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Sample records for aureus bacteremia role

  1. Predictors of Mortality in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Slade O.; Vaska, Vikram L.; Espedido, Björn A.; Paterson, David L.; Gosbell, Iain B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is an important infection with an incidence rate ranging from 20 to 50 cases/100,000 population per year. Between 10% and 30% of these patients will die from SAB. Comparatively, this accounts for a greater number of deaths than for AIDS, tuberculosis, and viral hepatitis combined. Multiple factors influence outcomes for SAB patients. The most consistent predictor of mortality is age, with older patients being twice as likely to die. Except for the presence of comorbidities, the impacts of other host factors, including gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and immune status, are unclear. Pathogen-host interactions, especially the presence of shock and the source of SAB, are strong predictors of outcomes. Although antibiotic resistance may be associated with increased mortality, questions remain as to whether this reflects pathogen-specific factors or poorer responses to antibiotic therapy, namely, vancomycin. Optimal management relies on starting appropriate antibiotics in a timely fashion, resulting in improved outcomes for certain patient subgroups. The roles of surgery and infectious disease consultations require further study. Although the rate of mortality from SAB is declining, it remains high. Future international collaborative studies are required to tease out the relative contributions of various factors to mortality, which would enable the optimization of SAB management and patient outcomes. PMID:22491776

  2. Heterogeneity of the humoral immune response following Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Verkaik (Nelianne); H.A.M. Boelens (Hélène); C.P. de Vogel (Corné); M. Tavakol (Mehri); L.G.M. Bode (Lonneke); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); W.J.B. van Wamel (Willem)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractExpanding knowledge on the humoral immune response in Staphylococcus aureus-infected patients is a mandatory step in the development of vaccines and immunotherapies. Here, we present novel insights into the antibody responses following S. aureus bacteremia. Fifteen bacteremic patients

  3. 18F-FDG PET/CT Optimizes Treatment in Staphylococcus Aureus Bacteremia and Is Associated with Reduced Mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrevoets, M.A.H.; Kouijzer, I.J.E.; Aarntzen, E.H.J.G.; Janssen, M.J.; Geus-Oei, L.F. de; Wertheim, H.F.L.; Kullberg, B.J.; Oever, J. ten; Oyen, W.J.G.; Bleeker-Rovers, C.P.

    2017-01-01

    Metastatic infection is an important complication of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB). Early diagnosis of metastatic infection is crucial, because specific treatment is required. However, metastatic infection can be asymptomatic and difficult to detect. In this study, we investigated the role

  4. Increased risk of arterial thromboembolic events after Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejer, N; Gotland, N; Uhre, M L

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: An association between infection and arterial thromboembolic events (ATE) has been suggested. Here we examined the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke and other ATE after Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB). METHODS: Danish register-based nation-wide observational cohort study...

  5. Novel structurally designed vaccine for S. aureus α-hemolysin: protection against bacteremia and pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Rajan P; Karauzum, Hatice; Sarwar, Jawad; Abaandou, Laura; Mahmoudieh, Mahta; Boroun, Atefeh R; Vu, Hong; Nguyen, Tam; Devi, V Sathya; Shulenin, Sergey; Warfield, Kelly L; Aman, M Javad

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a human pathogen associated with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) and life threatening sepsis and pneumonia. Efforts to develop effective vaccines against S. aureus have been largely unsuccessful, in part due to the variety of virulence factors produced by this organism. S. aureus alpha-hemolysin (Hla) is a pore-forming toxin expressed by most S. aureus strains and reported to play a key role in the pathogenesis of SSTI and pneumonia. Here we report a novel recombinant subunit vaccine candidate for Hla, rationally designed based on the heptameric crystal structure. This vaccine candidate, denoted AT-62aa, was tested in pneumonia and bacteremia infection models using S. aureus strain Newman and the pandemic strain USA300 (LAC). Significant protection from lethal bacteremia/sepsis and pneumonia was observed upon vaccination with AT-62aa along with a Glucopyranosyl Lipid Adjuvant-Stable Emulsion (GLA-SE) that is currently in clinical trials. Passive transfer of rabbit immunoglobulin against AT-62aa (AT62-IgG) protected mice against intraperitoneal and intranasal challenge with USA300 and produced significant reduction in bacterial burden in blood, spleen, kidney, and lungs. Our Hla-based vaccine is the first to be reported to reduce bacterial dissemination and to provide protection in a sepsis model of S. aureus infection. AT62-IgG and sera from vaccinated mice effectively neutralized the toxin in vitro and AT62-IgG inhibited the formation of Hla heptamers, suggesting antibody-mediated neutralization as the primary mechanism of action. This remarkable efficacy makes this Hla-based vaccine a prime candidate for inclusion in future multivalent S. aureus vaccine. Furthermore, identification of protective epitopes within AT-62aa could lead to novel immunotherapy for S. aureus infection.

  6. Novel structurally designed vaccine for S. aureus α-hemolysin: protection against bacteremia and pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan P Adhikari

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is a human pathogen associated with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI and life threatening sepsis and pneumonia. Efforts to develop effective vaccines against S. aureus have been largely unsuccessful, in part due to the variety of virulence factors produced by this organism. S. aureus alpha-hemolysin (Hla is a pore-forming toxin expressed by most S. aureus strains and reported to play a key role in the pathogenesis of SSTI and pneumonia. Here we report a novel recombinant subunit vaccine candidate for Hla, rationally designed based on the heptameric crystal structure. This vaccine candidate, denoted AT-62aa, was tested in pneumonia and bacteremia infection models using S. aureus strain Newman and the pandemic strain USA300 (LAC. Significant protection from lethal bacteremia/sepsis and pneumonia was observed upon vaccination with AT-62aa along with a Glucopyranosyl Lipid Adjuvant-Stable Emulsion (GLA-SE that is currently in clinical trials. Passive transfer of rabbit immunoglobulin against AT-62aa (AT62-IgG protected mice against intraperitoneal and intranasal challenge with USA300 and produced significant reduction in bacterial burden in blood, spleen, kidney, and lungs. Our Hla-based vaccine is the first to be reported to reduce bacterial dissemination and to provide protection in a sepsis model of S. aureus infection. AT62-IgG and sera from vaccinated mice effectively neutralized the toxin in vitro and AT62-IgG inhibited the formation of Hla heptamers, suggesting antibody-mediated neutralization as the primary mechanism of action. This remarkable efficacy makes this Hla-based vaccine a prime candidate for inclusion in future multivalent S. aureus vaccine. Furthermore, identification of protective epitopes within AT-62aa could lead to novel immunotherapy for S. aureus infection.

  7. Concurrent infectious mononucleosis and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li Jun; Du, Xiao Qin; Nyirimigabo, Eric; Shou, Song Tao

    2014-04-01

    It is rare to see a concurrent infection with infectious mononucleosis and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Tianjin, China. Until now, there is still no any single recorded case of concurrent infectious mononucleosis and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

  8. Concomitant Staphylococcus aureus bacteriuria is associated with complicated S. aureus bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcini, Céline; Matta, Matta; Mondain, Véronique; Gaudart, Alice; Girard-Pipau, Fernand; Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Dellamonica, Pierre

    2009-10-01

    To identify factors associated with complicated Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) in adults. Prospective observational multicenter study during 2 years in Nice University Hospital and during 6 months in the Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Paris, including all adult inpatients with SAB assessed by an Infectious Diseases (ID) specialist. We included 104 SAB (79 in Nice and 25 in Paris), of which 45 were complicated, including 18 endocarditis and 23 bone and joint infections. A concomitant urine sample was performed in 65% of the cases, showing S. aureus bacteriuria 23/68 (34%) times. Blood cultures were drawn 48-96h after an appropriate antibiotic therapy had been started in 70 of the 104 cases (67%) and were positive in 28 cases (40%). The 3 following factors were found to be associated with complicated SAB in univariate analysis: community acquisition (56% vs 26%, P=0.002), concomitant bacteriuria (47% vs 19%, P=0.016) and persistent bacteremia (55% vs 26%, P=0.016). This last factor was associated with endocarditis, but not with other complications such as bone and joint infections.

  9. Staphylococcus aureus bacteriuria as a prognosticator for outcome of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: a case-control study

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    Weinstein Robert A

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When Staphylococcus aureus is isolated in urine, it is thought to usually represent hematogenous spread. Because such spread might have special clinical significance, we evaluated predictors and outcomes of S. aureus bacteriuria among patients with S. aureus bacteremia. Methods A case-control study was performed at John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County among adult inpatients during January 2002-December 2006. Cases and controls had positive and negative urine cultures, respectively, for S. aureus, within 72 hours of positive blood culture for S. aureus. Controls were sampled randomly in a 1:4 ratio. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were done. Results Overall, 59% of patients were African-American, 12% died, 56% of infections had community-onset infections, and 58% were infected with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA. Among 61 cases and 247 controls, predictors of S. aureus bacteriuria on multivariate analysis were urological surgery (OR = 3.4, p = 0.06 and genitourinary infection (OR = 9.2, p = 0.002. Among patients who died, there were significantly more patients with bacteriuria than among patients who survived (39% vs. 17%; p = 0.002. In multiple Cox regression analysis, death risks in bacteremic patients were bacteriuria (hazard ratio 2.9, CI 1.4-5.9, p = 0.004, bladder catheter use (2.0, 1.0-4.0, p = 0.06, and Charlson score (1.1, 1.1-1.3, p = 0.02. Neither length of stay nor methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection was a predictor of S. aureus bacteriuria or death. Conclusions Among patients with S. aureus bacteremia, those with S. aureus bacteriuria had 3-fold higher mortality than those without bacteriuria, even after adjustment for comorbidities. Bacteriuria may identify patients with more severe bacteremia, who are at risk of worse outcomes.

  10. Course and Outcome of Bacteremia Due to Staphylococcus Aureus: Evaluation of Different Clinical Case Definitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Lautenschlager (Stephan); C. Herzog (Christian); W. Zimmerli (Werner)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIn a retrospective survey of patients hospitalized in the University Hospital of Basel, Switzerland, the course and outcome of 281 cases of true bacteremia due to Staphylococcus aureus over a 7-year period were analyzed. The main purpose was to evaluate different case definitions. In 78%

  11. β-Lactam Therapy for Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia: A Comparative Review of Cefazolin versus Antistaphylococcal Penicillins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Julius; Echevarria, Kelly L; Traugott, Kristi A

    2017-03-01

    Methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Traditionally, antistaphylococcal penicillins (ASPs) have been considered the agents of choice for the treatment of MSSA bacteremia. Vancomycin has been demonstrated to have poorer outcomes in several studies and is only recommended for patients with severe penicillin allergies. Although cefazolin is considered as an alternative to the ASPs for patients with nonsevere penicillin allergies, cefazolin offers several pharmacologic advantages over ASPs, such as more convenient dosing regimens, and antimicrobial stewardship programs are increasingly using cefazolin as the preferential agent for MSSA infections as part of cost-saving initiatives. Concerns about susceptibility to hydrolysis by type A β-lactamases, particularly at high inocula seen in deep-seated infections such as endocarditis; selective pressures from unnecessary gram-negative coverage; and lack of comparative clinical data have precluded recommending cefazolin as a first-line therapy for MSSA bacteremia. Recent clinical studies, however, have suggested similar clinical efficacy but better tolerability, with lower rates of discontinuation due to adverse drug reactions, of cefazolin compared with ASPs. Other variables, such as adequate source control (e.g., intravascular catheter removal, debridement, or drainage) and enhanced pharmacodynamics through aggressive cefazolin dosing, may mitigate the role of cefazolin inoculum effect and factor into determining improved clinical outcomes. In this review, we highlight the utility of cefazolin versus ASPs in the treatment of MSSA bacteremia with a focus on clinical efficacy and safety. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  12. Risk and prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia among individuals with and without end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lise Have; Jensen-Fangel, Søren; Benfield, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bloodstream infections among hemodialysis patients and of exit-site infections among peritoneal dialysis patients. However, the risk and prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia among end-stage renal disease patients have not been......, age, and comorbidity. After stratification for type of renal replacement therapy, we found the highest incidence rate of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia among hemodialysis patients (46.3 per 1,000 person-years) compared to peritoneal dialysis patients (22.0 per 1,000 person-years) and renal......, and hemodialysis patients in particular, have greatly increased risk of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia compared to population controls. Future challenges will be to develop strategies to reduce Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia-related morbidity and death in this high-risk population....

  13. Future challenges and treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia with emphasis on MRSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Fowler, Vance G; Skov, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is an urgent medical problem due to its growing frequency and its poor associated outcome. As healthcare delivery increasingly involves invasive procedures and implantable devices, the number of patients at risk for SAB and its complications is likely to grow....... Compounding this problem is the growing prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and the dwindling efficacy of vancomycin, long the treatment of choice for this pathogen. Despite the recent availability of several new antibiotics for S. aureus, new strategies for treatment and prevention...

  14. Distinguishing Complicated from Uncomplicated Bacteremia Caused by Staphylococcus aureus: The Value of "New" and "Old" Serological Tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); W.H.F. Goessens (Wil); M.F. Michel; R. Peters (Roel)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractAntibody responses to staphylococcal α-toxin, cell wall teichoic acid, and cell wall peptodoglycan were measured in 259 serum samples from 74 consecutive patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. All patients with complicated bacteremia were seropositive in at least one of three

  15. [Role of ceftaroline fosamil in the treatment of bacteremia and infectious endocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirante, Benito; Pericás, Juan M; Miró, José M

    2014-03-01

    Ceftaroline fosamil is a new subclass of cephalosporins with high intrinsic activity against various multi-resistant Gram-positive organisms, including Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as against Enterobacteriaceae causing bacteremia and infective endocarditis. Because of its pharmacokinetic profile and pharmacodynamic characteristics, this drug is a good therapeutic option for these infections. Experimental studies have shown good clinical efficacy for the treatment of endocarditis caused by S. aureus, regardless of their sensitivity to methicillin or vancomycin. Clinical experience is limited, although clinical trials and case series have reported a favorable clinical response in patients with bacteremia associated with skin and soft tissue infections, pneumonia, or infective endocarditis. Future studies should define more precisely the role of this new antibiotic in the treatment of these infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. The management of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in the United Kingdom and Vietnam: a multi-centre evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy E Thwaites

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia is a common and serious infection worldwide and although treatment guidelines exist, there is little consensus on optimal management. In this study we assessed the variation in management and adherence to treatment guidelines of S. aureus bacteremia.We prospectively recorded baseline clinical characteristics, management, and in-hospital outcome of all adults with S. aureus bacteremia treated consecutively over one year in eight centres in the United Kingdom, three in Vietnam and one in Nepal. 630 adults were treated for S. aureus bacteremia: 549 in the UK (21% methicillin-resistant, 80 in Vietnam (19% methicillin-resistant and 1 in Nepal. In the UK, 41% had a removable infection focus (50% intravenous catheter-related, compared to 12% in Vietnam. Significantly (p50% of treatment with oral antibiotics alone (25% versus 4%. UK centres varied significantly (p50% of treatment (range 12-40%, in those treated for longer than 28 days (range 13-54%, and in those given combination therapy (range 14-94%. 24% died during admission: older age, time in hospital before bacteremia, and an unidentified infection focus were independent predictors of in-hospital death (p<0.001.The management of S. aureus bacteremia varies widely between the UK and Vietnam and between centres in the UK with little adherence to published guidelines. Controlled trials defining optimal therapy are urgently required.

  17. Persistent catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia after catheter removal and initiation of antimicrobial therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Ho Park

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (CRSAB occasionally persists despite catheter removal and initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of persistent CRSAB after catheter removal and initiation of antimicrobial therapy. METHODS: Consecutive patients with CRSAB were prospectively included from over a 41-month period. We compared the clinical features, 40 bacterial virulence genes, and outcomes between patients with persistent CRSAB (i.e., bacteremia for >3 days after catheter removal and initiation of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and non-persistent CRSAB. RESULTS: Among the 220 episodes of CRSAB, the catheter was kept in place in 17 (6% and removed in 203 (94% cases. In 43 (21% of the 203 episodes, bacteremia persisted for >3 days after catheter removal and initiation of antimicrobial therapy. Methicillin resistance (Odds ratio [OR], 9.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.05-26.61; P<0.001, non-catheter prosthetic devices (OR, 5.37; 95% CI, 1.62-17.80; P=0.006, and renal failure (OR, 3.23; 95% CI, 1.48-7.08; P=0.003 were independently associated with persistent CRSAB. Patients with persistent CRSAB were more like to experience complication than were those with non-persistent CRSAB (72% vs. 15%; P<0.001. Among all episodes due to methicillin-resistant S. aureus, persistent CRSAB isolates were associated with accessory gene regulator (agr group II (P= .04, but presence of other bacterial virulence genes, distribution of vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration distribution, and frequency of vancomycin heteroresistance did not differ between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with CRSAB, bacteremia persisted in 21% of cases despite catheter removal and initiation of antimicrobial therapy. Methicillin resistance, renal failure, and non-catheter prosthetic devices were independent risk factors for persistent CRSAB, which was

  18. Association of mannose-binding lectin 2 gene polymorphisms with persistent Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

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    Yong Pil Chong

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Mannose-binding lectin (MBL is an important component of innate immunity. Structural and promoter polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene that are responsible for low MBL levels are associated with susceptibility to infectious diseases. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of serum MBL levels and MBL2 polymorphisms with persistent Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB in adult Korean patients. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study nested in a prospective cohort of patients with SAB. The study compared 41 patients with persistent bacteremia (≥7 days and 46 patients with resolving bacteremia (<3 days. In each subject, we genotyped six single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the promoter region (alleles H/L, X/Y, and P/Q and exon 1 (alleles A/B, A/C, and A/D of the MBL2 gene and measured serum MBL concentrations. We also compared MBL2 genotypes between SAB patients and healthy people. RESULTS: Patients with persistent bacteremia were significantly more likely to have low/deficient MBL-producing genotypes and resultant low serum MBL levels, than were patients with resolving bacteremia (P = 0.019 and P = 0.012, respectively. Independent risk factors for persistent bacteremia were metastatic infection (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 34.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 12.83-196.37; P = 0.003, methicillin resistance (aOR, 4.10; 95% CI, 3.19-29.57; P = 0.025, and low/deficient MBL-producing genotypes (aOR, 7.64; 95% CI, 4.12-63.39; P = 0.003. Such genotypes were significantly more common in patients with persistent bacteremia than in healthy people (OR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.03-4.26; P = 0.040. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first demonstration of an association of low MBL levels and MBL2 polymorphisms responsible for low or deficient MBL levels with persistent SAB. A combination of factors, including clinical and microbiological characteristics and host defense factors such as MBL levels, may together contribute

  19. Familial Clustering of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia in First-Degree Relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oestergaard, Louise B.; Christiansen, Mia N.; Schmiegelow, Michelle D.

    2016-01-01

    the rate of the disease, and whether this rate is affected by the type of family relationship (that is, parent or sibling) or by how the relative acquired the infection. DESIGN: Register-based nationwide cohort study (1992 to 2011). SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: First-degree relatives (children...... of variables in the multiple regression analysis, and whether nonsignificant interactions were true or caused by insufficient statistical power remains uncertain. CONCLUSION: A significant familial clustering of S aureus bacteremia was found, with the greatest relative rate of disease observed in individuals...

  20. Risk and outcomes of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia among patients admitted with and without MRSA nares colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzec, Natalie S; Bessesen, Mary T

    2016-04-01

    The risk of nosocomial methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in patients with nasal colonization on admission is 3-fold higher than in patients who are not colonized. Limited data on this question have been reported for methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA). This is an observational cohort study of patients admitted to a tertiary care medical center from October 1, 2007-September 30, 2013, who underwent active screening for nasal colonization with MRSA. There were 29,371 patients who underwent screening for nasal MRSA colonization; 3,262 (11%) were colonized with MRSA. There were 32 cases of MRSA bacteremia among colonized patients, for an incidence of 1%. Thirteen cases of bacteremia occurred in non-MRSA-colonized patients, for an incidence of 0.05%. The odds of developing MRSA bacteremia for patients who were nasally colonized with MRSA compared with those who were not colonized were 19.89. There was no difference between colonized and noncolonized subjects with bacteremia in all-cause mortality at 30 days or 1 year. In a setting with active screening for MRSA, the risk of MRSA bacteremia is 19.89-fold higher among colonized than noncolonized patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Genetic and Molecular Predictors of High Vancomycin MIC in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnidge, John D.; Munckhof, Wendy J.; Robinson, J. Owen; Korman, Tony M.; O'Sullivan, Matthew V. N.; Anderson, Tara L.; Roberts, Sally A.; Warren, Sanchia J. C.; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Tan, Hui-Leen; Gao, Wei; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Howden, Benjamin P.

    2014-01-01

    An elevated vancomycin MIC is associated with poor outcomes in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) and is reported in patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) bacteremia in the absence of vancomycin treatment. Here, using DNA microarray and phenotype analysis, we investigated the genetic predictors and accessory gene regulator (agr) function and their relationship with elevated vancomycin MIC using blood culture isolates from a multicenter binational cohort of patients with SAB. Specific clonal complexes were associated with elevated (clonal complex 8 [CC8] [P < 0.001]) or low (CC22 [P < 0.001], CC88 [P < 0.001], and CC188 [P = 0.002]) vancomycin MIC. agr dysfunction (P = 0.014) or agr genotype II (P = 0.043) were also associated with an elevated vancomycin MIC. Specific resistance and virulence genes were also linked to an elevated vancomycin MIC, including blaZ (P = 0.002), sea (P < 0.001), clfA (P < 0.001), splA (P = 0.001), and the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) locus (P = 0.02). These data suggest that inherent organism characteristics may explain the link between elevated vancomycin MICs and poor outcomes in patients with SAB, regardless of the antibiotic treatment received. A consideration of clonal specificity should be included in future research when attempting to ascertain treatment effects or clinical outcomes. PMID:25031442

  2. Comparison of outcome and clinical characteristics of bacteremia caused by methicillin-resistant, penicillin-resistant and penicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokinen, Elina; Laine, Janne; Huttunen, Reetta; Rahikka, Pekka; Huhtala, Heini; Vuento, Risto; Vuopio, Jaana; Syrjänen, Jaana

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association of methicillin resistance and penicillinase production with clinical characteristics and outcome of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. For 126 patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia, 378 age- and gender-matched controls with methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia were selected. Of controls, 126 had bacteremia caused by penicillin-susceptible strains (PSSA) and 252 by penicillinase-producing strains (PRSA). Underlying diseases, clinical course and mortality were retrospectively assessed. Patients with MRSA bacteremia were more often smokers than patients with MSSA bacteremia (OR 2.34, 95% CI 1.27-4.32). MRSA bacteremia was more often healthcare-associated (OR 4.23, 95% CI 2.47-7.24), associated with central venous catheters (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.27-3.47), glucocorticoid therapy (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.12-2.93) and prior surgery (OR 2.32, 95% CI 1.43-3.76). Patients with MRSA bacteremia received appropriate empiric antibiotic (31%) less often than controls (98%). Mortality within 28 days was higher in MRSA bacteremia (26.8%) than in MSSA bacteremia (15.5%) (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.20-3.34), PRSA bacteremia (17.0%) (OR 1.79 95% CI 1.04-3.09) or PSSA bacteremia (12.5%) (OR 2.56 95% CI 1.27-5.15). The difference remained after adjusting for underlying diseases and foci. There was no significant difference in clinical course between PRSA and PSSA bacteremias. MRSA bacteremia was associated with poorer outcome than either PRSA or PSSA bacteremia. We corroborated several risk factors found in previous studies.

  3. Seasonal Variation of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae Bacteremia According to Acquisition and Patient Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradel, Kim Oren; Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Pedersen, Court

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal variation analysis. METHODS In 3 Danish health regions (2.3 million total inhabitants), patients with bacteremia were identified from 2000 through 2011 using information from laboratory information systems. Analyses were confined to Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus...... pneumoniae. Additional data were obtained from the Danish National Hospital Registry for the construction of admission histories and calculation of the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). Bacteremias were categorized as community acquired, healthcare associated (HCA), and hospital acquired. We defined multiple....... coli, 6,924 S. aureus, and 4,884 S. pneumoniae bacteremia cases. For E. coli, the seasonal variation was highest for community-acquired cases (PTT ratio, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.17-1.32), was diminished for HCA (PTT ratio, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.04-1.25), and was missing for hospital-acquired cases. No seasonal...

  4. Long-term infectious complications and their relation to treatment duration in catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeylemaker, M.M.; Jaspers, C.A.; Visser, M.R.; Hoepelman, I.M.; Kraaij, M.G.J. van

    2001-01-01

    The optimal duration of treatment for catheter-related Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia is not known. Short courses (< or = 2 weeks) of therapy should be viewed with caution because essential data on late complications, such as osteomyelitis and metastatic abscesses, are lacking. This study

  5. Metastatic infectious disease and clinical outcome in Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus species bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Fidel J; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Sturm, Patrick D; Krabbe, Paul F M; van Dijk, Arie P J; Wanten, Geert J A; Oyen, Wim J G; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P

    2012-03-01

    Early detection of metastatic infection in patients with Gram-positive bacteremia is important as morbidity and mortality are higher in the presence of these foci, probably due to incomplete eradication of clinically silent foci during initial treatment. We performed a prospective study in 115 patients with Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus species bacteremia with at least 1 risk factor for the development of metastatic foci, such as community acquisition, treatment delay, persistently positive blood cultures for >48 hours, and persistent fever >72 hours after initiation of treatment. An intensive search for metastatic infectious foci was performed including ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography in combination with low-dose computed tomography scanning for optimizing anatomical correlation (FDG-PET/CT) and echocardiography in the first 2 weeks of admission. Metastatic infectious foci were detected in 84 of 115 (73%) patients. Endocarditis (22 cases), endovascular infections (19 cases), pulmonary abscesses (16 cases), and spondylodiscitis (11 cases) were diagnosed most frequently. The incidence of metastatic infection was similar in patients with Streptococcus species and patients with S. aureus bacteremia. Signs and symptoms guiding the attending physician in the diagnostic workup were present in only a minority of cases (41%). An unknown portal of entry, treatment delay >48 hours, and the presence of foreign body material were significant risk factors for developing metastatic foci. Mean C-reactive protein levels on admission were significantly higher in patients with metastatic infectious foci (74 vs. 160 mg/L). FDG-PET/CT was the first technique to localize metastatic infectious foci in 35 of 115 (30%) patients. As only a minority of foci were accompanied by guiding signs or symptoms, the number of foci revealed by symptom-guided CT, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging remained low. Mortality tended to be lower in patients without

  6. Improving Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia and Reported Penicillin Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Kimberly G.; Parker, Robert A.; Shenoy, Erica S.; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia is a morbid infection. First-line MSSA therapies (nafcillin, oxacillin, cefazolin) are generally avoided in the 10% of patients reporting penicillin (PCN) allergy, but most of these patients are not truly allergic. We used a decision tree with sensitivity analyses to determine the optimal evaluation and treatment for patients with MSSA bacteremia and reported PCN allergy. Methods. Our model simulates 3 strategies: (1) no allergy evaluation, give vancomycin (Vanc); (2) allergy history–guided treatment: if history excludes anaphylactic features, give cefazolin (Hx-Cefaz); and (3) complete allergy evaluation with history-appropriate PCN skin testing: if skin test negative, give cefazolin (ST-Cefaz). Model outcomes included 12-week MSSA cure, recurrence, and death; allergic reactions including major, minor, and potentially iatrogenic; and adverse drug reactions. Results. Vanc results in the fewest patients achieving MSSA cure and the highest rate of recurrence (67.3%/14.8% vs 83.4%/9.3% for Hx-Cefaz and 84.5%/8.9% for ST-Cefaz) as well as the greatest frequency of allergic reactions (3.0% vs 2.4% for Hx-Cefaz and 1.7% for ST-Cefaz) and highest rates of adverse drug reactions (5.2% vs 4.6% for Hx-Cefaz and 4.7% for ST-Cefaz). Even in a “best case for Vanc” scenario, Vanc yields the poorest outcomes. ST-Cefaz is preferred to Hx-Cefaz although sensitive to input variations. Conclusions. Patients with MSSA bacteremia and a reported PCN allergy should have the allergy addressed for optimal treatment. Full allergy evaluation with skin testing seems to be preferred, although more data are needed. PMID:25991471

  7. Improving Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia and Reported Penicillin Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Kimberly G; Parker, Robert A; Shenoy, Erica S; Walensky, Rochelle P

    2015-09-01

    Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia is a morbid infection. First-line MSSA therapies (nafcillin, oxacillin, cefazolin) are generally avoided in the 10% of patients reporting penicillin (PCN) allergy, but most of these patients are not truly allergic. We used a decision tree with sensitivity analyses to determine the optimal evaluation and treatment for patients with MSSA bacteremia and reported PCN allergy. Our model simulates 3 strategies: (1) no allergy evaluation, give vancomycin (Vanc); (2) allergy history-guided treatment: if history excludes anaphylactic features, give cefazolin (Hx-Cefaz); and (3) complete allergy evaluation with history-appropriate PCN skin testing: if skin test negative, give cefazolin (ST-Cefaz). Model outcomes included 12-week MSSA cure, recurrence, and death; allergic reactions including major, minor, and potentially iatrogenic; and adverse drug reactions. Vanc results in the fewest patients achieving MSSA cure and the highest rate of recurrence (67.3%/14.8% vs 83.4%/9.3% for Hx-Cefaz and 84.5%/8.9% for ST-Cefaz) as well as the greatest frequency of allergic reactions (3.0% vs 2.4% for Hx-Cefaz and 1.7% for ST-Cefaz) and highest rates of adverse drug reactions (5.2% vs 4.6% for Hx-Cefaz and 4.7% for ST-Cefaz). Even in a "best case for Vanc" scenario, Vanc yields the poorest outcomes. ST-Cefaz is preferred to Hx-Cefaz although sensitive to input variations. Patients with MSSA bacteremia and a reported PCN allergy should have the allergy addressed for optimal treatment. Full allergy evaluation with skin testing seems to be preferred, although more data are needed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Importance of control group selection for evaluating antimicrobial use as a risk factor for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Erika J; Raley, George; Herwaldt, Loreen A; Diekema, Daniel J

    2005-07-01

    We investigated the importance of control group selection during an evaluation of antimicrobial use as a risk factor for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia at our institution. We performed a case-control study. A case was defined as any patient admitted between January 1997 and May 2001 who developed nosocomial MRSA bacteremia. We used two control groups; control group I consisted of patients with nosocomial methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) bacteremia and control group II included only patients without bacteremia. We matched control-patients to case-patients using age, gender, time at risk, and hospital ward. Data collected on all patients included demographics, comorbidities, antibiotic use, time at risk, length of stay, severity of illness, and outcome. We evaluated 63 patients (21 in each group). The three groups were well matched regarding age, gender, underlying diseases, and severity of illness. Patients in the MRSA group were more likely to have received a fluoroquinolone and had a higher mean number of days of fluoroquinolone use than did patients in the MSSA group (P = .027 and P = .015, respectively). However, all measures of fluoroquinolone use were similar for case-patients and for control-patients who did not have nosocomial bloodstream infection. Control group selection is important in evaluating antimicrobial use as a risk factor for MRSA bacteremia. Using control-patients infected with MSSA, rather than uninfected control-patients, may overestimate the association between antimicrobial use and MRSA infection.

  9. The importance of timely introduction of vancomycin therapy against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA bacteremia and severity of MRSA bacteremia at Teaching Hospital, Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka

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    Jayaweera Arachchige Asela Sampath Jayaweera

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Worldwide, an estimated 2 billion healthy people carry Staphylococcus aureus (SA and of these, up to 53 million are thought to carry methicillin-resistant SA (MRSA. MRSA bacteremia patients are more critical to manage and timely introduction of antibiotics is life-saving. The aim of the study was to elucidate the prevalence of MRSA bacteremia in different units of Teaching Hospital, Anuradhapura (THA, Sri Lanka and assess the clinical characteristics and associated mortality related to timely introduction of vancomycin therapy. Materials and Methods: The data on MRSA bacteremia which were obtained from THA, for the period of March 2012 to December 2013 were statically analyzed emphasizing the unit-wise prevalence, severity, and comorbidity and timely introduction of vancomycin therapy. Results: The laboratory records of total 13,260 blood cultures were analyzed. Of those, MRSA bacteremia was detected in 61 cultures (9.3%. The highest prevalence of MRSA bacteremia was observed in the nephrology unit. The survival rate of the patients when the vancomycin therapy started before 24 h of receiving the blood culture report was 94.9% and in the instances of the treatment started after 24 h of blood culture report, the survival rate decreased down to 50%. High Pitt Bacteraemia score (PBS (p<0.05 and initiation of vancomycin therapy after 24 h following the receipt of blood culture report (p<0.05 independently affected the MRSA bacteremic patient’s 7th day mortality. Having comorbidities have not shown significant impact on 7th day mortality. Conclusion: The start of vancomycin therapy as earlier as possible following arrival of antibacterial susceptibility test reduces the likelihood of mortality.

  10. The associations between socioeconomic status and risk of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and subsequent endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oestergaard, Louise Bruun; Schmiegelow, Michelle D.; Bruun, Niels Eske

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is the leading cause of infective endocarditis in several countries. Since socioeconomic status (SES) is known to influence the risk of infectious diseases in general, we aimed to investigate the association between SES and SAB, and risk...... of subsequent endocarditis in a nationwide adult population. METHODS: All Danish residents were consecutively included at age ≥ 30 years during 1996-2010. We obtained information on SES (highest attained educational level), comorbidities, and microbiologically verified SAB by cross-linking nationwide registries....... The incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of SAB and later endocarditis were investigated using Poisson regression models adjusted for sex, age and year (reference = highest SES). RESULTS: Our study population comprised 3,394,936 individuals (median age = 43.2 years). Over a median follow-up of 15.9 years, 13...

  11. Comparative effectiveness of nafcillin or cefazolin versus vancomycin in methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

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    McGregor Jessina C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA has led clinicians to select antibiotics that have coverage against MRSA, usually vancomycin, for empiric therapy for suspected staphylococcal infections. Clinicians often continue vancomycin started empirically even when methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA strains are identified by culture. However, vancomycin has been associated with poor outcomes such as nephrotoxicity, persistent bacteremia and treatment failure. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of vancomycin versus the beta-lactam antibiotics nafcillin and cefazolin among patients with MSSA bacteremia. The outcome of interest for this study was 30-day in-hospital mortality. Methods This retrospective cohort study included all adult in-patients admitted to a tertiary-care facility between January 1, 2003 and June 30, 2007 who had a positive blood culture for MSSA and received nafcillin, cefazolin or vancomycin. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess independent mortality hazards comparing nafcillin or cefazolin versus vancomycin. Similar methods were used to estimate the survival benefits of switching from vancomycin to nafcillin or cefazolin versus leaving patients on vancomycin. Each model included statistical adjustment using propensity scores which contained variables associated with an increased propensity to receive vancomycin. Results 267 patients were included; 14% (38/267 received nafcillin or cefazolin, 51% (135/267 received both vancomycin and either nafcillin or cefazolin, and 35% (94/267 received vancomycin. Thirty (11% died within 30 days. Those receiving nafcillin or cefazolin had 79% lower mortality hazards compared with those who received vancomycin alone (adjusted hazard ratio (HR: 0.21; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.09, 0.47. Among the 122 patients who initially received vancomycin empirically, those who were switched to nafcillin or cefazolin (66

  12. Clinical presentation, management and outcomes of Staph aureus bacteremia (SAB) in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahav, Dafna; Schlesinger, Agata; Shaked, Hila; Goldberg, Elad; Paul, Mical; Bishara, Jihad; Leibovici, Leonard

    2017-04-01

    The incidence of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) increases with advancing age with higher mortality reported in older adults. We aimed to describe the clinical presentation, management and outcomes of older patients with SAB. We analyzed data from a retrospectively collected database including 1692 patients with SAB, and compared 1158 older patients (≥65 years) with 534 younger patients (<65 years) in terms of clinical features, management of infection, and outcomes. Older patients were significantly less likely to be febrile on presentation, with 37.5 % (415/1106) of older patients presenting with normal body temperature [versus 29.2 % (152/520) of younger patients]. Older patients were however, more likely to have leukocytosis, septic shock, lower heart rate and lower diastolic blood pressure compared with younger patients. Management of older patients included significantly less imaging studies, performance of transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) and infectious diseases consultation. TEE was performed less in older patients [124/726 (17.1 %) versus 72/285 (25.3 %)]. Mortality was significantly higher in older patients [550/1158 (47.5 %) versus 124/534 (23.2 %)], with predictors for mortality for the entire cohort in multivariate analysis including older age, higher Charlson comorbidity index, female sex, impaired functional capacity, pneumonia or primary bacteremia, and non-performance of TEE. Mortality rates in older patients with SAB are higher compared with younger patients. Several diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the management of SAB were less likely to be performed in older patients in our cohort. These may have implications on outcome and should not be dismissed on the basis of age alone.

  13. Active immunization with an octa-valent Staphylococcus aureus antigen mixture in models of S. aureus bacteremia and skin infection in mice.

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    Sanne van den Berg

    Full Text Available Proteomic studies with different Staphylococcus aureus isolates have shown that the cell surface-exposed and secreted proteins IsaA, LytM, Nuc, the propeptide of Atl (pro-Atl and four phenol-soluble modulins α (PSMα are invariantly produced by this pathogen. Therefore the present study was aimed at investigating whether these proteins can be used for active immunization against S. aureus infection in mouse models of bacteremia and skin infection. To this end, recombinant His-tagged fusions of IsaA, LytM, Nuc and pro-Atl were isolated from Lactococcus lactis or Escherichia coli, while the PSMα1-4 peptides were chemically synthesized. Importantly, patients colonized by S. aureus showed significant immunoglobulin G (IgG responses against all eight antigens. BALB/cBYJ mice were immunized subcutaneously with a mixture of the antigens at day one (5 μg each, and boosted twice (25 μg of each antigen with 28 days interval. This resulted in high IgG responses against all antigens although the response against pro-Atl was around one log lower compared to the other antigens. Compared to placebo-immunized mice, immunization with the octa-valent antigen mixture did not reduce the S. aureus isolate P load in blood, lungs, spleen, liver, and kidneys in a bacteremia model in which the animals were challenged for 14 days with a primary load of 3 × 10(5 CFU. Discomfort scores and animal survival rates over 14 days did not differ between immunized mice and placebo-immunized mice upon bacteremia with S. aureus USA300 (6 × 10(5 CFU. In addition, this immunization did not reduce the S. aureus isolate P load in mice with skin infection. These results show that the target antigens are immunogenic in both humans and mice, but in the used animal models do not result in protection against S. aureus infection.

  14. Comparative effectiveness of β-lactam versus vancomycin empiric therapy in patients with methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Davie; Wong, Titus; Romney, Marc; Leung, Victor

    2016-04-26

    Vancomycin may be inferior to β-lactams for the empiric treatment of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia. We compared empiric β-lactams to vancomycin to assess clinical outcomes in patients with MSSA bacteremia. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adult inpatients with their first episode of MSSA bacteremia at two tertiary care hospitals in Vancouver, Canada, between 2007 and 2014. Exposure was either empiric β-lactam with or without vancomycin or vancomycin monotherapy. All patients received definitive treatment with cloxacillin or cefazolin. The primary outcome was 28-day mortality. Secondary outcomes were 90-day mortality, duration of bacteremia, and hospital length-of-stay. Outcomes were adjusted using multivariable logistic regression. Of 669 patients identified, 255 met inclusion criteria (β-lactam = 131, vancomycin = 124). Overall 28-day mortality was 7.06 % (n = 18). There were more cases of infective endocarditis in the β-lactam than in the vancomycin group [24 (18.3 %) vs 12 (9.7 %), p = 0.05]. Adjusted mortality at 28 days was similar between the two groups (OR 0.85; 95 % CI 0.27-2.67). The duration of bacteremia was longer in the vancomycin group (97.1 vs 70.7 h, p = 0.007). Transition to cloxacillin or cefazolin occurred within a median of 68.3 h in the vancomycin group. Empiric β-lactams was associated with earlier clearance of bacteremia by a median of 1 day compared to vancomycin. Future prospective studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  15. The Impact of Reporting a Prior Penicillin Allergy on the Treatment of Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Kimberly G; Shenoy, Erica S; Huang, Mingshu; Kuhlen, James L; Ware, Winston A; Parker, Robert A; Walensky, Rochelle P

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia is a morbid infection with mortality benefit from receipt of parenteral β-lactam therapy. A substantial portion of MSSA bacteremia patients report penicillin allergy, but infrequently have true allergy. To determine the frequency and predictors of optimal and adequate therapy in patients with MSSA bacteremia. Retrospective cohort. Adult inpatients with MSSA bacteremia, January 2009 through October 2013. The primary measure was a trial of optimal therapy (OT), defined as ≥3 inpatient days or discharge on any first-line agents (nafcillin, oxacillin, cefazolin, or penicillin G, if susceptible). The secondary measure was completion of adequate therapy (AT), defined as ≥10 inpatient days or discharge on an agent appropriate for MSSA bacteremia. Data were electronically gathered with key variables manually validated through chart review. Log-binomial regression models were used to determine the frequency and predictors of outcomes. Of 456 patients, 346 (76%) received a trial of OT. Patients reporting penicillin allergy (13%) were less likely to receive OT trial than those without penicillin allergy (47% vs. 80%, p penicillin allergy was the largest negative predictor of OT trial (RR 0.64 [0.49, 0.83]). Infectious Disease (ID) consultation was the largest positive predictor of OT trial across all patients (RR 1.34 [1.14, 1.57]). Allergy/Immunology consultation was the single most important predictor of OT trial among patients reporting penicillin allergy (RR 2.33 [1.44, 3.77]). Of 440 patients, 391 (89%) completed AT, with ID consultation the largest positive predictor of the outcome (RR 1.28 [1.15, 1.43]). Nearly 25% of patients with MSSA bacteremia did not receive OT trial and about 10% did not receive AT completion. Reported penicillin allergy reduced, and ID consult increased, the likelihood of OT. Allergy evaluation, coupled with ID consultation, may improve outcomes in MSSA bacteremic patients.

  16. Community-associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia and Endocarditis among HIV Patients: A cohort study

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    Stine Oscar C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV patients are at increased risk of development of infections and infection-associated poor health outcomes. We aimed to 1 assess the prevalence of USA300 community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA among HIV-infected patients with S. aureus bloodstream infections and. 2 determine risk factors for infective endocarditis and in-hospital mortality among patients in this population. Methods All adult HIV-infected patients with documented S. aureus bacteremia admitted to the University of Maryland Medical Center between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2005 were included. CA-MRSA was defined as a USA300 MRSA isolate with the MBQBLO spa-type motif and positive for both the arginine catabolic mobile element and Panton-Valentin Leukocidin. Risk factors for S. aureus-associated infective endocarditis and mortality were determined using logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI. Potential risk factors included demographic variables, comorbid illnesses, and intravenous drug use. Results Among 131 episodes of S. aureus bacteremia, 85 (66% were MRSA of which 47 (54% were CA-MRSA. Sixty-three patients (48% developed endocarditis and 10 patients (8% died in the hospital on the index admission Patients with CA-MRSA were significantly more likely to develop endocarditis (OR = 2.73, 95% CI = 1.30, 5.71. No other variables including comorbid conditions, current receipt of antiretroviral therapy, pre-culture severity of illness, or CD4 count were significantly associated with endocarditis and none were associated with in-hospital mortality. Conclusions CA-MRSA was significantly associated with an increased incidence of endocarditis in this cohort of HIV patients with MRSA bacteremia. In populations such as these, in which the prevalence of intravenous drug use and probability of endocarditis are both high, efforts must be made for early detection, which may improve

  17. Evaluating genetic susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in African Americans using admixture mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr, D D; Allen, A S; Du, G-J; Ruffin, F; Adams, C; Thaden, J T; Maskarinec, S A; Souli, M; Guo, S; Dykxhoorn, D M; Scott, W K; Fowler, V G

    2017-03-01

    The incidence of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is significantly higher in African American (AA) than in European-descended populations. We used admixture mapping (AM) to test the hypothesis that genomic variations with different frequencies in European and African ancestral genomes influence susceptibility to SAB in AAs. A total of 565 adult AAs (390 cases with SAB; 175 age-matched controls) were genotyped for AM analysis. A case-only admixture score and a mixed χ2(1df) score (MIX) to jointly evaluate both single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and admixture association (P<5.00e-08) were computed using MIXSCORE. In addition, a permutation scheme was implemented to derive multiplicity adjusted P-values (genome-wide 0.05 significance threshold: P<9.46e-05). After empirical multiplicity adjustment, one region on chromosome 6 (52 SNPs, P=4.56e-05) in the HLA class II region was found to exhibit a genome-wide statistically significant increase in European ancestry. This region encodes genes involved in HLA-mediated immune response and these results provide additional evidence for genetic variation influencing HLA-mediated immunity, modulating susceptibility to SAB.

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of bacteremia and endocarditis due to Staphylococcus aureus. A clinical guideline from the Spanish Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (SEIMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiol, Francesc; Aguado, José María; Almirante, Benito; Bouza, Emilio; Cercenado, Emilia; Domínguez, M Ángeles; Gasch, Oriol; Lora-Tamayo, Jaime; Miró, José M; Palomar, Mercedes; Pascual, Alvaro; Pericas, Juan M; Pujol, Miquel; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Shaw, Evelyn; Soriano, Alex; Vallés, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    Both bacteremia and infective endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus aureus are common and severe diseases. The prognosis may darken not infrequently, especially in the presence of intracardiac devices or methicillin-resistance. Indeed, the optimization of the antimicrobial therapy is a key step in the outcome of these infections. The high rates of treatment failure and the increasing interest in the influence of vancomycin susceptibility in the outcome of infections caused by both methicillin-susceptible and -resistant isolates has led to the research of novel therapeutic schemes. Specifically, the interest raised in recent years on the new antimicrobials with activity against methicillin-resistant staphylococci has been also extended to infections caused by susceptible strains, which still carry the most important burden of infection. Recent clinical and experimental research has focused in the activity of new combinations of antimicrobials, their indication and role still being debatable. Also, the impact of an appropriate empirical antimicrobial treatment has acquired relevance in recent years. Finally, it is noteworthy the impact of the implementation of a systematic bundle of measures for improving the outcome. The aim of this clinical guideline is to provide an ensemble of recommendations in order to improve the treatment and prognosis of bacteremia and infective endocarditis caused by S. aureus, in accordance to the latest evidence published. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  19. Vertebral osteomyelitis caused by vancomycin-tolerant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: Experience with teicoplanin plus fosfomycin combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Sen; Chen, Yen-Chuo; Chen, Hung-Ping; Chen, Tso-Hsiao; Cheng, Chung-Yi

    2016-08-01

    An 85-year-old female presented with fever and consciousness disturbance for 3 days. The patient's blood culture subsequently revealed persistent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia despite the administration of vancomycin or teicoplanin monotherapy. Gallium inflammation scan and magnetic resonance image of the spine disclosed osteomyelitis and discitis at the level of L4-5. Surgical debridement was not feasible in this debilitated patient. Because of the creeping minimal inhibitory concentration of vancomycin of the causative isolate (1.5 μg/mL) and clinical failure with glycopeptide monotherapy, we changed the antibiotic therapy to a fosfomycin and teicoplanin combination therapy. The patient showed improved clinical response in terms of her enhanced consciousness as well as subsidence of persisted bacteremia. Despite the potential side effects of fosfomycin (such as diarrhea and hypernatremia), it combined with a glycopeptide may be an alternative therapy for invasive refractory MRSA infections. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. The Impact of Reporting a Prior Penicillin Allergy on the Treatment of Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly G Blumenthal

    Full Text Available Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA bacteremia is a morbid infection with mortality benefit from receipt of parenteral β-lactam therapy. A substantial portion of MSSA bacteremia patients report penicillin allergy, but infrequently have true allergy.To determine the frequency and predictors of optimal and adequate therapy in patients with MSSA bacteremia.Retrospective cohort.Adult inpatients with MSSA bacteremia, January 2009 through October 2013.The primary measure was a trial of optimal therapy (OT, defined as ≥3 inpatient days or discharge on any first-line agents (nafcillin, oxacillin, cefazolin, or penicillin G, if susceptible. The secondary measure was completion of adequate therapy (AT, defined as ≥10 inpatient days or discharge on an agent appropriate for MSSA bacteremia. Data were electronically gathered with key variables manually validated through chart review. Log-binomial regression models were used to determine the frequency and predictors of outcomes.Of 456 patients, 346 (76% received a trial of OT. Patients reporting penicillin allergy (13% were less likely to receive OT trial than those without penicillin allergy (47% vs. 80%, p <0.001. Adjusting for other factors, penicillin allergy was the largest negative predictor of OT trial (RR 0.64 [0.49, 0.83]. Infectious Disease (ID consultation was the largest positive predictor of OT trial across all patients (RR 1.34 [1.14, 1.57]. Allergy/Immunology consultation was the single most important predictor of OT trial among patients reporting penicillin allergy (RR 2.33 [1.44, 3.77]. Of 440 patients, 391 (89% completed AT, with ID consultation the largest positive predictor of the outcome (RR 1.28 [1.15, 1.43].Nearly 25% of patients with MSSA bacteremia did not receive OT trial and about 10% did not receive AT completion. Reported penicillin allergy reduced, and ID consult increased, the likelihood of OT. Allergy evaluation, coupled with ID consultation, may improve

  1. Beta-lactam combination therapy for the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus species bacteremia: A summary and appraisal of the evidence

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    Rachel Bartash

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal bacteremia and enterococcal bacteremia are prevalent in hospitalized or recently instrumented patients, and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. They are often difficult to treat due to the pathogenicity of the organisms, poor response to antibiotics, and increasing development of multidrug resistance. Therefore, there has been increasing interest in combination therapy for the treatment of these infections. The aim of this review was to summarize and assess the evidence supporting combination beta-lactam therapy for both Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus species blood stream infections. Currently, there is promising in vitro data but little clinical evidence supporting combination beta-lactam therapy for this indication. Further clinical investigations are needed to elucidate the potential benefits of beta-lactam combination therapy over monotherapy for Gram-positive bacteremia, although combination therapy may be useful in refractory cases of bacteremia that do not respond to standard antibiotic therapy.

  2. Metastatic infectious disease and clinical outcome in Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus species bacteremia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Fidel J; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Sturm, Patrick D; Krabbe, Paul F M; van Dijk, Arie P J; Wanten, Geert J A; Oyen, Wim J G; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P

    Early detection of metastatic infection in patients with Gram-positive bacteremia is important as morbidity and mortality are higher in the presence of these foci, probably due to incomplete eradication of clinically silent foci during initial treatment. We performed a prospective study in 115

  3. Future challenges and treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia with emphasis on MRSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Fowler, Vance G; Skov, Robert

    2011-01-01

    . Compounding this problem is the growing prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and the dwindling efficacy of vancomycin, long the treatment of choice for this pathogen. Despite the recent availability of several new antibiotics for S. aureus, new strategies for treatment and prevention...

  4. A 5-year Survey Reveals Increased Susceptibility to Glycopeptides for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Patients in a Chinese Burn Center

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    Bei Jiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections are prevalent in burn wards, and are especially serious in S. aureus bacteremia (SAB patients. Glycopeptides and daptomycin are effective against MRSA infections, but MIC creeps can reduce their efficacy. Our object was to perform a molecular epidemiological investigation of S. aureus isolates in our burn center and to evaluate MICs for antimicrobials against SAB-associated MRSA isolates. A total of 259 S. aureus isolates, obtained from August 2011 to July 2016, were used in this study. Multiple molecular typing was used for molecular epidemiological analysis. E-tests were used to determine MICs of vancomycin, teicoplanin, and daptomycin for SAB-associated MRSA isolates. MIC values were stratified by collection date or source and compared. Spearman's test was used to analyze MICs correlations amongst tested antimicrobials. ST239-MRSA-III-t030-agrI clone was found to be dominant in both SAB and non-SAB patients, and significantly more in SAB patients (P < 0.0001. SAB-MRSA isolates exhibited decreased MICs for vancomycin, teicoplanin, and daptomycin during the 5-year period. Compared to those isolated from catheters or wounds, SAB-MRSA isolates from the bloodstream were less susceptible to vancomycin and daptomycin, but more susceptible to teicoplanin. MICs Correlation was found only between vancomycin and daptomycin in MRSA isolates from the bloodstream (rho = 0.250, P = 0.024. In conclusion, our results suggest that MRSA infections are still serious problems in burn centers. In contrast to most other studies, we observed increased susceptibility to glycopeptides and daptomycin against SAB-associated MRSA in our center from 2011 to 2016, suggesting the use of glycopeptides does not lead to MIC creeps. Isolates from different sites of the body may exhibit different levels of susceptibility and change trend over time for different antimicrobials, antimicrobials selection for MRSA

  5. Association of Evidence-Based Care Processes With Mortality in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia at Veterans Health Administration Hospitals, 2003-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Michihiko; Schweizer, Marin L; Vaughan-Sarrazin, Mary S; Perencevich, Eli N; Livorsi, Daniel J; Diekema, Daniel J; Richardson, Kelly K; Beck, Brice F; Alexander, Bruce; Ohl, Michael E

    2017-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia is common and frequently associated with poor outcomes. Evidence indicates that specific care processes are associated with improved outcomes for patients with S aureus bacteremia, including appropriate antibiotic prescribing, use of echocardiography to identify endocarditis, and consultation with infectious diseases (ID) specialists. Whether use of these care processes has increased in routine care for S aureus bacteremia or whether use of these processes has led to large-scale improvements in survival is unknown. To examine the association of evidence-based care processes in routine care for S aureus bacteremia with mortality. This retrospective observational cohort study examined all patients admitted to Veterans Health Administration (VHA) acute care hospitals who had a first episode of S aureus bacteremia from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2014. Use of appropriate antibiotic therapy, echocardiography, and ID consultation. Thirty-day all-cause mortality. Analyses included 36 868 patients in 124 hospitals (mean [SD] age, 66.4 [12.5] years; 36 036 [97.7%] male), including 19 325 (52.4%) with infection due to methicillin-resistant S aureus and 17 543 (47.6%) with infection due to methicillin-susceptible S aureus. Risk-adjusted mortality decreased from 23.5% (95% CI, 23.3%-23.8%) in 2003 to 18.2% (95% CI, 17.9%-18.5%) in 2014. Rates of appropriate antibiotic prescribing increased from 2467 (66.4%) to 1991 (78.9%), echocardiography from 1256 (33.8%) to 1837 (72.8%), and ID consultation from 1390 (37.4%) to 1717 (68.0%). After adjustment for patient characteristics, cohort year, and other care processes, receipt of care processes was associated with lower mortality, with adjusted odds ratios of 0.74 (95% CI, 0.68-0.79) for appropriate antibiotics, 0.73 (95% CI, 0.68-0.78) for echocardiography, and 0.61 (95% CI, 0.56-0.65) for ID consultation. Mortality decreased progressively as the number of care processes that a

  6. Because of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

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    Rezan Harman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the significant risk factor in the development of nosocomial Staphylococcal infections is bacteria Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureuscolonized in the nose of health personnel. The meticilin resistant S. aureus (MRSA was detected in the repeated blood cultures of two babies who had been followed for about 20 days in neonatal intensive care due to premature birth. Because of the failure to find the source in the assesment of the infants of whom MRSA reproduction continue, despite the appropriate treatment according to the results of antibiograms, examinations were performed fort he environment and the healtyh personnel. Cultures were taken from the total parenteral nutrition (TPN solution given to the babies. S. aureus growth was detected in the received culture. Therefore cultures were obtained from the places where there will be source in the division where TPN was prepared and nsal cultures were taken from the personnel. Because of growth of S. aureus only in the nasal cultures of the personnel, considering that the source was the personnel, the personnel were given the treatment of mupirocin pomad for five days, and during this period the work of the staff were replaced. There was not any growth in the TPN received at the and of the treatment an in the blood cultures of the patients. These facts showed us the necessity of making the necessary screening by considering the health personnel can also be the source in case of any S. aureus growth. [J Contemp Med 2016; 6(4.000: 382-384

  7. Distinctive cytokines as biomarkers predicting fatal outcome of severe Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Sanne; Laman, Jon D; Boon, Louis; ten Kate, Marian T; de Knegt, Gerjo J; Verdijk, Rob M; Verbrugh, Henri A; Nouwen, Jan L; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A J M

    2013-01-01

    Invasive Staphylococcus aureus infections are frequently associated with bacteraemia. To support clinical decisions on antibiotic therapy, there is an urgent need for reliable markers as predictors of infection outcome. In the present study in mice, bacteraemia was established by intravenous inoculation of a clinical S. aureus isolate at the LD50 inoculum. As potential biomarkers for fatal outcome, blood culture (qualitative and quantitative), serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), as well as 31 selected cytokines and chemokines were assessed during the first three days of infection. A positive S. aureus blood culture, the quantitative blood culture, CRP levels, and levels of eight cytokines were indicative for the presence of S. aureus bacteraemia. However, only tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, interleukin (IL) 1α, and keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC; a functional homologue of human IL-8) were each significantly elevated in eventually non-surviving infected mice versus eventually surviving infected mice. In severe S. aureus bacteraemia in mice, TNF-α, IL-1α, and KC are biomarkers predicting fatal outcome of infection. KC was a biomarker elevated irrespective the progression of infection, which is very interesting regarding clinical application in view of the heterogeneity of patients experiencing bacteraemia in this respect.

  8. Seasonal Variation of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae Bacteremia According to Acquisition and Patient Characteristics: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradel, Kim Oren; Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Pedersen, Court; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Østergaard, Christian; Arpi, Magnus; Jensen, Thøger Gorm; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Søgaard, Mette; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Seasonal variation is a characteristic of many infectious diseases, but relatively little is known about determinants thereof. We studied the impact of place of acquisition and patient characteristics on seasonal variation of bacteremia caused by the 3 most common pathogens. DESIGN Seasonal variation analysis. METHODS In 3 Danish health regions (2.3 million total inhabitants), patients with bacteremia were identified from 2000 through 2011 using information from laboratory information systems. Analyses were confined to Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Additional data were obtained from the Danish National Hospital Registry for the construction of admission histories and calculation of the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). Bacteremias were categorized as community acquired, healthcare associated (HCA), and hospital acquired. We defined multiple subgroups by combining the following characteristics: species, acquisition, age group, gender, CCI level, and location of infection. Assuming a sinusoidal model, seasonal variation was assessed by the peak-to-trough (PTT) ratio with a 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS In total, we included 16,006 E. coli, 6,924 S. aureus, and 4,884 S. pneumoniae bacteremia cases. For E. coli, the seasonal variation was highest for community-acquired cases (PTT ratio, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.17-1.32), was diminished for HCA (PTT ratio, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.04-1.25), and was missing for hospital-acquired cases. No seasonal variation was observed for S. aureus. S. pneumoniae showed high seasonal variation, which did not differ according to acquisition (overall PTT ratio, 3.42; 95% CI, 3.10-3.83). CONCLUSIONS Seasonal variation was mainly related to the species although the place of acquisition was important for E. coli. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:946-953.

  9. Timing of Initiating Glycopeptide Therapy for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia: The Impact on Clinical Outcome

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    Chen-Hsiang Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available When a Staphylococcus-like organism (SLO is microscopically found in Gram staining of blood culture (BC specimen, it seems reasonable to administrate a glycopeptide (GP for empirical therapy. The paper investigates the risk factors for 14-day mortality in patients with methicillin-resistance Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (MRSAB and clarifies the impact of the timing for initiating GP therapy. A retrospective study identifies patients with MRSAB (endocarditis was excluded between 2006 and 2009. Patients were categorized as receiving GP at the interval before a preliminary BC report indicating the growth of SLO and the onward 24 hours or receiving GP 24 h after a preliminary BC report indicating the growth of SLO. Total 339 patients were enrolled. There was no difference on the 14-day overall or infection-related mortality rates at the time to administer GP. Multivariate analysis disclosed pneumonia (OR = 4.47; of 95% CI; of 2.09–9.58; and high APACHE II score (OR, 2.81, with 95% CI, 1.19–6.65; were independent risk factors for infection-related mortality. The mortality rate did not decrease following administrating GP immediately after a preliminary BC indicating SLO growth. An additional research for the optimal timing for initiating GP treatment is warranted.

  10. Multicenter prospective observational study of the comparative efficacy and safety of vancomycin versus teicoplanin in patients with health care-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young Kyung; Park, Dae Won; Sohn, Jang Wook; Kim, Hyo Youl; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Lee, Chang-Seop; Lee, Mi Suk; Ryu, Seong-Yeol; Jang, Hee-Chang; Choi, Young Ju; Kang, Cheol-In; Choi, Hee Jung; Lee, Seung Soon; Kim, Shin Woo; Kim, Sang Il; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Jeong Yeon; Yang, Kyung Sook; Peck, Kyong Ran; Kim, Min Ja

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical efficacy and safety of vancomycin to those of teicoplanin for the treatment of adult patients with health care-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) bacteremia. A multicenter observational study was prospectively conducted in 15 teaching hospitals in Korea between February 2010 and July 2011. Adult patients (≥18 years old) with HA-MRSA bacteremia who were initially treated with vancomycin (VAN) (n = 134) or teicoplanin (TEC) (n = 56) were enrolled. Clinical and microbiological responses and drug-related adverse events were compared between the two treatment groups using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. The vancomycin and teicoplanin MICs were determined by Etest. The MRSA-related mortality, duration of fever, and duration of MRSA bacteremia in the treatment groups were not significantly different. There was no significant difference in the occurrence of drug-related adverse events. Among the 190 MRSA isolates, the VAN MICs ranged from 0.5 to 2 μg/ml (MIC50 and MIC90, 1.5 μg/ml), and the TEC MIC ranged from 0.5 to 8 μg/ml (MIC50, 3 μg/ml; MIC90, 6 μg/ml). In multivariate analyses, the antibiotic type (vancomycin or teicoplanin) was not associated with treatment outcomes. This study indicates that teicoplanin is an effective and safe alternative to vancomycin for the treatment of HA-MRSA bacteremia.

  11. [Consensus document for the treatment of bacteremia and endocarditis caused by methicillin-resistent Staphylococcus aureus. Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiol, Francisco; Aguado, José María; Pascual, Alvaro; Pujol, Miquel; Almirante, Benito; Miró, José María; Cercenado, Emilia; Domínguez, María de Los Angeles; Soriano, Alex; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Vallés, Jordi; Palomar, Mercedes; Tornos, Pilar; Bouza, Emilio

    2009-02-01

    Bacteremia and endocarditis due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are prevalent and clinically important. The rise in MRSA bacteremia and endocarditis is related with the increasing use of venous catheters and other vascular procedures. Glycopeptides have been the reference drugs for treating these infections. Unfortunately their activity is not completely satisfactory, particularly against MRSA strains with MICs > 1 microg/mL. The development of new antibiotics, such as linezolid and daptomycin, and the promise of future compounds (dalvabancin, ceftobiprole and telavancin) may change the expectatives in this field.The principal aim of this consensus document was to formulate several recommendations to improve the outcome of MRSA bacteremia and endocarditis, based on the latest reported scientific evidence. This document specifically analyzes the approach for three clinical situations: venous catheter-related bacteremia, persistent bacteremia, and infective endocarditis due to MRSA.

  12. Comparison of outcomes in patients with methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia who are treated with β-lactam vs vancomycin empiric therapy: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Davie; Wong, Titus; Romney, Marc; Leung, Victor

    2016-05-23

    Prior studies suggested that vancomycin may be inferior to β-lactams for the empiric treatment of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) bacteremia. We assessed whether empiric therapy with β-lactams compared to vancomycin was associated with differences in clinical outcomes in patients with MSSA bacteremia. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adult inpatients with their first episode of MSSA bacteremia at two tertiary care hospitals in Vancouver, Canada, between 2007 and 2014. Exposure was either empiric β-lactam or vancomycin therapy. All patients received definitive treatment with cloxacillin or cefazolin. The primary outcome was 28-day mortality. Secondary outcomes were 90-day mortality, recurrent infection at 6 months, duration of bacteremia and hospital length-of-stay. Outcomes were adjusted using multivariable logistic regression. Of 814 patients identified, 400 met inclusion criteria (β-lactam = 200, vancomycin = 200). Overall 28-day mortality was 8.5 % (n=34). There were more cases of infective endocarditis in the β-lactam than in the vancomycin group [45 (22.5 %) vs 23 (11.5 %), p < 0.01]. Adjusted mortality at 28 days was similar between the two groups (OR: 1.14; 95 % CI: 0.49-2.64). No differences in secondary outcomes were observed. Transition to cloxacillin or cefazolin occurred within a median of 67.8 h in the vancomycin group. Empiric therapy with β-lactams was not associated with differences in all-cause mortality, recurrent infection, microbiological cure or hospital length-of-stay compared to vancomycin. Vancomycin monotherapy may be appropriate for the empiric treatment of MSSA bacteremia if definitive therapy with cloxacillin or cefazolin can be initiated within 3 days.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia with iliac artery endarteritis in a patient receiving ustekinumab

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    Insa Joost

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ustekinumab (Stelara®, a human monoclonal antibody targeting the p40-subunit of interleukin (IL-12 and IL-23, is indicated for moderate to severe plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. In large multicenter, prospective trials assessing efficacy and safety of ustekinumab increased rates of severe infections have not been observed so far. Case presentation Here, we report the case of a 64-year old woman presenting with chills, pain and swelling of her right foot with dark maculae at the sole, and elevated inflammatory markers. She had received a third dose of ustekinumab due to psoriatic arthritis three days before admission. Blood cultures revealed growth of Staphylococcus aureus and imaging showed a thickening of the aortic wall ventral the bifurcation above the right internal iliac artery, resembling an acute bacterial endarteritis. Without the evidence of aneurysms and in absence of foreign bodies, the decision for conservative management was made. The patient received four weeks of antibiotic therapy with intravenous flucloxacillin, followed by an oral regime with levofloxacin and rifampicin for an additional four weeks. Inflammatory markers resolved promptly and the patient was discharged in good health. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of a severe S. aureus infection in a patient receiving ustekinumab. Albeit ustekinumab is generally regarded as a safe drug, severe bacterial infections should always be included in the differential diagnosis of elevated inflammatory markers in patients receiving biologicals as these might present with nonspecific symptoms and fever might be absent. Any effort to detect deep-seated or metastatic infections should be made to prevent complications and to secure appropriate treatment. Although other risk factors for an invasive staphylococcal infection like psoriasis, recent corticosteroid injection, or prior hospitalisations were present, and therefore a directive

  14. The associations between socioeconomic status and risk of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and subsequent endocarditis - a Danish nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oestergaard, Louise Bruun; Schmiegelow, Michelle D; Bruun, Niels Eske; Skov, Robert L; Petersen, Andreas; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2017-08-25

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is the leading cause of infective endocarditis in several countries. Since socioeconomic status (SES) is known to influence the risk of infectious diseases in general, we aimed to investigate the association between SES and SAB, and risk of subsequent endocarditis in a nationwide adult population. All Danish residents were consecutively included at age ≥ 30 years during 1996-2010. We obtained information on SES (highest attained educational level), comorbidities, and microbiologically verified SAB by cross-linking nationwide registries. The incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of SAB and later endocarditis were investigated using Poisson regression models adjusted for sex, age and year (reference = highest SES). Our study population comprised 3,394,936 individuals (median age = 43.2 years). Over a median follow-up of 15.9 years, 13,181 individuals acquired SAB. SES was inversely associated with SAB acquisition, which declined with increasing age, e.g. in individuals with lowest SES, IRRs were 3.78 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.89-4.95) in age 30-50 years, 1.87 (CI = 1.60-2.18) in age > 50-70 years and 1.31 (CI = 1.11-1.54) in age > 70 years (interaction-p < 0.0001). Adjustment for comorbidities attenuated the IRRs, but the pattern persisted. No association between SES and endocarditis risk among patients with SAB was observed. Decreasing SES was associated with an increased risk of SAB, particularly in younger adults. SES was not associated with risk of subsequent endocarditis.

  15. Compliance of hospital staff with guidelines for the active surveillance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and its impact on rates of nosocomial MRSA bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoabi, Marwan; Keness, Yoram; Titler, Nava; Bisharat, Naiel

    2011-12-01

    The compliance of hospital staff with guidelines for the active surveillance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Israel has not been determined. To evaluate the compliance of hospital staff with guidelines for the active surveillance of MRSA and assess its impact on the incidence of nosocomial MRSA bacteremia. We assessed compliance with MRSA surveillance guidelines by assessing adherence to the screening protocol and reviewing medical and nursing charts of patients colonized with MRSA, and observed hand hygiene opportunities among health care workers and colonized patients. Rates of nosocomial MRSA bacteremia and of adherence with hand hygiene among overall hospital staff were obtained from archived data for the period 2001-2010. Only 32.4% of eligible patients were screened for MRSA carriage on admission, and 69.9% of MRSA carriers did not receive any eradication treatment. The mean rate of adherence to glove use among nurses and doctors was 69% and 31% respectively (Pstaff with guidelines for active MRSA surveillance was poor. The encouraging increase in adherence to hand hygiene and concomitant decrease in nosocomial MRSA bacteremia is gratifying. The deficiencies in compliance with MRSA infection control policy warrant an adjusted strategy based on the hospital resources.

  16. Decreasing incidence rates of bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Pedersen, C; Jensen, T G

    2014-01-01

    ) and the incidence rate of nosocomial bacteremia decreased by 28.9% from 82.2 to 56.0 (4.2% annually, p Staphylococcus aureus (12.3%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (10.......0%) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (9.1%). Regardless of place of acquisition, the proportion of bacteremias caused by enterococci increased (p

  17. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in a single large Minnesota medical center in 2015 as assessed using MLST, core genome MLST and spa typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Hwa; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Uhl, James R; Cunningham, Scott A; Chia, Nicholas; Jeraldo, Patricio R; Sampathkumar, Priya; Nelson, Heidi; Patel, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bacteremia in hospitalized patients. Whether or not S. aureus bacteremia (SAB) is associated with clonality, implicating potential nosocomial transmission, has not, however, been investigated. Herein, we examined the epidemiology of SAB using whole genome sequencing (WGS). 152 SAB isolates collected over the course of 2015 at a single large Minnesota medical center were studied. Staphylococcus protein A (spa) typing was performed by PCR/Sanger sequencing; multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and core genome MLST (cgMLST) were determined by WGS. Forty-eight isolates (32%) were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The isolates encompassed 66 spa types, clustered into 11 spa clonal complexes (CCs) and 10 singleton types. 88% of 48 MRSA isolates belonged to spa CC-002 or -008. Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates were more genotypically diverse, with 61% distributed across four spa CCs (CC-002, CC-012, CC-008 and CC-084). By MLST, there was 31 sequence types (STs), including 18 divided into 6 CCs and 13 singleton STs. Amongst MSSA isolates, the common MLST clones were CC5 (23%), CC30 (19%), CC8 (15%) and CC15 (11%). Common MRSA clones were CC5 (67%) and CC8 (25%); there were no MRSA isolates in CC45 or CC30. By cgMLST analysis, there were 9 allelic differences between two isolates, with the remaining 150 isolates differing from each other by over 40 alleles. The two isolates were retroactively epidemiologically linked by medical record review. Overall, cgMLST analysis resulted in higher resolution epidemiological typing than did multilocus sequence or spa typing.

  18. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in a single large Minnesota medical center in 2015 as assessed using MLST, core genome MLST and spa typing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Hwa Park

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bacteremia in hospitalized patients. Whether or not S. aureus bacteremia (SAB is associated with clonality, implicating potential nosocomial transmission, has not, however, been investigated. Herein, we examined the epidemiology of SAB using whole genome sequencing (WGS. 152 SAB isolates collected over the course of 2015 at a single large Minnesota medical center were studied. Staphylococcus protein A (spa typing was performed by PCR/Sanger sequencing; multilocus sequence typing (MLST and core genome MLST (cgMLST were determined by WGS. Forty-eight isolates (32% were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. The isolates encompassed 66 spa types, clustered into 11 spa clonal complexes (CCs and 10 singleton types. 88% of 48 MRSA isolates belonged to spa CC-002 or -008. Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA isolates were more genotypically diverse, with 61% distributed across four spa CCs (CC-002, CC-012, CC-008 and CC-084. By MLST, there was 31 sequence types (STs, including 18 divided into 6 CCs and 13 singleton STs. Amongst MSSA isolates, the common MLST clones were CC5 (23%, CC30 (19%, CC8 (15% and CC15 (11%. Common MRSA clones were CC5 (67% and CC8 (25%; there were no MRSA isolates in CC45 or CC30. By cgMLST analysis, there were 9 allelic differences between two isolates, with the remaining 150 isolates differing from each other by over 40 alleles. The two isolates were retroactively epidemiologically linked by medical record review. Overall, cgMLST analysis resulted in higher resolution epidemiological typing than did multilocus sequence or spa typing.

  19. Predictive Value of C-Reactive Protein (CRP in Identifying Fatal Outcome and Deep Infections in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia.

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    Tomi Mölkänen

    Full Text Available Clear cut-off levels could aid clinicians in identifying patients with a risk of fatal outcomes or complications such as deep infection foci in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB. Cut-off levels for widely used clinical follow-up parameters including serum C-reactive protein (CRP levels and white blood cell counts (WBC have not been previously studied.430 adult SAB patients in Finland took part in prospective multicentre study in which their CRP levels and WBC counts were measured on the day of the positive blood culture, every other day during the first week, twice a week during hospitalization and at 30 days. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis was used to evaluate the prognostic value of CRP and WBC on the day of the positive blood culture and at days 4, 7, and 14 in predicting mortality and the presence of deep infections at 30 days. Adjusted hazard ratios (HR for CRP level and WBC count cut-off values for mortality were calculated by the Cox regression analysis and adjusted odds ratios (OR for cut-off values to predict the presence of deep infection by the binary logistic regression analysis.The succumbing patients could be distinguished from the survivors, starting on day 4 after the positive blood culture, by higher CRP levels. Cut-off values of CRP for day 30 mortality in adjusted analysis, that significantly predicted fatal outcome were at day 4 CRP >103 mg/L with sensitivity of 77%, specificity of 55%, and HR of 3.5 (95% CI, 1.2-10.3; p = 0.024, at day 14 CRP >61 mg/L with a sensitivity of 82%, specificity of 80% and HR of 3.6 (95% CI, 1.1-10.3; p8.6 x109/L was prognostic with sensitivity of 77%, specificity of 78% and HR of 8.2 (95% CI, 2.9-23.1; p108 mg/L with sensitivity of 77%, specificity of 60%, and HR of 2.6 (95% CI, 1.3-4.9; p = 0.005 and at day 14 CRP >22 mg/L with sensitivity of 59%, specificity of 68%, and HR of 3.9 (95% CI, 1.6-9.5; p = 0.003. The lack of decline of CRP in 14 days or during the second week

  20. Executive summary of the diagnosis and treatment of bacteremia and endocarditis due to Staphylococcus aureus. A clinical guideline from the Spanish Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (SEIMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiol, Francesc; Aguado, José María; Almirante, Benito; Bouza, Emilio; Cercenado, Emilia; Domínguez, M Ángeles; Gasch, Oriol; Lora-Tamayo, Jaime; Miró, José M; Palomar, Mercedes; Pascual, Alvaro; Pericas, Juan M; Pujol, Miquel; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Shaw, Evelyn; Soriano, Alex; Vallés, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    Bacteremia and infective endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus aureus are common and severe diseases. Optimization of treatment is fundamental in the prognosis of these infections. The high rates of treatment failure and the increasing interest in the influence of vancomycin susceptibility in the outcome of infections caused by both methicillin-susceptible and -resistant isolates have led to research on novel therapeutic schemes. The interest in the new antimicrobials with activity against methicillin-resistant staphylococci has been extended to susceptible strains, which still carry the most important burden of infection. New combinations of antimicrobials have been investigated in experimental and clinical studies, but their role is still being debated. Also, the appropriateness of the initial empirical therapy has acquired relevance in recent years. The aim of this guideline is to update the 2009 guidelines and to provide an ensemble of recommendations in order to improve the treatment of staphylococcal bacteremia and infective endocarditis, in accordance with the latest published evidence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  1. Complicated Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia (SAB) Is Associated with Genetic Variation in GLS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Vance; Ruffin, Felicia; Kuinkel, Batu Sharma; Cyr, Derek D; Guo, Shengru; Dykxhoorn, Derek; Skov, Robert; Bruun, Niels; Dahl, Anders; Lærke, Christian; Scott, William; Andersen, Paal

    2017-01-01

    association with complicated SAB in a two-stage discovery/replication design identified a novel candidate gene. GLS2 is an interesting candidate for complicated SAB due to its role in regulating glutamine production, a key factor in activation of T-cell production. Disclosures V. Fowler Jr., Pfizer, Novartis, Galderma, Novadigm, Durata, Debiopharm, Genentech, Achaogen, Affinium, Medicines Co., Cerexa, Tetraphase, Trius, MedImmune, Bayer, Theravance, Cubist, Basilea, Affinergy, Janssen, xBiotech, Contrafect: Consultant, Consulting fee; NIH, Basilea, MedImmune, Cerexa/Forest/Actavis/Allergan, Pfizer, Advanced Liquid Logics, Theravance, Novartis, Cubist/Merck; Medical Biosurfaces; Locus; Affinergy; Contrafect; Karius: Grant Investigator, Research grant; Green Cross, Cubist, Cerexa, Durata, Theravance; Debiopharm: Consultant, Consulting fee; UpToDate: author on several chapters, Royalties

  2. Diabetes increases the risk of disease and death due to Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. A matched case-control and cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marie-Louise Uhre; Gotland, Nanja; Mejer, Niels

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study investigated the effect and influence of diabetes severity on susceptibility and 30-day mortality of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB). METHODS: Nationwide population-based study of individuals with SAB and matched population controls. Diabetes severity was categorized...... without complications (OR 1.83 (95% CI 1.74-1.92)) and of diabetes with complications (OR 3.62 (95% CI 3.43-3.81) compared to no diabetes. The risk of SAB was highest within the first year of diabetes. Diabetes without complications was associated with an increased risk of 30-day mortality (HR 1.62 (95...... significantly increased the risk of SAB. In contrast, there was an increased risk of 30-day mortality after SAB for diabetes without complications but not for diabetes with complications overall. Diabetes with ketoacidosis/coma conferred the highest relative risk of 30-day mortality....

  3. Predicting Risk of Endocarditis Using a Clinical Tool (PREDICT): Scoring System to Guide Use of Echocardiography in the Management of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palraj, Bharath Raj; Baddour, Larry M.; Hess, Erik P.; Steckelberg, James M.; Wilson, Walter R.; Lahr, Brian D.; Sohail, M. Rizwan

    2015-01-01

    Background. Infective endocarditis (IE) is a serious complication of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB). There is limited clinical evidence to guide use of echocardiography in the management of SAB cases. Methods. Baseline and 12-week follow-up data of all adults hospitalized at our institution with SAB from 2006 to 2011 were reviewed. Clinical predictors of IE were identified using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results. Of the 757 patients screened, 678 individuals with SAB (24% community acquired, 56% healthcare associated, and 20% nosocomial) met study criteria. Eighty-five patients (13%) were diagnosed with definite IE within the 12 weeks of initial presentation based on modified Duke criteria. The proportion of patients with IE was 22% (36/166) in community-acquired SAB, 11% (40/378) in community-onset healthcare-associated SAB, and 7% (9/136) in nosocomial SAB. Community-acquired SAB, presence of cardiac device, and prolonged bacteremia (≥72 hours) were identified as independent predictors of IE in multivariable analysis. Two scoring systems, day 1 (SAB diagnosis day) and day 5 (when day 3 culture results are known), were derived based on the presence of these risk factors, weighted in magnitude by the corresponding regression coefficients. A score of ≥4 for day 1 model had a specificity of 96% and sensitivity of 21%, whereas a score of <2 for day 5 model had a sensitivity of 98.8% and negative predictive value of 98.5%. Conclusions. We propose 2 novel scoring systems to guide use of echocardiography in SAB cases. Larger prospective studies are needed to validate the classification performance of these scoring systems. PMID:25810284

  4. Molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from patients with bacteremia based on MLST, SCCmec, spa, and agr locus types analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Mehdi; Seyedjavadi, Sima Sadat; Nasiri, Mohammad Javad; Goudarzi, Hossein; Sajadi Nia, Raheleh; Dabiri, Hossein

    2017-03-01

    The widespread emergence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, as a common cause of nosocomial infections, is becoming a serious concern in global public health. The objective of the present study was to investigate antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, frequency of virulence genes and molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from patients with bacteremia. A total of 128 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates were collected during February 2015 to January 2016. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates was assessed using the disk diffusion method. Conventional PCR was performed for the detection of adhesion (can, bbp, ebp, fnbB, fnbA, clfB, clfA) and toxin (etb, eta, pvl, tst) encoding genes, determining the agr type, SCCmec, MLST and spa typing of the isolates. All the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates were found to be sensitive to linezolid, teicoplanin, and vancomycin. Resistance to the tested antibiotics varied from 97.7% for penicillin to 24.2% for mupirocin. The rate of multi drug resistance (MDR) in the present study was 97.7%. The most commonly detected toxin and adhesion genes were tst (58.6%), and clfB (100%), respectively. The majority of SCCmec III isolates were found in agr group I while SCCmec IV and II isolates were distributed among agr group III. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) of the MRSA isolates showed five different sequence types: ST239 (43%), ST22 (39.8%), ST585 (10.9%), ST45 (3.9%) and ST240 (2.3%). All of the pvl positive strains belonged to ST22-SCCmec IV/t790 clone and were MDR. Among different 7 spa types, the most common were t790 (27.3%), t037 (21.9%), and t030 (14.1%). spa types t016, t924 and spa type t383 were reported for the first time from Asia and Iran, respectively. It was shown that spa types circulating in the studied hospitals varied which support the need to perform future surveillance studies in order to understand

  5. Bacteremia in burned patients admitted to Sina Hospital, Tabriz, Iran

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    Parviz Saleh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most important causes of mortality and morbidity in burn wards is infection, and it is the major reason of death in burn injuries. There are several reasons that make burn victims predisposed to infection. The current study aimed to investigate the role of different factors that have an effect on bacteremia occurrence in burn patients and factors which are relevant to mortality in these patients. Methods: This descriptive-analytic study conducted in a 1 year period in Sina Hospital, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran, and 81 burn were included. We collected patients’ data about their age, body weight, cause of burn, lesion color, place and percentage of burn by getting history and studying of their files. Then we documented all interventions. Blood tests and cultures and colonies criteria were recorded. Results: In this study, 39 patients were male (48.1%, and 42 was female (51.9%. Mean age was 32.06 ± 17.46 years. In patients without bacteremia, 57 patients did not need catheterization (89.1%, however in patients with bacteremia 9 patients demanded catheter insertion (52.9%. In patients with bacteremia 12 patients survived (70.9%, however in the without bacteremia group 56 patients survived (92.2%. Then, the relationship between type of burn, wound infection and bacterial species investigated, (P = 0.650, P = 0.210 and P = 0.110 respectively. Conclusion: We concluded, invasive interventions increased bacteremia susceptibility in our studied burned patients. Mortality rate is directly related to bacteremia prevalence and increased by extent of burn area in these patients. The three most frequent microbial agents responsible for bacteremia were Pseudomona aeruginosa, Klebsiella and Staphylococcus aureus.

  6. The role of intestinal colonization with gram-negative bacteria as a source for intensive care unit-acquired bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostdijk, Evelien A N; de Smet, Anne Marie G A; Kesecioglu, Jozef; Bonten, Marc J M

    2011-05-01

    Selective digestive tract decontamination aims to eradicate gram-negative bacteria in both the intestinal tract and respiratory tract and is combined with a 4-day course of intravenous cefotaxime. Selective oropharyngeal decontamination only aims to eradicate respiratory tract colonization. In a recent study, selective digestive tract decontamination and selective oropharyngeal decontamination were associated with lower day-28 mortality, when compared to standard care. Furthermore, selective digestive tract decontamination was associated with a lower incidence of intensive care unit-acquired bacteremia caused by gram-negative bacteria. We quantified the role of intestinal tract carriage with gram-negative bacteria and intensive care unit-acquired gram-negative bacteremia. Data from a cluster-randomized and a single-center observational study. Intensive care unit in The Netherlands. Patients with intensive care unit stay of >48 hrs that received selective digestive tract decontamination (n = 2,667), selective oropharyngeal decontamination (n = 2,166) or standard care (n = 1,945). Selective digestive tract decontamination or selective oropharyngeal decontamination. Incidence densities (episodes/1000 days) of intensive care unit-acquired gram-negative bacteremia were 4.5, 3.0, and 1.4 during standard care, selective oropharyngeal decontamination, and selective digestive tract decontamination, respectively, and the daily risk for developing intensive care unit-acquired gram-negative bacteria bacteremia increased until days 36, 33, and 31 for selective digestive tract decontamination, standard care, and selective oropharyngeal decontamination and was always lowest during selective digestive tract decontamination. Rectal colonization with gram-negative bacteria was present in 26% and 71% of patient days during selective digestive tract decontamination and selective oropharyngeal decontamination, respectively (p gram-negative bacteremia was 4.5 during patient days with

  7. A Prospective Cohort Multicenter Study of Molecular Epidemiology and Phylogenomics of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia in Nine Latin American Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Cesar A; Reyes, Jinnethe; Carvajal, Lina Paola; Rincon, Sandra; Diaz, Lorena; Panesso, Diana; Ibarra, Gabriel; Rios, Rafael; Munita, Jose M; Salles, Mauro J; Alvarez-Moreno, Carlos; Labarca, Jaime; Garcia, Coralith; Luna, Carlos M; Mejia-Villatoro, Carlos; Zurita, Jeannete; Guzman-Blanco, Manuel; Rodriguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Narechania, Apurva; Rojas, Laura J; Planet, Paul J; Weinstock, George M; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Seas, Carlos

    2017-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen causing a spectrum of diseases ranging from mild skin and soft tissue infections to life-threatening conditions. Bloodstream infections are particularly important, and the treatment approach is complicated by the presence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates. The emergence of new genetic lineages of MRSA has occurred in Latin America (LA) with the rise and dissemination of the community-associated USA300 Latin American variant (USA300-LV). Here, we prospectively characterized bloodstream MRSA recovered from selected hospitals in 9 Latin American countries. All isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing. Whole-genome sequencing was performed on 96 MRSA representatives. MRSA represented 45% of all (1,185 S. aureus) isolates. The majority of MRSA isolates belonged to clonal cluster (CC) 5. In Colombia and Ecuador, most isolates (≥72%) belonged to the USA300-LV lineage (CC8). Phylogenetic reconstructions indicated that MRSA isolates from participating hospitals belonged to three major clades. Clade A grouped isolates with sequence type 5 (ST5), ST105, and ST1011 (mostly staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec [SCCmec] I and II). Clade B included ST8, ST88, ST97, and ST72 strains (SCCmec IV, subtypes a, b, and c/E), and clade C grouped mostly Argentinian MRSA belonging to ST30. In summary, CC5 MRSA was prevalent in bloodstream infections in LA with the exception of Colombia and Ecuador, where USA300-LV is now the dominant lineage. Clonal replacement appears to be a common phenomenon, and continuous surveillance is crucial to identify changes in the molecular epidemiology of MRSA. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Comparable Effectiveness of First Week Treatment with Anti-Staphylococcal Penicillin versus Cephalosporin in Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia: A Propensity-Score Adjusted Retrospective Study.

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    Erik Forsblom

    Full Text Available The objective was to compare the prognostic impact of first week treatment with anti-staphylococcal penicillin (ASP versus cephalosporin in methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (MS-SAB. Altogether 580 patients were retrospectively followed and categorized according to first week treatment; 84% (488 received ASP (cloxacillin and 16% (92 cephalosporin (cefuroxime or ceftriaxone. SAB management was optimized with formal bedside infectious disease specialist consultation in 88%, deep infection foci diagnosed in 77% and adjunctive rifampicin therapy given to 61% of patients. The total case fatality in 580 patients was 12% at 28 days and 18% at 90 days. When comparing effectiveness of first week ASP versus cephalosporin treatment there were no significant differences in 28-days (11% vs. 12%, OR; 1.05, 95% CI, 0.53-2.09 or 90-days (17% vs. 21% OR; 1.25, 95% CI, 0.72-2.19 outcome. In univariate analysis no prognostic impact of either first week ASP or cephalosporin treatment was observed for 28-days (OR; 0.96, 95% CI, 0.48-1.90 and OR; 1.05, 95% CI, 0.53-2.09 or 90-days (OR; 0.80, 95% CI, 0.46-1.39 and OR; 1.25, 95% CI, 0.72-2.19 outcome. Propensity-score adjusted Cox proportional regression analysis for first week treatment with cephalosporin demonstrated no significant prognostic impact at 28-days (HR 1.54, 95% CI 0.72-3.23 or 90-days (HR 1.56, 95% CI 0.88-2.86.There is a comparable effectiveness with respect to 28- and 90-days outcome for first week treatment with ASP versus cephalosporin in MS-SAB. The results indicate that the difference in prognostic impact between first week ASP and cephalosporin may be non-significant in patient cohorts with SAB management optimized by infectious disease specialist consultation.

  9. Effects of inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy on mortality in patients with healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: a propensity-matched analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young Kyung; Park, Dae Won; Sohn, Jang Wook; Kim, Hyo Youl; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Lee, Chang-Seop; Lee, Mi Suk; Ryu, Seong-Yeol; Jang, Hee-Chang; Choi, Young Ju; Kang, Cheol-In; Choi, Hee Jung; Lee, Seung Soon; Kim, Shin Woo; Kim, Sang Il; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Jeong Yeon; Yang, Kyung Sook; Peck, Kyong Ran; Kim, Min Ja

    2016-07-15

    The purported value of empirical therapy to cover methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been debated for decades. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy on clinical outcomes in patients with healthcare-associated MRSA bacteremia (HA-MRSAB). A prospective, multicenter, observational study was conducted in 15 teaching hospitals in the Republic of Korea from February 2010 to July 2011. The study subjects included adult patients with HA-MRSAB. Covariate adjustment using the propensity score was performed to control for bias in treatment assignment. The predictors of in-hospital mortality were determined by multivariate logistic regression analyses. In total, 345 patients with HA-MRSAB were analyzed. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 33.0 %. Appropriate empirical antibiotic therapy was given to 154 (44.6 %) patients. The vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations of the MRSA isolates ranged from 0.5 to 2 mg/L by E-test. There was no significant difference in mortality between propensity-matched patient pairs receiving inappropriate or appropriate empirical antibiotics (odds ratio [OR] = 1.20; 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 0.71-2.03). Among patients with severe sepsis or septic shock, there was no significant difference in mortality between the treatment groups. In multivariate analyses, severe sepsis or septic shock (OR = 5.45; 95 % CI = 2.14-13.87), Charlson's comorbidity index (per 1-point increment; OR = 1.52; 95 % CI = 1.27-1.83), and prior receipt of glycopeptides (OR = 3.24; 95 % CI = 1.08-9.67) were independent risk factors for mortality. Inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy was not associated with clinical outcome in patients with HA-MRSAB. Prudent use of empirical glycopeptide therapy should be justified even in hospitals with high MRSA prevalence.

  10. Community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: Studies of risk and prognosis with special attention to diabetes mellitus and chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Jesper

    2017-05-01

    Community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (CA-SAB) is a serious infection with detrimental clinical effects. Chronic diseases constitute some of the most important risk and prognostic factors for CA-SAB. The prevalence of diabetes and chronic heart failure (CHF) is rapidly increasing on a global scale, nevertheless, there are few data available specifically elucidating the influence of these chronic conditions on CA-SAB risk and outcome. Therefore, to extend the current knowledge, we aimed to I) elucidate the impact of different definitions of healthcare-associated (HCA) infection on the prevalence of HCA-SAB, patient characteristics, and mortality, II) to investigate whether diabetes is a risk factor for CA-SAB, III) to ascertain the prognostic influence of diabetes on CA-SAB outcome, and IV) to investigate the influence of CHF on mortality in patients with CA-SAB. The thesis is based on a cross-sectional study, a case-control study, and two cohort studies, all conducted in Northern Denmark, 2000-2011. Utilizing the unique civil registration number assigned to all Danish residents, we linked data from the local departments of clinical microbiology, the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish National Patient Registry, the LABKA database, and the Aarhus University Prescription Database. In study I, we included 4,385 patients with SAB. The proportion of patients classified as HCA-SAB ranged between 29.8% and 71.7% across five different definitions of HCA infection. Use of different definition of HCA infection also influenced the distribution of patient characteristics, whereas estimates of 30-day mortality remained unchanged (~ 24%). Study II included 2,638 patients with CA-SAB and 26,379 population controls matched by age, gender, and residence. We found diabetes to be strongly associated with an increased risk of CA-SAB (adjusted odds ratio=2.8 (95% CI, 2.5-3.1)). Compared with persons without diabetes, the increased CA-SAB risk was most apparent

  11. The incidence and prognosis of patients with bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stig Lønberg

    2015-01-01

    of community-acquired bacteremia (3.7% per year, p Staphylococcus...... aureus, co-agulasenegative staphylococci and Streptococcus pneumoniae, and increased for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and enterococci species (p

  12. Role of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in chronic urticaria

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    Ashimav Deb Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the role of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in patients suffering from chronic urticaria. Method: All total 82 patients were included for this study. Study group comprised 57 patients with chronic urticaria and the control group comprised 25 healthy volunteers. Nasal swab specimens were taken from all the 82 patients for bacterial culture and antimicrobial sensitivity. Patients with chronic urticaria who had positive growth for S. aureus were treated with sensitive antimicrobial agent. Nasal swab specimens were taken again from all the patients who received antimicrobial therapy to ensure complete eradication of S. aureus. All patients were followed up for a period of 6 weeks after the treatment. Urticarial activity was measured with the help of urticarial activity score. Results: S. aureus was detected in swab specimens from the nasal cavity in 32 patients in the study group and 7 patients in the control group. In the study group, after the antimicrobial treatment, 9 patients (28.12% had complete recovery from urticaria during the follow-up period; 4 patients (12.5% showed partial recovery from urticaria while the remaining patients (59.37% continued to suffer from urticaria. Conclusion: This study showed that nasal carriage of S. aureus can act as an etiological factor in chronic urticaria.

  13. Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterimias from 1980 to 1993: Impact of Intravascular Devices and Methicillin Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Steinberg; C.C. Clarke; B.O. Hackman

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe rate of nosocomial bacteremia due to Staphylococcus aureus has increased over the past decade, but trends in community-acquired S. aureus bacteremia are less certain. This hospital-based observational study compares nosocomial and community-acquired S. aureus bacteremias during

  14. THE ROLE OF CORTICOSTEROIDS IN ADULT RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME CAUSED BY VIRIDANS GROUP STREPTOCOCCI BACTEREMIA IN NEUTROPENIC PATIENTS

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    Abraham Tareq Yacoub

    2014-09-01

    A retrospective chart review of patients with hematologic malignancy diagnosed with VGS bacteremia admitted to the Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Florida between 1/1/2001 and 4/1/2012 was completed. Data was collected about respiratory symptoms, diagnosis of adult respiratory syndrome, results of blood cultures, medications received and outcome. Results In this study, 70 cases of VGS bacteremia in neutropenic patients were reviewed.  The most common adverse event of VGS bacteremia in this group of patients is the development of serious pulmonary complications such as ARDS. In our study, 7 patients developed ARDS. The most common identifies streptococcal species was Streptococcus mitis, isolated in 4 of 7 patients. All 7 patients received corticosteroids early with the onset of respiratory failure. The most commonly prescribed regimen was methylprednisolone 60 mg intravenously every 12 hour for an average of 3 days.  All patients received comparable supportive care, appropriate antibiotics, ventilation and hemodynamic support. All patients (100 % recovered from respiratory failure after receiving corticosteroids. There were no significant adverse events attributable to steroids use. Conclusion Streptococcus mitis is the species most frequently isolated from the patients who have developed ARDS from Streptococcus viridans bacteremia. Our data suggest that the early administration of corticosteroids to neutropenic patients who develop early signs of respiratory failure with VGS bacteremia can prevent the progression of ARDS and improve mortality.  Moderate doses of steroids with short duration of administration were not associated with significant adverse events in our case series. While the use of corticosteroids in this setting has been described in the literature since the early 1990s, there remains a scarcity of data and our study help shed some light on this area. Moreover there is little recognition among clinicians of the association between ARDS and VGS

  15. Liver abscess and bacteremia caused by lactobacillus: role of probiotics? Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherid, Muhammed; Samo, Salih; Sulaiman, Samian; Husein, Husein; Sifuentes, Humberto; Sridhar, Subbaramiah

    2016-11-18

    Lactobacilli are non-spore forming, lactic acid producing, gram-positive rods. They are a part of the normal gastrointestinal and genitourinary microbiota and have rarely been reported to be the cause of infections. Lactobacilli species are considered non-pathogenic organisms and have been used as probiotics to prevent antibiotic associated diarrhea. There are sporadic reported cases of infections related to lactobacilli containing probiotics. In this paper we discuss a case of an 82 year old female with liver abscess and bacteremia from lactobacillus after using probiotics containing lactobacilli in the course of her treatment of Clostridium difficile colitis. The Lactobacillus strain identification was not performed and therefore, both commensal microbiota and the probiotic product should be considered as possible sources of the strain. Lactobacilli can lead to bacteremia and liver abscesses in some susceptible persons and greater awareness of this potential side effect is warranted with the increasing use of probiotics containing lactobacilli.

  16. Immunological role of nasal staphylococcus aureus carriage in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2008-10-30

    Oct 30, 2008 ... Nasal carriage of staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) exerts immunomodulatory effects in patients with atopic dermatitis and it may contribute to airway inflammation and allergic response in patients with allergic rhinitis. We investigated the frequency of nasal S. aureus carriage in patients with perennial ...

  17. Mortality among critically ill patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: a multicenter cohort study in Colombia Mortalidad en pacientes gravemente enfermos con bacteriemia por Staphylococcus aureus resistente a la meticilina: un estudio multicéntrico de cohortes en Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan S. Castillo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate risk factors associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA bacteremia emergence, its prognosis, and mortality-determining factors in critically ill patients in Colombia. METHODS: A multicenter, retrospective cohort study conducted in 2005-2008 at 16 public and private reference health care institutions in Bogotá, Colombia, that form part of a national epidemiological surveillance network and a hospital network with 4 469 beds. Methicillin-resistant emergence and mortality were analyzed using descriptive and time-to-event analysis; a multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression model was built to test the association between methicillin resistance and mortality. RESULTS: A total of 372 patients were studied: 186 with MRSA bacteremia, randomly matched with 186 with methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA bacteremia. Previous surgery, antibiotic exposure, and hospital-acquired infections were independently associated with methicillin resistance. MRSA caused longer hospital stays among survivors (median 24 versus 18 days, P = 0.014. Mortality predictors were: patient age, creatinine level over 1.21mg/dl at ICU admission, severe sepsis, and inotropic requirement. Appropriate antimicrobial therapy and antimicrobial therapy change were independent protective factors, as was male gender. CONCLUSIONS: Methicillin resistance per se was not a mortality-independent prognostic factor. Previous conditions, such as age, baseline renal impairment, severe sepsis, and inotropy demand explained the observed mortality. Appropriate antimicrobial therapy remained a protective factor. A call to improve infection control measures in Colombia is mandatory.OBJETIVO: Evaluar los factores de riesgo asociados con la aparición de bacteriemia por Staphylococcus aureus resistente a la meticilina (MRSA, su pronóstico y los factores determinantes de la mortalidad en pacientes gravemente enfermos en Colombia. M

  18. Bacteremia with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J S; Jensen, T G; Kolmos, H J

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a hospital-based cohort study among adult patients with first-time Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia (SPB) from 2000 through 2008. Patients were identified in a population-based bacteremia database and followed up for mortality through the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS...

  19. Impacto de la resistencia a la meticilina sobre la mortalidad y vigilancia de la sensibilidad a la vancomicina en bacteriemias causadas por Staphylococcus aureus Impact of methicillin resistance on mortality and surveillance of vancomycin susceptibility in bacteremias caused by Staphylococcus aureus

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    F. Traverso

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus es uno de los principales patógenos nosocomiales y produce una alta morbimortalidad en numerosos hospitales del mundo. Además, la incidencia de bacteriemias por este microorganismo ha aumentado significativamente en las últimas décadas. Los objetivos del presente trabajo fueron identificar los factores de riesgo que favorecen la aparición de resistencia a la meticilina en aislamientos de S. aureus y los factores que afectan la mortalidad por bacteriemias asociadas a este patógeno, así como evaluar la sensibilidad a la vancomicina de las cepas resistentes a la meticilina. Se estudiaron 39 aislamientos de S. aureus provenientes de hemocultivos de pacientes internados con bacteriemia en la Nueva Clínica Chacabuco de Tandil (Pcia. de Buenos Aires, Argentina en el período 01/2006-12/2008. La mortalidad global fue del 51,3% y estuvo significativamente asociada con la resistencia a la meticilina (OR: 4,20; IC95%: 1,08-16,32; p: 0,05; aunque dicho factor no fue un predictor independiente de mortalidad. La cirugía previa (OR: 17,23; IC95%: 1,80-164,60 y la estancia previa en la unidad de cuidados intensivos (OR: 21,12; IC95%: 2,33-191,30 fueron predictores independientes de la resistencia a la meticilina y la asistencia respiratoria mecánica (OR: 15,99; IC: 3,24-78,86 fue un predictor independiente de la mortalidad. No se detectaron cepas con sensibilidad disminuida a la vancomicina. Todos los aislamientos estudiados fueron sensibles in vitro a la vancomicina, con una CIM50 y una CIM90 de 0,5 μg/ml.Staphylococcus aureus is a major nosocomial pathogen that causes severe morbidity and mortality in many hospitals worldwide. Besides, the incidence of S. aureus bacteremia has significantly increased over the past decades. The aims of this study were to detect the risk factors for methicillin resistance and mortality and to evaluate vancomycin susceptibility in methicillin-resistant isolates. Thus, 39 S. aureus isolates from

  20. Mortality and hospital stay associated with resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteremia: estimating the burden of antibiotic resistance in Europe.

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    Marlieke E A de Kraker

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The relative importance of human diseases is conventionally assessed by cause-specific mortality, morbidity, and economic impact. Current estimates for infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria are not sufficiently supported by quantitative empirical data. This study determined the excess number of deaths, bed-days, and hospital costs associated with blood stream infections (BSIs caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli (G3CREC in 31 countries that participated in the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance System (EARSS.The number of BSIs caused by MRSA and G3CREC was extrapolated from EARSS prevalence data and national health care statistics. Prospective cohort studies, carried out in hospitals participating in EARSS in 2007, provided the parameters for estimating the excess 30-d mortality and hospital stay associated with BSIs caused by either MRSA or G3CREC. Hospital expenditure was derived from a publicly available cost model. Trends established by EARSS were used to determine the trajectories for MRSA and G3CREC prevalence until 2015. In 2007, 27,711 episodes of MRSA BSIs were associated with 5,503 excess deaths and 255,683 excess hospital days in the participating countries, whereas 15,183 episodes of G3CREC BSIs were associated with 2,712 excess deaths and 120,065 extra hospital days. The total costs attributable to excess hospital stays for MRSA and G3CREC BSIs were 44.0 and 18.1 million Euros (63.1 and 29.7 million international dollars, respectively. Based on prevailing trends, the number of BSIs caused by G3CREC is likely to rapidly increase, outnumbering the number of MRSA BSIs in the near future.Excess mortality associated with BSIs caused by MRSA and G3CREC is significant, and the prolongation of hospital stay imposes a considerable burden on health care systems. A foreseeable shift in the burden of antibiotic resistance from Gram

  1. Dental bacteremia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, G J; Holzel, H S; Sury, M R; Simmons, N A; Gardner, P; Longhurst, P

    1997-01-01

    Bacteremia resulting from dental extraction is regarded as an important cause of bacterial endocarditis, and it is therefore recommended that patients undergoing tooth extraction be given prophylactic antibiotics. As dental procedures other than extractions may also cause bacteremias, we studied a variety of dental procedures routinely used in pediatric dentistry. Blood samples for cultures were obtained 30 s after each of 13 dental operative procedures in 735 anesthetized children aged 2-16 years. Four procedures used for conservative dentistry caused bacteremias significantly more often than the baseline value of 9.4%: polishing teeth 24.5%, intraligamental injection 96.6%, rubber dam placement 29.4%, and matrix band with wedge placement 32.1%. In comparison, toothbrushing alone caused a bacteremia on 38.5% of occasions. The organisms isolated were typical of odontogenic bacteremias in that 50% of the isolates were identified as varieties of viridans streptococci. These data show that a wider variety of dental procedures than was previously documented cause bacteremia.

  2. Campylobacter bacteremia: a rare and under-reported event?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louwen, R.; van Baarlen, P.; van Vliet, A. H. M.; van Belkum, A.; Hays, J. P.; Endtz, H. P.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the species Campylobacter are the most common cause of bacterial diarrhoea in humans. The clinical phenotype associated with Campylobacter infections ranges from asymptomatic conditions to severe colitis and bacteremia. In susceptible patients, Campylobacter infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, with both host factors and bacterial factors being involved in the pathogenesis of bacteremia. In the host, age, gender and immune-compromising conditions may predispose for Campylobacter infections, whilst the most important bacterial determinants mentioned in the literature are cytotoxin production and flagellar motility. The role of sialylated lipo-oligosaccharide (LOS) and serum resistance in bacteremia is inconclusive at this time, and the clinical significance of Campylobacter bacteremia is not yet fully understood. More emphasis on the detection of Campylobacter species from blood cultures in susceptible patients at risk for Campylobacter infections will increase our understanding of the pathogenesis and the relevance of Campylobacter bacteremia. PMID:24611124

  3. Staphylococcus aureus Toxins and Diabetic Foot Ulcers: Role in Pathogenesis and Interest in Diagnosis

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    Catherine Dunyach-Remy

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Infection of foot ulcers is a common, often severe and costly complication in diabetes. Diabetic foot infections (DFI are mainly polymicrobial, and Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequent pathogen isolated. The numerous virulence factors and toxins produced by S. aureus during an infection are well characterized. However, some particular features could be observed in DFI. The aim of this review is to describe the role of S. aureus in DFI and the implication of its toxins in the establishment of the infection. Studies on this issue have helped to distinguish two S. aureus populations in DFI: toxinogenic S. aureus strains (harboring exfoliatin-, EDIN-, PVL- or TSST-encoding genes and non-toxinogenic strains. Toxinogenic strains are often present in infections with a more severe grade and systemic impact, whereas non-toxinogenic strains seem to remain localized in deep structures and bone involving diabetic foot osteomyelitis. Testing the virulence profile of bacteria seems to be a promising way to predict the behavior of S. aureus in the chronic wounds.

  4. Bacteremia causes hippocampal apoptosis in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Østergaard; Leib, S.L.; Rowland, Ian J

    2010-01-01

    by antibody treatment resulted in significantly reduced apoptosis (0.08 (0.02-0.20), P=0.01) as compared to meningitis. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that bacteremia accompanying meningitis plays an important role in the development of hippocampal injury in pneumococcal meningitis.......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Bacteremia and systemic complications both play important roles in brain pathophysiological alterations and the outcome of pneumococcal meningitis. Their individual contributions to the development of brain damage, however, still remain to be defined. METHODS: Using an adult...... rat pneumococcal meningitis model, the impact of bacteremia accompanying meningitis on the development of hippocampal injury was studied. The study comprised of the three groups: I. Meningitis (n=11), II. meningitis with attenuated bacteremia resulting from iv injection of serotype...

  5. Polymorphisms in Fibronectin Binding Proteins A and B among Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Isolates Are Not Associated with Arthroplasty Infection.

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    Emily M Eichenberger

    Full Text Available Nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in fibronectin binding protein A (fnbA of Staphylococcus aureus are associated with cardiac device infections. However, the role of fnbA SNPs in S. aureus arthroplasty infection is unknown.Bloodstream S. aureus isolates from a derivation cohort of patients at a single U.S. medical center with S. aureus bacteremia (SAB and prosthetic hip or knee arthroplasties that were infected (PJI, n = 27 or uninfected (PJU, n = 43 underwent sequencing of fnbA and fnbB. A validation cohort of S. aureus bloodstream PJI (n = 12 and PJU (n = 58 isolates from Germany also underwent fnbA and fnbB sequencing.Overall, none of the individual fnbA or fnbB SNPs were significantly associated with the PJI or PJU clinical groups within the derivation cohort. Similarly, none of the individual fnbA or fnbB SNPs were associated with PJI or PJU when the analysis was restricted to patients with either early SAB (i.e., bacteremia occurring 1 year after placement or manipulation of prostheses.In contrast to cardiac device infections, there is no association between nonsynonymous SNPs in fnbA or fnbB of bloodstream S. aureus isolates and arthroplasty infection. These results suggest that initial steps leading to S. aureus infection of cardiovascular and orthopedic prostheses may arise by distinct processes.

  6. Impact of bacteremia on the pathogenesis of experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian; Peters, David Alberg; Liptrot, Matthew George

    2008-01-01

    Background. Bacteremia plays a major role in the outcome of pneumococcal meningitis. This experimental study investigated how bacteremia influences the pathophysiologic profile of the brain. Methods. Rats with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis were randomized to 1 of 3 groups of infected study...... rats: (1) rats with attenuated bacteremia resulting from intravenous injection of serotype-specific pneumococcal antibody, (2) rats with early-onset bacteremia resulting from concomitant intravenous infection, or (3) a meningitis control group. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, ventricle size......, brain water distribution, and brain pathologic findings were analyzed using magnetic resonance morphological and functional imaging. Laboratory data and clinical disease scores were obtained. Results. Attenuation of the bacteremic component of pneumococcal meningitis improved clinical disease symptoms...

  7. An Important Role of α-Hemolysin in Extracellular Vesicles on the Development of Atopic Dermatitis Induced by Staphylococcus aureus

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    Hong, Sung-Wook; Choi, Eun-Byul; Min, Taek-Ki; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Min-Hye; Jeon, Seong Gyu; Lee, Byung-Jae; Gho, Yong Song; Jee, Young-Koo; Pyun, Bok-Yang; Kim, Yoon-Keun

    2014-01-01

    Skin barrier disruption and dermal inflammation are key phenotypes of atopic dermatitis (AD). Staphylococcus aureus secretes extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are involved in AD pathogenesis. Here, we evaluated the role of EVs-associated α-hemolysin derived from S. aureus in AD pathogenesis. α-hemolysin production from S. aureus was detected using western blot analyses. The cytotoxic activity of α-hemolysin on HaCaT keratinocytes was evaluated by measuring cell viability after treating cell...

  8. Genetic Screen Reveals the Role of Purine Metabolism in Staphylococcus aureus Persistence to Rifampicin

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    Rebecca Yee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic infections with Staphylococcus aureus such as septicemia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, and biofilm infections are difficult to treat because of persisters. Despite many efforts in understanding bacterial persistence, the mechanisms of persister formation in S. aureus remain elusive. Here, we performed a genome-wide screen of a transposon mutant library to study the molecular mechanisms involved in persistence of community-acquired S. aureus. Screening of the library for mutants defective in persistence or tolerance to rifampicin revealed many genes involved in metabolic pathways that are important for antibiotic persistence. In particular, the identified mutants belonged to metabolic pathways involved in carbohydrate, amino acid, lipid, vitamin and purine biosynthesis. Five mutants played a role in purine biosynthesis and two mutants, purB, an adenylosuccinate lyase, and purM, a phosphoribosylaminoimidazole synthetase, were selected for further confirmation. Mutants purB and purM showed defective persistence compared to the parental strain USA300 in multiple stress conditions including various antibiotics, low pH, and heat stress. The defect in persistence was restored by complementation with the wildtype purB and purM gene in the respective mutants. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of persistence in S. aureus and provide novel therapeutic targets for developing more effective treatment for persistent infections due to S. aureus.

  9. Enterobacteriaceae bacteremias among cancer patients: an observational cohort study

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    Henao-Martínez, Andrés F.; González-Fontal, Guido R.; Castillo-Mancilla, José R.; Yang, Ivana V.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia is a common complication in patients with neoplasm. The cancer itself, chemotherapy-induced immunosuppression, and other cancer-related procedures play a role as predisposing factors for this condition. However, despite the clear association between cancer and Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia, the distinctive clinical characteristics of patients with cancer presenting with Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia have not been well established. Methods The population studied was a prospective cohort of adult hospitalized patients with Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia in a tertiary care hospital. We compared the clinical variables and microbiological features between patients with an underlying neoplasm (n = 203) and those without (n = 259). STATA software was used for statistical association analysis. Results In a bivariate analysis, older age, prior exposure to aminopenicillins, fewer days of symptoms, biliary source of bacteremia, greater severity of APACHE II score, lower white blood cell and platelet counts, and the presence of Klebsiella pneumoniae were more common in the neoplasm group. In a multivariable analysis, K. pneumoniae bacteremia (odds ratio (OR) 6.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.65–22.71; p = 0.007), APACHE II score (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.05–1.34; p = 0.007), and exposure to aminopenicillins (OR 28.84, 95% CI 1.94–429.3; p = 0.015) were associated with neoplasm. K. pneumoniae bacteremia was more commonly present in patients with lung and gastrointestinal cancers. Conclusions We have confirmed the association of K. pneumoniae bacteremia with underlying neoplastic disease, especially with gastrointestinal malignancies, which may allow stratification for initial empiric antibiotic therapy in this subset of patients. Prior exposure to aminopenicillins in the neoplasm group might contribute to this finding. PMID:23313157

  10. Changing epidemiology of bacteremia in infants aged 1 week to 3 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhow, Tara L; Hung, Yun-Yi; Herz, Arnd M

    2012-03-01

    Bacteremia in young infants has remained an important ongoing concern for decades. Despite changes in prenatal screening and infant immunizations, the current epidemiology of this problem has received little attention. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all blood cultures collected at Kaiser Permanente Northern California on full-term, previously healthy infants presenting for care between 1 week to 3 months of age for whom a blood culture was drawn from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2009. During the study period, 4255 blood cultures were collected from 160 818 full-term infants. Only 2% of all blood cultures were positive for pathogens (93/4255), whereas 247 positive cultures were due to contaminants. The incidence rate of true bacteremia was 0.57 in 1000 full-term births. The most common pathogen was Escherichia coli (56%). Ninety-eight percent of infants with E coli bacteremia had a urinary tract infection. Group B Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus were the second and third most common pathogens, respectively. There were no cases of Listeria monocytogenes bacteremia or meningococcemia and only 1 case of enterococcal bacteremia. Ampicillin resistant pathogens accounted for 36% of organisms. Our study indicates bacteremia in young infants occurs infrequently and in only 2.2% of those who had a blood culture drawn. On the basis of the epidemiology of pathogens found in this large cohort, these data suggest a change in currently recommended presumptive antibiotic coverage in 1-week to 3-month-old infants with suspected bacteremia.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis and pyomyositis: Rare complications of rotavirus gastroenteritis.

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    Aldemir-Kocabaş, Bilge; Karbuz, Adem; Kara, Tuğçe Tural; Çiftçi, Ömer; Uçar, Tayfun; Fitöz, Suat; Çiftçi, Ergin; İnce, Erdal

    2015-08-01

    Rotavirus may cause life-threatening complications in untreated patients during the course of gastroenteritis. Electrolyte imbalance, bacteremia and sepsis are the most common complications of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RG). It is believed that translocation of intestinal microorganisms as a result of intestinal epithelium dysfunction is the underlying mechanism of bacteremia in RG. Although Gram-negative bacteremia has been noted as a complication in RG, Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and endocarditis have not been reported previously. A 22-month-old boy was admitted with complaints of fever, diarrhea and dehydration. He was diagnosed with RG complicated with S. aureus bacteremia, pyomyositis and endocarditis. We call attention to these complications in patients with prolonged or late-onset fever during RG as rare complications of the disease. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  12. Spa type distribution in MRSA and MSSA bacteremias and association of spa clonal complexes with the clinical characteristics of bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokinen, Elina; Lindholm, Laura; Huttunen, Reetta; Huhtala, Heini; Vuento, Risto; Vuopio, Jaana; Syrjänen, Jaana

    2018-02-10

    The genetic distribution of invasive methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) and resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains has to be addressed in order to target infection control strategies. A large MRSA epidemic caused by a certain MRSA strain (spa type 067) broke out in 2001 in our health district. We wanted to investigate the current spa type distribution in MRSA and MSSA bacteremias and assess the potential association of spa clonal complexes (spaCC) with the clinical characteristics of S. aureus bacteremia. One hundred nine invasive MRSA isolates and 353 invasive MSSA isolates were spa typed and grouped into clonal complexes (spaCC). Spa type distribution was compared to that of colonizing MRSA strains. Spa type and spaCC data linked to clinical information on the course of bacteremic cases was used to search for differences in virulence between strains. Spa type distribution in MRSA is less heterogenic than in MSSA. t067 dominates both in MRSA colonisations and in invasive findings. Among MSSA, no such dominating strains were found. Of spaCCs, mortality was the highest in spaCC 067 (25.6%). SpaCC 008 was more often associated with endocarditis than other CCs (22.7 vs 5.8%, p = 0.013), spaCC 2133 with skin infections (68.4 vs 36.4%, p = 0.007), and spaCC 012 with foreign body infections (25.0 vs 9.3%, p = 0.029) than other clonal complexes. A single successful strain can explain the major proportion of MRSA among S. aureus bacteremias. Certain spaCCs showed association with certain clinical characteristics. These findings suggest that S. aureus strains differ in their virulence and invasiveness.

  13. Survey of Enteric Pathogens Causing Bacteremia in Cancer Patients

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    Enayatollah Kalantar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Symptomatic bacteraemia, is a frequent condition among cancer patients with a significant morbidity and mortality all over the world. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the burden of enteric pathogens causing bacteremia among cancer patients. Patients and Methods: Ten ml blood samples were withdrawn from the cancer patients under aseptic conditions. The blood specimens were added to the blood culture bottles and incubated at 37°C. The bacterial isolates from these samples were identified by routine biochemical reactions. Results: During the study period, 68 blood samples from cancer patients were analyzed for bacteremia. Of these patients, six were female (08/82% and 62 were male (91.18%; with age ranging from under 40 years to 85 years old (mean, 63 years. Gastro-intestinal cancer and cancers of head and neck were the most frequent cancer types in the studied group, accounting for 51 (75% and 15 (22.1% cases, respectively. The mean weight of patients was 69.18 Kg (range: 49-100 Kg. Similarly, the mean length of hospital stay was 8 days (range: 4-12 days. Positive blood cultures were detected in only 12 (17.65% and 11 (91.7% blood specimens from the Cancer Institute, Tehran, compared with one (08.33% from Shahid Kamali hospital, Karaj. From these patients, 15 bacteria were isolated; E. coli alone outnumbered other species and accounted for 33.33% of the episodes of bacteremia. Conclusions: In conclusion, our investigation revealed that cancers of GI tract are the most common cancer types causing bacteremia and also we identified that most common bacteria causing bacteremia in Cancer Institute, Tehran and Shahid Kamali Hospital, Karaj, are E. coli and S. aureus

  14. Bacteremia in Children Hospitalized with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia-Grande, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Pinnock, Elli; Salas, Antonio; Fink, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background The risk of bacteremia is considered low in children with acute bronchiolitis. However the rate of occult bacteremia in infants with RSV infection is not well established. The aim was to determine the actual rate and predictive factors of bacteremia in children admitted to hospital due to confirmed RSV acute respiratory illness (ARI), using both conventional culture and molecular techniques. Methods A prospective multicenter study (GENDRES-network) was conducted between 2011–2013 in children under the age of two admitted to hospital because of an ARI. Among those RSV-positive, bacterial presence in blood was assessed using PCR for Meningococcus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus, in addition to conventional cultures. Results 66 children with positive RSV respiratory illness were included. In 10.6% patients, bacterial presence was detected: H. influenzae (n = 4) and S. pneumoniae (n = 2). In those patients with bacteremia, there was a previous suspicion of bacterial superinfection and had received empirical antibiotic treatment 6 out of 7 (85.7%) patients. There were significant differences in terms of severity between children with positive bacterial PCR and those with negative results: PICU admission (100% vs. 50%, P-value = 0.015); respiratory support necessity (100% vs. 18.6%, P-value < 0.001); Wood-Downes score (mean = 8.7 vs. 4.8 points, P-value < 0.001); GENVIP scale (mean = 17 vs. 10.1, P-value < 0.001); and length of hospitalization (mean = 12.1 vs. 7.5 days, P-value = 0.007). Conclusion Bacteremia is not frequent in infants hospitalized with RSV respiratory infection, however, it should be considered in the most severe cases. PMID:26872131

  15. Predictors of bacteremia in emergency department patients with suspected infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Maureen; Klasco, Richard S; Joyce, Nina R; Donnino, Michael W; Wolfe, Richard E; Shapiro, Nathan I

    2012-11-01

    The goal of this study is to identify clinical variables associated with bacteremia. Such data could provide a rational basis for blood culture testing in emergency department (ED) patients with suspected infection. This is a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort of ED patients with suspected infection. Data collected included demographics, vital signs, medical history, suspected source of infection, laboratory and blood culture results and outcomes. Bacteremia was defined as a positive blood culture by Centers for Disease Control criteria. Clinical variables associated with bacteremia on univariate logistic regression were entered into a multivariable model. There were 5630 patients enrolled with an average age of 59.9 ± 19.9 years, and 54% were female. Blood cultures were obtained on 3310 (58.8%). There were 409 (12.4%) positive blood cultures, of which 68 (16.6%) were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and 161 (39.4%) were Gram negatives. Ten covariates (respiratory failure, vasopressor use, neutrophilia, bandemia, thrombocytopenia, indwelling venous catheter, abnormal temperature, suspected line or urinary infection, or endocarditis) were associated with all-cause bacteremia in the final model (c-statistic area under the curve [AUC], 0.71). Additional factors associated with MRSA bacteremia included end-stage renal disease (odds ratio [OR], 3.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9-7.8) and diabetes (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.6) (AUC, 0.73). Factors strongly associated with Gram-negative bacteremia included vasopressor use in the ED (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.7-4.6), bandemia (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 2.3-5.3), and suspected urinary infection (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 2.8-5.8) (AUC, 0.75). This study identified several clinical factors associated with bacteremia as well as MRSA and Gram-negative subtypes, but the magnitude of their associations is limited. Combining these covariates into a multivariable model moderately increases their predictive value. Copyright

  16. Identification of Th cell epitopes on clfA adhesin of Staphylococcus aureus and characterization of their role in immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Li, Zhijie; Li, Yagang; Ye, Junfeng

    2013-09-04

    The ClfA adhesin of Staphylococcus aureus is an excellent vaccine candidate antigen. CD4 + T cells play central roles during immune responses, but their functional contributions to Staphylococcus aureus in fection have yet to be evaluated. By using the SYFPEITHI prediction algorithm, we identified and characterized four Th epitopes within the ClfA adhesin. Peptide C335 was I-Ed restricted Th1 type epitopes; peptides C214, C286, and C436 were I-Ad restricted Th2 type epitope. The identification of these epitopes is important to evaluate and optimize the vaccine-primed protection against Staphylococcus aureus infection.

  17. Secretome analysis defines the major role of SecDF in Staphylococcus aureus virulence.

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    Chantal Quiblier

    Full Text Available The Sec pathway plays a prominent role in protein export and membrane insertion, including the secretion of major bacterial virulence determinants. The accessory Sec constituent SecDF has been proposed to contribute to protein export. Deletion of Staphylococcus aureus secDF has previously been shown to reduce resistance, to alter cell separation, and to change the expression of certain virulence factors. To analyse the impact of the secDF deletion in S. aureus on protein secretion, a quantitative secretome analysis was performed. Numerous Sec signal containing proteins involved in virulence were found to be decreased in the supernatant of the secDF mutant. However, two Sec-dependent hydrolases were increased in comparison to the wild type, suggesting additional indirect, regulatory effects to occur upon deletion of secDF. Adhesion, invasion, and cytotoxicity of the secDF mutant were reduced in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Virulence was significantly reduced using a Galleria mellonella insect model. Altogether, SecDF is a promising therapeutic target for controlling S. aureus infections.

  18. Bacteremias em pacientes internados em hospital universitário Bacteremias at a teaching hospital: etiology, antimicrobial susceptibiliy pattern and risk factors for mortality

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    Adriana Oliveira Guilarde

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a incidência de bacteremias, seu perfil de suscetibilidade antimicrobiana, e fatores associados ao óbito, em hospital universitário, no período de 1º de janeiro de 2000 a 31 de dezembro de 2001. MÉTODOS: Coorte retrospectiva. Pacientes maiores de 1 ano de idade, com bacteremia laboratorialmente confirmada e clinicamente significativa foram incluídos no estudo. Realizada análise de sobrevida multivariada, seguindo o modelo de riscos proporcionais de Cox. RESULTADOS: Foram detectados 295 episódios de bacteremia. O patógeno mais freqüente foi o Staphylococcus aureus: 118 (40%, com 55,9% de MRSA. A letalidade pela bacteremia foi de 34,5%. Os fatores de risco independentes para o óbito foram terapia inicial inadequada (HR ajustado 2,05 IC 95%: 1,25-3,36 e gravidade da apresentação clínica (HR ajustado 5,52 IC 95%: 3,15-9,69. CONCLUSÃO: Nosso estudo mostrou elevada letalidade associada a bacteremia, com alta freqüência de MRSA. A terapia inicial inadequada e a gravidade da apresentação clínica foram fatores de risco independentes para o óbito pela bacteremia.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency and profile of bacteremia, its antimicrobial susceptibility and to analyze predictors of mortality in bloodstream infections (BSI at this Teaching Hospital from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2001. METHODS: Design: retrospective cohort. Patients over one year old with clinically significant episodes of BSI which were microbiologically documented were included in the study. The Cox proportional hazards risk model was applied to identify prognostic factors related to death by bacteremia. RESULTS: A total of 295 episodes of BSI were detected. The most common pathogen was S. aureus: 118 (40.0%, with 55.9% of MRSA. Mortality associated with bacteremia was 34.5%. Independent predictors of mortality were: inadequate initial therapy (HR adjusted 2.05 IC95%: 1.25-3.36 and severity of the clinical manifestations (HR adjusted 5

  19. Implementation of global antimicrobial resistance surveillance system (GLASS in patients with bacteremia.

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    Rujipas Sirijatuphat

    Full Text Available The global antimicrobial resistance surveillance system (GLASS was launched by the World Health Organization (WHO in 2015. GLASS is a surveillance system for clinical specimens that are sent to microbiology laboratory for clinical purposes. The unique feature of GLASS is that clinical data is combined with microbiological data, and deduplication of the microbiological results is performed. The objective of the study was to determine feasibility and benefit of GLASS for surveillance of blood culture specimens. GLASS was implemented at Siriraj Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand using a locally developed web application program (app to transfer blood culture specimen data, and to enter clinical data of patients with positive blood culture by infection control nurses and physicians via the app installed in their smart phones. The rate of positive blood culture specimens with true infection was 15.2%. Escherichia coli was the most common cause of bacteremia. Secondary bacteremia, primary bacteremia, and central line-associated blood stream infection was observed in 61.8%, 30.6%, and 12.6% of cases, respectively. Sepsis was observed in 56.9% of patients. E.coli was significantly more common in community-acquired bacteremia, whereas Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Acinetobacter baumannii were significantly more common in hospital-acquired bacteremia. Hospital-acquired isolates of E.coli, K.pneumoniae, A.baumannii, P.aeruginosa, S.aureus and Enterococcus faecium were more resistant to antibiotics than community-acquired isolates. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in patients with antibiotic-resistant bacteremia than in patients with antibiotic non-resistant bacteremia (40.5% vs. 28.5%, p<0.001. The patients with antibiotic-resistant bacteremia consumed more resources than those with antibiotic non-resistant bacteremia. Blood culture results combined with patient clinical data were

  20. Daptomycin-Nonsusceptible, Vancomycin-Intermediate, Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Endocarditis

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    Ryan Yu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the emergence of Staphylococcus aureus with reduced vancomycin susceptibility, newer antibiotics, including daptomycin, have been used to treat methicillin-resistant S aureus infections. Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide that is approved to treat S aureus bacteremia and right-sided endocarditis, and reports of S aureus with reduced susceptibility to daptomycin are infrequent. To our knowledge, the present report describes the first Canadian case of daptomycin-nonsusceptible, vancomycin-intermediate S aureus infection.

  1. A regulatory role for Staphylococcus aureus toxin-antitoxin system PemIKSa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Michal; Lyzen, Robert; Helbin, Weronika M; Bonar, Emilia; Szalewska-Palasz, Agnieszka; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Dubin, Grzegorz; Dubin, Adam; Wladyka, Benedykt

    2013-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin systems were shown to be involved in plasmid maintenance when they were initially discovered, but other roles have been demonstrated since. Here we identify and characterize a novel toxin-antitoxin system (pemIKSa) located on Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pCH91. The toxin (PemKSa) is a sequence-specific endoribonuclease recognizing the tetrad sequence U↓AUU, and the antitoxin (PemISa) inhibits toxin activity by physical interaction. Although the toxin-antitoxin system is responsible for stable plasmid maintenance our data suggest the participation of pemIKSa in global regulation of staphylococcal virulence by alteration of the translation of large pools of genes. We propose a common mechanism of reversible activation of toxin-antitoxin systems based on antitoxin transcript resistance to toxin cleavage. Elucidation of this mechanism is particularly interesting because reversible activation is a prerequisite for the proposed general regulatory role of toxin-antitoxin systems.

  2. Epidemiology of bacteremia in young hospitalized infants in Vientiane, Laos, 2000-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Margot; Luangxay, Khonesavanh; Sisouk, Kongkham; Vorlasan, Latdavan; Soumphonphakdy, Bandith; Sengmouang, Vanmaly; Chansamouth, Vilada; Phommasone, Koukeo; Van Dyke, Russell; Chong, Euming; Dance, David A B; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Newton, Paul N

    2014-02-01

    As data about the causes of neonatal sepsis in low-income countries are inadequate, we reviewed the etiology and antibiotic susceptibilities of bacteremia in young infants in Laos. As Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of bacteremia in Lao infants, we also examined risk factors for this infection, in particular the local practice of warming mothers during the first weeks postpartum with hot coals under their beds (hot beds). Clinical and laboratory data regarding infants aged 0-60 days evaluated for sepsis within 72 h of admission to Mahosot Hospital in Vientiane, Laos, were reviewed, and 85 of 1438 (5.9%) infants' blood cultures grew a clinically significant organism. Most common were S. aureus, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Whereas no methicillin-resistant S. aureus was found, only 18% of E. coli isolates were susceptible to ampicillin. A history of sleeping on a hot bed with mother was associated with S. aureus bacteremia (odds ratio 4.8; 95% confidence interval 1.2-19.0).

  3. Role of two-component systems in the resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to antibacterial agents.

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    Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Yoshida, Yuuma; Nakamura, Norifumi; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) play important roles in the adaptation of bacteria to environmental changes and the regulation of virulence factor expression. In addition, the association of TCSs with susceptibility to antibacterial agents has been demonstrated in some bacterial species. Staphylococcus aureus, a major human pathogen that can cause serious problems due to nosocomial infections, possesses 16 TCSs. Here we report a TCS, designated BceRS (MW2 gene ID: MW2545-44), which is related to bacitracin susceptibility. We found that BceRS regulates the expression of two transporters that determine susceptibility to bacitracin. One of these, BceAB (MW2543-42), is located downstream of BceRS, while the other, VraDE (MW2620-21), is more distant. With regard to other TCSs, VraRS and Aps/GraRS are reportedly associated with susceptibility to cell wall synthesis inhibitors and cationic antibacterial agents, respectively. Therefore, S. aureus possesses at least three TCSs that are involved in mediating its resistance to antibacterial agents.

  4. RNase Y of Staphylococcus aureus and its role in the activation of virulence genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marincola, Gabriella; Schäfer, Tina; Behler, Juliane; Bernhardt, Jörg; Ohlsen, Knut; Goerke, Christiane; Wolz, Christiane

    2012-09-01

    RNase Y of Bacillus subtilis is a key member of the degradosome and important for bulk mRNA turnover. In contrast to B. subtilis, the RNase Y homologue (rny/cvfA) of Staphylococcus aureus is not essential for growth. Here we found that RNase Y plays a major role in virulence gene regulation. Accordingly, rny deletion mutants demonstrated impaired virulence in a murine bacteraemia model. RNase Y is important for the processing and stabilization of the immature transcript of the global virulence regulator system SaePQRS. Moreover, RNase Y is involved in the activation of virulence gene expression at the promoter level. This control is independent of both the virulence regulator agr and the saePQRS processing and may be mediated by small RNAs some of which were shown to be degraded by RNase Y. Besides this regulatory effect, mRNA levels of several operons were significantly increased in the rny mutant and the half-life of one of these operons was shown to be extremely extended. However, the half-life of many mRNA species was not significantly altered. Thus, RNase Y in S. aureus influences mRNA expression in a tightly controlled regulatory manner and is essential for coordinated activation of virulence genes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Study of the humoral immunological response after vaccination with a Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-embedded bacterin in dairy cows: possible role of the exopolysaccharide specific antibody production in the protection from Staphylococcus aureus induced mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenafeta, Antoni; March, Ricard; Foix, Antoni; Casals, Isidre; Costa, Llorenç

    2010-04-15

    The objective of the present study was to analyze an extracellular component from Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), which we refer to as slime associated antigenic complex (SAAC), and to investigate the role of SAAC-specific antibody production in protection from S. aureus bovine mastitis. Twelve primiparous gestating cows were randomly assigned to one of the three groups: Group 1 was vaccinated with a S. aureus bacterin with very limited SAAC content; Group 2 received a S. aureus bacterin with high SAAC content and Group 3 served as unvaccinated controls. Animals were vaccinated at 45 days before the expected parturition date and revaccinated 35 days later. All groups were challenged by intramammary infusion with a virulent heterologous strain of S. aureus 23 days after calving. Antibody response against SAAC in serum and in milk, general clinical signs, mastitis score, somatic cell count (SCC) and count of S. aureus in milk were evaluated before and after challenge. Immunization with a high SAAC content in the S. aureus bacterin (Group 2) significantly enhanced antibody titers against SAAC (in serum and milk) and reduced the S. aureus concentration in milk during the post-challenge period compared to Group 1 and Group 3. Moreover, a significant negative correlation was observed between SAAC antibody production on the day of the challenge and the S. aureus count in milk by 1 day after challenge. However, there was no evidence of a difference between vaccinated and control groups with regard to clinical signs of mastitis following the challenge. Nevertheless, the SAAC antibody concentration on the day of the challenge negatively correlated with the mastitis score in quarters infected with S. aureus at 2 days post-challenge. These results indicate that the vaccines did not prevent S. aureus intramammary infection (IMI) after the experimental challenge, but immunization with a S. aureus bacterin with high SAAC content was able to reduce S. aureus multiplication in

  6. Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin-dependent induction of host cell death by membrane-derived vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Thay

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide spectrum of infections in humans, ranging from superficial cutaneous infections, infections in the circum-oral region, to life-threatening bacteremia. It was recently demonstrated that Gram-positive organisms such as S. aureus liberate membrane-derived vesicles (MVs, which analogously to outer membrane vesicles (OMVs of Gram-negative bacteria can play a role in delivering virulence factors to host cells. In the present study we have shown that cholesterol-dependent fusion of S. aureus MVs with the plasma membrane represents a route for delivery of a key virulence factor, α-toxin (α-hemolysin; Hla to human cells. Most S. aureus strains produce this 33-kDa pore-forming protein, which can lyse a wide range of human cells, and induce apoptosis in T-lymphocytes. Our results revealed a tight association of biologically active α-toxin with membrane-derived vesicles isolated from S. aureus strain 8325-4. Concomitantly, α-toxin contributed to HeLa cell cytotoxicity of MVs, and was the main vesicle-associated protein responsible for erythrocyte lysis. In contrast, MVs obtained from an isogenic hla mutant were significantly attenuated with regards to both causing lysis of erythrocytes and death of HeLa cells. This is to our knowledge the first recognition of an S. aureus MV-associated factor contributing to host cell cytotoxicity.

  7. Staphylococcus aureus-Fibronectin Interactions with and without Fibronectin-Binding Proteins and Their Role in Adhesion and Desorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, C.P.; Boks, N.P.; Vries, de J.; Kaper, H.J.; Norde, W.; Busscher, H.J.; Mei, van der H.C.

    2008-01-01

    Adhesion and residence-time-dependent desorption of two Staphylococcus aureus strains with and without fibronectin (Fn) binding proteins (FnBPs) on Fn-coated glass were compared under flow conditions. To obtain a better understanding of the role of Fn-FnBP binding, the adsorption enthalpies of Fn

  8. The role of staphylococci in subclinical mastitis of cows and lytic phage isolation against to Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliye Gulmez Saglam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was conducted to determine the role of Staphylococcus in the formation of subclinical mastitis in cows and to isolate the phage against isolated Staphylococcus aureus strains. Materials and Methods: In this study, 400 milk cows were screened by California Mastitis Test (CMT for subclinical mastitis and 235 udders of 96 cows, which were determined to be positive, were evaluated for Staphylococcus. Milk samples were evaluated using conventional and molecular methods. In addition, phage isolation studies were performed against S. aureus strains causing mastitis. Results: At the result of cultural examination, of 235 milk samples that were found as positive for mastitis by CMT, a total of 117 (49.7% Staphylococcus spp. were isolated as a distribution of 74 (63.24% coagulase-positive staphylococci and 43 (36.75% coagulase-negative staphylococci. Of these isolates, 76 (64.95% were characterized as S. aureus both conventional and molecular techniques. Lytic bacteriophages against two S. aureus strains which were isolated from mastitic milk samples were obtained from wastewater samples. Conclusion: The results of this study show that a significant portion of subclinical mastitis was formed by staphylococci. In addition, phage isolation against S. aureus strains isolated can be considered as one of the steps to be applied in the prophylaxis and treatment of such infections.

  9. The role of staphylococci in subclinical mastitis of cows and lytic phage isolation against toStaphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sağlam, Aliye Gülmez; Şahin, Mitat; Çelik, Elif; Çelebi, Özgür; Akça, Doğan; Otlu, Salih

    2017-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the role of Staphylococcus in the formation of subclinical mastitis in cows and to isolate the phage against isolated Staphylococcus aureus strains. In this study, 400 milk cows were screened by California Mastitis Test (CMT) for subclinical mastitis and 235 udders of 96 cows, which were determined to be positive, were evaluated for Staphylococcus . Milk samples were evaluated using conventional and molecular methods. In addition, phage isolation studies were performed against S. aureus strains causing mastitis. At the result of cultural examination, of 235 milk samples that were found as positive for mastitis by CMT, a total of 117 (49.7%) Staphylococcus spp. were isolated as a distribution of 74 (63.24%) coagulase-positive staphylococci and 43 (36.75%) coagulase-negative staphylococci. Of these isolates, 76 (64.95%) were characterized as S. aureus both conventional and molecular techniques. Lytic bacteriophages against two S. aureus strains which were isolated from mastitic milk samples were obtained from wastewater samples. The results of this study show that a significant portion of subclinical mastitis was formed by staphylococci. In addition, phage isolation against S. aureus strains isolated can be considered as one of the steps to be applied in the prophylaxis and treatment of such infections.

  10. Methicillin and vancomycin resistant S. aureus in hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Sood Loomba

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available S. aureus is the major bacterial cause of skin, soft tissue and bone infections, and one of the commonest causes of healthcare-associated bacteremia. Hospital-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA carriage is associated with an increased risk of infection, morbidity and mortality. Screening of high-risk patients at the time of hospital admission and decolonization has proved to be an important factor in an effort to reduce nosocomial transmission. The electronic database Pub Med was searched for all the articles on "Establishment of MRSA and the emergence of vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA." The search included case reports, case series and reviews. All the articles were cross-referenced to search for any more available articles. A total of 88 references were obtained. The studies showed a steady increase in the number of vancomycin-intermediate and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus. Extensive use of vancomycin creates a selective pressure that favors the outgrowth of rare, vancomycin-resistant clones leading to heterogenous vancomycin intermediate S. aureus hVISA clones, and eventually, with continued exposure, to a uniform population of vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA clones. However, the criteria for identifying hVISA strains have not been standardized, complicating any determination of their clinical significance and role in treatment failures. The spread of MRSA from the hospital to the community, coupled with the emergence of VISA and VRSA, has become major concern among healthcare providers. Infection-control measures, reliable laboratory screening for resistance, appropriate antibiotic prescribing practices and avoidance of blanket treatment can prevent long-term emergence of resistance.

  11. Cost Attributable to Nosocomial Bacteremia. Analysis According to Microorganism and Antimicrobial Sensitivity in a University Hospital in Barcelona.

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    Marta Riu

    Full Text Available To calculate the incremental cost of nosocomial bacteremia caused by the most common organisms, classified by their antimicrobial susceptibility.We selected patients who developed nosocomial bacteremia caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These microorganisms were analyzed because of their high prevalence and they frequently present multidrug resistance. A control group consisted of patients classified within the same all-patient refined-diagnosis related group without bacteremia. Our hospital has an established cost accounting system (full-costing that uses activity-based criteria to analyze cost distribution. A logistic regression model was fitted to estimate the probability of developing bacteremia for each admission (propensity score and was used for propensity score matching adjustment. Subsequently, the propensity score was included in an econometric model to adjust the incremental cost of patients who developed bacteremia, as well as differences in this cost, depending on whether the microorganism was multidrug-resistant or multidrug-sensitive.A total of 571 admissions with bacteremia matched the inclusion criteria and 82,022 were included in the control group. The mean cost was € 25,891 for admissions with bacteremia and € 6,750 for those without bacteremia. The mean incremental cost was estimated at € 15,151 (CI, € 11,570 to € 18,733. Multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa bacteremia had the highest mean incremental cost, € 44,709 (CI, € 34,559 to € 54,859. Antimicrobial-susceptible E. coli nosocomial bacteremia had the lowest mean incremental cost, € 10,481 (CI, € 8,752 to € 12,210. Despite their lower cost, episodes of antimicrobial-susceptible E. coli nosocomial bacteremia had a major impact due to their high frequency.Adjustment of hospital cost according to the organism causing bacteremia and antibiotic sensitivity could improve prevention strategies

  12. Distinct Roles of Phenol-Soluble Modulins in Spreading of Staphylococcus aureus on Wet Surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsompanidou, Eleni; Denham, Emma L.; Becher, Doerte; de Jong, Anne; Buist, Girbe; van Oosten, Marleen; Manson, Willem L.; Back, Jaap Willem; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Dreisbach, Annette

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is renowned for the rapid colonization of contaminated wounds, medical implants, and food products. Nevertheless, little is known about the mechanisms that allow S. aureus to colonize the respective wet surfaces. The present studies were therefore aimed at

  13. Bacteremia and candidemia in hematological malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, D; Skinhøj, P; Bangsborg, Jette Marie

    1988-01-01

    171 episodes of bacteremia and candidemia in 142 patients were recorded during the period 1981-1985 in patients with hematological malignancies. Overall mortality, within 1 week of onset of bacteremia, was 20%. Increased mortality was found in patients with poor disease-prognosis (39%), with gran...

  14. [Incidence and risk factors for bacteremia on pediatric patients with burns in a specialized care center in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Velarde, Teresa de J; Lona-Reyes, Juan C; Riebeling-Dueñas, Alejandra; Orozco-Alatorre, Luis G

    2017-06-01

    Bacteremia events are frequent cause of mortality in burn patients and may originate from infected wounds, by bacterial translocation of endogenous microorganisms, from invasive devices or contaminated intravenous solutions. To quantify the incidence of bacteremia in pediatric patients with burns and to identify risk factors. A prospective cohort study was performed in pediatric patients with burns of Hospital Civil de Guadalajara "Dr. Juan I. Menchaca". Bacteremia was diagnosed by blood cultures in patients with clinical manifestations of sepsis. Risk factors were investigated by multivariate analysis with Cox regression. Were included in the cohort 260 patients, median age 3 years. The incidence of bacteremia was 9.6 events per 1,000 days patient. The most frequently isolated bacteria were Enterobacteriaceae (41.9%), Staphylococcus aureus (22.6%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (22.6%). Factors associated with bacteremia were: bums ≥ 20% TBSA (HR 11.06; 95% CI 4.8-25.4), deep second degree bums or higher (HR 6.9; 95% CI 2.0-23.3) and have had two or less debridement (HR 26.4; 95% CI 8.0-87.7). Patients with more extensive and deep burns with fewer debridement are at increased risk of bacteremia.

  15. Risk factors and outcomes of bacteremia caused by drug-resistant ESKAPE pathogens in solid-organ transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodro, Marta; Sabé, Núria; Tubau, Fe; Lladó, Laura; Baliellas, Carme; Roca, Josep; Cruzado, Josep Maria; Carratalà, Jordi

    2013-11-15

    Although infections due to the six ESKAPE pathogens have recently been identified as a serious emerging problem, information regarding bacteremia caused by these organisms in solid-organ transplant (SOT) recipients is lacking. We sought to determine the frequency, risk factors, and outcomes of bacteremia due to drug-resistant ESKAPE (rESKAPE) organisms in liver, kidney, and heart adult transplant recipients. All episodes of bacteremia prospectively documented in hospitalized SOT recipients from 2007 to 2012 were analyzed. Of 276 episodes of bacteremia, 54 (19.6%) were due to rESKAPE strains (vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium [0], methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [5], extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae [10], carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii [8], carbapenem- and quinolone-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa [26], and derepressed chromosomal β-lactam and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacter species [5]). Factors independently associated with rESKAPE bacteremia were prior transplantation, septic shock, and prior antibiotic therapy. Patients with rESKAPE bacteremia more often received inappropriate empirical antibiotic therapy than the others (41% vs. 21.6%; P=0.01). Overall case-fatality rate (30 days) was higher in patients with rESKAPE bacteremia (35.2% vs. 14.4%; P=0.001). Bacteremia due to rESKAPE pathogens is frequent in SOT recipients and causes significant morbidity and mortality. rESKAPE organisms should be considered when selecting empirical antibiotic therapy for hospitalized SOT recipients presenting with septic shock, particularly those with prior transplantation and antibiotic use.

  16. Contribution of Panton-Valentine leukocidin in community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binh An Diep

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA strains typically carry genes encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL. We used wild-type parental and isogenic PVL-deletion (Delta pvl strains of USA300 (LAC and SF8300 and USA400 (MW2 to test whether PVL alters global gene regulatory networks and contributes to pathogenesis of bacteremia, a hallmark feature of invasive staphylococcal disease. Microarray and proteomic analyses revealed that PVL does not alter gene or protein expression, thereby demonstrating that any contribution of PVL to CA-MRSA pathogenesis is not mediated through interference of global gene regulatory networks. Inasmuch as a direct role for PVL in CA-MRSA pathogenesis remains to be determined, we developed a rabbit bacteremia model of CA-MRSA infection to evaluate the effects of PVL. Following experimental infection of rabbits, an animal species whose granulocytes are more sensitive to the effects of PVL compared with the mouse, we found a contribution of PVL to pathogenesis over the time course of bacteremia. At 24 and 48 hours post infection, PVL appears to play a modest, but measurable role in pathogenesis during the early stages of bacteremic seeding of the kidney, the target organ from which bacteria were not cleared. However, the early survival advantage of this USA300 strain conferred by PVL was lost by 72 hours post infection. These data are consistent with the clinical presentation of rapid-onset, fulminant infection that has been associated with PVL-positive CA-MRSA strains. Taken together, our data indicate a modest and transient positive effect of PVL in the acute phase of bacteremia, thereby providing evidence that PVL contributes to CA-MRSA pathogenesis.

  17. Immunological role of nasal staphylococcus aureus carriage in patients with persistent allergic rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Yousif Atia

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Nasal carriage of staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus exerts immunomodulatory effect in patients with atopic dermatitis and it may contribute to airway inflammation and allergic response in patients with allergic rhinitis. We Aim to investigate the frequency of nasal S.aureus carriage in patients with persistent allergic rhinitis and its possible influence on their symptoms and immune markers. We chosed 20 non smoker patients with house dust mite (HDM allergy causing allergic rhinitis and 20 non smoker healthy subjects matched for age and sex. For all subjects rhinoscopy was done, skin prick test, nasal culture for S.aureus, nasal interleukin 4,nasal total IgE, serum total IgE and serum specific IgE(SSIgE for HDM. Nasal S.aureus was detected in 16/20 patients (80% and 5/20 (25% in healthy subjects with highly significant statistical difference plt0.01. Correlation of nasal staph.aureus count and different systemic and local immune markers revealed highly significant positive correlation between nasal S.aureus count and serum total IgE (r = 0.78, plt0.01 and significant positive correlation with SSIgE (HDM (r = 0.53, plt0.05, nasal total IgE (r = 0.39, plt0.05 and nasal IL-4 (r = 0.55, plt0.05. Nasal staph.aureus actively modulated the immune reaction in persistent allergic rhinitis patients by promoting local IgE production, so we recommend early detection and treatment of S.aureus carriage in patients

  18. Bacteremia and fungemia in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whimbey, E; Gold, J W; Polsky, B; Dryjanski, J; Hawkins, C; Blevins, A; Brannon, P; Kiehn, T E; Brown, A E; Armstrong, D

    1986-04-01

    Forty-nine episodes of bacteremia and fungemia occurred in 38 of 336 patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome seen at our institution since 1980. There were five types of infections. Infections commonly associated with a T-cell immunodeficiency disorder comprised 16 episodes and included those with Salmonella species, Listeria monocytogenes, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Histoplasma capsulatum. Infections commonly associated with a B-cell immunodeficiency disorder included those with Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. Infections occurring with neutropenia were caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Streptococcus faecalis. Other infections occurring in the hospital were caused by Candida albicans, Staphylococcus epidermidis, enteric gram-negative rods, Staphylococcus aureus, and mixed S. aureus and group G streptococcus. Other infections occurring out of the hospital included those with S. aureus, Clostridium perfringens, Shigella sonnei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and group B streptococcus. Because two thirds of the septicemias were caused by organisms other than T-cell opportunists, these pathogens should be anticipated during diagnostic evaluation and when formulating empiric therapy.

  19. Role of a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 in Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin–mediated cellular injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Georgia A.; Wardenburg, Juliane Bubeck

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin (Hla), a potent cytotoxin, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of staphylococcal diseases, including those caused by methicillin-resistant epidemic strains. Hla is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that undergoes a series of conformational changes to generate a heptameric, β-barrel structure in host membranes. Structural maturation of Hla depends on its interaction with a previously unknown proteinaceous receptor in the context of the cell membrane. It is reported here that a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) interacts with Hla and is required to initiate the sequence of events whereby the toxin is transformed into a cytolytic pore. Hla binding to the eukaryotic cell requires ADAM10 expression. Further, ADAM10 is required for Hla-mediated cytotoxicity, most notably when the toxin is present at low concentrations. These data thus implicate ADAM10 as the probable high-affinity toxin receptor. Upon Hla binding, ADAM10 relocalizes to caveolin 1-enriched lipid rafts that serve as a platform for the clustering of signaling molecules. It is demonstrated that the Hla–ADAM10 complex initiates intracellular signaling events that culminate in the disruption of focal adhesions. PMID:20624979

  20. Role of a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 in Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin-mediated cellular injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Georgia A; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2010-07-27

    Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin (Hla), a potent cytotoxin, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of staphylococcal diseases, including those caused by methicillin-resistant epidemic strains. Hla is secreted as a water-soluble monomer that undergoes a series of conformational changes to generate a heptameric, beta-barrel structure in host membranes. Structural maturation of Hla depends on its interaction with a previously unknown proteinaceous receptor in the context of the cell membrane. It is reported here that a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) interacts with Hla and is required to initiate the sequence of events whereby the toxin is transformed into a cytolytic pore. Hla binding to the eukaryotic cell requires ADAM10 expression. Further, ADAM10 is required for Hla-mediated cytotoxicity, most notably when the toxin is present at low concentrations. These data thus implicate ADAM10 as the probable high-affinity toxin receptor. Upon Hla binding, ADAM10 relocalizes to caveolin 1-enriched lipid rafts that serve as a platform for the clustering of signaling molecules. It is demonstrated that the Hla-ADAM10 complex initiates intracellular signaling events that culminate in the disruption of focal adhesions.

  1. Central venous catheters as a source of hemodialysis-related bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G D; McKenzie, M; Buchanan-Chell, M; Caballo, L; Chui, L; Kowalewska-Grochowska, K

    1998-09-01

    To describe investigations into an increase in hemodialysis-related bacteremia that occurred in our hospital in the first 6 months of 1996. Hemodialysis unit in a tertiary-care medical center. Prospective surveillance for hemodialysis bacteremia has been performed for several years. Cases that occurred in 1995 were compared to cases in the first 6 months of 1996. Unit data on dialysis runs and method of dialysis access were used to calculate rates. Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to type 18 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from 1996. A case-control study comparing 80 randomly selected hemodialysis patients from 1995 and 1996 was performed to examine infection risk factors. The hemodialysis bacteremia rate was 1.2 per 1,000 runs in 1995 and 2.8 per 1,000 in the first 6 months of 1996 (P=.0009). The 25 cases in 1995 and 32 in the first half of 1996 were similar in age, gender, means of vascular access, and microbial etiology. Central venous catheter (CVC) access accounted for >90% of cases in both time periods. S aureus was the most common microbial etiology (53% of the 1996 cases). PCR typing of S aureus isolates from 1996 demonstrated five different strains, the most common having six isolates. The use of CVCs as a means of vascular access abruptly increased in the unit in January 1996, from 40% in 1996 (P<.001), associated with structural changes in healthcare delivery in the region resulting in delays in performing surgical procedures, such as creation of vascular grafts and fistulae. A marked increase in hemodialysis bacteremia occurred in 1996, associated with increased reliance on CVCs for vascular access in hemodialysis patients during a period of healthcare restructuring.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a dangerous pathogen that causes a variety of severe diseases. The virulence of S. aureus is defined by a large repertoire of virulence factors, among which secreted toxins play a preeminent role. Many S. aureus toxins damage biological membranes, leading to cell death. In particular, S. aureus produces potent hemolysins and leukotoxins. Among the latter, some were recently identified to lyse neutrophils after ingestion, representing an especially powerful weapon against bacterial elimination by innate host defense. Furthermore, S. aureus secretes many factors that inhibit the complement cascade or prevent recognition by host defenses. Several further toxins add to this multi-faceted program of S. aureus to evade elimination in the host. This review will give an overview over S. aureus toxins focusing on recent advances in our understanding of how leukotoxins work in receptor-mediated or receptor-independent fashions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. An important role of α-hemolysin in extracellular vesicles on the development of atopic dermatitis induced by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Wook Hong

    Full Text Available Skin barrier disruption and dermal inflammation are key phenotypes of atopic dermatitis (AD. Staphylococcus aureus secretes extracellular vesicles (EVs, which are involved in AD pathogenesis. Here, we evaluated the role of EVs-associated α-hemolysin derived from S. aureus in AD pathogenesis. α-hemolysin production from S. aureus was detected using western blot analyses. The cytotoxic activity of α-hemolysin on HaCaT keratinocytes was evaluated by measuring cell viability after treating cells with soluble and EVs-associated α-hemolysin. To determine the type of cell death, HaCaT keratinocytes were stained with annexin V and 7-AAD. The in vivo effects of α-hemolysin were evaluated by application of soluble and EV-associated α-hemolysin on the mouse skin. The present study showed that increased α-hemolysin was produced by S. aureus colonized on AD patients compared to healthy subjects. α-hemolysin production was also related to AD severity. In addition, EV-associated α-hemolysin was more cytotoxic to HaCaT keratinocytes than soluble α-hemolysin, and α-hemolysin-negative EVs did not induce keratinocyte death. EV-associated α-hemolysin induced necrosis, but soluble α-hemolysin induced apoptosis of keratinocytes. In vivo, skin barrier disruption and epidermal hyperplasia were induced by soluble and EV-associated α-hemolysin. However, AD-like dermal inflammation was only caused by EV-associated α-hemolysin. Moreover, neither skin barrier disruption nor AD-like skin inflammation was induced by α-hemolysin-negative EVs. Taken together, α-Hemolysin secreted from S. aureus, particularly the EV-associated form, induces both skin barrier disruption and AD-like skin inflammation, suggesting that EV-associated α-hemolysin is a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for the control of AD.

  4. An important role of α-hemolysin in extracellular vesicles on the development of atopic dermatitis induced by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Wook; Choi, Eun-Byul; Min, Taek-Ki; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Min-Hye; Jeon, Seong Gyu; Lee, Byung-Jae; Gho, Yong Song; Jee, Young-Koo; Pyun, Bok-Yang; Kim, Yoon-Keun

    2014-01-01

    Skin barrier disruption and dermal inflammation are key phenotypes of atopic dermatitis (AD). Staphylococcus aureus secretes extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are involved in AD pathogenesis. Here, we evaluated the role of EVs-associated α-hemolysin derived from S. aureus in AD pathogenesis. α-hemolysin production from S. aureus was detected using western blot analyses. The cytotoxic activity of α-hemolysin on HaCaT keratinocytes was evaluated by measuring cell viability after treating cells with soluble and EVs-associated α-hemolysin. To determine the type of cell death, HaCaT keratinocytes were stained with annexin V and 7-AAD. The in vivo effects of α-hemolysin were evaluated by application of soluble and EV-associated α-hemolysin on the mouse skin. The present study showed that increased α-hemolysin was produced by S. aureus colonized on AD patients compared to healthy subjects. α-hemolysin production was also related to AD severity. In addition, EV-associated α-hemolysin was more cytotoxic to HaCaT keratinocytes than soluble α-hemolysin, and α-hemolysin-negative EVs did not induce keratinocyte death. EV-associated α-hemolysin induced necrosis, but soluble α-hemolysin induced apoptosis of keratinocytes. In vivo, skin barrier disruption and epidermal hyperplasia were induced by soluble and EV-associated α-hemolysin. However, AD-like dermal inflammation was only caused by EV-associated α-hemolysin. Moreover, neither skin barrier disruption nor AD-like skin inflammation was induced by α-hemolysin-negative EVs. Taken together, α-Hemolysin secreted from S. aureus, particularly the EV-associated form, induces both skin barrier disruption and AD-like skin inflammation, suggesting that EV-associated α-hemolysin is a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for the control of AD.

  5. Nosocomial Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterimia among Nasal Carriers of Methicillin- Resistant and Methicillin-Susceptible Strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pujol (Miquel); C. Pena; R. Pallares (Roman); J. Ariza (Javier); J. Ayats (Josefina); M.A. Dominguez; F. Gudiol (Francesc)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractObjectives To determine the relevance of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus, either methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) or methicillinresistant (MRSA), as a risk factor for the development of nosocomial S aureus bacteremia during an MRSA outbreak. patients and methods: In this prospective

  6. Actinomyces turicensis Bacteremia Secondary to Pyometra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiya, Hideharu; Ogawa, Hiroko; Takahashi, Yusuke; Kimura, Kosuke; Hasegawa, Kan; Otsuka, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    We herein present a rare case of Actinomyces turicensis bacteremia that was caused by pyometra. The patient was successfully treated with transvaginal drainage and antibiotic therapy. A literature review in MEDLINE showed that there have been only 8 previously reported cases of A. turicensis bacteremia. This infection frequently occurs in patients with visceral abscesses, and blood culture examinations usually reveal a polymicrobial pattern. However, the prognosis of such patients has been reported to generally be benign. Due to difficulties in performing bacterial identification and the wide-spectrum clinical pictures associated with this bacteremia, no comprehensive understanding of the clinical features of each Actinomyces species has yet been established.

  7. Bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

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  8. Bacteremias in liver transplant recipients: shift toward gram-negative bacteria as predominant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nina; Wagener, Marilyn M; Obman, Asia; Cacciarelli, Thomas V; de Vera, Michael E; Gayowski, Timothy

    2004-07-01

    During the 1990s, gram-positive bacteria emerged as major pathogens after liver transplantation. We sought to determine whether the pathogens associated with bacteremias in liver transplant recipients have changed. Patients included 233 liver transplant recipients transplanted between 1989 and 2003. The proportion of all infections due to bacteremias increased significantly over time (P gram-negatives increased from 25% in the period of 1989-1993 to 51.8% in 1998-03, that of gram-positive bacteria decreased from 75% in the period of 1989-93 to 48.2% in the period of 1998-2003. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the most frequent pathogens in bacteremic patients. The incidence of bacteremias due to MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa has remained unchanged (P gram-negative bacteria, particularly Klebsiella pneumoniae has increased (P =.02). Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in the current quartile were not clonally related. In conclusion, bacteremias as a proportion of all infections in liver transplant recipients have increased significantly over time, due in part to a decline in infections due to other major pathogens, e.g., fungi, primarily Candida species, and CMV. Gram-negative bacteria have emerged as predominant pathogens in bacteremic liver transplant recipients.

  9. Polymicrobial Bacteremia Involving Comamonas testosteroni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Orsini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Comamonas spp. are uncommon isolates in microbiology laboratories and have been rarely observed as an infectious agent in clinical practice. They have widespread environmental distribution and have been isolated from water, soil, and plants as well as from some hospital devices such as intravenous catheters and water contained in humidifier reservoirs used in respiratory treatment. The genus Comamonas originally contained the following species: acidovorans, testosteroni, kerstersii, terrigena, denitrificans, and nitrativorans. It now contains 17 species, while acidovorans spp. have been reclassified as Delftia acidovorans. In spite of its uncommon human pathogenesis, there are few reports on the aggressive manner of it as an opportunistic pathogen, mostly related to testosteroni spp. We present a case of polymicrobial bacteremia involving Comamonas testosteroni. The aim of this case report is to alert clinicians to the potential diagnosis of bloodstream infections caused by uncommon pathogens.

  10. Internalization of Staphylococcus aureus in Lymphocytes Induces Oxidative Stress and DNA Fragmentation: Possible Ameliorative Role of Nanoconjugated Vancomycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhankari Prasad Chakraborty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequently isolated pathogen causing bloodstream infections, skin and soft tissue infections and pneumonia. Lymphocyte is an important immune cell. The aim of the present paper was to test the ameliorative role of nanoconjugated vancomycin against Vancomycin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (VSSA and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA infection-induced oxidative stress in lymphocytes. VSSA and VRSA infections were developed in Swiss mice by intraperitoneal injection of 5×106 CFU/mL bacterial solutions. Nanoconjugated vancomycin was adminstrated to VSSA- and VRSA-infected mice at its effective dose for 10 days. Vancomycin was adminstrated to VSSA- and VRSA-infected mice at a similar dose, respectively, for 10 days. Vancomycin and nanoconjugated vancomycin were adminstrated to normal mice at their effective doses for 10 days. The result of this study reveals that in vivo VSSA and VRSA infection significantly increases the level of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, oxidized glutathione level, nitrite generation, nitrite release, and DNA damage and decreases the level of reduced glutathione, antioxidant enzyme status, and glutathione-dependent enzymes as compared to control group, which were increased or decreased significantly near to normal in nanoconjugated vancomycin-treated group. These findings suggest the potential use and beneficial role of nanoconjugated vancomycin against VSSA and VRSA infection-induced oxidative stress in lymphocytes.

  11. Bacteremia in patients receiving TNF-alpha antagonists--a prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loulergue, Pierre; Tubach, Florence; Salmon, Dominique; Dellamonica, Pierre; Taillan, Bruno; Thorel, Jean-Baptiste; Marteau, Philippe; Bressot, Christian; Ravaud, Philippe; Mariette, Xavier; Lortholary, Olivier

    2013-12-01

    TNF-alpha antagonists have changed the outcome of various chronic inflammatory diseases. Their use has spread widely and many patients receive those treatments for years. Previous reports found that the use of TNF-alpha antagonists may be associated with an increased risk of serious bacterial infections. We report 47 prospective bacteremia cases from the RATIO registry. A national prospective study was conducted in France between 2004 and 2007 to collect severe bacterial infections in patients receiving TNF-alpha antagonists. All reported cases of bacteremia were validated by an expert committee. Forty-seven bacteremic episodes were reported. Staphylococcus aureus represented the most frequent causative pathogen (40%) and was mostly associated with bones and/or joints infections (68%) and with a worse outcome compared to that observed with other bacterial pathogens. Patients receiving TNF-alpha antagonists may develop bacteremia and S. aureus has to be included in the spectrum of the initial empiric antimicrobial therapy. Copyright © 2013 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Bacteremia during quinsy and elective tonsillectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klug, Tejs Ehlers; Henriksen, Jens-Jacob; Rusan, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Bacteremia during elective tonsillectomy is well recognized, whereas bacteremia during quinsy tonsillectomy has never been studied. The aim of the present study was to explore the incidence of bacteremia during elective and quinsy tonsillectomy in order to evaluate the antibiotic...... prophylaxis recommendations to patients at high risk of infective endocarditis who are undergoing tonsillectomy. Methods: A prospective study was conducted on 80 patients undergoing elective tonsillectomy and 36 patients undergoing acute tonsillectomy due to peritonsillar abscess. Blood cultures, tonsillar...... swabs, core tissue, and pus aspirates were analyzed by standard microbiological techniques. Results: Bacteremia was detected in 73% of patients during elective tonsillectomy compared to 56% during quinsy tonsillectomy (P ¼ .089, Fishers exact test). Significantly more blood culture bottles were positive...

  13. Panton-Valentine leukocidin does play a role in the early stage of Staphylococcus aureus skin infections: a rabbit model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Lipinska

    Full Text Available Despite epidemiological data linking necrotizing skin infections with the production of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, the contribution of this toxin to the virulence of S. aureus has been highly discussed as a result of inconclusive results of in vivo studies. However, the majority of these results originate from experiments using mice, an animal species which neutrophils--the major target cells for PVL--are highly insensitive to the action of this leukocidin. In contrast, the rabbit neutrophils have been shown to be as sensitive to PVL action as human cells, making the rabbit a better experimental animal to explore the PVL role. In this study we examined whether PVL contributes to S. aureus pathogenicity by means of a rabbit skin infection model. The rabbits were injected intradermally with 10(8 cfu of either a PVL positive community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolate, its isogenic PVL knockout or a PVL complemented knockout strain, and the development of skin lesions was observed. While all strains induced skin infection, the wild type strain produced larger lesions and a higher degree of skin necrosis compared to the PVL knockout strain in the first week after the infection. The PVL expression in the rabbits was indirectly confirmed by a raise in the serum titer of anti-LukS-PV antibodies observed only in the rabbits infected with PVL positive strains. These results indicate that the rabbit model is more suitable for studying the role of PVL in staphylococcal diseases than other animal models. Further, they support the epidemiological link between PVL producing S. aureus strains and necrotizing skin infections.

  14. The role of macrophages in the innate immune response to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus: mechanisms and contrasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Joby; Aberdein, Jody; Jubrail, Jamil; Dockrell, David H

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are critical mediators of innate immune responses against bacteria. The Gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus express a range of virulence factors, which challenge macrophages' immune competence. We review how macrophages respond to this challenge. Macrophages employ a range of strategies to phagocytose and kill each pathogen. When the macrophages capacity to clear bacteria is overwhelmed macrophages play important roles in orchestrating the inflammatory response through pattern recognition receptor-mediated responses. Macrophages also ensure the inflammatory response is tightly constrained, to avoid tissue damage, and play an important role in downregulating the inflammatory response once initial bacterial replication is controlled. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

  15. Role of the alternative sigma factor sigma on Staphylococcus aureus resistance to stresses of relevance to food preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrián, G; Sagarzazu, N; Aertsen, A; Pagán, R; Condón, S; Mañas, P

    2009-07-01

    To examine the role of the alternative general stress sigma factor sigma(B) on the resistance of Staphylococcus aureus to stresses of relevance to food preservation, with special emphasis on emerging technologies such as pulsed electric fields (PEF) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). S. aureus strain Newman and its isogenic DeltasigB mutant were grown to exponential and stationary growth phases and its resistance to various stresses was tested. The absence of the sigma(B) factor caused a decrease in the resistance to heat, PEF, HHP, alkali, acid and hydrogen peroxide. In the case of heat, the influence of the sigma(B) factor was particularly important, and decreases in decimal reduction time values of ninefold were observed as a result of its deficiency. The increased thermotolerance of the parental strain as compared with the sigB mutant could be attributed to a better capacity to sustain and repair sublethal damages caused by heat. sigma(B) factor provides S. aureus cells with resistance to multiple stresses, increasing survival to heat, PEF and HHP treatments. Results obtained in this work help in understanding the physiological mechanisms behind cell survival and death in food-processing environments.

  16. Bartonella henselae prevalence in domestic cats in California: risk factors and association between bacteremia and antibody titers.

    OpenAIRE

    Chomel, B.B.; Abbott, R C; Kasten, R W; Floyd-Hawkins, K A; Kass, P.H.; Glaser, C A; Pedersen, N C; Koehler, J. E.

    1995-01-01

    The isolation of Bartonella henselae, the agent of cat scratch disease, from the blood of naturally infected domestic cats and the demonstration that cats remain bacteremic for several months suggest that cats play a major role as a reservoir for this bacterium. A convenience sample of 205 cats from northern California was selected between 1992 and 1994 to evaluate the B. henselae antibody and bacteremia prevalences and to determine the risk factors and associations between bacteremia and ant...

  17. Two cases of Ruminococcus gnavus bacteremia associated with diverticulitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sanne Grønvall Kjær; Skov, Marianne N; Justesen, Ulrik S

    2013-01-01

    We report two cases of bacteremia with the anaerobic bacterium Ruminococcus gnavus. In both cases, the bacteremia was associated with diverticular disease. Preliminary conventional identification suggested peptostreptococci, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spec...

  18. Comparative antimicrobial susceptibility of aerobic and facultative bacteria from community-acquired bacteremia to ertapenem in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fung Chang-Phone

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ertapenem is a once-a-day carbapenem and has excellent activity against many gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic, facultative, and anaerobic bacteria. The susceptibility of isolates of community-acquired bacteremia to ertapenem has not been reported yet. The present study assesses the in vitro activity of ertapenem against aerobic and facultative bacterial pathogens isolated from patients with community-acquired bacteremia by determining and comparing the MICs of cefepime, cefoxitin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ertapenem, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, amikacin and gentamicin. The prevalence of extended broad spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL producing strains of community-acquired bacteremia and their susceptibility to these antibiotics are investigated. Methods Aerobic and facultative bacteria isolated from blood obtained from hospitalized patients with community-acquired bacteremia within 48 hours of admission between August 1, 2004 and September 30, 2004 in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, Taiwan, were identified using standard procedures. Antimicrobial susceptibility was evaluated by Etest according to the standard guidelines provided by the manufacturer and document M100-S16 Performance Standards of the Clinical Laboratory of Standard Institute. Antimicrobial agents including cefepime, cefoxitin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ertapenem, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, amikacin and gentamicin were used against the bacterial isolates to test their MICs as determined by Etest. For Staphylococcus aureus isolates, MICs of oxacillin were also tested by Etest to differentiate oxacillin-sensitive and oxacillin-resistant S. aureus. Results Ertapenem was highly active in vitro against many aerobic and facultative bacterial pathogens commonly recovered from patients with community-acquired bacteremia (128/159, 80.5 %. Ertapenem had more potent activity than ceftriaxone, piperacillin

  19. Evolution in Fast Forward: a Potential Role for Mutators in Accelerating Staphylococcus aureus Pathoadaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Gregory S.; Schwingel, Johanna M.; Foley, Matthew H.; Vore, Kelly L.; Boonanantanasarn, Kanitsak; Gill, Ann L.; Sutton, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogen evolution and subsequent phenotypic heterogeneity during chronic infection are proposed to enhance Staphylococcus aureus survival during human infection. We tested this theory by genetically and phenotypically characterizing strains with mutations constructed in the mismatch repair (MMR) and oxidized guanine (GO) system, termed mutators, which exhibit increased spontaneous-mutation frequencies. Analysis of these mutators revealed not only strain-dependent increases in the spontaneous-mutation frequency but also shifts in mutational type and hot spots consistent with loss of GO or MMR functions. Although the GO and MMR systems are relied upon in some bacterial species to prevent reactive oxygen species-induced DNA damage, no deficit in hydrogen peroxide sensitivity was found when either of these DNA repair pathways was lost in S. aureus. To gain insight into the contribution of increased mutation supply to S. aureus pathoadaptation, we measured the rate of α-hemolysin and staphyloxanthin inactivation during serial passage. Detection of increased rates of α-hemolysin and staphyloxanthin inactivation in GO and MMR mutants suggests that these strains are capable of modifying virulence phenotypes implicated in mediating infection. Accelerated derivation of altered virulence phenotypes, combined with the absence of increased ROS sensitivity, highlights the potential of mutators to drive pathoadaptation in the host and serve as catalysts for persistent infections. PMID:23204459

  20. Mechanism of action and in vivo efficacy of a human-derived antibody against Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foletti, Davide; Strop, Pavel; Shaughnessy, Lee; Hasa-Moreno, Adela; Casas, Meritxell Galindo; Russell, Marcella; Bee, Christine; Wu, Si; Pham, Amber; Zeng, Zhilan; Pons, Jaume; Rajpal, Arvind; Shelton, Dave

    2013-05-27

    The emergence and spread of multi-drug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus in hospitals and in the community emphasize the urgency for the development of novel therapeutic interventions. Our approach was to evaluate the potential of harnessing the human immune system to guide the development of novel therapeutics. We explored the role of preexisting antibodies against S. aureus α-hemolysin in the serum of human individuals by isolating and characterizing one antibody with a remarkably high affinity to α-hemolysin. The antibody provided protection in S. aureus pneumonia, skin, and bacteremia mouse models of infection and also showed therapeutic efficacy when dosed up to 18 h post-infection in the pneumonia model. Additionally, in pneumonia and bacteremia animal models, the therapeutic efficacy of the α-hemolysin antibody appeared additive to the antibiotic linezolid. To better understand the mechanism of action of this isolated antibody, we solved the crystal structure of the α-hemolysin:antibody complex. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the crystal structure of the α-hemolysin monomer. The structure of the complex shows that the antibody binds α-hemolysin between the cap and the rim domains. In combination with biochemical data, the structure suggests that the antibody neutralizes the activity of the toxin by preventing binding to the plasma membrane of susceptible host cells. The data presented here suggest that protective antibodies directed against S. aureus molecules exist in some individuals and that such antibodies have a therapeutic potential either alone or in combination with antibiotics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of the regulation, metabolic functions, and roles in virulence of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase homologues gapA and gapB in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Joanne; Cockayne, Alan; Moody, Peter C E; Morrissey, Julie A

    2010-12-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus contains two glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) homologues known as GapA and GapB. GapA has been characterized as a functional GAPDH protein, but currently there is no biological evidence for the role of GapB in metabolism in S. aureus. In this study we show through a number of complementary methods that S. aureus GapA is essential for glycolysis while GapB is essential in gluconeogenesis. These proteins are reciprocally regulated in response to glucose concentrations, and both are influenced by the glycolysis regulator protein GapR, which is the first demonstration of the role of this regulator in S. aureus and the first indication that GapR homologues control genes other than those within the glycolytic operon. Furthermore, we show that both GapA and GapB are important in the pathogenesis of S. aureus in a Galleria mellonella model of infection, showing for the first time in any bacteria that both glycolysis and gluconeogenesis have important roles in virulence.

  2. PBP-2 Negative Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus schleiferi Bacteremia from a Prostate Abscess: An Unusual Occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandni Merchant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp. schleiferi is a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus which has been described as a pathogen responsible for various nosocomial infections including bacteremia, brain abscess, and infection of intravenous pacemakers. Recently, such bacteria have been described to be found typically on skin and mucosal surfaces. It is also believed to be a part of the preaxillary human flora and more frequently found in men. It is very similar in its pathogenicity with Staphylococcus aureus group and expresses a fibronectin binding protein. Literature on this pathogen reveals that it commonly causes otitis among dogs because of its location in the auditory meatus of canines. Also, it has strong association with pyoderma in dogs. The prime concern with this organism is the antibiotic resistance and relapse even after appropriate treatment. Very rarely, if any, cases have been reported about prostatic abscess (PA with this microbe. Our patient had a history of recurrent UTIs and subsequent PA resulting in S. schleiferi bacteremia in contrast to gram negative bacteremia commonly associated with UTI. This organism was found to be resistant to methicillin, in spite of being negative for PBP2, which is a rare phenomenon and needs further studies.

  3. Fatal Case of Listeria innocua Bacteremia

    OpenAIRE

    Perrin, Monique; Bemer, Michel; Delamare, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    Listeria innocua is widespread in the environment and in food. This species has to date never been described in association with human disease. We report a case of fatal bacteremia caused by L. innocua in a 62-year-old patient.

  4. Fatal case of Listeria innocua bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Monique; Bemer, Michel; Delamare, Catherine

    2003-11-01

    Listeria innocua is widespread in the environment and in food. This species has to date never been described in association with human disease. We report a case of fatal bacteremia caused by L. innocua in a 62-year-old patient.

  5. Molecular Epidemiology of Enterococcal Bacteremia in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Julie C.; Daley, Denise A.; Le, Tam; Robinson, Owen J.; Gottlieb, Thomas; Howden, Benjamin P.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Bennett, Catherine M.; Stinear, Timothy P.; Turnidge, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Enterococci are a major cause of health care-associated infections and account for approximately 10% of all bacteremias globally. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of enterococcal bacteremia isolates in Australia that are antimicrobial resistant, with particular emphasis on susceptibility to ampicillin and the glycopeptides, and to characterize the molecular epidemiology of the Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium isolates. From 1 January to 31 December 2011, 1,079 unique episodes of bacteremia were investigated, of which 95.8% were caused by either E. faecalis (61.0%) or E. faecium (34.8%). The majority of bacteremias were health care associated, and approximately one-third were polymicrobial. Ampicillin resistance was detected in 90.4% of E. faecium isolates but was not detected in E. faecalis isolates. Vancomycin nonsusceptibility was reported in 0.6% and 36.5% of E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates, respectively. Unlike Europe and the United States, where vancomycin resistance in E. faecium is predominately due to the acquisition of the vanA operon, 98.4% of E. faecium isolates harboring van genes carried the vanB operon, and 16.1% of the vanB E. faecium isolates had vancomycin MICs at or below the susceptible breakpoint of the CLSI. Although molecular typing identified 126 E. faecalis pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pulsotypes, >50% belonged to two pulsotypes that were isolated across Australia. E. faecium consisted of 73 pulsotypes from which 43 multilocus sequence types were identified. Almost 90% of the E. faecium isolates were identified as CC17 clones, of which approximately half were characterized as ST203, which was isolated Australia-wide. In conclusion, the Australian Enterococcal Sepsis Outcome Programme (AESOP) study has shown that although they are polyclonal, enterococcal bacteremias in Australia are frequently caused by ampicillin-resistant vanB E. faecium. PMID:24391201

  6. [Trends for bacteremia and risk factors for death in a tertiary hospital in Mexico City. 1981-1992].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifuentes-Osornio, J; Guerrero-Almeida, M C; Ponce de León-Garduño, L A; Guerrero-Almeida, M L

    2001-01-01

    To describe the trends and risk factors of death for bacteremia in adult from a tertiary-care center from 1981 to 1992. We randomly included 20% of bacteremic episodes per year. 47,618 blood-cultures from 19,530 patients, 3428 patients (17.6%) had bacteremia (285/y). From 600 episodes (50/y), 307 were from men, 368 were hospital-acquired (HA), and 88% were monomicrobial. Diabetes mellitus was seen in 103 cases, cirrhosis of the liver in 98, and AIDS in 33, among others. The main microorganisms were: Escherichia coli (177), Klebsiella pneumoniae (53), Enterobacter (50), Salmonella (45) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (35); coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) (116), Staphylococcus aureus (56), and enterococci (22), and Candida (20). CNS decreased during the study (p mortality of the HA bacteremia was 70.8%, and 29.2% in the case of community-acquired, the mortality attributable to HA bacteremia was 41.6%. The main risk factors were: cardiac valvular disease (p mortality during the study period that has not change despite opportune therapy, Enterococci and candida have emerged as significant pathogens.

  7. Origin of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus health care-associated infections: evaluation of the role of anterior nares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinadatha, Chetan; Hussain, Zehra; Erickson, Timothy A; Villamaria, Frank C; Copeland, Laurel A; Huber, Thomas W

    2015-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) health care-associated infections (HAIs) are a cause of extended hospitalizations and escalating health care costs. We typed 49 MRSA HAIs and their corresponding admission nasal MRSA isolates to determine strain-relatedness and better define the role of anterior nares in the causation of HAI and the value of decolonization. Based on repetitive extragenic palindromic sequencing polymerase chain reaction results, the majority of our patients possibly acquired MRSA HAI from nonnasal sources (36 out of 49; 74%). Among the remaining patients (13 out of 49; 26%) the nasal and clinical HAI isolates matched, indicating potential benefit of decolonization among this subsegment of patients. These findings may be relevant to institutions such as Veterans Health Administration hospitals that already have universal screening programs but are looking at ways to further reduce MRSA HAI incidence. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Identification of Staphylococcus aureus Factors Required for Pathogenicity and Growth in Human Blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, John; Boldock, Emma; Prince, Lynne R; Renshaw, Stephen A; Whyte, Moira K; Foster, Simon J

    2017-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal but also has devastating potential as an opportunistic pathogen. S. aureus bacteremia is often associated with an adverse outcome. To identify potential targets for novel control approaches, we have identified S. aureus components that are required for growth in human blood. An ordered transposon mutant library was screened, and 9 genes involved specifically in hemolysis or growth on human blood agar were identified by comparing the mutants to the parental strain. Three genes ( purA , purB , and pabA ) were subsequently found to be required for pathogenesis in the zebrafish embryo infection model. The pabA growth defect was specific to the red blood cell component of human blood, showing no difference from the parental strain in growth in human serum, human plasma, or sheep or horse blood. PabA is required in the tetrahydrofolate (THF) biosynthesis pathway. The pabA growth defect was found to be due to a combination of loss of THF-dependent dTMP production by the ThyA enzyme and increased demand for pyrimidines in human blood. Our work highlights pabA and the pyrimidine salvage pathway as potential targets for novel therapeutics and suggests a previously undefined role for a human blood factor in the activity of sulfonamide antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Connolly et al.

  9. Back to the Future: Penicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Matthew P; René, Pierre; Cheng, Alexandre P; Lee, Todd C

    2016-12-01

    Widespread penicillin usage rapidly resulted in the emergence of penicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. However, new data suggest that penicillin susceptibility may be in a period of renaissance. The objective of our study was to quantify penicillin resistance in methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia. We retrospectively reviewed all adult MSSA bacteremia from April 2010 to April 2015 at the McGill University Health Centre (Montreal, QC, Canada). Susceptibility to penicillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) was determined in accordance with the Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. There were 324 unique episodes of MSSA bacteremia. Ninety (28%) isolates were susceptible to penicillin, 229 (71%) to erythromycin, 239 (74%) to clindamycin, and 317 (98%) to TMP-SMX. Isolates that were penicillin resistant were more likely to also be resistant to other antibiotics, but a statistically significant association was apparent only for erythromycin resistance (76/234, 32.2% vs 19/90, 21.1%, P = .04). The median age of patients was 67.5 years (interquartile range 52-78) and overall in-hospital 30-day mortality was 16.3% (53 deaths). After adjustment for patient age, there was no association between penicillin resistance and either intensive care unit admission or death. More than one-quarter of patients with MSSA bacteremia potentially could be treated with parenteral penicillin, which may offer pharmacokinetic advantages over other beta-lactam drugs and potentially improved outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Mycoplasma hominis bacteremia. An underestimated etiological agent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posse, Tamara; Prieto, Monica; Cipolla, Lucia; Kaufman, Sara

    2017-10-17

    Mycoplasma hominis is a fastidious bacterium, which usually colonizes the lower urogenital tract and may cause systemic infections in neonates and genital infections in adults. It can also be the cause of serious extra-genital infections, mainly in immunosuppressed or predisposed subjects. We describe a case of bacteremia caused by M. hominis in a previously healthy woman after uterine curettage due to incomplete abortion. M. hominis could be an underestimated cause of bacteremia in immunocompetent patients. Mycoplasma organisms have fastidious growth requirements, are often difficult to culture on a cell-free medium and have no cell wall. The conventional method for detection may fail. This is the first report of M. hominis isolation from a positive automated blood culture (BD BACTEC, USA). Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Pasteurella multocida Bacteremia in an Immunocompromised Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Kukrety

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 61-year-old Caucasian gentleman who presented with a one-day history of fever, chills, and altered mental status. His symptoms were initially thought to be secondary to cellulitis. Blood cultures grew Pasteurella multocida, a rare pathogen to cause bacteremia. Our patient was treated with ciprofloxacin for two weeks and made a complete and uneventful recovery. Our patient’s uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease put him at a higher risk for developing serious P. multocida infection. The patient’s dog licking the wounds on his legs was considered as the possible source of infection. As P. multicoda bacteremia is rare, but severe with a high mortality rate, it is imperative to have a high index of suspicion for this infection especially in the vulnerable immunocompromised population.

  12. Macrophage serum markers in pneumococcal bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren K; Weis, Nina

    2006-01-01

    with pneumococcal bacteremia. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. SETTING: Five university hospitals in Denmark. PATIENTS: A total of 133 patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia (positive blood culture) and 133 age- and gender-matched controls. INTERVENTIONS: Samples were collected for biochemical...... analyses at the time of first positive blood culture. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: sCD163 was highly correlated with other macrophage markers and was significantly elevated (median [25-75 percentiles], 4.6 mg/L [2.8-8.9]) compared with healthy controls (2.7 mg/L [2.1-3.3], p ... were observed in patients who needed intensive care (hemodialysis, p = .0011; hypotension, p = .0014; mechanical ventilation, p = .0019). Significantly lower levels of sCD163, ferritin, transcobalamin, and suPAR (but not C-reactive protein) were measured in patients > or =75 yrs. In patients

  13. Microbiology of odontogenic bacteremia: beyond endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parahitiyawa, N B; Jin, L J; Leung, W K; Yam, W C; Samaranayake, L P

    2009-01-01

    The human gingival niche is a unique microbial habitat. In this habitat, biofilm organisms exist in harmony, attached to either enamel or cemental surfaces of the tooth as well as to the crevicular epithelium, subjacent to a rich vascular plexus underneath. Due to this extraordinary anatomical juxtaposition, plaque biofilm bacteria have a ready portal of ingress into the systemic circulation in both health and disease. Yet the frequency, magnitude, and etiology of bacteremias due to oral origin and the consequent end organ infections are not clear and have not recently been evaluated. In this comprehensive review, we address the available literature on triggering events, incidence, and diversity of odontogenic bacteremias. The nature of the infective agents and end organ infections (other than endocarditis) is also described, with an emphasis on the challenge of establishing the link between odontogenic infections and related systemic, focal infections.

  14. Incidence of bacteremia after chewing, tooth brushing and scaling in individuals with periodontal inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forner, Lone; Larsen, Tove; Kilian, Mogens

    2006-01-01

    SCIENTIFIC RATIONALE FOR STUDY: Bacteremia occurs with various frequency after oral procedures. Periodontal disease may affect the incidence, magnitude, duration and bacterial spectrum of bacteremia. PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: The incidence and magnitude of bacteremia after scaling was significantly hig...

  15. Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Preterm Neonate

    OpenAIRE

    Hilliard, Nicholaus J; Schelonka, Robert L.; Waites, Ken B.

    2003-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is an uncommon but potentially serious bacterial pathogen causing infections of the bloodstream, lungs, and central nervous system of preterm neonates. A case of bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a 19-day-old preterm neonate who was successfully treated with vancomycin, tobramycin, meropenem, and clindamycin is described. Implications for the diagnostic laboratory and clinicians when Bacillus species are detected in normally sterile sites are discussed, and the small numbers o...

  16. Bacteremia following dental implant surgery: Preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    Bölükbas, Nilüfer; Özdemi, Tayfun; Öksüz, Lütfiye; Gürler, Nezahat

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of this study were to investigate the incidence of bacteremia, bacteriology and antibiotic susceptibility against to causative bacteria associated with dental implant installation. Study Design: 30 generally healthy patients were enrolled in this study. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 30 minutes after dental implant installation and 24 hours after dental implant surgery. Blood samples were cultured in a BACTEC system. The isolated bacteria were identified ...

  17. [Isolation of Bordetella trematum from bacteremia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Ilham; Ihbibane, Fatima; Belabbes, Houria; Zerouali, Khalid; El Mdaghri, Naima

    2014-01-01

    The species Bordetella trematum was first described in 1996. Currently only eleven cases were published. We describe the first case of Bordetella trematum issued from bacteremia with a patient who has severe burns in Morocco. The identification was not possible by conventional microbiological methods where the resort to 16S ARNr sequencing. The use of molecular methods, including sequencing of the 16S ARNr, is currently an essential complementary tool to identify microbiological pathogens.

  18. Update on detection of bacteremia and fungemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Reimer, L G; M. L. Wilson; Weinstein, M P

    1997-01-01

    The presence of microorganisms in a patient's blood is a critical determinant of the severity of the patient's illness. Equally important, the laboratory isolation and identification of a microorganism present in blood determine the etiologic agent of infection, especially when the site of infection is localized and difficult to access. This review addresses the pathophysiology and clinical characteristics of bacteremia, fungemia, and sepsis; diagnostic strategies and critical factors in the ...

  19. Investigation of bacteremia after separator placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjuman Preet Kaur Dua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Simple orthodontic procedure such as separator placement can be associated with the occurrence of transient bacteraemia. Use of clorhexidine before separator placement has been recommended as a measure to decrease the bacteraemia. Aim: The purpose of this study was to detect the presence of transient bacteremia after separator placement following use of 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash. Methodology: The study group consisted of 27 adult patients who reported for orthodontic treatment (18 males and 9 females. The patients were asked to rinse their mouth for 60 sec with 15 mL of 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash before the separator placement. An aseptic technique was used to draw out 5 ml of blood was from either the left or right antecubital fossa immediately before orthodontic separator placement (as control group, and the second 5 ml sample was taken 1–2 min after the placement of separators mesial and distal to all the first molars. All the blood samples were inoculated into culture bottles containing Brain Heart Infusion and incubated aerobically for 7 days. Media used for bacterial growth is chocolate agar and MacConkey agar. Results: From a total of 27 patients and 54 samples, none of the sample was found positive for bacteremia. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that there is no bacteremia after the placement of separators following the use of chlorhexidine mouthwash.

  20. Risk Factors for Nosocomial Bacterremia Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pujol (Miquel); C. Pena; R. Pallares (Roman); J. Ayats (Josefina); J. Ariza (Javier); F. Gudiol (Francesc)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn a prospective surveillance study (February 1990–December 1991) performed at a 1000-bed teaching hospital to identify risk factors for nosocomial methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia, 309 patients were found to be colonized (n=103; 33 %) or infected (n=206; 67

  1. E. coli bacteremia in comparison to K. pneumoniae bacteremia: influence of pathogen species and ESBL production on 7-day mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Leistner

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a previous study, we demonstrated prolonged length of hospital stay in cases of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-positive K. pneumoniae bacteremia compared to bacteremia cases due to E. coli (ESBL-positive and –negative and ESBL-negative K. pneumoniae. The overall mortality was significantly higher in bacteremia cases resulting from ESBL-positive pathogens but also in K. pneumoniae cases disregarding ESBL-production. In order to examine whether pathogen species rather than multidrug resistance might affect mortality risk, we reanalyzed our dataset that includes 1.851 cases of bacteremia.

  2. D-dimer and histamine in early stage bacteremia: A prospective controlled cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwameis, Michael; Steiner, Margarete Maria; Schoergenhofer, Christian; Lagler, Heimo; Buchtele, Nina; Jilma-Stohlawetz, Petra; Boehm, Thomas; Jilma, Bernd

    2015-12-01

    Plasma histamine levels and D-dimer predict disease severity and mortality in advanced septic shock. We hypothesized that increased plasma histamine levels parallel coagulation activation and yield prognostic significance already at a very early stage of bacteremia. This prospective controlled cohort study enrolled 72 consecutive non-surgical non-ICU-ward inpatients with newly culture-diagnosed bacteremia and a Pitt Bacteremia score ≤2 to determine the extent of histamine and D-dimer release and their predictive role on outcome at the earliest stage of blood stream infection. Age-matched healthy adults served as internal controls (n=36). A binominal logistic regression and a Cox proportional hazards regression analysis were performed to ascertain the effects of D-dimer and histamine on in-hospital mortality. In contrast to plasma histamine, D-dimer levels were significantly higher within hours of culture-proven bacteremia. In-hospital mortality occurred in 17%. Histamine levels were neither associated with D-dimer level (r=0.04; p>0.05) nor with ICU admissions (r=0.06; p>0.05) and outcome (crude OR 0.8, 95% CI 0.3-1.9; p=0.6). In contrast, early-elevated D-dimer levels predicted mortality: the odds to die increased with the D-dimer level, and was 12.6 (crude OR, 95% CI 3-52; p=0.001) in patients with a D-dimer ≥4μg/mL (n=13). Histamine levels are elevated in only few patients (4%) with newly diagnosed bacteremia. Our findings suggest that D-dimer, but not plasma histamine, could be a promising marker of lethality already at a very early stage of blood stream infection. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Socioeconomic Status on Mortality after Bacteremia in Working-Age Patients. A Danish Population-Based Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Kristoffer; Nørgaard, Mette; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich; Søgaard, Mette

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effect of socioeconomic status (SES) on mortality in patients with bacteremia and the underlying factors that may mediate differences in mortality. Methods We conducted a population-based cohort study in two Danish regions. All patients 30 to 65 years of age with first time bacteremia from 2000 through 2008 were identified in a population-based microbiological bacteremia database (n = 8,653). Individual-level data on patients’ SES (educational level and personal income) and comorbid conditions were obtained from public and medical registries. We used Cox regression to examine mortality within 30 days after bacteremia with and without cumulative adjustment for potential mediators. Results Bacteremia patients of low SES were more likely to live alone and be unmarried than patients of high SES. They also had more pre-existing comorbidity, more substance abuse, more Staphylococcus aureus and nosocomial infections, and more admissions to small nonteaching hospitals. Overall, 1,374 patients (15.9%) died within 30 days of follow-up. Patients of low SES had consistently higher mortality after bacteremia than those of high SES crude hazard ratio for low vs. high education, 1.38 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18–1.61]; crude hazard ratio for low-income vs. high-income tertile, 1.58 [CI, 1.39–1.80]. Adjustment for differences in social support, pre-existing comorbidity, substance abuse, place of acquisition of the infection, and microbial agent substantially attenuated the effect of SES on mortality (adjusted hazard ratio for low vs. high education, 1.15 [95% CI, 0.98–1.36]; adjusted hazard ratio for low-income vs. high-income tertile, 1.29 [CI, 1.12–1.49]). Further adjustment for characteristics of the admitting hospital had minimal effect on observed mortality differences. Conclusions Low SES was strongly associated with increased 30-day mortality after bacteremia. Less social support, more pre-existing comorbidity, more substance

  4. Effect of socioeconomic status on mortality after bacteremia in working-age patients. A Danish population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Kristoffer; Nørgaard, Mette; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich; Søgaard, Mette

    2013-01-01

    To examine the effect of socioeconomic status (SES) on mortality in patients with bacteremia and the underlying factors that may mediate differences in mortality. We conducted a population-based cohort study in two Danish regions. All patients 30 to 65 years of age with first time bacteremia from 2000 through 2008 were identified in a population-based microbiological bacteremia database (n = 8,653). Individual-level data on patients' SES (educational level and personal income) and comorbid conditions were obtained from public and medical registries. We used Cox regression to examine mortality within 30 days after bacteremia with and without cumulative adjustment for potential mediators. Bacteremia patients of low SES were more likely to live alone and be unmarried than patients of high SES. They also had more pre-existing comorbidity, more substance abuse, more Staphylococcus aureus and nosocomial infections, and more admissions to small nonteaching hospitals. Overall, 1,374 patients (15.9%) died within 30 days of follow-up. Patients of low SES had consistently higher mortality after bacteremia than those of high SES crude hazard ratio for low vs. high education, 1.38 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18-1.61]; crude hazard ratio for low-income vs. high-income tertile, 1.58 [CI, 1.39-1.80]. Adjustment for differences in social support, pre-existing comorbidity, substance abuse, place of acquisition of the infection, and microbial agent substantially attenuated the effect of SES on mortality (adjusted hazard ratio for low vs. high education, 1.15 [95% CI, 0.98-1.36]; adjusted hazard ratio for low-income vs. high-income tertile, 1.29 [CI, 1.12-1.49]). Further adjustment for characteristics of the admitting hospital had minimal effect on observed mortality differences. Low SES was strongly associated with increased 30-day mortality after bacteremia. Less social support, more pre-existing comorbidity, more substance abuse, and differences in place of acquisition and

  5. Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis: a rare cause of chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chest pain is a common presenting symptom with a broad differential. Life-threatening cardiac and pulmonary etiologies of chest pain should be evaluated first. However, it is critical to perform a thorough assessment for other sources of chest pain in order to limit morbidity and mortality from less common causes. We present a rare case of a previously healthy 45 year old man who presented with focal, substernal, reproducible chest pain and Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia who was later found to have primary Staphylococcus aureus sternal osteomyelitis.

  6. An Essential Role for Coagulase in Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Development Reveals New Therapeutic Possibilities for Device-Related Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapotoczna, Marta; McCarthy, Hannah; Rudkin, Justine K; O'Gara, James P; O'Neill, Eoghan

    2015-12-15

    High-level resistance to antimicrobial drugs is a major factor in the pathogenesis of chronic Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-associated, medical device-related infections. Antimicrobial susceptibility analysis revealed that biofilms grown for ≤ 24 hours on biomaterials conditioned with human plasma under venous shear in iron-free cell culture medium were significantly more susceptible to antistaphylococcal antibiotics. Biofilms formed under these physiologically relevant conditions were regulated by SaeRS and dependent on coagulase-catalyzed conversion of fibrinogen into fibrin. In contrast, SarA-regulated biofilms formed on uncoated polystyrene in nutrient-rich bacteriological medium were mediated by the previously characterized biofilm factors poly-N-acetyl glucosamine, fibronectin-binding proteins, or autolytic activity and were antibiotic resistant. Coagulase-mediated biofilms exhibited increased antimicrobial resistance over time (>48 hours) but were always susceptible to dispersal by the fibrinolytic enzymes plasmin or nattokinase. Biofilms recovered from infected central venous catheters in a rat model of device-related infection were dispersed by nattokinase, supporting the important role of the biofilm phenotype and identifying a potentially new therapeutic approach with antimicrobials and fibrinolytic drugs, particularly during the early stages of device-related infection. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Elucidating the crucial role of poly N-acetylglucosamine from Staphylococcus aureus in cellular adhesion and pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Hui Lin

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen that forms biofilms on the surfaces of medical implants. Biofilm formation by S. aureus is associated with the production of poly N-acetylglucosamine (PNAG, also referred to as polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA, which mediates bacterial adhesion, leading to the accumulation of bacteria on solid surfaces. This study shows that the ability of S. aureus SA113 to adhere to nasal epithelial cells is reduced after the deletion of the ica operon, which contains genes encoding PIA/PNAG synthesis. However, this ability is restored after a plasmid carrying the entire ica operon is transformed into the mutant strain, S. aureus SA113Δica, showing that the synthesis of PIA/PNAG is important for adhesion to epithelial cells. Additionally, S. carnosus TM300, which does not produce PIA/PNAG, forms a biofilm and adheres to epithelial cells after the bacteria are transformed with a PIA/PNAG-expressing plasmid, pTXicaADBC. The adhesion of S. carnosus TM300 to epithelial cells is also demonstrated by adding purified exopolysaccharide (EPS, which contains PIA/PNAG, to the bacteria. In addition, using a mouse model, we find that the abscess lesions and bacterial burden in lung tissues is higher in mice infected with S. aureus SA113 than in those infected with the mutant strain, S. aureus SA113Δica. The results indicate that PIA/PNAG promotes the adhesion of S. aureus to human nasal epithelial cells and lung infections in a mouse model. This study elucidates a mechanism that is important to the pathogenesis of S. aureus infections.

  8. Invited Review: The role of cow, pathogen, and treatment regimen in the therapeutic success of bovine Staphylococcus aureus mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkema, H W; Schukken, Y H; Zadoks, R N

    2006-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important cause of udder infections in dairy herds. Both lactational and dry cow therapy are part of Staph. aureus control programs. Reported cure rates for Staph. aureus mastitis vary considerably. The probability of cure depends on cow, pathogen, and treatment factors. Cure rates decrease with increasing age of the cow, increasing somatic cell count, increasing duration of infection, increasing bacterial colony counts in milk before treatment, and increasing number of quarters infected. Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in hind quarters has a low cure rate compared with front quarters. Antimicrobial treatment of intramammary infections with penicillin-resistant Staph. aureus strains results in a lower cure rate for treatment with either beta-lactam or non-beta-lactam antibiotics. Other strain-specific factors may affect the probability of cure but routine diagnostic methods for use in bacteriology laboratories or veterinary practices are not yet available. The most important treatment factor affecting cure is treatment duration. Increased duration of treatment is associated with increased chance of cure. Economically, extended treatment is not always justified, even when indirect effects of treatment such as prevention of contagious transmission are taken into consideration. Usefulness of treatment trials could be improved by standardization of case definitions, consideration of host and strain factors, and sufficient statistical power. Treatment of young animals with penicillin-sensitive Staph. aureus infections is often justified based on bacteriological cure and economic outcome, whereas treatment of older animals, chronic infections, or penicillin-resistant isolates should be discouraged.

  9. Gardnerella vaginalis bacteremia in a premature neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Rene A; Al-Dossary, Fahad; Demmler, Gail J

    2002-01-01

    Gardnerella vaginalis is a normal component of the human vaginal flora and commonly associated with bacterial vaginosis. Invasive infection in obstetrical patients due to G. vaginalis has also been reported. In the pediatric age range, infection due to G. vaginalis is extremely rare and limited to neonates. We describe a 23-week premature infant with G. vaginalis bacteremia and review the characteristics of neonatal G. vaginalis infection reported in the literature. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of G. vaginalis isolates has shown that penicillin, ampicillin, erthromycin, clindamycin, and vancomycin are effective in vitro.

  10. Bacteremia with an Unusual Pathogen: Mycobacterium neoaurum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham Awadh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium neoaurum (M. neoaurum is an infrequently encountered cause of infection in humans. It is a member of the rapidly growing mycobacteria family. It predominately afflicts those with a compromised immune status and a chronically indwelling vascular access. Isolation of this organism is challenging yet the advent of 16s ribosomal sequencing paved the way for more sensitive detection. No treatment guidelines are available and treatment largely depends on the experience of the treating physician and nature of the isolate. We report a case of M. neoaurum bacteremia in an immune competent host, with a chronically placed peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC line.

  11. Protective or deleterious role of scavenger receptors SR-A and CD36 on host resistance to Staphylococcus aureus depends on the site of infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlène Blanchet

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major human opportunistic pathogen responsible for a broad spectrum of infections ranging from benign skin infection to more severe life threatening disorders (e.g. pneumonia, sepsis, particularly in intensive care patients. Scavenger receptors (SR-A and CD36 are known to be involved in S. aureus recognition by immune cells in addition to MARCO, TLR2, NOD2 and α5β1 integrin. In the present study, we further deciphered the contribution of SR-A and CD36 scavenger receptors in the control of infection of mice by S. aureus. Using double SR-A/CD36 knockout mice (S/C-KO and S. aureus strain HG001, a clinically relevant non-mutagenized strain, we showed that the absence of these two scavenger receptors was protective in peritoneal infection. In contrast, the deletion of these two receptors was detrimental in pulmonary infection following intranasal instillation. For pulmonary infection, susceptible mice (S/C-KO had more colony-forming units (CFU in their broncho-alveolar lavages fluids, associated with increased recruitment of macrophages and neutrophils. For peritoneal infection, susceptible mice (wild-type had more CFU in their blood, but recruited less macrophages and neutrophils in the peritoneal cavity than resistant mice. Exacerbated cytokine levels were often observed in the susceptible mice in the infected compartment as well as in the plasma. The exception was the enhanced compartmentalized expression of IL-1β for the resistant mice (S/C-KO after peritoneal infection. A similar mirrored susceptibility to S. aureus infection was also observed for MARCO and TLR2. Marco and tlr2 -/- mice were more resistant to peritoneal infection but more susceptible to pulmonary infection than wild type mice. In conclusion, our results show that innate immune receptors can play distinct and opposite roles depending on the site of infection. Their presence is protective for local pulmonary infection, whereas it becomes detrimental

  12. Nosocomial bacteremia in neonates related to poor standards of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Alejandro E; Munoz, Juan M; Galvan, Amparo; Gonzalez, Juan A; Medina, Humberto; Alpuche, Celia; Cortes, Gabriel; Ponce-de-Leon, Samuel

    2005-08-01

    In developing countries, intravenous liquids are mixed and administered by nurses, sometimes under suboptimal infection control conditions. We hypothesized that outbreaks of infusate-associated neonatal bacteremias are common, and we evaluated whether they can be detected by vigilant microbiologic surveillance of infusates. We studied intravenous infusates administered to neonates in a Mexican hospital where mixtures of infusates were prepared in hospital wards. The study was performed in 3 stages: stage 1, initial culturing of in-use infusates under basal conditions; stage 2, prospective culturing during a cluster of clinical sepsis; and stage 3, final culturing once the outbreak was controlled. In stage 1, 68 infusates were sterile, and 1 was contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus (1.45%), from 23 patients. In stage 2, of 182 infusates from 39 patients, 51 infusates (28%) were contaminated with Gram-negative rods. On the first day of stage 2, 11 of 15 infusates were contaminated with the same strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae, which continued to appear for 26 days. Another 4 strains of Gram-negative rods were also isolated during stage 2. The association between contaminated infusate and death was significant (odds ratio, 9.4; 95% confidence interval, 2-44.3; P < 0.001). Mixtures made by nurses were more likely contaminated than commercial preparations (odds ratio, 3.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-8.5; P = 0.037). In stage 3, there were 42 sterile infusates from 22 patients. Our study suggests that poor standards of care common in hospitals from developing countries sometimes result in outbreaks of sepsis and death for newborn patients.

  13. Association between Accessory Gene Regulator Polymorphism and Mortality among Critically Ill Patients Receiving Vancomycin for Nosocomial MRSA Bacteremia: A Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Cechinel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Polymorphism of the accessory gene regulator group II (agr in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is predictive of vancomycin failure therapy. Nevertheless, the impact of group II agr expression on mortality of patients with severe MRSA infections is not well established. Objective. The goal of our study was to evaluate the association between agr polymorphism and all-cause in-hospital mortality among critically ill patients receiving vancomycin for nosocomial MRSA bacteremia. Methods. All patients with documented bacteremia by MRSA requiring treatment in the ICU between May 2009 and November 2011 were included in the study. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to evaluate whether agr polymorphism was associated with all-cause in-hospital mortality. Covariates included age, APACHE II score, initial C-reactive protein plasma levels, initial serum creatinine levels, vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration, vancomycin serum levels, and time to effective antibiotic administration. Results. The prevalence of group I and group II agr expression was 52.4% and 47.6%, respectively. Bacteremia by MRSA group III or group IV agr was not documented in our patients. The mean APACHE II of the study population was 24.3 (standard deviation 8.5. The overall cohort mortality was 66.6% (14 patients. After multivariate analysis, initial plasma C-reactive protein levels (P=0.01, initial serum creatinine levels (P=0.008, and expression of group II agr (P=0.006 were positively associated with all-cause in-hospital mortality. Patients with bacteremia by MRSA with group II agr expression had their risk of death increased by 12.6 times when compared with those with bacteremia by MRSA with group I agr expression. Conclusion. Group II agr polymorphism is associated with an increase in mortality in critically ill patients with bacteremia by MRSA treated with vancomycin.

  14. Deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism detected by FDG PET/CT in a patient with bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Thomassen, Anders; Hess, Søren

    2013-01-01

    We report incidental FDG PET/CT findings of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in a patient with bacteremia. In this patient, diagnosis of thromboembolism was not considered until FDG PET/CT imaging was performed, and the findings prompted immediate anticoagulant therapy. The role of FDG...

  15. Direct Identification of Staphylococcus aureus and Determination of Methicillin Susceptibility From Positive Blood-Culture Bottles in a Bact/ALERT System Using Binax Now S. aureus and PBP2a Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heraud, Sandrine; Freydiere, Anne-Marie; Doleans-Jordheim, Anne; Bes, Michèle; Tristan, Anne; Vandenesch, François; Laurent, Frederic; Dauwalder, Olivier

    2015-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia is associated with high mortality and morbidity, requiring prompt and appropriate antimicrobial treatment. Therefore, it is important to detect methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) rapidly from blood cultures. Two immunochromatographic tests, BinaxNow S. aureus and BinaxNow PBP2a, were directly applied to 79 Bact/Alert bottles that were positive for Gram positive cocci in cluster aggregations. Sensitivity and specificity for the identification of S. aureus and determination of methicillin resistance were 94% and 87%, and 100% and 100%, respectively, with less than 30 min of performance time. These tests are efficient and rapid; these tests are valuable alternatives to more sophisticated and expensive methods used in the diagnosis of MRSA bacteremia.

  16. Non-spa-typeable clinical Staphylococcus aureus strains are naturally occurring protein A mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baum, Cathrin; Haslinger-Löffler, Bettina; Westh, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen responsible for increasing the prevalence of community- and hospital-acquired infections. Protein A (SpA) is a key virulence factor of S. aureus and is highly conserved. Sequencing of the variable-number tandem-repeat region of SpA (spa typing......) provides a rapid and reliable method for epidemiological studies. Rarely, non-spa-typeable S. aureus strains are encountered. The reason for this is not known. In this study, we characterized eight non-spa-typeable bacteremia isolates. Sequencing of the entire spa locus was successful for five strains...

  17. Bacteremia in connection with transurethral resection of the prostate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P B; Hansen, R I; Madsen, O G

    1987-01-01

    A bacteriological survey of 50 consecutive patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate was performed. Preoperatively, 28% of the patients had asymptomatic bacteriuria. In the postoperative period, 46% of all the patients developed transient bacteremia. A significantly higher rate...... of bacteremia was found in patients with hypertrophy of the prostate than in those with cancer of the prostate and in patients undergoing long-lasting surgical intervention. Patients who developed bacteremia due to pathogenic bacteria were hospitalized for a significantly longer period of time....

  18. Staphylococcal bacteremia in cancer patients: risk factors and outcome in 134 episodes prior to and after introduction of quinolones into infection prevention in neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukuckova, E; Spanik, S; Ilavska, I; Helpianska, L; Oravcova, E; Lacka, J; Krupova, I; Grausova, S; Koren, P; Bezakova, I; Grey, E; Balaz, M; Studena, M; Kunova, A; Torfs, K; Trupl, J; Korec, S; Stopkova, K; Krcmery, V

    1996-11-01

    A total of 134 episodes of staphylococcal bacteremia (SBE) appearing among 9987 admissions, and 979 episodes of bacteremia in cancer patients within 5 years, were analyzed for risk factors, clinical course and outcome; 64 were monomicrobial and 70 polymicrobial. The most frequent risk factors were acute leukemia, catheter insertion, long-lasting neutropenia, and prior prophylaxis with quinolones. There was no significant difference between polymicrobial and monomicrobial SBE in risk factors. The two groups differed only in the source of bacteremia (gastrointestinal and respiratory-tract infections were more common in monomicrobial SBE) and etiology-Staphylococcus aureus appeared more frequently in monomicrobial than in polymicrobial bacteremia (20.3% compared to 4.3%, P < 0.05). More complications (14.3%) such as abscesses, endocarditis, etc. appeared in the group of polymicrobial SBE (P < 0.05). No difference was observed in clinical course and outcome between monomicrobial and polymicrobial SBE. The incidence of SBE has increased since 1991, when quinolones were first used in prophylaxis in afebrile neutropenia at our center; however, the infection-associated mortality in monomicrobial SBE was low (4.3%).

  19. Raoultella Planticola Bacteremia Following Consumption of Seafood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip W Lam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Raoultella planticola is a Gram-negative bacillus commonly found in water, soil and aquatic environments. There have only been 16 cases of R planticola infection documented in the literature to date. R planticola possesses the ability to convert histidine to histamine and can produce symptoms of scombroid poisoning when poorly prepared seafood is consumed in large amounts. The present report describes a case involving a 56-year-old woman who presented with R planticola bacteremia and symptoms consistent with cholangitis four days after consuming a seafood salad containing squid and octopus. She was successfully treated with intravenous ceftriaxone followed by oral ciprofloxacin. Recent chemotherapy, proton pump inhibitor use and altered biliary flow secondary to hepatic metastases may have been contributing factors to the pathogenesis of disease.

  20. Cellulitis and Bacteremia Caused by Bergeyella zoohelcum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ru Lin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bergeyella zoohelcum is a rod-shaped, aerobic, Gram-negative, non-motile and non-saccharolytic bacterium. It is frequently isolated from the upper respiratory tract of dogs, cats and other mammals. Clinically, B. zoohelcum has been known to cause cellulitis, leg abscess, tenosynovitis, septicemia, pneumonia and meningitis, and is associated with animal bites. In addition, food-borne transmission was considered in a recent case report. We report a 73-year-old man with liver cirrhosis who had no history of dog bite but had dog exposure, who developed cellulitis of the left lower leg and B. zoohelcum was isolated from blood culture. This patient, without evidence of polymicrobial infection, was treated with cefazolin and gentamicin with a good outcome. B. zoohelcum is a zoonotic pathogen that may cause bacteremia in patients with underlying disease such as liver cirrhosis; it can be treated with a beta-lactam or quinolone.

  1. Increasing incidence of hospital-acquired and healthcare-associated bacteremia in northeast Thailand: a multicenter surveillance study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliwan Hongsuwan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about the epidemiology of nosocomial bloodstream infections in public hospitals in developing countries. We evaluated trends in incidence of hospital-acquired bacteremia (HAB and healthcare-associated bacteremia (HCAB and associated mortality in a developing country using routinely available databases. METHODS: Information from the microbiology and hospital databases of 10 provincial hospitals in northeast Thailand was linked with the national death registry for 2004-2010. Bacteremia was considered hospital-acquired if detected after the first two days of hospital admission, and healthcare-associated if detected within two days of hospital admission with a prior inpatient episode in the preceding 30 days. RESULTS: A total of 3,424 patients out of 1,069,443 at risk developed HAB and 2,184 out of 119,286 at risk had HCAB. Of these 1,559 (45.5% and 913 (41.8% died within 30 days, respectively. Between 2004 and 2010, the incidence rate of HAB increased from 0.6 to 0.8 per 1,000 patient-days at risk (p<0.001, and the cumulative incidence of HCAB increased from 1.2 to 2.0 per 100 readmissions (p<0.001. The most common causes of HAB were Acinetobacter spp. (16.2%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (13.9%, and Staphylococcus aureus (13.9%, while those of HCAB were Escherichia coli (26.3%, S. aureus (14.0%, and K. pneumoniae (9.7%. There was an overall increase over time in the proportions of ESBL-producing E. coli causing HAB and HCAB. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates a high and increasing incidence of HAB and HCAB in provincial hospitals in northeast Thailand, increasing proportions of ESBL-producing isolates, and very high associated mortality.

  2. OXA-48-Producing Enterobacteriaceae Causing Bacteremia, United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chulsoo Ahn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OXA-48-producing isolates were identified in approximately 4% and less than 1% of ESBL-producing and non-ESBL-producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae causing bacteremia at the largest tertiary hospital in Abu Dhabi.

  3. Bacteremia due to Acinetobacter ursingii in infants: Reports of two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacteremia due to Acinetobacter ursingii in infants: Reports of two cases. Nurhayat Yakut, Eda Kadayifci Kepenekli, Ayse Karaaslan, Serkan Atici, Gulsen Akkoc, Sevliya Ocal Demir, Ahmet Soysal, Mustafa Bakir ...

  4. Campylobacter bacteremia: A rare and under-reported event?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwen, R.; Baarlen, van P.; Vliet, van A.H.M.; Belkum, van A.; Hays, J.P.; Endtz, H.P.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the species Campylobacter are the most common cause of bacterial diarrhoea in humans. The clinical phenotype associated with Campylobacter infections ranges from asymptomatic conditions to severe colitis and bacteremia. In susceptible patients, Campylobacter infections are

  5. Risk factors for mortality in patients with Serratia marcescens bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Bean; Jeon, Yong Duk; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Ann, Hea Won; Choi, Heun; Kim, Min Hyung; Song, Je Eun; Ahn, Jin Young; Jeong, Su Jin; Ku, Nam Su; Han, Sang Hoon; Choi, Jun Yong; Song, Young Goo; Kim, June Myung

    2015-03-01

    Over the last 30 years, Serratia marcescens (S. marcescens) has emerged as an important pathogen, and a common cause of nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with mortality in patients with S. marcescens bacteremia. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 98 patients who had one or more blood cultures positive for S. marcescens between January 2006 and December 2012 in a tertiary care hospital in Seoul, South Korea. Multiple risk factors were compared with association with 28-day all-cause mortality. The 28-day mortality was 22.4% (22/98 episodes). In a univariate analysis, the onset of bacteremia during the intensive care unit stay (p=0.020), serum albumin level (p=0.011), serum C-reactive protein level (p=0.041), presence of indwelling urinary catheter (p=0.023), and Sequential Oran Failure Assessment (SOFA) score at the onset of bacteremia (pmarcescens bacteremia.

  6. Group B Streptococcal Colonization and Bacteremia in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arda Lembet

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We evaluated the effect of maternal administration of ampicillin/sulbactam on colonization and bacteremia in newborn rabbits after intracervical inoculation of mothers with group B streptococci (GBS.

  7. Evaluation of the incidence of bacteremia following middle ear operations

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Naeimi; Kiarash Ghazvini K; Mohammad Taghi Shakeri MT; Merangiz Kaboli; Mahmood Bagheri

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Bacteremia following middle ear surgeries occurs in a significant number of patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence of bacteremia following middle ear surgeries. Materials and Methods: Sixty two patients who where candidates for middle ear operation were enrolled in this study. Blood samples were obtained from each patient immediately before and after operation for bacteriologic analysis. Demographic and middle ear disease characteristics were also record...

  8. Pulmonary infiltrates during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjeldsøe-Nielsen, Hans; Gjeraa, Kirsten; Berthelsen, Birgitte G

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to describe the frequency of pulmonary infiltrates on chest X-ray (CXR) during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia at a single centre in Denmark.......The primary aim of this study was to describe the frequency of pulmonary infiltrates on chest X-ray (CXR) during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia at a single centre in Denmark....

  9. Comparison between bacteremia caused by Acinetobacter pittii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuag-Meng; Lee, Yi-Tzu; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Chen, Te-Li; Liu, Chang-Pan; Liu, Chun-Eng

    2017-02-01

    Patients with Acinetobacter pittii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis bacteremia have lower mortality rates than those with Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia. However, it is unknown whether these organisms differ in outcomes of bacteremic patients. We conducted this study to answer this question. In this retrospective study conducted at a teaching hospital in Taiwan, we enrolled all 86 patients who had developed A. pittii bacteremia and those with A. nosocomialis bacteremia from 2000 to 2008 while matching for age, sex, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, and appropriate antimicrobial therapy. After adjustment, we accessed the clinical characteristics and 14- and 28-day mortalities. We found that the patients with A. pittii bacteremia had multiple comorbidities less often and received invasive procedures less frequently. The 14-day mortality rate of patients with A. pittii or A. nosocomialis bacteremia was 14% and 7%, respectively, whereas their 28-day mortality rate was 17% and 9%, respectively. Using the mortality rate in patients with A. nosocomialis bacteremia as a reference, the odds ratios for the 14- and 28-day crude morality in those with A. pittii were 2.16 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.77-6.05] and 2.06 (95% CI, 0.82-5.15), respectively, whereas the adjusted odds ratios for 14- and 28-day mortality were 1.89 (95% CI, 0.56-6.14) and 1.67 (95% CI, 0.59-4.78) respectively. Our 8-year study showed that the mortality rate of A. pittii bacteremia was higher but the difference was not statistically significant. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes after a cat bite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ida Ringsborg; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2011-01-01

    Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite.......Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite....

  11. Staphylococcus hyicus Bacteremia in a Farmer ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Casanova, Carlo; Iselin, Lukas; von Steiger, Niklaus; Droz, Sara; Sendi, Parham

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria known in animal infectious diseases can cause challenges in human diagnostic laboratories. We present pitfalls in the identification and susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus hyicus, a pathogen that typically causes exudative epidermitis in pigs. In this case, the coagulase-positive staphylococcus isolated from a septic patient was misidentified as Staphylococcus aureus.

  12. Bacteremias por bacilos gram-negativos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrelírio J. R. Gonçalves

    1969-01-01

    Full Text Available São apresentados 31 casos de bacteremia por gram-negativos, assunto que vem merecendo muita atenção dos pesquisadores nos últimos anos. Os organismos etiológicos mais importantes que apareceram em igualdade de freqüência foram Escherichia coli e Klebsiella-Aerobacter, sendo responsáveis por 58% do total das infecções, seguidos por Pseudomonas. A porta de entrada mais freqüente foi o trato urinário em 61,3% dos casos. A infecção foi mais comum no sexo masculino e a faixa etária de 50 a 60 anos predominou. O uso prévio de antibióticos foi um fator predisponente muito importante, seguido pelo uso de esteróides e citostáticos. As principais doenças predisponentes foram diabetes mellitus e neoplasias malignas. Os principais fatores precipitantes foram a manipulação do aparelho urinário, com infecção prévia ou desencadeada, cirurgia do aparelho digestivo, uronatia obstrutiva e obstrução biliar. As principais manifestações clínicas foram a presença de febre, calafrios e hipotensão arterial. A complicação mais freqüente foi o choque bacteriano que incidiu em 58% dos casos, aproximadamente três vêzes aquela relatada na literatura. As outras foram a insuficiência renal aguda, superinfecção e infecção pulmonar metastática. Considerações terapêuticas gerais e esquemas de antibióticos são propostos para estes casos. A mortalidade da bacteremia simples foi de 30,7% e quando associada ao choque elevou-se para 72,2% . As infecções por Pseudomonas foram 100% fatais.

  13. Prevalence of bacteremia in dairy cattle with acute puerperal metritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credille, B C; Woolums, A R; Giguère, S; Robertson, T; Overton, M W; Hurley, D J

    2014-01-01

    Acute puerperal metritis (APM) affects 30% of postpartum dairy cattle. Bacteremia negatively impacts survival in cattle with coliform mastitis. However, the prevalence of bacteremia in dairy cattle with APM is unknown. Bacteremia is detectable in a large proportion of cattle with APM. Seventeen dairy cows with APM and 17 healthy dairy cattle. Prospective case-control study. Cases were identified by daily monitoring of cattle in the first 10 days after calving. Controls were matched to cases by parity and days in milk. Cows were examined at the time of identification of APM. A complete blood count, serum biochemical analysis, and bacteriologic culture of blood and lochial fluid were performed on each animal at the time of diagnosis. The same samples were collected from healthy herdmates of a similar parity and days in milk. Blood culture results and clinicopathologic variables were compared between groups. Conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate factors associated with APM, whereas multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate factors associated with bacteremia. Bacteremia occurred in 53% (9/17) of cattle with APM and 53% (8/15) controls. Bacillus spp. was the organism most commonly isolated from the bloodstream in cattle of both groups. Bacteremic cattle in both groups were significantly less likely to have basophils in the peripheral circulation (P = .02) and more likely to have higher serum globulin concentrations (P = .02). Bacteremia is a common occurrence in postpartum dairy cattle. Further study is warranted to investigate the modes by which bacteria colonize the bloodstream in this population of animals and the importance of bacteremia on health and productivity of affected animals. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  14. EDIN-B Promotes the Translocation of Staphylococcus aureus to the Bloodstream in the Course of Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Courjon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It is crucial to define risk factors that contribute to host invasion by Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we demonstrate that the chromosomally encoded EDIN-B isoform from S. aureus contributes to the onset of bacteremia during the course of pneumonia. Deletion of edinB in a European lineage community-acquired methicillin resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA strain (ST80-MRSA-IV dramatically decreased the frequency and magnitude of bacteremia in mice suffering from pneumonia. This deletion had no effect on the bacterial burden in both blood circulation and lung tissues. Re-expression of wild-type EDIN-B, unlike the catalytically inactive mutant EDIN-R185E, restored the invasive characteristics of ST80-MRSA-IV.

  15. Staphylococcus epidermidis as a cause of bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschmidt, Sharon; Huygens, Flavia; Faoagali, Joan; Rathnayake, Irani U; Hafner, Louise M

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a biofilm-producing commensal organism found ubiquitously on human skin and mucous membranes, as well as on animals and in the environment. Biofilm formation enables this organism to evade the host immune system. Colonization of percutaneous devices or implanted medical devices allows bacteria access to the bloodstream. Isolation of this organism from blood cultures may represent either contamination during the blood collection procedure or true bacteremia. S. epidermidis bloodstream infections may be indolent compared with other bacteria. Isolation of S. epidermidis from a blood culture may present a management quandary for clinicians. Over-treatment may lead to patient harm and increases in healthcare costs. There are numerous reports indicating the difficulty of predicting clinical infection in patients with positive blood cultures with this organism. No reliable phenotypic or genotypic algorithms currently exist to predict the pathogenicity of a S. epidermidis bloodstream infection. This review will discuss the latest advances in identification methods, global population structure, pathogenicity, biofilm formation, antimicrobial resistance and clinical significance of the detection of S. epidermidis in blood cultures. Previous studies that have attempted to discriminate between invasive and contaminating strains of S. epidermidis in blood cultures will be analyzed.

  16. Acinetobacter spp. are associated with a higher mortality in intensive care patients with bacteremia: a survival analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, Aline C Q; Menezes, Paulo R; Oliveira, Maura S; Levin, Anna S

    2016-08-09

    It has been challenging to determine the true clinical impact of Acinetobacter spp., due to the predilection of this pathogen to colonize and infect critically ill patients, who often have a poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to assess whether Acinetobacter spp. bacteremia is associated with lower survival compared with bacteremia caused by other pathogens in critically ill patients. This study was performed at Hospital das Clínicas, University of São Paulo, Brazil. There are 12 intensive care units (ICUs) in the hospital: five Internal Medicine ICUs (emergency, nephrology, infectious diseases and respiratory critical care), three surgical ICU (for general surgery and liver transplantion), an Emergency Department ICU for trauma patients, an ICU for burned patients, a neurosurgical ICU and a post-operative ICU. A retrospective review of medical records was conducted for all patients admitted to any of the ICUs, who developed bacteremia from January 2010 through December 2011. Patients with Acinetobacter spp. were compared with those with other pathogens (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter spp., Enterococcus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa). We did a 30-day survival analysis. The Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used to determine the overall survival. Potential prognostic factors were identified by bivariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis. One hundred forty-one patients were evaluated. No differences between patients with Acinetobacter spp. and other pathogens were observed with regard to age, sex, APACHE II score, Charlson Comorbidity Score and type of infection. Initial inappropriate antimicrobial treatment was more frequent in Acinetobacter bacteremia (88 % vs 51 %). Bivariate analysis showed that age > 60 years, diabetes mellitus, and Acinetobacter spp. infection were significantly associated with a poor prognosis. Multivariate model showed that Acinetobacter spp. infection (HR = 1.93, 95 % CI: 1

  17. Identification by genomic and genetic analysis of two new genes playing a key role in intermediate glycopeptide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzoni, Adriana; Kelley, William L; Barras, Christine; Monod, Antoinette; Huggler, Elzbieta; François, Patrice; Schrenzel, Jacques; Studer, René; Vaudaux, Pierre; Lew, Daniel P

    2009-03-01

    Endogenous, low-level glycopeptide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus results from multifactorial genetic changes. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed the specific deletion of a 1.8-kb segment encompassing two adjacent open reading frames (ORFs) of unknown function in a teicoplanin-susceptible revertant (strain 14-4rev) compared to the sequence of its isogenic, teicoplanin-resistant parental strain, strain 14-4. This provocative finding prompted us to perform a detailed genetic analysis of the contribution of this genomic segment to glycopeptide resistance. Despite repeated efforts in our laboratory, 14-4 and 14-4rev have proven refractory to most genetic manipulations. To circumvent this difficulty, we evaluated the contribution of both putative ORFs (designated teicoplanin resistance factors trfA and trfB) on teicoplanin resistance in a different, genetically tractable background. Genetic analysis showed that single or double trfA and/or trfB mutations abolished teicoplanin resistance in two independent teicoplanin-resistant derivatives of NCTC8325 strain ISP794 generated by two-step passages with the drug. The frequency of teicoplanin-resistant mutants was markedly decreased by the absence of trfAB in the teicoplanin-susceptible ISP794 background. Nevertheless, a low rate of teicoplanin-resistant mutants was selected from ISP794 trfAB, thus indicating an additional contribution of trfAB-independent pathways in the emergence of low-level glycopeptide resistance. Further experiments performed with clinical glycopeptide-intermediate S. aureus isolate NRS3 indicated that the trfAB mutation could affect not only teicoplanin resistance but also vancomycin and oxacillin resistance. In conclusion, our study demonstrates the key role of two novel loci in endogenous, low-level glycopeptide resistance in S. aureus whose precise molecular functions warrant further investigation.

  18. Diabetes does not affect outcome in patients with Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peralta Galo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited information about the effect of diabetes on the prognosis of patients with bacterial infections. We performed a retrospective cohort study to investigate possible correlations between diabetes and prognosis in patients with Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia. Methods We reviewed the medical charts of 1112 patients who were treated at a community teaching hospital for Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia from January 1997 through June 2007. Factors associated with in-hospital mortality were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. Results Among the 1112 patients with Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia, 181 (16.3% were diabetic patients; 90 patients (8.1% died while in the hospital. Compared to non-diabetic patients, diabetic patients were older (75.4 ± 11.9 years vs. 70 ± 16.6 years, p p = 0.39]. In a multivariate analysis, the variables associated with in-hospital mortality were age, the origin of the bacteremia, and the presence of immunosuppression. Diabetes was not associated with outcome. Conclusion In this cohort of patients with Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia, diabetes was not associated with a poorer prognosis.

  19. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) Determinants of Vancomycin Efficacy in Enterococcal Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumah, Muhammed Taufiq Bin; Vasoo, Shawn; Menon, Sanjay R; De, Partha Pratim; Neely, Michael; Teng, Christine B

    2017-12-20

    Background. While pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic targets for vancomycin therapy are recognized for invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, scant data are available to guide therapy for other gram positive infections.Methods. A retrospective single-centre cohort of patients with Enterococcus spp. bacteremia hospitalized between 1st January 2009 and 31st May 2015 were studied. Average vancomycin AUC0-24hrs was computed using a Bayesian approach. MIC was determined by gradient diffusion (E-test, bioMerieux) and the average AUC0-24hrs/MIC over the initial 72 hours of therapy was calculated. We assessed 30-day all-cause mortality as the primary outcome. Classification and regression tree analysis (CART) was used to identify vancomycin AUC0-24hrs/MIC associated with 30-day mortality.Results. Fifty-seven patients with enterococcal bacteremia (32 E. faecium, 21 E. faecalis, 4 other Enteroccocusspp.) were studied. The median vancomycin MIC was 0.75 mg/L (range 0.38-3 mg/L). All-cause 30-day mortality occurred in 10 out of 57 patients (17.5%). A CART-derived vancomycin AUC/MICEtest of ≥389 was associated with reduced mortality (P= 0.017); failure to achieve this independently predicted 30-day mortality [OR 5.65 (95% CI 1.18-27.03), P= 0.03].Conclusion. We found that a vancomycin AUC/MICEtest (≥389), achieved within 72 hours, was associated with reduced mortality. Larger, prospective studies are warranted to verify the vancomycin pharmacodynamic targets associated with maximal clinical outcomes and acceptable safety. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Bacteremia during adenoidectomy: a comparison of suction diathermy adenoid ablation and adenoid curettage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casserly, Paula

    2010-08-01

    Transient bacteremia is induced by adenoidectomy when the integrity of the nasopharyngeal membrane is broken. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of bacteremia in patients undergoing adenoidectomy, to identify the causative organisms, and to compare the incidences of bacteremia between the two techniques suction diathermy and curettage.

  1. Predominant association of Raoultella bacteremia with diseases of the biliary tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Eefje de; Erkens-Hulshof, S.; Velden, L.B. van der; Voss, A.; Bosboom, R.; Hodiamont, C.J.; Wever, P.C.; Rentenaar, R.J.; Sturm, P.D.J.

    2014-01-01

    A case series of 14 patients with Raoultella bacteremia was compared with 28 Klebsiella oxytoca and 28 Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia cases. Forty-three percent of Raoultella bacteremia cases were associated with biliary tract disease, compared to 32% and 22% of patients with K. oxytoca and K.

  2. Predominant association of Raoultella bacteremia with diseases of the biliary tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Eefje; Erkens-Hulshof, Sandra; van der Velden, Lieven B. J.; Voss, Andreas; Bosboom, Ron; Hodiamont, Caspar J.; Wever, Peter C.; Rentenaar, Rob J.; Sturm, Patrick D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A case series of 14 patients with Raoultella bacteremia was compared with 28 Klebsiella oxytoca and 28 Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia cases. Forty-three percent of Raoultella bacteremia cases were associated with biliary tract disease, compared to 32% and 22% of patients with K. oxytoca

  3. Bacteremia is associated with excess long-term mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Gradel, Kim Oren

    2015-01-01

    of birth, residency and calendar time, in Denmark during 2000-2008. We calculated absolute mortality and adjusted mortality rate ratios (MRRs) in predefined follow-up periods. RESULTS: The absolute mortality for bacteremia patients (n = 7783) and population controls (n = 38,906) was 22.0% vs. 0.2% (30 days......), 41.4% vs. 2.6% (1 year) and 75.8% vs. 36.6% (10 years). For bacteremia patients, the MRR was 115.3 (95% CI, 88.2-150.9) 0-30 days after bacteremia and 2.1 (95% CI, 1.8-2.3) from 5 years to end of follow-up. The most common causes of death were cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Within one year...

  4. Incidence of bacteremia in cirrhotic patients undergoing upper endoscopic ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Esparrach, Gloria; Sendino, Oriol; Araujo, Isis; Pellisé, Maria; Almela, Manel; González-Suárez, Begoña; López-Cerón, María; Córdova, Henry; Sanabria, Erwin; Uchima, Hugo; Llach, Josep; Ginès, Àngels

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of bacteremia after endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) or EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is between 0% and 4%, but there are no data on this topic in cirrhotic patients. To prospectively assess the incidence of bacteremia in cirrhotic patients undergoing EUS and EUS-FNA. We enrolled 41 cirrhotic patients. Of these, 16 (39%) also underwent EUS-FNA. Blood cultures were obtained before and at 5 and 30 min after the procedure. When EUS-FNA was used, an extra blood culture was obtained after the conclusion of radial EUS and before the introduction of the sectorial echoendoscope. All patients were clinically followed up for 7 days for signs of infection. Blood cultures were positive in 16 patients. In 10 patients, blood cultures grew coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium species, Propionibacterium species or Acinetobacterium Lwoffii, which were considered contaminants (contamination rate 9.8%, 95% CI: 5.7-16%). The remaining 6 patients had true positive blood cultures and were considered to have had true bacteremia (15%, 95% CI: 4-26%). Blood cultures were positive after diagnostic EUS in five patients but were positive after EUS-FNA in only one patient. Thus, the frequency of bacteremia after EUS and EUS-FNA was 12% and 6%, respectively (95% CI: 2-22% and 0.2-30%, respectively). Only one of the patients who developed bacteremia after EUS had a self-limiting fever with no other signs of infection. Asymptomatic Gram-positive bacteremia developed in cirrhotic patients after EUS and EUS-FNA at a rate higher than in non-cirrhotic patients. However, this finding was not associated with any clinically significant infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  5. Peripartum bacteremia in the era of group B streptococcus prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cape, Alison; Tuomala, Ruth E; Taylor, Chirisse; Puopolo, Karen M

    2013-04-01

    To define the microbial epidemiology and clinical risk factors associated with peripartum bacteremia in the era of group B streptococcus prophylaxis. We identified all cases of maternal bacteremia occurring during the peripartum time period (defined as from 7 days before delivery until 30 days after delivery) in a large maternity center from 2000 to 2008. Chart review was performed to determine the clinical factors associated with bacteremia. During the study period, blood cultures were obtained from 1,295 febrile peripartum women (1.6% of all parturients); 172 of 1,295 febrile peripartum women (13.3%) had bacteremia (2.2 cases per 1,000 deliveries) with 194 microbial isolates and 1 yeast. The most frequent bacterial isolates were Escherichia coli (35.9%), enterococci (23.6%), and anaerobic species (9.2%); group B streptococcus was isolated in only eight cases (4.1%). Clinical diagnoses among infected women included endometritis (56%), chorioamnionitis (21%), and urosepsis (8%). Among women with endometritis, 77% underwent cesarean delivery (compared with vaginal delivery; relative risk [RR] 10.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.75-17.45) and 39% delivered at less than 37 weeks of gestation (compared with 37 weeks or more; RR 3.21, 95% CI 2.42-4.25). Severe maternal complications of bacteremia were noted; six women required intensive care unit admission, five women had development of ileus, and one death occurred because of urosepsis. In the era of group B streptococcus prophylaxis, E coli and enterococci are the most frequent bacteria isolated in peripartum bacteremia. Group B streptococcus accounted for only 4% of cases. III.

  6. Clinical and microbiological features of bacteremia caused by Enterococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceci, Mónica; Delpech, Gastón; Sparo, Mónica; Mezzina, Vito; Sánchez Bruni, Sergio; Baldaccini, Beatriz

    2015-11-30

    Enterococcus faecalis is a frequent etiologic agent of invasive infections in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to analyze clinical and microbiological features of bacteremia caused by E. faecalis. Between 2011 and 2013, significant bacteremia caused by E. faecalis in hospitalized patients was studied. Patient characteristics, comorbid conditions, and 14-day mortality were recorded. Virulence genes esp, gelE, and cylA; opsonophagocytosis resistance; resistance to bactericidal effect of normal serum; beta lactamase production; and susceptibility to ampicillin, vancomycin, teicoplanin, gentamicin, and streptomycin were investigated. E. faecalis strains were recovered from 33 bacteremic patients. Polymicrobial bacteremia was diagnosed in 2 patients; 10 patients died. Virulence genes were found in strains from both deceased patients and survivors. Sources of bacteremia included urinary tract infections (36.4%), vascular catheters (15.1%), abscesses (9.1%), and unknown (48.5%). Underlying diseases included cancer (30.3%), diabetes (36.4%), cirrhosis (6.1%), renal (36.4%), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (2.0%). Co-morbidities included alcohol use (26.1%); glucocorticoid therapy (19.0%); prior antibiotic therapy (60.6%); and central venous (21.2%), arterial (12.1%), and urinary (63.6%) catheters. Also, 57.6% of patients came from the intensive care unit (ICU); 33.3% had mechanical ventilation. Significant mortality-associated conditions included polymicrobial bacteremia, oncological disease, APACHE II score ≤ 20, ICU stay, renal disease, central venous catheter, and mechanical ventilation. Outcome of patients was associated with their status and not with the presence of virulence genes in E. faecalis strains. A significant percentage of bacteremia had undetermined origin. An alternate origin may be the gastrointestinal tract, through translocation.

  7. Shewanella alga bacteremia in two patients with lower leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domínguez, H.; Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Gram, Lone

    1996-01-01

    The first Danish cases of Shewanella alga bacteremia in two patients with chronic lower leg ulcers are reported. Both patients were admitted to the hospital during the same month of a very warm summer and had been exposed to the same marine environment, thereby suggesting the same source of infec......The first Danish cases of Shewanella alga bacteremia in two patients with chronic lower leg ulcers are reported. Both patients were admitted to the hospital during the same month of a very warm summer and had been exposed to the same marine environment, thereby suggesting the same source...

  8. Risk Factors of Endocarditis in Patients with Enterococcus faecalis Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders; Lauridsen, Trine K; Arpi, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  The NOVA score is a recently developed diagnostic tool to identify patients with increased risk of infective endocarditis (IE) among patients with Enterococcus faecalis (EF) bacteremia. We aim to validate an adapted version of the NOVA score and to identify risk factors for IE...... in a sensitivity of 97%, specificity of 23%, a negative predictive value of 95% and a positive predictive value of 38%. CONCLUSION:  Monomicrobial EF bacteremia, community acquisition, prosthetic heart valve and male sex are associated with increased risk of IE. In our retrospective cohort, the adapted NOVA score...

  9. Lipoteichoic acid from Staphylococcus aureus induces lung endothelial cell barrier dysfunction: role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Barton Pai

    Full Text Available Tunneled central venous catheters (TCVCs are used for dialysis access in 82% of new hemodialysis patients and are rapidly colonized with Gram-positive organism (e.g. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm, a source of recurrent infections and chronic inflammation. Lipoteichoic acid (LTA, a cell wall ribitol polymer from Gram-positive organisms, mediates inflammation through the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2. The effect of LTA on lung endothelial permeability is not known. We tested the hypothesis that LTA from Staphylococcus aureus induces alterations in the permeability of pulmonary microvessel endothelial monolayers (PMEM that result from activation of TLR2 and are mediated by reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (RONS. The permeability of PMEM was assessed by the clearance rate of Evans blue-labeled albumin, the activation of the TLR2 pathway was assessed by Western blot, and the generation of RONS was measured by the fluorescence of oxidized dihydroethidium and a dichlorofluorescein derivative. Treatment with LTA or the TLR2 agonist Pam((3CSK((4 induced significant increases in albumin permeability, IκBα phosphorylation, IRAK1 degradation, RONS generation, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS activation (as measured by the p-eNOS(ser1177:p-eNOS(thr495 ratio. The effects on permeability and RONS were effectively prevented by co-administration of the superoxide scavenger Tiron, the peroxynitrite scavenger Urate, or the eNOS inhibitor L-NAME and these effects as well as eNOS activation were reduced or prevented by pretreatment with an IRAK1/4 inhibitor. The results indicate that the activation of TLR2 and the generation of ROS/RNS mediates LTA-induced barrier dysfunction in PMEM.

  10. Relevant Role of Fibronectin-Binding Proteins in Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm-Associated Foreign-Body Infections▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Irigaray, Marta; Valle, Jaione; Merino, Nekane; Latasa, Cristina; García, Begoña; Ruiz de los Mozos, Igor; Solano, Cristina; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Penadés, José R.; Lasa, Iñigo

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can establish chronic infections on implanted medical devices due to its capacity to form biofilms. Analysis of the factors that assemble cells into a biofilm has revealed the occurrence of strains that produce either a polysaccharide intercellular adhesin/poly-N-acetylglucosamine (PIA/PNAG) exopolysaccharide- or a protein-dependent biofilm. Examination of the influence of matrix nature on the biofilm capacities of embedded bacteria has remained elusive, because a natural strain that readily converts between a polysaccharide- and a protein-based biofilm has not been studied. Here, we have investigated the clinical methicillin (meticillin)-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain 132, which is able to alternate between a proteinaceous and an exopolysaccharidic biofilm matrix, depending on environmental conditions. Systematic disruption of each member of the LPXTG surface protein family identified fibronectin-binding proteins (FnBPs) as components of a proteinaceous biofilm formed in Trypticase soy broth-glucose, whereas a PIA/PNAG-dependent biofilm was produced under osmotic stress conditions. The induction of FnBP levels due to a spontaneous agr deficiency present in strain 132 and the activation of a LexA-dependent SOS response or FnBP overexpression from a multicopy plasmid enhanced biofilm development, suggesting a direct relationship between the FnBP levels and the strength of the multicellular phenotype. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that cells growing in the FnBP-mediated biofilm formed highly dense aggregates without any detectable extracellular matrix, whereas cells in a PIA/PNAG-dependent biofilm were embedded in an abundant extracellular material. Finally, studies of the contribution of each type of biofilm matrix to subcutaneous catheter colonization revealed that an FnBP mutant displayed a significantly lower capacity to develop biofilm on implanted catheters than the isogenic PIA/PNAG-deficient mutant. PMID:19581398

  11. Group B streptococcal bacteremia in a major teaching hospital in Malaysia: a case series of eighteen patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandarian, N; Neela, V; Ismail, Z; Puzi, S M; Hamat, R A; Desa, M N M; Nordin, S A

    2013-09-01

    .5%). Polymicrobial bacteremia was found in five (45.4%) cases and Staphylococcus aureus was the most common concurrent bacterial isolate. Of the 18 GBS isolates in both adults and neonates, serotype Ia was predominant (38.9%), followed by VI (27.8%), V (11.1%), and III (5.5%); the remaining 16.7% were non-typeable. GBS bacteremia is a significant problem and is associated with serious underlying disease, which may result in a high rate of mortality, not only in neonates and pregnant women, but also in non-pregnant adults. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative Study of Plasma Endotoxin with Procalcitonin Levels in Diagnosis of Bacteremia in Intensive Care Unit Patients

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    Tao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Plasma endotoxin was more related to GN than to Gram-positive bacteremia, and that endotoxin level was species dependent, but PCT level remained relatively more stable within the GN bacteria caused bacteremia. Both GN and positive bacteria caused bacteremia in the ICU patients in different regions of China. And PCT is a more valuable biomarker than endotoxin in the diagnosis of bacteremia.

  13. Incidence of bacteremia after chewing, tooth brushing and scaling in individuals with periodontal inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, F.L.; Kilian, Mogens; Holmstrup, P.

    2006-01-01

    Scientific rationale for study: Bacteremia occurs with various frequency after oral procedures. Periodontal disease may affect the incidence, magnitude, duration and bacterial spectrum of bacteremia. Principle findings: The incidence and magnitude of bacteremia after scaling was significantly......: The prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases appear to be crucial for the prevention of bacteremia associated with oral procedures....... higher in periodontitis than in gingivitis patients and healthy control individuals. In periodontitis patients, the magnitude of bacteremia was associated with gingival index, plaque index and number of sites with bleeding on probing, but not with probing pocket depth measurements. Practical implications...

  14. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization rates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carriers of Staphylococcus aureus have an important role in its dissemination. The colonization rates of S. aureus in anterior nose nares from 210 healthy volunteers (70 from the non-hospital adult personnel in the community, 68 from clinical students and 72 from healthcare workers “HCWs” in 6 hospitals) in the eastern ...

  15. Nosocomial bloodstream infection in patients caused by Staphylococcus aureus: drug susceptibility, outcome, and risk factors for hospital mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Yan, Zhong-Qiang; Feng, Dan; Luo, Yan-Ping; Wang, Lei-Li; Shen, Ding-Xia

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have different viewpoints about the clinical impact of methicillin resistance on mortality of hospital-acquired bloodstream infection (BSI) patients with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The objective of this study was to investigate the mortality of hospital-acquired BSI with S. aureus in a military hospital and analyze the risk factors for the hospital mortality. A retrospective cohort study was performed in patients admitted to the biggest military tertiary teaching hospital in China between January 2006 and May 2011. All included patients had clinically significant nosocomial BSI with S. aureus. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors for hospital mortality of patients with S. aureus BSI. One hundred and eighteen patients of more than one year old were identified as clinically and microbiologically confirmed nosocomial bacteraemia due to S. aureus, and 75 out of 118 patients were infected with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The overall mortality of nosocomial S. aureus BSI was 28.0%. Methicillin resistance in S. aureus bacteremia was associated with significant increase in the length of hospitalization and high proportion of inappropriate empirical antibiotic treatment. After Logistic regression analysis, the severity of clinical manifestations (APACHE II score) (odds ratio (OR) 1.22, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12 - 1.34) and inadequacy of empirical antimicrobial therapy (OR 0.25, 95%CI 0.09 - 0.69) remained as risk factors for hospital mortality. Nosocomial S. aureus BSI was associated with high in-hospital mortality. Methicillin resistance in S. aureus has no significant impact on the outcome of patients with staphylococcal bacteremia. Proper empirical antimicrobial therapy is very important to the prognosis.

  16. Prevention of Staphylococcus aureus Infections by Glycoprotein Vaccines Synthesized in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Michael; Wang, Linhui; Kowarik, Michael; Dowd, Meghan; Lipowsky, Gerd; Faridmoayer, Amir; Shields, Kelly; Park, Saeyoung; Alaimo, Cristina; Kelley, Kathryn A.; Braun, Martin; Quebatte, Julien; Gambillara, Veronica; Carranza, Paula; Steffen, Michael; Lee, Jean C.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of superficial and invasive human disease that is often refractory to antimicrobial therapy. Vaccines have the potential to reduce the morbidity, mortality, and economic impact associated with staphylococcal infections. However, single-component vaccines targeting S. aureus have failed to show efficacy in clinical trials. Methods. A novel glycoengineering technology for creation of a multicomponent staphylococcal vaccine is described. Genes encoding S. aureus capsular polysaccharide (CP) biosynthesis, PglB (a Campylobacter oligosaccharyl transferase), and a protein carrier (detoxified Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoprotein A or S. aureus α toxin [Hla]) were coexpressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant proteins N-glycosylated with S. aureus serotype 5 or 8 CPs were purified from E. coli. Results. Rabbits and mice immunized with the glycoprotein vaccines produced antibodies that were active in vitro in functional assays. Active and passive immunization strategies targeting the CPs protected mice against bacteremia, and vaccines targeting Hla protected against lethal pneumonia. The CP-Hla bioconjugate vaccine protected against both bacteremia and lethal pneumonia, providing broad-spectrum efficacy against staphylococcal invasive disease. Conclusions. Glycoengineering technology, whereby polysaccharide and protein antigens are enzymatically linked in a simple E. coli production system, has broad applicability for use in vaccine development against encapsulated microbial pathogens. PMID:24308931

  17. Neurocognitive Outcomes at 10 Years of Age in Extremely Preterm Newborns with Late-Onset Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, H Reeve; Babata, Kikelomo; Allred, Elizabeth N; Erdei, Carmina; Kuban, Karl C K; Joseph, Robert M; O'Shea, T Michael; Leviton, Alan; Dammann, Olaf

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the difference in 10-year neurocognitive outcomes between extremely low gestational age newborns without bacteremia and those with suspected or confirmed late-onset bacteremia. Neurocognitive function was evaluated at 10 years of age in 889 children born at <28 weeks of gestation and followed from birth. Definite (culture-positive) late-onset bacteremia during postnatal weeks 2-4 was identified in 223 children, and 129 children had suspected bacteremia. Infants with the lowest gestational age and birth weight z-score had the highest prevalence of definite and suspected late-onset bacteremia. Compared with peers with no or suspected bacteremia, infants with definite bacteremia performed worse on tests of general cognitive ability, language, academic achievement, and executive function, even after adjustment for potential confounders. Adjustment for low IQ attenuated the associations between bacteremia and all dysfunctions at age 10 years. Children with suspected bacteremia did not differ appreciably from those with no evidence of bacteremia. The motor domain was unaffected. Extremely low gestational age newborns who had definite late bacteremia during postnatal weeks 2-4 are at heightened risk of neurocognitive limitations at age 10 years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Non-spa-typeable clinical Staphylococcus aureus strains are naturally occurring protein A mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baum, Cathrin; Haslinger-Löffler, Bettina; Westh, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen responsible for increasing the prevalence of community- and hospital-acquired infections. Protein A (SpA) is a key virulence factor of S. aureus and is highly conserved. Sequencing of the variable-number tandem-repeat region of SpA (spa typing......) provides a rapid and reliable method for epidemiological studies. Rarely, non-spa-typeable S. aureus strains are encountered. The reason for this is not known. In this study, we characterized eight non-spa-typeable bacteremia isolates. Sequencing of the entire spa locus was successful for five strains...... and revealed various mutations of spa, all of which included a deletion of immunoglobulin G binding domain C, in which the upper primer for spa typing is located, while two strains were truly spa negative. This is the first report demonstrating that nontypeability of S. aureus by spa sequencing is due either...

  19. Efficacy profile of a bivalent Staphylococcus aureus glycoconjugated vaccine in adults on hemodialysis: Phase III randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattom, Ali; Matalon, Albert; Buerkert, John; Taylor, Kimberly; Damaso, Silvia; Boutriau, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) hemodialysis patients, a single dose of Staphylococcus aureus type 5 and 8 capsular polysaccharides (T5/T8) conjugated to nontoxic recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A investigational vaccine showed no efficacy against S. aureus bacteremia 1 year post-vaccination, but a trend for efficacy was observed over the first 40 weeks post-vaccination. Vaccine efficacy (VE) of 2 vaccine doses was therefore evaluated. In a double-blind trial 3359 ESRD patients were randomized (1:1) to receive vaccine or placebo at week 0 and 35. VE in preventing S. aureus bacteremia was assessed between 3-35 weeks and 3-60 weeks post-dose-1. Anti-T5 and anti-T8 antibodies were measured. Serious adverse events (SAEs) were recorded for 42 days post-vaccination and deaths until study end. No significant difference in the incidence of S. aureus bacteremia was observed between vaccine and placebo groups between weeks 3-35 weeks post-dose 1 (VE -23%, 95%CI: -98;23, p = 0.39) or at 3-60 weeks post-dose-1 (VE -8%, 95%CI: -57;26, p = 0.70). Day 42 geometric mean antibody concentrations were 272.4 μg/ml and 242.0 μg/ml (T5 and T8, respectively) in vaccinees. SAEs were reported by 24%/25.3% of vaccinees/placebo recipients. These data do not show a protective effect of either 1 or 2 vaccine doses against S. aureus bacteremia in ESRD patients. The vaccine induced a robust immune response and had an acceptable safety profile. Further investigation suggested possible suboptimal vaccine quality (manufacturing) and a need to expand the antigen composition of the vaccine. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00071214.

  20. Evaluation of the incidence of bacteremia following middle ear operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Naeimi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bacteremia following middle ear surgeries occurs in a significant number of patients. The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence of bacteremia following middle ear surgeries. Materials and Methods: Sixty two patients who where candidates for middle ear operation were enrolled in this study. Blood samples were obtained from each patient immediately before and after operation for bacteriologic analysis. Demographic and middle ear disease characteristics were also recorded for each patient. Results: In 2 culture samples obtained before the operation and in 15 culture samples obtained after the operation, blood cultures were positive. One postoperative sample was excluded from the study due to probability of contamination. Of 14 postoperative cultures, staphylococcus epidermidis and streptococcus pyogenes were positive in 8 and 4 cases, respectively. There were no significant correlations between positive culture and age, otorrhea (duration and odor, surgical approach, type of surgery and pathological condition of patients. Conclusion: Risk of bacteremia following middle ear operations should be considered especially in patients who are high risk for postoperative endocarditis. Considering the serious complications of bacteremia, prophylactic measures are necessary in middle ear operations in this group of patients.    

  1. Agrobacterium radiobacter bacteremia in pediatric patients: case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Rene A; Edwards, Morven S

    2003-02-01

    Agrobacterium radiobacter is an opportunistic pathogen often associated with indwelling catheters. We report five children with central venous catheter-associated A. radiobacter bacteremia and review the characteristics of pediatric Agrobacterium infections. Cure was achieved with appropriate antibiotics, often ticarcillin-clavulanate and gentamicin, and removal of the catheter.

  2. A rabbit model of non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Aruna; Tatarov, Ivan; Masek, Billie Jo; Hardick, Justin; Crusan, Annabelle; Wakefield, Teresa; Carroll, Karen; Yang, Samuel; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Lipsky, Michael M; McLeod, Charles G; Levine, Myron M; Rothman, Richard E; Gaydos, Charlotte A; DeTolla, Louis J

    2014-09-01

    Bacteremia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. In this study, we focused on the development of an animal model of bacteremia induced by non-typhoidal Salmonella. New Zealand White rabbits were inoculated with a human isolate of non-typhoidal Salmonella strain CVD J73 via the intra-peritoneal route. Blood samples were collected at specific time points and at euthanasia from infected rabbits. Additionally, tissue samples from the heart, lungs, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, liver and kidneys were obtained at euthanasia. All experimentally infected rabbits displayed clinical signs of disease (fever, dehydration, weight loss and lethargy). Tissues collected at necropsy from the animals exhibited histopathological changes indicative of bacteremia. Non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteria were detected in the blood and tissue samples of infected rabbits by microbiological culture and real-time PCR assays. The development of this animal model of bacteremia could prove to be a useful tool for studying how non-typhoidal Salmonella infections disseminate and spread in humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Brucella bacteremia in patients with acute leukemia: a case series

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    Al-Anazi Khalid

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brucellosis may cause serious infections in healthy individuals living in countries that are endemic for the infection. However, reports of brucella infections in immunocompromised hosts are relatively rare. Case Presentations Reported here are two patients with acute leukemia who developed Brucella melitensis bacteremia during their follow up at the Armed Forces Hospital in Riyadh. The first patient developed B. melitensis bacteremia during the transformation of his myelodysplasia into acute myeloid leukemia. The second patient developed B. melitensis bacteremia while his acute lymphoblastic leukemia was under control. Interestingly, he presented with acute cholecystitis during the brucella sepsis. Both brucella infections were associated with a marked reduction in the hematological parameters in addition to other complications. The bacteremic episodes were successfully treated with netilmicin, doxycycline and ciprofloxacin. Conclusion Brucellosis can cause systemic infections, complicated bacteremia and serious morbidity in patients with acute leukemia living in endemic areas. These infections may occur at the presentation of the leukemia or even when the leukemia is in remission. Nevertheless, the early diagnosis of brucellosis and the administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy for sufficient duration usually improves the outcome in these immunocompromised patients.

  4. Urinary proteins, vitamin D and genetic polymorphisms as risk factors for febrile urinary tract infection and relation with bacteremia: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Starre, Willize E; van Nieuwkoop, Cees; Thomson, Uginia; Zijderveld-Voshart, Marleen S M; Koopman, Jan Pieter R; van der Reijden, Tanny J K; van Dissel, Jaap T; van de Vosse, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common bacterial disease that may lead to substantial morbidity and mortality especially among the elderly. Little is known about biomarkers that predict a complicated course. Our aim was to determine the role of certain urinary cytokines or antimicrobial proteins, plasma vitamin D level, and genetic variation in host defense of febrile UTI and its relation with bacteremia. A case-control study. Out of a cohort of consecutive adults with febrile UTI (n = 787) included in a multi-center observational cohort study, 46 cases with bacteremic E.coli UTI and 45 cases with non-bacteremic E.coli UTI were randomly selected and compared to 46 controls. Urinary IL-6, IL-8, LL37, β-defensin 2 and uromodulin as well as plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured. In 440 controls and 707 UTI patients polymorphisms were genotyped in the genes CXCR1, DEFA4, DEFB1, IL6, IL8, MYD88, UMOD, TIRAP, TLR1, TLR2, TLR5 and TNF. IL-6, IL-8, and LL37 are different between controls and UTI patients, although these proteins do not distinguish between patients with and without bacteremia. While uromodulin did not differ between groups, inability to produce uromodulin is more common in patients with bacteremia. Most participants in the study, including the controls, had insufficient vitamin D and, at least in winter, UTI patients have lower vitamin D than controls. Associations were found between the CC genotype of IL6 SNP rs1800795 and occurrence of bacteremia and between TLR5 SNP rs5744168 and protection from UTI. The rare GG genotype of IL6 SNP rs1800795 was associated with higher β-defensin 2 production. Although no biomarker was able to distinguish between UTI with or without bacteremia, two risk factors for bacteremia were identified. These were inability to produce uromodulin and an IL6 rs1800795 genotype.

  5. Urinary proteins, vitamin D and genetic polymorphisms as risk factors for febrile urinary tract infection and relation with bacteremia: a case control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willize E van der Starre

    Full Text Available Febrile urinary tract infection (UTI is a common bacterial disease that may lead to substantial morbidity and mortality especially among the elderly. Little is known about biomarkers that predict a complicated course. Our aim was to determine the role of certain urinary cytokines or antimicrobial proteins, plasma vitamin D level, and genetic variation in host defense of febrile UTI and its relation with bacteremia.A case-control study. Out of a cohort of consecutive adults with febrile UTI (n = 787 included in a multi-center observational cohort study, 46 cases with bacteremic E.coli UTI and 45 cases with non-bacteremic E.coli UTI were randomly selected and compared to 46 controls. Urinary IL-6, IL-8, LL37, β-defensin 2 and uromodulin as well as plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D were measured. In 440 controls and 707 UTI patients polymorphisms were genotyped in the genes CXCR1, DEFA4, DEFB1, IL6, IL8, MYD88, UMOD, TIRAP, TLR1, TLR2, TLR5 and TNF.IL-6, IL-8, and LL37 are different between controls and UTI patients, although these proteins do not distinguish between patients with and without bacteremia. While uromodulin did not differ between groups, inability to produce uromodulin is more common in patients with bacteremia. Most participants in the study, including the controls, had insufficient vitamin D and, at least in winter, UTI patients have lower vitamin D than controls. Associations were found between the CC genotype of IL6 SNP rs1800795 and occurrence of bacteremia and between TLR5 SNP rs5744168 and protection from UTI. The rare GG genotype of IL6 SNP rs1800795 was associated with higher β-defensin 2 production.Although no biomarker was able to distinguish between UTI with or without bacteremia, two risk factors for bacteremia were identified. These were inability to produce uromodulin and an IL6 rs1800795 genotype.

  6. Piperine Plays an Anti-Inflammatory Role in Staphylococcus aureus Endometritis by Inhibiting Activation of NF-κB and MAPK Pathways in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-jun Zhai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometritis is commonly caused by pathogenic microorganisms, including Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus. Piperine, which is a natural medicine, has shown a variety of biological activities. To explore the effect and mechanism of piperine on S. aureus endometritis, a mouse model of S. aureus endometritis was successfully established in the present study. Histopathological changes were observed with H&E staining, cytokines were analyzed by ELISA, mRNA was analyzed by qPCR, and proteins were detected by western blot. The results showed that piperine could significantly alleviate inflammatory injury in S. aureus endometritis. The qPCR and ELISA results showed that piperine effectively reduced the S. aureus-induced overexpression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 but increased the expression of IL-10. The S. aureus-induced inflammation was related to TLR-2 and TLR-4 because the results showed that their expression was increased in S. aureus infection but then decreased with piperine treatment. To further confirm that piperine caused an anti-inflammatory response by targeting NF-κB and MAPKs, the expression of I-κB, p65, p38, ERK, and JNK was measured. The phosphorylation of I-κB, p65, p38, ERK, and JNK was inhibited by piperine in a dose-dependent manner. All of the results indicated that piperine may be a potential anti-inflammatory drug both in endometritis and in other S. aureus-induced diseases.

  7. Staphylococcus aureus Infections: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, Clinical Manifestations, and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Joshua S.; Eichenberger, Emily; Holland, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that causes a wide range of clinical infections. It is a leading cause of bacteremia and infective endocarditis as well as osteoarticular, skin and soft tissue, pleuropulmonary, and device-related infections. This review comprehensively covers the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and management of each of these clinical entities. The past 2 decades have witnessed two clear shifts in the epidemiology of S. aureus infections: first, a growing number of health care-associated infections, particularly seen in infective endocarditis and prosthetic device infections, and second, an epidemic of community-associated skin and soft tissue infections driven by strains with certain virulence factors and resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. In reviewing the literature to support management strategies for these clinical manifestations, we also highlight the paucity of high-quality evidence for many key clinical questions. PMID:26016486

  8. IMPORTANCE OF HEMOCULTURE IN DIAGNOSIS OF BACTEREMIA AND SEPSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Dinic

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost all kinds of microorganisms from blood can be isolated by hemoculture. The isolate consists of 75–85% Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria, until the other part of the isolate consists of fungi or other microorganisms.During the three-year period (1998–2001 we analyzed microbiological characteristics of all positive hemocultures inspected in microbiological laboratory in the Public Health Institute in Nis as well as clinical parameters of patients with the aim of determining the cause of bacteremia. We applied standard microbiologic methods for inspection of 1995 hemocultures taken from 759 patients whereupon we registered positive medical findings in 18,75%. In the majority of cases only one kind of microorganisms was isolated, while in 1.06% of positive hemocultures we isoleted two kinds of microorganisms.Isolation of Streptococcus b heamolyticus gr. A, Streptococcus pneumoniae, E.coli, Proteus mirabilisa, Salmonellae enteritidis, Pseudomonas aeruginose i Candide spp confirms bacteremia. Difteroids and Bacillus spp. were isolated only from contaminated hemocultures. Staphylococcus epidermidis is the most frequent contminant and causes bacteremia in the patients with intravascular catheter and patients on intravenous and peritoneal dialysis. A similar finding of α hemolitic streptococcus of viridans group was registered in the patients with subacute and acute endocarditis who had had an intravenous catheter implanted.On the basis of the results obtained, we can conclude that microorganisms from groups of Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Candida and Enterobacteriaceace family are the most frequent causes of bacteremia. Beside its limiting factors (time of sampling, duration of incubation, possible contamination of samples, number of hemocultures, hemoculture is the only method by which the causes of bacteremia and sepsis can be isolated.

  9. Experimental gingivitis, bacteremia and systemic biomarkers: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinane, D F; Zhang, P; Benakanakere, M; Singleton, J; Biesbrock, A; Nonnenmacher, C; He, T

    2015-12-01

    Bacteremia and systemic inflammatory markers are associated with periodontal and systemic diseases and may be linking mechanisms between these conditions. We hypothesized that in the development of gingival inflammation, systemic markers of inflammation and bacteremia would increase. To study the effect of bacteremia on systemic inflammatory markers, we recruited 80 subjects to participate in an experimental gingivitis study. Subjects were stratified based on gender, smoking and the number of bleeding sites and then randomized to one of two groups: control group (n = 40) or experimental gingivitis group (n = 40). Subjects in the control group conducted an oral hygiene regimen: brushing twice daily with a regular sodium fluoride cavity protection dentifrice and a standard manual toothbrush, flossing twice daily, and mouth rinsing with an anti-cavity fluoride rinse once daily. The experimental group stopped brushing and flossing, and used only the fluoride anti-cavity mouth rinse for 21 d. Seventy-nine of 80 subjects were evaluable. One subject in the control group was excluded from the results due to antibiotic use during the study. Our data showed the experimental gingivitis group exhibited a significant (p gingival inflammatory indices relative to baseline and the control group but a decrease in bacteremia and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels vs. baseline. Bacteremia was negatively correlated with gingival inflammatory indices and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels in the experimental gingivitis group, thus negating our hypothesis. We conclude that there are marked differences in systemic cytokine levels over the course of short-term experimentally induced gingivitis and further conclude that a long-term periodontitis study must be considered to address mechanisms whereby oral diseases may affect systemic diseases. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Bacteremia and "Endotipsitis" following transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Meir; Roemi, Lilach; Shouval, Daniel; Adar, Tomer; Korem, Maya; Moses, Alon; Bloom, Alan; Shibolet, Oren

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To identify all cases of bacteremia and suspected endotipsitis after Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting (TIPS) at our institution and to determine risk factors for their occurrence. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed records of all patients who underwent TIPS in our institution between 1996 and 2009. Data included: indications for TIPS, underlying liver disease, demographics, positive blood cultures after TIPS, microbiological characteristics, treatment and outcome. RESULTS: 49 men and 47 women were included with a mean age of 55.8 years (range 15-84). Indications for TIPS included variceal bleeding, refractory ascites, hydrothorax and hepatorenal syndrome. Positive blood cultures after TIPS were found in 39/96 (40%) patients at various time intervals following the procedure. Seven patients had persistent bacteremia fitting the definition of endotipsitis. Staphylococcus species grew in 66% of the positive cultures, Candida and enterococci species in 15% each of the isolates, and 3% cultures grew other species. Multi-variate regression analysis identified 4 variables: hypothyroidism, HCV, prophylactic use of antibiotics and the procedure duration as independent risk factors for positive blood cultures following TIPS (P < 0.0006, 0.005, 0.001, 0.0003, respectively). Prophylactic use of antibiotics before the procedure was associated with a decreased risk for bacteremia, preventing mainly early infections, occurring within 120 d of the procedure. CONCLUSION: Bacteremia is common following TIPS. Risk factors associated with bacteremia include failure to use prophylactic antibiotics, hypothyroidism, HCV and a long procedure. Our results strongly support the use of prophylaxis as a means to decrease early post TIPS infections. PMID:21731907

  11. Local infusion of Staphylococcus aureus into the porcine internal carotid artery as a model of sepsis-related brain abscesses - a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Lærke Boye; Iburg, Tine Moesgaard; Agerholm, Jørgen Steen

    2017-01-01

    . Unfortunately, models of sepsis in pigs are difficult to manage due to the accompanying massive systemic inflammatory response. To overcome these difficulties we designed a model in pigs of brain bacteremia established by local brain infusion in order to evaluate if this approach could reduce the systemic...... responses but still reflect the brain pathology of sepsis in humans. As a pilot study to obtain basic knowledge, we evaluated two methods of local infusion: long term infusion (60 minutes) of Staphylococcus aureus suspended in saline and, short-term infusion (10 minutes) of S. aureus embedded in autologous...... microthrombi. The study revealed: 1) bacteria suspended in saline as well as embedded in microthrombi can pass through the rete mirabile and thereby cause local brain bacteremia; 2) despite the high dose of S. aureus used for infusion, only mild clinical signs developed; and 3) despite the mild clinical signs...

  12. Active surveillance to determine the impact of methicillin resistance on mortality in patients with bacteremia and influences of the use of antibiotics on the development of MRSA infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Pena Porto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is among the most important pathogens of nosocomial infections, mainly in intensive care units (ICUs, and accounts for 40-60% of all healthcare-associated S. aureus infections. We evaluated the incidence of nosocomial infection by S. aureus, identified the risk factors for MRSA infection, and evaluated the effect of resistance to methicillin on mortality in patients. Methods We conducted MRSA surveillance at a university hospital in Brazil from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2010, and performed a retrospective case-control matched study to evaluate the frequency of subsequent MRSA bacteremia and death among patients. We evaluated and compared the risk factors between patients with MRSA and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA infection. Results Sepsis was the most common cause of infection (17.7/1,000 patient-days, followed by surgical site (11.4/1,000 patient-days, pneumonia (4.1/1,000 patient-days, and urinary tract infection (2.4/1,000 patient-days. The significant risk factors were time of hospitalization, use of central vascular catheter (CVC, urinary catheter, nasogastric tube, parenteral nutrition, tracheostomy, mechanical ventilation, and previous antibiotic administration, the latter of which was the only independent risk factor for MRSA infection. Mortality was significantly higher in patients with MRSA. The number of antibiotics tested was not related to increases in the frequency of MRSA/1,000 patient-days. The incidence of mortality attributable to MRSA (bloodstream infection BSI was 50%. Conclusions Surveillance results showed that the use of high levels of antibiotics was directly related to the development of MRSA infection, and the mortality attributable to MRSA in patients with bacteremia was significant.

  13. A New Acid-oxidizing Solution: Assessment of Its Role on Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Biofilm Morphological Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Atanasio, Noemi; Capezzone de Joannon, Alessandra; Mangano, Giorgina; Meloni, Marisa; Giarratana, Nadia; Milanese, Claudio; Tongiani, Serena

    2015-10-01

    Biofilms represent a key challenge in the treatment of chronic wounds, as they are among the main reasons for delays in chronic wound healing. This in vitro study was aimed at evaluating the activity of a new acid-oxidizing solution (AOS) on biofilm formation. Acid-oxidizing solution contains free chlorine species with stabilized hypochlorous acid in high concentration (> 95%) and is characterized by acidic (pH less than 3) and super-oxidizing (Redox greater than 1000mV) features. A 3-dimensional in vitro model of reconstructed human epidermis was used to compare the activity of AOS vs 2 reference products (RP) containing betaine and polyhexanide (RP1) and sodium hypochlorite and hypochlorous acid (RP2). Different approaches were used to assess the prevention and eradication of methicillin-resistant Staphyloccocus aureus biofilm by the study products. Xylitol and chlorhexidine were used as positive controls. The activity of the study products on the biofilm structure was evaluated analyzing the ultrastructural modification by scanning electron microscopy, while skin compatibility was assessed on noncolonized tissues measuring the metabolic activity of the cells. In all experiments, AOS showed to be active on the biofilm matrix, modifying its structure and allowing bacterial release from the matrix. In all experiments, no cytotoxicity was observed in the tissues treated with the product suggesting a good compatibility of AOS with skin tissues. Reference product 1 affected the biofilm, suggesting a disruption effect; RP2 was slightly less active than AOS in modifying the biofilm structure. Treatment with AOS affects biofilm by modifying its structure and therefore facilitating local bacteria accessibility to bactericidal agents, with consequent potential clinical benefits in the treatment of chronic wounds.

  14. Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay for the Rapid Detection of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Ting Lim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, is an important human pathogen that produces a variety of toxins and causes a wide range of infections, including soft-tissue infections, bacteremia, and staphylococcal food poisoning. A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay targeting the arcC gene of S. aureus was developed and evaluated with 119 S. aureus and 25 non-S. aureus strains. The usefulness of the assay was compared with the PCR method that targets spa and arcC genes. The optimal temperature for the LAMP assay was 58.5°C with a detection limit of 2.5 ng/μL and 102 CFU/mL when compared to 12.5 ng/μL and 103 CFU/mL for PCR (spa and arcC. Both LAMP and PCR assays were 100% specific, 100% sensitive, 100% positive predictive value (PPV, and 100% negative predictive value (NPV. When tested on 30 spiked blood specimens (21 MRSA, eight non-S. aureus and one negative control, the performance of LAMP and PCR was comparable: 100% specific, 100% sensitive, 100% PPV, and 100% NPV. In conclusion, the LAMP assay was equally specific with a shorter detection time when compared to PCR in the identification of S. aureus. The LAMP assay is a promising alternative method for the rapid identification of S. aureus and could be used in resource-limited laboratories and fields.

  15. Bacteriemia en pacientes internados con celulitis Bacteremia in patients hospitalized with cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan S. Lasa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available La celulitis es una inflamación aguda de la dermis y tejido celular subcutáneo de causa bacteriana, que generalmente complica a heridas, úlceras y dermatosis, aunque de manera frecuente no existe sitio de entrada. Se recomienda la realización de cultivo de punción de piel y partes blandas (PPB. Los hemocultivos raramente dan resultados positivos. El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la prevalencia de bacteriemia en pacientes internados en nuestra institución con diagnóstico de celulitis. Se analizaron retrospectivamente los registros clínicos de los pacientes con este diagnóstico al ingreso entre junio de 2007 y marzo de 2010. Se evaluaron los datos poblacionales, presencia de comorbilidades, y resultados de los cultivos. En ese período, se internaron 140 pacientes con diagnóstico de celulitis y a todos ellos se les realizó hemocultivo y cultivos de PPB. Setenta y cuatro eran varones (52.8%. La edad promedio: 47.5 ± 19.7 años (rango 16-94. El 40% tuvo cultivos positivos de PPB, en los que el Staphylococcus aureus meticilino resistente (SAMR fue el germen más frecuentemente aislado (35.7%; la prevalencia de bacteriemia fue del 8.6%, en donde el germen más frecuente fue Streptoccocus Beta hemolítico, grupo G (33% del total de hemocultivos positivos. La bacteriemia se asoció significativamente a mayor estadía hospitalaria (10.5 ± 8.9 vs. 4.9 ± 6, p = 0.004. Se asoció con mayor riesgo de hemocultivo positivo a ser diabético, tener cultivo de PPB positivo, consumo de alcohol y/o enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica.Cellulitis is an acute inflammation of dermis and subcutaneous tissue, usually complicating wounds, ulcers, or dermatosis. Even though in these cases it is recommended to perform culture from skin and soft tissue samples, the utility of blood cultures remains controversial due to the low frequency of positive results. Here we report the prevalence of bacteremia in patients with cellulitis admitted in our

  16. Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin induces apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells : role of endogenous tumour necrosis factor-alpha and the mitochondrial death pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haslinger, Bettina; Strangfeld, Katrin; Peters, Georg; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Sinha, Bhanu

    2003-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections can result in septic and toxic shock with depletion of immune cells and massive cytokine production. Recently, we showed that, in S. aureus-infected Jurkat T cells, alpha-toxin is the major mediator of caspase activation and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the

  17. The daily risk of bacteremia during hospitalization and associated 30-day mortality evaluated in relation to the traditional classification of bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated the overall and daily incidence of bacteremia among hospitalized patients and evaluated the traditional classification of bacteremia (community-onset vs nosocomial based on a 48-hour time window) by means of the daily incidence and associated 30-day mortality. METHODS...

  18. Community-acquired necrotizing pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in San Antonio de Areco, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Fernández

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is the first cause of skin and soft tissue infections, but can also produce severe diseases such as bacteremia, osteomyelitis and necrotizing pneumonia. Some S. aureus lineages have been described in cases of necrotizing pneumonia worldwide, usually in young, previously healthy patients. In this work, we describe a fatal case of necrotizing pneumonia due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus clone ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in an immunocompetent adult patient.

  19. The role of micro-organisms (Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans) in the pathogenesis of breast pain and infection in lactating women: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Lisa H; Cullinane, Meabh; Garland, Suzanne M; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Donath, Susan M; Bennett, Catherine M; Cooklin, Amanda R; Fisher, Jane R W; Payne, Matthew S

    2011-07-22

    The CASTLE (Candida and Staphylococcus Transmission: Longitudinal Evaluation) study will investigate the micro-organisms involved in the development of mastitis and "breast thrush" among breastfeeding women. To date, the organism(s) associated with the development of breast thrush have not been identified. The CASTLE study will also investigate the impact of physical health problems and breastfeeding problems on maternal psychological health in the early postpartum period. The CASTLE study is a longitudinal descriptive study designed to investigate the role of Staphylococcus spp (species) and Candida spp in breast pain and infection among lactating women, and to describe the transmission dynamics of S. aureus and Candida spp between mother and infant. The relationship between breastfeeding and postpartum health problems as well as maternal psychological well-being is also being investigated. A prospective cohort of four hundred nulliparous women who are at least thirty six weeks gestation pregnant are being recruited from two hospitals in Melbourne, Australia (November 2009 to June 2011). At recruitment, nasal, nipple (both breasts) and vaginal swabs are taken and participants complete a questionnaire asking about previous known staphylococcal and candidal infections. Following the birth, participants are followed-up six times: in hospital and then at home weekly until four weeks postpartum. Participants complete a questionnaire at each time points to collect information about breastfeeding problems and postpartum health problems. Nasal and nipple swabs and breast milk samples are collected from the mother. Oral and nasal swabs are collected from the baby. A telephone interview is conducted at eight weeks postpartum to collect information about postpartum health problems and breastfeeding problems, such as mastitis and nipple and breast pain. This study is the first longitudinal study of the role of both staphylococcal and candidal colonisation in breast infections

  20. The role of micro-organisms (Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans in the pathogenesis of breast pain and infection in lactating women: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabrizi Sepehr N

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CASTLE (Candida and Staphylococcus Transmission: Longitudinal Evaluation study will investigate the micro-organisms involved in the development of mastitis and "breast thrush" among breastfeeding women. To date, the organism(s associated with the development of breast thrush have not been identified. The CASTLE study will also investigate the impact of physical health problems and breastfeeding problems on maternal psychological health in the early postpartum period. Methods/Design The CASTLE study is a longitudinal descriptive study designed to investigate the role of Staphylococcus spp (species and Candida spp in breast pain and infection among lactating women, and to describe the transmission dynamics of S. aureus and Candida spp between mother and infant. The relationship between breastfeeding and postpartum health problems as well as maternal psychological well-being is also being investigated. A prospective cohort of four hundred nulliparous women who are at least thirty six weeks gestation pregnant are being recruited from two hospitals in Melbourne, Australia (November 2009 to June 2011. At recruitment, nasal, nipple (both breasts and vaginal swabs are taken and participants complete a questionnaire asking about previous known staphylococcal and candidal infections. Following the birth, participants are followed-up six times: in hospital and then at home weekly until four weeks postpartum. Participants complete a questionnaire at each time points to collect information about breastfeeding problems and postpartum health problems. Nasal and nipple swabs and breast milk samples are collected from the mother. Oral and nasal swabs are collected from the baby. A telephone interview is conducted at eight weeks postpartum to collect information about postpartum health problems and breastfeeding problems, such as mastitis and nipple and breast pain. Discussion This study is the first longitudinal study of the role of both

  1. Changing epidemiology of pediatric Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in Denmark from 1971 through 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Marianne Sjølin; Espersen, Frank; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2007-01-01

    and endocarditis for all age groups, comorbidity for the older than 1 year, and hospital-acquired infections for the oldest group were independently associated with an increased risk of death. CONCLUSIONS: Mortality rates associated with SAB decreased significantly in the past 3 decades, possibly because of new...

  2. Penetration of antibiotics through Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Singh, Rachna; Ray, Pallab; Das, Anindita; Sharma, Meera

    2010-01-01

    This study was carried out to elucidate the role of reduced antibiotic penetration in the resistance of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms to different antibiotics. The biofilms...

  3. Staphylococcus aureus and hand eczema severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haslund, P; Bangsgaard, N; Jarløv, J O

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of bacterial infections in hand eczema (HE) remains to be assessed. OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with HE compared with controls, and to relate presence of S. aureus, subtypes and toxin production to severity of HE. METHODS......: Bacterial swabs were taken at three different visits from the hand and nose in 50 patients with HE and 50 controls. Staphylococcus aureus was subtyped by spa typing and assigned to clonal complexes (CCs), and isolates were tested for exotoxin-producing S. aureus strains. The Hand Eczema Severity Index...... was used for severity assessment. RESULTS: Staphylococcus aureus was found on the hands in 24 patients with HE and four controls (P

  4. The T Cell Response to Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara M. Bröker

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is a dangerous pathogen and a leading cause of both nosocomial and community acquired bacterial infection worldwide. However, on the other hand, we are all exposed to this bacterium, often within the first hours of life, and usually manage to establish equilibrium and coexist with it. What does the adaptive immune system contribute toward lifelong control of S. aureus? Will it become possible to raise or enhance protective immune memory by vaccination? While in the past the S. aureus-specific antibody response has dominated this discussion, the research community is now coming to appreciate the role that the cellular arm of adaptive immunity, the T cells, plays. There are numerous T cell subsets, each with differing functions, which together have the ability to orchestrate the immune response to S. aureus and hence to tip the balance between protection and pathology. This review summarizes the state of the art in this dynamic field of research.

  5. In Vivo Analysis of Staphylococcus aureus-Infected Mice Reveals Differential Temporal and Spatial Expression Patterns of fhuD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacconi, Marta; Haag, Andreas F; Chiarot, Emiliano; Donato, Paolo; Bagnoli, Fabio; Delany, Isabel; Bensi, Giuliano

    2017-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic human pathogen and a major cause of invasive infections such as bacteremia, endocarditis, pneumonia, and wound infections. FhuD2 is a staphylococcal lipoprotein involved in the uptake of iron-hydroxymate and is under the control of the iron uptake regulator Fur. This protein is part of an investigational multicomponent vaccine formulation that has shown protective efficacy in several murine models of infection. Even though fhuD2 expression has been shown to be upregulated in murine kidneys infected with S. aureus, it is not known whether the bacterium undergoes increased iron deprivation during prolonged infection. Furthermore, different S. aureus infection niches might provide different environments and levels of iron availability, resulting in different fhuD2 expression patterns among organs of the same host. To address these questions, we characterized the in vitro expression of the fhuD2 gene and confirmed Fur-dependent regulation of its expression. We further investigated its expression in mice infected with a bioluminescent reporter strain of S. aureus expressing the luciferase operon under the control of the fhuD2 promoter. The emission of bioluminescence in different organs was followed over a 7-day time course, and quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the RNA transcribed from the endogenous fhuD2 gene was performed. Using this approach, we were able to show that fhuD2 expression was induced during infection in all organs analyzed and that differences in expression were observed at different time points and in different infected organs. Our data suggest that S. aureus undergoes increased iron deprivation during the progression of infection in diverse host organs and accordingly induces dedicated iron acquisition mechanisms. Since FhuD2 plays a central role in providing the pathogen with the required iron, further knowledge of the patterns of fhuD2 expression in vivo during infection will be instrumental in better

  6. Staphylococcus aureus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcus aureus (Staph Infection) In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby with ... from your health care provider. What is a staph infection? Staphylococcus aureus (staph) is a type of ...

  7. Rhodococcus bacteremia in cancer patients is mostly catheter related and associated with biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Al Akhrass

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus is an emerging cause of opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, most commonly causing cavitary pneumonia. It has rarely been reported as a cause of isolated bacteremia. However, the relationship between bacteremia and central venous catheter is unknown. Between 2002 and 2010, the characteristics and outcomes of seventeen cancer patients with Rhodococcus bacteremia and indwelling central venous catheters were evaluated. Rhodococcus bacteremias were for the most part (94% central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI. Most of the bacteremia isolates were Rhodococcus equi (82%. Rhodococcus isolates formed heavy microbial biofilm on the surface of polyurethane catheters, which was reduced completely or partially by antimicrobial lock solution. All CLABSI patients had successful response to catheter removal and antimicrobial therapy. Rhodococcus species should be added to the list of biofilm forming organisms in immunocompromised hosts and most of the Rhodococcus bacteremias in cancer patients are central line associated.

  8. Fatal bacteremia due to Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens: first description in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Secchi

    Full Text Available Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens is an anaerobic, Gram-negative, spiral shaped bacteria, which is motile by means of bipolar tuffs of flagella. This organism appears to be a rare cause of bacteremia in humans, and it usually affects patients submitted to immunosuppressive therapy. Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens resembles Campylobacter spp. in Gram-stained preparations, however, it is considered resistant to most antimicrobial drugs that are used to treat Campylobacter infections. We observed Gram-negative, spiral shaped bacteria in Gram-stained preparations from blood culture flasks. Growth occurred only under anaerobic incubation, and identification to the species level was achieved by PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene, followed by direct sequencing and a GenBank homology search. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported Brazilian case of Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens bacteremia.

  9. Streptococcus bovis Bacteremia in Neonates in a Predominantly Hispanic Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YI eJIA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptococcus bovis bacteremia has been associated with gastrointestinal diseases, especially colon cancer, neoplastic colon polyps and other malignancies of the GI tract in adults. Sporadic cases of S. bovis disease have also been reported in neonates and young infants. Although uncommon, S. bovis infection can cause fulminant neonatal sepsis and meningitis. Objectives: We report a series of pediatric patients with S. bovis bacteremia in a county hospital in a United States - Mexico border city in order to examine the demographic and clinical associations. Methods: We characterized the demographic and clinical features in all pediatric patients with blood cultures positive for S. bovis at University Medical Center in El Paso, Texas between January 2000 and December 2010. Hospital records were systematically reviewed by using a standardized protocol.Results: A total of 7 episodes of S. bovis bacteremia were documented in 7 pediatric patients (4 female and 3 male. Mean age was 1.2 days (range 1-3 days, all were Hispanic, average birth weight (3.25 kg. Mode of delivery was spontaneous vaginal delivery (5 and Caesarian section (2. All of our patients developed early (< 1 week onset disease and presented with signs of respiratory distress. Five out of 7 babies presented with abdominal distention and diarrhea. Six had clinical evidence of sepsis at presentation. Respiratory distress was the most common manifestation of sepsis (7. Aspiration pneumonia was diagnosed in 2 of them. Most patients were treated with a combination of antibiotics (6, either ampicillin and gentamicin or ampicillin and cefotaxime, and one with ampicillin alone. None of the pediatric patients had endoscopy and none of them died.Conclusions: S. bovis is considered an uncommon pathogen in the newborn, but can be associated with substantial morbidity and mortality if not identified and treated early. Physicians should be alert to the less common presentation of neonatal

  10. Nosocomial bacteremia due to Kluyvera cryocrescens: Case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshino, Yusuke; Nakazawa, Susumu; Otani, Sumire; Sekizuka, Eiichi; Ota, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Kluyvera cryocrescens infection has been considered rare; clinical features of K. cryocrescens bacteremia remain unclear because few reports have been published. We report a case of K. cryocrescens bacteremia in an adult male patient and review the literature. Our case was one with nosocomial bacteremia in a patient with interstitial lung disease. The primary infection site was undetermined, although he had an indwelling peripheral intravenous catheter and a urinary catheter. Piperacilin/tazo...

  11. Dynamics of nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among healthcare workers in a tertiary-care hospital in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, C; Acuña-Villaorduña, A; Dulanto, A; Vandendriessche, S; Hallin, M; Jacobs, J; Denis, O

    2016-01-01

    The study aims were to describe the frequency and dynamics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage among healthcare workers (HCWs), and to compare the molecular epidemiology of MRSA isolates from HCWs with those from patients with bacteremia. HCWs were interviewed and three nasal swabs were collected in a hospital in Lima, Peru, during 2009-2010. Consecutive S. aureus blood culture isolates from patients with bacteremia in the same hospital were also collected. SCCmec, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and spa typing were performed. Persistent carriage was defined if having at least two consecutive cultures grown with S. aureus harboring an identical spa type. Among 172 HCWs included, the proportions of S. aureus and MRSA nasal carriage during first sampling were 22.7 % and 8.7 %, respectively. From 160 HCWs who were sampled three times, 12.5 % (20/160) were persistent S. aureus carriers and 26.9 % (43/160) were intermittent carriers. MRSA carriage among persistent and intermittent S. aureus carriers was 45.0 % (9/20) and 37.2 % (16/43), respectively. Fifty-six S. aureus blood culture isolates were analyzed, and 50 % (n = 28) were MRSA. Multidrug resistant ST5-spa t149-SCCmec I and ST72-spa t148-SCCmec non-typeable were the two most frequent genotypes detected among HCWs (91.7 %, i.e., 22/24 HCW in whom MRSA was isolated in at least one sample) and patients (24/28, 85.7 %). In conclusion, we found high proportions of MRSA among persistent and intermittent S. aureus nasal carriers among HCWs in a hospital in Lima. They belonged to similar genetic lineages as those recovered from patients with bacteremia.

  12. [Predictive ability of clinical parameters of bacteremia in hemodialysed patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Ana L; Vilaró, Mario; De la Fuente, Jorge; Cuestas, Eduardo; Bongiovanni, María E

    2012-01-01

    No clinical events to differentiate bacteteremia from other pathologies in hemodialysis patients therefore the physicians makes diagnosis and treatment decisions based on clinical evidence an local epidemiology. the aim of this work was to study the frequency of microorganism isolated from blood culture of hemodialysis patients with suspected bacteraemia and evaluate Sensitivity (S) and Specificity (E) of medical diagnostic orientation in this cases of suspected Materials and methods: we performed an observational and prospective study for one year in hemodialysis patient with suspected bacteremia. We evaluated blood pressure, temperature (Tº), altered conscious state (AEC), respiratory frequency (FR), chills (ESC),diarrhea (DIARR), blood culture results and microbiological identification. We work with the mean ± standar desviation for continuous variables and frequencies for categorical variables We analyzed S, E, negative predictive value (VPN), positive predictive value (VPP) RESULTADOS: a total of 87 events with suspected bacteremia 34 (39%) were confirmed with positive blood culture the most common microorganisms were cocci Gram positive (CGP) 65%, Most relevant clinical variables were PCP ≥ 2 (VPN 81%), Tº ≥ 38 (VPN 76%) and AEC (E 98% y VPP 80%). CGP were the most prevalent microorganisms None of the clinical variables shows high S and E indicating low usefulness as a predictive tool of bacteremia Excepting AEC with E98% and VPP 80% but it would be necessary to evaluate this variable with a more number patient. Results justify to routine HC use like diagnostic tool.

  13. Transcriptome analysis of the responses of Staphylococcus aureus to antimicrobial peptides and characterization of the roles of vraDE and vraSR in antimicrobial resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrenzel Jacques

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding how pathogens respond to antimicrobial peptides, and how this compares to currently available antibiotics, is crucial for optimizing antimicrobial therapy. Staphylococcus aureus has several known resistance mechanisms against human cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs. Gene expression changes in S. aureus strain Newman exposed to linear CAMPs were analyzed by DNA microarray. Three antimicrobial peptides were used in the analysis, two are derived from frog, temporin L and dermaseptin K4-S4(1-16, and the ovispirin-1 is obtained from sheep. Results The peptides induced the VraSR cell-wall regulon and several other genes that are also up-regulated in cells treated with vancomycin and other cell wall-active antibiotics. In addition to this similarity, three genes/operons were particularly strongly induced by the peptides: vraDE, SA0205 and SAS016, encoding an ABC transporter, a putative membrane-bound lysostaphin-like peptidase and a small functionally unknown protein, respectively. Ovispirin-1 and dermaseptin K4-S4(1-16, which disrupt lipid bilayers by the carpet mechanism, appeared to be strong inducers of the vraDE operon. We show that high level induction by ovispirin-1 is dependent on the amide modification of the peptide C-terminus. This suggests that the amide group has a crucial role in the activation of the Aps (GraRS sensory system, the regulator of vraDE. In contrast, temporin L, which disrupts lipid bilayers by forming pores, revealed a weaker inducer of vraDE despite the C-terminal amide modification. Sensitivity testing with CAMPs and other antimicrobials suggested that VraDE is a transporter dedicated to resist bacitracin. We also showed that SA0205 belongs to the VraSR regulon. Furthermore, VraSR was shown to be important for resistance against a wide range of cell wall-active antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents including the amide-modified ovispirin-1, bacitracin, teicoplanin, cefotaxime and

  14. Extensively drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia in solid organ transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodro, Marta; Sabé, Núria; Tubau, Fe; Lladó, Laura; Baliellas, Carme; González-Costello, José; Cruzado, Josep Maria; Carratalà, Jordi

    2015-03-01

    We sought to determine the risk factors, molecular epidemiology, antibiotic therapy, and outcomes of bacteremia because of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. All episodes of bacteremia occurring in SOT recipients were prospectively documented from 2007 to 2013. Of 318 episodes of bacteremia, 49 were caused by P. aeruginosa. Thirty-one strains (63%) were XDR defined by nonsusceptibility to at least one agent in all but two or fewer antipseudomonal antimicrobial categories. Time from transplantation to bacteremia was shorter in XDR P. aeruginosa group comparing to other etiologies (median days 66 vs. 278; P=0.03). Factors independently associated with XDR P. aeruginosa bacteremia were prior transplantation, nosocomial acquisition, and septic shock at onset. XDR P. aeruginosa isolates belonged to a single clone (ST-175). Comparing to other etiologies, patients with bacteremia because of XDR P. aeruginosa more often received inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy. Persistence of bacteremia, shock, respiratory failure and intensive care unit admission were more frequent in patients with XDR P. aeruginosa. The overall case-fatality rate was higher among patients with XDR P. aeruginosa bacteremia than in the others (38% vs. 16%; P=0.009). Bacteremia because of XDR P. aeruginosa should be carefully considered when selecting empirical antibiotic therapy for hospitalized SOT recipients with prior transplantation presenting with septic shock.

  15. Highly drug-resistant pathogens implicated in burn-associated bacteremia in an Iraqi burn care unit.

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    Jean-Baptiste Ronat

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In low- and middle-income countries, bloodstream infections are an important cause of mortality in patients with burns. Increasingly implicated in burn-associated infections are highly drug-resistant pathogens with limited treatment options. We describe the epidemiology of bloodstream infections in patients with burns in a humanitarian surgery project in Iraq. METHODS: We performed a retrospective, descriptive study of blood culture isolates identified between July 2008 and September 2009 among patients with burns in a single hospital in Iraq who developed sepsis. RESULTS: In 1169 inpatients admitted to the burn unit during the study period, 212 (18% had suspected sepsis, and 65 (6% had confirmed bacteremia. Sepsis was considered the primary cause of death in 198 patients (65%; 95% CI 65-70 of the 304 patients that died. The most commonly isolated organisms were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (22 isolates [34%], Staphylococcus aureus (17 [26%], Klebsiella pneumoniae (8 [12%], Staphylococcus epidermidis (7 [11%], Acinetobacter baumannii (6 [9%], and Enterobacter cloacae (5 [8%]. A high proportion of Enterobacteriaceae strains produced extended-spectrum beta-lactamase and S. aureus isolates were uniformly methicillin-resistant. For gram-negative bacteria, the most reliably active antibiotics were imipenen and amikacin. CONCLUSIONS: Burn patients with sepsis in Iraq were commonly found to have bloodstream pathogens resistant to most antibiotics available locally. Effective empirical therapy of burn sepsis in this region of Iraq would consist of vancomycin or teicoplanin and a carbapenem-class antibiotic with antipseudomonal activity.

  16. MF59- and Al(OH)3-Adjuvanted Staphylococcus aureus (4C-Staph) Vaccines Induce Sustained Protective Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses, with a Critical Role for Effector CD4 T Cells at Low Antibody Titers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaci, Elisabetta; Mancini, Francesca; Lofano, Giuseppe; Bacconi, Marta; Tavarini, Simona; Sammicheli, Chiara; Arcidiacono, Letizia; Giraldi, Monica; Galletti, Bruno; Rossi Paccani, Silvia; Torre, Antonina; Fontana, Maria Rita; Grandi, Guido; de Gregorio, Ennio; Bensi, Giuliano; Chiarot, Emiliano; Nuti, Sandra; Bagnoli, Fabio; Soldaini, Elisabetta; Bertholet, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is an important opportunistic pathogen that may cause invasive life-threatening infections, like sepsis and pneumonia. Due to the increasing antibiotic resistance, the development of an effective vaccine against S. aureus is needed. Although a correlate of protection against staphylococcal diseases is not yet established, several findings suggest that both antibodies and CD4 T cells might contribute to optimal immunity. In this study, we show that adjuvanting a multivalent vaccine (4C-Staph) with MF59, an oil-in-water emulsion licensed in human vaccines, further potentiated antigen-specific IgG titers and CD4 T-cell responses compared to alum and conferred protection in the peritonitis model of S. aureus infection. Moreover, we showed that MF59- and alum-adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines induced persistent antigen-specific humoral and T-cell responses, and protected mice from infection up to 4 months after immunization. Furthermore, 4C-Staph formulated with MF59 was used to investigate which immune compartment is involved in vaccine-induced protection. Using CD4 T cell-depleted mice or B cell-deficient mice, we demonstrated that both T and B-cell responses contributed to 4C-Staph vaccine-mediated protective immunity. However, the role of CD4 T cells seemed more evident in the presence of low-antibody responses. This study provides preclinical data further supporting the use of the adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines against S. aureus diseases, and provides critical insights on the correlates of protective immunity necessary to combat this pathogen. PMID:26441955

  17. MF59- and Al(OH3-adjuvanted Staphylococcus aureus (4C-Staph vaccines induce sustained protective humoral and cellular immune responses, with a critical role for effector CD4 T cells at low antibody titers.

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    Elisabetta eMonaci

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is an important opportunistic pathogen that may cause invasive life-threatening infections like sepsis and pneumonia. Due to increasing antibiotic-resistance, the development of an effective vaccine against S. aureus is needed. Although a correlate of protection against staphylococcal diseases is not yet established, several findings suggest that both antibodies and CD4 T cells might contribute to optimal immunity. In this study, we show that adjuvanting a multivalent vaccine (4C-Staph with MF59, an oil-in-water emulsion licensed in human vaccines, further potentiated antigen-specific IgG titers and CD4 T cell responses compared to alum and conferred protection in the peritonitis model of S. aureus infection. Moreover, we showed that MF59- and alum-adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines induced persistent antigen-specific humoral and T cell responses, and protected mice from infection up to 4 months after immunization. Furthermore, 4C-Staph formulated with MF59 was used to investigate which immune compartment is involved in vaccine-induced protection. Using CD4 T cell-depleted mice or B cell deficient mice, we demonstrated that both T and B cell responses contributed to 4C-Staph vaccine-mediated protective immunity. However, the role of CD4 T cells seemed more evident in the presence of low antibody responses. This study provides preclinical data further supporting the use of the adjuvanted 4C-Staph vaccines against S. aureus diseases, and provides critical insights on the correlates of protective immunity necessary to combat this pathogen.

  18. The ecology of nasal colonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus aureus: the role of competition and interactions with host's immune response.

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    Margolis, Elisa; Yates, Andrew; Levin, Bruce R

    2010-02-23

    The first step in invasive disease caused by the normally commensal bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae is their colonization of the nasal passages. For any population to colonize a new habitat it is necessary for it to be able to compete with the existing organisms and evade predation. In the case of colonization of these species the competition is between strains of the same and different species of bacteria and the predation is mediated by the host's immune response. Here, we use a neonatal rat model to explore these elements of the ecology of nasal colonization by these occasionally invasive bacteria. When neonatal rats are colonized by any one of these species the density of bacteria in the nasal passage rapidly reaches a steady-state density that is species-specific but independent of inoculum size. When novel populations of H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae are introduced into the nasal passages of neonatal rats with established populations of the same species, residents and invaders coexisted. However, this was not the case for S. aureus - the established population inhibited invasion of new S. aureus populations. In mixed-species introductions, S. aureus or S. pneumoniae facilitated the invasion of another H. influenzae population; for other pairs the interaction was antagonistic and immune-mediated. For example, under some conditions H. influenzae promoted an immune response which limited the invasion of S. pneumoniae. Nasal colonization is a dynamic process with turnover of new strains and new species. These results suggest that multiple strains of either H. influenzae or S. pneumoniae can coexist; in contrast, S. aureus strains require a host to have no other S. aureus present to colonize. Levels of colonization (and hence the possible risk of invasive disease) by H. influenzae are increased in hosts pre-colonized with either S. aureus or S. pneumoniae.

  19. Effect of vancomycin minimal inhibitory concentration on the outcome of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis.

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    Cervera, Carlos; Castañeda, Ximena; de la Maria, Cristina Garcia; del Rio, Ana; Moreno, Asunción; Soy, Dolors; Pericas, Juan Manuel; Falces, Carlos; Armero, Yolanda; Almela, Manel; Ninot, Salvador; Pare, Juan Carlos; Mestres, Carlos A; Gatell, Jose M; Marco, Francesc; Miro, Jose M

    2014-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis has a high mortality rate. Vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) has been shown to affect the outcome of methicillin-resistant S. aureus bacteremia, and recent data point to a similar effect on methicillin-susceptible S. aureus bacteremia. We aimed to evaluate the effect of vancomycin MIC on left-sided S. aureus infective endocarditis (IE) treated with cloxacillin. We analyzed a prospectively collected cohort of patients with IE in a single tertiary-care hospital. Vancomycin, daptomycin, and cloxacillin MIC was determined by E-test. S. aureus strains were categorized as low vancomycin MIC (cloxacillin, of whom 53 (57%) had a vancomycin MIC < 1.5 µg/mL and 40 (43%) a vancomycin MIC ≥ 1.5 µg/mL. In-hospital mortality was 30% (n = 16/53) in patients with a low vancomycin MIC and 53% (n = 21/40) in those with a high vancomycin MIC (P = .03). No correlation was found between oxacillin MIC and vancomycin or daptomycin MIC. Logistic regression analysis showed that higher vancomycin MIC increased in-hospital mortality 3-fold (odds ratio, 3.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-8.2) after adjustment for age, year of diagnosis, septic complications, and nonseptic complicated endocarditis. Our results indicate that vancomycin MIC could be used to identify a subgroup of patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus IE at risk of higher mortality. The worse outcome of staphylococcal infections with a higher vancomycin MIC cannot be explained solely by suboptimal pharmacokinetics of antibiotics. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Brazilin plays an anti-inflammatory role with regulating Toll-like receptor 2 and TLR 2 downstream pathways in Staphylococcus aureus-induced mastitis in mice.

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    Gao, Xue-jiao; Wang, Tian-cheng; Zhang, Ze-cai; Cao, Yong-guo; Zhang, Nai-sheng; Guo, Meng-yao

    2015-07-01

    Mastitis, which commonly occurs during the postpartum period, is caused by the infection of the mammary glands. The most common infectious bacterial pathogen of mastitis is Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) in both human and animals. Brazilin, a compound isolated from the traditional herbal medicine Caesalpinia sappan L., has been shown to exhibit multiple biological properties. The present study was performed to determine the effect of brazilin on the inflammatory response in the mouse model of S. aureus mastitis and to confirm the mechanism of action involved. Brazilin treatment was applied in both a mouse model and cells. After brazilin treatment of cells, Western blotting and qPCR were performed to detect the protein levels and mRNA levels, respectively. Brazilin treatment significantly attenuated inflammatory cell infiltration and inhibited the expressions of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of brazilin in mice suppressed S. aureus-induced inflammatory injury and the production of proinflammatory mediators. This suppression was achieved by reducing the increased expression of TLR2 and regulating the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways in the mammary gland tissues and cells with S. aureus-induced mastitis. These results suggest that brazilin appears to be an effective drug for the treatment of mastitis and may be applied as a clinical therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Chronic Liver Disease Impairs Bacterial Clearance in a Human Model of Induced Bacteremia

    OpenAIRE

    Ashare, Alix; Stanford, Clark; Hancock, Patricia; Stark, Donna; Lilli, Kathleen; Birrer, Emily; Nymon, Amanda; Doerschug, Kevin C.; Hunninghake, Gary W

    2009-01-01

    Sepsis often causes impaired hepatic function. Patients with liver disease have an increased risk of bacteremia. This is thought to be secondary to impaired reticuloendothelial system function. However, this has not been demonstrated clinically. Since transient bacteremia occurs following toothbrushing, we hypothesized that subjects with cirrhosis would have impaired bacterial clearance following toothbrushing compared with subjects with pulmonary disease and healthy controls. After baseline ...

  2. Nosocomial bacteremia due to Kluyvera cryocrescens: Case report and literature review.

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    Yoshino, Yusuke; Nakazawa, Susumu; Otani, Sumire; Sekizuka, Eiichi; Ota, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Kluyvera cryocrescens infection has been considered rare; clinical features of K. cryocrescens bacteremia remain unclear because few reports have been published. We report a case of K. cryocrescens bacteremia in an adult male patient and review the literature. Our case was one with nosocomial bacteremia in a patient with interstitial lung disease. The primary infection site was undetermined, although he had an indwelling peripheral intravenous catheter and a urinary catheter. Piperacilin/tazobactam was administered for 2 weeks and the bacteremia resolved. Unfortunately, there was acute exacerbation of the interstitial lung disease, which was fatal. According to our review, including our case, K. cryocrescens bacteremia tends to occur in immunocompromised hosts, and indwelling catheters might be risk factors. Extended spectrum cephalosporins, carbapenems, fluoroquinolones and tetracyclines are generally adequate agents for empiric therapy based on susceptibilities of K. cryocrescens clinical isolates.

  3. Clostridium difficile bacteremia: Report of two cases in French hospitals and comprehensive review of the literature

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    Mouna Doufair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two cases of bacteremia due to Clostridium difficile from two French hospitals. The first patient with previously diagnosed rectal carcinoma underwent courses of chemotherapy, and antimicrobial treatment, and survived the C. difficile bacteremia. The second patient with colon perforation and newly diagnosed lung cancer underwent antimicrobial treatment in an ICU but died shortly after the episode of C. difficile bacteremia. A review of the literature allowed the identification of 137 cases of bacteremia between July 1962 and November 2016. Advanced age, gastro-intestinal disruption, severe underlying diseases and antimicrobial exposure were the major risk factors for C. difficile bacteremia. Antimicrobial therapy was primarily based on metronidazole and/or vancomycin. The crude mortality rate was 35% (21/60.

  4. Streptomyces bacteremia in a patient with actinomycotic mycetoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Noyal Mariya; Harish, Belgode Narasimha; Sistla, Sujatha; Thappa, Devinder Mohan; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2010-05-01

    A 29-year-old woman presented with multiple painful swelling with discharging sinuses over the scalp. Histopathological examination of the biopsy tissue was suggestive of actinomycotic mycetoma. Streptomyces spp. was isolated from blood culture. The patient was successfully treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and crystalline penicillin. This case is reported because of the rare occurrence of bacteremia by Streptomyces spp. secondary to subcutaneous actinomycotic mycetoma. Moreover, an interesting association between successive two pregnancies and occurrence of mycetoma of the scalp was observed in this case.

  5. Both host and pathogen factors predispose to Escherichia coli urinary-source bacteremia in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, Jonas; Zhang, Lixin; Foxman, Betsy; Warren, David K; Henderson, Jeffrey P

    2012-06-01

    The urinary tract is the most common source for Escherichia coli bacteremia. Mortality from E. coli urinary-source bacteremia is higher than that from urinary tract infection. Predisposing factors for urinary-source E. coli bacteremia are poorly characterized. In order to identify urinary-source bacteremia risk factors, we conducted a 12-month prospective cohort study of adult inpatients with E. coli bacteriuria that were tested for bacteremia within ±1 day of the bacteriuria. Patients with bacteremia were compared with those without bacteremia. Bacterial isolates from urine were screened for 16 putative virulence genes using high-throughput dot-blot hybridization. Twenty-four of 156 subjects (15%) had E. coli bacteremia. Bacteremic patients were more likely to have benign prostatic hyperplasia (56% vs 19%; P = .04), a history of urogenital surgery (63% vs 28%; P = .001), and presentation with hesitancy/retention (21% vs 4%; P = .002), fever (63% vs 38%; P = .02), and pyelonephritis (67% vs 41%; P = .02). The genes kpsMT (group II capsule) (17 [71%] vs 62 [47%]; P = .03) and prf (P-fimbriae family) (13 [54%] vs 40 [30%]; P = .02) were more frequent in the urinary strains from bacteremic patients. Symptoms of hesitancy/retention (odds ratio [OR], 7.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-37), history of a urogenital procedure (OR, 5.4; 95% CI, 2-14.7), and presence of kpsMT (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1-8.2) independently predicted bacteremia. Bacteremia secondary to E. coli bacteriuria was frequent (15%) in those tested for it. Urinary stasis, surgical disruption of urogenital tissues, and a bacterial capsule characteristic contribute to systemic invasion by uropathogenic E. coli.

  6. Identification of Infantile Diarrhea Caused by Breast Milk-Transmitted Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

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    Chen, Zhong; Pan, Wei-Guang; Xian, Wei-Yi; Cheng, Hang; Zheng, Jin-Xin; Hu, Qing-Hua; Yu, Zhi-Jian; Deng, Qi-Wen

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a well-known organism which is responsible for a variety of human infectious diseases including skin infections, pneumonia, bacteremia, and endocarditis. Few of the microorganisms can be transmitted from mother to the newborn or infant by milk breastfeeding. This study aims to identify transmission of S. aureus from healthy, lactating mothers to their infants by breastfeeding. Stool specimens of diarrheal infants and breast milk of their mother (totally three pairs) were collected and six Staphylococcus aureus isolates were cultured positively. Homology and molecular characters of isolated strains were tested using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, and multilocus sequence typing. Furthermore, toxin genes detection was also performed. Each pair of isolates has the same PFGE type and spa type. Four Sequence types (STs) were found among all the isolates; they are ST15, ST188, and ST59, respectively. Among the strains, seb, sec, and tst genes were found, and all were negative for pvl gene. The homology of the S. aureus strains isolated from the infants' stool and the mothers' milk was genetically demonstrated, which indicated that breastfeeding may be important in the transmission of S. aureus infection, and the character of S. aureus needed to be further evaluated.

  7. Prevalência e fatores associados à bacteremia nos portadores de colecistite aguda litiásica Bacteremia - prevalence and associated factors in patients with acute calculous cholecystitis

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    André Luciano Baitello

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a prevalência de bacteremia e os fatores associados no período pré-operatório em portadores de colecistite aguda litiásica e analisar comparativamente as complicações e mortalidade nos pacientes com e sem bacteremia, que foram submetidos a colecistectomia de urgência. MÉTDODOS: Foram estudados, prospectivamente, 51 pacientes com diagnóstico histopatológico de colecistite aguda litiásica. O sistema Bactec foi o método utilizado para a detecção de bacteremia. As médias dos grupos foram analisadas quanto às variáveis clínicas e laboratoriais, relacionando-as com a bacteremia. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de bacteremia no pré-operatório foi de 15,68%, e a idade (p=0,024, a freqüência cardíaca (p=0,026, a freqüência respiratória (p=0,028, a creatinina (p=0,028 e a presença da SIRS (Síndrome da Resposta Inflamatória Sistêmica, p=0,016 associaram-se positivamente com a bacteremia. Nos portadores de bacteremia verificou-se um óbito, maior número de complicações gerais (p=0,045 e infecciosas (p=0,039 e maior tempo de internação (pBACKGROUND: Bacteremia seems to increase the morbidity and mortality in clinical and surgical conditions, however the importance and factors associated with it during acute calculous cholecystitis are not well established. The purpose of this study was to determine pre-operative prevalence, associated factors and prognosis of bacteremia in patients with acute calculous cholecystitis submitted to an emergency cholecystectomy. METHODS: A prospective study of 51 patients with histological diagnosis of acute calculous cholecystitis was designed. The Bactec System was used to detect bacteremia. Mean results of clinical and laboratory analyses were related to the presence of bacteremia. RESULTS: The pre-operative prevalence of bacteremia was of 15.68%. Age (P=0.024, heart rate (P=0.026, respiratory rate (P=0.028, serum creatinine (P=0.028 and presence of systemic inflammatory

  8. Bacteremia caused by Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Shio-Shin; Wang, Jen-Yu; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2006-10-01

    Since 1995, there has been a steady increase in the number of reported cases of Salmonella enterica serotype Choleraesuis (S. Choleraesuis) sepsis in Taiwan. Representative Taiwanese survey data from 1996 to 2004 revealed that these adult patients with S. Choleraesuis bacteremia presented with primary bacteremia (57%, especially immunocompromised hosts), mycotic aneurysm (16%), and fever (86%) predominantly. S. Choleraesuis septicemia demonstrated a higher invasion index (with secondary involved sites) than other Salmonella spp. In swine experiments, the inoculation dose of 10(3) colony forming units S. Choleraesuis was cleared without apparent sequelae. Transmission of specific strains (with mutations of GyrA and parC, subsequently resistance to fluoroquinolones) from swine, and the acquisition of genes (CMY-2, AmpC complex) encoding beta-lactamases (with resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins) have been implicated in the evolution of multiresistant phenotypes of S. Choleraesuis. The virulence plasmid of S. Choleraesuis (pSCV), and other genes mediating adhesion to the epithelial cell membrane of the gastrointestinal tract, were considered important pathogenic factors for S. Choleraesuis. Vaccines for domestic animals combined with effective controls on antibiotic use offer the greatest potential to control the increasing impact of S. Choleraesuis on humans.

  9. The role of biofilms in persistent infections and factors involved in ica-independent biofilm development and gene regulation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Agnes Marie Sá; Ferreira, Fabienne Antunes; Beltrame, Cristiana Ossaille; Côrtes, Marina Farrel

    2017-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilms represent a unique micro-environment that directly contribute to the bacterial fitness within hospital settings. The accumulation of this structure on implanted medical devices has frequently caused the development of persistent and chronic S. aureus-associated infections, which represent an important social and economic burden worldwide. ica-independent biofilms are composed of an assortment of bacterial products and modulated by a multifaceted and overlapping regulatory network; therefore, biofilm composition can vary among S. aureus strains. In the microniches formed by biofilms-produced by a number of bacterial species and composed by different structural components-drug refractory cell subpopulations with distinct physiological characteristics can emerge and result in therapeutic failures in patients with recalcitrant bacterial infections. In this review, we highlight the importance of biofilms in the development of persistence and chronicity in some S. aureus diseases, the main molecules associated with ica-independent biofilm development and the regulatory mechanisms that modulate ica-independent biofilm production, accumulation, and dispersion.

  10. Potential Impact of Rapid Blood Culture Testing for Gram-Positive Bacteremia in Japan with the Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture Test

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    Ken Kikuchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Early detection of Gram-positive bacteremia and timely appropriate antimicrobial therapy are required for decreasing patient mortality. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the performance of the Verigene Gram-positive blood culture assay (BC-GP in two special healthcare settings and determine the potential impact of rapid blood culture testing for Gram-positive bacteremia within the Japanese healthcare delivery system. Furthermore, the study included simulated blood cultures, which included a library of well-characterized methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE isolates reflecting different geographical regions in Japan. Methods. A total 347 BC-GP assays were performed on clinical and simulated blood cultures. BC-GP results were compared to results obtained by reference methods for genus/species identification and detection of resistance genes using molecular and MALDI-TOF MS methodologies. Results. For identification and detection of resistance genes at two clinical sites and simulated blood cultures, overall concordance of BC-GP with reference methods was 327/347 (94%. The time for identification and antimicrobial resistance detection by BC-GP was significantly shorter compared to routine testing especially at the cardiology hospital, which does not offer clinical microbiology services on weekends and holidays. Conclusion. BC-GP generated accurate identification and detection of resistance markers compared with routine laboratory methods for Gram-positive organisms in specialized clinical settings providing more rapid results than current routine testing.

  11. Prevalence of clonal complexes and virulence genes among commensal and invasive Staphylococcus aureus isolates in Sweden.

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    Gunlög Rasmussen

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus encodes a remarkable number of virulence factors which may contribute to its pathogenicity and ability to cause invasive disease. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the association between S. aureus invasiveness and bacterial genotype, in terms of the presence of virulence genes and affiliation to clonal complexes. Also, the significance of different virulence genes, mainly adhesins, for the development of infective endocarditis was investigated. DNA microarray technology was used to analyze 134 S. aureus isolates, all methicillin-susceptible, derived from three groups of clinically well-characterized patients: nasal carriers (n=46, bacteremia (n=55, and bacteremia with infective endocarditis (n=33. Invasive isolates were dominant in four of the major clonal complexes: 5, 8, 15, and 25. Of the 170 virulence genes examined, those encoding accessory gene regulator group II (agr II, capsule polysaccharide serotype 5 (cap5, and adhesins such as S. aureus surface protein G (sasG and fibronectin-binding protein B (fnbB were found to be associated with invasive disease. The same was shown for the leukocidin genes lukD/lukE, as well as the genes encoding serine protease A and B (splA/splB, staphylococcal complement inhibitor (scn and the staphylococcal exotoxin-like protein (setC or selX. In addition, there was a trend of higher prevalence of certain genes or gene clusters (sasG, agr II, cap5 among isolates causing infective endocarditis compared to other invasive isolates. In most cases, the presence of virulence genes was linked to clonal complex affiliation. In conclusion, certain S. aureus clonal lineages harboring specific sets of virulence genes seem to be more successful in causing invasive disease.

  12. The Influence of the Route of Antibiotic Administration, Methicillin Susceptibility, Vancomycin Duration and Serum Trough Concentration on Outcomes of Pediatric Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremic Osteoarticular Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, J Chase; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Vallejo, Jesus G

    2017-06-01

    Bacteremia is often one factor used in deciding the need for prolonged intravenous antimicrobial therapy in osteoarticular infections (OAIs). We examined treatment practices and outcomes of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremic osteoarticular infections (BOAIs) evaluated at Texas Children's Hospital. Cases of acute hematogenous OAI in children with positive blood cultures for S. aureus at Texas Children's Hospital between 2011 and 2014 were reviewed. Orthopedic complications included chronic osteomyelitis, growth arrest, pathologic fracture, avascular necrosis and chronic dislocation. Acute kidney injury was defined as a doubling of the baseline creatinine. One hundred and ninety-two cases of S. aureus OAI were identified with 102 cases of BOAI included [35 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)]. Twenty-five patients were discharged home on oral antibiotics. Patients discharged on oral antibiotics had a shorter duration of fever, had a more rapid decline in C-reactive protein and were less likely to have MRSA. The frequency of orthopedic complications did not increase in patients who received early transition to oral antibiotics. For patients with MRSA bacteremia, the rates of complications between those who received ≥7 days versus 15 µg/mL were not associated with a decreased duration of fever, bacteremia or hospitalization, need for repeat operation or orthopedic complications but were associated with acute kidney injury. S. aureus BOAIs are associated with substantial morbidity. Early transition to oral therapy may be a safe option for select patients with S. aureus BOAI, including those due to MRSA. Prolonged courses of vancomycin and vancomycin troughs >15 μg/mL were not associated with improved outcomes for MRSA OAI.

  13. Use of rifampin in persistent coagulase negative staphylococcal bacteremia in neonates

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    Walther Frans J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS are the most common cause of neonatal sepsis in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU. A minority of neonates does not respond to vancomycin therapy and develops persistent bacteremia, which may be treated with rifampin. We evaluated the use of rifampin in persistent CoNS bacteremia. Methods Retrospective study of 137 neonates with CoNS bacteremia during admission to a tertiary NICU between July 2006 and July 2009. Main outcome measures were total duration of bacteremia and the adequacy of vancomycin and rifampin therapy. Results 137/1696 (8.0% neonates developed a CoNS bacteremia. Eighteen were treated with rifampin because of persistent bacteremia (3 positive blood cultures at least 48 hours apart with clinical symptoms or (a serious suspicion of an intravascular thrombus. Duration of bacteremia prior to rifampin therapy (8.0 ± 3.6 days was positively correlated (p Conclusion Rifampin may be effective in the treatment of persistent CoNS infections in neonates. Outcome may be improved by adequate monitoring of vancomycin trough levels.

  14. c-di-AMP is a new second messenger in Staphylococcus aureus with a role in controlling cell size and envelope stress.

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    Rebecca M Corrigan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The cell wall is a vital and multi-functional part of bacterial cells. For Staphylococcus aureus, an important human bacterial pathogen, surface proteins and cell wall polymers are essential for adhesion, colonization and during the infection process. One such cell wall polymer, lipoteichoic acid (LTA, is crucial for normal bacterial growth and cell division. Upon depletion of this polymer bacteria increase in size and a misplacement of division septa and eventual cell lysis is observed. In this work, we describe the isolation and characterization of LTA-deficient S. aureus suppressor strains that regained the ability to grow almost normally in the absence of this cell wall polymer. Using a whole genome sequencing approach, compensatory mutations were identified and revealed that mutations within one gene, gdpP (GGDEF domain protein containing phosphodiesterase, allow both laboratory and clinical isolates of S. aureus to grow without LTA. It was determined that GdpP has phosphodiesterase activity in vitro and uses the cyclic dinucleotide c-di-AMP as a substrate. Furthermore, we show for the first time that c-di-AMP is produced in S. aureus presumably by the S. aureus DacA protein, which has diadenylate cyclase activity. We also demonstrate that GdpP functions in vivo as a c-di-AMP-specific phosphodiesterase, as intracellular c-di-AMP levels increase drastically in gdpP deletion strains and in an LTA-deficient suppressor strain. An increased amount of cross-linked peptidoglycan was observed in the gdpP mutant strain, a cell wall alteration that could help bacteria compensate for the lack of LTA. Lastly, microscopic analysis of wild-type and gdpP mutant strains revealed a 13-22% reduction in the cell size of bacteria with increased c-di-AMP levels. Taken together, these data suggest a function for this novel secondary messenger in controlling cell size of S. aureus and in helping bacteria to cope with extreme membrane and cell wall stress.

  15. Remote transient Lactobacillus animalis bacteremia causing prosthetic hip joint infection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Somayaji

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactobacillus spp. are uncommon pathogens in immunocompetent hosts, and even rarer causes of prosthetic device infections. Case presentation A case of chronic hip prosthetic joint infection (PJI caused by L. animalis is described. This occurred 5 years after a transient bacteremia with the same organism. Whole genome sequencing of both isolates proved this PJI infection resulted from this remote bacteremia. Conclusions We document that prosthetic joint infections may be a consequence of bacteremia as much as 3 years before the onset of symptoms.

  16. Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in solid organ transplant recipients with bacteremias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Q Q; Ye, Q F; Yuan, H

    2015-03-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) remain as life-threatening complications and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality among solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria can cause serious bacteremias in these recipients. Reviews have aimed to investigate MDR Gram-negative bacteremias; however, they were lacking in SOT recipients in the past. To better understand the characteristics of bacteremias due to MDR Gram-negative bacteria, optimize preventive and therapeutic strategies, and improve the outcomes of SOT recipients, this review summarize the epidemiology, clinical and laboratory characteristics, and explores the mechanisms, prevention, and treatment of MDR Gram-negative bacteria.

  17. Role of antibodies in protection elicited by active vaccination with genetically inactivated alpha hemolysin in a mouse model of staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocca, Christopher P; Brady, Rebecca A; Burns, Drusilla L

    2014-05-01

    Due to the emergence of highly virulent community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections, S. aureus has become a major threat to public health. A majority of CA-MRSA skin and soft tissue infections in the United States are caused by S. aureus USA300 strains that are known to produce high levels of alpha hemolysin (Hla). Therefore, vaccines that contain inactivated forms of this toxin are currently being developed. In this study, we sought to determine the immune mechanisms of protection for this antigen using a vaccine composed of a genetically inactivated form of Hla (HlaH35L). Using a murine model of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), we found that BALB/c mice were protected by vaccination with HlaH35L; however, Jh mice, which are deficient in mature B lymphocytes and lack IgM and IgG in their serum, were not protected. Passive immunization with anti-HlaH35L antibodies conferred protection against bacterial colonization. Moreover, we found a positive correlation between the total antibody concentration induced by active vaccination and reduced bacterial levels. Animals that developed detectable neutralizing antibody titers after active vaccination were significantly protected from infection. These data demonstrate that antibodies to Hla represent the major mechanism of protection afforded by active vaccination with inactivated Hla in this murine model of SSTI, and in this disease model, antibody levels correlate with protection. These results provide important information for the future development and evaluation of S. aureus vaccines.

  18. Bartonella spp. bacteremia in blood donors from Campinas, Brazil.

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    Luiza Helena Urso Pitassi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bartonella species are blood-borne, re-emerging organisms, capable of causing prolonged infection with diverse disease manifestations, from asymptomatic bacteremia to chronic debilitating disease and death. This pathogen can survive for over a month in stored blood. However, its prevalence among blood donors is unknown, and screening of blood supplies for this pathogen is not routinely performed. We investigated Bartonella spp. prevalence in 500 blood donors from Campinas, Brazil, based on a cross-sectional design. Blood samples were inoculated into an enrichment liquid growth medium and sub-inoculated onto blood agar. Liquid culture samples and Gram-negative isolates were tested using a genus specific ITS PCR with amplicons sequenced for species identification. Bartonella henselae and Bartonella quintana antibodies were assayed by indirect immunofluorescence. B. henselae was isolated from six donors (1.2%. Sixteen donors (3.2% were Bartonella-PCR positive after culture in liquid or on solid media, with 15 donors infected with B. henselae and one donor infected with Bartonella clarridgeiae. Antibodies against B. henselae or B. quintana were found in 16% and 32% of 500 blood donors, respectively. Serology was not associated with infection, with only three of 16 Bartonella-infected subjects seropositive for B. henselae or B. quintana. Bartonella DNA was present in the bloodstream of approximately one out of 30 donors from a major blood bank in South America. Negative serology does not rule out Bartonella spp. infection in healthy subjects. Using a combination of liquid and solid cultures, PCR, and DNA sequencing, this study documents for the first time that Bartonella spp. bacteremia occurs in asymptomatic blood donors. Our findings support further evaluation of Bartonella spp. transmission which can occur through blood transfusions.

  19. [Significant bacteremias by Corynebacterium amycolatum: an emergent pathogen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteo, J; Aracil, B; Ignacio Alós, J; Luis Gómez-Garcés, J

    2001-03-01

    Corynebacterium sp. is an extremely varied genus which includes little known species and of which only Corynebacterium diphteriae, Corynebacterium urealyticum and Corynebacterium jeikeium are considered indisputable pathogens. Other species, such as C. amycolatum are at present being reconsidered as causative agents in infectious pathologies, partly on account of our greater aquaintance and improved identification techniques for these microorganisms and partly on account of the growing number of immunocompromised patients in whom all their pathogenic capacity is usually able to develope. We present 3 cases of significant bacteremia by C. amycolatum. Bacterial isoliations from blood culture were obtained using the Vital Systems. Identification was performed by means of Gran stain, colony morphology, the results of numerous biochemical tests (including the Api Coryne systems), the behaviour of the strains against the vibriostatic agent O/129 and the antibiotic susceptibility pattern obtained with the E-test. The three isolates of C. amycolatum were obtained from patients after a lenghtly hospitalization, multi-instrumentation and who had severe underlying disease. All three presented with concomitant isolates of C. amycolatum from other sites: sputum, wound and catheter respectively, which could explain the origin of the bacteremia. Colony morphology, antibiotic susceptibility patterns, resistance to the vibriostatic agent O/129 and the results of the biochemical test carried out were similar to those previously describe in the literature. C. amycolatum should be born in mind as a agent responsable for significant and severe pathology in this type of patient. In addition, it as certain specific characteristics which assits in its identification in the normal micr

  20. Host gene expression profiling and in vivo cytokine studies to characterize the role of linezolid and vancomycin in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA murine sepsis model.

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    Batu K Sharma-Kuinkel

    Full Text Available Linezolid (L, a potent antibiotic for Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, inhibits bacterial protein synthesis. By contrast, vancomycin (V is a cell wall active agent. Here, we used a murine sepsis model to test the hypothesis that L treatment is associated with differences in bacterial and host characteristics as compared to V. Mice were injected with S. aureus USA300, and then intravenously treated with 25 mg/kg of either L or V at 2 hours post infection (hpi. In vivo alpha-hemolysin production was reduced in both L and V-treated mice compared to untreated mice but the reduction did not reach the statistical significance [P = 0.12 for L; P = 0.70 for V. PVL was significantly reduced in L-treated mice compared to untreated mice (P = 0.02. However the reduction of in vivo PVL did not reach the statistical significance in V- treated mice compared to untreated mice (P = 0.27. Both antibiotics significantly reduced IL-1β production [P = 0.001 for L; P = 0.006 for V]. IL-6 was significantly reduced with L but not V antibiotic treatment [P<0.001 for L; P = 0.11 for V]. Neither treatment significantly reduced production of TNF-α. Whole-blood gene expression profiling showed no significant effect of L and V on uninfected mice. In S. aureus-infected mice, L altered the expression of a greater number of genes than V (95 vs. 42; P = 0.001. Pathway analysis for the differentially expressed genes identified toll-like receptor signaling pathway to be common to each S. aureus-infected comparison. Expression of immunomodulatory genes like Cxcl9, Cxcl10, Il1r2, Cd14 and Nfkbia was different among the treatment groups. Glycerolipid metabolism pathway was uniquely associated with L treatment in S. aureus infection. This study demonstrates that, as compared to V, treatment with L is associated with reduced levels of toxin production, differences in host inflammatory response, and distinct host gene expression

  1. Comparative efficacy of daptomycin, vancomycin, and cloxacillin for the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis in rats and role of test conditions in this determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantoni, L; Glauser, M P; Bille, J

    1990-01-01

    The in vivo efficacy of daptomycin, a new cell wall-active anti-gram-positive-bacterial agent, was compared to those of cloxacillin and vancomycin in a rat model of Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis. Both methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains were used. When therapy was initiated early (8 h) after infection, at the time when valvular bacterial counts were relatively low (approximately 10(6) CFU/g of vegetation), 3 days of therapy was found to be effective against the MSSA strains whatever the antibiotic regimen. In contrast, when the onset of therapy was delayed up to 15 h after infection, so that higher bacterial counts could develop on the valves (approximately 10(9) CFU/g of vegetation), a longer period of treatment (6 days) was required to cure infection. Under these conditions after 3 days of therapy, daptomycin was more effective than cloxacillin and vancomycin against the MSSA strains. Similarly, daptomycin showed a greater activity than vancomycin against the MRSA strain after 3 days of treatment, but after 6 days both antibiotics were equally effective. Decreasing doses of daptomycin showed decreasing activity: 10 mg/kg of body weight every 12 h (q12h) was better than 5 mg/kg q12h, whereas 5 mg/kg q24h (providing drug levels in blood detectable only during the first 12 h) failed to cure infection. In vitro, daptomycin was highly bactericidal at high concentrations (25 and 60 micrograms/ml, corresponding to peak levels in serum after doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg, respectively) and bacteriostatic at lower concentrations (0.5 to 2.5 micrograms/ml, corresponding to trough levels in serum). In conclusion, against low-bacterial-count S. aureus endocarditis, daptomycin showed an efficacy similar to those of vancomycin and cloxacillin. Against high-bacterial-count S. aureus endocarditis, daptomycin showed a higher bactericidal activity than cloxacillin (against the MSSA strains) and vancomycin (against both the

  2. Survival Benefit of Empirical Therapy for Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infections in Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaden, Joshua T; Ericson, Jessica E; Cross, Heather; Bergin, Stephen P; Messina, Julia A; Fowler, Vance G; Benjamin, Daniel K; Clark, Reese H; Hornik, Christoph P; Smith, P Brian

    2015-11-01

    The impact of early adequate empirical antibiotic therapy on outcomes of infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) who develop Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections (BSI) is unknown. Infants with S. aureus BSI discharged in 1997-2012 from 348 NICUs managed by the Pediatrix Medical Group were identified. Early adequate empirical antibiotic therapy was defined as exposure to ≥1 antibiotic with anti-staphylococcal activity on the day the first positive blood culture was obtained. All other cases were defined as inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy. We evaluated the association between inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy on outcomes controlling for gestational age, small for gestational age status, gender, discharge year, mechanical ventilation, inotropic support and use of supplemental oxygen. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. Secondary outcomes were 7-day mortality, death before hospital discharge and length of bacteremia. Of the 3339 infants with S. aureus BSI, 2492 (75%) had methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) BSI and 847 (25%) had methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) BSI. Inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy was administered in 725 (22%) cases. Inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy was associated with increased 30-day mortality (odds ratio: 2.03; 95% confidence interval: 1.08-3.82) among infants with MRSA BSI. Inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy was not associated with increases in mortality among infants with MSSA BSI. After controlling for confounders, inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy was associated with a modestly increased mortality at 30 days for infants with MRSA BSI.

  3. C-reactive protein level as a predictor of mortality in liver disease patients with bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janum, Sine H; Søvsø, Morten; Gradel, Kim O

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background and objective. C-reactive protein (CRP) is synthesized in the liver in response to inflammation, and CRP is a widely used marker of sepsis. In bacteremia the initial CRP level is an independent predictor of mortality. Since the CRP response in patients with chronic liver disease...... is lower than in patients without liver disease the objective was to assess whether CRP levels in chronic liver disease and bacteremia was associated with case fatality. Patients. The study enrolled 105 patients with chronic liver disease and bacteremia as well as 202 patients with bacteremia...... was significantly higher in patients with chronic liver disease (mortality rate ratio 2.2; 95% confidence interval 1.2-3.9) and it was correlated to Child-Turcotte-Pugh scores. CRP levels were not different between the three Child-Turcotte-Pugh classes (p = 0.33), and no linear correlation with 30-day mortality...

  4. Gram-negative rod bacteremia after cardiovascular surgery: Clinical features and prognostic factors

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    Sayaka Tago

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Graft replacement was the most common surgical procedure in patients with GNRB after CVS. Empirical antibiotics covering Gram-negative rods including P. aeruginosa should be considered if bacteremia is suspected in unstable patients after CVS.

  5. A propensity score analysis shows that empirical treatment with linezolid does not increase the thirty-day mortality rate in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternavasio-de la Vega, Hugo-Guillermo; Mateos-Díaz, Ana-María; Martinez, Jose-Antonio; Almela, Manel; Cobos-Trigueros, Nazaret; Morata, Laura; De-la-Calle, Cristina; Sala, Marta; Mensa, Josep; Marcos, Miguel; Soriano, Alex

    2014-12-01

    The role of linezolid in empirical therapy of suspected bacteremia remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of empirical use of linezolid or glycopeptides in addition to other antibiotics on the 30-day mortality rates in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. For this purpose, 1,126 patients with Gram-negative bacteremia in the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona from 2000 to 2012 were included in this study. In order to compare the mortality rates between patients who received linezolid or glycopeptides, the propensity scores on baseline variables were used to balance the treatment groups, and both propensity score matching and propensity-adjusted logistic regression were used to compare the 30-day mortality rates between the groups. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 16.0% during the study period. Sixty-eight patients received empirical treatment with linezolid, and 1,058 received glycopeptides. The propensity score matching included 64 patients in each treatment group. After matching, the mortality rates were 14.1% (9/64) in patients who received glycopeptides and 21.9% (14/64) in those who received linezolid, and a nonsignificant association between empirical linezolid treatment and mortality rate (odds ratio [OR], 1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69 to 3.82; P = 0.275, McNemar's test) was found. This association remained nonsignificant when variables that remained unbalanced after matching were included in a conditional logistic regression model. Further, the stratified propensity score analysis did not show any significant relationship between empirical linezolid treatment and the mortality rate after adjustment by propensity score quintiles or other variables potentially associated with mortality. In conclusion, the propensity score analysis showed that empirical treatment with linezolid compared with that with glycopeptides was not associated with 30-day mortality rates in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. Copyright

  6. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor complicated by Streptococcus milleri bacteremia and liver abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong; Dang, Ngoc-Duyen T; Elmunzer, Badih Joseph

    2009-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. Often discovered incidentally, GISTs can present with nonspecific abdominal symptoms or more overt symptoms of bleeding, obstruction, or perforation. Despite a myriad of clinical presentations, bacteremia associated with a GIST has not been described. In this report, we present an unusual clinical case that illustrates how GISTs can become infected, and demonstrate the importance of Streptococcus milleri bacteremia as an indicator of possible underlying gastrointestinal neoplasm.

  7. Nosocomial bacteremia due to Kluyvera cryocrescens: Case report and literature review

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    Yusuke Yoshino

    2016-01-01

    Piperacilin/tazobactam was administered for 2 weeks and the bacteremia resolved. Unfortunately, there was acute exacerbation of the interstitial lung disease, which was fatal. According to our review, including our case, K. cryocrescens bacteremia tends to occur in immunocompromised hosts, and indwelling catheters might be risk factors. Extended spectrum cephalosporins, carbapenems, fluoroquinolones and tetracyclines are generally adequate agents for empiric therapy based on susceptibilities of K. cryocrescens clinical isolates.

  8. Molecular epidemiological characteristics of Klebsiella pneumoniae associated with bacteremia among patients with pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Ryota; Shindo, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Ando, Masahiko; Jin, Wanchun; Wachino, Jun-ichi; Yamada, Keiko; Kimura, Kouji; Yagi, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2015-03-01

    Some important virulence factors have been elucidated in Klebsiella pneumoniae infections. We investigated the relationship between virulence factors and multilocus sequence types (STs) and assessed the risk factors for bacteremia in patients with pneumonia due to K. pneumoniae. From April 2004 through April 2012, a total of 120 K. pneumoniae isolates from patients with pneumonia (23 with bacteremia and 97 without bacteremia) were collected from 10 medical institutions in Japan. Additionally, 10 strains of K. pneumoniae serotype K2 that were isolated >30 years ago were included in this study. These isolates were characterized using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and the characteristics of their virulence factors, such as hypermucoviscosity phenotype and RmpA and aerobactin production between patients with and without bacteremia, were examined. MLST analysis was performed on the 120 isolates from patients with pneumonia, and some sequence type groups were defined as genetic lineages (GLs). GL65 was more prevalent among patients with bacteremia (21.7%) than in those without bacteremia (7.2%). The majority of the strains with serotype K2 were classified into GL14 or GL65, and rmpA and the gene for aerobactin were present in all GL65-K2 strains but absent in all GL14-K2 strains. In a multivariate analysis, the independent risk factors for bacteremia included GL65 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 9.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.81 to 49.31), as well as neoplastic disease (AOR, 9.94; 95% CI, 2.61 to 37.92), immunosuppression (AOR, 17.85; 95% CI, 1.49 to 214.17), and hypoalbuminemia (AOR, 4.76; 95% CI, 1.29 to 17.61). GL65 was more prevalent among patients with bacteremia and was associated with the virulence factors of K. pneumoniae. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Actinomyces urogenitalis bacteremia and tubo-ovarian abscess after an in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoecke, Frederik; Beuckelaers, Ellen; Lissens, Peter; Boudewijns, Michael

    2013-12-01

    We describe the first case of bacteremia due to Actinomyces urogenitalis. Bacteremia was secondary to a tubo-ovarian abscess following transvaginal oocyte retrieval. Identification was established by matrix-assisted desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. A. urogenitalis should be considered as a potential causative agent of infection after gynecological procedures.

  10. Recurrent bacteremia with different strains of Streptococcus pyogenes in an immunocompromised child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Takuya; Minami, Masaaki; Narita, Kotaro; Nakata, Tomohiko; Itomi, Seiko; Kubota, Kinya; Oya, Teruaki; Nishiyama, Hideki; Kato, Hideki; Yuasa, Norihiro

    2016-06-01

    We report an immunocompromised child who experienced two episodes of bacteremia due to Streptococcus pyogenes. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA profiles, emm genotypes, superantigen profiles, antimicrobial susceptibility, and resistance-related genes were investigated, and the results showed different profiles between the two isolates. This is the first report describing recurrent bacteremia caused by different strains of S. pyogenes. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Antimicrobial properties of graphene-like nanoparticles: coating effect on Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivi, M. [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Biology and Biotechnology (Italy); Alfè, M.; Gargiulo, V. [CNR, Institute for Research on Combustion (Italy); Valle, F. [ISMN, Institute of Nanostructured Materials (Italy); Mura, F. [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Chemistry (Italy); Di Giosia, M.; Rapino, S. [University of Bologna, Department of Chemistry “Giacomo Ciamician” (Italy); Palleschi, C.; Uccelletti, D., E-mail: daniela.uccelletti@uniroma1.it [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Biology and Biotechnology (Italy); Fiorito, S., E-mail: silvana.fiorito@ift.cnr.it [CNR, Institute of Translational Pharmacology (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    The exploitation of nanomaterials with antimicrobial properties has attracted an ever-growing interest in the recent years. Carbon-based materials, such as graphene and graphene family materials (GFMs), have gained most of the attention for application in many biomedical fields. Here, we describe the antimicrobial activity of graphene-like (GL) layers derived from the chemical demolition of carbon black, against the planktonic growth of Staphylococcus aureus cells, primary cause of hospital and community-acquired infections, often leading to bacteremia and sepsis. The inhibitory capabilities of GL layers on the formation of S. aureus biofilm are also assessed. The antimicrobial properties seem based mainly on the interaction between GL layers and bacteria surfaces. FESEM and AFM analyses suggest that the GL layers coat the cells as soon as they get in contact with them, as also indicated by the wettability of the GLs.

  12. ADAM10 mediates vascular injury induced by Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Michael E; Kim, Hwan Keun; Wang, Yang; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2012-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bacteremia and sepsis. The interaction of S. aureus with the endothelium is central to bloodstream infection pathophysiology yet remains ill-understood. We show herein that staphylococcal α-hemolysin, a pore-forming cytotoxin, is required for full virulence in a murine sepsis model. The α-hemolysin binding to its receptor A-disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) upregulates the receptor's metalloprotease activity on endothelial cells, causing vascular endothelial-cadherin cleavage and concomitant loss of endothelial barrier function. These cellular injuries and sepsis severity can be mitigated by ADAM10 inhibition. This study therefore provides mechanistic insight into toxin-mediated endothelial injury and suggests new therapeutic approaches for staphylococcal sepsis.

  13. Evaluation of the incidence of occult bacteremia among children with fever of unknown origin

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    Eitan Naaman Berezin

    Full Text Available We reviewed the incidence of occult bacteremia, to identify the most frequent etiological agents of bacteremias in otherwise healthy children from one month to 10 years old, who had fever of unknown origin attended at the emergency ward of an urban, university-affiliated pediatric referral center. This was a retrospective medical record review, evaluating children with fever. Data were collected from the initial visit, when blood cultures, hematological properties and hemosedimentation rates were examined. Fever was considered as the highest temperature assessed in the hospital or reported by the responsible adult. Occult bacteremia was discovered in 1.4% of the 1,051 children evaluated, and the most common etiologic agent was Streptococcus pneumoniae. Total leukocyte count and blood sedimentation rates greater than 30 mm³ were not predictive factors for occult bacteremia. Fever greater than 39ºC was the most important factor for predicting occult bacteremia (P<0.001. The presence of occult bacteremia was significantly correlated with patient hospitalization.

  14. Risk factors for mortality in patients with nosocomial Gram-negative rod bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakoc, C; Tekin, R; Yeşilbağ, Z; Cagatay, A

    2013-04-01

    The percentage of hospital-acquired bloodstream infections associated with Gram-negative bacilles has decreased during last decade but it is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to determine the outcome of Gram-negative rod (GNR) bacteremia, which is an important clinical problem with high mortality rates, and the risk factors for GNR related mortality in our Clinic. During the study period, 520 episodes of bacteremia were detected in 411 patients. Only patients with GNR bacteremia in blood cultures were included in the study (n = 197). Among 197 patients fulfilling study criteria, GNR were grown in 239 samples. Escherichia coli (n = 97, 40.5%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 54, 22.5%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n= 24, 10%), Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 24, 10%) were the most commonly isolated bacteria. The most frequently identified infection sources of bacteremia were pneumonia (n = 35, 17.7%), catheter-related infections (n = 24, 12.2%), urinary tract infections (n = 20, 10%). In multivariate analysis, it was found that the GNR bacteremia mortality risk increased in patients treated in intensive care units (ICU) (OR: 0.2, p = 0.03) and patients with ventilatory support (OR: 20.8, p = 0.05). In clinical practice of the hospital settings, efforts should concentrate on preventive measures for nosocomial infections since pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and urinary infections appear to be the most frequent causes of secondary bacteremia.    

  15. Computer-assisted flapless implant placement reduces the incidence of surgery-related bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arısan, Volkan; Bölükbaşı, Nilüfer; Öksüz, Lütfiye

    2013-12-01

    Bacteremia--the access of bacterium to the bloodstream--may yield life-threatening complications. The aim of this study was to compare the incidence, duration, and type of bacterium leading to bacteremia with relation to conventional and computer-assisted flapless implant surgery. A total of 377 implants were placed in 68 edentulous jaws using the conventional (conventional group) or a computer-assisted stereolithographic (SLA) template-guided surgery technique (flapless group). Bacteremia was monitored from pre- and postoperative blood samples. The duration of the surgical intervention was significantly shorter in the flapless group (p = 0.3510). Baseline samples were sterile. Following the 15th minute after the placement of the last implant, bacteria were present in 62 and 12 % of the patients in the conventional and flapless groups, respectively (p flapless group. Staphylocccus epidermidis, Bifidobacterium spp., Streptococcus viridans, Corynebacterium spp., and Streptococcus sanguinis were the isolated bacterium. Irrespective of the utilized technique, bacteremia may occur upon the placement of four to eight implants to an edentulous jaw. The probability of bacteremia for the patients operated with the conventional technique is, however, 3.05 greater than those operated with the flapless technique. Flapless implant placement reduces the incidence of surgery-related bacteremia and, therefore, may be beneficial to patients at risk.

  16. Daptomycin approved in Japan for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mori T

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Mao Hagihara1, Takumi Umemura1, Takeshi Mori1,2, Hiroshige Mikamo11Department of Infection Control and Prevention, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi, Japan; 2Division of Pharmaceutical Science, Faculty of Pharmacy, Meijo University, Nagoya, Aichi, JapanAbstract: Daptomycin is a lipoglycopeptide antibacterial drug that is rapidly bactericidal for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection and has antibiotic activity against a wide range of Gram-positive organisms. It has been approved by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare in Japan for the treatment for bacteremia, right-sided endocarditis, and skin and skin-structure infections, such as necrotizing fasciitis, due to MRSA on the basis of a Phase III trial conducted in Japan since July, 2011. In Japanese Phase I and III trials, daptomycin therapy given at 4 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg once per day was well tolerated and effective as standard therapy for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections and bacteremia caused by MRSA, but side effects remain to be evaluated in large-scale trials.Keywords: daptomycin, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, Japan

  17. Incidence of oral indigenous bacteria in causative strains isolated from blood cultures in 759 laboratory-confirmed cases of bacteremia

    OpenAIRE

    Shinya Yura; Sadaya Matano

    2012-01-01

    Background: The incidence of oral indigenous bacteria in cases of bacteremia has been reported in only a few studies. We investigated the annual incidence of oral indigenous bacteria isolated in blood cultures from patients with bacteremia and call into consideration the impact of oral health measures implemented at our facility. Methods: In the period from 2001 to 2006, 759 laboratory-confirmed cases of bacteremia were reported and subsequently analyzed in this study. The incidences of the c...

  18. Bacteriemias de origen comunitario en pacientes adultos que acuden al servicio de urgencias de un hospital universitario Community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients attending the emergency service of a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel J Artico

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available La bacteriemia es causa importante de morbimortalidad. Nuestro objetivo es describir una serie de episodios de bacteriemia de origen comunitario en adultos, registrados en el hospital de Clínicas de Córdoba. Entre enero de 2005 y diciembre de 2009 se estudiaron 271 episodios. La rentabilidad diagnóstica del hemocultivo fue 13,5 %. El 52 % de los pacientes eran varones y el 48 % mujeres, la edad promedio fue de 60 años. Las comorbilidades prevalentes fueron diabetes (21 %, neoplasia (18 %, cardiopatía (11 % e infección por HIV (8 %. Los focos que se pudieron establecer fueron el respiratorio (21 %, el urinario (15 %, el cutáneo (9 % y otros (13 %. Predominaron las bacterias gram positivas (51,4 %. Los microorganismos más frecuentes fueron Escherichia coli (25 %, Streptococcus pneumoniae (22,9 % y Staphylococcus aureus (12,3 %. La bacteriemia fue polimicrobiana en el 7 % de los casos. El 33 % de los aislamientos de E. coli presentó resistencia a la ciprofloxacina y el 6 % a la ceftacidima. El 14 % de los aislamientos de S. aureus fue resistente a la oxacilina. Solo el 7 % de los aislamientos de S. pneumoniae expresó altos niveles de resistencia a la penicilina según el criterio poblacional, con CIM = 2 ug/ml.Bacteremia is an important cause of morbimortality. This study describes the episodes of community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients registered at our hospital. Between January 2005, and December 2009, 271 episodes were studied. The diagnostic yield of blood cultures was 13.5 %. A total of 52 % of patients were male and 48 % female. The mean age was 60. The most frequent comorbidities were: diabetes (21 %, neoplasia (18 %, cardiopathy (11 %, and HIV infection (8 %. The focus was- respiratory (21 %, urinary (15 %, cutaneous (9 %, and others (13 %. Gram-positive bacteria prevailed (51.4%. The most frequent microorganisms were Escherichia coli (25 %, Streptococcus pneumoniae (22.9 %, and Staphylococcus aureus (12.3 %. Bacteremia

  19. Bacteremia and other body site infection caused by hypervirulent and classic Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hua; Li, Dongdong; Zhou, Haijian; Sun, Yunfang; Guo, Ling; Shen, Dingxia

    2017-03-01

    To investigate bacteremia and other body site infection caused by hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae (hvKP), a recently recognized pathogen of invasive infection, and classic Klebsiella pneumoniae (cKP), a very common organism associated with many kinds of nosocomial infection. Clinical information obtained from patients with both bacteremia and other body site infections caused by hvKP and/or cKP was retrospectively reviewed. Homo-hvKP (or homo-cKP) was defined as homologous hvKP (or cKP) strains from different body sites in each individual patient according to string test, virulence gene amplification and PFGE pattern. MLST was carried on to understand the correlation of sequence type with capsular polysaccharide type for Klebsiella pneumoniae from blood. Sixty-four hvKP and 101 cKP strains were isolated from blood and other body sites of 76 patients who had bacteremia accompanied by other site infection. Among these patients, 27 were infected with homo-hvKP, 32 were with homo-cKP, 12 were with heterogeneous cKP, and five were with both hvKP and cKP. Patients with bacteremia and liver abscesses caused by homo-hvKP accounted for 51.9%, and 92.6% of homo-hvKP infected patients did not receive any invasive procedures before bacteremia. However, patients with bacteremia and biliary tract infection caused by homo-cKP accounted for 34.4%, and 78.1% of homo-cKP infected patients had history of invasive procedures before bacteremia. More homo-hvKP strains (59.3%) than homo-cKP strains (34.4%) were isolated from blood earlier than other sites. HvKP strains were statistically more susceptible to the tested antimicrobials than cKP strains. An outbreak of carbapenem-resistant cKP infection and possible gene transfer of KPC-2 from cKP to hvKP were brought to notice. Both hvKP and cKP could cause bacteremia and other body site infection. But patients with hvKP bacteremia usually suffered from liver abscess without previous invasive procedures, most patients with c

  20. Risk factors and microbiology of meningitis and/or bacteremia after transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yu; Liu, Xiaohai; Gao, Lu; Guo, Xiaopeng; Wang, Qiang; Bao, Xinjie; Deng, Kan; Yao, Yong; Feng, Ming; Lian, Wei; Wang, Renzhi; Yang, Qiwen; Wang, Yao; Xing, Bing

    2017-11-27

    To investigate the incidence, bacteriological features, and risk factors of post- transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) meningitis and/or bacteremia. This retrospective study included 3242 patients who underwent TSS for pituitary adenoma at the Dept. of Neurosurgery of Peking Union Medical College Hospital between January 2012 and December 2016. Clinical data for patients with and without post-TSS meningitis and/or bacteremia were compared and analyzed. Meningitis and bacteremia developed after 27 (0.8%) and 26 (0.8%) procedures, respectively, and six patients (0.2%) developed both. Gram-positive organisms (coagulase-negative staphylococci, Streptococcus (S.) pneumonia, and S. viridans) predominated in meningitis, whereas gram-negative organisms (K. pneumonia, E. aerogenes, and E. coli) predominated in bacteremia. All identified species were sensitive to amikacin, imipenem and meropenem. Antibiotic treatment cured 52 patients (seven died). In a multivariate analysis, the risk of meningitis and/or bacteremia was independently associated with diabetes (p < 0.001, OR 6.06), previous surgery at the same location (p < 0.001, OR 4.23), intraoperative CSF (Cerebrospinal Fluid) leakage (p < 0.001, OR 4.63), and an endoscopic approach (p = 0.001, OR 2.50). Meningitis and/or bacteremia remain critical postoperative complications of TSS for pituitary adenoma. The pathogens with drug-sensitivity to antibiotics differed between meningitis and bacteremia. Early blood and CSF bacterial cultures, drug susceptibility analyses, and appropriate antibiotic treatment can help control the rate of infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus vs. Osteoblast: Relationship and Consequences in Osteomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josse, Jérôme; Velard, Frédéric; Gangloff, Sophie C.

    2015-01-01

    Bone cells, namely osteoblasts and osteoclasts work in concert and are responsible for bone extracellular matrix formation and resorption. This homeostasis is, in part, altered during infections by Staphylococcus aureus through the induction of various responses from the osteoblasts. This includes the over-production of chemokines, cytokines and growth factors, thus suggesting a role for these cells in both innate and adaptive immunity. S. aureus decreases the activity and viability of osteoblasts, by induction of apoptosis-dependent and independent mechanisms. The tight relationship between osteoclasts and osteoblasts is also modulated by S. aureus infection. The present review provides a survey of the relevant literature discussing the important aspects of S. aureus and osteoblast interaction as well as the ability for antimicrobial peptides to kill intra-osteoblastic S. aureus, hence emphasizing the necessity for new anti-infectious therapeutics. PMID:26636047

  2. Role of Acidic pH in the Susceptibility of Intraphagocytic Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains to Meropenem and Cloxacillin▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Sandrine; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule; Glupczynski, Youri; Tulkens, Paul M.

    2007-01-01

    Early studies showed that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are susceptible to β-lactams when they are exposed to pH ≤ 5.5 in broth. Because S. aureus survives in the phagolysosomes of macrophages, where the pH may be acidic, we have examined the susceptibility of MRSA ATCC 33591 phagocytized by human THP-1 macrophages to meropenem (MEM) and cloxacillin (CLX). Using a pharmacodynamic model assessing key pharmacological (50% effective concentration and maximal efficacy) and microbiological (static concentration) descriptors of antibiotic activity, we show that intraphagocytic MRSA strains are as sensitive to MEM and CLX as methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA; ATCC 25923). This observation was replicated in broth if the pH was brought to 5.5 and was confirmed with clinical strains. Electron microscopy showed that both the MRSA and the MSSA strains localized and multiplied in membrane-bounded structures (phagolysosomes) in the absence of β-lactams. Incubation of the infected macrophages with ammonium chloride (to raise the phagolysosomal pH) made MRSA insensitive to MEM and CLX. No difference was seen in mec, mecA, mecI, mecR1, femA, and femB expression (reversed transcription-PCR) or in PBP 2a content (immunodetection) in MRSA grown in broth at pH 5.5 compared with that in MRSA grown in broth at 7.4. The level of [14C]benzylpenicillin binding to cell walls prepared from a non-β-lactamase-producing MRSA clinical isolate was two times lower than that to cell walls prepared from MSSA ATCC 25923 at pH 7.4, but the levels increased to similar values for both strains at pH 5.5. These data suggest that the restoration of susceptibility of intraphagocytic of MRSA to MEM and CLX is due to the acidic pH prevailing in phagolysosomes and is mediated by an enhanced binding to penicillin-binding proteins. PMID:17307986

  3. Francisella tularensis Bacteremia: A Case Report from Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma E. R. Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent intracellular gram-negative bacterium. The organism is usually isolated from wild and domestic animals and invertebrate. Man gets infection by direct contact with those animals or their products but the most common mode of transmission is via arthropod vectors. The disease is endemic in North America, parts of Europe, and Asia but has never been reported in Africa. A 29-year old male living in a rural area of Southern Sudan has been maintained on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis for two years. He presented to our center in May 2010 complaining of fever, dry cough, shortness of breath, and abdominal discomfort for four days. He was very ill, pale, and dehydrated. There were enlarged tender submandibular lymph nodes, but no mouth ulcers or other palpable lymph nodes. Peritonitis was excluded by effluent white blood cell count and culture. Empiric antibiotic treatment with ceftriaxon, and ciprofloxacin was started. Gram-negative coccobacilli were isolated by blood culture. The organism was identified as Francisella tularensis. We started him on a ten-day course of gentamicin after which he improved. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first reported case of bacteremia caused by Francisella tularensis in Sudan.

  4. Role of acidic pH in the susceptibility of intraphagocytic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains to meropenem and cloxacillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Sandrine; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule; Glupczynski, Youri; Tulkens, Paul M

    2007-05-01

    Early studies showed that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are susceptible to beta-lactams when they are exposed to pH cloxacillin (CLX). Using a pharmacodynamic model assessing key pharmacological (50% effective concentration and maximal efficacy) and microbiological (static concentration) descriptors of antibiotic activity, we show that intraphagocytic MRSA strains are as sensitive to MEM and CLX as methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA; ATCC 25923). This observation was replicated in broth if the pH was brought to 5.5 and was confirmed with clinical strains. Electron microscopy showed that both the MRSA and the MSSA strains localized and multiplied in membrane-bounded structures (phagolysosomes) in the absence of beta-lactams. Incubation of the infected macrophages with ammonium chloride (to raise the phagolysosomal pH) made MRSA insensitive to MEM and CLX. No difference was seen in mec, mecA, mecI, mecR1, femA, and femB expression (reversed transcription-PCR) or in PBP 2a content (immunodetection) in MRSA grown in broth at pH 5.5 compared with that in MRSA grown in broth at 7.4. The level of [(14)C]benzylpenicillin binding to cell walls prepared from a non-beta-lactamase-producing MRSA clinical isolate was two times lower than that to cell walls prepared from MSSA ATCC 25923 at pH 7.4, but the levels increased to similar values for both strains at pH 5.5. These data suggest that the restoration of susceptibility of intraphagocytic of MRSA to MEM and CLX is due to the acidic pH prevailing in phagolysosomes and is mediated by an enhanced binding to penicillin-binding proteins.

  5. Role of lipase from community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain USA300 in hydrolyzing triglycerides into growth-inhibitory free fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadieux, Brigitte; Vijayakumaran, Vithooshan; Bernards, Mark A; McGavin, Martin J; Heinrichs, David E

    2014-12-01

    Part of the human host innate immune response involves the secretion of bactericidal lipids on the skin and delivery of triglycerides into abscesses to control invading pathogens. Two Staphylococcus aureus lipases, named SAL1 and SAL2, were identified in the community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain USA300, which, presumably, are produced and function to degrade triglycerides to release free fatty acids. We show that the SAL2 lipase is one of the most abundant proteins secreted by USA300 and is proteolytically processed from the 72-kDa proSAL2 to the 44-kDa mature SAL2 by the metalloprotease aureolysin. We show that spent culture supernatants had lipase activity on both short- and long-chain fatty acid substrates and that deletion of gehB, encoding SAL2, resulted in the complete loss of these activities. With the use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we show that SAL2 hydrolyzed trilinolein to linoleic acid, a fatty acid with known antistaphylococcal properties. When added to cultures of USA300, trilinolein and, to a lesser extent, triolein inhibited growth in a SAL2-dependent manner. This effect was shown to be due to the enzymatic activity of SAL2 on these triglycerides, since the catalytically inactive SAL2 Ser412Ala mutant was incapable of hydrolyzing the triglycerides or yielding delayed growth in their presence. Overall, these results reveal that SAL2 hydrolyzes triglycerides of both short- and long-chain fatty acids and that the released free fatty acids have the potential to cause significant delays in growth, depending on the chemical nature of the free fatty acid. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. The evolution of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurenberg, Ruud H; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    2008-01-01

    A broad variety of infections, ranging from minor infections of the skin to post-operative wound infections can be caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The adaptive power of S. aureus to antibiotics leaded, in the early 1960s, to the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The cause of

  7. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of bacteremia caused by Streptococcus viridans in children with hematologic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Panina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteremia caused by Streptococcus viridans may be fulminant in neutropenic patients. The clinical signs of streptococcal bacteremiain neutropenic patients are obvious, but non-specific, and are characterized by fever, pulmonary symptoms (pneumonia, respiratory distress syndrome in 20–25 % of cases, hemodynamic instability (about 30 % of cases, rash and followed desquamation, in rare cases – neurological disorders (encephalopathy. Perhaps the main difference from other bacteremia in immunocompromised patients is approximately 10 times higher risk of rapid (during the first two days development of acute lung injury with hypoxemia often requiring oxygen subsidies and respiratory support. Frequency, clinical characteristics and outcomes of streptococcal bacteremia, as well as the spectrum of antibiotics sensitivity was retrospective analyzed in this study. From 2003 to 2009 in children with various oncological and hematological diseases and febrile neutropenia 265 microorganisms were isolated from blood cultures, including Gram-positive in 113 (42 % patients. Strains of Streptococcus viridans, isolated at least once from blood (central venous catheter and / or peripheral veins, are included in analysis. Streptococcus viridans were isolated from the blood of 20 patients, accounting for 7.5 % of the total number of bacteremia and 17.7 % of gram-ositive bacteremia. Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML accounted for 45 % of all patients with streptococcal bacteremia, but the incidence of streptococcal bacteremia in AML patients was 8.7 % and did not differ from patients with other diagnoses. 11 (55 % from 20 patients have mucositis at diagnosis of bacteremia, in 14 patients (70 % prior chemotherapy included high dose of cytosine arabinoside. All patients with streptococcal bacteremia have severe neutropenia (median 70 cells / mkl and characterized by fever (100 %, septic shock (8 patients, 40 % and RDS (7 patients, 35 % required high

  8. Predicting bacteremia based on nurse-assessed food consumption at the time of blood culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Takayuki; Onda, Toshihito; Murayama, Go; Yamanouchi, Masashi; Inukai, Minori; Sakai, Ai; Kikuta, Masumi; Branch, Joel; Aoki, Makoto; Tierney, Lawrence M; Inoue, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Bacteremia and its complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. However, the yield of blood cultures is relatively low, with many false-positive results from bacterial contamination. We investigated the relationship between patient food consumption and the presence of bacteremia. This was an observational analysis of a cohort of 1179 patients who underwent blood culture analysis between January 2005 and December 2009. Patients with anorexia-inducing conditions, such as gastrointestinal illness and malignant disease treated with chemotherapy, were excluded. Food consumption was rated by nurses as the percentage of food consumed during the meal preceding the blood culture. Groupings were as follows: low consumption (50% to 80%). Low consumption was observed in 39.8% of patients, moderate in 17.8%, and high in 41.6%. The average body temperature was 38.1 ± 1.1°C. Bacteremia was present in 18.5%, 3.9%, and 1.4% of patients in the low, moderate, and high food consumption groups, respectively. The negative predictive value was 98.3%, suggesting that bacteremia is very unlikely in the setting of good food intake. Bacteremia is an unlikely occurrence in hospitalized patients who maintain adequate food consumption at the time of blood culture. Copyright © 2012 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  9. P-27/HP endolysin as antibacterial agent for antibiotic resistant Staphylococcus aureus of human infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ragini; Prasad, Yogendra

    2011-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide range of suppurative infections in humans and animals. Due to its high virulence, ability to adopt various environmental conditions, and acquired multiple drug resistance, treatment of such infections has become difficult. Therefore, there is an immense need to develop alternate drug modalities to control this pathogen. In past few years, phage-encoded endolysin therapy has emerged as a new hope not only due to its ability to specifically kill the target bacteria irrespective of their antibiotic sensitivity but also because of minimum or no side effects, a problem associated with antibiotic therapy. In this article, we report purification of a broad spectrum anti-staphylococcal endolysin (P-27/HP endolysin) encoded by phage P-27/HP isolated from sewage water. On SDS-PAGE endolysin resolved in three polypeptides of molecular weights 33.5, 48.6, and 62.2 kDa. Endolysin exhibited maximum in vitro lytic activity at temperature between 35 and 40°C and pH 7.0. In vivo experiments revealed considerable (99.9%) elimination of S. aureus 27/HP from spleens of endolysin-treated mice and had saved them from death due to bacteremia caused by S. aureus 27/HP challenge infection. Thus, P-27/HP endolysin offers suitable substitute of antibiotics to control S. aureus infections.

  10. Operon structure of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Broeke-Smits, Nicole J P; Pronk, Tessa E; Jongerius, Ilse; Bruning, Oskar; Wittink, Floyd R; Breit, Timo M; van Strijp, Jos A G; Fluit, Ad C; Boel, C H Edwin

    2010-06-01

    In bacteria, gene regulation is one of the fundamental characteristics of survival, colonization and pathogenesis. Operons play a key role in regulating expression of diverse genes involved in metabolism and virulence. However, operon structures in pathogenic bacteria have been determined only by in silico approaches that are dependent on factors such as intergenic distances and terminator/promoter sequences. Knowledge of operon structures is crucial to fully understand the pathophysiology of infections. Presently, transcriptome data obtained from growth curves in a defined medium were used to predict operons in Staphylococcus aureus. This unbiased approach and the use of five highly reproducible biological replicates resulted in 93.5% significantly regulated genes. These data, combined with Pearson's correlation coefficients of the transcriptional profiles, enabled us to accurately compile 93% of the genome in operon structures. A total of 1640 genes of different functional classes were identified in operons. Interestingly, we found several operons containing virulence genes and showed synergistic effects for two complement convertase inhibitors transcribed in one operon. This is the first experimental approach to fully identify operon structures in S. aureus. It forms the basis for further in vitro regulation studies that will profoundly advance the understanding of bacterial pathophysiology in vivo.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus CC398

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Lance B.; Stegger, Marc; Hasman, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Since its discovery in the early 2000s, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 398 (CC398) has become a rapidly emerging cause of human infections, most often associated with livestock exposure. We applied whole-genome sequence typing to characterize a diverse collectio...

  12. GENTAMICIN REDUCES BACTEREMIA AND MORTALITY-RATES ASSOCIATED WITH THE TREATMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL PERITONITIS WITH RECOMBINANT TISSUE-PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Harry; de Graaf, JS; KOOI, K; BLEICHRODT, RP

    BACKGROUND: Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA), administered intraperitoneally, reduces intra-abdominal abscess formation in rats with fecal peritonitis at the costs of increased mortality and early Escherichia coli bacteremia. It was determined whether or not mortality and bacteremia

  13. [Epidemiology and clinical features of Streptococcus pyogenes bacteremia in Cartagena (Murcia, Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimeno-Almazán, Amaya; Viqueira-Gonzalez, Montserrat; Alcalde, María Del Mar; Alcaraz-Vidal, Begoña; Vera-Méndez, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    A gradual increase in severe cases due to Streptococcus pyogenes or Streptococcus beta-hemolytic group A (SGA), has been detected in the last few decades. Retrospective study of bacteremia due to S.pyogenes detected between January 2009 and January 2013 in Cartagena. The annual incidence for severe bacteremia has been estimated. Thirteen cases of SGA bacteremia were recorded. The incidence increased from 0.37 in 2009 to 2.5 cases/100,000 inhabitants in 2012. The predominant focus was skin and soft tissue infections (53%). Early mortality was 20%. Severe streptococcal disease is rare, but affects individuals with good functional status, and is associated with a high mortality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Increase in hippocampal water diffusion and volume during experimental pneumococcal meningitis is aggravated by bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Jon G; Brandt, Christian T; Leib, Stephen L

    2014-01-01

    pneumococci. The study comprised of four experimental groups. I. Uninfected controls (n = 8); II. Meningitis (n = 11); III. Meningitis with early onset bacteremia by additional i.v. injection of live pneumococci (n = 10); IV. Meningitis with attenuated bacteremia by treatment with serotype-specific anti......BACKGROUND: The hippocampus undergoes apoptosis in experimental pneumococcal meningitis leading to neurofunctional deficits in learning and memory function. The aim of the present study was 1) to investigate hippocampal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and volume with MRI during the course...... of experimental pneumococcal meningitis, 2) to explore the influence of accompanying bacteremia on hippocampal water distribution and volume, 3) and to correlate these findings to the extent of apoptosis in the hippocampus. METHODS: Experimental meningitis in rats was induced by intracisternal injection of live...

  15. Staphylococcus aureus and the ecology of the nasal microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Cindy M; Price, Lance B; Hungate, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    The human microbiome can play a key role in host susceptibility to pathogens, including in the nasal cavity, a site favored by Staphylococcus aureus. However, what determines our resident nasal microbiota-the host or the environment-and can interactions among nasal bacteria determine S. aureus...... colonization? Our study of 46 monozygotic and 43 dizygotic twin pairs revealed that nasal microbiota is an environmentally derived trait, but the host's sex and genetics significantly influence nasal bacterial density. Although specific taxa, including lactic acid bacteria, can determine S. aureus colonization...

  16. Implantation of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum for elimination of Staphylococcus aureus from the nasal cavity in volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viacheslav, Ilyin; Kiryukhina, Nataliya

    Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is a well-documented risk factor of infection and inflammation of the skin, soft tissues and bacteremia. It is also known that most often etiology of these disorders is associated with autoinfection. The present-day methods of opportunistic pathogens eradication from the nasal cavity are based principally on the use of antiseptic and antibacterial agents. For instance, a local antibiotic mupirocin in the form of nasal ointment is considered to be the gold standard for the treatment of S. aureus carriage. The literature describes investigations showing how mupirocin can strengthen antibiotic resistance in S. aureus strains, including those with methicillin resistance (MRSA). It is also common knowledge that recolonization of the nasal mucous membrane takes place within several months after mupirocin treatment. This circumstance dictates the necessity to look for alternative ways of preventing the S. aureus carriage and methods of elimination. One of the methods of nasal S. aureus elimination is implantation of nonpathogenic microorganisms which will extrude opportunistic pathogens without impinging the symbiotic microbiota. Effectiveness of saline suspension of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum containing spray was assessed in a several chamber experiments with simulation of some spaceflight factors (dry immersion, isolation). Various schemes of application of preparations were applied. In all cases of corynebacteria application the strong inhibiting effect against S. aureus was detected. This fact opens a prospect of using nonpathogenic corynebacteria as a nasal probiotic. Administration of the nasal corynebacteria spray possibly prevented cross-infection by MRSA and appearance of staphylococcal infection. Further pre-clinical and clinical study of this bacterial therapy method is under development.

  17. Prevalence of toxin genes among the clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and its clinical impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Deodhar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus causes a variety of infections, ranging from a mild skin infection to blood stream infections and deep seated infections. As Stapylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB has the tendency to cause endovascular and metastatic infections, complications can occur at almost all sites of the body. Hence, SAB is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in spite of appropriate antimicrobial treatment. The virulence in S. aureus is determined by the presence of adhesins and toxins, which behave like superantigens (SAgs and leads to a massive release of proinflammatory cytokines causing overwhelming inflammatory response leading to endothelial leakage, hemodynamic shock, multiorgan failure, and possibly death. Materials and Methods: One year prospective study conducted in a tertiary care hospital in southern part of India included all patients with SAB. Clinical details were filled according to. All isolates were subjected to polymerase chain reaction (PCR for enterotoxin profiling. Results: A total of 101 patients of SAB were identified which comprises of 61 (60.4% patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA and 40 (39.6% patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. Most common predictors of mortality were prior hospitalization and antibiotic intake, severe organ dysfunction, shock, tachycardia, and leukocytosis. Two-third of the isolates had at least one enterotoxin, most prevalent was sea; 28% and 27% (P - value = 0.001 MSSA isolates had seg and sei; whereas, 38.6% (P - value < 0.001 of MRSA isolates were found to have sea. The most common enterotoxin associated with mortality was sei, which comprised of 38% of all mortality. Conclusion: In SAB, the significant predictors of mortality were prior hospitalization and antibiotic intake, presence of multiorgan dysfunction, and shock. Although overall significance between the enterotoxin and shock could not be demonstrated, it successfully

  18. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization: Modulation of Host Immune Response and Impact on Human Vaccine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Aisling F.; Leech, John M.; Rogers, Thomas R.; McLoughlin, Rachel M.

    2014-01-01

    In apparent contrast to its invasive potential Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the anterior nares of 20–80% of the human population. The relationship between host and microbe appears particularly individualized and colonization status seems somehow predetermined. After decolonization, persistent carriers often become re-colonized with their prior S. aureus strain, whereas non-carriers resist experimental colonization. Efforts to identify factors facilitating colonization have thus far largely focused on the microorganism rather than on the human host. The host responds to S. aureus nasal colonization via local expression of anti-microbial peptides, lipids, and cytokines. Interplay with the co-existing microbiota also influences colonization and immune regulation. Transient or persistent S. aureus colonization induces specific systemic immune responses. Humoral responses are the most studied of these and little is known of cellular responses induced by colonization. Intriguingly, colonized patients who develop bacteremia may have a lower S. aureus-attributable mortality than their non-colonized counterparts. This could imply a staphylococcal-specific immune “priming” or immunomodulation occurring as a consequence of colonization and impacting on the outcome of infection. This has yet to be fully explored. An effective vaccine remains elusive. Anti-S. aureus vaccine strategies may need to drive both humoral and cellular immune responses to confer efficient protection. Understanding the influence of colonization on adaptive response is essential to intelligent vaccine design, and may determine the efficacy of vaccine-mediated immunity. Clinical trials should consider colonization status and the resulting impact of this on individual patient responses. We urgently need an increased appreciation of colonization and its modulation of host immunity. PMID:24409186

  19. Postoperative bacteremia in periodontal flap surgery, with and without prophylactic antibiotic administration: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asi Kanwarjit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Many a times in clinical periodontology, the decision whether to prescribe prophylactic antibiotics or not , is perplexing.The present study was conducted to compare the bacteremias induced after periodontal flap surgeries with and without prophylactic antibiotics. Materials and Methods: The occurrence of postoperative bacteremia following periodontal flap surgery was studied in 30 patients. On these patients, 30 quadrant wise flap surgeries were carried out without any preoperative prophylactic antibiotics and 30 surgeries carried out after prophylactic administration of amoxycillin preoperatively. A blood sample was taken from each patient at the time of maximum surgical trauma and was cultured for micro-organisms and antibiotic sensitivity. Results: 18 out of 60 blood samples were positive for micro-organisms. There was a significant reduction in post operative bacteremia after amoxycillin prophylaxis (x - 7.96 with P< 0.01 as post operative bacteremia was found in 14 of the non medicated patients as compared to only 4 of the pre medicated patients. The micro-organisms encountered in the study are as follows:- 1 Staphylococcus albus coagulase negative, 2 Klebsiella, 3 Psedomonas aerugenosa, 4 Streptococcus viridans, 5 Alpha hemolytic streptococcus, 6 Neisseria catarrhalis Conclusion: On the basis of the study, it is concluded that the incidence of postoperative bacteremia following periodontal flap surgery is not as high as previously reported. The clinical results show that Amoxicillin is highly effective in reducing postoperative bacteremia in periodontal flap surgery and thus in preventing the possible sequelae (Infective Endocarditis and other systemic maladies in susceptible patients. However, cefotaxime and cephalexin may prove to be more effective in preventing the same.

  20. Clinical Pharmacist Management of Bacteremia in a Community Hospital Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, C Dustin; Bitton, Bryce J; Torosyan, Annie; Myers, Kevin P

    2017-06-01

    Bacteremia is a serious condition that leads to high morbidity and mortality. Data describing pharmacist involvement in the management of bacteremia in the emergency department are lacking. To determine if pharmacist involvement in the management of bacteremia in the emergency department (ED) led to an increase in appropriate treatment of bacteremia as well as improvements in patient outcomes. The primary outcome of this retrospective cohort study was the rate of appropriate treatment of bacteremia. Secondary outcomes included the rate of unplanned, infectious disease-related 90-day admission or readmission to the ED or hospital as well as infectious disease-related 90-day mortality. All patients seen in the ED and subsequently discharged who had a positive blood culture determined not to be a contaminant were included in the study. Patients were analyzed in 2 cohorts: those that were physician managed (107 patients) and those that were pharmacist managed (138 patients). In the physician-managed cohort, 50 of 107 (47%) patients were treated appropriately compared with 131 of 138 (95%) patients in the pharmacist-managed cohort ( P managed patients, which occurred in 4 of 138 patients (2.9%) versus the physician-managed patient cohort in which 13 of 107 patients (12.1%) were readmitted ( P = 0.01). There was no difference in mortality between the groups ( P = 0.8337). Pharmacist involvement in the management of bacteremia in the ED was associated with higher rates of appropriate treatment and a corresponding decrease in the rates of attributable 90-day admission or readmission to the hospital or ED.

  1. Clinical features of children with nontyphoidal Salmonella bacteremia: A single institution survey in rural Japan.

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    Yoshihiro Aoki

    Full Text Available Nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS can cause bacterial enterocolitis. Although some children with NTS infection develop bacteremia, its clinical manifestations have not been discussed adequately. Therefore, we examined children with NTS bacteremia. We retrospectively examined the medical records of 15 patients aged less than 15 years. Salmonella spp. were detected in the blood cultures of these patients between 1991 and 2014. We divided an additional sample group of 34 patients diagnosed with an NTS infection between 2005 and 2014, into 2 groups. Group bacteremia (B included patients in whose blood cultures Salmonella spp. were detected, and group non-bacteremia (NB included patients in whom Salmonella infection was not detected. We compared each group using Wilcoxon test and Fisher's exact test. The number of patients with fever, diarrhea, or abdominal pain was 15 (100%, 13 (87%, and 9 (60%, respectively, in the first sample of patients. However, vomiting and bloody stool were observed in only 5 patients (33%. More than 70% of patients exhibited a reduced white blood cell count, while C-reactive protein levels were variable in the patients. Salmonella spp. were detected via stool culture in 10 patients (67%. Diarrhea persisted for more than 4 days more frequently in group B than group NB (p = 0.004. The number of patients whose fever persisted for more than 4 days was significantly higher in group B than group NB (p = 0.030. Therefore, if NTS bacteremia is suspected, blood cultures should be collected and antibiotics should be initiated in cases with diarrhea or fever for more than 4 days. Furthermore, a negative stool culture result does not preclude the possibility of NTS bacteremia.

  2. Bacteremia caused by antimicrobial resistant Campylobacter species at a medical center in Taiwan, 1998-2008.

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    Liao, Chun-Hsing; Chuang, Chia-Yunn; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Lee, Ping-Ing; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-11-01

    This study was intended to delineate the clinical and microbiological characteristics of patients with bacteremia caused by Campylobacter species. Twenty-four patients with Campylobacter bacteremia were treated at the National Taiwan University Hospital from 1998 to 2008. All isolates from the 24 patients were confirmed to the species level by multiplex PCR (cadF, hipO and asp gene) and 16S RNA gene sequencing. Bacteremia was caused by Campylobacter coli in 15 (62.5%) patients, Campylobacter fetus in 6 (25%), and Campylobacter jejuni in 3 (12.5%). Of the 24 patients, 16 were male. The major underlying conditions included chronic renal insufficiency (41.7%), liver cirrhosis (37.5%), malignancy (33.3%), and previous abdominal surgery (33.3%). The most common infections were intra-abdominal infection (54.2%), followed by primary bacteremia (41.7%), and cellulitis (4.2%). The mean Pittsburgh bacteremia score was 2.5 (range, 0-9). During the bacteremic episodes, six (25%) patients developed septic shock. Third-generation cephalosporins were administered to 12 (50%) patients as empirical therapy. All-cause mortality was 4.2% at 14 days and 12.5% at 30 days. The majority of the isolates were resistant to third-generation cephalosporins and quinolones, with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC(90)) values of 32 mg/L for cefotaxime, 128 mg/L for ceftriaxone, and 32 mg/L for both ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. All isolates possessed a parC mutation (Arg-139-Gln) and 15 exhibited an additional gyrA mutation (Thr-86-Ile). Among these isolates, 20.8% were susceptible to erythromycin (MIC≤0.5 mg/L). Bacteremia caused by antimicrobial resistant Campylobacter species is alarming although the mortality rate is low. Copyright © 2012 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical manifestations of bacteremia caused by Aeromonas species in southern Taiwan.

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    Hung-Jen Tang

    Full Text Available This study is conducted to investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with bacteremia caused by Aeromonas species.Patients with bacteremia caused by Aeromonas species during the period 2009 to 2013 were identified from a computerized database of a regional hospital in southern Taiwan. The medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed.A total of 91 patients with bacteremia due to Aeromonas species were identified. In addition to 16 (17.6% primary bacteremia, the most common source of secondary infection is peritonitis (n = 27, 29.7%, followed by biliary tract infection (n = 18, 19.8%, and SSTI (n = 12, 13.2%, pneumonia (n = 9, 9.9%, catheter-related bloodstream infection (n =  5, 5.5%, and genitourinary tract infection (n = 4, 4.4%. A. hydrophila (n = 35, 38.5% was the most common pathogen, followed by A. veronii biovar sobria (n = 31, 34.1%, A. caviae (n = 14, 15.4%, and A. veronii biovar veronii (n = 9, 9.9%. Forty-three (47.3% patients were classified as healthcare-associated infections (HCAI causes by Aeromonas species, and patients with HCAI were more likely to have cancer, and receive immunosuppressant than patients with community-acquired bacteremia. The overall outcomes, including rate of ICU admission, acute respiratory failure, and mortality were 33.3%, 28.6%, and 23.1%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that the in-hospital day mortality was significantly associated only with underlying cancer (P <.001, and initial shock (P <.001.Aeromonas species should be considered one of the causative pathogens of healthcare-associated bacteremia, especially in immunocompromised patients. In addition, it can be associated with high fatality. Cancer and initial shock were the poor prognostic factors.

  4. Carbapenems and piperacillin/tazobactam for the treatment of bacteremia caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Proteus mirabilis.

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    Tsai, Hsih-Yeh; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Tang, Hung-Jen; Huang, Chi-Chang; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Chu, Fang-Yeh; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Ko, Wen-Chien; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2014-11-01

    This study was intended to delineate the role of carbapenems and piperacillin/tazobactam in treating bacteremia caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Proteus mirabilis. We performed a multicenter and retrospective study of the patients with ESBL-producing P. mirabilis bacteremia. The outcomes of the patients treated by piperacillin/tazobactam or a carbapenem for at least 48 hours and the MICs of the prescribed drugs for these isolates were analyzed. Forty-seven patients with available clinical data were included. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 29.8%. All available isolates (n = 44) were susceptible to ertapenem, meropenem, and doripenem, and 95.6% were susceptible to piperacillin/tazobactam; however, only 11.4% of the isolates were susceptible to imipenem. Among the 3 patients infected with isolates exhibiting non-susceptibility to imipenem (MIC ≥2 mg/L) who were treated with imipenem, none died within 28 days. The 30-day (14.3% versus 23.1%, P = 0.65) or in-hospital (19.1% versus 30.8%, P = 0.68) mortality rate of 21 patients treated by a carbapenem was lower than that of 13 treated by piperacillin/tazobactam. However, among those treated by piperacillin/tazobactam, the mortality rate of those infected by the isolates with lower piperacillin/tazobactam MICs (≤0.5/4 mg/L) was lower than that of the isolates with MICs of ≥1/4 mg/L (0%, 0/7 versus 60%, 3/5; P = 0.045). ESBL-producing P. mirabilis bacteremia is associated with significant mortality, and carbapenem therapy could be regarded as the drugs of choice. The role of piperacillin/tazobactam, especially for the infections due to the isolates with an MIC ≤0.5/4 mg/L, warrants more clinical studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Risk factors for mortality of nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream infection: with investigation of the potential role of community-associated MRSA strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jann-Tay; Wang, Jiun-Ling; Fang, Chi-Tai; Chie, Wei-Chu; Lai, Mei-Shu; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling; Weng, Chia-Min; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2010-12-01

    The difference in the outcomes of nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI) caused by community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strains and healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) strains remains unclear. From January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2008, all adult patients hospitalized at National Taiwan University Hospital with nosocomial MRSA BSI were analyzed. Available MRSA isolates were submitted for subsequent microbiologic studies to determine whether they belonged to CA-MRSA strains. In total, 308 patients were enrolled and 253 MRSA isolates were available. Forty-seven isolates belonged to CA-MRSA strains. The all-cause mortality rates on Day 14 and Day 30 were 19.8% and 30.5%, respectively, and were not different between those caused by CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA strains. The independent risk factors for Day 14 mortality were septic shock, thrombocytopenia, and an inadequate serum trough level of vancomycin (p = nosocomial MRSA BSI were not different between that caused by CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA strains. Copyright © 2010 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Leg ulcer and osteomyelitis due to methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus infection after fracture repair treatment: a case highlighting the potential role of prostaglandin E₁ vasodilator.

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    Bentivegna, Erminia; Citarrella, Emanuele; Vivaldi, Roberto; De Luca, Dario; Maira, Giovanna Grazia; Casuccio, Alessandra; Di Carlo, Paola

    2015-03-01

    Prostaglandins appear to reduce biofilm formation and chronicization of infections, and stimulate a rapid and effective clearance of infecting micro-organisms. We report a case of recovery from methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) osteomyelitis after multidisciplinary management with antibiotics, anti-thrombotics and prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) vasodilator, in a patient with tibial plateau fracture repaired with internal fixation devices. A 47-year-old HIV-negative male with chronic ulcer on the proximal third of the left leg was admitted to the Orthopaedic Unit of the Orestano Clinic in Palermo, Italy, for suspected osteomyelitis. A biopsy of the skin ulcer and blood cultures were performed and resulted positive for MSSA. Labelled leukocyte scintigraphy confirmed osteomyelitis. No clinical improvement was observed after combined antibiotic treatment with rifampicin plus trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The patient underwent a 4-day therapeutic cycle: PGE1 (alprostadil 60 mg/day IV) combined with nadroparin calcium plus gentamicin, followed by treatment with aminaftone plus sulodexide plus levofloxacin. At discharge, the patient's painful symptoms had completely resolved and the ulcer had cicatrized; recovery from osteomyelitis was confirmed by scintigraphy. This treatment protocol including PGE1 may result in a significant improvement in quality of life and functional status of patients with a reduction in direct and indirect costs and economic benefit for the National Health Service.

  7. SarA is a repressor of hla (alpha-hemolysin) transcription in Staphylococcus aureus: its apparent role as an activator of hla in the prototype strain NCTC 8325 depends on reduced expression of sarS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscarsson, Jan; Kanth, Anna; Tegmark-Wisell, Karin; Arvidson, Staffan

    2006-12-01

    In most Staphylococcus aureus strains, inactivation of sarA increases hla transcription, indicating that sarA is a repressor. However, in S. aureus NCTC 8325 and its derivatives, used for most studies of hla regulation, inactivation of sarA resulted in decreased hla transcription. The disparate phenotype of strain NCTC 8325 seems to be associated with its rsbU mutation, which leads to sigma(B) deficiency. This has now been verified by the demonstration that sarA repressed hla transcription in an rsbU+ derivative of strain 8325-4 (SH1000). That sarA could act as a repressor of hla in an 8325-4 background was confirmed by the observation that inactivation of sarA in an agr sarS rot triple mutant dramatically increased hla transcription to wild-type levels. However, the apparent role of sarA as an activator of hla in 8325-4 was not a result of the rsbU mutation alone, as inactivation of sarA in another rsbU mutant, strain V8, led to increased hla transcription. Northern blot analysis revealed much higher levels of sarS mRNA in strain V8 than in 8325-4, which was likely due to the mutation in the sarS activator, tcaR, in 8325-4, which was not found in strain V8. On the other hand, the relative increase in sarS transcription upon the inactivation of sarA was 15-fold higher in 8325-4 than in strain V8. Because of this, inactivation of sarA in 8325-4 means a net increase in repressor activity, whereas in strain V8, inactivation of sarA means a net decrease in repressor activity and, therefore, enhanced hla transcription.

  8. Successful treatment of refractory listeria meningitis and bacteremia with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in an immunocompetent child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Meltem; Kara, Soner Sertan; Tapısız, Anıl; Derinöz, Okşan; Çağlar, Kayhan; Tezer, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important cause of life-threatening bacteremia and meningoencephalitis in neonates, pregnant women, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. However, it is an uncommon cause of illness in immunocompetent children beyond the neonatal period. Ampicillin with or without an aminoglycoside remains the best treatment for listeriosis. Here, we report a rare case of Listeria meningitis and bacteremia in a 7-month-old immunocompetent girl, which was refractory to ampicillin plus gentamicin treatment and successfully treated by the addition of TMP/SMX.

  9. Successful Treatment of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia

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    Fatma Deniz Aygun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus can cause serious, life-threatening, systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. The ability of microorganism to form biofilm on biomedical devices can be responsible for catheter-related bloodstream infections. Other manifestations of severe disease are meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections. The most common feature in true bacteremia caused by Bacillus is the presence of an intravascular catheter. Herein, we report a case of catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with propionic acidemia.

  10. Successful Treatment of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aygun, Fatma Deniz; Aygun, Fatih; Cam, Halit

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious, life-threatening, systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. The ability of microorganism to form biofilm on biomedical devices can be responsible for catheter-related bloodstream infections. Other manifestations of severe disease are meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections. The most common feature in true bacteremia caused by Bacillus is the presence of an intravascular catheter. Herein, we report a case of catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with propionic acidemia.

  11. The effect of S. pneumoniae bacteremia on cerebral blood flow autoregulation in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael; Brandt, Christian T.; Knudsen, Gitte Moos

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, we studied the effect of bacteremia on cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation in a rat model of pneumococcal bacteremia and meningitis. Anesthetized rats were divided into five groups (A to E) and inoculated with pneumococci intravenously and normal saline intracisternally......); or saline intravenously and saline intracisternally (group E, N=10), respectively. Positive cultures occurred in the blood for all rats in groups A, B, and C, and in the cerebrospinal fluid for all rats in groups D and E. Twenty-four hours after inoculation, CBF was measured with laser-Doppler ultrasound...

  12. A case of disseminated intravascular coagulation secondary to Acinetobacter lwoffii and Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia

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    Candice Baldeo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteremia is currently one of the infections with the highest mortality in hospitals [1]. Acinetobacter lwoffii and Acinetobacter baumannii are gram-negative bacteria and both represent opportunistic pathogens. In certain cases, the management can be challenging since these organisms can be highly resistant to antimicrobial agents. Clinical illnesses associated with Acinetobacter include pneumonia, meningitis, peritonitis, endocarditis and infections of the urinary tract and skin [1]. Acinetobacter bacteremia represents a serious and ever increasing problem because of the high associated morbidity and mortality.

  13. Can Levofloxacin Be a Useful Alternative to Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole for Treating Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Bacteremia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sun Young; Kim, Jungok; Ha, Young Eun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Lee, Nam Yong; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of levofloxacin in the treatment of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia. The 30-day mortality rates were similar between the trimerthoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) and levofloxacin treatment groups. Adverse events related to antibiotics occurred more frequently in patients receiving TMP-SMX, and recurrent bacteremia due to levofloxacin-resistant S. maltophilia strains developed in patients treated with levofloxacin. Our data suggest that levofloxacin can be a useful alternative option for treating S. maltophilia infections. PMID:24126583

  14. Brevundimonas vesicularis bacteremia: A rare case report in a female infant

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    S M Bhatawadekar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Brevundimonas vesicularis has rarely been isolated from clinical specimens. We report here a case of B. vesicularis bacteremia in a female infant who presented with fever, vomiting and altered sensorium. USG abdomen showed mild hepatomegaly, moderate ascitis with bilateral mild basal pleural effusion. Blood culture was processed by BACTEC BD. Isolate was identified as B. vesicularis, by API ID 32 GN automated system. We have come across only one report of neonatal sepsis caused by B. vesicularis from India. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the rare case reports of B. vesicularis bacteremia in a female infant.

  15. Chorioamnionitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus with intact membranes in a term pregnancy: A case of maternal and fetal septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorano, Sumire; Goto, Maki; Matsuoka, Sakiko; Tohyama, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Nakamura, Sumie; Fukami, Tatsuya; Matsuoka, Ryoei; Tsujioka, Hiroshi; Eguchi, Fuyuki

    2016-04-01

    Chorioamnionitis is usually caused by migration of cervicovaginal flora through the cervical canal in women with ruptured membranes. Common causative pathogens are genital mycoplasmas, anaerobes, enteric gram-negative bacilli, and group B streptococcus. There have been only seven previous reports of chorioamnionitis due to Staphylococcus aureus and their clinical courses are characterized by rapid disease progression and poor prognosis. This case report describes a case of acute chorioamnionitis due to S. aureus, which was successfully managed with immediate cesarean section and postoperative intensive care. A 22-year-old woman presented at 39 weeks' gestation with a fever and acute lower abdominal pain. Fetal heart monitoring showed fetal distress. Immediate cesarean delivery was performed under general anesthesia. A male infant weighing 2450 g was born. He had Apgar scores of 3 and 7 at 1 and 5 min, respectively. He was immediately intubated and admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. Maternal blood culture, vaginal culture, neonatal nares, and blood and gastric fluid culture all showed methicillin-sensitive S. aureus. Histopathology of the placenta demonstrated focal acute funisitis and acute chorioamnionitis. Interestingly, most of the patients in the previous reports developed chorioamnionitis due to S. aureus despite the presence of intact membranes, as in our case. Bacterial spread in the absence of membrane rupture and the presence of bacteremia suggests hematogenous, rather than ascending, etiology of S. aureus chorioamnionitis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. An affinity adsorption media that mimics heparan sulfate proteoglycans for the treatment of drug-resistant bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrea, Keith R.; Ward, Robert S.

    2016-06-01

    Removal of several drug-resistant bacteria from blood by affinity adsorption onto a heparin-functional media is reported. Heparin is a chemical analogue of heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans, found on transmembrane proteins of endothelial cells. Many blood-borne human pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi have been reported to target HS as an initial step in their pathogenesis. Here, we demonstrate the binding and removal of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Extended-Spectrum Betalactamase Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL), and two Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (both CRE Escherichia coli and CRE K. pneumoniae) using 300 μm polyethylene beads surface modified with end-point-attached heparin. Depending on the specific bacteria, the amount removed ranged between 39% (ESBL) and 99.9% (CRE). The total amount of bacteria adsorbed ranged between 2.8 × 105 and 8.6 × 105 colony forming units (CFU) per gram of adsorption media. Based on a polymicrobial challenge which showed no competitive binding, MRSA and CRE apparently utilize different binding sequences on the immobilized heparin ligand. Since the total circulating bacterial load during bacteremia seldom exceeds 5 × 105 CFUs, it appears possible to significantly reduce bacterial concentration in infected patients by multi-pass recirculation of their blood through a small extracorporeal affinity filter containing the heparin-functional adsorption media. This 'dialysis-like therapy' is expected to improve patient outcomes and reduce the cost of care, particularly when there are no anti-infective drugs available to treat the infection.

  17. Epidemiology, microbiology and mortality associated with community-acquired bacteremia in northeast Thailand: a multicenter surveillance study.

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    Manas Kanoksil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: National statistics in developing countries are likely to underestimate deaths due to bacterial infections. Here, we calculated mortality associated with community-acquired bacteremia (CAB in a developing country using routinely available databases. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Information was obtained from the microbiology and hospital database of 10 provincial hospitals in northeast Thailand, and compared with the national death registry from the Ministry of Interior, Thailand for the period between 2004 and 2010. CAB was defined in patients who had pathogenic organisms isolated from blood taken within 2 days of hospital admission without a prior inpatient episode in the preceding 30 days. A total of 15,251 CAB patients identified, of which 5,722 (37.5% died within 30 days of admission. The incidence rate of CAB between 2004 and 2010 increased from 16.7 to 38.1 per 100,000 people per year, and the mortality rate associated with CAB increased from 6.9 to 13.7 per 100,000 people per year. In 2010, the mortality rate associated with CAB was lower than that from respiratory tract infection, but higher than HIV disease or tuberculosis. The most common causes of CAB were Escherichia coli (23.1%, Burkholderia pseudomallei (19.3%, and Staphylococcus aureus (8.2%. There was an increase in the proportion of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases (ESBL producing E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae over time. CONCLUSIONS: This study has demonstrated that national statistics on causes of death in developing countries could be improved by integrating information from readily available databases. CAB is neglected as an important cause of death, and specific prevention and intervention is urgently required to reduce its incidence and mortality.

  18. Long-term mortality and causes of death associated with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotland, N; Uhre, M L; Mejer, N

    2016-01-01

    decreased gradually by 38% from 1992-1995 to 2012-2014. Compared to controls, SAB patients were more likely to die from congenital malformation, musculoskeletal/skin disease, digestive system disease, genitourinary disease, infectious disease, endocrine disease, injury and cancer and less likely to die from...... respiratory disease, nervous system disease, unknown causes, psychiatric disorders, cardiovascular disease and senility. Over time, rates of death decreased or were stable for all disease categories except for musculoskeletal and skin disease where a trend towards an increase was seen. CONCLUSION: Long...

  19. Increased Age-Dependent Risk of Death Associated With lukF-PV-Positive Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Trine A; Skov, Robert; Petersen, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    -based nationwide observational cohort study. lukF-PV was detected by polymerase chain reaction. Factors associated with the presence of lukF-PV were assessed by logistic regression analysis. Adjusted 30-day hazard ratios of mortality associated with lukF-PV status were computed by Cox proportional hazards...... was comparable to SAB. However, lukF-PV-positive SAB nonsurvivors were significantly older and had more comorbidity. Consequently, by adjusted analysis, the risk of 30-day mortality was increased by 70% for lukF-PV-positive SAB compared with SAB (hazard ratio, 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.20-2.42; P = .003......). CONCLUSIONS: lukF-PV-positive SAB is rare in Denmark but associated with a significantly increased risk of mortality. Although the risk of lukF-PV-positive SAB was highest in the younger age groups, >80% of deaths associated with lukF-PV-positive SAB occurred in individuals older than 55 years....

  20. Azoreductase in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wen; Cerniglia, Carl E; Chen, Huizhong

    2009-01-01

    Azoreductase(s) catalyze a NAD(P)H-dependent reaction in bacteria to metabolize azo dyes to colorless aromatic amines. Azoreductases from bacteria represent a novel family of enzymes with little similarity to other reductases. This unit will describe the current methods for measuring azoreductase from Staphylococcus aureus, which has been suggested to serve as a model strain to study the azo dye degradation by human skin microflora.

  1. Clinical features, risk factors and outcomes of bacteremia due to enterococci with high-level gentamicin resistance: comparison with bacteremia due to enterococci without high-level gentamicin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hee-Chang; Lee, Shinwon; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Jeon, Jae Hyun; Park, Wan Beom; Park, Sang-Won; Kim, Hong Bin; Kim, Nam Joong; Kim, Eui-Chong; Oh, Myoung-Don; Choe, Kang Won

    2010-01-01

    High-level gentamicin resistance (HLGR) in enterococci has increased since the 1980s, but the clinical significance of the resistance and its impact on outcome have not been established. One hundred and thirty-six patients with bacteremia caused by enterococci with HLGR (HLGR group) were compared with 79 patients with bacteremia caused by enterococci without HLGR (non-HLGR group). Hematologic malignancy, neutropenia, Enterococcus faecium infection, nosocomial infection and monomicrobial bacteremia were more common in the HLGR group than the non-HLGR group, and APACHE II scores were also higher (P<0.05, in each case). Neutropenia, monomicrobial infection, stay in intensive care at culture, and use of 3rd generation cephalosporin, were independent risk factors for acquisition of HLGR enterococcal bacteremia. Fourteen-day and 30-day mortalities were higher in the HLGR group than the non-HLGR group in univariate analysis (37% vs. 15%, P=0.001; 50% vs. 22%, P<0.001). However, HLGR was not an independent risk factor for mortality due to enterococcal bacteremia in multivariate analysis. Therefore, HLGR enterococcal bacteremia is associated with more severe comorbid conditions and higher mortality than non-HLGR enterococcal bacteremia but the HLGR itself does not contribute significantly to mortality.

  2. Magnitude of enterococcal bacteremia in trauma patients admitted for intensive trauma care: A tertiary care experience from South Asian country

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    Nonika Rajkumari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bloodstream infection (BSI and bacteremias due to Enterococcus spp. are increasing worldwide with the current need to understand its causes among hospitalized trauma patients. Hence, the study was conducted. Methodology: A 3-year retrospective laboratory cum clinical based study was performed at a level I trauma center in India. Patients with health care associated enterococcal bacteremia were identified using the hospital database, their episodes of BSI/bacteremia calculated and their clinical records and treatment were noted. Results: A total of 104 nonrepetitive Enterococcus spp. was isolated of which Enterococcus faecium was the most common (52%. High-level resistance to gentamicin high-level aminoglycoside resistance was seen in all the Enterococcus spp. causing bacteremia, whereas a low resistance to vancomycin and teichoplanin was observed. Overall mortality was more in patients infected with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (5/11, 46% compared to those with vancomycin sensitive Enterococcus (9/93, 10%; though no significant association of mortality with Enterococcus spp. bacteremia ( P > 0.05 was seen. The rate of bacteremia due to Enterococcus spp. was 25.4 episodes/1,000 admissions (104/4,094 during the study period. Conclusion: Enterococcal bacteremia is much prevalent in trauma care facilities. Here, a microbiologist can act as a sentinel and help in preventing such infections.

  3. Does the empiric use of vancomycin in pediatrics increase the risk for Gram-negative bacteremia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuno, SPMU; Heesen, GJM; Arends, JP; Kimpen, JLL; van Houten, M.A.

    Background, Gram-negative bacteremia in children, a major cause of morbidity and mortality, may in part be induced by intensive treatment procedures and nonspecific use of antibiotics. Our primary objective was to study the causal relationship between the use of vancomycin and Gram-negative

  4. Bordetella trematum bacteremia in an infant: a cause to look for.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksena, R; Manchanda, V; Mittal, M

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella trematum spp. nov. has been isolated from wounds, ear infections and diabetic ulcers. We report a case of a 7-month-old infant with fever, vomiting and abnormal body movements with bacteremia caused by this novel species. The infant responded to fluoroquinolone and macrolide combination therapy.

  5. Investigation of bacteremia induced by removal of orthodontic mini-implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Livas, Christos; Delli, Konstantina; Karapsias, Stergios; Pandis, Nikolaos; Ren, Yijin

    The aim of this study was to investigate potential occurrence of bacteremia in orthodontic patients after removal of miniscrews.The study group comprised 30 healthy subjects (17 males, 13 females) with a mean age of 24.1 years treated with self-ligating fixed appliances and mini-implant anchorage.

  6. First clinical description of Eggerthia catenaformis bacteremia in a patient with dental abscess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kordjian, Hayarpi H; Schultz, Joyce D J H; Rosenvinge, Flemming Schønning

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of Eggerthia catenaformis bacteremia originating from a dental abscess and imitating necrotizing fasciitis in a previously healthy adult. The isolates were easily identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The clinical course, surgical and antibiotic treatment as well as the successful outcome...

  7. [Procalcitonin as a predictor of bacteremia in pediatric patients with malignancies and febrile neutropenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyev, D A; Vezirova, Z Sh; Geyusheva, T F

    2015-02-01

    Dynamics of procalcitonin level was studied in 75 pediatric patients, in whom on back- ground of polychemotherapy conduction for oncological disease bacteremia and neutropenia have occurred. Determination of procalcitonin level as a rapidly reacting biomarker of generalized infectious process permits to establish its progression, to con- duct early diagnosis, to perform timely and adequate treatment measures.

  8. Hemolytic uremic syndrome due to Capnocytophaga canimorsus bacteremia after a dog bite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tobe, TJM; Franssen, CFM; Zijlstra, JG; de Jong, PE; Stegeman, CA

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is known to have several causes, including infectious diseases, drugs, pregnancy, and malignant disease. We report a patient who developed acute renal failure attributable to HUS in the course of Capnocytophaga canimorsus bacteremia. Acute tubular necrosis as well

  9. Antimicrobial Resistance in Gram-Negative Rods Causing Bacteremia in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Averbuch, Diana; Tridello, Gloria; Hoek, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Background: This intercontinental study aimed to study gram-negative rod (GNR) resistance in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods: GNR bacteremias occurring during 6 months post-HSCT (February 2014-May 2015) were prospectively collected, and analyzed for rates and risk factors ...

  10. Multidrug-Resistant Bacteroides fragilis Bacteremia in a US Resident: An Emerging Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Merchan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of Bacteroides fragilis bacteremia associated with paraspinal and psoas abscesses in the United States. Resistance to b-lactam/b-lactamase inhibitors, carbapenems, and metronidazole was encountered despite having a recent travel history to India as the only possible risk factor for multidrug resistance. Microbiological cure was achieved with linezolid, moxifloxacin, and cefoxitin.

  11. First case report of bacteremia due to ‘Campylobacter-like organism 3’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itaru Nakamura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of bacteremia caused by a rare Helicobacter species, Campylobacter-like organism 3 (CLO-3, in a 75-year-old man with prostate cancer and an indwelling urethral catheter for urinary retention, is reported. Oral levofloxacin (500 mg per day was effective, although the results of antimicrobial susceptibility testing were unknown. Non-film-like, small, clear colonies were isolated on blood agar after 72 h of microaerobic incubation at 37 °C. Biochemical testing indicated that the isolates were catalase-positive, negative for nitrate reduction and urease activity, and positive for indoxyl acetate hydrolysis. The isolate was identified as CLO-3 by sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA and hsp60 genes. Although CLO-3 is known to cause enterocolitis, bacteremia due to CLO-3 has not been described. There have been an increasing number of reports of bacteremia caused by Helicobacter cinaedi and Helicobacter fennelliae, which were first reported as CLO-1 and CLO-2, and CLO-3 may represent another emerging cause of Helicobacter-induced bacteremia.

  12. First case report of bacteremia due to 'Campylobacter-like organism 3'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Itaru; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Nakagami, Yoshihiro; Tachibana, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    A case of bacteremia caused by a rare Helicobacter species, Campylobacter-like organism 3 (CLO-3), in a 75-year-old man with prostate cancer and an indwelling urethral catheter for urinary retention, is reported. Oral levofloxacin (500mg per day) was effective, although the results of antimicrobial susceptibility testing were unknown. Non-film-like, small, clear colonies were isolated on blood agar after 72h of microaerobic incubation at 37°C. Biochemical testing indicated that the isolates were catalase-positive, negative for nitrate reduction and urease activity, and positive for indoxyl acetate hydrolysis. The isolate was identified as CLO-3 by sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA and hsp60 genes. Although CLO-3 is known to cause enterocolitis, bacteremia due to CLO-3 has not been described. There have been an increasing number of reports of bacteremia caused by Helicobacter cinaedi and Helicobacter fennelliae, which were first reported as CLO-1 and CLO-2, and CLO-3 may represent another emerging cause of Helicobacter-induced bacteremia. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Changing trends in β-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia in Manitoba, Canada: 2007-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ilan Steven; Keynan, Yoav; Gilmour, Matthew W; Dufault, Brenden; Lagacé-Wiens, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    European surveillance studies have reported an increasing incidence of β-hemolytic group G streptococcal bacteremia, but no studies have evaluated trends in β-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia in North America. We reviewed bacteremic episodes and positive throat swab cultures from two tertiary care centers in Manitoba, Canada, from January 2007 to December 2012. During the study period, 19 864 bacteremic episodes, and 9948 positive throat swabs were identified. There were 1025 (5.16%) bacteremic episodes attributable to β-hemolytic streptococci: 425 (2.03%), 339 (1.71%), 62 (0.31%), and 199 (0.95%) to β-hemolytic groups A, B, C, and G streptococci, respectively. From 2007 to 2012, there were significant increases in the proportion of bacteremia attributable to β-hemolytic streptococci in general (6.32% vs. 4.02%; pstreptococcal groups among throat swabs. Bacteremia attributable to β-hemolytic groups G and C streptococci increased in Manitoba, Canada. Further study of the factors underlying these changes is required.

  14. Community-acquired bacteremia and acute cholecystitis due to Enterobacter cloacae: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isasti Guillermo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Enterobacter cloacae is responsible for 65-75% of all Enterobacter infections, bacteremia being the most common syndrome. The majority of infections are nosocomially acquired and in patients with predisposing factors. Case presentation We present a case of E. cloacae bacteremia secondary to acute cholecystitis in a 60-year-old man with recent diagnosis of cholelithiasis. The diagnosis was established with abdominal echography and positive blood and biliary cultures. The patient was managed successfully with cholecystectomy and antibiotic therapy. Conclusion The peculiarity of our case is the development of community-acquired bacteremia due to E. cloacae with a clear infectious focus, as a single agent isolated in several blood cultures, in a patient without severe underlying diseases, prior antimicrobial use or previous hospital admission. Although the majority of Enterobacter spp. infections are nosocomially acquired, primary bacteremia being the most common syndrome, these pathogens may also be responsible for community-acquired cases. Patients without predisposing factors may also be affected.

  15. Clinical importance and cost of bacteremia caused by nosocomial multi drug resistant acinetobacter baumannii

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    Tugba Arslan Gulen

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Our results suggest that the occurrence of MDR A.baumannii bacteremia was related with the usage of the wide spectrum antibiotics, and mortality rates were increased in patients that high SAPS II scores, long term hospitalization. Infection control procedures and limited antibiotic usage are very important for prevent nosocomial infections.

  16. A Retrospective Quality Study of Hemodialysis Catheter-Related Bacteremia in a Danish Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaarup, Sophie; Olesen, Bente; Pourarsalan, Mahshid

    2016-01-01

    and surveillance is a critical aspect of infection control and prevention. Aim: To analyze incidence, causative species, and treatment of HD CRB in adult chronic HD patients at Nordsjaellands Hospital (NOH), Denmark. Methods: All episodes of bacteremia in the Department of Cardiology, Nephrology and Endocrinology...

  17. A Teenager With Sacroileitis, Rash and Fever Caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Navneet K; Craft, David; Crook, Tonya; Dossett, John

    2016-12-01

    We report a rare case of sacroileitis in a teenager resulting from Streptobacillus moniliformis bacteremia, identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight. We discuss the challenges of making this diagnosis and review the literature on rat bite fever.

  18. Catheter-related Mycobacterium abscessus bacteremia manifested with skin nodules, pneumonia, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-Hsin Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although previously rare, catheter-related bloodstream infection caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria is now increasingly encountered, especially among cancer patients who have catheters implanted for chemotherapy treatments. A 73-year-old female patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML had Mycobacterium abscessus bacteremia with manifestations of multiple skin nodules, pneumonia, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy 4 months after the implantation of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC for the delivery of chemotherapy. The catheter-related M. abscessus bacteremia was confirmed by positive blood cultures of specimens drawn from a PICC line and a peripheral vein. She defervesced with the administration of meropenem, amikacin, levofloxacin, clarithromycin, and by the removal of PICC. Her fever subsided for 3 months with the disappearance of skin and lung lesions; however, she died of AML relapse. Bacteremia and skin infection caused by M. abscessus can be detected by culture and pathological examinations and should be considered in leukemia patients with a PICC. With appropriate laboratory diagnosis, M. abscessus bacteremia with disseminated infections can improve with catheter removal and combination antimicrobial therapy.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus and the ecology of the nasal microbiome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cindy M.; Price, Lance B.; Hungate, Bruce A.; Abraham, Alison G.; Larsen, Lisbeth A.; Christensen, Kaare; Stegger, Marc; Skov, Robert; Andersen, Paal Skytt

    2015-01-01

    The human microbiome can play a key role in host susceptibility to pathogens, including in the nasal cavity, a site favored by Staphylococcus aureus. However, what determines our resident nasal microbiota—the host or the environment—and can interactions among nasal bacteria determine S. aureus colonization? Our study of 46 monozygotic and 43 dizygotic twin pairs revealed that nasal microbiota is an environmentally derived trait, but the host’s sex and genetics significantly influence nasal bacterial density. Although specific taxa, including lactic acid bacteria, can determine S. aureus colonization, their negative interactions depend on thresholds of absolute abundance. These findings demonstrate that nasal microbiota is not fixed by host genetics and opens the possibility that nasal microbiota may be manipulated to prevent or eliminate S. aureus colonization. PMID:26601194

  20. Protection of mice against Staphylococcus aureus infection by a recombinant protein ClfA-IsdB-Hlg as a vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfani, Somayeh; Mohabati Mobarez, Ashraf; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Amani, Jafar; Emaneini, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important causes of nosocomial infections. An effective vaccine to prevent S. aureus infections is urgently required due to the dramatic increase in the number of antibiotic-resistant strains. In this report, we evaluated a newly recombinant protein composed of selected antigenic regions of clumping factor A (ClfA), iron surface determinant B (IsdB) and gamma hemolysin B (HlgB) of S. aureus and sequence coding for hydrophobic linkers between three domains. The recombinant gene was constructed in pET-28a (+) and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. In addition, sequence coding for a His(6)-tag was added followed by a hybrid procedure of nickel chelate protein purification. Immunization of BALB/c mice with the recombinant protein ClfA-IsdB-Hlg evoked antigen-specific antibodies that could opsonize S. aureus cells, enhancing in vitro phagocytosis by macrophages. Vaccination with the recombinant protein also reduced the bacterial load recovered from mice spleen samples and increased survival following the intraperitoneal challenge with pathogenic S. aureus compared to the control mice. Our results showed that the recombinant protein ClfA-IsdB-Hlg is a promising vaccine candidate for the prevention of S. aureus bacteremia infections.

  1. Resistance to Antimicrobials Mediated by Efflux Pumps in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sofia S.; Junqueira, Elisabete; Palma, Cláudia; Viveiros, Miguel; Melo-Cristino, José; Amaral, Leonard; Couto, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Resistance mediated by efflux has been recognized in Staphylococcus aureus in the last few decades, although its clinical relevance has only been recognized recently. The existence of only a few studies on the individual and overall contribution of efflux to resistance phenotypes associated with the need of well-established methods to assess efflux activity in clinical isolates contributes greatly to the lack of solid knowledge of this mechanism in S. aureus. This study aims to provide information on approaches useful to the assessment and characterization of efflux activity, as well as contributing to our understanding of the role of efflux to phenotypes of antibiotic resistance and biocide tolerance in S. aureus clinical isolates. The results described show that efflux is an important contributor to fluoroquinolone resistance in S. aureus and suggest it as a major mechanism in the early stages of resistance development. We also show that efflux plays an important role on the reduced susceptibility to biocides in S. aureus, strengthening the importance of this long neglected resistance mechanism to the persistence and proliferation of antibiotic/biocide-resistant S. aureus in the hospital environment. PMID:27029294

  2. Bacteremia due to Streptococcus tigurinus: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Jun; Sakanashi, Daisuke; Hagihara, Mao; Haranaga, Shusaku; Uechi, Kohei; Kato, Hideo; Hamada, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Naoya; Koizumi, Yusuke; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Yamagishi, Yuka; Fujita, Jiro; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-11-01

    Gene sequence analysis methods, including 16S rRNA identification, allows accurate identification of Streptococcus species, which include phenotypically closely related species that are difficult to differentiate using conventional chemical methods. We report a case of bacteremia due to Streptococcus tigurinus, identified by 16S rRNA, in a 72-year-old woman with gastrointestinal cancer and ascites. She was hospitalized to undergo elective tumor-related surgery. Five days prior to undergoing surgery, she developed a fever with no obvious source of infection. Blood cultures identified gram-positive cocci. The patient's bacteremia was initially thought to be caused by an Enterococcus species, given her underlying gastrointestinal disease. However, alpha-hemolytic, mucoid, circular colonies were observed on sheep blood agar the following day. Although matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and biochemical testing suggested Streptococcus pneumoniae, we conducted further investigation to identify the bacterium, as the patient had no symptoms of infections usually related with S. pneumoniae such as pneumonia, meningitis, or sinusitis, and the bacteremia occurred 30 days after hospitalization. Finally, the gram-positive cocci were identified as S. tigurinus, assigned to the Streptococcus mitis group in 2012. Although the origin of infection was unclear, it was suspected that peritonitis or bacterial translocation from the gastrointestinal tract caused the bacteremia. This novel species was recently reported as being extremely pathogenic and different from other Streptococcus species. It has been reported to occur in cases of infectious endocarditis and bacteremia. In this article, we reviewed previous reports of S. tigurinus infection and summarized the clinical and pathogenetic features. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  3. National Automated Surveillance of Hospital-Acquired Bacteremia in Denmark Using a Computer Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbels, Sophie; Nielsen, Jens; Voldstedlund, Marianne; Kristensen, Brian; Schønheyder, Henrik C; Ellermann-Eriksen, Svend; Engberg, Jørgen H; Møller, Jens K; Østergaard, Christian; Mølbak, Kåre

    2017-05-01

    BACKGROUND In 2015, Denmark launched an automated surveillance system for hospital-acquired infections, the Hospital-Acquired Infections Database (HAIBA). OBJECTIVE To describe the algorithm used in HAIBA, to determine its concordance with point prevalence surveys (PPSs), and to present trends for hospital-acquired bacteremia SETTING Private and public hospitals in Denmark METHODS A hospital-acquired bacteremia case was defined as at least 1 positive blood culture with at least 1 pathogen (bacterium or fungus) taken between 48 hours after admission and 48 hours after discharge, using the Danish Microbiology Database and the Danish National Patient Registry. PPSs performed in 2012 and 2013 were used for comparison. RESULTS National trends showed an increase in HA bacteremia cases between 2010 and 2014. Incidence was higher for men than women (9.6 vs 5.4 per 10,000 risk days) and was highest for those aged 61-80 years (9.5 per 10,000 risk days). The median daily prevalence was 3.1% (range, 2.1%-4.7%). Regional incidence varied from 6.1 to 8.1 per 10,000 risk days. The microorganisms identified were typical for HA bacteremia. Comparison of HAIBA with PPS showed a sensitivity of 36% and a specificity of 99%. HAIBA was less sensitive for patients in hematology departments and intensive care units. Excluding these departments improved the sensitivity of HAIBA to 44%. CONCLUSIONS Although the estimated sensitivity of HAIBA compared with PPS is low, a PPS is not a gold standard. Given the many advantages of automated surveillance, HAIBA allows monitoring of HA bacteremia across the healthcare system, supports prioritizing preventive measures, and holds promise for evaluating interventions. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:559-566.

  4. Computed tomography findings associated with bacteremia in adult patients with a urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, T Y; Kim, H R; Hwang, K E; Lee, J-M; Cho, J H; Lee, J H

    2016-11-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI) has rapidly increased recently at acute stage, but the CT findings associated with bacteremia in UTI patients are unknown. 189 UTI patients were enrolled who underwent a CT scan within 24 h after hospital admission. We classified CT findings into eight types: a focal or multifocal wedge-shaped area of hypoperfusion, enlarged kidneys, perinephric fat stranding, ureteritis or pyelitis, complicated renal cyst, renal papillary necrosis, hydronephrosis, and renal and perirenal abscess. A retrospective analysis was conducted to evaluate the CT findings associated with bacteremia. The mean age of these patients was 60 ± 17.2 years, and 93.1 % were women. Concurrent bacteremia was noted in 40.2 % of the patients. Abnormal CT findings were noted in 96.3 % of the patients and 62.4 % had two or more abnormal findings. The most frequent abnormal CT finding was a focal or multifocal wedge-shaped area of hypoperfusion (77.2 %), followed by perinephric fat stranding (29.1 %). Perinephric fat stranding, hydronephrosis, and the presence of two or more abnormal CT findings were significantly associated with bacteremia in patients with community-acquired UTI. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, age [odds ratio (OR) 1.03; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.009-1.062], two or more abnormal CT findings (OR 3.163; 95 % CI 1.334-7.498), and hydronephrosis (OR 13.160; 95 % CI 1.048-165.282) were significantly associated with bacteremia. Physicians should be aware that appropriate early management is necessary to prevent fatality in patients with these CT findings.

  5. Genome-Based Analysis of Enterococcus faecium Bacteremia Associated with Recurrent and Mixed-Strain Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, Kathy E; Gouliouris, Theodore; Parkhill, Julian; Peacock, Sharon J

    2018-03-01

    Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREfm) bloodstream infections are associated with high recurrence rates. This study used genome sequencing to accurately distinguish the frequency of relapse and reinfection in patients with recurrent E. faecium bacteremia and to investigate strain relatedness in patients with apparent VREfm and vancomycin-susceptible E. faecium (VSEfm) mixed infection. A retrospective study was performed at the Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CUH) between November 2006 and December 2012. We analyzed the genomes of 44 E. faecium isolates from 21 patients (26 VREfm isolates from 12 patients with recurrent bacteremia and 18 isolates from 9 patients with putative VREfm/VSEfm mixed infection). Phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility was determined using a Vitek2 instrument. Genomes were compared with those of a further 263 E. faecium isolates associated with bacteremia in patients at CUH over the same time period. Pairwise comparison of core genomes indicated that 10 (71%) episodes of recurrent VREfm bacteremia were due to reinfection with a new strain, with reinfection being more likely with increasing time between the two positive cultures. The majority (78%) of patients with a mixed VREfm and VSEfm infection had unrelated strains. More than half (59%) of study isolates were closely related to another isolate associated with bacteremia from CUH. This included 60% of isolates associated with reinfection, indicating acquisition in the hospital. This study provides the first high-resolution insights into recurrence and mixed infection by E. faecium and demonstrates that reinfection with a new strain, often acquired from the hospital, is a driver of recurrence. Copyright © 2018 Raven et al.

  6. Clinical Characteristics and Low Susceptibility to Daptomycin in Enterococcus faecium Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namikawa, Hiroki; Yamada, Koichi; Shibata, Wataru; Fujimoto, Hiroki; Takizawa, Etsuko; Niki, Makoto; Nakaie, Kiyotaka; Nakamura, Yasutaka; Oinuma, Ken-Ichi; Niki, Mamiko; Takemoto, Yasuhiko; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Shuto, Taichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi

    2017-11-01

    Enterococcus faecium has high levels of resistance to multiple antibiotics, and the mortality due to E. faecium bacteremia is high. Accordingly, E. faecium strains with low susceptibility to daptomycin are a concern in clinical practice. This study assessed the predictive factors and prognosis of patients with bacteremia due to E. faecium as well as the antimicrobial susceptibility, particularly to daptomycin, among E. faecium isolates. The medical records of patients admitted to Osaka City University Hospital with E. faecalis (n = 60) and E. faecium (n = 48) bacteremia between January 2011 and March 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. The E. faecalis group (mean age: 62.0 years) included 22 women, and the E. faecium group (mean age: 59.1 years) included 19 women. Predictive factors for infection, prognosis, and isolate antimicrobial susceptibilities were evaluated. The mean Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score and mortality rate did not differ between the two groups. The independent predictors of E. faecium bacteremia in multivariate analysis included quinolone use (p = 0.025), malignancy (p = 0.021), and prolonged hospitalization (p = 0.016). Cardiovascular disease was associated with a reduced risk of E. faecium bacteremia (p = 0.015). Notably, the percentage of E. faecium isolates with low daptomycin susceptibility was higher than that of E. faecalis (8.5% vs. 0%, p = 0.036). Thus, E. faecium should be considered when administering antibiotic therapy to patients with a history of these predictors. Furthermore, the use of daptomycin should be avoided in case of E. faecium with low susceptibility to daptomycin.

  7. Estudio microbiológico de bacteriemias y fungemias en pacientes en hemodiálisis crónica Microbiologic study of bacteremia and fungemia in chronic hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Zárate

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Las bacteriemias y fungemias constituyen la segunda causa de muerte en pacientes en hemodiálisis crónica (HDC y el conocimiento de su epidemiología es útil para establecer terapias empíricas apropiadas. El objetivo de este estudio fue describir la frecuencia y distribución de microorganismos en bacteriemias y fungemias de 530 pacientes en HDC. Se analizaron 248 series de hemocultivos correspondientes a 114 pacientes con sospecha de bacteriemias. Se obtuvo un 44% de hemocultivos positivos, de los cuales el 71% (n=78, correspondientes a 58 episodios de bacteriemia, fueron considerados clínicamente significativos. El 68% de los aislamientos clínicamente significativos fueron cocos gram-positivos (n=53 y el 22% bacilos gram-negativos (BGN (n=17. Staphylococcus aureus fue el patógeno prevalente con un 23% de meticilina-resistencia. Candida spp. ocupó el cuarto lugar de frecuencia.Bloodstream infections are the second cause of death in patients in chronic hemodialysis (CHD, and the knowledge of the epidemiology is useful to establish proper empiric therapies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and distribution of microorganisms, in bacteremia and fungemia in 530 patients in CHD. Two hundred and forty eight blood culture series from 114 patients with suspected bacteremia were processed; 44% of them were positive from which 71% (n=78 were clinically significative and belonged to 58 patients. Sixty eight percent of these isolates were gram-positive cocci (n:53, and 22% gram-negative rods (n:17. Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent pathogen showing 23% of methicillin-resistance. Candida spp. was the fourth pathogen most common in frequency.

  8. Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection caused by Staphylococcus aureus: microbiology and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Sadoyma

    Full Text Available Although central vascular catheters (CVC are indispensable in modern medicine, they are an important risk factor for primary bacteremias. We examined the incidence and risk factors associated with catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI caused by Staphylococcus aureus in surgical patients. A prospective study was carried out in the Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Uberlândia (HC-UFU from September 2000 to December 2002. The skin insertion site, catheter tip, and blood were microbiologically analyzed. Demographics and risk factors were recorded for each patient, and cultures were identified phenotypically. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent pathogen, with an incidence rate of 4.9 episodes of CR-BSIs per 1,000 catheter/days. Based on logistic regression, the independent risk factors were: colonization on the insertion site =200 colony forming units (CFU/20 cm² (p=0.03; odds ratio (OR =6.89 and catheter tip (p=0.01; OR=7.95. The CR-BSI rate was high; it was mainly associated with S. aureus, and skin colonization at the insertion site and on the catheter tip were important risk factors for CR-BSI.

  9. Global changes in Staphylococcus aureus gene expression in human blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Malachowa

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bloodstream infections worldwide. In the United States, many of these infections are caused by a strain known as USA300. Although progress has been made, our understanding of the S. aureus molecules that promote survival in human blood and ultimately facilitate metastases is incomplete. To that end, we analyzed the USA300 transcriptome during culture in human blood, human serum, and trypticase soy broth (TSB, a standard laboratory culture media. Notably, genes encoding several cytolytic toxins were up-regulated in human blood over time, and hlgA, hlgB, and hlgC (encoding gamma-hemolysin subunits HlgA, HlgB, and HlgC were among the most highly up-regulated genes at all time points. Compared to culture supernatants from a wild-type USA300 strain (LAC, those derived from an isogenic hlgABC-deletion strain (LACΔhlgABC had significantly reduced capacity to form pores in human neutrophils and ultimately cause neutrophil lysis. Moreover, LACΔhlgABC had modestly reduced ability to cause mortality in a mouse bacteremia model. On the other hand, wild-type and LACΔhlgABC strains caused virtually identical abscesses in a mouse skin infection model, and bacterial survival and neutrophil lysis after phagocytosis in vitro was similar between these strains. Comparison of the cytolytic capacity of culture supernatants from wild-type and isogenic deletion strains lacking hlgABC, lukS/F-PV (encoding PVL, and/or lukDE revealed functional redundancy among two-component leukotoxins in vitro. These findings, along with a requirement of specific growth conditions for leukotoxin expression, may explain the apparent limited contribution of any single two-component leukotoxin to USA300 immune evasion and virulence.

  10. Influence of Host Genetics and Environment on Nasal Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in Danish Middle-Aged and Elderly Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Paal Skytt; Pedersen, Jacob Krabbe; Fode, Peder

    2012-01-01

    Background. Nasal carriage is a major risk factor for Staphylococcus aureus infection. Approximately, one-quarter of adults carry S. aureus. However, the role of host genetics on S. aureus nasal carriage is unknown. Methods. Nasal swabs were obtained from a national cohort of middle-aged and elde......Background. Nasal carriage is a major risk factor for Staphylococcus aureus infection. Approximately, one-quarter of adults carry S. aureus. However, the role of host genetics on S. aureus nasal carriage is unknown. Methods. Nasal swabs were obtained from a national cohort of middle...... exhibited only a modest influence on the S. aureus carrier state of middle-aged and elderly individuals....

  11. Orbital Cellulitis with Endogenous Panophthalmitis Caused by Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulakh, Simranjeet; Gopinathan Nair, Akshay; Gandhi, Rahul; H Palkar, Amit; G Trivedi, Mihir; A Potdar, Nayana; A Shinde, Chhaya

    2017-05-24

    Orbital cellulitis along with panophthalmitis is uncommon. The causes are usually trauma-related or endogenous. The prognosis in terms of globe salvage is very poor, with most cases usually requiring enucleation or evisceration of the affected eye. Immunosuppression in some form is usually present, which accounts for the aggressive course of the infection. In this communication, we report on a case in a 25-year-old female, who in the second trimester of pregnancy had developed orbital cellulitis and panophthalmitis caused by methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA), with the primary source of infection being cellulitis on her forearm following intravenous therapy for severe anemia. Despite intensive intravenous and topical antibiotics, she required an evisceration of the eye. However, the pregnancy continued uneventfully with the delivery of a full-term, healthy infant. Bacteremia, although rare in pregnancy, can cause endogenous panophthalmitis and orbital cellulitis, especially in a background of immunosuppresssion.

  12. [Sepsis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: the shadow of a persistent threat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifuentes-Osornio, José; Pérez-Patrigeon, Santiago

    2006-01-01

    Clinical case. This 27 year-old male was referred admitted with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) after heavy consumption of alcohol and sepsis (bacteremia and multilobar pneumonia) due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); he required mechanical ventilation and haemodyalisis, and developed fungemia by fluconazol-resistant Candida albicans. He was treated with caspofungin for 20 days and vancomycin for six weeks, and he was discharged after 51 days of hospitalization. This case shows the painful evolution of a patient admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with MRSA sepsis. According to the National Nosocomial Infections Study (USA), S. aureus is the cause of up to 35% of hospital-acquired pneumonia and bacteremia. Using molecular tools (e.g. pulse gel electrophoresis), different families of MRSA have been well described. Use of i.v. catheters, long-term hospitalization, surgery and previous use of antimicrobials are considered major risk factors for MRSA. In Mexico, Alpuche-Aranda, et al (1986) reported a prevalence of 5% in a pediatric hospital. However, a recent report from the National Resistance Network showed a MRSA prevalence of 36% in 2004. In this institution, we observed a rate of MRSA of 100% in the ICU during 2005. This case shows an episode of SAP after heavy alcohol consumption, complicated with severe infections such as candidemia and MRSA sepsis; fortunately he had a favorable outcome after a multidisciplinary and aggressive approach. This case fulfilled all the risk factors for an MRSA infection, in a setting with a very high rate of methicillin-resistance, which compels the medical community to implement adequate and efficacious epidemiological control measures.

  13. Diosmetin inhibits the expression of alpha-hemolysin in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shui; Zhou, Xuan; Li, Wenhua; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Bing; Li, Gen; Liu, Bowen; Deng, Xuming; Peng, Liping

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant human pathogen that causes a wide range of diseases. Alpha-hemolysin (Hla), a pore-forming cytotoxin that is produced by most S. aureus strains, can cause tissue injury and plays a critical role in the virulence of this pathogen. In the present study, we discovered that diosmetin, a natural flavonoid that occurs primarily in citrus fruits and exhibits little anti-S. aureus activity, could diminish the production of Hla in culture supernatants in a concentration-dependent manner. The analysis of cytotoxicity in the co-culture system of S. aureus and A549 epithelial cells showed that such inhibition confers significant protection against S. aureus-mediated injury. Our results suggested that diosmetin has the potential to be a new anti-virulence drug for S. aureus infection, particularly for the targeting of Hla.

  14. Lymphocytopenia and neutrophil-lymphocyte count ratio predict bacteremia better than conventional infection markers in an emergency care unit

    OpenAIRE

    de Jager, C. P. C.; van Wijk, P.T.I.; Mathoera, R B; de Jongh-Leuvenink, J; van der Poll, T.; Wever, P. C.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Absolute lymphocytopenia has been reported as a predictor of bacteremia in medical emergencies. Likewise, the neutrophil-lymphocyte count ratio (NLCR) has been shown a simple promising method to evaluate systemic inflammation in critically ill patients. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated the ability of conventional infection markers, lymphocyte count and NLCR to predict bacteremia in adult patients admitted to the Emergency Department with suspected community-acquired bactere...

  15. Staphylococcus aureus and the oral cavity: an overlooked source of carriage and infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, M G; Smith, A J; Akram, A N; Jackson, M; Robertson, D; Edwards, G

    2015-01-01

    The role of intraoral Staphylococcus aureus in disease and cross-infection sources is controversial. We present a 10-year retrospective analysis of laboratory data reporting isolation of S aureus from oral and perioral clinical specimens. A review of laboratory records for specimens where S aureus was isolated were collated and analyzed from January 1998-December 2007 at the Oral Microbiology Laboratory, Glasgow Dental Hospital. There were 11,312 specimens submitted to the laboratory over the study time period. S aureus was isolated from 1,986 specimens (18%). Of these, 1,782 (90%) were methicillin-sensitive S aureus (MSSA), and 204 (10%) were methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA). The most common specimen type from which MSSA was isolated was an oral rinse, whereas for MRSA this was a tongue swab. Most of the MRSA isolates were EMRSA-15 or EMRSA-16 lineage. These findings suggest that S aureus continues to be a frequent isolate in the oral cavity and perioral region. The oral cavity should be considered a source of S aureus in terms of cross-infection and dissemination to other body sites. The role of S aureus in the pathogenesis of certain oral diseases should also be considered as part of a differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Avaliação in vitro da atividade antibacteriana da água ozonizada frente ao Staphylococcus aureus In vitro evaluation of the antibacterial activity of ozonized water against Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Engel VELANO

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available O Staphylococcus aureus faz parte da microbiota da pele, mucosas e nasofaringe de várias espécies animais, incluindo o homem, mas também está associado a enfermidades como abscessos, bacteremias, endocardites e osteomielites, além de se mostrar resistente a múltiplas drogas. Este trabalho foi realizado com a finalidade de avaliar o efeito do gás ozônio, dissolvido em água, sobre o S. aureus. Foram preparadas suspensões de S. aureus, com concentrações variando de 10(6 a 10(16 microrganismos/ml. De cada suspensão recém-preparada foi retirado 1 ml e adicionado a 99 ml de água destilada estéril (com ou sem prévia ozonização, em um reator de cristal. Foram preparadas diluições seriadas (1/10 das suspensões testadas e inoculado 0,1 ml de cada suspensão em Tryptic Soy Agar, incubadas a 37ºC por 24 h, quando então se procedeu à contagem das UFC. Os resultados obtidos mostraram que o tempo máximo para a inativação total das bactérias tratadas com água previamente ozonizada (0,6 mg/ml foi de 5’25" e, para a água não previamente ozonizada, foi de 23’45", indicando um efeito antibacteriano mais rápido da água previamente ozonizada, frente ao S. aureus.Staphylococcus aureus belongs to the normal flora of the skin, mucosa and nasopharynx of several animal species, including man, but it is also associated to illnesses such as abscesses, bacteremia, endocarditis and osteomyelitis, besides showing resistance to multiple drugs. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the disinfecting ability of ozone when dissolved in water. Suspensions of Staphylococcus aureus with concentrations varying from 10(6 to 10(16 microorganisms/ml were prepared. One milliliter of each recently prepared suspension was added to 99 ml of distilled water (with or without previous ozonization contained in a crystal reactor. Aliquots of 0.1 ml of this new suspension were taken at various time intervals and, then, serially diluted and inoculated on

  17. Comparative Study of Bacteremias Caused by Enterococcus spp. with and without High-Level Resistance to Gentamicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Granado, Francisco Javier; Cisneros, J. M.; Luque, R.; Torres-Tortosa, M.; Gamboa, F.; Díez, F.; Villanueva, J. L.; Pérez-Cano, R.; Pasquau, J.; Merino, D.; Menchero, A.; Mora, D.; López-Ruz, M. A.; Vergara, A.; Infecciosas, for the Grupo Andaluz Para El Estudio De Las Enfermedades

    1998-01-01

    A prospective, multicenter study was carried out over a period of 10 months. All patients with clinically significant bacteremia caused by Enterococcus spp. were included. The epidemiological, microbiological, clinical, and prognostic features and the relationship of these features to the presence of high-level resistance to gentamicin (HLRG) were studied. Ninety-three patients with enterococcal bacteremia were included, and 31 of these cases were caused by HLRG (33%). The multivariate analysis selected chronic renal failure, intensive care unit stay, previous use of antimicrobial agents, and Enterococcus faecalis species as the independent risk factors that influenced the development of HLRG. The strains with HLRG showed lower levels of susceptibility to penicillin and ciprofloxacin. Clinical features (except for chronic renal failure) were similar in both groups of patients. HLRG did not influence the prognosis for patients with enterococcal bacteremia in terms of either the crude mortality rate (29% for patients with bacteremia caused by enterococci with HLRG and 28% for patients not infected with strains with HLRG) or the hospital stay after the acquisition of enterococcal bacteremia. Hemodynamic compromise, inappropriate antimicrobial therapy, and mechanical ventilation were revealed in the multivariate analysis to be the independent risk factors for mortality. Prolonged hospitalization was associated with the nosocomial acquisition of bacteremia and polymicrobial infections. PMID:9466769

  18. Development of the immune response in pneumonia due to Staphylococcus aureus (part 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Abaturov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, based on the literature sources, the key role of chemokines of CC, CXS families and antimicrobial peptides in the elimination of Staphylococcus aureus is analyzed. The main mechanisms of the anti-staphylococcal activity of catelicidin LL-37 in the development of the immune response in pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus are described in detail.

  19. A combination of ceftaroline and daptomycin has synergistic and bactericidal activity in vitro against daptomycin nonsusceptible methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Iffat; Bulman, Zackery P; Spitznogle, Sarah L; Osorio, Justin E; Reilly, Irene S; Lesse, Alan J; Parameswaran, Ganapathi I; Mergenhagen, Kari A; Tsuji, Brian T

    2017-05-01

    There is an urgent need to optimize therapeutic options in patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia who have failed conventional therapy. Two clinical isolates were obtained from a 68-year-old male with persistent MRSA bacteremia before and after the development of daptomycin nonsusceptibility. The pharmacodynamic activity of monotherapies and combinations of ceftaroline, daptomycin, cefoxitin, nafcillin and vancomycin were evaluated in time-kill experiments versus 10 8 CFU/mL of the pre- and post-daptomycin nonsusceptible MRSA isolates. Cefoxitin, nafcillin and vancomycin alone or in combination with ceftaroline failed to generate prolonged bactericidal activity against the post-daptomycin nonsusceptible isolate whereas a ceftaroline-daptomycin combination resulted in 6, 24 and 48 h log 10 (CFU/mL) reductions of 3.90, 4.40 and 6.32. Population analysis profiles revealed a daptomycin heteroresistant subpopulation of the pre-daptomycin nonsusceptible MRSA isolate that expanded by >10,000× on daptomycin agar containing 2-16 mg/L in the post-daptomycin nonsusceptible isolate. Daptomycin and ceftaroline combinations may be promising against persistent MRSA bacteremia.

  20. [Bacteremia due to Abiotrophia defectiva in a febrile neutropenic pediatric patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopardo, H; Mastroianni, A; Casimir, L

    2007-01-01

    The presence of Granulicatella spp. in bacteremic episodes of neutropenic patients was recently highlighted whereas Abiotrophia defectiva, was only isolated in cases of infectious endocarditis. The aim of this study is to describe a case of A.defectiva bacteremia in a leukemic and febrile (40 degrees C) neutropenic (200 GB/mm3) boy. A.defectiva was only isolated from one of the two processed blood samples. Although the patient was undergoing an episode of varicela which could have accounted as the possible cause of fever, A. defectiva was considered a significant finding because this species is not part of the commensal skin flora. This case suggests that both A. defectiva and Granulicatella spp. should be regarded as possible causes of bacteremia in immunocompromised patients.

  1. Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology of Salmonella Paratyphi A Isolated from Patients with Bacteremia in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherchan, Jatan Bahadur; Morita, Masatomo; Matono, Takashi; Izumiya, Hidemasa; Ohnishi, Makoto; Sherchand, Jeevan B; Tandukar, Sarmila; Laghu, Ujjwal; Nagamatsu, Maki; Kato, Yasuyuki; Ohmagari, Norio; Hayakawa, Kayoko

    2017-12-01

    Little is known about the epidemiology of typhoid and paratyphoid fever in Nepal. We aimed to elucidate the molecular and clinical epidemiology of Salmonella Paratyphi A in Nepal. Isolates were collected from 23 cases of bacteremia due to S. Paratyphi A between December 2014 and October 2015. Thirteen patients (57%) were male, and the median age was 21 years. None of the patients had an underlying chronic disease. All S. Paratyphi A isolates were sensitive to ampicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, ceftriaxone, and chloramphenicol. All isolates were resistant to nalidixic acid and were categorized as intermediately susceptible to levofloxacin. Phylogenetic analysis revealed close relatedness among the isolates, including several clonal groups, suggesting local spread. Patients with bacteremia due to S. Paratyphi A in Kathmandu, Nepal, were relatively young and nondebilitated. Improving control of S. Paratyphi infections should focus on effective infection control measures and selection of empirical therapy based on current resistance patterns.

  2. Macrophage serum markers in pneumococcal bacteremia: Prediction of survival by soluble CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger Jon; K. Moestrup, Søren; Weis, Nina Margrethe

    2006-01-01

    with pneumococcal bacteremia. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. SETTING: Five university hospitals in Denmark. PATIENTS: A total of 133 patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia (positive blood culture) and 133 age- and gender-matched controls. INTERVENTIONS: Samples were collected for biochemical...... analyses at the time of first positive blood culture. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: sCD163 was highly correlated with other macrophage markers and was significantly elevated (median [25-75 percentiles], 4.6 mg/L [2.8-8.9]) compared with healthy controls (2.7 mg/L [2.1-3.3], p ... were observed in patients who needed intensive care (hemodialysis, p = .0011; hypotension, p = .0014; mechanical ventilation, p = .0019). Significantly lower levels of sCD163, ferritin, transcobalamin, and suPAR (but not C-reactive protein) were measured in patients > or =75 yrs. In patients

  3. National Automated Surveillance of Hospital-Acquired Bacteremia in Denmark Using a Computer Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gubbels, Sophie; Nielsen, Jens; Voldstedlund, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Microbiology Database and the Danish National Patient Registry. PPSs performed in 2012 and 2013 were used for comparison. RESULTS National trends showed an increase in HA bacteremia cases between 2010 and 2014. Incidence was higher for men than women (9.6 vs 5.4 per 10,000 risk days) and was highest for those...... aged 61-80 years (9.5 per 10,000 risk days). The median daily prevalence was 3.1% (range, 2.1%-4.7%). Regional incidence varied from 6.1 to 8.1 per 10,000 risk days. The microorganisms identified were typical for HA bacteremia. Comparison of HAIBA with PPS showed a sensitivity of 36% and a specificity...

  4. Long-term Treatment of Teicoplanin for Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Sternal Osteomyelitis with Renal Impairment: A Case of High Teicoplanin Trough Levels Maintained by Therapeutic Drug Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiohira, Hideo; Nakamatsu, Masashi; Kise, Yuya; Higa, Futoshi; Tateyama, Masao; Hokama, Nobuo; Kuniyoshi, Yukio; Ueda, Shinichiro; Nakamura, Katsunori; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Teicoplanin, a glycopeptide antibiotic for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, is recommended for therapeutic drug monitoring during treatment. Maintaining a high trough range of teicoplanin is also recommended for severe infectious disease. However, the optimal dose and interval of treatment for severe renal impairment is unknown. We report a 79-year-old man who received long-term teicoplanin treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia due to postoperative sternal osteomyelitis with renal impairment. Plasma teicoplanin trough levels were maintained at a high range (20-30 μg/mL). Although the patient required long-term teicoplanin treatment, a further decline in renal function was not observed, and blood culture remained negative after the start of treatment. Teicoplanin treatment that is maintained at a high trough level by therapeutic drug monitoring might be beneficial for severe methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection accompanied by renal impairment.

  5. Lactobacillus bacteremia, with special focus on the safety of probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    OpenAIRE

    Salminen, Minna

    2006-01-01

    Lactobacilli are gram positive rods, which belong to normal oropharyngeal, gastrointestinal and urogenital flora. They are widely used in food industry and as food additives. Although their virulence is presumed to be very low, opportunistic bacteremic infections, especially in immunocompromised hosts, have been detected. In the present study, the possible effects of increasing probiotic use of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) on the occurrence of bacteremia due to lactobacilli was evaluated ...

  6. Management of hemodialysis catheter-related bacteremia with an adjunctive antibiotic lock solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnasami, Zipporah; Carlton, Donna; Bimbo, Lisa; Taylor, Maria E; Balkovetz, Daniel F; Barker, Jill; Allon, Michael

    2002-03-01

    Tunneled dialysis catheters are complicated by frequent systemic infections. Standard therapy of catheter-associated bacteremia involves both systemic antibiotics and catheter replacement. Recent data suggest that biofilms in the catheter lumen are responsible for the bacteremia, and that instillation of an antibiotic lock (highly concentrated antibiotic solution) into the catheter lumen after dialysis sessions can eradicate the biofilm. We analyzed prospectively the efficacy of an antibiotic lock protocol, in conjunction with systemic antibiotics, for treatment of patients with dialysis catheter-associated bacteremia without catheter removal. Protocol success was defined as resolution of fever and negative surveillance cultures one week following completion of the protocol. Protocol failure was defined as persistence of fever or surveillance cultures positive for any pathogen. In addition, infection-free catheter survival was compared to that observed in institutional historical control patients treated with catheter replacement. Blood cultures were positive in 98 of 129 of episodes (76%) in which patients dialyzing with a catheter had fever or chills. Protocol success occurred in 40 of 79 infected patients (51%) treated with the antibiotic lock. Protocol failure occurred in 39 cases (49%): 7 had persistent fever, 15 had positive surveillance cultures (9 for Candida and 6 for bacteria), and 17 required catheter removal due to malfunction. Each of the pathogens in the surveillance cultures was different from the original pathogen in that patient. Eight of the 9 secondary Candida infections and all 6 secondary bacterial infections resolved after catheter exchange and specific antimicrobial treatment. Overall catheter survival with the antibiotic lock protocol was similar to that observed among patients managed with catheter replacement (median survival, 64 vs. 54 days, P = 0.24). Use of an antibiotic lock, in conjunction with systemic antibiotic therapy, can

  7. A rare bacteremia caused by Cedecea davisae in patient with chronic renal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Peretz, Avi; Simsolo, Claudia; Farber, Evgeny; Roth, Anna; Brodsky, Diana; Nakhoul, Farid

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Female, 77 Final Diagnosis: Bacteremia Symptoms: Chills ? diarrhea ? fever ? nausea Medication: ? Clinical Procedure: X-Ray ? CBC ? urine and blood cultur Specialty: Infectious diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Cedecea davisae is a gram negative, oxidase negative bacilli that include 5 species. In the medical literature there are very few reports that describe infections caused by different species of the Cedecea genus. Case Report: In this paper we report a fourth case of...

  8. An Unusual Cause of Infective Endocarditis: Proteus mirabilis Bacteremia from an Infected Pressure Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hao Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Proteus species is a common cause of urinary tract and wound infections in humans. We herein present the case of a 71-year-old male who had fever, a new-onset heart murmur, bacteremia, and a vegetation over his native aortic valve in echocardiography. This rare case demonstrated that infective endocarditis could be caused by Proteus mirabilis from an infected pressure ulcer.

  9. Epidemic gram-negative bacteremia in a neonatal intensive care unit in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegues, D A; Arathoon, E G; Samayoa, B; Del Valle, G T; Anderson, R L; Riddle, C F; O'Hara, C M; Miller, J M; Hill, B C; Highsmith, A K

    1994-06-01

    Nosocomial bloodstream infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among neonates. From September 1 through December 5, 1990 (epidemic period), gram-negative bacteremia developed in 26 neonates after their admission to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of Hospital General, a 1000-bed public teaching hospital in Guatemala with a 16-bed NICU. Twenty-three of the 26 patients (88%) died. To determine risk factors for and modes of transmission of gram-negative bacteremia in the NICU, we conducted a cohort study of NICU patients who had at least one blood culture drawn at least 24 hours after admission to the NICU and performed a microbiologic investigation in the NICU. The rate of gram-negative bacteremia was significantly higher among patients born at Hospital General, delivered by cesarian section, and exposed to selected intravenous medications and invasive procedures in the NICU during the 3 days before the referent blood culture was obtained. During the epidemic period, the hospital's chlorinated well-water system malfunctioned; chlorine levels were undetectable and tap water samples contained elevated microbial levels, including total and fecal coliform bacteria. Serratia marcescens was identified in 81% of case-patient blood cultures (13/16) available for testing and from 57% of NICU personnel handwashings (4/7). Most S. marcescens blood isolates were serotype O3:H12 (46%) or O14:H12 (31%) and were resistant to ampicillin (100%) and gentamicin (77%), the antimicrobials used routinely in the NICU. We hypothesize that gram-negative bacteremia occurred after invasive procedures were performed on neonates whose skin became colonized through bathing or from hands of NICU personnel.

  10. Severe Sepsis Secondary to Persistent Lysinibacillus sphaericus, Lysinibacillus fusiformis and Paenibacillus amylolyticus Bacteremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Wenzler

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lysinibacillus and Paenibacillus are pervasive bacteria rarely associated with human disease. Less sophisticated microbiology techniques may frequently incorrectly identify these genera as Bacillus spp., often regarded as environmental contamination. This report describes a case of severe sepsis due to persistent Lysinibacillus and Paenibacillus bacteremia, identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy and 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  11. [Ability of procalcitonin to predict bacteremia in patients with community acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Timón Zapata, Jesús; Laserna Mendieta, Emilio José; Parejo Miguez, Raquel; Flores Chacartegui, Manuel; Gallardo Schall, Pablo

    2014-04-07

    To analyze the usefulness and ability of procalcitonin (PCT) to predict the presence of bacteremia in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) or other bacteria. This is an observational, prospective and descriptive study involving patients who were diagnosed with CAP in our Emergency Department. Data collected included socio-demographic and comorbidity variables, Charlson index, stage in the Pneumonia Severity Index and criteria of severe NAC, microbiologic studies and biomarker determinations (PCT and C reactive protein). The follow-up was carried out during 30 days to calculate the predictive power and the diagnostic performance for bacteremia caused or not by S. pneumoniae. Four hundred and seventy-four patients were finally included in the study. Blood cultures were positive in 85 individuals (17.9%) and S. pneumoniae was identified as the responsible pathogen in 75 of them (88.4%) (in 5 cases together with another agent). The area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve for PCT to predict bacteremia (caused by S. pneumoniae or not) was 0.988 (95% confidence interval 0.908-0.995; P98% and>10, respectively. The most frequently isolated serotypes of S. pneumoniae were 19A, 7F, 1 and 3. The highest mean levels of PCT were found in serotypes 7F, 19A, 3 and 1, which showed statistically significant differences with regard to the others serotypes considered (P=.008). Serotypes associated with the highest percentage of severe sepsis-septic shock, 30-days mortality and multi-lobe or bilateral affection were 3, 1 and 19A; 1, 3 and 19A; and 3, 19A and 6A, respectively. PCT had a remarkable diagnostic ability to discard or suspect bacteremia and to guide the etiology of CAP caused by S. pneumoniae. Serotypes 1, 3, 19A and 7F showed greater frequency, systemic inflammatory response and clinical severity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluating Children with Otitis Media for Bacteremia or Urinary Tract Infection

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    Daniel Yawman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is unclear if clinicians evaluate for concurrent bacteremia or UTI in young patients diagnosed with acute otitis media (AOM. Objectives. To describe how often, and under which circumstances, emergency providers investigate for bacteremia or UTI in 2–36 month olds with AOM. Methods. Cases of AOM were analyzed from the 2001–2004 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS-Emergency Department dataset. Results. AOM was diagnosed in 17% of the 10,847 recorded visits of 2–36 month olds. Of these visits, laboratory testing included: CBC: 7%, Blood culture: 4%, urinalysis or urine culture: 5%, and any of these tests: 9%. Rates of testing for 2–6 month olds with temperature ≥ 38.0 (CBC: 13%, blood culture: 9%, urinalysis or urine culture: 7%, any of the tests: 14% were not significantly different from testing of patients aged 6–12 months, or 12–36 months (all P>.1. Patients with temperature of ≥39.0 were more likely to have all tests, with the exception of urine investigation, than patients with temperature between 38.0 and 38.9. Conclusions. 17% of 2–36 month old patients seen in the emergency department are diagnosed with AOM. Investigating for bacteremia or UTI in these patients is not routine, even in febrile infants.

  13. Beta Lactamase Producing Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia in an Elderly Man with Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens bacteremia is associated with adverse outcomes. Known risk factors include chronic kidney disease, malignancy, diabetes mellitus, and gastrointestinal disease. We present a 74-year-old man admitted with confusion, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Exam revealed tachycardia, hypotension, lethargy, distended abdomen, and cold extremities. He required intubation and aggressive resuscitation for septic shock. Laboratory data showed leukocytosis, metabolic acidosis, acute kidney injury, and elevated lipase. CT scan of abdomen revealed acute pancreatitis and small bowel ileus. He was started on vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam. Initial blood cultures were positive for C. perfringens on day five. Metronidazole and clindamycin were added to the regimen. Repeat CT (day 7 revealed pancreatic necrosis. The patient developed profound circulatory shock requiring multiple vasopressors, renal failure requiring dialysis, and bacteremia with vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Hemodynamic instability precluded surgical intervention and he succumbed to multiorgan failure. Interestingly, our isolate was beta lactamase producing. We review the epidemiology, risk factors, presentation, and management of C. perfringens bacteremia. This case indicates a need for high clinical suspicion for clostridial sepsis and that extended spectrum beta lactam antibiotic coverage may be inadequate and should be supplemented with use of clindamycin or metronidazole if culture is positive, until sensitivities are known.

  14. Yersinia enterocolitica bacteremia and enterocolitis in a previously healthy 20-month-old girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takao; Suzuki, Teruaki; Kawase, Jun; Fukushima, Hiroshi; Nanao, Kenji

    2012-10-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a gram-negative bacillus that can cause illness ranging from a self-limiting enterocolitis to life-threatening bacteremia. Y. enterocolitica biotype 1B, serotype O:8 (1B/O:8), is the most pathogenic of the Yersinia species because of the presence of the high-pathogenicity island and the Yersinia virulence plasmid (pYV). Here, we report a pediatric case of Y. enterocolitica 1B/O:8 bacteremia and enterocolitis. A 20-month-old girl was admitted to hospital with fever,pharyngitis, and abdominal pain on day 2. Blood culture on admission was positive for Y. enterocolitica 1B/O:8. Stool culture on day 5 after cefotaxime treatment was also positive for Y. enterocolitica 1B/O:8, but only after cold enrichment at 4°C for 3 weeks. PCR assays identified the pYV only in stool specimens, indicating that strains from routine blood culture at 37°C lacked the pYV. The present case showed the usefulness of stool culture with cold enrichment and agglutination test for the diagnosis of Y. enterocolitica infection. We would therefore like to emphasize the importance of collection and preservation of stool specimens for the identification of pYV. To our knowledge, this is the first reported pediatric case of Y. enterocolitica 1B/O:8 bacteremia.

  15. [Study of Staphylococcus aureus infections in a general acute care hospital (2002-2013)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togneri, Ana M; Podestá, Laura B; Pérez, Marcela P; Santiso, Gabriela M

    A twelve-year retrospective review of Staphylococcus aureus infections in adult and pediatric patients (AP and PP respectively) assisted in the Hospital Interzonal General de Agudos Evita in Lanús was performed to determine the incidence, foci of infection, the source of infection and to analyze the profile of antimicrobial resistance. An amount of 2125 cases of infection in AP and 361 in PP were documented. The incidence in AP decreased significantly in the last three years (χi2; p<0.05); in PP it increased significantly during the last five years (χ2; p<0.0001). In both populations was detected a notable increase in skin infections and associated structures (PEA) in bacteremia to the starting point of a focus on PEA, and in total S. aureus infections of hospital-onset (χ2; p < 0.005). Methicillin-resistance (MRSA) increased from 28 to 78% in PP; in AP it remained around 50%, with significant reduction in accompanying antimicrobial resistance to non-β-lactams in both groups of MRSA. In S. aureus documented from community onset infections (CO-MRSA) in the last three years, the percentage of methicillin-resistance was 57% in PP and 37% in AP; in hospital-onset infections it was 43% and 63% respectively. Although data showed that S. aureus remains a pathogen associated with the hospital-onset, there was an increase of CO-MRSA infections with predominance in PEA in both populations. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus paplitimas hospitalizavimo laikotarpiu

    OpenAIRE

    Maželienė, Žaneta; Kaukėnienė, Renata; Antuševas, Aleksandras; Pavilonis, Alvydas

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus strains among hospitalized patients at the beginning of their hospitalization and during their treatment and the resistance of strains to antibiotics, and to evaluate epidemiologic characteristics of these strains. Patients and methods. Sixty-one patients treated at the Department of Cardiac, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery were examined. Identification of Staphylococcus aureus strains was performed using plasmacoagulase and DNase ...

  17. Differing Burden and Epidemiology of Non-Typhi Salmonella Bacteremia in Rural and Urban Kenya, 2006–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabu, Collins; Breiman, Robert F.; Ochieng, Benjamin; Aura, Barrack; Cosmas, Leonard; Audi, Allan; Olack, Beatrice; Bigogo, Godfrey; Ongus, Juliette R.; Fields, Patricia; Mintz, Eric; Burton, Deron; Oundo, Joe; Feikin, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of non-Typhi Salmonella (NTS) bacteremia in Africa will likely evolve as potential co-factors, such as HIV, malaria, and urbanization, also change. Methods As part of population-based surveillance among 55,000 persons in malaria-endemic, rural and malaria-nonendemic, urban Kenya from 2006–2009, blood cultures were obtained from patients presenting to referral clinics with fever ≥38.0°C or severe acute respiratory infection. Incidence rates were adjusted based on persons with compatible illnesses, but whose blood was not cultured. Results NTS accounted for 60/155 (39%) of blood culture isolates in the rural and 7/230 (3%) in the urban sites. The adjusted incidence in the rural site was 568/100,000 person-years, and the urban site was 51/100,000 person-years. In both sites, the incidence was highest in children 85% of blood NTS isolates in both sites, but only 21% (urban) and 64% (rural) of stool NTS isolates. Overall, 76% of S. Typhimurium blood isolates were multi-drug resistant, most of which had an identical profile in Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis. In the rural site, the incidence of NTS bacteremia increased during the study period, concomitant with rising malaria prevalence (monthly correlation of malaria positive blood smears and NTS bacteremia cases, Spearman's correlation, p = 0.018 for children, p = 0.16 adults). In the rural site, 80% of adults with NTS bacteremia were HIV-infected. Six of 7 deaths within 90 days of NTS bacteremia had HIV/AIDS as the primary cause of death assigned on verbal autopsy. Conclusions NTS caused the majority of bacteremias in rural Kenya, but typhoid predominated in urban Kenya, which most likely reflects differences in malaria endemicity. Control measures for malaria, as well as HIV, will likely decrease the burden of NTS bacteremia in Africa. PMID:22363591

  18. A model for predicting bacteremia in patients with community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia: a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washio, Yasuyoshi; Ito, Akihiro; Kumagai, Shogo; Ishida, Tadashi; Yamazaki, Akio

    2018-01-30

    Pneumococcal pneumonia causes high morbidity and mortality among adults. This study aimed to identify risk factors for bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia, and to construct a prediction model for the development of bacteremia in patients with community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia. We retrospectively analyzed data from patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia between April 2007 and August 2015. Logistic regression models were applied to detect risk factors for pneumococcal bacteremia, and a receiver operating characteristic curve was used to devise a prediction model. Based on the results of sputum cultures, urine antigen tests, and/or blood cultures, 389 patients were diagnosed with pneumococcal pneumonia, 46 of whom had bacteremia. In the multivariate analysis, age  20 mg/dL were identified as independent risk factors for the development of pneumococcal bacteremia. The bacteremia prediction score based on receiver operating characteristic curve analysis had a sensitivity of 0.74 and a specificity of 0.78 in patients with two risk factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.77 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.70-0.85). Age < 65 years, hypoalbuminemia, IRVS, and high C-reactive protein level on admission are independent risk factors for the development of bacteremia in patients with community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia. A prediction model based on these four risk factors could help to identify patients with community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia at high risk of developing bacteremia; this can be used to guide antibiotic choices. UMIN-CTR UMIN 000004353 . Registered 7 October 2010. Retrospectively registered.

  19. Risk factors for multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia in patients with colonization in the intensive care unit

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    Kim Se

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemic outbreaks of multi-drug resistant (MDR Acinetobacter baumannii (AB in intensive care units (ICUs are increasing. The incidence of MDR AB bacteremia, which develops as a result of colonization, is increasing through widespread dissemination of the pathogen, and further colonization. We sought to determine risk factors for MDR AB bacteremia in patients colonized with MDR AB in the ICU. Methods We conducted a retrospective, observational study of 200 patients colonized with MDR AB in the ICU at Severance Hospital, South Korea during the outbreak period between January 2008 and December 2009. Results Of the 200 patients colonized with MDR AB, 108 developed MDR AB bacteremia, and 92 did not. APACHE II scores were higher in bacteremic than non-bacteremic patients at the time of ICU admission and colonization (24.0 vs. 21.6; P = 0.035, 22.9 vs. 16.8; P P = 0.923, but the duration of time at risk was shorter in bacteremic patients (12.1 vs. 6.0 days; P = 0.016. A recent invasive procedure was a significant risk factor for development of bacteremia (odds ratio = 3.85; 95% CI 1.45-10.24; P = 0.007. Multivariate analysis indicated infection and respiratory failure at the time of ICU admission, maintenance of mechanical ventilation, maintenance of endotracheal tube instead of switching to a tracheostomy, recent central venous catheter insertion, bacteremia caused by other microorganism after colonization by MDR AB, and prior antimicrobial therapy, were significant risk factors for MDR AB bacteremia. Conclusions Patients in the ICU, colonized with MDR AB, should be considered for minimizing invasive procedures and early removal of the invasive devices to prevent development of MDR AB bacteremia.

  20. Differing burden and epidemiology of non-Typhi Salmonella bacteremia in rural and urban Kenya, 2006-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins Tabu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The epidemiology of non-Typhi Salmonella (NTS bacteremia in Africa will likely evolve as potential co-factors, such as HIV, malaria, and urbanization, also change. METHODS: As part of population-based surveillance among 55,000 persons in malaria-endemic, rural and malaria-nonendemic, urban Kenya from 2006-2009, blood cultures were obtained from patients presenting to referral clinics with fever ≥38.0°C or severe acute respiratory infection. Incidence rates were adjusted based on persons with compatible illnesses, but whose blood was not cultured. RESULTS: NTS accounted for 60/155 (39% of blood culture isolates in the rural and 7/230 (3% in the urban sites. The adjusted incidence in the rural site was 568/100,000 person-years, and the urban site was 51/100,000 person-years. In both sites, the incidence was highest in children 85% of blood NTS isolates in both sites, but only 21% (urban and 64% (rural of stool NTS isolates. Overall, 76% of S. Typhimurium blood isolates were multi-drug resistant, most of which had an identical profile in Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis. In the rural site, the incidence of NTS bacteremia increased during the study period, concomitant with rising malaria prevalence (monthly correlation of malaria positive blood smears and NTS bacteremia cases, Spearman's correlation, p = 0.018 for children, p = 0.16 adults. In the rural site, 80% of adults with NTS bacteremia were HIV-infected. Six of 7 deaths within 90 days of NTS bacteremia had HIV/AIDS as the primary cause of death assigned on verbal autopsy. CONCLUSIONS: NTS caused the majority of bacteremias in rural Kenya, but typhoid predominated in urban Kenya, which most likely reflects differences in malaria endemicity. Control measures for malaria, as well as HIV, will likely decrease the burden of NTS bacteremia in Africa.

  1. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in diabetic foot infections

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    Estrella Cervantes-García

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is one of the major pathogens causing chronic infections. The ability of S. aureus to acquire resistance to a diverse range of antimicrobial compounds results in limited treatment options, particularly in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. A mechanism by which S. aureus develops reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials is through the formation of small colony variants (SCVs. Infections by SCVs of S. aureus are an upcoming problem due to difficulties in laboratory diagnosis and resistance to antimicrobial therapy. Methods: A prospective study was performed on 120 patients diagnosed with both type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. The study was carried out from July 2012 to December 2013 in Hospital General de Mexico. The samples were cultured in blood agar, mannitol salt agar, and MacConkey agar media, and incubated at 37°C in aerobic conditions. Results: We describe the first known cases of diabetic foot infections caused by MRSA-SCVs in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. In all of our cases, the patients had not received any form of gentamicin therapy. Conclusions: The antibiotic therapy commonly used in diabetic patients with infected diabetic foot ulcers fails in the case of MRSA-SCVs because the intracellular location protects S. aureus-SCVs from the host's defenses and also helps them resist antibiotics. The cases studied in this article add to the spectrum of persistent and relapsing infections attributed to MRSA-SCVs and emphasizes that these variants may also play a relevant role in diabetic foot infections.

  2. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in diabetic foot infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-García, Estrella; García-Gonzalez, Rafael; Reyes-Torres, Angélica; Resendiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Salazar-Schettino, Paz María

    2015-01-01

    Background : Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the major pathogens causing chronic infections. The ability of S. aureus to acquire resistance to a diverse range of antimicrobial compounds results in limited treatment options, particularly in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). A mechanism by which S. aureus develops reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials is through the formation of small colony variants (SCVs). Infections by SCVs of S. aureus are an upcoming problem due to difficulties in laboratory diagnosis and resistance to antimicrobial therapy. Methods : A prospective study was performed on 120 patients diagnosed with both type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. The study was carried out from July 2012 to December 2013 in Hospital General de Mexico. The samples were cultured in blood agar, mannitol salt agar, and MacConkey agar media, and incubated at 37°C in aerobic conditions. Results : We describe the first known cases of diabetic foot infections caused by MRSA-SCVs in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. In all of our cases, the patients had not received any form of gentamicin therapy. Conclusions : The antibiotic therapy commonly used in diabetic patients with infected diabetic foot ulcers fails in the case of MRSA-SCVs because the intracellular location protects S. aureus-SCVs from the host's defenses and also helps them resist antibiotics. The cases studied in this article add to the spectrum of persistent and relapsing infections attributed to MRSA-SCVs and emphasizes that these variants may also play a relevant role in diabetic foot infections.

  3. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus among food handlers and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Food handlers have been recognized to play a major role in the transmission of food borne diseases; contributing significantly to the global incidence and burden of the diseases. This study therefore, assesses the nasal carriage of staphylococcus aureus among food handlers and restaurant workers in Ekpoma, Edo State, ...

  4. Incidence of oral indigenous bacteria in causative strains isolated from blood cultures in 759 laboratory-confirmed cases of bacteremia

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    Shinya Yura

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The incidence of oral indigenous bacteria in cases of bacteremia has been reported in only a few studies. We investigated the annual incidence of oral indigenous bacteria isolated in blood cultures from patients with bacteremia and call into consideration the impact of oral health measures implemented at our facility. Methods: In the period from 2001 to 2006, 759 laboratory-confirmed cases of bacteremia were reported and subsequently analyzed in this study. The incidences of the causative strain and oral indigenous bacteria in blood cultures were studied by year Results: In 759 cases of bacteremia, oral streptococci were noted in 14 (1.8%, and anaerobic bacteria were noted in 9 (1.2%. The population of microorganisms did not change significantly during the study period. Conclusions: In a previous report, oral streptococci accounted for 3.8% of those under investigation. In this study, the incidence of oral streptococci was significantly low, 1.8% specifically. A focus on oral health care at our hospital may account for a reduced incidence of oral streptococci bacteremia.

  5. Usefulness of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein for predicting bacteremia in urinary tract infections in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Jiménez, A; Gutiérrez-Martín, P; Lizcano-Lizcano, A; López-Guerrero, M A; Barroso-Manso, Á; Heredero-Gálvez, E

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the capacity of procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), lactate and leukocytes to predict the presence of bacteremia in patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs). Observational, retro-prospective analytical study of adult patients (≥15 years) diagnosed with UTI in an emergency department from August 2012 to January 2013. The study included 328 patients diagnosed with UTI, with a mean age of 52±22 years, 74% of whom were women. Of these, 43 (13.1%) had bacteremia. For predicting bacteremia, PCT achieved the largest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC) at .993 (95% CI .987-1; P<.001). A cutoff≥1.16ng/mL achieves a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 97%, a positive predictive value of 84% and a negative predictive value of 100%. Lactate achieved an ROC-AUC of .844, and CRP achieved only .534. The mean values when comparing PCT levels in patients with UTIs with and without bacteremia were 8.08±16.37 and .34±.37ng/mL, respectively (P<.001). For patients with UTIs in the emergency department, PCT achieves considerable diagnostic performance for suspecting bacteremia, a performance greater than that of lactate, CRP and leukocytes. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. The Bicomponent Pore-Forming Leucocidins of Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Francis

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability to produce water-soluble proteins with the capacity to oligomerize and form pores within cellular lipid bilayers is a trait conserved among nearly all forms of life, including humans, single-celled eukaryotes, and numerous bacterial species. In bacteria, some of the most notable pore-forming molecules are protein toxins that interact with mammalian cell membranes to promote lysis, deliver effectors, and modulate cellular homeostasis. Of the bacterial species capable of producing pore-forming toxic molecules, the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most notorious. S. aureus can produce seven different pore-forming protein toxins, all of which are believed to play a unique role in promoting the ability of the organism to cause disease in humans and other mammals. The most diverse of these pore-forming toxins, in terms of both functional activity and global representation within S. aureus clinical isolates, are the bicomponent leucocidins. From the first description of their activity on host immune cells over 100 years ago to the detailed investigations of their biochemical function today, the leucocidins remain at the forefront of S. aureus pathogenesis research initiatives. Study of their mode of action is of immediate interest in the realm of therapeutic agent design as well as for studies of bacterial pathogenesis. This review provides an updated perspective on our understanding of the S. aureus leucocidins and their function, specificity, and potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:24847020

  7. A systematic review of animal models for Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reizner, W.; Hunter, J.G.; O’Malley, N.T.; Southgate, R.D.; Schwarz, E.M.; Kates, S.L.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) osteomyelitis is a significant complication for orthopaedic patients undergoing surgery, particularly with fracture fixation and arthroplasty. Given the difficulty in studying S. aureus infections in human subjects, animal models serve an integral role in exploring the pathogenesis of osteomyelitis, and aid in determining the efficacy of prophylactic and therapeutic treatments. Animal models should mimic the clinical scenarios seen in patients as closely as possible to permit the experimental results to be translated to the corresponding clinical care. To help understand existing animal models of S. aureus, we conducted a systematic search of PubMed & Ovid MEDLINE to identify in vivo animal experiments that have investigated the management of S. aureus osteomyelitis in the context of fractures and metallic implants. In this review, experimental studies are categorized by animal species and are further classified by the setting of the infection. Study methods are summarized and the relevant advantages and disadvantages of each species and model are discussed. While no ideal animal model exists, the understanding of a model’s strengths and limitations should assist clinicians and researchers to appropriately select an animal model to translate the conclusions to the clinical setting. PMID:24668594

  8. Staphylococcus aureus biofilms: recent developments in biofilm dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Jessica L; Horswill, Alexander R

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections and represents a significant burden on the healthcare system. S. aureus attachment to medical implants and host tissue, and the establishment of a mature biofilm, play an important role in the persistence of chronic infections. The formation of a biofilm, and encasement of cells in a polymer-based matrix, decreases the susceptibility to antimicrobials and immune defenses, making these infections difficult to eradicate. During infection, dispersal of cells from the biofilm can result in spread to secondary sites and worsening of the infection. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the pathways behind biofilm dispersal in S. aureus, with a focus on enzymatic and newly described broad-spectrum dispersal mechanisms. Additionally, we explore potential applications of dispersal in the treatment of biofilm-mediated infections.

  9. Clinical and Molecular Features of Decreased Chlorhexidine Susceptibility among Nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus Isolates at Texas Children's Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Eric Y.; Vallejo, Jesus G.; Campbell, Judith R.; Hulten, Kristina G.; Mason, Edward O.; Kaplan, Sheldon L.

    2015-01-01

    One of the strategies utilized to decrease infections in the hospital setting relies on topical antimicrobials and antiseptics. While their use is beneficial, concerns arise over the potential to develop resistance or tolerance to these agents. We examined nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus isolates from 2007 to 2013 for the presence of genes associated with tolerance to chlorhexidine. Isolates and patients were identified from an S. aureus surveillance study at Texas Children's Hospital. Nosocomial S. aureus isolates (those causing infection at ≥72 h of hospitalization) were identified and underwent PCR for the qacA or qacB (qacA/B) and smr genes associated with elevated minimum bactericidal concentrations of chlorhexidine. Molecular typing with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and agr typing and a review of the medical record were performed. Two hundred forty-seven nosocomial S. aureus infections were identified. Overall, 111 isolates carried one or both genes (44.9%); 33.1% were positive for smr, 22.7% were positive for qacA/B, and 10.9% of the isolates possessed both genes. The smr-positive isolates were more often resistant to methicillin, ciprofloxacin, and/or clindamycin. The isolates positive for qacA/B were more often associated with indwelling central venous catheters and a vancomycin MIC of ≥2 μg/ml. Isolates carrying either smr or qacA/B were associated with a diagnosis of bacteremia. The smr-positive isolates more often belonged to sequence type 8 (ST8) than the isolates that were positive for qacA/B. Mupirocin resistance was detected in 2.8% of the isolates. Antiseptic-tolerant S. aureus strains are common in our children's hospital and are associated with decreased susceptibility to other systemic antimicrobials and with bloodstream infections. Further work is needed to understand the implications that these organisms have on the hospital environment and antiseptic use in the future. PMID:26666947

  10. Whole-Genome Sequences of the Archetypal K1 Escherichia coli Neonatal Isolate RS218 and Contemporary Neonatal Bacteremia Clinical Isolates SCB11, SCB12, and SCB15

    OpenAIRE

    Day, Michael W.; Jackson, Lydgia A.; Akins, Darrin R.; Dyer, David W.; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal bacteremia Escherichia?coli strains commonly belong to the K1 capsular type. Their ability to cause invasive neonatal disease appears to be determined by other virulence factors that have yet to be identified. We report here the genome sequences of four E.?coli neonatal bacteremia isolates, including that of the archetypal strain RS218.

  11. Epidemiology and outcomes of community-onset methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia in a university hospital in Singapore

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    Tambyah Paul

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA bacteraemia remains a condition associated with considerable morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is a common but little-studied problem outside of Europe and North America. Methods A single-centre retrospective case series profiling all patients with community onset-MSSA bacteraemia presenting between March 2005 and February 2006 to a tertiary acute-care university hospital in Singapore. In addition to epidemiological and clinical data collection, risk factors for complicated bacteremia and attributable mortality were analysed. Results A total of 100 patients met the case definition. Patients were more likely to be male (65% and below 65 years of age (69%. Seventeen patients were intravenous drug abusers, while 38 had diabetes mellitus. There were 18 cases of endocarditis, with 11 occurring in intravenous buprenorphine abusers. Attributable mortality was 11%, and 46% of patients developed complicated bacteremia. On multivariate analysis, age > 65 years and presence of chronic pulmonary disease were the only significant risk factors for the former, while valvular heart disease was a significant risk factor for the latter. Conclusion MSSA bacteraemia is associated with a significant risk of serious complications in Singapore. Other Asian cities should be alert to the risk factors for adverse outcomes for this important cause of morbidity and mortality.

  12. Isorhamnetin Attenuates Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Lung Cell Injury by Inhibiting Alpha-Hemolysin Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lanxiang; Li, Hongen; Wang, Laiying; Song, Zexin; Shi, Lei; Li, Wenhua; Deng, Xuming; Wang, Jianfeng

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, like other gram-positive pathogens, has evolved a large repertoire of virulence factors as a powerful weapon to subvert the host immune system, among which alpha-hemolysin (Hla), a secreted pore-forming cytotoxin, plays a preeminent role. We observed a concentration-dependent reduction in Hla production by S. aureus in the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of isorhamnetin, a flavonoid from the fruits of Hippophae rhamnoides L., which has little antibacterial activity. We further evaluate the effect of isorhamnetin on the transcription of the Hla-encoding gene hla and RNAIII, an effector molecule in the agr system. Isorhamnetin significantly down-regulated RNAIII expression and subsequently inhibited hla transcription. In a co-culture of S. aureus and lung cells, topical isorhamnetin treatment protected against S. aureus-induced cell injury. Isorhamnetin may represent a leading compound for the development of anti-virulence drugs against S. aureus infections.

  13. Clostridium difficile bacteremia and meningitis as a complication of prolonged cephalosporin therapy in a case of staphylococcal pyogenic arthritis

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    Abhrajit Ganguly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With increasing incidence of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis, several extra-intestinal manifestations of the organism have been unmasked which include-bacteremia, brain abscess, pericarditis etc. We report a rare and interesting case of C. difficile bacteremia and subsequent meningitis in a 10 year old child. The child was immune competent, which further raises the question about the virulent possibilities of the organism and its implications in the near future. The condition resulted from a prolonged treatment with intravenous (I.V. cefotaxime for staphylococcal pyogenic arthritis. The child recovered from the septic arthritis but on the 7th day post-admission developed features of bacteremia. The child was later treated with intravenous metronidazole and vancomycin and he was discharged on the 21st day post-admission. No recurrence of symptoms was noted.

  14. Identifying Patients with Bacteremia in Community-Hospital Emergency Rooms: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

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    Taro Takeshima

    Full Text Available (1 To develop a clinical prediction rule to identify patients with bacteremia, using only information that is readily available in the emergency room (ER of community hospitals, and (2 to test the validity of that rule with a separate, independent set of data.Multicenter retrospective cohort study.To derive the clinical prediction rule we used data from 3 community hospitals in Japan (derivation. We tested the rule using data from one other community hospital (validation, which was not among the three "derivation" hospitals.Adults (age ≥ 16 years old who had undergone blood-culture testing while in the ER between April 2011 and March 2012. For the derivation data, n = 1515 (randomly sampled from 7026 patients, and for the validation data n = 467 (from 823 patients.We analyzed 28 candidate predictors of bacteremia, including demographic data, signs and symptoms, comorbid conditions, and basic laboratory data. Chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression were used to derive an integer risk score (the "ID-BactER" score. Sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (i.e., the AUC were computed.There were 241 cases of bacteremia in the derivation data. Eleven candidate predictors were used in the ID-BactER score: age, chills, vomiting, mental status, temperature, systolic blood pressure, abdominal sign, white blood-cell count, platelets, blood urea nitrogen, and C-reactive protein. The AUCs was 0.80 (derivation and 0.74 (validation. For ID-BactER scores ≥ 2, the sensitivities for derivation and validation data were 98% and 97%, and specificities were 20% and 14%, respectively.The ID-BactER score can be computed from information that is readily available in the ERs of community hospitals. Future studies should focus on developing a score with a higher specificity while maintaining the desired sensitivity.

  15. The impact of revised CLSI cefazolin breakpoints on the clinical outcomes of Escherichia coli bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kung-Ching; Liu, Meei-Fang; Lin, Chin-Fu; Shi, Zhi-Yuan

    2016-10-01

    The susceptibility breakpoints of cephalosporins for Enterobacteriaceae were revised by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) in 2010 and 2011. The clinical outcome and susceptibility data were analyzed to evaluate the impact of revised CLSI cefazolin breakpoints on the treatment of Escherichia coli bacteremia. Forty-three bacteremic Escherichia coli isolates from Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan, during the period from January 2013 to December 2013, were selected to analyze the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions of cefazolin and the correlated clinical responses to cefazolin therapy. The modal cefazolin MIC among the 43 isolates was 1 μg/mL and accounted for 18 (42%) isolates. The cumulative percentage for MICs ≤ 2 μg/mL was 79%. The conventional dosing regimens achieved clinical cure in 33 (97%) of 34 patients with bacteremia due to E. coli with a cefazolin MIC ≤ 2 μg/mL, in all of the six patients with a cefazolin MIC of 4 μg/mL, and all of the three patients with a cefazolin MIC of 8 μg/mL. The microbiological data support the revised CLSI breakpoints of cefazolin. The conventional cefazolin dosing regimens can still achieve satisfactory clinical cure rates for bacteremia of E. coli with a cefazolin MIC ≤ 2 μg/mL in patients without severe septic shock. Before the approval of the efficacy of cefazolin for the treatment of E. coli isolates with a cefazolin MIC of 4 μg/mL, it is prudent to use cefazolin only when a high drug level can be achieved in the infection site, such as the urinary tract. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus: resistance pattern and risk factors

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    Mohammad Naghavi-Behzad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has emerged as a nosocomial pathogen of major worldwide importance and is an increasingly frequent cause of community-acquired infections. In this study, different risk factors and MRSA resistance pattern were investigated. Methods: In a 24 months period, all of the patients who were confined to bed in the surgery ward were included in the study. Then they were assessed to find out as if they had MRSA infection when hospitalized and once when they were discharged. Almost 48 h after admission, when patients were discharged, social and medical histories were acquired. Acquired samples were examined. Results: During the present study of 475 patients, 108 patients (22.8% had S. aureus. About frequency of antibiotic resistance among collected S. aureus colonies, erythromycin resistance, was the most frequent antibiotic resistance, also resistance to vancomycin was 0.4% that was the least. Only hospitalization duration had statistically significant correlation with antibiotic resistance, also resistance to erythromycin had statistically significant relation with history of surgery and alcohol consumption. Of all 34 MRSA species, 22 (64.7% samples were resistant to erythromycin, 17 (50.0% resistant to cefoxitin, 5 (14.7% resistant to mupirocin, 1 (2.9% resistant to vancomycin and 1 (2.9% resistant to linezolid. Conclusion: The results of the current study show that among hospitalized patients, there is resistance against methicillin. Since based on results of the study there is resistance against oxacillin and erythromycin in most cases, administering appropriate antibiotics have an important role in minimizing the resistance burden among bacterial species.

  17. Epidemiology of pediatric pneumococcal meningitis and bacteremia in Latin America and the Caribbean: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciapponi, Agustín; Elorriaga, Natalia; Rojas, Juan Ignacio; Romano, Marina; Martí, Sebastián García; Bardach, Ariel; Ruvinsky, Silvina

    2014-09-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis and bacteremia pose a significant disease burden in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). To perform a systematic review of studies of pediatric pneumococcal meningitis and non-pneumonia, non-meningitis pneumococcal bacteremia in LAC, we conducted an exhaustive search from 2000 to 2010 in electronic databases and grey literature. Pairs of independently selected reviewers assessed the quality and extracted the studies' data. A STROBE-based checklist was used to assess the risk of bias in observational studies. Meta-analyses were performed. Of 1218 retrieved studies, 39 were included. In children <5 years, the pooled 95% confidence interval (CI) percentage of pneumococcal etiology out of cases studied with cerebrospinal fluid/blood cultures was 6.0% (95% CI: 3.3-9.5) for meningitis and 8.0% (95% CI: 5.3-12.4) for bacteremia. The incidences per 100,000 children were 4.7 (95% CI: 3.2-6.1) and 3.9 (95% CI: 2.0-5.9) for pneumococcal meningitis and non-pneumonia, non-meningitis bacteremia, respectively. The mortality was 8.3 (95% CI: 0.0-21.0) and 0.5 (95% CI: 0.3.0-0.6)/100,000 for meningitis and sepsis, respectively. The case fatality ratio was 33.2% (95% CI: 21.3-46.2) for meningitis and 29.0% (95% CI: 21.9-36.8) for sepsis. The pooled serotype distribution from SIREVA surveillance data showed that 14, 5, 6B (for meningitis) and 14, 6B, 19F (for bacteremia) were the most frequent serotypes, all included in licensed vaccines. Pneumococcal meningitis and bacteremia are important causes of morbidity and mortality in LAC children <5 years of age. This systematic review provided evidence about the burden of pneumococcal disease and the serotype distribution to assess the impact the pneumococcal vaccines and to assist decision makers in the region.

  18. Staphylococcus epidermidis Bacteremia Induces Brain Injury in Neonatal Mice via Toll-like Receptor 2-Dependent and -Independent Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Dan; Qiao, Lili; Bergelson, Ilana; Ek, C Joakim; Duan, Luqi; Zhang, Xiaoli; Albertsson, Anna-Maj; Pettengill, Matthew; Kronforst, Kenny; Ninkovic, Jana; Goldmann, Donald; Janzon, Anders; Hagberg, Henrik; Wang, Xiaoyang; Mallard, Carina; Levy, Ofer

    2015-11-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis causes late-onset sepsis in preterm infants. Staphylococcus epidermidis activates host responses in part via Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Epidemiologic studies link bacteremia and neonatal brain injury, but direct evidence is lacking. Wild-type and TLR2-deficient (TLR2-/-) mice were injected intravenously with S. epidermidis at postnatal day 1 prior to measuring plasma and brain cytokine and chemokine levels, bacterial clearance, brain caspase-3 activation, white/gray matter volume, and innate transcriptome. Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteremia spontaneously resolved over 24 hours without detectable bacteria in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). TLR2-/- mice demonstrated delayed S. epidermidis clearance from blood, spleen, and liver. Staphylococcus epidermidis increased the white blood cell count in the CSF, increased interleukin 6, interleukin 12p40, CCL2, and CXCL1 concentrations in plasma; increased the CCL2 concentration in the brain; and caused rapid (within 6 hours) TLR2-dependent brain activation of caspase-3 and TLR2-independent white matter injury. Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteremia, in the absence of bacterial entry into the CSF, impairs neonatal brain development. Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteremia induced both TLR2-dependent and -independent brain injury, with the latter occurring in the absence of TLR2, a condition associated with an increased bacterial burden. Our study indicates that the consequences of transient bacteremia in early life may be more severe than commonly appreciated, and our findings may inform novel approaches to reduce bacteremia-associated brain injury. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Bordetella holmesii bacteremia cases in the United States, April 2010-January 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartof, Sara Y; Gounder, Prabhu; Weiss, Don; Lee, Lillian; Cassiday, Pamela K; Clark, Thomas A; Briere, Elizabeth C

    2014-01-01

    We describe the first report of temporally related cases of Bordetella holmesii bacteremia. Demographic and clinical data were collected through chart abstraction and case-patient interviews. Twenty-two cases were identified from 6 states. Symptom onset dates ranged from April 2010 to January 2011. Median age of patients was 17.1 years and 64% had functional or anatomic asplenia. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles of a sample of isolates were identical. These cases occurred during a peak in pertussis outbreaks with documented cases of B. holmesii/Bordetella pertussis respiratory coinfection; whether there is a link between B. holmesii respiratory and bloodstream infection is unknown.

  20. Streptococcus lutetiensis Bacteremia. First Clindamycin Resistant Isolate Carrying lnuB Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Almuzara, Marisa; Bonofiglio, Laura; Cittadini, Roberto Arnaldo; Vera Ocampo, C.; Montilla, A.; del Castillo, M.; Ramirez, Maria Soledad; Mollerach, Marta Eugenia; C. Vay

    2015-01-01

    First Case of Streptococcus lutetiensis Bacteremia Involving a Clindamycin-Resistant Isolate Carrying the lnuB Gene Fil: Almuzara, Marisa. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica. Departamento de Bioquímica Clínica; Argentina; Fil: Bonofiglio, Laura. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica. Departamento de Microbiología, Inmunología y Biotecnología; Argentina; Fil: Cittadini, Roberto Arnaldo. Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria;...

  1. Staphylococcus pettenkoferi Bacteremia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz Ahmed Hashi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus pettenkoferi is a relatively recently described coagulase-negative staphylococci species first described in 2002. Since then, nine additional cases of infection caused by this species have been reported in various countries around the world, including Germany, Belgium, France, South Korea, Italy, Brazil and Mexico. The present report describes a case of S pettenkoferi peripheral line-associated bacteremia. To our knowledge, the present report is the first description of human infection caused by S pettenkoferi in Canada. The present report also provides an overview of the laboratory detection of uncommon coagulase-negative staphylococci.

  2. A rare case of Shewanella putrefaciens bacteremia in a patient of road traffic accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Ranjan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella putrefaciens rarely causes human infection. These are mostly found in environment and food stuffs. Shewanella are often found in mixed culture. It has been implicated in cellulitis, otitis media, and septicemia. It may be found in respiratory tract, urine, feces, and pleural fluid. There is no definite guideline for therapeutic option. In general, these are susceptible to various antimicrobial agents but are often resistant to penicillin and cephalothin. We report a rare case of bacteremia by S. putrefaciens in a patient of head injury with polytrauma after a road traffic accident.

  3. Fatal case of bacteremia caused by an atypical strain of Corynebacterium mucifaciens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlademir Vicente Cantarelli

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium species have often been considered normal skin flora or contaminants; however, in recent years they have been increasingly implicated in serious infections. Moreover, many new species have been discovered and old species renamed, especially after molecular biology techniques were introduced. Corynebacterium mucifaciens is mainly isolated from blood and from other normally-sterile body fluids; it forms slightly yellow, mucoid colonies on blood agar. We report a fatal case of bacteremia due to an atypical strain of C. mucifaciens. This strain had atypical colony morphology; analysis of the 16S rRNA gene was used to define the species.

  4. [Protein toxins of Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsutdinov, A F; Tiurin, Iu A

    2014-01-01

    Main scientific-research studies regarding protein bacterial toxins of the most widespread bacteria that belong to Staphylococcus spp. genus and in particular the most pathogenic species for humans--Staphylococcus aureus, are analyzed. Structural and biological properties of protein toxins that have received the name of staphylococcus pyrogenic toxins (PTSAg) are presented. Data regarding genetic regulation of secretion and synthesis of these toxins and 3 main regulatory genetic systems (agr--accessory gene regulator, xpr--extracellular protein regulator, sar--staphylococcal accessory regulator) that coordinate synthesis of the most important protein toxins and enzymes for virulence of S. aureus, are presented.

  5. Extended spectrum β-lactamase producing Shigella flexneri serotype-2 causing bacteremia in a patient with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninan, Marilyn M; George, Tarun K; Balaji, V; Ramya, I

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of Shigella flexneri serotype-2 causing bacteremia in an elderly gentleman with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, who had no other apparent risk factors. Antibiotic susceptibility testing revealed that the organism was a multidrug resistant extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing straian, which was confirmed by molecular characterization. This rare case alerts both the clinician and microbiologist to a previously unaddressed risk factor of Shigella spp. causing bacteremia, as well as emerging resistant strains that are on the rise in immunocompromised patients.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Carriage among Surgical personnel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the most common causes of both community and hospital acquired bacterial infection. There is strong correlation between S aureus nasal carriage and disease progress. Nasal carriage is high among health care workers. Inappropriate usage of antibiotic may

  7. Nasal Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus and Antibiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus has been demonstrated to be a major risk factor for invasive S. aureus infections in various population including children. The extent of S. aureus carriage in Sierra Leonean children is largely unknown. To determine the prevalence and pattern of antibiotic susceptibility of nasal S.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus transmission : clinical and molecular aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemendaal, A.L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen in nosocomial infections. Up to 30% of UCI related infections are caused by S. aureus. In this thesis we explore both clinical and molecular aspects of patient-to-patient transmission of S. aureus. We performed a European ICU study exploring infection

  9. Vancomycin Sensitivity of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (MRSA), resistant to all antibiotics including Vancomycin, has been reported in Japan, USA, Canada and Brazil. Hence, the main objective of this study was to evaluate the possible presence of Vancomycin resistant or intermediate S.aureus in Karachi. A total of 850 ...

  10. Epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus infections and nasal carriage at the Ibn Rochd University Hospital Center, Casablanca, Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zriouil, Sanaâ Bouhali; Bekkali, Mohammed; Zerouali, Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus are a major problem in hospitals. The multidrug resistance and the nasal carriage of S. aureus play a key role in the epidemic of these infections. In this prospective study, 160 S. aureus strains were isolated from pathological samples of patients (79 cases) and nasal swabs (81) of cases and controls from January to July 2007. The susceptibility to 16 antibiotics, including cefoxitin, was determined by the agar diffusion method, and methicillin resistance was confirmed by amplifying the mecA gene by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was high in the burns (57.7%) and dermatology (39.4%) wards, and the MRSA strains isolated were extremely multi-resistant, but all of them were still susceptible to vancomycin. The rate of S. aureus nasal carriage was high in both cases and controls, in state, MRSA nasal carriage was more common among people infected with S. aureus.

  11. Pathogenic Characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus Endovascular Infection Isolates from Different Clonal Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafne Pérez-Montarelo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of bacteremia and, even with appropriate clinical management, causes high morbidity, and mortality due to its involvement in endovascular complications and metastatic infections. Through different pathogenic in vivo and in vitro models we investigated the behavior of S. aureus most relevant clonal complexes (CCs causing endovascular complications. We analyzed 14 S. aureus strains representing CC5, CC8, CC15, CC30, and CC45 that caused endovascular complications, including methicillin susceptible and resistant isolates and strains with different functionality of the agr global regulator. Their adherence to collagen, interaction with the endothelium, resistance to immune attack, capacity to form biofilm and virulence in the Galleria mellonella model were analyzed. CC30 and CC45 showed greater adhesion to collagen and CC8 showed a trend towards higher rate of intracellular persistence in endothelial cells. All CCs exhibited similar tolerance to neutrophil antimicrobial peptide hNP-1 and were capable of forming biofilms under static conditions. The virulence assay in the G. mellonella model demonstrated that CC15 and CC30 were the most and least virulent, respectively. The analysis of the genomic sequences of the most relevant virulence genes identified some CC15 specific gene patterns (absence of enterotoxins and sak gene and variants (mainly in leucocidins and proteases, but did not reveal any gene or variant that could be responsible for the increased virulence detected for CC15 strains. Even though all the CCs were capable of causing endovascular complications, our results showed that different CCs are likely to produce these complications through different mechanisms which, if confirmed in more sophisticated models, would indicate the need to more specific management and therapeutic approaches.

  12. DNAGear--a free software for spa type identification in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Tam, Faroq; Brunel, Anne-Sophie; Bouzinbi, Nicolas; Corne, Philippe; Bañuls, Anne-Laure; Shahbazkia, Hamid Reza

    2012-11-19

    Staphylococcus aureus is both human commensal and an important human pathogen, responsible for community-acquired and nosocomial infections ranging from superficial wound infections to invasive infections, such as osteomyelitis, bacteremia and endocarditis, pneumonia or toxin shock syndrome with a mortality rate up to 40%. S. aureus reveals a high genetic polymorphism and detecting the genotypes is extremely useful to manage and prevent possible outbreaks and to understand the route of infection. One of current and expanded typing method is based on the X region of the spa gene composed of a succession of repeats of 21 to 27 bp. More than 10000 types are known. Extracting the repeats is impossible by hand and needs a dedicated software. Unfortunately the only software on the market is a commercial program from Ridom. This article presents DNAGear, a free and open source software with a user friendly interface written all in Java on top of NetBeans Platform to perform spa typing, detecting new repeats and new spa types and synchronizing automatically the files with the open access database. The installation is easy and the application is platform independent. In fact, the SPA identification is a formal regular expression matching problem and the results are 100% exact. As the program is using Java embedded modules written over string manipulation of well established algorithms, the exactitude of the solution is perfectly established. DNAGear is able to identify the types of the S. aureus sequences and detect both new types and repeats. Comparing to manual processing, which is time consuming and error prone, this application saves a lot of time and effort and gives very reliable results. Additionally, the users do not need to prepare the forward-reverse sequences manually, or even by using additional tools. They can simply create them in DNAGear and perform the typing task. In short, researchers who do not have commercial software will benefit a lot from this

  13. Stress Responses in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aures are prominent members of the normal flora of humans and animals, but are also a major cause of mild and severe infections. To persist and disseminate in the human host, and to survive in environmental settings, such as hospitals, S. aureus have developed a plethora of cellular...

  14. PTX3 is up-regulated in epithelial mammary cells during S. aureus intramammary infection in goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Fernando Soares Filipe

    2015-07-01

    PTX3 was up-regulated in epithelial mammary cells and in milk cells after S. aureus infection, demonstrating that it represents a first line of immune defense in goat udder. No modulation was observed in macrophages, in the secretum and in the ductal epithelial cells. Further experiments are needed to elucidate the role of PTX3 in the pathogenesis of S. aureus infection.

  15. Empedobacter brevis Bacteremia in a Patient Infected with HIV: Case Report and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Bokhari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical disease caused by Empedobacter brevis (E. brevis is very rare. We report the first case of E. brevis bacteremia in a patient with HIV and review the current literature. A 69-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and CD4 count of 319 presented with chief complaints of black tarry stools, nausea and vomiting for 2 days. Physical exam was significant for abdominal pain on palpation with no rebound or guarding. His total leukocyte count was 32,000 cells/μL with 82% neutrophils and 9% bands. Emergent colonoscopy and endoscopic esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed esophageal candidiasis, a nonbleeding gastric ulcer, and diverticulosis. Blood cultures drawn on days 1, 2, and 3 of hospitalization grew E. brevis. Patient improved with intravenous antibiotics. This case is unusual, raising the possibility of gastrointestinal colonization as a source of the patient’s bacteremia. In conclusion, E. brevis is an emerging pathogen that can cause serious health care associated infections.

  16. Recurrent Campylobacter jejuni bacteremia in a patient with hypogammaglobulinemia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youie; Shin, Ju Ae; Han, Seung Beom; Cho, Bin; Jeong, Dae Chul; Kang, Jin Han

    2017-06-01

    Although some cases of recurrent bacteremia due to Campylobacter jejuni have been reported in immunocompromised patients, antibiotic treatment strategies to eradicate C. jejuni and prevent recurrent infections in immunocompromised patients have not been established. Authors' experience of such rare cases should be shared for improving patients' outcomes. An 18-year-old boy with hypogammaglobulinemia, who received intravenous immunoglobulin replacement therapy every 3 weeks, was admitted to hospital repeatedly due to recurrent diarrhea and cellulitis of the leg. The patient was admitted 6 times, and among them, C. jejuni was isolated from blood cultures 4 times and stool cultures 2 times. The patient experienced recurrent C. jejuni enteritis and bacteremia 5 times despite macrolide therapy. Doxycycline was administered for 3 months after the fifth admission. Ten months after the completion of doxycycline therapy for 3 months, C. jejuni enteritis relapsed; however, since then, recurrent infection has not occurred for 10 months. Immunocompromised patients can experience recurrent C. jejuni infection despite prolonged antibiotic therapy. Further studies to establish appropriate antibiotic therapy for eradicating colonized C. jejuni and preventing recurrent infection are needed.

  17. Bacteremia caused by a rare pathogen – Chromobacterium violaceum: a case report from Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parajuli NP

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Narayan Prasad Parajuli,1,2 Anjeela Bhetwal,2 Sumitra Ghimire,2 Anjila Maharjan,2 Shreena Shakya,2 Deepa Satyal,2 Roshan Pandit,2 Puspa Raj Khanal2 1Department of Clinical Laboratory Services, Manmohan Memorial Medical College and Teaching Hospital, Kathmandu, 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Manmohan Memorial Institute of Health Sciences, Kathmandu, Nepal Abstract: Chromobacterium violaceum is a gram negative saprophytic bacterium, prevalent in tropical and subtropical climates. Infections caused by C. violaceum are very uncommon, yet it can cause severe systemic infections with higher mortality when entered into the bloodstream through open wound. A case of symptomatic bacteremia in a woman caused by C. violaceum was identified recently at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Nepal. Timely diagnosis by microbiological methods and rapid administration of antimicrobials led to a successful treatment of this life-threatening infection in this case. From this experience, we suggest to include this bacterium in the differential diagnosis of sepsis, especially when abraded skin is exposed to soil or stagnant water in tropical areas. The precise antimicrobial selection and timely administration should be considered when this infection is suspected. Keywords: Chromobacterium violaceum, case report, bacteremia, Nepal

  18. [Results of the implementation of the Bacteremia Zero project in Catalonia, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Oliva, Glòria; Ferrer, Joan M; Riera, Alba; Palomar, Mercedes

    2014-07-01

    The nationwide Bacteremia Zero (BZ) Project consists in the simultaneous implementation of measures to prevent central venous catheter-related bacteremia (CVC-B) in critically ill patients and in the development of an integral safety plan. The objective is to present the results obtained after the implementation of the BZ project in the ICUs of the Autonomous Community of Catalonia, Spain. All patients admitted to ICUs in Catalonia participating in the ENVIN-HELICS registry between January 2009 and June 2010 were included. Information was provided by 36 (92.3%) of the total possible 39 ICUs. A total of 281 episodes of CVC-B were diagnosed (overall rate of 2.53 episodes per 1000 days of CVC). The rates have varied significantly between ICUs that participated in the project for more or less than 12 months (2.17 vs. 4.27 episodes per 1000 days of CVC, respectively; p<.0001). The implementation of the BZ Project in Catalonia has been associated with a decrease greater than 40% in the CVC-B rates in the ICUs of this community, which is much higher than the initial objective of 4 episodes per 1000 days of CVC). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  19. A Case of Infective Endocarditis and Spinal Epidural Abscess Caused by Streptococcus mitis Bacteremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria S. Byrd

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 57-year-old man presented with abdominal pain, hematemesis, and melena. He reported taking high-dose ibuprofen for back pain and drinking several 24-ounce beers daily. Examination was remarkable for icteric sclera, poor dentition, tachycardia, and crescendo-decrescendo murmur at right upper sternal border, radiating to the carotids. Labs revealed leukocytosis, anemia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated liver function tests and INR. Endoscopy demonstrated antral ulcers, duodenitis, and esophagitis. Blood cultures were obtained and broad-spectrum antibiotics started; cultures later grew Streptococcus mitis, and antibiotic coverage was narrowed. Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE demonstrated aortic stenosis and regurgitation, but no vegetation. Repeat blood cultures were negative; however, the patient developed neurological symptoms concerning for cauda equina syndrome, and MRI revealed epidural abscess. Emergent decompression could not be performed as the patient developed hematemesis and required intubation. Transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE, initially deferred due to friable esophageal mucosa, was performed and revealed small aortic valve vegetation. Poor oral hygiene was felt to be the probable source of the patient’s S. mitis bacteremia, epidural abscess, and infective endocarditis. The patient’s neurological symptoms resolved without intervention and remaining teeth were extracted. This case demonstrates that Streptococcus mitis can result in clinically significant bacteremia, particularly in immunocompromised patients, including chronic heavy alcohol users.

  20. Capnocytophaga canimorsus bacteremia presenting with acute cholecystitis after a dog bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Hiroaki; Kozuki, Tomohiro; Kamei, Hiroki

    2015-03-01

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus is part of normal gingival flora of dogs and cats. The organism can cause septicemia, meningitis, and endocarditis in humans after contact with dogs or cats. In spite of the frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in C. canimorsus infection patients, specific gastrointestinal disease or clinical images have not been reported. We report a case of C. canimorsus bacteremia presenting with acute cholecystitis in elderly woman. She suffered from general fatigue and right upper abdominal pain. She had leukocytosis and abnormal liver function tests. She showed abnormal findings of the gallbladder by abdominal computed tomography and ultrasonography. She was diagnosed with acute cholecystitis without gallstones and was administered with antibiotics. C. canimorsus was isolated from blood cultures. A history of an insignificant wound secondary to a dog bite was elicited. She recovered completely with antibiotic treatment. This case revealed that C. canimorsus bacteremia can be presented with acute cholecystitis, suggesting that C. canimorsus could cause cholecystitis. And this cholecystitis can be treated with antibiotics without operation. Physicians seeing patients with acute cholecysitis should ask questions regarding animal contact. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular epidemiological survey of bacteremia by multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: the relevance of intrinsic resistance mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Cristina Cavalcanti Dantas

    Full Text Available The bacterial factors associated with bacteremia by multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant P. aeruginosa, including overexpression of efflux pumps, AmpC overproduction, and loss/alteration of the OprD porin in isolates that are non-Metallo-β-Lactamase producing were analyzed in a retrospective study. Molecular analyses included strain typing by Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis and identification of key genes via qualitative and quantitative PCR-based assays. Previous use of carbapenems and tracheostomy was independently associated with the development of bacteremia by extensively drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa. A high consumption of antimicrobials was observed, and 75.0% of the isolates contained amplicons with the blaSPM-1 and blaVIM genes. Of the 47 non-Metallo-β-Lactamase isolates, none had another type of carbapenemase. However, the isolates exhibited high rates of hyperproduction of AmpC, loss of the OprD porin (71.4% and the presence of MexABOprM (57.1% and MexXY (64.3%. This study suggests that in non-Metallo-β-Lactamase isolates, the association of intrinsic resistance mechanisms could contributes to the expression of multidrug-resistant/extensively drug-resistant phenotypes.

  2. Prophylactic effect of human lactoferrin against Streptococcus mutans bacteremia in lactoferrin knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velusamy, Senthil Kumar; Fine, Daniel H; Velliyagounder, Kabilan

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary agent of dental caries, which is often detected in transient bacteremia. Lactoferrin is a multifunctional glycoprotein showing antibacterial activities against several Streptococcus species. We reported here the prophylactic effect of human lactoferrin (hLF) in a lactoferrin knockout mouse (LFKO-/-) bacteremic model. The hLF treatment significantly cleared S. mutans from the blood and organs of bacteremic mice when compared to the non-hLF treated mice. Further, analysis of serum cytokines, spleen and liver cytokine mRNA levels revealed that hLF prophylaxis modulates their release differently when compared to the non-hLF treated group. C-reactive protein level (P = 0.003) also decreased following hLF prophylaxis in S. mutans induced bacteremic mice. Additional quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that hLF prophylaxis significantly decreased the expression level of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, MPO and iNOS in spleen and liver. These results suggested that the hLF protects the host against S. mutans-induced experimental bacteremia. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Human case of bacteremia caused by Streptococcus canis sequence type 9 harboring the scm gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniyama, Daisuke; Abe, Yoshihiko; Sakai, Tetsuya; Kikuchi, Takahide; Takahashi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus canis (Sc) is a zoonotic pathogen that is transferred mainly from companion animals to humans. One of the major virulence factors in Sc is the M-like protein encoded by the scm gene, which is involved in anti-phagocytic activities, as well as the recruitment of plasminogen to the bacterial surface in cooperation with enolase, and the consequent enhancement of bacterial transmigration and survival. This is the first reported human case of uncomplicated bacteremia following a dog bite, caused by Streptococcus canis harboring the scm gene. The similarity of the 16S rRNA from the infecting species to that of the Sc type strain, as well as the amplification of the species-specific cfg gene, encoding a co-hemolysin, was used to confirm the species identity. Furthermore, the isolate was confirmed as sequence type 9. The partial scm gene sequence harbored by the isolate was closely related to those of other two Sc strains. While this isolate did not possess the erm(A), erm(B), or mef(A), macrolide/lincosamide resistance genes, it was not susceptible to azithromycin: its susceptibility was intermediate. Even though human Sc bacteremia is rare, clinicians should be aware of this microorganism, as well as Pasteurella sp., Prevotella sp., and Capnocytophaga sp., when examining and treating patients with fever who maintain close contact with companion animals.

  4. Does C-reactive protein independently predict mortality in adult community-acquired bacteremia patients with known sepsis severity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradel, Kim O; Jensen, Thøger G; Kolmos, Hans J

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated whether sepsis severity and C-reactive protein (CRP) level on admission prognostically corroborated or annulled each other in adult patients with incident community-acquired bacteremia (Funen, Denmark, 2000-2008). We used logistic regression and area under the receiver operating...

  5. Francisella philomiragia Bacteremia in a Patient with Acute Respiratory Insufficiency and Acute-on-Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relich, Ryan F; Humphries, Romney M; Mattison, H Reid; Miles, Jessica E; Simpson, Edward R; Corbett, Ian J; Schmitt, Bryan H; May, M

    2015-12-01

    Francisella philomiragia is a very uncommon pathogen of humans. Diseases caused by it are protean and have been reported largely in near-drowning victims and those with chronic granulomatous disease. We present a case of F. philomiragia pneumonia with peripheral edema and bacteremia in a renal transplant patient and review the diverse reports of F. philomiragia infections.

  6. Randomized Open Trial of Gentamicin and Doxycycline for Eradication of Bartonella quintana from Blood in Patients with Chronic Bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucault, C.; Raoult, D.; Brouqui, P.

    2003-01-01

    Chronic Bartonella quintana bacteremia is known to occur in homeless people exposed to lice. We present here the results of an open randomized trial performed to evaluate the efficacy of doxycycline in combination with gentamicin in the eradication of B. quintana bacteremia. From 1 January 2001 to 1 April 2002, homeless people with blood cultures positive for B. quintana were randomized to receive either no treatment (untreated controls) or a combination of gentamicin (3 mg/kg of body weight/day intravenously for 14 days) and doxycycline (200 mg/day orally for 28 days). Patients were evaluated from the results of blood cultures performed between day 28 (the end of treatment) and day 90 postinclusion. Intention-to-treat analysis of 20 included patients showed eradication of bacteremia in 7 out of 9 treated patients versus 2 out of 11 untreated controls (P = 0.01). In the per-protocol analysis, eradication was obtained for 7 out of 7 treated patients versus 2 out of 9 untreated controls (P = 0.003). This study demonstrates the efficiency of the combination of doxycycline and gentamicin in eradicating B. quintana bacteremia. PMID:12821469

  7. Characteristics of bacteremia in pediatric oncology patients based on pathogen classification as associated with the gastrointestinal mucosa or skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flagg, Aron; Worley, Sarah; Foster, Charles B

    2015-06-01

    Factors favoring blood stream infections associated with gastrointestinal mucosa versus skin organisms were explored. An observed difference was attributable to bacteremia from oral flora in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia or mucositis. Our data do not support the conclusion that isolation of enteric Gram-negatives is unrelated to the central catheter.

  8. Bacteria causing bacteremia in pediatric cancer patients presenting with febrile neutropenia-species distribution and susceptibility patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, Karin G. E.; Winter, Rik H. L. J.; Ammann, Roland A.; Droz, Sara; Spanjaard, Lodewijk; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Kamps, Willem A.; van de Wetering, Marianne D.; Tissing, Wim J. E.

    Infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric cancer patients. The aim of this study was to establish the microbiological spectrum and the susceptibility patterns of bacteremia-causing bacteria in pediatric cancer patients with febrile neutropenia in relation to the use of

  9. Nosocomial extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia in hemodialysis patients and the implications for antibiotic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chao Yang

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: In accordance with our previous study, our results have demonstrated the inferiority of flomoxef to carbapenems in the treatment of HD access-related ESBL-Kp bacteremia and provide an insight into the possibility of using ertapenem rather than flomoxef as an initial or de-escalating therapy for infections caused by ESBL-producing bacteria.

  10. Central venous catheter-related bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae: Case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Michael Z

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Kocuria species are unusual human pathogens isolated most commonly from immunocompromised hosts, such as transplant recipients and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, or from patients with chronic medical conditions. A case of catheter-related bacteremia with pulmonary septic emboli in a pregnant adult female without chronic medical conditions is described. A review of other reported Kocuria infections is provided.

  11. Campylobacter fetus Bacteremia Revealed by Cellulitis without Gastrointestinal Symptoms in the Context of Acquired Hypogammaglobulinemia: A Report of Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souleymane Brah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter fetus bacteremia is rare and occurs mainly in patients with immunosuppression. This infection, which often involves secondary localizations has already been reported in some primary humoral immune deficiencies. We describe three cases of severe infection due to C. fetus with cellulitis at presentation, but without any gastrointestinal symptoms, occurring in patients with acquired hypogammaglobulinemia.

  12. Development of the immune response in pneumonia due to Staphylococcus aureus (part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Abaturov

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the role of pattern-recognition receptors involved in recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns of Staphylococcus aureus. There are shown the basic operation of macrophage and monocyte NLRP3, NLRC5, NLRP7, AIM2 inflammasomes that form the active forms of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1-beta and IL-18 du-ring the development of pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

  13. Development of the immune response in pneumonia induced by Staphylococcus aureus (part 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Abaturov

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the key role of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the development of immune response in pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus based on the literature data. Genes associated with a predisposition to staphylococcal infection and/or determining its course are considered. Signal pathways inducing the production of interferons I, II and III type participating in elimination of Staphylococcus aureus are described.

  14. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization among patients and their parents /guardian in an Iranian referral hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourakbari, Babak; Khodabandeh, Mahmoud; Mahmoudi, Shima; Sabouni, Farah; Aziz-Ahari, Alireza; Bahador, Abbas; Keshavarz Valian, Sepideh; Hosseinpour Sadeghi, Reihaneh; Mamishi, Setareh

    2017-06-01

    Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in the nose appears to play a key role in the epidemiology and pathogenesis of infection. It is important to investigate the genetic relatedness of S. aureus and MRSA clones in different geographic regions. The aim of this study was to assess the nasal carriage rate of S. aureus, including MRSA strains in both hospitalized children and general adult population (parents/guardian). In addition, antibiotic susceptibility pattern and molecular diversity of S. aureus in both population was evaluated in an Iranian referral pediatrics Hospital. All samples were obtained through nasal screening of patients and general adult population at admission and discharge day. The prevalence, resistance, and molecular diversity of all S. aureus isolates were examined. In the current study, nasal carriage of S. aureus and Staphylococcus non aureus was identified in 384 (26%) and 1004 (68%) of the study population. The prevalence of MRSA nasal carriage in children and adults was 6.6% (29 out of 438) and 2.8% (29 out of 1046), respectively. Among S. aureus strains isolated obtained from patients and general adult population at admission day, high sensitivity to most of the antibiotics such as vancomycin (100%), rifampin (95%), linezolid (94%), quinupristin/dalfopristin (94%), minocycline (94%), chloramphenicol (89%), gentamycin (87%), amikacin (87%), clindamycin (86%) and moxifloxacin (83%) was seen. The most resistance antibiotics were penicillin (96-98%) and methicillin (44-47%). The susceptibility patterns of nasal S. aureus strains isolated at discharge day was not statistically different from S. aureus isolates obtained at admission day. Admission S. aureus isolated strains of 77 patients (64%) were similar to the isolated S. aureus strains of discharge, while S. aureus isolated strains of 43 patients (36%) was not similar to the strain of discharge (had similarity of less than 70%). High prevalence of nasal carriage of S. aureus and

  15. Staphylococcus aureus redirects central metabolism to increase iron availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Friedman

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis is significantly influenced by the iron status of the host. However, the regulatory impact of host iron sources on S. aureus gene expression remains unknown. In this study, we combine multivariable difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry with multivariate statistical analyses to systematically cluster cellular protein response across distinct iron-exposure conditions. Quadruplicate samples were simultaneously analyzed for alterations in protein abundance and/or post-translational modification state in response to environmental (iron chelation, hemin treatment or genetic (Deltafur alterations in bacterial iron exposure. We identified 120 proteins representing several coordinated biochemical pathways that are affected by changes in iron-exposure status. Highlighted in these experiments is the identification of the heme-regulated transport system (HrtAB, a novel transport system which plays a critical role in staphylococcal heme metabolism. Further, we show that regulated overproduction of acidic end-products brought on by iron starvation decreases local pH resulting in the release of iron from the host iron-sequestering protein transferrin. These findings reveal novel strategies used by S. aureus to acquire scarce nutrients in the hostile host environment and begin to define the iron and heme-dependent regulons of S. aureus.

  16. Molecular Basis of Virulence in Staphylococcus aureus Mastitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maréchal, Caroline; Seyffert, Nubia; Jardin, Julien; Hernandez, David; Jan, Gwenaël; Rault, Lucie; Azevedo, Vasco; François, Patrice; Schrenzel, Jacques; van de Guchte, Maarten; Even, Sergine; Berkova, Nadia; Thiéry, Richard; Fitzgerald, J. Ross

    2011-01-01

    Background S. aureus is one of the main pathogens involved in ruminant mastitis worldwide. The severity of staphylococcal infection is highly variable, ranging from subclinical to gangrenous mastitis. This work represents an in-depth characterization of S. aureus mastitis isolates to identify bacterial factors involved in severity of mastitis infection. Methodology/Principal Findings We employed genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic approaches to comprehensively compare two clonally related S. aureus strains that reproducibly induce severe (strain O11) and milder (strain O46) mastitis in ewes. Variation in the content of mobile genetic elements, iron acquisition and metabolism, transcriptional regulation and exoprotein production was observed. In particular, O11 produced relatively high levels of exoproteins, including toxins and proteases known to be important in virulence. A characteristic we observed in other S. aureus strains isolated from clinical mastitis cases. Conclusions/Significance Our data are consistent with a dose-dependant role of some staphylococcal factors in the hypervirulence of strains isolated from severe mastitis. Mobile genetic elements, transcriptional regulators, exoproteins and iron acquisition pathways constitute good targets for further research to define the underlying mechanisms of mastitis severity. PMID:22096559

  17. Effect of anticapsular antibodies on neutrophil phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, A J; Oliver, S P; Squiggins, K E; Erbe, E F; Dowlen, H H; Hambleton, C N; Berning, L M

    1991-10-01

    One of the major virulence factors of Staphylococcus aureus is development of an exopolysaccharide capsule in vivo, which inhibits recognition of antibodies to highly antigenic cell wall by neutrophils. To circumvent this inhibition, an attempt was made to produce anticapsular antibodies. Three cows per group were immunized in midlactation by injections in the area of the supramammary lymph node and intramuscularly and were boosted on d 14, 42, and 70 with three variants of Smith S. aureus: compact, unencapsulated; diffuse, rigid capsule; and diffuse large clearing, exceptionally large flaccid capsule using dextran sulfate as adjuvant. Serum agglutination and ELISA titers of cows immunized with diffuse and diffuse large clearing increased after immunization and after each boost and remained elevated to the end of the experiment at 112 d. Phagocytosis of diffuse and diffuse large clearing, measured by flow cytometry, was enhanced by immunization with either organism. No antibody response to capsule or enhanced phagocytosis of diffuse developed in cows immunized with compact. However, anticompact antibodies were opsonic for diffuse large clearing. These data show that bovine antibodies to S. aureus capsule are opsonic for bovine neutrophils and that capsule plays a role in inhibition of cell-wall opsonization of S. aureus.

  18. Exaggerated Acute Lung Injury and Impaired Antibacterial Defenses During Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Rats with the Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaomei; Maze, Mervyn; Koch, Lauren G; Britton, Steven L; Hellman, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Rats with Metabolic Syndrome (MetaS) have a dysregulated immune response to the aseptic trauma of surgery. We hypothesized that rats with MetaS would have dysregulated inflammation, increased lung injury, and less effective antibacterial defenses during Staphylococcus (S.) aureus sepsis as compared to rats without MetaS. Low capacity runner (LCR; a model of MetaS) and high capacity runner (HCR) rats were challenged intravenously with S. aureus bacteria. After 48 h, inflammatory mediators and bacteria were quantified in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung homogenates. Lungs were analyzed histologically. BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios were quantified to assess for vascular leak. Endpoints were compared in infected LCR vs HCR rats. LCR rats had higher blood and lung S. aureus counts, as well as higher levels of IL-6 in plasma, lungs and BALF, MIP-2 in plasma and lung, and IL-17A in lungs. Conversely, LCR rats had lower levels of IL-10 in plasma and lungs. Although lactate levels, and liver and renal function tests were similar between groups, LCR rats had higher BALF protein and lung wet-dry ratios, and more pronounced acute lung injury histologically. During S. aureus bacteremia, as compared with HCR rats, LCR (MetaS) rats have heightened pro-inflammatory responses, accompanied by increased acute lung injury and vascular leak. Notably, despite an augmented pro-inflammatory phenotype, LCR rats have higher bacterial levels in their blood and lungs. The MetaS state may exacerbate lung injury and vascular leak by attenuating the inflammation-resolving response, and by weakening antimicrobial defenses.

  19. Role of Penicillin-Binding Protein 2 (PBP2) in the Antibiotic Susceptibility and Cell Wall Cross-Linking of Staphylococcus aureus: Evidence for the Cooperative Functioning of PBP2, PBP4, and PBP2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łęski, Tomasz A.; Tomasz, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Ceftizoxime, a beta-lactam antibiotic with high selective affinity for penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) of Staphylococcus aureus, was used to select a spontaneous resistant mutant of S. aureus strain 27s. The stable resistant mutant ZOX3 had an increased ceftizoxime MIC and a decreased affinity of its PBP2 for ceftizoxime and produced peptidoglycan in which the proportion of highly cross-linked muropeptides was reduced. The pbpB gene of ZOX3 carried a single C-to-T nucleotide substitution at nucleotide 1373, causing replacement of a proline with a leucine at amino acid residue 458 of the transpeptidase domain of the protein, close to the SFN conserved motif. Experimental proof that this point mutation was responsible for the drug-resistant phenotype, and also for the decreased PBP2 affinity and reduced cell wall cross-linking, was provided by allelic replacement experiments and site-directed mutagenesis. Disruption of pbpD, the structural gene of PBP4, in either the parental strain or the mutant caused a large decrease in the highly cross-linked muropeptide components of the cell wall and in the mutant caused a massive accumulation of muropeptide monomers as well. Disruption of pbpD also caused increased sensitivity to ceftizoxime in both the parental cells and the ZOX3 mutant, while introduction of the plasmid-borne mecA gene, the genetic determinant of the beta-lactam resistance protein PBP2A, had the opposite effects. The findings provide evidence for the cooperative functioning of two native S. aureus transpeptidases (PBP2 and PBP4) and an acquired transpeptidase (PBP2A) in staphylococcal cell wall biosynthesis and susceptibility to antimicrobial agents. PMID:15716453

  20. Involvement of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways in Staphylococcus aureus Invasion of Normal Osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, John K.; Elhofy, Adam; Bost, Kenneth L.; Hudson, Michael C.

    2001-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus invades osteoblasts and can persist in the intracellular environment. The present study examined the role of osteoblast mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in bacterial invasion. S. aureus infection of normal human and mouse osteoblasts resulted in an increase in the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK 1 and 2). This stimulation of ERK 1 and 2 correlated with the time course of S. aureus invasion, and bacterial adherence induced the MAPK pathway. ERK 1 and 2 phosphorylation was time and dose dependent and required active S. aureus gene expression for maximal induction. The nonpathogenic Staphylococcus carnosus was also able to induce ERK 1 and 2 phosphorylation, albeit at lower levels than S. aureus. Phosphorylation of the stress-activated protein kinases was increased in both infected human and mouse osteoblasts; however, the p38 MAPK pathway was not activated in response to S. aureus. Finally, the transcription factor c-Jun, but not Elk-1 or ATF-2, was phosphorylated in response to S. aureus infection. PMID:11500391

  1. Treatment of Haemophilus bacteremia with benzylpenicillin is associated with increased (30-day mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thønnings Sara

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimal antibiotic treatment strategies of Haemophilus infections are still needed. Therefore, 30-day case fatality rate (CFR of Haemophilus bacteremia and efficacy of various antibiotic treatment regimes were studied. Methods All episodes of Haemophilus bacteremia in the former Copenhagen County during the period 2000-9 were included in the study. Clinical and biochemical findings and outcome were collected retrospectively from medical records. Results 105 consecutive episodes were identified (median age: 69 years, with only 4 children H. influenzae, and 11% to other Haemophilus species. Pneumonia was the most common primary focus (in 48%, and 58% of the patients had Charlson comorbidity index > 1. Definitive antibiotic therapy was in 26 cases benzylpenicillin, in 12 cases aminopenicillins, in 50 cases cefuroxime and in 16 cases broadspectrum antibiotics, whereas 1 palliative case died without start of therapy. Whereas the use of broadspectrum antibiotics was related to the severity of the disease (admittance to ICU, need for assisted ventilation or hemodialysis, septic shock, no significant difference in clinical features was demonstrated for therapy with benzylpenicillin, aminopenicillin or cefuroxime, except benzylpenicillin was rarely administered to immunosuppressed patients. The CFR was 22% (23/105. The choice of empiric antibiotic therapy was not significantly associated with mortality (adequate vs. inadequate treatment: 23% (21/93 vs. 17% (2/12, respectively, P > 0.05. In contrast, definite antibiotic therapy with cefuroxime or aminopenicillins resulted in a significantly lower CFR than treatment with benzylpenicillin (12% (6/50 or 0% (0/12 vs. 39% (10/26, respectively, Log rank test P  0.02. When adjustments were made for other identified risk factors in bivariate logistic regression analysis, treatment with cefuroxime was still were found to be associated with a significantly lower CFR than for

  2. Diabetes and Risk of Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Infections, Urinary Tract Infections, and Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Reimar W.; Mor, Anil

    2013-01-01

    increase for hospitalization with pneumonia associated with diabetes. The increase of risk for tuberculosis is of similar magnitude in highly developed countries, and possibly higher in low-income countries. Poor glycemic control and long diabetes duration predict higher risk for both pneumonia...... and tuberculosis. Limited data is available for diabetes and influenza, yet both influenza and pneumococcal vaccination is recommended in patients with diabetes. Urinary tract infections: The risk of asymptomatic bacteriuria and cystitis is 1.5 to 2 times increased in diabetes patients, while their risk......This review provides an update on the risk of several important community-acquired infections seen in patients with diabetes: respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and bacteremia. Respiratory tract infections: Recent epidemiological evidence shows a modest (1.25 to 1.75-fold) risk...

  3. Bacteremia due to Acinetobacter ursingii in infants: Reports of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakut, Nurhayat; Kepenekli, Eda Kadayifci; Karaaslan, Ayse; Atici, Serkan; Akkoc, Gulsen; Demir, Sevliya Ocal; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter ursingii is an aerobic, gram-negative, opportunistic microorganism which is rarely isolated among Acinetobacter species. We present two immunocompetent infants who developed bacteremia due to A. ursingii. The first patient is a two -month- old boy who had been hospitalized in pediatric surgery unit for suspected tracheo-esophageal fistula because of recurrent aspiration pneumonia unresponsive to antibiotic therapy. The second patient is a fourteen -month- old boy with prolonged vomiting and diarrhea. A. ursingii was isolated from their blood cultures. They were successfully treated with ampicillin-sulbactam. Although A. ursingii has recently been isolated from a clinical specimen; reports of infection with A. ursingii in children are rare. A. ursingii should be kept in mind as an opportunistic microorganism in children.

  4. Rationale for and protocol of a multi-national population-based bacteremia surveillance collaborative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Church Deirdre L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bloodstream infections are frequent causes of human illness and cause major morbidity and death. In order to best define the epidemiology of these infections and to track changes in occurrence, adverse outcome, and resistance rates over time, population based methodologies are optimal. However, few population-based surveillance systems exist worldwide, and because of differences in methodology inter-regional comparisons are limited. In this report we describe the rationale and propose first practical steps for developing an international collaborative approach to the epidemiologic study and surveillance for bacteremia. Findings The founding collaborative participants represent six regions in four countries in three continents with a combined annual surveillance population of more than 8 million residents. Conclusion Future studies from this collaborative should lead to a better understanding of the epidemiology of bloodstream infections.

  5. Spectrum of bacteremia in posthematopoietic stem cell transplant patients from an Indian center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafur, A; Devarajan, V; Raj, R; Easow, J; Raja, T

    2016-01-01

    Despite the relatively low prevalence of Gram-positive bacteremic infections in Indian oncology patients, glycopeptides are extensively used for empirical management of febrile neutropenia. Our aim was to analyze the spectrum of bacteremia in posthematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients in our center and make a recommendation on glycopeptide use in this patient population. Retrospective analysis of bacteremic data from HSCT recipients in a tertiary care oncology and transplant center from South India, between 2011 and 2013. In 217 patients, 52 bacteremic episodes were identified. The majority of the isolates were Gram-negatives (88.4%) with very few Gram-positives (7.69%). Glycopeptides need not be included in the empirical antibiotic regimen in post-HSCT settings with very low Gram-positive infection rates.

  6. Bifidobacterium Bacteremia: Clinical Characteristics and a Genomic Approach To Assess Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjerde, Erik; Cavanagh, Jorunn Pauline; Simonsen, Gunnar Skov; Klingenberg, Claus

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bifidobacteria are commensals that colonize the orogastrointestinal tract and rarely cause invasive human infections. However, an increasing number of bifidobacterial blood culture isolates has lately been observed in Norway. In order to investigate the pathogenicity of the Bifidobacterium species responsible for bacteremia, we studied Bifidobacterium isolates from 15 patients for whom cultures of blood obtained from 2013 to 2015 were positive. We collected clinical data and analyzed phenotypic and genotypic antibiotic susceptibility. All isolates (11 Bifidobacterium longum, 2 B. breve, and 2 B. animalis isolates) were subjected to whole-genome sequencing. The 15 patients were predominantly in the extreme lower or upper age spectrum, many were severely immunocompromised, and 11 of 15 had gastrointestinal tract-related conditions. In two elderly patients, the Bifidobacterium bacteremia caused a sepsis-like picture, interpreted as the cause of death. Most bifidobacterial isolates had low MICs (≤0.5 mg/liter) to beta-lactam antibiotics, vancomycin, and clindamycin and relatively high MICs to ciprofloxacin and metronidazole. We performed a pangenomic comparison of invasive and noninvasive B. longum isolates based on 65 sequences available from GenBank and the sequences of 11 blood culture isolates from this study. Functional annotation identified unique genes among both invasive and noninvasive isolates of Bifidobacterium. Phylogenetic clusters of invasive isolates were identified for a subset of the B. longum subsp. longum isolates. However, there was no difference in the number of putative virulence genes between invasive and noninvasive isolates. In conclusion, Bifidobacterium has an invasive potential in the immunocompromised host and may cause a sepsis-like picture. Using comparative genomics, we could not delineate specific pathogenicity traits characterizing invasive isolates. PMID:28490487

  7. Mobilization of endothelial progenitors by recurrent bacteremias with a periodontal pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Kebschull

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Periodontal infections are independent risk factors for atherosclerosis. However, the exact mechanisms underlying this link are yet unclear. Here, we evaluate the in vivo effects of bacteremia with a periodontal pathogen on endothelial progenitors, bone marrow-derived cells capable of endothelial regeneration, and delineate the critical pathways for these effects. METHODS: 12-week old C57bl6 wildtype or toll-like receptor (TLR-2 deficient mice were repeatedly intravenously challenged with 10⁹ live P. gingivalis 381 or vehicle. Numbers of Sca1+/flk1+ progenitors, circulating angiogenic cells, CFU-Hill, and late-outgrowth EPC were measured by FACS/culture. Endothelial function was assessed using isolated organ baths, reendothelization was measured in a carotid injury model. RANKL/osteoprotegerin levels were assessed by ELISA/qPCR. RESULTS: In wildtype mice challenged with intravenous P.gingivalis, numbers of Sca1+/flk1+ progenitors, CAC, CFU-Hill, and late-outgrowth EPC were strongly increased in peripheral circulation and spleen, whereas Sca1+/flk1+ progenitor numbers in bone marrow decreased. Circulating EPCs were functional, as indicated by improved endothelial function and improved reendothelization in infected mice. The osteoprotegerin/RANKL ratio was increased after P. gingivalis challenge in the bone marrow niche of wildtype mice and late-outgrowth EPC in vitro. Conversely, in mice deficient in TLR2, no increase in progenitor mobilization or osteoprotegerin/RANKL ratio was detected. CONCLUSION: Recurrent transient bacteremias, a feature of periodontitis, increase peripheral EPC counts and decrease EPC pools in the bone marrow, thereby possibly reducing overall endothelial regeneration capacity, conceivably explaining pro-atherogenic properties of periodontal infections. These effects are seemingly mediated by toll-like receptor (TLR-2.

  8. [The relevance of correct identification and interpretation of susceptibility testing of Aeromonas spp. bacteremia isolates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Castillo, Ana; Lepe-Jiménez, José Antonio; Torres-Sánchez, María José; Artacho-Reinoso, María José; Aznar-Martín, Javier

    2016-02-01

    To assess the relevance of correct identification and interpretation of susceptibility testing of Aeromonas spp. bacteremia isolates using newly developed molecular methods in comparison to previous conventional methods. The study included 22 patients with bacteremia due to Aeromonas hydrophila group, microbiologically characterized using the MicroScan system. Further identification to species level was performed by mass spectrometry, and confirmed by sequencing the rpoB gene. The MIC of imipenem, cefotaxime, piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin and cotrimoxazole was studied using a commercial broth microdilution and antibiotic gradient strips with low and high inocula. Detection of carbapenemase production was performed using the modified Hodge test, and was confirmed by amplifying the cphA gene by PCR. A total of 9 (40.9%) isolates were identified as Aeromonas hydrophila, 8 (36.4%) as Aeromonas veronii, and the remaining 5 (22.7%) isolates as Aeromonas caviae. Resistance to beta-lactams according to both the commercial microdilution and MIC gradient strips methods was: 36%-50% to imipenem; 4%-56% to cefotaxime, and 27%-56% to piperacillin/tazobactam. The agreement between results generated by the automated system and the diffusion antibiotic gradient strip was, for all 3 species, 68% for imipenem, 50% to cefotaxime, and 46% to piperacillin/tazobactam. No resistance to cotrimoxazole and ciprofloxacin was found by either of the two methods, although 22.7% of the strains were resistant to nalidixic acid. It is essential to identify the isolates of Aeromonas spp. at the species level, due to the fact that beta-lactam resistance is species- and method-dependent. The high rate of resistance to beta-lactam and quinolones reduce their application as empiric treatments for invasive infection by Aeromonas ssp. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical effect of discordance in empirical treatment of cases with urinary tract infection accompanied by bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dökmetaş, İlyas; Hamidi, Aziz Ahmad; Bulut, Mehmet Emin; Çetin, Sinan; Öncül, Ahsen; Uzun, Nuray

    2017-12-01

    It has been shown in previous studies that inadequate empirical treatment is associated with mortality in a variety of infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, the clinical effect of discordance in empirical treatment was investigated in patients with urinary tract infection (UTI) accompanied by bacteremia. We retrospectively reviewed the files of adult (>18 years old) patients who were diagnosed with UTI in our clinic between January 2014 and December 2015. Cases in which the same causative microorganism grew in both blood and urine cultures were included in the study. Patients using ceftriaxone and carbapenem as empirical antibiotic therapy (EAT) were compared as two different groups. In cases that the ethiologic agents were extended- spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli isolates, if the microorganism was resistant to initial antibiotic treatment the situation was defined as EAT discordance, and if it was sensitive it was defined as EAT concordance. After the exclusion criteria were applied, 65 of the 266 cases examined were taken into the study. Clinical and laboratory features of cases of ceftriaxone and carbapenem groups were similar. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of hospital stay and survival (p>0.05). Of 28 cases of ESBL-producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae, 18 were EAT discordant and 10 were EAT concordant. Clinical and laboratory features of EAT concordant and EAT discordant groups were similar. No statistically significant difference was found between the two groups in terms of hospital stay and survival (p>0.05). It was considered that ceftriaxone can still be a viable option in the EAT of UTI, which is accompanied by bacteremia without severe sepsis and septic shock findings. It was concluded that EAT discordance may not have a negative effect on the duration of hospital stay and survival rates in neither total cases nor ESBL positive

  10. Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus: the Trojan horse of recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Neil C-W; Foreman, Andrew; Jardeleza, Camille; Douglas, Richard; Vreugde, Sarah; Wormald, Peter-John

    2013-04-01

    Despite recent evidence suggesting that Staphylococcus aureus exists within the sinonasal epithelium of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) patients, certain questions remain. The intracellular environment may provide a protective niche for pathogenic bacteria to evade host immunity and yet provide a reservoir for reinfection. To date, no studies have examined the impact of this bacterial phenotype; therefore, this study was designed to evaluate the role of intracellular S. aureus on postsurgical outcomes. This study included 51 patients undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) for medically-recalcitrant CRS. Sinonasal mucosa harvested at the time of surgery was dually stained with fluorescent molecular probes and imaged using confocal scanning laser microscopy for biofilm and intracellular status. Patients were followed in their early and late postoperative course for evidence of ongoing disease and signs of clinical relapse. Intracellular S. aureus was identified in 20 of 51 (39%) patients, and all were associated with surface biofilm. Biofilm alone was found in 16 of 51 (31%) patients and 15 of 51 (29%) patients had no evidence of S. aureus. Intracellular positive patients had a significantly higher risk of late clinical and microbiological relapse (p = 0.014). In this study, biofilm status without coexisting intracellular bacteria did not appear to impact on outcomes. Clinical and microbiological relapse of disease following ESS is significantly associated with intracellular S. aureus. Evidence suggests that this disease association is independent to surface biofilm status. Intracellular bacteria should be taken into consideration when designing novel treatment strategies to lessen the chance of reinfection. © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  11. ENTEROTOXIGENIC STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS IN SHEEP RAW MILK

    OpenAIRE

    G. Giacinti; Amatiste, S.; A. Tammaro; D. Sagrafoli; G. Giangolini; R. Rosati

    2011-01-01

    A total of 366 raw milk samples from 30 sheep farms were examined quantitatively for Staphylococcus aureus. Enterotoxin production by strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated was investigated. S. aureus was detected in 19 farms (63,3%). The ability to synthetise enterotoxins was found in ten strains (52,6%). Production of staphylococcal enterotoxins C (SEC) was recorded in 6 (60%) and production of SEC together with staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) in 4 (40%) staphylococcal isolates. Raw m...

  12. Differential Analysis of the Nasal Microbiome of Pig Carriers or Non-Carriers of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Espinosa-Gongora

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is presently regarded as an emerging zoonotic agent due to the spread of specific methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA clones in pig farms. Studying the microbiota can be useful for the identification of bacteria that antagonize such opportunistic veterinary and zoonotic pathogen in animal carriers. The aim of this study was to determine whether the nasal microbiome of pig S. aureus carriers differs from that of non-carriers. The V3-V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced from nasal swabs of 44 S. aureus carriers and 56 non-carriers using the 454 GS FLX titanium system. Carriers and non-carriers were selected on the basis of quantitative longitudinal data on S. aureus carriage in 600 pigs sampled at 20 Danish herds included in two previous studies in Denmark. Raw sequences were analysed with the BION meta package and the resulting abundance matrix was analysed using the DESeq2 package in R to identify operational taxonomic units (OTUs with differential abundance between S. aureus carriers and non-carriers. Twenty OTUs were significantly associated to non-carriers, including species with known probiotic potential and antimicrobial effect such as lactic acid-producing isolates described among Leuconostoc spp. and some members of the Lachnospiraceae family, which is known for butyrate production. Further 5 OTUs were significantly associated to carriage, including known pathogenic bacteria such as Pasteurella multocida and Klebsiella spp. Our results show that the nasal microbiome of pigs that are not colonized with S. aureus harbours several species/taxa that are significantly less abundant in pig carriers, suggesting that the nasal microbiota may play a role in the individual predisposition to S. aureus nasal carriage in pigs. Further research is warranted to isolate these bacteria and assess their possible antagonistic effect on S. aureus for the pursuit of new strategies to control MRSA in pig farming.

  13. Effects of nisin on Staphylococcus aureus count and physicochemical properties of Minas Frescal cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicio, Bruna A; Pinto, Maximiliano S; Oliveira, Francielly S; Lempk, Marcus W; Pires, Ana Clarissa S; Lelis, Carini A

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of nisin on in vitro and in situ Staphylococcus aureus counts. For in vitro experiment, milk was inoculated with 5.0 log cfu·mL(-1) of S. aureus and nisin was added at concentrations of 0, 100, 200, 400, and 500 IU mL(-1). The main effect of the bacteriocin was lag phase extension from 0h, for 0 and 100 IU·mL(-1) to 8h, when 200, 400, and 500 IU·mL(-1) of nisin were used; however, log phase was not affected. Microbial growth rate was found to be exponential and around 0.11 log cfu·mL(-1)·h(-1) for all treatments. For in situ experiments, 0, 400, and 500 IU·mL(-1) of nisin were directly added to pasteurized milk previously inoculated with 5.0 log cfu·g(-1) of S. aureus. Milk, curd, and whey were analyzed to S. aureus counts. Nisin at concentration of 500 IU·mL(-1) was able to reduce S. aureus count in curd and whey, demonstrating nisin partition between both phases. Throughout storage at 4°C, S. aureus count increased for all treatments, but the bacterial grew slower when nisin was added in both concentrations, maintaining S. aureus count about 1.5 log cycles lower than the control, despite abusive initial S. aureus count. Therefore, nisin seems to play an important role in reducing S. aureus initial count in cheese made with highly contaminated milk. Nisin showed potential to be used as an additional, important hurdle to improve Minas Frescal cheese safety, without replacing good manufacturing practices. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential Analysis of the Nasal Microbiome of Pig Carriers or Non-Carriers of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Larsen, Niels; Schønning, Kristian; Fredholm, Merete; Guardabassi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is presently regarded as an emerging zoonotic agent due to the spread of specific methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clones in pig farms. Studying the microbiota can be useful for the identification of bacteria that antagonize such opportunistic veterinary and zoonotic pathogen in animal carriers. The aim of this study was to determine whether the nasal microbiome of pig S. aureus carriers differs from that of non-carriers. The V3-V5 region of the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced from nasal swabs of 44 S. aureus carriers and 56 non-carriers using the 454 GS FLX titanium system. Carriers and non-carriers were selected on the basis of quantitative longitudinal data on S. aureus carriage in 600 pigs sampled at 20 Danish herds included in two previous studies in Denmark. Raw sequences were analysed with the BION meta package and the resulting abundance matrix was analysed using the DESeq2 package in R to identify operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with differential abundance between S. aureus carriers and non-carriers. Twenty OTUs were significantly associated to non-carriers, including species with known probiotic potential and antimicrobial effect such as lactic acid-producing isolates described among Leuconostoc spp. and some members of the Lachnospiraceae family, which is known for butyrate production. Further 5 OTUs were significantly associated to carriage, including known pathogenic bacteria such as Pasteurella multocida and Klebsiella spp. Our results show that the nasal microbiome of pigs that are not colonized with S. aureus harbours several species/taxa that are significantly less abundant in pig carriers, suggesting that the nasal microbiota may play a role in the individual predisposition to S. aureus nasal carriage in pigs. Further research is warranted to isolate these bacteria and assess their possible antagonistic effect on S. aureus for the pursuit of new strategies to control MRSA in pig farming.

  15. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Nasal Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedieh Moradi-Tabriz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is one of the major virulence factors of hospital and community acquired infections. Healthcare workers can be the host of S.aureus for many months. And it is very important due to the possibility of transmission to patients. Theaim of this study was to determine the prevalence of S.aureus nasal carriers, the antibiotic susceptibility pattern and its effective factors on Sina Hospital workers in Tehran, Iran.Methods: healthcare workers from different wards of Sina Hospital were studied in Tehran, Iran in 2010. Samples were taken from both nostrils of each individual. After 18-24hr incubation, the isolates were evaluated by gram stain, catalase, coagulase, DNase and manitol salt agar bywhich staphylococci were isolated. Disk diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility tests against oxacillin, cefoxitin and vancomycin was performed. Finally, by using PCR, the mecA gene was studied in methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA.Results: 34of the 166 workers, were nasal carriers of S. aureus and one of them was MRSA. The ratio of carriers in operating room workers was more than other wards, without significant relationship (p.value>0.05. S.aureus was found in 34.3% of operating room, 13.8% of nurses and 22.7% of licensed and other personnel. There was a significant relationship betweenoccupations and S.aureus carriage (p.value:0.03.Conclusion: According to the low prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA carriers in Sina hospital, it can be said that the role of the hospital staff as a source of infections caused by S. aureus especially is very low.

  16. Immunomodulation and Disease Tolerance to Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most frequent pathogens that causes severe morbidity and mortality throughout the world. S. aureus can infect skin and soft tissues or become invasive leading to diseases such as pneumonia, endocarditis, sepsis or toxic shock syndrome. In contrast, S. aureus is also a common commensal microbe and is often part of the human nasal microbiome without causing any apparent disease. In this review, we explore the immunomodulation and disease tolerance mechanisms that promote commensalism to S. aureus.

  17. S. aureus colonization at ICU admission as a risk factor for developing S. aureus ICU pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paling, Fleur P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413968669; Wolkewitz, Martin; Bode, Lonneke G M; Klein Klouwenberg, Peter M C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/33706864X; Ong, David S Y; Depuydt, Pieter; de Bus, Liesbet; Sifakis, Frangiscos; Bonten, Marc J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337; Kluijtmans, Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323262139

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the incidence of intensive care unit (ICU) acquired pneumonia caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and its association with S. aureus colonization at ICU admission. METHODS: This was a post-hoc analysis of two cohort studies in critically ill patients. The primary

  18. Relationship and susceptibility profile of Staphylococcus aureus infection diabetic foot ulcers with Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Aza Bahadeen

    2013-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the main cause of diabetic foot infection with the patient's endogenous flora as the principal source. Nasal carriage of S. aureus has been identified as an important risk factor for the acquisition of diabetic foot infections. The study assessment the associations of S. aureus with methicillin resistant S. aureus were isolation from diabetic foot infection and nasal carriage of the same patients and their antibiotic susceptibility profile. Diagnosis of S. aureus and methicillin resistant S. aureus were carried out by using standard procedures. Antibiotic sensitivity profiles were determent by breakpoint dilution method. Out of 222 S. aureus isolation, 139 (62.61%) were isolated from the diabetic foot and 83 (37.39%) from the nasal carriage. Seventy one (30.87%) of the patients were S. aureus infection diabetic foot with nasal carriage. Among diabetic foot infection and nasal carriage patients, 40.85% of S. aureus were considered as methicillin resistant S. aureus. Rifampicin (96.40%) and Levofloxacin (91.44%) were active against S. aureus. Patients at strong risk for methicillin resistant S. aureus nasal carriage and subsequent diabetic foot infection with high resistance to antibiotics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduction in hospitalwide incidence of infection or colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with use of antimicrobial hand-hygiene gel and statistical process control charts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Glenys; Watson, Kerrie; Bailey, Michael; Land, Gillian; Borrell, Susan; Houston, Leanne; Kehoe, Rosaleen; Bass, Pauline; Cockroft, Emma; Marshall, Caroline; Mijch, Anne; Spelman, Denis

    2007-07-01

    To evaluate the impact of serial interventions on the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Longitudinal observational study before and after interventions. The Alfred Hospital is a 350-bed tertiary referral hospital with a 35-bed intensive care unit (ICU). A series of interventions including the introduction of an antimicrobial hand-hygiene gel to the intensive care unit and a hospitalwide MRSA surveillance feedback program that used statistical process control charts but not active surveillance cultures. Serial interventions were introduced between January 2003 and May 2006. The incidence and rates of new patients colonized or infected with MRSA and episodes of MRSA bacteremia in the intensive care unit and hospitalwide were compared between the preintervention and intervention periods. Segmented regression analysis was used to calculate the percentage reduction in new patients with MRSA and in episodes of MRSA bacteremia hospitalwide in the intervention period. The rate of new patients with MRSA in the ICU was 6.7 cases per 100 patient admissions in the intervention period, compared with 9.3 cases per 100 patient admissions in the preintervention period (P=.047). The hospitalwide rate of new patients with MRSA was 1.7 cases per 100 patient admissions in the intervention period, compared with 3.0 cases per 100 patient admissions in the preintervention period (P<.001). By use of segmented regression analysis, the maximum and conservative estimates for percentage reduction in the rate of new patients with MRSA were 79.5% and 42.0%, respectively, and the maximum and conservative estimates for percentage reduction in the rate of episodes of MRSA bacteremia were 87.4% and 39.0%, respectively. A sustained reduction in the number of new patients with MRSA colonization or infection has been demonstrated using minimal resources and a limited number of interventions.

  20. Candidate genes on murine chromosome 8 are associated with susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus infection in mice and are involved with Staphylococcus aureus septicemia in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Yan

    Full Text Available We previously showed that chromosome 8 of A/J mice was associated with susceptibility to S. aureus infection. However, the specific genes responsible for this susceptibility are unknown. Chromosome substitution strain 8 (CSS8 mice, which have chromosome 8 from A/J but an otherwise C57BL/6J genome, were used to identify the genetic determinants of susceptibility to S. aureus on chromosome 8. Quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping of S. aureus-infected N2 backcross mice (F1 [C8A] × C57BL/6J identified a locus 83180780-88103009 (GRCm38/mm10 on A/J chromosome 8 that was linked to S. aureus susceptibility. All genes on the QTL (n~ 102 were further analyzed by three different strategies: 1 different expression in susceptible (A/J and resistant (C57BL/6J mice only in response to S. aureus, 2 consistently different expression in both uninfected and infected states between the two strains, and 3 damaging non-synonymous SNPs in either strain. Eleven candidate genes from the QTL region were significantly differently expressed in patients with S. aureus infection vs healthy human subjects. Four of these 11 genes also exhibited significantly different expression in S. aureus-challenged human neutrophils: Ier2, Crif1, Cd97 and Lyl1. CD97 ligand binding was evaluated within peritoneal neutrophils from A/J and C57BL/6J. CD97 from A/J had stronger CD55 but weaker integrin α5β1 ligand binding as compared with C57BL/6J. Because CD55/CD97 binding regulates immune cell activation and cytokine production, and integrin α5β1 is a membrane receptor for fibronectin, which is also bound by S. aureus, strain-specific differences could contribute to susceptibility to S. aureus. Down-regulation of Crif1 with siRNA was associated with increased host cell apoptosis among both naïve and S. aureus-infected bone marrow-derived macrophages. Specific genes in A/J chromosome 8, including Cd97 and Crif1, may play important roles in host defense against S. aureus.

  1. Horses in Denmark Are a Reservoir of Diverse Clones of Methicillin-Resistant and -Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Md Zohorul; Espinosa-Gongora, Carmen; Damborg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Denmark is a country with high prevalence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex (CC) 398 in pigs. Even though pig farming is regarded as the main source of human infection or colonization with MRSA CC398, 10-15% of the human cases appear not to ...... that these animals are exposed to MRSA and MSSA clones that are likely to originate from livestock and humans, respectively....... isolates was t127 (CC1), which was detected in 12 horses from 11 farms and represents the most common S. aureus clone isolated from human bacteremia cases in Denmark. Among the 17 MRSA carriers, 10 horses from three farms carried CC398 t011 harboring the immune evasion cluster (IEC), four horses from two......-adapted clone in Europe and were closely related to human t011 isolates fromthree Danish equine veterinarians, whereas t034 isolates belonged to pig-adapted clones. Our study confirms that horses carry an equine-specific clone of MRSA CC398 that can be transmitted to veterinary personnel, and reveals...

  2. Third generation cephalosporin resistant Enterobacteriaceae and multidrug resistant gram-negative bacteria causing bacteremia in febrile neutropenia adult cancer patients in Lebanon, broad spectrum antibiotics use as a major risk factor, and correlation with poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghnieh, Rima; Estaitieh, Nour; Mugharbil, Anas; Jisr, Tamima; Abdallah, Dania I; Ziade, Fouad; Sinno, Loubna; Ibrahim, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Bacteremia remains a major cause of life-threatening complications in patients receiving anticancer chemotherapy. The spectrum and susceptibility profiles of causative microorganisms differ with time and place. Data from Lebanon are scarce. We aim at evaluating the epidemiology of bacteremia in cancer patients in a university hospital in Lebanon, emphasizing antibiotic resistance and risk factors of multi-drug resistant organism (MDRO)-associated bacteremia. This is a retrospective study of 75 episodes of bacteremia occurring in febrile neutropenic patients admitted to the hematology-oncology unit at Makassed General Hospital, Lebanon, from October 2009-January 2012. It corresponds to epidemiological data on bacteremia episodes in febrile neutropenic cancer patients including antimicrobial resistance and identification of risk factors associated with third generation cephalosporin resistance (3GCR) and MDRO-associated bacteremia. Out of 75 bacteremias, 42.7% were gram-positive (GP), and 57.3% were gram-negative (GN). GP bacteremias were mostly due to methicillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci (28% of total bacteremias and 66% of GP bacteremias). Among the GN bacteremias, Escherichia coli (22.7% of total, 39.5% of GN organisms) and Klebsiella pneumoniae(13.3% of total, 23.3% of GN organisms) were the most important causative agents. GN bacteremia due to 3GC sensitive (3GCS) bacteria represented 28% of total bacteremias, while 29% were due to 3GCR bacteria and 9% were due to carbapenem-resistant organisms. There was a significant correlation between bacteremia with MDRO and subsequent intubation, sepsis and mortality. Among potential risk factors, only broad spectrum antibiotic intake >4 days before bacteremia was found to be statistically significant for acquisition of 3GCR bacteria. Using carbapenems or piperacillin/tazobactam>4 days before bacteremia was significantly associated with the emergence of MDRO (p < 0.05). Our findings have major

  3. Significância clínica, epidemiologia e microbiologia das bacteremias por estafilococos coagulase-negativos em Hospital de Ensino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Góngora-Rubio F.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Os estafilococos coagulase-negativos (ECN são importantes agentes etiológicos das bacteremias hospitalares e freqüentemente considerados como contaminantes de hemoculturas. No período de outubro de 1990 a setembro de 1992, foram estudadas 300 hemoculturas positivas para ECN no Hospital São Paulo, sendo 141 bacteremias consideradas de origem hospitalar. Com o objetivo de diferenciar as bacteremias hospitalares verdadeiras das contaminantes por ECN, foram definidos critérios clínicos e microbiológicos. Apenas 20,6% das bacteremias hospitalares por ECN foram consideradas como verdadeiras. A maior freqüência de recém-nascidos internados na unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal, a presença de cateter intravascular e a utilização de nutrição parenteral foram achados significativos. Não houve diferença significante quanto a resistência a oxacilina e produção de SLIME entre os ECN isolados das bacteremias verdadeiras e contaminantes. O critério clínico e a positividade da hemocultura até 48 horas após a incubação, utilizados em nossa definição, foram úteis para caracterizar as bacteremias verdadeiras por ECN.

  4. Comparative study of bacteremias caused by Enterococcus spp. with and without high-level resistance to gentamicin. The Grupo Andaluz para el estudio de las Enfermedades Infecciosas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Granado, F J; Cisneros, J M; Luque, R; Torres-Tortosa, M; Gamboa, F; Díez, F; Villanueva, J L; Pérez-Cano, R; Pasquau, J; Merino, D; Menchero, A; Mora, D; López-Ruz, M A; Vergara, A

    1998-02-01

    A prospective, multicenter study was carried out over a period of 10 months. All patients with clinically significant bacteremia caused by Enterococcus spp. were included. The epidemiological, microbiological, clinical, and prognostic features and the relationship of these features to the presence of high-level resistance to gentamicin (HLRG) were studied. Ninety-three patients with enterococcal bacteremia were included, and 31 of these cases were caused by HLRG (33%). The multivariate analysis selected chronic renal failure, intensive care unit stay, previous use of antimicrobial agents, and Enterococcus faecalis species as the independent risk factors that influenced the development of HLRG. The strains with HLRG showed lower levels of susceptibility to penicillin and ciprofloxacin. Clinical features (except for chronic renal failure) were similar in both groups of patients. HLRG did not influence the prognosis for patients with enterococcal bacteremia in terms of either the crude mortality rate (29% for patients with bacteremia caused by enterococci with HLRG and 28% for patients not infected with strains with HLRG) or the hospital stay after the acquisition of enterococcal bacteremia. Hemodynamic compromise, inappropriate antimicrobial therapy, and mechanical ventilation were revealed in the multivariate analysis to be the independent risk factors for mortality. Prolonged hospitalization was associated with the nosocomial acquisition of bacteremia and polymicrobial infections.

  5. Searching PubMed for studies on bacteremia, bloodstream infection, septicemia, or whatever the best term is: a note of caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søgaard, Mette; Andersen, Jens P; Schønheyder, Henrik C

    2012-04-01

    There is inconsistency in the terminology used to describe bacteremia. To demonstrate the impact on information retrieval, we compared the yield of articles from PubMed MEDLINE using the terms "bacteremia," "bloodstream infection," and "septicemia." We searched for articles published between 1966 and 2009, and depicted the relationships among queries graphically. To examine the content of the retrieved articles, we extracted all Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms and compared topic similarity using a cosine measure. The recovered articles differed greatly by term, and only 53 articles were captured by all terms. Of the articles retrieved by the "bacteremia" query, 21,438 (84.1%) were not captured when searching for "bloodstream infection" or "septicemia." Likewise, only 2,243 of the 11,796 articles recovered by free-text query for "bloodstream infection" were retrieved by the "bacteremia" query (19%). Entering "bloodstream infection" as a phrase, 46.1% of the records overlapped with the "bacteremia" query. Similarity measures ranged from 0.52 to 0.78 and were lowest for "bloodstream infection" as a phrase compared with "septicemia." Inconsistent terminology has a major impact on the yield of queries. Agreement on terminology should be sought and promoted by scientific journals. An immediate solution is to add "bloodstream infection" as entry term for bacteremia in the MeSH vocabulary. Copyright © 2012 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of Two New Chromogenic Media, CHROMagar MRSA and S. aureus ID, for Identifying Staphylococcus aureus and Screening Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus

    OpenAIRE

    Hedin, Göran; Fang, Hong

    2005-01-01

    Thirty-nine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates with diverse genetic backgrounds and two reference strains were correctly identified as S. aureus on CHROMagar MRSA and S. aureus ID media. Growth inhibition on CHROMagar MRSA was noted. A combination of cefoxitin disk and S. aureus ID was found suitable for rapid MRSA screening.

  7. Oral antibiotics increase blood neutrophil maturation and reduce bacteremia and necrotizing enterocolitis in the immediate postnatal period of preterm pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Fuglsang, Eva; Jiang, Pingping

    2016-01-01

    Immature immunity may predispose preterm neonates to infections and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intravenous antibiotics are frequently given to prevent and treat sepsis, while oral antibiotics are seldom used. We hypothesized that oral antibiotics promote maturation of systemic immunity and ......, high gut permeability, Gram-positive bacteremia and NEC. Neonatal oral antibiotics may benefit mucosal and systemic immunity via delayed gut colonization and enhanced blood neutrophil maturation just after preterm birth.......Immature immunity may predispose preterm neonates to infections and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intravenous antibiotics are frequently given to prevent and treat sepsis, while oral antibiotics are seldom used. We hypothesized that oral antibiotics promote maturation of systemic immunity...... and delay gut bacterial colonization and thereby protect preterm neonates against both NEC and bacteremia in the immediate postnatal period. Preterm pigs were given formula and administered saline (CON) or broad-spectrum antibiotics orally (ORA) or systemically (SYS) for 5 d after birth. Temporal changes...

  8. Clinical outbreak of linezolid-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez García, Miguel; De la Torre, María Angeles; Morales, Gracia; Peláez, Beatriz; Tolón, María José; Domingo, Sara; Candel, Francisco Javier; Andrade, Raquel; Arribi, Ana; García, Nicolás; Martínez Sagasti, Fernando; Fereres, José; Picazo, Juan

    2010-06-09

    Linezolid resistance is extremely uncommon in Staphylococcus aureus. To report an outbreak with linezolid and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (LRSA) in an intensive care department and the effective control measures taken. Outbreak study of consecutive critically ill patients colonized and/or infected with LRSA at an intensive care department of a 1000-bed tertiary care university teaching hospital in Madrid, Spain. Patients were placed under strict contact isolation. Daily updates of outbreak data and recommendations for the use of linezolid were issued. Extensive environmental sampling and screening of the hands of health care workers were performed. Linezolid use and clinical and epidemiological characteristics and outcomes using minimal inhibitory concentrations, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and polymerase chain reaction of LRSA isolates. Between April 13 and June 26, 2008, 12 patients with LRSA were identified. In 6 patients, LRSA caused ventilator-associated pneumonia and in 3 patients it caused bacteremia. Isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, glycopeptides, tigecycline, and daptomycin. Genotyping identified 1 predominant clone and 3 other types. Cfr-mediated linezolid resistance was demonstrated in all isolates. Potential hospital staff carriers and environmental samples were negative except for one. Six patients died, 5 of them in the intensive care unit, with 1 death attributed to LRSA infection. Linezolid use decreased from 202 defined daily doses in April 2008 to 25 defined daily doses in July 2008. Between July 2008 and April 2010, no new cases have been identified in the weekly surveillance cultures or diagnostic samples. The first clinical outbreak, to our knowledge, with LRSA mediated by the cfr gene developed at our center, was associated with nosocomial transmission and extensive usage of linezolid. Reduction of linezolid use and infection-control measures were associated with the termination of the outbreak.

  9. Relative prevalence of methicilline resistant Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In our region, although methicillin resistance increased in S. aureus strains, because of the unavailability and the high cost of alternative antibiotics, gentamycin is still suggested as an alternative for treatment of S. aureus infections. These results however indicate that vancomycin seemed to be the only antimicrobial agent ...

  10. METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS (MRSA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nosocomial infections caused by methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus often pose therapeutic dilemma to the clinicians because of the multi resistant nature of these strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Outbreaks of both nosocomial and community acquired infections are also frequent and difficult to control.

  11. (allium sativum) on staphylococcus aureus conjunctivites

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. Bacterial conjunctivitis is common usually self-limiting. The most common causative organisms are staphylococcus epidermis and staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Bacterial conjunctivitis is rarely sight threatening. However, accurate diagnosis and prompt treatment at the primary level is important as it ...

  12. Nasal Carriage of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major causes of community and hospital acquired infections. The emergence of methicillin resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus in the hospitals and the community is a serious health problem. The aim of this study was to determine the nasal carriage and ...