-03-23

    The effect of deletion of trp operon and tna operon on the Escherichia coli biofilm formation was investigated in order to elucidate the role of L-tryptophan metabolism in biofilm formation. trp operon deletion mutants ΔtrpC, ΔtrpD and ΔtrpE deficient in L-tryptophan biosynthesis showed higher biofilm formation. In addition, ΔtnaC with increased L-tryptophan degradation activity showed higher biofilm formation. On the contrary, ΔtnaA deletion mutant which lost L-tryptophan degradation activity showed low biofilm formation. From these results, it was suggested that decrease of intracellular L-tryptophan level induced biofilm formation and increase of L-tryptophan repressed biofilm formation. So the effect of the addition of L-tryptophan to the medium on the E. coli biofilm formation was investigated. L-Tryptophan addition at starting culture decreased biofilm formation and furthermore L-tryptophan addition after 16 h culture induced the degradation of preformed biofilm. From the above results, it was suggested that maintenance of high intracellular L-tryptophan concentration prevents E. coli biofilm formation and elevation of intracellular L-tryptophan concentration triggers degradation of matured biofilm. PMID:22386992

  3. 新的细胞壁锚定蛋白SasX对金黄葡萄球菌生物膜形成和毒力的影响%The novel surface-anchored protein SasX promotes biofilm formation and is a virulence factor of Staphylococcus aureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜昕; 宋燕; 胡锦辉; 阮斐怡; 吕元; 李敏

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the novel surface-anchored protein SasX mediates biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus and to investigate the function of SasX in the virulence of S.aureus.Methods Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(MRSA) ST-239 HS sasX gene mutant (HS770 △ sasX) and complement [ HS770 △sasX(pRBsasX) ] were gotten by gene knock out and complement methods.Semiquantitative biofilm assay was used for detection of the biofilm formation of wild type and mutant.By using abscess model in mice,we investigate the function of SasX in the virulence of S.aureus.Results The sasX gene mutant strain was gotten successfully by using pKOR1 plasmid.HS770 △sasX with a very clear reduction of biofilm formation compared to wild type and complement(P<0.05),there was no significant difference of biofilm formation between wild type and complement(P>0.05).Primary attachment assays demonstrated that comparing to wild type,there was significant reduction of initial accumulative phases of biofilm development in HS770△sasX(P<0.05),but there was no difference between wild type and complement(P>0.05).Both sasX wild type and mutant could cause abscess in the skin of mice,no abscess were forming in the PBS control group.The biggest abscess size was found on the second day after injection.The size of abscess was smaller with extension of the time.But on the same time,the wild type group produced significantly larger abscesses compared to mutant group( P<0.05 ).Conclusion It could improve the effect of gene knocking out by using pKOR1 plasmid.SasX promotes biofilm formation by influencing on the initial accumulative phases of biofilm development,SasX is a marker of invasive infection of S.aureus,it is very important for S.aureus persistence in the hospital setting.%目的 研究新的细胞壁锚定蛋白SasX对金黄葡萄球菌生物膜形成及毒力的影响.方法 采用基因敲除及基因互补技术获得耐甲

  4. Inactivation of Efflux Pumps Abolishes Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Malin; Hancock, Viktoria; Klemm, Per

    2008-01-01

    to get rid of toxic substances. We discovered that efflux pumps are highly active in bacterial biofilms, thus making efflux pumps attractive targets for antibiofilm measures. A number of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) are known. EPIs were shown to reduce biofilm formation, and in combination they could...... abolish biofilm formation completely. Also, EPIs were able to block the antibiotic tolerance of biofilms. The results of this feasibility study might pave the way for new treatments for biofilm-related infections and may be exploited for prevention of biofilms in general.......Bacterial biofilms cause numerous problems in health care and industry; notably, biofilms are associated with a large number of infections. Biofilm-dwelling bacteria are particularly resistant to antibiotics, making it hard to eradicate biofilm-associated infections. Bacteria rely on efflux pumps...

  5. SCCmec-associated psm-mec mRNA promotes Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongchang; Zhang, Xuemei; Huang, Wenfang; Yin, Yibing

    2016-10-01

    Biofilm formation is considered the major pathogenic mechanism of Staphylococcus epidermidis-associated nosocomial infections. Reports have shown that SCCmec-associated psm-mec regulated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus virulence and biofilm formation. However, the role of psm-mec in S. epidermidis remains unclear. To this purpose, we analysed 165 clinical isolates of S. epidermidis to study the distribution, mutation and expression of psm-mec and the relationship between this gene and biofilm formation. Next, we constructed three psm-mec deletion mutants, one psm-mec transgene expression strain (p221) and two psm-mec point mutant strains (pM, pAG) to explore its effects on S. epidermidis biofilm formation. Then, the amount of biofilm formation, extracellular DNA (eDNA) and Triton X-100-induced autolysis of the constructed strains was measured. Results of psm-mec deletion and transgene expression showed that the gene regulated S. epidermidis biofilm formation. Compared with the control strains, the ability to form biofilm, Triton X-100-induced autolysis and the amount of eDNA increased in the p221 strain and the two psm-mec mutants pM and pAG expressed psm-mec mRNA without its protein, whereas no differences were observed among the three constructed strains, illustrating that psm-mec mRNA promoted S. epidermidis biofilm formation through up-regulation of bacterial autolysis and the release of eDNA. Our results reveal that acquisition of psm-mec promotes S. epidermidis biofilm formation. PMID:27502022

  6. Evaluation of ethyl N-(2-phenethyl) carbamate analogues as biofilm inhibitors of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Matthew D; Yodsanit, Nisakorn; Melander, Christian

    2016-07-12

    A small molecule library consisting of 45 compounds was synthesized based on the bacterial metabolite ethyl N-(2-phenethyl) carbamate. Screening of the compounds revealed a potent analogue capabale of inhibiting several strains of Methicillin Resistant S. aureus biofilms with low to moderate micromolar IC50 values. PMID:27341658

  7. Evidence for icaADBC-Independent Biofilm Development Mechanism in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzpatrick, Fidelma; Humphreys, Hilary; O'Gara, James P.

    2005-01-01

    Synthesis of a polysaccharide adhesin by icaADBC-encoded enzymes is currently the best-understood mechanism of staphylococcal biofilm development. In four methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates, environmental activation of icaADBC did not always correlate with increased biofilm production. Moreover, glucose-mediated biofilm development in these isolates was icaADBC independent. Apparently, an environmentally regulated, ica-independent mechanism(s) of biofilm development exists i...

  8. Influence of Streptococcus mutans on Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, Dong Mei; Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; Exterkate, Rob A. M.; Jiang, Lei Meng; van der Sluis, Lucas W. M.; ten Cate, Jacob M.; Crielaard, Wim

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: An important virulence factor of Enterococcus faecalis is its ability to form biofilms. Most studies on biofilm formation have been carried out by using E. faecalis monocultures. Given the polymicrobial nature of root canal infections, it is important to understand biofilm formation of

  9. Ginger Extract Inhibits Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14

    OpenAIRE

    Han-Shin Kim; Hee-Deung Park

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation can cause serious problems in clinical and industrial settings, which drives the development or screening of biofilm inhibitors. Some biofilm inhibitors have been screened from natural products or modified from natural compounds. Ginger has been used as a medicinal herb to treat infectious diseases for thousands of years, which leads to the hypothesis that it may contain chemicals inhibiting biofilm formation. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated ginger's ability ...

  10. Activity of ozonated water and ozone against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialoszewski, Dariusz; Pietruczuk-Padzik, Anna; Kalicinska, Agnieszka; Bocian, Ewa; Czajkowska, Magdalena; Bukowska, Bozena; Tyski, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The known bactericidal properties of ozone have not been checked in relation to its action on bacterial biofilms. This is especially true of ozonated fluids. The aim of this study was to investigate the bactericidal activity of ozonated water and that of a mixture of ozone and oxygen against biofilms. Material/Methods Eighteen clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibiting various levels of antibiotic sensitivity were investigated. Bacteria were cultured in biofilm form on polystyrene titration plates for periods of 2 to 72 hours. The biofilms formed in this way were exposed to in statu nascendi ozonated water produced in a prototype device that had been tested in clinical conditions, or to a mixture of oxygen and ozone generated in the same device. Live cells in the biofilm were stained with a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium (MTT) bromide solution. The degree of reduction of viable bacteria following ozone exposure was determined. Results Ozonated water was found to be an effective bactericidal agent against biofilms after as little as 30 seconds of exposure, while the bactericidal activity of the ozone-oxygen solution was much lower. Prolongation of the duration of biofilm exposure to the gaseous disinfectant to 40 minutes led to a reduction in the viable cell count, which nevertheless remained high. Conclusions Unlike the ozone-oxygen mixture, ozonated water effectively destroys bacterial biofilms in vitro. PMID:22037737

  11. Comparison of the in vitro activity of five antimicrobial drugs on Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aude A Ferran

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Resistance in canine pathogenic staphylococci is necessitating re-evaluation of the current antimicrobial treatments especially for biofilm-associated infections. Long, repeated treatments are often required to control such infections due to the tolerance of bacteria within the biofilm. To comply with the goal of better antibiotic stewardship in veterinary medicine, the efficacies of the available drugs need to be directly assessed on bacterial biofilms.We compared the activities of amoxicillin, cefalexin, clindamycin, doxycycline and marbofloxacin on in vitro biofilms of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Staphylococcus aureus. Exposure of biofilms for 15 hours to maximum concentrations of the antibiotics achievable in canine plasma only reduced biofilm bacteria by 0.5 to 2.0 log10 CFU, compared to the control, except for marbofloxacin which reduced S. aureus biofilms by 5.4 log10 CFU. Two-antibiotic combinations did not improve, and even decreased, bacterial killing. In comparison, 5 min-exposure to 2 % chlorhexidine reduced biofilms of the 2 tested strains by 4 log10 CFU. Our results showed that S. pseudintermedius biofilm, unlike S. aureus biofilm, was highly tolerant to all the drugs tested, consistent with the treatment failures observed in practice. Under our conditions, the use of topical chlorhexidine would probably be the best currently available strategy to reduce S. pseudintermedius biofilm.

  12. Coexistence facilitates interspecific biofilm formation in complex microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Røder, Henriette Lyng; Russel, Jakob;

    2016-01-01

    , the underlying role of fundamental ecological factors, specifically coexistence and phylogenetic history, in biofilm formation remains unclear. This study examines how social interactions affect biofilm formation in multi-species co-cultures from five diverse environments. We found prevalence of increased...... biofilm formation among co-cultured bacteria that have coexisted in their original environment. Conversely, when randomly co-culturing bacteria across these five consortia, we found less biofilm induction and a prevalence of biofilm reduction. Reduction in biofilm formation was even more predominant when...... correlated with an increase in planktonic cell numbers, thus implying a behavioral response rather than mere growth competition. Our findings suggest that an increase in biofilm formation is a common adaptive response to long-term coexistence....

  13. Biofilm Formation Characteristics of Pseudomonas lundensis Isolated from Meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Ji; Xie, Jing; Zhao, Li-Jun; Qian, Yun-Fang; Zhao, Yong; Liu, Xiao

    2015-12-01

    Biofilms formations of spoilage and pathogenic bacteria on food or food contact surfaces have attracted increasing attention. These events may lead to a higher risk of food spoilage and foodborne disease transmission. While Pseudomonas lundensis is one of the most important bacteria that cause spoilage in chilled meat, its capability for biofilm formation has been seldom reported. Here, we investigated biofilm formation characteristics of P. lundensis mainly by using crystal violet staining, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The swarming and swimming motility, biofilm formation in different temperatures (30, 10, and 4 °C) and the protease activity of the target strain were also assessed. The results showed that P. lundensis showed a typical surface-associated motility and was quite capable of forming biofilms in different temperatures (30, 10, and 4 °C). The strain began to adhere to the contact surfaces and form biofilms early in the 4 to 6 h. The biofilms began to be formed in massive amounts after 12 h at 30 °C, and the extracellular polysaccharides increased as the biofilm structure developed. Compared with at 30 °C, more biofilms were formed at 4 and 10 °C even by a low bacterial density. The protease activity in the biofilm was significantly correlated with the biofilm formation. Moreover, the protease activity in biofilm was significantly higher than that of the corresponding planktonic cultures after cultured 12 h at 30 °C.

  14. Effect of essential oils of Syzygium aromaticum and Cinnamomum zeylanicum and their major components on biofilm production in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from milk of cows with mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budri, P E; Silva, N C C; Bonsaglia, E C R; Fernandes Júnior, A; Araújo Júnior, J P; Doyama, J T; Gonçalves, J L; Santos, M V; Fitzgerald-Hughes, D; Rall, V L M

    2015-09-01

    Bovine mastitis is an inflammation of the mammary glands of cows and causes significant economic losses in dairy cattle. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the microorganisms most commonly isolated. Novel agents are required in agricultural industries to prevent the development of mastitis. The production of biofilm by Staph. aureus facilitates the adhesion of bacteria to solid surfaces and contributes to the transmission and maintenance of these bacteria. The effect of the essential oils of Syzygium aromaticum (clove; EOSA) and Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon; EOCZ) and their major components, eugenol and cinnamaldehyde, on Staph. aureus biofilm formation on different surfaces was investigated. The results showed a significant inhibition of biofilm production by EOSA on polystyrene and stainless steel surfaces (69.4 and 63.6%, respectively). However, its major component, eugenol, was less effective on polystyrene and stainless steel (52.8 and 19.6%, respectively). Both EOCZ and its major component, cinnamaldehyde, significantly reduced biofilm formation on polystyrene (74.7 and 69.6%, respectively) and on stainless steel surfaces (45.3 and 44.9%, respectively). These findings suggest that EOSA, EOCZ, and cinnamaldehyde may be considered for applications such as sanitization in the food industry.

  15. Effect of essential oils of Syzygium aromaticum and Cinnamomum zeylanicum and their major components on biofilm production in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from milk of cows with mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budri, P E; Silva, N C C; Bonsaglia, E C R; Fernandes Júnior, A; Araújo Júnior, J P; Doyama, J T; Gonçalves, J L; Santos, M V; Fitzgerald-Hughes, D; Rall, V L M

    2015-09-01

    Bovine mastitis is an inflammation of the mammary glands of cows and causes significant economic losses in dairy cattle. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the microorganisms most commonly isolated. Novel agents are required in agricultural industries to prevent the development of mastitis. The production of biofilm by Staph. aureus facilitates the adhesion of bacteria to solid surfaces and contributes to the transmission and maintenance of these bacteria. The effect of the essential oils of Syzygium aromaticum (clove; EOSA) and Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon; EOCZ) and their major components, eugenol and cinnamaldehyde, on Staph. aureus biofilm formation on different surfaces was investigated. The results showed a significant inhibition of biofilm production by EOSA on polystyrene and stainless steel surfaces (69.4 and 63.6%, respectively). However, its major component, eugenol, was less effective on polystyrene and stainless steel (52.8 and 19.6%, respectively). Both EOCZ and its major component, cinnamaldehyde, significantly reduced biofilm formation on polystyrene (74.7 and 69.6%, respectively) and on stainless steel surfaces (45.3 and 44.9%, respectively). These findings suggest that EOSA, EOCZ, and cinnamaldehyde may be considered for applications such as sanitization in the food industry. PMID:26142866

  16. Biofilm Formation on Dental Restorative and Implant Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, H. J.; Rinastiti, M.; Siswomihardjo, W.; van der Mei, H. C.

    2010-01-01

    Biomaterials for the restoration of oral function are prone to biofilm formation, affecting oral health. Oral bacteria adhere to hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, but due to fluctuating shear, little biofilm accumulates on hydrophobic surfaces in vivo. More biofilm accumulates on rough than on s

  17. Biofilm formation by Clostridium difficile

    OpenAIRE

    Dapa, Tanja; Unnikrishnan, Meera

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major healthcare-associated disease worldwide. Recurring infections and increasing antibiotic resistance have complicated treatment of CDI. While C. difficile spores are important for transmission and persistence of CDI, other factors such as gut colonization and formation of bacterial communities in the gut may also contribute to pathogenesis and persistence, but have not been well investigated. Recently, we reported that important clinical C. diffi...

  18. Comparison of the In vitro Activity of Five Antimicrobial Drugs against Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferran, Aude A.; Liu, JingJing; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Bousquet-Mélou, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Resistance in canine pathogenic staphylococci is necessitating re-evaluation of the current antimicrobial treatments especially for biofilm-associated infections. Long, repeated treatments are often required to control such infections due to the tolerance of bacteria within the biofilm. To comply with the goal of better antibiotic stewardship in veterinary medicine, the efficacies of the available drugs need to be directly assessed on bacterial biofilms. We compared the activities of amoxicillin, cefalexin, clindamycin, doxycycline, and marbofloxacin on in vitro biofilms of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Staphylococcus aureus. Exposure of biofilms for 15 h to maximum concentrations of the antibiotics achievable in canine plasma only reduced biofilm bacteria by 0.5–2.0 log10 CFU, compared to the control, except for marbofloxacin which reduced S. aureus biofilms by 5.4 log10 CFU. Two-antibiotic combinations did not improve, and even decreased, bacterial killing. In comparison, 5 min-exposure to 2% chlorhexidine reduced biofilms of the two tested strains by 4 log10 CFU. Our results showed that S. pseudintermedius and S. aureus biofilms were highly tolerant to all the drugs tested, consistent with the treatment failures observed in practice. Under our in vitro conditions, the use of chlorhexidine was more efficacious than antimicrobials to reduce S. pseudintermedius biofilm. PMID:27531995

  19. Comparison of the In vitro Activity of Five Antimicrobial Drugs against Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferran, Aude A; Liu, JingJing; Toutain, Pierre-Louis; Bousquet-Mélou, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Resistance in canine pathogenic staphylococci is necessitating re-evaluation of the current antimicrobial treatments especially for biofilm-associated infections. Long, repeated treatments are often required to control such infections due to the tolerance of bacteria within the biofilm. To comply with the goal of better antibiotic stewardship in veterinary medicine, the efficacies of the available drugs need to be directly assessed on bacterial biofilms. We compared the activities of amoxicillin, cefalexin, clindamycin, doxycycline, and marbofloxacin on in vitro biofilms of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Staphylococcus aureus. Exposure of biofilms for 15 h to maximum concentrations of the antibiotics achievable in canine plasma only reduced biofilm bacteria by 0.5-2.0 log10 CFU, compared to the control, except for marbofloxacin which reduced S. aureus biofilms by 5.4 log10 CFU. Two-antibiotic combinations did not improve, and even decreased, bacterial killing. In comparison, 5 min-exposure to 2% chlorhexidine reduced biofilms of the two tested strains by 4 log10 CFU. Our results showed that S. pseudintermedius and S. aureus biofilms were highly tolerant to all the drugs tested, consistent with the treatment failures observed in practice. Under our in vitro conditions, the use of chlorhexidine was more efficacious than antimicrobials to reduce S. pseudintermedius biofilm. PMID:27531995

  20. Chemically Specific Cellular Imaging of Biofilm Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herberg, J L; Schaldach, C; Horn, J; Gjersing, E; Maxwell, R

    2006-02-09

    This document and the accompanying manuscripts summarize the technical accomplishments for our one-year LDRD-ER effort. Biofilm forming microbes have existed on this planet for billions of years and make up 60% of the biological mass on earth. Such microbes exhibit unique biochemical pathways during biofilm formation and play important roles in human health and the environment. Microbial biofilms have been directly implicated in, for example, product contamination, energy losses, and medical infection that cost the loss of human lives and billions of dollars. In no small part due to the lack of detailed understanding, biofilms unfortunately are resistant to control, inhibition, and destruction, either through treatment with antimicrobials or immunological defense mechanisms of the body. Current biofilm research has concentrated on the study of biofilms in the bulk. This is primarily due to the lack of analytical and physical tools to study biofilms non-destructively, in three dimensions, and on the micron or sub-micron scale. This has hindered the development of a clear understanding of either the early stage mechanisms of biofilm growth or the interactions of biofilms with their environment. Enzymatic studies have deduced a biochemical reaction that results in the oxidation of reduced sulfur species with the concomitant reduction of nitrate, a common groundwater pollutant, to dinitrogen gas by the bacterium, Thiobacillus denitrificans (TD). Because of its unique involvement in biologically relevant environmental pathways, TD is scheduled for genome sequencing in the near future by the DOE's Joint Genome Institute and is of interest to DOE's Genomes to Life Program. As our ecosystem is exposed to more and more nitrate contamination large scale livestock and agricultural practices, a further understanding of biofilm formation by organisms that could alleviate these problems is necessary in order to protect out biosphere. However, in order to study this

  1. Type IV pili promote early biofilm formation by Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldarelli, Grace A; Piepenbrink, Kurt H; Scott, Alison J; Freiberg, Jeffrey A; Song, Yang; Achermann, Yvonne; Ernst, Robert K; Shirtliff, Mark E; Sundberg, Eric J; Donnenberg, Michael S; von Rosenvinge, Erik C

    2016-08-01

    Increasing morbidity and mortality from Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) present an enormous challenge to healthcare systems. Clostridium difficile express type IV pili (T4P), but their function remains unclear. Many chronic and recurrent bacterial infections result from biofilms, surface-associated bacterial communities embedded in an extracellular matrix. CDI may be biofilm mediated; T4P are important for biofilm formation in a number of organisms. We evaluate the role of T4P in C. difficile biofilm formation using RNA sequencing, mutagenesis and complementation of the gene encoding the major pilin pilA1, and microscopy. RNA sequencing demonstrates that, in comparison to other growth phenotypes, C. difficile growing in a biofilm has a distinct RNA expression profile, with significant differences in T4P gene expression. Microscopy of T4P-expressing and T4P-deficient strains suggests that T4P play an important role in early biofilm formation. A non-piliated pilA1 mutant forms an initial biofilm of significantly reduced mass and thickness in comparison to the wild type. Complementation of the pilA1 mutant strain leads to formation of a biofilm which resembles the wild-type biofilm. These findings suggest that T4P play an important role in early biofilm formation. Novel strategies for confronting biofilm infections are emerging; our data suggest that similar strategies should be investigated in CDI. PMID:27369898

  2. Ginger extract inhibits biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han-Shin; Park, Hee-Deung

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation can cause serious problems in clinical and industrial settings, which drives the development or screening of biofilm inhibitors. Some biofilm inhibitors have been screened from natural products or modified from natural compounds. Ginger has been used as a medicinal herb to treat infectious diseases for thousands of years, which leads to the hypothesis that it may contain chemicals inhibiting biofilm formation. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated ginger's ability to inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 biofilm formation. A static biofilm assay demonstrated that biofilm development was reduced by 39-56% when ginger extract was added to the culture. In addition, various phenotypes were altered after ginger addition of PA14. Ginger extract decreased production of extracellular polymeric substances. This finding was confirmed by chemical analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, ginger extract formed noticeably less rugose colonies on agar plates containing Congo red and facilitated swarming motility on soft agar plates. The inhibition of biofilm formation and the altered phenotypes appear to be linked to a reduced level of a second messenger, bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate. Importantly, ginger extract inhibited biofilm formation in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Also, surface biofilm cells formed with ginger extract detached more easily with surfactant than did those without ginger extract. Taken together, these findings provide a foundation for the possible discovery of a broad spectrum biofilm inhibitor. PMID:24086697

  3. Ginger extract inhibits biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Shin Kim

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilm formation can cause serious problems in clinical and industrial settings, which drives the development or screening of biofilm inhibitors. Some biofilm inhibitors have been screened from natural products or modified from natural compounds. Ginger has been used as a medicinal herb to treat infectious diseases for thousands of years, which leads to the hypothesis that it may contain chemicals inhibiting biofilm formation. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated ginger's ability to inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 biofilm formation. A static biofilm assay demonstrated that biofilm development was reduced by 39-56% when ginger extract was added to the culture. In addition, various phenotypes were altered after ginger addition of PA14. Ginger extract decreased production of extracellular polymeric substances. This finding was confirmed by chemical analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, ginger extract formed noticeably less rugose colonies on agar plates containing Congo red and facilitated swarming motility on soft agar plates. The inhibition of biofilm formation and the altered phenotypes appear to be linked to a reduced level of a second messenger, bis-(3'-5'-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate. Importantly, ginger extract inhibited biofilm formation in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Also, surface biofilm cells formed with ginger extract detached more easily with surfactant than did those without ginger extract. Taken together, these findings provide a foundation for the possible discovery of a broad spectrum biofilm inhibitor.

  4. Image-based fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to dissect vancomycin diffusion-reaction processes in Staphylococcus aureus biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daddi Oubekka, S.; Briandet, R.; Waharte, F.; Fontaine-Aupart, M.-P.; Steenkeste, K.

    2011-07-01

    The diffusion capabilities of free fluorophores inside the heterogeneous three dimensional structure of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm were studied by an original image-based Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching method. The study was extended to BODIPY-vancomycin in order to better understand the mechanisms involved in the high tolerance of the bacteria embedded in a biofilm to the antibiotic.

  5. Alginate production affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development and architecture, but is not essential for biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stapper, A.P.; Narasimhan, G.; Oman, D.E.;

    2004-01-01

    Extracellular polymers can facilitate the non-specific attachment of bacteria to surfaces and hold together developing biofilms. This study was undertaken to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the architecture of biofilms produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 and its alginate......-overproducing (mucA22) and alginate-defective (algD) variants in order to discern the role of alginate in biofilm formation. These strains, PAO1, Alg(+) PAOmucA22 and Alg(-) PAOalgD, tagged with green fluorescent protein, were grown in a continuous flow cell system to characterize the developmental cycles...... of their biofilm formation using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Biofilm Image Processing (BIP) and Community Statistics (COMSTAT) software programs were used to provide quantitative measurements of the two-dimensional biofilm images. All three strains formed distinguishable biofilm architectures, indicating...

  6. Stpahylococcus aureus biofilms on central venous haemodialysis catheters Biofilmes de Staphylococcus aureus em cateter venoso central em hemodiálise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Eyko Aoki

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm bacterial infections are common in patients undergoing treatment with haemodialysis. This study involved 16 patients (7 males, 9 females; ages from 22 to 81 with an average age of 50 who had had a total of 25 temporary haemodialysis polyurethane catheter insertions into the subclavian vein (22 dual-lumen and 3 triple-lumen. The catheters remained in place from 3 to 91 days, on an average of 47 days. The reasons for catheter removal were: bad functioning (44%, suspicion of catheter-related infection (20%, availability of permanent access (16%, accidental removal (12%, signs and symptoms of infection at the site of catheter insertion (4%, and exogenous contamination (4%. Positive tip cultures were observed on seven of the catheters (28%, showing three positive blood cultures. The Staphylococcus aureus were identified in 12% of the blood cultures and isolated from one of the hubs, and biofilms were observed on all catheter tips. The S. aureus retrieved from both blood and catheters (tips and hubs were resistant to penicillin and susceptible to azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, oxacillin, rifampin, sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, and vancomycin. The S. aureus strains isolated from both blood and catheters (tips and hubs were considered to be identical based on antibiotic susceptibility patterns and genetic similarity assessed using an automated ribotyping system.As infecções devido a biofilmes bacterianos são comuns em pacientes sob tratamento em hemodiálise. Neste estudo, 16 pacientes (7 homens, 9 mulheres, de 22 a 81 anos, média 50 anos de idade, com um total de 25 cateteres de hemodiálise (3 de triplo-lúmen e 22 de duplo-lúmen de poliuretano inseridos em veia subclávia foram estudados. Os cateteres permaneceram no local de 3 a 91 dias (média de 47 dias. Os cateteres foram removidos devido ao: mau funcionamento (44%, suspeita de infecção relacionada ao cateter (20%, viabilidade de um acesso

  7. Bacterial Extracellular Polysaccharides Involved in Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P. Ivanova

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS produced by microorganisms are a complex mixture of biopolymers primarily consisting of polysaccharides, as well as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and humic substances. EPS make up the intercellular space of microbial aggregates and form the structure and architecture of the biofilm matrix. The key functions of EPS comprise the mediation of the initial attachment of cells to different substrata and protection against environmental stress and dehydration. The aim of this review is to present a summary of the current status of the research into the role of EPS in bacterial attachment followed by biofilm formation. The latter has a profound impact on an array of biomedical, biotechnology and industrial fields including pharmaceutical and surgical applications, food engineering, bioremediation and biohydrometallurgy. The diverse structural variations of EPS produced by bacteria of different taxonomic lineages, together with examples of biotechnological applications, are discussed. Finally, a range of novel techniques that can be used in studies involving biofilm-specific polysaccharides is discussed.

  8. Characterization of Mannheimia haemolytica biofilm formation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukahil, Ismail; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2015-01-30

    Mannheimia haemolytica is the primary bacterial agent in the bovine respiratory disease complex. It is thought that M. haemolytica colonizes the tonsillar crypts of cattle as a commensal and subsequently descends into the lungs to cause disease. Many bacterial species persist in the host as biofilms. There is limited information about the ability of M. haemolytica to form biofilms. The aim of this study was to develop an in vitro model for M. haemolytica biofilm formation. We found that M. haemolytica required at least 36 h to form robust biofilms on plastic in vitro when incubated in RPMI-1640 tissue culture medium at 37 °C, with maximal biofilm formation being evident at 48 h. Biofilm formation was inhibited by adding the monosaccharides d(+) galactose and d(+) mannose to the growth medium. Addition of antibodies to the M. haemolytica surface protein OmpA also reduced biofilm formation. Upon evaluating the macromolecules within the biofilm extracellular polymeric substance we found it contained 9.7 μg/cm(2) of protein, 0.81 μg/cm(2) of total carbohydrate, and 0.47 μg/cm(2) of extracellular DNA. Furthermore, proteinase K treatment significantly decreased biofilms (Pbiofilms to a lesser extent. M. haemolytica biofilm cells were more resistant than planktonic cells to the antibiotics florfenicol, gentamicin, and tulathromycin. These results provide evidence that M. haemolytica can form biofilms, which could contribute to its ability to persist as a commensal in the bovine upper respiratory tract.

  9. Biofilm formation on dental restorative and implant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busscher, H J; Rinastiti, M; Siswomihardjo, W; van der Mei, H C

    2010-07-01

    Biomaterials for the restoration of oral function are prone to biofilm formation, affecting oral health. Oral bacteria adhere to hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, but due to fluctuating shear, little biofilm accumulates on hydrophobic surfaces in vivo. More biofilm accumulates on rough than on smooth surfaces. Oral biofilms mostly consist of multiple bacterial strains, but Candida species are found on acrylic dentures. Biofilms on gold and amalgam in vivo are thick and fully covering, but barely viable. Biofilms on ceramics are thin and highly viable. Biofilms on composites and glass-ionomer cements cause surface deterioration, which enhances biofilm formation again. Residual monomer release from composites influences biofilm growth in vitro, but effects in vivo are less pronounced, probably due to the large volume of saliva into which compounds are released and its continuous refreshment. Similarly, conflicting results have been reported on effects of fluoride release from glass-ionomer cements. Finally, biomaterial-associated infection of implants and devices elsewhere in the body is compared with oral biofilm formation. Biomaterial modifications to discourage biofilm formation on implants and devices are critically discussed for possible applications in dentistry. It is concluded that, for dental applications, antimicrobial coatings killing bacteria upon contact are more promising than antimicrobial-releasing coatings.

  10. Biofilm production and presence of ica and bap genes in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from cows with mastitis in the eastern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szweda, Piotr; Schielmann, Marta; Milewski, Sławomir; Frankowska, Aneta; Jakubczak, Antoni

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was phenotypic and genotypic analysis of 132 S. aureus strains isolated from mastitis in eastern Poland in respect to their biofilm formation ability. The analysis of the size polymorphism of fragment X in the gene encoding protein A (spa) revealed high genetic differentiation of the analyzed group of isolates. The ability of biofilm formation by the isolates was tested using two phenotypic methods. The Congo Red plate assay was found to be irreproducible and very subjective. More objective results were obtained using the spectrophotometric, microtiter plate assay. Most of the isolates, namely 76/132 (57.6 %) were classified as biofilm producers depending on the value of absorbance in the microtiter plate test. All of the isolates tested were found to possess both icaA and icaD genes, while the bap gene was absent in all strains.

  11. Dressings Loaded with Cyclodextrin-Hamamelitannin Complexes Increase Staphylococcus aureus Susceptibility Toward Antibiotics Both in Single as well as in Mixed Biofilm Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackman, Gilles; Garcia-Fernandez, Maria José; Lenoir, Joke; De Meyer, Laurens; Remon, Jean-Paul; De Beer, Thomas; Concheiro, Angel; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Coenye, Tom

    2016-06-01

    Bacteria reside within biofilms at the infection site, making them extremely difficult to eradicate with conventional wound care products. Bacteria use quorum sensing (QS) systems to regulate biofilm formation, and QS inhibitors (QSIs) have been proposed as promising antibiofilm agents. Despite this, few antimicrobial therapies that interfere with QS exist. Nontoxic hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-functionalized cellulose gauzes releasing a burst of the antibiotic vancomycin and the QSI hamamelitannin are developed, followed by a sustained release of both. The gauzes affect QS and biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus in an in vitro model of chronic wound infection and can be considered as candidates to be used to prevent wound infection as well as treat infected wounds. PMID:26891369

  12. Screening a Commercial Library of Pharmacologically Active Small Molecules against Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Nelson S; Abercrombie, Johnathan J; Srinivasan, Anand; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L; Ramasubramanian, Anand K; Leung, Kai P

    2016-10-01

    It is now well established that bacterial infections are often associated with biofilm phenotypes that demonstrate increased resistance to common antimicrobials. Further, due to the collective attrition of new antibiotic development programs by the pharmaceutical industries, drug repurposing is an attractive alternative. In this work, we screened 1,280 existing commercially available drugs in the Prestwick Chemical Library, some with previously unknown antimicrobial activity, against Staphylococcus aureus, one of the commonly encountered causative pathogens of burn and wound infections. From the primary screen of the entire Prestwick Chemical Library at a fixed concentration of 10 μM, 104 drugs were found to be effective against planktonic S. aureus strains, and not surprisingly, these were mostly antimicrobials and antiseptics. The activity of 18 selected repurposing candidates, that is, drugs that show antimicrobial activity that are not already considered antimicrobials, observed in the primary screen was confirmed in dose-response experiments. Finally, a subset of nine of these drug candidates was tested against preformed biofilms of S. aureus We found that three of these drugs, niclosamide, carmofur, and auranofin, possessed antimicrobial activity against preformed biofilms, making them attractive candidates for repurposing as novel antibiofilm therapies. PMID:27401577

  13. Screening a Commercial Library of Pharmacologically Active Small Molecules against Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Nelson S; Abercrombie, Johnathan J; Srinivasan, Anand; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L; Ramasubramanian, Anand K; Leung, Kai P

    2016-10-01

    It is now well established that bacterial infections are often associated with biofilm phenotypes that demonstrate increased resistance to common antimicrobials. Further, due to the collective attrition of new antibiotic development programs by the pharmaceutical industries, drug repurposing is an attractive alternative. In this work, we screened 1,280 existing commercially available drugs in the Prestwick Chemical Library, some with previously unknown antimicrobial activity, against Staphylococcus aureus, one of the commonly encountered causative pathogens of burn and wound infections. From the primary screen of the entire Prestwick Chemical Library at a fixed concentration of 10 μM, 104 drugs were found to be effective against planktonic S. aureus strains, and not surprisingly, these were mostly antimicrobials and antiseptics. The activity of 18 selected repurposing candidates, that is, drugs that show antimicrobial activity that are not already considered antimicrobials, observed in the primary screen was confirmed in dose-response experiments. Finally, a subset of nine of these drug candidates was tested against preformed biofilms of S. aureus We found that three of these drugs, niclosamide, carmofur, and auranofin, possessed antimicrobial activity against preformed biofilms, making them attractive candidates for repurposing as novel antibiofilm therapies.

  14. Mechanism and risk factors of oral biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Pasich

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent microbiological investigations completely changed our understanding of the role of biofilm in the formation of the mucosal immune barrier and in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation of bacterial etiology. It is now clear that formation of bacterial biofilm on dental surfaces is characteristic for existence of oral microbial communities. It has also been proved that uncontrolled biofilms on dental tissues, as well as on different biomaterials (e.g. orthodontic appliances, are the main cause of dental diseases such as dental caries and periodontitis.The aim of this paper is to explain mechanisms and consequences of orthodontic biofilm formation. We will discuss current opinions on the influence of different biomaterials employed for orthodontic treatment in biofilm formation and new strategies employed in prevention and elimination of oral biofilm (“dental plaque”.

  15. [Mechanism and risk factors of oral biofilm formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasich, Ewa; Walczewska, Maria; Pasich, Adam; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz

    2013-08-02

    Recent microbiological investigations completely changed our understanding of the role of biofilm in the formation of the mucosal immune barrier and in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation of bacterial etiology. It is now clear that formation of bacterial biofilm on dental surfaces is characteristic for existence of oral microbial communities. It has also been proved that uncontrolled biofilms on dental tissues, as well as on different biomaterials (e.g. orthodontic appliances), are the main cause of dental diseases such as dental caries and periodontitis. The aim of this paper is to explain mechanisms and consequences of orthodontic biofilm formation. We will discuss current opinions on the influence of different biomaterials employed for orthodontic treatment in biofilm formation and new strategies employed in prevention and elimination of oral biofilm ("dental plaque").

  16. The Possible Role of Staphylococcus epidermidis LPxTG Surface Protein SesC in Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaparast, Laleh; Khodaparast, Ladan; Shahrooei, Mohammad; Stijlemans, Benoit; Merckx, Rita; Baatsen, Pieter; O'Gara, James P; Waters, Elaine; Van Mellaert, Lieve; Van Eldere, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is the most common cause of device-associated infections. It has been shown that active and passive immunization in an animal model against protein SesC significantly reduces S. epidermidis biofilm-associated infections. In order to elucidate its role, knock-out of sesC or isolation of S. epidermidis sesC-negative mutants were attempted, however, without success. As an alternative strategy, sesC was introduced into Staphylococcus aureus 8325-4 and its isogenic icaADBC and srtA mutants, into the clinical methicillin-sensitive S. aureus isolate MSSA4 and the MRSA S. aureus isolate BH1CC, which all lack sesC. Transformation of these strains with sesC i) changed the biofilm phenotype of strains 8325-4 and MSSA4 from PIA-dependent to proteinaceous even though PIA synthesis was not affected, ii) converted the non-biofilm-forming strain 8325-4 ica::tet to a proteinaceous biofilm-forming strain, iii) impaired PIA-dependent biofilm formation by 8325-4 srtA::tet, iv) had no impact on protein-mediated biofilm formation of BH1CC and v) increased in vivo catheter and organ colonization by strain 8325-4. Furthermore, treatment with anti-SesC antibodies significantly reduced in vitro biofilm formation and in vivo colonization by these transformants expressing sesC. These findings strongly suggest that SesC is involved in S. epidermidis attachment to and subsequent biofilm formation on a substrate.

  17. Correlation of mupirocin resistance with biofilm production in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from surgical site infections in a tertiary centre, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Ghada I; Nabil, Yasmin M

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to detect mupirocin-resistant isolates from pus/wound swabs taken postoperatively in a tertiary centre in Egypt and to determine their ability to form biofilm in order to establish its correlation with mupirocin resistance. This was a prospective study including 513pus/wound swabs from patients suffering from postoperative surgical site infections over the period July 2013-January 2015. Samples were cultured and isolates were identified by coagulase activity, DNase test, mannitol fermentation by mannitol salt agar followed by API Staph 32. Oxacillin agar screen test, agar dilution test for mupirocin, and mupA gene detection by PCR were performed for all methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates. Biofilm detection was carried out by the microtitre plate and Congo red agar methods. Of the 161 S. aureus isolates identified, 73 (45.3%) were MRSA, among which 82.2% were mupirocin-susceptible and 17.8% were mupirocin-resistant. Among the resistant isolates, 38.5% showed low-level resistance and 61.5% were high-level mupirocin-resistant. The mupA gene was detected in 75.0% of high-level mupirocin-resistant strains and in none of the low-level mupirocin-resistant strains. Among the mupirocin-susceptible isolates, 95.0% were biofilm-producers and 5.0% did not produce biofilm. All mupirocin-resistant isolates produced biofilm. Moreover, 15.3% of high-level mupirocin-resistant strains were negative for the mupA gene but showed evidence of biofilm formation. In conclusion, biofilm formation may be suggested to play a role in mupirocin resistance besides the presence of a genetic element encoding abnormal isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase, however further studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27436387

  18. Effect of an acrylic resin combined with an antimicrobial polymer on biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliê Marra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of an acrylic resin combined with an antimicrobial polymer poly (2-tert-butylaminoethyl methacrylate (PTBAEMA to inhibit Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans biofilm formation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Discs of a heat-polymerized acrylic resin were produced and divided according to PTBAEMA concentration: 0 (control, 10 and 25%. The specimens were inoculated (10(7 CFU/mL and incubated at 37ºC for 48 h. After incubation, the wells were washed and each specimen was sonicated for 20 min. Replicate aliquots of resultant suspensions were plated at dilutions at 37ºC for 48 h. The number of colony-forming units (CFU was counted and expressed as log (CFU+1/mL and analyzed statistically with α=.05. RESULTS: The results showed that 25% PTBAEMA completely inhibited S. aureus and S. mutans biofilm formation. A significant reduction of log (CFU+1/mL in count of S. aureus (control: 7.9±0.8A; 10%: 3.8±3.3B and S. mutans (control: 7.5±0.7A; 10%: 5.1±2.7B was observed for the group containing 10% PTBAEMA (Mann-Whitney, p0.05, P=0.079. CONCLUSIONS: Acrylic resin combined with 10 and 25% of PTBAEMA showed significant antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and S. mutans biofilm, but it was inactive against the C. albicans biofilm.

  19. Formation and retention of staphylococcal biofilms on DLC and its hybrids compared to metals used as biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myllymaa, Katja; Levon, Jaakko; Tiainen, Veli-Matti; Myllymaa, Sami; Soininen, Antti; Korhonen, Hannu; Kaivosoja, Emilia; Lappalainen, Reijo; Konttinen, Yrjö Tapio

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus cause most of the implant-related infections. Antibiotic treatment often fails and cure requires surgical intervention. It was hypothesized that biomaterial coatings resistant to biofilms offer a preventive option. Physical vapour deposited diamond-like carbon (DLC) and its polytetrafluoroethylene (DLC-PTFE-h) and polydimethylsiloxane (DLC-PDMS-h) hybrids were compared to titanium (Ti), tantalum (Ta) and chromium (Cr) thin films on silicon wafers for their resistance against formation and/or retention of biofilms produced by S. epidermidis and S. aureus in vitro. Sample surfaces were characterized for surface topography, contact angle and zeta-potential, because such properties might affect the biofilm. Biofilm was stained using calcofluor white and analysed in fluorescence microscopy using morphometry. Sixteen hour incubation was selected in pilot tests; at this checkpoint Ti, Ta, Cr and DLC-PDMS-h were almost fully covered by biofilm, but DLC and DLC-PTFE-h were only partially biofilm coated by S. epidermidis (88±26%, pcoating for implants and medical devices. This ability to resist biofilm formation and attachment could not be explained by only one factor, but it seems to be related to a combination of various properties, with electrokinetic streaming potential and protein coating being particularly important for its outcome. PMID:23010032

  20. An expanded regulatory network temporally controls Candida albicans biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Emily P; Bui, Catherine K; Nett, Jeniel E; Hartooni, Nairi; Mui, Michael C; Andes, David R; Nobile, Clarissa J; Johnson, Alexander D

    2015-06-01

    Candida albicans biofilms are composed of highly adherent and densely arranged cells with properties distinct from those of free-floating (planktonic) cells. These biofilms are a significant medical problem because they commonly form on implanted medical devices, are drug resistant and are difficult to remove. C. albicans biofilms are not static structures; rather they are dynamic and develop over time. Here we characterize gene expression in biofilms during their development, and by comparing them to multiple planktonic reference states, we identify patterns of gene expression relevant to biofilm formation. In particular, we document time-dependent changes in genes involved in adhesion and metabolism, both of which are at the core of biofilm development. Additionally, we identify three new regulators of biofilm formation, Flo8, Gal4, and Rfx2, which play distinct roles during biofilm development over time. Flo8 is required for biofilm formation at all time points, and Gal4 and Rfx2 are needed for proper biofilm formation at intermediate time points.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of compounds affecting bacterial biofilm formation and dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landini, Paolo; Antoniani, Davide; Burgess, J Grant; Nijland, Reindert

    2010-04-01

    Bacteria can switch between planktonic forms (single cells) and biofilms, i.e., bacterial communities growing on solid surfaces and embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substance. Biofilm formation by pathogenic bacteria often results in lower susceptibility to antibiotic treatments and in the development of chronic infections; thus, biofilm formation can be considered an important virulence factor. In recent years, much attention has been directed towards understanding the biology of biofilms and towards searching for inhibitors of biofilm development and of biofilm-related cellular processes. In this report, we review selected examples of target-based screening for anti-biofilm agents: We focus on inhibitors of quorum sensing, possibly the most characterized target for molecules with anti-biofilm activity, and on compounds interfering with the metabolism of the signal molecule cyclic di-GMP metabolism and on inhibitors of DNA and nucleotide biosynthesis, which represent a novel and promising class of biofilm inhibitors. Finally, we discuss the activation of biofilm dispersal as a novel mode of action for anti-biofilm compounds. PMID:20165945

  2. Prevention of biofilm formation and removal of existing biofilms by extracellular DNases of Campylobacter jejuni.

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    Helen L Brown

    Full Text Available The fastidious nature of the foodborne bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni contrasts with its ability to survive in the food chain. The formation of biofilms, or the integration into existing biofilms by C. jejuni, is thought to contribute to food chain survival. As extracellular DNA (eDNA has previously been proposed to play a role in C. jejuni biofilms, we have investigated the role of extracellular DNases (eDNases produced by C. jejuni in biofilm formation. A search of 2791 C. jejuni genomes highlighted that almost half of C. jejuni genomes contains at least one eDNase gene, but only a minority of isolates contains two or three of these eDNase genes, such as C. jejuni strain RM1221 which contains the cje0256, cje0566 and cje1441 eDNase genes. Strain RM1221 did not form biofilms, whereas the eDNase-negative strains NCTC 11168 and 81116 did. Incubation of pre-formed biofilms of NCTC 11168 with live C. jejuni RM1221 or with spent medium from a RM1221 culture resulted in removal of the biofilm. Inactivation of the cje1441 eDNase gene in strain RM1221 restored biofilm formation, and made the mutant unable to degrade biofilms of strain NCTC 11168. Finally, C. jejuni strain RM1221 was able to degrade genomic DNA from C. jejuni NCTC 11168, 81116 and RM1221, whereas strain NCTC 11168 and the RM1221 cje1441 mutant were unable to do so. This was mirrored by an absence of eDNA in overnight cultures of C. jejuni RM1221. This suggests that the activity of eDNases in C. jejuni affects biofilm formation and is not conducive to a biofilm lifestyle. These eDNases do however have a potential role in controlling biofilm formation by C. jejuni strains in food chain relevant environments.

  3. Prevention of biofilm formation and removal of existing biofilms by extracellular DNases of Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Helen L; Reuter, Mark; Hanman, Kate; Betts, Roy P; van Vliet, Arnoud H M

    2015-01-01

    The fastidious nature of the foodborne bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni contrasts with its ability to survive in the food chain. The formation of biofilms, or the integration into existing biofilms by C. jejuni, is thought to contribute to food chain survival. As extracellular DNA (eDNA) has previously been proposed to play a role in C. jejuni biofilms, we have investigated the role of extracellular DNases (eDNases) produced by C. jejuni in biofilm formation. A search of 2791 C. jejuni genomes highlighted that almost half of C. jejuni genomes contains at least one eDNase gene, but only a minority of isolates contains two or three of these eDNase genes, such as C. jejuni strain RM1221 which contains the cje0256, cje0566 and cje1441 eDNase genes. Strain RM1221 did not form biofilms, whereas the eDNase-negative strains NCTC 11168 and 81116 did. Incubation of pre-formed biofilms of NCTC 11168 with live C. jejuni RM1221 or with spent medium from a RM1221 culture resulted in removal of the biofilm. Inactivation of the cje1441 eDNase gene in strain RM1221 restored biofilm formation, and made the mutant unable to degrade biofilms of strain NCTC 11168. Finally, C. jejuni strain RM1221 was able to degrade genomic DNA from C. jejuni NCTC 11168, 81116 and RM1221, whereas strain NCTC 11168 and the RM1221 cje1441 mutant were unable to do so. This was mirrored by an absence of eDNA in overnight cultures of C. jejuni RM1221. This suggests that the activity of eDNases in C. jejuni affects biofilm formation and is not conducive to a biofilm lifestyle. These eDNases do however have a potential role in controlling biofilm formation by C. jejuni strains in food chain relevant environments.

  4. The Activity of Cotinus coggygria Scop. Leaves on Staphylococcus aureus Strains in Planktonic and Biofilm Growth Forms

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    Katarína Rendeková

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to detect the effectiveness of Cotinus coggygria Scop. leaves methanol extract against planktonic and biofilm growth forms of Staphylococcus aureus. The antimicrobial activity was determined by the broth microdilution test. Minimal inhibitory concentrations and minimal bactericidal concentrations were detected against two collection and ten clinical S. aureus strains. Anti-biofilm activity of the tested extract was detected using 24 h bacterial biofilm on the surface of microtiter plate wells. The biofilm inhibitory activity was evaluated visually after 24 h interaction of extract with biofilm, and the eradicating activity by a regrowth method. The tested extract showed bactericidal activity against all S. aureus strains (methicillin susceptible or methicillin resistant in concentrations ranging from 0.313 to 0.625 mg·mL−1. Biofilm inhibitory concentrations were 10-times higher and biofilm eradicating concentrations 100-times higher (8 and 32 mg·mL−1, respectively. The phytochemical analysis of C. coggygria leaves 60% methanol extract performed by LC-DAD-MS/MS revealed quercetin rhamnoside, methyl gallate, and methyl trigallate as main constituents. Results of our study indicate that C. coggygria, rich in tannins and flavonoids, seems to be a prospective topical antibacterial agent with anti-biofilm activity.

  5. The Activity of Cotinus coggygria Scop. Leaves on Staphylococcus aureus Strains in Planktonic and Biofilm Growth Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendeková, Katarína; Fialová, Silvia; Jánošová, Lucia; Mučaji, Pavel; Slobodníková, Lívia

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect the effectiveness of Cotinus coggygria Scop. leaves methanol extract against planktonic and biofilm growth forms of Staphylococcus aureus. The antimicrobial activity was determined by the broth microdilution test. Minimal inhibitory concentrations and minimal bactericidal concentrations were detected against two collection and ten clinical S. aureus strains. Anti-biofilm activity of the tested extract was detected using 24 h bacterial biofilm on the surface of microtiter plate wells. The biofilm inhibitory activity was evaluated visually after 24 h interaction of extract with biofilm, and the eradicating activity by a regrowth method. The tested extract showed bactericidal activity against all S. aureus strains (methicillin susceptible or methicillin resistant) in concentrations ranging from 0.313 to 0.625 mg·mL(-1). Biofilm inhibitory concentrations were 10-times higher and biofilm eradicating concentrations 100-times higher (8 and 32 mg·mL(-1), respectively). The phytochemical analysis of C. coggygria leaves 60% methanol extract performed by LC-DAD-MS/MS revealed quercetin rhamnoside, methyl gallate, and methyl trigallate as main constituents. Results of our study indicate that C. coggygria, rich in tannins and flavonoids, seems to be a prospective topical antibacterial agent with anti-biofilm activity. PMID:26729086

  6. Osteopontin reduces biofilm formation in a multi-species model of dental biofilm.

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    Sebastian Schlafer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Combating dental biofilm formation is the most effective means for the prevention of caries, one of the most widespread human diseases. Among the chemical supplements to mechanical tooth cleaning procedures, non-bactericidal adjuncts that target the mechanisms of bacterial biofilm formation have gained increasing interest in recent years. Milk proteins, such as lactoferrin, have been shown to interfere with bacterial colonization of saliva-coated surfaces. We here study the effect of bovine milk osteopontin (OPN, a highly phosphorylated whey glycoprotein, on a multispecies in vitro model of dental biofilm. While considerable research effort focuses on the interaction of OPN with mammalian cells, there are no data investigating the influence of OPN on bacterial biofilms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Biofilms consisting of Streptococcus oralis, Actinomyces naeslundii, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus downei and Streptococcus sanguinis were grown in a flow cell system that permitted in situ microscopic analysis. Crystal violet staining showed significantly less biofilm formation in the presence of OPN, as compared to biofilms grown without OPN or biofilms grown in the presence of caseinoglycomacropeptide, another phosphorylated milk protein. Confocal microscopy revealed that OPN bound to the surface of bacterial cells and reduced mechanical stability of the biofilms without affecting cell viability. The bacterial composition of the biofilms, determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization, changed considerably in the presence of OPN. In particular, colonization of S. mitis, the best biofilm former in the model, was reduced dramatically. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: OPN strongly reduces the amount of biofilm formed in a well-defined laboratory model of acidogenic dental biofilm. If a similar effect can be observed in vivo, OPN might serve as a valuable adjunct to mechanical tooth cleaning procedures.

  7. Properties of silver and copper nanoparticle-containing aqueous solutions and evaluation of their in vitro activity against Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes Aguirre, Melissa Mariluz

    Most microorganisms grow on surfaces as biofilms rather than as individual planktonic cells, and cells within biofilms show high levels of resistance against antimicrobial drugs. Thereby biofilm formation complicates treatment and contributes to high morbidity and mortality rates associated with infections. This study explores the physical, optical, and nano-structural properties of selected nanoparticles dispersed in aqueous solutions (nanoparticulate colloidal water or nanofluids) and examines their in vitro activity against microbial biofilms. Silver and copper nanofluids of various concentrations were prepared and studied. Their surface energies, surface charge and surface plasmonic resonance properties were obtained using contact angle measurement, zeta potential and optical spectrometer, respectively. The temperature dependence of the surface plasmon resonance behavior was also determined for the selected nanoparticulate aqueous solutions. A model of biofilm formation on the wells of microtiter plates was used to determine the in vitro activity of the nanoparticle preparations against both fungal (Candida albicans) and bacterial (Staphylococcus aureus) biofilms. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the nanoparticle interactions with microbial cells. Results show that silver nanofluid has higher surface energy than that of the copper, the surface energy increases as the concentration of silver nanoparticles increases; and both nanoparticles in liquid are positively charged. The interaction between silver nanoparticles and water molecules produces notable changes on the usual temperature properties of water. Altogether, effectiveness of silver nanoparticle-containing liquids in controlling biofilm formation is observed and reported. For a given size of silver nanoparticles studied, it is found that the effective concentrations of silver nanoparticles against microbial biofilms are far lower than their cytotoxic concentrations, indicating an

  8. The relationship between resistance spectrum and biofilm formation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from two origins%两种临床标本中耐甲氧西林的金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜形成能力的检测与其耐药特征的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李方去; 杨锦红; 王慧燕; 田鹏鹏; 刘彩霞

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究两种临床标本来源中耐甲氧西林的金黄色葡萄球菌(MRSA)生物膜形成能力和抗菌药物耐药率,并探讨二者的关系,为临床检测和治疗提供依据.方法 收集温州医学院附属第二医院2009年1月至2010年12月的分离鉴定的MRSA共128株,其中脓液59株,痰液69株;采用刚果红平板检测多糖粘附素(PIA),半定量粘附试验检测生物膜表型,PCR检测icaA基因结果用x2分割法进行统计分析.结果 128株MRSA中生物膜阳性菌株为61株,其中脓液36株、痰液25株,脓液中检出生物膜的阳性率明显高于痰液中检出生物膜的阳性率(x2=7.382,P =0.005).MRSA对所有β-内酰胺类抗生素全耐药,对万古霉素和利奈唑胺全敏感,痰液中MRSA对利福平、庆大霉素、环丙沙星的耐药率显著高于脓液中MRSA的耐药率(P<0.05),但是痰液中MRSA对克林霉素的耐药率要显著低于脓液中MRSA的耐药率(P<0.05).脓液中生物膜阳性菌株和生物膜阴性菌株对抗菌药物的耐药率差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),但是痰液中生物膜阳性菌株对克林霉素的耐药率高于生物膜阴性菌株的耐药率(P<0.05),对利福平的耐药率显著低于生物膜阴性菌株的耐药率(P<0.05).结论 脓液中M RSA的生物膜检出率比痰液高,但是脓液中MRSA的耐药率比痰液中的耐药率要低,MRSA对抗菌药物的耐药谱和生物膜的形成并无直接的关系.%Objective To investigate the antimicrobial-resistance and biofilm forming ability of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MKSA) from two origins and discuss the relationship between them, and provide evidence for clinical detection and therapy. Method 128 strains MRSA were collected in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical Collage from January 2009 to December 2010, including 59 strains from abscess and 69 strains from sputum. Congo red agar plate was used to examine polysaccharide intercellular adhesion ( PIA

  9. Dynamics of biofilm formation during anaerobic digestion of organic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Susanne; Schropp, Daniel; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Othman, Maazuza; Kazda, Marian

    2014-10-01

    Biofilm-based reactors are effectively used for wastewater treatment but are not common in biogas production. This study investigated biofilm dynamics on biofilm carriers incubated in batch biogas reactors at high and low organic loading rates for sludge from meat industry dissolved air flotation units. Biofilm formation and dynamics were studied using various microscopic techniques. Resulting micrographs were analysed for total cell numbers, thickness of biofilms, biofilm-covered surface area, and the area covered by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Cell numbers within biofilms (10(11) cells ml(-1)) were up to one order of magnitude higher compared to the numbers of cells in the fluid reactor content. Further, biofilm formation and structure mainly correlated with the numbers of microorganisms present in the fluid reactor content and the organic loading. At high organic loading (45 kg VS m(-3)), the thickness of the continuous biofilm layer ranged from 5 to 160 μm with an average of 51 μm and a median of 26 μm. Conversely, at lower organic loading (15 kg VS m(-3)), only microcolonies were detectable. Those microcolonies increased in their frequency of occurrence during ongoing fermentation. Independently from the organic loading rate, biofilms were embedded completely in EPS within seven days. The maturation and maintenance of biofilms changed during the batch fermentation due to decreasing substrate availability. Concomitant, detachment of microorganisms within biofilms was observed simultaneously with the decrease of biogas formation. This study demonstrates that biofilms of high cell densities can enhance digestion of organic waste and have positive effects on biogas production.

  10. Bap, a biofilm matrix protein of Staphylococcus aureus prevents cellular internalization through binding to GP96 host receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Jaione; Latasa, Cristina; Gil, Carmen; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Solano, Cristina; Penadés, José R; Lasa, Iñigo

    2012-01-01

    The biofilm matrix, composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids and lipids, plays a well-known role as a defence structure, protecting bacteria from the host immune system and antimicrobial therapy. However, little is known about its responsibility in the interaction of biofilm cells with host tissues. Staphylococcus aureus, a leading cause of biofilm-associated chronic infections, is able to develop a biofilm built on a proteinaceous Bap-mediated matrix. Here, we used the Bap protein as a model to investigate the role that components of the biofilm matrix play in the interaction of S. aureus with host cells. The results show that Bap promotes the adhesion but prevents the entry of S. aureus into epithelial cells. A broad analysis of potential interaction partners for Bap using ligand overlayer immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation with purified Bap and pull down with intact bacteria, identified a direct binding between Bap and Gp96/GRP94/Hsp90 protein. The interaction of Bap with Gp96 provokes a significant reduction in the capacity of S. aureus to invade epithelial cells by interfering with the fibronectin binding protein invasion pathway. Consistent with these results, Bap deficient bacteria displayed an enhanced capacity to invade mammary gland epithelial cells in a lactating mice mastitis model. Our observations begin to elucidate the mechanisms by which components of the biofilm matrix can facilitate the colonization of host tissues and the establishment of persistent infections.

  11. Bap, a biofilm matrix protein of Staphylococcus aureus prevents cellular internalization through binding to GP96 host receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaione Valle

    Full Text Available The biofilm matrix, composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids and lipids, plays a well-known role as a defence structure, protecting bacteria from the host immune system and antimicrobial therapy. However, little is known about its responsibility in the interaction of biofilm cells with host tissues. Staphylococcus aureus, a leading cause of biofilm-associated chronic infections, is able to develop a biofilm built on a proteinaceous Bap-mediated matrix. Here, we used the Bap protein as a model to investigate the role that components of the biofilm matrix play in the interaction of S. aureus with host cells. The results show that Bap promotes the adhesion but prevents the entry of S. aureus into epithelial cells. A broad analysis of potential interaction partners for Bap using ligand overlayer immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation with purified Bap and pull down with intact bacteria, identified a direct binding between Bap and Gp96/GRP94/Hsp90 protein. The interaction of Bap with Gp96 provokes a significant reduction in the capacity of S. aureus to invade epithelial cells by interfering with the fibronectin binding protein invasion pathway. Consistent with these results, Bap deficient bacteria displayed an enhanced capacity to invade mammary gland epithelial cells in a lactating mice mastitis model. Our observations begin to elucidate the mechanisms by which components of the biofilm matrix can facilitate the colonization of host tissues and the establishment of persistent infections.

  12. Biofilm Formation of Pasteurella Multocida on Bentonite Clay

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    Ramachandranpillai Rajagopal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Biofilms are structural communities of bacterial cells enshrined in a self produced polymeric matrix. The studies on biofilm formation of Pasteurella multocida have become imperative since it is a respiratory pathogen and its biofilm mode could possibly be one of its virulence factors for survival inside a host. The present study describes a biofilm assay for P. multocida on inert hydrophilic material called bentonite clay.Materials and methods: The potential of the organism to form in vitro biofilm was assessed by growing the organism under nutrient restriction along with the inert substrate bentonite clay, which will provide a surface for attachment. For quantification of biofilm, plate count by the spread plate method was employed. Capsule production of the attached bacteria was demonstrated by light microscopic examination following Maneval staining and capsular polysaccharide estimation was done using standard procedures.Results and Conclusion: The biofilm formation peaked on the third day of incubation (1.54 ×106 cfu/g of bentonite clay while the planktonic cells were found to be at a maximum on day one post inoculation (8.10 ×108 cfu/ml of the broth. Maneval staining of late logarithmic phase biofilm cultures revealed large aggregates of bacterial cells, bacteria appearing as chains or as a meshwork. The capsular polysaccharide estimation of biofilm cells revealed a 3.25 times increase over the planktonic bacteria. The biofilm cells cultured on solid media also produced some exclusive colony morphotypes

  13. Involvement of NADH Oxidase in Biofilm Formation in Streptococcus sanguinis.

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    Xiuchun Ge

    Full Text Available Biofilms play important roles in microbial communities and are related to infectious diseases. Here, we report direct evidence that a bacterial nox gene encoding NADH oxidase is involved in biofilm formation. A dramatic reduction in biofilm formation was observed in a Streptococcus sanguinis nox mutant under anaerobic conditions without any decrease in growth. The membrane fluidity of the mutant bacterial cells was found to be decreased and the fatty acid composition altered, with increased palmitic acid and decreased stearic acid and vaccenic acid. Extracellular DNA of the mutant was reduced in abundance and bacterial competence was suppressed. Gene expression analysis in the mutant identified two genes with altered expression, gtfP and Idh, which were found to be related to biofilm formation through examination of their deletion mutants. NADH oxidase-related metabolic pathways were analyzed, further clarifying the function of this enzyme in biofilm formation.

  14. Organic compounds inhibiting S. epidermidis adhesion and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jingdong; Hu, Yifan;

    2009-01-01

    The formation of biofilms on surfaces of indwelling medical devices is a serious medical problem. Staphylococcus epidermidis is a common pathogen found to colonize implanted devices and as a biofilm is more resistant to the host immune system as well as to antibiotic treatments. Combating S....... epidermidis infections by preventing or eradicating biofilm formation of the bacterium is therefore a medically important challenge. We report here a study of biofilm formation of S. epidermidis on solid surfaces using a combination of confocal laser scanning (CLSM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in both...... air and aqueous environments. We have investigated the inhibitory effects of surfaces treated with four organic compounds, two benzoate derivatives denoted as compound 59 and 75 and two carboxamicle derivatives denoted as compound 47 and 73, on S. epidermidis adhesion and biofilm formation. All four...

  15. Determination of the biofilm formation capacity of bacterial pathogens associated with otorhinolaryngologic diseases in the Malaysian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Yalda; Ling, Lina Chooi; Loke, Mun Fai; Shailendra, Sivalingam; Prepageran, Narayanan; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2014-05-01

    This study aims to assess the association between microbial composition, biofilm formation and chronic otorhinolaryngologic disorders in Malaysia. A total of 45 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis, chronic tonsillitis and chronic suppurative otitis media and 15 asymptomatic control patients were studied. Swab samples were obtained from these subjects. Samples were studied by conventional microbiological culturing, PCR-based microbial detection and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) and other Streptococcus species were detected in subjects of both patient and control groups. Biofilm was observed in approximately half of the smear prepared from swab samples obtained from subjects of the patient group. Most of these were polymicrobial biofilms. S. aureus biofilm was most prevalent among nasal samples while H. influenzae biofilm was more common among ear and throat samples. Results from this study supported the hypothesis that chronic otorhinolaryngologic diseases may be biofilm related. Due to the presence of unculturable bacteria in biofilms present in specimens from ear, nose and throat, the use of molecular methods in combination with conventional microbiological culturing has demonstrated an improvement in the detection of bacteria from such specimens in this study.

  16. Gel-Entrapped Staphylococcus aureus Bacteria as Models of Biofilm Infection Exhibit Growth in Dense Aggregates, Oxygen Limitation, Antibiotic Tolerance, and Heterogeneous Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, Breana; Pitts, Betsey; Lauchnor, Ellen; Stewart, Philip S

    2016-10-01

    An experimental model that mimicked the structure and characteristics of in vivo biofilm infections, such as those occurring in the lung or in dermal wounds where no biomaterial surface is present, was developed. In these infections, microbial biofilm forms as cell aggregates interspersed in a layer of mucus or host matrix material. This structure was modeled by filling glass capillary tubes with an agarose gel that had been seeded with Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and then incubating the gel biofilm in medium for up to 30 h. Confocal microscopy showed that the bacteria formed in discrete pockets distributed throughout the gel matrix. These aggregates enlarged over time and also developed a size gradient, with the clusters being larger near the nutrient- and oxygen-supplied interface and smaller at greater depths. Bacteria entrapped in gels for 24 h grew slowly (specific growth rate, 0.06 h(-1)) and were much less susceptible to oxacillin, minocycline, or ciprofloxacin than planktonic cells. Microelectrode measurements showed that the oxygen concentration decreased with depth into the gel biofilm, falling to values less than 3% of air saturation at depths of 500 μm. An anaerobiosis-responsive green fluorescent protein reporter gene for lactate dehydrogenase was induced in the region of the gel where the measured oxygen concentrations were low, confirming biologically relevant hypoxia. These results show that the gel biofilm model captures key features of biofilm infection in mucus or compromised tissue: formation of dense, distinct aggregates, reduced specific growth rates, local hypoxia, and antibiotic tolerance. PMID:27503656

  17. Analysis of meticillin-susceptible and meticillin-resistant biofilm-forming Staphylococcus aureus from catheter infections isolated in a large Italian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrelli, Dezemona; Repetto, Antonella; D'Ercole, Stefania; Rombini, Silvia; Ripa, Sandro; Prenna, Manuela; Vitali, Luca Agostino

    2008-03-01

    Several characteristics were analysed in 37 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from nosocomial catheter infections: the PFGE profile after SmaI digestion of chromosomal DNA, the ability to form a biofilm on a polystyrene surface, antibiotic susceptibility patterns (penicillin, oxacillin, erythromycin, tetracycline, clindamycin, telithromycin, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, rifampicin, vancomycin and linezolid), and the presence of genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation. All strains but three (92 %) were able to grow on a plastic surface as a biofilm. An almost complete association was found between phenotypes and genotypic traits of antibiotic resistance, whilst PFGE profiling showed the highly polyclonal composition of the set of strains under study. Sixteen isolates (43 %) were meticillin-resistant and were subjected to staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) and cassette chromosome recombinase (ccr) complex type determination by multiplex PCR. Only a subgroup of six strains belonged to the archaic clone PFGE type and bore the SCCmec/ccrAB type I structure. Among the remaining strains some presented small rearrangements of the SCCmec/ccrAB genetic locus, whilst others could barely be traced back to a known structural type. These observations suggest that, at the local level and at a particular site of infection, S. aureus may show great genetic variability and escape the general rule of expansion of the S. aureus pandemic clones. PMID:18287301

  18. Comparative proteomic analysis of extracellular proteins expressed by various clonal types of Staphylococcus aureus and during planktonic growth and biofilm development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Sahab Atshan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is well known for its biofilm formation with rapid emergence of new clones circulating worldwide. The main objectives of the study were 1 to identify possible differences in protein expression among various and closely related clonal types of S. aureus, 2 to establish the differences in protein expression in terms of size of protein spots and its intensities between bacteria which are grown statically (biofilm formation with that of under aeration and agitation, and 3 to compare the differences in protein expression as a function of time (in hours. In this study, we selected six clinical isolates comprising two similar (MRSA-527 and MRSA-524 and four different (MRSA-139, MSSA-12E, MSSA-22d, and MSSA-10E types identified by spa typing, MLST and SCCmec typing. We performed 2D gel migration comparison. Also, two MRSA isolates (527 and 139 were selected to determine quantitative changes in the level of extracellular proteins at different biofilm growth time points of 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h. The study was done using a strategy that combines 2-DGE and LC-MS/MS analysis for absolute quantification and identification of the extracellular proteins. The 2DGE revealed that the proteomic profiles for the isolates belonging to the similar spa, MLST and SCCmec types were still quite different. Among the extracellular proteins secreted at different time points of biofilm formation, significant changes in protein expression were observed at 48 h incubation as compared to the exponential growth at 12 h incubation. The main conclusion of the work is that the authors do observe differences among isolates, and growth conditions do influence the protein content at different time points of biofilm formation.

  19. Functional Relationship between Sucrose and a Cariogenic Biofilm Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Na Cai

    Full Text Available Sucrose is an important dietary factor in cariogenic biofilm formation and subsequent initiation of dental caries. This study investigated the functional relationships between sucrose concentration and Streptococcus mutans adherence and biofilm formation. Changes in morphological characteristics of the biofilms with increasing sucrose concentration were also evaluated. S. mutans biofilms were formed on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite discs in culture medium containing 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, or 40% (w/v sucrose. The adherence (in 4-hour biofilms and biofilm composition (in 46-hour biofilms of the biofilms were analyzed using microbiological, biochemical, laser scanning confocal fluorescence microscopic, and scanning electron microscopic methods. To determine the relationships, 2nd order polynomial curve fitting was performed. In this study, the influence of sucrose on bacterial adhesion, biofilm composition (dry weight, bacterial counts, and water-insoluble extracellular polysaccharide (EPS content, and acidogenicity followed a 2nd order polynomial curve with concentration dependence, and the maximum effective concentrations (MECs of sucrose ranged from 0.45 to 2.4%. The bacterial and EPS bio-volume and thickness in the biofilms also gradually increased and then decreased as sucrose concentration increased. Furthermore, the size and shape of the micro-colonies of the biofilms depended on the sucrose concentration. Around the MECs, the micro-colonies were bigger and more homogeneous than those at 0 and 40%, and were surrounded by enough EPSs to support their structure. These results suggest that the relationship between sucrose concentration and cariogenic biofilm formation in the oral cavity could be described by a functional relationship.

  20. Blocking of bacterial biofilm formation by a fish protein coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Klemm, Per

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation on inert surfaces is a significant health and economic problem in a wide range of environmental, industrial, and medical areas. Bacterial adhesion is generally a prerequisite for this colonization process and, thus, represents an attractive target for the development......, this proteinaceous coating is characterized with regards to its biofilm-reducing properties by using a range of urinary tract infectious isolates with various pathogenic and adhesive properties. The antiadhesive coating significantly reduced or delayed biofilm formation by all these isolates under every condition...... examined. The biofilm-reducing activity did, however, vary depending on the substratum physicochemical characteristics and the environmental conditions studied. These data illustrate the importance of protein conditioning layers with respect to bacterial biofilm formation and suggest that antiadhesive...

  1. Quorum-Quenching and Matrix-Degrading Enzymes in Multilayer Coatings Synergistically Prevent Bacterial Biofilm Formation on Urinary Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Kristina; Fernandes, Margarida M; Francesko, Antonio; Mendoza, Ernest; Guezguez, Jamil; Burnet, Michael; Tzanov, Tzanko

    2015-12-16

    Bacteria often colonize in-dwelling medical devices and grow as complex biofilm communities of cells embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix, which increases their resistance to antibiotics and the host immune system. During biofilm growth, bacterial cells cooperate through specific quorum-sensing (QS) signals. Taking advantage of this mechanism of biofilm formation, we hypothesized that interrupting the communication among bacteria and simultaneously degrading the extracellular matrix would inhibit biofilm growth. To this end, coatings composed of the enzymes acylase and α-amylase, able to degrade bacterial QS molecules and polysaccharides, respectively, were built on silicone urinary catheters using a layer-by-layer deposition technique. Multilayer coatings of either acylase or amylase alone suppressed the biofilm formation of corresponding Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus. Further assembly of both enzymes in hybrid nanocoatings resulted in stronger biofilm inhibition as a function of acylase or amylase position in the layers. Hybrid coatings, with the QS-signal-degrading acylase as outermost layer, demonstrated 30% higher antibiofilm efficiency against medically relevant Gram-negative bacteria compared to that of the other assemblies. These nanocoatings significantly reduced the occurrence of single-species (P. aeruginosa) and mixed-species (P. aeruginosa and Escherichia coli) biofilms on silicone catheters under both static and dynamic conditions. Moreover, in an in vivo animal model, the quorum quenching and matrix degrading enzyme assemblies delayed the biofilm growth up to 7 days. PMID:26593217

  2. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation on wound dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Kenneth S; Calderon, Diego F; Kierski, Patricia R; Brown, Amanda L; Shah, Nihar M; Abbott, Nicholas L; Schurr, Michael J; Murphy, Christopher J; McAnulty, Jonathan F; Czuprynski, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic nonhealing skin wounds often contain bacterial biofilms that prevent normal wound healing and closure and present challenges to the use of conventional wound dressings. We investigated inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, a common pathogen of chronic skin wounds, on a commercially available biological wound dressing. Building on prior reports, we examined whether the amino acid tryptophan would inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the three-dimensional surface of the biological dressing. Bacterial biomass and biofilm polysaccharides were quantified using crystal violet staining or an enzyme linked lectin, respectively. Bacterial cells and biofilm matrix adherent to the wound dressing were visualized through scanning electron microscopy. D-/L-tryptophan inhibited P. aeruginosa biofilm formation on the wound dressing in a dose dependent manner and was not directly cytotoxic to immortalized human keratinocytes although there was some reduction in cellular metabolism or enzymatic activity. More importantly, D-/L-tryptophan did not impair wound healing in a splinted skin wound murine model. Furthermore, wound closure was improved when D-/L-tryptophan treated wound dressing with P. aeruginosa biofilms were compared with untreated dressings. These findings indicate that tryptophan may prove useful for integration into wound dressings to inhibit biofilm formation and promote wound healing.

  3. Lactobacilli : Important in biofilm formation on voice prostheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijssen, Kevin J. D. A.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Laan, Bernard F. A. M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to identify bacterial strains responsible for biofilm formation on silicone rubber voice prostheses. STUDY DESIGN: We conducted an analysis of the bacterial population in biofilms on used silicone rubber voice prostheses by using new microbiological methods. METHODS: Two microbi

  4. Effects of norspermidine on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation and eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Lin; She, Pengfei; Wang, Yangxia; Liu, Fengxia; Zhang, Di; Chen, Lihua; Luo, Zhen; Xu, Huan; Qi, Yong; Wu, Yong

    2016-06-01

    Biofilms are defined as aggregation of single cell microorganisms and associated with over 80% of all the microbial infections. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen capable of leading to various infections in immunocompromised people. Recent studies showed that norspermidine, a kind of polyamine, prevented and disrupted biofilm formation by some Gram-negative bacterium. In this study, the effects of norspermidine on P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and eradication were tested. Microtiter plate combined with crystal violet staining was used to study the effects of norspermidine on P. aeruginosa initial attachment, then we employed SEM (scanning electron microscope), qRT-PCR, and QS-related virulence factor assays to investigate how norspermidine prevent biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We reported that high-dose norspermidine had bactericide effect on P. aeruginosa, and norspermidine began to inhibit biofilm formation and eradicate 24-h mature biofilm at concentration of 0.1 and 1 mmol/L, respectively, probably by preventing cell-surface attachment, inhibiting swimming motility, and downregulating QS-related genes expression. To investigate the potential utility of norspermidine in preventing device-related infections, we found that catheters immersed with norspermidine were effective in eradicating mature biofilm. These results suggest that norspermidine could be a potent antibiofilm agent for formulating strategies against P. aeruginosa biofilm. PMID:26817804

  5. Comparison of the antibiotic activities of Daptomycin, Vancomycin, and the investigational Fluoroquinolone Delafloxacin against biofilms from Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siala, Wafi; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule; Tulkens, Paul M; Hallin, Marie; Denis, Olivier; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2014-11-01

    Biofilm-related infections remain a scourge. In an in vitro model of biofilms using Staphylococcus aureus reference strains, delafloxacin and daptomycin were found to be the most active among the antibiotics from 8 different pharmacological classes (J. Bauer, W. Siala, P. M. Tulkens, and F. Van Bambeke, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 57:2726-2737, 2013, doi:10.1128/AAC.00181-13). In this study, we compared delafloxacin to daptomycin and vancomycin using biofilms produced by 7 clinical strains (S. aureus epidemic clones CC5 and CC8) in order to rationalize the differences observed between the antibiotics and strains. The effects of the antibiotics on bacterial viability (resazurin reduction assay) and biomass (crystal violet staining) were measured and correlated with the proportion of polysaccharides in the matrix, the local microenvironmental pH (micro-pH), and the antibiotic penetration in the biofilm. At clinically meaningful concentrations, delafloxacin, daptomycin, and vancomycin caused a ≥25% reduction in viability against the biofilms formed by 5, 4, and 3 strains, respectively. The antibiotic penetration within the biofilms ranged from 0.6 to 52% for delafloxacin, 0.2 to 10% for daptomycin, and 0.2 to 1% for vancomycin; for delafloxacin, this was inversely related to the polysaccharide proportion in the matrix. Six biofilms were acidic, explaining the high potency of delafloxacin (lower MICs at acidic pH). Norspermidine and norspermine (disassembling the biofilm matrix) drastically increased delafloxacin potency and efficacy (50% reduction in viability for 6 biofilms at clinically meaningful concentrations) in direct correlation with its increased penetration within the biofilm, while they only modestly improved daptomycin efficacy (50% reduction in viability for 2 biofilms) and penetration, and they showed marginal effects with vancomycin. Delafloxacin potency and efficacy against biofilms are benefited by its penetration into the matrix and the local

  6. BIOFILM FORMATION ON THE SURFACE OF MATERIALS AND MEDICAL PRODUCTS BY NOSOCOMIAL STRAINS ISOLATED FROM THE BIOLOGICAL SUBSTRATES OF PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Nemets

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the ability of hospital-associated strains isolated from the biological substrates of patients oper- ated on under extracorporeal circulation, to form biofilms on the surface of medical materials and products. Materials and methods. The formation of biofilms of strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Serratia liquefaciens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. isolated from the biological substrates of patients operated on under extracorporeal circulation, on different surfaces (politetraftorotilen, medical poly- ethylene, Polyoxybutirate-to-valerate, silicone, polyvinyl chloride, was studied by a modified method for the surface of the medical materials and products. Results. The influence of the material nature, as well as hydrophi- lization of the surface, on the ability of hospital-associated strains, isolated from the biological substrates of pa- tients operated on under extracorporeal circulation, to form biofilms is studied. It is shown that that certain strains exhibit an increased tendency to biofilm formation on more hydrophobic surfaces, e. g., Acinetobacter spp. At the same time the activity of Staphylococcus aureus on silicon surface (hydrophobic surface is minimal. Other strains almost equally form biofilms on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces e.g. Serratia liquefaciens. It was also shown that the surface hydrophilization of PEG to 50% for all the studied strains leads to dramatic reduc- tion of biofilm formation. Conclusion. The tendency to form biofilms of a particular hospital-associated strain is individual and depends on the nature of the medical material and physical-chemical characteristics of its surface. Hydrophilization of the surface of the medical material is accompanied by a lowered risk of biofilm formation

  7. 金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜的控制方法研究进展%Research progress of control methods for Staphylococcus aureus biofilm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙纪录; 陈小雪; 韩北忠

    2011-01-01

    金黄色葡萄球菌是一种重要的食源性病原菌.金黄色葡萄球菌能够形成生物被膜,使其更加难于根除.文中对金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜的控制方法进行了全面综述,包括去除已形成的生物被膜、杀灭生物被膜中的金黄色葡萄球菌和抑制生物被膜的形成3个主要方面,旨在为食品工业领域生物被膜的控制提供借鉴.%Staphylococcus aureus is a major food-borne pathogen.S.aureus is able to form biofilm, which makes it more difficult to be eradicated.The control methods for S.aureus biofilm were comprehensively reviewed, including the removal of preformed biofilm, the killing of S.aureus imbedded in biofilm and the inhibition ofbiofilm formation.It would provide references for biofilm control in food industry.

  8. Organic compounds inhibiting S. epidermidis adhesion and biofilm formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Zhiqiang [Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Dk-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology of Ministry of Education and Public Health, Institute of Medical Microbiology and Institutes of Biomedical Science, Shanghai Medical School of Fudan University, Yi Xue Yuan Road 138, Shanghai 200032 (China); Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, 86 Jonathan Lucas Street, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Zhang, Jingdong; Hu, Yifan; Chi, Qijin [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, NanoDTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Mortensen, Ninell P. [Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Dk-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Department of Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37932 (United States); Qu, Di [Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Virology of Ministry of Education and Public Health, Institute of Medical Microbiology and Institutes of Biomedical Science, Shanghai Medical School of Fudan University, Yi Xue Yuan Road 138, Shanghai 200032 (China); Molin, Soren [Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Dk-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Ulstrup, Jens, E-mail: ju@kemi.dtu.dk [Department of Chemistry, Building 207, NanoDTU, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2009-07-15

    The formation of biofilms on surfaces of indwelling medical devices is a serious medical problem. Staphylococcus epidermidis is a common pathogen found to colonize implanted devices and as a biofilm is more resistant to the host immune system as well as to antibiotic treatments. Combating S. epidermidis infections by preventing or eradicating biofilm formation of the bacterium is therefore a medically important challenge. We report here a study of biofilm formation of S. epidermidis on solid surfaces using a combination of confocal laser scanning (CLSM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in both air and aqueous environments. We have investigated the inhibitory effects of surfaces treated with four organic compounds, two benzoate derivatives denoted as compound 59 and 75 and two carboxamide derivatives denoted as compound 47 and 73, on S. epidermidis adhesion and biofilm formation. All four compounds evoke significant inhibitory effects on the formation of S. epidermidis biofilms with compounds 47 and 73 being most effective. None of the compounds were found to inhibit growth of S. epidermidis in liquid cultures. Bacteria attached to the substrate when exposed to the compounds were not affected indicating that these compounds inhibit initial adhesion. These results suggest a pretreatment for medically implanted surfaces that can prevent the biofilm formation and reduce infection.

  9. Spore formation and toxin production in Clostridium difficile biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina G Semenyuk

    Full Text Available The ability to grow as a biofilm can facilitate survival of bacteria in the environment and promote infection. To better characterize biofilm formation in the pathogen Clostridium difficile, we established a colony biofilm culture method for this organism on a polycarbonate filter, and analyzed the matrix and the cells in biofilms from a variety of clinical isolates over several days of biofilm culture. We found that biofilms readily formed in all strains analyzed, and that spores were abundant within about 6 days. We also found that extracellular DNA (eDNA, polysaccharide and protein was readily detected in the matrix of all strains, including the major toxins A and/or B, in toxigenic strains. All the strains we analyzed formed spores. Apart from strains 630 and VPI10463, which sporulated in the biofilm at relatively low frequencies, the frequencies of biofilm sporulation varied between 46 and 65%, suggesting that variations in sporulation levels among strains is unlikely to be a major factor in variation in the severity of disease. Spores in biofilms also had reduced germination efficiency compared to spores obtained by a conventional sporulation protocol. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that in 3 day-old biofilms, the outermost structure of the spore is a lightly staining coat. However, after 6 days, material that resembles cell debris in the matrix surrounds the spore, and darkly staining granules are closely associated with the spores surface. In 14 day-old biofilms, relatively few spores are surrounded by the apparent cell debris, and the surface-associated granules are present at higher density at the coat surface. Finally, we showed that biofilm cells possess 100-fold greater resistance to the antibiotic metronidazole then do cells cultured in liquid media. Taken together, our data suggest that C. difficile cells and spores in biofilms have specialized properties that may facilitate infection.

  10. Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and dispersion during colonization and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashuan eChao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus is a common colonizer of the human nasopharynx. Despite a low rate of invasive disease, the high prevalence of colonization results in millions of infections and over 1 million deaths per year, mostly in individuals under the age of 5 and the elderly. Colonizing pneumococci form well-organized biofilm communities in the nasopharyngeal environment, but the specific role of biofilms and their interaction with the host during colonization and disease is not yet clear. Pneumococci in biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and this phenotype can be recapitulated when pneumococci are grown on respiratory epithelial cells under conditions found in the nasopharyngeal environment. Pneumococcal biofilms display lower levels of virulence in vivo and provide an optimal environment for increased genetic exchange both in vitro and in vivo, with increased natural transformation seen during co-colonization with multiple strains. Biofilms have also been detected on mucosal surfaces during pneumonia and middle ear infection, although the role of these biofilms in the disease process is debated. Recent studies have shown that changes in the nasopharyngeal environment caused by concomitant virus infection, changes in the microflora, inflammation, or other host assaults trigger active release of pneumococci from biofilms. These dispersed bacteria have distinct phenotypic properties and transcriptional profiles different from both biofilm and broth-grown, planktonic bacteria, resulting in a significantly increased virulence in vivo.In this review we discuss the properties of pneumococcal biofilms, the role of biofilm formation during pneumococcal colonization, including their propensity for increased ability to exchange genetic material, as well as mechanisms involved in transition from asymptomatic biofilm colonization to dissemination and disease of otherwise sterile sites. Greater understanding of

  11. Identification of Listeria monocytogenes determinants required for biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almaris N Alonso

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, food-borne pathogen of humans and animals. L. monocytogenes is considered to be a potential public health risk by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA, as this bacterium can easily contaminate ready-to-eat (RTE foods and cause an invasive, life-threatening disease (listeriosis. Bacteria can adhere and grow on multiple surfaces and persist within biofilms in food processing plants, providing resistance to sanitizers and other antimicrobial agents. While whole genome sequencing has led to the identification of biofilm synthesis gene clusters in many bacterial species, bioinformatics has not identified the biofilm synthesis genes within the L. monocytogenes genome. To identify genes necessary for L. monocytogenes biofilm formation, we performed a transposon mutagenesis library screen using a recently constructed Himar1 mariner transposon. Approximately 10,000 transposon mutants within L. monocytogenes strain 10403S were screened for biofilm formation in 96-well polyvinyl chloride (PVC microtiter plates with 70 Himar1 insertion mutants identified that produced significantly less biofilms. DNA sequencing of the transposon insertion sites within the isolated mutants revealed transposon insertions within 38 distinct genetic loci. The identification of mutants bearing insertions within several flagellar motility genes previously known to be required for the initial stages of biofilm formation validated the ability of the mutagenesis screen to identify L. monocytogenes biofilm-defective mutants. Two newly identified genetic loci, dltABCD and phoPR, were selected for deletion analysis and both ΔdltABCD and ΔphoPR bacterial strains displayed biofilm formation defects in the PVC microtiter plate assay, confirming these loci contribute to biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes.

  12. Coral-Associated Bacteria as a Promising Antibiofilm Agent against Methicillin-Resistant and -Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmugaraj Gowrishankar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study deals with the evaluation of two coral-associated bacterial (CAB extracts to inhibit the biofilm synthesis in vitro as well as the virulence production like hemolysin and exopolysaccharide (EPS, and also to assess their ability to modify the adhesion properties, that is cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH of methicillin-resistant (MRSA and -susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA. Out of nine CAB screened, the ethyl acetate extract of CAB-E2 (Bacillus firmus and CAB-E4 (Vibrio parahemolyticus have shown excellent antibiofilm activity against S. aureus. CAB-E2 reduced the production of EPS (57–79% and hemolysin (43–70%, which ultimately resulted in the significant inhibition of biofilms (80–87% formed by both MRSA and MSSA. Similarly, CAB-E4 was also found to decrease the production of EPS (43–57%, hemolysin (43–57% and biofilms (80–85% of test pathogens. CLSM analysis also proved the antibiofilm efficacy of CAB extracts. Furthermore, the CAB extracts strongly decreased the CSH of S. aureus. Additionally, FT-IR analysis of S. aureus treated with CAB extracts evidenced the reduction in cellular components compared to their respective controls. Thus, the present study reports for the first time, B. firmus—a coral-associated bacterium, as a promising source of antibiofilm agent against the recalcitrant biofilms formed by multidrug resistant S. aureus.

  13. Development of a biofilm inhibitor molecule against multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus associated with gestational urinary tract infections

    OpenAIRE

    Balamurugan, P.; Hema, M.; Kaur, Gurmeet; Sridharan, V.; Prabu, P. C.; Sumana, M. N.; Princy, S. Adline

    2015-01-01

    Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) is a globally widespread human infection caused by an infestation of uropathogens. Eventhough, Escherichia coli is often quoted as being the chief among them, Staphylococcus aureus involvement in UTI especially in gestational UTI is often understated. Staphylococcal accessory regulator A (SarA) is a quorum regulator of S. aureus that controls the expression of various virulence and biofilm phenotypes. Since SarA had been a focussed target for antibiofilm agent de...

  14. In vivo monitoring of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm infections and antimicrobial therapy by 18F-FDG-MicroPET in a mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido, Victoria; Collantes, María; Barberán, Montserrat; Peñuelas, Iván; Arbizu, Javier; Amorena Zabalza, Beatriz; Grilló, María Jesús

    2014-01-01

    A mouse model was developed for in vivo monitoring of infection and the effect of antimicrobial treatment against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, using the [18F]fluoro-deoxyglucose–MicroPET ([18F]FDG-MicroPET) image technique. In the model, sealed Vialon catheters were briefly precolonized with S. aureus strains ATCC 15981 or V329, which differ in cytotoxic properties and biofilm matrix composition. After subcutaneous implantation of catheters in mice, the S. aureus strain differences found i...

  15. Control of pathogen growth and biofilm formation using a urinary catheter that releases antimicrobial nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishikawa, Hiroaki; Ebberyd, Anette; Römling, Ute; Brauner, Annelie; Lüthje, Petra; Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie

    2013-12-01

    Antibacterial nitrogen oxides including nitric oxide are formed from nitrite under acidic conditions. In a continuous-flow model of the urinary bladder we used the retention cuff of an all-silicone Foley catheter as a depot for export of nitrogen oxides. The cuff was filled with sodium nitrite (50mM) and an acidic buffer solution (pH 3.6) and the growth of nine common uropathogens in the surrounding artificial urine was measured along with biofilm formation on the catheter surface. In experiments with control catheters (NaCl) bacteria grew readily and biofilm developed within hours in five of nine strains. In contrast, with test catheters bacterial counts were markedly reduced and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterobacter cloace was prevented, whereas Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were unaffected. We conclude that antibacterial nitrogen oxides generated in the retention cuff of a urinary catheter diffuse into urine and prevent the growth of urinary pathogens and biofilm formation. Although promising, future studies will reveal if this novel approach can be clinically useful for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

  16. Tobacco smoke augments Porphyromonas gingivalis-Streptococcus gordonii biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhi Bagaitkar

    Full Text Available Smoking is responsible for the majority of periodontitis cases in the US and smokers are more susceptible than non-smokers to infection by the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. P. gingivalis colonization of the oral cavity is dependent upon its interaction with other plaque bacteria, including Streptococcus gordonii. Microarray analysis suggested that exposure of P. gingivalis to cigarette smoke extract (CSE increased the expression of the major fimbrial antigen (FimA, but not the minor fimbrial antigen (Mfa1. Therefore, we hypothesized that CSE promotes P. gingivalis-S. gordonii biofilm formation in a FimA-dependent manner. FimA total protein and cell surface expression were increased upon exposure to CSE whereas Mfa1 was unaffected. CSE exposure did not induce P. gingivalis auto-aggregation but did promote dual species biofilm formation, monitored by microcolony numbers and depth (both, p<0.05. Interestingly, P. gingivalis biofilms grown in the presence of CSE exhibited a lower pro-inflammatory capacity (TNF-α, IL-6 than control biofilms (both, p<0.01. CSE-exposed P. gingivalis bound more strongly to immobilized rGAPDH, the cognate FimA ligand on S. gordonii, than control biofilms (p<0.001 and did so in a dose-dependent manner. Nevertheless, a peptide representing the Mfa1 binding site on S. gordonii, SspB, completely inhibited dual species biofilm formation. Thus, CSE likely augments P. gingivalis biofilm formation by increasing FimA avidity which, in turn, supports initial interspecies interactions and promotes subsequent high affinity Mfa1-SspB interactions driving biofilm growth. CSE induction of P. gingivalis biofilms of limited pro-inflammatory potential may explain the increased persistence of this pathogen in smokers. These findings may also be relevant to other biofilm-induced infectious diseases and conditions.

  17. Spatial & Temporal Geophysical Monitoring of Microbial Growth and Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have examined the effect of biogenic gases and biomineralization on the acoustic properties of porous media. In this study, we investigated the spatiotemporal effect of microbial growth and biofilm formation on compressional waves and complex conductivity in sand...

  18. Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation on food processing surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Dorthe; Hjelm, M.; Johansen, C.;

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory model systems were developed for studying Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation under batch and flow conditions. S. putrefaciens plays a major role in food spoilage and may cause microbially induced corrosion on steel surfaces. S. putrefaciens bacteria suspended...

  19. Bacterial cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase activity coordinates biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J Kalivoda

    Full Text Available Biofilm-related infections are a major contributor to human disease, and the capacity for surface attachment and biofilm formation are key attributes for the pathogenesis of microbes. Serratia marcescens type I fimbriae-dependent biofilms are coordinated by the adenylate cyclase, CyaA, and the cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-cAMP receptor protein (CRP complex. This study uses S. marcescens as a model system to test the role of cAMP-phosphodiesterase activity in controlling biofilm formation. Herein we describe the characterization of a putative S. marcescens cAMP-phosphodiesterase gene (SMA3506, designated as cpdS, and demonstrated to be a functional cAMP-phosphodiesterase both in vitro and in vivo. Deletion of cpdS resulted in defective biofilm formation and reduced type I fimbriae production, whereas multicopy expression of cpdS conferred a type I fimbriae-dependent hyper-biofilm. Together, these results support a model in which bacterial cAMP-phosphodiesterase activity modulates biofilm formation.

  20. Effect of Lactobacillus species on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ayaz; Dachang, Wu; Lei, Zhou; Jianjun, Liu; Juanjuan, Qiu; Yi, Xin

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary pathogen responsible for initiating dental caries and decay. The presence of sucrose, stimulates S. mutans to produce insoluble glucans to form oral biofilm also known as dental plaque to initiate caries lesion. The GtfB and LuxS genes of S. mutans are responsible for formation and maturation of biofilm. Lactobacillus species as probiotic can reduces the count of S. mutans. In this study effect of different Lactobacillus species against the formation of S. mutans biofilm was observed. Growing biofilm in the presence of sucrose was detected using 96 well microtiter plate crystal violet assay and biofilm formation by S. mutans in the presence of Lactobacillus was detected. Gene expression of biofilm forming genes (GtfB and LuxS) was quantified through Real-time PCR. All strains of Lactobacillus potently reduced the formation of S. mutans biofilm whereas Lactobacillus acidophilus reduced the genetic expression by 60-80%. Therefore, probiotic Lactobacillus species can be used as an alternative instead of antibiotics to decrease the chance of dental caries by reducing the count of S. mutans and their gene expression to maintain good oral health.

  1. Molecule Targeting Glucosyltransferase Inhibits Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhi; Cui, Tao; Zeng, Jumei; Chen, Lulu; Zhang, Wenling; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Jiyao; Zhou, Xuedong; Li, Yuqing

    2015-10-19

    Dental plaque biofilms are responsible for numerous chronic oral infections and cause a severe health burden. Many of these infections cannot be eliminated, as the bacteria in the biofilms are resistant to the host's immune defenses and antibiotics. There is a critical need to develop new strategies to control biofilm-based infections. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus mutans is promoted by major virulence factors known as glucosyltransferases (Gtfs), which synthesize adhesive extracellular polysaccharides (EPS). The current study was designed to identify novel molecules that target Gtfs, thereby inhibiting S. mutans biofilm formation and having the potential to prevent dental caries. Structure-based virtual screening of approximately 150,000 commercially available compounds against the crystal structure of the glucosyltransferase domain of the GtfC protein from S. mutans resulted in the identification of a quinoxaline derivative, 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-N-(3-{[2-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethyl]imino}-1,4-dihydro-2-quinoxalinylidene)ethanamine, as a potential Gtf inhibitor. In vitro assays showed that the compound was capable of inhibiting EPS synthesis and biofilm formation in S. mutans by selectively antagonizing Gtfs instead of by killing the bacteria directly. Moreover, the in vivo anti-caries efficacy of the compound was evaluated in a rat model. We found that the compound significantly reduced the incidence and severity of smooth and sulcal-surface caries in vivo with a concomitant reduction in the percentage of S. mutans in the animals' dental plaque (P biofilm formation and the cariogenicity of S. mutans.

  2. Biofilm Formation of Listeria monocytogenes on Various Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mahdavi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Listeria monocytogenes is considered as a ubiquitous foodborne pathogen which can lead to serious infections, especially in newborns, elderly, pregnant, and immunocompromised people. The organism has been isolated from many foods and may cause meningitis, septicemia and abortion in pregnant women. Also L. monocytogenes forms biofilms on many food contact surface materials and medical devices. Development of biofilms on many surfaces is a potential source of contamination of foods that may lead to spoilage or transmission of foodborne pathogens. Materials & Methods: Biofilm formation of L. monocytogenes (RITCC 1293 serotype 4a was investigated. Hydrophobicity of L. monocytogenes was measured by MATH method. Then biofilm formation of the organism was assessed at 2, 4, 8, 16 and 20 hours on stainless steel (type 304 no 2B, polyethylene and glass by drop plate method. Results: Results indicated that L. monocytogenes with 85% of hydrophobicity formed biofilm on each of three surfaces. Biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces was significantly more than other surfaces (p<0.05. Conclusion: The ability of biofilm formation of L. monocytogenes on medical devices and food containers is very important as far as hygiene and disease outbreaks are concerned.

  3. Helicobacter pylori-coccoid forms and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Leif Percival; Rasmussen, Lone

    2009-01-01

    be detected by PCR in water supplies. There is no substantial evidence for viable H. pylori persisting in water supplies. Epidemiological studies suggest that environmental water is a risk factor for H. pylori infection when compared with tap water, and formation of H. pylori biofilm cannot be excluded....... Helicobacter pylori does not seem to take part in biofilm formation in the oral cavity even though the bacterium may be detected....

  4. Photodynamic antibacterial and antibiofilm activity of RLP068/Cl against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa forming biofilms on prosthetic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassena, Christian; Fenu, Simone; Giuliani, Francesco; Fantetti, Lia; Roncucci, Gabrio; Simonutti, Giulio; Romanò, Carlo Luca; De Francesco, Raffaele; Drago, Lorenzo

    2014-07-01

    Prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are becoming a growing public health concern in developed countries as more people undergo arthroplasty for bone fixation or joint replacement. Because a wide range of bacterial strains responsible for PJIs can produce biofilms on prosthetic implants and because the biofilm structure confers elevated bacterial resistance to antibiotic therapy, new drugs and therapies are needed to improve the clinical outcome of treatment of PJIs. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (APDT), a non-antibiotic broad-spectrum antimicrobial treatment, is also active against multidrug-resistant micro-organisms such as meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. APDT uses a photosensitiser that targets bacterial cells following exposure to visible light. APDT with RLP068/Cl, a novel photosensitiser, was studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to evaluate the disruption of MRSA and P. aeruginosa biofilms on prosthetic material. Quantitative CLSM studies showed a reduction in biofilm biomass (biofilm disruption) and a decrease in viable cell numbers, as determined by standard plate counting, in the S. aureus and P. aeruginosa biofilms exposed to APDT with the photosensitiser RLP068/Cl. APDT with RLP068/Cl may be a useful approach to the treatment of PJI-associated biofilms.

  5. Bacterial biofilm formation inhibitory activity revealed for plant derived natural compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artini, M; Papa, R; Barbato, G; Scoarughi, G L; Cellini, A; Morazzoni, P; Bombardelli, E; Selan, L

    2012-01-15

    Use of herbal plant remedies to treat infectious diseases is a common practice in many countries in traditional and alternative medicine. However to date there are only few antimicrobial agents derived from botanics. Based on microbiological screening tests of crude plant extracts we identified four compounds derived from Krameria, Aesculus hippocastanum and Chelidonium majus that showed a potentially interesting antimicrobial activity. In this work we present an in depth characterization of the inhibition activity of these pure compounds on the formation of biofilm of Staphylococcus aureus as well as of Staphylococcus epidermidis strains. We show that two of these compounds possess interesting potential to become active principles of new drugs. PMID:22182580

  6. Patterned biofilm formation reveals a mechanism for structural heterogeneity in bacterial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Huan; Hou, Shuyu; Yongyat, Chanokpon; De Tore, Suzanne; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous and are the major cause of chronic infections in humans and persistent biofouling in industry. Despite the significance of bacterial biofilms, the mechanism of biofilm formation and associated drug tolerance is still not fully understood. A major challenge in biofilm research is the intrinsic heterogeneity in the biofilm structure, which leads to temporal and spatial variation in cell density and gene expression. To understand and control such structural heterogeneity, surfaces with patterned functional alkanthiols were used in this study to obtain Escherichia coli cell clusters with systematically varied cluster size and distance between clusters. The results from quantitative imaging analysis revealed an interesting phenomenon in which multicellular connections can be formed between cell clusters depending on the size of interacting clusters and the distance between them. In addition, significant differences in patterned biofilm formation were observed between wild-type E. coli RP437 and some of its isogenic mutants, indicating that certain cellular and genetic factors are involved in interactions among cell clusters. In particular, autoinducer-2-mediated quorum sensing was found to be important. Collectively, these results provide missing information that links cell-to-cell signaling and interaction among cell clusters to the structural organization of bacterial biofilms.

  7. 黄芩苷对金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜抑制作用的体外研究%Inhibitory effect of Baicalin on formation of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜仲业; 陈一强; 孔晋亮; 闫萍; 蔡双启; 张东伟

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the inhibitory effect of Baicalin on Staphylococcus aureu biofilm (BF)in vitro. METHODS The in vitro BF model was established by setting S. aureu-17546 isolates as the study strains, which were divided into the control group and Baicalin groups minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was measured by using double dilution method; the configuration of the BF on the carries surface was observed by fluorescence microscope; viable bacterial counts were determined by serial dilution. RESULTS On the third day of the building of BF model, fluorescence microscope revealed that the BF formed in the Baicalin group with final concentration of Baicalin of 1024 μg/ml, 512 μg/ml and 256 fig/ml was significantly less than those in the control group, the viable bacterial counts of S. aareu-17546 adhered to the surface of carriers in Baicalin group were respectively(5. 05 ±0. 27) log10CFU/ml, (5. 17 ± 0. 31) log10CFU/ml, and (5. 27 ±0. 55) log10CFU/ml, significantly less than in the control group (P<0. 05); on the 7th day of the building of BF model, fluorescence microscope revealed that there were a few of scattered BF in the Baicalin group with the final concentration of Baicalin of 1024 jug/ml, 512 μg /ml and 256 μg/ml, the construction of BF was significantly rarefied as compared with the control group, the viable bacterial counts inside the BF were respectively(5. 19 ±0. 30)logl0CFU/ml, (5. 24±0. 04)log10CFU/ml, and (5. 33±0. 22)log10CFU/ml, significantly less than (P<0. 05). CONCLUSION Baicalin can inhibit the in vitro formation of S. aureu BF.%目的 研究黄芩苷对金黄色葡萄球菌早期、成熟生物膜(BF)的抑制作用.方法 以编号为17546金黄色葡萄球菌为试验菌株,构建体外BF模型,分为空白对照组、试验组(黄芩苷组),两倍稀释法测定最低抑菌浓度;荧光显微镜观察载体表面BF形态;连续稀释法行活菌计数.结果 建模3d,荧光显微镜发现黄芩苷终浓度分别为1024

  8. Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) isolates of swine origin form robust biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization of livestock animals is common and prevalence rates for pigs have been reported to be as high as 49%. One hypothesis to explain the high prevalence of MRSA in swine herds is the ability of these organisms to exist as biofilms. To invest...

  9. Wild Mushroom Extracts as Inhibitors of Bacterial Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Alves

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms can colonize a wide variety of medical devices, putting patients in risk for local and systemic infectious complications, including local-site infections, catheter-related bloodstream infections, and endocarditis. These microorganisms are able to grow adhered to almost every surface, forming architecturally complex communities termed biofilms. The use of natural products has been extremely successful in the discovery of new medicine, and mushrooms could be a source of natural antimicrobials. The present study reports the capacity of wild mushroom extracts to inhibit in vitro biofilm formation by multi-resistant bacteria. Four Gram-negative bacteria biofilm producers (Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from urine were used to verify the activity of Russula delica, Fistulina hepatica, Mycena rosea, Leucopaxilus giganteus, and Lepista nuda extracts. The results obtained showed that all tested mushroom extracts presented some extent of inhibition of biofilm production. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the microorganism with the highest capacity of biofilm production, being also the most susceptible to the extracts inhibition capacity (equal or higher than 50%. Among the five tested extracts against E. coli, Leucopaxillus giganteus (47.8% and Mycenas rosea (44.8% presented the highest inhibition of biofilm formation. The extracts exhibiting the highest inhibitory effect upon P. mirabilis biofilm formation were Sarcodon imbricatus (45.4% and Russula delica (53.1%. Acinetobacter baumannii was the microorganism with the lowest susceptibility to mushroom extracts inhibitory effect on biofilm production (highest inhibition—almost 29%, by Russula delica extract. This is a pioneer study since, as far as we know, there are no reports on the inhibition of biofilm production by the studied mushroom extracts and in particular against multi-resistant clinical isolates; nevertheless, other

  10. Fimbriae have distinguishable roles in Proteus mirabilis biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scavone, Paola; Iribarnegaray, Victoria; Caetano, Ana Laura; Schlapp, Geraldine; Härtel, Steffen; Zunino, Pablo

    2016-07-01

    Proteus mirabilis is one of the most common etiological agents of complicated urinary tract infections, especially those associated with catheterization. This is related to the ability of P. mirabilis to form biofilms on different surfaces. This pathogen encodes 17 putative fimbrial operons, the highest number found in any sequenced bacterial species so far. The present study analyzed the role of four P. mirabilis fimbriae (MR/P, UCA, ATF and PMF) in biofilm formation using isogenic mutants. Experimental approaches included migration over catheter, swimming and swarming motility, the semiquantitative assay based on adhesion and crystal violet staining, and biofilm development by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Different assays were performed using LB or artificial urine. Results indicated that the different fimbriae contribute to the formation of a stable and functional biofilm. Fimbriae revealed particular associated roles. First, all the mutants showed a significantly reduced ability to migrate across urinary catheter sections but neither swimming nor swarming motility were affected. However, some mutants formed smaller biofilms compared with the wild type (MRP and ATF) while others formed significantly larger biofilms (UCA and PMF) showing different bioarchitecture features. It can be concluded that P. mirabilis fimbriae have distinguishable roles in the generation of biofilms, particularly in association with catheters. PMID:27091004

  11. Efficient suppression of biofilm formation by a nucleic acid aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Yi; Cheng, Lijuan; Ling, Min; Feng, Xinru; Chen, Lingli; Wu, Minxi; Deng, Le

    2015-08-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that are attached to a solid surface using extracellular polymeric substances. Motility and initial attachment mediated by flagella are required for biofilm formation. Therefore, blocking the motility of flagella is a potential strategy to inhibit biofilm formation. In this study, single-stranded DNA aptamers specific to the Salmonella choleraesuis were selected after 14 cycles of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment. Among the selected aptamers, the aptamer 3 showed the highest affinity for S. choleraesuis with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 41 ± 2 nM. Aptamer 3, conjugated with magnetic beads, was then used to capture its binding target on the bacteria. After mass spectrometry and specific binding analysis, the flagellin was identified as the target captured by aptamer 3. Furthermore, inhibition experiments, inverted microscopy and atomic force microscopy demonstrated that aptamer 3 was able to control the biofilm formation and promote the inhibitory effect of an antibiotic on bacterial biofilms. Single-stranded DNA aptamers therefore have great potential as inhibitors of biofilm formation.

  12. Antibiotic Resistance Related to Biofilm Formation in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuotto, Claudia; Longo, Francesca; Balice, Maria Pia; Donelli, Gianfranco; Varaldo, Pietro E

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen, Klebsiella pneumoniae, is responsible for causing a spectrum of community-acquired and nosocomial infections and typically infects patients with indwelling medical devices, especially urinary catheters, on which this microorganism is able to grow as a biofilm. The increasingly frequent acquisition of antibiotic resistance by K. pneumoniae strains has given rise to a global spread of this multidrug-resistant pathogen, mostly at the hospital level. This scenario is exacerbated when it is noted that intrinsic resistance to antimicrobial agents dramatically increases when K. pneumoniae strains grow as a biofilm. This review will summarize the findings about the antibiotic resistance related to biofilm formation in K. pneumoniae.

  13. Vibriophages differentially influence biofilm formation by Vibrio anguillarum strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Demeng; Dahl, Amalie; Middelboe, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    different effects on the biofilm development. Addition of phage ΦH20 to strain BA35 showed efficient control of biofilm formation and density of free-living cells. The interactions between BA35 and ΦH20 were thus characterized by a strong phage control of the phage-sensitive population and subsequent...... against phage infection. By the formation of biofilms, strain PF430-3 created spatial refuges that protected the host from phage infection and allowed coexistence between phage-sensitive cells and lytic phage KVP40. Together, the results demonstrate highly variable phage protection mechanisms in two......-living and surface-associated growth conditions. In this study, we explored in vitro phage-host interactions in two different strains of V. anguillarum (BA35 and PF430-3) during growth in microcolonies, biofilms, and free-living cells. Two vibriophages, ΦH20 (Siphoviridae) and KVP40 (Myoviridae), had completely...

  14. In Vitro Activities of Moxifloxacin, 127I-Moxifloxacin and 131I-Moxifloxacin Against Staphylococcus Aureus Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Demiroğlu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the antimicrobial effect of Moxifloxacin (MXF, radio (Na131I and cold (K127I iodinated MXF on methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 35556 (MSSA biofilms. Methods: MXF was labeled with Na131I using the iodogen method. The optimum radiodination conditions for 131I-MXF was determined by thin-layer radio chromatography studies. Thin-layer radio chromatography (TLRC chromatograms were obtained by using Cyclone Plus Storage Phosphor System. The MICs of MXF, 127I-MXF and 131I-MXF were determined using the microdilution broth method according to CLSI criteria. Time kill curves were performed over 24 h using an inoculum of 2×105 (CFU/mL. Biofilms were grown in microtitre plates, dyed with crystal violet and the mean optical density (OD630 was used for quantification. Biofilms were incubated MXF, 127I-MXF and 131I-MXF at various concentration (0.03 to 64 µg/mL. Results: MXF was labeled with 131I iodogen method. 131I-MXF was obtained with high a yield 95±3%. The MIC values for MXF, 127I-MXF and 131I-MXF was 0.06 µg/mL. Bactericidal activity was demonstrated at 0.25 µg/mL 4 hour for MXF, 127I-MXF and 131I-MXF. At MIC levels, MXF, 127I-MXF and 131I-MXF was not showed a marked reduction of metabolic activity in the S. aureus biofilm. The ODs of biofilm after incubation with an increasing antibiotic concentration were significantly lower than the ODs of biofilms without antibiotic p≤005. The radiolabeled MXF was most effective than MXF, 127I-MXF in reducing the number of bacteria in biofilm. After 24 h incubation Log10 CFU/mL values for 32 µg/mL antibiotic concentration: Control, MXF, 127I-MXF and 131I-MXF were 9.5, 4.3, 4.8 and 3.1, respectively. Conclusion: 131I and 127I were used alone there was no penetration of the S. aureus biofilm and no damage. In contrast our results demonstrate that the radiolabeled Moxifloxacin (131I-MXF have potent anti-biofilm activity against S. aureus

  15. Effect of glucose on Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation, and assessment of the biofilm's sanitation tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoui, Daisuke; Hirokawa, Eri; Takahashi, Hajime; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2016-08-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important cause of human foodborne infections and its ability to form biofilms is a serious concern to the food industry. To reveal the effect of glucose conditions on biofilm formation of L. monocytogenes, 20 strains were investigated under three glucose conditions (0.1, 1.0, and 2.0% w v(-1)) by quantifying the number of cells in the biofilm and observing the biofilm structure after incubation for 24, 72, and 168 h. In addition, the biofilms were examined for their sensitivity to sodium hypochlorite. It was found that high concentrations of glucose reduced the number of viable cells in the biofilms and increased extracellular polymeric substance production. Moreover, biofilms formed at a glucose concentration of 1.0 or 2.0% were more resistant to sodium hypochlorite than those formed at a glucose concentration of 0.1%. This knowledge can be used to help design the most appropriate sanitation strategy. PMID:27353113

  16. Impact of early colonizers on in vitro subgingival biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Ammann

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of early colonizing species on the structure and the composition of the bacterial community developing in a subgingival 10-species biofilm model system. The model included Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus anginosus, Actinomycesoris, Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. nucleatum, Veillonella dispar, Campylobacter rectus, Prevotella intermedia, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola. Based on literature, we considered Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus anginosus, and Actinomyces oris as early colonizers and examined their role in the biofilms by either a delayed addition to the consortium, or by not inoculating at all the biofilms with these species. We quantitatively evaluated the resulting biofilms by real-time quantitative PCR and further compared the structures using confocal laser scanning microscopy following fluorescence in situ hybridisation. The absence of the early colonizers did not hinder biofilm formation. The biofilms reached the same total counts and developed to normal thickness. However, quantitative shifts in the abundances of individual species were observed. In the absence of streptococci, the overall biofilm structure appeared looser and more dispersed. Moreover, besides a significant increase of P. intermedia and a decrease of P. gingivalis , P. intermedia appeared to form filamented long chains that resembled streptococci. A. oris, although growing to significantly higher abundance in absence of streptococci, did not have a visible impact on the biofilms. Hence, in the absence of the early colonizers, there is a pronounced effect on P. intermedia and P. gingivalis that may cause distinct shifts in the structure of the biofilm. Streptococci possibly facilitate the establishment of P. gingivalis into subgingival biofilms, while in their absence P. intermedia became more dominant and forms elongated chains.

  17. Does the bracket composition material influence initial biofilm formation?

    OpenAIRE

    Gustavo Antônio Martins Brandão; Antonio Carlos Pereira; Ana Maria Martins Brandão; Haroldo Amorim de Almeida; Rogério Heládio Lopes Motta

    2015-01-01

    Context: Orthodontic treatment has been reported to contribute to the development and accumulation of dental biofilm, which is commonly found on bracket and adjacent surfaces. Aims: The aim of this work is to test the hypothesis if there are differences in dental biofilm formation on the surface of orthodontic brackets according to the type of composition material. Subjects and Methods: Three bracket types (metallic, composite, and ceramic) had been evaluated. Subjects wore acrylic pa...

  18. AI-2 of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Inhibits Candida albicans Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang W. Bachtiar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a Gram-negative bacterium, and Candida albicans, a polymorphic fungus, are both commensals of the oral cavity but both are opportunistic pathogens that can cause oral diseases. A. actinomycetemcomitans produces a quorum-sensing molecule called autoinducer-2 (AI-2, synthesized by LuxS, that plays an important role in expression of virulence factors, in intra- but also in interspecies communication. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of AI-2 based signaling in the interactions between C. albicans and A. actinomycetemcomitans. A. actinomycetemcomitans adhered to C. albicans and inhibited biofilm formation by means of a molecule that was secreted during growth. C. albicans biofilm formation increased significantly when co-cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans luxS, lacking AI-2 production. Addition of wild-type-derived spent medium or synthetic AI-2 to spent medium of the luxS strain, restored inhibition of C. albicans biofilm formation to wild-type levels. Addition of synthetic AI-2 significantly inhibited hypha formation of C. albicans possibly explaining the inhibition of biofilm formation. AI-2 of A. actinomycetemcomitans is synthesized by LuxS, accumulates during growth and inhibits C. albicans hypha- and biofilm formation. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between bacteria and fungi may provide important insight into the balance within complex oral microbial communities.

  19. Surface modification of materials to encourage beneficial biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amreeta Sarjit

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are communities of sessile microorganisms that grow and produce extrapolymeric substances on an abiotic or biotic surface. Although biofilms are often associated with negative impacts, the role of beneficial biofilms is wide and include applications in bioremediation, wastewater treatment and microbial fuel cells. Microbial adhesion to a surface, which is highly dependent on the physicochemical properties of the cells and surfaces, is an essential step in biofilm formation. Surface modification therefore represents an important way to modulate microbial attachment and ultimately biofilm formation by microorganisms. In this review different surface modification processes such as organosilane surface modification, plasma treatment, and chemical modification of carbon nanotubes, electro-oxidation and covalent-immobilization with neutral red and methylene blue molecules are outlined. The effectiveness of these modifications and their industrial applications are also discussed. There is inadequate literature on surface modification as a process to enhance beneficial biofilm formation. These methods need to be safe, economically viable, scalable and environmental friendly and their potential to fulfil these criteria for many applications has yet to be determined.

  20. 果汁饮料加工过程中金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜形成的研究%Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation during juice drink processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢盼盼; 李南薇; 杨公明; 邓开野

    2013-01-01

    从清洗过的果汁饮料加工设备的管件中采样分离细菌,对纯化后的菌株进行了形态和生化反应鉴定以及分子生物学鉴定;同时分别采用银染法和结晶紫染色法对分离菌株所形成的生物被膜进行了检测.结果表明,分离菌株被鉴定为金黄色葡萄球菌(Staphylococcus aureus);银染法和结晶学染色法均证明金色葡萄球菌能形成生物被膜,从而证明清洗后的果汁饮料加工管件中依然可能形成金色葡萄球菌生物被膜.

  1. Antibacterial activity of Thymoquinone, an active principle of Nigella sativa and its potency to prevent bacterial biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhrouf Amina

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thymoquinone is an active principle of Nigella sativa seed known as "Habbah Al-Sauda" in Arabic countries and "Sinouj" in Tunisia. Bacterial biofilms tend to exhibit significant tolerance to antimicrobials drugs during infections. Methods The antibacterial activity of Thymoquinone (TQ and its biofilm inhibition potencies were investigated on 11 human pathogenic bacteria. The growth and development of the biofilm were assessed using the crystal violet (CV and the 2, 3-bis [2-methyloxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT reduction assay. Results TQ exhibited a significant bactericidal activity against the majority of the tested bacteria (MICs values ranged from 8 to 32 μg/ml especially Gram positive cocci (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Staphylococcus epidermidis CIP 106510. Crystal violet assay demonstrated that the minimum biofilm inhibition concentration (BIC50 was reached with 22 and 60 μg/ml for Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Staphylococcus epidermidis CIP 106510 respectively. In addition our data revealed that cells oxidative activity was influenced by TQ supplementation. In the same way, TQ prevented cell adhesion to glass slides surface. Conclusion The ability of TQ to prevent biofilm formation warrants further investigation to explore its use as bioactive substances with antibiofilm potential.

  2. Actinomyces naeslundii in intial dental biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Raarup, Merete Krog; Nyengaard, Jens Randel;

    2009-01-01

    Combined use of Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) and Fluorescent in situ Hybridization (FISH) offers new opportunities for analysing the spatial relationships and temporal changes of specific members of microbial populations in intact dental biofilms. AIMS: The purpose of this study....... RESULTS: This study confirmed previous work that streptococci are the predominant colonizers of early dental biofilm along with A. naeslundii. There was a notable increase in the total number of bacteria, Streptococcus spp., and A. naeslundii over time with a tendency towards a slower growth rate for A......-layer dental biofilms up to 48 h definitively demonstrated that A. naeslundii preferentially occupied the inner layers. Some A. naeslundii microcolonies extended perpendicularly from the supporting surface surrounded by other bacteria forming chimneys of complex multilayered micro-colonies. CONCLUSIONS...

  3. Deacetylation of Fungal Exopolysaccharide Mediates Adhesion and Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J. Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The mold Aspergillus fumigatus causes invasive infection in immunocompromised patients. Recently, galactosaminogalactan (GAG, an exopolysaccharide composed of galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc, was identified as a virulence factor required for biofilm formation. The molecular mechanisms underlying GAG biosynthesis and GAG-mediated biofilm formation were unknown. We identified a cluster of five coregulated genes that were dysregulated in GAG-deficient mutants and whose gene products share functional similarity with proteins that mediate the synthesis of the bacterial biofilm exopolysaccharide poly-(β1-6-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (PNAG. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that the GAG cluster gene agd3 encodes a protein containing a deacetylase domain. Because deacetylation of N-acetylglucosamine residues is critical for the function of PNAG, we investigated the role of GAG deacetylation in fungal biofilm formation. Agd3 was found to mediate deacetylation of GalNAc residues within GAG and render the polysaccharide polycationic. As with PNAG, deacetylation is required for the adherence of GAG to hyphae and for biofilm formation. Growth of the Δagd3 mutant in the presence of culture supernatants of the GAG-deficient Δuge3 mutant rescued the biofilm defect of the Δagd3 mutant and restored the adhesive properties of GAG, suggesting that deacetylation is an extracellular process. The GAG biosynthetic gene cluster is present in the genomes of members of the Pezizomycotina subphylum of the Ascomycota including a number of plant-pathogenic fungi and a single basidiomycete species, Trichosporon asahii, likely a result of recent horizontal gene transfer. The current study demonstrates that the production of cationic, deacetylated exopolysaccharides is a strategy used by both fungi and bacteria for biofilm formation.

  4. DNase I and proteinase K impair Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation and induce dispersal of pre-existing biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Uyen T; Burrows, Lori L

    2014-09-18

    Current sanitation methods in the food industry are not always sufficient for prevention or dispersal of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms. Here, we determined if prevention of adherence or dispersal of existing biofilms could occur if biofilm matrix components were disrupted enzymatically. Addition of DNase during biofilm formation reduced attachment (biofilms with 100μg/ml of DNase for 24h induced incomplete biofilm dispersal, with biofilm remaining compared to control. In contrast, addition of proteinase K completely inhibited biofilm formation, and 72h biofilms-including those grown under stimulatory conditions-were completely dispersed with 100μg/ml proteinase K. Generally-regarded-as-safe proteases bromelain and papain were less effective dispersants than proteinase K. In a time course assay, complete dispersal of L. monocytogenes biofilms from both polystyrene and type 304H food-grade stainless steel occurred within 5min at proteinase K concentrations above 25μg/ml. These data confirm that both DNA and proteins are required for L. monocytogenes biofilm development and maintenance, and that these components of the biofilm matrix can be targeted for effective prevention and removal of biofilms.

  5. Natural and synthetic cathelicidin peptides with anti-microbial and anti-biofilm activity against Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Hoek Monique L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic, infected wounds typically contain multiple genera of bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, many of which are strong biofilm formers. Bacterial biofilms are thought to be a direct impediment to wound healing. New therapies that focus on a biofilm approach may improve the recovery and healing rate for infected wounds. In this study, cathelicidins and related short, synthetic peptides were tested for their anti-microbial effectiveness as well as their ability to inhibit the ability of S. aureus to form biofilms. Results The helical human cathelicidin LL-37 was tested against S. aureus, and was found to exhibit effective anti-microbial, anti-attachment as well as anti-biofilm activity at concentrations in the low μg/ml range. The effect of peptide chirality and associated protease-resistance was explored through the use of an all-D amino acid peptide, D-LL-37, and in turn compared to scrambled LL-37. Helical cathelicidins have been identified in other animals such as the Chinese cobra, Naja atra (NA-CATH. We previously identified an 11-residue imperfectly repeated pattern (ATRA motif within the sequence of NA-CATH. A series of short peptides (ATRA-1, -2, -1A, as well as a synthetic peptide, NA-CATH:ATRA1-ATRA1, were designed to explore the significance of the conserved residues within the ATRA motif for anti-microbial activity. The CD spectrum of NA-CATH and NA-CATH:ATRA1-ATRA1 revealed the structural properties of these peptides and suggested that helicity may factor into their anti-microbial and anti-biofilm activities. Conclusions The NA-CATH:ATRA1-ATRA1 peptide inhibits the production of biofilm by S. aureus in the presence of salt, exhibiting anti-biofilm activity at lower peptide concentrations than NA-CATH, LL-37 and D-LL-37; and demonstrates low cytoxicity against host cells but does not affect bacterial attachment. The peptides utilized in this anti-biofilm approach may provide templates for a new group of

  6. Staphylococcus aureus β-Toxin Mutants Are Defective in Biofilm Ligase and Sphingomyelinase Activity, and Causation of Infective Endocarditis and Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Alfa; Vu, Bao G; Stach, Christopher S; Merriman, Joseph A; Horswill, Alexander R; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2016-05-01

    β-Toxin is an important virulence factor of Staphylococcus aureus, contributing to colonization and development of disease [Salgado-Pabon, W., et al. (2014) J. Infect. Dis. 210, 784-792; Huseby, M. J., et al. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 14407-14412; Katayama, Y., et al. (2013) J. Bacteriol. 195, 1194-1203]. This cytotoxin has two distinct mechanisms of action: sphingomyelinase activity and DNA biofilm ligase activity. However, the distinct mechanism that is most important for its role in infective endocarditis is unknown. We characterized the active site of β-toxin DNA biofilm ligase activity by examining deficiencies in site-directed mutants through in vitro DNA precipitation and biofilm formation assays. Possible conformational changes in mutant structure compared to that of wild-type toxin were assessed preliminarily by trypsin digestion analysis, retention of sphingomyelinase activity, and predicted structures based on the native toxin structure. We addressed the contribution of each mechanism of action to producing infective endocarditis and sepsis in vivo in a rabbit model. The H289N β-toxin mutant, lacking sphingomyelinase activity, exhibited lower sepsis lethality and infective endocarditis vegetation formation compared to those of the wild-type toxin. β-Toxin mutants with disrupted biofilm ligase activity did not exhibit decreased sepsis lethality but were deficient in infective endocarditis vegetation formation compared to the wild-type protein. Our study begins to characterize the DNA biofilm ligase active site of β-toxin and suggests β-toxin functions importantly in infective endocarditis through both of its mechanisms of action.

  7. Staphylococcus aureus β-Toxin Mutants Are Defective in Biofilm Ligase and Sphingomyelinase Activity, and Causation of Infective Endocarditis and Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Alfa; Vu, Bao G; Stach, Christopher S; Merriman, Joseph A; Horswill, Alexander R; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2016-05-01

    β-Toxin is an important virulence factor of Staphylococcus aureus, contributing to colonization and development of disease [Salgado-Pabon, W., et al. (2014) J. Infect. Dis. 210, 784-792; Huseby, M. J., et al. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 14407-14412; Katayama, Y., et al. (2013) J. Bacteriol. 195, 1194-1203]. This cytotoxin has two distinct mechanisms of action: sphingomyelinase activity and DNA biofilm ligase activity. However, the distinct mechanism that is most important for its role in infective endocarditis is unknown. We characterized the active site of β-toxin DNA biofilm ligase activity by examining deficiencies in site-directed mutants through in vitro DNA precipitation and biofilm formation assays. Possible conformational changes in mutant structure compared to that of wild-type toxin were assessed preliminarily by trypsin digestion analysis, retention of sphingomyelinase activity, and predicted structures based on the native toxin structure. We addressed the contribution of each mechanism of action to producing infective endocarditis and sepsis in vivo in a rabbit model. The H289N β-toxin mutant, lacking sphingomyelinase activity, exhibited lower sepsis lethality and infective endocarditis vegetation formation compared to those of the wild-type toxin. β-Toxin mutants with disrupted biofilm ligase activity did not exhibit decreased sepsis lethality but were deficient in infective endocarditis vegetation formation compared to the wild-type protein. Our study begins to characterize the DNA biofilm ligase active site of β-toxin and suggests β-toxin functions importantly in infective endocarditis through both of its mechanisms of action. PMID:27015018

  8. Silver-Palladium Surfaces Inhibit Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Schroll, Casper; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel;

    2009-01-01

    efficacy and study of the biofilm inhibition mechanism, the silver-sensitive Escherichia coli J53 and the silver-resistant E. coli J53[pMG101] strains were used as model organisms, and batch and flow chamber setups were used as model systems. In the case of the silver-sensitive strain, the silver...

  9. Effects of ginseng on Pseudomonas aeruginosa motility and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hong; Lee, Baoleri; Yang, Liang;

    2011-01-01

    of P. aeruginosa at concentrations as low as 0.25%. Oral administration of ginseng extracts in mice promoted phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa PAO1 by airway phagocytes, but did not affect phagocytosis of a PAO1-filM mutant. Our study suggests that ginseng treatment may help to eradicate the biofilm......Biofilm-associated chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis are virtually impossible to eradicate with antibiotics because biofilm-growing bacteria are highly tolerant to antibiotics and host defense mechanisms. Previously, we found that ginseng treatments...... protected animal models from developing chronic lung infection by P. aeruginosa. In the present study, the effects of ginseng on the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms were further investigated in vitro and in vivo. Ginseng aqueous extract at concentrations of 0.5-2.0% did not inhibit the growth of P...

  10. Effect the biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus by Xinjiang black propolis%新疆黑蜂胶对金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜形成的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱明; 于倩; 吴晔华; 雒云霄; 文昊; 王嘉颖; 徐琦

    2014-01-01

    目的 研究新疆黑蜂胶提取物对金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜(bacterial biofilm,BF)形成的影响,为临床辅助治疗耐药性感染提供实验依据.方法 用醇提法提取新疆黑蜂胶得到黑蜂胶提取物,采用试管二倍稀释法测定蜂胶的最低抑菌浓度(MIC),用微孔板改良法复制金黄色葡萄球菌BF模型,并检测新疆黑蜂胶不同MIC浓度对金黄色葡萄球菌BF形成的影响,同时通过检测蜂胶对成熟金黄色葡萄球菌BF中活菌数的影响评价其对成熟金黄色葡萄球菌BF的作用.结果 新疆黑蜂胶提取物对金黄色葡萄球菌的MIC为6.25mg/ml,当浓度为3.125 mg/ml时新疆黑蜂胶就可干扰细菌BF的形成,致活菌数明显少于空白对照组;新疆黑蜂胶还可以抑制并破坏成熟金黄色葡萄球菌BF,高浓度蜂胶抗菌活性与青霉素相比无显著性差异.结论 新疆黑蜂胶提取物在体外具有抑制金黄色葡萄球菌BF形成的作用,并能破坏已形成的BF,具备开发应用的潜力.

  11. Molecule Targeting Glucosyltransferase Inhibits Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation and Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhi; Cui, Tao; Zeng, Jumei; Chen, Lulu; Zhang, Wenling; Xu, Xin; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Jiyao; Zhou, Xuedong; Li, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Dental plaque biofilms are responsible for numerous chronic oral infections and cause a severe health burden. Many of these infections cannot be eliminated, as the bacteria in the biofilms are resistant to the host's immune defenses and antibiotics. There is a critical need to develop new strategies to control biofilm-based infections. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus mutans is promoted by major virulence factors known as glucosyltransferases (Gtfs), which synthesize adhesive extracellular polysaccharides (EPS). The current study was designed to identify novel molecules that target Gtfs, thereby inhibiting S. mutans biofilm formation and having the potential to prevent dental caries. Structure-based virtual screening of approximately 150,000 commercially available compounds against the crystal structure of the glucosyltransferase domain of the GtfC protein from S. mutans resulted in the identification of a quinoxaline derivative, 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-N-(3-{[2-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethyl]imino}-1,4-dihydro-2-quinoxalinylidene)ethanamine, as a potential Gtf inhibitor. In vitro assays showed that the compound was capable of inhibiting EPS synthesis and biofilm formation in S. mutans by selectively antagonizing Gtfs instead of by killing the bacteria directly. Moreover, the in vivo anti-caries efficacy of the compound was evaluated in a rat model. We found that the compound significantly reduced the incidence and severity of smooth and sulcal-surface caries in vivo with a concomitant reduction in the percentage of S. mutans in the animals' dental plaque (P biofilm formation and the cariogenicity of S. mutans. PMID:26482298

  12. Inhibitory effect of Lactobacillus salivarius on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C-C; Lin, C-T; Wu, C-Y; Peng, W-S; Lee, M-J; Tsai, Y-C

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries arises from an imbalance of metabolic activities in dental biofilms developed primarily by Streptococcus mutans. This study was conducted to isolate potential oral probiotics with antagonistic activities against S. mutans biofilm formation from Lactobacillus salivarius, frequently found in human saliva. We analysed 64 L. salivarius strains and found that two, K35 and K43, significantly inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation with inhibitory activities more pronounced than those of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), a prototypical probiotic that shows anti-caries activity. Scanning electron microscopy showed that co-culture of S. mutans with K35 or K43 resulted in significantly reduced amounts of attached bacteria and network-like structures, typically comprising exopolysaccharides. Spot assay for S. mutans indicated that K35 and K43 strains possessed a stronger bactericidal activity against S. mutans than LGG. Moreover, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that the expression of genes encoding glucosyltransferases, gtfB, gtfC, and gtfD was reduced when S. mutans were co-cultured with K35 or K43. However, LGG activated the expression of gtfB and gtfC, but did not influence the expression of gtfD in the co-culture. A transwell-based biofilm assay indicated that these lactobacilli inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation in a contact-independent manner. In conclusion, we identified two L. salivarius strains with inhibitory activities on the growth and expression of S. mutans virulence genes to reduce its biofilm formation. This is not a general characteristic of the species, so presents a potential strategy for in vivo alteration of plaque biofilm and caries. PMID:24961744

  13. Inhibited Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation on Quaternized Chitosan-Loaded Titania Nanotubes with Various Diameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-tao Lin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Titania nanotube-based local drug delivery is an attractive strategy for combating implant-associated infection. In our previous study, we demonstrated that the gentamicin-loaded nanotubes could dramatically inhibit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on implant surfaces. Considering the overuse of antibiotics may lead to the evolution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, we synthesized a new quaternized chitosan derivative (hydroxypropyltrimethyl ammonium chloride chitosan, HACC with a 27% degree of substitution (DS; referred to as 27% HACC that had a strong antibacterial activity and simultaneously good biocompatibility with osteogenic cells. Titania nanotubes with various diameters (80, 120, 160, and 200 nm and 200 nm length were loaded with 2 mg of HACC using a lyophilization method and vacuum drying. Two standard strain, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (American Type Culture Collection 43300 and Staphylococcus epidermidis (American Type Culture Collection 35984, and two clinical isolates, S. aureus 376 and S. epidermidis 389, were selected to investigate the bacterial adhesion at 6 h and biofilm formation at 24, 48, and 72 h on the HACC-loaded nanotubes (NT-H using the spread plate method, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Smooth titanium (Smooth Ti was also investigated and compared. We found that NT-H could significantly inhibit bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on its surface compared with Smooth Ti, and the NT-H with 160 nm and 200 nm diameters had stronger antibacterial activity because of the extended HACC release time of NT-H with larger diameters. Therefore, NT-H can significantly improve the antibacterial ability of orthopedic implants and provide a promising strategy to prevent implant-associated infections.

  14. Biofilm-Forming Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Survive in Kupffer Cells and Exhibit High Virulence in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuto Oyama

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although Staphylococcus aureus is part of the normal body flora, heavy usage of antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA. MRSA can form biofilms and cause indwelling foreign body infections, bacteremia, soft tissue infections, endocarditis, and osteomyelitis. Using an in vitro assay, we screened 173 clinical blood isolates of MRSA and selected 20 high-biofilm formers (H-BF and low-biofilm formers (L-BF. These were intravenously administered to mice and the general condition of mice, the distribution of bacteria, and biofilm in the liver, lung, spleen, and kidney were investigated. MRSA count was the highest in the liver, especially within Kupffer cells, which were positive for acid polysaccharides that are associated with intracellular biofilm. After 24 h, the general condition of the mice worsened significantly in the H-BF group. In the liver, bacterial deposition and aggregation and the biofilm-forming spot number were all significantly greater for H-BF group than for L-BF. CFU analysis revealed that bacteria in the H-BF group survived for long periods in the liver. These results indicate that the biofilm-forming ability of MRSA is a crucial factor for intracellular persistence, which could lead to chronic infections.

  15. Efficacy of Linezolid and Fosfomycin in Catheter-Related Biofilm Infection Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Dong; Liu, Xu; Wang, Rui; Bai, Yan; Cai, Yun

    2016-01-01

    As long-standing clinical problems, catheter-related infections and other chronic biofilm infections are more difficult to treat due to the high antibiotic resistance of biofilm. Therefore, new treatments are needed for more effective bacteria clearance. In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial activities of several common antibiotics alone and their combinations against biofilm-embedded methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, both in vitro and in vivo. In brief, fosfomycin, levofloxacin, and rifampin alone or in combination with linezolid were tested in vitro against planktonic and biofilm-embedded MRSA infection in three MRSA stains. The synergistic effects between linezolid and the other three antibiotics were assessed by fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) and time-kill curves, where the combination of linezolid plus fosfomycin showed the best synergistic effect in all strains. For further evaluation in vivo, we applied the combination of linezolid and fosfomycin in a catheter-related biofilm rat model and found that viable bacteria counts in biofilm were significantly reduced after treatment (P fosfomycin treatment had improved therapeutic effects on biofilm-embedded MRSA infection both in vitro and in vivo, which provided important basis for new clinical therapy development. PMID:27366751

  16. Efficacy of Linezolid and Fosfomycin in Catheter-Related Biofilm Infection Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Chai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As long-standing clinical problems, catheter-related infections and other chronic biofilm infections are more difficult to treat due to the high antibiotic resistance of biofilm. Therefore, new treatments are needed for more effective bacteria clearance. In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial activities of several common antibiotics alone and their combinations against biofilm-embedded methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections, both in vitro and in vivo. In brief, fosfomycin, levofloxacin, and rifampin alone or in combination with linezolid were tested in vitro against planktonic and biofilm-embedded MRSA infection in three MRSA stains. The synergistic effects between linezolid and the other three antibiotics were assessed by fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI and time-kill curves, where the combination of linezolid plus fosfomycin showed the best synergistic effect in all strains. For further evaluation in vivo, we applied the combination of linezolid and fosfomycin in a catheter-related biofilm rat model and found that viable bacteria counts in biofilm were significantly reduced after treatment (P<0.05. In summary, we have shown here that the combination of linezolid and fosfomycin treatment had improved therapeutic effects on biofilm-embedded MRSA infection both in vitro and in vivo, which provided important basis for new clinical therapy development.

  17. Synergistic antibiofilm efficacy of various commercial antiseptics, enzymes and EDTA: a study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Elodie; Vighetto, Christophe; Di Martino, Patrick; Larreta Garde, Véronique; Seyer, Damien

    2016-08-01

    A multistep strategy was used to generate a combined antibiofilm treatment that could efficiently decrease the biomass of dense biofilms (≥6 × 10(7) CFU/cm(2)). Several compounds that exhibited activity against various targets were tested individually and in combination to search for possible synergistic effects. First, the antibiofilm activity of various commercially available antiseptics was tested on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Second, antiseptics were mixed with ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA), which is an ion chelator that can disturb biofilm organisation, and additive effects on biofilm biomass degradation were found for both strains. Then, enzymes with the ability to destabilise the biofilm matrix by hydrolysing either its proteins or its polysaccharides were used; as expected, they did not decrease bacterial viability but were revealed as efficient biomass reducers. The combination of antiseptics, EDTA and proteases, all at low concentrations, revealed a synergistic effect leading to total eradication of dense biofilms both of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus. PMID:27424598

  18. DNase I and proteinase K impair Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation and induce dispersal of pre-existing biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Uyen T; Burrows, Lori L

    2014-09-18

    Current sanitation methods in the food industry are not always sufficient for prevention or dispersal of Listeria monocytogenes biofilms. Here, we determined if prevention of adherence or dispersal of existing biofilms could occur if biofilm matrix components were disrupted enzymatically. Addition of DNase during biofilm formation reduced attachment (bromelain and papain were less effective dispersants than proteinase K. In a time course assay, complete dispersal of L. monocytogenes biofilms from both polystyrene and type 304H food-grade stainless steel occurred within 5min at proteinase K concentrations above 25μg/ml. These data confirm that both DNA and proteins are required for L. monocytogenes biofilm development and maintenance, and that these components of the biofilm matrix can be targeted for effective prevention and removal of biofilms. PMID:25043896

  19. D-amino acids enhance the activity of antimicrobials against biofilms of clinical wound isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Carlos J; Akers, Kevin S; Romano, Desiree R; Woodbury, Ronald L; Hardy, Sharanda K; Murray, Clinton K; Wenke, Joseph C

    2014-08-01

    Within wounds, microorganisms predominantly exist as biofilms. Biofilms are associated with chronic infections and represent a tremendous clinical challenge. As antibiotics are often ineffective against biofilms, use of dispersal agents as adjunctive, topical therapies for the treatment of wound infections involving biofilms has gained interest. We evaluated in vitro the dispersive activity of D-amino acids (D-AAs) on biofilms from clinical wound isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; moreover, we determined whether combinations of D-AAs and antibiotics (clindamycin, cefazolin, oxacillin, rifampin, and vancomycin for S. aureus and amikacin, colistin, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, and ceftazidime for P. aeruginosa) enhance activity against biofilms. D-Met, D-Phe, and D-Trp at concentrations of ≥ 5 mM effectively dispersed preformed biofilms of S. aureus and P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, an effect that was enhanced when they were combined as an equimolar mixture (D-Met/D-Phe/D-Trp). When combined with D-AAs, the activity of rifampin was significantly enhanced against biofilms of clinical isolates of S. aureus, as indicated by a reduction in the minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC) (from 32 to 8 μg/ml) and a >2-log reduction of viable biofilm bacteria compared to treatment with antibiotic alone. The addition of D-AAs was also observed to enhance the activity of colistin and ciprofloxacin against biofilms of P. aeruginosa, reducing the observed MBIC and the number of viable bacteria by >2 logs and 1 log at 64 and 32 μg/ml in contrast to antibiotics alone. These findings indicate that the biofilm dispersal activity of D-AAs may represent an effective strategy, in combination with antimicrobials, to release bacteria from biofilms, subsequently enhancing antimicrobial activity.

  20. The interconnection between biofilm formation and horizontal gene transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Burmølle, Mette; Hansen, Lars H.;

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has revealed that horizontal gene transfer and biofilm formation are connected processes. Although published research investigating this interconnectedness is still limited, we will review this subject in order to highlight the potential of these observations because of their beli......Recent research has revealed that horizontal gene transfer and biofilm formation are connected processes. Although published research investigating this interconnectedness is still limited, we will review this subject in order to highlight the potential of these observations because...... of their believed importance in the understanding of the adaptation and subsequent evolution of social traits in bacteria. Here, we discuss current evidence for such interconnectedness centred on plasmids. Horizontal transfer rates are typically higher in biofilm communities compared with those in planktonic states....... Biofilms, furthermore, promote plasmid stability and may enhance the host range of mobile genetic elements that are transferred horizontally. Plasmids, on the other hand, are very well suited to promote the evolution of social traits such as biofilm formation. This, essentially, transpires because plasmids...

  1. Mevalonolactone: an inhibitor of Staphylococcus epidermidis adherence and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scopel, Marina; Abraham, Wolf-Rainer; Antunes, Ana Lúcia; Henriques, Amélia Terezinha; Macedo, Alexandre José

    2014-05-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis, a commensal microorganism at the human skin and mucosae, is nowadays considered an important opportunistic pathogen related to nosocomial infections on indwelling medical devices due biofilm formation. Bacterial biofilms are the worst aspect in the treatment of infections and now efforts have been made in the search for new molecular entities to overcome this situation. In this work, a compound isolated from marine associated fungi was capable to interfere with the adherence and biofilm formation of S. epidermidis. This compound, identified as mevalonolactone, showed significant inhibition of S. epidermidis ATCC 35984 biofilm formation, without antibacterial activity, evaluated by crystal violet assay, turbidimetric assay and scanning electron microscopy. When assayed against 12 clinical isolates of S. epidermidis, this compound exhibited both biofilm inhibition and antimicrobial activity, but no activity against gram-negative bacteria was observed. Therefore, when this constitutive molecule is added in the antibiofilm and antibacterial assays, it might act as an important agent against this pathogen, contributing to the arsenal of antibiofilm compounds. PMID:24111986

  2. Susceptibility of Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus mutans biofilms to photodynamic inactivation: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; Romeiro, Rogério Lima; Costa, Anna Carolina Borges Pereira; Machado, Ana Karina Silva; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate specific effects of photodynamic inactivation (PDI) using methylene blue as photosensitizer and low-power laser irradiation on the viability of single-, dual-, and three-species biofilms formed by C. albicans, S. aureus, and S. mutans. Biofilms were grown in acrylic discs immersed in sterile brain heart infusion broth (BHI) containing 5% sucrose, inoculated with microbial suspension (10(6) cells/ml) and incubated for 5 days. On the fifth day, the effects of the methylene blue (MB) photosensitizer at a concentration of 0.1 mg/ml for 5 min and InGaAlP laser (660 nm) for 98 s, alone and conjugated were evaluated. Next, the discs were placed in tubes with sterile physiological solution [0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl)] and sonicated for to disperse the biofilms. Ten-fold serial dilutions were carried and aliquots seeded in selective agar, which were then incubated for 48 h. Then the numbers CFU/ml (log(10)) were counted and analyzed statistically (ANOVA, Tukey test, p biofilms groups was performed. Significant decreases in the viability of all microorganisms were observed for biofilms exposed to PDI mediated by MB dye. Reductions (log(10)) of single-species biofilms were greater (2.32-3.29) than the association of biofilms (1.00-2.44). Scanning electron microscopy micrographs suggested that lethal photosensitization occurred predominantly in the outermost layers of the biofilms. The results showed that PDI mediated by MB dye, might be a useful approach for the control of oral biofilms.

  3. Coral-Associated Bacteria as a Promising Antibiofilm Agent against Methicillin-Resistant and -Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Shanmugaraj Gowrishankar; Nyagwencha Duncun Mosioma; Shunmugiah Karutha Pandian

    2012-01-01

    The current study deals with the evaluation of two coral-associated bacterial (CAB) extracts to inhibit the biofilm synthesis in vitro as well as the virulence production like hemolysin and exopolysaccharide (EPS), and also to assess their ability to modify the adhesion properties, that is cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and -susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA). Out of nine CAB screened, the ethyl acetate extract of CAB-E2 (Bacillus firmus) and CAB-E4 (V...

  4. Darwinolide, a New Diterpene Scaffold That Inhibits Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm from the Antarctic Sponge Dendrilla membranosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Salm, Jacqueline L; Witowski, Christopher G; Fleeman, Renee M; McClintock, James B; Amsler, Charles D; Shaw, Lindsey N; Baker, Bill J

    2016-06-01

    A new rearranged spongian diterpene, darwinolide, has been isolated from the Antarctic Dendroceratid sponge Dendrilla membranosa. Characterized on the basis of spectroscopic and crystallographic analysis, the central seven-membered ring is hypothesized to originate from a ring-expansion of a spongian precursor. Darwinolide displays 4-fold selectivity against the biofilm phase of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus compared to the planktonic phase and may provide a scaffold for the development of therapeutics for this difficult to treat infection.

  5. Efficacy of ultraviolet C light at sublethal dose in combination with antistaphylococcal antibiotics to disinfect catheter biofilms of methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Azizi M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed El-Azizi,1 Nancy Khardori2 1Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, German University in Cairo, New Cairo City, Egypt; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USA Background: Biofilm formation inside inserted medical devices leads to their failure and acts as a source of refractory infections. The ultraviolet C (UVC light is a potential therapy that can be used against the biofilm of bacterial pathogens. Objective: We evaluated the efficacy of sublethal dose of UVC light with anti-staphylococcal antibiotics against biofilms made from 30 isolates of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus and S. epidermidis on vascular catheters. Materials and methods: A novel biofilm device was used to assess the combined approach. The biofilms on the catheters were irradiated with the UVC light at 254 nm and irradiance of 6.4 mW followed by treatment with vancomycin or quinupristin/dalfopristin at twice their minimum bactericidal concentrations or with linezolid at 64 µg/mL for 24 hours. The catheters were cut into segments and sonicated, and the number of the sessile cells was determined ­colorimetrically using XTT viable cells assay. The effect of UVC radiation followed by treatment with an ­antistaphylococcal antibiotic on the viability of the bacteria in the biofilm was visualized using LIVE/DEAD BacLight bacterial viability stain and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results: Exposure of the bacterial biofilms to the UVC light or each of the antibiotics alone was ineffective in killing the bacteria. Treatment of the biofilms with the antibiotics following their exposure to UVC light significantly (P<0.001 reduced the number of viable cells within the biofilms but did not completely eradicate them. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this combinatorial approach has not been

  6. Biofilm formation on complete denture liners

    OpenAIRE

    Rahal, Juliana Saab; Locks, Bruna Jussara Constantino; Mesquita, Marcelo Feraz; Henriques, Guilherme Elias Pessanha; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To clinically evaluate biofilm growth on 4 liners in complete denture base surfaces of 20 geriatric patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients received new complete maxillary dentures prepared with 4 chambers (10x10x2 mm) in the tissue surface of acrylic denture base. Each of the 4 chambers was randomly filled with the following denture liners: Eversoft (M1); Kooliner (M2); GC Reline Extra Soft (M3); Elite Soft Relining (M4). Patients were randomly separated into 2 treatment groups: T1- sa...

  7. BACTERIAL BIOFILM FORMATION UNDER MICROGRAVITY CONDITIONS. (R825503)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although biofilm formation is widely documented on Earth, it has not been demonstrated in the absence of gravity. To explore this possibility, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, suspended in sterile buffer, was flown in a commercial payload on space shuttle flight STS-95. During earth or...

  8. An update on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, tolerance, and dispersal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Morten; Yang, Liang; Pamp, Sünje Johanna;

    2010-01-01

    We review the recent advances in the understanding of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm lifestyle from studies using in vitro laboratory setups such as flow chambers and microtiter trays. Recent work sheds light on the role of nutrients, motility, and quorum sensing in structure formation in P...

  9. Quantitative characterization of the influence of the nanoscale morphology of nanostructured surfaces on bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Vikram Singh

    Full Text Available Bacterial infection of implants and prosthetic devices is one of the most common causes of implant failure. The nanostructured surface of biocompatible materials strongly influences the adhesion and proliferation of mammalian cells on solid substrates. The observation of this phenomenon has led to an increased effort to develop new strategies to prevent bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation, primarily through nanoengineering the topology of the materials used in implantable devices. While several studies have demonstrated the influence of nanoscale surface morphology on prokaryotic cell attachment, none have provided a quantitative understanding of this phenomenon. Using supersonic cluster beam deposition, we produced nanostructured titania thin films with controlled and reproducible nanoscale morphology respectively. We characterized the surface morphology; composition and wettability by means of atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. We studied how protein adsorption is influenced by the physico-chemical surface parameters. Lastly, we characterized Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus adhesion on nanostructured titania surfaces. Our results show that the increase in surface pore aspect ratio and volume, related to the increase of surface roughness, improves protein adsorption, which in turn downplays bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. As roughness increases up to about 20 nm, bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are enhanced; the further increase of roughness causes a significant decrease of bacterial adhesion and inhibits biofilm formation. We interpret the observed trend in bacterial adhesion as the combined effect of passivation and flattening effects induced by morphology-dependent protein adsorption. Our findings demonstrate that bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on nanostructured titanium oxide surfaces are significantly influenced by nanoscale morphological

  10. Exploration of fluid dynamic indicators/causative factors in the formation of tower structures in staphylococci bacteria bio-films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Erica; Derek, Moormeier; Bayles, Kenneth; Wei, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteria form biofilms with distinct structures that facilitate their ability to tolerate treatment and to spread within the body. As such, staph infections represent one of the greatest threats to post-surgery patients. It has been found that flow conditions play a significant role in the developmental and dispersal activity of a biofilm. The coupling between the growing biofilm and surrounding flow, however, is not well understood. Indeed, little is know why bacteria form tower structures under certain conditions but not in a predictable way. μ-PTV measurements were made in a microchannel to try to identify fluid dynamic indicators for the formation of towers in biofilm growth. Preliminary experiments indicated changes in the near wall flow up to five hours before a tower formed. The reason for that is the target of this investigation. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria were cultured in the Bioflux Fluxion channel and subjected to a steady shear rate of 0.5 dynes. In addition to μ-PTV measurement, nuclease production and cell number density counts were observed prior to and during tower development. These were compared against measurements made under the same nominal flow conditions where a tower did not form.

  11. Potential novel therapeutic strategies in cystic fibrosis: antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity of natural and designed α-helical peptides against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pompilio Arianna

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of cystic fibrosis-associated lung infections is hampered by the presence of multi-drug resistant pathogens, many of which are also strong biofilm producers. Antimicrobial peptides, essential components of innate immunity in humans and animals, exhibit relevant in vitro antimicrobial activity although they tend not to select for resistant strains. Results Three α-helical antimicrobial peptides, BMAP-27 and BMAP-28 of bovine origin, and the artificial P19(9/B peptide were tested, comparatively to Tobramycin, for their in vitro antibacterial and anti-biofilm activity against 15 Staphylococcus aureus, 25 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 27 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains from cystic fibrosis patients. All assays were carried out in physical-chemical experimental conditions simulating a cystic fibrosis lung. All peptides showed a potent and rapid bactericidal activity against most P. aeruginosa, S. maltophilia and S. aureus strains tested, at levels generally higher than those exhibited by Tobramycin and significantly reduced biofilm formation of all the bacterial species tested, although less effectively than Tobramycin did. On the contrary, the viability-reducing activity of antimicrobial peptides against preformed P. aeruginosa biofilms was comparable to and, in some cases, higher than that showed by Tobramycin. Conclusions The activity shown by α-helical peptides against planktonic and biofilm cells makes them promising “lead compounds” for future development of novel drugs for therapeutic treatment of cystic fibrosis lung disease.

  12. Visualizing biofilm formation in endotracheal tubes using endoscopic three-dimensional optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Andrew E.; Moghaddam, Samer; Troung, Kimberly K.; Chou, Lidek; Genberg, Carl; Brenner, Matthew; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-12-01

    Biofilm formation has been linked to ventilator-associated pneumonia, which is a prevalent infection in hospital intensive care units. Currently, there is no rapid diagnostic tool to assess the degree of biofilm formation or cellular biofilm composition. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a minimally invasive, nonionizing imaging modality that can be used to provide high-resolution cross-sectional images. Biofilm deposited in critical care patients' endotracheal tubes was analyzed in vitro. This study demonstrates that OCT could potentially be used as a diagnostic tool to analyze and assess the degree of biofilm formation and extent of airway obstruction caused by biofilm in endotracheal tubes.

  13. The potential of bacteriophage cocktail in eliminating Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in terms of different extracellular matrices expressed by PIA, ciaA-D and FnBPA genes

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulamir, Ahmed Sahib; Jassim, Sabah A. A.; Hafidh, Rand R; Bakar, Fatimah Abu

    2015-01-01

    Background This study assessed novel approach of using highly lytic phages against methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) biofilms with and without biofilm extracellular matrix- disrupting chemical. Method The resultant phage-based control was assessed in relation to the type of biofilm extracellular matrix namely, polysaccharide intercellular adhesion (PIA) or proteinacious fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA). The biofilm...

  14. Regulation of biofilm formation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simm, Roger; Ahmad, Irfan; Rhen, Mikael; Le Guyon, Soazig; Römling, Ute

    2014-01-01

    In animals, plants and the environment, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium forms the red dry and rough (rdar) biofilm characterized by extracellular matrix components curli and cellulose. With complex expression control by at least ten transcription factors, the bistably expressed orphan response regulator CsgD directs rdar morphotype development. CsgD expression is an integral part of the Hfq regulon and the complex cyclic diguanosine monophosphate signaling network partially controlled by the global RNA-binding protein CsrA. Cell wall turnover and the periplasmic redox status regulate csgD expression on a post-transcriptional level by unknown mechanisms. Furthermore, phosphorylation of CsgD is a potential inactivation and degradation signal in biofilm dissolution. Including complex incoherent feed-forward loops, regulation of biofilm formation versus motility and virulence is of recognized complexity.

  15. Monitoring in Real Time the Formation and Removal of Biofilms from Clinical Related Pathogens Using an Impedance-Based Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Hidalgo-Cantabrana, Claudio; Rodríguez, Ana; García, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria found in diverse ecosystems grow in a community of aggregated cells that favors their survival and colonization. Different extracellular polymeric substances are used to entrap this multispecies community forming a biofilm, which can be associated to biotic and abiotic surfaces. This widespread and successful way of bacterial life, however, can lead to negative effects for human activity since many pathogen and spoiling bacteria form biofilms which are not easy to eradicate. Therefore, the search for novel anti-biofilm bio-active molecules is a very active research area for which simple, reliable, and fast screening methods are demanded. In this work we have successfully validated an impedance-based method, initially developed for the study of adherent eukaryotic cells, to monitor the formation of single-species biofilms of three model bacteria in real time. The xCelligence real time cell analyzer (RTCA) equipment uses specific microtiter E-plates coated with gold-microelectrodes that detect the attachment of adherent cells, thus modifying the impedance signal. In the current study, this technology allowed the distinction between biofilm-producers and non-producers of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, as well as the formation of Streptococcus mutans biofilms only when sucrose was present in the culture medium. Besides, different impedance values permitted discrimination among the biofilm-producing strains tested regardless of the nature of the polymeric biofilm matrix. Finally, we have continuously monitored the inhibition of staphylococcal biofilm formation by the bacteriophage phi-IPLA7 and the bacteriophage-encoded endolysin LysH5, as well as the removal of a preformed biofilm by this last antimicrobial treatment. Results observed with the impedance-based method showed high correlation with those obtained with standard approaches, such as crystal violet staining and bacteria enumeration, as well as with those obtained upon other

  16. Streptococcus pyogenes biofilmsformation, biology,and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas eFiedler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococci, GAS is an exclusive human bacterial pathogen. The virulence potential of this species is tremendous. Interactions with humans range from asymptomatic carriage over mild and superficial infections of skin and mucosal membranes up to systemic purulent toxic-invasive disease manifestations. Particularly the latter are a severe threat for predisposed patients and lead to significant death tolls worldwide. This places GAS among the most important Gram-positive bacterial pathogens. Many recent reviews have highlighted the GAS repertoire of virulence factors, regulators and regulatory circuits/networks that enable GAS to colonize the host and to deal with all levels of the host immune defense. This covers in vitro and in vivo studies, including animal infection studies based on mice and more relevant, macaque monkeys. It is now appreciated that GAS, like many other bacterial species, do not necessarily exclusively live in a planktonic lifestyle. GAS is capable of microcolony and biofilm formation on host cells and tissues. We are now beginning to understand that this feature significantly contributes to GAS pathogenesis. In this review we will discuss the current knowledge on GAS biofilm formation, the biofilm-phenotype associated virulence factors, regulatory aspects of biofilm formation, the clinical relevance, and finally contemporary treatment regimens and future treatment options.

  17. Bacterial biofilm formation, pathogenicity, diagnostics and control: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawhney Rajesh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilms are complex, mono- or poly-microbialn communities adhering to biotic or abiotic surfaces. This adaptation has been implicated as a survival strategy. The formation of biofilms is mediated by mechanical, biochemical and genetical factors. The biofilms enhance the virulence of the pathogen and have their potential role in various infections, such as dental caries, cystic fibrosis, osteonecrosis, urinary tract infection and eye infections. A number of diagnostic techniques, viz., bright-field microscopy, epifluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy and amplicon length heterogeneity polymerase chain reaction, have been employed for detection of these communities. Researchers have worked on applications of catheter lock solutions, a fish protein coating, acid shock treatment, susceptibility to bacteriophages, etc., for biofilm control. However, we need to rearrange our strategies to have thorough insight and concentrate on priority basis to develop new accurate, precise and rapid diagnostic protocols for detection and evaluation of biofilm. Above all, the strict compliance to these techniques is required for accurate diagnosis and control.

  18. Beneficial biofilms in marine aquaculture? Linking points of biofilm formation mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudoalteromonas species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke Wesseling

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available For marine aquaculture it is suggested that a specific substrate coated with a beneficial biofilm could prevent fish egg clutches from pathogenic infestations and improve the water quality and health of adult fish while, at the same time, minimising the need for the application of antibiotics. In marine biotopes, the habitat of Pseudoalteromonas species (a strain with suggested beneficial properties, biofilms are mostly discussed in the context of fouling processes. Hence research focuses on unravelling the mechanisms of biofilm formation aiming to prevent formation or to destroy existing biofilms. Initially in this review, particular components of biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a gram-negative model organism that is responsible for nosocomial infections and considered as a food spoiling agent, are described (extracellular appendages, role of matrix components, cell-cell signalling to get an advanced understanding of biofilm formation. The aim of this treatise is to seek linking points for biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa and Pseudoalteromonas sp., respectively. Furthermore, approaches are discussed for how biofilm formation can be realized to improve fish (larvae rearing by species of the genus Pseudoalteromonas.

  19. Electroactive mixed culture biofilms in microbial bioelectrochemical systems: the role of temperature for biofilm formation and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sunil A; Harnisch, Falk; Kapadnis, Balasaheb; Schröder, Uwe

    2010-10-15

    In this paper we investigate the temperature dependence and temperature limits of waste water derived anodic microbial biofilms. We demonstrate that these biofilms are active in a temperature range between 5°C and 45°C. Elevated temperatures during initial biofilm growth not only accelerate the biofilm formation process, they also influence the bioelectrocatalytic performance of these biofilms when measured at identical operation temperatures. For example, the time required for biofilm formation decreases from above 40 days at 15°C to 3.5 days at 35°C. Biofilms grown at elevated temperatures are more electrochemically active at these temperatures than those grown at lower incubation temperature. Thus, at 30°C current densities of 520 μA cm(-2) and 881 μA cm(-2) are achieved by biofilms grown at 22°C and 35°C, respectively. Vice versa, and of great practical relevance for waste water treatment plants in areas of moderate climate, at low operation temperatures, biofilms grown at lower temperatures outperform those grown at higher temperatures. We further demonstrate that all biofilms possess similar lower (0°C) and upper (50°C) temperature limits--defining the operational limits of a respective microbial fuel cell or microbial biosensor--as well as similar electrochemical electron transfer characteristics.

  20. In Vitro Evaluation of Bacteriocins Activity Against Listeria monocytogenes Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Anderson Carlos; de Paula, Otávio Almeida Lino; Todorov, Svetoslav Dimitrov; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to assess the activity of cell-free supernatant (CFS) containing bacteriocins on the formation and maintenance of biofilms developed by Listeria monocytogenes, and the associated effect of bacteriocins and ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) on the formed biofilm. CFS from 9 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains was tested for inhibitory activity against 85 L. monocytogenes isolates and 21 LAB strains. Then, 12 L. monocytogenes strains were selected based on genetic profiles and sensitivity to CFS and were subjected to an in vitro assay to assess biofilm formation in microtiter plates, considering different culture media and incubation conditions. Based on these results, 6 L. monocytogenes strains were subjected to the same in vitro procedure to assess biofilm formation, being co-inoculated with CFS. In addition, these strains were subjected to the same in vitro procedure, modified by adding the CFS after biofilm formation. Relevant decrease in biofilm formation was observed in the first experiment, but CFS added after biofilm formation did not eliminate them. CFS from Lactobacillus curvatus ET31 were selected due to its anti-biofilm activity, being associated to EDTA at different concentrations and tested for biofilm control of three strains of L. monocytogenes, using the same in vitro procedure described previously. Concentrated bacteriocin presented poor performance in eliminating formed biofilms, and EDTA concentration presented no evident interference on biofilm elimination. Twelve selected L. monocytogenes strains were positive for investigated virulence makers and negative for luxS gene, recognized as being involved in biofilm formation. Selected L. monocytogenes strains were able to produce biofilms under different conditions. CFSs have the potential to prevent biofilm formation, but they were not able to destroy already formed biofilms. Nevertheless, low concentrations of CFS combined with EDTA caused a relevant reduction in

  1. Influence of culture heterogeneity in cell surface charge on adhesion and biofilm formation by Enterococcus faecalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Merode, Annet E.J.; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Krom, BP

    2006-01-01

    Biofilm formation is an increasing problem in medicine, due to the intrinsic resistance of microorganisms in the biofilm mode of growth against the host immune system and antimicrobial therapy. Adhesion is an important step in biofilm formation, influenced, among other factors, by the surface hydrop

  2. csrA Inhibits the Formation of Biofilms by Vibrio vulnificus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Melissa K.; Warner, Elizabeth B.; Oliver, James D.

    2008-01-01

    PCR screening of the shellfish-borne pathogen Vibrio vulnificus revealed csrA-negative strains, and these strains formed increased biofilm compared to csrA-positive strains. Complementation in trans with csrA resulted in reduced biofilm formation, similar to that by csrA+ strains. Our results provide evidence that csrA inhibits biofilm formation in V. vulnificus.

  3. A role for amyloid in cell aggregation and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa C Garcia

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion molecules in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans contain amyloid-forming sequences that are highly conserved. We have now used site-specific mutagenesis and specific peptide perturbants to explore amyloid-dependent activity in the Candida albicans adhesin Als5p. A V326N substitution in the amyloid-forming region conserved secondary structure and ligand binding, but abrogated formation of amyloid fibrils in soluble Als5p and reduced cell surface thioflavin T fluorescence. When displayed on the cell surface, Als5p with this substitution prevented formation of adhesion nanodomains and formation of large cellular aggregates and model biofilms. In addition, amyloid nanodomains were regulated by exogenous peptides. An amyloid-forming homologous peptide rescued aggregation and biofilm activity of Als5p(V326N cells, and V326N substitution peptide inhibited aggregation and biofilm activity in Als5p(WT cells. Therefore, specific site mutation, inhibition by anti-amyloid peturbants, and sequence-specificity of pro-amyloid and anti-amyloid peptides showed that amyloid formation is essential for nanodomain formation and activation.

  4. Characterization of biofilm formation by Borrelia burgdorferi in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Sapi

    Full Text Available Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, has long been known to be capable of forming aggregates and colonies. It was recently demonstrated that Borrelia burgdorferi aggregate formation dramatically changes the in vitro response to hostile environments by this pathogen. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that these aggregates are indeed biofilms, structures whose resistance to unfavorable conditions are well documented. We studied Borrelia burgdorferi for several known hallmark features of biofilm, including structural rearrangements in the aggregates, variations in development on various substrate matrices and secretion of a protective extracellular polymeric substance (EPS matrix using several modes of microscopic, cell and molecular biology techniques. The atomic force microscopic results provided evidence that multilevel rearrangements take place at different stages of aggregate development, producing a complex, continuously rearranging structure. Our results also demonstrated that Borrelia burgdorferi is capable of developing aggregates on different abiotic and biotic substrates, and is also capable of forming floating aggregates. Analyzing the extracellular substance of the aggregates for potential exopolysaccharides revealed the existence of both sulfated and non-sulfated/carboxylated substrates, predominately composed of an alginate with calcium and extracellular DNA present. In summary, we have found substantial evidence that Borrelia burgdorferi is capable of forming biofilm in vitro. Biofilm formation by Borrelia species might play an important role in their survival in diverse environmental conditions by providing refuge to individual cells.

  5. The interconnection between biofilm formation and horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Burmølle, Mette; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2012-07-01

    Recent research has revealed that horizontal gene transfer and biofilm formation are connected processes. Although published research investigating this interconnectedness is still limited, we will review this subject in order to highlight the potential of these observations because of their believed importance in the understanding of the adaptation and subsequent evolution of social traits in bacteria. Here, we discuss current evidence for such interconnectedness centred on plasmids. Horizontal transfer rates are typically higher in biofilm communities compared with those in planktonic states. Biofilms, furthermore, promote plasmid stability and may enhance the host range of mobile genetic elements that are transferred horizontally. Plasmids, on the other hand, are very well suited to promote the evolution of social traits such as biofilm formation. This, essentially, transpires because plasmids are independent replicons that enhance their own success by promoting inter-bacterial interactions. They typically also carry genes that heighten their hosts' direct fitness. Furthermore, current research shows that the so-called mafia traits encoded on mobile genetic elements can enforce bacteria to maintain stable social interactions. It also indicates that horizontal gene transfer ultimately enhances the relatedness of bacteria carrying the mobile genetic elements of the same origin. The perspective of this review extends to an overall interconnectedness between horizontal gene transfer, mobile genetic elements and social evolution of bacteria.

  6. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Laverty

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl, pellicle Formation (Pel and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation.

  7. Capillary isoelectric focusing--useful tool for detection of the biofilm formation in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, Filip; Horka, Marie; Hola, Veronika; Votava, Miroslav

    2007-03-01

    The biofilm formation is an important factor of S. epidermidis virulence. Biofilm-positive strains might be clinically more important than biofilm-negative ones. Unlike biofilm-negative staphylococci, biofilm-positive staphylococci are surrounded with an extracellular polysaccharide substance. The presence of this substance on the surface can affect physico-chemical properties of the bacterial cell, including surface charge. 73 S. epidermidis strains were examined for the presence of ica operon, for the ability to form biofilm by Christensen test tube method and for the production of slime by Congo red agar method. Isoelectric points (pI) of these strains were determined by means of Capillary Isoelectric Focusing. The biofilm negative strains focused near pI value 2.3, while the pI values of the biofilm positive strains were near 2.6. Isoelectric point is a useful criterion for the differentiation between biofilm-positive and biofilm-negative S. epidermidis strains.

  8. Capillary isoelectric focusing--useful tool for detection of the biofilm formation in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, Filip; Horka, Marie; Hola, Veronika; Votava, Miroslav

    2007-03-01

    The biofilm formation is an important factor of S. epidermidis virulence. Biofilm-positive strains might be clinically more important than biofilm-negative ones. Unlike biofilm-negative staphylococci, biofilm-positive staphylococci are surrounded with an extracellular polysaccharide substance. The presence of this substance on the surface can affect physico-chemical properties of the bacterial cell, including surface charge. 73 S. epidermidis strains were examined for the presence of ica operon, for the ability to form biofilm by Christensen test tube method and for the production of slime by Congo red agar method. Isoelectric points (pI) of these strains were determined by means of Capillary Isoelectric Focusing. The biofilm negative strains focused near pI value 2.3, while the pI values of the biofilm positive strains were near 2.6. Isoelectric point is a useful criterion for the differentiation between biofilm-positive and biofilm-negative S. epidermidis strains. PMID:17157942

  9. Proteins with GGDEF and EAL domains regulate Pseudomonas putida biofilm formation and dispersal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjermansen, Morten; Ragas, Paula Cornelia; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2006-01-01

    Microbial biofilm formation often causes problems in medical and industrial settings, and knowledge about the factors that are involved in biofilm development and dispersion is useful for creating strategies to control the processes. In this report, we present evidence that proteins with GGDEF...... and EAL domains are involved in the regulation of biofilm formation and biofilm dispersion in Pseudomonas putida. Overexpression in P. putida of the Escherichia coli YedQ protein, which contains a GGDEF domain, resulted in increased biofilm formation. Overexpression in P. putida of the E. coli Yhj......H protein, which contains an EAL domain, strongly inhibited biofilm formation. Induction of YhjH expression in P. putida cells situated in established biofilms led to rapid dispersion of the biofilms. These results support the emerging theme that GGDEF-domain and EAL-domain proteins are involved...

  10. The effect of berberine hydrochloride on Enterococcus faecalis biofilm formation and dispersion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lihua; Bu, Qianqian; Xu, Huan; Liu, Yuan; She, Pengfei; Tan, Ruichen; Wu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) is one of the major causes of biofilm infections. Berberine hydrochloride (BBH) has diverse pharmacological effects; however, the effects and mechanisms of BBH on E. faecalis biofilm formation and dispersion have not been reported. In this study, 99 clinical isolates from the urine samples of patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs) were collected and identified. Ten strains of E. faecalis with biofilm formation ability were studied. BBH inhibited E. faecalis biofilm formation and promoted the biofilm dispersion of E. faecalis. In addition, sortase A and esp expression levels were elevated during early E. faecalis biofilm development, whereas BBH significantly reduced their expression levels. The results of this study indicated that BBH effectively prevents biofilm formation and promotes biofilm dispersion in E. faecalis, most likely by inhibiting the expressions of sortase A and esp. PMID:27242142

  11. Control of marine biofouling and medical biofilm formation with engineered topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, James Frederick

    Biofouling is the unwanted accumulation and growth of cells and organisms on clean surfaces. This process occurs readily on unprotected surfaces in both the marine and physiological environments. Surface protection in both systems has typically relied upon toxic materials and biocides. Metallic paints, based on tin and copper, have been extremely successful as antifouling coatings for the hulls of ships by killing the majority of fouling species. Similarly, antibacterial medical coatings incorporate metal-containing compounds such as silver or antibiotics that kill the bacteria. The environmental concerns over the use of toxic paints and biocides in the ocean, the developed antibiotic resistance of bacterial biofilms, and the toxicity concerns with silver suggest the need for non-toxic and non-kill solutions for these systems. The manipulation of surface topography on non-toxic materials at the size scale of the fouling species or bacteria is one approach for the development of alternative coatings. These surfaces would function simply as a physical deterrent of settlement of fouling organisms or a physical obstacle for the adequate formation of a bacterial biofilm without the need to kill the targeted microorganisms. Species-specific topographical designs called engineered topographies have been designed, fabricated and evaluated for potential applications as antifouling marine coatings and material surfaces capable of reducing biofilm formation. Engineered topographies fabricated on the surface of a non-toxic, polydimethylsiloxane elastomer, or silicone, were shown to significantly reduce the attachment of zoospores of a common ship fouling green algae (Ulva) in standard bioassays versus a smooth substrate. Other engineered topographies were effective at significantly deterring the settlement of the cyprids of barnacles (Balanus amphitrite). These results indicate the potential use of engineered topography applied to non-toxic materials as an environmentally

  12. Inactivation of the Autolysis-Related Genes lrgB and yycI in Staphylococcus aureus Increases Cell Lysis-Dependent eDNA Release and Enhances Biofilm Development In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Ossaille Beltrame

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus ica-independent biofilms are multifactorial in nature, and various bacterial proteins have been associated with biofilm development, including fibronectin-binding proteins A and B, protein A, surface protein SasG, proteases, and some autolysins. The role of extracellular DNA (eDNA has also been demonstrated in some S. aureus biofilms. Here, we constructed a Tn551 library, and the screening identified two genes that affected biofilm formation, lrgB and yycI. The repressive effect of both genes on the development of biofilm was also confirmed in knockout strains constructed by allelic recombination. In contrast, the superexpression of either lrgB or yycI by a cadmium-inducible promoter led to a decrease in biofilm accumulation. Indeed, a significant increase in the cell-lysis dependent eDNA release was detected when lrgB or yycI were inactivated, explaining the enhanced biofilm formed by these mutants. In fact, lrgB and yycI genes belong to distinct operons that repress bacterial autolysis through very different mechanisms. LrgB is associated with the synthesis of phage holin/anti-holin analogues, while YycI participates in the activation/repression of the two-component system YycGF (WalKR. Our in vivo data suggest that autolysins activation lead to increased bacterial virulence in the foreign body animal model since a higher number of attached cells was recovered from the implanted catheters inoculated with lrgB or yycI knockout mutants.

  13. Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis: new insights into regulatory strategies and assembly mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Lynne S; Hobley, Laura; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R

    2014-08-01

    Biofilm formation is a social behaviour that generates favourable conditions for sustained survival in the natural environment. For the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis the process involves the differentiation of cell fate within an isogenic population and the production of communal goods that form the biofilm matrix. Here we review recent progress in understanding the regulatory pathways that control biofilm formation and highlight developments in understanding the composition, function and structure of the biofilm matrix. PMID:24988880

  14. In vitro model of bacterial biofilm formation on polyvinyl chloride biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guang-qiang; Ye, Lian-hua; Huang, Yun-chao; Yang, Da-kuan; Li, Li; Xu, Geng; Lei, Yu-jie

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the study was to establish an in vitro model of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms on polyvinyl chloride (PVC) material, and to investigate bacterial biofilm formation and its structure using the combined approach of confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria (stain RP62A) were incubated with PVC pieces in Tris buffered saline to form biofilms. Biofilm formation was examined at 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 48 h. Thicknesses of these biofilms and the number, and percentage of viable cells in biofilms were measured. CT scan images of biofilms were obtained using CLSM and environmental SEM. The results of this study showed that Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm is a highly organized multi-cellular structure. The biofilm is constituted of large number of viable and dead bacterial cells. Bacterial biofilm formation on the surface of PVC material was found to be a dynamic process with maximal thickness being attained at 12-18 h. These biofilms became mature by 24 h. There was significant difference in the percentage of viable cells along with interior, middle, and outer layers of biofilms (P < 0.05). Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm is sophisticated in structure and the combination method involving CLSM and SEM was ideal for investigation of biofilms on PVC material.

  15. Development of a biofilm inhibitor molecule against multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus associated with gestational urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balamurugan eP

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Urinary Tract Infection (UTI is a globally widespread human infection caused by an infestation of uropathogens. Eventhough, Escherichia coli is often quoted as being the chief among them, Staphylococcus aureus involvement in UTI especially in gestational UTI is often understated. Staphylococcal accessory regulator A (SarA is a quorum regulator of S. aureus that controls the expression of various virulence and biofilm phenotypes. Since SarA had been a focussed target for antibiofilm agent development, the study aims to develop a potential drug molecule targeting the SarA of S. aureus to combat biofilm associated infections in which it is involved. In our previous studies, we have reported the antibiofilm activity of SarA based biofilm inhibitor, (SarABI with a 50% minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC50 value of 200 µg/mL against S. aureus associated with vascular graft infections and also the antibiofilm activity of the root ethanolic extracts of Melia dubia against uropathogenic E. coli. In the present study, in silico design of a hybrid molecule composed of a molecule screened from M. dubia root ethanolic extracts and a modified SarA based inhibitor (SarABIM was undertaken. SarABIM is a modified form of SarABI where the fluorine groups are absent in SarABIM. Chemical synthesis of the hybrid molecule, 4-(Benzylaminocyclohexyl 2-hydroxycinnamate (henceforth referred to as UTI Quorum-Quencher, UTIQQ was then performed, followed by in vitro and in vivo validation. The MBIC¬50 and MBIC90 of UTIQQ were found to be 15 µg/mL and 65 µg/mL respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM images witnessed biofilm reduction and bacterial killing in either UTIQQ or in combined use of antibiotic gentamicin and UTIQQ. Similar results were observed with in vivo studies of experimental UTI in rat model. So, we propose that the drug UTIQQ would be a promising candidate when used alone or, in combination with an antibiotic for staphylococcal

  16. Non-toxic plant metabolites regulate Staphylococcus viability and biofilm formation: a natural therapeutic strategy useful in the treatment and prevention of skin infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán, A; Gutiérrez, S; Martínez-Blanco, H; Ferrero, M A; Monteagudo-Mera, A; Rodríguez-Aparicio, L B

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the efficacy of generally recognised as safe (GRAS) antimicrobial plant metabolites in regulating the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and S. epidermidis was investigated. Thymol, carvacrol and eugenol showed the strongest antibacterial action against these microorganisms, at a subinhibitory concentration (SIC) of ≤ 50 μg ml(-1). Genistein, hydroquinone and resveratrol showed antimicrobial effects but with a wide concentration range (SIC = 50-1,000 μg ml(-1)), while catechin, gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and cranberry extract were the most biologically compatible molecules (SIC ≥ 1000 μg ml(-1)). Genistein, protocatechuic acid, cranberry extract, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and resveratrol also showed anti-biofilm activity against S. aureus, but not against S. epidermidis in which, surprisingly, these metabolites stimulated biofilm formation (between 35% and 1,200%). Binary combinations of cranberry extract and resveratrol with genistein, protocatechuic or p-hydroxibenzoic acid enhanced the stimulatory effect on S. epidermidis biofilm formation and maintained or even increased S. aureus anti-biofilm activity. PMID:25397362

  17. Chemoinformatics-assisted development of new anti-biofilm compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dürig, Anna; Kouskoumvekaki, Irene; Vejborg, Rebecca Munk;

    2010-01-01

    to identify new and efficient anti-biofilm drugs. We found that ellagic acid (present in green tea) significantly inhibited biofilm formation of Streptococcus dysgalactiae. Based on ellagic acid, we performed in silico screening of the Chinese Natural Product Database to predict a 2nd-generation list...... of compounds with similar characteristics. One of these, esculetin, proved to be more efficient in preventing biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus. From esculetin a 3rd-generation list of compounds was predicted. One of them, fisetin, was even better to abolish biofilm formation than the two parent...... compounds. Fisetin dramatically inhibited biofilm formation of both S. aureus and S. dysgalactiae. The compounds did not affect planktonic growth in concentrations where they affected biofilm formation and appeared to be specific antagonists of biofilms. Arguably, since all three compounds are natural...

  18. PREVENTION OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON NORFLOXACINMETRONIDAZOLE TREATED URETERAL LATEX STENTS

    OpenAIRE

    B. ELAYARAJAH; R. RAJENDRAN,; B. VENKATRAJAH,; WEDA SREEKUMAR,; ASASUDHAKAR,; P. K. JANIGA

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterial-associated bacterial infections present common and challenging complications with medical implants. The purpose of this study was to determine the antibacterial properties of latex rubber stents with integrated norfloxacin-metronidazole (synergistic antibacterial agent combinations) for the first time in order to prevent the colonization and biofilm formation on the surface of ureteral stents. Treating of latex rubber stents were carried out by adding the norfloxacin-metronidazole...

  19. Inhibitory Effect of Duabanga grandiflora on MRSA Biofilm Formation via Prevention of Cell-Surface Attachment and PBP2a Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Santiago

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Formation of biofilms is a major factor for nosocomial infections associated with methicillin-resistance Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. This study was carried out to determine the ability of a fraction, F-10, derived from the plant Duabanga grandiflora to inhibit MRSA biofilm formation. Inhibition of biofilm production and microtiter attachment assays were employed to study the anti-biofilm activity of F-10, while latex agglutination test was performed to study the influence of F-10 on penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a level in MRSA biofilm. PBP2a is a protein that confers resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. The results showed that, F-10 at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, 0.75 mg/mL inhibited biofilm production by 66.10%; inhibited cell-surface attachment by more than 95%; and a reduced PBP2a level in the MRSA biofilm was observed. Although ampicilin was more effective in inhibiting biofilm production (MIC of 0.05 mg/mL, 84.49% compared to F-10, the antibiotic was less effective in preventing cell-surface attachment. A higher level of PBP2a was detected in ampicillin-treated MRSA showing the development of further resistance in these colonies. This study has shown that F-10 possesses anti-biofilm activity, which can be attributed to its ability to reduce cell-surface attachment and attenuate the level of PBP2a that we postulated to play a crucial role in mediating biofilm formation.

  20. Inhibitory effect of Duabanga grandiflora on MRSA biofilm formation via prevention of cell-surface attachment and PBP2a production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Carolina; Lim, Kuan-Hon; Loh, Hwei-San; Ting, Kang Nee

    2015-01-01

    Formation of biofilms is a major factor for nosocomial infections associated with methicillin-resistance Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). This study was carried out to determine the ability of a fraction, F-10, derived from the plant Duabanga grandiflora to inhibit MRSA biofilm formation. Inhibition of biofilm production and microtiter attachment assays were employed to study the anti-biofilm activity of F-10, while latex agglutination test was performed to study the influence of F-10 on penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a) level in MRSA biofilm. PBP2a is a protein that confers resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. The results showed that, F-10 at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, 0.75 mg/mL) inhibited biofilm production by 66.10%; inhibited cell-surface attachment by more than 95%; and a reduced PBP2a level in the MRSA biofilm was observed. Although ampicilin was more effective in inhibiting biofilm production (MIC of 0.05 mg/mL, 84.49%) compared to F-10, the antibiotic was less effective in preventing cell-surface attachment. A higher level of PBP2a was detected in ampicillin-treated MRSA showing the development of further resistance in these colonies. This study has shown that F-10 possesses anti-biofilm activity, which can be attributed to its ability to reduce cell-surface attachment and attenuate the level of PBP2a that we postulated to play a crucial role in mediating biofilm formation. PMID:25764489

  1. [Research advances on regulation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation and its therapeutic strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-min; Xu, Zhi-hao

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important pathogenic bacterium of nosocomial infections. The microbe easily produce biofilm which brings us much difficulties in clinical treatment. The formation processes of biofilm, including the stages of early bacteria planting, mushroom-like structure forming and extracellular matrix producing, are regulated by a series of molecules and genes. And quorum sensing system of the microbe is responsible for regulation of the whole process of biofilm formation. According to the process of biofilm formation and the mimitat associated regulation mechanism, several anti-biofilm therapeutic strategies have been applied in clinical medicine, and some novel drugs and methods are developed. PMID:20175245

  2. Selected Antimicrobial Essential Oils Eradicate Pseudomonas spp. and Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Kavanaugh, Nicole L.; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are difficult to eliminate with standard antimicrobial treatments due to their high antibiotic resistance relative to free-living cells. Here, we show that selected antimicrobial essential oils can eradicate bacteria within biofilms with higher efficiency than certain important antibiotics, making them interesting candidates for the treatment of biofilms.

  3. Effect of Algae and Plant Lectins on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation in Clinically Relevant Bacteria and Yeasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayron Alves Vasconcelos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the abilities of plant and algae lectins to inhibit planktonic growth and biofilm formation in bacteria and yeasts. Initially, ten lectins were tested on Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella oxytoca, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and C. tropicalis at concentrations of 31.25 to 250 μg/mL. The lectins from Cratylia floribunda (CFL, Vatairea macrocarpa (VML, Bauhinia bauhinioides (BBL, Bryothamnion seaforthii (BSL, and Hypnea musciformis (HML showed activities against at least one microorganism. Biofilm formation in the presence of the lectins was also evaluated; after 24 h of incubation with the lectins, the biofilms were analyzed by quantifying the biomass (by crystal violet staining and by enumerating the viable cells (colony-forming units. The lectins reduced the biofilm biomass and/or the number of viable cells to differing degrees depending on the microorganism tested, demonstrating the different characteristics of the lectins. These findings indicate that the lectins tested in this study may be natural alternative antimicrobial agents; however, further studies are required to better elucidate the functional use of these proteins.

  4. Effects of Iron Chelators on the Formation and Development of Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazik, Hasan; Penner, John C; Ferreira, Jose A; Haagensen, Janus A J; Cohen, Kevin; Spormann, Alfred M; Martinez, Marife; Chen, Vicky; Hsu, Joe L; Clemons, Karl V; Stevens, David A

    2015-10-01

    Iron acquisition is crucial for the growth of Aspergillus fumigatus. A. fumigatus biofilm formation occurs in vitro and in vivo and is associated with physiological changes. In this study, we assessed the effects of Fe chelators on biofilm formation and development. Deferiprone (DFP), deferasirox (DFS), and deferoxamine (DFM) were tested for MIC against a reference isolate via a broth macrodilution method. The metabolic effects (assessed by XTT [2,3-bis[2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide inner salt]) on biofilm formation by conidia were studied upon exposure to DFP, DFM, DFP plus FeCl3, or FeCl3 alone. A preformed biofilm was exposed to DFP with or without FeCl3. The DFP and DFS MIC50 against planktonic A. fumigatus was 1,250 μM, and XTT gave the same result. DFM showed no planktonic inhibition at concentrations of ≤2,500 μM. By XTT testing, DFM concentrations of biofilms forming in A. fumigatus or preformed biofilms (P biofilm formation (P Biofilm formation with 625 μM DFP plus any concentration of FeCl3 was lower than that in the controls (P biofilms, DFP in the range of ≥625 to 1,250 μM was inhibitory compared to the controls (P biofilm formation (P biofilm increased with 2,500 μM FeCl3 only (P biofilms of A. fumigatus clinical isolates to DFP were noted. In conclusion, iron stimulates biofilm formation and preformed biofilms. Chelators can inhibit or enhance biofilms. Chelation may be a potential therapy for A. fumigatus, but we show here that chelators must be chosen carefully. Individual isolate susceptibility assessments may be needed.

  5. D-amino acids trigger biofilm disassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Romero, Diego; Cao, Shugeng; Clardy, Jon; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard

    2010-04-30

    Bacteria form communities known as biofilms, which disassemble over time. In our studies outlined here, we found that, before biofilm disassembly, Bacillus subtilis produced a factor that prevented biofilm formation and could break down existing biofilms. The factor was shown to be a mixture of D-leucine, D-methionine, D-tyrosine, and D-tryptophan that could act at nanomolar concentrations. D-amino acid treatment caused the release of amyloid fibers that linked cells in the biofilm together. Mutants able to form biofilms in the presence of D-amino acids contained alterations in a protein (YqxM) required for the formation and anchoring of the fibers to the cell. D-amino acids also prevented biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. D-amino acids are produced by many bacteria and, thus, may be a widespread signal for biofilm disassembly. PMID:20431016

  6. Inhibitory effect of andrographolide on staphylococcus aureus biofilms in vitro%穿心莲内酯对金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜的体外抑制作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝司霞

    2016-01-01

    and 500 mg/L, re-spectively.Andrographolide significantly inhibited the early adhesion of staphylococcus aureus biofilm at 1000, 500 and 250 mg/L.Conclusion A certain concentration of andrographolide can inhibit staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation and adhesion , but the effect is less than that of vancomycin .

  7. The two-component signal transduction system ArlRS regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation in an ica-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wu

    Full Text Available Due to its ability to form biofilms on medical devices, Staphylococcus epidermidis has emerged as a major pathogen of nosocomial infections. In this study, we investigated the role of the two-component signal transduction system ArlRS in regulating S. epidermidis biofilm formation. An ArlRS-deficient mutant, WW06, was constructed using S. epidermidis strain 1457 as a parental strain. Although the growth curve of WW06 was similar to that of SE1457, the mutant strain was unable to form biofilms in vitro. In a rabbit subcutaneous infection model, sterile disks made of polymeric materials were implanted subcutaneously followed with inoculation of WW06 or SE1457. The viable bacteria cells of WW06 recovered from biofilms on the embedded disks were much lower than that of SE1457. Complementation of arlRS genes expression from plasmid in WW06 restored biofilm-forming phenotype both in vivo and in vitro. WW06 maintained the ability to undergo initial attachment. Transcription levels of several genes involved in biofilm formation, including icaADBC, sigB, and sarA, were decreased in WW06, compared to SE1457; and icaR expression was increased in WW06, detected by real-time reverse-transcription PCR. The biofilm-forming phenotype was restored by overexpressing icaADBC in WW06 but not by overexpressing sigB, indicating that ArlRS regulates biofilm formation through the regulation of icaADBC. Gel shift assay showed that ArlR can bind to the promoter region of the ica operon. In conclusion, ArlRS regulates S. epidermidis biofilm formation in an ica-dependent manner, distinct from its role in S. aureus.

  8. Evaluation of intraspecies interactions in biofilm formation by Methylobacterium species isolated from pink-pigmented household biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fang-Fang; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Wang, Wen-Zhao; Yamaguchi, Yuka; Liang, Yan; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2014-01-01

    Concern regarding household biofilms has grown due to their widespread existence and potential to threaten human health by serving as pathogen reservoirs. Previous studies identified Methylobacterium as one of the dominant genera found in household biofilms. In the present study, we examined the mechanisms underlying biofilm formation by using the bacterial consortium found in household pink slime. A clone library analysis revealed that Methylobacterium was the predominant genus in household pink slime. In addition, 16 out of 21 pink-pigmented bacterial isolates were assigned to the genus Methylobacterium. Although all of the Methylobacterium isolates formed low-level biofilms, the amount of the biofilms formed by Methylobacterium sp. P-1M and P-18S was significantly increased by co-culturing with other Methylobacterium strains that belonged to a specific phylogenetic group. The single-species biofilm was easily washed from the glass surface, whereas the dual-species biofilm strongly adhered after washing. A confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis showed that the dual-species biofilms were significantly thicker and tighter than the single-species biofilms.

  9. Effect of Cinnamon Oil on icaA Expression and Biofilm Formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuryastuti, Titik; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Iravati, Susi; Aman, Abu T.; Krom, Bastiaan P.

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is notorious for its biofilm formation on medical devices, and novel approaches to prevent and kill S. epidermidis biofilms are desired. In this study, the effect of cinnamon oil on planktonic and biofilm cultures of clinical S. epidermidis isolates was evaluated. Initiall

  10. A Functional DNase I Coating to Prevent Adhesion of Bacteria and the Formation of Biofilm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swartjes, Jan J. T. M.; Das, Theerthankar; Sharifi, Shahriar; Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash; Sharma, Prashant K.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are detrimental in many industrial and biomedical applications and prevention of biofilm formation has been a prime challenge for decades. Biofilms consist of communities of adhering bacteria, supported and protected by extracellular-polymeric-substances (EPS), the so-called house of biofil

  11. Methods for studying biofilm formation: flow cells and confocal laser scanning microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter methods for growing and analyzing biofilms under hydrodynamic conditions in flow cells are described. Use of flow cells allows for direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The flow in these chambers is essentially laminar, which means that the biofilms can be grown u...

  12. Biofilm formation by environmental isolates of Salmonella and their sensitivity to natural antimicrobials

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated 15 Salmonella isolates; S. Derby (2), S. Infantis (4), and S. Typhimurium (9) from conventional swine farm environment (soil and lagoon) for biofilm formation. Biofilm forming ability was determined by 96-well microtitre plate Crystal-Violet and Minimum Biofilm Eradication Concentration...

  13. Biofilm Formation by Mycobacterium bovis: Influence of Surface Kind and Temperatures of Sanitizer Treatments on Biofilm Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria O. Adetunji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis causes classic bovine tuberculosis, a zoonosis which is still a concern in Africa. Biofilm forming ability of two Mycobacterium bovis strains was assessed on coupons of cement, ceramic, or stainless steel in three different microbiological media at 37°C with agitation for 2, 3, or 4 weeks to determine the medium that promotes biofilm. Biofilm mass accumulated on coupons was treated with 2 sanitizers (sanitizer A (5.5 mg L−1 active iodine and sanitizer B (170.6 g1 alkyl dimethylbenzyl ammonium chloride, 78 g−1 didecyldimethyl ammonium chloride, 107.25 g L−1 glutaraldehyde, 146.25 g L−1 isopropanol, and 20 g L−1 pine oil at 28 and 45°C and in hot water at 85°C for 5 min. Residual biofilms on treated coupons were quantified using crystal violet binding assay. The two strains had a similar ability to form biofilms on the three surfaces. More biofilms were developed in media containing 5% liver extract. Biofilm mass increased as incubation time increased till the 3rd week. More biofilms were formed on cement than on ceramic and stainless steel surfaces. Treatment with hot water at 85°C reduced biofilm mass, however, sanitizing treatments at 45°C removed more biofilms than at 28°C. However, neither treatment completely eliminated the biofilms. The choice of processing surface and temperatures used for sanitizing treatments had an impact on biofilm formation and its removal from solid surfaces.

  14. Histophilus somni biofilm formation in cardiopulmonary tissue of the bovine host following respiratory challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandal, Indra; Shao, Jian Q.; Annadata, Satish;

    2009-01-01

    cultured with H. somni from heart and lung samples. Transposon mutagenesis of H. somni strain 2336 resulted in the generation of mutants that expressed more or less biofilm. than the parent strain. Six mutants deficient in biofilm formation had an insertion in the gene encoding for a homolog of filamentous...... haemagglutinin (FHA), predicted to be involved in attachment. Thus, this investigation demonstrated that H. somni is capable of forming a biofilm in its natural host, that such a biofilm may be capable of harboring other bovine respiratory disease pathogens, and that the genes responsible for biofilm formation......Biofilms form in a variety of host sites following infection with many bacterial species. However, the study of biofilms in a host is hindered due to the lack of protocols for the proper experimental investigation of biofilms in vivo. Histophilus somni is an agent of respiratory and systemic...

  15. Preliminary Study on the Effects of Tuoguansan in Staphylococcus Aureus Biofilms Biofilm%脱管散对金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜作用的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈多平; 李春梅; 张晓刚; 曹林忠; 张秀

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the ef ect of TuoGuansan Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.Methods Through brown plate improved method,to cultivate Staphylococcus aureus biofilms in vitro, according to tube dilution method TuoGuanSan minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC)were measured,respectively TuoGuansan diluted to 1/4,1/2,1.5-fold,2-fold.To observe the changes of the drug at dif erent concentrations and dif erent time by electron microscopy.Results Within 7 days of staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation stability When the concentration of TuoGuansan to 30 mg/ml(1/4), 60 mg/ml(1/2)concentrations.there was no dif erence in bacterial biofilms at each time point and the control group,there was no dif erence between groups at dif erent time.180 mg/ml(1.5 times),240 mg/ml(2 times),360 mg/ml(three times)of staphylococcus aureus have obvious scavenging ef ect on BF,and with the car ier concentration increases gradual y reduced the number of bacteria;under 360 mg/ml concentration ef ect aureus was completely cleared within 24h.Conclusion It has clinical development use value because of TuoGuansan'sAntimicrobial properties.%目的:探讨脱管散对金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜的影响。方法体外Brown平板法改良法进行体外金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜的培育,根据试管二倍稀释法对脱管散的最低抑菌浓度(MIC)进行测定,分别将脱管散稀释为1/4、1/2、1.5倍、2倍浓度,在扫描电镜的辅助下观察不同浓度药物、不同时间点干预后金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜的变化情况。结果7d内金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜稳定形成,当脱管散浓度为30mg/ml(1/4)、60mg/ml(1/2)浓度下,在各时间点与对照组的生物膜细菌无统计学差异(>0.05),两者无差异,180mg/ml(1.5倍)、240mg/ml(2倍)、360mg/ml(3倍)时对BF上的金黄色葡萄球菌有明显清除作用,且随着浓度的升高载体细菌数数量逐渐减少;360 mg/ml浓度作用下24h时BF内的金

  16. Biofilm formation, pathogenicity and resistance profile of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from clinical specimens%临床分离金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜形成、毒性以及耐药性的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫兵; 潘一鸣; 张昌峰; 赵丽萍

    2016-01-01

    目的 分析临床分离金黄色葡萄球菌(Staphylococcus aureus,S.aureus)的耐药性,毒性和生物膜(Bacterial biofilm,BF)形成能力,并进一步探究三者之间的关系,为临床预防和治疗S.aureus感染提供理论依据.方法 临床分离的122株S.aureus经全自动微生物分析仪鉴定及药物敏感性检测,采用结晶紫染色和刚果红平板法分析生物膜形成能力;通过对其溶血素、胞外蛋白酶和脂肪酶的检测评估其毒性.结果 122株S.aureus甲氧西林耐药株(MRSA)分离率达到将近70%,且表现出多重耐药现象;31.97%能产生溶血素,29.51%能产生胞外蛋白酶,54.10%能产生胞外脂肪酶;约40%的菌株有一定的生物膜形成能力,且MRSA的生物膜形成能力强于甲氧西林敏感株(MSSA),毒性弱于MSSA.结论 S.aureus感染引起的不同临床疾病主要与其产生的毒素和耐药性有关,而细菌的生物膜对于其毒性和耐药性同样有很重要的影响.

  17. Polyspecies biofilm formation on implant surfaces with different surface characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick R. SCHMIDLIN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the microbial adherence and colonization of a polyspecies biofilm on 7 differently processed titanium surfaces. Material and Methods Six-species biofilms were formed anaerobically on 5-mm-diameter sterilized, saliva-preconditioned titanium discs. Material surfaces used were either machined, stained, acid-etched or sandblasted/acid-etched (SLA. Samples of the latter two materials were also provided in a chemically modified form, with increased wettability characteristics. Surface roughness and contact angles of all materials were determined. The discs were then incubated anaerobically for up to 16.5 h. Initial microbial adherence was evaluated after 20 min incubation and further colonization after 2, 4, 8, and 16.5 h using non-selective and selective culture techniques. Results at different time points were compared using ANOVA and Scheffé post hoc analysis. Results The mean differences in microorganisms colonizing after the first 20 min were in a very narrow range (4.5 to 4.8 log CFU. At up to 16.5 h, the modified SLA surface exhibited the highest values for colonization (6.9±0.2 log CFU, p<0.05 but increasing growth was observed on all test surfaces over time. Discrepancies among bacterial strains on the differently crafted titanium surfaces were very similar to those described for total log CFU. F. nucleatum was below the detection limit on all surfaces after 4 h. Conclusion Within the limitations of this in vitro study, surface roughness had a moderate influence on biofilm formation, while wettability did not seem to influence biofilm formation under the experimental conditions described. The modified SLA surface showed the highest trend for bacterial colonization.

  18. Prophage spontaneous activation promotes DNA release enhancing biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Carrolo

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus is able to form biofilms in vivo and previous studies propose that pneumococcal biofilms play a relevant role both in colonization and infection. Additionally, pneumococci recovered from human infections are characterized by a high prevalence of lysogenic bacteriophages (phages residing quiescently in their host chromosome. We investigated a possible link between lysogeny and biofilm formation. Considering that extracellular DNA (eDNA is a key factor in the biofilm matrix, we reasoned that prophage spontaneous activation with the consequent bacterial host lysis could provide a source of eDNA, enhancing pneumococcal biofilm development. Monitoring biofilm growth of lysogenic and non-lysogenic pneumococcal strains indicated that phage-infected bacteria are more proficient at forming biofilms, that is their biofilms are characterized by a higher biomass and cell viability. The presence of phage particles throughout the lysogenic strains biofilm development implicated prophage spontaneous induction in this effect. Analysis of lysogens deficient for phage lysin and the bacterial major autolysin revealed that the absence of either lytic activity impaired biofilm development and the addition of DNA restored the ability of mutant strains to form robust biofilms. These findings establish that limited phage-mediated host lysis of a fraction of the bacterial population, due to spontaneous phage induction, constitutes an important source of eDNA for the S. pneumoniae biofilm matrix and that this localized release of eDNA favors biofilm formation by the remaining bacterial population.

  19. Biofilm formation ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium acrAB mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlisselberg, Dov B; Kler, Edna; Kisluk, Guy; Shachar, Dina; Yaron, Sima

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies offer contradictory findings about the role of multidrug efflux pumps in bacterial biofilm development. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the AcrAB efflux pump in biofilm formation by investigating the ability of AcrB and AcrAB null mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to produce biofilms. Three models were used to compare the ability of S. Typhimurium wild-type and its mutants to form biofilms: formation of biofilm on polystyrene surfaces; production of biofilm (mat model) on the air/liquid interface; and expression of curli and cellulose on Congo red-supplemented agar plates. All three investigated genotypes formed biofilms with similar characteristics. However, upon exposure to chloramphenicol, formation of biofilms on solid surfaces as well as the production of curli were either reduced or were delayed more significantly in both mutants, whilst there was no visible effect on pellicle formation. It can be concluded that when no selective pressure is applied, S. Typhimurium is able to produce biofilms even when the AcrAB efflux pumps are inactivated, implying that the use of efflux pump inhibitors to prevent biofilm formation is not a general solution and that combined treatments might be more efficient. Other factors that affect the ability to produce biofilms depending on efflux pump activity are yet to be identified.

  20. d-Amino Acids Indirectly Inhibit Biofilm Formation in Bacillus subtilis by Interfering with Protein Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Leiman, Sara A.; May, Janine M.; Lebar, Matthew D.; Kahne, Daniel; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis forms biofilms on surfaces and at air-liquid interfaces. It was previously reported that these biofilms disassemble late in their life cycle and that conditioned medium from late-stage biofilms inhibits biofilm formation. Such medium contained a mixture of d-leucine, d-methionine, d-tryptophan, and d-tyrosine and was reported to inhibit biofilm formation via the incorporation of these d-amino acids into the cell wall. Here, we show that l-amino acids were ...

  1. The contribution of cell-cell signaling and motility to bacterial biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrout, Joshua D; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    Many bacteria grow attached to a surface as biofilms. Several factors dictate biofilm formation, including responses by the colonizing bacteria to their environment. Here we review how bacteria use cell-cell signaling (also called quorum sensing) and motility during biofilm formation. Specifically...... gene expression important to the production of polysaccharides, rhamnolipid, and other virulence factors. Surface motility affects the assembly and architecture of biofilms, and some aspects of motility are also influenced by quorum sensing. While some genes and their function are specific to P....... aeruginosa, many aspects of biofilm development can be used as a model system to understand how bacteria differentially colonize surfaces....

  2. Formation and post-formation dynamics of bacterial biofilm streamers as highly viscous liquid jets

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Siddhartha

    2013-01-01

    It has been recently reported that in presence of low Reynolds number (Re<<1) transport, preformed bacterial biofilms, several hours after their formation, may degenerate in form of filamentous structures, known as streamers. In this letter, we explain that such streamers form as the highly viscous liquid states of the intrinsically viscoelastic biofilms. Such "viscous liquid" state can be hypothesized by noting that the time of appearance of the streamers is substantially larger than the viscoelastic relaxation time scale of the biofilms, and this appearance is explained by the inability of a viscous liquid to withstand an external shear. Further, by identifying the post formation dynamics of the streamers as that of a viscous liquid jet in a surrounding flow field, we can interpret several unexplained issues associated with the post-formation dynamics of streamers, such as the clogging of the flow passage or the exponential time growth of streamer dimensions.

  3. The impact of quorum sensing and swarming motility on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation is nutritionally conditional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shrout, J.D.; Chopp, D.L.; Just, C.L.;

    2006-01-01

    The role of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation is unclear. Some researchers have shown that quorum sensing is important for biofilm development, while others have indicated it has little or no role. In this study, the contribution of quorum sensing to biofilm development...... was found to depend upon the nutritional environment. Depending upon the carbon source, quorum-sensing mutant strains (lasIrhlI and lasRrhlR) either exhibited a pronounced defect early in biofilm formation or formed biofilms identical to the wild-type strain. Quorum sensing was then shown to exert its...... nutritionally conditional control of biofilm development through regulation of swarming motility. Examination of pilA and fliM mutant strains further supported the role of swarming motility in biofilm formation. These data led to a model proposing that the prevailing nutritional conditions dictate...

  4. SarA is a negative regulator of Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Christer; Heinze, C.; Busch, M.;

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation is essential for Staphylococcus epidermidis pathogenicity in implant-associated infections. Nonetheless, large proportions of invasive S. epidermidis isolates fail to show accumulative biofilm growth in vitro. We here tested the hypothesis that this apparent paradox is related...... to the existence of superimposed regulatory systems suppressing a multi-cellular biofilm life style in vitro. Transposon mutagenesis of clinical significant but biofilm-negative S. epidermidis 1585 was used to isolate a biofilm positive mutant carrying a Tn917 insertion in sarA,chief regulator of staphylococcal...... regulator of Embp- and eDNA dependent biofilm formation. Given the importance of SarA as a positive regulator of polysaccharide mediated cell aggregation, the regulator enables S. epidermidis to switch between mechanisms of biofilm formation, ensuring S. epidermidis adaptation to hostile environments....

  5. Biofilm formation as a function of adhesin, growth medium, substratum and strain type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Witsø, Ingun Lund; Klemm, Per

    2011-01-01

    and P fimbriae were seen to influence biofilm formation significantly different depending on strain background, growth media and aeration as well as surface material. Altogether, this report clearly demonstrates that biofilm formation of a given strain is highly dependent on experimental design...... and that specific mechanisms involved in biofilm formation such as fimbrial expression only play a role under certain environmental conditions. This study underscores the importance of careful selection of experimental conditions when investigating bacterial biofilm formation and to take great precaution/care when...

  6. Effects of ambroxol on Candida albicans growth and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rene, Hernandez-Delgadillo; José, Martínez-Sanmiguel Juan; Isela, Sánchez-Nájera Rosa; Claudio, Cabral-Romero

    2014-04-01

    Typically, the onset of candidiasis is characterised by the appearance of a biofilm of Candida albicans, which is associated with several diseases including oral candidiasis in young and elderly people. The objective of this work was to investigate the in vitro fungicidal activity as well as the antibiofilm activity of ambroxol (AMB) against C. albicans growth. In the present investigation, the fungicidal activity of AMB was established using the cell viability 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Also the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AMB required to inhibit the fungal growth was determined. Simultaneously, the antibiofilm activity of AMB was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy. The study revealed that 2 mg ml(-1) of AMB exhibited higher fungicidal activity than 3.3 mg ml(-1) of terbinafine, one of most common commercial antifungals. A MIC of 1 mg ml(-1) was determined for AMB to interfere with C. albicans growth. Furthermore, AMB was found to be effective in inhibiting the biofilm formation of C. albicans and exerted its fungicidal activity against the fungal cells interspersed in the preformed biofilm. The study suggests a potential role of the mucolytic agent, AMB, as an interesting therapeutic alternative in the treatment of oral candidiasis.

  7. Effects of ambroxol on Candida albicans growth and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rene, Hernandez-Delgadillo; José, Martínez-Sanmiguel Juan; Isela, Sánchez-Nájera Rosa; Claudio, Cabral-Romero

    2014-04-01

    Typically, the onset of candidiasis is characterised by the appearance of a biofilm of Candida albicans, which is associated with several diseases including oral candidiasis in young and elderly people. The objective of this work was to investigate the in vitro fungicidal activity as well as the antibiofilm activity of ambroxol (AMB) against C. albicans growth. In the present investigation, the fungicidal activity of AMB was established using the cell viability 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Also the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AMB required to inhibit the fungal growth was determined. Simultaneously, the antibiofilm activity of AMB was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy. The study revealed that 2 mg ml(-1) of AMB exhibited higher fungicidal activity than 3.3 mg ml(-1) of terbinafine, one of most common commercial antifungals. A MIC of 1 mg ml(-1) was determined for AMB to interfere with C. albicans growth. Furthermore, AMB was found to be effective in inhibiting the biofilm formation of C. albicans and exerted its fungicidal activity against the fungal cells interspersed in the preformed biofilm. The study suggests a potential role of the mucolytic agent, AMB, as an interesting therapeutic alternative in the treatment of oral candidiasis. PMID:24224742

  8. Motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa contributes to SOS-inducible biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellappa, Shakinah T; Maredia, Reshma; Phipps, Kara; Haskins, William E; Weitao, Tao

    2013-12-01

    DNA-damaging antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin induce biofilm formation and the SOS response through autocleavage of SOS-repressor LexA in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, the biofilm-SOS connection remains poorly understood. It was investigated with 96-well and lipid biofilm assays. The effects of ciprofloxacin were examined on biofilm stimulation of the SOS mutant and wild-type strains. The stimulation observed in the wild-type in which SOS was induced was reduced in the mutant in which LexA was made non-cleavable (LexAN) and thus SOS non-inducible. Therefore, the stimulation appeared to involve SOS. The possible mechanisms of inducible biofilm formation were explored by subproteomic analysis of outer membrane fractions extracted from biofilms. The data predicted an inhibitory role of LexA in flagellum function. This premise was tested first by functional and morphological analyses of flagellum-based motility. The flagellum swimming motility decreased in the LexAN strain treated with ciprofloxacin. Second, the motility-biofilm assay was performed, which tested cell migration and biofilm formation. The results showed that wild-type biofilm increased significantly over the LexAN. These results suggest that LexA repression of motility, which is the initial event in biofilm development, contributes to repression of SOS-inducible biofilm formation.

  9. A controlled release of antibiotics from calcium phosphate-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) particles and their in vitro efficacy against Staphylococcus aureus biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastari, Kelsen; Arshath, Mohamed; Ng, Zhi Hui Melissa; Chia, Jia Hua; Yow, Zhi Xian Daniel; Sana, Barindra; Tan, Meng Fong Cherine; Lim, Sierin; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2014-03-01

    Ceramic-polymer hybrid particles, intended for osteomyelitis treatment, were fabricated by preparing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) particles through an emulsion solvent evaporation technique, followed by calcium phosphate (CaP) coating via a surface adsorption-nucleation method. The presence of CaP coating on the surface of the particles was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Subsequently, two antibiotics for treating bone infection, nafcillin (hydrophilic) and levofloxacin (amphiphilic), were loaded into these hybrid particles and their in vitro drug release studies were investigated. The CaP coating was shown to reduce burst release, while providing sustained release of the antibiotics for up to 4 weeks. In vitro bacterial study against Staphylococcus aureus demonstrated the capability of these antibiotic-loaded hybrid particles to inhibit biofilm formation as well as deteriorate established biofilm, making this hybrid system a potential candidate for further investigation for osteomyelitis treatment.

  10. Biofilm Formation and Adherence Characteristics of Listeria ivanovii Strains Isolated from Ready-to-Eat Foods in Alice, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirriam E. Nyenje

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to investigate the potential of Listeria ivanovii isolates to exist as biofilm structures. The ability of Listeria ivanovii isolates to adhere to a surface was determined using a microtiter plate adherence assay whereas the role of cell surface properties in biofilm formation was assessed using the coaggregation and autoaggregation assays. Seven reference bacterial strains were used for the coaggregation assay. The degree of coaggregation and autoaggregation was determined. The architecture of the biofilms was examined under SEM. A total of 44 (88% strains adhered to the wells of the microtiter plate while 6 (12% did not adhere. The coaggregation index ranged from 12 to 77% while the autoaggregation index varied from 11 to 55%. The partner strains of S. aureus, S. pyogenes, P. shigelloides, and S. sonnei displayed coaggregation indices of 75% each, while S. Typhimurium, A. hydrophila, and P. aeruginosa registered coaggregation indices of 67%, 58%, and 50%, respectively. The ability of L. ivanovii isolates to form single and multispecies biofilms at 25°C is of great concern to the food industry where these organisms may adhere to kitchen utensils and other environments leading to cross-contamination of food processed in these areas.

  11. Actinomyces naeslundii GroEL-dependent initial attachment and biofilm formation in a flow cell system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Toshiaki; Ochiai, Kuniyasu; Senpuku, Hidenobu

    2015-02-01

    Actinomyces naeslundii is an early colonizer with important roles in the development of the oral biofilm. The effects of butyric acid, one of short chain fatty acids in A. naeslundii biofilm formation was observed using a flow cell system with Tryptic soy broth without dextrose and with 0.25% sucrose (TSB sucrose). Significant biofilms were established involving live and dead cells in TSB sucrose with 60mM butyric acid but not in concentrations of 6, 30, 40, and 50mM. Biofilm formation failed in 60mM sodium butyrate but biofilm level in 60mM sodium butyrate (pH4.7) adjusted with hydrochloric acid as 60mM butyric media (pH4.7) was similar to biofilm levels in 60mM butyric acid. Therefore, butyric acid and low pH are required for significant biofilm formation in the flow cell. To determine the mechanism of biofilm formation, we investigated initial A. naeslundii colonization in various conditions and effects of anti-GroEL antibody. The initial colonization was observed in the 60mM butyric acid condition and anti-GroEL antibody inhibited the initial colonization. In conclusion, we established a new biofilm formation model in which butyric acid induces GroEL-dependent initial colonization of A. naeslundii resulting in significant biofilm formation in a flow system. PMID:25555820

  12. Characterization of Biofilm Formation in [Pasteurella] pneumotropica and [Actinobacillus] muris Isolates of Mouse Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, Martin; Benten, W Peter M; Engelhardt, Eva; Gougoula, Christina; Benga, Laurentiu

    2015-01-01

    [Pasteurella] pneumotropica biotypes Jawetz and Heyl and [Actinobacillus] muris are the most prevalent Pasteurellaceae species isolated from laboratory mouse. However, mechanisms contributing to their high prevalence such as the ability to form biofilms have not been studied yet. In the present investigation we analyze if these bacterial species can produce biofilms in vitro and investigate whether proteins, extracellular DNA and polysaccharides are involved in the biofilm formation and structure by inhibition and dispersal assays using proteinase K, DNase I and sodium periodate. Finally, the capacity of the biofilms to confer resistance to antibiotics is examined. We demonstrate that both [P.] pneumotropica biotypes but not [A.] muris are able to form robust biofilms in vitro, a phenotype which is widely spread among the field isolates. The biofilm inhibition and dispersal assays by proteinase and DNase lead to a strong inhibition in biofilm formation when added at the initiation of the biofilm formation and dispersed pre-formed [P.] pneumotropica biofilms, revealing thus that proteins and extracellular DNA are essential in biofilm formation and structure. Sodium periodate inhibited the bacterial growth when added at the beginning of the biofilm formation assay, making difficult the assessment of the role of β-1,6-linked polysaccharides in the biofilm formation, and had a biofilm stimulating effect when added on pre-established mature biofilms of [P.] pneumotropica biotype Heyl and a majority of [P.] pneumotropica biotype Jawetz strains, suggesting that the presence of β-1,6-linked polysaccharides on the bacterial surface might attenuate the biofilm production. Conversely, no effect or a decrease in the biofilm quantity was observed by biofilm dispersal using sodium periodate on further biotype Jawetz isolates, suggesting that polysaccharides might be incorporated in the biofilm structure. We additionally show that [P.] pneumotropica cells enclosed in biofilms

  13. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel hamamelitannin analogues as potentiators for vancomycin in the treatment of biofilm related Staphylococcus aureus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermote, Arno; Brackman, Gilles; Risseeuw, Martijn D P; Coenye, Tom; Van Calenbergh, Serge

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent cause of biofilm-related infections. Bacterial cells within a biofilm are protected from attack by the immune system and conventional antibiotics often fail to penetrate the biofilm matrix. The discovery of hamamelitannin as a potentiator for antibiotics, recently led to the design of a more drug-like lead. In the present study, we want to gain further insight into the structure-activity relationship (S.A.R.) of the 5-position of the molecule, by preparing a library of 21 hamamelitannin analogues. PMID:27507109

  14. 金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜研究知识图谱分析%Knowledge Map Analysis in Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨峰; 王旭荣; 王玲; 李新圃; 罗金印; 张世栋; 李宏胜

    2015-01-01

    为了展示金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜领域的整体研究状况和研究热点,基于 CitespaceⅢ研究了1995年-2015年 Web of ScienceTM核心合集数据库所收录的有关金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜的3582条科技文献,分析了年度发文量,绘制了国家、机构、作者、被引期刊、被引文献及关键词的知识图谱。金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜研究领域的发文量从1995年-2014年持续上升,2015年有延续的趋势;研究金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜的国家和机构及刊登该领域文献的期刊主要分布在北美洲和欧洲,大学是该研究领域的主要研究机构;金黄色葡萄球菌生物被膜的研究热点集中于生物被膜的形成机制和抑制药物的研发两个方面,未来一段时间的研究方向将侧重于阻碍生物被膜形成和促进已形成生物被膜瓦解的药物研发。%Based on CitespaceⅢ,knowledge maps of countries,institutions,authors,cites journals,cite ref-erences,key words,year distributions of publications on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm research were stud-ied,which was conducted on 3 582 international scientific literatures download from Web of ScienceTM core collection (1995-2015).The analyzed results showed,in research field of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm,the number of published papers increased from 1995-2014 on the whole,and it will continue increase in 2015;Countries and institutions,as well as the journals published relevant literatures were mainly distributed in America and Europe,and universities play important roles in this field;In addition,the research fields were focused on two active areas including mechanism of biofilm formation and drugs inhibiting biofilm forma-tion.In the future,studies will pay more attention to research and development of drug to inhibit biofilm formation and promote biofilm collapse.

  15. Identification of the genes involved in Riemerella anatipestifer biofilm formation by random transposon mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghai Hu

    Full Text Available Riemerella anatipestifer causes epizootics of infectious disease in poultry that result in serious economic losses to the duck industry. Our previous studies have shown that some strains of R. anatipestifer can form a biofilm, and this may explain the intriguing persistence of R. anatipestifer on duck farms post infection. In this study we used strain CH3, a strong producer of biofilm, to construct a library of random Tn4351 transposon mutants in order to investigate the genetic basis of biofilm formation by R. anatipestifer on abiotic surfaces. A total of 2,520 mutants were obtained and 39 of them showed a reduction in biofilm formation of 47%-98% using crystal violet staining. Genetic characterization of the mutants led to the identification of 33 genes. Of these, 29 genes are associated with information storage and processing, as well as basic cellular processes and metabolism; the function of the other four genes is currently unknown. In addition, a mutant strain BF19, in which biofilm formation was reduced by 98% following insertion of the Tn4351 transposon at the dihydrodipicolinate synthase (dhdps gene, was complemented with a shuttle plasmid pCP-dhdps. The complemented mutant strain was restored to give 92.6% of the biofilm formation of the wild-type strain CH3, which indicates that the dhdp gene is associated with biofilm formation. It is inferred that such complementation applies also to other mutant strains. Furthermore, some biological characteristics of biofilm-defective mutants were investigated, indicating that the genes deleted in the mutant strains function in the biofilm formation of R. anatipestifer. Deletion of either gene will stall the biofilm formation at a specific stage thus preventing further biofilm development. In addition, the tested biofilm-defective mutants had different adherence capacity to Vero cells. This study will help us to understand the molecular mechanisms of biofilm development by R. anatipestifer and to

  16. Study on Hydro-Alcoholic Extract Effect of Pomegranate Peel on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Habibipour

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Microorganisms form biomass as biofilm in response to many factors, in order to adapt to hostile extracellular environments and biocides. Using different herbal compounds are of those strategies to deal with biofilm. It has been proved that plants extracts such as pomegranate, raspberry and chamomile essential oils have anti-biofilm effects. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of black peel pomegranate ex-tract on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation. Materials & Methods: In this experimental research the anti-biofilm effect, reducing the amount of biofilm formation and growth kinetics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in different treatments was measured by microtiter and plate colorimetric crystal violet method. Biofilm formation was also examined using a microscope. Statistical analysis of data obtained from the reading of the ELISA was performed using SPSS software, P value 0.05. Results: Findings of this study showed that bacteria cannot form any biofilm in first 6 hours of incubation, in all treatments. The amount of biofilm formation after 12 hours in 0.01 and 0.05 g/ mL treatments were medium. Among treatments, after 18 and 24 hours of incubation 0.001 g/ mL concentration of pomegranate peel extract had medium and strong inhibitory effect on biofilm formation, respectively. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that biofilm formation and biofilm reduction percent-age is directly related to the duration of exposure of bacteria that could be due to the different phases of growth. Growth kinetics study also revealed that in the majority of treatments the growth was incremental up to about 15 hours and decrement afterwards due to the effective-ness of different treatments. After 18 hours, treatments have greatest influence on biofilm formation. The foregoing has been fully confirmed by the results of microscopic slides. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2015; 22 (3: 195-202

  17. Dynamics of Aerial Tower Formation in Bacillus subtilis Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Naveen; Seminara, Agnese; Wilking, James; Brenner, Michael; Weitz, Dave

    2012-02-01

    Biofilms are highly-organized colonies of bacteria that form on surfaces. These colonies form sophisticated structures which make them robust and difficult to remove from environments such as catheters, where they pose serious infection problems. Previous work has shown that sub-mm sized aerial towers form on the surface of Bacillus subtilis colony biofilms. Spore-formation is located preferentially at the tops of these towers, known as fruiting bodies, which aid in the dispersal and propagation of the colony to new sites. The formation of towers is strongly affected by the quorum-sensing molecule surfactin and the cannibalism pathway of the bacteria. In the present work, we use confocal fluorescence microscopy to study the development of individual fruiting bodies, allowing us to visualize the time-dependent spatial distribution of matrix-forming and sporulating bacteria within the towers. With this information, we investigate the physical mechanisms, such as surface tension and polymer concentration gradients, that drive the formation of these structures.

  18. Mycobacterium avium Possesses Extracellular DNA that Contributes to Biofilm Formation, Structural Integrity, and Tolerance to Antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha J Rose

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis is an opportunistic pathogen that is associated with biofilm-related infections of the respiratory tract and is difficult to treat. In recent years, extracellular DNA (eDNA has been found to be a major component of bacterial biofilms, including many pathogens involved in biofilm-associated infections. To date, eDNA has not been described as a component of mycobacterial biofilms. In this study, we identified and characterized eDNA in a high biofilm-producing strain of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (MAH. In addition, we surveyed for presence of eDNA in various MAH strains and other nontuberculous mycobacteria. Biofilms of MAH A5 (high biofilm-producing strain and MAH 104 (reference strain were established at 22°C and 37°C on abiotic surfaces. Acellular biofilm matrix and supernatant from MAH A5 7 day-old biofilms both possess abundant eDNA, however very little eDNA was found in MAH 104 biofilms. A survey of MAH clinical isolates and other clinically relevant nontuberculous mycobacterial species revealed many species and strains that also produce eDNA. RAPD analysis demonstrated that eDNA resembles genomic DNA. Treatment with DNase I reduced the biomass of MAH A5 biofilms when added upon biofilm formation or to an already established biofilm both on abiotic surfaces and on top of human pharyngeal epithelial cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of an established biofilm with DNase 1 and either moxifloxacin or clarithromycin significantly increased the susceptibility of the bacteria within the biofilm to these clinically used antimicrobials. Collectively, our results describe an additional matrix component of mycobacterial biofilms and a potential new target to help treat biofilm-associated nontuberculous mycobacterial infections.

  19. Bioguided Fractionation Shows Cassia alata Extract to Inhibit Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Growth and Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Takashi Saito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant extracts have a long history to be used in folk medicine. Cassia alata extracts are known to exert antibacterial activity but details on compounds and mechanism of action remain poorly explored. We purified and concentrated the aqueous leaf extract of C. alata by reverse phase-solid phase extraction and screened the resulting CaRP extract for antimicrobial activity. CaRP extract exhibited antimicrobial activity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, S. aureus, and Bacillus subtilis. CaRP also inhibited biofilm formation of S. epidermidis and P. aeruginosa. Several bacterial growth-inhibiting compounds were detected when CaRP extract was fractionated by TLC chromatography coupled to bioautography agar overlay technique. HPLC chromatography of CaRP extract yielded 20 subfractions that were tested by bioautography for antimicrobial activity against S. aureus and S. epidermidis. Five bioactive fractions were detected and chemically characterized, using high-resolution mass spectrometry (qTOF-MS/MS. Six compounds from four fractions could be characterized as kaempferol, kaempferol-O-diglucoside, kaempferol-O-glucoside, quercetin-O-glucoside, rhein, and danthron. In the Salmonella/microsome assay CaRP showed weak mutagenicity (MI<3 only in strain TA98, pointing to a frameshift mutation activity. These results indicate that C. alata leaf extract contains a minimum of 7 compounds with antimicrobial activity and that these together or as single substance are active in preventing formation of bacterial biofilm, indicating potential for therapeutic applications.

  20. The LuxS based quorum sensing governs lactose induced biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle eDuanis-Assaf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus species present a major concern in the dairy industry as they can form biofilms in pipelines and on surfaces of equipment and machinery used in the entire line of production. These biofilms represent a continuous hygienic problem and can lead to serious economic losses due to food spoilage and equipment impairment. Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis is apparently dependent on LuxS quorum sensing (QS by Autoinducer-2 (AI-2. However, the link between sensing environmental cues and AI-2 induced biofilm formation remains largely unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of lactose, the primary sugar in milk, on biofilm formation by B. subtilis and its possible link to QS processes. Our phenotypic analysis shows that lactose induces formation of biofilm bundles as well as formation of colony type biofilms. Furthermore, using reporter strain assays, we observed an increase in AI-2 production by B. subtilis in response to lactose in a dose dependent manner. Moreover, we found that expression of eps and tapA operons, responsible for extracellular matrix synthesis in B. subtilis, were notably up-regulated in response to lactose. Importantly, we also observed that LuxS is essential for B. subtilis biofilm formation in the presence of lactose. Overall, our results suggest that lactose may induce biofilm formation by B. subtilis through the LuxS pathway.

  1. TOL plasmid carriage enhances biofilm formation and increases extracellular DNA content in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Alvise, Paul; Sjoholm, O.R.; Yankelevich, T.;

    2010-01-01

    Adherent growth of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 with and without the TOL plasmid (pWWO) at the solid-liquid and air-liquid interface was examined. We compared biofilm formation on glass in flow cells, and assayed pellicle (air-liquid interface biofilm) formation in stagnant liquid cultures by confocal...... to increased biofilm formation by production of eDNA....... laser scanning microscopy. The TOL-carrying strains formed pellicles and thick biofilms, whereas the same strains without the plasmid displayed little adherent growth. Microscopy using fluorescent nucleic acid-specific stains revealed differences in the production of extracellular polymeric substances...

  2. Biofilm formation by Bacillus subtilis: new insights into regulatory strategies and assembly mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Cairns, Lynne S; Hobley, Laura; Stanley-Wall, Nicola R.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a social behaviour that generates favourable conditions for sustained survival in the natural environment. For the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis the process involves the differentiation of cell fate within an isogenic population and the production of communal goods that form the biofilm matrix. Here we review recent progress in understanding the regulatory pathways that control biofilm formation and highlight developments in understanding the composition, func...

  3. Inhibitory activity of Iranian plant extracts on growth and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Mansouri, S.; Safa, A.; Najar, S. G.; Najar, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a drug resistance opportunistic bacterium. Biofilm formation is key factor for survivalof P. aeruginosa in various environments. Polysaccharides may be involved in biofilm formation. The purpose of thisstudy was to evaluate antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activities of seven plant extracts with known alpha-glucosidaseinhibitory activities on different strains of P. aeruginosa.Methodology and results: Plants were extracted with methanol by the maceration method. ...

  4. Synergism of roxithromycin and acetylspiramycin on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm in ocular region%罗红霉素与乙酰螺旋霉素对眼部金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓晓慧; 付升旗; 郑风劲

    2012-01-01

    目的:比较罗红霉素与乙酰螺旋霉素对眼部金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜的影响及与环丙沙星合用的抗菌协同作用.方法:用0.22 μm微孔膜构建金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜模型;测定罗红霉素、乙酰螺旋霉素及环丙沙星的最低抑菌浓度(MIC)值;银染金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜,扫描电镜( SEM)观察生物膜形态结构,连续稀释法进行活菌计数.结果:生物膜(BF)可在7d内稳定形成,1/16MIC、1/4MIC浓度罗红霉素显著减少单用环丙沙星组中的BF活菌数(P<0.05),乙酰螺旋霉素没有明显作用.结论:罗红霉素能显著提高环丙沙星对BF中金黄色葡萄球菌的抗菌活性.%OBJECTIVE To compare the influence of roxithromycin and acetylspiramycin on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation in ocular region and the Synergism of antibacterial activities between roxithromycin and ciprofloxacin on staphylococcus aureus. METHODS In vitro Staphylococcus aureus biofilm were cultivated with 0. 22 μm aperture microporefilm. The MICs of roxithromycin and acetylspiramycin and ciprofloxacin were measured; Staphylococcus aureus BF was stained with Ag-NO3 and the morphological structure was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); The viable bacterial in BF were counted separately by serial dilution. RESULTS The BF of Staphylococcus aureus was formed steadily after a week. The viable bacterial amount showed when Roxithromycin of 1/16MIC and 1/4MIC combined with Ciprofloxacin alone was applied respectively, bactericidal activity of Ciprofloxacin to Staphylococcus aureus within the BF was enhanced significantly (P<0. 05). Acetylspiramycin showed without effect. CONCLUSION Roxithromycin was considered to enhance significantly the bacterial sensitivity to ciprofloxacin on Staphylococcus aureus in biofilm.

  5. D-amino acids indirectly inhibit biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis by interfering with protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiman, Sara A; May, Janine M; Lebar, Matthew D; Kahne, Daniel; Kolter, Roberto; Losick, Richard

    2013-12-01

    The soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis forms biofilms on surfaces and at air-liquid interfaces. It was previously reported that these biofilms disassemble late in their life cycle and that conditioned medium from late-stage biofilms inhibits biofilm formation. Such medium contained a mixture of D-leucine, D-methionine, D-tryptophan, and D-tyrosine and was reported to inhibit biofilm formation via the incorporation of these D-amino acids into the cell wall. Here, we show that L-amino acids were able to specifically reverse the inhibitory effects of their cognate D-amino acids. We also show that D-amino acids inhibited growth and the expression of biofilm matrix genes at concentrations that inhibit biofilm formation. Finally, we report that the strain routinely used to study biofilm formation has a mutation in the gene (dtd) encoding D-tyrosyl-tRNA deacylase, an enzyme that prevents the misincorporation of D-amino acids into protein in B. subtilis. When we repaired the dtd gene, B. subtilis became resistant to the biofilm-inhibitory effects of D-amino acids without losing the ability to incorporate at least one noncanonical D-amino acid, D-tryptophan, into the peptidoglycan peptide side chain. We conclude that the susceptibility of B. subtilis to the biofilm-inhibitory effects of D-amino acids is largely, if not entirely, due to their toxic effects on protein synthesis. PMID:24097941

  6. In vitro prevention of Pseudomonas aeruginosa early biofilm formation with antibiotics used in cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Olmos, Ana; García-Castillo, María; Maiz, Luis; Lamas, Adelaida; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael

    2012-08-01

    The ability of antibiotics used in bronchopulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients to prevent Pseudomonas aeruginosa early biofilm formation was studied using a biofilm microtitre assay with 57 non-mucoid P. aeruginosa isolates (44 first colonisers and 13 recovered during the initial intermittent colonisation stage) obtained from 35 CF patients. Minimum biofilm inhibitory concentrations (BICs) of levofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, ceftazidime, tobramycin, colistin and azithromycin were determined by placing a peg lid with a formed biofilm onto microplates containing antibiotics. A modification of this protocol consisting of antibiotic challenge during biofilm formation was implemented in order to determine the biofilm prevention concentration (BPC), i.e. the minimum concentration able to prevent biofilm formation. The lowest BPCs were for fluoroquinolones, tobramycin and colistin and the highest for ceftazidime and imipenem. The former antibiotics had BPCs identical to or only slightly higher than their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) determined by standard Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) microdilution and were also active on formed biofilms as reflected by their low BIC values. In contrast, ceftazidime and imipenem were less effective for prevention of biofilm formation and on formed biofilms. In conclusion, the new BPC parameter determined in non-mucoid P. aeruginosa isolates recovered during early colonisation stages in CF patients supports early aggressive antimicrobial treatment guidelines in first P. aeruginosa-colonised CF patients. PMID:22727530

  7. In vitro effectiveness of 455-nm blue LED to reduce the load of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans biofilms in compact bone tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Luciano Pereira; da Silva, Francine Cristina; Viana, Magda Souza; Meira, Giselle Andrade

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 455-nm blue light-emitting diode (LED), at different application times, to reduce the load of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans biofilms applied to compact bone tissue. The microorganisms S. aureus (ATCC 25923) and C. albicans (ATCC 18804) were used to form biofilms on 160 specimens of compact bones that had been divided into eight experimental groups (n = 10) for each microorganism, according to the times of application of the 455-nm blue LED (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and 10 min) with an irradiance of 75 mW/cm2. After LED application, decimal dilutions of microorganisms were performed, plated on BHI or Sabouraud agar and incubated for 24 h/35 °C to obtain CFU/mL counts. The findings were statistically analyzed using a ANOVA 5 %. For the group of S. aureus biofilms, all groups of 455-nm LED application differ compared with the control group (p albicans biofilms, only those samples receiving 3, 7, and 10 min of LED application presented a significant difference compared with the control group (p albicans biofilms, especially during 10 min of application.

  8. Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    López, Daniel; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The ability to form biofilms is a universal attribute of bacteria. Biofilms are multicellular communities held together by a self-produced extracellular matrix. The mechanisms that different bacteria employ to form biofilms vary, frequently depending on environmental conditions and specific strain attributes. In this review, we emphasize four well-studied model systems to give an overview of how several organisms form biofilms: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, and ...

  9. Experimental and Computational Investigation of Biofilm Formation by Rhodopseudomonas palustris Growth under Two Metabolic Modes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chase Kernan

    Full Text Available We examined biofilms formed by the metabolically versatile bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris grown via different metabolic modes. R. palustris was grown in flow cell chambers with identical medium conditions either in the presence or absence of light and oxygen. In the absence of oxygen and the presence of light, R. palustris grew and formed biofilms photoheterotrophically, and in the presence of oxygen and the absence of light, R. palustris grew and formed biofilms heterotrophically. We used confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis software to quantitatively analyze and compare R. palustris biofilm formation over time in these two metabolic modes. We describe quantifiable differences in structure between the biofilms formed by the bacterium grown heterotrophically and those grown photoheterotrophically. We developed a computational model to explore ways in which biotic and abiotic parameters could drive the observed biofilm architectures, as well as a random-forest machine-learning algorithm based on structural differences that was able to identify growth conditions from the confocal imaging of the biofilms with 87% accuracy. Insight into the structure of phototrophic biofilms and conditions that influence biofilm formation is relevant for understanding the generation of biofilm structures with different properties, and for optimizing applications with phototrophic bacteria growing in the biofilm state.

  10. Cationic Pillararenes Potently Inhibit Biofilm Formation without Affecting Bacterial Growth and Viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Roymon; Naugolny, Alissa; Feldman, Mark; Herzog, Ido M; Fridman, Micha; Cohen, Yoram

    2016-01-27

    It is estimated that up to 80% of bacterial infections are accompanied by biofilm formation. Since bacteria in biofilms are less susceptible to antibiotics than are bacteria in the planktonic state, biofilm-associated infections pose a major health threat, and there is a pressing need for antibiofilm agents. Here we report that water-soluble cationic pillararenes differing in the quaternary ammonium groups efficiently inhibited the formation of biofilms by clinically important Gram-positive pathogens. Biofilm inhibition did not result from antimicrobial activity; thus, the compounds should not inhibit growth of natural bacterial flora. Moreover, none of the cationic pillararenes caused detectable membrane damage to red blood cells or toxicity to human cells in culture. The results indicate that cationic pillararenes have potential for use in medical applications in which biofilm formation is a problem. PMID:26745311

  11. A three-step method for analysing bacterial biofilm formation under continuous medium flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutzler, Karolin; Schmid, Andreas; Buehler, Katja

    2015-07-01

    For the investigation and comparison of microbial biofilms, a variety of analytical methods have been established, all focusing on different growth stages and application areas of biofilms. In this study, a novel quantitative assay for analysing biofilm maturation under the influence of continuous flow conditions was developed using the interesting biocatalyst Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120. In contrast to other tubular-based assay systems, this novel assay format delivers three readouts using a single setup in a total assay time of 40 h. It combines morphotype analysis of biofilm colonies with the direct quantification of biofilm biomass and pellicle formation on an air/liquid interphase. Applying the Tube-Assay, the impact of the second messenger cyclic diguanylate on biofilm formation of P. taiwanensis VLB120 was investigated. To this end, 41 deletions of genes encoding for protein homologues to diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase were generated in the genome of P. taiwanensis VLB120. Subsequently, the biofilm formation of the resulting mutants was analysed using the Tube-Assay. In more than 60 % of the mutants, a significantly altered biofilm formation as compared to the parent strain was detected. Furthermore, the potential of the proposed Tube-Assay was validated by investigating the biofilms of several other bacterial species.

  12. [Biofilm formation capacity of Listeria monocytogens strains isolated from soft cheese from Costa Rica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo Zeledón, Gabriela; Redondo Solano, Mauricio; Arias Echandi, María Laura

    2010-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacteria associated with the production of severe infectious disease in human being, but also with the formation of biofilms in different surfaces related to the food production environment. Biofilm represents a serious problem in food industry, since it is a constant and important contamination source and also, bacteria present in it have an increased resistance towards physical and chemical agents of common use. The capacity of biofilm formation of L. monocytogenes strains previously isolated from soft cheese samples from Costa Rica was studied under different temperature and culture conditions. The microplate technique was performed using different culture media (BHIB, TSB 1:20 and cheese serum) and at different incubation temperatures (refrigeration, environmental and 35 degrees C). Biofilm formation capacity was classified according to the optical density obtained at 620 nm. None of the strains evaluated was classified as strong biofilm former under any of the variables studied, nevertheless, weak and moderate formers were detected. The results obtained show the influence of the nutrient content of the culture media used over biofilm formation; BHIB was the only culture media that allowed the expression of moderate biofilm forms, contrary to cheese serum that did not promote biofilm production. Biofilm formation is a multifactorial process, where adsorption level depends on several variables and its study must be promoted in order to develop methodologies that allow its reduction or elimination, so food industries may offer safe food products to consumers.

  13. Subinhibitory Concentrations of Allicin Decrease Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) Biofilm Formation, Adhesion Ability, and Swimming Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Sha, Kaihui; Xu, Guangya; Tian, Hanwen; Wang, Xiaoying; Chen, Shanze; Wang, Yi; Li, Jingyu; Chen, Junli; Huang, Ning

    2016-06-29

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) biofilm formation enables the organism to avoid the host immune system, resist antibiotics, and provide a reservoir for persistent infection. Once the biofilm is established, eradication of the infection becomes difficult. Therefore, strategies against UPEC biofilm are urgently required. In this study, we investigated the effect of allicin, isolated from garlic essential oil, on UPEC CFT073 and J96 biofilm formation and dispersal, along with its effect on UPEC adhesion ability and swimming motility. Sub-inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of allicin decreased UPEC biofilm formation and affected its architecture. Allicin was also capable of dispersing biofilm. Furthermore, allicin decreased the bacterial adhesion ability and swimming motility, which are important for biofilm formation. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) revealed that allicin decreased the expression of UPEC type 1 fimbriae adhesin gene fimH. Docking studies suggested that allicin was located within the binding pocket of heptyl α-d-mannopyrannoside in FimH and formed hydrogen bonds with Phe1 and Asn135. In addition, allicin decreased the expression of the two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) cognate response regulator gene uvrY and increased the expression of the RNA binding global regulatory protein gene csrA of UPEC CFT073, which is associated with UPEC biofilm. The findings suggest that sub-MICs of allicin are capable of affecting UPEC biofilm formation and dispersal, and decreasing UPEC adhesion ability and swimming motility.

  14. Comparison of two methods for quantification of Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saghar Hendiani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: ‏ Medical devices are made from a variety of materials such as polypropylene, polycarbonate, poly styrene, glass and etc. by attaching to this surfaces, Acinetobacter baumannii can form biofilms and then cause several device associated infections. Biofilms are communities of bacteria attached to the surfaces. In this study, biofilm formation ability in clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii was assessed by two methods on different surfaces. Materials and methods: ‏ Biofilm formation by 75 clinical isolates of A. baumannii was evaluated on polycarbonate surface (microtiter plate and polypropylene surface (falcon by crystal violet and 2,3-Bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide salt (XTT tetrazolium sodium salt assay methods. Falcon or tube method was carried out under static and agitation conditions. Results: ‏ Results showed the most isolates can form biofilm but higher numbers of isolates form biofilm on polypropylene surface under agitation. XTT method confirmed strong biofilm formation ability of 10 isolates. Discussion and conclusion: Each of the two assays showed an excellent applicability for the quantification of biofilms. The Crystal violet assay is cheap, easy and is usually used for the quantification of biofilms formed by microorganisms but XTT is more reliable and repeatable. Most of A. baumannii isolates have potential to form biofilm on the medical devices which may result in device-associated infections.

  15. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm Formation by Traditional Thai Herbal Recipes Used for Wound Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Chusri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of biofilm is a key mechanism involved in Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence during device-associated infections. We aimed to investigate antibiofilm formation and mature biofilm eradication ability of ethanol and water extracts of Thai traditional herbal recipes including THR-SK004, THR-SK010, and THR-SK011 against S. epidermidis. A biofilm forming reference strain, S. epidermidis ATCC 35984 was employed as a model for searching anti-biofilm agents by MTT reduction assay. The results revealed that the ethanol extract of THR-SK004 (THR-SK004E could inhibit the formation of S. epidermidis biofilm on polystyrene surfaces. Furthermore, treatments with the extract efficiently inhibit the biofilm formation of the pathogen on glass surfaces determined by scanning electron microscopy and crystal violet staining. In addition, THR-SK010 ethanol extract (THR-SK010E; 0.63–5 μg/mL could decrease 30 to 40% of the biofilm development. Almost 90% of a 7-day-old staphylococcal biofilm was destroyed after treatment with THR-SK004E (250 and 500 μg/mL and THR-SK010E (10 and 20 μg/mL for 24 h. Therefore, our results clearly demonstrated THR-SK004E could prevent the staphylococcal biofilm development, whereas both THR-SK004E and THR-SK010E possessed remarkable eradication ability on the mature staphylococcal biofilm.

  16. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm Formation by Traditional Thai Herbal Recipes Used for Wound Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chusri, S; Sompetch, K; Mukdee, S; Jansrisewangwong, S; Srichai, T; Maneenoon, K; Limsuwan, S; Voravuthikunchai, S P

    2012-01-01

    Development of biofilm is a key mechanism involved in Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence during device-associated infections. We aimed to investigate antibiofilm formation and mature biofilm eradication ability of ethanol and water extracts of Thai traditional herbal recipes including THR-SK004, THR-SK010, and THR-SK011 against S. epidermidis. A biofilm forming reference strain, S. epidermidis ATCC 35984 was employed as a model for searching anti-biofilm agents by MTT reduction assay. The results revealed that the ethanol extract of THR-SK004 (THR-SK004E) could inhibit the formation of S. epidermidis biofilm on polystyrene surfaces. Furthermore, treatments with the extract efficiently inhibit the biofilm formation of the pathogen on glass surfaces determined by scanning electron microscopy and crystal violet staining. In addition, THR-SK010 ethanol extract (THR-SK010E; 0.63-5 μg/mL) could decrease 30 to 40% of the biofilm development. Almost 90% of a 7-day-old staphylococcal biofilm was destroyed after treatment with THR-SK004E (250 and 500 μg/mL) and THR-SK010E (10 and 20 μg/mL) for 24 h. Therefore, our results clearly demonstrated THR-SK004E could prevent the staphylococcal biofilm development, whereas both THR-SK004E and THR-SK010E possessed remarkable eradication ability on the mature staphylococcal biofilm. PMID:22919409

  17. [Biofilm Formation by the Nonflagellated flhB1 Mutant of Azospirillum brasilense Sp245].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelud'ko, A V; Filip'echeva, Yu A; Shumiliva, E M; Khlebtsov, B N; Burov, A M; Petrova, L P; Katsy, E I

    2015-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 with mixed flagellation are able to form biofilms on various surfaces. A nonflagellated mutant of this strain with inactivated chromosomal copy of the flhB gene (flhB1) was shown to exhibit specific traits at the later stages of biofilm formation on a hydrophilic (glass) surface. Mature biofilms of the flhB1::Omegon-Km mutant Sp245.1063 were considerably thinner than those of the parent strain Sp245. The biofilms of the mutant were more susceptible to the forces of hydrodynamic shear. A. brasilense Sp245 cells in biofilms were not found to possess lateral flagella. Cells with polar flagella were, however, revealed by atomic force microscopy of mature native biofilms of strain Sp245. Preservation of a polar flagellum (probably nonmotile) on the cells of A. brasilense Sp245 may enhance the biofilm stability.

  18. A dual role of extracellular DNA during biofilm formation of Neisseria meningitidis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappann, M.; Claus, H.; van Alen, T.;

    2010-01-01

    formation, whereas biofilm formation of cc with low point prevalence (ST-8 cc and ST-11 cc) was eDNA-independent. For initial biofilm formation, a ST-32 cc type strain, but not a ST-11 type strain, utilized eDNA. The release of eDNA was mediated by lytic transglycosylase and cytoplasmic N......-acetylmuramyl-l-alanine amidase genes. In late biofilms, outer membrane phospholipase A-dependent autolysis, which was observed in most cc, but not in ST-8 and ST-11 strains, was required for shear force resistance of microcolonies. Taken together, N. meningitidis evolved two different biofilm formation strategies, an e....... On the contrary, spreaders (ST-11 and ST-8 cc) are unable to use eDNA for biofilm formation and might compensate for poor colonization properties by high transmission rates....

  19. Interference of Pseudomonas aeruginosa signalling and biofilm formation for infection control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Høiby, Niels;

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the best described bacterium with regards to quorum sensing (QS), in vitro biofilm formation and the development of antibiotic tolerance. Biofilms composed of P. aeruginosa are thought to be the underlying cause of many chronic infections, including those in wounds...... and in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. In this review, we provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in QS, QS-enabled virulence, biofilm formation and biofilm-enabled antibiotic tolerance. We now have substantial knowledge of the multicellular behaviour of P. aeruginosa in vitro. A major...

  20. Biofilm Formation Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Predicted via Genome-Scale Kinetic Models of Bacterial Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital-Lopez, Francisco G; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2015-10-01

    A hallmark of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its ability to establish biofilm-based infections that are difficult to eradicate. Biofilms are less susceptible to host inflammatory and immune responses and have higher antibiotic tolerance than free-living planktonic cells. Developing treatments against biofilms requires an understanding of bacterial biofilm-specific physiological traits. Research efforts have started to elucidate the intricate mechanisms underlying biofilm development. However, many aspects of these mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we addressed questions regarding biofilm metabolism using a genome-scale kinetic model of the P. aeruginosa metabolic network and gene expression profiles. Specifically, we computed metabolite concentration differences between known mutants with altered biofilm formation and the wild-type strain to predict drug targets against P. aeruginosa biofilms. We also simulated the altered metabolism driven by gene expression changes between biofilm and stationary growth-phase planktonic cultures. Our analysis suggests that the synthesis of important biofilm-related molecules, such as the quorum-sensing molecule Pseudomonas quinolone signal and the exopolysaccharide Psl, is regulated not only through the expression of genes in their own synthesis pathway, but also through the biofilm-specific expression of genes in pathways competing for precursors to these molecules. Finally, we investigated why mutants defective in anthranilate degradation have an impaired ability to form biofilms. Alternative to a previous hypothesis that this biofilm reduction is caused by a decrease in energy production, we proposed that the dysregulation of the synthesis of secondary metabolites derived from anthranilate and chorismate is what impaired the biofilms of these mutants. Notably, these insights generated through our kinetic model-based approach are not accessible from previous constraint-based model analyses of P. aeruginosa biofilm

  1. Biofilm Formation by Helicobacter pylori and Its Involvement for Antibiotic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Yonezawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial biofilms are communities of microorganisms attached to a surface. Biofilm formation is critical not only for environmental survival but also for successful infection. Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common causes of bacterial infection in humans. Some studies demonstrated that this microorganism has biofilm forming ability in the environment and on human gastric mucosa epithelium as well as on in vitro abiotic surfaces. In the environment, H. pylori could be embedded in drinking water biofilms through water distribution system in developed and developing countries so that the drinking water may serve as a reservoir for H. pylori infection. In the human stomach, H. pylori forms biofilms on the surface of gastric mucosa, suggesting one possible explanation for eradication therapy failure. Finally, based on the results of in vitro analyses, H. pylori biofilm formation can decrease susceptibility to antibiotics and H. pylori antibiotic resistance mutations are more frequently generated in biofilms than in planktonic cells. These observations indicated that H. pylori biofilm formation may play an important role in preventing and controlling H. pylori infections. Therefore, investigation of H. pylori biofilm formation could be effective in elucidating the detailed mechanisms of infection and colonization by this microorganism.

  2. Role of type 1 and type 3 fimbriae in Klebsiella pneumoniae biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krogfelt Karen A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important gram-negative opportunistic pathogen causing primarily urinary tract infections, respiratory infections, and bacteraemia. The ability of bacteria to form biofilms on medical devices, e.g. catheters, has a major role in development of many nosocomial infections. Most clinical K. pneumoniae isolates express two types of fimbrial adhesins, type 1 fimbriae and type 3 fimbriae. In this study, we characterized the role of type 1 and type 3 fimbriae in K. pneumoniae biofilm formation. Results Isogenic fimbriae mutants of the clinical K. pneumoniae isolate C3091 were constructed, and their ability to form biofilm was investigated in a flow cell system by confocal scanning laser microscopy. The wild type strain was found to form characteristic biofilm and development of K. pneumoniae biofilm occurred primarily by clonal growth, not by recruitment of planktonic cells. Type 1 fimbriae did not influence biofilm formation and the expression of type 1 fimbriae was found to be down-regulated in biofilm forming cells. In contrast, expression of type 3 fimbriae was found to strongly promote biofilm formation. Conclusion By use of well defined isogenic mutants we found that type 3 fimbriae, but not type 1 fimbriae, strongly promote biofilm formation in K. pneumoniae C3091. As the vast majority of clinical K. pneumoniae isolates express type 3 fimbriae, this fimbrial adhesin may play a significant role in development of catheter associated K. pneumoniae infections.

  3. Enhanced biofilm formation and multi-host transmission evolve from divergent genetic backgrounds in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Ben; Méric, Guillaume; Murray, Susan; Yahara, Koji; Mageiros, Leonardos; Bowen, Ryan; Jones, Nathan H; Jeeves, Rose E; Lappin-Scott, Hilary M; Asakura, Hiroshi; Sheppard, Samuel K

    2015-11-01

    Multicellular biofilms are an ancient bacterial adaptation that offers a protective environment for survival in hostile habitats. In microaerophilic organisms such as Campylobacter, biofilms play a key role in transmission to humans as the bacteria are exposed to atmospheric oxygen concentrations when leaving the reservoir host gut. Genetic determinants of biofilm formation differ between species, but little is known about how strains of the same species achieve the biofilm phenotype with different genetic backgrounds. Our approach combines genome-wide association studies with traditional microbiology techniques to investigate the genetic basis of biofilm formation in 102 Campylobacter jejuni isolates. We quantified biofilm formation among the isolates and identified hotspots of genetic variation in homologous sequences that correspond to variation in biofilm phenotypes. Thirteen genes demonstrated a statistically robust association including those involved in adhesion, motility, glycosylation, capsule production and oxidative stress. The genes associated with biofilm formation were different in the host generalist ST-21 and ST-45 clonal complexes, which are frequently isolated from multiple host species and clinical samples. This suggests the evolution of enhanced biofilm from different genetic backgrounds and a possible role in colonization of multiple hosts and transmission to humans.

  4. Antiseptics and microcosm biofilm formation on titanium surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia VERARDI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oral rehabilitation with osseointegrated implants is a way to restore esthetics and masticatory function in edentulous patients, but bacterial colonization around the implants may lead to mucositis or peri-implantitis and consequent implant loss. Peri-implantitis is the main complication of oral rehabilitation with dental implants and, therefore, it is necessary to take into account the potential effects of antiseptics such as chlorhexidine (CHX, chloramine T (CHT, triclosan (TRI, and essential oils (EO on bacterial adhesion and on biofilm formation. To assess the action of these substances, we used the microcosm technique, in which the oral environment and periodontal conditions are simulated in vitro on titanium discs with different surface treatments (smooth surface - SS, acid-etched smooth surface - AESS, sand-blasted surface - SBS, and sand-blasted and acid-etched surface - SBAES. Roughness measurements yielded the following results: SS: 0.47 µm, AESS: 0.43 µm, SB: 0.79 µm, and SBAES: 0.72 µm. There was statistical difference only between SBS and AESS. There was no statistical difference among antiseptic treatments. However, EO and CHT showed lower bacterial counts compared with the saline solution treatment (control group. Thus, the current gold standard (CHX did not outperform CHT and EO, which were efficient in reducing the biofilm biomass compared with saline solution.

  5. Essential oil of Curcuma longa inhibits Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Beom-Su; Keum, Ki-Suk; Yu, Hyeon-Hee; Kim, Young-Hoi; Chang, Byoung-Soo; Ra, Ji-Young; Moon, Hae-Dalma; Seo, Bo-Ra; Choi, Na-Young; You, Yong-Ouk

    2011-01-01

    Curcuma longa (C. longa) has been used as a spice in foods and as an antimicrobial in Oriental medicine. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of an essential oil isolated from C. longa on the cariogenic properties of Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), which is an important bacterium in dental plaque and dental caries formation. First, the inhibitory effects of C. longa essential oil on the growth and acid production of S. mutans were tested. Next, the effect of C. longa essential oil on adhesion to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite beads (S-HAs) was investigated. C. longa essential oil inhibited the growth and acid production of S. mutans at concentrations from 0.5 to 4 mg/mL. The essential oil also exhibited significant inhibition of S. mutans adherence to S-HAs at concentrations higher than 0.5 mg/mL. S. mutans biofilm formation was determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and safranin staining. The essential oil of C. longa inhibited the formation of S. mutans biofilms at concentrations higher than 0.5 mg/mL. The components of C. longa essential oil were then analyzed by GC and GC-MS, and the major components were α-turmerone (35.59%), germacrone (19.02%), α-zingiberene (8.74%), αr-turmerone (6.31%), trans-β-elemenone (5.65%), curlone (5.45%), and β-sesquiphellandrene (4.73%). These results suggest that C. longa may inhibit the cariogenic properties of S. mutans. PMID:22416707

  6. Differential effects of antifungal agents on expression of genes related to formation of Candida albicans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzimoschou, Athanasios; Simitsopoulou, Maria; Antachopoulos, Charalampos; Walsh, Thomas J; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse specific molecular mechanisms involved in the intrinsic resistance of C. albicans biofilms to antifungals. We investigated the transcriptional profile of three genes (BGL2, SUN41, ECE1) involved in Candida cell wall formation in response to voriconazole or anidulafungin after the production of intermediate and mature biofilms. C. albicans M61, a well-documented biofilm producer strain, was used for the development of intermediate (12 h and 18 h) and completely mature biofilms (48 h). After exposure of cells from each biofilm growth mode to voriconazole (128 and 512 mg l(-1)) or anidulafungin (0.25 and 1 mg l(-1)) for 12-24 h, total RNA samples extracted from biofilm cells were analysed by RT-PCR. The voriconazole and anidulafungin biofilm MIC was 512 and 0.5 mg l(-1) respectively. Anidulafungin caused significant up-regulation of SUN41 (3.7-9.3-fold) and BGL2 (2.2-2.8 fold) in intermediately mature biofilms; whereas, voriconazole increased gene expression in completely mature biofilms (SUN41 2.3-fold, BGL2 2.1-fold). Gene expression was primarily down-regulated by voriconazole in intermediately, but not completely mature biofilms. Both antifungals caused down-regulation of ECE1 in intermediately mature biofilms.

  7. Contribution of alginate and levan production to biofilm formation by Pseudomonas syringae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laue, H.; Schenk, A.; Li, H.;

    2006-01-01

    formation, biofilms of Pseudomonas syringae strains with different EPS patterns were compared. The mucoid strain PG4180.muc, which produces levan and alginate, and its levan- and/or alginate-deficient derivatives all formed biofilms in the wells of microtitre plates and in flow chambers. Confocal laser...... by binding of the lectin from Naja mossambica to a fibrous structure in biofilms of all P. syringae derivatives. Production of the as yet uncharacterized additional EPS might be more important for biofilm formation than the syntheses of levan and alginate.......Exopolysaccharides (EPSs) play important roles in the attachment of bacterial cells to a surface and/or in building and maintaining the three-dimensional, complex structure of bacterial biofilms. To elucidate the spatial distribution and function of the EPSs levan and alginate during biofilm...

  8. Denitrification-derived nitric oxide modulates biofilm formation in Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruebarrena Di Palma, Andrés; Pereyra, Cintia M; Moreno Ramirez, Lizbeth; Xiqui Vázquez, María L; Baca, Beatriz E; Pereyra, María A; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Creus, Cecilia M

    2013-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense is a rhizobacterium that provides beneficial effects on plants when they colonize roots. The formation of complex bacterial communities known as biofilms begins with the interaction of planktonic cells with surfaces in response to appropriate signals. Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule implicated in numerous processes in bacteria, including biofilm formation or dispersion, depending on genera and lifestyle. Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 produces NO by denitrification having a role in root growth promotion. We analyzed the role of endogenously produced NO on biofilm formation in A. brasilense Sp245 and in a periplasmic nitrate reductase mutant (napA::Tn5; Faj164) affected in NO production. Cells were statically grown in media with nitrate or ammonium as nitrogen sources and examined for biofilm formation using crystal violet and by confocal laser microscopy. Both strains formed biofilms, but the mutant produced less than half compared with the wild type in nitrate medium showing impaired nitrite production in this condition. NO measurements in biofilm confirmed lower values in the mutant strain. The addition of a NO donor showed that NO influences biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner and reverses the mutant phenotype, indicating that Nap positively regulates the formation of biofilm in A. brasilense Sp245.

  9. CHARACTERISATION OF AEROBIC BACTERIOLOGICAL ISOLATES FROM ORTHOPEDIC IMPLANT SITE INFECTIONS WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO BIOFILM FORMATION IN A TERITIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopa Shree

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Orthopedic implant site infection is one of the major constituents of surgical site infection associated with high morbidity and mortality . Due to the use of implants for open reduction and internal fixation , which are foreign to the body , orthopedic trauma surgery is at grave risk of microbiological contamination . Often isolates causing these infections are assoc iated with biofilm formation resulting in increased antibiotic resistance . OBJECTIVES: To determine the aerobic bacteriological profile with their antibiotic susceptibility patterns from pus samples of patients with orthopedic implant site infections . To d etermine the potential of these isolates to produce biofilm . MATERIALS AND METHODS : Pus samples were collected and sent to the laboratory from patients with suspected implant infections over a period of 6 months were processed according to CLSI guidelines . Biofilm detection was done using Congo red Agar ( CRA method , tube method and Tissue culture plate method . RESULTS: Of the 46 culture positive cases out of 63 , most common isolate was Staphylococcus aureus 30 ( 65 . 21% followed by Coagulase negative Staphy lococcus 4 ( 8 . 69% , Escherichia coli 4 ( 8 . 69% , Klebsiella species 3 ( 6 . 52% , Pseudomonas species 3 ( 6 . 52% , enterococcus species 2 ( 4 . 32% . 13 . 33% of S . aureus was Methicillin resistant ( MRSA , 100% of gram negative bacilli were ESBL and AmpC producers , 27 . 27% of gram negative bacilli were resistant to Imepenem and Meropenem , 1 vancomycin resistant enterococci was isolated . 72% of the isolates were biofilm producers by Congo Red Agar method , 76% by Tube method , and 84% by tissue culture plate m ethod . CONCLUSIONS : Staphylococcus aureus ( MSSA is the most common organism causing orthopedic implant site infection . Gram negative isolates exhibit multidrug resistance patterns . Significant numbers of isolates causing implant infections are biofilm pro ducers . Antibiotic

  10. A putative ABC transporter is involved in negative regulation of biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xinna; Long, Fei; Chen, Yonghui;

    2008-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes may persist for long periods in food processing environments. In some instances, this may be due to aggregation or biofilm formation. To investigate the mechanism controlling biofilm formation in the food-borne pathogen L. monocytogenes, we characterized LM-49, a mutant...... with enhanced ability of biofilm-formation generated via transposon Tn917 mutagenesis of L. monocytogenes 4b G. In this mutant, a Tn917 insertion has disrupted the coding region of the gene encoding a putative ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter permease identical to Lmof2365_1771 (a putative ABC...... the same amount of biofilm biomass as the wild-type strain. Furthermore, transcription of the downstream lm.G_1770 was not influenced by the upstream Tn917 insertion, and the presence of Tn917 has no effect on biofilm formation. These results suggest that lm.G_1771 was solely responsible for the negative...

  11. Candidate Targets for New Anti-Virulence Drugs: Selected Cases of Bacterial Adhesion and Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Hancock, Viktoria; Kvist, Malin;

    2007-01-01

    formation are highly attractive targets for new drugs. Specific adhesion provides bacteria with target selection and prevents removal by hydrodynamic flow forces. Bacterial adhesion is of paramount importance for bacterial pathogenesis. Adhesion is also the first step in biofilm formation. Biofilm formation...... is particularly problematic in medical contexts because biofilm-associated bacteria are particularly hard to eradicate. Several promising candidate drugs that target bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are being developed. Some of these might be valuable weapons for fighting infectious diseases in the future......Management of bacterial infections is becoming increasingly difficult due to the rising frequency of strains that are resistant to many current antibiotics. New types of antibiotics are, therefore, urgently needed. Virulence factors or virulence-associated phenotypes such as adhesins and biofilm...

  12. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type III Translocon Is Required for Biofilm Formation at the Epithelial Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Cindy S; Rangel, Stephanie M; Almblad, Henrik;

    2014-01-01

    Clinical infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a deadly Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen of immunocompromised hosts, often involve the formation of antibiotic-resistant biofilms. Although biofilm formation has been extensively studied in vitro on glass or plastic surfaces, much less is known...... about biofilm formation at the epithelial barrier. We have previously shown that when added to the apical surface of polarized epithelial cells, P. aeruginosa rapidly forms cell-associated aggregates within 60 minutes of infection. By confocal microscopy we now show that cell-associated aggregates...... a previously unappreciated function for the type III translocon in the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms at the epithelial barrier and demonstrate that biofilms may form at early time points of infection....

  13. Biofilm Formation and Detachment in Gram-Negative Pathogens Is Modulated by Select Bile Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez, Laura M.; Cheng, Andrew T.; Warner, Christopher J. A.; Loni Townsley; Peach, Kelly C.; Gabriel Navarro; Nicholas J Shikuma; Bray, Walter M.; Riener, Romina M.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.; Linington, Roger G.

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are a ubiquitous feature of microbial community structure in both natural and host environments; they enhance transmission and infectivity of pathogens and provide protection from human defense mechanisms and antibiotics. However, few natural products are known that impact biofilm formation or persistence for either environmental or pathogenic bacteria. Using the combination of a novel natural products library from the fish microbiome and an image-based screen for biofilm inhibition,...

  14. Effect of Cinnamon Oil on icaA Expression and Biofilm Formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Nuryastuti, Titik; van der Mei, Henny C.; Henk J Busscher; Iravati, Susi; Aman, Abu T.; Krom, Bastiaan P.

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is notorious for its biofilm formation on medical devices, and novel approaches to prevent and kill S. epidermidis biofilms are desired. In this study, the effect of cinnamon oil on planktonic and biofilm cultures of clinical S. epidermidis isolates was evaluated. Initially, susceptibility to cinnamon oil in planktonic cultures was compared to the commonly used antimicrobial agents chlorhexidine, triclosan, and gentamicin. The MIC of cinnamon oil, defined as the low...

  15. The Ciprofloxacin Impact on Biofilm Formation by Proteus Mirabilis and P. Vulgaris Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Kwiecinska-Pirog, Joanna; Skowron, Krzysztof; Bartczak, Wojciech; Gospodarek-Komkowska, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Background Proteus spp. bacilli belong to opportunistic human pathogens, which are primarily responsible for urinary tract and wound infections. An important virulence factor is their ability to form biofilms that greatly reduce the effectiveness of antibiotics in the site of infection. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the value of the minimum concentration of ciprofloxacin that eradicates a biofilm of Proteus spp. strains. Materials and Methods A biofilm formation of 20 stra...

  16. Interspecies interactions result in enhanced biofilm formation by co-cultures of bacteria isolated from a food processing environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Raghupathi, Prem Krishnan; Herschend, Jakob;

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial attachment and biofilm formation can lead to poor hygienic conditions in food processing environments. Furthermore, interactions between different bacteria may induce or promote biofilm formation. In this study, we isolated and identified a total of 687 bacterial strains from seven...... different locations in a meat processing environment and evaluated their biofilm formation capability. A diverse group of bacteria was isolated and most were classified as poor biofilm producers in a Calgary biofilm device assay. Isolates from two sampling sites, the wall and the meat chopper, were further......-culture biofilm production with high relevance for food safety and food production facilities....

  17. Protein-based biofilm matrices in Staphylococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro eSpeziale

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are the most important etiological agents of biofilm associated-infections on indwelling medical devices. Biofilm infections may also develop independently of indwelling devices, e.g. in native valve endocarditis, bone tissue and open wounds. After attachment to tissue or indwelling medical devices that have been conditioned with host plasma proteins, staphylococcal biofilms grow and produce a specific environment which provides the conditions for cell-cell interaction and formation of multicellular communities. Bacteria living in biofilms express a variety of macromolecules, including exopolysaccharides, proteins, extracellular eDNA and other polymers. The S. aureus surface protein C and G (SasC and SasG, clumping factor B (ClfB, serine aspartate repeat protein (SdrC, the biofilm-associated protein (Bap and the fibronectin/fibrinogen-binding proteins (FnBPA and FnBPB are individually implicated in biofilm matrix formation. In S. epidermidis, a protein named accumulation-associated protein (Aap contributes to both the primary attachment phase and the establishment of intercellular connections by forming fibrils on the cell surface. In S. epidermidis proteinaceous biofilm formation can also be mediated by the extracellular matrix binding protein (Embp and S. epidermidis surface protein C (SesC. Additionally, multifunctional proteins such as extracellular adherence protein (Eap and extracellular matrix protein binding protein (Emp of S. aureus and the iron-regulated surface determinant protein C (IsdC of S. lugdunensis can promote biofilm formation in iron-depleted conditions. This multitude of proteins intervene at different stages of biofilm formation with certain proteins contributing to biofilm accumulation and others mediating primary attachment to surfaces. This review examines the contribution of proteins to biofilm formation in staphylococci. The potential to develop vaccines to prevent

  18. Biofilm formation of Salmonella serotypes in simulated meat processing environments and its relationship to cell characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huhu; Ding, Shijie; Dong, Yang; Ye, Keping; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2013-10-01

    Salmonella attached to meat contact surfaces encountered in meat processing facilities may serve as a source of cross-contamination. In this study, the influence of serotypes and media on biofilm formation of Salmonella was investigated in a simulated meat processing environment, and the relationships between biofilm formation and cell characteristics were also determined. All six serotypes (Salmonella enterica serotype Heidelberg, Salmonella Derby, Salmonella Agona, Salmonella Indiana, Salmonella Infantis, and Salmonella Typhimurium) can readily form biofilms on stainless steel surfaces, and the amounts of biofilms were significantly influenced by the serotypes, incubation media, and incubation time used in this study. Significant differences in cell surface hydrophobicity, autoaggregation, motility, and growth kinetic parameters were observed between individual serotypes tested. Except for growth kinetic parameters, the cell characteristics were correlated with the ability of biofilm formation incubated in tryptic soy broth, whereas no correlation with biofilm formation incubated in meat thawing-loss broth (an actual meat substrate) was found. Salmonella grown in meat thawing-loss broth showed a "cloud-shaped" morphology in the mature biofilm, whereas when grown in tryptic soy broth it had a "reticulum-shaped" appearance. Our study provides some practical information to understand the process of biofilm formation on meat processing contact surfaces.

  19. Role of flgA for Flagellar Biosynthesis and Biofilm Formation of Campylobacter jejuni NCTC11168.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo-Sung; Park, Changwon; Kim, Yun-Ji

    2015-11-01

    The complex roles of flagella in the pathogenesis of Campylobacter jejuni, a major cause of worldwide foodborne diarrheal disease, are important. Compared with the wild-type, an insertional mutation of the flgA gene (cj0769c) demonstrated significant decrease in the biofilm formation of C. jejuni NCTC11168 on major food contact surfaces, such as polystyrene, stainless steel, and borosilicate glass. The flgA mutant was completely devoid of flagella and non-motile whereas the wild-type displayed the full-length flagella and motility. In addition, the biofilm formation of the wild-type was inversely dependent on the viscosity of the media. These results support that flagellar-mediated motility plays a significant role in the biofilm formation of C. jejuni NCTC11168. Moreover, our adhesion assay suggests that it plays an important role during biofilm maturation after initial attachment. Furthermore, C. jejuni NCTC11168 wild-type formed biofilm with a net-like structure of extracellular fiber-like material, but such a structure was significantly reduced in the biofilm of the flgA mutant. It supports that the extracellular fiber-like material may play a significant role in the biofilm formation of C. jejuni. This study demonstrated that flgA is essential for flagellar biosynthesis and motility, and plays a significant role in the biofilm formation of C. jejuni NCTC11168.

  20. In Vivo Monitoring of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Infections and Antimicrobial Therapy by [18F]Fluoro-Deoxyglucose–MicroPET in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Victoria; Collantes, María; Barberán, Montserrat; Peñuelas, Iván; Arbizu, Javier; Amorena, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    A mouse model was developed for in vivo monitoring of infection and the effect of antimicrobial treatment against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, using the [18F]fluoro-deoxyglucose–MicroPET ([18F]FDG-MicroPET) image technique. In the model, sealed Vialon catheters were briefly precolonized with S. aureus strains ATCC 15981 or V329, which differ in cytotoxic properties and biofilm matrix composition. After subcutaneous implantation of catheters in mice, the S. aureus strain differences found in bacterial counts and the inflammatory reaction triggered were detected by the regular bacteriological and histological procedures and also by [18F]FDG-MicroPET image signal intensity determinations in the infection area and regional lymph node. Moreover, [18F]FDG-MicroPET imaging allowed the monitoring of the rifampin treatment effect, identifying the periods of controlled infection and those of reactivated infection due to the appearance of bacteria naturally resistant to rifampin. Overall, the mouse model developed may be useful for noninvasive in vivo determinations in studies on S. aureus biofilm infections and assessment of new therapeutic approaches. PMID:25155589

  1. In vivo monitoring of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm infections and antimicrobial therapy by [18F]fluoro-deoxyglucose-MicroPET in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Victoria; Collantes, María; Barberán, Montserrat; Peñuelas, Iván; Arbizu, Javier; Amorena, Beatriz; Grilló, María-Jesús

    2014-11-01

    A mouse model was developed for in vivo monitoring of infection and the effect of antimicrobial treatment against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, using the [(18)F]fluoro-deoxyglucose-MicroPET ([(18)F]FDG-MicroPET) image technique. In the model, sealed Vialon catheters were briefly precolonized with S. aureus strains ATCC 15981 or V329, which differ in cytotoxic properties and biofilm matrix composition. After subcutaneous implantation of catheters in mice, the S. aureus strain differences found in bacterial counts and the inflammatory reaction triggered were detected by the regular bacteriological and histological procedures and also by [(18)F]FDG-MicroPET image signal intensity determinations in the infection area and regional lymph node. Moreover, [(18)F]FDG-MicroPET imaging allowed the monitoring of the rifampin treatment effect, identifying the periods of controlled infection and those of reactivated infection due to the appearance of bacteria naturally resistant to rifampin. Overall, the mouse model developed may be useful for noninvasive in vivo determinations in studies on S. aureus biofilm infections and assessment of new therapeutic approaches. PMID:25155589

  2. Quorum-sensing regulates biofilm formation in Vibrio scophthalmi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Aljaro Cristina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a previous study, we demonstrated that Vibrio scophthalmi, the most abundant Vibrio species among the marine aerobic or facultatively anaerobic bacteria inhabiting the intestinal tract of healthy cultured turbot (Scophthalmus maximus, contains at least two quorum-sensing circuits involving two types of signal molecules (a 3-hydroxy-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone and the universal autoinducer 2 encoded by luxS. The purpose of this study was to investigate the functions regulated by these quorum sensing circuits in this vibrio by constructing mutants for the genes involved in these circuits. Results The presence of a homologue to the Vibrio harveyi luxR gene encoding a main transcriptional regulator, whose expression is modulated by quorum–sensing signal molecules in other vibrios, was detected and sequenced. The V. scophthalmi LuxR protein displayed a maximum amino acid identity of 82% with SmcR, the LuxR homologue found in Vibrio vulnificus. luxR and luxS null mutants were constructed and their phenotype analysed. Both mutants displayed reduced biofilm formation in vitro as well as differences in membrane protein expression by mass-spectrometry analysis. Additionally, a recombinant strain of V. scophthalmi carrying the lactonase AiiA from Bacillus cereus, which causes hydrolysis of acyl homoserine lactones, was included in the study. Conclusions V. scophthalmi shares two quorum sensing circuits, including the main transcriptional regulator luxR, with some pathogenic vibrios such as V. harveyi and V. anguillarum. However, contrary to these pathogenic vibrios no virulence factors (such as protease production were found to be quorum sensing regulated in this bacterium. Noteworthy, biofilm formation was altered in luxS and luxR mutants. In these mutants a different expression profile of membrane proteins were observed with respect to the wild type strain suggesting that quorum sensing could play a role in the regulation of

  3. Modeling and predicting the biofilm formation of Salmonella Virchow with respect to temperature and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariafar, M Nima; Buzrul, Sencer; Akçelik, Nefise

    2016-03-01

    Biofilm formation of Salmonella Virchow was monitored with respect to time at three different temperature (20, 25 and 27.5 °C) and pH (5.2, 5.9 and 6.6) values. As the temperature increased at a constant pH level, biofilm formation decreased while as the pH level increased at a constant temperature, biofilm formation increased. Modified Gompertz equation with high adjusted determination coefficient (Radj(2)) and low mean square error (MSE) values produced reasonable fits for the biofilm formation under all conditions. Parameters of the modified Gompertz equation could be described in terms of temperature and pH by use of a second order polynomial function. In general, as temperature increased maximum biofilm quantity, maximum biofilm formation rate and time of acceleration of biofilm formation decreased; whereas, as pH increased; maximum biofilm quantity, maximum biofilm formation rate and time of acceleration of biofilm formation increased. Two temperature (23 and 26 °C) and pH (5.3 and 6.3) values were used up to 24 h to predict the biofilm formation of S. Virchow. Although the predictions did not perfectly match with the data, reasonable estimates were obtained. In principle, modeling and predicting the biofilm formation of different microorganisms on different surfaces under various conditions could be possible.

  4. Effects of short-chain fatty acids on Actinomyces naeslundii biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, S; Kawarai, T; Narisawa, N; Tuna, E B; Sato, N; Tsugane, T; Saeki, Y; Ochiai, K; Senpuku, H

    2013-10-01

    Actinomyces naeslundii is an early colonizer and has important roles in the development of the oral biofilm. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) are secreted extracellularly as a product of metabolism by gram-negative anaerobes, e.g. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum; and the SCFA may affect biofilm development with interaction between A. naeslundii and gram-negative bacteria. Our aim was to investigate the effects of SCFA on biofilm formation by A. naeslundii and to determine the mechanism. We used the biofilm formation assay in 96-well microtiter plates in tryptic soy broth without dextrose and with 0.25% sucrose using safranin stain of the biofilm monitoring 492 nm absorbance. To determine the mechanism by SCFA, the production of chaperones and stress-response proteins (GrpE and GroEL) in biofilm formation was examined using Western blot fluorescence activity with GrpE and GroEL antibodies. Adding butyric acid (6.25 mm) 0, 6 and 10 h after beginning culture significantly increased biofilm formation by A. naeslundii, and upregulation was observed at 16 h. Upregulation was also observed using appropriate concentrations of other SCFA. In the upregulated biofilm, production of GrpE and GroEL was higher where membrane-damaged or dead cells were also observed. The upregulated biofilm was significantly reduced by addition of anti-GroEL antibody. The data suggest biofilm formation by A. naeslundii was upregulated dependent on the production of stress proteins, and addition of SCFA increased membrane-damaged or dead cells. Production of GroEL may physically play an important role in biofilm development. PMID:23731652

  5. Relationship of biofilm formation and different virulence genes in uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolates from Northwest Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fattahi, Sargol

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: The ( bacterium is one of the main causative agents of urinary tract infections (UTI worldwide. The ability of this bacterium to form biofilms on medical devices such as catheters plays an important role in the development of UTI. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible relationship between virulence factors and biofilm formation of isolates responsible for urinary tract infection.Materials and methods: A total of 100 isolates isolated from patients with UTI were collected and characterized by routine bacteriological methods. In vitro biofilm formation by these isolates was determined using the 96-well microtiter-plate test, and the presence of , , and virulence genes was examined by PCR assay. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 16.0 software.Results: From 100 isolates isolated from UTIs, 92% were shown to be biofilm positive. The genes , , and were detected in 43%, 94% and 26% of isolates, respectively. Biofilm formation in isolates that expressed , , and genes was 100%, 93%, and 100%, respectively. A significant relationship was found between presence of the gene and biofilm formation in isolates isolated from UTI (<0.01, but there was no statistically significant correlation between presence of and genes with biofilm formation (<0.072, <0.104. Conclusion: Results showed that and genes do not seem to be necessary or sufficient for the production of biofilm in , but the presence of correlates with increased biofilm formation of urinary tract isolates. Overall, the presence of , , and virulence genes coincides with in vitro biofilm formation in uropathogenic

  6. New insights on molecular regulation of biofilm formation in plant-associated bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luisa F. Castiblanco; George W. Sundin

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms are complex bacterial assemblages with a defined three-dimensional architecture, attached to solid surfaces, and surrounded by a self-produced matrix generally composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, lipids and extrac-ellular DNA. Biofilm formation has evolved as an adaptive strategy of bacteria to cope with harsh environmental conditions as well as to establish antagonistic or beneficial interactions with their host. Plant-associated bacteria attach and form biofilms on different tissues including leaves, stems, vasculature, seeds and roots. In this review, we examine the formation of biofilms from the plant-associated bacterial perspective and detail the recently-described mechanisms of genetic regulation used by these organisms to orchestrate biofilm formation on plant surfaces. In addition, we describe plant host signals that bacterial pathogens recognize to activate the transition from a planktonic lifestyle to multi-cellular behavior.

  7. Dynamics of biofilm formation in a model drinking water distribution system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boe-Hansen, Rasmus; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Arvin, Erik;

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics of biofilm formation in non-chlorinated groundwater-based drinking water was studied in a model distribution system. The formation of biofilm was closely monitored for a period of 522 days by total bacterial counts (AODC), heterotrophic plate counts (R2A media), and ATP content...... determinations. The biofilm grew at a rate of 0.030±0.002 day−1 reaching quasi-stationary state at 2.6×106 cells/cm2 after approximately 200 days. The low substrate level in the bulk phase (AOC at approximately 6 g ac-C/l) most likely caused the relatively slow biofilm formation rate observed. During...... the maturation of the biofilm, the bacterial community changed properties in terms of cell-specific ATP content and culturability of the bacteria....

  8. Biofilm formation in long-term central venous catheters in children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Fuursted, Kurt; Funch, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    Taurolidine has demonstrated inhibition of biofilm formation in vitro. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of catheter locking with taurolidine vs heparin in biofilm formation in central venous catheters. Forty-eight children with cancer were randomized to catheter locking by heparin (n...... = 22) or taurolidine (n = 26), respectively. After removal, catheters were examined by standardized scanning electron microscopy to assess quantitative biofilm formation. Biofilm was present if morphologically typical structures and bacterial cells were identified. Quantitative and semi......-quantitative cultures were also performed. Biofilm was identified in 23 of 26 catheters from the taurolidine group and 21 of 22 catheters from the heparin group. A positive culture was made of six of the catheters locked with taurolidine and heparin, respectively (p = 0.78). The rate of catheter-related bloodstream...

  9. In vitro study of biofilm formation and effectiveness of antimicrobial treatment on various dental material surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Finnegan, M B; Özkan, S; Kim, Y; Lillehoj, P B; Ho, C-M; Lux, R; Mito, R; Loewy, Z; Shi, W

    2010-12-01

    Elevated proportions of Candida albicans in biofilms formed on dentures are associated with stomatitis whereas Streptococcus mutans accumulation on restorative materials can cause secondary caries. Candida albicans, S. mutans, saliva-derived and C. albicans/saliva-derived mixed biofilms were grown on different materials including acrylic denture, porcelain, hydroxyapatite (HA), and polystyrene. The resulting biomass was analysed by three-dimensional image quantification and assessment of colony-forming units. The efficacy of biofilm treatment with a dissolved denture cleansing tablet (Polident(®)) was also evaluated by colony counting. Biofilms formed on HA exhibited the most striking differences in biomass accumulation: biofilms comprising salivary bacteria accrued the highest total biomass whereas C. albicans biofilm formation was greatly reduced on the HA surface compared with other materials, including the acrylic denture surface. These results substantiate clinical findings that acrylic dentures can comprise a reservoir for C. albicans, which renders patients more susceptible to C. albicans infections and stomatitis. Additionally, treatment efficacy of the same type of biofilms varied significantly depending on the surface. Although single-species biofilms formed on polystyrene surfaces exhibited the highest susceptibility to the treatment, the most surviving cells were recovered from HA surfaces for all types of biofilms tested. This study demonstrates that the nature of a surface influences biofilm characteristics including biomass accumulation and susceptibility to antimicrobial treatments. Such treatments should therefore be evaluated on the surfaces colonized by the target pathogen(s).

  10. Effect of biofilm formation on virulence factor secretion via the general secretory pathway in Streptococcus mutans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, M.; Meng, L.; Fan, M.; Hu, P.; Bian, Z.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the role of SecA in protein secretion, and to evaluate the effect of biofilm formation on protein secretion in Streptococcus mutans. DESIGN: S. mutans strains UA159 and GS-5 were used in this study. Cells grown in biofilm and planktonic conditions were observed using immun

  11. Assessment of biofilm formation in device-associated clinical bacterial isolates in a tertiary level hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summaiya A Mulla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biofilm formation is a developmental process with intercellular signals that regulate growth. Biofilms contaminate catheters, ventilators, and medical implants; they act as a source of disease for humans, animals, and plants. Aim: In this study we have done quantitative assessment of biofilm formation in device-associated clinical bacterial isolates in response to various concentrations of glucose in tryptic soya broth and with different incubation time. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out on 100 positive bacteriological cultures of medical devices, which were inserted in hospitalized patients. The bacterial isolates were processed as per microtitre plate method with tryptic soya broth alone and with varying concentrations of glucose and were observed in response to time. Results: Majority of catheter cultures were positive. Out of the total 100 bacterial isolates tested, 88 of them were biofilm formers. Incubation period of 16-20 h was found to be optimum for biofilm development. Conclusions: Availability of nutrition in the form of glucose enhances the biofilm formation by bacteria. Biofilm formation depends on adherence of bacteria to various surfaces. Time and availability of glucose are important factors for assessment of biofilm progress.

  12. Spectrum of bacteria associated with diabetic foot ulcer and biofilm formation: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asima Banu

    2015-09-01

    The organisms causing chronic diabetic foot ulcers were commonly multidrug-resistant; this was also observed among biofilm formers. Therefore, screening for biofilm formation, along with the usual antibiogram, needs to be performed as a routine procedure in chronic diabetic ulcers to formulate effective treatment strategies for these patients.

  13. Biofilm formation and Candida albicans morphology on the surface of denture base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susewind, Sabine; Lang, Reinhold; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    Fungal biofilms may contribute to the occurrence of denture stomatitis. The objective of the study was to investigate the biofilm formation and morphology of Candida albicans in biofilms on the surface of denture base materials. Specimens were prepared from different denture base materials. After determination of surface properties and salivary pellicle formation, mono- and multispecies biofilm formation including Candida albicans ATCC 10231 was initiated. Relative amounts of adherent cells were determined after 20, 44, 68 and 188 h; C. albicans morphology was analysed employing selective fluorescence microscopic analysis. Significant differences were identified in the relative amount of cells adherent to the denture base materials. Highest blastospore/hyphae index suggesting an increased percentage of hyphae was observed in mono- and multispecies biofilms on the soft denture liner, which did not necessarily respond to the highest relative amount of adherent cells. For both biofilm models, lowest relative amount of adherent cells was identified on the methacrylate-based denture base material, which did not necessarily relate to a significantly lower blastospore/hyphae index. The results indicate that there are significant differences in both biofilm formation as well as the morphology of C. albicans cells in biofilms on the surface of different denture base materials.

  14. Air-liquid interface biofilms of Bacillus cereus: formation, sporulation, and dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijman, J.G.E.; Leeuw, de P.P.L.A.; Moezelaar, R.; Zwietering, M.H.; Abee, T.

    2007-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Bacillus cereus was assessed using 56 strains of B. cereus, including the two sequenced strains, ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10987. Biofilm production in microtiter plates was found to be strongly dependent on incubation time, temperature, and medium, as well as the strain used, with so

  15. The Effect of Carbon Source and Fluoride Concentrations in the "Streptococcus Mutans" Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, Tony P.; Andrade, Ricardo O.; Bruschi-Thedei, Giuliana C. M.; Thedei, Geraldo, Jr.; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this class experiment is to show the influence of carbon source and of different fluoride concentrations on the biofilm formation by the bacterium "Streptococcus mutans." The observation of different biofilm morphology as a function of carbon source and fluoride concentration allows an interesting discussion regarding the…

  16. Pyoverdine and PQS Mediated Subpopulation Interactions Involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Nilsson, Martin; Gjermansen, Morten;

    2009-01-01

    Using flow chamber-grown Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms as model system, we show in the present study that formation of heterogeneous biofilms may occur through mechanisms that involve complex subpopulation interactions. One example of this phenomenon is expression of the iron...

  17. Colistin-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Strains with Deficient Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafopoulou, Konstantina; Xavier, Basil Britto; Hotterbeekx, An; Janssens, Lore; Lammens, Christine; Dé, Emmanuelle; Goossens, Herman; Tsakris, Athanasios; Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi

    2015-01-01

    In two pairs of clinical colistin-susceptible/colistin-resistant (Csts/Cstr) Acinetobacter baumannii strains, the Cstr strains showed significantly decreased biofilm formation in static and dynamic assays (P Cstr strain and a frameshift mutation in CarO and the loss of a 47,969-bp element containing multiple genes associated with biofilm production in the other. PMID:26666921

  18. Biofilm formation and design features of indwelling silicone rubber tracheoesophageal voice prostheses - An electron microscopical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leunisse, C; van Weissenbruch, R; Busscher, HJ; van der Mei, HC; Dijk, F; Albers, FWJ

    2001-01-01

    After total laryngectomy, voice can be restored with a silicone rubber tracheoesophageal voice prosthesis. However, biofilm formation and subsequent deterioration of the silicone material of the prosthesis will limit device life by impairing valve function. To simulate the natural process of biofilm

  19. Orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances and biofilm formation-a potential public health threat?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, Yijin; Jongsma, Marije A.; Mei, Li; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Orthodontic treatment is highly popular for restoring functional and facial esthetics in juveniles and adults. As a downside, prevalence of biofilm-related complications is high. Objectives of this review are to (1) identify special features of biofilm formation in orthodontic patients a

  20. MPC-polymer reduces adherence and biofilm formation by oral bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, K; Yumoto, H; Miyamoto, K; Yamamoto, N; Murakami, K; Hoshino, Y; Matsuo, T; Miyake, Y

    2011-07-01

    Oral biofilms such as dental plaque cause dental caries and periodontitis, as well as aspiration pneumonia and infectious endocarditis by translocation. Hence, the suppression of oral biofilm formation is an issue of considerable importance. Mechanical removal, disinfectants, inhibition of polysaccharide formation, and artificial sugar have been used for the reduction of oral biofilm. From the viewpoint of the inhibition of bacterial adherence, we investigated whether aqueous biocompatible 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)-polymer can reduce streptococcal colonization and biofilm formation. We examined the effects of MPC-polymer on streptococcal adherence to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite and oral epithelial cells, and the adherence of Fusobacterium nucleatum to streptococcal biofilm. MPC-polymer application markedly inhibited both the adherence and biofilm formation of Streptococcus mutans on saliva-coated hydroxyapatite and streptococcal adherence to oral epithelial cells, and reduced the adherence of F. nucleatum to streptococcal biofilms. A small-scale clinical trial revealed that mouthrinsing with MPC-polymer inhibited the increase of oral bacterial numbers, especially of S. mutans. These findings suggest that MPC-polymer is a potent inhibitor of bacterial adherence and biofilm development, and may be useful to prevent dental-plaque-related diseases. (UMIN Clinical Trial Registry UMIN000003471).

  1. Inhibition of Salmonella enterica biofilm formation using small-molecule adenosine mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Jacob A; Marshall, Joanna M; Bhatiya, Aditi; Eguale, Tadesse; Kwiek, Jesse J; Gunn, John S

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms have been widely implicated in chronic infections and environmental persistence of Salmonella enterica, facilitating enhanced colonization of surfaces and increasing the ability of the bacteria to be transmitted to new hosts. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi biofilm formation on gallstones from humans and mice enhances gallbladder colonization and bacterial shedding, while Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium biofilms facilitate long-term persistence in a number of environments important to food, medical, and farming industries. Salmonella regulates expression of many virulence- and biofilm-related processes using kinase-driven pathways. Kinases play pivotal roles in phosphorylation and energy transfer in cellular processes and possess an ATP-binding pocket required for their functions. Many other cellular proteins also require ATP for their activity. Here we test the hypothesis that pharmacological interference with ATP-requiring enzymes utilizing adenosine mimetic compounds would decrease or inhibit bacterial biofilm formation. Through the screening of a 3,000-member ATP mimetic library, we identified a single compound (compound 7955004) capable of significantly reducing biofilm formation by S. Typhimurium and S. Typhi. The compound was not bactericidal or bacteriostatic toward S. Typhimurium or cytotoxic to mammalian cells. An ATP-Sepharose affinity matrix technique was used to discover potential protein-binding targets of the compound and identified GroEL and DeoD. Compound 7955004 was screened against other known biofilm-forming bacterial species and was found to potently inhibit biofilms of Acinetobacter baumannii as well. The identification of a lead compound with biofilm-inhibiting capabilities toward Salmonella provides a potential new avenue of therapeutic intervention against Salmonella biofilm formation, with applicability to biofilms of other bacterial pathogens.

  2. Disturbance of the bacterial cell wall specifically interferes with biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Tabitha; Oppenheimer-Shaanan, Yaara; Savidor, Alon; Bloom-Ackermann, Zohar; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana

    2015-12-01

    In nature, bacteria communicate via chemical cues and establish complex communities referred to as biofilms, wherein cells are held together by an extracellular matrix. Much research is focusing on small molecules that manipulate and prevent biofilm assembly by modifying cellular signalling pathways. However, the bacterial cell envelope, presenting the interface between bacterial cells and their surroundings, is largely overlooked. In our study, we identified specific targets within the biosynthesis pathways of the different cell wall components (peptidoglycan, wall teichoic acids and teichuronic acids) hampering biofilm formation and the anchoring of the extracellular matrix with a minimal effect on planktonic growth. In addition, we provide convincing evidence that biofilm hampering by transglycosylation inhibitors and D-Leucine triggers a highly specific response without changing the overall protein levels within the biofilm cells or the overall levels of the extracellular matrix components. The presented results emphasize the central role of the Gram-positive cell wall in biofilm development, resistance and sustainment. PMID:26472159

  3. Disturbance of the bacterial cell wall specifically interferes with biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Tabitha; Oppenheimer-Shaanan, Yaara; Savidor, Alon; Bloom-Ackermann, Zohar; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana

    2015-12-01

    In nature, bacteria communicate via chemical cues and establish complex communities referred to as biofilms, wherein cells are held together by an extracellular matrix. Much research is focusing on small molecules that manipulate and prevent biofilm assembly by modifying cellular signalling pathways. However, the bacterial cell envelope, presenting the interface between bacterial cells and their surroundings, is largely overlooked. In our study, we identified specific targets within the biosynthesis pathways of the different cell wall components (peptidoglycan, wall teichoic acids and teichuronic acids) hampering biofilm formation and the anchoring of the extracellular matrix with a minimal effect on planktonic growth. In addition, we provide convincing evidence that biofilm hampering by transglycosylation inhibitors and D-Leucine triggers a highly specific response without changing the overall protein levels within the biofilm cells or the overall levels of the extracellular matrix components. The presented results emphasize the central role of the Gram-positive cell wall in biofilm development, resistance and sustainment.

  4. Numerical simulation of wrinkle morphology formation and the evolution of different Bacillus subtilis biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Hao, Mudong; Wang, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Wrinkle morphology is a distinctive phenomenon observed in mature biofilms that are produced by a great number of bacteria. The wrinkle pattern depends on the mechanical properties of the agar substrate and the biofilm itself, governed by the extracellular matrix (ECM). Here we study the macroscopic structures and the evolution of Bacillus subtilis biofilm wrinkles using the commercial finite element software ABAQUS. A mechanical model and simulation are set up to analyze and evaluate bacteria biofilm's wrinkle characteristics. We uncover the wrinkle formation mechanism and enumerate the quantitative relationship between wrinkle structure and mechanical properties of biofilm and its substrate. Our work can be used to modify the wrinkle pattern and control the biofilm size. PMID:26877034

  5. Staphylococcus epidermidis: metabolic adaptation and biofilm formation in response to different oxygen concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe-Alvarez, Cristina; Chiquete-Félix, Natalia; Contreras-Zentella, Martha; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Peña, Antonio; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis has become a major health hazard. It is necessary to study its metabolism and hopefully uncover therapeutic targets. Cultivating S. epidermidis at increasing oxygen concentration [O2] enhanced growth, while inhibiting biofilm formation. Respiratory oxidoreductases were differentially expressed, probably to prevent reactive oxygen species formation. Under aerobiosis, S. epidermidis expressed high oxidoreductase activities, including glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, ethanol dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase, as well as cytochromes bo and aa3; while little tendency to form biofilms was observed. Under microaerobiosis, pyruvate dehydrogenase and ethanol dehydrogenase decreased while glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase nearly disappeared; cytochrome bo was present; anaerobic nitrate reductase activity was observed; biofilm formation increased slightly. Under anaerobiosis, biofilms grew; low ethanol dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase and cytochrome bo were still present; nitrate dehydrogenase was the main terminal electron acceptor. KCN inhibited the aerobic respiratory chain and increased biofilm formation. In contrast, methylamine inhibited both nitrate reductase and biofilm formation. The correlation between the expression and/or activity or redox enzymes and biofilm-formation activities suggests that these are possible therapeutic targets to erradicate S. epidermidis.

  6. Fibrinogen-Induced Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Formation and Adherence to Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Blanca Lombardo Bedran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus mutans, the predominant bacterial species associated with dental caries, can enter the bloodstream and cause infective endocarditis. The aim of this study was to investigate S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells induced by human fibrinogen. The putative mechanism by which biofilm formation is induced as well as the impact of fibrinogen on S. mutans resistance to penicillin was also evaluated. Bovine plasma dose dependently induced biofilm formation by S. mutans. Of the various plasma proteins tested, only fibrinogen promoted the formation of biofilm in a dose-dependent manner. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed the presence of complex aggregates of bacterial cells firmly attached to the polystyrene support. S. mutans in biofilms induced by the presence of fibrinogen was markedly resistant to the bactericidal effect of penicillin. Fibrinogen also significantly increased the adherence of S. mutans to endothelial cells. Neither S. mutans cells nor culture supernatants converted fibrinogen into fibrin. However, fibrinogen is specifically bound to the cell surface of S. mutans and may act as a bridging molecule to mediate biofilm formation. In conclusion, our study identified a new mechanism promoting S. mutans biofilm formation and adherence to endothelial cells which may contribute to infective endocarditis.

  7. Levorotatory carbohydrates and xylitol subdue Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Eugenio; Ionescu, Andrei C; Cazzaniga, Gloria; Ottobelli, Marco; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Dietary carbohydrates and polyols affect the microbial colonization of oral surfaces by modulating adhesion and biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a select group of l-carbohydrates and polyols on either Streptococcus mutans or Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation in vitro. S. mutans or C. albicans suspensions were inoculated on polystyrene substrata in the presence of Tryptic soy broth containing 5% of the following compounds: d-glucose, d-mannose, l-glucose, l-mannose, d- and l-glucose (raceme), d- and l-mannose (raceme), l-glucose and l-mannose, sorbitol, mannitol, and xylitol. Microbial adhesion (2 h) and biofilm formation (24 h) were evaluated using MTT-test and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Xylitol and l-carbohydrates induced the lowest adhesion and biofilm formation in both the tested species, while sorbitol and mannitol did not promote C. albicans biofilm formation. Higher adhesion and biofilm formation was noted in both organisms in the presence of d-carbohydrates relative to their l-carbohydrate counterparts. These results elucidate, hitherto undescribed, interactions of the individually tested strains with l- and d-carbohydrates, and how they impact fungal and bacterial colonization. In translational terms, our data raise the possibility of using l-form of carbohydrates and xylitol for dietary control of oral plaque biofilms. PMID:26456320

  8. Levorotatory carbohydrates and xylitol subdue Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Eugenio; Ionescu, Andrei C; Cazzaniga, Gloria; Ottobelli, Marco; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Dietary carbohydrates and polyols affect the microbial colonization of oral surfaces by modulating adhesion and biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a select group of l-carbohydrates and polyols on either Streptococcus mutans or Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation in vitro. S. mutans or C. albicans suspensions were inoculated on polystyrene substrata in the presence of Tryptic soy broth containing 5% of the following compounds: d-glucose, d-mannose, l-glucose, l-mannose, d- and l-glucose (raceme), d- and l-mannose (raceme), l-glucose and l-mannose, sorbitol, mannitol, and xylitol. Microbial adhesion (2 h) and biofilm formation (24 h) were evaluated using MTT-test and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Xylitol and l-carbohydrates induced the lowest adhesion and biofilm formation in both the tested species, while sorbitol and mannitol did not promote C. albicans biofilm formation. Higher adhesion and biofilm formation was noted in both organisms in the presence of d-carbohydrates relative to their l-carbohydrate counterparts. These results elucidate, hitherto undescribed, interactions of the individually tested strains with l- and d-carbohydrates, and how they impact fungal and bacterial colonization. In translational terms, our data raise the possibility of using l-form of carbohydrates and xylitol for dietary control of oral plaque biofilms.

  9. PCR analysis of clinically isolated Staphylococcus aureus biofilm associated gene%临床分离金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜相关基因的PCR分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙凤军; 枉前; 夏培元

    2009-01-01

    目的 确定临床分离的金黄色葡萄球菌生物膜形成能力和生物膜相关基因之间的关系,为生物膜形成的机制研究提供依据.方法 96孔板番红染色法检测生物膜的形成,icaAD、icaBC、sar、agr和sigB的PCR扩增,并对产物进行测序和同源性比较.结果 27株金黄色葡萄球菌中共有17株形成了肉眼可见的生物膜,其中以X387和X409两株最明显;有22株扩增出icaAD和icaBC,全部菌株扩增出sar、agr和sigB.结论 ica是形成金葡菌生物膜的关键基因,但ica在形成生物膜过程中需要其他基因的协同作用.%Objective To investigate the correlation of biofilm forming ability with biofilm associated gene of the clinically isolated Staphylococcus aureus for providing basis for the further studies of the mechanisms of biofilm formation. Methods Safranine staining was conducted for the detection of the forming ability of biofilm in 96-well plates, icaAD, icaBC, sar, agr and sigB was amplified by PCR. Results Formation of biofilm could be found macroscopically in 17 out of 27 strains, especially to X387 and X409. icaAD and icaBC were amplified in 22 isolates and sar, agr and sigB in all 27 S. anreus strains. Conclusion ica operon is the key gene for biofilm formation but cooperative action of other genes is needed during the process of biofilm formation.

  10. Comparative Efficacies of Tedizolid Phosphate, Linezolid, and Vancomycin in a Murine Model of Subcutaneous Catheter-Related Biofilm Infection Due to Methicillin-Susceptible and -Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Arnold S; Abdelhady, Wessam; Li, Liang; Gonzales, Rachelle; Xiong, Yan Q

    2016-08-01

    Tedizolid, a novel oxazolidinone, exhibits bacteriostatic activity through inhibition of protein synthesis. The efficacies of tedizolid, linezolid, and vancomycin were compared in a murine catheter-related biofilm infection caused by methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA, respectively) strains engineered for bioluminescence. We observed significantly improved efficacy in terms of decreased S. aureus densities and bioluminescent signals in the tedizolid-treated group versus the linezolid- and vancomycin-treated groups in the model of infection caused by the MSSA and MRSA strains. PMID:27297485

  11. Biofilm formation of Clostridium perfringens and its exposure to low-dose antimicrobials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey eCharlebois

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause food poisoning in humans and various enterotoxemia in animal species. Very little is known on the biofilm of C. perfringens and its exposure to subminimal inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobials. This study was undertaken to address these issues. Most of the C. perfringens human and animal isolates tested in this study were able to form biofilm (230/277. Porcine clinical isolates formed significantly more biofilm than the porcine commensal isolates. A subgroup of clinical and commensal C. perfringens isolates was randomly selected for further characterization. Biofilm was found to protect C. perfringens bacterial cells from exposure to high concentrations of tested antimicrobials. Exposure to low doses of some of these antimicrobials tended to lead to a diminution of the biofilm formed. However, a few isolates showed an increase in biofilm formation when exposed to low doses of tylosin, bacitracin, virginiamycin and monensin. Six isolates were randomly selected for biofilm analysis using scanning laser confocal microscopy. Of those, four produced more biofilm in presence of low doses of bacitracin whereas biofilms formed without bacitracin were thinner and less elevated. An increase in the area occupied by bacteria in the biofilm following exposure to low doses of bacitracin was also observed in the majority of isolates. Morphology examination revealed flat biofilms with the exception of one isolate that demonstrated a mushroom-like biofilm. Matrix composition analysis showed the presence of proteins, beta 1-4 linked polysaccharides and extracellular DNA, but no poly-beta-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (PNAG. This study brings new information on the biofilm produced by C. perfringens and its exposure to low doses of antimicrobials.

  12. Biofilm formation is not a prerequisite for production of the antibacterial compound tropodithietic acid in Phaeobacter inhibens DSM17395

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prol García, María Jesús; D'Alvise, Paul; Rygaard, Anita Mac;

    2014-01-01

    ) mutants with increased biofilm formation or adhesion were selected. None of the selected biofilm-overproducing white mutants showed any antibiotic activity, while all brown mutants with reduced or disabled biofilm formation produced the antibacterial compound. Sequencing analysis indicated that genes...

  13. The natural antimicrobial carvacrol inhibits quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum and reduces bacterial biofilm formation at sub-lethal concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burt, Sara A; Ojo-Fakunle, Victoria T A; Woertman, Jenifer; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A

    2014-01-01

    The formation of biofilm by bacteria confers resistance to biocides and presents problems in medical and veterinary clinical settings. Here we report the effect of carvacrol, one of the major antimicrobial components of oregano oil, on the formation of biofilms and its activity on existing biofilms.

  14. Mycological examination and biofilm formation in drinking water

    OpenAIRE

    Paterson, R. R. M.; A. B. Gonçalves; Lima, Nelson

    2006-01-01

    This study reports the presence of filamentous fungi (ff) in drinking water including biofilms. Ff are not studied ufficiently in drinking water. Ff were highest in winter and had an indirect relation with other microorganisms. Pathogenic fungi were not observed at the mesophilic temperatures used. Penicillium expansum and P. brevicompactum were observed which may affect biofilms by mycotoxin production. FISH and calcofluor methods indicated presumptive ff in biofilms in water distri...

  15. Electro-active bio-films: formation, characterization and mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some bacteria, which are able to exchange electrons with a conductive material without mediator form on conductive surfaces electro-active bio-films. This bacterial property has been recently discovered (2001). Objectives of this work are to develop electro-active bio-films in various natural environments from indigenous flora, then through complementary electrochemical techniques (chrono-amperometry and cyclic voltammetry), to evaluate electro-activity of isolates coming from so-formed bio-films and to characterize mechanisms of electron transfer between bacteria and materials. First, electro-active bio-films have been developed under chrono-amperometry in garden compost and in water coming from Guyana mangrove. These bio-films were respectively able to use an electrode as electron acceptor (oxidation) or as electron donor (reduction). In compost, results obtained in chrono-amperometry and cyclic voltammetry suggest a two-step electron transfer: slow substrate consumption, then rapid electron transfer between bacteria and the electrode. Thereafter, the ability to reduce oxygen was demonstrated with cyclic voltammetry for facultative aerobic isolates from compost bio-films (Enterobacter spp. and Pseudomonas spp.) and for aerobic isolates obtained from marine electro-active bio-films (Roseobacter spp. in majority). Finally, bio-films inducing current increase in chrono-amperometry were developed in bioreactor with synthetic medium from a pure culture of isolates. Hence, for the first time, electro-activity of several anaerobic strains of Geobacter bremensis isolated from compost bio-films was highlighted. (author)

  16. Impact of Plant Extracts and Antibiotics on Biofilm Formation of Clinical Isolates From Otitis Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Saba; Mujtaba Ghauri, Shahbaz; Sabri, Anjum Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Otitis media can lead to severe health consequences, and is the most common reason for antibiotic prescriptions and biofilm-mediated infections. However, the increased pattern of drug resistance in biofilm forming bacteria complicates the treatment of such infections. Objectives: This study was aimed to estimate the biofilm formation potential of the clinical isolates of otitis media, and to evaluate the efficacy of antibiotics and plant extracts as alternative therapeutic agents in biofilm eradication. Materials and Methods: The ear swab samples collected from the otitis media patients visiting the Mayo Hospital in Lahore were processe