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Sample records for auranofin disrupts selenium

  1. Selective inhibition of endogenous antioxidants with Auranofin causes mitochondrial oxidative stress which can be countered by selenium supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radenkovic, Filip; Holland, Olivia; Vanderlelie, Jessica J; Perkins, Anthony V

    2017-12-15

    Auranofin is a thiol-reactive gold (I)-containing compound with potential asa chemotherapeutic. Auranofin has the capacity to selectively inhibit endogenous antioxidant enzymes thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), resulting in oxidative stress and the initiation of a pro-apoptotic cascade. The effect of Auranofin exposure on TrxR and GPx, and the potential for cellular protection through selenium supplementation was examined in the non-cancerous human cell line Swan-71. Auranofin exposure resulted in a concentration dependent differential inhibition of selenoprotein antioxidants. Significant inhibition of TrxR was observed at 20nM Auranofin with inhibition of GPx from 10µM. Significant increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) were associated with antioxidant inhibition at Auranofin concentrations of 100nM (TrxR inhibition) and 10µM (TrxR and GPx inhibition), respectively. Evaluation of mitochondrial respiration demonstrated significant reductions in routine and maximal respiration at both 100nM and 10μM Auranofin. Auranofin treatment at concentrations of 10μM and higher concentrations resulted in a ∼68% decrease in cellular viability and was associated with elevations in pro-apoptotic markers cytochrome c flux control factor (FCFc) at concentration of 100nM and mitochondrial Bax at 10μM. The supplementation of selenium (100nM) prior to treatment had a generalized protective affect through the restoration of antioxidant activity with a significant increase in TrxR and GPx activity, a significant reduction in ROS and associated improvement in mitochondrial respiration and cellular viability (10µM ∼48% increase). Selenium supplementation reduced the FCFc at low doses of Auranofin (<10μM) however no effect was noted on either FCFc or Bax at concentrations above 10μM. The inhibition of antioxidant systems in non-cancerous cells by Auranofin is strongly dose dependent, and this inhibition can be altered by selenium exposure

  2. Selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillings, Lisa L.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Selenium (Se) was discovered in 1817 in pyrite from copper mines in Sweden. It is a trace element in Earth’s crust, with an abundance of three to seven orders of magnitude less than the major rock-forming elements. Commercial use of selenium began in the United States in 1910, when it was used as a pigment for paints, ceramic glazes, and red glass. Since that time, it has had many other economic uses—notably, in the 1930s and 1940s, when it was used in rectifiers (which change alternating current to direct current), and in the 1960s, when it began to be used in the liner of photocopier drums. In the 21st century, other compounds have replaced selenium in these older products; modern uses for selenium include energy-efficient windows that limit heat transfer and thin-film photovoltaic cells that convert solar energy into electricity.In Earth’s crust, selenium is found as selenide minerals, selenate and selenite salts, and as substitution for sulfur in sulfide minerals. It is the sulfide minerals, most commonly those in porphyry copper deposits, that provide the bulk of the selenium produced for the international commodity market. Selenium is obtained as a byproduct of copper refining and recovered from the anode slimes generated in electrolytic production of copper. Because of this, the countries that have the largest resources and (or) reserves of copper also have the largest resources and (or) reserves of selenium.Because selenium occurs naturally in Earth’s crust, its presence in air, water, and soil results from both geologic reactions and human activity. Selenium is found concentrated naturally in soils that overlie bedrock with high selenium concentrations. Selenium mining, processing, use in industrial and agricultural applications, and disposal may all contribute selenium to the environment. A well-known case of selenium contamination from agricultural practices was discovered in 1983 in the Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge in California. There

  3. Auranofin efficacy against MDR Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguinagalde, Leire; Díez-Martínez, Roberto; Yuste, Jose; Royo, Inmaculada; Gil, Carmen; Lasa, Íñigo; Martín-Fontecha, Mar; Marín-Ramos, Nagore Isabel; Ardanuy, Carmen; Liñares, Josefina; García, Pedro; García, Ernesto; Sánchez-Puelles, José M

    2015-09-01

    Auranofin is an FDA-approved, gold-containing compound in clinical use for the oral treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and has been recently granted by the regulatory authorities due to its antiprotozoal properties. A reprofiling strategy was performed with a Streptococcus pneumoniae phenotypic screen and a proprietary library of compounds, consisting of both FDA-approved and unapproved bioactive compounds. Two different multiresistant S. pneumoniae strains were employed in a sepsis mouse model of infection. In addition, an MRSA strain was tested using both the thigh model and a mesh-associated biofilm infection in mice. The repurposing approach showed the high potency of auranofin against multiresistant clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus in vitro and in vivo. Efficacy in the S. pneumoniae sepsis model was obtained using auranofin by the oral route in the dose ranges used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Thioglucose replacement by alkyl chains showed that this moiety was not essential for the antibacterial activity and led to the discovery of a new gold derivative (MH05) with remarkable activity in vitro and in vivo. Auranofin and the new gold derivative MH05 showed encouraging in vivo activity against multiresistant clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae and S. aureus. The clinical management of auranofin, alone or in combination with other antibiotics, deserves further exploration before use in patients presenting therapeutic failure caused by infections with multiresistant Gram-positive pathogens. Decades of clinical use mean that this compound is safe to use and may accelerate its evaluation in humans. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Acute exposure to selenium disrupts associative conditioning and long-term memory recall in honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Christina M; Elmore, Christopher; Hladun, Kristen R; Trumble, John T; Smith, Brian H

    2016-05-01

    A plethora of toxic compounds - including pesticides, heavy metals, and metalloids - have been detected in honey bees (Apis mellifera) and their colonies. One such compound is selenium, which bees are exposed to by consuming nectar and pollen from flowers grown in contaminated areas. Though selenium is lethal at high concentrations, sublethal exposure may also impair honey bees' ability to function normally. Examining the effect of selenium exposure on learning and memory provides a sensitive assay with which to identify sublethal effects on honey bee health and behavior. To determine whether sublethal selenium exposure causes learning and memory deficits, we used proboscis extension reflex conditioning coupled with recall tests 30min and 24h post-conditioning. We exposed forager honey bees to a single sublethal dose of selenium, and 3h later we used an olfactory conditioning assay to train the bees to discriminate between one odor associated with sucrose-reinforcement and a second unreinforced odor. Following conditioning we tested short- and long-term recall of the task. Acute exposure to as little as 1.8ng of an inorganic form of selenium (sodium selenate) before conditioning caused a reduction in behavioral performance during conditioning. And, exposure to 18ng of either an inorganic form (sodium selenate) or an organic form (methylseleno-l-cysteine) of selenium caused a reduction in the bees' performance during the long-term recall test. These concentrations of selenium are lower than those found in the nectar of plants grown in selenium-contaminated soil, indicating that even low-grade selenium toxicity produces significant learning and memory impairments. This may reduce foragers' ability to effectively gather resources for the colony or nurse bees' ability to care for and maintain a healthy colony. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. BRCA1 deficiency increases the sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to auranofin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oommen, Deepu [School of Biological Sciences, Plymouth University, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Yiannakis, Dennis [Plymouth Oncology Centre, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Plymouth PL6 8DH (United Kingdom); Jha, Awadhesh N., E-mail: a.jha@plymouth.ac.uk [School of Biological Sciences, Plymouth University, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • BRCA1 deficient cancer cells exhibit increased DNA damage upon auranofin treatment. • Auranofin induces apoptosis in BRCA1 deficient cancer cells despite the activation of Nrf2. • Antioxidant protects BRCA1 deficient cancer cells from auranofin. - Abstract: Auranofin, a thioredoxin reductase inhibitor and an anti-rheumatic drug is currently undergoing phase 2 clinical studies for repurposing to treat recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Previous studies have established that auranofin exerts its cytotoxic activity by increasing the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1) is a DNA repair protein whose functional status is critical in the prognosis of ovarian cancer. Apart from its key role in DNA repair, BRCA1 is also known to modulate cellular redox homeostasis by regulating the stability of anti-oxidant transcription factor, nuclear factor erythroid 2—related factor 2 (Nrf2) via direct protein–protein interaction. However, it is currently unknown whether BRCA1 modulates the sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to auranofin. Here we report that BRCA1-depleted cells exhibited increased DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and decreased clonogenic cell survival upon auranofin treatment. Interestingly, auranofin induced the expression of Nrf2 in BRCA1-depleted cells suggesting its regulation independent of BRCA1. Furthermore, anti-oxidant agent, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) protected BRCA1-depleted cells from DNA damage and apoptosis induced by auranofin. Our study suggests that accumulated lethal DSBs resulting from the oxidative damage render BRCA1 deficient cells more sensitive to auranofin despite the activation of Nrf2.

  6. Auranofin-loaded nanoparticles as a new therapeutic tool to fight streptococcal infections

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Díez-Martínez, Roberto; García-Fernández, Esther; Manzano, Miguel; Martínez, Ángel; Domenech, Mirian; Vallet-Regí, María; García, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    .... We have loaded auranofin, a gold compound traditionally used for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, into PLGA NPs and their efficiency as antibacterial agent against two Gram-positive pathogens...

  7. Selenium, selenoproteins and vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohé, Leopold

    2005-01-01

    Selenium biochemistry is reviewed in respect to its presumed relevance to age-related ocular diseases. Selenium is an essential trace element that exerts its physiological role as selenocysteine residue in at least 25 distinct selenoenzymes in mammals. Lack of GPx-1 due to alimentary selenium deprivation has been inferred to induce cataract in rats and was demonstrated to cause cataracts in mice by targeted gene disruption. The role of other selenoproteins in the eye remains to be worked out. Selenium in excess of the tiny amounts required for selenoprotein synthesis is toxic in general and causes cataracts in experimental animals. Clinical evidence for a protective role of selenium in the development of cataract, macula degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa or any other ocular disease is not available, likely because suboptimum selenium intake, as it may result from unbalanced diet, does not cause any pathologically relevant selenium deficiency in the eye. At present, there is neither theoretical nor an empirical basis to expect beneficial effects of selenium supplementation beyond the dietary reference intakes of 55 microg/day in the context of ocular diseases.

  8. Selenium Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium sulfide, an anti-infective agent, relieves itching and flaking of the scalp and removes the dry, ... Selenium sulfide comes in a lotion and is usually applied as a shampoo. As a shampoo, selenium ...

  9. Auranofin protects against cocaine-induced hepatic injury through induction of heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashino, Takashi; Sugiuchi, Jinko; Uehara, Junna; Naito-Yamamoto, Yumiko; Kenmotsu, Sachiyo; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Shioda, Seiji; Numazawa, Satoshi; Yoshida, Takemi

    2011-10-01

    Auranofin, a disease-modifying gold compound, has been empirically applying to the management of rheumatoid arthritis. We investigated a protective effect of auranofin against hepatic injury induced by cocaine. Cocaine (75 mg/kg) markedly increased serum alanine amino transferase (ALT) (4,130 IU/l) and aspartate amino transferase (AST) (1,730 IU/l) activities at 16 hr after treatment, and induced hepatic necrosis surrounding central veins in mice. Concurrently, overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a rate-limiting enzyme for heme degradation and an oxidative stress marker, was identified at the edges of cocaine-mediated necrotic area. Auranofin (10 mg/ml, i.p.) significantly induced hepatic HO-1 protein in mice from 12 hr after treatment. Interestingly, pretreatment with auranofin resulted in the prevention of the increase of serum ALT and AST activities in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, although cocaine increased tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) gene expression in mouse livers, cocaine-induced liver injury was observed in TNFα deficient mice as well as wild-type mice. Auranofin-inducted HO-1 gene expression was observed in human primary hepatocytes as well as mouse primary hepatocytes. The present findings suggest that auranofin is effective in preventing cocaine-induced hepatic injury, and HO-1 may contribute to protect against chemically-induced cytotoxicity.

  10. Auranofin inactivates Trichomonas vaginalis thioredoxin reductase and is effective against trichomonads in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Melissa; Yun, Jeong-Fil; Zhou, Bianhua; Le, Christine; Kehoe, Katelin; Le, Ryan; Hill, Ryan; Jongeward, Gregg; Debnath, Anjan; Zhang, Liangfang; Miyamoto, Yukiko; Eckmann, Lars; Land, Kirkwood M; Wrischnik, Lisa A

    2016-12-01

    Trichomoniasis, caused by the protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis, is the most common, non-viral, sexually transmitted infection in the world, but only two closely related nitro drugs are approved for its treatment. New antimicrobials against trichomoniasis remain an urgent need. Several organic gold compounds were tested for activity against T. vaginalis thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) in cell-free systems as well as for activity against different trichomonads in vitro and in a murine infection model. The organic gold(I) compounds auranofin and chloro(diethylphenylphosphine)gold(I) inhibited TrxR in a concentration-dependent manner in assays with recombinant purified reductase and in cytoplasmic extracts of T. vaginalis transfected with a haemagglutinin epitope-tagged form of the reductase. Auranofin potently suppressed the growth of three independent clinical T. vaginalis isolates as well as several strains of another trichomonad (Tritrichomonas foetus) in a 24 h-assay, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of 0.7-2.5 µM and minimum lethal concentrations of 2-6 µM. The drug also compromised the ability of the parasite to overcome oxidant stress, supporting the notion that auranofin acts, in part, by inactivating TrxR-dependent antioxidant defences. Chloro(diethylphenylphosphine)gold(I) was 10-fold less effective against T. vaginalis in vitro than auranofin. Oral administration of auranofin for 4 days cleared the parasites in a murine model of vaginal T. foetus infection without displaying any apparent adverse effects. The approved human drug auranofin may be a promising agent as an alternative treatment of trichomoniasis in cases when standard nitro drug therapies have failed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  11. Disruption of Skin Stem Cell Homeostasis following Transplacental Arsenicosis; Alleviation by Combined Intake of Selenium and Curcumin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiv Poojan

    Full Text Available Of late, a consirable interest has grown in literature on early development of arsenicosis and untimely death in humans after exposure to iAs in drinking water in utero or during the childhood. The mechanism of this kind of intrauterine arsenic poisoning is not known; however it is often suggested to involve stem cells. We looked into this possibility by investigating in mice the influence of chronic in utero exposure to arsenical drinking water preliminarily on multipotent adult stem cell and progenitor cell counts at the beginning of neonatal age. We found that repeated intake of 42.5 or 85 ppm iAs in drinking water by pregnant BALB/c mice substantially changed the counts of EpASCs, the progenitor cells, and the differentiated cells in epidermis of their zero day old neonates. EpASCs counts decreased considerably and the differentiated/apoptosed cell counts increased extensively whereas the counts of progenitor cell displayed a biphasic effect. The observed trend of response was dose-dependent and statistically significant. These observations signified a disruption in stem cell homeostasis. The disorder was in parallel with changes in expression of biomarkers of stem cell and progenitor (TA cell besides changes in expression of pro-inflammatory and antioxidant molecules namely Nrf2, NFkB, TNF-α, and GSH. The biological monitoring of exposure to iAs and the ensuing transplacental toxicity was verifiable correspondingly by the increase in iAs burden in hair, kidney, skin, liver of nulliparous female mice and the onset of chromosomal aberrations in neonate bone marrow cells. The combined intake of selenite and curcumin in utero was found to prevent the disruption of homeostasis and associated biochemical changes to a great extent. The mechanism of prevention seemed possibly to involve (a curcumin and Keap-1 interaction, (b consequent escalated de novo GSH biosynthesis, and (c the resultant toxicant disposition. These observations are important

  12. Disruption of Skin Stem Cell Homeostasis following Transplacental Arsenicosis; Alleviation by Combined Intake of Selenium and Curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poojan, Shiv; Kumar, Sushil; Verma, Vikas; Dhasmana, Anupam; Lohani, Mohtashim; Verma, Mukesh K

    2015-01-01

    Of late, a consirable interest has grown in literature on early development of arsenicosis and untimely death in humans after exposure to iAs in drinking water in utero or during the childhood. The mechanism of this kind of intrauterine arsenic poisoning is not known; however it is often suggested to involve stem cells. We looked into this possibility by investigating in mice the influence of chronic in utero exposure to arsenical drinking water preliminarily on multipotent adult stem cell and progenitor cell counts at the beginning of neonatal age. We found that repeated intake of 42.5 or 85 ppm iAs in drinking water by pregnant BALB/c mice substantially changed the counts of EpASCs, the progenitor cells, and the differentiated cells in epidermis of their zero day old neonates. EpASCs counts decreased considerably and the differentiated/apoptosed cell counts increased extensively whereas the counts of progenitor cell displayed a biphasic effect. The observed trend of response was dose-dependent and statistically significant. These observations signified a disruption in stem cell homeostasis. The disorder was in parallel with changes in expression of biomarkers of stem cell and progenitor (TA) cell besides changes in expression of pro-inflammatory and antioxidant molecules namely Nrf2, NFkB, TNF-α, and GSH. The biological monitoring of exposure to iAs and the ensuing transplacental toxicity was verifiable correspondingly by the increase in iAs burden in hair, kidney, skin, liver of nulliparous female mice and the onset of chromosomal aberrations in neonate bone marrow cells. The combined intake of selenite and curcumin in utero was found to prevent the disruption of homeostasis and associated biochemical changes to a great extent. The mechanism of prevention seemed possibly to involve (a) curcumin and Keap-1 interaction, (b) consequent escalated de novo GSH biosynthesis, and (c) the resultant toxicant disposition. These observations are important with respect to

  13. Selenium essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Sams, Prashanth

    2015-01-01

    If you are a developer who wants to migrate from Selenium RC or any other automation tool to Selenium WebDriver, then this book is for you. Knowledge of automation tools is necessary to follow the examples in this book.

  14. Compatibilidad química por calorimetría diferencial de barrido y termogravimetría del auranofin tabletas 3 mg Chemical compatibility of 3 mg Auranofin tablets demonstrated by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Octavio Martínez Álvarez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Como parte de la pre-estabilidad de la preformulación de auranofin tabletas, se realizó un estudio de compatibilidad química, para lo cual se emplearon técnicas de análisis térmico como la calorimetría diferencial de barrido y la termogravimetría. Previo a dichos estudios se caracterizó térmicamente por calorimetría diferencial de barrido el principio activo y cada uno de los excipientes. Posteriormente se procedió a la realización del estudio de compatibilidad química, mediante la preparación de mezclas físicas binarias entre el principio activo y cada uno de los excipientes. Se detectó por ambos métodos que el principio activo tuvo una transición física de fusión, no reportada en la literatura, lo que permitió poder calcular su pureza por calorimetría diferencial de barrido. Mediante la técnica calorimétrica fue posible inferir la ausencia de incompatibilidad química entre el principio activo y los excipientes estudiados. Además, mediante el cálculo de la energía de activación se estableció el siguiente orden de estabilidad térmica: auranofin:PVP> auranofin:lactosa> auranofin:explotab> auranofin:estearato> auranofin:aerosil> auranofin:celulosa, por lo que se recomienda el uso de estos excipientes en la elaboración de la formulación farmacéutica.As part of the pre-stability study of the Auranofin tablet pre-formulation, a chemical compatibility study was conducted using thermal analysis techniques such as the differential scanning calorimetry and the thermogravimetry. Prior to these studies, the active principle and each of the excipients were thermally characterized with the aid of the differential scanning calorimetry. Then, there proceeded to carry out the chemical compatibility study by preparing binary physical mixtures between the active principle and each of the excipients. Both methods showed that the active principle had a melting physical transition, not reported in the literature, which allowed

  15. Repurposing auranofin as a lead candidate for treatment of lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina A Bulman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Two major human diseases caused by filariid nematodes are onchocerciasis, or river blindness, and lymphatic filariasis, which can lead to elephantiasis. The drugs ivermectin, diethylcarbamazine (DEC, and albendazole are used in control programs for these diseases, but are mainly effective against the microfilarial stage and have minimal or no effect on adult worms. Adult Onchocerca volvulus and Brugia malayi worms (macrofilariae can live for up to 15 years, reproducing and allowing the infection to persist in a population. Therefore, to support control or elimination of these two diseases, effective macrofilaricidal drugs are necessary, in addition to current drugs. In an effort to identify macrofilaricidal drugs, we screened an FDA-approved library with adult worms of Brugia spp. and Onchocerca ochengi, third-stage larvae (L3s of Onchocerca volvulus, and the microfilariae of both O. ochengi and Loa loa. We found that auranofin, a gold-containing drug used for rheumatoid arthritis, was effective in vitro in killing both Brugia spp. and O. ochengi adult worms and in inhibiting the molting of L3s of O. volvulus with IC50 values in the low micromolar to nanomolar range. Auranofin had an approximately 43-fold higher IC50 against the microfilariae of L. loa compared with the IC50 for adult female O. ochengi, which may be beneficial if used in areas where Onchocerca and Brugia are co-endemic with L. loa, to prevent severe adverse reactions to the drug-induced death of L. loa microfilariae. Further testing indicated that auranofin is also effective in reducing Brugia adult worm burden in infected gerbils and that auranofin may be targeting the thioredoxin reductase in this nematode.

  16. Auranofin Inhibits the Enzyme Activity of Pasteurella multocida Toxin PMT in Human Cells and Protects Cells from Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Carle

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The AB-type protein toxin from Pasteurella multocida (PMT contains a functionally important disulfide bond within its catalytic domain, which must be cleaved in the host cell cytosol to render the catalytic domain of PMT into its active conformation. Here, we found that the reductive potential of the cytosol of target cells, and more specifically, the activity of the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR is crucial for this process. This was demonstrated by the strong inhibitory effect of the pharmacological TrxR inhibitor auranofin, which inhibited the intoxication of target cells with PMT, as determined by analyzing the PMT-catalyzed deamidation of GTP-binding proteins (G-proteins in the cytosol of cells. The amount of endogenous substrate levels modified by PMT in cells pretreated with auranofin was reduced compared to cells treated with PMT alone. Auranofin had no inhibitory effect on the activity of the catalytic domain of constitutively active PMT in vitro, demonstrating that auranofin did not directly inhibit PMT activity, but interferes with the mode of action of PMT in cells. In conclusion, the results show that TrxR is crucial for the mode of action of PMT in mammalian cells, and that the drug auranofin can serve as an efficient inhibitor, which might be a starting point for novel therapeutic options against toxin-associated diseases.

  17. Auranofin Inhibits the Enzyme Activity of Pasteurella multocida Toxin PMT in Human Cells and Protects Cells from Intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carle, Stefan; Brink, Thorsten; Orth, Joachim H C; Aktories, Klaus; Barth, Holger

    2017-01-13

    The AB-type protein toxin from Pasteurella multocida (PMT) contains a functionally important disulfide bond within its catalytic domain, which must be cleaved in the host cell cytosol to render the catalytic domain of PMT into its active conformation. Here, we found that the reductive potential of the cytosol of target cells, and more specifically, the activity of the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) is crucial for this process. This was demonstrated by the strong inhibitory effect of the pharmacological TrxR inhibitor auranofin, which inhibited the intoxication of target cells with PMT, as determined by analyzing the PMT-catalyzed deamidation of GTP-binding proteins (G-proteins) in the cytosol of cells. The amount of endogenous substrate levels modified by PMT in cells pretreated with auranofin was reduced compared to cells treated with PMT alone. Auranofin had no inhibitory effect on the activity of the catalytic domain of constitutively active PMT in vitro, demonstrating that auranofin did not directly inhibit PMT activity, but interferes with the mode of action of PMT in cells. In conclusion, the results show that TrxR is crucial for the mode of action of PMT in mammalian cells, and that the drug auranofin can serve as an efficient inhibitor, which might be a starting point for novel therapeutic options against toxin-associated diseases.

  18. Selenium biofortification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant foods are the major dietary sources of selenium (Se) in most countries around the world, followed by meats and seafood. For this reason, it is vital to increase Se uptake by plants and to produce crops with higher Se concentrations and bioavailability in their edible tissues. One of the most p...

  19. Investigation of a potential mechanism for the inhibition of SmTGR by Auranofin and its implications for Plasmodium falciparum inhibition

    KAUST Repository

    Caroli, Antonia

    2012-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni and Plasmodium falciparum are pathogen parasites that spend part of their lives in the blood stream of the human host and are therefore heavily exposed to fluxes of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS). SmTGR, an essential enzyme of the S. mansoni ROS detoxification machinery, is known to be inhibited by Auranofin although the inhibition mechanism has not been completely clarified. Auranofin also kills P. falciparum, even if its molecular targets are unknown. Here, we used computational and docking techniques to investigate the molecular mechanism of interaction between SmTGR and Auranofin. Furthermore, we took advantage of the homology relationship and of docking studies to assess if PfTR, the SmTGR malaria parasite homologue, can be a putative target for Auranofin. Our findings support a recently hypothesized molecular mechanism of inhibition for SmTGR and suggest that PfTR is indeed a possible and attractive drug target in P. falciparum. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  20. Selenium supplementation protects trophoblast cells from oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, M; van Leer, L; Vanderlelie, J J; Perkins, A V

    2012-12-01

    Oxidative stress is a key feature in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia and antioxidants have been proposed as a potential therapy in the treatment of this important complication of pregnancy. In this report selenium supplementation was used to up-regulate the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase and the protective effect that this had on cellular metabolism during oxidative stress was examined. Bewo and Jeg-3 trophoblast cells were supplemented with organic and inorganic forms of selenium and 3 forms of peroxide in a range of doses were utilised to generate oxidative stress. Thioredoxin reductase and glutathione peroxidase activity were maximally expressed after supplementation with 100 nM NaSe and 500 nM SeMethionine. Application of H₂O₂ in the range of 200-400 μM for 24h resulted in significant (psupplementation. Tert-butyl H₂O₂ and cumene H₂O₂ concentrations between 30 and 50 uM similarly inhibited cellular activity and this could be significantly (psupplementation. Auranofin, a specific inhibitor of thioredoxin reductase and glutathione peroxidase was used to prove that the protective effect generated by Se supplementation was due to up regulation of these enzymes. These studies provide direct evidence that selenium supplementation can up-regulate endogenous antioxidant systems and protects trophoblast cells from oxidative stress. This may inform the development of future therapies for pre-eclampsia and emphasises the importance of selenium adequacy during pregnancy. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Selenium levels of Estonians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauhamaa, P; Kantola, M; Viitak, A; Kaasik, T; Mussalo-Rauhamaa, H

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this study is to sum up the dietary selenium intake of the Estonian people according to the serum selenium concentrations. This research compiles the information published in the literature about the levels of selenium in the serum of the Estonian people. We compare these results with the findings obtained from the analyses of serum samples gathered by us in the 1990s in Estonia. The selenium concentration in sera of 404 Estonians ranged from 26 to 116 microg/l; the mean was 75 microg/l. The selenium contents of Estonians were at a similar level as reported for Finns before the selenium supplementation of fertilizers carried out in Finland in 1984. In view of the selenium concentration in the sera, we suggest that the dietary selenium intake among the Estonian people might be scarce, and Estonian authorities should consider in their nutrition policies the possible low intake of selenium of Estonians.

  2. Compatibilidad química por calorimetría diferencial de barrido y termogravimetría del auranofin tabletas 3 mg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Octavio Martínez Álvarez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Como parte de la pre-estabilidad de la preformulación de auranofin tabletas, se realizó un estudio de compatibilidad química, para lo cual se emplearon técnicas de análisis térmico como la calorimetría diferencial de barrido y la termogravimetría. Previo a dichos estudios se caracterizó térmicamente por calorimetría diferencial de barrido el principio activo y cada uno de los excipientes. Posteriormente se procedió a la realización del estudio de compatibilidad química, mediante la preparación de mezclas físicas binarias entre el principio activo y cada uno de los excipientes. Se detectó por ambos métodos que el principio activo tuvo una transición física de fusión, no reportada en la literatura, lo que permitió poder calcular su pureza por calorimetría diferencial de barrido. Mediante la técnica calorimétrica fue posible inferir la ausencia de incompatibilidad química entre el principio activo y los excipientes estudiados. Además, mediante el cálculo de la energía de activación se estableció el siguiente orden de estabilidad térmica: auranofin:PVP> auranofin:lactosa> auranofin:explotab> auranofin:estearato> auranofin:aerosil> auranofin:celulosa, por lo que se recomienda el uso de estos excipientes en la elaboración de la formulación farmacéutica.

  3. Attenuation of MUC4 potentiates the anticancer activity of auranofin via regulation of the Her2/Akt/FOXO3 pathway in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jun Sang; Lee, Jongsung; Park, Yoonkook; Park, Kyungmoon; Kim, Jung Ryul; Cho, Dong Hyu; Jang, Kyu Yun; Park, See-Hyoung

    2017-10-01

    Previously, we reported that auranofin induces apoptosis in SKOV3 cells via regulation of the IKKβ/FOXO3 pathway. In the present study, we reveal that the anticancer activity of auranofin in SKOV3 cells could be enhanced by the attenuation of MUC4 through the regulation of the Her2/Akt/FOXO3 pathway. Compared to the control-siRNA, siRNA transfection against MUC4 into SKOV3 cells accelerated the protein degradation of Her2. Under the same conditions, the expression level of phosphorylated Akt was also downregulated leading to an increase of FOXO3 in the nucleus. Notably, auranofin treatment in SKOV3 cells also resulted in the downregulation of the expression levels of both Her2 and phosphorylated Akt. Thus, Her2 was identified as the common molecular target protein by siRNA transfection against MUC4. Western blot analysis of total and nuclear fraction lysates from SKOV3 cells revealed that attenuation of MUC4 combined with auranofin treatment in SKOV3 cells synergistically activated FOXO3 translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus through the regulation of the Her2/Akt/FOXO3 pathway. Attenuation of MUC4 by siRNA transfection potentiated the antitumor effect of auranofin which was examined by performing in vitro assays such as WST-1, cell counting, colony formation, TUNEL and Annexin V staining. In addition, western blot analysis of the apoptosis‑related proteins such as PARP1, caspase-3, Bim extra large (EL), Bax and Bcl2 revealed that the attenuation of MUC4 by siRNA transfection potentiates the pro-apoptotic activity of auranofin in SKOV3 cells. Collectively, auranofin could regulate the Her2/Akt/FOXO3 signaling pathway in SKOV3 cells and be used as a potential antitumor agent considering the expression of MUC4 in ovarian cancer patients.

  4. Auranofin, an anti-rheumatic gold compound, modulates apoptosis by elevating the intracellular calcium concentration ([ca2+]I) in mcf-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Elizabeth; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2014-11-06

    Auranofin, a transition metal complex is used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis but is also an effective anti-cancer drug. We investigate the effects of Auranofin in inducing cell death by apoptosis and whether these changes are correlated to changes of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in breast cancer cells (MCF-7). Cytotoxicity of Auranofin was evaluated using MTS assay and the Trypan blue dye exclusion method. With fluorescent dyes SR-FLICA and 7-AAD apoptotic death and necrotic death were differentiated by Flow cytometry. A concentration dependent decrease in the viability occurred and cells were shifted to the apoptotic phase. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) was recorded using florescence microscopy and a calcium sensitive dye (Fluo-4 AM) with a strong negative correlation (r = -0.713) to viability. Pharmacological modulators 2-APB (50 μM), Nimodipine (10 μM), Caffeine (10 mM), SKF 96365(20 μM) were used to modify calcium entry and release. Auranofin induced a sustained increase of [Ca2+]i in a concentration and time dependent manner. The use of different blockers of calcium channels did not reveal the source for the rise of [Ca2+]i. Overall, elevation of [Ca2+]i by Auranofin might be crucial for triggering Ca2+-dependent apoptotic pathways. Therefore, in anti-cancer therapy, modulating [Ca2+]i should be considered as a crucial factor for the induction of cell death in cancer cells.

  5. Auranofin, an Anti-Rheumatic Gold Compound, Modulates Apoptosis by Elevating the Intracellular Calcium Concentration ([Ca2+]i in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Varghese

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Auranofin, a transition metal complex is used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis but is also an effective anti-cancer drug. We investigate the effects of Auranofin in inducing cell death by apoptosis and whether these changes are correlated to changes of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i in breast cancer cells (MCF-7. Cytotoxicity of Auranofin was evaluated using MTS assay and the Trypan blue dye exclusion method. With fluorescent dyes SR-FLICA and 7-AAD apoptotic death and necrotic death were differentiated by Flow cytometry. A concentration dependent decrease in the viability occurred and cells were shifted to the apoptotic phase. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i was recorded using florescence microscopy and a calcium sensitive dye (Fluo-4 AM with a strong negative correlation (r = −0.713 to viability. Pharmacological modulators 2-APB (50 μM, Nimodipine (10 μM, Caffeine (10 mM, SKF 96365(20 μM were used to modify calcium entry and release. Auranofin induced a sustained increase of [Ca2+]i in a concentration and time dependent manner. The use of different blockers of calcium channels did not reveal the source for the rise of [Ca2+]i. Overall, elevation of [Ca2+]i by Auranofin might be crucial for triggering Ca2+-dependent apoptotic pathways. Therefore, in anti-cancer therapy, modulating [Ca2+]i should be considered as a crucial factor for the induction of cell death in cancer cells.

  6. A proof-of-concept trial of protein kinase C iota inhibition with auranofin for the paclitaxel-induced acute pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatoi, Aminah; Grudem, Megan E; Dockter, Travis J; Block, Matthew S; Villasboas, Jose C; Tan, Angelina; Deering, Erin; Kasi, Pashtoon M; Mansfield, Aaron S; Botero, Juliana Perez; Okuno, Scott H; Smith, Deanne R; Fields, Alan P

    2017-03-01

    Paclitaxel causes the paclitaxel-induced acute pain (PIAP) syndrome. Based on preclinical data, we hypothesized that the protein kinase C (PKC) iota inhibitor, auranofin (a gold salt used for other pain conditions), palliates this pain. In a randomized, double-blinded manner, patients who had suffered this syndrome were assigned a one-time dose of auranofin 6 mg orally on day #2 of the chemotherapy cycle (post-paclitaxel) versus placebo. Patients completed the Brief Pain Inventory and a pain diary on days 2 through 8 and at the end of the cycle. The primary endpoint was pain scores, as calculated by area under the curve, in response to "Please rate your pain by circling the one number that best describes your pain at its worse in the last 24 hours." Thirty patients were enrolled. For the primary endpoint, mean area under the curve of 55 units (standard deviation 19) and 61 units (standard deviation 22) were observed in auranofin-treated and placebo-exposed patients, respectively (p = 0.44). On day 8 and at the end of the cycle, pain scores in auranofin-treated patients were more favorable, although differences were not statistically significant. In the dose schedule studied, auranofin did not palliate the PIAP syndrome, but delayed beneficial trends suggest further study for this indication.

  7. Selenium: Poison and Preventive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmion Howe, Sister

    1978-01-01

    Selenium is an essential nutrient to the human body, but it can reach toxic levels causing a disease called selenosis. This article discusses selenium, its geographical distribution, toxicity, nutritional role, and carcinogenicity. (MA)

  8. Selenium: Element of Contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Robert H.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Reports on recent findings concerning the impact of selenium on human and animal health. In its various oxidation states, different concentrations of selenium may be helpful or detrimental to human health. (CP)

  9. Selenium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002414.htm Selenium in diet To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Selenium is an essential trace mineral. This means your ...

  10. Aquatic Life Criterion - Selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents pertaining to the 2016 Acute and Chronic Ambient Aquatic Life Water Quality Criteria for Selenium (Freshwater). These documents include what the safe levels of Selenium are in water for the majority of species.

  11. Selenium and Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Abedi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Selenium is an essential element for human health and it is toxic at high concentrations. Selenium is a constituent component of selenoproteins that have enzymatic and structural roles in human biochemistry. Selenium is a best antioxidant and catalyst for production of thyroid hormone. This element has the key role in the immune function; prevention of AIDS progression and the deactivity of toxins. Furthermore, selenium is essential for sperm motility and can reduce abortions. Selenium deficiency was also associated with adverse mood states. The findings regarding cardiovascular disease risk related to selenium deficiency is unclear, though other conditions such as vascular inflammation, oxidative stress and selenium deficiency can cause this disease too. Moreover, consuming of 60 mg of selenium per day may be associated with reduction of cancer risk. In this study, a review of studies has been performed on the biochemical function of selenium toxicity, and its effects on human health. Furthermore, certain identified cancers associated with selenium have been discussed to absorb more attention to the status of this element and also as a guide for further studies. Selenium plays the dual character (useful and harmful in human health, and then it is necessary to determine the concentration of this element in body fluids and tissues. An appropriate method for routine measurement of selenium in clinical laboratories is electro thermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS with very low detection limit and good precision.

  12. Drug susceptibility testing in microaerophilic parasites: Cysteine strongly affects the effectivities of metronidazole and auranofin, a novel and promising antimicrobial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Leitsch

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The microaerophilic parasites Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Giardia lamblia annually cause hundreds of millions of human infections which are treated with antiparasitic drugs. Metronidazole is the most often prescribed drug but also other drugs are in use, and novel drugs with improved characteristics are constantly being developed. One of these novel drugs is auranofin, originally an antirheumatic which has been relabelled for the treatment of parasitic infections. Drug effectivity is arguably the most important criterion for its applicability and is commonly assessed in susceptibility assays using in vitro cultures of a given pathogen. However, drug susceptibility assays can be strongly affected by certain compounds in the growth media. In the case of microaerophilic parasites, cysteine which is added in large amounts as an antioxidant is an obvious candidate because it is highly reactive and known to modulate the toxicity of metronidazole in several microaerophilic parasites.In this study, it was attempted to reduce cysteine concentrations as far as possible without affecting parasite viability by performing drug susceptibility assays under strictly anaerobic conditions in an anaerobic cabinet. Indeed, T. vaginalis and E. histolytica could be grown without any cysteine added and the cysteine concentration necessary to maintain G. lamblia could be reduced to 20%. Susceptibilities to metronidazole were found to be clearly reduced in the presence of cysteine. With auranofin the protective effect of cysteine was extreme, providing protection to concentrations up to 100-fold higher as observed in the absence of cysteine. With three other drugs tested, albendazole, furazolidone and nitazoxanide, all in use against G. lamblia, the effect of cysteine was less pronounced. Oxygen was found to have a less marked impact on metronidazole and auranofin than cysteine but bovine bile which is standardly used in growth media for G

  13. Fecal selenium excretion is regulated by dietary selenium intake1

    OpenAIRE

    Pedrosa,Lucia Fatima Campos; Motley, Amy K.; Stevenson, Teri D.; Hill, Kristina E.; Burk, Raymond F.

    2012-01-01

    Whole-body selenium is regulated by excretion of the element. Reports of studies carried out using isotopic tracers have led to the conclusion that urinary selenium excretion is regulated by selenium intake but that fecal excretion is not. Because of the limitations of tracer studies, we measured urinary and fecal selenium excretion by mice with selenium intakes ranging from deficient to almost toxic. Tissue and whole-body selenium concentrations increased sharply between deficient and adequa...

  14. Biomonitoring Equivalents for selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Sean M; Macey, Kristin; Nong, Andy; Aylward, Lesa L

    2014-10-01

    Selenium is an essential nutrient for human health with a narrow range between essentiality and toxicity. Selenium is incorporated into several proteins that perform important functions in the body. With insufficient selenium intake, the most notable effect is Keshan disease, an endemic cardiomyopathy in children. Conversely, excessive selenium intake can result in selenosis, manifested as brittle nails and hair and gastro-intestinal disorders. As such, guidance values have been established to protect against both insufficient and excessive selenium exposures. Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) have been established as standard reference values for nutritional adequacy in North America. To protect against selenosis resulting from exposure to excessive amounts of selenium, several government and non-governmental agencies have established a range of guidance values. Exposure to selenium is primarily through the diet, but monitoring selenium intake is difficult. Biomonitoring is a useful means of assessing and monitoring selenium status for both insufficient and excessive exposures. However, to be able to interpret selenium biomonitoring data, levels associated with both DRIs and toxicity guidance values are required. Biomonitoring Equivalents (BEs) were developed for selenium in whole blood, plasma and urine. The BEs associated with assuring adequate selenium intake (Estimated Average Requirements - EAR) are 100, 80 and 10μg/L in whole blood, plasma and urine, respectively. The BEs associated with protection against selenosis range from 400 to 480μg/L in whole blood, 180-230μg/L in plasma, and 90-110μg/L in urine. These BE values can be used by both regulatory agencies and public health officials to interpret selenium biomonitoring data in a health risk context. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A new look at auranofin, dextromethorphan and rosiglitazone for reduction of glia-mediated inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn M Madeira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer′s disease are characterized by chronic inflammation in the central nervous system. The two main glial types involved in inflammatory reactions are microglia and astrocytes. While these cells normally protect neurons by providing nutrients and growth factors, disease specific stimuli can induce glial secretion of neurotoxins. It has been hypothesized that reducing glia-mediated inflammation could diminish neuronal loss. This hypothesis is supported by observations that chronic use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs is linked with lower incidences of neurodegenerative disease. It is possible that the NSAIDs are not potent enough to appreciably reduce chronic neuroinflammation after disease processes are fully established. Gold thiol compounds, including auranofin, comprise another class of medications effective at reducing peripheral inflammation. We have demonstrated that auranofin inhibits human microglia- and astrocyte-mediated neurotoxicity. Other drugs which are currently used to treat peripheral inflammatory conditions could be helpful in neurodegenerative disease. Three different classes of anti-inflammatory compounds, which have a potential to inhibit neuroinflammation are highlighted below.

  16. Selenium and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayman, Margaret P

    2012-03-31

    Selenium is incorporated into selenoproteins that have a wide range of pleiotropic effects, ranging from antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects to the production of active thyroid hormone. In the past 10 years, the discovery of disease-associated polymorphisms in selenoprotein genes has drawn attention to the relevance of selenoproteins to health. Low selenium status has been associated with increased risk of mortality, poor immune function, and cognitive decline. Higher selenium status or selenium supplementation has antiviral effects, is essential for successful male and female reproduction, and reduces the risk of autoimmune thyroid disease. Prospective studies have generally shown some benefit of higher selenium status on the risk of prostate, lung, colorectal, and bladder cancers, but findings from trials have been mixed, which probably emphasises the fact that supplementation will confer benefit only if intake of a nutrient is inadequate. Supplementation of people who already have adequate intake with additional selenium might increase their risk of type-2 diabetes. The crucial factor that needs to be emphasised with regard to the health effects of selenium is the inextricable U-shaped link with status; whereas additional selenium intake may benefit people with low status, those with adequate-to-high status might be affected adversely and should not take selenium supplements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Auranofin, an Anti-Rheumatic Gold Compound, Modulates Apoptosis by Elevating the Intracellular Calcium Concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varghese, Elizabeth; Büsselberg, Dietrich, E-mail: dib2015@qatar-med.cornell.edu [Weil Cornell Medical College in Qatar, Qatar Foundation-Education City, P.O. Box 24144 Doha (Qatar)

    2014-11-06

    Auranofin, a transition metal complex is used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis but is also an effective anti-cancer drug. We investigate the effects of Auranofin in inducing cell death by apoptosis and whether these changes are correlated to changes of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) in breast cancer cells (MCF-7). Cytotoxicity of Auranofin was evaluated using MTS assay and the Trypan blue dye exclusion method. With fluorescent dyes SR-FLICA and 7-AAD apoptotic death and necrotic death were differentiated by Flow cytometry. A concentration dependent decrease in the viability occurred and cells were shifted to the apoptotic phase. Intracellular calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) was recorded using florescence microscopy and a calcium sensitive dye (Fluo-4 AM) with a strong negative correlation (r = −0.713) to viability. Pharmacological modulators 2-APB (50 μM), Nimodipine (10 μM), Caffeine (10 mM), SKF 96365(20 μM) were used to modify calcium entry and release. Auranofin induced a sustained increase of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in a concentration and time dependent manner. The use of different blockers of calcium channels did not reveal the source for the rise of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. Overall, elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} by Auranofin might be crucial for triggering Ca{sup 2+}-dependent apoptotic pathways. Therefore, in anti-cancer therapy, modulating [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} should be considered as a crucial factor for the induction of cell death in cancer cells.

  18. X-ray structures of thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase from Entamoeba histolytica and prevailing hypothesis of the mechanism of Auranofin action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsonage, Derek; Sheng, Fang; Hirata, Ken; Debnath, Anjan; McKerrow, James H; Reed, Sharon L; Abagyan, Ruben; Poole, Leslie B; Podust, Larissa M

    2016-05-01

    The anti-arthritic gold-containing drug Auranofin is lethal to the protozoan intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica, the causative agent of human amebiasis, in both culture and animal models of the disease. A putative mechanism of Auranofin action proposes that monovalent gold, Au(I), released from the drug, can bind to the redox-active dithiol group of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). Au(I) binding in the active site is expected to prevent electron transfer to the downstream substrate thioredoxin (Trx), thus interfering with redox homeostasis in the parasite. To clarify the molecular mechanism of Auranofin action in more detail, we determined a series of atomic resolution X-ray structures for E. histolytica thioredoxin (EhTrx) and thioredoxin reductase (EhTrxR), the latter with and without Auranofin. Only the disulfide-bonded form of the active site dithiol (Cys(140)-Cys(143)) was invariably observed in crystals of EhTrxR in spite of the addition of reductants in various crystallization trials, and no gold was found associated with these cysteines. Non-catalytic Cys(286) was identified as the only site of modification, but further mutagenesis studies using the C286Q mutant demonstrated that this site was not responsible for inhibition of EhTrxR by Auranofin. Interestingly, we obtained both of the catalytically-relevant conformations of this bacterial-like, low molecular weight TrxR in crystals without requiring an engineered disulfide linkage between Cys mutants of TrxR and Trx (as was originally done with Escherichia coli TrxR and Trx). We note that the -CXXC- catalytic motif, even if reduced, would likely not provide space sufficient to bind Au(I) by both cysteines of the dithiol group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Selenium in reproductive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Hiten D; Broughton Pipkin, Fiona; Redman, Christopher W G; Poston, Lucilla

    2012-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element of importance to human biology and health. Increasing evidence suggests that this mineral plays an important role in normal growth and reproduction in animals and humans, and selenium supplementation is now recommended as part of public health policy in geographical areas with severe selenium deficiency in soil. This review addresses the biological functions of selenium followed by a detailed review of associations between selenium status and reproductive health. In many countries, selenium dietary intake falls below the recommended nutrient intakes and is inadequate to support maximal expression of the selenoenzymes. Numerous reports implicate selenium deficiency in several reproductive and obstetric complications including male and female infertility, miscarriage, preeclampsia, fetal growth restriction, preterm labor, gestational diabetes, and obstetric cholestasis. Currently, there is inadequate information from the available small intervention studies to inform public health strategies. Larger intervention trials are required to reinforce or refute a beneficial role of selenium supplementation in disorders of reproductive health. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Selenium and the thyroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhrle, Josef

    2015-10-01

    This article provides an update on the role of the essential trace element selenium and its interaction with the other trace elements iodine and iron that together contribute to adequate thyroid hormone status. Synthesis, secretion, metabolism and action of thyroid hormone in target tissues depend on a balanced nutritional availability or supplementation of these elements. Selenium status is altered in benign and malignant thyroid diseases and various selenium compounds have been used to prevent or treat widespread diseases such as goiter, autoimmune thyroid disease or thyroid cancer. Several studies, most with still too low numbers of cases, indicate that selenium administration in both autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto thyroiditis) and mild Graves' disease improves clinical scores and well-being of patients and reduces thyroperoxidase antibody titers. However, published results are still conflicting depending on basal selenium status, dose, time and form of selenium used for intervention. Evidence for sex-specific selenium action, lack of beneficial effects in pregnancy and contribution of genetic polymorphisms (selenoprotein S) has been presented. Adequate nutritional supply of selenium that saturates expression of circulating selenoprotein P, together with optimal iodine and iron intake, is required for a healthy and functional thyroid during development, adolescence, adulthood and aging.

  1. Erythrocyte selenium concentration as a marker of selenium status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanowicz, Fiona A; Talwar, Dinesh; O'Reilly, Denis S J; Dickinson, Natalie; Atkinson, John; Hursthouse, Andrew S; Rankin, Jean; Duncan, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    Plasma selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity are commonly used as markers of selenium nutritional status. However, plasma selenium concentrations fall independently of selenium status during the acute phase response and GPx is analytically problematic. The assay for erythrocyte selenium is robust and concentrations are unaffected by the systemic inflammatory response. This study was performed to investigate the validity of erythrocyte selenium measurement in assessing selenium status. C-reactive protein (CRP), plasma and erythrocyte selenium concentrations and GPx activity were measured in 96 women from two regions of Malawi with low and high selenium dietary intakes. CRP and plasma and erythrocyte selenium was measured in 91 critically ill patients with a systemic inflammatory response. The median CRP value of all subjects from Malawi was 4.2 mg/L indicating no inflammation. The median CRP value for the critically ill patients was 126 mg/L indicating this group was inflamed. In the non-inflamed population there was a strong positive correlation (r = 0.95) between erythrocyte and plasma selenium and a strong positive correlation (r = 0.77) between erythrocyte selenium and erythrocyte GPx up to 6.10 nmol/g Hb after which maximal activity was reached. In the inflamed population, plasma selenium was low, erythrocyte selenium was normal and there was a weak correlation (r = 0.30) between selenium concentrations in plasma and erythrocytes. This demonstrates that plasma selenium is affected by the inflammatory response while erythrocyte selenium concentration is unaffected and can be used to reliably assess selenium status across a wide range of selenium intakes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  2. Selenium for preventing cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Dennert

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selenium is a trace element essential to humans. Higher selenium exposure and selenium supplements have been suggested to protect against several types of cancers. OBJECTIVE: Two research questions were addressed in this review: What is the evidence for: 1. an aetiological relationship between selenium exposure and cancer risk in women and men?; 2. the efficacy of selenium supplementation for cancer prevention in women and men? SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched electronic databases and bibliographies of reviews and included publications. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included prospective observational studies to answer research question (a and randomised controlled trials (RCTs to answer research question (b. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We conducted random effects meta-analyses of epidemiological data when five or more studies were retrieved for a specific outcome. We made a narrative summary of data from RCTs. MAIN RESULTS: We included 49 prospective observational studies and six RCTs. In epidemiologic data, we found a reduced cancer incidence (summary odds ratio, OR, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.53 to 0.91 and mortality (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.36 to 0.83 with higher selenium exposure. Cancer risk was more pronouncedly reduced in men (incidence: OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.42 to 1.05 than in women (incidence: OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.45 to 1.77. These findings have potential limitations due to study design, quality and heterogeneity of the data, which complicated the interpretation of the summary statistics. The RCTs found no protective efficacy of selenium yeast supplementation against non-melanoma skin cancer or L-selenomethionine supplementation against prostate cancer. Study results for the prevention of liver cancer with selenium supplements were inconsistent and studies had an unclear risk of bias. The results of the Nutritional Prevention of Cancer Trial (NPCT and SELECT raised concerns about possible harmful effects of selenium supplements. AUTHORS

  3. The possible repositioning of an oral anti-arthritic drug, auranofin, for Nrf2-activating therapy: The demonstration of Nrf2-dependent anti-oxidative action using a zebrafish model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, Yuji; Endo, Yuka; Araoi, Sho; Daitoku, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Kato, Mitsuyasu; Kobayashi, Makoto

    2018-02-01

    The Nrf2 pathway is a biological defense system against oxidative stress. The pharmacological activation of the Nrf2 pathway is a promising therapy for oxidative stress-related diseases, but it has been challenging to find an Nrf2 activator with acceptable toxicity. To circumvent this problem, we focused on an already approved oral anti-arthritic drug, auranofin that has been reported to have the potential to activate Nrf2. We used a zebrafish model to investigate whether auranofin has protective action against oxidative stress in vivo. Auranofin pre-treatment considerably improved the survival of zebrafish larvae that were challenged with a lethal dose of hydrogen peroxide. This protective effect was not observed in an Nrf2 mutant zebrafish strain, suggesting that the activation of the biological defense against oxidative stress was Nrf2-dependent. Auranofin-induced protection was further tested by challenges with redox-active heavy metals. A clear protective effect was observed against arsenite, a highly redox-reactive toxicant. In addition, this effect was also demonstrated to be Nrf2-dependent based on the analysis of an Nrf2 mutant strain. These results clearly demonstrate the anti-oxidative action of auranofin and encourage the repositioning of auranofin as a drug that improves oxidative stress-related pathology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mineral Commodity Profiles: Selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterman, W.C.; Brown, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    Overview -- Selenium, which is one of the chalcogen elements in group 16 (or 6A) of the periodic table, is a semiconductor that is chemically similar to sulfur for which it substitutes in many minerals and synthetic compounds. It is a byproduct of copper refining and, to a much lesser extent, lead refining. It is used in many applications, the major ones being a decolorizer for glass, a metallurgical additive to free-machining varieties of ferrous and nonferrous alloys, a constituent in cadmium sulfoselenide pigments, a photoreceptor in xerographic copiers, and a semiconductor in electrical rectifiers and photocells. Refined selenium amounting to more than 1,800 metric tons (t) was produced by 14 countries in 2000. Japan, Canada, the United States, and Belgium, which were the four largest producers, accounted for nearly 85 percent of world production. An estimated 250 t of the world total is secondary selenium, which is recovered from scrapped xerographic copier drums and selenium rectifiers; the selenium in nearly all other uses is dissipated (not recoverable as waste or scrap). The present selenium reserve bases for the United States and the world (including the United States), which are associated with copper deposits, are expected to be able to satisfy demand for selenium for several decades without difficulty.

  5. Selenium in Graves' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadwiga Kryczyk

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to present the current state of knowledge of the role of selenium in Graves’ disease. Recently, in the pathogenesis and course of this autoimmune disease, more attention has been paid to the relationship between oxidative stress and the antioxidant system, where selenium compounds play an important role. The thyroid is the organ with the highest selenium concentration in the human body. Selenium compounds, having antioxidant properties, protect thyrocytes against the destructive effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which are generated during the synthesis of thyroid hormones. Therefore, strengthening the body’s defense mechanisms, which protect against the formation and activity of ROS during medical treatment of Graves’ disease patients, may be an effective adjuvant in commonly used methods of therapy.

  6. Biological significance of selenium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerre, P.; Andreesen, J.R.

    1986-02-01

    Until a few years ago, selenium was exclusively thought of as a toxic substance which was applied mainly in the optical and electrical industries. By now, many biological reactions have been detected which cannot take place without the catalytic effect of selenium. The majority of these processes was found and clarified in microorganisms; however, the anticarcinogenic properties of this trace element may well have some significance for man in future.

  7. Methods of Selenium Supplementation: Bioavailability and Determination of Selenium Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Malgorzata; Szczyglowska, Marzena; Konieczka, Piotr; Namiesnik, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Selenium, a "dual-surface" element, maintains a very thin line between a level of necessity and harmfulness. Because of this, a deficiency or excess of this element in an organism is dangerous and causes health-related problems, both physically and mentally. The main source of selenium is a balanced diet, with a proper selection of meat and plant products. Meanwhile, the proper assimilation of selenium into these products depends on their bioavailability, bioaccessibility, and/or bioactivity of a given selenium compound. From the time when it was discovered that selenium and its compounds have a significant influence on metabolic processes and in many countries throughout the world, a low quantity of selenium was found in different parts of the environment, pressure was put upon an effective and fast method of supplementing the environment with the help of selenium. This work describes supplementation methods applied with the use of selenium, as well as new ideas for increasing the level of this element in various organisms. Based on the fact that selenium appears in the environment at trace levels, the determination of total amount of selenium or selenium speciation in a given sample demands the selection of appropriate measurement methods. These methods are most often comprised of a sample preparation technique and/or a separation technique as well as a detection system. The work presents information on the subject of analytical methods used for determining selenium and its compounds as well as examples in literature of their application.

  8. Aquatic Life Criterion - Selenium Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents pertaining to the 2016 Acute and Chronic Ambient Aquatic Life Water Quality Criteria for Selenium (Freshwater). These documents include what the safe levels of Selenium are in water for the majority of species.

  9. Biological selenium removal from wastewaters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, microbial conversion of water-soluble, highly toxic forms of selenium (selenate, selenite) to less bioavailable elemental selenium was investigated. By the exploitation of different groups of microorganisms (selenium-respiring, nitrate-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria,

  10. Selenium and redox signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigelius-Flohé, Regina; Flohé, Leopold

    2017-03-01

    Selenium compounds that contain selenol functions or can be metabolized to selenols are toxic via superoxide and H2O2 generation, when ingested at dosages beyond requirement. At supra-nutritional dosages various forms of programmed cell death are observed. At physiological intakes, selenium exerts its function as constituent of selenoproteins, which overwhelmingly are oxidoreductases. Out of those, the glutathione peroxidases counteract hydroperoxide-stimulated signaling cascades comprising inflammation triggered by cytokines or lipid mediators, insulin signaling and different forms of programmed cell death. Similar events are exerted by peroxiredoxins, which functionally depend on the selenoproteins of the thioredoxin reductase family. The thiol peroxidases of both families can, however, also act as sensors for hydroperoxides, thereby initiating signaling cascades. Although the interaction of selenoproteins with signaling events has been established by genetic techniques, the in vivo relevance of these findings is still hard to delineate for several reasons: The biosynthesis of individual selenoproteins responds differently to variations of selenium intakes; selenium is preferentially delivered to privileged tissues via inter-organ trafficking and receptor-mediated uptake, and only half of the selenoproteins known by sequence have been functionally characterized. The fragmentary insights do not allow any uncritical use of selenium for optimizing human health. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Selenium and cancer: biomarkers of selenium status and molecular action of selenium supplements.

    OpenAIRE

    Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Reszka, Edyta; Bruzelius, Katharina; Wasowicz, Wojciech; Akesson, Bjorn

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The relationship between selenium and cancer involves many different aspects. These include the forms of selenium present in the diet and in the body, their functions and mechanisms of action, and methods employed in assessing an individual's selenium nutritional status-both in general, and in epidemiological studies of the risk of cancer in relation to diet, as well as in connection with long-term trials for investigating the disease-preventive potential of selenium supplementati...

  12. Selenium for preventing cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinceti, Marco; Dennert, Gabriele; Crespi, Catherine M; Zwahlen, Marcel; Brinkman, Maree; Zeegers, Maurice PA; Horneber, Markus; D'Amico, Roberto; Del Giovane, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    Background This review is an update of the first Cochrane publication on selenium for preventing cancer (Dennert 2011). Selenium is a metalloid with both nutritional and toxicological properties. Higher selenium exposure and selenium supplements have been suggested to protect against several types of cancers. Objectives Two research questions were addressed in this review: What is the evidence for: an aetiological relation between selenium exposure and cancer risk in humans? andthe efficacy of selenium supplementation for cancer prevention in humans? Search methods We conducted electronic searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, 2013, Issue 1), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1966 to February 2013 week 1), EMBASE (1980 to 2013 week 6), CancerLit (February 2004) and CCMed (February 2011). As MEDLINE now includes the journals indexed in CancerLit, no further searches were conducted in this database after 2004. Selection criteria We included prospective observational studies (cohort studies including sub-cohort controlled studies and nested case-control studies) and randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with healthy adult participants (18 years of age and older). Data collection and analysis For observational studies, we conducted random effects meta-analyses when five or more studies were retrieved for a specific outcome. For RCTs, we performed random effects meta-analyses when two or more studies were available. The risk of bias in observational studies was assessed using forms adapted from the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale for cohort and case-control studies; the criteria specified in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions were used to evaluate the risk of bias in RCTs. Main results We included 55 prospective observational studies (including more than 1,100,000 participants) and eight RCTs (with a total of 44,743 participants). For the observational studies, we found lower cancer incidence (summary odds ratio (OR) 0

  13. Selenium in human mammary carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overvad, Kim; Grøn, P.; Langhoff, Otto

    1991-01-01

    In a case-referent study on the possible role of selenium in human mammary carcinogenesis, serum selenium was found to be 79 +/- 12 micrograms/l in 66 cases and 81 +/- 12 micrograms/l in 93 referents. An internal trend in serum selenium was observed among cases (TNM stage I 81 +/- 11 micrograms....../l and TNM stage II 76 +/- 13 micrograms selenium/l), indicating disease-mediated changes. The evaluation of selenium as a risk indicator in human breast cancer was therefore restricted to TNM stage I patients (n = 36). Multiple logistic regression analyses including variables associated with selenium levels...... revealed no association between selenium levels and breast cancer risk....

  14. [Selenium content in human in Sakha Republic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubkina, N A; Senkevich, O A; Kekina, E G

    2009-01-01

    Sakha Republic is considered to be endemic selenium deficient and poorly investigated region. Analysis of selenium in human sera, hair and nails revealed strongly decreased values. Low selenium concentrations were registered also in meat of domestic animals, fresh-water fish, mushrooms weight, agaricus campester. The possibility of the human selenium content improvement is discussed via import of grain with high selenium concentration.

  15. Biomarkers of selenium status

    Science.gov (United States)

    The essential trace element selenium (Se) has multiple biological activities, which depend on the level of Se intake. Relatively low Se intakes determine the expression of selenoenzymes in which it serves as an essential constituent. Higher intakes have been shown to have anti-tumorigenic potentia...

  16. Selenium Treatment Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium (Se) is a metalloid that is a dietary requirement in small quantities, but toxic at higher quantities. It also is known to bioaccumulate. In oxic environments, it exists as selenate (+6) and selenite (+4), both of which are soluble. Selenite will sorb more strongly to...

  17. A Selenium-Dependent Xanthine Dehydrogenase Triggers Biofilm Proliferation in Enterococcus faecalis through Oxidant Production▿ ‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Milan; Mallard, Chris; Barke, Theresa; Hancock, Lynn E.; Self, William T.

    2011-01-01

    Selenium has been shown to be present as a labile cofactor in a small class of molybdenum hydroxylase enzymes in several species of clostridia that specialize in the fermentation of purines and pyrimidines. This labile cofactor is poorly understood, yet recent bioinformatic studies have suggested that Enterococcus faecalis could serve as a model system to better understand the way in which this enzyme cofactor is built and the role of these metalloenzymes in the physiology of the organism. An mRNA that encodes a predicted selenium-dependent molybdenum hydroxylase (SDMH) has also been shown to be specifically increased during the transition from planktonic growth to biofilm growth. Based on these studies, we examined whether this organism produces an SDMH and probed whether selenoproteins may play a role in biofilm physiology. We observed a substantial increase in biofilm density upon the addition of uric acid to cells grown in a defined culture medium, but only when molybdate (Mo) and selenite (Se) were also added. We also observed a significant increase in biofilm density in cells cultured in tryptic soy broth with 1% glucose (TSBG) when selenite was added. In-frame deletion of selD, which encodes selenophosphate synthetase, also blocked biofilm formation that occurred upon addition of selenium. Moreover, mutation in the gene encoding the molybdoenzyme (xdh) prevented the induction of biofilm proliferation upon supplementation with selenium. Tungstate or auranofin addition also blocked this enhanced biofilm density, likely through inhibition of molybdenum or selenium cofactor synthesis. A large protein complex labeled with 75Se is present in higher concentrations in biofilms than in planktonic cells, and the same complex is formed in TSBG. Xanthine dehydrogenase activity correlates with the presence of this labile selenoprotein complex and is absent in a selD or an xdh mutant. Enhanced biofilm density correlates strongly with higher levels of extracellular

  18. Selenium and ocular health in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheck, Leo; Davies, Jo; Wilson, Graham

    2010-06-11

    Selenium is an essential mineral and severe selenium deficiency is known to cause significant health problems. It has been well documented that New Zealand soil is low in selenium. Recent studies have addressed the roles of selenoproteins in the eyes, with evidence suggesting that selenium supplementation may have a role in preventing cataract formation and age-related maculopathy. This paper summarises the role of selenium in ocular and general health and discusses selenium supplementation in a New Zealand specific context.

  19. Selenium in food and health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reilly, Conor

    2006-01-01

    ...) to be a carcinogen and banned as an additive in food. Selenium is considered by some to be a serious hazard to the environment and to animal health. Selenium-contaminated water has brought deformity and death to wildlife in nature reserves in western USA. There is even concern that because of selenium contamination of soil, crops supplied to the great cities of California could become unfit for human consumption. In large areas of China, endemic selenium toxicity is a hazard for locals who depend on cr...

  20. Binary mixtures of mercury/ selenium, and lead/selenium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Physiologically-based biokinetic models have been developed for predicting simultaneously the Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Elimination (ADME) properties of lead (Pb) and selenium (Se), and mercury (Hg) and selenium in a number of target tissues of humans. This was done for three population groups, ...

  1. Microbial selenium sulfide reduction for selenium recovery from wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, S.P.W.; Weijden, van der R.D.; Stams, A.J.M.; Cappellen, van P.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2017-01-01

    Microbial reduction of selenium sulfide (SeS2) is a key step in a new treatment process to recover selenium from selenate and selenite streams. In this process, selenate is first reduced to selenite, and subsequently selenite is reduced by sulfide and precipitates from the solution as SeS2. The

  2. Role of calcium in selenium cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, T R; David, L L

    The purpose of this research was to test the role of certain minerals in the formation of cataract caused by an overdose of selenium. Several pieces of information indicated that lenticular calcium may play an important role in selenite cataractogenesis: 1) Lens calcium concentrations in selenite treated rats were increased more than 5-fold, and the increase in lens calcium was localized in the nucleus. 2) Lens calcium concentrations were elevated at least one full day before actual formation of nuclear cataract, but serum calcium levels were not changed. 3) In older rats not susceptible to selenite cataract, lens calcium was not significantly increased. 4) No evidence was found for a generalized disruption in lens permeability, since no major changes in lens water, sodium, and potassium levels were observed, and 5) when levels of calcium observed in selenite cataract were added to solutions of soluble proteins from rat lenses, light scattering was increased. Selenium-overdose cataracts may provide an important model for studies on the role of calcium in cataractogenesis.

  3. Arsenic and Selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, J. A.; Kinniburgh, D. G.; Smedley, P. L.; Fordyce, F. M.; Klinck, B. A.

    2003-12-01

    Arsenic (As) and selenium (Se) have become increasingly important in environmental geochemistry because of their significance to human health. Their concentrations vary markedly in the environment, partly in relation to geology and partly as a result of human activity. Some of the contamination evident today probably dates back to the first settled civilizations which used metals.Arsenic is in group 15 of the periodic table (Table 1) and is usually described as a metalloid. It has only one stable isotope, 75As. It can exist in the -III, -I, 0, III, and V oxidation states (Table 2).

  4. Symptoms and implications of selenium toxicity in fish: the Belews Lake case example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemly, A Dennis

    2002-04-01

    Belews Lake, North Carolina was contaminated by selenium in wastewater from a coal-fired power plant during the mid-1970s, and toxic impacts to the resident fish community (20 species) were studied for over two decades. Symptoms of chronic selenium poisoning in Belews Lake fish included, (1) telangiectasia (swelling) of gill lamellae; (2) elevated lymphocytes; (3) reduced hematocrit and hemoglobin (anemia); (4) corneal cataracts; (5) exopthalmus (popeye); (6) pathological alterations in liver, kidney, heart, and ovary (e.g. vacuolization of parenchymal hepatocytes, intracapillary proliferative glomerulonephritis, severe pericarditis and myocarditis, necrotic and ruptured mature egg follicles); (7) reproductive failure (reduced production of viable eggs due to ovarian pathology, and post-hatch mortality due to bioaccumulation of selenium in eggs); and (8) teratogenic deformities of the spine, head, mouth, and fins. Important principles of selenium cycling and toxicity were documented in the Belews Lake studies. Selenium poisoning in fish can be 'invisible', because, the primary point of impact is the egg, which receives selenium from the female's diet (whether consumed in organic or inorganic forms), and stores it until hatching, whereupon it is metabolized by the developing fish. If concentrations in eggs are great enough (about 10 microg/g or greater) biochemical functions may be disrupted, and teratogenic deformity and death may occur. Adult fish can survive and appear healthy despite the fact that extensive reproductive failure is occurring--19 of the 20 species in Belews Lake were eliminated as a result of this insidious mode of toxicity. Bioaccumulation in aquatic food chains causes otherwise harmless concentrations of selenium to reach toxic levels, and the selenium in contaminated sediments can be cycled into food chains for decades. The lessons learned from Belews Lake provide information useful for protecting aquatic ecosystems as new selenium issues

  5. Disruptive firms

    OpenAIRE

    Coccia, Mario

    2017-01-01

    This study proposes the concept of disruptive firms: they are firms with market leadership that deliberate introduce new and improved generations of durable goods that destroy, directly or indirectly, similar products present in markets in order to support their competitive advantage and/or market leadership. These disruptive firms support technological and industrial change and induce consumers to buy new products to adapt to new socioeconomic environment. In particular, disruptive firms gen...

  6. Selenium and thyroid autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Negro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Roberto NegroDepartment of Endocrinology, “V. Fazzi” Hospital, Lecce, ItalyAbstract: The trace element selenium (Se occurs in the form of the amino acid selenocysteine in selenoproteins. Selenoproteins exerts multiple physiological effects in human health, many of which are related with regulation of reduction-oxidation processes. In fact, the selenoenzyme families of glutathione peroxidase (GPx and thioredoxin reductase (TRx display the ability to act as antioxidants, protecting cells from oxidative damage. Furthermore, another class of selenoproteins are the iodothyronine deiodinase enzymes (DIO, which catalyze the conversion of thyroxine (T4 in triiodothyronine (T3, then exerting a fine tuned control on thyroid hormones metabolism. Several studies have investigated the potential positive effects of Se supplementation in thyroid diseases, characterized by increased levels of hydrogen peroxide and free radicals, like autoimmune chronic thyroiditis. These studies have supplied evidences indicating that Se supplementation, maximizing the antioxidant enzymes activity, may reduce the thyroid inflammatory status. Then, it may be postulated that Se could play a therapeutical role in thyroid autoimmune diseases. Despite the fact that recent studies seem to be concordant about Se beneficial effects in decreasing thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb titers and ameliorating the ultrasound echogenicity pattern, several doubts have to be still clarified, before advising Se supplementation in chronic autoimmune thyroiditis.Keywords: selenium, thyroid, autoimmunity

  7. Review on Nano SeleniumProduced by Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    LI Ji-xiang; Wu, Wen-Liang; GUO Yan-bin

    2014-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is a kind of essential trace element for people and animal, while ionic state of selenium is toxic with high concentrations and will cause the selenium pollution. Nano-selenium is stable, nontoxic with higher biological activity. Application of bacteria reducing selenite or selenate to biological nano-selenium has great potential in selenium pollution control and nano-selenium production. This review summarizes the research progress of the red elemental nano-selenium reduced by ...

  8. Phytoremediation of selenium using transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H; LeDuc, Danika L

    2009-04-01

    Selenium (Se) is a micronutrient for many organisms but also toxic at higher concentrations. Both selenium deficiency and toxicity are serious problems worldwide. Owing to the similarity of selenium to sulfur, plants readily take up and assimilate selenate via sulfur transporters and enzymes and can even volatilize selenium. Selenium accumulating or volatilizing plants may be used for phytoremediation of selenium pollution and as fortified foods. Several transgenic approaches have been used successfully to further enhance plant selenium accumulation, tolerance, and volatilization: upregulation of genes involved in sulfur/selenium assimilation and volatilization, methylation of selenocysteine, and conversion of selenocysteine to elemental Se. Lab and field trials with different transgenic plants have yielded promising results, showing up to ninefold higher levels of selenium accumulation and up to threefold faster volatilization rates.

  9. Compatibilidad química por calorimetría diferencial de barrido y termogravimetría del auranofin tabletas 3 mg

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Octavio Martínez Álvarez; Marlene Montes Pérez

    2011-01-01

    Como parte de la pre-estabilidad de la preformulación de auranofin tabletas, se realizó un estudio de compatibilidad química, para lo cual se emplearon técnicas de análisis térmico como la calorimetría diferencial de barrido y la termogravimetría. Previo a dichos estudios se caracterizó térmicamente por calorimetría diferencial de barrido el principio activo y cada uno de los excipientes. Posteriormente se procedió a la realización del estudio de compatibilidad química, mediante la preparació...

  10. Selenium and pseudoexfoliation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ayça; Ayaz, Lokman; Tamer, Lülüfer

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the levels of selenium (Se), an essential trace element, in aqueous humor, conjunctival specimens, and serum of patients with pseudoexfoliation (PEX) syndrome and control subjects; and to determine the role of Se in the development and pathogenesis of PEX syndrome. A prospective case-control study. Twenty-seven cataract patients with PEX syndrome and 20 age-matched cataract patients without PEX syndrome were enrolled in this institutional study. Patients with ophthalmic conditions other than PEX and conditions that may influence Se levels were excluded. During cataract surgeries, aqueous humor, conjunctival specimens, and serum were collected in both groups. Selenium levels of all samples were measured by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The mean Se levels in aqueous humor of patients with PEX syndrome (50.96 ± 23.79 μg/L) were significantly lower than the control group (77.85 ± 19.21 μg/L) (P < .001). The mean Se levels in conjunctival specimens of patients with PEX syndrome (4.04 ± 1.44 μg/mg) were significantly lower than the control group (7.19 ± 2.00 μg/mg) (P < .001), as well. The mean Se levels in serum of patients with PEX syndrome (115.25 ± 25.20 μg/L) were lower than the control group (124.25 ± 14.40 μg/L), but this was not statistically significant (P = .325). Reduced levels of Se in aqueous humor, conjunctival specimens, and serum of patients with PEX may support the role of impairment in antioxidant defense system in the pathogenesis of PEX syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Histopathological changes due to the effect of selenium in experimental cockerels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A.A Latheef

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Selenium usually acts as an antioxidant at optimal levels in the body and increased levels are toxic. In this study an attempt was made to evaluate the effect of an optimum dose (0.14 mg of selenium on histopathological changes in experimental hypercholesterolemia in cockerels. Methods: The effect of selenium (0.14 mg was investigated on histopathological changes in four tissues namely liver, kidney, heart, and descending aorta in cockerel animal model. Animals were either fed with stock diet (group C, stock diet with cholesterol (group CH, stock diet with selenium (group Se, stock diet, selenium and cholesterol (group CH+Se for six months. Animals were sacrified and the tissues were isolated and subjected to histopathological study. Results: Xanthochromatic collections in liver were observed in group CH; hydropic degeneration in group Se and lobular disarray, hydropic degeneration and kuppfer cell hyperplasia in group CH+Se were observed. In kidney, mild mononuclear infiltration was observed in interstitium in groups CH, Se and CH+Se. myocyte disruption, and mononuclear infiltration in group CH and c0 H+Se, and disruption of muscle bundles with vascular congestion in group Se were observed. Smooth muscle proliferation in the media of blood vessel was observed in groups CH, Se and CH+Se. Interpretation & conclusions: The results of the present study suggested that the optimum dose of (140 ΅g/day feeding induced atherogenesis by inflammation and smooth muscle proliferation in cockerels with experimentally induced hypercholesterolaemia.

  12. Baseline selenium status and effects of selenium and vitamin e supplementation on prostate cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristal, Alan R; Darke, Amy K; Morris, J Steven; Tangen, Catherine M; Goodman, Phyllis J; Thompson, Ian M; Meyskens, Frank L; Goodman, Gary E; Minasian, Lori M; Parnes, Howard L; Lippman, Scott M; Klein, Eric A

    2014-03-01

    The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial found no effect of selenium supplementation on prostate cancer (PCa) risk but a 17% increased risk from vitamin E supplementation. This case-cohort study investigates effects of selenium and vitamin E supplementation conditional upon baseline selenium status. There were 1739 total and 489 high-grade (Gleason 7-10) PCa cases and 3117 men in the randomly selected cohort. Proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for effects of supplementation within quintiles of baseline toenail selenium. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios, and all statistical tests are two-sided. Toenail selenium, in the absence of supplementation, was not associated with PCa risk. Selenium supplementation (combined selenium only and selenium + vitamin E arms) had no effect among men with low selenium status (selenium) but increased the risk of high-grade PCa among men with higher selenium status by 91% (P = .007). Vitamin E supplementation (alone) had no effect among men with high selenium status (≥40th percentile of toenail selenium) but increased the risks of total, low-grade, and high-grade PCa among men with lower selenium status (63%, P = .02; 46%, P = .09; 111%, P = .008, respectively). Selenium supplementation did not benefit men with low selenium status but increased the risk of high-grade PCa among men with high selenium status. Vitamin E increased the risk of PCa among men with low selenium status. Men should avoid selenium or vitamin E supplementation at doses that exceed recommended dietary intakes.

  13. Digital Disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstand, Claus Andreas Foss

    det digitale domæne ud over det niveau, der kendetegner den nuværende debat, så præsenteres der ny viden om digital disruption. Som noget nyt udlægges Clayton Christens teori om disruptiv innovation med et særligt fokus på små organisationers mulighed for eksponentiel vækst. Specielt udfoldes...... forholdet mellem disruption og den stadig accelererende digitale udvikling i konturerne til ny teoridannelse om digital disruption. Bogens undertitel ”faretruende og fascinerende forandringer” peger på, at der er behov for en nuanceret debat om digital disruption i modsætning til den tone, der er slået an i...... videre kalder et ”disruption-råd”. Faktisk er rådet skrevet ind i 2016 regeringsgrundlaget for VLK-regeringen. Disruption af organisationer er ikke et nyt fænomen; men hastigheden, hvormed det sker, er stadig accelererende. Årsagen er den globale mega-trend: Digitalisering. Og derfor er specielt digital...

  14. Geiten krijgen meestal te veel selenium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, E.A.A.; Govaerts, W.; Eekeren, van N.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Geiten gaan efficiënt om met selenium. Mede daardoor zijn de bloedwaardes voor selenium bij geiten vaak hoog, en soms te hoog, zo bleek na bloedonderzoek op dertien biologische geitenbedrijven binnen het project Biogeit. Te veel selenium is schadelijk voor geiten.

  15. 21 CFR 573.920 - Selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... months.” (h) Selenium yeast is a dried, non-viable yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cultivated in a fed... additive; (4) selenium at such levels does not achieve its intended effect of promoting normal growth and... which minimizes the detrimental effects of selenium salts on the growth rate of the yeast and allows for...

  16. Selenium accumulation by plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Philip J

    2016-02-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential mineral element for animals and humans, which they acquire largely from plants. The Se concentration in edible plants is determined by the Se phytoavailability in soils. Selenium is not an essential element for plants, but excessive Se can be toxic. Thus, soil Se phytoavailability determines the ecology of plants. Most plants cannot grow on seleniferous soils. Most plants that grow on seleniferous soils accumulate plant species have evolved tolerance to Se, and commonly accumulate tissue Se concentrations >100 mg Se kg(-1) dry matter. These plants are considered to be Se accumulators. Some species can even accumulate Se concentrations of 1000-15 000 mg Se kg(-1 )dry matter and are called Se hyperaccumulators. This article provides an overview of Se uptake, translocation and metabolism in plants and highlights the possible genetic basis of differences in these between and within plant species. The review focuses initially on adaptations allowing plants to tolerate large Se concentrations in their tissues and the evolutionary origin of species that hyperaccumulate Se. It then describes the variation in tissue Se concentrations between and within angiosperm species and identifies genes encoding enzymes limiting the rates of incorporation of Se into organic compounds and chromosomal loci that might enable the development of crops with greater Se concentrations in their edible portions. Finally, it discusses transgenic approaches enabling plants to tolerate greater Se concentrations in the rhizosphere and in their tissues. The trait of Se hyperaccumulation has evolved several times in separate angiosperm clades. The ability to tolerate large tissue Se concentrations is primarily related to the ability to divert Se away from the accumulation of selenocysteine and selenomethionine, which might be incorporated into non-functional proteins, through the synthesis of less toxic Se metabilites. There is potential to breed or select crops

  17. Selenium and inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudva, Avinash K; Shay, Ashley E; Prabhu, K Sandeep

    2015-07-15

    Dietary intake of the micronutrient selenium is essential for normal immune functions. Selenium is cotranslationally incorporated as the 21st amino acid, selenocysteine, into selenoproteins that function to modulate pathways involved in inflammation. Epidemiological studies have suggested an inverse association between selenium levels and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis that can potentially progress to colon cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here we summarize the current literature on the pathophysiology of IBD, which is multifactorial in origin with unknown etiology. We have focused on a few selenoproteins that mediate gastrointestinal inflammation and activate the host immune response, wherein macrophages play a pivotal role. Changes in cellular oxidative state coupled with altered expression of selenoproteins in macrophages drive the switch from a proinflammatory phenotype to an anti-inflammatory phenotype to efficiently resolve inflammation in the gut and restore epithelial barrier integrity. Such a phenotypic plasticity is accompanied by changes in cytokines, chemokines, and bioactive metabolites, including eicosanoids that not only mitigate inflammation but also partake in restoring gut homeostasis through diverse pathways involving differential regulation of transcription factors such as nuclear factor-κB and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ. The role of the intestinal microbiome in modulating inflammation and aiding in selenium-dependent resolution of gut injury is highlighted to provide novel insights into the beneficial effects of selenium in IBD. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Biomarkers of Selenium Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Gerald F.

    2015-01-01

    The essential trace element, selenium (Se), has multiple biological activities, which depend on the level of Se intake. Relatively low Se intakes determine the expression of selenoenzymes in which it serves as an essential constituent. Higher intakes have been shown to have anti-tumorigenic potential; and very high Se intakes can produce adverse effects. This hierarchy of biological activities calls for biomarkers informative at different levels of Se exposure. Some Se-biomarkers, such as the selenoproteins and particularly GPX3 and SEPP1, provide information about function directly and are of value in identifying nutritional Se deficiency and tracking responses of deficient individuals to Se-treatment. They are useful under conditions of Se intake within the range of regulated selenoprotein expression, e.g., for humans health considerations. This would include determining whether supranutritional intakes of Se may be required for maximal selenoprotein expression in immune surveillance cells. It would also include developing methods to determine low molecular weight Se-metabolites, i.e., selenoamino acids and methylated Se-metabolites, which to date have not been detectable in biological specimens. Recent analytical advances using tandem liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry suggest prospects for detecting these metabolites. PMID:25835046

  19. Long-term selenium supplementation of humans: selenium status and relationships between selenium concentrations in skeletal muscle and indicator materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behne, Dietrich; Alber, Dorothea; Kyriakopoulos, Antonios

    2010-04-01

    Supplementation with elevated doses of l-selenomethionine (SeM) or selenium-enriched yeast that contains SeM as the main selenium species is frequently used as a protective or therapeutic measure. Information on the effects of long-term selenium supplementation on the body selenium status is, however, rather scarce. We therefore investigated fifteen male test persons who had taken selenium yeast and/or SeM supplements in medium doses of 62.5-125 microg Se/day or high doses of 200-262.5 microg Se/day for periods ranging from 1 year to 24 years. Seven non-supplemented men served as controls. As skeletal muscle is the main selenium pool, thigh muscle biopsy samples were taken. The selenium concentrations in these biopsies and in samples of the indicator materials blood, blood plasma, blood cells, head hair and toenails were determined by neutron activation analysis. Compared with the controls, the muscle selenium level was raised with additional selenium supplementation, but the relative increase in the mean muscle selenium concentration (by factors of about 1.6 and 2 for the medium and high doses, respectively) was lower than that in the selenium intake. Highly significant correlations found between the selenium concentrations in muscle and whole blood (R=0.90), red blood cells (R=0.91), blood plasma (R=0.87), head hair (R=0.89) and toenails (R=0.85) show that in humans supplemented in this way the selenium status can be assessed in a relatively easy way by analysis of the selenium retention in these indicator materials. 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Selenium Content in Seafood in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Iida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential micronutrient for humans, and seafood is one of the major selenium sources, as well as red meat, grains, eggs, chicken, liver and garlic. A substantial proportion of the total amount of selenium is present as selenium containing imidazole compound, selenoneine, in the muscles of ocean fish. In order to characterize the selenium content in seafood, the total selenium levels were measured in the edible portions of commercially important fish and shellfish species. Among the tested edible portions, alfonsino muscle had the highest selenium levels (concentration of 1.27 mg/kg tissue. High levels of selenium (1.20–1.07 mg/kg were also found in the salted ovary products of mullet and Pacific herring. In other fish muscles, the selenium levels ranged between 0.12 and 0.77 mg/kg tissue. The selenium levels were closely correlated with the mercury levels in the white and red muscles in alfonsino. The selenium content in spleen, blood, hepatopancreas, heart, red muscle, white muscle, brain, ovary and testis ranged between 1.10 and 24.8 mg/kg tissue in alfonsino.

  1. Disrupting Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Geoff; Bazzichelli, Tatiana

    Disruptive Business explores some of the interconnections between art, activism and the business concept of disruptive innovation. With a backdrop of the crisis of financial capitalism, austerity cuts in the cultural sphere, the idea is to focus on potential art strategies in relation to a broken...... economy. In a perverse way, we ask whether this presents new opportunities for cultural producers to achieve more autonomy over their production process. If it is indeed possible, or desirable, what alternative business models emerge? The book is concerned broadly with business as material for reinvention...

  2. Does selenium supplementation affect thyroid function?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kristian Hillert; Bonnema, Steen Joop; Cold, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Selenium is present in the active site of proteins important for thyroid hormone synthesis and metabolism. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of selenium supplementation in different doses on thyroid function, under conditions of suboptimal dietary selenium intake......=0.015), respectively, per 100 μg/day increase, with insignificant differences between 6 months and 5 years. No significant effects were found for FT3 and FT3:FT4 ratio. CONCLUSIONS: In euthyroid subjects, selenium supplementation minutely and dose-dependently affects thyroid function, when compared...... with placebo, by decreasing serum TSH and FT4 concentrations. Based on these findings, selenium supplementation is not warranted under conditions of marginal selenium deficiency. However, a role for selenium supplementation in the treatment of autoimmune thyroid diseases is still unresolved....

  3. Natural selenium particles from Staphylococcus carnosus: Hazards or particles with particular promise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevam, Ethiene Castellucci; Griffin, Sharoon; Nasim, Muhammad Jawad; Denezhkin, Polina; Schneider, Ramona; Lilischkis, Rainer; Dominguez-Alvarez, Enrique; Witek, Karolina; Latacz, Gniewomir; Keck, Cornelia; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Jacob, Claus

    2017-02-15

    Various bacteria, including diverse Staphylococci, reduce selenite to yield red selenium particles with diameters in the high nanometer to low micrometer range. Formation and accumulation of such particles in bacteria often results in cell death, triggered by a loss of thiols and formation of disruptive deposits inside the cell. Hence certain pathogenic bacteria are rather sensitive to the presence of selenite, whilst other organisms, such as small nematodes, do not employ this kind of nanotechnology, yet become affected by micromolar concentrations of such naturally generated materials. Selenium particles extracted from cultures of Staphylococcus carnosus and apparently stabilized by their natural protein coating, for instance, show considerable activity against the nematode Steinernema feltiae, Escherichia coli and Saccaromyces cerevisiae. Such natural nano- and micro-particles are also more active than mechanically generated selenium particles and may be applied as antimicrobial materials in Medicine and Agriculture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Radioprotection by metals: Selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J. F.; Srinivasan, V.; Kumar, K. S.; Landauer, M. R.

    The need exists for compounds that will protect individuals from high-dose acute radiation exposure in space and for agents that might be less protective but less toxic and longer acting. Metals and metal derivatives provide a small degree of radioprotection (dose reduction factor animal survival after whole-body irradiation). Emphasis is placed here on the radioprotective potential of selenium (Se). Both the inorganic salt, sodium selenite, and the organic Se compound, selenomethionine, enhance the survival of irradiated mice (60Co, 0.2 Gy/min) when injected IP either before (-24 hr and -1 hr) or shortly after (+15 min) radiation exposure. When administered at equitoxic doses (one-fourth LD10; selenomethionine = 4.0 mg/kg Se, sodium selenite = 0.8 mg/kg Se), both drugs enhanced the 30-day survival of mice irradiated at 9 Gy. Survival after 10-Gy exposure was significantly increased only after selenomethionine treatment. An advantage of selenomethionine is lower lethal and behavioral toxicity (locomotor activity depression) compared to sodium selenite, when they are administered at equivalent doses of Se. Sodium selenite administered in combination with WR-2721, S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid, enhances the radioprotective effect and reduces the lethal toxicity, but not the behavioral toxicity, of WR-2721. Other studies on radioprotection and protection against chemical carcinogens by different forms of Se are reviewed. As additional animal data and results from human chemoprevention trials become available, consideration also can be given to prolonged administration of Se compounds for protection against long-term radiation effects in space.

  5. Biomarkers of Selenium Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald F. Combs, Jr.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The essential trace element, selenium (Se, has multiple biological activities, which depend on the level of Se intake. Relatively low Se intakes determine the expression of selenoenzymes in which it serves as an essential constituent. Higher intakes have been shown to have anti-tumorigenic potential; and very high Se intakes can produce adverse effects. This hierarchy of biological activities calls for biomarkers informative at different levels of Se exposure. Some Se-biomarkers, such as the selenoproteins and particularly GPX3 and SEPP1, provide information about function directly and are of value in identifying nutritional Se deficiency and tracking responses of deficient individuals to Se-treatment. They are useful under conditions of Se intake within the range of regulated selenoprotein expression, e.g., for humans <55 μg/day and for animals <20 μg/kg diet. Other Se-biomarkers provide information indirectly through inferences based on Se levels of foods, tissues, urine or feces. They can indicate the likelihood of deficiency or adverse effects, but they do not provide direct evidence of either condition. Their value is in providing information about Se status over a wide range of Se intake, particularly from food forms. There is need for additional Se biomarkers particularly for assessing Se status in non-deficient individuals for whom the prospects of cancer risk reduction and adverse effects risk are the primary health considerations. This would include determining whether supranutritional intakes of Se may be required for maximal selenoprotein expression in immune surveillance cells. It would also include developing methods to determine low molecular weight Se-metabolites, i.e., selenoamino acids and methylated Se-metabolites, which to date have not been detectable in biological specimens. Recent analytical advances using tandem liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry suggest prospects for detecting these metabolites.

  6. Nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics and selenium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynnette Robiin Ferguson

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se is an important micronutrient that, as a component of selenoproteins, influences oxidative and inflammatory processes. Its’ levels vary considerably, with different ethnic and geographic population groups showing varied conditions, ranging from frank Se deficiencies to toxic effects. An optimum Se level is essential for the maintenance of homeostasis, and this optimum may vary according to life stage, general state of health and genotype. Nutrigenetic studies of different Se levels, in the presence of genetic variants in selenoproteins, suggest that an effective dietary Se intake for one individual may be very different from that for others. However, we are just starting to learn the significance of various genes in selenoprotein pathways, functional variants in these, and how to combine such data from genes into pathways, alongside dietary intake or serum levels of Se. Advances in systems biology, genetics and genomics technologies, including genetic/genomic, epigenetic/epigenomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic information, start to make it feasible to assess a comprehensive spectrum of the biological activity of Se. Such nutrigenomic approaches may prove very sensitive biomarkers of optimal Se status at the individual or population level. The premature cessation of a major human Se intervention trial has led to considerable controversy as to the value of Se supplementation at the population level. New websites provide convenient links to current information on methodologies available for nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics. These new technologies will increasingly become an essential tool in optimising the level of Se and other micronutrients for optimal health, in individuals and in population groups. However, definitive proof of such effects will require very large collaborative studies, international agreement on study design and innovative approaches to data analysis.

  7. Selenium, selenoproteins and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Bárbara Rita; Roberts, Blaine R; Bush, Ashley I; Hare, Dominic J

    2015-08-01

    It is unsurprising that our understanding of the role of selenium in neurological function is somewhat immature, considering its relatively recent discovery as an essential element to human health. Selenocysteine, the 21st amino acid, is the defining feature of the 25 selenoprotein-encoding genes so far discovered within the human genome. The low abundance of these proteins in the brain belies the integral role they play in normal neurological function, from well-characterised antioxidant activity in the periphery to poorly understood mechanisms that modulate mitochondrial function and response to brain pathology. Selenium has been identified as playing a role in several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, though its function as a 'cause or effect' of disease process remains unclear. This review discusses selenium metabolism in detail, specifically with regard to the role it plays within the central nervous system, and examines the most current literature investigating how selenium may be involved in chronic diseases of the central nervous system.

  8. Metabolic interrelationships between arsenic and selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levander, O A

    1977-08-01

    In 1938, Moxon discovered that arsenic protected against selenium toxicity. Since that time it has been shown that this protective effect of arsenic against selenium poisoning can be demonstrated in many different animal species under a wide variety of conditions. Antagonistic effects between arsenic and selenium have also been noted in teratologic experiments. Early metabolic studies showed that arsenic inhibited the expiration of volatile selenium compounds by rats injected with acutely toxic doses of both elements. This was puzzling since pulmonary excretion had long been regarded as a means by which animals could rid themselves of excess selenium. However, later work demonstrated that arsenic increased the biliary excretion of selenium. Not only did arsenic stimulate the excretion of selenium in the bile, but selenium also stimulated the excretion of arsenic in the bile. This increased biliary excretion of selenium caused by arsenic provides a reasonable rationale for the ability of arsenic to counteract the toxicity of selenium, although the chemical mechanism by which arsenic does this is not certain. The most satisfactory explanation is that these two elements react in the liver to form a detoxication conjugate which is then excreted into the bile. This is consistent with the fact that both arsenic and selenium each increase the biliary excretion of the other. Several other metabolic interactions between arsenic and selenium have been demonstrated in vitro, but their physiological significance is not clear. Although arsenic decreased selenium toxicity under most conditions, there is a pronounced synergistic toxicity between arsenic and two methylated selenium metabolites, trimethylselenonium ion or dimethyl selenide. The ecological consequences of these synergisms are largely unexplored, although it is likely that selenium methylation occurs in the environment. All attempts to promote or prevent selenium deficiency diseases in animals by feeding arsenic have

  9. Serum selenium concentration in Mashhad prisoners, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehteshamfar, Seyed-Morteza; Shapouri-Moghaddam, Abbas; Safarian, Mohammad; Nematy, Mohsen; Bahrami-Taghanaki, Hamidreza; Azizi, Hoda

    2012-08-01

    To determine the serum selenium concentration among prisoners in the central jail of Mashhad, Northeast of Iran. In a cross-section study, a sample of 435 prisoners (387 men [34.5±10 years] and 48 women [36.4±11 years]) recruited during May 2008 to June 2008 from Mashhad Central Prison, Mashhad, Iran, using multistage sampling method, proportionate to gender, age groups and kind of crime. Serum level of selenium was assessed using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The mean of serum selenium concentration was 121±20 ug/l. Prevalence of selenium deficiency was 9.7% in selected sample. The selenium deficiency was more prevalent in women than men (25.5% versus 7.8%, p=0.00). Age distribution of serum selenium level had a different pattern among men and women. While in men serum selenium level on average was least in those aged 50 and over, in women, serum selenium did not change with age. Body mass index (BMI) and weight change had no relations. Results of this study suggest that selenium status of the prisoners in Mashhad central prison is of concern. Women may be at higher risk for selenium deficiency. These results have implications for officials in charge with prisoners and health policy makers.

  10. Genome-wide association study of serum selenium concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Jian; Hsu, Li; Harrison, Tabitha

    2013-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element and circulating selenium concentrations have been associated with a wide range of diseases. Candidate gene studies suggest that circulating selenium concentrations may be impacted by genetic variation; however, no study has comprehensively investigated this ...

  11. Shedding Light on Selenium Biomineralization: Proteins Associated with Bionanominerals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, M.; Kolvenbach, B.; Gygax, B.; Moes, S.; Corvini, P.F.X.

    2011-01-01

    Selenium reducing microorganisms produce elemental selenium nanoparticles with particular physico-chemical properties being due to an associated organic fraction. This study identified high affinity proteins being associated with such bionanominerals and with non-biogenic elemental selenium.

  12. Chemical form of selenium in naturally selenium-rich lentils (Lens culinaris L.) from Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavarajah, Dil; Vandenberg, Albert; George, Graham N; Pickering, Ingrid J

    2007-09-05

    Lentils (Lens culinaris L.) are a source of many essential dietary components and trace elements for human health. In this study we show that lentils grown in the Canadian prairies are additionally enriched in selenium, an essential micronutrient needed for general well-being, including a healthy immune system and protection against cancer. Selenium K near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the selenium biochemistry of two lentil cultivars grown in various locations in Saskatchewan, Canada. We observe significant variations in total selenium concentration with geographic location and cultivar; however, almost all the selenium (86-95%) in these field-grown lentils is present as organic selenium modeled as selenomethionine with a small component (5-14%) as selenate. As the toxicities of certain forms of arsenic and selenium are antagonistic, selenium-rich lentils may have a pivotal role to play in alleviating the chronic arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh.

  13. Chemical Form of Selenium in Naturally Selenium-Rich Lentils (Lens Culinaris L.) From Saskatchewan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thavarajah, D.; Vandenberg, A.; George, G.N.; Pickering, I.J.

    2009-06-04

    Lentils (Lens culinaris L.) are a source of many essential dietary components and trace elements for human health. In this study we show that lentils grown in the Canadian prairies are additionally enriched in selenium, an essential micronutrient needed for general well-being, including a healthy immune system and protection against cancer. Selenium K near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the selenium biochemistry of two lentil cultivars grown in various locations in Saskatchewan, Canada. We observe significant variations in total selenium concentration with geographic location and cultivar; however, almost all the selenium (86--95%) in these field-grown lentils is present as organic selenium modeled as selenomethionine with a small component (5--14%) as selenate. As the toxicities of certain forms of arsenic and selenium are antagonistic, selenium-rich lentils may have a pivotal role to play in alleviating the chronic arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh.

  14. Blood selenium levels and contribution of food groups to selenium intake in adolescent girls in Iceland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gudmundsdottir, Edda Y; Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg; Thorlacius, Arngrimur; Reykdal, Olafur; Gunnlaugsdottir, Helga; Thorsdottir, Inga; Steingrimsdottir, Laufey

    2012-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to assess selenium in the diet and whole blood of adolescent girls, as well as define the most important foods contributing to intake and blood concentrations of selenium...

  15. Disruptive innovations

    OpenAIRE

    Viglia, Giampaolo; H. Werthner; Buhalis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion of disrupting innovations has generated significant market changes, modifying the dominant logic and affecting the strategic positioning of companies. This structural change is affecting market structure, the networks and the services that tourism players are supposed to use (Gretzel et al. 2015). One can also refer to the notion of digital infrastructure, which provides a nice framework that connects the different stakeholders, their relations as well as internal dynamics. At t...

  16. Anti-rheumatic agent auranofin induced apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukemia cells resistant to imatinib through both Bcr/Abl-dependent and -independent mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofen; Lan, Xiaoying; Liu, Shouting; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Ningning; Liao, Siyan; Zang, Dan; Song, Wenbin; Liu, Quentin; Carter, Bing Z.; Dou, Q. Ping; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to Imatinib mesylate (IM) is an emerging problem for patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). T315I mutation in the Bcr-Abl is the predominant mechanism of the acquired resistance to IM and second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). Therefore it is urgent to search for new measures to overcome TKI-resistance. Auranofin (AF), clinically used to treat rheumatic arthritis, was recently approved by US Food and Drug Administration for Phase II clinical trial to treat cancer. In contrast to the reports that AF induces apoptosis by increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels via inhibiting thioredoxin reductase, our recent study revealed that AF-induced apoptosis depends on inhibition of proteasomal deubiquitinases (UCHL5 and USP14). Here we report that (i) AF induces apoptosis in both Bcr-Abl wild-type cells and Bcr-Abl-T315I mutation cells and inhibits the growth of IM-resistant Bcr-Abl-T315I xenografts in vivo; (ii) AF inhibits Bcr-Abl through both downregulation of Bcr-Abl gene expression and Bcr-Abl cleavage mediated by proteasome inhibition-induced caspase activation; (iii) proteasome inhibition but not ROS is required for AF-induced caspase activation and apoptosis. These findings support that AF overcomes IM resistance through both Bcr/Abl-dependent and -independent mechanisms, providing great clinical significance for cancer treatment. PMID:25193854

  17. Auranofin induces apoptosis by ROS-mediated ER stress and mitochondrial dysfunction and displayed synergistic lethality with piperlongumine in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Peng; Chen, Minxiao; Ji, Jiansong; Chen, Weiqian; Chen, Xi; Ying, Shilong; Zhang, Junru; Zhang, Ziheng; Liu, Zhiguo; Yang, Shulin; Liang, Guang

    2015-11-03

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in the world. In addressing the need of treatments for relapsed disease, we report the identification of an existing U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved small-molecule drug to repurpose for GC treatment. Auranofin (AF), clinically used to treat rheumatic arthritis, but it exhibited preclinical efficacy in GC cells. By increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, AF induces a lethal endoplasmic reticulum stress response and mitochondrial dysfunction in cultured GC cells. Blockage of ROS production reversed AF-induced ER stress and mitochondrial pathways activation as well as apoptosis. In addition, AF displays synergistic lethality with an ROS-generating agent piperlongumine, which is a natural product isolated from the long pepper Piper longum L. Taken together, this work provides a novel anticancer candidate for the treatment of gastric cancer. More importantly, it reveals that increased ROS generation might be an effective strategy in treating human gastric cancer.

  18. Selenium exposure by food sources. impact into human health due selenium deficiency as well as selenium excess

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov Iliev, Angel

    2012-01-01

    Selenium is important micronutrient with great impact into human health. In mammal metabolism it is included as coenzyme in several key enzymes. There are 35 selenoproteins identified, which role is not fully clarified yet. Selenium is well known both with its high toxicity and presence of several important diseases impacted by its deficiency. Selenium dosage is also a problem. Minimal daily required dose differs less than an order from maximum allowed daily intake. Northern Balkans is territ...

  19. PLANT RESOURCES BASED SELENIUM SUPPLEMENTATION IN DAILY NUTRITION

    OpenAIRE

    Vida Škrabanja

    2017-01-01

    Selenium is one of the essential elements that has a direct effect on human health and disease. Environmental conditions and agricultural practice have a profound influence on the selenium content in plants. Cultivation of plants enriched with the selenium has an effective potential for selenium supplementation in diets for population which is exposed to selenium deficiency. Bioavailability of selenium compounds from food is in strong correlation with the source and its chemical form. The sel...

  20. Meaning and resource of selenium in human nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    KRATOCHVÍLOVÁ, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Bachelor's thesis concentrates on functions of selenium in human nutrition. Selenium is an essential trace element of importance to human health. Its availability depends on the concentration of selenium in the soil. The average income of selenium in the Czech population are usually 36 g/day per individuals. Excess or insufficient selenium intakes can result in adverse effects on human health. The most important sources of selenium in the diets of most people are meat, fish, eggs, milk, cerea...

  1. The influence of selenium supplementation of animal feed on human selenium intake in Serbia

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlović Z.; Miletić I.; Jokić Ž.; Stevanović J.; Šobajić S.; Bulat Z.

    2013-01-01

    The use of selenium as animal feed supplement in Serbia was approved in 1989 for some categories of pigs, sheep and poultry. From 2000 selenium in animal feed became a requirement for all categories of farm animals. The aim of this study was to determine the consumption of selenium by Serbian livestock and in poultry production between 1990-1991 and 2000-2008 and to analyze the selenium content of meat, milk and eggs sold on Serbian markets to gain insight ...

  2. Baseline Selenium Status and Effects of Selenium and Vitamin E Supplementation on Prostate Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Kristal, AR; Darke, AK; Morris, JS; Tangen, CM; Goodman, PJ; Thompson, IM; Meyskens, FL; Goodman, Ge; Minasian, LM; Parnes, HL; Lippman, SM; Klein, EA

    2014-01-01

    Background The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial found no effect of selenium supplementation on prostate cancer (PCa) risk but a 17% increased risk from vitamin E supplementation. This case-cohort study investigates effects of selenium and vitamin E supplementation conditional upon baseline selenium status. Methods There were 1739 total and 489 high-grade (Gleason 7-10) PCa cases and 3117 men in the randomly selected cohort. Proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios (HR...

  3. Toxicology evaluation of selenium protein powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Shunyi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to evaluate the safety of selenium protein powder, a novel organic selenium nutritional supplement, and reported corresponding data and results based on a series of toxicological tests. It was examined to evaluate oral acute toxicity by median lethal dose test and mutagenic potential by bone marrow cell micronucleus test and sperm abnormality test using Kun-Ming mice. The results showed that the oral LD50 of selenium protein powder exceeded 31.25 g/kg body weight in mice. No mutagenicity was found by mouse bone marrow cell micronucleus test and mouse sperm abnormality test. The results suggested greater safety of selenium protein powder as a nutritional selenium supplement, and selenium protein powder has the potential for development and application in food systems or functional foods.

  4. Selenium in Oncology: From Chemistry to Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver Micke; Lutz Schomburg; Jens Buentzel; Klaus Kisters; Ralph Muecke

    2009-01-01

    The essential trace element selenium, which is a crucial cofactor in the most important endogenous antioxidative systems of the human body, is attracting more and more the attention of both laypersons and expert groups. The interest of oncologists mainly focuses in the following clinical aspects: radioprotection of normal tissues, radiosensitizing in malignant tumors, antiedematous effect, prognostic impact of selenium, and effects in primary and secondary cancer prevention. Selenium is a con...

  5. How to use the world's scarce selenium resources efficiently to increase the selenium concentration in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Anna; Graham, Robin D; Christophersen, Olav A; Lyons, Graham H

    2007-12-01

    The world's rare selenium resources need to be managed carefully. Selenium is extracted as a by-product of copper mining and there are no deposits that can be mined for selenium alone. Selenium has unique properties as a semi-conductor, making it of special value to industry, but it is also an essential nutrient for humans and animals and may promote plant growth and quality. Selenium deficiency is regarded as a major health problem for 0.5 to 1 billion people worldwide, while an even larger number may consume less selenium than required for optimal protection against cancer, cardiovascular diseases and severe infectious diseases including HIV disease. Efficient recycling of selenium is difficult. Selenium is added in some commercial fertilizers, but only a small proportion is taken up by plants and much of the remainder is lost for future utilization. Large biofortification programmes with selenium added to commercial fertilizers may therefore be a fortification method that is too wasteful to be applied to large areas of our planet. Direct addition of selenium compounds to food (process fortification) can be undertaken by the food industry. If selenomethionine is added directly to food, however, oxidation due to heat processing needs to be avoided. New ways to biofortify food products are needed, and it is generally observed that there is less wastage if selenium is added late in the production chain rather than early. On these bases we have proposed adding selenium-enriched, sprouted cereal grain during food processing as an efficient way to introduce this nutrient into deficient diets. Selenium is a non-renewable resource. There is now an enormous wastage of selenium associated with large-scale mining and industrial processing. We recommend that this must be changed and that much of the selenium that is extracted should be stockpiled for use as a nutrient by future generations.

  6. Review on Nano SeleniumProduced by Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Ji-xiang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se is a kind of essential trace element for people and animal, while ionic state of selenium is toxic with high concentrations and will cause the selenium pollution. Nano-selenium is stable, nontoxic with higher biological activity. Application of bacteria reducing selenite or selenate to biological nano-selenium has great potential in selenium pollution control and nano-selenium production. This review summarizes the research progress of the red elemental nano-selenium reduced by bacteria including characteristics and application of nano-selenium, effects of carbon and nitrogen source, oxygen, temperature and pH in bacteria nano-selenium production, and molecular mechanisms of nano-selenium reduced by bacteria.

  7. Selenium Enrichment of Horticultural Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Puccinelli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of some crops to accumulate selenium (Se is crucial for human nutrition and health. Selenium has been identified as a cofactor of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase, which is a catalyzer in the reduction of peroxides that can damage cells and tissues, and can act as an antioxidant. Plants are the first link in the food chain, which ends with humans. Increasing the Se quantity in plant products, including leafy and fruity vegetables, and fruit crops, without exceeding the toxic threshold, is thus a good way to increase animal and human Se intake, with positive effects on long-term health. In many Se-enriched plants, most Se is in its major organic form. Given that this form is more available to humans and more efficient in increasing the selenium content than inorganic forms, the consumption of Se-enriched plants appears to be beneficial. An antioxidant effect of Se has been detected in Se-enriched vegetables and fruit crops due to an improved antioxidative status and to a reduced biosynthesis of ethylene, which is the hormone with a primary role in plant senescence and fruit ripening. This thus highlights the possible positive effect of Se in preserving a longer shelf-life and longer-lasting quality.

  8. Selenium Enrichment of Horticultural Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puccinelli, Martina; Malorgio, Fernando; Pezzarossa, Beatrice

    2017-06-04

    The ability of some crops to accumulate selenium (Se) is crucial for human nutrition and health. Selenium has been identified as a cofactor of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase, which is a catalyzer in the reduction of peroxides that can damage cells and tissues, and can act as an antioxidant. Plants are the first link in the food chain, which ends with humans. Increasing the Se quantity in plant products, including leafy and fruity vegetables, and fruit crops, without exceeding the toxic threshold, is thus a good way to increase animal and human Se intake, with positive effects on long-term health. In many Se-enriched plants, most Se is in its major organic form. Given that this form is more available to humans and more efficient in increasing the selenium content than inorganic forms, the consumption of Se-enriched plants appears to be beneficial. An antioxidant effect of Se has been detected in Se-enriched vegetables and fruit crops due to an improved antioxidative status and to a reduced biosynthesis of ethylene, which is the hormone with a primary role in plant senescence and fruit ripening. This thus highlights the possible positive effect of Se in preserving a longer shelf-life and longer-lasting quality.

  9. Assessment of requirements for selenium and adequacy of selenium status: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, C D

    2004-03-01

    The intent of this review is to evaluate the scientific evidence for the assessment of adequacy of selenium status and of the requirements for selenium. From this evidence, attempts have been made to define levels of plasma selenium and dietary selenium intake, which could be used for the assessment of deficiency or adequacy of selenium status. The first section briefly reviews the methods for assessment of selenium status. The second section outlines the requirements for selenium based on a number of criteria, and how these have been translated into recommended intakes of selenium. In the final section, levels of plasma selenium and dietary intake based on different criteria of adequacy have been proposed. The minimum requirement for selenium is that which prevents the deficiency disease, Keshan disease. The recommended intakes of selenium have been calculated from the requirement for optimum plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity that must, because of the hierarchy of selenoproteins, also take account of the amounts needed for normal levels of other biologically necessary selenium compounds. Whether optimal health depends upon maximization of GPx or other selenoproteins, however, has yet to be resolved, and the consequences of less-than-maximal GPx activities or mRNA levels need investigation. Intakes, higher than recommended intakes, and plasma selenium concentrations that might be protective for cancer or result in other additional health benefits have been proposed. There is an urgent need for more large-scale trials to assess any such beneficial effects and to provide further data on which to base more reliable estimates for intakes and plasma selenium levels that are protective.

  10. Sustainable Disruptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Silje Alberthe Kamille; Kjær, Lykke Bloch

    2016-01-01

    Since 2012 the Sustainable Disruptions (SD) project at the Laboratory for Sustainability at Design School Kolding (DK) has developed and tested a set of design thinking tools, specifically targeting the barriers to economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable business development....... The tools have been applied in practice in collaboration with 11 small and medium sized companies (SMEs). The study investigates these approaches to further understand how design thinking can contribute to sustainable transition in a business context. The study and the findings are relevant to organizations...... invested in the issue of sustainable business development, in particular the leaders and employees of SMEs, but also to design education seeking new ways to consciously handle and teach the complexity inherent in sustainable transformation. Findings indicate that the SD design thinking approach contributes...

  11. Learning selenium testing tools with Python

    CERN Document Server

    Gundecha, Unmesh

    2014-01-01

    If you are a quality testing professional, or a software or web application developer looking to create automation test scripts for your web applications, with an interest in Python, then this is the perfect guide for you. Python developers who need to do Selenium testing need not learn Java, as they can directly use Selenium for testing with this book.

  12. DIETARY SELENIUM AND COPPER INTAKE BY RESIDENT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-01-01

    Jan 1, 2004 ... Ph.D., Senior Research Fellow and Head, Nutrition Unit, Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Ghana and P. Amankwa, ... Objectives: To determine and evaluate dietary intake of selenium and copper by resident undergraduate ... number of Selenium-dependent enzymes known as.

  13. Immunomodulatory effect of dietary selenium supplementation on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of selenium supplementation on the immune response of Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected rats was investigated. Twenty five (25) adult male albino rats divided into five groups of five rats each were used for this study. Groups A, B and C were fed 4, 8 and 16 part per million (ppm) selenium in their feed, respectively ...

  14. Understanding selenium biogeochemistry in engineered ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jain, Rohan; Hullebusch, Van Eric D.; Lenz, Markus; Farges, François

    2017-01-01

    Selenium is used extensively in many industries, and it is necessary for human nutrition. On the other hand, it is also toxic at slightly elevated concentrations. With the advent of industrialisation, selenium concentrations in the environment due to anthropogenic activities have increased.

  15. Changing selenium nutritional status of Chinese residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    China has been designated as one of 40 countries deficient in selenium (Se) according to the World Health Organization. Selenium concentrations in hair are commonly used to evaluate the Se level of the human body. Moreover, hair Se concentrations are significantly correlated with Se concentrations ...

  16. The Role of Selenium in Human Immunity | Chisenga | Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... including selenium deficiency, so it has been postulated that selenium has a role in immune function. Immune dysfunction, susceptibility to viral infections and increased mortality are some of the outcomes associated with selenium deficiency. Key Words: Selenium; Human; Cell-mediated immunity; Innate immunity; HIV; ...

  17. Advanced prostate cancer risk in relation to toenail selenium levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geybels, M.S.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Schooten, F.J. van; Goldbohm, A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Selenium may prevent advanced prostate cancer (PCa), but most studies on this topic were conducted in populations with moderate to high selenium status. We investigated the association of toenail selenium, reflecting long-term selenium exposure, and advanced PCa risk in a population from

  18. Selenium: a micronutrient essential for maintaining human health

    OpenAIRE

    GONCA, Süheyla

    2014-01-01

    Selenium is an fundamental importance to human health. It is an essential trace element for major metabolic pathways, since selenium is an essential component of Glutathione peroxidase enzyme. Diet is the main source of selenium. Selenoproteins in mammalian cells indicated that essential role of selenium in the bodys antioxidant defense system.

  19. Structural and electrical properties of selenium nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Prajna, E-mail: prajna111@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan, 731235 (India); Department of Physics, Bolpur College, Bolpur, 731204 (India); Konar, Shyamal [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan, 731235 (India); Gupta, Bikash C., E-mail: bikashc.gupta@visva-bharati.ac.in [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan, 731235 (India)

    2016-01-08

    The electronic structure calculations are systematically carried out within the density functional formalism for understanding the structural and electronic properties of a number of selenium nanotubes. In particular, single walled selenium nanotubes (achiral) are studied in this work. Our investigations reveal that the lower diameter nanotubes are unstable. Beyond certain diameter, the tubes retain their tubular structure and they show metallic property. Furthermore, work-functions of these tubes are found to depend on their diameters and differ from that of the bulk selenium surface. - Highlights: • The selenium tubes become stable and retain tubular shape beyond certain diameter. • In contrary to bulk selenium, the tubular structures show metallic property. • The work-functions of tubes vary with diameter. The amount of variation is 1.2 eV.

  20. Selenium supplementation induces mitochondrial biogenesis in trophoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khera, Alisha; Dong, Lan-Feng; Holland, Olivia; Vanderlelie, Jessica; Pasdar, Elham A; Neuzil, Jiri; Perkins, Anthony V

    2015-08-01

    Placental oxidative stress has been implicated in pregnancy complications and previous work has shown that selenium can protect trophoblast mitochondria from oxidative stress. This report examines mitochondrial function and content in trophoblasts supplemented with selenium. Swan-71, JEG-3 and BeWo cells and placental tissue were incubated with sodium selenite or selenomethionine. Mitochondrial function was examined in a respirometer. Mitochondrial content was determined using RT-PCR. The levels of the mitochondrial biogenesis markers selenoprotein H, PGC-1α and NRF-1 was examined by western blotting. Mitochondrial respiration was significantly enhanced post selenium supplementation in cells and tissues. Selenium supplementation increased mitochondrial content and up-regulated mitochondrial biogenesis mediators in cells. These results emphasise the importance of selenium in mitochondrial regeneration in trophoblasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of selenium in dietary supplements using elemental speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubachka, Kevin M; Hanley, Traci; Mantha, Madhavi; Wilson, Robert A; Falconer, Travis M; Kassa, Zena; Oliveira, Aline; Landero, Julio; Caruso, Joseph

    2017-03-01

    Selenium-enriched dietary supplements containing various selenium compounds are readily available to consumers. To ensure proper selenium intake and consumer confidence, these dietary supplements must be safe and have accurate label claims. Varying properties among selenium species requires information beyond total selenium concentration to fully evaluate health risk/benefits A LC-ICP-MS method was developed and multiple extraction methods were implemented for targeted analysis of common "seleno-amino acids" and related oxidation products, selenate, selenite, and other species relatable to the quality and/or accuracy of the labeled selenium ingredients. Ultimately, a heated water extraction was applied to recover selenium species from non-selenized yeast supplements in capsule, tablet, and liquid forms. For selenized yeast supplements, inorganic selenium was monitored as a means of assessing selenium yeast quality. A variety of commercially available selenium supplements were evaluated and discrepancies between labeled ingredients and detected species were noted. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Distribution of selenium in zebrafish larvae after exposure to organic and inorganic selenium forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgova, N V; Hackett, M J; MacDonald, T C; Nehzati, S; James, A K; Krone, P H; George, G N; Pickering, I J

    2016-03-01

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient for many organisms, and in vertebrates has a variety of roles associated with protection from reactive oxygen species. Over the past two decades there have been conflicting reports upon human health benefits and detriments arising from consumption of selenium dietary supplements. Thus, early studies report a decrease in the incidence of certain types of cancer, whereas subsequent studies did not observe any anti-cancer effect, and adverse effects such as increased risks for type 2 diabetes have been reported. A possible contributing factor may be that different chemical forms of selenium were used in different studies. Using larval stage zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model organism, we report a comparison of the toxicities and tissue selenium distributions of four different chemical forms of selenium. We find that the organic forms of selenium tested (Se-methyl-l-selenocysteine and l-selenomethionine) show considerably more toxicity than inorganic forms (selenite and selenate), and that this appears to be correlated with the level of bioaccumulation. Despite differences in concentrations, the tissue specific pattern of selenium accumulation was similar for the chemical forms tested; selenium was found to be highly concentrated in pigment (melanin) containing tissues especially for the organic selenium treatments, with lower concentrations in eye lens, yolk sac and heart. These results suggest that pigmented tissues might serve as a storage reservoir for selenium.

  3. Blood selenium levels and contribution of food groups to selenium intake in adolescent girls in Iceland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/objectives: Significant changes have been reported in dietary habits and food availability in Iceland that would be expected to compromise selenium intake and status, especially among young people. These include substantial decreases in the consumption of fish and milk, as well as the selenium content of imported wheat. The aim of this study was to assess selenium in the diet and whole blood of adolescent girls, as well as define the most important foods contributing to intake and blood concentrations of selenium. Design: The subjects were 96 randomly selected girls, aged 16–20, who answered a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ for dietary assessment. Selenium intake from each food group was calculated in µg/day. Blood samples were collected for measurement of whole blood selenium. Results: Mean dietary selenium was 51±25 µg/day. Milk/dairy products, including cheese, contributed 36±14% of total dietary selenium; fish 18±12%; and bread/cereal products 13±6%. Mean whole blood selenium was 117±12 µg/l (range 90–208; nearly 90% of subjects were above the optimal level of 100 µg/l. Fish and bread/cereal products were the only foods significantly correlated with selenium in blood (r=0.32; P = 0.002 and r=0.22; P = 0.04, respectively while no correlation was found with milk and dairy products in spite of their greater contribution to total selenium intake. Conclusion: In this population of Icelandic adolescent girls, selenium intake and status seem acceptable. Judging from associations between intake and blood levels, fish and cereals may be the most important contributors to blood selenium.

  4. Selenium in oncology: from chemistry to clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micke, Oliver; Schomburg, Lutz; Buentzel, Jens; Kisters, Klaus; Muecke, Ralph

    2009-10-12

    The essential trace element selenium, which is a crucial cofactor in the most important endogenous antioxidative systems of the human body, is attracting more and more the attention of both laypersons and expert groups. The interest of oncologists mainly focuses in the following clinical aspects: radioprotection of normal tissues, radiosensitizing in malignant tumors, antiedematous effect, prognostic impact of selenium, and effects in primary and secondary cancer prevention. Selenium is a constituent of the small group of selenocysteine-containing selenoproteins and elicits important structural and enzymatic functions. Selenium deficiency has been linked to increased infection risk and adverse mood states. It has been shown to possess cancer-preventive and cytoprotective activities in both animal models and humans. It is well established that Se has a key role in redox regulation and antioxidant function, and hence in membrane integrity, energy metabolism and protection against DNA damage. Recent clinical trials have shown the importance of selenium in clinical oncology. Our own clinical study involving 48 patients suggest that selenium has a positive effect on radiation-associated secondary lymphedema in patients with limb edemas, as well as in the head and neck region, including endolaryngeal edema. Another randomized phase III study of our group was performed to examine the cytoprotective properties of selenium in radiation oncology. The aim was to evaluate whether sodium selenite is able to compensate a preexisting selenium deficiency and to prevent radiation induced diarrhea in adjuvant radiotherapy for pelvic gynecologic malignancies. Through this study, the significant benefits of sodium selenite supplementation with regards to selenium deficiency and radiotherapy induced diarrhea in patients with cervical and uterine cancer has been shown for the first time in a prospective randomized trial. Survival data imply that supplementation with selenium does not

  5. Selenium in Oncology: From Chemistry to Clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Micke

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The essential trace element selenium, which is a crucial cofactor in the most important endogenous antioxidative systems of the human body, is attracting more and more the attention of both laypersons and expert groups. The interest of oncologists mainly focuses in the following clinical aspects: radioprotection of normal tissues, radiosensitizing in malignant tumors, antiedematous effect, prognostic impact of selenium, and effects in primary and secondary cancer prevention. Selenium is a constituent of the small group of selenocysteine-containing selenoproteins and elicits important structural and enzymatic functions. Selenium deficiency has been linked to increased infection risk and adverse mood states. It has been shown to possess cancer-preventive and cytoprotective activities in both animal models and humans. It is well established that Se has a key role in redox regulation and antioxidant function, and hence in membrane integrity, energy metabolism and protection against DNA damage. Recent clinical trials have shown the importance of selenium in clinical oncology. Our own clinical study involving 48 patients suggest that selenium has a positive effect on radiation-associated secondary lymphedema in patients with limb edemas, as well as in the head and neck region, including endolaryngeal edema. Another randomized phase III study of our group was performed to examine the cytoprotective properties of selenium in radiation oncology. The aim was to evaluate whether sodium selenite is able to compensate a preexisting selenium deficiency and to prevent radiation induced diarrhea in adjuvant radiotherapy for pelvic gynecologic malignancies. Through this study, the significant benefits of sodium selenite supplementation with regards to selenium deficiency and radiotherapy induced diarrhea in patients with cervical and uterine cancer has been shown for the first time in a prospective randomized trial. Survival data imply that supplementation with

  6. Spectrophotometric Determination of Selenium Through Triiodide Anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizerea-Spiridon, Otilia; Nartita, Radu; Rogobete, Alexandru F; Negrea, Adina; Stroescu, Ramona; Bizerea, Teofana O; Ilie, Constantin; Marginean, Otilia

    2017-05-01

    Selenium is a chemical element found in the human body that plays a crucial role in its regulation. Depending on the concentration, it may have beneficial or have toxic effects. Selenium is incorporated as selenocysteine amino acid residue in selenoproteins which play an important role in many biological functions: anti-oxidant defense, regulation of the immune function and of the inflammatory response, metabolism of thyroid hormones, functioning of the central nervous system, biosynthesis of DNA and RNA, fertility, and reproduction. Excess selenium, altough less common than selenium deficiency, has equally important negative effects. Given the importance of selenium quantification in various samples, the study proposes a simple and direct spectrophotometric determination of selenium using triiodide anions. The method is based on the oxidation of iodide in acidic medium by selenium (IV) contained in the sample, to form elemental iodine which, in turn, reacts with the excess iodide to form the triiodide anions, the most stable soluble species in aqueous solution. Triiodide is colored from yellow to brown, depending on the concentration. The coloured compound has maximum absorbance at specific wavelengths and thus, the stage of interaction with a chromogenic agent is eliminated. Due to the sensitivity of the reaction, the detection limit of triiodide, and therefore selenium, is extended toward lower values. The optimal conditions for the measurements were established: λ = 290 nm, pH = 1.0 - 1.5, reaction time = 15 minutes. Two areas of selenium detection were determined from the samples: 0.025 - 0.100 ppm, and 0.1 - 4.0 ppm. The detection limit of selenium was lowered at 0.100 ppm and even at 0.025 ppm, which significantly improves the sensitivity of the determination. Types of samples were specified which are suitable for analysis using the proposed method and explained why, in case of biological fluids, it must be used only accompanied by an adequate digestion

  7. Selenium in Cattle: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youcef Mehdi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This review article examines the role of selenium (Se and the effects of Se supplementation especially in the bovine species. Selenium is an important trace element in cattle. Some of its roles include the participation in the antioxidant defense the cattle farms. The nutritional requirements of Se in cattle are estimated at 100 μg/kg DM (dry matter for beef cattle and at 300 μg/kg DM for dairy cows. The rations high in fermentable carbohydrates, nitrates, sulfates, calcium or hydrogen cyanide negatively influence the organism’s use of the selenium contained in the diet. The Se supplementation may reduce the incidence of metritis and ovarian cysts during the postpartum period. The increase in fertility when adding Se is attributed to the reduction of the embryonic death during the first month of gestation. A use of organic Se in feed would provide a better transfer of Se in calves relative to mineral Se supplementation. The addition of Se yeasts in the foodstuffs of cows significantly increases the Se content and the percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA in milk compared to the addition of sodium selenite. The enzyme 5-iodothyronine deiodinase is a seleno-dependent selenoprotein. It is one of the last proteins to be affected in the event of Se deficiency. This delay in response could explain the fact that several studies did not show the effect of Se supplementation on growth and weight gain of calves. Enrichment of Se in the diet did not significantly affect the slaughter weight and carcass yield of bulls. The impact and results of Se supplementation in cattle depend on physiological stage, Se status of animals, type and content of Se and types of Se administration. Further studies in Se supplementation should investigate the speciation of Se in food and yeasts, as well as understanding their metabolism and absorption. This constitute a path to exploit in order to explain certain different effects of Se.

  8. Selenium in Cattle: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Youcef; Dufrasne, Isabelle

    2016-04-23

    This review article examines the role of selenium (Se) and the effects of Se supplementation especially in the bovine species. Selenium is an important trace element in cattle. Some of its roles include the participation in the antioxidant defense the cattle farms. The nutritional requirements of Se in cattle are estimated at 100 μg/kg DM (dry matter) for beef cattle and at 300 μg/kg DM for dairy cows. The rations high in fermentable carbohydrates, nitrates, sulfates, calcium or hydrogen cyanide negatively influence the organism's use of the selenium contained in the diet. The Se supplementation may reduce the incidence of metritis and ovarian cysts during the postpartum period. The increase in fertility when adding Se is attributed to the reduction of the embryonic death during the first month of gestation. A use of organic Se in feed would provide a better transfer of Se in calves relative to mineral Se supplementation. The addition of Se yeasts in the foodstuffs of cows significantly increases the Se content and the percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in milk compared to the addition of sodium selenite. The enzyme 5-iodothyronine deiodinase is a seleno-dependent selenoprotein. It is one of the last proteins to be affected in the event of Se deficiency. This delay in response could explain the fact that several studies did not show the effect of Se supplementation on growth and weight gain of calves. Enrichment of Se in the diet did not significantly affect the slaughter weight and carcass yield of bulls. The impact and results of Se supplementation in cattle depend on physiological stage, Se status of animals, type and content of Se and types of Se administration. Further studies in Se supplementation should investigate the speciation of Se in food and yeasts, as well as understanding their metabolism and absorption. This constitute a path to exploit in order to explain certain different effects of Se.

  9. Fracture Phenomena in Amorphous Selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard-Andersen, Asger; Dahle, Birgit

    1966-01-01

    Fracture surfaces of amorphous selenium broken in flexure at room temperature have been studied. The fracture velocity was found to vary in different regions of the fracture surface. Peculiar features were observed in a transition zone between fast and slower fracture. In this zone cleavage steps...... with a nearly constant spacing of approximately 1 µ were found. Occasionally long cleavage whiskers—up to some millimeters long—were observed. Within certain regions the cleavage steps were crossed and interrupted by two line systems. The maximum fracture velocity has been measured to 350 m/sec. Further...

  10. PLANT RESOURCES BASED SELENIUM SUPPLEMENTATION IN DAILY NUTRITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Škrabanja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is one of the essential elements that has a direct effect on human health and disease. Environmental conditions and agricultural practice have a profound influence on the selenium content in plants. Cultivation of plants enriched with the selenium has an effective potential for selenium supplementation in diets for population which is exposed to selenium deficiency. Bioavailability of selenium compounds from food is in strong correlation with the source and its chemical form. The selenium of different sources and forms can become a part of human consumption when entering the food chain, wherein the inorganic forms of selenium are metabolized and converted to more available organic forms. Numerous results of systematic research of the selenium content in individual plant species as well as various techniques for producing selenium enriched foodstuffs is reviewed. The soil in Slovenia is selenium-poor and may concern a part of population which is potentially sensitive to selenium status. The merits of selenium effect, either alone or in combination with different environmental changes on plant production published by Slovenian authors are thus closely considered. Controversies continue to prevail regarding adequate amounts for selenium for health and disease prevention. Thus, general and individualized recommendations for selenium intake and supplementation in the future need to be cautiously followed and the reference values continually revised.

  11. In Situ Immobilization of Selenium in Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Robert C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stewart, Thomas Austin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This project focused on the use of a sorbent, carbonated apatite, to immobilize selenium in the environment. It is know that apatite will sorb selenium and based on the mechanism of sorption it is theorized that carbonated apatite will be more effective that pure apatite. Immobilization of selenium in the environment is through the use of a sorbent in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB). A PRB can be constructed by trenching and backfill with the sorbent or in the case of apatite as the sorbent formed in situ using the apatite forming solution of Moore (2003, 2004). There is very little data on selenium sorption by carbonated apatite in the literature. Therefore, in this work, the basic sorptive properties of carbonated apatite were investigated. Carbonated apatite was synthesized by a precipitation method and characterized. Batch selenium kinetic and equilibrium experiments were performed. The results indicate the carbonated apatite contained 9.4% carbonate and uptake of selenium as selenite was rapid; 5 hours for complete uptake of selenium vs. more than 100 hours for pure hydroxyapatite reported in the literature. Additionally, the carbonated apatite exhibited significantly higher distribution coefficients in equilibrium experiments than pure apatite under similar experimental conditions. The next phase of this work will be to seek additional funds to continue the research with the goal of eventually demonstrating the technology in a field application.

  12. Genetic polymorphisms that affect selenium status and response to selenium supplementation in United Kingdom pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jinyuan; Vanderlelie, Jessica J; Perkins, Anthony V; Redman, Christopher W G; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Rayman, Margaret P

    2016-01-01

    Low selenium status in pregnancy has been associated with a number of adverse conditions. In nonpregnant populations, the selenium status or response to supplementation has been associated with polymorphisms in dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (DMGDH), selenoprotein P (SEPP1) and the glutathione peroxidases [cytosolic glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) and phospholipid glutathione peroxidase (GPx4)]. We hypothesized that, in pregnant women, these candidate polymorphisms would be associated with selenium status in early pregnancy, its longitudinal change, and the interindividual response to selenium supplementation at 60 μg/d. With the use of stored samples and data from the United Kingdom Selenium in Pregnancy Intervention (SPRINT) study in 227 pregnant women, we carried out genetic-association studies, testing for associations between selenium status, its longitudinal change, and response to supplementation and common genetic variation in DMGDH (rs921943), SEPP1 (rs3877899 and rs7579), GPx1 (rs1050450) and GPx4 (rs713041). Selenium status was represented by the concentration of whole-blood selenium at 12 and 35 wk of gestation, the concentration of toenail selenium at 16 wk of gestation, and plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx3) activity at 12 and 35 wk of gestation. Our results showed that DMGDH rs921943 was significantly associated with the whole-blood selenium concentration at 12 wk of gestation (P = 0.032), which explained ≤2.0% of the variance. This association was replicated with the use of toenail selenium (P = 0.043). In unsupplemented women, SEPP1 rs3877899 was significantly associated with the percentage change in whole-blood selenium from 12 to 35 wk of gestation (P = 0.005), which explained 8% of the variance. In supplemented women, SEPP1 rs3877899 was significantly associated with the percentage change in GPx3 activity from 12 to 35 wk of gestation (P = 0.01), which explained 5.3% of the variance. Selenium status was not associated with GPx1, GPx4, or SEPP1

  13. Characterization of Selenium Species in the Shijimi Clam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Sakura; Koga, Kaori; Iwataka, Miho; Fuchigami, Takeshi; Haratake, Mamoru; Nakayama, Morio

    2017-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element for humans and animals. Fish and shellfish are known to be rich in selenium and suppose to be an effective selenium source. In this study, we characterized the selenium species in the Shijimi clam (Corbicula japonica), which is a typical clam eaten in Japan. The Shijimi clam contains a relatively high concentration of selenium (3.5 µg-selenium/g-dry Shijimi). Approximately 30% of the total selenium in the Shijimi clam meat was extractable with water, while selenium in the Shijimi clam was hardly extracted with ethanol, chloroform and hexane. Based on an ultrafiltration study, the molecular mass of the major selenium species in the Shijimi water-extract was estimated to be less than 5000. Because amphoteric selenium species were contained in the Shijimi water-extract, which was indicated by ion-exchange chromatographic separation, an ion-pair reagent was utilized to extract the ionic selenium species into an organic solvent. A matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) time of flight (TOF)-mass spectrometric analysis revealed the selenium isotopic pattern involving one selenium atom in a molecule with the 80Se molecular ion peak at m/z 534. This selenium species was mainly found in the visceral part of the Shijimi clam by imaging mass spectrometry.

  14. Selenium: environmental significance, pollution, and biological treatment technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Lea Chua; Nancharaiah, Yarlagadda V; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Lens, Piet N L

    2016-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element needed for all living organisms. Despite its essentiality, selenium is a potential toxic element to natural ecosystems due to its bioaccumulation potential. Though selenium is found naturally in the earth's crust, especially in carbonate rocks and volcanic and sedimentary soils, about 40% of the selenium emissions to atmospheric and aquatic environments are caused by various industrial activities such as mining-related operations. In recent years, advances in water quality and pollution monitoring have shown that selenium is a contaminant of potential environmental concern. This has practical implications on industry to achieve the stringent selenium regulatory discharge limit of 5μgSeL(-1) for selenium containing wastewaters set by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. Over the last few decades, various technologies have been developed for the treatment of selenium-containing wastewaters. Biological selenium reduction has emerged as the leading technology for removing selenium from wastewaters since it offers a cheaper alternative compared to physico-chemical treatments and is suitable for treating dilute and variable selenium-laden wastewaters. Moreover, biological treatment has the advantage of forming elemental selenium nanospheres which exhibit unique optical and spectral properties for various industrial applications, i.e. medical, electrical, and manufacturing processes. However, despite the advances in biotechnology employing selenium reduction, there are still several challenges, particularly in achieving stringent discharge limits, the long-term stability of biogenic selenium and predicting the fate of bioreduced selenium in the environment. This review highlights the significance of selenium in the environment, health, and industry and biotechnological advances made in the treatment of selenium contaminated wastewaters. The challenges and future perspectives are overviewed considering recent

  15. Selenium hyperaccumulation offers protection from cell disruptor herbivores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn Colin F

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperaccumulation, the rare capacity of certain plant species to accumulate toxic trace elements to levels several orders of magnitude higher than other species growing on the same site, is thought to be an elemental defense mechanism against herbivores and pathogens. Previous research has shown that selenium (Se hyperaccumulation protects plants from a variety of herbivores and pathogens. Selenium hyperaccumulating plants sequester Se in discrete locations in the leaf periphery, making them potentially more susceptible to some herbivore feeding modes than others. In this study we investigate the protective function of Se in the Se hyperaccumulators Stanleya pinnata and Astragalus bisulcatus against two cell disrupting herbivores, the western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis and the two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae. Results Astragalus bisulcatus and S. pinnata with high Se concentrations (greater than 650 mg Se kg-1 were less subject to thrips herbivory than plants with low Se levels (less than 150 mg Se kg-1. Furthermore, in plants containing elevated Se levels, leaves with higher concentrations of Se suffered less herbivory than leaves with less Se. Spider mites also preferred to feed on low-Se A. bisulcatus and S. pinnata plants rather than high-Se plants. Spider mite populations on A. bisulcatus decreased after plants were given a higher concentration of Se. Interestingly, spider mites could colonize A. bisulcatus plants containing up to 200 mg Se kg-1 dry weight, concentrations which are toxic to many other herbivores. Selenium distribution and speciation studies using micro-focused X-ray fluorescence (μXRF mapping and Se K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that the spider mites accumulated primarily methylselenocysteine, the relatively non-toxic form of Se that is also the predominant form of Se in hyperaccumulators. Conclusions This is the first reported study investigating the

  16. Reproductive impacts of elevated selenium levels

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objectives of this study were to: 1. Evaluate selenium levels in Neotropical migrants and riparian obligate birds on Imperial National Wildlife Refuge. 2....

  17. Selenium nanoparticles: potential in cancer gene and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiyo, Fiona; Singh, Moganavelli

    2017-05-01

    In recent decades, colloidal selenium nanoparticles have emerged as exceptional selenium species with reported chemopreventative and therapeutic properties. This has sparked widespread interest in their use as a carrier of therapeutic agents with results displaying synergistic effects of selenium with its therapeutic cargo and improved anticancer activity. Functionalization remains a critical step in selenium nanoparticles' development for application in gene or drug delivery. In this review, we highlight recent developments in the synthesis and functionalization strategies of selenium nanoparticles used in cancer drug and gene delivery systems. We also provide an update of recent preclinical studies utilizing selenium nanoparticles in cancer therapeutics.

  18. Is selenium supplementation in autoimmune thyroid diseases justified?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kristian H.; Bonnema, Steen; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review provides an appraisal of recent evidence for or against selenium supplementation in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases, and discusses possible effect mechanisms. RECENT FINDINGS: Epidemiological data suggest an increased prevalence of autoimmune thyroid...... diseases under conditions of low dietary selenium intake. Two systematic reviews have evaluated controlled trials among patients with autoimmune thyroiditis and report that selenium supplementation decreases circulating thyroid autoantibodies. The immunomodulatory effects of selenium might involve reducing...... proinflammatory cytokine release. However, clinically relevant effects of selenium supplementation, including improvement in quality of life, are more elusive. In Graves’ disease, some, but not all, trials indicate that adjuvant selenium supplementation enhances the restoration of biochemical euthyroidism...

  19. Selenium supplementation for patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism (the GRASS trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watt, Torquil; Cramon, Per; Bjorner, Jakob Bue

    2013-01-01

    Graves' hyperthyroidism is an autoimmune disease causing hyperfunction of the thyroid gland. The concentration of selenium is high in the thyroid gland and two important groups of enzymes within the thyroid are selenoproteins, that is, they depend on selenium. Selenium may have beneficial effects...... on autoimmune hypothyroidism and on Graves' orbitopathy, but the effects of selenium on Graves' hyperthyroidism is unknown.We hypothesize that adjuvant selenium may be beneficial in the treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism. The objective is to investigate if selenium supplementation plus standard treatment......, anti-thyroid drug treatment success), and improved quality of life in patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism....

  20. Enteral yeast-selenium supplementation in preterm infants

    OpenAIRE

    Bogye, G.; Alfthan, G.; Machay, T.; Zubovics, L.

    1998-01-01

    AIM—To study the bioavailability of selenium enriched yeast in preterm infants living in a low selenium area (Hungary).
METHODS—Thirty six preterm infants were randomly assigned to two groups at birth with respect to selenium supplementation. In the supplemented group (n=18) infants received 4.8 mg of selenium enriched yeast containing 5 µg selenium daily.
RESULTS—In the supplemented group the serum selenium concentration increased from 36.1(±12.8) µg/l to 43.5 (7.9) µg/l and in t...

  1. Selenium deficiency and toxicity in the environment

    OpenAIRE

    Fordyce, Fiona

    2005-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is a naturally occurring metalloid element, which is essential to human and other animal health in trace amounts but is harmful in excess. Of all the elements, selenium has one of the narrowest ranges between dietary deficiency (40 gday1) and toxic levels (400gday1) (WHO, 1996), which makes it necessary to carefully control intakes by humans and other animals, hence, the importance of understanding the relationships between environmental exposure and health. Geology exerts...

  2. Accidental death from acute selenium poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Katharine A; Lavercombe, Peter S; Dillon, Jasmine; Ginsberg, Riesa

    2006-10-02

    We report a fatal case of acute selenium poisoning in a 75-year-old man. After reading on the Internet about a possible role of selenium in prostate cancer, the patient ingested 10 g of sodium selenite. Despite intensive care treatment, he suffered a cardiac arrest and died 6 hours after ingestion. This case illustrates the risks of failing to critically evaluate Internet information and exposes the myth that natural therapies are inherently safe.

  3. Biomarkers of selenium status in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Van Zelst, Marielle; Hesta, Myriam; Gray, Kerry; Staunton, Ruth; Du Laing, Gijs; Janssens, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inadequate dietary selenium (Se) intake in humans and animals can lead to long term health problems, such as cancer. In view of the owner's desire for healthy longevity of companion animals, the impact of dietary Se provision on long term health effects warrants investigation. Little is currently known regards biomarkers, and rate of change of such biomarkers in relation to dietary selenium intake in dogs. In this study, selected biomarkers were assessed for their suitability to d...

  4. Pathology of selenium poisoning in fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Dennis Lemly

    1998-01-01

    Selenium presents an interesting paradox in the field of aquatic toxicology because it is both a nutrient and a poison. As a nutrient, it is required in the diet of fish at concentrations of about 0. 1 to 0. 5 Fg/g dry weight. Selenium is necessary for proper formation and functioning of glutathione peroxidase, which is a major cellular antioxidant enzyme. This enzyme...

  5. The role of selenium in predicting preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Ghaemi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Preeclampsia is a common disorder that is a leading cause of perinatal and maternal morbidity and mortality; however its specific etiology has still remained obscure.The first step in preventing preeclampsia is early detection of women at risk. Since there is no valid and reliable screening test, appropriate diagnostic and screening tests are necessary, which are inexpensive, non-invasive and beneficial for pregnant women. Therefore, regarding the role of selenium as an antioxidant in the prevention preeclampsia, this study was designed which aimed to determine the prognostic value of plasma selenium levels in the diagnosis of preeclampsia in primigravida women Methods: In a nested case control design, a sample of 650 normal primigravida women of 24-28 weeks participated in the study. Subjects who involved the case group were followed up for 3 months and 38 were affected by preeclampsia. Blood samples were obtained from these 38patients as well as from 38 subjects as their matched controls. Moreover, the amount of selenium was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. Results: The mean level of selenium in blood plasma of the cases was significantly lower than in their matched controls. The present study findings revealed that pregnant women with serum Se < 66.1 μg/L had a significantly increased risk of preeclampsia. Conclusion: Lower plasma selenium level in women destines to suffering from preeclampsia which confirms the destructive effect of selenium deficiency as an antioxidant in etiopathology of preeclampsia. Measurement of plasma selenium can improve the prediction of preeclampsia; thus, it seems that plasma selenium level test owns an acceptable sensitivity and specificity for predicting preeclampsia.

  6. Selenium in human health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairweather-Tait, Susan J; Bao, Yongping; Broadley, Martin R; Collings, Rachel; Ford, Dianne; Hesketh, John E; Hurst, Rachel

    2011-04-01

    This review covers current knowledge of selenium in the environment, dietary intakes, metabolism and status, functions in the body, thyroid hormone metabolism, antioxidant defense systems and oxidative metabolism, and the immune system. Selenium toxicity and links between deficiency and Keshan disease and Kashin-Beck disease are described. The relationships between selenium intake/status and various health outcomes, in particular gastrointestinal and prostate cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and male fertility, are reviewed, and recent developments in genetics of selenoproteins are outlined. The rationale behind current dietary reference intakes of selenium is explained, and examples of differences between countries and/or expert bodies are given. Throughout the review, gaps in knowledge and research requirements are identified. More research is needed to improve our understanding of selenium metabolism and requirements for optimal health. Functions of the majority of the selenoproteins await characterization, the mechanism of absorption has yet to be identified, measures of status need to be developed, and effects of genotype on metabolism require further investigation. The relationships between selenium intake/status and health, or risk of disease, are complex but require elucidation to inform clinical practice, to refine dietary recommendations, and to develop effective public health policies.

  7. Dietary Selenium and Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Schomburg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Next year (2017, the micronutrient Selenium (Se is celebrating its birthday—i.e., 200 years after first being identified by the Swedish chemist Jöns Jakob Berzelius. Despite its impressive age, research into the functions of this essential trace element is very alive and reaching out for new horizons. This special issue presents some recent fascinating, exciting, and promising developments in Se research in the form of eight original contributions and seven review articles. Collectively, aspects of Se supply, biochemical, physiological, and chemotherapeutic effects, and geobiological interactions are covered by leading scientists in the areas of nutritional, basic, and clinical research. It is obvious from the contributions that the bicentennial anniversary will celebrate a micronutrient still in its infancy with respect to being understood in terms of its biomedical importance.

  8. Dietary Selenium and Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomburg, Lutz

    2016-12-30

    Next year (2017), the micronutrient Selenium (Se) is celebrating its birthday-i.e., 200 years after first being identified by the Swedish chemist Jöns Jakob Berzelius. Despite its impressive age, research into the functions of this essential trace element is very alive and reaching out for new horizons. This special issue presents some recent fascinating, exciting, and promising developments in Se research in the form of eight original contributions and seven review articles. Collectively, aspects of Se supply, biochemical, physiological, and chemotherapeutic effects, and geobiological interactions are covered by leading scientists in the areas of nutritional, basic, and clinical research. It is obvious from the contributions that the bicentennial anniversary will celebrate a micronutrient still in its infancy with respect to being understood in terms of its biomedical importance.

  9. Biological activity of selenium: Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Jagoda K; Power, Ronan; Toborek, Michal

    2016-02-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient that exerts multiple and complex effects on human health. Se is essential for human well-being largely due to its potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiviral properties. The physiological functions of Se are carried out by selenoproteins, in which Se is specifically incorporated as the amino acid, selenocysteine. Importantly, both beneficial and toxic effects of Se have been reported suggesting that the mode of action of Se is strictly chemical form and concentration dependent. Additionally, there is a relatively narrow window between Se deficiency and toxicity and growing evidence suggests that Se health effects depend greatly on the baseline level of this micronutrient. Thus, Se supplementation is not an easy task and requires an individualized approach. It is essential that we continue to explore and better characterize Se containing compounds and mechanisms of action, which could be crucial for disease prevention and treatment. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  10. Thin film solar cells by selenization sulfurization using diethyl selenium as a selenium precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Kadam, Ankur A.

    2009-12-15

    A method of forming a CIGSS absorber layer includes the steps of providing a metal precursor, and selenizing the metal precursor using diethyl selenium to form a selenized metal precursor layer (CIGSS absorber layer). A high efficiency solar cell includes a CIGSS absorber layer formed by a process including selenizing a metal precursor using diethyl selenium to form the CIGSS absorber layer.

  11. [Selenium levels in human bodies and environment in Qinghai province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, S; Yuan, J; Yan, H

    1996-07-01

    To study selenium level, its distribution in human bodies and environment and its effects on health, 3,035 specimens of human hair, blood, urine, and environmetal water, soil, food were collected from 91 sampling spots in 23 cities and counties of Qinghai Province and determined for selenium levels with fluorescence analysis. Results showed overall biological selenium level of human bodies in Qinghai Province was low and blood selenium level was lower than the normal reference value in 84.73% of the population, same as that in selenium-poor nations. Environmental selenium was poor or in a deficient status in Qinghai Province, 69.57% of the areas in the Province was in low, poor, or severely deficient selenium. Selenium level in vegetable food correlated closely with that in human blood, which indicated low selenium level in environment caused human selenium deficient in their internal environment via food chain. There were difference in biological selenium levels of human bodies in seven districts and six ethnic nationalities, which suggests selenium levels in human bodies correlate closely with economic development, selenium intake, geographical environment, living habits and customs, etc., and are nothing to do with the altitude above sea level.

  12. Updates on clinical studies of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitasari, Irma M; Abdulah, Rizky; Yamazaki, Chiho; Kameo, Satomi; Nakano, Takashi; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2014-05-29

    To establish guidelines for the selenium supplementation in radiotherapy we assessed the benefits and risks of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy. Clinical studies on the use of selenium in radiotherapy were searched in the PubMed electronic database in January 2013. Sixteen clinical studies were identified among the 167 articles selected in the initial search. Ten articles were observational studies, and the other 6 articles reported studies on the effects of selenium supplementation in patients with cancer who underwent radiotherapy. The studies were conducted worldwide including European, American and Asian countries between 1987 and 2012. Plasma, serum or whole blood selenium levels were common parameters used to assess the effects of radiotherapy and the selenium supplementation status. Selenium supplementation improved the general conditions of the patients, improved their quality of life and reduced the side effects of radiotherapy. At the dose of selenium used in these studies (200-500 μg/day), selenium supplementation did not reduce the effectiveness of radiotherapy, and no toxicities were reported. Selenium supplementation may offer specific benefits for several types of cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy. Because high-dose selenium and long-term supplementation may be unsafe due to selenium toxicity, more evidence-based information and additional research are needed to ensure the therapeutic benefits of selenium supplementation.

  13. Updates on clinical studies of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    To establish guidelines for the selenium supplementation in radiotherapy we assessed the benefits and risks of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy. Clinical studies on the use of selenium in radiotherapy were searched in the PubMed electronic database in January 2013. Sixteen clinical studies were identified among the 167 articles selected in the initial search. Ten articles were observational studies, and the other 6 articles reported studies on the effects of selenium supplementation in patients with cancer who underwent radiotherapy. The studies were conducted worldwide including European, American and Asian countries between 1987 and 2012. Plasma, serum or whole blood selenium levels were common parameters used to assess the effects of radiotherapy and the selenium supplementation status. Selenium supplementation improved the general conditions of the patients, improved their quality of life and reduced the side effects of radiotherapy. At the dose of selenium used in these studies (200–500 μg/day), selenium supplementation did not reduce the effectiveness of radiotherapy, and no toxicities were reported. Selenium supplementation may offer specific benefits for several types of cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy. Because high-dose selenium and long-term supplementation may be unsafe due to selenium toxicity, more evidence-based information and additional research are needed to ensure the therapeutic benefits of selenium supplementation. PMID:24885670

  14. Organic selenium supplementation increased selenium concentrations in ewe and newborn lamb blood and in slaughter lamb meat compared to inorganic selenium supplementation

    OpenAIRE

    Steen Arvid; Strøm Turid; Bernhoft Aksel

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Selenium is part of the antioxidant defence system in animals and humans. The available selenium concentration in soil is low in many regions of the world. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of organic versus inorganic selenium supplementation on selenium status of ewes, their lambs, and slaughter lambs. Methods Ewes on four organic farms were allocated five or six to 18 pens. The ewes were given either 20 mg/kg inorganic selenium as sodium selenite or or...

  15. SELENIUM MOBILITY IN SOME SOILS OF ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Lungu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Selenium mobility in soil depends on a multitude of physical and chemical factors. The present paper highlights the selenium solubilization degree out of the total soil content in relation with its agrochemical properties. Soils samples were considered collected from different agricultural areas of the Country, with or without certain natural handicaps, from soils under industrial impact and long term agrochemical experiments. The selenium solubilization percentages out of the soil total content ranged between 3.57 and 8.15%. No solubilization percentage was calculated for Central and Southern Dobrudja and the South-Eastern Romanian Plane, because the total selenium quantities in these areas are lower and mobile selenium values are very low. The statistical analysis of the calculated percentage values highlighted homogeneous areas and areas with a higher scattering degree. Thus, in agricultural land, in acknowledged agrarian areas and in long term agricultural experiments, the percentage values are better grouped, showing (expectable soil homogeneousness, on one hand, and a significant soil selenium supply and its adequate solubilization for plant nutrition, on the other. The most scattered values occurred in the Călmăţui and Buzău valleys area in halomorphic soils, and in the Făgăraş Depression which is under the industrial polluting influence of chemical works. Among the causes for these differences is the uniformity or non-uniformity of the terrains, induced by land use and the existence or not of a handicap (polluting impact or halomorphic soils, for example. In general, there are no significant differences between the selenium mobility values and their grouping or scattering degree in the soil depth. A single exception stands out, namely in the Făgăraş Depression, where the selenium solubilization degree tends to increase with soil depth, as well as the scattering degree. In the Danube Delta diked areas Sireasa and Pardina very

  16. EURRECA-Estimating selenium requirements for deriving dietary reference values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Rachel; Collings, Rachel; Harvey, Linda J; King, Maria; Hooper, Lee; Bouwman, Jildau; Gurinovic, Mirjana; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2013-01-01

    Current reference values for selenium, an essential micronutrient, are based on the intake of selenium that is required to achieve maximal glutathione peroxidase activity in plasma or erythrocytes. In order to assess the evidence of relevance to setting dietary reference values for selenium, the EURRECA Network of Excellence focused on systematic searches, review, and evaluation of (i) selenium status biomarkers and evidence for relationships between intake and status biomarkers, (ii) selenium and health (including the effect of intake and/or status biomarkers on cancer risk, immune function, HIV, cognition, and fertility), (iii) bioavailability of selenium from the diet, and (iv) impact of genotype/single nucleotide polymorphisms on status or health outcomes associated with selenium. The main research outputs for selenium and future research priorities are discussed further in this review.

  17. Optimization of selenoprotein P and other plasma selenium biomarkers for the assessment of the selenium nutritional requirement: a placebo-controlled, double-blind study of selenomethionine supplementation in selenium-deficient Chinese subjects1234

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, YiMing; Hill, Kristina E.; Li, Ping; Xu, Jiayuan; Zhou, Dingyou; Motley, Amy K.; WANG, LI; Byrne, Daniel W.; Burk, Raymond F.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The intake of selenium needed for optimal health has not been established. Selenoproteins perform the functions of selenium, and the selenium intake needed for their full expression is not known.

  18. Updates on clinical studies of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Puspitasari, Irma M.; Abdulah, Rizky; Yamazaki, Chiho; KAMEO, Satomi; Nakano, Takashi; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    To establish guidelines for the selenium supplementation in radiotherapy we assessed the benefits and risks of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy. Clinical studies on the use of selenium in radiotherapy were searched in the PubMed electronic database in January 2013. Sixteen clinical studies were identified among the 167 articles selected in the initial search. Ten articles were observational studies, and the other 6 articles reported studies on the effects of selenium supplementation i...

  19. Low blood selenium: A probable factor in essential hypertension ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The possible association between selenium and essential hypertension was investigated in this study. Blood selenium (BSe) and plasma glutathione peroxidase (plGSH-Px) activity were measured as biochemical markers of selenium status of 103 hypertensive patients (44 males and 59 females) and 88 apparently healthy ...

  20. Reduced Maternal Selenium levels in Pregnant and Lactating ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reduced Maternal Selenium levels in Pregnant and Lactating Nigerian women: Should Routine Selenium Supplementation be advocated? ... However, there was a non significant increase immediately after birth. In the breast milk, selenium concentration significantly decreased (P<0.0001) as lactation progressed.

  1. Bio-induced solid selenium for recovery from water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, S.P.W.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium in the form of selenate or selenite in wastewater needs to be removed due to its potential toxicity in the environment. Also, selenium is a valuable element that is used in several industries and current selenium resources are likely to be exhausted in less than 50 years. Waste streams

  2. Selenium deficiency and the effects of supplementation on preterm infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Renata Germano B. O. N.; Nogueira, Roberto José N.; Antonio, Maria Ângela R. G. M.; Barros-Filho, Antonio de Azevedo; Hessel, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to review the literature about blood concentrations of selenium associated with gestational age, feeding, supplementation and related clinical features in preterm infants. Data sources: Systematic review in the following databases: MEDLINE, PubMed, Google academics, SciELO. org, ScienceDirect (Elsevier) and CINAHL-Plus with Full Text (EBSCO). Articles published up to January 2013 with the keywords "selenium deficiency", "selenium supplementation", "neonates", "infants", "newborn" and "preterm infants" were selected. Data synthesis: The studies reported that low blood selenium levels are associated with increased risk of respiratory diseases. Preterm infants, especially with low birth weight, presented lower selenium levels. Selenium deficiency has also been associated with the use of oral infant formula, enteral and parenteral nutrition (with or without selenium addition). The optimal dose and length of selenium supplementation is not well-established, since they are based only on age group and selenium ingestion by breastfed children. Furthermore, the clinical status of the infant affected by conditions that may increase oxidative stress, and consequently, selenium requirements is not taken into account. Conclusions: Prematurity and low birth weight can contribute to low blood selenium in premature infants. Selenium supplementation seems to minimize or prevent clinical complications caused by prematurity. PMID:24676200

  3. Evaluation Of Selenium Supplementation Alone, A Combination Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of selenium supplementation alone and a combination of selenium and Vitamin E or low dose diminazene aceturate (berenil) was investigated in Trypanosoma brucei brucei infected rats. The effect of the selenium supplementation and its combinations were assessed using the parasitaemia, changes in body ...

  4. NAIL KERATIN AS MONITOR-TISSUE FOR SELENIUM EXPOSURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANNOORD, PAH; MAAS, MJ; DEBRUIN, M

    1992-01-01

    Nail clippings might provide a way to monitor exposure to selenium in the recent past of an individual, since a clipping collected from a toe would reflect exposures months before actual clipping date. The relation between levels of exogenous selenium exposure and selenium levels in nail keratin was

  5. Selenium deficiency, reversible cardiomyopathy and short-term intravenous feeding.

    OpenAIRE

    Levy, J. B.; Jones, H. W.; Gordon, A. C.

    1994-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with Crohn's disease receiving short-term postoperative parenteral nutrition supplemented with trace elements who nevertheless became selenium deficient with evidence of a cardiomyopathy. This was fully reversible with oral selenium supplementation. Current parenteral feeding regimes may not contain enough selenium for malnourished patients.

  6. Environmental Selenium Research: From Microscopic Processes to Global Understanding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkel, L.H.E.; Johnson, C.A.; Lenz, M.; Grundl, T.; Leupin, O.X.; Amini, M.; Charlet, L.

    2012-01-01

    Selenium is a natural trace element that is of fundamental importance to human health. The extreme geographical variation in selenium concentrations in soils and food crops has resulted in significant health problems related to deficient or excess levels of selenium in the environment. To deal with

  7. Selenistasis: Epistatic Effects of Selenium on Cardiovascular Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jacob; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Although selenium metabolism is intricately linked to cardiovascular biology and function, and deficiency of selenium is associated with cardiac pathology, utilization of selenium in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease remains an elusive goal. From a reductionist standpoint, the major function of selenium in vivo is antioxidant defense via its incorporation as selenocysteine into enzyme families such as glutathione peroxidases and thioredoxin reductases. In addition, selenium compounds are heterogeneous and have complex metabolic fates resulting in effects that are not entirely dependent on selenoprotein expression. This complex biology of selenium in vivo may underlie the fact that beneficial effects of selenium supplementation demonstrated in preclinical studies using models of oxidant stress-induced cardiovascular dysfunction, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury and myocardial infarction, have not been consistently observed in clinical trials. In fact, recent studies have yielded data that suggest that unselective supplementation of selenium may, indeed, be harmful. Interesting biologic actions of selenium are its simultaneous effects on redox balance and methylation status, a combination that may influence gene expression. These combined actions may explain some of the biphasic effects seen with low and high doses of selenium, the potentially harmful effects seen in normal individuals, and the beneficial effects noted in preclinical studies of disease. Given the complexity of selenium biology, systems biology approaches may be necessary to reach the goal of optimization of selenium status to promote health and prevent disease. PMID:23434902

  8. Selenium deficiency and the effects of supplementation on preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Renata Germano B O N; Nogueira, Roberto Jose N; Antonio, Maria Angela R G M; Barros-Filho, Antonio de Azevedo; Hessel, Gabriel

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to review the literature about blood concentrations of selenium associated with gestational age, feeding, supplementation and related clinical features in preterm infants. Systematic review in the following databases: MEDLINE, PubMed, Google academics, SciELO. org, ScienceDirect (Elsevier) and CINAHL-Plus with Full Text (EBSCO). Articles published up to January 2013 with the keywords "selenium deficiency", "selenium supplementation", "neonates", "infants", "newborn" and "preterm infants" were selected. The studies reported that low blood selenium levels are associated with increased risk of respiratory diseases. Preterm infants, especially with low birth weight, presented lower selenium levels. Selenium deficiency has also been associated with the use of oral infant formula, enteral and parenteral nutrition (with or without selenium addition). The optimal dose and length of selenium supplementation is not well-established, since they are based only on age group and selenium ingestion by breastfed children. Furthermore, the clinical status of the infant affected by conditions that may increase oxidative stress, and consequently, selenium requirements is not taken into account. Prematurity and low birth weight can contribute to low blood selenium in premature infants. Selenium supplementation seems to minimize or prevent clinical complications caused by prematurity.

  9. Selenistasis: epistatic effects of selenium on cardiovascular phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jacob; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2013-01-31

    Although selenium metabolism is intricately linked to cardiovascular biology and function, and deficiency of selenium is associated with cardiac pathology, utilization of selenium in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease remains an elusive goal. From a reductionist standpoint, the major function of selenium in vivo is antioxidant defense via its incorporation as selenocysteine into enzyme families such as glutathione peroxidases and thioredoxin reductases. In addition, selenium compounds are heterogeneous and have complex metabolic fates resulting in effects that are not entirely dependent on selenoprotein expression. This complex biology of selenium in vivo may underlie the fact that beneficial effects of selenium supplementation demonstrated in preclinical studies using models of oxidant stress-induced cardiovascular dysfunction, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury and myocardial infarction, have not been consistently observed in clinical trials. In fact, recent studies have yielded data that suggest that unselective supplementation of selenium may, indeed, be harmful. Interesting biologic actions of selenium are its simultaneous effects on redox balance and methylation status, a combination that may influence gene expression. These combined actions may explain some of the biphasic effects seen with low and high doses of selenium, the potentially harmful effects seen in normal individuals, and the beneficial effects noted in preclinical studies of disease. Given the complexity of selenium biology, systems biology approaches may be necessary to reach the goal of optimization of selenium status to promote health and prevent disease.

  10. EURRECA—Estimating Selenium Requirements for Deriving Dietary Reference Values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurst, R.; Collings, R.; Harvey, L.J.; King, M.; Hooper, L.; Bouwman, J.; Gurinovic, M.; Fairweather-Tait, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Current reference values for selenium, an essential micronutrient, are based on the intake of selenium that is required to achieve maximal glutathione peroxidase activity in plasma or erythrocytes. In order to assess the evidence of relevance to setting dietary reference values for selenium, the

  11. Selenium deficiency and the effects of supplementation on preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Germano B. O. N. Freitas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to review the literature about blood concentrations of selenium associated with gestational age, feeding, supplementation and related clinical features in preterm infants. Data sources: Systematic review in the following databases: MEDLINE, PubMed, Google academics, SciELO. org, ScienceDirect (Elsevier and CINAHL-Plus with Full Text (EBSCO. Articles published up to January 2013 with the keywords "selenium deficiency", "selenium supplementation", "neonates", "infants", "newborn" and "preterm infants" were selected. Data synthesis: The studies reported that low blood selenium levels are associated with increased risk of respiratory diseases. Preterm infants, especially with low birth weight, presented lower selenium levels. Selenium deficiency has also been associated with the use of oral infant formula, enteral and parenteral nutrition (with or without selenium addition. The optimal dose and length of selenium supplementation is not well-established, since they are based only on age group and selenium ingestion by breastfed children. Furthermore, the clinical status of the infant affected by conditions that may increase oxidative stress, and consequently, selenium requirements is not taken into account. Conclusions: Prematurity and low birth weight can contribute to low blood selenium in premature infants. Selenium supplementation seems to minimize or prevent clinical complications caused by prematurity.

  12. Selenistasis: Epistatic Effects of Selenium on Cardiovascular Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Loscalzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although selenium metabolism is intricately linked to cardiovascular biology and function, and deficiency of selenium is associated with cardiac pathology, utilization of selenium in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease remains an elusive goal. From a reductionist standpoint, the major function of selenium in vivo is antioxidant defense via its incorporation as selenocysteine into enzyme families such as glutathione peroxidases and thioredoxin reductases. In addition, selenium compounds are heterogeneous and have complex metabolic fates resulting in effects that are not entirely dependent on selenoprotein expression. This complex biology of selenium in vivo may underlie the fact that beneficial effects of selenium supplementation demonstrated in preclinical studies using models of oxidant stress-induced cardiovascular dysfunction, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury and myocardial infarction, have not been consistently observed in clinical trials. In fact, recent studies have yielded data that suggest that unselective supplementation of selenium may, indeed, be harmful. Interesting biologic actions of selenium are its simultaneous effects on redox balance and methylation status, a combination that may influence gene expression. These combined actions may explain some of the biphasic effects seen with low and high doses of selenium, the potentially harmful effects seen in normal individuals, and the beneficial effects noted in preclinical studies of disease. Given the complexity of selenium biology, systems biology approaches may be necessary to reach the goal of optimization of selenium status to promote health and prevent disease.

  13. Toxicity of organic and inorganic selenium to mallard ducklings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Gold, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    The toxicity of selenomethionine and sodium selenite to mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos) was measured by feeding each form from hatching to six weeks of age at dietary concentrations of 0, 10, 20, 40, and 80 ppm selenium. At 80 ppm selenium, sodium selenite caused 97.5% mortality by six weeks and selenomethionine caused 100% mortality. At 40 ppm, these two forms of selenium caused 25 and 12.5% mortality. No mortality occurred at 10 or 20 ppm. Diets containing 20, 40, or 80 ppm selenium in both forms caused decreases in food consumption and growth. The only statistically significant effect of 10 ppm selenium was with sodium selenite, which resulted in larger livers than controls. Selenomethionine was more readily stored in the liver than sodium selenite at levels above 10 ppm selenium in the diet. Based on comparisons of residues of selenium in livers of surviving and dead ducklings, concentrations in the liver were not diagnostic of death due to selenium poisoning. Because both forms of selenium resulted in severe reductions in food consumption, selenium-induced starvation may have been related to duckling mortality. It was not clear whether either form of selenium at 10 ppm in the diet resulted in a leveling off of selenium concentrations in the liver within six weeks.

  14. Selenium supplementation in radiotherapy patients: do we need to measure selenium levels in serum or blood regularly prior radiotherapy?

    OpenAIRE

    Mücke, Ralph; Micke, Oliver; Schomburg, Lutz; Kisters, Klaus; Büntzel, Jens; Hübner, Jutta; Kriz, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Considering the review by Puspitasari and colleagues, an additional discussion of the endpoints of the Se supplementation studies described would be helpful. In our view, selenium can safely be given to selenium-deficient cancer patients prior to and during radiotherapy. Therefore, in order to help the radiation oncologist in decision making, we strongly advocate to determine the selenium status prior to and during a potential adjuvant selenium supplementation, e.g. when trying to ease the si...

  15. Selenium and Vitamin E for Prostate Cancer: Post-SELECT (Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial) Status

    OpenAIRE

    Ledesma, Mark C; Jung-Hynes, Brittney; Schmit, Travis L; Kumar,Raj; Mukhtar, Hasan; Ahmad, Nihal

    2010-01-01

    Various formulations of selenium and vitamin E, both essential human dietary components, have been shown to possess a therapeutic and preventive effect against prostate cancer. Fortuitous results of clinical trials also implied a risk-reduction effect of selenium and vitamin E supplements. The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT), using oral selenium and vitamin E supplementation in disease-free volunteers, was designed to test a prostate cancer chemoprevention hypothesis. ...

  16. Toenail mercury and dyslipidemia: Interaction with selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyong; Seo, Eunmin

    2017-01-01

    Although compelling evidences from in vivo and in vitro studies exist, limited studies have examined the association between chronic mercury exposure and dyslipidemia. Particularly, data are sparse regarding the influence of selenium on this association of mercury with dyslipidemia in humans. The purpose of the current study was to examine the associations of toenail mercury with dyslipidemia and its components, and to examine whether selenium in toenails modifies these associations. We performed cross-sectional analyses using baseline data from a cohort in the Yeungnam area in South Korea, including 232 men and 269 women. Toenail mercury and selenium concentrations were quantified using neutron activation analysis, and fasting serum lipid measurements were obtained through the medical examination. Odds ratios of the prevalent hypercholesterolemia, hyper-LDL-cholesterolemia, hypo-HDL-cholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and dyslipidemia in correlation with mercury levels were calculated using multivariable logistic regression. The mean levels of toenail mercury were 0.47μg/g for men and 0.34μg/g for women. After adjustment for multiple confounding variables, participants in the highest tertile of toenail mercury levels had 4.08 (95% CI 1.09-15.32, p for trend=0.02) times higher risk of hyper-LDL-cholesterolemia, and 2.24 (95% CI 1.15-4.37, p for trend=0.004) times higher risk of dyslipidemia than those in the lowest tertile. Selenium is a significant effect-modifier for these associations; the highest tertile of toenail mercury were significantly associated with a higher risk of hypercholesterolemia (OR 5.25, 95% CI 1.04-26.38) and dyslipidemia (OR 2.98, 95% CI 1.16-7.66) compared to the lowest tertile at toenail selenium levels ≤0.685μg/g, while these associations became weak and non-significant, showing OR 0.98 and 95% CI 0.25-3.80 for hypercholesterolemia and OR 1.99 and 95% CI 0.73-5.45 for dyslipidemia at toenail selenium levels >0.685μg/g. We

  17. Selenium and Prostate Cancer Prevention: Insights from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly L. Nicastro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT was conducted to assess the efficacy of selenium and vitamin E alone, and in combination, on the incidence of prostate cancer. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 factorial design clinical trial found that neither selenium nor vitamin E reduced the incidence of prostate cancer after seven years and that vitamin E was associated with a 17% increased risk of prostate cancer compared to placebo. The null result was surprising given the strong preclinical and clinical evidence suggesting chemopreventive activity of selenium. Potential explanations for the null findings include the agent formulation and dose, the characteristics of the cohort, and the study design. It is likely that only specific subpopulations may benefit from selenium supplementation; therefore, future studies should consider the baseline selenium status of the participants, age of the cohort, and genotype of specific selenoproteins, among other characteristics, in order to determine the activity of selenium in cancer prevention.

  18. Selenium and Prostate Cancer Prevention: Insights from the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicastro, Holly L.; Dunn, Barbara K.

    2013-01-01

    The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) was conducted to assess the efficacy of selenium and vitamin E alone, and in combination, on the incidence of prostate cancer. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 factorial design clinical trial found that neither selenium nor vitamin E reduced the incidence of prostate cancer after seven years and that vitamin E was associated with a 17% increased risk of prostate cancer compared to placebo. The null result was surprising given the strong preclinical and clinical evidence suggesting chemopreventive activity of selenium. Potential explanations for the null findings include the agent formulation and dose, the characteristics of the cohort, and the study design. It is likely that only specific subpopulations may benefit from selenium supplementation; therefore, future studies should consider the baseline selenium status of the participants, age of the cohort, and genotype of specific selenoproteins, among other characteristics, in order to determine the activity of selenium in cancer prevention. PMID:23552052

  19. Speciation of selenium dietary supplements; formation of S-(methylseleno)cysteine and other selenium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoako, Prince O. [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 710 N. Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01003-9336 (United States); Uden, Peter C., E-mail: pcuden@chem.umass.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 710 N. Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01003-9336 (United States); Tyson, Julian F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 710 N. Pleasant St., Amherst, MA 01003-9336 (United States)

    2009-10-12

    Speciation of selenium is of interest because it is both essential and toxic to humans, depending on the species and the amount ingested. Following indications that selenium supplementation could reduce the incidence of some cancers, selenium-enriched yeast and other materials have been commercialized as supplements. Most dramatically however, the SELECT trial that utilized L-selenomethionine as the active supplement was terminated in 2008 and there is much debate regarding both the planning and the results of efficacy studies. Further, since dietary supplements are not regulated as pharmaceuticals, there are concerns about the quality, storage conditions, stability and selenium content in selenium supplements. Enzymatic hydrolysis enabled selenium speciation profiles to be obtained by high performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) and following derivatization gas chromatography with atomic emission detection (GC-AED). Coated fiber solid phase microextraction (SPME) was used to extract volatile selenium species for determination by GC-AED and GC-MS. Similar speciation patterns were observed between yeast-based supplements subject to extended storage and those heated briefly at elevated temperatures. All the yeast-based supplements and one yeast-free supplement formed S-(methylseleno)cysteine on heating. Evidence was obtained in support of the hypotheses that S-(methylseleno)cysteine is formed from a reaction between dimethyldiselenide and cysteine or cystine.

  20. Selenium dietary supplementation as a mechanism to restore hepatic selenoprotein regulation in rat pups exposed to alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jotty, Karick; Ojeda, M Luisa; Nogales, Fátima; Murillo, M Luisa; Carreras, Olimpia

    2013-11-01

    Ethanol exposure during gestation and lactation decreases selenium (Se) intake, disrupting body Se balance and inducing oxidative stress in rat offspring. Selenium-supplemented diet (0.5 ppm) was administered to ethanol-exposed (20% v/v) dams during gestation and lactation. When the dams' pups were 21 days old, the pups' levels of the main hepatic selenoproteins glutathione peroxidase (GPx1 and GPx4) and selenoprotein P (SelP) were measured. The pups were divided into control (C), alcohol (A), control-selenium (CS), and alcohol-selenium (AS) groups. The purpose was to evaluate the effect of the selenium-supplemented diet on the levels of Se deposits present in the livers of their pups. Alcohol decreases hepatic Se deposits, GPx activity, and GPx1 expression; alcohol increases GPx4 and SelP expression. Se was measured by furnace graphite atomic absorption spectrometry, the antioxidant activity of GPx and concentration of hepatic phospholipids (PL) were determined by spectrophotometry, and the selenoprotein expressions were detected by Western blotting. Selenite treatment prevented alcohol's effects of diminishing the Se deposits, GPx activity, and GPx1 expression, while maintaining the high levels of the expression of GPx4 and SelP. These results suggest that depletion of hepatic Se levels in rat pups, caused by ethanol exposure to their dams, affects the synthesis of the 3 main hepatic selenoproteins in different ways, which is related to a decrease in GPx activity and PL concentration, and an increase in serum Se levels. Selenium supplementation to the dams increased the expression of GPx1, GPx4, and SelP in their pups. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Cadmium and selenium interaction in mammals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Maja

    2010-09-01

    Cadmium occurs in the environment naturally and as a pollutant. Its exposure is inevitable and may produce toxic effects in many organs and organ systems through binding to biological structures, accumulation in internal organs or induction of free radical production. Another important aspect of Cd toxicity is its interaction, often anthagonistic, with essential elements. Vice versa, additional intake of the essential elements may have beneficial influence on distribution and toxic effects of cadmium. Selenium is an essential microelement and a constituent of many selenoproteins with antioxidant properties that bind cadmium (and other toxic elements such as mercury or arsenic). This review summarizes results, to date, of cadmium toxicokinetics and toxicodinamics, selenium biokinetics and biodinamics, as well as mechanisms of cadmium-selenium interaction and their impact on the oxidative status derived from the studies based upon mainly on animal experiments and on limited number of human studies. The wide variety of different doses, dose ratios, element administration modes and exposure lenghts of cadmium and selenium often yielded contradictory results. Future studies should be focused on assessment of effects of cadmium and selenium interaction in sensitive population groups and mechanisms of that interaction. Regarding animal studies, doses and exposure should be adjusted to long-term low exposure levels that are usually found in human population.

  2. Selenium in Camel – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Faye

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Requirements for trace minerals in camels, particularly selenium, are not well-known. Selenium supplementation using a pharmaceutical form or commercial mineral mixture is common practice in camels to address the cardiomyopathy often attributed to selenium deficiency. This supplementation is often empirical and based on estimated needs for cattle. Nowadays the use of selenium in animal foodstuffs is commonplace and further investigation of its metabolism (ingestion, dynamic of storage-destocking, excretion in camels is warranted. The present review aimed to synthesize all the experimental research (comparative selenium status in cow and camel, response to different levels of supplementation at different physiological stages, excretion maternal transfer, experimental toxicosis and field observations (deficiency, supplementation practices undertaken in camels. The results underline the particularity of the unique metabolic profile of the camel and lead to practical recommendations for supplementation in camels, highlighting its relative sensitivity to excess Se intake at lower levels than in cattle. The maximal tolerable dose is 8 mg and the recommended doses range from 2 to 4 mg.

  3. Selenium balance in the adult cat in relation to intake of dietary sodium selenite and organically bound selenium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Todd, S.E.; Thomas, D.G.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2012-01-01

    The response of cats to dietary sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) and organically bound selenium was studied in two separate studies with four cats per treatment and three levels of selenium supplementation (targets 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 µg/g DM) for each Se source. Whole blood and plasma selenium concentrations

  4. Loss of selenium-binding protein 1 decreases sensitivity to clastogens and intracellular selenium content in HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium-binding protein 1 (SBP1) is not a selenoprotein but structurally binds selenium. Loss of SBP1 during carcinogenesis usually predicts poor prognosis. Because genome instability is a hallmark of cancer, we hypothesized that loss of SBP1 modulates cellular selenium content and the response of ...

  5. Selenium deficiency in children and adolescents nourished by parenteral nutrition and/or selenium-deficient enteral formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etani, Yuri; Nishimoto, Yukiko; Kawamoto, Kouji; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Shouji, Yasuko; Kawahara, Hisayoshi; Ida, Shinobu

    2014-10-01

    The authors analyzed serum selenium levels of 95 children and adolescents with intestinal dysfunction and/or neurological disabilities [age range: 7 months-20 years; mean±standard deviation (SD): 8.0±5.3 years] who received parenteral nutrition (PN) and/or enteral nutrition (EN) with either reduced or no selenium doses for more than 3 months. Twenty-eight patients (29%) showed serum selenium levels below 4.0μg/dL. Five patients whose serum selenium levels were below 2μg/dL presented various clinical manifestations, including hair browning (n=5), macrocythemia (n=4), nail whitening (n=3) and cardiac dysfunction (n=1). None of these 5 patients were nourished through ordinary diets. Three of these patients were nourished through selenium-free enteral nutritional products, 1 through selenium-deficient PN and 1 through PN and a formula with reduced selenium. After selenium supplement therapy for 1 year, all 5 patients exhibited improvement in their serum selenium levels and clinical features of selenium deficiency. It is important to be cautious about secondary selenium deficiency in children and adolescents nourished only through EN/PN without an adequate dose of selenium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Levels of selenium in blood and tissues associated with some selenium deficiency diseases in New Zealand sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, A D; Blom, L; Grant, A B

    1984-06-01

    Whole bloods from weaned lambs with severe selenium responsive unthriftiness usually contain <5 ng Se/ml. Mildly or moderately affected lambs have blood levels of 5-10 ng/ml. Selenium responsive infertility in ewes appears to be associated with whole blood selenium levels below 10 ng/ml.

  7. Selenium and selenocysteine: roles in cancer, health, and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Dolph L; Tsuji, Petra A; Carlson, Bradley A; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2014-03-01

    The many biological and biomedical effects of selenium are relatively unknown outside the selenium field. This fascinating element, initially described as a toxin, was subsequently shown to be essential for health and development. By the mid-1990s selenium emerged as one of the most promising cancer chemopreventive agents, but subsequent human clinical trials yielded contradictory results. However, basic research on selenium continued to move at a rapid pace, elucidating its many roles in health, development, and in cancer prevention and promotion. Dietary selenium acts principally through selenoproteins, most of which are oxidoreductases involved in diverse cellular functions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Selenium supplementation for critically ill adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Mikkel; Afshari, Arash

    2015-01-01

    was originally published in 2004 updated in 2007 and again 2015. OBJECTIVES: The primary objective was to examine the effect of nutrition supplemented with selenium or ebselen on mortality in critically ill patients.The secondary objective was to examine the relationship between selenium or ebselen...... supplementation and number of infections, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of intensive care unit stay and length of hospital stay. SEARCH METHODS: In this update, we searched the current issue of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Library (2014, Issue 5); MEDLINE (Ovid SP...... RESULTS: We included six new RCTs in this review update. In total we included 16 RCTs (2084 participants) in this review. Most trials were at high risk of bias. The availability of outcome data was limited and trials involving selenium supplementation were, with the exception of one trial, small regarding...

  9. Selenium nanoparticles as a nutritional supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalickova, Sylvie; Milosavljevic, Vedran; Cihalova, Kristyna; Horky, Pavel; Richtera, Lukas; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element in the diet, required for maintenance of health and growth; however, its toxicity could cause serious damage depending on dose and chemical form. Selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) represent what we believe to be a novel prospect for nutritional supplementation because of their lower toxicity and ability to gradually release selenium after ingestion. In this review, we discuss various forms and types of SeNPs, as well as the way they are synthesized. We also discuss absorption and bioavailability of nanoparticles within the organism. SeNPs demonstrate anticancer and antimicrobial properties that may contribute to human health, not only as dietary supplements, but also as therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone Abuse Peer ... and Health › Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) EDCs Myth vs. Fact Steroid ...

  11. Plasma Selenium Levels in Chronic Cocaine Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Julia; Manolov, Victor; Kiryakova, Theodora; Vasilev, Vasil; Tzatchev, Kamen; Borislav, Marinov; Radoslava, Emilova

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine abuse is a significant health problem worldwide. We aim to evaluate the role of selenium in oxidative stress in patients with cocaine related cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases. Selenium is of fundamental importance to human health. It is an essential component of several major metabolic pathways. We included 26 patients with chronic cocaine abuse separated into two groups according to duration of intake--from six months up to one year and more than a year, with and without only vascular incidents (TIA, stroke, myocardial infarction), or presence of hypertension. All included groups were analyzed for laboratory parameters: CBC, CRP, AST, ALT, γ-GT, serum creatinine, urea, K, Na, and Ca. Main risk factors were evaluated: total cholesterol, LDL and HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, and selenium. Our result shows that in the first group only 20% have cardiovascular problems. In the group with cocaine abuse more than a year, number of vascular incidents has increased (58.3%). Patients from the group cocaine abuse up to 1 year showed no changes in lipid profile, but cocaine abuse more than a year showed interesting changes in the lipid profile. We found a high positive correlation between the two cocaine groups for plasma selenium concentrations. This means that after the first six months oxidative stress has occured. It increases with duration of cocaine abuse. CRP correlated positively between these two groups, showing an endothelial function disorder. Development of oxidative stress increased with cocaine abuse, which leads to lower plasma selenium levels in patients with different duration of intake--less and more than a year. It is possible to supplement selenium during the early period of cocaine dependence to prevent hard vascular accidents, which are common after more than one year of cocaine abuse.

  12. Selenium supplementation can slow the development of naphthalene cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiangjia; Lu, Yi

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of selenium supplementation on the progress of naphthalene cataract. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups as follows: normal control, naphthalene control and selenium-supplemented groups (Selenium I, II and III, which were orally administrated with selenium at doses of 0.0104 mg/kg, 0.0208 mg/kg and 0.0416 mg/kg, respectively). All the intervention groups were orally administered with 10% naphthalene solution for 5 weeks. The lens density of each group was determined by photography. Moreover, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in the lens, erythrocyte and plasma was investigated. In addition, lens glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) and hydroxyl radical levels were evaluated. Selenium level in aqueous humor was determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. The maximum, mean and minimum densities of lens opacities were lower in Selenium group II and III than those in naphthalene group. The maximum density of the lens increased more slowly in Selenium group I than that in naphthalene controls. In selenium-supplemented groups, blood and lens GPx activities as well as aqueous humor selenium level increased significantly. Selenium supplementation also significantly ameliorated the decrease in GSH level and increase in MDA and hydroxyl radical levels in the lens of naphthalene-treated rats. Selenium supplementation could slow the development of naphthalene cataract possibly by attenuating the oxidative stress in the lens.

  13. Bioaccumulation and distribution of selenium in Enterococcus durans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieniz, Simone; Andreazza, Robson; Mann, Michele Bertoni; Camargo, Flávio; Brandelli, Adriano

    2017-03-01

    Selenium is an essential nutrient for all living organisms. Under appropriate conditions lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are capable for accumulating large amounts of trace elements, such as selenium, and incorporating them into organic compounds. In this study, the capacity of selenium bioaccumulation by Enterococcus durans LAB18s was evaluated. The distribution of organic selenium in selenium-enriched E. durans LAB18s biomass was analyzed, and the highest percentage of organic selenium was found in the fraction of total protein, followed by the fractions of polysaccharides and nucleic acids. When the protein fraction was obtained by different extractions (water, NaCl, ethanol and NaOH) it was demonstrated that alkali-soluble protein showed the higher Selenium content. Analysis of protein fractions by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) revealed that selenium was present in the proteins ranging from 23 to 100kDa. The cells were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM/EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). SEM, TEM and SEM/EDS showed the morphology, the selenium particles bioaccumulated into and on the cells and the amounts of selenium present into the cells, respectively. Thus, the isolate E. durans LAB18s can be a promising probiotic to be used as selenium-enriched biomass in feed trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. [The role of selenium in endocrine system diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balázs, Csaba; Rácz, Károly

    2013-10-13

    Oxygen derived free radicals, generated by a number of cellular reactions, include superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals. They exert their cytotoxic effects mainly via peroxidation of the cell membrane resulting in the loss of membrane integrity. The essential trace element, selenium exerts complex effects on the endocrine systems, partly due to its antioxidant capacity. Well-characterized selenoproteins include iodothyronine deiodinases, glutathione peroxidases and thioredoxin reductases involved in thyroid hormone metabolism and protection from oxidative damage. The value of selenium supplementation in autoimmune thyroid disorders has been investigated and most studies confirmed the beneficial effect of selenium supplementation in Hashimoto's and Graves's diseases. Recently, selenium proved to be effective in mild inflammatory orbitopathy. There are a number of reports about the effect of selenium in diabetes mellitus, but the data are controversial as both insulin-like and diabetes-inducing effects of selenium have been described. Selenium was successfully used in both female and male infertility of autoimmune origin.

  15. Selenium supplementation in radiotherapy patients: do we need to measure selenium levels in serum or blood regularly prior radiotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muecke, Ralph; Micke, Oliver; Schomburg, Lutz; Kisters, Klaus; Buentzel, Jens; Huebner, Jutta; Kriz, Jan

    2014-12-16

    Considering the review by Puspitasari and colleagues, an additional discussion of the endpoints of the Se supplementation studies described would be helpful. In our view, selenium can safely be given to selenium-deficient cancer patients prior to and during radiotherapy. Therefore, in order to help the radiation oncologist in decision making, we strongly advocate to determine the selenium status prior to and during a potential adjuvant selenium supplementation, e.g. when trying to ease the side-effects of radiation treatment or in the aftercare situation when the selenium status may become insufficient.

  16. In vivo and in vitro testing for selenium and selenium compounds bioavailability assessment in foodstuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreda-Piñeiro, Jorge; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

    2017-03-04

    The assessment of selenium and selenium species bioavailability in foodstuff is of special concern on the context of human nutrition. In vivo (human and animal), and in vitro tests are important approaches for estimating the bioavailability of toxic and essential compounds to humans. An overview on in vivo and in vitro bioavailability assays for releasing selenium and selenium species in foodstuffs is summarized. Se and Se species content in a foodstuff critically influence Se bioavailability and bioactivity to humans and animals. Se bioavailability is affected by foodstuff-matrix major composition and minor components. Foodstuffs processing and/or treatments could enhancement or decrease Se bioavailability. Experimental conditions such as the selection of healthy status of examined people (in in vivo humans approaches), the selection of animal model (in vivo animals approaches), or the selection of GI conditions (in in vitro tests) could determines the results. Thus, international standardized protocol for in vivo and in vitro approaches assessment is mandatory.

  17. Changes in selenium speciation associated with increasing tissue concentrations of selenium in wheat grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubadda, Francesco; Aureli, Federica; Ciardullo, Silvia; D'Amato, Marilena; Raggi, Andrea; Acharya, Raghunath; Reddy, Ramana A V; Prakash, Nagaraja Tejo

    2010-02-24

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum) collected in the Nawanshahr-Hoshiarpur Region (Punjab, India) showed the highest selenium concentrations ever recorded in cereal grains (29-185 microg g(-1)). There was a strong positive relationship between the selenium content in shoots and that in kernels, showing that grain selenium concentration can be predicted from that in the vegetative tissues of the plant. The identity and content of the selenocompounds in the grain samples and in wheat-based reference materials were investigated by HPLC-ICP-dynamic reaction cell-MS. Reversed-phase, cation exchange, and anion exchange HPLC were used to separate the selenium species after ultrasound-assisted enzymatic extraction with an ultrasonic probe. Selenomethionine and selenate accounted for 72-85% and 2-6% of the sum of the selenium species, respectively. The proportion of organic Se species varied with increasing Se content; namely, SeMet showed a relative reduction whereas the other organoselenium compounds increased up to 18-22% of the total chromatographed selenium. Se-methyl-selenocysteine was detected as a minor compound (0.2-0.5%) in high-Se wheat by both reversed-phase and cation exchange HPLC using retention time matching with the standard substance spiked to the sample extracts. Regular consumption of locally produced wheat-based food items may lead the population of the study area to an excessive intake of selenium. On the other hand, the large predominance of selenomethionine shows that local wheat can be a promising raw material for naturally enriched products to be used to supplement human and animal diets in low selenium areas.

  18. Selenium enrichment of table eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, D C; Cheng, K M

    2010-10-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element with a recommended dietary allowance for human adults of 55 μg/d. However, there is evidence that greater dietary intakes may have possible health benefits, including a reduction in the risk of cancer. Several studies have shown the feasibility of enriching eggs using organic Se and that Se-enriched eggs are an effective way to supplement human diets. However, few studies have examined the response of egg Se concentration to high (>1 μg/g) dietary organic Se intake by the laying hens. The objective of the current study is to examine the effect of higher dietary organic Se levels on production, egg mass, and egg Se levels. These were assessed by feeding 3 breeds of laying hens (Barred Plymouth Rock, Lohmann Brown, Lohmann White) a basal diet containing 0.3 μg of Se/g of diet as Na2SeO3. Into this diet, Se yeast (SelenoSource AF 600), an organic source of Se, was added at 1.0, 2.4, or 5.1 μg of Se/g of diet for 4 wk. Feed consumption, egg production, and egg mass were not affected by the dietary Se concentration in all 3 breeds. Within the range of Se levels employed in the laying hens' diet, egg Se content increased linearly as dietary levels of Se increased. The results of this study indicate that feeding up to 5.1 µg/g of Se will not affect egg production and the welfare of the laying hen and is a practical way of producing Se-enriched eggs for the consumers.

  19. The Relationship between Selenium and T3 in Selenium Supplemented and Nonsupplemented Ewes and Their Lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd Elghany Hefnawy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty pregnant ewes were selected and classified into two groups. The first group received subcutaneous selenium supplementation (0.1 mg of sodium selenite/kg BW at the 8th and 5th weeks before birth and 1st week after birth while the other was control group without selenium injection. Maternal plasma and serum samples were collected weekly from the 8th week before birth until the 8th week after birth and milk samples were taken from ewes weekly, while plasma and serum samples were collected at 48 hours, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 5th, and 8th weeks after birth from the newborn lambs. Results demonstrated significant positive relationship between maternal plasma selenium and serum T3 in supplemented and control ewes (r=0.69 to 0.72, P<0.05. There was significant (P<0.001 increase in T3 in supplemented ewes and their lambs until the 8th week after birth. There was positive relationship between milk, selenium concentration, and serum T3 in the newborn lambs of the supplemented group (r=0.84, P<0.01, while the relationship was negative in the control one (r=-0.89, P<0.01. Muscular and thyroid pathological changes were independent of selenium supplementation. Selenium supplementation was important for maintaining T3 in ewes and newborn lambs until the 8th week after birth.

  20. Mercury and selenium content of Taiwanese seafood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, G C; Nam, D H; Basu, N

    2011-01-01

    Fish consumption is avid in Taiwan (and other Asian nations), but little is known about the mercury and selenium content in local seafood. This paper reports on total mercury, methylmercury and selenium levels from 14 commonly consumed seafood items obtained from Taichung, Taiwan. Mean total mercury concentrations varied nearly 100-fold across species. Fifty per cent of the marlins sampled and 35% of the sharks exceeded the 0.3 µg g(-1) US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) guideline. Methylmercury comprised a majority of the total mercury in all species. In all species studied there was a molar excess of selenium over mercury. The rank order of mean selenium-mercury molar ratios was red tilapia (166.8) > abura (87.9) > river prawn (82.4) > whiteleg shrimp (64.2) > butterfish (44.6) > milkfish (37.0) > tuna (15.6) > grouper (13.9) > ayu (13.4) > coral hind (13.0) > weever (11.8) > saury (9.0) > shark (7.8) > marlin (4.2).

  1. Selecting Lentil Accessions for Global Selenium Biofortification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofortification of lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus.) has the potential to provide adequate daily selenium (Se) to human diets. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine how low dose Se fertilizer application at germination affects seedling biomass, antioxidant activity, and Se uptake of 26 ...

  2. Optimising Selenium for Modulation of Cancer Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Stephen Owen; Khairuddin, Puteri Farisa; Jameson, Michael B

    2017-12-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element involved in many biological processes that are mediated through, at least, 25 selenoproteins expressed in humans. Extensive study of selenium compounds has demonstrated growth inhibition of malignant cells in a vast array of experimental models. Moreover combining selenium with conventional cancer therapy has yielded promising results in both preclinical studies and a cohort of human trials. The aim of this review is to highlight the current research evaluating the role of selenium compounds in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. Pharmacodymanic mechanisms responsible for the differential effects of the commonly studied compounds on healthy and malignant cells are presented and the pertinent in vitro and in vivo data summarised. The clinical utility of this approach is discussed both in terms of anti-tumour efficacy and toxicity prevention. Finally a case is made for novel trial designs to facilitate rapid progression into pivotal studies. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  3. Selenium as a cancer preventive agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most epidemiological studies have shown inverse associations of selenium (Se) status and cancer risk. Almost all experimental animal studies have shown that supranutritional exposures of Se can reduce tumor yield. Each of the limited number of clinical intervention trials conducted to date has found...

  4. Selenium speciation in anaerobic granular sludge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, M.; Gmerek, A.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2006-01-01

    Chromatographic (IC-CD, GC-FID) and spectroscopic (XRD) techniques that allow the specific determination of several selenium species present or formed during bioremediation processes of selenate contaminated drinking, ground, or wastewaters have been established. The developed techniques are shown

  5. Ameliorative effects of selenium and zinc

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a sub-acute 4-week exposure to methidathion (MD) on the hematological system and hepatic integrity of rats. We also assessed whether co-administration of micronutrients such as selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn) prevented MD-induced hepatic damage. Rats were randomly ...

  6. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  7. Genetic Determinants of Responses to Selenium Supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a cohort of healthy adults (106 M, 155 W) in eastern North Dakota, we determined the relationships of five biomarkers of selenium (Se) status (plasma Se, serum selenoprotein P [SePP], plasma glutathione peroxidase [GPX3] activity, buccal cell Se, urine Se) to genotype for four selenoproteins (cyt...

  8. Responses to Selenium Supplementation in Healthy Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine dose-response relationships of selenium (Se) intake and markers of Se status in healthy, non-deficient subjects, we conducted a 12 mo. intervention using Se supplements (0, 50, 100 or 200 ug Se [as L-selenomethionine]/d) in a group of 106 men and 155 women. At baseline, this cohort, non...

  9. Status of selenium in cancer prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    An abundance of data indicate that selenium (Se) can be antitumorigenic. Those data, mostly from controlled studies using animal tumor models and some from clinical studies in free-living people, indicate that treatment with Se in the absence of nutritional Se-deficiency, can reduce cancer risk. T...

  10. Chapter 6: Selenium Toxicity to Aquatic Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter addresses the characteristics and nature of organic selenium (Se) toxicity to aquatic organisms, based on the most current state of scientific knowledge. As such, the information contained in this chapter relates to the 'toxicity assessment' phase of aquatic ecologi...

  11. Selenium supplementation and prostate cancer mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenfield, Stacey A; Van Blarigan, Erin L; DuPre, Natalie; Stampfer, Meir J; L Giovannucci, Edward; Chan, June M

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the relation between selenium supplementation after diagnosis and prostate cancer outcomes. We prospectively followed 4459 men initially diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study from 1988 through 2010 and examined whether selenium supplement use (from selenium-specific supplements and multivitamins) after diagnosis was associated with risk of biochemical recurrence, prostate cancer mortality, and, secondarily, cardiovascular disease mortality and overall mortality, using Cox proportional hazards models. All P values were from two-sided tests. We documented 965 deaths, 226 (23.4%) because of prostate cancer and 267 (27.7%) because of cardiovascular disease, during a median follow-up of 8.9 years. In the biochemical recurrence analysis, we documented 762 recurrences during a median follow-up of 7.8 years. Crude rates per 1000 person-years for prostate cancer death were 5.6 among selenium nonusers and 10.5 among men who consumed 140 or more μg/day. Crude rates per 1000 person-years were 28.2 vs 23.5 for all-cause mortality and 28.4 vs 29.3 for biochemical recurrence, for nonuse vs highest-dose categories, respectively. In multivariable analyses, men who consumed 1 to 24 μg/day, 25 to 139 μg/day, and 140 or more μg/day of supplemental selenium had a 1.18 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.73 to 1.91), 1.33 (95% CI = 0.77 to 2.30), and 2.60-fold (95% CI = 1.44 to 4.70) greater risk of prostate cancer mortality compared with nonusers, respectively, P trend = .001. There was no statistically significant association between selenium supplement use and biochemical recurrence, cardiovascular disease mortality, or overall mortality. Selenium supplementation of 140 or more μg/day after diagnosis of nonmetastatic prostate cancer may increase risk of prostate cancer mortality. Caution is warranted regarding usage of such supplements among men with prostate cancer. © The Author 2014. Published by

  12. Selenium Supplementation and Prostate Cancer Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blarigan, Erin L.; DuPre, Natalie; Stampfer, Meir J.; L. Giovannucci, Edward; Chan, June M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Few studies have evaluated the relation between selenium supplementation after diagnosis and prostate cancer outcomes. Methods: We prospectively followed 4459 men initially diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study from 1988 through 2010 and examined whether selenium supplement use (from selenium-specific supplements and multivitamins) after diagnosis was associated with risk of biochemical recurrence, prostate cancer mortality, and, secondarily, cardiovascular disease mortality and overall mortality, using Cox proportional hazards models. All P values were from two-sided tests. Results: We documented 965 deaths, 226 (23.4%) because of prostate cancer and 267 (27.7%) because of cardiovascular disease, during a median follow-up of 8.9 years. In the biochemical recurrence analysis, we documented 762 recurrences during a median follow-up of 7.8 years. Crude rates per 1000 person-years for prostate cancer death were 5.6 among selenium nonusers and 10.5 among men who consumed 140 or more μg/day. Crude rates per 1000 person-years were 28.2 vs 23.5 for all-cause mortality and 28.4 vs 29.3 for biochemical recurrence, for nonuse vs highest-dose categories, respectively. In multivariable analyses, men who consumed 1 to 24 μg/day, 25 to 139 μg/day, and 140 or more μg/day of supplemental selenium had a 1.18 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.73 to 1.91), 1.33 (95% CI = 0.77 to 2.30), and 2.60-fold (95% CI = 1.44 to 4.70) greater risk of prostate cancer mortality compared with nonusers, respectively, P trend = .001. There was no statistically significant association between selenium supplement use and biochemical recurrence, cardiovascular disease mortality, or overall mortality. Conclusion: Selenium supplementation of 140 or more μg/day after diagnosis of nonmetastatic prostate cancer may increase risk of prostate cancer mortality. Caution is warranted regarding usage of such supplements among men with prostate

  13. An examination of the selenium nutrition of sheep in Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caple, I W; Andrewartha, K A; Edwards, S J; Halpin, C G

    1980-04-01

    The selenium nutrition of sheep throughout Victoria was assessed by a survey of the blood glutathione peroxidase activity in 708 flocks. It was shown that the blood glutathione peroxidase activity in sheep had a seasonal variation with lowest levels in the spring. The enzyme activity was correlated with the blood selenium concentration. Areas where blood selenium was less than 0.03 micrograms/ml in spring were defined. Sheep with low selenium nutrition were grazing pastures in the high rainfall areas on acid soils, particularly those derived from granite. Selenium concentrations in pasture samples examined were greater than 0.02 mg/kg, and it was found that superphosphate application had no significant effect on the selenium content of pasture. However, management practices such as high stocking rates and rates of application of superphosphate to pasture were associated with low blood glutathione peroxidase activities in sheep. It was concluded that the selenium nutrition of most of the sheep flocks in Victoria is adequate, and that the deficient areas are localised. There seems little requirement for supplementation of adult sheep. As the delayed type of white muscle disease in spring lambs appears to be the main selenium-responsive disorder, direct supplementation of lambs in the low selenium areas would be the most effective method of ensuring adequate selenium nutrition.

  14. [Selenium and cataract--risk factor or useful dietary supplement?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawczynski, J; Winnefeld, K; Königsdörffer, E; Augsten, R; Blum, M; Strobel, J

    2006-08-01

    The exact role of selenium in cataract development is still unclear. Both protective and toxic effects and mechanisms have been postulated in the past. Accordingly, the selenium contents in human lenses and blood sera in different forms of cataract were investigated. 123 patients (76 female and 37 male) with a mean age of 69.8 years (range: 17 to 91 years) were enrolled in this study. Overall, 84 lenses (after ECCE) and 110 blood serum samples were investigated by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Interpretation of data was accompanied by exact preoperative investigations including Scheimpflug techniques. A significant increase of selenium content of the lenses was found with increasing lens opacification and colouration. Lenses with a mature cataract showed the highest selenium contents in the lens compared to other cataract forms. Opposite results were detected in blood serum. Lenses of diabetics showed already at a younger age changes in selenium content. Smokers showed both decreased selenium contents in the lens and decreased selenium concentration in blood serum. An obvious correlation between the type of cataract and selenium content of the lens seems to exist. The question by which mechanism selenium acts directly or by selenium-dependent enzymes acts lens opacification remains speculative up to now.

  15. Review - Selenium - Its metabolism and relation to exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltaci, Abdulkerim Kasim; Mogulkoc, Rasim; Akil, Mustafa; Bicer, Mursel

    2016-09-01

    Selenium (Se), which is commonly found in nature, is one of the essential trace elements necessary for the normal development of human and animal organisms. Selenium was first defined in 1818 by the Swedish chemist Berzelius in sulfuric acid residues. At the end of 1960s, the role of selenium in human health began to attract attention and human diseases that resembled animal diseases responding to selenium was started to be investigated. Selenium, which is highly important for human health, is necessary for a variety of metabolic processes, including thyroid hormone metabolism, protection against oxidative stress and immunity functions. Selenium is a molecule that activates glutathione peroxidase, and thus, it is involved in the antioxidant mechanisms that prevent oxidant damage. Exhaustive physical exercise is known to cause oxidant damage, probably by promoting free radical production in many tissues, including muscle, liver, heart and lungs in animals. The increase in oxidative stress during exercise and recognition of selenium's stimulation of antioxidant activity inevitably suggest a relation between selenium and exercise. The present review aims to provide information on selenium metabolism and the relation between selenium and exercise.

  16. Selenium and the thyroid gland: more good news for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drutel, Anne; Archambeaud, Françoise; Caron, Philippe

    2013-02-01

    The thyroid is the organ with the highest selenium content per gram of tissue because it expresses specific selenoproteins. Since the discovery of myxoedematous cretinism and thyroid destruction following selenium repletion in iodine- and selenium-deficient children, data on links between thyroid metabolism and selenium have multiplied. Although very minor amounts of selenium appear sufficient for adequate activity of deiodinases, thus limiting the impact of its potential deficiency on synthesis of thyroid hormones, selenium status appears to have an impact on the development of thyroid pathologies. The value of selenium supplementation in autoimmune thyroid disorders has been emphasized. Most authors attribute the effect of supplementation on the immune system to the regulation of the production of reactive oxygen species and their metabolites. In patients with Hashimoto's disease and in pregnant women with anti-TPO antibodies, selenium supplementation decreases anti-thyroid antibody levels and improves the ultrasound structure of the thyroid gland. Although clinical applications still need to be defined for Hashimoto's disease, they are very interesting for pregnant women given that supplementation significantly decreases the percentage of postpartum thyroiditis and definitive hypothyroidism. In Graves' disease, selenium supplementation results in euthyroidism being achieved more rapidly and appears to have a beneficial effect on mild inflammatory orbitopathy. A risk of diabetes has been reported following long-term selenium supplementation, but few data are available on the side effects associated with such supplementation and further studies are required. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Selenium and Thyroid Disease: From Pathophysiology to Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Ventura

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Selenium is a micronutrient embedded in several proteins. In adults, the thyroid is the organ with the highest amount of selenium per gram of tissue. Selenium levels in the body depend on the characteristics of the population and its diet, geographic area, and soil composition. In the thyroid, selenium is required for the antioxidant function and for the metabolism of thyroid hormones. Methods. We performed a review of the literature on selenium’s role in thyroid function using PubMed/MEDLINE. Results. Regarding thyroid pathology, selenium intake has been particularly associated with autoimmune disorders. The literature suggests that selenium supplementation of patients with autoimmune thyroiditis is associated with a reduction in antithyroperoxidase antibody levels, improved thyroid ultrasound features, and improved quality of life. Selenium supplementation in Graves’ orbitopathy is associated with an improvement of quality of life and eye involvement, as well as delayed progression of ocular disorders. The organic form of selenium seems to be the preferable formulation for supplementation or treatment. Conclusion. Maintaining a physiological concentration of selenium is a prerequisite to prevent thyroid disease and preserve overall health. Supplementation with the organic form is more effective, and patients with autoimmune thyroiditis seem to have benefits in immunological mechanisms. Selenium supplementation proved to be clinically beneficial in patients with mild to moderate Graves’ orbitopathy.

  18. Thyroid hormones regulate selenoprotein expression and selenium status in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Mittag

    Full Text Available Impaired expression of selenium-containing proteins leads to perturbed thyroid hormone (TH levels, indicating the central importance of selenium for TH homeostasis. Moreover, critically ill patients with declining serum selenium develop a syndrome of low circulating TH and a central downregulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. This prompted us to test the reciprocal effect, i.e., if TH status would also regulate selenoprotein expression and selenium levels. To investigate the TH dependency of selenium metabolism, we analyzed mice expressing a mutant TH receptor α1 (TRα1+m that confers a receptor-mediated hypothyroidism. Serum selenium was reduced in these animals, which was a direct consequence of the mutant TRα1 and not related to their metabolic alterations. Accordingly, hyperthyroidism, genetically caused by the inactivation of TRβ or by oral TH treatment of adult mice, increased serum selenium levels in TRα1+m and controls, thus demonstrating a novel and specific role for TRα1 in selenium metabolism. Furthermore, TH affected the mRNA levels for several enzymes involved in selenoprotein biosynthesis as well as serum selenoprotein P concentrations and the expression of other antioxidative selenoproteins. Taken together, our results show that TH positively affects the serum selenium status and regulates the expression of several selenoproteins. This demonstrates that selenium and TH metabolism are interconnected through a feed-forward regulation, which can in part explain the rapid parallel downregulation of both systems in critical illness.

  19. Low plasma selenium concentrations in critically ill children: the interaction effect between inflammation and selenium deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low plasma selenium concentrations are frequent in critically ill patients. However, whether this is due to systemic inflammation, a deficient nutritional state or both is still not clear. We aimed to determine the factors associated with low plasma selenium in critically ill children while considering the inflammatory response and nutritional status. Method A prospective study was conducted in 173 children (median age 34 months) with systemic inflammatory response who had plasma selenium concentrations assessed 48 hours after admission and on the 5th day of ICU stay. The normal reference range was 0.58 μmol/L to 1.6 μmol/L. The outcome variable was ‘low plasma selenium’, which was defined as plasma selenium values below the distribution median during this period. The main explanatory variables were age, malnutrition, sepsis, C-reactive protein (CRP), and clinical severity scores. The data were analyzed using a Binomial Generalized Estimating Equations model, which includes the correlation between admission and 5th day responses. Results Malnutrition and CRP were associated with low plasma selenium. The interaction effect between these two variables was significant. When CRP values were less than or equal to 40 mg/L, malnutrition was associated with low plasma selenium levels (odds ratio (OR) = 3.25, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.39 to 7.63, P = 0.007; OR = 2.98, 95% CI 1.26 to 7.06, P = 0.013; OR = 2.49, 95% CI 1.01 to 6.17, P = 0.049, for CRP = 10, 20 and 40 mg/L, respectively). This effect decreased as CRP concentrations increased and there was loose significance when CRP values were >40 mg/L. Similarly, the effect of CRP on low plasma selenium was significant for well-nourished patients (OR = 1.13; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.22, P selenium. This interaction should be considered when interpreting plasma concentrations as an index of selenium status in patients with systemic inflammation as well as in the decision

  20. Selenium is a Chemotherapeutic Agent for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knox, Susan J

    2005-01-01

    .... In spite of this, little is known about the use of selenium as a cancer therapy. The inorganic form of selenium, selenite, undergoes thiol-dependent reduction to selenide, which supplies selenium for the synthesis of selenoproteins...

  1. Bioavailability of selenium from fish, yeast and selenate: A comparative study in humans using stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, T.E.; Heuvel, E.G.H.M. van den; Atherton, C.A.; Dainty, J.R.; Lewis, D.J.; Langford, N.J.; Crews, H.M.; Luten, J.B.; Lorentzen, M.; Sieling, F.W.; Aken-Schneyder, P. van; Hoek, M.; Kotterman, M.J.J.; Dael, P. van; Firweather-Tail, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To measure the bioavailability of selenium from cooked and raw fish in humans by estimating and comparing apparent absorption and retention of selenium in biosynthetically labelled fish with labelled selenate and biosynthetically labelled selenium in brewers yeast. Design: The

  2. Bioavailibility of selenium from fish, yeast and selenate: a comparative study in humans using stable isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, T.E.; Heuvel, van den E.G.H.M.; Atherton, C.A.; Luten, J.B.; Hoek-van Nieuwenhuizen, van M.; Kotterman, M.J.J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To measure the bioavailability of selenium from cooked and raw fish in humans by estimating and comparing apparent absorption and retention of selenium in biosynthetically labelled fish with labelled selenate and biosynthetically labelled selenium in brewers yeast. Design: The

  3. Both Selenium Deficiency and Modest Selenium Supplementation Lead to Myocardial Fibrosis in Mice via Effects on Redox-Methylation Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metes-Kosik, Nicole; Luptak, Ivan; DiBello, Patricia M.; Handy, Diane E.; Tang, Shiow-Shih; Zhi, Hui; Qin, Fuzhong; Jacobsen, Donald W.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Joseph, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Scope Selenium has complex effects in vivo on multiple homeostatic mechanisms such as redox balance, methylation balance, and epigenesis, via its interaction with the methionine-homocysteine cycle. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that selenium status would modulate both redox and methylation balance and thereby modulate myocardial structure and function. Methods and Results We examined the effects of selenium deficient (selenium supplemented (0.5 mg/kg) diets on myocardial histology, biochemistry and function in adult C57/BL6 mice. Selenium deficiency led to reactive myocardial fibrosis and systolic dysfunction accompanied by increased myocardial oxidant stress. Selenium supplementation significantly reduced methylation potential, DNA methyltransferase activity and DNA methylation. In mice fed the supplemented diet, inspite of lower oxidant stress, myocardial matrix gene expression was significantly altered resulting in reactive myocardial fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction in the absence of myocardial hypertrophy. Conclusions Our results indicate that both selenium deficiency and modest selenium supplementation leads to a similar phenotype of abnormal myocardial matrix remodeling and dysfunction in the normal heart. The crucial role selenium plays in maintaining the balance between redox and methylation pathways needs to be taken into account while optimizing selenium status for prevention and treatment of heart failure. PMID:23097236

  4. Enrichment of the African catfish Clarias gariepinus (Burchell) with functional selenium originating from garlic: effect of enrichment period and depuration on total selenium level and sensory properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schram, E.; Schelvis-Smit, A.A.M.; Heul, van der J.W.; Luten, J.B.

    2010-01-01

    We wanted to optimize the procedure for the selenium enrichment of farmed African catfish, using garlic as dietary selenium source. In the first experiment we established the relation between the length of the selenium enrichment period and the resulting total selenium level in the fillet of the

  5. Disruption of Radiologist Workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansagra, Akash P; Liu, Kevin; Yu, John-Paul J

    2016-01-01

    The effect of disruptions has been studied extensively in surgery and emergency medicine, and a number of solutions-such as preoperative checklists-have been implemented to enforce the integrity of critical safety-related workflows. Disruptions of the highly complex and cognitively demanding workflow of modern clinical radiology have only recently attracted attention as a potential safety hazard. In this article, we describe the variety of disruptions that arise in the reading room environment, review approaches that other specialties have taken to mitigate workflow disruption, and suggest possible solutions for workflow improvement in radiology. Copyright © 2015 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ecology and biotechnology of selenium-respiring bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancharaiah, Y V; Lens, P N L

    2015-03-01

    In nature, selenium is actively cycled between oxic and anoxic habitats, and this cycle plays an important role in carbon and nitrogen mineralization through bacterial anaerobic respiration. Selenium-respiring bacteria (SeRB) are found in geographically diverse, pristine or contaminated environments and play a pivotal role in the selenium cycle. Unlike its structural analogues oxygen and sulfur, the chalcogen selenium and its microbial cycling have received much less attention by the scientific community. This review focuses on microorganisms that use selenate and selenite as terminal electron acceptors, in parallel to the well-studied sulfate-reducing bacteria. It overviews the significant advancements made in recent years on the role of SeRB in the biological selenium cycle and their ecological role, phylogenetic characterization, and metabolism, as well as selenium biomineralization mechanisms and environmental biotechnological applications. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Production of selenium-enriched milk and dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csapó J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Until the middle of the last century, selenium was considered to be toxic, but recently it turned out to be a micronutrient with important physiological effects, whose lack impedes the functioning of several enzymes, while in the case of a prolonged deficiency, disease processes can also occur in the body. Hungary belongs to the selenium-deficient regions in Europe; therefore, our aim was to contribute to the improvement of selenium supply of the population through increasing the selenium content of milk and dairy products. A daily supplementation of 1-6 mg organic selenium to the feed of dairy cows increases the selenium content of milk from the value of 18 μg/kg to 94 μg/kg in 8 weeks, decreasing again to the initial value in 6 weeks after stopping the supplementation.

  8. Selenium Recycling in the United States in 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Micheal W.; Wagner, Lorie A.

    2009-01-01

    The vast majority of selenium consumption in the United States is in dissipative uses, such as alloys, animal feeds, fertilizers, glass decolorizer, and pigments. The nondissipative use as a photoreceptor for xerographic copiers is declining. As a result of a lack of a substantial supply of selenium-containing scrap, there are no longer selenium recycling facilities in the United States. Selenium-containing materials collected for recycling, primarily selenium-containing photocopier drums, are exported for processing in other countries. Of the estimated 350 metric tons (t) of selenium products that went to the U.S. market in 2004, an estimated 300 t went to dissipative uses. An estimated 4 t was recovered from old scrap and exported for recycling.

  9. Selenium Poisoning of Wildlife and Western Agriculture: Cause and Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, N.E.

    2000-02-01

    This project examined the hypothesis that selenium contamination is not the principal cause of the decline of endemic fish species in the Upper Colorado Basin. Activities employed to test this hypothesis included a reconnaissance of locations altered by recent road construction, a re-interpretation of available literature regarding selenium toxicity, and the interpretation of unpublished data obtained from the Upper Colorado Basin Fish Recovery Program. The project demonstrates that most of the evidence implicating selenium is circumstantial.

  10. Health risk assessment of environmental selenium: Emerging evidence and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Vinceti,Marco; Filippini, Tommaso; Cilloni, Silvia; Bargellini, Annalisa; Vergoni, Anna Valeria; Tsatsakis, Aristides; Ferrante, Margherita

    2017-01-01

    New data have been accumulated in the scientific literature in recent years which allow a more adequate risk assessment of selenium with reference to human health. This new evidence comes from environmental studies, carried out in populations characterized by abnormally high or low selenium intakes, and from high-quality and large randomized controlled trials with selenium recently carried out in the US and in other countries. These trials have consistently shown no beneficial effect on cance...

  11. Immunomodulatory effect of selenosemicarbazides and selenium inorganic compounds, distribution in organs after selenium supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musik, I; Koziol-Montewka, M; Toś-Luty, S; Pasternak, K; Latuszyńska, J; Tokarska, M; Kielczykowska, M

    1999-12-01

    Antioxidant properties of selenium producing a protective barrier against free radicals play an important role in numerous metabolic and immunologic processes associated with oxidation-reduction reactions which take place during intracellular digestion of phagocyted bacteria. The aim of our study was to examine the properties of an organic compound of selenium, 4-(o-tolilo)-selenosemicarbazide of p-chlorobenzoic acid in terms of its retention in organs, effect on erythropoesis and phagocytic abilities of neutrophiles as well as antioxidant properties in neutrophiles tested with NBT test. This compound as well as inorganic sodium selenate was given to Swiss mice at the dose of 10(-3) g Se/kg for the period of 10 days. The concentrations of selenium in livers of mice treated with sodium selenate and selenosemicarbazide were found to be higher than in controls (18.7 micrograms lg-1 and 23.2 micrograms lg-1 vs. 12 micrograms lg-1, respectively). Analysis of blood cells count has shown a significant decrease in neutrophile levels in both groups treated with selenium. The influence of selenium compounds on phagocytosis and especially NBT test has been determined (3.8% of positive cells in the controls vs. 2.2% and 0.9% in the groups treated with sodium selenate and selenosemicarbazide, respectively). Our preliminary investigations suggest that selenosemicarbazides are biologically active compounds and can modify neutrophile functions.

  12. Effects of selenium on mallard duck reproduction and immune function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteley, P.L.; Yuill, T.M.; Fairbrother, A.

    1989-11-01

    Selenium from irrigation drain water and coal-fired power stations is a significant environmental contaminant in some regions of the USA. The objectives were to examine whether selenium-exposed waterfowl had altered immune function, disease resistance, or reproduction. Pairs of adult mallards were exposed for 95-99 days on streams with sodium selenite-treated water at 10 and 30 ppb, or on untreated streams. Selenium biomagnified through the food chain to the ducks. Disease resistance was decreased in ducklings hatched on the streams and challenged with duck hepatitis virus 1 (DHV1) when 15-days old. Liver selenium concentrations for these ducklings on the 10 and 30 ppb streams was 3.6 and 7.6 ppm dry weight, respectively. Mortality of ducklings purchased when 7-days old, exposed to selenium for 14 days, and challenged when 22-days old was not affected. However, their selenium exposure was lower (liver selenium 4.1 ppm dry weight for the 30 ppb stream). Five parameters of immune function were measured in adult ducks. Phagocytosis of killed Pasteurella multocida by blood heterophils and monocytes, and blood monocyte concentrations were higher in adult males following 84 days exposure to 30 ppb selenium. Their liver selenium concentrations were 11.1 ppm dry weight after 95-99 days exposure.

  13. Teratogenic effects of selenium in natural populations of freshwater fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemly, A D

    1993-10-01

    The prevalence of abnormalities and associated tissue selenium residues were assessed for the fish population of Belews Lake, North Carolina, and two reference lakes in 1975, 1978, 1982, and 1992. Teratogenic defects identified included lordosis, kyphosis, scoliosis, and head, mouth, and fin deformities. Many fish exhibited multiple malformations and some were grossly deformed and distorted in appearance. Other abnormalities observed were edema, exophthalmus, and cataracts. Whole-body tissue residues of selenium in the fishes of Belews Lake were up to 130 times those in the reference lakes and the incidence of abnormalities was some 7 to 70 times greater. Teratogenic defects increased as selenium levels rose between 1975 and 1982 and fell with declining selenium levels between 1982 and 1992 as selenium inputs into Belews Lake were curtailed. The relationship between selenium residues and prevalence of malformations approximated an exponential function (R2 = 0.881, P selenium and 0-70% deformities. This relationship could be useful in evaluating the role of teratogenic effects in warm-water fish populations suspected of having selenium-related reproductive failure. Unique conditions may have existed in Belews Lake which led to the high frequency and persistence of deformities in juvenile and adult fish. In other, less-contaminated locations competition and predation may eliminate malformed individuals in all but the larval life stage. Teratogenesis could be an important, but easily overlooked phenomenon contributing to fishery reproductive failure in selenium-contaminated aquatic habitats.

  14. Conceptual Model for Selenium Cycling in the Great Salt Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. P.; Conover, M. R.; Wurtsbaugh, W. A.; Adams, J.

    2006-12-01

    The conceptual model for Selenium cycling in the Great Salt Lake was developed to guide investigations in support of determining an open water selenium standard for the Great Salt Lake. The motivation to determine this particular selenium standard derives from public concern for a plan to allow disposal of reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate in the GSL, which would contain elevated concentrations of major and trace elements, including selenium. The development of an open water standard for selenium requires a working knowledge of the biological significance of existing selenium concentrations in the Great Salt Lake, as well as a working understanding of the likely changes of these concentrations over time given existing and proposed loads to the system. This working knowledge" is being represented in a conceptual model that accounts for selenium in various stocks" in the system (e.g. water, sediment, biota) and the flow" of selenium between stocks (e.g., precipitation and settling, volatilization, bioconcentration). It illustrates the critical pathway of selenium in the Great Salt Lake from water, to microorganisms, to brine shrimp and brine flies, to birds, and to their eggs. It also addresses the complexity of the GSL system: a) Spatially diverse, being comprised by four distinct bays and two layers, with major differences in salinity among their waters. b) Temporally dynamic, due to seasonal and inter-annual variations in runoff. The conceptual model is presently descriptive, but will serve as the basis for a semi-quantitative model that will be fed by data accumulated during subsequent investigations.

  15. Volatile Selenium Flux in the Great Salt Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, X.; Johnson, W. P.

    2006-12-01

    Volatilization of selenium has been proven to be the major source of selenium vapor from oceans and estuaries and it may be the major mechanism of permanent selenium removal from the Great Salt Lake (other than brine shrimp harvest). However, the volatilization flux of selenium from the Great Salt Lake has not been previously measured due to challenges of analysis in this hyper-saline environment. This work presents results from recent field studies examining the spatial distribution of volatile selenium (geographical and with depth) in the South Arm (main body) of the Great Salt Lake. The analyses involved collection of volatile selenium in a cryo-focusing trap system via sparging with helium. The cryo-trapped volatile selenium was digested with nitric acid and analyzed by ICP-MS. The results show concentrations of volatile selenium that are much greater than values reported for marine estuaries and oceans. Volatile selenium flux to the atmosphere was determined using mass transport equations corrected to simulate the highly saline environment of the South Arm of the Great Salt Lake.

  16. Hazard assessment of selenium to endangered razorback suckers (Xyrauchen texanus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, S.J.; Holley, K.M.; Buhl, K.J.

    2002-01-01

    A hazard assessment was conducted based on information derived from two reproduction studies conducted with endangered razorback suckers (Xyrauchen texanus) at three sites near Grand Junction, CO, USA. Selenium contamination of the upper and lower Colorado River basin has been documented in water, sediment, and biota in studies by US Department of the Interior agencies and academia. Concern has been raised that this selenium contamination may be adversely affecting endangered fish in the upper Colorado River basin. The reproduction studies with razorback suckers revealed that adults readily accumulated selenium in various tissues including eggs, and that 4.6 μg/g of selenium in food organisms caused increased mortality of larvae. The selenium hazard assessment protocol resulted in a moderate hazard at the Horsethief site and high hazards at the Adobe Creek and North Pond sites. The selenium hazard assessment was considered conservative because an on-site toxicity test with razorback sucker larvae using 4.6 μg/g selenium in zooplankton caused nearly complete mortality, in spite of the moderate hazard at Horsethief. Using the margin of uncertainty ratio also suggested a high hazard for effects on razorback suckers from selenium exposure. Both assessment approaches suggested that selenium in the upper Colorado River basin adversely affects the reproductive success of razorback suckers.

  17. Absorption and retention of selenium from shrimps in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugel, S. H.; Sandstrom, B.; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    2001-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the bioavailability of selenium in shrimps, a possible good source of selenium, by measurements of the absorption and retention of selenium and the effects on plasma selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity. Twelve healthy young subjects (9F...... of the study, after 2, 4, and 6 weeks. The selenium intake increased from 39.4 +/- 15.3 mug/d to 127 +/- 5.5 mug/d with the addition of shrimps. The apparent absorption of selenium from shrimps was 83 +/- 4%, Faecal and urinary selenium excretion was 32.5 +/- 17.0 mug/d and 21.2 +/- 9.0 mug/d, re spectively...... and the total retention of selenium was 3.1 +/- 1.1 mg. Plasma selenium concentrations were 95.2 +/- 9.7 mug/L and 101.5 +/- 9.7 mug/L before and after six weeks of shrimp intake, respectively (p...

  18. Selenium and Human Health: Witnessing a Copernican Revolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonska, Ewa; Vinceti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In humans, selenium was hypothesized to lower the risk of several chronic diseases, mainly due to the antioxidant activity of selenium-containing proteins. Recent epidemiologic and laboratory studies, however, are changing our perception of the biological effects of this nutritionally essential trace element. We reviewed the most recent epidemiologic and biochemical literature on selenium, synthesizing the findings from these studies into a unifying view. Randomized trials have shown that selenium did not protect against cancer and other chronic diseases, but even increased the risk of specific neoplasms such as advanced prostate cancer and skin cancer, in addition to type 2 diabetes. Biochemical studies indicate that selenium may exert a broad pattern of toxic effects at unexpectedly low concentrations. Furthermore, its upregulation of antioxidant proteins (selenium-dependent and selenium-independent) may be a manifestation of self-induced oxidative stress. In conclusion, toxic effects of selenium species occur at lower concentrations than previously believed. Those effects may include a large range of proteomic changes and adverse health effects in humans. Since the effects of environmental exposure to this element on human health still remain partially unknown, but are potentially serious, the toxicity of selenium exposure should be further investigated and considered as a public health priority.

  19. Deficient selenium status of a healthy adult Spanish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán Adame, E; Florea, D; Sáez Pérez, L; Molina López, J; López-González, B; Pérez de la Cruz, A; Planells del Pozo, E

    2012-01-01

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient for human health, being a cofactor for enzymes with antioxidant activity that protect the organism from oxidative damage. An inadequate intake of this mineral has been associated with the onset and progression of chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, coronary diseases, asthma, and cancer. For this reason, knowledge of the plasma and erythrocyte selenium levels of a population makes a relevant contribution to assessment of its nutritional status. The objective of the present study was to determine the nutritional status of selenium and risk of selenium deficiency in a healthy adult population in Spain by examining food and nutrient intake and analyzing biochemical parameters related to selenium metabolism, including plasma and erythrocyte levels and selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPx) enzymatic activity. We studied 84 healthy adults (31 males and 53 females) from the province of Granada, determining their plasma and erythrocyte selenium concentrations and the association of these levels with the enzymatic activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and with life style factors. We also gathered data on their food and nutrient intake and the results of biochemical analyses. Correlations were studied among all of these variables. The mean plasma selenium concentration was 76.6 ± 17.3 μg/L (87.3 ± 17.4 μg/L in males, 67.3 ± 10.7 μg/L in females), whereas the mean erythrocyte selenium concentration was 104.6 μg/L (107.9 ± 26.1 μg/L in males and 101.7 ± 21.7 μg/L in females). The nutritional status of selenium was defined by the plasma concentration required to reach maximum GPx activity, establishing 90 μg/L as reference value. According to this criterion, 50% of the men and 53% of the women were selenium deficient. Selenium is subjected to multiple regulation mechanisms. Erythrocyte selenium is a good marker of longer term selenium status, while plasma selenium appears to be a marker of short

  20. Is selenium supplementation in autoimmune thyroid diseases justified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winther, Kristian H; Bonnema, Steen J; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2017-10-01

    This review provides an appraisal of recent evidence for or against selenium supplementation in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases, and discusses possible effect mechanisms. Epidemiological data suggest an increased prevalence of autoimmune thyroid diseases under conditions of low dietary selenium intake. Two systematic reviews have evaluated controlled trials among patients with autoimmune thyroiditis and report that selenium supplementation decreases circulating thyroid autoantibodies. The immunomodulatory effects of selenium might involve reducing proinflammatory cytokine release. However, clinically relevant effects of selenium supplementation, including improvement in quality of life, are more elusive. In Graves' disease, some, but not all, trials indicate that adjuvant selenium supplementation enhances the restoration of biochemical euthyroidism, and might benefit patients with mild Graves' orbitopathy. The use of selenium supplementation as adjuvant therapy to standard thyroid medication may be widespread, but a growing body of evidence yields equivocal results. The available evidence from trials does not support routine selenium supplementation in the standard treatment of patients with autoimmune thyroiditis or Graves' disease. However, correction of moderate to severe selenium deficiency may offer benefits in preventing, as well as treating, these disorders. Molecular mechanisms have been proposed, but further studies are needed.

  1. Selenium Administration Attenuates 5-Flurouracil-Induced Intestinal Mucositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Min; Chun, Hoon Jai; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Eun Sun; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chul Hwan; Sul, Donggeun

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced mucositis is mediated by the release of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species. Selenium has several metabolic functions, including the protection of membrane lipids and macromolecules against oxidative damage. However, to date, there is little evidence on the effect of trace elements on intestinal mucositis after chemotherapy. This study investigated the protective effect of selenium against chemotherapy-induced mucositis in rats. Twenty-four 9-wk-old female Wistar rats were randomized to 4 groups: control, selenium, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and 5-FU plus selenium. Mucositis was induced by a single dose of 5-FU (400 mg/kg BW) via intraperitoneal injection, and selenium was administered by a single intraperitoneal dose of sodium selenite (0.2 mg/kg BW). Diarrhea and weight loss after 5-FU administration were attenuated by selenium treatment. The mean villus height in the 5-FU plus selenium group was significantly taller than rats administered with 5-FU alone, but not significantly different compared to the control group. Interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α mRNA expression were significantly lower in the 5-FU plus selenium group than in the 5-FU only group (IL-1β, P selenium protects the mucosa during chemotherapy via its anti-inflammatory effects and its suppression of cytotoxic cytokine production.

  2. Randomised clinical trial of parenteral selenium supplementation in preterm infants.

    OpenAIRE

    Daniels, L; Gibson, R.; Simmer, K.

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether selenium supplementation of parenteral nutrition with 3 micrograms/kg/day of selenious acid is safe and effective in improving the selenium status of preterm infants. METHODS: Thirty eight preterm infants with mean (SEM) birthweight of 1171 (38) g and gestational age 29 (0.3) weeks were randomly allocated to a non-supplemented (PN-selenium, n = 19) or supplemented (PN+selenium, n = 19) group. The study began at 2.8 (0.2) (range 1-5) days of age. Term breastfed (n = 2...

  3. Ecological Importance of Insects in Selenium Biogenic Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda Golubkina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential trace element for animal and human beings. Despite the importance of insects in most ecosystems and their significant contribution to the biological cycling of trace elements due to high abundance, population productivity, and diverse ecosystem functions, surprisingly little information is available on selenium bioaccumulation by these arthropods. This review considers selenium essentiality and toxicity to insects as well as insects’ contribution to selenium trophic transfer through the food chains. Data on Se accumulation by insects of the Dniester River Valley with no anthropogenic Se loading reveal typically low Se content in necrophagous insects compared to predators and herbivores and seasonal variations in Se accumulation.

  4. Selenium uptake and assessment of the biochemical changes in Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis biomass during the synthesis of selenium nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinicovscaia, I; Chiriac, T; Cepoi, L; Rudi, L; Culicov, O; Frontasyeva, M; Rudic, V

    2017-01-01

    The process of selenium uptake by biomass of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis was investigated by neutron activation analysis at different selenium concentrations in solution and at different contact times. Experimental data showed good fit with the Freundlich adsorption isotherm model, with a regression coefficient value of 0.99. In terms of absorption dependence on time, the maximal selenium content was adsorbed in the first 5 min of interaction without significant further changes. It was also found that A. platensis biomass forms spherical selenium nanoparticles. Biochemical analysis was used to assess the changes in the main components of spirulina biomass (proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and phycobilin) during nanoparticle formation.

  5. Genetic polymorphisms that affect selenium status and response to selenium supplementation in United Kingdom pregnant women1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jinyuan; Vanderlelie, Jessica J; Perkins, Anthony V; Redman, Christopher WG; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Rayman, Margaret P

    2016-01-01

    Background: Low selenium status in pregnancy has been associated with a number of adverse conditions. In nonpregnant populations, the selenium status or response to supplementation has been associated with polymorphisms in dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (DMGDH), selenoprotein P (SEPP1) and the glutathione peroxidases [cytosolic glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) and phospholipid glutathione peroxidase (GPx4)]. Objective: We hypothesized that, in pregnant women, these candidate polymorphisms would be associated with selenium status in early pregnancy, its longitudinal change, and the interindividual response to selenium supplementation at 60 μg/d. Design: With the use of stored samples and data from the United Kingdom Selenium in Pregnancy Intervention (SPRINT) study in 227 pregnant women, we carried out genetic-association studies, testing for associations between selenium status, its longitudinal change, and response to supplementation and common genetic variation in DMGDH (rs921943), SEPP1 (rs3877899 and rs7579), GPx1 (rs1050450) and GPx4 (rs713041). Selenium status was represented by the concentration of whole-blood selenium at 12 and 35 wk of gestation, the concentration of toenail selenium at 16 wk of gestation, and plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx3) activity at 12 and 35 wk of gestation. Results: Our results showed that DMGDH rs921943 was significantly associated with the whole-blood selenium concentration at 12 wk of gestation (P = 0.032), which explained ≤2.0% of the variance. This association was replicated with the use of toenail selenium (P = 0.043). In unsupplemented women, SEPP1 rs3877899 was significantly associated with the percentage change in whole-blood selenium from 12 to 35 wk of gestation (P = 0.005), which explained 8% of the variance. In supplemented women, SEPP1 rs3877899 was significantly associated with the percentage change in GPx3 activity from 12 to 35 wk of gestation (P = 0.01), which explained 5.3% of the variance. Selenium status was

  6. Improvement of Selenium Status of Pasture Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1984-01-01

    Selenium was applied to pasture crops in a field experiment (1) by foliar application of 10 g Se/ha as selenite in the spring, (2) or by 5 g Se/ha in the spring plus 5 g in early August, (3) as selenite-enriched calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN) at 4 g Se/ha after each cut, and (4) as 4 g Se after...

  7. Selenoprotein P is the major selenium transport protein in mouse milk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina E Hill

    Full Text Available Selenium is transferred from the mouse dam to its neonate via milk. Milk contains selenium in selenoprotein form as selenoprotein P (Sepp1 and glutathione peroxidase-3 (Gpx3 as well as in non-specific protein form as selenomethionine. Selenium is also present in milk in uncharacterized small-molecule form. We eliminated selenomethionine from the mice in these experiments by feeding a diet that contained sodium selenite as the source of selenium. Selenium-replete dams with deletion of Sepp1 or Gpx3 were studied to assess the effects of these genes on selenium transfer to the neonate. Sepp1 knockout caused a drop in milk selenium to 27% of the value in wild-type milk and a drop in selenium acquisition by the neonates to 35%. In addition to decreasing milk selenium by eliminating Sepp1, deletion of Sepp1 causes a decline in whole-body selenium, which likely also contributes to the decreased transfer of selenium to the neonate. Deletion of Gpx3 did not decrease milk selenium content or neonate selenium acquisition by measurable amounts. Thus, when the dam is fed selenium-adequate diet (0.25 mg selenium/kg diet, milk Sepp1 transfers a large amount of selenium to neonates but the transfer of selenium by Gpx3 is below detection by our methods.

  8. Impact of Selenium Supplementation on Growth and Selenium Accumulation on Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh SAFFARYAZDI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se has been proved to be an essential element for humans and animals. However, less is known about its effects on plants. A hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of selenium on growth, selenium accumulation and some physiological characteristics of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv. �Missouri� plants. Plants were grown in Hoagland nutrient solution amended with sodium selenite at 0 (control, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 10 mg.L-1 for 28 days. Growth parameters like shoot and root fresh weight, shoot and root dry weight, total dry weight, shoot and root length increased by 17, 15, 38, 19, 18 and 34 percent in response to the lowest concentration of Se (1 mg L-1, respectively over control. However, application of higher Se concentrations reduced these parameters as compared to control. Selenium up to 1 mg L-1 enhanced the levels of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b by 87 and 165 percent, respectively, while higher levels of Se exert toxic effects. Total phenolic compounds in leaves increased directly by increasing the level of Se and plants treated with 10 mg. L-1 Se had the highest values. Selenium, sodium and calcium content increased, while potassium content decreased, by increasing selenium treatments. The highest amounts of Se in shoots (3.89 mg g-1 DW and roots (4.27 mg g-1 DW were obtained for the highest concentration of Se (10 mg L-1. The present results suggested the beneficial effects of Se on spinach growth and also its contribute ion to improving the nutritional value of spinach for livestock and human nutrition.

  9. Impact of Selenium Supplementation on Growth and Selenium Accumulation on Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh SAFFARYAZDI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se has been proved to be an essential element for humans and animals. However, less is known about its effects on plants. A hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of selenium on growth, selenium accumulation and some physiological characteristics of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv. Missouri plants. Plants were grown in Hoagland nutrient solution amended with sodium selenite at 0 (control, 1, 2, 4, 6 and 10 mg.L-1 for 28 days. Growth parameters like shoot and root fresh weight, shoot and root dry weight, total dry weight, shoot and root length increased by 17, 15, 38, 19, 18 and 34 percent in response to the lowest concentration of Se (1 mg L-1, respectively over control. However, application of higher Se concentrations reduced these parameters as compared to control. Selenium up to 1 mg L-1 enhanced the levels of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b by 87 and 165 percent, respectively, while higher levels of Se exert toxic effects. Total phenolic compounds in leaves increased directly by increasing the level of Se and plants treated with 10 mg. L-1 Se had the highest values. Selenium, sodium and calcium content increased, while potassium content decreased, by increasing selenium treatments. The highest amounts of Se in shoots (3.89 mg g-1 DW and roots (4.27 mg g-1 DW were obtained for the highest concentration of Se (10 mg L-1. The present results suggested the beneficial effects of Se on spinach growth and also its contribute ion to improving the nutritional value of spinach for livestock and human nutrition.

  10. Biofortification and phytoremediation of selenium in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhilin; Bañuelos, Gary S; Lin, Zhi-Qing; Liu, Ying; Yuan, Linxi; Yin, Xuebin; Li, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element for humans and animals but at high concentrations, Se becomes toxic to organisms due to Se replacing sulfur in proteins. Selenium biofortification is an agricultural process that increases the accumulation of Se in crops, through plant breeding, genetic engineering, or use of Se fertilizers. Selenium phytoremediation is a green biotechnology to clean up Se-contaminated environments, primarily through phytoextraction and phytovolatilization. By integrating Se phytoremediation and biofortification technologies, Se-enriched plant materials harvested from Se phytoremediation can be used as Se-enriched green manures or other supplementary sources of Se for producing Se-biofortified agricultural products. Earlier studies primarily aimed at enhancing efficacy of phytoremediation and biofortification of Se based on natural variation in progenitor or identification of unique plant species. In this review, we discuss promising approaches to improve biofortification and phytoremediation of Se using knowledge acquired from model crops. We also explored the feasibility of applying biotechnologies such as inoculation of microbial strains for improving the efficiency of biofortification and phytoremediation of Se. The key research and practical challenges that remain in improving biofortification and phytoremediation of Se have been highlighted, and the future development and uses of Se-biofortified agricultural products in China has also been discussed.

  11. Zinc and selenium nutritional status in vegetarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bortoli, Maritsa Carla; Cozzolino, Silvia Maria Franciscato

    2009-03-01

    A vegetarian diet may have beneficial effects on human health, however when it is not well-balanced may be deficient in some nutrients, as minerals for example. The aim of the present study was to assess the nutritional status of zinc and selenium in vegetarians in the city of São Paulo. A cross-sectional study was performed, and the inclusion criteria were age > or = 18 years, both gender, no use of food or pharmaceutical supplements. Thirty vegetarian, of both genders, mean age of 27 years and 4.5 years of vegetarianism had performed the study, and their mean BMI was 21.5. Zinc plasma concentration was 71 and 62.5 microg/dL for men and women and erythrocyte concentration was 37 microg/gHb for both genders. Selenium concentration was 73.5 and 77.3 microg/L in plasma and 51.4 and 66.9 microg/L in erythrocytes for men and women, respectively. These biochemical values show that, according to the references, selenium blood levels are adequate and zinc concentration in erythrocytes is deficient in the studied population. For this reason, vegetarians should be constantly assessed and receive nutritional support to reduce the effects of inadequate zinc status.

  12. Selenium in soil–plant–food systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garousi F.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Humans and animals require a multitude of nutrients in order to have a properly functioning body for purposes of growth, development and metabolism. Plant-based foods have represented one of the most important nutrient sources in human diet since the beginning of mankind. But nowadays the amount of arable land is being reduced and much of the natural resources already in use show signs of degradation. Also, staple crops (i.e. plants that constitute the main food in the diets of people in developing countries, e.g. wheat, rice, maize, and cassava regrettably contain low amounts of micronutrients, making them insufficient to meet the minimum daily requirements. Shortages in mineral micronutrients, including iron (Fe, zinc (Zn, selenium (Se, and iodine (I, are affecting more than half of the world’s population. In this case, it is fundamental to improve strategies that let us make plant foods more efficient and with higher micronutrient amounts and bioavailability concerning their edible textures. In this regard, in this review paper, we tried to summarize selenium availability and its application in the soil, plant and food systems to understand the place of selenium in plant-based foods.

  13. Selenium accumulation and metabolism in algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Michela; Ertani, Andrea; Parrasia, Sofia; Vecchia, Francesca Dalla

    2017-08-01

    Selenium (Se) is an intriguing element because it is metabolically required by a variety of organisms, but it may induce toxicity at high doses. Algae primarily absorb selenium in the form of selenate or selenite using mechanisms similar to those reported in plants. However, while Se is needed by several species of microalgae, the essentiality of this element for plants has not been established yet. The study of Se uptake and accumulation strategies in micro- and macro-algae is of pivotal importance, as they represent potential vectors for Se movement in aquatic environments and Se at high levels may affect their growth causing a reduction in primary production. Some microalgae exhibit the capacity of efficiently converting Se to less harmful volatile compounds as a strategy to cope with Se toxicity. Therefore, they play a crucial role in Se-cycling through the ecosystem. On the other side, micro- or macro-algae enriched in Se may be used in Se biofortification programs aimed to improve Se content in human diet via supplementation of valuable food. Indeed, some organic forms of selenium (selenomethionine and methylselenocysteine) are known to act as anticarcinogenic compounds and exert a broad spectrum of beneficial effects in humans and other mammals. Here, we want to give an overview of the developments in the current understanding of Se uptake, accumulation and metabolism in algae, discussing potential ecotoxicological implications and nutritional aspects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Krypton ion implantation effect on selenium nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Suresh; Chauhan, R. P.

    2017-08-01

    Among the rapidly progressing interdisciplinary areas of physics, chemistry, material science etc. ion induced modifications of materials is one such evolving field. It has been realized in recent years that a material, in the form of an accelerated ion beam, embedded into a target specimen offers a most productive tool for transforming its properties in a controlled manner. In semiconductors particularly, where the transport behavior is determined by very small concentrations of certain impurities, implantation of ions may bring considerable changes. The present work is based on the study of the effect of krypton ion implantation on selenium nanowires. Selenium nanowires of diameter 80 nm were synthesized by template assisted electro deposition technique. Implantation of krypton ions was done at Inter University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi, India. The effect of implantation on structural, electrical and optical properties of selenium nanowires was investigated. XRD analysis of pristine and implanted nanowires shows no shifting in the peak position but there is a variation in the relative intensity with fluence. UV-Visible spectroscopy shows the decrease in the optical band gap with fluence. PL spectra showed emission peak at higher wavelength. A substantial rise in the current was observed from I-V measurements, after implantation and with the increase in fluence. The increase in current conduction may be due to the increase in the current carriers.

  15. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired

  16. Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... conduct research on numerous areas of study, including cognition, genetics, epidemiology, and psychiatry. The studies take place ... Leibenluft, Senior Investigator and Chief of the NIMH Emotion and Development Branch, explains the history of Disruptive ...

  17. Search and Disrupt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    This paper analyzes how external search is affected by strategic interest alignment among knowledge sources. I focus on misalignment arising from the heterogeneous effects of disruptive technologies by analyzing the influence of incumbents on 2,855 non-incumbents? external knowledge search efforts....... The efforts most likely to solve innovation problems obtained funding from the European Commission?s 7th Framework Program (2007-2013). The results show that involving incumbents improves search in complementary technologies, while demoting it when strategic interests are misaligned in disruptive technologies....... However, incumbent sources engaged in capability reconfiguration to accommodate disruption improve search efforts in disruptive technologies. The paper concludes that the value of external sources is contingent on more than their knowledge. Specifically, interdependence of sources in search gives rise...

  18. Lower plasma levels of selenium and glutathione in smear- positive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Abstract. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate selenium and glutathione levels in pulmonary tuberculosis patients and controls in Malawi. Methods: The case-control study included 19 patients and 15 apparently healthy controls for whom, levels of selenium and glutathione were measured. Results: The ...

  19. Copper and selenium supplementation of ewes gnazing on pastures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of copper and selenium supplementation in SA Mutton. Merino ewes, kept on pastures with low copper ... plasma copper, pregnancy, selenium supplementation,. Low copper concentrations are frequently ... very weak at birth, their mortality rate was high and growth rate poor (Van Niekerk & Van Niekerk, 1989c).

  20. Lentils (Lens culinaris L.) as a source of dietary selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chapter discusses the nutritional value of lentils, with a focus on factors affecting lentils as a source of dietary selenium. It addresses the chemical nature of lentil-selenium, pointing out that more than 90% is present in organic compounds which are generally well absorbed by humans. The se...

  1. Accurate determination of selenium and iron in erythrocytes from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accurate determination of selenium and iron in erythrocytes from Nigeria subjects using INAA. JO Ojo, Jan Kucera. Abstract. Levels of two essential elements playing crucial roles in erythrocyte's structure and functions, iron and selenium, have been carefully determined in 36 erythrocyte samples drawn from two healthy ...

  2. Relationship between soil contents and plasma levels of selenium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The soil contents of trace elements selenium, chromium and manganese were measured to determine their impact on the plasma levels of 160 healthy adult Nigerians in five different experimental locations in Cross River and Akwa Ibom States, South - South Nigeria. The mean (±SD) soil selenium, chromium and ...

  3. Influence of different soaking times with selenium on growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low temperature (LT) is one of the most important factors limiting the growth, development and distribution of wheat plants in temperate regions. Selenium often acts as an antioxidant in plants and this study hypothesize that selenium application can partly alleviate LT-induced oxidative stress and negative impacts of LT on ...

  4. Mercury and selenium in wild and experimental seals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, van de W.S.M.; Koeman, J.H.; Svenson, A.

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes the tissue distribution of inorganic mercury, organic mercury selenium in Dutch and British seals as well as in seals which were dosed with methylmercury under experimental conditions. In the experimental animals, a time-related increase of both mercury and selenium was found in

  5. Importance of selenium status in patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Ebner

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Overactivity of the immune system may be a worthwhile therapeutic target for implementing prognostic improvements. Therefore the impact of lipopolysaccharide (LPS desensitization on survival may help in the development of novel therapies. An understanding of the pathophysiology of the trace element selenium may complement such approaches, as recent data suggest that inflammatory responses are selenium-dependent.

  6. The selenium status of grazing herbivores in different regions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    Although a substantial amount of information is available on the selenium status of grazing animals in southern Africa, this information has not been mapped to give a clear view of the situation at a glance. In this presentation data available to the author have been used to produce a map of the selenium status of grazing ...

  7. Copper and selenium supplementation of ewes grazing on pastures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of copper and selenium supplementationi n SA Mutton Merino ewes, kept on pastures with low copper and selenium concentrations, was investigated. Ewes which came into oestrus and conceived during March to April, were found to have concentrations of plasma copper of 60 to 80 pg /dl. Inadequare copper ...

  8. Enrichment of African catfish with functional selenium originating from garlic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schram, E.; Pedrero, Z.; Camara, C.; Heul, van der J.W.; Luten, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    We wanted to create functional seafood with high concentrations of organic selenium (seleno-methyl-selenocysteine and ¿-glutamyl-seleno-methyl-selenocysteine) with anti-carcinogenic properties for human consumers. Garlic containing high concentrations of these organic selenium compounds was used as

  9. Selenium enrichment pattern in flowering Chinese cabbage, cabbage and asparagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mo, H.Z.; Yang Zhu, Yang; Zhang, M.

    2006-01-01

    CONCLUSIONS - Within a certain range, selenium accumulation in three studied vegetables was lineally correlated with spraying concentration. However, a too high concentration caused the reduction of vegetable output and damage in quality. - Twice spraying with lower concentration of selenium was a

  10. 21 CFR 524.2101 - Selenium disulfide suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Selenium disulfide suspension. 524.2101 Section 524.2101 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 524.2101 Selenium disulfide suspension. (a) Specifications. The product contains 0.9-percent weight in...

  11. 21 CFR 520.2100 - Selenium, vitamin E capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Selenium, vitamin E capsules. 520.2100 Section 520.2100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 520.2100 Selenium, vitamin...

  12. Zinc and Selenium levels in Motor Mechanics, Paints Sprayers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Zinc and Selenium levels in Motor Mechanics, Paints Sprayers, Smokers, Lubricant Workers and Battery Workers Exposed to Lead in Nnewi, South Eastern Nigeria. ... Blood lead, zinc and selenium levels were determined in both exposed and control subjects. Results: The result shows that there was a significant increase ...

  13. Acute selenium toxicity associated with a dietary supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarquhar, Jennifer K; Broussard, Danielle L; Melstrom, Paul; Hutchinson, Richard; Wolkin, Amy; Martin, Colleen; Burk, Raymond F; Dunn, John R; Green, Alice L; Hammond, Roberta; Schaffner, William; Jones, Timothy F

    2010-02-08

    Selenium is an element necessary for normal cellular function, but it can have toxic effects at high doses. We investigated an outbreak of acute selenium poisoning. A case was defined as the onset of symptoms of selenium toxicity in a person within 2 weeks after ingesting a dietary supplement manufactured by "Company A," purchased after January 1, 2008. We conducted case finding, administered initial and 90-day follow-up questionnaires to affected persons, and obtained laboratory data where available. The source of the outbreak was identified as a liquid dietary supplement that contained 200 times the labeled concentration of selenium. Of 201 cases identified in 10 states, 1 person was hospitalized. The median estimated dose of selenium consumed was 41 749 microg/d (recommended dietary allowance is 55 microg/d). Frequently reported symptoms included diarrhea (78%), fatigue (75%), hair loss (72%), joint pain (70%), nail discoloration or brittleness (61%), and nausea (58%). Symptoms persisting 90 days or longer included fingernail discoloration and loss (52%), fatigue (35%), and hair loss (29%). The mean initial serum selenium concentration of 8 patients was 751 microg/L (reference range, selenium concentration of 7 patients was 166 microg/24 h (reference range, selenium in a liquid dietary supplement resulted in a widespread outbreak. Had the manufacturers been held to standards used in the pharmaceutical industry, it may have been prevented.

  14. Selenium induces cholinergic motor neuron degeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevez, Annette O; Mueller, Catherine L; Morgan, Kathleen L; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J; Teece, Luke; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio; Estevez, Miguel

    2012-10-01

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient required for cellular antioxidant systems, yet at higher doses it induces oxidative stress. Additionally, in vertebrates environmental exposures to toxic levels of selenium can cause paralysis and death. Here we show that selenium-induced oxidative stress leads to decreased cholinergic signaling and degeneration of cholinergic neurons required for movement and egg-laying in Caenorhabditis elegans. Exposure to high levels of selenium leads to proteolysis of a soluble muscle protein through mechanisms suppressible by two pharmacological agents, levamisole and aldicarb which enhance cholinergic signaling in muscle. In addition, animals with reduction-of-function mutations in genes encoding post-synaptic levamisole-sensitive acetylcholine receptor subunits or the vesicular acetylcholine transporter developed impaired forward movement faster during selenium-exposure than normal animals, again confirming that selenium reduces cholinergic signaling. Finally, the antioxidant reduced glutathione, inhibits selenium-induced reductions in egg-laying through a cellular protective mechanism dependent on the C. elegans glutaredoxin, GLRX-21. These studies provide evidence that the environmental toxicant selenium induces neurodegeneration of cholinergic neurons through depletion of glutathione, a mechanism linked to the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of Selenium Yeast on Blood Glucose and Antioxidant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Selenium yeast is a recognised source of organic nutrient from selenium and naturally present in various food types such as Brazil nuts, chicken, fish, turkey, .... experimental period (Kolawole et al., 2012) with slight modification. Determination of Blood Glucose Level. Blood samples (5mls) were collected by cutting the tail.

  16. The influence of zinc and selenium on some biochemical responses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water deficit cowpea sample treated with selenium once weekly (WOS) returned back to full turgor after 6 days of rehydration with water. Rehydration caused significant reductions in MDA levels and antioxidant enzymes activities. The use of antioxidant chemicals particularly selenium is therefore recommended in this study ...

  17. Aquatic selenium pollution is a global environmental safety issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Dennis Lemly

    2004-01-01

    Selenium pollution is a worldwide phenomenon and is associated with a broad spectrum of human activities, ranging from the most basic agricultural practices to the most high-tech industrial processes. Consequently, selenium contamination of aquatic habitats can take place in urban, suburban, and rural settings alike--from mountains to plains, from deserts to...

  18. Digital disruption ?syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Clair; Staib, Andrew

    2017-05-18

    The digital transformation of hospitals in Australia is occurring rapidly in order to facilitate innovation and improve efficiency. Rapid transformation can cause temporary disruption of hospital workflows and staff as processes are adapted to the new digital workflows. The aim of this paper is to outline various types of digital disruption and some strategies for effective management. A large tertiary university hospital recently underwent a rapid, successful roll-out of an integrated electronic medical record (EMR). We observed this transformation and propose several digital disruption "syndromes" to assist with understanding and management during digital transformation: digital deceleration, digital transparency, digital hypervigilance, data discordance, digital churn and post-digital 'depression'. These 'syndromes' are defined and discussed in detail. Successful management of this temporary digital disruption is important to ensure a successful transition to a digital platform.What is known about this topic? Digital disruption is defined as the changes facilitated by digital technologies that occur at a pace and magnitude that disrupt established ways of value creation, social interactions, doing business and more generally our thinking. Increasing numbers of Australian hospitals are implementing digital solutions to replace traditional paper-based systems for patient care in order to create opportunities for improved care and efficiencies. Such large scale change has the potential to create transient disruption to workflows and staff. Managing this temporary disruption effectively is an important factor in the successful implementation of an EMR.What does this paper add? A large tertiary university hospital recently underwent a successful rapid roll-out of an integrated electronic medical record (EMR) to become Australia's largest digital hospital over a 3-week period. We observed and assisted with the management of several cultural, behavioural and

  19. Recent Microextraction Techniques for Determination and Chemical Speciation of Selenium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Ahmed S. A.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Research designed to improve extraction has led to the development of microextraction techniques (ME, which involve simple, low cost, and effective preconcentrationof analytes in various matrices. This review is concerned with the principles and theoretical background of ME, as well as the development of applications for selenium analysis during the period from 2008 to 2016. Among all ME, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction was found to be most favorable for selenium. On the other hand, atomic absorption spectrometry was the most frequently used instrumentation. Selenium ME have rarely been coupled to spectrophotometry and X-ray spectrophotometry methods, and there is no published application of ME with electrochemical techniques. We strongly support the idea of using a double preconcentration process, which consists of microextraction prior to preconcentration, followed by selenium determination using cathodic stripping voltammetry (ME-CSV. More attention should focus on the development of accurate, precise, and green methods for selenium analysis.

  20. Selenium fertilization on lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus) grain yield, seed selenium concentration, and antioxidant activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium (Se) is an essential element for mammals but has not been considered as an essential element for higher plants. Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a cool season food legume rich in protein and a range of micronutrients including minerals (iron and zinc), folates, and carotenoids. The objecti...

  1. Total selenium and selenium species in irrigation drain inflows to the Salton Sea, California, October 2008 and January 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Michael J.; Saiki, Michael K.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the results for two sampling periods (October 2008 and January 2009) during a 4-year monitoring program to characterize selenium concentrations in selected irrigation drains flowing into the Salton Sea, California. Total selenium, selenium species (dissolved selenite, selenate, organoselenium), and total suspended solids were determined in water samples. Total selenium also was determined in water column particulates and in sediment, detritus, and biota that included algae, plankton, midge larvae (family, Chironomidae), and two fish species (western mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis, and sailfin molly, Poecilia latipinna). In addition, sediments were analyzed for percent total organic carbon and particle size. Mean total selenium concentrations in water for both sampling periods ranged from 1.00 to 33.6 micrograms per liter, predominately as selenate, which is typical of waters where selenium is leached out of selenium-containing marine shales and associated soils under alkaline and oxidizing conditions. Total selenium concentrations (micrograms per gram dry weight) ranged as follows: algae, 1.52 to 8.26; plankton, 0.79 to 3.66; midges, 2.68 to 50.6; fish, 3.09 to 30.4; detritus, 1.78 to 58.0; and sediment, 0.42 to 10.0.

  2. Total selenium and selenium species in irrigation drain inflows to the Salton Sea, California, October 2007 and January 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Michael J.; Saiki, Michael K.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents the results for two sampling periods (October 2007 and January 2008) during a 4-year monitoring program to characterize selenium concentrations in selected irrigation drains flowing into the Salton Sea, California. Total selenium, selenium species (selenite, selenate, organoselenium), and total suspended solids were determined in water samples, and total selenium was determined in sediment, detritus, and biota that included algae, plankton, midge larvae (family, Chironomidae), and two fish species?western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) and sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna). In addition, sediments were analyzed for percent total organic carbon and particle size. Mean total selenium concentrations in water for both sampling periods ranged from 0.97 to 64.5 micrograms per liter, predominately as selenate, which is typical of waters where selenium is leached out of selenium-containing marine shales and associated soils under alkaline and oxidizing conditions. Total selenium concentrations (micrograms per gram dry weight) ranged as follows: algae, 0.95 to 5.99; plankton, 0.15 to 19.3; midges, 1.39 to 15.4; fish, 3.71 to 25.1; detritus, 0.85 to 21.7; sediment, 0.32 to 7.28.

  3. Total selenium and selenium species in irrigation drain inflows to the Salton Sea, California, April and July 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Michael J.; Saiki, Michael K.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents the results for two sampling periods (April 2008 and July 2008) during a 4-year monitoring program to characterize selenium concentrations in selected irrigation drains flowing into the Salton Sea, California. Total selenium, selenium species (dissolved selenite, selenate, organoselenium), and total suspended solids were determined in water samples and total selenium was determined in water column particulates and in sediment, detritus, and biota that included algae, plankton, midge larvae (family, Chironomidae), and two fish species - western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) and sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna). In addition, sediments were analyzed for percent total organic carbon and particle size. Mean total selenium concentrations in water for both sampling periods ranged from 1.93 to 44.2 micrograms per liter, predominately as selenate, which is typical of waters where selenium is leached out of selenium-containing marine shales and associated soils under alkaline and oxidizing conditions. Total selenium concentrations (micrograms per gram dry weight) ranged as follows: algae, 0.75 to 3.39; plankton, 0.88 to 4.03; midges, 2.52 to 44.3; fish, 3.37 to 18.9; detritus, 1.11 to 13.6; sediment, 0.11 to 8.93.

  4. Selenium and Lung Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Heidi; Kennedy, Deborah; Fergusson, Dean; Fernandes, Rochelle; Cooley, Kieran; Seely, Andrew; Sagar, Stephen; Wong, Raimond; Seely, Dugald

    2011-01-01

    Background Selenium is a natural health product widely used in the treatment and prevention of lung cancers, but large chemoprevention trials have yielded conflicting results. We conducted a systematic review of selenium for lung cancers, and assessed potential interactions with conventional therapies. Methods and Findings Two independent reviewers searched six databases from inception to March 2009 for evidence pertaining to the safety and efficacy of selenium for lung cancers. Pubmed and EMBASE were searched to October 2009 for evidence on interactions with chemo- or radiation-therapy. In the efficacy analysis there were nine reports of five RCTs and two biomarker-based studies, 29 reports of 26 observational studies, and 41 preclinical studies. Fifteen human studies, one case report, and 36 preclinical studies were included in the interactions analysis. Based on available evidence, there appears to be a different chemopreventive effect dependent on baseline selenium status, such that selenium supplementation may reduce risk of lung cancers in populations with lower baseline selenium status (serumselenium (≥121.6 ng/mL). Pooling data from two trials yielded no impact to odds of lung cancer, OR 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.61–1.43); other cancers that were the primary endpoints of these trials, OR 1.51 (95%CI 0.70–3.24); and all-cause-death, OR 0.93 (95%CI 0.79–1.10). In the treatment of lung cancers, selenium may reduce cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and side effects associated with radiation therapy. Conclusions Selenium may be effective for lung cancer prevention among individuals with lower selenium status, but at present should not be used as a general strategy for lung cancer prevention. Although promising, more evidence on the ability of selenium to reduce cisplatin and radiation therapy toxicity is required to ensure that therapeutic efficacy is maintained before any broad clinical recommendations can be made in this context. PMID:22073154

  5. The risk assessment of selenium exposure from food in the Slovak Republic

    OpenAIRE

    Ursinyova, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Selenium is a ubiquitous essential trace element originated from natural and anthropogenic sources.  Effects of selenium on human health are ranging from protective to toxic (acute or chronic selenosis). Toxicity depends on the form of selenium in a compound and its bioavailability. Selenium occurs naturally in food and is worldwide approved as an additive into food and food supplements. The existing studies point out that the levels of selenium in food and the status of Slovak population are...

  6. SELENIUM SUBSTITUTION – EFFECT ON THYROID FUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Pešić

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of the essential role of selenium (Se in thyroid hormone synthesis, metabolism and action, as well as normal thyroid function, increased during the past decades. The thyroid gland is among the human tissues with the highest Se content per mas unit, similar to other endocrine organs and brain. Biological actions of Se are mediated, in most cases, through the expression of at least 30 selenoproteins coded by 25 selenoprotein genes in the human. Via the selenoproteins, selenium can influence the cell function through antioxidant activites, modifying redox status and thyroid hormone synthesis and metabolism. Selenoproteins iodothyronine deiodinases are present in most tissues and have a role to increase the production of bioactive tri-iodothyronine. Futhermore, Se has been shown to be important in the regulation of immune function. Se deficiency is accompained by the loss of immune competence. The links between Se deficiency, altered immune function and inflamation have prompted studies in humans to examine if Se suplementation can modify auto-antibodies production in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. Until now, several randomised prospective clinical trials have been performed in patients with established chronic autoimmune thyrioditis. The clinical endpoint of each study was the decrease in TPO antibodies concentration after 3-12 months of treatment. Ussualy, the dosage of daily Se supplementation was 200µg. Selenium suplemetation had no significant effect on the concentration of TSH or thyroid hormone concentrations. These studies indicate that Se treatment result in reduced inflammatory activity, but it does not cure chronc autoimmune process.

  7. The disruption management model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlister, James

    2011-10-01

    Within all organisations, business continuity disruptions present a set of dilemmas that managers may not have dealt with before in their normal daily duties. The disruption management model provides a simple but effective management tool to enable crisis management teams to stay focused on recovery in the midst of a business continuity incident. The model has four chronological primary headlines, which steer the team through a quick-time crisis decision-making process. The procedure facilitates timely, systematic, rationalised and justified decisions, which can withstand post-event scrutiny. The disruption management model has been thoroughly tested within an emergency services environment and is proven to significantly support clear and concise decision making in a business continuity context.

  8. Emerging and Disruptive Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kricka, Larry J

    2016-08-01

    Several emerging or disruptive technologies can be identified that might, at some point in the future, displace established laboratory medicine technologies and practices. These include increased automation in the form of robots, 3-D printing, technology convergence (e.g., plug-in glucose meters for smart phones), new point-of-care technologies (e.g., contact lenses with sensors, digital and wireless enabled pregnancy tests) and testing locations (e.g., Retail Health Clinics, new at-home testing formats), new types of specimens (e.g., cell free DNA), big biology/data (e.g., million genome projects), and new regulations (e.g., for laboratory developed tests). In addition, there are many emerging technologies (e.g., planar arrays, mass spectrometry) that might find even broader application in the future and therefore also disrupt current practice. One interesting source of disruptive technology may prove to be the Qualcomm Tricorder XPrize, currently in its final stages.

  9. Search and Disrupt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    Extant research on external knowledge search and open innovation assumes that collaborators are aligned in their strategic interests towards solving innovation problems. However, disruptive innovation is known to threaten the competitive advantage of incumbent firms, thereby creating a potential...... conflict of interest between these firms and their collaborators. This paper explores the extent to which strategic interests influence joint problem solving in both complementary and disruptive technologies by analyzing the effects of incumbent collaboration. The analysis disentangles inability...... and strategic intent to find that non-incumbents experience suppression of problem solving likelihood within disruptive technologies when incumbent collaborators are not strategically committed. The paper contributes to extant theory by showing the influence of firms’ underlying strategic interests...

  10. Endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Karen

    suggested as particularly sensitive to endocrine disruption. Mammary gland examination in toxicological studies may be useful for improving knowledge on possible influences of EDCs on human mammary glands and also be useful for detection of endocrine disrupting effects of chemicals as part of safety testing....... To improve knowledge on possible influences of endocrine disrupters on female reproductive system, the effects of EDCs on genital malformations in females and the development of mammary glands were studied in the present project. AIMS: The aims for the studies on male and female mammary gland development...... effects on prepubertal female rat mammary glands were observed at lower levels than those affecting other endpoints studied. CONCLUSION: The present findings in rats suggest that EDCs may affect mammary gland development in women and men, although risk assessment including comparison with exposure...

  11. Interruptions disrupt reading comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Cyrus K; Werner, Nicole E; Barragán, Daniela; Boehm-Davis, Deborah A

    2015-06-01

    Previous research suggests that being interrupted while reading a text does not disrupt the later recognition or recall of information from that text. This research is used as support for Ericsson and Kintsch's (1995) long-term working memory (LT-WM) theory, which posits that disruptions while reading (e.g., interruptions) do not impair subsequent text comprehension. However, to fully comprehend a text, individuals may need to do more than recognize or recall information that has been presented in the text at a later time. Reading comprehension often requires individuals to connect and synthesize information across a text (e.g., successfully identifying complex topics such as themes and tones) and not just make a familiarity-based decision (i.e., recognition). The goal for this study was to determine whether interruptions while reading disrupt reading comprehension when the questions assessing comprehension require participants to connect and synthesize information across the passage. In Experiment 1, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension. In Experiment 2, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension but not recognition of information from the text. In Experiment 3, the addition of a 15-s time-out prior to the interruption successfully removed these negative effects. These data suggest that the time it takes to process the information needed to successfully comprehend text when reading is greater than that required for recognition. Any interference (e.g., an interruption) that occurs during the comprehension process may disrupt reading comprehension. This evidence supports the need for transient activation of information in working memory for successful text comprehension and does not support LT-WM theory. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Serum selenium level and risk of lung cancer mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suadicani, P; Hein, H O; Gyntelberg, F

    2011-01-01

    Serum selenium has been implicated as a risk factor for lung cancer, but the issue remains unsettled. We tested in a cohort of 3,333 males aged 53 to 74 years the hypothesis that a low serum selenium would be associated with an increased risk of lung cancer mortality.During 16 years, 167 subjects(5.......1%) died from lung cancer; 48 males (5.0%) among males with low serum selenium, 0.4-1.0 μmol·l(-1), n=965, 57 males (5.1%) among males with medium serum selenium, 1.1-1.2 μmol·l(-1), n=1,141, and 62 males (5.1%) among males with high serum selenium, 1.3-3.0 μmol·l(-1), n=1,227. After adjustment for age...... (chronic bronchitis and peak flow), referencing the lowest level of serum selenium HRs were 1.17(0.79-1.75), and 1.43(0.96-2.14), respectively. Among heavy smokers a high serum selenium was associated with a significantly increased risk of lung cancer mortality after taking into account all potential...

  13. Selenium impacts on razorback sucker, Colorado: Colorado River: III. Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, S.J.; Holley, K.M.; Buhl, K.J.; Bullard, F.A.

    2005-01-01

    Razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) larvae from adults exposed to selenium at three sites near Grand Junction, Colorado, for 9 months were used in a 30-day waterborne and dietary selenium study. Selenium concentrations in water averaged brine shrimp, 5.6 ??g/g in zooplankton from Horsethief east wetland, 20 ??g/g in zooplankton from Adobe Creek, and 39 ??g/g in zooplankton from North Pond. The lowest survival occurred in larvae fed zooplankton rather than brine shrimp. Survival of larvae at Adobe Creek and North Pond was lower in site water than in reference water. Survival of brood stock larvae was higher than Horsethief larvae even though they received the same water and dietary treatments. Arsenic concentrations in brine shrimp may have resulted in an antagonistic interaction with selenium and reduced adverse effects in larvae. Deformities in larvae from North Pond were similar to those reported for selenium-induced teratogenic deformities in other fish species. Selenium concentrations of ???4.6 ??g/g in food resulted in rapid mortality of larvae from Horsethief, Adobe Creek, and North Pond, and suggested that selenium toxicity in the Colorado River could limit recovery of this endangered fish.

  14. Serum Selenium and Ceruloplasmin in Nigerians with Peripartum Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamilu M. Karaye

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to determine if selenium deficiency, serum ceruloplasmin and traditional birth practices are risk factors for peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM, in Kano, Nigeria. This is a case-control study carried out in three hospitals, and PPCM patients were followed up for six months. Critically low serum selenium concentration was defined as <70 µg/L. A total of 39 PPCM patients and 50 controls were consecutively recruited after satisfying the inclusion criteria. Mean serum selenium in patients (61.7 ± 14.9 µg/L was significantly lower than in controls (118.4 ± 45.6 µg/L (p < 0.001. The prevalence of serum selenium <70 µg/L was significantly higher among patients (76.9% than controls (22.0% (p < 0.001. The mean ceruloplasmin and prevalence of socio-economic indices, multiparity, pregnancy-induced hypertension, obesity and twin pregnancy were not different between the groups (p > 0.05. Logistic regression showed that rural residency significantly increased the odds for serum selenium <70 µg/L by 2.773-fold (p = 0.037. Baseline serum levels of selenium and ceruloplasmin were not associated with six-month mortality. This study has shown that selenium deficiency is a risk factor for PPCM in Kano, Nigeria, and is related to rural residency. However, serum ceruloplasmin, customary birth practices and some other characteristics were not associated with PPCM in the study area.

  15. The role of selenium in human conception and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieczyńska, Joanna; Grajeta, Halina

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is a trace element essential for the appropriate course of vital processes in the human body. It is also a constituent of the active center of glutathione peroxidase that protects cellular membranes against the adverse effects of H2O2 lipid peroxides. Epidemiological surveys have demonstrated that selenium deficiency in the body may contribute to an increased risk for certain neoplasmic diseases (including colonic carcinoma, gastric carcinoma, pulmonary carcinoma and prostate carcinoma), as well as diseases of the cardiovascular, osseous and nervous systems. Apart from its cancer prevention and antioxidative activities, selenium protects the body against detrimental effects of heavy metals and determines the proper functioning of the immunological system. Furthermore, selenium plays a significant role in the undisturbed functioning of the reproductive system. Many studies have addressed correlations between its intake and fertility as well as disorders of procreation processes. Selenium deficiencies may lead to gestational complications, miscarriages and the damaging of the nervous and immune systems of the fetus. A low concentration of selenium in blood serum in the early stage of pregnancy has been proved to be a predictor of low birth weight of a newborn. A deficiency of this element may also cause infertility in men by causing a deterioration in the quality of semen and in sperm motility. For this reason, supplementation in the case of selenium deficiencies in the procreation period of both women and men is of utmost significance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Selenium Nanoparticles for Stress-Resilient Fish and Livestock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Biplab; Bhattacharjee, Surajit; Daware, Akshay; Tribedi, Prosun; Krishnani, K. K.; Minhas, P. S.

    2015-09-01

    The fisheries and livestock sectors capture the highest share of protein-rich animal food and demonstrate accelerated growth as an agriculture subsidiary. Environmental pollution, climate change, as well as pathogenic invasions exert increasing stress impacts that lead the productivity momentum at a crossroads. Oxidative stress is the most common form of stress phenomenon responsible for the retardation of productivity in fisheries and livestock. Essential micronutrients play a determinant role in combating oxidative stress. Selenium, one of the essential micronutrients, appears as a potent antioxidant with reduced toxicity in its nanoscale form. In the present review, different methods of synthesis and characterization of nanoscale selenium have been discussed. The functional characterization of nano-selenium in terms of its effect on growth patterns, feed digestibility, and reproductive system has been discussed to elucidate the mechanism of action. Moreover, its anti-carcinogenic and antioxidant potentiality, antimicrobial and immunomodulatory efficacy, and fatty acid reduction in liver have been deciphered as the new phenomena of nano-selenium application. Biologically synthesized nano-selenium raises hope for pharmacologically enriched, naturally stable nanoscale selenium with high ecological viability. Hence, nano-selenium can be administered with commercial feeds for improvising stress resilience and productivity of fish and livestock.

  17. Iodine and Selenium Intakes of Postmenopausal Women in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brough, Louise; Gunn, Caroline A; Weber, Janet L; Coad, Jane; Jin, Ying; Thomson, Jasmine S; Mauze, Mathilde; Kruger, Marlena C

    2017-03-09

    Iodine and selenium are required for thyroid function. This study investigated iodine and selenium intakes in healthy, women aged 50-70 years (n = 97) from three cities in the North Island of New Zealand, after mandatory fortification of bread with iodised salt. Iodine and selenium concentrations were determined in 24-h urine samples; daily intakes were extrapolated from amounts in urine (90% and 55% of daily intake, respectively). Three day diet diaries (3DDD) also estimated selenium and iodine (excluding iodised salt) intake. Median urinary iodine concentration (UIC) was 57 (41, 78) µg/L, indicating mild iodine deficiency. Estimated median iodine intake based on urine was 138 (100, 172) µg/day, below Recommended Dietary Intake (RDI) (150 µg/day) with 25% below Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) (100 µg/day). Estimated median selenium intake was 50 (36, 71) µg/day based on urine and 45 (36, 68) µg/day using 3DDD, below RDI (60 µg/day) with 49%-55% below EAR (50 µg/day). Median bread intakes were low at 1.8 (1.1, 2.7) serves/day; 25% consumed ≤1 serve/day. Although population iodine intakes improved following mandatory fortification, some had low intakes. Selenium intakes remain low. Further research should investigate thyroid function of low consumers of iodine fortified bread and/or selenium in New Zealand.

  18. Genome-Wide Association Study of Serum Selenium Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Peters

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential trace element and circulating selenium concentrations have been associated with a wide range of diseases. Candidate gene studies suggest that circulating selenium concentrations may be impacted by genetic variation; however, no study has comprehensively investigated this hypothesis. Therefore, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study to identify genetic variants associated with serum selenium concentrations in 1203 European descents from two cohorts: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO Cancer Screening and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI. We tested association between 2,474,333 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and serum selenium concentrations using linear regression models. In the first stage (PLCO 41 SNPs clustered in 15 regions had p < 1 × 10−5. None of these 41 SNPs reached the significant threshold (p = 0.05/15 regions = 0.003 in the second stage (WHI. Three SNPs had p < 0.05 in the second stage (rs1395479 and rs1506807 in 4q34.3/AGA-NEIL3; and rs891684 in 17q24.3/SLC39A11 and had p between 2.62 × 10−7 and 4.04 × 10−7 in the combined analysis (PLCO + WHI. Additional studies are needed to replicate these findings. Identification of genetic variation that impacts selenium concentrations may contribute to a better understanding of which genes regulate circulating selenium concentrations.

  19. Selenium Effect on Oxidative Stress Factors in Septic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmira Zolali

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Severe oxidative stress is an important event that occurs in patients with sepsis. The body has extensive and multiple defense mechanisms against the reactive oxygen species (ROS produced during inflammation and sepsis. One of these mechanisms includes a group of enzymes that utilize selenium as their cofactor. The purpose of this study is investigating of Selenium effect on oxidative stress factors in animal model of sepsis. Methods: Sepsis was induced by caecal ligation and puncture (CLP method. 30 Male Wistar rats were divided into following groups: sham group; CLP group; 100 μg/kg Selenium- treated CLP group. 12 hours after inducing sepsis animals were killed and lungs were removed. One of the lungs was frozen in liquid nitrogen and kept at -70°C for enzymatic activity analysis and the other was kept in formalin 10% until tissue section preparation performed for histopathological studies. Results: The Myeloperoxidase (MPO activity was decreased in Selenium- treated CLP group. Inflammation score of lung tissue was lowered in Selenium- treated CLP group, but it wasn’t statically significant. Level of glutathione peroxidase (GPx was higher in CLP and Selenium- treated CLP groups. Conclusion: It seems that Selenium has protective effect on lung inflammation during acute lung injury. Also it may improve some stress oxidative profile during CLP model of sepsis.

  20. Selenium compound protects corneal epithelium against oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Higuchi

    Full Text Available The ocular surface is strongly affected by oxidative stress, and anti-oxidative systems are maintained in corneal epithelial cells and tear fluid. Dry eye is recognized as an oxidative stress-induced disease. Selenium compound eye drops are expected to be a candidate for the treatment of dry eye. We estimated the efficacy of several selenium compounds in the treatment of dry eye using a dry eye rat model. All of the studied selenium compounds were uptaken into corneal epithelial cells in vitro. However, when the selenium compounds were administered as eye drops in the dry eye rat model, most of the selenium compounds did not show effectiveness except for Se-lactoferrin. Se-lactoferrin is a lactoferrin that we prepared that binds selenium instead of iron. Se-lactoferrin eye drops suppressed the up-regulated expression of heme oxygenase-1, cyclooxygenase-2, matrix metallopeptidase-9, and interleukin-6 and also suppressed 8-OHdG production in the cornea induced by surgical removal of the lacrimal glands. Compared with Se-lactoferrin, apolactoferrin eye drops weakly improved dry eye in high dose. The effect of Se-lactoferrin eye drops on dry eye is possibly due to the effect of selenium and also the effect of apolactoferrin. Se-lactoferrin is a candidate for the treatment of dry eye via regulation of oxidative stress in the corneal epithelium.

  1. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Mahesh M.; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used “over the counter” sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to understand how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models, and a combination of multi-disciplinary experimental methodologies to examine and understand anatomical and cellular substrates mediating the effects of acute and chronic alcohol exposure on sleep-wakefulness. The results of our studies suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol’s action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Lesions of the BF cholinergic neurons or blockade of AD A1 receptors results in attenuation of alcohol-induced sleep promotion, suggesting that AD and BF cholinergic neurons are critical for sleep-promoting effects of alcohol. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern

  2. Biofortification and phytoremediation of selenium in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilin eWu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Selenium (Se is an essential trace element for humans and animals but at high concentrations, Se becomes toxic to organisms due to Se replacing sulfur in proteins. Selenium biofortification is an agricultural process that increases the accumulation of Se in crops, through plant breeding, genetic engineering, or use of Se fertilizers. While Se phytoremediation is a green biotechnology to clean up Se-contaminated environments, primarily through phytoextraction and phytovolatilization. By integrating Se phytoremediation and biofortification technologies, Se-enriched plant materials harvested from Se phytoremediation can be used as Se-enriched green manures or other supplementary sources of Se for producing Se-biofortified agricultural products. Earlier studies primarily aimed at enhancing efficacy of phytoremediation and biofortification of Se based on natural variation in progenitor or identification of unique plant species. In this review, we discuss promising approaches to improve biofortification and phytoremediation of Se using knowledge acquired from model crops. We also explored the feasibility of applying biotechnologies such as inoculation of microbial strains for improving the efficiency of biofortification and phytoremediation of Se. The key research and practical challenges that remain in improving biofortification and phytoremediation of Se have been highlighted, and the future development and uses of Se-biofortified agricultural products in China has also been discussed.

  3. Bacterial respiration of arsenic and selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J.F.; Oremland, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    Oxyanions of arsenic and selenium can be used in microbial anaerobic respiration as terminal electron acceptors. The detection of arsenate and selenate respiring bacteria in numerous pristine and contaminated environments and their rapid appearance in enrichment culture suggest that they are widespread and metabolically active in nature. Although the bacterial species that have been isolated and characterized are still few in number, they are scattered throughout the bacterial domain and include Gram- positive bacteria, beta, gamma and epsilon Proteobacteria and the sole member of a deeply branching lineage of the bacteria, Chrysiogenes arsenatus. The oxidation of a number of organic substrates (i.e. acetate, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, ethanol) or hydrogen can be coupled to the reduction of arsenate and selenate, but the actual donor used varies from species to species. Both periplasmic and membrane-associated arsenate and selenate reductases have been characterized. Although the number of subunits and molecular masses differs, they all contain molybdenum. The extent of the environmental impact on the transformation and mobilization of arsenic and selenium by microbial dissimilatory processes is only now being fully appreciated.

  4. Selenium for the prevention of cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Pamela B; Fain, Heidi D; Cassidy, James P; Tran, Sally M; Moos, Philip J; Boucher, Kenneth M; Gerads, Russell; Florell, Scott R; Grossman, Douglas; Leachman, Sancy A

    2013-03-07

    The role of selenium (Se) supplementation in cancer prevention is controversial; effects often depend on the nutritional status of the subject and on the chemical form in which Se is provided. We used a combination of in vitro and in vivo models to study two unique therapeutic windows for intervention in the process of cutaneous melanomagenisis, and to examine the utility of two different chemical forms of Se for prevention and treatment of melanoma. We studied the effects of Se in vitro on UV-induced oxidative stress in melanocytes, and on apoptosis and cell cycle progression in melanoma cells. In vivo, we used the HGF transgenic mouse model of UV-induced melanoma to demonstrate that topical treatment with l-selenomethionine results in a significant delay in the time required for UV-induced melanoma development, but also increases the rate of growth of those tumors once they appear. In a second mouse model, we found that oral administration of high dose methylseleninic acid significantly decreases the size of human melanoma xenografts. Our findings suggest that modestly elevation of selenium levels in the skin might risk acceleration of growth of incipient tumors. Additionally, certain Se compounds administered at very high doses could have utility for the treatment of fully-malignant tumors or prevention of recurrence.

  5. Selenium for the Prevention of Cutaneous Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Grossman

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of selenium (Se supplementation in cancer prevention is controversial; effects often depend on the nutritional status of the subject and on the chemical form in which Se is provided. We used a combination of in vitro and in vivo models to study two unique therapeutic windows for intervention in the process of cutaneous melanomagenisis, and to examine the utility of two different chemical forms of Se for prevention and treatment of melanoma. We studied the effects of Se in vitro on UV-induced oxidative stress in melanocytes, and on apoptosis and cell cycle progression in melanoma cells. In vivo, we used the HGF transgenic mouse model of UV-induced melanoma to demonstrate that topical treatment with l-selenomethionine results in a significant delay in the time required for UV-induced melanoma development, but also increases the rate of growth of those tumors once they appear. In a second mouse model, we found that oral administration of high dose methylseleninic acid significantly decreases the size of human melanoma xenografts. Our findings suggest that modestly elevation of selenium levels in the skin might risk acceleration of growth of incipient tumors. Additionally, certain Se compounds administered at very high doses could have utility for the treatment of fully-malignant tumors or prevention of recurrence.

  6. Biogenesis of Selenium Nanoparticles Using Green Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoeibi, Sara; Mozdziak, Paul; Golkar-Narenji, Afsaneh

    2017-11-09

    Selenium binds some enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase, which may be activated in biological infections and oxidative stress. Chemical and physical methods for synthesizing nanoparticles, apart from being expensive, have their own particular risks. However, nanoparticle synthesis through green chemistry is a safe procedure that different biological sources such as bacteria, fungi, yeasts, algae and plants can be the catalyst bed for processing. Synthesis of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) by macro/microorganisms causes variation in morphology and shape of the particles is due to diversity of reduction enzymes in organisms. Reducing enzymes of microorganisms by changing the status of redox convert metal ions (Se 2- ) to SeNPs without charge (Se 0 ). Biological activity of SeNPs includes their protective role against DNA oxidation. Because of the biological and industrial properties, SeNPs have wide applications in the fields of medicine, microelectronic, agriculture and animal husbandry. SeNPs can show strong antimicrobial effects on the growth and proliferation of microorganisms in a dose-dependent manner. The objective of this review is to consider SeNPs applications to various organisms.

  7. Defining the Optimal Selenium Dose for Prostate Cancer Risk Reduction: Insights from the U-Shaped Relationship between Selenium Status, DNA Damage, and Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Emily C. Chiang; Shen, Shuren; Kengeri, Seema S.; Xu, Huiping; Combs, Gerald F.; Morris, J. Steven; Bostwick, David G.; Waters, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Our work in dogs has revealed a U-shaped dose response between selenium status and prostatic DNA damage that remarkably parallels the relationship between dietary selenium and prostate cancer risk in men, suggesting that more selenium is not necessarily better. Herein, we extend this canine work to show that the selenium dose that minimizes prostatic DNA damage also maximizes apoptosis—a cancer-suppressing death switch used by prostatic epithelial cells. These provocative findings suggest a n...

  8. An Introduction to Testing Web Applications with twill and Selenium

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Titus; Huggins, Jason

    2007-01-01

    This Short Cut is an introduction tobuilding automated web tests using twotools, twill and Selenium. twill is a simpleweb scripting language that can be usedto automate web tests, while Selenium isa web testing framework that runs in anybrowser and can be used to test complexweb sites that make extensive use ofJavaScript. The best way to use this Short Cut is torun through the examples. We expectthat within an hour you can start writingyour own functional tests in either twillor Selenium, and within a day you willunderstand most, if not all, of the possibilitiesand the limitations of these t

  9. Selenium Level and Dyslipidemia in Rural Elderly Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Liqin; Gao, Sujuan; Unverzagt, Frederick W.; Cheng, Yibin; Hake, Ann M.; Xin, Pengju; Chen, Chen; Liu, Jingyi; Ma, Feng; Bian, Jianchao; Li, Ping; Jin, Yinlong

    2015-01-01

    Objective Higher selenium level has been hypothesized to have the potential to reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases including dyslipidemia. However, results from previous studies are inconsistent. This study aims to determine the association between selenium level and dyslipidemia in elderly Chinese with relatively low selenium status. Methods A cross-sectional study of 1859 participants aged 65 or older from four rural counties in China was conducted. Serum total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDLC) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDLC), nail selenium concentration and APOE genotype were measured in all subjects. The four types of dyslipidemia were defined as >5.17mmol/L for High-TC, >1.69 mmol/L for High-TG, >3.36 mmol/L for High-LDLC, and selenium levels and the risk of dyslipidemia. Results Mean nail selenium concentration was 0.465μg/gin this sample. Rates for High-TC, High-LDLC, High-TG, Low-HDLC were 18.13%, 13.23%, 12.21% and 32.76% respectively. Results from logistic models indicated that higher selenium levels were significantly associated with higher risk of High-TC, High-LDLC and lower risk of Low-HDLC adjusting for covariates (p selenium quartile group, participants in selenium quartile groups 2, 3 and 4 had significantly higher rates of High-TC, High-LDLC, High-TG, and lower rate of Low-HDLC adjusting for covariates. No significant association was observed between selenium level and the risk of High-TG. APOEε4 carriers had higher rates of High-TC and High-LDLC. There was no interaction between selenium level and APOE with the rates of dyslipidemia. Conclusions Our results suggest long-term selenium exposure level may be associated with the risk of dyslipidemia in elderly population. Future studies are needed to examine the underlying mechanism of the association. PMID:26380972

  10. Selenium Level and Dyslipidemia in Rural Elderly Chinese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqin Su

    Full Text Available Higher selenium level has been hypothesized to have the potential to reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases including dyslipidemia. However, results from previous studies are inconsistent. This study aims to determine the association between selenium level and dyslipidemia in elderly Chinese with relatively low selenium status.A cross-sectional study of 1859 participants aged 65 or older from four rural counties in China was conducted. Serum total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDLC and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDLC, nail selenium concentration and APOE genotype were measured in all subjects. The four types of dyslipidemia were defined as >5.17 mmol/L for High-TC, >1.69 mmol/L for High-TG, >3.36 mmol/L for High-LDLC, and <1.04 mmol/L for Low-HDLC according to Chinese Guidelines on Prevention and Treatment of Dyslipidemia in Adults. Logistic models adjusting for age, gender, APOE genotype, body mass index, alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, medication use for cardiovascular diseases were used to examine the relationship between selenium levels and the risk of dyslipidemia.Mean nail selenium concentration was 0.465 μg/gin this sample. Rates for High-TC, High-LDLC, High-TG, Low-HDLC were 18.13%, 13.23%, 12.21% and 32.76% respectively. Results from logistic models indicated that higher selenium levels were significantly associated with higher risk of High-TC, High-LDLC and lower risk of Low-HDLC adjusting for covariates (p < 0.0001. Compared with the lowest selenium quartile group, participants in selenium quartile groups 2, 3 and 4 had significantly higher rates of High-TC, High-LDLC, High-TG, and lower rate of Low-HDLC adjusting for covariates. No significant association was observed between selenium level and the risk of High-TG. APOEε4 carriers had higher rates of High-TC and High-LDLC. There was no interaction between selenium level and APOE with the rates of

  11. Total selenium and selenium species in irrigation drain inflows to the Salton Sea, California, April and July 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Thomas W.; Walther, Michael J.; Saiki, Michael K.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2007-01-01

    This report presents the results for two sampling periods during a 4-year monitoring survey to provide a characterization of selenium concentrations in selected irrigation drains flowing into the Salton Sea, California. Total selenium, selenium species, and total suspended solids were determined in water samples, and total selenium was determined in sediment, detritus, and biota that included algae, plankton, midge larvae (family, Chironomidae), and two fish species-western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis), and sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna). In addition, sediments were analyzed for percent total organic carbon and particle size. Total selenium concentrations in water for both sampling periods ranged from 1.43 to 47.1 micrograms per liter, predominately as selenate, which is typical of waters leached out of selenium-contaminated marine shales under alkaline and oxidizing conditions. Total selenium concentrations ranged from 0.88 to 20.2 micrograms per gram in biota, and from 0.15 to 28.9 micrograms per gram in detritus and sediment.

  12. A Novel Organic Selenium Compound Exerts Unique Regulation of Selenium Speciation, Selenogenome, and Selenoproteins in Broiler Chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ling; Sun, Lv-Hui; Huang, Jia-Qiang; Briens, Mickael; Qi, De-Sheng; Xu, Shi-Wen; Lei, Xin Gen

    2017-05-01

    Background: A new organic selenium compound, 2-hydroxy-4-methylselenobutanoic acid (SeO), displayed a greater bioavailability than sodium selenite (SeNa) or seleno-yeast (SeY) in several species.Objective: This study sought to determine the regulation of the speciation of selenium, expression of selenogenome and selenocysteine biosynthesis and degradation-related genes, and production of selenoproteins by the 3 forms of selenium in the tissues of broiler chicks.Methods: Day-old male chicks (n = 6 cages/diet, 6 chicks/cage) were fed a selenium-deficient, corn and soy-based diet [base diet (BD), 0.05 mg Se/kg] or the BD + SeNa, SeY, or SeO at 0.2 mg Se/kg for 6 wk. Plasma, livers, and pectoral and thigh muscles were collected at weeks 3 and 6 to assay for total selenium, selenomethionine, selenocysteine, redox status, and selected genes, proteins, and enzymes.Results: Although both SeY and SeO produced greater concentrations (P selenium (20-172%) and of selenomethionine (≤15-fold) in the liver, pectoral muscle, and thigh than those of SeNa, SeO further raised (P selenium depositions, to induce the early expression of Selenos and Mrsb1 mRNA and TXRND activity, and to enhance the protein production of GPX4, SELENOP, and SELENOU in the tissues of chicks. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Biochemical discrimination between selenium and sulfur 1: a single residue provides selenium specificity to human selenocysteine lyase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruairi Collins

    Full Text Available Selenium and sulfur are two closely related basic elements utilized in nature for a vast array of biochemical reactions. While toxic at higher concentrations, selenium is an essential trace element incorporated into selenoproteins as selenocysteine (Sec, the selenium analogue of cysteine (Cys. Sec lyases (SCLs and Cys desulfurases (CDs catalyze the removal of selenium or sulfur from Sec or Cys and generally act on both substrates. In contrast, human SCL (hSCL is specific for Sec although the only difference between Sec and Cys is the identity of a single atom. The chemical basis of this selenium-over-sulfur discrimination is not understood. Here we describe the X-ray crystal structure of hSCL and identify Asp146 as the key residue that provides the Sec specificity. A D146K variant resulted in loss of Sec specificity and appearance of CD activity. A dynamic active site segment also provides the structural prerequisites for direct product delivery of selenide produced by Sec cleavage, thus avoiding release of reactive selenide species into the cell. We thus here define a molecular determinant for enzymatic specificity discrimination between a single selenium versus sulfur atom, elements with very similar chemical properties. Our findings thus provide molecular insights into a key level of control in human selenium and selenoprotein turnover and metabolism.

  14. Sustainable Disruption Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaaben, Bo Valdemar

    in the same way, when operation is disrupted. Never the less, we may recall that the Suez Canal was closed due to riots in Egypt, that the fuel price was impacted by threats of closing of the Strait of Hormuz, and we do from time to time hear about acts of piracy outside the coast of Somalia. All...

  15. Effects of Dietary Selenium, Sulphur and Copper Levels on Selenium Concentration in the Serum and Liver of Lamb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlindo Saran Netto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-two lambs were distributed in eight treatments under 2×2×2 factorial experiment to compare the effects of two levels of selenium (0.2 to 5 mg/kg dry matter [DM], sulphur (0.25% and 0.37% and copper (8 and 25 mg/kg DM levels on selenium concentration in liver and serum of lambs. A liver biopsy was done on all animals and blood samples were collected from the jugular vein prior to the beginning of the treatments. The blood was sampled every thirty days and the liver was sampled after 90 days, at the slaughter. Increasing differences were noticed during the data collection period for the serum selenium concentration, and it was found to be 0.667 mg/L in animals fed with 5 mg Se/kg DM and normal sulphur and copper concentrations in their diet. However, a three-way interaction and a reduction of selenium concentration to 0.483 mg/L was verified when increasing copper and sulphur concentration levels to 25 ppm and 0.37% respectively. The liver selenium concentration was also high for diets containing higher selenium concentrations, but the antagonist effect with the increased copper and sulphur levels remained, due to interactions between these minerals. Therefore, for regions where selenium is scarce, increasing its concentration in animal diets can be an interesting option. For regions with higher levels of selenium, the antagonistic effect of interaction between these three minerals should be used by increasing copper and sulphur dietary concentrations, thus preventing possible selenium poisoning.

  16. Bio-transformation of selenium in Se-enriched bacterial strains of Lactobacillus casei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurek, Eliza; Ruszczyńska, Anna; Wojciechowski, Marcin; Łuciuk, Anna; Michalska-Kacymirow, Magdalena; Motyl, Ilona; Bulska, Ewa

    Selenium is an element of very great importance for the proper functioning of the human body, mainly due to its antioxidant properties. Selenium exhibits a preventive effect in the case of cardiovascular disease, the immune system, male infertility and inhibits the toxic action of other agents. Selenium is important for Hashimoto's disease. Intake of selenium in the diet slows the aging process. The biological and toxicological effects of selenium strongly depend on its chemical form. Some organisms for example: plant, yeast, are capable of metabolizing low bioavailable selenium compounds (inorganic selenium) into its high bioavailable forms (organic selenium). The aim of this study was to investigate the bio-transformation of selenium by Lactobacillus bacteria towards the characterisation of selenium metabolites. The speciation of selenium was evaluated by high performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry detector. The extraction of selenium species from lyophilized bacteria was executed with water, the mixture of lipase and protease, as well as lisozyme and sodium dodecyl sulphate. All investigated bacteria strains cultivated in the presence of Na2SeO3 effectively uptake selenium. Surprisingly, none of the applied extraction media exhibited a strong power to release the majority of the uptaken selenium compounds. Thus a maximum of 10% of the selenium was extracted from bacteria exposed to the enzymes. However, it was found that Lactobacillus bacteria are able to metabolize inorganic ions of selenium (IV) into Se-methionine, Se-methyloselenocysteine and other unidentified forms. The study confirmed the ability of probiotic bacteria to biotransform inorganic selenium into its organic derivatives. Therefore, Se-enriched bacteria can be considered as an addition to the functional food. selenium speciation, extraction procedure, Lactobacillus casei bacteria, Lactic acid bacteria (LAB), HPLC ICP-MS, functional food.

  17. Selenium in aquatic habitats at Imperial National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — During 1991 and 1992, selenium levels were studied in aquatic communities at Imperial National Wildlife Refuge on the lower Colorado River. Composite samples of...

  18. Early development of selenium-induced cataract: slit lamp evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, T R; Anderson, R S; Britton, J L; Palmer, E A

    1983-06-01

    The purpose of our research was to document early lenticular changes preceding cataract formation in rats receiving an elevated dose of selenium. The following stages were observed after selenium injection: Stage 1 (13-24 hr post-injection), formation of posterior equatorial subcapsular cataract (PESC); Stage 2 (24-72 hr), decline of the PESC, development of a prominent 'washer' shaped change in the refraction of the cortex, and first appearance of swollen fibers around the nucleus; Stage 3 (three to five days), appearance of bilateral dense central nuclear cataracts and further development of perinuclear swollen fibers; Stage 4 (five to 10 days), some nuclear cataracts became more opaque and/or angular. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the initial site of action of selenium in nuclear cataract formation is not in the lens nucleus. Rather, selenium causes early changes outside the nucleus, which are followed by nuclear cataracts.

  19. BACTERIAL RESPIRATION OF ARSENIC AND SELENIUM. (R826105)

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractOxyanions of arsenic and selenium can be used in microbial anaerobic respiration as terminal electron acceptors. The detection of arsenate and selenate respiring bacteria in numerous pristine and contaminated environments and their rapid appearance in enrichme...

  20. Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arsenic, chromium, copper, iron, manganese, lead, selenium and zinc in the tissues of the largemouth yellowfish, Labeobarbus kimberleyensis (Gilchrist and Thompson, 1913), from the Vaal Dam, South Africa, and associated consumption risks.

  1. Concentrations of plasma copper and zinc and blood selenium in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Human and Animal Physiology, University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch 7600, ... Concentrations of plasma copper and zinc as well as blood selenium were determined in ..... metabolism: Current aspects in health and disease.

  2. Union Slough National Wildlife Refuge, Iowa: Avian selenium study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 2006 and 2007, we tested selenium concentrations in the eggs and nestling carcasses of tree swallows attracted to artificial nest boxes installed around Union...

  3. Mixed Surfactant Template Method for Preparation of Nanometer Selenium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Lin Li

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenium nanoparticles have been synthesized in an aqueous solution by using sodium dodecyl sulfate and polyvinyl alcohol as a soft template. The factors on synthesis, such as reaction time, concentration of reactants and ultrasonic irradiation were studied. The uniform stable selenium nanospheres were obstained in the conditions of 1.0 (mass fraction sodium dodecyl sulfate, 1.0 (mass fraction polyvinyl alcohol, n(Vc:n(H2SeO3=7:1 and 7 minutes after the initiation of the reaction at room temperature. The average particle size of selenium is about 30 nm. The product was characterized by UV and TEM. Finally the applications of the red element nanometer selenium in anti-older cosmetics are presented.

  4. Mercury and selenium levels, and selenium:mercury molar ratios of brain, muscle and other tissues in bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) from New Jersey, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Jeitner, Christian; Donio, Mark; Pittfield, Taryn; Gochfeld, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A number of contaminants affect fish health, including mercury and selenium, and the selenium: mercury molar ratio. Recently the protective effects of selenium on methylmercury toxicity have been publicized, particularly for consumption of saltwater fish. Yet the relative ameliorating effects of selenium on toxicity within fish have not been examined, nor has the molar ratio in different tissues, (i.e. brain). We examined mercury and selenium levels in brain, kidney, liver, red and white muscle, and skin and scales in bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) from New Jersey to determine whether there were toxic levels of either metal, and we computed the selenium: mercury molar ratios by tissues. Total mercury averaged 0.32 ± 0.02 ppm wet weight in edible muscle and 0.09 ± 0.01 ppm in brain. Selenium concentration averaged 0.37 ± 0.03 in muscle and 0.36 ± 0.03 ppm in brain. There were significant differences in levels of mercury, selenium, and selenium: mercury molar ratios, among tissues. Mercury and selenium levels were correlated in kidney and skin/scales. Mercury levels were highest in kidney, intermediate in muscle and liver, and lowest in brain and skin/scales; selenium levels were also highest in kidney, intermediate in liver, and were an order of magnitude lower in the white muscle and brain. Mercury levels in muscle, kidney and skin/scales were positively correlated with fish size (length). Selenium levels in muscle, kidney and liver were positively correlated with fish length, but in brain; selenium levels were negatively correlated with fish length. The selenium: mercury molar ratio was negatively correlated with fish length for white muscle, liver, kidney, and brain, particularly for fish over 50 cm in length, suggesting that older fish experience less protective advantages of selenium against mercury toxicity than smaller fish, and that consumers of bluefish similarly receive less advantage from eating larger fish. PMID:23202378

  5. Selenium and lung cancer: a systematic review and meta analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Fritz

    Full Text Available Selenium is a natural health product widely used in the treatment and prevention of lung cancers, but large chemoprevention trials have yielded conflicting results. We conducted a systematic review of selenium for lung cancers, and assessed potential interactions with conventional therapies.Two independent reviewers searched six databases from inception to March 2009 for evidence pertaining to the safety and efficacy of selenium for lung cancers. Pubmed and EMBASE were searched to October 2009 for evidence on interactions with chemo- or radiation-therapy. In the efficacy analysis there were nine reports of five RCTs and two biomarker-based studies, 29 reports of 26 observational studies, and 41 preclinical studies. Fifteen human studies, one case report, and 36 preclinical studies were included in the interactions analysis. Based on available evidence, there appears to be a different chemopreventive effect dependent on baseline selenium status, such that selenium supplementation may reduce risk of lung cancers in populations with lower baseline selenium status (serum<106 ng/mL, but increase risk of lung cancers in those with higher selenium (≥ 121.6 ng/mL. Pooling data from two trials yielded no impact to odds of lung cancer, OR 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.61-1.43; other cancers that were the primary endpoints of these trials, OR 1.51 (95%CI 0.70-3.24; and all-cause-death, OR 0.93 (95%CI 0.79-1.10. In the treatment of lung cancers, selenium may reduce cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and side effects associated with radiation therapy.Selenium may be effective for lung cancer prevention among individuals with lower selenium status, but at present should not be used as a general strategy for lung cancer prevention. Although promising, more evidence on the ability of selenium to reduce cisplatin and radiation therapy toxicity is required to ensure that therapeutic efficacy is maintained before any broad clinical recommendations can be made in

  6. Biomarkers of selenium status in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zelst, Mariëlle; Hesta, Myriam; Gray, Kerry; Staunton, Ruth; Du Laing, Gijs; Janssens, Geert P J

    2016-01-19

    Inadequate dietary selenium (Se) intake in humans and animals can lead to long term health problems, such as cancer. In view of the owner's desire for healthy longevity of companion animals, the impact of dietary Se provision on long term health effects warrants investigation. Little is currently known regards biomarkers, and rate of change of such biomarkers in relation to dietary selenium intake in dogs. In this study, selected biomarkers were assessed for their suitability to detect changes in dietary Se in adult dogs within eight weeks. Twenty-four dogs were fed a semi-purified diet with an adequate amount of Se (46.1 μg/MJ) over an 8 week period. They were then divided into two groups. The first group remained on the adequate Se diet, the second were offered a semi-purified diet with a low Se concentration (6.5 μg/MJ; 31% of the FEDIAF minimum) for 8 weeks. Weekly urine and blood was collected and hair growth measurements were performed. The urinary Se to creatinine ratio and serum Se concentration were significantly lower in dogs consuming the low Se diet from week 1 onwards, by 84% (adequate 25.3, low 4.1) and 7% (adequate 257 μg/L, low 238 μg/L) respectively. Serum and whole blood glutathione peroxidase were also significantly lower in dogs consuming the low Se diet from weeks 6 and 8 respectively. None of the other biomarkers (mRNA expression and serum copper, creatine kinase, triiodothyronine:thyroxine ratio and hair growth) responded significantly to the low Se diet over the 8 week period. This study demonstrated that urinary Se to creatinine ratio, serum Se and serum and whole blood glutathione peroxidase can be used as biomarkers of selenium status in dogs. Urinary Se to creatinine ratio and serum Se concentrations responded faster to decreased dietary Se than the other parameters. This makes these biomarkers candidates for early screening of long term effects of dietary Se provision on canine health.

  7. Effect of organic and inorganic selenium supplementation on growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ninety-six thousand one-day-old AA broilers were randomly assigned to two groups, 5 replicates in each group, and 9,600 chickens for each replicate. In the control group, 0.3 part per million (ppm) inorganic selenium (Na2SeO3) was added to the diets; while in the experimental group, 0.3 ppm organic selenium ...

  8. Effects of selenium biofortification on crop nutritional quality

    OpenAIRE

    Mario eMalagoli; Michela eSchiavon; Stefano eDall'Acqua; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se) at very low doses has crucial functions in humans and animals. Since plants represent the main dietary source of this element, Se-containing crops may be used as a means to deliver Se to consumers (biofortification). Several strategies have been exploited to increase plant Se content. Selenium assimilation in plants affects both sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) metabolic pathways, which is why recent research has also focused on the effect of Se fertilization on the production of S- ...

  9. Selenium transformation in coal mine spoils: Its environmental impact assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harness, J.; Atalay, A.; Koll, K.J.; Zhang, H.; Maggon, D.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this program was to conduct an environmental impact assessment study for selenium from coal mine spoils. The use of in-situ lysimetry to predict selenium speciation, transformation, and mobility under natural conditions was evaluated. The scope of the study was to construct and test field-scale lysimeter and laboratory mini-column to assess mobility and speciation of selenium in coal mine overburden and soil systems; to conduct soil and groundwater sampling throughout the state of Oklahoma for an overall environmental impact assessment of selenium; and to conduct an in-depth literature review on the solubility, speciation, mobility, and toxicity of selenium from various sources. Groundwater and surface soil samples were also collected from each county in Oklahoma. Data collected from the lysimeter study indicated that selenium in the overburden of the abandoned mine site was mainly found in the selenite form. The amount of selenite found was too low and immobile to be of concern to the environment. The spoil had equilibrated long enough (over 50 years) that most of the soluble forms of selenium have already been lost. Examination of the overburden indicated the presence of pyrite crystals that precipitated over time. The laboratory mini-column study indicated that selenite is quite immobile and remained on the overburden material even after leaching with dilute acid. Data from groundwater samples indicated that based on the current permissible level for selenium in groundwater (0.01 mg Se/L), Oklahoma groundwater is widely contaminated with the element. However, according to the new regulation (0.05 mg Se/L), which is to be promulgated in 1992, only 9 of the 77 counties in the state exceed the limit.

  10. Study of damages induced by fungicide propiconazole on testicular tissue and process of spermatogenesis and protective effects of selenium in male Sprague Dawley rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Mohsenikouchesfehani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Propiconazole is an herbal fungicide which is used as a tropical and systematic drug for fungal infection and also as an agricultural chemical for protection and preservation of fruits, vegetables and grains. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of fungicides propiconazol and possible protective effects of selenium on testes tissue. Methods: The present expremental trail study was conducted on forty rats which were divided into ten groups of four including control , sham (solvent of propiconazole, distilled water, solvent of selenium (normal saline and seven experimental groups : group 1 received 0.5 mg/kg/day of selenium, groups 2,3,4 received three doses of 10,50,75 mg/kg/day of Propiconazole, and groups 5,6,7 received three doses of 10, 50, 75 mg/kg/day of propiconazole with 0.5 mg/kg/day of selenium toevaluate. The administration was done intrapritoneal for two weeks in an alternatively fashion. After determining the level of LH, FSH, Testosterone, sperm was counted by hemocitometer. Data were analyzed by the SPSS software using ANOVA test. Results: No significant differences was observed in the level of hormones in the experimental groups2-7 compared with the control group, but the number of sertoli cells, spermatogonia , primary spermatocyte , spermatid and sperm decreased significantly in comparison with the control group (p<0.05. Conclusion: The decrease in numbers of counted sperm indicates that propiconazole has disrupted the production process of these cells and selenium was unable to improve that.

  11. Nuclear-based methods for the study of selenium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spyrou, N.M.; Akanle, O.A.; Dhani, A. (Univ. of Surrey (England))

    1988-01-01

    The essentiality of selenium to the human being and in particular its deficiency state, associated with prolonged inadequate dietary intake, have received considerable attention. In addition, the possible relationship between selenium and cancer and the claim that selenium may possess cancer-prevention properties have focused research effort. It has been observed in a number of studies on laboratory animals that selenium supplementation protects the animals against carcinogen-induced neoplastic growth in various organ sites, reduces the incidence of spontaneous mammary tumors, and suppresses the growth of transplanted tumor cells. In these research programs on the relationship between trace element levels and senile dementia and depression and the elemental changes in blood associated with selenium supplementation in a normal group of volunteers, it became obvious that in addition to establishing normal levels of elements in the population of interest, there was a more fundamental requirement for methods to be developed that would allow the study of the distribution of selenium in the body and its binding sites. The authors propose emission tomography and perturbed angular correlation as techniques worth exploring.

  12. Selenium biochemistry and its role for human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Marco; Jitaru, Petru; Barbante, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Despite its very low level in humans, selenium plays an important and unique role among the (semi)metal trace essential elements because it is the only one for which incorporation into proteins is genetically encoded, as the constitutive part of the 21st amino acid, selenocysteine. Twenty-five selenoproteins have been identified so far in the human proteome. The biological functions of some of them are still unknown, whereas for others there is evidence for a role in antioxidant defence, redox state regulation and a wide variety of specific metabolic pathways. In relation to these functions, the selenoproteins emerged in recent years as possible biomarkers of several diseases such as diabetes and several forms of cancer. Comprehension of the selenium biochemical pathways under normal physiological conditions is therefore an important requisite to elucidate its preventing/therapeutic effect for human diseases. This review summarizes the most recent findings on the biochemistry of active selenium species in humans, and addresses the latest evidence on the link between selenium intake, selenoproteins functionality and beneficial health effects. Primary emphasis is given to the interpretation of biochemical mechanisms rather than epidemiological/observational data. In this context, the review includes the following sections: (1) brief introduction; (2) general nutritional aspects of selenium; (3) global view of selenium metabolic routes; (4) detailed characterization of all human selenoproteins; (5) detailed discussion of the relation between selenoproteins and a variety of human diseases.

  13. Selenium concentrations of selected medicinal and aromatic plants in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkutlu, Faruk; Sekeroglu, Nazim; Koca, Ufuk; Yazici, Gizem

    2011-10-01

    Recent scientific studies have proven the importance of trace elements on human health. The main food supplies are plants and animals, which are significant sources of these minerals. Studies on determining mineral compositions of herbs, spices and some other crops have increased all over the world. Published works revealed that spices, herbs and medicinal plants should be consumed to obtain beneficial trace elements. Selenium (Se), one of the most vital trace elements, has a significant role in human diet acting as a preventative agent against some serious illnesses. Despite numerous scientific works on mineral compositions of medicinal and aromatic plants, investigations of selenium content in these foods could not be successfully studied until recently due to the lack of suitable analytical methods for selenium analysis. Thus, publications on selenium concentrations of foods are recent. In this regard, selenium contents of some medicinal and aromatic plants commonly used as spices, herbal teas and traditional medicines in Turkey were studied in the present research. Selenium contents of the most used parts of these plants were analyzed by ICP-OES (Varian Vista-Pro, Australia). Of the analyzed 26 medicinal and aromatic plants, the highest Se concentration (1133 microg kg-1) was found in sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) and the lowest in sumac (Rhus coriaria L.) fruits (11 microg kg(-1)).

  14. Selenium suppresses leukemia through the action of endogenous eicosanoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Ujjawal H; Kaushal, Naveen; Hegde, Shailaja; Finch, Emily R; Kudva, Avinash K; Kennett, Mary J; Jordan, Craig T; Paulson, Robert F; Prabhu, K Sandeep

    2014-07-15

    Eradicating cancer stem-like cells (CSC) may be essential to fully eradicate cancer. Metabolic changes in CSC could hold a key to their targeting. Here, we report that the dietary micronutrient selenium can trigger apoptosis of CSC derived from chronic or acute myelogenous leukemias when administered at supraphysiologic but nontoxic doses. In leukemia CSC, selenium treatment activated ATM-p53-dependent apoptosis accompanied by increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species. Importantly, the same treatment did not trigger apoptosis in hematopoietic stem cells. Serial transplantation studies with BCR-ABL-expressing CSC revealed that the selenium status in mice was a key determinant of CSC survival. Selenium action relied upon the endogenous production of the cyclooxygenase-derived prostaglandins Δ(12)-PGJ2 and 15d-PGJ2. Accordingly, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and NADPH oxidase inhibitors abrogated the ability of selenium to trigger apoptosis in leukemia CSC. Our results reveal how selenium-dependent modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism can be directed to trigger apoptosis of primary human and murine CSC in leukemia. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Vocally disruptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, M K; Kaas, M J; Richie, M F

    1996-11-01

    Vocally disruptive behavior (VDB) is intelligible or unintelligible noise making that may be goal-directed or purposeless. VDB can be conceptualized as a cyclic phenomenon. VDB has been linked to cognitive impairment, poor sleep, requiring assistance with ADLs, and being at high risk for falling. General nursing interventions for VDB include remaining calm, using gentle touch, creating a familiar, home-like environment, and using diversions during ADLs.

  16. Selenium accumulation in the cockle Anadara trapezia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolley, Dianne F. [GEOQUEST, Department of Chemistry, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)]. E-mail: djolley@uow.edu.au; Maher, William A. [Ecochemistry Laboratory, Division of Science and Design, University of Canberra ACT 2601 (Australia); Kyd, Jennelle [Immunological Research Group, Division of Science and Design, University of Canberra ACT 2601 (Australia)

    2004-11-01

    An extensive study on Se accumulation in a population of Anadara trapezia from a marine lake is reported. The effects of organism mass, gender, reproductive cycle, and season on Se accumulation and tissue distribution were investigated. Analyses showed that gender and reproductive cycle had no significant effect on Se accumulation. A. trapezia showed a strong positive correlation between Se burden and tissue mass. Constant Se concentrations were observed within individual populations but varied spatially with sediment Se concentrations. Se concentrations in tissues decreased from gills > gonad/intestine > mantle > muscle > foot, which remained constant over 12 months, however, significantly lower concentrations were observed in the summer compared to winter. A. trapezia is a good biomonitor for Se, as gender and size do not effect concentration, however, season of collection must be reported if changes in Se bioavailability are to be identified in short term studies, or during intersite comparisons. - Capsule: The marine bivalve Anadara trapezia is a good bioindicator for marine selenium contamination.

  17. Determinants of selenium status in healthy adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Selenium (Se) status in non-deficient subjects is typically assessed by the Se contents of plasma/serum. That pool comprises two functional, specific selenoprotein components and at least one non-functional, non-specific components which respond differently to changes in Se intake. A more informative means of characterizing Se status in non-deficient individuals is needed. Methods Multiple biomarkers of Se status (plasma Se, serum selenoprotein P [SEPP1], plasma glutathione peroxidase activity [GPX3], buccal cell Se, urinary Se) were evaluated in relation to selenoprotein genotypes (GPX1, GPX3, SEPP1, SEP15), dietary Se intake, and parameters of single-carbon metabolism in a cohort of healthy, non-Se-deficient men (n = 106) and women (n = 155). Conclusions Plasma Se concentration was 142.0 ± 23.5 ng/ml, with GPX3 and serum-derived SEPP1 calculated to comprise 20% and 34%, respectively, of that total. The balance, comprised of non-specific components, accounted for virtually all of the interindividual variation in total plasma Se. Buccal cell Se was associated with age and plasma homocysteine (hCys), but not plasma Se. SEPP1 showed a quadratic relationship with body mass index, peaking at BMI 25-30. Urinary Se was greater in women than men, and was associated with metabolic body weight (kg0.75), plasma folate, vitamin B12 and hCys (negatively). One GPX1 genotype (679T/T) was associated with significantly lower plasma Se levels than other allelic variants. Selenium intake, estimated from food frequency questionnaires, did not predict Se status as indicated by any biomarker. These results show that genotype, methyl-group status and BMI contribute to variation in Se biomarkers in Se-adequate individuals. PMID:21767397

  18. Determinants of selenium status in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoeg Antonia

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selenium (Se status in non-deficient subjects is typically assessed by the Se contents of plasma/serum. That pool comprises two functional, specific selenoprotein components and at least one non-functional, non-specific components which respond differently to changes in Se intake. A more informative means of characterizing Se status in non-deficient individuals is needed. Methods Multiple biomarkers of Se status (plasma Se, serum selenoprotein P [SEPP1], plasma glutathione peroxidase activity [GPX3], buccal cell Se, urinary Se were evaluated in relation to selenoprotein genotypes (GPX1, GPX3, SEPP1, SEP15, dietary Se intake, and parameters of single-carbon metabolism in a cohort of healthy, non-Se-deficient men (n = 106 and women (n = 155. Conclusions Plasma Se concentration was 142.0 ± 23.5 ng/ml, with GPX3 and serum-derived SEPP1 calculated to comprise 20% and 34%, respectively, of that total. The balance, comprised of non-specific components, accounted for virtually all of the interindividual variation in total plasma Se. Buccal cell Se was associated with age and plasma homocysteine (hCys, but not plasma Se. SEPP1 showed a quadratic relationship with body mass index, peaking at BMI 25-30. Urinary Se was greater in women than men, and was associated with metabolic body weight (kg0.75, plasma folate, vitamin B12 and hCys (negatively. One GPX1 genotype (679T/T was associated with significantly lower plasma Se levels than other allelic variants. Selenium intake, estimated from food frequency questionnaires, did not predict Se status as indicated by any biomarker. These results show that genotype, methyl-group status and BMI contribute to variation in Se biomarkers in Se-adequate individuals.

  19. Copper and selenium supplementation in the diet of Brangus steers on the nutritional characteristics of meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlindo Saran Netto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-eight Brangus cattle were used to determine the effect of copper and selenium supplementation on the carcass characteristics, fatty acid composition of the longissimus dorsi muscle and on the copper and selenium concentrations in the liver. The treatments were: no supplementation of copper or selenium; 2 mg Se/kg DM as sodium selenite; 40 mg Cu/kg DM as copper sulfate; and 2 mg Se/kg DM as sodium selenite and 40 mg Cu/kg DM as copper sulfate. The fat thickness, rib eye area and fatty acid composition of the longissimus dorsi muscle were not affected by treatments. There was no effect on carcass yield and cooling loss with the supplementation of copper, selenium or selenium × copper in the levels studied. For the ether extract concentration in the longissimus dorsi muscle, no differences were found according to the treatments with selenium, copper or selenium × copper. The treatments with selenium and selenium × copper showed higher selenium concentrations in the liver than the control and copper treatments. For the copper concentration in the liver, the copper and selenium × copper treatments showed higher values than the control and selenium treatments. Despite the little effect on the meat composition, the results of this experiment demonstrate no interaction between selenium and copper in the levels studied.

  20. Selenium status in a group of schoolchildren from the region of Madrid, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navia, B; Ortega, R M; Perea, J M; Aparicio, A; López-Sobaler, A M; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, E

    2014-04-01

    To assess the selenium status of a group of schoolchildren from the Region of Madrid, Spain. Study subjects comprised 483 children (216 boys and 267 girls) aged between 8 and 13 years. Selenium intake was determined using a 3-day food record. The foods consumed were transformed into energy and nutrients, and the selenium intake was compared with that recommended. Serum selenium levels were also recorded. Mean (SD) selenium intake [91.0 (25.2) μg day(-1) ] was above the recommended level in 99.4% of subjects; the main dietary sources were cereals, meats, fish and milk products. The serum selenium concentration [mean (SD) 71.1 (14.4) μg L(-1) ], however, was selenium concentration correlated with the selenium intake (r = 0.169; P selenium concentration of selenium intakes than those with a serum concentration of ≥75 μg L(-1) . Although selenium intake was generally above that recommended, the serum selenium concentration of the children could be improved. This could be achieved by increasing the relative consumption of cereals and other selenium rich foods such as fish. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  1. Young children with excess of weight show an impaired selenium status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Rosa M; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Elena; Aparicio, Aránzazu; Jiménez-Ortega, Ana Isabel; Palmeros, Carolina; Perea, José Miguel; Navia, Beatriz; López-Sobaler, Ana María

    2012-04-01

    People who are overweight/obese commonly experience poorer antioxidant protection. The aim of the present study was to determine whether overweight/obesity is associated with children's selenium status. The study subjects were 573 Madrid schoolchildren aged 8 - 13 years. Their selenium intake was monitored via a three-day food record. Serum selenium concentration and blood glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity of each subject was also determined, as was body mass index (BMI). Children with excess of weight (BMI>P85) had lower serum selenium concentrations than those of normal weight (64.6 ± 16.8 µg/L compared to 75.3 ± 12.2 µg/L; p selenium intake was also lower (1.99 ± 0.62 µg/kg compared to 2.73 ± 0.88 µg/kg; p selenium and selenium intake (the best being obtained when intake was measured in µg/kg/day, r = 0.338, p selenium and all the anthropometric variables recorded (the strongest correlation was seen between serum selenium and BMI, r = -0.390, p selenium deficiency (selenium intake [OR = 0.9862 (0.9775 - 0.9949)] and age [OR = 0.6813 (0.5434 - 0.8542)] (p selenium and GPx activity (r = 0.177; p selenium status than children of normal weight, which can contribute to poor antioxidant protection. This situation could be more evident in children with central adiposity.

  2. Comparison of selenium distribution in mice organs after the supplementation with inorganic and organic selenium compound selenosemicarbazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musik, Irena; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria; Toś-Luty, Sabina; Donica, Helena; Pasternak, Kazimierz; Wawrzycki, Sławomir

    2002-01-01

    Studies on selenium organ content and its function in living organisms just like studies on other elements provide interesting results although their interpretation is not always clear. The aim of our study was to determine the concentration and distribution of selenium in several organs and tissues in mice after supplementation with our newly synthesized organic compound of selenium selenosemicarbazide (4-o-tolyl-selenosemicarbazide of o-chlorobenzoic acid) as compared to the effects of the supplementation with inorganic compounds. SWISS mice were fed with both types of compounds at the dose of 10(-3) g Se per kg for the period of 10 days. The concentrations of selenium in brains of mice treated with selenocarbazide and sodium selenite were higher than in controls (38.04 micrograms g-1 and 32.00 micrograms g-1 vs. 26.18 micrograms g-1). There was a statistically significant increase in the selenium contents in lungs after supplementation with selenosemicarbazide and sodium selenite (11.81 micrograms g-1 and 6.79 micrograms g-1 vs. 1.75 micrograms g-1 in controls). We found a statistically insignificant increase in selenium contents in intercostal muscles after supplementation with inorganic selenium compounds and a statistically significant increase after the supplementation with selenosemicarbazide (10.13 micrograms g-1; 14.21 micrograms g-1 and 28.84 micrograms g-1, respectively). Our investigations lead to a conclusion that 4-o-tolyl-seleno-semicarbazide of o-chlorobenzoic acid, an organic selenium compound may be more easily absorbed than inorganic sodium IV selenite.

  3. Selenium and vitamin E for prostate cancer: post-SELECT (Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial) status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, Mark C; Jung-Hynes, Brittney; Schmit, Travis L; Kumar, Raj; Mukhtar, Hasan; Ahmad, Nihal

    2011-01-01

    Various formulations of selenium and vitamin E, both essential human dietary components, have been shown to possess a therapeutic and preventive effect against prostate cancer. Fortuitous results of clinical trials also implied a risk-reduction effect of selenium and vitamin E supplements. The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT), using oral selenium and vitamin E supplementation in disease-free volunteers, was designed to test a prostate cancer chemoprevention hypothesis. SELECT was terminated early because of both safety concerns and negative data for the formulations and doses given. Here, we review and discuss the studies done before and since the inception of SELECT, as well as the parameters of the trial itself. We believe that there is a lack of appropriate in vivo preclinical studies on selenium and vitamin E despite many promising in vitro studies on these agents. It seems that the most effective doses and formulations of these agents for prostate cancer chemoprevention have yet to be tested. Also, improved understanding of selenium and vitamin E biology may facilitate the discovery of these doses and formulations.

  4. Effect of selenium deficiency on the antioxidative status and muscle damage in growing turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Julia; Bosse, Astrid; Pallauf, Josef

    2008-12-01

    An experiment investigated the effect of different selenium supplementations on the antioxidant defence system and on the occurrence of muscle dystrophy in growing turkeys. Newly hatched male turkeys (B.U.T. Big 6) were divided into eight groups of 18 turkeys each and fed either a basal diet (selenium Vitamin E was adequately supplemented in all diets. After 35 days, muscle damage parameters including aspartate aminotransferase, creatine kinase, creatine kinase M and B were significantly increased in the selenium deficient Group I. A significant reduction of weight gain, feed consumption and selenium dependent glutathione peroxidase activity was also observed in the liver of selenium deficient birds. The ratio of oxidised glutathione (GSSG) to total glutathione (tGSH) was substantially altered in the selenium deficient Group I as well as in Group II (0.10 mg selenium/kg feed). The activity of glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) was not affected by selenium deficiency.

  5. Final report on biogeochemical cycling of selenium in Benton Lake, Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The biogeochemical cycling of selenium in Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, west-central Montana was very complicated. Selenium accumulation in sediment was a...

  6. Bioavailable nanoparticles obtained in laser ablation of a selenium target in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, P. G.; Shafeev, Georgii A.; Voronov, Valerii V.; Raspopov, R. V.; Arianova, E. A.; Trushina, E. N.; Gmoshinskii, I. V.; Khotimchenko, S. A.

    2012-11-01

    The process of producing colloidal solutions of selenium nanoparticles in water using the laser ablation method is described. The prospects of using nanoparticles of elementary selenium as a nutrition source of this microelement are discussed.

  7. Bioavailable nanoparticles obtained in laser ablation of a selenium target in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmin, P G; Shafeev, Georgii A; Voronov, Valerii V; Raspopov, R V; Arianova, E A; Trushina, E N; Gmoshinskii, I V; Khotimchenko, S A

    2012-11-30

    The process of producing colloidal solutions of selenium nanoparticles in water using the laser ablation method is described. The prospects of using nanoparticles of elementary selenium as a nutrition source of this microelement are discussed. (nanoparticles)

  8. Update to hazard assessment of selenium contamination at Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes a study done to assess selenium levels on Benton Lake NWR. Water was sampled for dissolved selenium in Lake Creek at the point where it enters...

  9. Update to hazard assessment of selenium contamination at Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The levels of selenium in all trophic levels in Unit 1 on the refuge continue to be a concern. The mean concentration of selenium in water, sediment,...

  10. Transformation of Selenium-Containing Phases in Copper Anode Slimes During Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue Jiao; Yang, Hong Ying; Jin, Zhe Nan; Chen, Guo Bao; Tong, Lin Lin

    2017-10-01

    The transformation of selenium-containing phases in copper anode slimes during the leaching process was investigated based on the Eh-pH diagram, leaching efficiencies of metals, and characterization of the residues produced during leaching. The leaching efficiency of selenium increases slowly to 17.7% in the first 50 min and then more rapidly to 98.3% in the next 110 min. The Eh-pH diagram indicates that elemental selenium is an intermediate product of the oxidation of selenide to selenite. The x-ray powder diffraction data and scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy data demonstrate that selenium leaching can be divided into three stages. Ag-Cu selenide first transforms into silver selenide and then converts to elemental selenium. Finally, elemental selenium is dissolved as selenite. The intermediate product, elemental selenium, is the main reason for the slow initial leaching rate of selenium.

  11. [Blood selenium in healthy persons and individuals with malignant diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backović, D; Stamenić, V; Marmut, Z; Jorga, J

    1998-01-01

    Preliminary researches taken part in Yugoslavia showed the risky low concentration of selenium in soil, food items and in serum of the examined population [10]. This research was carried out to discover the some factors which could influence the relationship of serum selenium concentration and the appearance of malignant diseases. The investigation was carried out in two Belgrade communities, one rural (Barajevo), and the other central (Stari Grad), in two groups: cancer patients (57 + 17) and healthy controls (41 + 13). These groups were similar in median age and gender. Samples of human serum were obtained by venepunction, and after wet digestion selenium concentration was determined by hydride generated AAS (Perkin-Elmer 5000). Anamnestic data concerning family history of malignancy and comorbidity, especially chronic noncommunicable diseases, were collected by questionnaire. All the participants were asked about their health related habits like: cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption. Dietary habits were assessed by food frequency method. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated as the parameter of nutritional status. The mean serum selenium level in cancer patients and healthy control (Table 1) were not significantly different. But, both cancer patients and healthy controls from Barajevo have significantly lower values comparing to those living in Stari Grad. Table 2 shows the relationship between serum selenium level and various environmental factors. The factors identified as the most important are: living in community Barajevo, age, history of chronic disease and some dietary factors. The univariate analysis (Table 3) revealed that factors like cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, family history of malignancy and comorbid states were not important predictive factors for patient malignant disease. The multivariate analysis revealed that consumption of sugar, fat and fruit were of the highest predictive value in assessing cancer relative risk. The results

  12. Treating chronic arsenic toxicity with high selenium lentil diets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sah, Shweta [Department of Ecosystem and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6 (Canada); Vandenberg, Albert [Department of Plant Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8 (Canada); Smits, Judit, E-mail: judit.smits@ucalgary.ca [Department of Ecosystem and Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6 (Canada)

    2013-10-01

    Arsenic (As) toxicity causes serious health problems in humans, especially in the Indo-Gangetic plains and mountainous areas of China. Selenium (Se), an essential micronutrient is a potential mitigator of As toxicity due to its antioxidant and antagonistic properties. Selenium is seriously deficient in soils world-wide but is present at high, yet non-toxic levels in the great plains of North America. We evaluate the potential of dietary Se in counteracting chronic As toxicity in rats through serum biochemistry, blood glutathione levels, immunotoxicity (antibody response), liver peroxidative stress, thyroid response and As levels in tissues and excreta. To achieve this, we compare diets based on high-Se Saskatchewan (SK) lentils versus low-Se lentils from United States. Rats drank control (0 ppm As) or As (40 ppm As) water while consuming SK lentils (0.3 ppm Se) or northwestern USA lentils (< 0.01 ppm Se) diets for 14 weeks. Rats on high Se diets had higher glutathione levels regardless of As exposure, recovered antibody responses in As-exposed group, higher fecal and urinary As excretion and lower renal As residues. Selenium deficiency caused greater hepatic peroxidative damage in the As exposed animals. Thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), were not different. After 14 weeks of As exposure, health indicators in rats improved in response to the high Se lentil diets. Our results indicate that high Se lentils have a potential to mitigate As toxicity in laboratory mammals, which we hope will translate into benefits for As exposed humans. - Highlights: • We reduce chronic arsenic toxicity in rats with a whole food solution. • High selenium lentils decrease liver damage and increase blood glutathione levels. • High selenium lentil diets increase urinary and fecal arsenic excretion. • High selenium lentil diets decrease arsenic levels in kidney, the storage organ. • High selenium lentil diets reverse arsenic suppression of the B cell

  13. Selenium contamination of the Grasslands, a major California waterfowl area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlendorf, H.M.; Hothem, R.L.; Aldrich, T.W.; Krynitsky, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    In a recent study at Kesterson Reservoir in California, selenium was shown to cause mortality and deformities in embryos of aquatic birds. The present study was conducted to determine if selenium or other contaminants in agricultural drainwater used for marsh management were likely to cause similar adverse effects in the nearby Grasslands area. Selenium concentrations were elevated (greater than 15 ppm, dry-weight) in livers of some birds of all species collected from the Grasslands. Mean selenium concentrations in all species sampled in the South Grasslands were significantly higher (P less than 0.05) than those from the 'control site', the Volta Wildlife Area. Mean selenium levels in black-necked stilts (Himantopus mexicanus) from the South Grasslands (35.6 ppm) were similar (P greater than 0.05) to levels in stilts from Kesterson (46.4 ppm), but means for American avocets (Recurvirostra americana) from the South Grasslands (67.3 ppm) were higher (P less than 0.05) than those from Kesterson (28.4 ppm). Bird eggs and fish from the Grasslands also contained elevated levels of selenium. Concentrations of eight heavy metals in fish generally reflected those patterns previously found in water entering the study areas. Of the organochlorines detected in fish, only DDE occurred at concentrations potentially harmful to birds (6.1 and 3.0 ppm, wet weight, at two South Grassland sites). The effect on avian health or reproduction of the other contaminants, singly or in combination, could not be determined. However, selenium levels were apparently sufficiently elevated in 1984 to have caused adverse effects on avian reproduction in the South Grasslands.

  14. Selenium redox biochemistry of zinc–sulfur coordination sites in proteins and enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob, Claus; Maret, Wolfgang; Vallee, Bert L.

    1999-01-01

    Selenium has been increasingly recognized as an essential element in biology and medicine. Its biochemistry resembles that of sulfur, yet differs from it by virtue of both redox potentials and stabilities of its oxidation states. Selenium can substitute for the more ubiquitous sulfur of cysteine and as such plays an important role in more than a dozen selenoproteins. We have chosen to examine zinc–sulfur centers as possible targets of selenium redox biochemistry. Selenium compounds release zi...

  15. Technology of production biological active additive based on selenium containing culture of bifidobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kaprelyants

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents data on the positive impact of essential microelement selenium on the human body. It was characterized the ability to accumulate inorganic forms of selenium (such as selenites and selenates into the organic forms by probiotic microorganisms. The article presents data concerning sodium selenite concentration impact on biomass growth of bifidobacterium culture. It was fined optimum conditions for accumulation maximum selenium containing biomass of microorganisms. Based on experiments it was created selenium containing biologically active additive.

  16. Disruption - Access cards service

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    We would like to inform you that between 10 November and 15 December 2014, the access cards service in Building 55 will be disrupted, as the GS Department has decided to improve the facilities for users of this building. During the work, you will find the registration, biometric registration and dosimeter exchange services on the second floor of Building 55 and the vehicle sticker service on the ground floor along with the access cards service. We thank you for your understanding and apologise for any inconvenience caused.

  17. Manuel's asteroid disruption technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Manuel; Ipe, Abraham; Jacob, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    A seventy-year-old male presented with dense asteroid hyalosis in both eyes. He had undergone cataract extraction in one eye 3 years ago, and the other eye had immature cataract. Both the autorefractor and dilated streak retinoscopy did not give readings and subjective visual improvement could not be achieved. Immediately following YAG posterior capsulotomy and anterior vitreous asteroid disruption, the vision improved to 20/20 with recordable auto refractor and streak retinoscopy values. Our initial experience indicates that the treatment is simple, safe and effective but needs controlled and prospective studies to confirm its long-term safety.

  18. Disrupted Refugee Family Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Ditte Krogh

    2017-01-01

    of family members in social historical contexts. Studying the multiple perspectives of family members shows how social support conceptualized as care practises is conflictual in the changing everyday family practices that are transformed by policy. The purpose of studying how families manage to flee civil......Fleeing civil war involves managing life threatening events and multiple disruptions of everyday life. The theoretical potentials of analysing the recreation of everyday family life among Syrian refugees in Denmark is explored based on conceptualizations that emphasize the collective agency...

  19. Selenium containing clays minerals as additive for the discoloration of glass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, K.; Limpt, J.A.C. van; Fischer, H.R.

    2010-01-01

    While selenium is applied as decolorizing agent for flint container glass or tableware glass, the retention of selenium in glass however is very low. Generally more than 75% of the total selenium input sublimes from the glass melt and leaves the clay minerals due to the high volatility of

  20. Telomerase as an Androgen Receptor-Regulated Target in Selenium Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    and Vita- min E Chemoprevention Trial (SELECT) indicated that supplementation of healthy individuals with nutritional dose of selenium did not reduce...were conducted by using pharmacologic doses of selenium , not the nutritional dose that was used in the SELECT. Therefore, the negative SELECT finding...Regulated Target in Selenium Chemoprevention of Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Shuang Liu, Ph.D

  1. Selenium status, thyroid volume, and multiple nodule formation in an area with mild iodine deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lone Banke; Schomburg, Lutz; Köhrle, Josef

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to study the associations between serum selenium concentration and thyroid volume, as well as the association between serum selenium concentration and risk for an enlarged thyroid gland in an area with mild iodine deficiency before and after iodine fortification was introduced....... Another objective was to examine the association between serum selenium concentration and prevalence of thyroid nodules....

  2. Speciation of Selenium in Stream Insects Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrahennadi, R.; Wayland, M.; Pickering, I.J.

    2009-05-28

    Selenium contamination in the environment is a widespread problem affecting insects and other wildlife. Insects occupy a critical middle link and aid in trophic transfer of selenium in many terrestrial and freshwater food chains, but the mechanisms of selenium uptake through the food chain are poorly understood. In particular, biotransformation of selenium by insects into different chemical forms will greatly influence how toxic or benign the selenium is to that organism or to its predators. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to identify the chemical form of selenium in insects inhabiting selenium contaminated streams near Hinton, Alberta (Canada). Selenium K near-edge spectra indicate a variability of selenium speciation among the insects that included mayflies (Ephemeroptera), stoneflies (Plecoptera), caddisflies (Trichoptera), and craneflies (Diptera). Higher percentages of inorganic selenium were observed in primary consumers, detritivores, and filter feeders than in predatory insects. Among the organic forms of selenium, organic selenides constituted a major fraction in most organisms. A species modeled as trimethylselenonium was observed during the pupal stage of caddisflies. These results provide insights into how the insects cope with their toxic cargo, including how the selenium is biotransformed into less toxic forms and how it can be eliminated from the insects. More broadly, this study demonstrates the strengths of XAS to probe the effects of heavy elements at trace levels in insects from the field.

  3. Relativistic tidal disruption events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levan A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In March 2011 Swift detected an extremely luminous and long-lived outburst from the nucleus of an otherwise quiescent, low luminosity (LMC-like galaxy. Named Swift J1644+57, its combination of high-energy luminosity (1048 ergs s−1 at peak, rapid X-ray variability (factors of >100 on timescales of 100 seconds and luminous, rising radio emission suggested that we were witnessing the birth of a moderately relativistic jet (Γ ∼ 2 − 5, created when a star is tidally disrupted by the supermassive black hole in the centre of the galaxy. A second event, Swift J2058+0516, detected two months later, with broadly similar properties lends further weight to this interpretation. Taken together this suggests that a fraction of tidal disruption events do indeed create relativistic outflows, demonstrates their detectability, and also implies that low mass galaxies can host massive black holes. Here, I briefly outline the observational properties of these relativistic tidal flares observed last year, and their evolution over the first year since their discovery.

  4. Nanosized Selenium: A Novel Platform Technology to Prevent Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi

    As an important category of bacterial infections, healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are considered an increasing threat to the safety and health of patients worldwide. HAIs lead to extended hospital stays, contribute to increased medical costs, and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In the United States, infections encountered in the hospital or a health care facility affect more than 1.7 million patients, cost 35.7 billion to 45 billion, and contribute to 88,000 deaths in hospitals annually. The most conventional and widely accepted method to fight against bacterial infections is using antibiotics. However, because of the widespread and sometimes inappropriate use of antibiotics, many strains of bacteria have rapidly developed antibiotic resistance. Those new, stronger bacteria pose serious, worldwide threats to public health and welfare. In 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported antibiotic resistance as a global serious threat that is no longer a prediction for the future but is now reality. It has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country. The most effective strategy to prevent antibiotic resistance is minimizing the use of antibiotics. In recent years, nanomaterials have been investigated as one of the potential substitutes of antibiotics. As a result of their vastly increased ratio of surface area to volume, nanomaterials will likely exert a stronger interaction with bacteria which may affect bacterial growth and propagation. A major concern of most existing antibacterial nanomaterials, like silver nanoparticles, is their potential toxicity. But selenium is a non-metallic material and a required nutrition for the human body, which is recommended by the FDA at a 53 to 60 μg daily intake. Nanosized selenium is considered to be healthier and less toxic compared with many metal-based nanomaterials due to the generation of reactive oxygen species from metals, especially heavy metals. Therefore, the objectives of

  5. Disruptive behavior within the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Charlene R; Porterfield, Susan; Gordon, Glenna

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of disruptive behavior among nurses in the healthcare workplace, the details that are associated with its occurrence, and the organizational procedures utilized when disruptive incidents occur. Healthcare workers have a higher risk of experiencing disruptive behavior among staff in the workplace compared to other industries, and nurses are more susceptible than other healthcare workers. A quantitative, descriptive, survey design asked nurses if they had experienced disruptive behavior within the past 12 months and how this was handled by their organization. Disruptive behavior included any type of verbal abuse, electronic or e-mail abuse, or physical abuse within the work environment. There were 2,821 participants that validated the occurrence of verbal, electronic, and physical disruptive behavior, and the majority rated their overall work environment to be at high risk of experiencing disruptive behavior at least once every 6 months. Twenty-four statistically significant relationships were found with strongest associations (disruptive behavior and position; and feeling comfortable reporting the abuse and position as well as education. It is evident that disruptive behavior exists verbally, electronically, and physically, and that the overall work environment is felt to be at high risk of experiencing repeated disruptive behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of selenium in nuts by cathodic stripping potentiometry (CSP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugo, Giacomo; La Pera, Lara; Lo Turco, Vincenzo; Mavrogeni, Ekaterini; Alfa, Maria

    2003-06-18

    The aim of this work was to determine the selenium content in nut samples by cathodic stripping potentiometry. Dry-powdered nuts were digested by HNO(3) and dissolved with concentrated hydrochloric acid. To avoid the interference of natural oxygen, the potentiometric determination of selenium was carried out in an electrolyte solution consisting of 2 M CaCl(2) and 4 M HCl. The analysis was executed applying an electrolysis potential of -150 mV for 60 s and a constant current of -30 microA. Under these conditions, detection limits lower than 1.0 ng g(-)(1) were obtained for selenium analysis in nuts. The relative standard deviation of these measurements (expressed as rsd %) ranged from 0.44 to 0.88% while recoveries ranged from 90.2 to 95.3%. The results obtained with the proposed method were compared with those obtained via hydride vapor generation atomic absorption spectroscopy, a common method for determining selenium. The results of the two methods agreed within 5% for almond, hazelnut, and pistachio samples. The mean concentrations of selenium determined in Sicilian samples of almond, hazelnut, and pistachio were 531 +/- 1, 865 +/- 1, and 893 +/- 4 microg/kg, respectively.

  7. Selenium neurotoxicity in humans: bridging laboratory and epidemiologic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinceti, Marco; Mandrioli, Jessica; Borella, Paola; Michalke, Bernhard; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Finkelstein, Yoram

    2014-10-15

    Selenium is a metalloid of considerable interest in the human from both a toxicological and a nutritional perspective, with a very narrow safe range of intake. Acute selenium intoxication is followed by adverse effects on the nervous system with special clinical relevance, while the neurotoxicity of long-term overexposure is less characterized and recognized. We aimed to address this issue from a public health perspective, focusing on both laboratory studies and the few epidemiologic human studies available, with emphasis on their methodological strengths and limitations. The frequently overlooked differences in toxicity and biological activity of selenium compounds are also outlined. In addition to lethargy, dizziness, motor weakness and paresthesias, an excess risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is the effect on the nervous system which has been more consistently associated with chronic low-level selenium overexposure, particularly to its inorganic compounds. Additional research efforts are needed to better elucidate the neurotoxic effects exerted by selenium overexposure. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. AN ANALYTICAL METHOD FOR CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF SELENIUM IN SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Luca

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential microelement, sometimes redoubtable, through its beneficial role - risk depending on its concentration in the food chain, at low dose is an important nutrient in the life of humans and animals, contrary at high doses, it becomes toxic. Selenium may be find itself in the environment (soil, sediment, water in many forms (oxidized, reduced, organometallic which determine their mobility and toxicity. Determination of chemical speciation (identification of different chemical forms provides much more complete information for a better understanding of the behavior and the potential impact on the environment. In this work we present the results of methodological research on the extraction of sequential forms of selenium in the soil and the coupling of analytical methods capable of identifying very small amounts of selenium in soils An efficient scheme of sequential extractions forms of selenium (SES consisting in atomic absorption spectrometry coupled with hydride generation (HGAAS has been developed into five experimental steps, detailed in the paper. This operational scheme has been applied to the analysis of chemical speciation in the following areas: the Bărăgan Plain and Central Dobrogea of Romania.

  9. Mercury-selenium interactions in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saroff, L. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Lipfert, W.; Moskowitz, P.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

    1996-02-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to consider the need to control emissions of trace elements and compounds emitted from coal combustion, including coal-fired power plants. Concern has been expressed about emissions of mercury and arsenic, for example, since health effects may be associated with exposure to some of these compounds. By and large, effects of trace element emissions have been considered individually, without regard for possible interactions. To the extent that the relevant environmental pathways and health endpoints differ, this mode of analysis is appropriate. For example, arsenic is considered a carcinogen and mercury affects the brain. However, there may be compelling reasons to consider emissions of mercury (Hg) and selenium (Se) together: (1) Both Se and Hg are emitted from power plants primarily as vapors. (2) Hg and Se are both found in fish, which is the primary pathway for Hg health effects. (3) Se has been shown to suppress Hg methylation in aqueous systems, which is a necessary step for Hg health effects at current environmental concentrations. (4) Se is a trace element that is essential for health but that can also be toxic at high concentrations; it can thus have both beneficial and adverse health effects, depending on the dosage. This paper reviews some of the salient characteristics and interactions of the Hg-Se system, to consider the hypothesis that the effects of emissions of these compounds should be considered jointly.

  10. Effect of Selenium from Selenium-Enriched Kale Sprout Versus Other Selenium Sources on Productivity and Selenium Concentrations in Egg and Tissue of Laying Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantiratikul, Anut; Chinrasri, Orawan; Chantiratikul, Piyanete

    2017-06-07

    A 6-week trial was conducted to compare the effect of selenium (Se) from hydroponically produced Se-enriched kale sprout (HPSeKS), sodium selenite (SS), and Se-enriched yeast (SeY) in laying hens. A total of 144 40-week-old hens were randomly divided into four groups, according to a completely randomized design. Each group consisted of four replicates with nine hens per replicate. The dietary treatments were T1 (basal diet) and T2, T3, and T4 (basal diets supplemented with 0.30 mg Se/kg from SS, SeY, and HPSeKS, respectively). Results showed that Se supplement did not affect (p > 0.05) productivity and egg quality. Hens fed Se from HPSeKS and SeY exhibited higher (p  0.05) to that of hens fed Se from SeY, but higher (p  0.05). The results of this trial demonstrated that Se from HPSeKS and SeY was more efficient than Se from SS on Se bioavailability and whole egg Se concentration in laying hens.

  11. Adsorption of selenium using bagasse fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasewar, Kailas L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Visveswarya National Institute of Technology (VNIT), Nagpur (India); Prasad, Basheshwar; Gulipalli, Sekhararao [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Roorkee (India)

    2009-07-15

    The present work involves the study of Se(IV) adsorption onto bagasse fly ash. The adsorbents were coated with a ferric chloride solution for the effective removal of selenium. The physico-chemical characterization of the adsorbent was carried out using standard methods, e. g., proximate analysis, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. Batch experiments were carried out to determine the effect of various parameters such as adsorbent dose, initial pH, contact time, and temperature on the adsorption process. Results obtained from these studies were analyzed using various kinetic models and isotherms. Se(IV) adsorption onto adsorbent was high at low pH values, and decreased with an increase in initial pH. A temperature study showed that the uptake of Se(IV) was greatest at 293 K, within the temperature range studied. The parameters of pseudo first order, pseudo second order, and Weber-Morris intra-particle kinetic models were determined. Equilibrium isotherms were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin isotherms. Error analyses were also carried out using hybrid fractional error function and Marquardt's percent standard deviation. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. Selenium deficiency associated porcine and human cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oropeza-Moe, Marianne; Wisløff, Helene; Bernhoft, Aksel

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is a trace element playing an important role in animal and human physiological homeostasis. It is a key component in selenoproteins (SeP) exerting multiple actions on endocrine, immune, inflammatory and reproductive processes. The SeP family of glutathione peroxidases (GSH-Px) inactivates peroxides and thereby maintains physiological muscle function in humans and animals. Animals with high feed conversion efficiency and substantial muscle mass have shown susceptibility to Se deficiency related diseases since nutritional requirements of the organism may not be covered. Mulberry Heart Disease (MHD) in pigs is an important manifestation of Se deficiency often implicating acute heart failure and sudden death without prior clinical signs. Post-mortem findings include hemorrhagic and pale myocardial areas accompanied by fluid accumulation in the pericardial sac and pleural cavity. Challenges in MHD are emerging in various parts of the world. Se is of fundamental importance also to human health. In the 1930s the Se deficiency associated cardiomyopathy named Keshan Disease (KD) was described for the first time in China. Various manifestations, such as cardiogenic shock, enlarged heart, congestive heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias are common. Multifocal necrosis and fibrous replacement of myocardium are characteristic findings. Pathological findings in MD and KD show striking similarities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Disruptive Co-Creation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butler, Ivan; Christensen, David

    set up to foster innovative partnerships between civil society organizations, businesses and academia with the objective of supporting disruptive business model innovation in co-creation processes across these sectors. This paper delves into state-of-the-art concerning literature pertinent......Faced with constant changes in the marketplace and increasing pressure to adapt to e.g. recessive and saturated conditions, businesses in industrialized countries have the option to pursue opportunities in emerging markets. In the poorest of developing countries, there is a proposition of high......-payoff, albeit high-risk opportunities for sustainable business models that address poverty alleviation. However, many businesses exhibit hesitation and wariness before giving serious consideration toward entering markets in e.g. Sub-Saharan Africa. In addressing this, the initiative access2innovation has been...

  14. Chemopreventive functional food through selenium biofortification of cauliflower plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Oancea

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to develop a biotechnological approach for production of cauliflower as safe functional food, with an optimal content of chemopreventive compounds, by a protective biofortification, through selenium application together with betaine and spraying adjuvants. In the control and treated cauliflower plants we determined the amount of total selenium, glucosinolates (sulforaphane and SAH (S-Adenosyl-homocysteine. We also assayed the chemopreventive effects of compounds formed in the treated cruciferous plants through in vitro tests, using human colorectal tumor cell line (CaCo2. Extracts of plants treated with selenium applied together with betaine and spraying adjuvant were significantly more active on reduction of tumoral cell viability than the extract of control plants. Cauliflower plants, obtained after our treatments for protective biofortification, were used to feed rabbits, for 10 days. The ingestion of biofortified cauliflower did not modify the hematological and biochemical parameters on the laboratory animals.

  15. Selenium and vitamin E: Reproductive disorders in dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joksimović-Todorović Mirjana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenium and vitamin E deficiency leads to reproductive disorders in dairy cows: placental retention, ovarian cysts, metritis, reduced percentage of conception, abortions, birthing of poorly vital calves. Placental retention is a post partal disorder of multifactorial etiology which has harmful effects on reproduction and the feasibility of milk production. The administration of selenium and vitamin E reduces the incidence of placental retention, which suggests that oxidative stress is responsible for the occurrence of this disorder. The occurrence of ovarian cysts has as its consequence a disorder in the oestral cycle. Vitamin E prevents oxidative damage of lipid membranes by preventing the forming of destructive hydroperoxides, acting in synergy with selenium. These nutrients protect cell membranes and lipid organelles, inhibit and destroy endogenous peroxides, and in that way protect the integrity of the membranes and reduce oxidative stress.

  16. The chronic autoimmune thyroiditis quality of life selenium trial (CATALYST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kristian Hillert; Watt, Torquil; Bjørner, Jakob Bue

    2014-01-01

    . Previous randomized controlled trials have found that selenium supplementation decreases thyroid-disease-specific antibody levels. We hypothesize that selenium might be beneficial in the treatment of chronic autoimmune thyroiditis.Methods/design: The CATALYST trial is an investigator-initiated randomized......, blinded, multicentre clinical trial of selenium supplementation versus placebo in patients with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis. Inclusion criteria: age >=18 years; serum thyroid peroxidase antibody level >=100 IU/ml within the previous 12 months; treatment with levothyroxine and written informed consent....... Exclusion criteria: previous diagnosis of toxic nodular goitre, Graves' hyperthyroidism, postpartum thyroiditis, Graves' orbitopathy; previous antithyroid drug treatment, radioiodine therapy or thyroid surgery; immune-modulatory or other medication affecting thyroid function; pregnancy, planned pregnancy...

  17. Structure of amorphous selenium studied by neutron diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Knudsen, Torben Steen; Carneiro, K.

    1975-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements on amorphous selenium have been performed at 293 and 80 K. Careful analyses of the instrumental corrections were made to avoid systematic errors in the measured structure factor S (kappa) in the wave vector region 0 ? kappa ? 12 Å−1. As a result of the data...... treatment, the neutron scattering cross sections of selenium are determined to be sigmacoh = 8.4±0.1 b and sigmainc = 0.1±0.1 b. Using the fact that S (kappa) for large kappa's is determined by the short distances in the sample, a new method for extrapolation of the experimental S (kappa) until convergence....... Finally, we give a brief discussion of the different models for the structure of amorphous selenium, taking both diffraction measurements and thermodynamic considerations into account. The Journal of Chemical Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  18. Investigation of the selenium metabolism in cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunøe, Kristoffer; Gabel-Jensen, Charlotte; Stürup, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare different selenium species for their ability to induce cell death in different cancer cell lines, while investigating the underlying chemistry by speciation analysis. A prostate cancer cell line (PC-3), a colon cancer cell line (HT-29) and a leukaemia cell line...... (Jurkat E6-1) were incubated with five selenium compounds representing inorganic as well as organic Se compounds in different oxidation states. Selenomethionine (SeMet), Se-methylselenocysteine (MeSeCys), methylseleninic acid (MeSeA), selenite and selenate in the concentration range 5-100 mu M were...... incubated with cells for 24 h and the induction of cell death was measured using flow cytometry. The amounts of total selenium in cell medium, cell lysate and the insoluble fractions was determined by ICP-MS. Speciation analysis of cellular fractions was performed by reversed phase, anion exchange and size...

  19. Epigenetic effects of selenium and their implications for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speckmann, Bodo; Grune, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    Alterations of epigenetic marks are linked to normal development and cellular differentiation as well as to the progression of common chronic diseases. The plasticity of these marks provides potential for disease therapies and prevention strategies. Macro- and micro-nutrients have been shown to modulate disease risk in part via effects on the epigenome. The essential micronutrient selenium affects human health outcomes, e.g., cancers, cardiovascular and autoimmune diseases, via selenoproteins and through a range of biologically active dietary selenocompounds and metabolism products thereof. This review provides an assessment of the current literature regarding epigenetic effects of dietary and synthetic selenocompounds, which include the modulation of marks and editors of epigenetic information and interference with one-carbon metabolism, which provides the methyl donor for DNA methylation. The relevance of a selenium-epigenome interaction for human health is discussed, and we also indicate where future studies will be helpful to gain a deeper understanding of epigenetic effects elicited by selenium.

  20. Surveying selenium speciation from soil to cell - forms and transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Gabel-Jensen, Charlotte [University of Copenhagen, Department of Pharmaceutics and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jackson, Matthew I. [Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this review is to present and evaluate the present knowledge of which selenium species are available to the general population in the form of food and common supplements and how these species are metabolized in mammals. The overview of the selenium sources takes a horizontal approach, which encompasses identification of new metabolites in yeast and food of plant and animal origin, whereas the survey of the mammalian metabolism takes a horizontal as well as a vertical approach. The vertical approach encompasses studies on dynamic conversions of selenium compounds within cells, tissues or whole organisms. New and improved sample preparation, separation and detection methods are evaluated from an analytical chemical perspective to cover the progress in horizontal speciation, whereas the analytical methods for the vertical speciation and the interpretations of the results are evaluated from a biological angle as well. (orig.)

  1. Dilated Cardiomyopathy Induced by Chronic Starvation and Selenium Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soham Dasgupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein energy malnutrition (PEM has been rarely documented as a cause of cardiovascular abnormalities, including dilated cardiomyopathy. Selenium is responsible for antioxidant defense mechanisms in cardiomyocytes, and its deficiency in the setting of PEM and disease related malnutrition (DRM may lead to exacerbation of the dilated cardiomyopathy. We report a rare case of a fourteen-year-old boy who presented with symptoms of congestive heart failure due to DRM and PEM (secondary to chronic starvation along with severe selenium deficiency. An initial echocardiogram showed severely depressed systolic function consistent with dilated cardiomyopathy. Aggressive nutritional support and replacement of selenium and congestive heart failure medications that included diuretics and ACE inhibitors with the addition of carvedilol led to normalization of the cardiac function within four weeks. He continues to have significant weight gain and is currently completely asymptomatic from a cardiovascular standpoint.

  2. Disrupting the Industry with Play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2016-01-01

    Decades of research into intelligent, playful technology and user-friendly man-machine interfaces has provided important insight into the creation of robotic systems and intelligent interactive systems which are much more user-friendly, safer and cheaper than what appeared possible merely a decade...... or two ago. This is significantly disrupting the industry in several market sectors. This paper describes the components of the playware and embodied artificial intelligence research that has led to disruption in the industrial robotics sector, and which points to the next disruption of the health care......, anytime to use these systems, providing an unforeseen flexibility into the sectors, which become disrupted with these systems....

  3. Differential determination of selenium(IV) and selenium(VI) with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate and dithizone by atomic-absorption spectrophotometry with a carbon-tube atomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, T; Shiraishi, T; Yamamoto, Y

    1978-01-01

    The extraction behaviour of selenium(IV) and selenium(VI) with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate and dithizone in organic solvents has been investigated by means of flameless atomic-absorption spectrophotometry with a carbon-tube atomizer. The selective extraction of selenium(IV) and differential determination of selenium(IV) and selenium(VI) have been developed. With sodium diethyldithiocarbamate and carbon tetrachloride, when the aqueous phase/organic solvent volume ratio is 5 and the injection volume in the carbon tube is 20 microl, the sensitivity for selenium is 0.4 ng/ml for 1% absorption. The relative standard deviations are ca. 3%. Interference by many metal ions can he prevented by masking with EDTA. The proposed methods have been applied satisfactorily to determination of Se(IV) and Se(VI) in various types of water.

  4. Investigation of biotransformation of selenium in plants using spectrometric methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszczyńska, Anna; Konopka, Anna; Kurek, Eliza; Torres Elguera, Julio Cesar; Bulska, Ewa

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this research was to study the processes of biotransformation of selenium in plants such as garlic, radish sprouts and sunflower sprouts via identification of selenium-containing compounds as metabolites of inorganic selenium using mass spectrometry. Speciation analysis of selenium in extracts from plant samples was performed with the use of hyphenated high performance liquid chromatography and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) method. Matching the retention times of sample compounds with standards allowed identification of Se-methyl-selenocysteine, selenomethionine, γ-glutamyl-Se-methylselenocysteine and inorganic SeO32 -. However, registered chromatograms included additional 82Se signals which couldn't be identified due to the lack of standards. Qualitative analysis of unknown compounds was achieved using high-resolution mass spectrometer equipped with mass analyzer Orbitrap coupled to high performance liquid chromatography. Since selenium has six stable isotopes of different abundance in nature, mass spectra of have a very characteristic isotopic pattern. In order to elucidate the structure of unknown Se compounds, selected ions were subjected to the fragmentation. Following selenocompounds were identified an inorganic selenium metabolites in garlic, sunflower sprouts and/or radish sprouts: selenohomolanthionine, Se-methyl-selenocysteine, selenomethionine, selenomethionine oxide, deaminohydroxy-selenohomolanthionine, N-acetylcysteine-selenomethionine, γ-glutamyl-Se-methyl-selenocysteine, methylseleno-Se-pentose-hexose, Se-methyl-selenoglutathione, 2,3-dihydroxy-propionyl-selenocysteine-cysteine, methyltio-selenoglutathione, 2,3-dihydroxypropionyl-selenolanthionine and two Se-containing compounds with proposed molecular formula C10H18N2O6Se and C10H13N5O3Se. Moreover, the structure was proposed for one selenocompound found in sunflower sprouts which has not been reported so far.

  5. Epigenetic Regulation of Inflammatory Gene Expression in Macrophages by Selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Vivek; Ravindra, Kodihalli C.; Liao, Chang; Kaushal, Naveen; Carlson, Bradley A.; Prabhu, K. Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins by histone acetyltransferases plays a pivotal role in the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Given the importance of dietary selenium in mitigating inflammation, we hypothesized that selenium supplementation may regulate inflammatory gene expression at the epigenetic level. The effect of selenium towards histone acetylation was examined in both in vitro and in vivo models of inflammation by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and immunoblotting. Our results indicated that selenium supplementation, as selenite, decreased acetylation of histone H4 at K12 and K16 in COX-2 and TNF promoters, and of the p65 subunit of the redox sensitive transcription factor NFκB in primary and immortalized macrophages. On the other hand, selenomethionine had a much weaker effect. Selenite treatment of HIV-1 infected human monocytes also significantly decreased the acetylation of H4 at K12 and K16 on the HIV-1 promoter, supporting the downregulation of proviral expression by selenium. A similar decrease in histone acetylation was also seen in the colonic extracts of mice treated with dextran sodium sulfate that correlated well with the levels of selenium in the diet. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from Trspfl/flCreLysM mice that lack expression of selenoproteins in macrophages confirmed the important role of selenoproteins in the inhibition of histone H4 acetylation. Our studies suggest that the ability of selenoproteins to skew the metabolism of arachidonic acid to contribute, in part, to their ability to inhibit histone acetylation. In summary, our studies suggest a new role for selenoproteins in the epigenetic modulation of pro-inflammatory genes. PMID:25458528

  6. The characteristics of railway service disruption: implications for disruption management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, D; Dadashi, N

    2017-03-01

    Rail disruption management is central to operational continuity and customer satisfaction. Disruption is not a unitary phenomenon - it varies by time, cause, location and complexity of coordination. Effective, user-centred technology for rail disruption must reflect this variety. A repertory grid study was conducted to elicit disruption characteristics. Construct elicitation with a group of experts (n = 7) captured 26 characteristics relevant to rail disruption. A larger group of operational staff (n = 28) rated 10 types of rail incident against the 26 characteristics. The results revealed distinctions such as business impact and public perception, and the importance of management of the disruption over initial detection. There were clear differences between those events that stop the traffic, as opposed to those that only slow the traffic. The results also demonstrate the utility of repertory grid for capturing the characteristics of complex work domains. Practitioner Summary: The aim of the paper is to understand how variety in rail disruption influences socio-technical design. It uses repertory grid to identify and prioritise 26 constructs, and group 10 disruption types, identifying critical factors such as whether an incident stops or merely slows the service, and business reputation.

  7. Plasma selenium and risk of dysglycemia in an elderly French population: Results from the prospective Epidemiology of Vascular Ageing Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Hininger-Favier Isabelle; Rayman Margaret P; Arnaud Josiane; Akbaraly Tasnime N; Roussel Anne-Marie; Berr Claudine; Fontbonne Annick

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background A preventive role of selenium on the risk of diabetes has been reported and ascribed to the "insulin-like" activity of selenium and the antioxidant properties of the selenoenzymes. By contrast, data from cross-sectional studies and clinical trials have suggested an adverse effect of high selenium status and selenium supplementation on type-2 diabetes risk. Given these controversial results, we investigated prospectively the relationship between baseline plasma selenium con...

  8. Selenium and selenoprotein deficiencies induce widespread pyogranuloma formation in mice, while high levels of dietary selenium decrease liver tumor size driven by TGFα.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed E Moustafa

    Full Text Available Changes in dietary selenium and selenoprotein status may influence both anti- and pro-cancer pathways, making the outcome of interventions different from one study to another. To characterize such outcomes in a defined setting, we undertook a controlled hepatocarcinogenesis study involving varying levels of dietary selenium and altered selenoprotein status using mice carrying a mutant (A37G selenocysteine tRNA transgene (Trsp(tG37 and/or a cancer driver TGFα transgene. The use of Trsp(tG37 altered selenoprotein expression in a selenoprotein and tissue specific manner and, at sufficient dietary selenium levels, separate the effect of diet and selenoprotein status. Mice were maintained on diets deficient in selenium (0.02 ppm selenium or supplemented with 0.1, 0.4 or 2.25 ppm selenium or 30 ppm triphenylselenonium chloride (TPSC, a non-metabolized selenium compound. Trsp(tG37 transgenic and TGFα/Trsp(tG37 bi-transgenic mice subjected to selenium-deficient or TPSC diets developed a neurological phenotype associated with early morbidity and mortality prior to hepatocarcinoma development. Pathology analyses revealed widespread disseminated pyogranulomatous inflammation. Pyogranulomas occurred in liver, lungs, heart, spleen, small and large intestine, and mesenteric lymph nodes in these transgenic and bi-transgenic mice. The incidence of liver tumors was significantly increased in mice carrying the TGFα transgene, while dietary selenium and selenoprotein status did not affect tumor number and multiplicity. However, adenoma and carcinoma size and area were smaller in TGFα transgenic mice that were fed 0.4 and 2.25 versus 0.1 ppm of selenium. Thus, selenium and selenoprotein deficiencies led to widespread pyogranuloma formation, while high selenium levels inhibited the size of TGFα-induced liver tumors.

  9. Analyses of Selenotranscriptomes and Selenium Concentrations in Response to Dietary Selenium Deficiency and Age Reveal Common and Distinct Patterns by Tissue and Sex in Telomere-Dysfunctional Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Zhang, Li; Zeng, Huawei; Wu, Ryan Ty; Wu, Tung-Lung; Cheng, Wen-Hsing

    2017-10-01

    Background: The hierarchies of tissue selenium distribution and selenotranscriptomes are thought to critically affect healthspan and longevity.Objective: We determined selenium status and selenotranscriptomes in response to long-term dietary selenium deficiency and age in tissues of male and female mice.Methods: Weanling telomerase RNA component knockout C57BL/6 mice were fed a selenium-deficient (0.03 mg Se/kg) Torula yeast-based AIN-93G diet or a diet supplemented with sodium selenate (0.15 mg Se/kg) until age 18 or 24 mo. Plasma, hearts, kidneys, livers, and testes were collected to assay for selenotranscriptomes, selected selenoproteins, and tissue selenium concentrations. Data were analyzed with the use of 2-factor ANOVA (diet × age) in both sexes.Results: Dietary selenium deficiency decreased (P ≤ 0.05) selenium concentrations (65-72%) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) 3 (82-94%) and selenoprotein P (SELENOP) (17-41%) levels in the plasma of both sexes of mice and mRNA levels (9-68%) of 4, 4, and 12 selenoproteins in the heart, kidney, and liver of males, respectively, and 5, 16, and 14 selenoproteins, respectively, in females. Age increased selenium concentrations and SELENOP levels (27% and 30%, respectively; P ≤ 0.05) in the plasma of males only but decreased (12-46%; P selenium deficiency and age in ≥1 tissue or sex, or both. Dietary selenium deficiency upregulated (40-160%; P ≤ 0.05) iodothyronine deiodinase 2 (Dio2) and selenoprotein N (Selenon) in the kidneys of males. Age upregulated (11-44%; P selenium status and selenotranscriptomes because of dietary selenium deficiency and age. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. Selenium and Selenoprotein Deficiencies Induce Widespread Pyogranuloma Formation in Mice, while High Levels of Dietary Selenium Decrease Liver Tumor Size Driven by TGFα

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Nianxin; Ward, Jerrold M.; Perella, Christine M.; Hoffmann, Victoria J.; Rogers, Keith; Combs, Gerald F.; Schweizer, Ulrich; Merlino, Glenn; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Hatfield, Dolph L.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in dietary selenium and selenoprotein status may influence both anti- and pro-cancer pathways, making the outcome of interventions different from one study to another. To characterize such outcomes in a defined setting, we undertook a controlled hepatocarcinogenesis study involving varying levels of dietary selenium and altered selenoprotein status using mice carrying a mutant (A37G) selenocysteine tRNA transgene (TrsptG37) and/or a cancer driver TGFα transgene. The use of TrsptG37 altered selenoprotein expression in a selenoprotein and tissue specific manner and, at sufficient dietary selenium levels, separate the effect of diet and selenoprotein status. Mice were maintained on diets deficient in selenium (0.02 ppm selenium) or supplemented with 0.1, 0.4 or 2.25 ppm selenium or 30 ppm triphenylselenonium chloride (TPSC), a non-metabolized selenium compound. TrsptG37 transgenic and TGFα/TrsptG37 bi-transgenic mice subjected to selenium-deficient or TPSC diets developed a neurological phenotype associated with early morbidity and mortality prior to hepatocarcinoma development. Pathology analyses revealed widespread disseminated pyogranulomatous inflammation. Pyogranulomas occurred in liver, lungs, heart, spleen, small and large intestine, and mesenteric lymph nodes in these transgenic and bi-transgenic mice. The incidence of liver tumors was significantly increased in mice carrying the TGFα transgene, while dietary selenium and selenoprotein status did not affect tumor number and multiplicity. However, adenoma and carcinoma size and area were smaller in TGFα transgenic mice that were fed 0.4 and 2.25 versus 0.1 ppm of selenium. Thus, selenium and selenoprotein deficiencies led to widespread pyogranuloma formation, while high selenium levels inhibited the size of TGFα–induced liver tumors. PMID:23460847

  11. Effects of Dietary Selenium and Vitamin E on Growth Performance, Meat Yield, and Selenium Content and Lipid Oxidation of Breast Meat of Broilers Reared Under Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibian, Mahmood; Ghazi, Shahab; Moeini, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted using 360 broiler chickens to evaluate the effects of dietary vitamin E (0, 125, and 250 mg/kg), selenium (0, 0.5, and 1 mg/kg), or their different combinations on performance, meat yield, and selenium content and lipid oxidation of breast meat of broilers raised under either a thermoneutral (TN, 24 °C constant) or heat stress (HS, 24 to 37 °C cycling) condition. There was a reduction (P vitamin E and selenium supplementation. However, under HS condition, broilers receiving 250 mg/kg vitamin E and 0.5 mg/kg selenium consumed more (P vitamin E alone, but similar (P > 0.05) to that of broilers receiving 250 mg/kg vitamin E and 1 mg/kg selenium. The malondialdehyde (MDA) content of the breast meat was increased (P content was decreased (P meat selenium content was increased (P meat selenium content was decreased (P vitamin E to diet of TN birds. However, the breast meat selenium content was increased (P vitamin E under HS condition. The breast meat MDA content was not affected (P > 0.05) by dietary treatments under TN condition. However, the breast meat MDA content was decreased (P vitamin E and selenium supplementation under HS condition, and the lowest MDA content was observed in the breast meat of broilers receiving combination of 125 mg/kg vitamin E and 1 mg/kg selenium. The results showed that supplementation of selenium and vitamin E was capable of increasing the selenium content of the breast meat and could improve the lipid oxidation of the breast meat when broilers reared under HS condition.

  12. Selenium intake and nutritional status of children with phenylketonuria in Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Michelle R A; Starling, Ana L P; Kanufre, Viviane C; Soares, Rosângelis D L; Norton, Rocksane de C; Aguiar, Marcos J B; Januario, José N

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate selenium dietary intake and nutritional status of patients with phenylketonuria. The study prospectively evaluated 54 children with phenylketonuria, from 4 to10 years old. The study was performed before and after the use of a selenium-supplemented amino acid mixture. The second phase of the study was performed after, at least, 90 days of use of the supplementation. Selenium nutritional status was assessed through the analysis of biochemical parameters: serum free thyroxin and selenium and glutathione peroxidase in erythrocytes. Selenium dietary intake was evaluated by the administration of the Food Frequency Questionnaire. Mean age of the children was of 7.0±1.8 years, and 35.2% were female. Mean time of supplementation of selenium, on special formula, was 122.2±25.1 days. The selenium-supplemented amino acid mixture represented 72.9% of the daily supply of the mineral. Upon supplementation, mean concentrations of serum selenium and glutathione peroxidase in erythrocytes increased significantly (p selenium increased significantly (p Selenium supplementation through protein replacement is effective to improve and adapt the nutritional status of selenium in patients with phenylketonuria.

  13. Selenium and Its Supplementation in Cardiovascular Disease—What do We Know?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Benstoem

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The trace element selenium is of high importance for many of the body’s regulatory and metabolic functions. Balanced selenium levels are essential, whereas dysregulation can cause harm. A rapidly increasing number of studies characterizes the wide range of selenium dependent functions in the human body and elucidates the complex and multiple physiological and pathophysiological interactions of selenium and selenoproteins. For the majority of selenium dependent enzymes, several biological functions have already been identified, like regulation of the inflammatory response, antioxidant properties and the proliferation/differentiation of immune cells. Although the potential role of selenium in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease has been investigated for decades, both observational and interventional studies of selenium supplementation remain inconclusive and are considered in this review. This review covers current knowledge of the role of selenium and selenoproteins in the human body and its functional role in the cardiovascular system. The relationships between selenium intake/status and various health outcomes, in particular cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia/infarction and reperfusion injury are reviewed. We describe, in depth, selenium as a biomarker in coronary heart disease and highlight the significance of selenium supplementation for patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  14. Selenium and Its Supplementation in Cardiovascular Disease—What do We Know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benstoem, Carina; Goetzenich, Andreas; Kraemer, Sandra; Borosch, Sebastian; Manzanares, William; Hardy, Gil; Stoppe, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The trace element selenium is of high importance for many of the body’s regulatory and metabolic functions. Balanced selenium levels are essential, whereas dysregulation can cause harm. A rapidly increasing number of studies characterizes the wide range of selenium dependent functions in the human body and elucidates the complex and multiple physiological and pathophysiological interactions of selenium and selenoproteins. For the majority of selenium dependent enzymes, several biological functions have already been identified, like regulation of the inflammatory response, antioxidant properties and the proliferation/differentiation of immune cells. Although the potential role of selenium in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease has been investigated for decades, both observational and interventional studies of selenium supplementation remain inconclusive and are considered in this review. This review covers current knowledge of the role of selenium and selenoproteins in the human body and its functional role in the cardiovascular system. The relationships between selenium intake/status and various health outcomes, in particular cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia/infarction and reperfusion injury are reviewed. We describe, in depth, selenium as a biomarker in coronary heart disease and highlight the significance of selenium supplementation for patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:25923656

  15. Selenium and its supplementation in cardiovascular disease--what do we know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benstoem, Carina; Goetzenich, Andreas; Kraemer, Sandra; Borosch, Sebastian; Manzanares, William; Hardy, Gil; Stoppe, Christian

    2015-04-27

    The trace element selenium is of high importance for many of the body's regulatory and metabolic functions. Balanced selenium levels are essential, whereas dysregulation can cause harm. A rapidly increasing number of studies characterizes the wide range of selenium dependent functions in the human body and elucidates the complex and multiple physiological and pathophysiological interactions of selenium and selenoproteins. For the majority of selenium dependent enzymes, several biological functions have already been identified, like regulation of the inflammatory response, antioxidant properties and the proliferation/differentiation of immune cells. Although the potential role of selenium in the development and progression of cardiovascular disease has been investigated for decades, both observational and interventional studies of selenium supplementation remain inconclusive and are considered in this review. This review covers current knowledge of the role of selenium and selenoproteins in the human body and its functional role in the cardiovascular system. The relationships between selenium intake/status and various health outcomes, in particular cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia/infarction and reperfusion injury are reviewed. We describe, in depth, selenium as a biomarker in coronary heart disease and highlight the significance of selenium supplementation for patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  16. Association of selenium status and blood glutathione concentrations in blacks and whites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richie, John P.; Muscat, Joshua E.; Ellison, Irina; Calcagnotto, Ana; Kleinman, Wayne; El-Bayoumy, Karam

    2011-01-01

    Selenium deficiency has been linked with increased cancer risk and, in some studies, selenium supplementation was protective against certain cancers. Previous studies suggest that selenium chemoprevention may involve reduced oxidative stress through enhanced glutathione (GSH). Our objectives were to examine the relationships between selenium and GSH in blood and modifying effects of race and sex in free living adults and individuals supplemented with selenium. Plasma selenium concentrations and free and bound GSH concentrations and γ-glutamyl cysteine ligase (GCL) activity in blood were measured in 336 healthy adults, (161 blacks, 175 whites). Plasma selenium and blood GSH were also measured in 36 healthy men from our previously conducted placebo-controlled trial of selenium-enriched yeast (247 μg/day for 9 months). In free-living adults, selenium concentrations were associated with increased blood GSH concentration and GCL activity (Pselenium was significantly higher in whites than in blacks (Psupplementation, plasma selenium was increased 114% in whites and 50% in blacks (Pselenium and GSH in blood of both free-living and selenium-supplemented individuals, with race being an important modifying factor. PMID:21462082

  17. Health risk assessment of environmental selenium: Emerging evidence and challenges (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinceti, Marco; Filippini, Tommaso; Cilloni, Silvia; Bargellini, Annalisa; Vergoni, Anna Valeria; Tsatsakis, Aristides; Ferrante, Margherita

    2017-05-01

    New data have been accumulated in the scientific literature in recent years which allow a more adequate risk assessment of selenium with reference to human health. This new evidence comes from environmental studies, carried out in populations characterized by abnormally high or low selenium intakes, and from high-quality and large randomized controlled trials with selenium recently carried out in the US and in other countries. These trials have consistently shown no beneficial effect on cancer and cardiovascular risk, and have yielded indications of unexpected toxic effects of selenium exposure. Overall, these studies indicate that the minimal amount of environmental selenium which is source of risk to human health is much lower than anticipated on the basis of older studies, since toxic effects were shown at levels of intake as low as around 260 µg/day for organic selenium and around 16 µg/day for inorganic selenium. Conversely, populations with average selenium intake of less than 13-19 µg/day appear to be at risk of a severe cardiomyopathy, Keshan disease. Overall, there is the need to reconsider the selenium standards for dietary intake, drinking water, outdoor and indoor air levels, taking into account the recently discovered adverse health effects of low-dose selenium overexposure, and carefully assessing the significance of selenium-induced proteomic changes.

  18. Optimization of selenoprotein P and other plasma selenium biomarkers for the assessment of the selenium nutritional requirement: a placebo-controlled, double-blind study of selenomethionine supplementation in selenium-deficient Chinese subjects1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yiming; Hill, Kristina E; Li, Ping; Xu, Jiayuan; Zhou, Dingyou; Motley, Amy K; Wang, Li; Byrne, Daniel W; Burk, Raymond F

    2010-01-01

    Background: The intake of selenium needed for optimal health has not been established. Selenoproteins perform the functions of selenium, and the selenium intake needed for their full expression is not known. Objective: This study sought to determine the intake of selenium required to optimize plasma selenoprotein P (SEPP1) and to compare SEPP1 with other plasma selenium biomarkers. Design: A 40-wk placebo-controlled, double-blind study of selenium repletion was carried out in 98 healthy Chinese subjects who had a daily dietary selenium intake of 14 mu g. Fourteen subjects each were assigned randomly to daily dose groups of 0, 21, 35, 55, 79, 102, and 125 mu g Se as l-selenomethionine. Plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity, SEPP1, and selenium were measured. A biomarker was considered to be optimized when its value was not different from the mean value of the subjects receiving larger supplements. Results: The SEPP1 concentration was optimized at 40 wk by the 35- mu g supplement, which indicated that 49 mu g/d could optimize it. GPX activity was optimized by 21 mu g (total ingestion: 35 mu g/d). The selenium concentration showed no tendency to become optimized. Conclusions: The present results indicate that SEPP1 concentration is the best plasma biomarker studied for assessing optimal expression of all selenoproteins, because its optimization required a larger intake of selenium than did GPX activity. On the basis of the selenium intake needed for SEPP1 optimization with adjustments for body weight and individual variation, ap 75 mu g Se/d as selenomethionine is postulated to allow full expression of selenoproteins in US residents. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00428649. PMID:20573787

  19. Selenium Metabolism in Cancer Cells: The Combined Application of XAS and XFM Techniques to the Problem of Selenium Speciation in Biological Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh H. Harris

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Determining the speciation of selenium in vivo is crucial to understanding the biological activity of this essential element, which is a popular dietary supplement due to its anti-cancer properties. Hyphenated techniques that combine separation and detection methods are traditionally and effectively used in selenium speciation analysis, but require extensive sample preparation that may affect speciation. Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption and fluorescence techniques offer an alternative approach to selenium speciation analysis that requires minimal sample preparation. We present a brief summary of some key HPLC-ICP-MS and ESI-MS/MS studies of the speciation of selenium in cells and rat tissues. We review the results of a top-down approach to selenium speciation in human lung cancer cells that aims to link the speciation and distribution of selenium to its biological activity using a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS and X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM. The results of this approach highlight the distinct fates of selenomethionine, methylselenocysteine and selenite in terms of their speciation and distribution within cells: organic selenium metabolites were widely distributed throughout the cells, whereas inorganic selenium metabolites were compartmentalized and associated with copper. New data from the XFM mapping of electrophoretically-separated cell lysates show the distribution of selenium in the proteins of selenomethionine-treated cells. Future applications of this top-down approach are discussed.

  20. Effects of dietary selenium supplementation on serum and liver selenium, serum malondialdehyde and liver glutathione peroxidase activity in rats consuming thermally oxidized sunflower oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Negar; Jamalian, Jalal; Owji, Ali Akbar; Ramezani, Roghayeh; Karbalaie, Narges; Rajaeifard, Abdol Reza

    2008-11-01

    The present study compared the effects of four isocaloric diets containing (1) fresh sunflower oil not supplemented with selenium (Fresh), (2) oxidized sunflower oil not supplemented with selenium (Oxidized), (3) fresh sunflower oil supplemented with 1 ppm selenium as sodium selenite (Fresh+Se), (4) oxidized sunflower oil supplemented with 1 ppm selenium as sodium selenite (Oxidized+Se) on serum MDA concentrations, liver GPx activity and serum and liver selenium contents in growing male Sprague Dawley rats during a period of 43 days. The oxidized oil used was prepared by heating fresh sunflower oil at 180 degrees C for 48 h. Serum and liver selenium contents and liver GPx activity were significantly higher in the selenium supplemented groups compared to the non-selenium supplemented groups, but these parameters did not differ significantly between the oxidized oil fed groups and the fresh oil fed groups. Serum MDA concentrations increased significantly in the Oxidized group compared to the Fresh group. This suggests that the ingestion of oxidized oil resulted in, in vivo lipid peroxidation. Serum MDA concentrations remained significantly higher even in comparison of the Oxidized + Se group with the Oxidized group. Our results emphasize that the consumption of oxidized oil increases in vivo lipid peroxidation and thus can be deleterious to health. However, we did not observe a significant beneficial effect of selenium supplementation upon the ingestion of thermally oxidized oil on lipid peroxidation.

  1. Dietary selenium for the mitigation of radiation injury: effects of selenium dose escalation and timing of supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, Fritz; Muir, Sarah A; Cohen, Eric P; Fish, Brian L; Mäder, Marylou; Schock, Ashley M; Althouse, Bryan J; Moulder, John E

    2011-09-01

    We recently reported that daily dietary supplementation with 100 µg selenium (a dose exceeding a rat's nutritional requirement by about 33-fold) initiated immediately after total-body irradiation (TBI) and maintained for 21 weeks mitigates radiation nephropathy in a rat model as indicated by blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels and histopathological criteria (Radiat Res. 2009; 17:368-73). In this follow-up study, we explored the risks and benefits of delaying the onset of supplementation, shortening periods of supplementation, and escalating selenium supplementation beyond 100 µg/day. Supplementation with 200 µg selenium/day (as selenite or seleno-l-methionine) substantially improved the mitigation of radiation nephropathy by lowering BUN levels at 4 months after TBI from 115 to as low as 34 mg/dl and by proportionally lowering the incidence of histopathological abnormalities. Shortening the period of supplementation to 3 or 2 months did not compromise efficacy. Delaying the onset of supplementation for 1 week reduced but did not abrogate the mitigation of radiation nephropathy. Supplementation with 300 µg/day mitigated radiation nephropathy less effectively than 200 µg and was poorly tolerated. Rats that had been given 10 Gy of TBI were less tolerant of high-dose selenium than nonirradiated rats. This reduced tolerance of high-dose selenium would need to be taken into consideration when selenium is used for the mitigation of radiation injury in victims of nuclear accidents or acts of radiological terrorism. The high dose requirements, the pronounced threshold effect, and the superior performance of selenite suggest that the mitigation of radiation nephropathy involves mechanisms that go beyond the induction of selenoproteins.

  2. Dietary Selenium for the Mitigation of Radiation Injury: Effects of Selenium Dose Escalation and Timing of Supplementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, Fritz; Muir, Sarah A.; Cohen, Eric P.; Fish, Brian L.; Mäder, Marylou; Schock, Ashley M.; Althouse, Bryan J.; Moulder, John E.

    2011-01-01

    We recently reported that daily dietary supplementation with 100 μg selenium (a dose exceeding a rat’s nutritional requirement by about 33-fold) initiated immediately after total-body irradiation (TBI) and maintained for 21 weeks mitigates radiation nephropathy in a rat model as indicated by blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels and histopathological criteria (Radiat Res. 2009; 17:368–73). In this follow-up study, we explored the risks and benefits of delaying the onset of supplementation, shortening periods of supplementation, and escalating selenium supplementation beyond 100 μg/day. Supplementation with 200 μg selenium/day (as selenite or seleno-L-methionine) substantially improved the mitigation of radiation nephropathy by lowering BUN levels at 4 months after TBI from 115 to as low as 34 mg/dl and by proportionally lowering the incidence of histopathological abnormalities. Shortening the period of supplementation to 3 or 2 months did not compromise efficacy. Delaying the onset of supplementation for 1 week reduced but did not abrogate the mitigation of radiation nephropathy. Supplementation with 300 μg/day mitigated radiation nephropathy less effectively than 200 μg and was poorly tolerated. Rats that had been given 10 Gy of TBI were less tolerant of high-dose selenium than nonirradiated rats. This reduced tolerance of high-dose selenium would need to be taken into consideration when selenium is used for the mitigation of radiation injury in victims of nuclear accidents or acts of radiological terrorism. The high dose requirements, the pronounced threshold effect, and the superior performance of selenite suggest that the mitigation of radiation nephropathy involves mechanisms that go beyond the induction of selenoproteins. PMID:21867430

  3. Disruptive technology and medical librarians

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cooper, I Diane

    2015-01-01

    ... has also been disrupted by technology. In our town, we used to have an afternoon newspaper. The reporters were competent; the managers worked hard. My father looked forward to reading the evening paper after coming home from work. But the newspaper industry was disrupted by technology, television. Dad's afternoon paper quit publishing, as newspapers...

  4. Selenium supplementation for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Karen; Hartley, Louise; Day, Camilla; Flowers, Nadine; Clarke, Aileen; Stranges, Saverio

    2013-01-31

    Selenium is a key component of a number of selenoproteins which protect against oxidative stress and have the potential to prevent chronic diseases including cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, observational studies have shown inconsistent associations between selenium intake and CVD risk; in addition, there is concern around a possible increased risk of type 2 diabetes with high selenium exposure. To determine the effectiveness of selenium only supplementation for the primary prevention of CVD and examine the potential adverse effect of type 2 diabetes. The following electronic databases were searched: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 10 of 12, October 2012) on The Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (Ovid) (1946 to week 2 October 2012); EMBASE Classic + EMBASE (Ovid) (1947 to 2012 Week 42); CINAHL (EBSCO) (to 24 October 2012); ISI Web of Science (1970 to 24 October 2012); PsycINFO (Ovid) (1806 to week 3 October 2012); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Health Technology Assessment Database and Health Economics Evaluations Database (Issue 4 of 4, October 2012) on The Cochrane Library. Trial registers and reference lists of reviews and articles were searched and experts in the field were approached. No language restrictions were applied. Randomised controlled trials on the effects of selenium only supplementation on major CVD end-points, mortality, changes in CVD risk factors, and type 2 diabetes were included both in adults of all ages from the general population and in those at high risk of CVD. Trials were only considered where the comparison group was placebo or no intervention. Only studies with at least three months follow-up were included in the meta-analyses, shorter term studies were dealt with descriptively. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for additional information. Twelve trials (seven with duration of at least three months) met the

  5. Selecting Lentil Accessions for Global Selenium Biofortification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavarajah, Dil; Abare, Alex; Mapa, Indika; Coyne, Clarice J.; Thavarajah, Pushparajah; Kumar, Shiv

    2017-01-01

    The biofortification of lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus.) has the potential to provide adequate daily selenium (Se) to human diets. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine how low-dose Se fertilizer application at germination affects seedling biomass, antioxidant activity, and Se uptake of 26 cultivated lentil genotypes; and (2) quantify the seed Se concentration of 191 lentil wild accessions grown in Terbol, Lebanon. A germination study was conducted with two Se treatments [0 (control) and 30 kg of Se/ha] with three replicates. A separate field study was conducted in Lebanon for wild accessions without Se fertilizer. Among cultivated lentil accessions, PI533690 and PI533693 showed >100% biomass increase vs. controls. Se addition significantly increased seedling Se uptake, with the greatest uptake (6.2 µg g−1) by PI320937 and the least uptake (1.1 µg g−1) by W627780. Seed Se concentrations of wild accessions ranged from 0 to 2.5 µg g−1; accessions originating from Syria (0–2.5 µg g−1) and Turkey (0–2.4 µg g−1) had the highest seed Se. Frequency distribution analysis revealed that seed Se for 63% of accessions was between 0.25 and 0.75 µg g−1, and thus a single 50 g serving of lentil has the potential to provide adequate dietary Se (20–60% of daily recommended daily allowance). As such, Se application during plant growth for certain lentil genotypes grown in low Se soils may be a sustainable Se biofortification solution to increase seed Se concentration. Incorporating a diverse panel of lentil wild germplasm into Se biofortification programs will increase genetic diversity for effective genetic mapping for increased lentil seed Se nutrition and plant productivity. PMID:28846602

  6. Selecting Lentil Accessions for Global Selenium Biofortification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dil Thavarajah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The biofortification of lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus. has the potential to provide adequate daily selenium (Se to human diets. The objectives of this study were to (1 determine how low-dose Se fertilizer application at germination affects seedling biomass, antioxidant activity, and Se uptake of 26 cultivated lentil genotypes; and (2 quantify the seed Se concentration of 191 lentil wild accessions grown in Terbol, Lebanon. A germination study was conducted with two Se treatments [0 (control and 30 kg of Se/ha] with three replicates. A separate field study was conducted in Lebanon for wild accessions without Se fertilizer. Among cultivated lentil accessions, PI533690 and PI533693 showed >100% biomass increase vs. controls. Se addition significantly increased seedling Se uptake, with the greatest uptake (6.2 µg g−1 by PI320937 and the least uptake (1.1 µg g−1 by W627780. Seed Se concentrations of wild accessions ranged from 0 to 2.5 µg g−1; accessions originating from Syria (0–2.5 µg g−1 and Turkey (0–2.4 µg g−1 had the highest seed Se. Frequency distribution analysis revealed that seed Se for 63% of accessions was between 0.25 and 0.75 µg g−1, and thus a single 50 g serving of lentil has the potential to provide adequate dietary Se (20–60% of daily recommended daily allowance. As such, Se application during plant growth for certain lentil genotypes grown in low Se soils may be a sustainable Se biofortification solution to increase seed Se concentration. Incorporating a diverse panel of lentil wild germplasm into Se biofortification programs will increase genetic diversity for effective genetic mapping for increased lentil seed Se nutrition and plant productivity.

  7. Selenium speciation profiles in biofortified sangiovese wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontanella, Maria Chiara; D'Amato, Roberto; Regni, Luca; Proietti, Primo; Beone, Gian Maria; Businelli, Daniela

    2017-09-01

    Biofortification is an agronomic-based strategy, utilized by farmers, to produce selenium (Se)-enriched food products that may help reduce dietary deficiencies of Se occurring throughout susceptible regions of the world. The foliar exposure route application ensures a high efficiency of Se assimilation by the plant since it does not depend on root-to-shoot translocation. In this study we treated grapevines of Sangiovese variety in the pre-flowering period with sodium selenate (100mg Se L-1). Se content was measured in leaves, fruit at harvest time and in wine respectively in treated and not treated samples with ICP-MS. At harvest, a higher amount of Se in the treated leaves compared to untreated ones was found, 16.0±3.1mgkg-1 dry weight (dw) against 0.17±0.006mgkg-1 dw in the untreated ones. The treated grapes had a content of Se of 0.800±0.08mgkg-1 dw, while that untreated one 0.065±0.025mgkg-1 dw. Immediately after the malolactic fermentation, the wine obtained from treated and untreated vines had a Se content of 0.620±0.09mg Se L-1 and 0.024±0.010mg Se L-1 respectively. In our case the percentage of inorganic Se is 26% of the total Se in the untreated wine, while in Se enriched wine this percentage increase to 47.5% of the total Se. The Se(VI) was the inorganic chemical form more present in enriched wine, probably due to foliar application with selenate. Distributions of Se species suggested being careful to the choice of the enrichment solutions to promote a balanced distribution of different chemical forms, perhaps favouring the accumulation of organic forms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Selenium Speciation and Management in Wet FGD Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Searcy, K; Richardson, M; Blythe, G; Wallschlaeger, D; Chu, P; Dene, C

    2012-02-29

    This report discusses results from bench- and pilot-scale simulation tests conducted to determine the factors that impact selenium speciation and phase partitioning in wet FGD systems. The selenium chemistry in wet FGD systems is highly complex and not completely understood, thus extrapolation and scale-up of these results may be uncertain. Control of operating parameters and application of scrubber additives have successfully demonstrated the avoidance or decrease of selenite oxidation at the bench and pilot scale. Ongoing efforts to improve sample handling methods for selenium speciation measurements are also discussed. Bench-scale scrubber tests explored the impacts of oxidation air rate, trace metals, scrubber additives, and natural limestone on selenium speciation in synthetic and field-generated full-scale FGD liquors. The presence and concentration of redox-active chemical species as well as the oxidation air rate contribute to the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) conditions in FGD scrubbers. Selenite oxidation to the undesirable selenate form increases with increasing ORP conditions, and decreases with decreasing ORP conditions. Solid-phase manganese [Mn(IV)] appeared to be the significant metal impacting the oxidation of selenite to selenate. Scrubber additives were tested for their ability to inhibit selenite oxidation. Although dibasic acid and other scrubber additives showed promise in early clear liquor (sodium based and without calcium solids) bench-scale tests, these additives did not show strong inhibition of selenite oxidation in tests with higher manganese concentrations and with slurries from full-scale wet FGD systems. In bench-tests with field liquors, addition of ferric chloride at a 250:1 iron-to-selenium mass ratio sorbed all incoming selenite to the solid phase, although addition of ferric salts had no impact on native selenate that already existed in the field slurry liquor sample. As ORP increases, selenite may oxidize to selenate more

  9. Disrupting Ethnography through Rhizoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Masny

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article interrogates principles of ethnography in education proposed by Mills and Morton: raw tellings, analytic pattern, vignette and empathy. This article adopts a position that is uncomfortable, unconventional and interesting. It involves a deterritorialization/ rupture of ethnography in education in order to reterritorialize a different concept: rhizoanalysis, a way to position theory and data that is multilayered, complex and messy. Rhizoanalysis, the main focus of this article is not a method. It is an approach to research conditioned by a reality in which Deleuze and Guattari disrupt representation, interpretation and subjectivity. In this article, Multiple Literacies Theory, a theoretical and practical framework, becomes a lens to examine a rhizomatic study of a Korean family recently arrived to Australia and attending English as a second language classes. Observations and interviews recorded the daily lives of the family. The vignettes were selected by reading data intensively and immanently through a process of palpation, an innovative approach to educational research. Rhizoanalysis proposes to abandon the given and invent different ways of thinking about and doing research and what might happen when reading data differently, intensively and immanently, through Multiple Literacies Theory. Rhizoanalysis, a game-changer in the way research can be conducted, affords a different lens to tackle issues in education through research.

  10. Soil-type influences human selenium status and underlies widespread selenium deficiency risks in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Rachel; Siyame, Edwin W P; Young, Scott D; Chilimba, Allan D C; Joy, Edward J M; Black, Colin R; Ander, E Louise; Watts, Michael J; Chilima, Benson; Gondwe, Jellita; Kang'ombe, Dalitso; Stein, Alexander J; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J; Gibson, Rosalind S; Kalimbira, Alexander A; Broadley, Martin R

    2013-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential human micronutrient with critical roles in immune functioning and antioxidant defence. Estimates of dietary Se intakes and status are scarce for Africa although crop surveys indicate deficiency is probably widespread in Malawi. Here we show that Se deficiency is likely endemic in Malawi based on the Se status of adults consuming food from contrasting soil types. These data are consistent with food balance sheets and composition tables revealing that >80% of the Malawi population is at risk of dietary Se inadequacy. Risk of dietary Se inadequacy is >60% in seven other countries in Southern Africa, and 22% across Africa as a whole. Given that most Malawi soils cannot supply sufficient Se to crops for adequate human nutrition, the cost and benefits of interventions to alleviate Se deficiency should be determined; for example, Se-enriched nitrogen fertilisers could be adopted as in Finland.

  11. Subacute toxicity of nano-selenium compared to other selenium species in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benko, Ilona; Nagy, Gabor; Tanczos, Bence; Ungvari, Eva; Sztrik, Attila; Eszenyi, Peter; Prokisch, Jozsef; Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2012-12-01

    Sixteen groups of mice were fed diets containing different selenium species to compare their toxicity. Inorganic sodium selenate and sodium hydroselenite, elementary nanoSe, organic Sel-Plex, and Lacto-MicroSelenium were administered for 14 d at concentrations of 0.5, 5, and 50 ppm Se, equivalent to 0.5, 5, and 50 mg Se/kg food, corresponding to an estimated 4, 40, and 400 µg/kg body weight/d Se uptake, respectively. At the end of the treatment, body, liver, spleen, kidney, heart, and brain weights were measured, mice were subjected to necropsy, and histological examinations were performed on the liver. At lower Se doses (0.5 and 5 ppm) a moderate reduction was observed in the number of bone marrow and white blood cells and in granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units (GM-CFUs) relative to the untreated control group of mice. A comparison of lowest toxic doses of sodium selenite in mice (0.5 ppm) and mallard (10 ppm) indicates that birds are more resistant to Se than rodents. In mice, a small but measurable weight loss was observed after 5 ppm selenate and LactoMicroSe treatment. The most significant changes took place after 50-ppm administration in body and spleen weight, hematology, and liver histology. Toxicity was more pronounced when inorganic Se was applied than after subacute application of Sel-Plex, nanoSe, or LactoMicroSe. To summarize the effects, the authors' 14-d murine subacute toxicity study showed that the toxicity of Se species decreased in the following order: selenate > selenite > nanoSe > Sel-Plex > LactoMicroSe. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  12. Mercury and selenium levels, and selenium:mercury molar ratios of brain, muscle and other tissues in bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) from New Jersey, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Jeitner, Christian; Donio, Mark; Pittfield, Taryn; Gochfeld, Michael

    2013-01-15

    A number of contaminants affect fish health, including mercury and selenium, and the selenium:mercury molar ratio. Recently the protective effects of selenium on methylmercury toxicity have been publicized, particularly for consumption of saltwater fish. Yet the relative ameliorating effects of selenium on toxicity within fish have not been examined, nor has the molar ratio in different tissues, (i.e. brain). We examined mercury and selenium levels in brain, kidney, liver, red and white muscle, and skin and scales in bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) (n=40) from New Jersey to determine whether there were toxic levels of either metal, and we computed the selenium:mercury molar ratios by tissues. Total mercury averaged 0.32±0.02 ppm wet weight in edible muscle and 0.09±0.01 ppm in brain. Selenium concentration averaged 0.37±0.03 in muscle and 0.36±0.03 ppm in brain. There were significant differences in levels of mercury, selenium, and selenium:mercury molar ratios, among tissues. Mercury and selenium levels were correlated in kidney and skin/scales. Mercury levels were highest in kidney, intermediate in muscle and liver, and lowest in brain and skin/scales; selenium levels were also highest in kidney, intermediate in liver, and were an order of magnitude lower in the white muscle and brain. Mercury levels in muscle, kidney and skin/scales were positively correlated with fish size (length). Selenium levels in muscle, kidney and liver were positively correlated with fish length, but in brain; selenium levels were negatively correlated with fish length. The selenium:mercury molar ratio was negatively correlated with fish length for white muscle, liver, kidney, and brain, particularly for fish over 50 cm in length, suggesting that older fish experience less protective advantages of selenium against mercury toxicity than smaller fish, and that consumers of bluefish similarly receive less advantage from eating larger fish. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  13. Interspecific and intraspecific variation in selenium:mercury molar ratios in saltwater fish from the Aleutians: Potential protection on mercury toxicity by selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Donio, Mark; Pittfield, Taryn

    2014-01-01

    A number of factors affect the consumption risk from mercury in fish, including mercury levels, seasonal patterns of mercury concentrations, human consumption patterns, and sensitive populations (e.g. pregnant women, fetuses, young children, and yet unknown genetic factors). Recently the protective effects of selenium on methylmercury toxicity have been publicized, particularly for saltwater fish. We examine levels of mercury and selenium in several species of fish and seabirds from the Aleutians (Alaska), determine selenium:mercury molar ratios, and examine species-specific and individual variation in the ratios as a means of exploring the use of the ratio in risk assessment and risk management. Variation among species was similar for mercury and selenium. There was significant inter-specific and intraspecific variation in selenium:mercury molar ratios for fish, and for birds. The mean selenium:mercury molar ratios for all fish and bird species were above 1, meaning there was an excess of selenium relative to mercury. It has been suggested that an excess of selenium confers some protective advantage for salt water fish, although the degree of excess necessary is unclear. The selenium:mercury molar ratio was significantly correlated negatively with total length for most fish species, but not for dolly varden. Some individuals of Pacific cod, yellow irish lord, rock greenling, Pacific halibut, dolly varden, and to a lesser extent, flathead sole, had selenium:mercury ratios below 1. No bird muscle had an excess of mercury (ratio below 1), and only glaucous-winged gull and pigeon guillemot had ratios between 1 and 5. There was a great deal of variation in selenium:mercury molar ratios within fish species, and within bird species, making it difficult and impractical to use these ratios in risk assessment or management, for fish advisories, or for consumers, particularly given the difficulty of interpreting the ratios. PMID:22664537

  14. Effect of ionophores and selenium supplementation on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    Short paper and poster abstracts: 38th Congress of the South African Society of Animal Science. The South African Journal of Animal Science is available online at http://www.sasas.co.za/Sajas.html. 131. Effect of ionophores and selenium supplementation on the composition of long-chain fatty acid in carcass fat of steers.

  15. Copper and selenium status of healthy pregnant women in Enugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dietary intake should be modified to ensure optimal selenium levels during pregnancy. Key words: Copper ... common practice to routinely supplement iron and folic acid with the aim of ... pregnant women to assist in the optimal formulation of micronutrient needs .... trend has been shown in many other studies from different.

  16. Selenium and mercury interactions wtih emphasis on fish tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review addresses the effects of mercury (Hg) in fish as it relates to the health of the fish themselves as well as potential risks of toxicity in wildlife and humans that consume fish. In particular, it addresses selenium (Se) as a bioindicator of susceptibility to harmful e...

  17. A role for p53 in selenium-induced senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The tumor suppressor p53 and the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase play important roles in the senescence response to oncogene activation and DNA damage. We have previously shown that selenium-containing compounds can activate an ATM-dependent senescence response in MRC-5 normal fibroblasts...

  18. Copper and selenium status of healthy pregnant women in Enugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    high serum copper levels during normal pregnancy.[7,8] These changes are steady and consistent from the first trimester to third trimester.[9,10]. Selenium is an essential antioxidant trace mineral for the human body. It is a component of selenoproteins such as the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), which.

  19. Selenium and the regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium was discovered by Berzelius in 1817, and the essentiality of Se was demonstrated that trace amounts of Se protected against liver necrosis in vitamin E deficient rats in the mid-1950s. The benefits of Se are many including protection against cancer, heart diseases, muscle disorders, immunit...

  20. Geographical distribution of the selenium status of herbivores in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Available information on the selenium (Se) status of grazing herbivores in South Africa is reviewed and collated in the form of a geographical distribution map. Marginal to acute Se deficiencies have been reported to occur in the Midlands region and in mountainous areas of the KwaZulu-Natal province and in the.

  1. Selenium oxyanion inhibition of hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenz, M.; Janzen, N.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2008-01-01

    Inhibitory effects of selenite and selenate towards hydrogenotrophic and acetoclastic methanogenesis were evaluated in anaerobic toxicity assays. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of both selenium oxyanions was below 6.1 X 10(-5) M in hydrogenotrophic assays, whereas acetoclastic methanogens

  2. Bioavailability of cobalt, zinc and selenium and anthelmintic effects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was carried out to compare the use of liver and plasma analysis as methods of assessing the status of cobalt, zinc and selenium in sheep, and to assess the anthelmintic efficacy of fortified and non-fortified albendazole preparations. Plasma and liver samples were collected in duplicate from fourteen ...

  3. Selenium dioxide catalysed oxidation of acetic acid hydrazide by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Selenium dioxide catalysed acetic acid hydrazide oxidation by bromate was studied in hydrochloric acid medium. The order in oxidant concentration, substrate and catalyst were found to be unity. Increasing hydrogen ion concentration increases the rate of the reaction due to protonation equilibria of the oxidant.

  4. Addition of Selenium to Carica papaya Linn Pulp Extract Enhances ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and water extracts of unripe Carica papaya. papaya were analyzed for mineral element composition (Ca, calcium; Mg, magnesium; Na, sodium; Fe, iron; Mn, manganese; Zn, zinc; Ag, silver; and Se, selenium) using a microwave-assisted digestion procedure. Atomic absorption ...

  5. Serum Levels of Selenium, Zinc, Copper and Magnesium in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Free radicals have harmful effects on cells and tissues and are thought to be responsible for the pathogenesis of many diseases including bronchial asthma. Selenium (Se), Zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and magnesium (Mg) are trace elements required for the antioxidant enzymes and hence the optimal functions of ...

  6. Oxidation of phosphine by sulfur or selenium involving a catalytic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 121; Issue 1. Oxidation of phosphine by sulfur or selenium involving a catalytic cycle in the interconversion of monomer and tetramer forms of copper-maleonitriledithiolate complexes. Biplab K Maiti Sabyasachi Sarkar. Full Papers Volume 121 Issue 1 January 2009 pp ...

  7. Kinetic spectrophotometric determination of trace amounts of selenium and vanadium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safavi, A.; Sedghy, H.R.; Shams, E. [Dept. of Chemistry, Shiraz Univ. (Iran)

    1999-11-01

    A sensitive kinetic spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of Se(IV) over the range of 45 to 4000 ng in 10 mL of solution. The method is based on the catalytic effect of Se(IV) on the reduction reaction of bromate by hydrazinium dichloride, with subsequent reaction of Ponceau S with products of the above reaction (chlorine and bromine), causing color changing of Ponceau S. Method development includes optimization of time interval for measurement of slope, pH, reagents concentration, and temperature. The optimized conditions yielded a theoretical detection limit of 33 ng/10 mL of solution of Se(IV). The interfering effects were studied and removed. The method was applied to the determination of selenium in spiked water, Kjeldahl tablet, selenium tablet, and shampoo. Vanadium(V) has an inhibition effect on the catalyzed reaction of bromate and hydrazine by selenium. Using this effect, V(V) can be determined in the range of 70 to 2500 ng in 10 mL of solution. The optimization procedure includes pH and selenium concentration. An extraction method was used for interference removal. The method was applied to the determination of vanadium in petroleum. (orig.)

  8. Selenium deficiency in cattle | Moxon | South African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Animal Science. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 11, No 2 (1981) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Selenium deficiency in cattle. AL Moxon. Abstract. No Abstract.

  9. Copper, selenium and zinc content of canned and noncanned ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The levels of copper, selenium and zinc in beverages purchased in Nigeria were studied. Fifty samples of these beverages were digested in nitric acid and were analyzed using the Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS). The zinc levels ranged from 0.0 - 1.34 mg/L for the canned and 0.01 - 1.11 mg/L for the ...

  10. Concentrations of plasma copper and zinc and blood selenium in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Concentrations of plasma copper and zinc as well as blood selenium were determined in single and twin lambs and their dams for a period of 120 days from the birth of the lambs, using Merino, Dohne Merino and SA Mutton Merino sheep. The ewes and their lambs were kept on the same pastures and received the same ...

  11. Selenium and tocopherol effects on parasitaemia, organ weights ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The efficiency of diminazene aceturate alone and in separate combinations with selenium and tocopherol in T. brucei infected rats was investigated. Parasitemia, the relative weights and histological changes in the liver, spleen and brain were determined 7 days after T. brucei inoculation (untreated rats) and also 7, 14 and ...

  12. Selenium alone or in combination with lycopene modifies liver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis is one of the major public health problems worldwide. This study was designed to evaluate the potential hepatoprotective effects of lycopene (Lyco) and selenium (Se) against galactosamine (Gala) induced hepatitis in rats. Materials and Methods: Seventy five (75) male albino rats were grouped into ...

  13. Geographical distribution of the selenium status of herbivores in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Available information on the selenium (Se) status of grazing herbivores in South Africa is reviewed and collated in the form of a geographical distribution map. Marginal to acute Se deficiencies have been reported to occur in the Midlands region and in mountainous areas of the KwaZulu-Natal province and in the southern ...

  14. Selenium concentration of maize grain in South Africa and possible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 896 maize grain samples were obtained from all the maize silos throughout South Africa (231 silos) and analysed for selenium (Se) content. This information was used to compile a regional distribution map of the Se content of maize grain in South Africa. Of the samples analysed, 94% contained below 50 μg ...

  15. Biogeochemistry of selenium isotopes: processes, cycling and paleoenvironmental applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitchell, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element, which, with multiple oxidation states and six stable isotopes, has been suggested as a potentially powerful environmental tracer and paleoenvironmental proxy. Chapter 1 provides a literature review of the Se cycle. While the Se cycle shares some

  16. Effects Of Dietary Supplementation Of Vitamin E And Selenium On ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to evaluate the combined effects of dietary supplementation of vitamin E (Vit E) and selenium (Se) on total white blood cells, mononucleated cells, polymorphonucleated cells and packed cell volume of Trypanosoma congolense-infected rats (Rattus rattus). Ninety adult R. rattus of pure breed of ...

  17. Ameliorative effects of selenium and vitamin e supplementation on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of selenium and vitamin E supplementation on some haematological parameters and red blood cell osmotic fragility in Wistar rats subjected to water immersion restraint stress (WRS) (n= 35). Male Wistar rats, weighing 200-220 g were divided in to five groups of ...

  18. Selenium Characterization In The Global Rice Supply Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    For up to 1 billion people worldwide, insufficient dietary intake of selenium (Se) is a serious health constraint. Cereals are the dominant Se source for those on low protein diets, as typified by the global malnourished population. With crop Se content constrained largely by u...

  19. Selenium Adsorption To Aluminum-Based Water Treatment Residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum-based water treatment residuals (WTR) can adsorb water-and soil-borne P, As(V), As(III), and perchlorate, and may be able to adsorb excess environmental selenium. WTR, clay minerals, and amorphous aluminum hydroxide were shaken for 24 hours in selenate or selenite solut...

  20. Decreased reproductive rates in sheep fed a high selenium diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    High Se-containing forages grow on seleniferous soils in many parts of the United States and throughout the world. Selenium is an essential trace element that is required for many physiological processes but can also be either acutely or chronically toxic to livestock. Anecdotal reports of decrease...

  1. Selenium speciation and extractability in Dutch agricultural soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Supriatin, Supriatin; Weng, Liping; Comans, Rob N.J.

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to understand selenium (Se) speciation and extractability in Dutch agricultural soils. Top soil samples were taken from 42 grassland fields and 41 arable land fields in the Netherlands. Total Se contents measured in aqua regia were between 0.12 and 1.97mgkg-1(on average

  2. Selenium affects biosilica formation in the demosponge Suberites domuncula

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, W.E.G.; Borejko, A.; Brandt, D.; Osinga, R.; Ushijima, H.; Hamer, B.; Krasko, A.; Xupeng, C.; Mueller, I.M.; Schroeder, H.C.

    2005-01-01

    Selenium is a trace element found in freshwater and the marine environment. We show that it plays a major role in spicule formation in the demosponge Suberites domuncula. If added to primmorphs, an in vitro sponge cell culture system, it stimulates the formation of siliceous spicules. Using

  3. Grain Accumulation of Selenium Species in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient in which up to 1 billion people worldwide are deficient, causing a range of health disorders and potentially an increased risk of certain cancers. Consequently, there is much interest in Se biofortification of rice, the staple food for...

  4. Speciation of arsenic and selenium during leaching of fly ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, E.E. van der

    1995-01-01

    The leaching (release) of large amounts of oxyanions, such as those of arsenic and selenium, is an major environmental problem when it comes to the disposal or use of coal fly ash. To predict environmentally safe conditions for the disposal or use of fly ash in, for example,

  5. Selenium concentration of maize grain in South Africa and possible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Casey W

    Abstract. A total of 896 maize grain samples were obtained from all the maize silos throughout South Africa. (231 silos) and analysed for selenium (Se) content. This information was used to compile a regional distribution map of the Se content of maize grain in South Africa. Of the samples analysed, 94% contained below 50 ...

  6. Dietary selenium and copper intake by resident undergraduate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Main outcome measures: Pre-tested structure questionnaires were administered to informed students to obtain personal data, intake of selenium, copper and/or multimineral supplements and foods consumed as well as frequency of consumption, A twenty four hour food intake on two non-consecutive days, were used to ...

  7. Synthesis of selenium nanorods with assistance of biomolecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    FTIR analysis confirmed that the presence of stretching and bending vibrations of Se–O in both synthesized and commercial selenium samples at 465, 668 and 1118 cm-1. The FESEM micrographs are evident for the changes of rod size as a function of aging time. It is observed that the optical band gap energy is increased ...

  8. JV Task 96 - Phase 2 - Investigating the Importance of the Mercury-Selenium Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas Ralston; Laura Raymond

    2008-03-01

    In order to improve the understanding of the mercury issue, it is vital to study mercury's effects on selenium physiology. While mercury present in the environment or food sources may pose health risks, the protective effects of selenium have not been adequately considered in establishing regulatory policy. Numerous studies report that vulnerability to mercury toxicity is inversely proportional to selenium status or level. However, selenium status has not been considered in the development of the reference dosage levels for mercury exposure. Experimental animals fed low-selenium diets are far more vulnerable to mercury toxicity than animals fed normal selenium, and animals fed selenium-rich diets are even more resistant. Selenium-dependent enzymes in brain and endocrine tissues can be impaired by excessive mercury exposure, apparently because mercury has an extremely high binding affinity for selenium. When selenium becomes bound to mercury, it is unable to participate in the metabolic cycling of selenoprotein synthesis. Because of mercury-dependent impairments of selenoprotein synthesis, various antioxidant and regulatory functions in brain biochemistry are compromised. This report details a 2-year multiclient-funded research program designed to examine the interactions between mercury and selenium in animal models. The studies explored the effects of dietary intakes of toxic amounts of methylmercury and the protective effects of the normal dietary range of selenium in counteracting mercury toxicity. This study finds that the amounts of selenium present in ocean fish are sufficient to protect against far larger quantities of methylmercury than those present in typical seafoods. Toxic effects of methylmercury exposure were not directly proportional to mercury concentrations in blood, brain, or any other tissues. Instead, mercury toxicity was proportional to molar ratios of mercury relative to selenium. In order to accurately assess risk associated with

  9. Modeling the impact of soil aggregate size on selenium immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Kausch

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil aggregates are mm- to cm-sized microporous structures separated by macropores. Whereas fast advective transport prevails in macropores, advection is inhibited by the low permeability of intra-aggregate micropores. This can lead to mass transfer limitations and the formation of aggregate scale concentration gradients affecting the distribution and transport of redox sensitive elements. Selenium (Se mobilized through irrigation of seleniferous soils has emerged as a major aquatic contaminant. In the absence of oxygen, the bioavailable oxyanions selenate, Se(VI, and selenite, Se(IV, can be microbially reduced to solid, elemental Se, Se(0, and anoxic microzones within soil aggregates are thought to promote this process in otherwise well-aerated soils. To evaluate the impact of soil aggregate size on selenium retention, we developed a dynamic 2-D reactive transport model of selenium cycling in a single idealized aggregate surrounded by a macropore. The model was developed based on flow-through-reactor experiments involving artificial soil aggregates (diameter: 2.5 cm made of sand and containing Enterobacter cloacae SLD1a-1 that reduces Se(VI via Se(IV to Se(0. Aggregates were surrounded by a constant flow providing Se(VI and pyruvate under oxic or anoxic conditions. In the model, reactions were implemented with double-Monod rate equations coupled to the transport of pyruvate, O2, and Se species. The spatial and temporal dynamics of the model were validated with data from experiments, and predictive simulations were performed covering aggregate sizes 1–2.5 cm in diameter. Simulations predict that selenium retention scales with aggregate size. Depending on O2, Se(VI, and pyruvate concentrations, selenium retention was 4–23 times higher in 2.5 cm aggregates compared to 1 cm aggregates. Under oxic conditions, aggregate size and pyruvate concentrations were found to have a positive synergistic effect on selenium retention. Promoting soil

  10. Modeling the impact of soil aggregate size on selenium immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kausch, M. F.; Pallud, C. E.

    2013-03-01

    Soil aggregates are mm- to cm-sized microporous structures separated by macropores. Whereas fast advective transport prevails in macropores, advection is inhibited by the low permeability of intra-aggregate micropores. This can lead to mass transfer limitations and the formation of aggregate scale concentration gradients affecting the distribution and transport of redox sensitive elements. Selenium (Se) mobilized through irrigation of seleniferous soils has emerged as a major aquatic contaminant. In the absence of oxygen, the bioavailable oxyanions selenate, Se(VI), and selenite, Se(IV), can be microbially reduced to solid, elemental Se, Se(0), and anoxic microzones within soil aggregates are thought to promote this process in otherwise well-aerated soils. To evaluate the impact of soil aggregate size on selenium retention, we developed a dynamic 2-D reactive transport model of selenium cycling in a single idealized aggregate surrounded by a macropore. The model was developed based on flow-through-reactor experiments involving artificial soil aggregates (diameter: 2.5 cm) made of sand and containing Enterobacter cloacae SLD1a-1 that reduces Se(VI) via Se(IV) to Se(0). Aggregates were surrounded by a constant flow providing Se(VI) and pyruvate under oxic or anoxic conditions. In the model, reactions were implemented with double-Monod rate equations coupled to the transport of pyruvate, O2, and Se species. The spatial and temporal dynamics of the model were validated with data from experiments, and predictive simulations were performed covering aggregate sizes 1-2.5 cm in diameter. Simulations predict that selenium retention scales with aggregate size. Depending on O2, Se(VI), and pyruvate concentrations, selenium retention was 4-23 times higher in 2.5 cm aggregates compared to 1 cm aggregates. Under oxic conditions, aggregate size and pyruvate concentrations were found to have a positive synergistic effect on selenium retention. Promoting soil aggregation on

  11. Impact of dietary selenium intake on cardiac health: experimental approaches and human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanguy, Stéphane; Grauzam, Stéphane; de Leiris, Joël; Boucher, François

    2012-07-01

    Selenium, a dietary trace mineral, essential for humans and animals, exerts its effects mainly through its incorporation into selenoproteins. Adequate selenium intake is needed to maximize the activity of selenoproteins, among which glutathione peroxidases have been shown to play a major role in cellular defense against oxidative stress initiated by excess reactive oxygen species. In humans, a low selenium status has been linked to increased risk of various diseases, including heart disease. The main objective of this review is to present current knowledge on the role of selenium in cardiac health. Experimental studies have shown that selenium may exert protective effects on cardiac tissue in animal models involving oxidative stress. Because of the narrow safety margin of this mineral, most interventional studies in humans have reported inconsistent findings. Major determinants of selenium status in humans are not well understood and several nondietary factors might be associated with reduced selenium status. In this review, we discuss recent studies regarding the role of selenoproteins in the cardiovascular system, the effect of dietary intake on selenium status, the impact of selenium status on cardiac health, and the cellular mechanisms that can be involved in the physiological and toxic effects of selenium. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Effect of selenium on the lipids of two unicellular marine algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gennity, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The incorporation of selenium into the lipids of two unicellar marine algae has been investigated. Axenic cultures of the green algae Dunaliella primolecta and the red algae Porphyridium cruentum were grown in the presence of sublethal quantities of selenium (10 ppm) as selenite. Both algae were found to contain selenium bound to all purified lipids, except for saturated hydrocarbons. Of the lipids which contain selenium, carotenoid pigments show the greatest selenium concentration (..beta..-carotene: 1.3..mu..gSe/mg lipid; zeaxanthin: 1.1..mu..gSe/mg lipid) in both algae. P. cruentum contains about ten times as much lipid-associated selenium as D. primolecta, even though the lipids of both algae were very similar. This selenium has been shown to be incorporated non-metabolically into the lipid molecule. The lipid-associated selenium is probably non-covalently bound to the lipid molecule and may interact with double bonds. Selenite does not affect the lipid composition of D. primolecta, as compared with algae grown in the absence of added selenium. A selenium-induced 40% decrease in the cell content of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5omega3) and 20% decrease in arachidonic acid (20:4omega6) in polar lipids (glycolipids plus phospholipids) was observed in P. cruentum. A 25% decrease in the chlorophyll a content of this red algae also occurred. The cell content of other fatty acids, phospholipids and glycolipids was unaltered by selenium. These results are consistent with a selenite-induced oxidation of P. cruentum lipids. Selenium is able to increase the antioxidant potential of algal cells. However, no in vivo selenium-induced protection of algal lipids from oxidation was apparent.

  13. Features of selenium metabolism in humans living under the conditions of North European Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshukova, Olga; Potolitsyna, Natalya; Shadrina, Vera; Chernykh, Aleksei; Bojko, Evgeny

    2014-08-01

    Selenium supplementation and its effects on Northerners have been little studied. The aim of our study was to assess the selenium levels of the inhabitants of North European Russia, the seasonal aspects of selenium supplementation, and the interrelationships between selenium levels and the levels of thyroid gland hormones. To study the particular features of selenium metabolism in Northerners over the course of 1 year, 19 healthy male Caucasian volunteers (18-21 years old) were recruited for the present study. The subjects were military guards in a Northern European region of Russia (Syktyvkar, Russia, 62°N latitude) who spent 6-10-h outdoors daily. The study was conducted over a 12-month period. Selenium levels, glutathione peroxidase (GP) activity, as well as total triiodothyronine (T3), total thyroxin (T4), free thyroxin, free triiodothyronine, and thyrotropin (TSH) levels, were determined in the blood serum. The study subjects showed low levels of plasma selenium throughout the year. We observed a noticeable decrease in plasma selenium levels during the period from May to August, with the lowest levels in July. Selenium levels in the military guards correlated with the levels of selenium-dependent GP enzyme activity throughout the year. Additionally, we demonstrated a significant correlation between selenium and pituitary-thyroid axis hormones (total T3, free T4, and TSH) in periods in which plasma selenium levels were lower than the established normal ranges. Over the course of 1 year, low levels of plasma selenium affect GP activity and thyroid hormone levels in humans living in North European Russia.

  14. Plasma selenium levels and oxidative stress biomarkers: a gene-environment interaction population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan-Chilet, Inmaculada; Tellez-Plaza, Maria; Guallar, Eliseo; De Marco, Griselda; Lopez-Izquierdo, Raul; Gonzalez-Manzano, Isabel; Carmen Tormos, M; Martin-Nuñez, Gracia M; Rojo-Martinez, Gemma; Saez, Guillermo T; Martín-Escudero, Juan C; Redon, Josep; Javier Chaves, F

    2014-09-01

    The role of selenium exposure in preventing chronic disease is controversial, especially in selenium-repleted populations. At high concentrations, selenium exposure may increase oxidative stress. Studies evaluating the interaction of genetic variation in genes involved in oxidative stress pathways and selenium are scarce. We evaluated the cross-sectional association of plasma selenium concentrations with oxidative stress levels, measured as oxidized to reduced glutathione ratio (GSSG/GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxo-dG) in urine, and the interacting role of genetic variation in oxidative stress candidate genes, in a representative sample of 1445 men and women aged 18-85 years from Spain. The geometric mean of plasma selenium levels in the study sample was 84.76 µg/L. In fully adjusted models the geometric mean ratios for oxidative stress biomarker levels comparing the highest to the lowest quintiles of plasma selenium levels were 0.61 (0.50-0.76) for GSSG/GSH, 0.89 (0.79-1.00) for MDA, and 1.06 (0.96-1.18) for 8-oxo-dG. We observed nonlinear dose-responses of selenium exposure and oxidative stress biomarkers, with plasma selenium concentrations above ~110 μg/L being positively associated with 8-oxo-dG, but inversely associated with GSSG/GSH and MDA. In addition, we identified potential risk genotypes associated with increased levels of oxidative stress markers with high selenium levels. Our findings support that high selenium levels increase oxidative stress in some biological processes. More studies are needed to disentangle the complexity of selenium biology and the relevance of potential gene-selenium interactions in relation to health outcomes in human populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of blood serum selenium on udder health in dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Davidov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of selenium concentration in early lactation on mammary gland health and histological characteristics of the udder. The experiment included 30 high-yielding Holstein-Friesian cows. Selenium concentrations in blood and milk serum, and the average somatic cell count in the first and sixth months of lactation were analyzed. After exclusion of the experimental cows from the herd, histological characteristics of the udder were examined (the degree of leukocyte infiltration and the number of granulomas in the parenchyma. The mean selenium concentration in the blood serum was 0.62±0.11 mmol/L and that in the milk serum was 0.12±0.07 mmol/L. Optimal blood levels of selenium were found in 19 cows and suboptimal levels in 11 cows. A significant negative correlation was observed between blood and milk selenium concentrations and somatic cell count in early and mid lactation. There was no relationship between blood selenium concentration, milk selenium concentration and the amount of milk produced. Selenium-deficient cows had a significantly higher milk somatic cell count in early and mid lactation and significantly lower levels of selenium in milk. Upon histological analysis, 120 samples of individual quarters of the udder were grouped according to the degree of leukocyte infiltration and number of granulomas. Results showed that an increase in the degree of leukocyte infiltration and number of granulomas leads to an increase in the proportion of quarters from selenium-deficient cows and a decline in the percentage of quarters from cows exhibiting normal blood selenium concentrations. Selenium has a significant impact on udder health. Changes caused by selenium deficiency occur due to marked inflammation process in the mammary gland.

  16. Binding and Conversion of Selenium in Candida utilis ATCC 9950 Yeasts in Bioreactor Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieliszek, Marek; Błażejak, Stanisław; Kurek, Eliza

    2017-02-25

    Selenium is considered an essential component of all living organisms. The use of yeasts as a selenium supplement in human nutrition has gained much interest over the last decade. The accumulation and biochemical transformation of selenium in yeast cells is particularly interesting to many researchers. In this article, we present the results of the determination of selenium and selenomethionine content in the biomass of feed yeast Candida utilis ATCC 9950 obtained from the culture grown in a bioreactor. The results indicated that C. utilis cells performed the biotransformation of inorganic selenium(IV) to organic derivatives (e.g., selenomethionine). Selenium introduced (20-30 mg Se(4+)∙L(-1)) to the experimental media in the form of sodium(IV) selenite (Na₂SeO₃) salt caused a significant increase in selenium content in the biomass of C. utilis,irrespective of the concentration. The highest amount of selenium (1841 μg∙gd.w.(-1)) was obtained after a 48-h culture in media containing 30 mg Se(4+)∙L(-1). The highest content of selenomethionine (238.8 μg∙gd.w.(-1)) was found after 48-h culture from the experimental medium that was supplemented with selenium at a concentration of 20 mg Se(4+)∙L(-1). Biomass cell in the cultures supplemented with selenium ranged from 1.5 to 14.1 g∙L(-1). The results of this study indicate that yeast cell biomass of C. utilis enriched mainly with the organic forms of selenium can be a valuable source of protein. It creates the possibility of obtaining selenium biocomplexes that can be used in the production of protein-selenium dietary supplements for animals and humans.

  17. Mercury and selenium relationship in a tropical estuarine fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Pizzochero

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic systems have been considered as final sinks for persistent and bioaccumulative toxicants (PBTs, such as metals and organohalogen compounds. Among the trace elements, non-essential metals deserve special attention due to their toxicity. In this context, mercury (Hg should be highlighted due to its toxic effects, which comprise neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, genotoxicity, among others. Several studies have highlighted the selenium-mediated methylmercury detoxification process, via mercury selenide formation in tissues of marine vertebrates. Despite being an essential element, selenium may also be toxic in high concentrations. This study focused on Guanabara Bay (GB, a heavily polluted urban estuary in Rio de Janeiro state (Brazil, where the whitemouth croaker (Micropogonias furnieri provides a valuable fishery resource. Therefore, hepatic (Hg and Se and muscular (Hg concentrations of these elements were determined in GB whitemouth croakers. Mercury and selenium measurements were performed by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS and electrothermal AAS (ET-AAS, respectively. Total mercury (THg concentrations in muscle (n=19 ranged from 184.9 to 858.6 (ng/g, while in liver they varied from 11.05 to 1188 (ng/g. Hepatic selenium concentrations ranged from 7820 to 40085 (ng/g. The hepatic Se:THg molar ratio ranged from 40,8 to 3102,5. The results showed a significant correlation between hepatic mercury and selenium levels, but the molar ratio suggests the absence of mercury selenide formation. Some of the Se concentrations found were above the threshold level for freshwater fish (12000 ng/g; however, it is not yet clear if these concentrations are toxic for marine fish as well. More studies are necessary for evaluating the impact of such exposure in fish from Guanabara Bay.

  18. Selenium. Role of the essential metalloid in health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Suguru; Berry, Marla J

    2013-01-01

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient in mammals, but is also recognized as toxic in excess. It is a non-metal with properties that are intermediate between the chalcogen elements sulfur and tellurium. Selenium exerts its biological functions through selenoproteins. Selenoproteins contain selenium in the form of the 21st amino acid, selenocysteine (Sec), which is an analog of cysteine with the sulfur-containing side chain replaced by a Se-containing side chain. Sec is encoded by the codon UGA, which is one of three termination codons for mRNA translation in non-selenoprotein genes. Recognition of the UGA codon as a Sec insertion site instead of stop requires a Sec insertion sequence (SECIS) element in selenoprotein mRNAs and a unique selenocysteyl-tRNA, both of which are recognized by specialized protein factors. Unlike the 20 standard amino acids, Sec is biosynthesized from serine on its tRNA. Twenty-five selenoproteins are encoded in the human genome. Most of the selenoprotein genes were discovered by bioinformatics approaches, searching for SECIS elements downstream of in-frame UGA codons. Sec has been described as having stronger nucleophilic and electrophilic properties than cysteine, and Sec is present in the catalytic site of all selenoenzymes. Most selenoproteins, whose functions are known, are involved in redox systems and signaling pathways. However, several selenoproteins are not well characterized in terms of their function. The selenium field has grown dramatically in the last few decades, and research on selenium biology is providing extensive new information regarding its importance for human health.

  19. Selenium. Role of the Essential Metalloid in Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Suguru; Berry, Marla J.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient in mammals, but is also recognized as toxic in excess. It is a non-metal with properties that are intermediate between the chalcogen elements sulfur and tellurium. Selenium exerts its biological functions through selenoproteins. Selenoproteins contain selenium in the form of the 21st amino acid, selenocysteine (Sec), which is an analog of cysteine with the sulfur-containing side chain replaced by a Se-containing side chain. Sec is encoded by the codon UGA, which is one of three termination codons for mRNA translation in non-selenoprotein genes. Recognition of the UGA codon as a Sec insertion site instead of stop requires a Sec insertion sequence (SECIS) element in selenoprotein mRNAs and a unique selenocysteyl-tRNA, both of which are recognized by specialized protein factors. Unlike the 20 standard amino acids, Sec is biosynthesized from serine on its tRNA. Twenty-five selenoproteins are encoded in the human genome. Most of the selenoprotein genes were discovered by bioinformatics approaches, searching for SECIS elements downstream of in-frame UGA codons. Sec has been described as having stronger nucleophilic and electrophilic properties than cysteine, and Sec is present in the catalytic site of all selenoenzymes. Most selenoproteins, whose functions are known, are involved in redox systems and signaling pathways. However, several selenoproteins are not well characterized in terms of their function. The selenium field has grown dramatically in the last few decades, and research on selenium biology is providing extensive new information regarding its importance for human health. PMID:24470102

  20. Selenium speciation in different organs of African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) enriched through a selenium-enriched garlic based diet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedrero, Z.; Murillo, S.; Camara, C.; Schram, E.; Luten, J.B.; Feldmann, I.; Jakubowski, N.; Madrid, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Speciation of Se in fish is needed to elucidate the metabolism of this element in living organisms in the marine environment. In this paper, selenium concentration and its species distribution in several organs and tissues (liver, gills, kidney, muscle and gastrointestinal tract) of African catfish

  1. Selenium supplementation and selenium status of dairy cows fed diets based on grass, grass silage or maize silage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gierus, M.; Schwarz, F.J.; Kirchgessner, M.

    2002-01-01

    In three separate trial series (TS) the effect of diet composition on selenium (Se) status of dairy cows were investigated. Diets were formulated based mainly on grass (TS1), grass silage (TS2) or maize silage (TS3) with different levels of Se supplementation. Each TS comprised a total of 30 dairy

  2. Selenium and breast cancer risk: A prospective nested case-control study on serum selenium levels, smoking habits and overweight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandsveden, Malte; Manjer, Jonas

    2017-11-01

    Previous research has not been conclusive regarding the association between selenium (Se) and breast cancer. This study was conducted to clarify if there is an association between prediagnostic serum Se levels and breast cancer risk. A population based cohort, the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study, was used and linked with the Swedish cancer registry up to 31 December 2013. Our study included 1,186 women with breast cancer and an equal number of controls. Selenium levels were analysed from stored serum samples. The included individuals were divided into quartiles based on Se value and we compared breast cancer cases with controls using logistic regression yielding odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals. Serum Se was also analysed as a continuous variable regarding breast cancer risk. The analyses were adjusted for established risk factors and stratified on smoking status and body mass index (BMI). When comparing the highest Se quartile with the lowest, the adjusted OR for breast cancer was 0.98 (0.75-1.26). With selenium as a continuous variable the adjusted OR was 1.00 (1.00-1.01) per 10 ng/ml. When comparing the highest with the lowest Se quartile in women with BMI > 25 kg/m(2) the adjusted OR was 0.77 (0.53-1.14). We conclude that it is unlikely that prediagnostic serum selenium is overall associated with breast cancer risk and no modifying effect from BMI or smoking was seen. © 2017 UICC.

  3. Selenium hyperaccumulation - Astragalus bisulcatus, Cardamine hupingshanensis and Stanleya pinnata - may be useful for agromining selenium-rich soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium hyperaccumulator plants like Stanleya pinnata, Astragalus bisulcatus and the newly discovered Se-accumulator Cardamine hupingshanensis may play an important role in the Se cycle from soil to plant to human in China. Se-hyperaccumulators can be used for agromining or for phytoremediation of ...

  4. The Effect on Selenium Concentrations of a Randomized Intervention with Fish and Mussels in a Population with Relatively Low Habitual Dietary Selenium Intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outzen, Malene; Tjønneland, Anne; Larsen, Erik H.; Andersen, Klaus K.; Christensen, Jane; Overvad, Kim; Olsen, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Selenium status of the Danish population is below that assumed optimal for the suggested protective effects against chronic diseases, including certain cancers. Fish and shellfish are important dietary sources of selenium in Denmark. We investigated the effect of increased fish and mussel intake on selenium blood concentrations in a population with relatively low habitual dietary selenium intake. We randomly assigned 102 healthy men and women (all non-smokers) aged 48–76 years to an intervention group (n = 51) or a control group (n = 51). Intervention participants received 1000 g fish and mussels/week for 26 weeks (~50 μg selenium/day). Controls received no intervention. Non-fasting blood samples were taken and whole blood selenium was determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and plasma selenoprotein P (SelP) was determined by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to ICP-MS. All available observations were included in linear multiple regression analysis to evaluate the effect of the intervention. The difference in mean change for intervention compared with control persons was 14.9 ng/mL (95% CI: 10.2, 19.7) for whole blood selenium, and 7.0 ng/mL (95% CI: 3.1, 10.9) for plasma SelP (Weeks 0–26). Selenium concentrations were significantly increased after 26 weeks of intervention, albeit to a lower degree than expected. PMID:25599275

  5. The Effect on Selenium Concentrations of a Randomized Intervention with Fish and Mussels in a Population with Relatively Low Habitual Dietary Selenium Intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Outzen, Malene; Tjønneland, Anne; Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt

    2015-01-01

    /week for 26 weeks (similar to 50 mu g selenium/day). Controls received no intervention. Non-fasting blood samples were taken and whole blood selenium was determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and plasma selenoprotein P (SelP) was determined by high performance liquid...

  6. The Effect on Selenium Concentrations of a Randomized Intervention with Fish and Mussels in a Population with Relatively Low Habitual Dietary Selenium Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malene Outzen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenium status of the Danish population is below that assumed optimal for the suggested protective effects against chronic diseases, including certain cancers. Fish and shellfish are important dietary sources of selenium in Denmark. We investigated the effect of increased fish and mussel intake on selenium blood concentrations in a population with relatively low habitual dietary selenium intake. We randomly assigned 102 healthy men and women (all non-smokers aged 48–76 years to an intervention group (n = 51 or a control group (n = 51. Intervention participants received 1000 g fish and mussels/week for 26 weeks (~50 μg selenium/day. Controls received no intervention. Non-fasting blood samples were taken and whole blood selenium was determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, and plasma selenoprotein P (SelP was determined by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to ICP-MS. All available observations were included in linear multiple regression analysis to evaluate the effect of the intervention. The difference in mean change for intervention compared with control persons was 14.9 ng/mL (95% CI: 10.2, 19.7 for whole blood selenium, and 7.0 ng/mL (95% CI: 3.1, 10.9 for plasma SelP (Weeks 0–26. Selenium concentrations were significantly increased after 26 weeks of intervention, albeit to a lower degree than expected.

  7. Persistent forecasting of disruptive technologies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Forecasting Future Disruptive Technologies; National Research Council

    ...) and the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) tasked the Committee for Forecasting Future Disruptive Technologies with providing guidance and insight on how to build a persistent forecasting system to predict, analyze, and reduce the impact...

  8. Vortex disruption by magnetohydrodynamic feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Mak, Julian; Hughes, D W

    2016-01-01

    In an electrically conducting fluid, vortices stretch out a weak, large-scale magnetic field to form strong current sheets on their edges. Associated with these current sheets are magnetic stresses, which are subsequently released through reconnection, leading to vortex disruption, and possibly even destruction. This disruption phenomenon is investigated here in the context of two-dimensional, homogeneous, incompressible magnetohydrodynamics. We derive a simple order of magnitude estimate for the magnetic stresses --- and thus the degree of disruption --- that depends on the strength of the background magnetic field (measured by the parameter $M$, a ratio between the Alfv\\'en speed and a typical flow speed) and on the magnetic diffusivity (measured by the magnetic Reynolds number $\\mbox{Rm}$). The resulting estimate suggests that significant disruption occurs when $M^{2}\\mbox{Rm} = O(1)$. To test our prediction, we analyse direct numerical simulations of vortices generated by the breakup of unstable shear flo...

  9. Ultrasonic disruption of algae cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, P. M.; Nowotarski, K.; Joyce, E. M.; Mason, T. J.

    2012-05-01

    During last decade there has been increasing interest in the production of sustainable fuels from microalgae (R.H. Wijffels and M.J. Barbosa, 2010; Singh et al 2011; D.H. Lee 2011). The aim of this project was to determine if algal cells can be ultrasonically disrupted to release lipids for biofuel production. Ultrasonic disruption of two unicellular algal species: Dunnaliella salina and Nannochloropsis oculata was investigated using a 20 kHz probe. Haemocytometer, optical density, UV-Vis, fluoro-spectrophotometer and confocal microscopy results demonstrated complete cell destruction of Dunaliella salina within 16 minutes of sonication. Results obtained for Nannochloropsis oculata differed in that ultrasound dispersed clumped cells with little or no cell disruption, as observed by haemocytometer and confocal microscopy analysis. However, UV-Visible and fluoro-spectrophotometer analysis indicated chlorophyll release following sonication, suggesting some cell disruption had occurred.

  10. Supplementation with Selenium and Coenzyme Q10 Reduces Cardiovascular Mortality in Elderly with Low Selenium Status. A Secondary Analysis of a Randomised Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alehagen, Urban; Alexander, Jan; Aaseth, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Selenium is needed by all living cells in order to ensure the optimal function of several enzyme systems. However, the selenium content in the soil in Europe is generally low. Previous reports indicate that a dietary supplement of selenium could reduce cardiovascular disease but mainly in populations in low selenium areas. The objective of this secondary analysis of a previous randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial from our group was to determine whether the effects on cardiovascular mortality of supplementation with a fixed dose of selenium and coenzyme Q10 combined during a four-year intervention were dependent on the basal level of selenium. In 668 healthy elderly individuals from a municipality in Sweden, serum selenium concentration was measured. Of these, 219 individuals received daily supplementation with selenium (200 μg Se as selenized yeast) and coenzyme Q10 (200 mg) combined for four years. The remaining participants (n = 449) received either placebo (n = 222) or no treatment (n = 227). All cardiovascular mortality was registered. No participant was lost during a median follow-up of 5.2 years. Based on death certificates and autopsy results, all mortality was registered. The mean serum selenium concentration among participants at baseline was low, 67.1 μg/L. Based on the distribution of selenium concentration at baseline, the supplemented group was divided into three groups; 85 μg/L (45 and 90 percentiles) and the remaining participants were distributed accordingly. Among the non-treated participants, lower cardiovascular mortality was found in the high selenium group as compared with the low selenium group (13.0% vs. 24.1%; P = 0.04). In the group with the lowest selenium basal concentration, those receiving placebo or no supplementation had a mortality of 24.1%, while mortality was 12.1% in the group receiving the active substance, which was an absolute risk reduction of 12%. In the middle selenium concentration group a mortality of 14

  11. Speciation and bioavailability of selenium in yeast-based intervention agents used in cancer chemoprevention studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Hansen, Marianne; Paulin, H.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the speciation and bioavailability of selenium in yeast-based intervention agents from multiple manufacturers from several time points. Sources of selenized yeast included Nutrition 21 (San Diego, CA), which supplied the Nutritional Prevention of Cancer (NPC) Trial from 1981......-1996; Cypress Systems (Fresno, CA; 1997-1999); and Pharma Nord (Vejle, Denmark; 1999-2000), which supplied the Prevention of Cancer by Intervention by Selenium (PRECISE) Trial pilot studies. The low-molecular-selenium species were liberated from the samples by proteolytic hydrolysis followed by separation...... at 54-60% of the total selenium in the yeasts. One batch of yeast, however (from 1985), which originated from the same producer as the yeast used in the NPC tablets, contained only 27% of selenium in the sample as selenomethionine. Human subjects receiving 200 mug selenium/day in the UK PRECISE Pilot...

  12. Selenium status, thyroid volume, and multiple nodule formation in an area with mild iodine deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lone Banke; Schomburg, Lutz; Kohrle, Josef

    2011-01-01

    ) introduction of iodine fortification. Serum selenium concentration and urinary iodine were measured, and the thyroid gland was examined by ultrasonography in the same subjects. Associations between serum selenium concentration and thyroid parameters were examined in multiple linear regression models...... or logistic regression models.Results: Serum selenium concentration was found to be significantly, negatively associated with thyroid volume (P=0.006), and a low selenium status significantly increased the risk for thyroid enlargement (P=0.007). Furthermore, low serum selenium status had a tendency...... to increase the risk for development of multiple nodules (P=0.087).Conclusions: Low serum selenium concentration was associated with a larger thyroid volume and a higher prevalence of thyroid enlargement....

  13. Current Knowledge on the Importance of Selenium in Food for Living Organisms: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieliszek, Marek; Błażejak, Stanisław

    2016-05-10

    Selenium is one of the elements classified within the group of micronutrients which are necessary in trace amounts for the proper functioning of organisms. Selenium participates in the protection of cells against excess H₂O₂, in heavy metal detoxification, and regulation of the immune and reproductive systems as well. It also ensures the proper functioning of the thyroid gland. Selenium induces the occurrence of the selenoprotein synthesis process involved in the antioxidant defense mechanism of the organism. Recent years have brought much success in the studies on selenium. Anticarcinogenic properties of selenium against some cancers have been reported. Supplementation is increasingly becoming a solution to this problem. A large number of different supplementation methods are promoting studies in this area. Slight differences in the selenium content can result in excess or deficiency, therefore supplementation has to be done carefully and cautiously.

  14. Biosynthesis of selenium nanoparticles using Klebsiella pneumoniae and their recovery by a simple sterilization process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Jafari Fesharaki

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of biologically derived metal nanoparticles for various proposes is going to be an issue of considerable importance; thus, appropriate methods should be developed and tested for the biological synthesis and recovery of these nanoparticles from bacterial cells. In this research study, a strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae was tested for its ability to synthesize elemental selenium nanoparticles from selenium chloride. A broth of Klebsiella pneumoniae culture containing selenium nanoparticles was subjected to sterilization at 121ºC and 17 psi for 20 minutes. Released selenium nanoparticles ranged in size from 100 to 550 nm, with an average size of 245 nm. Our study also showed that no chemical changes occurred in selenium nanoparticles during the wet heat sterilization process. Therefore, the wet heat sterilization process can be used successfully to recover elemental selenium from bacterial cells.

  15. Effect of Se-enriched Organic Fertilizers on Selenium Accumulation in Corn and Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Sheng-nan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of two Se-enriched organic fertilizers (cow dung and rice straw biochar on selenium accumulation of corn growing in selenium deficient soil was studied with pot experiment. The results showed that corn accumulated more selenium and the selenium was much easier to convert from root to shoot in the corn plant with the application of Se-enriched cow dung than Se-enriched rice straw biochar. With the application of more organic fertilizer such as 25 t·hm-2 Se-enriched cow dung or 40 t·hm-2 Se-enriched rice straw biochar, the accumulation of selenium and growth status of corn were getting better than the other treatments. At the same time, as the application amount of Se-enriched organic fertilizers (cow dung and rice straw biochar increased, the total selenium content in the soil also increased, which positively correlated with each other.

  16. New scientific challenges - the possibilities of using selenium in poultry nutrition and impact on meat quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, R.; Glišić, M.; Bošković, M.; Baltić, M. Ž.

    2017-09-01

    Physiological stress is one of many concerns facing modern broiler production. In conditions when birds are exposed to stress, supplementation of selenium, which is a crucial glutathione peroxidase enzymatic cofactor, increases the antioxidant capacity of the animals and decreases the harmful effects of free radicals. Dietary selenium improves production performance and health of animals, and positively affects the immune system, the quality, selenium content and fatty acid composition of meat and eggs. There are several different forms of selenium, the most common dietary supplements being an inorganic form (sodium selenite) and anorganic form (selenomethionine). However, in recent years, new forms of selenium, such as a 2-hydroxy-4-methylselenobutanoic acid (HMSeBA) and nanoselenium, which have more bioavailability, bioefficacy, and low toxicity have been designed. In this short comparative overview discusses the effects of inorganic, organic and nanoforms of selenium on production results, glutathione peroxidase activity, meat quality and level of toxicity in poultry.

  17. Current Knowledge on the Importance of Selenium in Food for Living Organisms: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Kieliszek

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is one of the elements classified within the group of micronutrients which are necessary in trace amounts for the proper functioning of organisms. Selenium participates in the protection of cells against excess H2O2, in heavy metal detoxification, and regulation of the immune and reproductive systems as well. It also ensures the proper functioning of the thyroid gland. Selenium induces the occurrence of the selenoprotein synthesis process involved in the antioxidant defense mechanism of the organism. Recent years have brought much success in the studies on selenium. Anticarcinogenic properties of selenium against some cancers have been reported. Supplementation is increasingly becoming a solution to this problem. A large number of different supplementation methods are promoting studies in this area. Slight differences in the selenium content can result in excess or deficiency, therefore supplementation has to be done carefully and cautiously.

  18. Redox-Active Selenium Compounds—From Toxicity and Cell Death to Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sougat Misra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is generally known as an antioxidant due to its presence in selenoproteins as selenocysteine, but it is also toxic. The toxic effects of selenium are, however, strictly concentration and chemical species dependent. One class of selenium compounds is a potent inhibitor of cell growth with remarkable tumor specificity. These redox active compounds are pro-oxidative and highly cytotoxic to tumor cells and are promising candidates to be used in chemotherapy against cancer. Herein we elaborate upon the major forms of dietary selenium compounds, their metabolic pathways, and their antioxidant and pro-oxidant potentials with emphasis on cytotoxic mechanisms. Relative cytotoxicity of inorganic selenite and organic selenocystine compounds to different cancer cells are presented as evidence to our perspective. Furthermore, new novel classes of selenium compounds specifically designed to target tumor cells are presented and the potential of selenium in modern oncology is extensively discussed.

  19. Determination of total selenium and selenium distribution in the milk phases in commercial cow's milk by HG-AAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muniz-Naveiro, Oscar; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Raquel; Bermejo-Barrera, Adela; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar [University of Santiago de Compostela, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Cocho, Jose A. [University Clinical Hospital, Laboratory of Metabolic and Nutritional Disorders, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Fraga, Jose M. [University Clinical Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2005-03-01

    A procedure has been developed for determining the selenium in cow's milk using hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS) following microwave-assisted acid digestion. The selenium distributions in milk whey, fat and micellar casein phases were studied after separating the different phases by ultracentrifugation and determining the selenium in all of them. The detection limits obtained by HG-AAS for the whole milk, milk whey and micellar casein were 0.074, 0.065 and 0.075 {mu}g l{sup -1}, respectively. The accuracy for the whole milk was checked by using a Certified Reference Material CRM 8435 whole milk powder from NIST, and the analytical recoveries for the milk whey and casein micelles were 100.9 and 96.9%, respectively. A mass balance study of the determination of selenium in the different milk phases was carried out, obtaining values of 95.5-100.8%. The total content of selenium was determined in 37 milk samples from 15 different manufacturers, 19 whole milk samples and 18 skimmed milk samples. The selenium levels found were within the 8.5-21 {mu}g l{sup -1} range. The selenium distributions in the different milk phases were studied in 14 whole milk samples, and the highest selenium levels were found in milk whey (47.2-73.6%), while the lowest level was found for the fat phase (4.8-16.2%). A strong correlation was found between the selenium levels in whole milk and the selenium levels in the milk components. (orig.)

  20. Distribution of Selenium and Oxidative Stress in Breast Tumor-Bearing Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chung Chen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effects of breast tumors on the blood and tissue distribution of essential trace mineral selenium (Se, and oxidative stress status of mice. Female 10-week-old BALB/cByJNarl mice were randomly assigned into control (CNL and breast tumor-bearing (TB groups. TB mice were injected subcutaneously into the right hind thigh with 5 × 106 EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells. After 22 days, we measured Se concentrations, Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPx activities, and malondialdehyde (MDA products (indicator of oxidative stress in plasma, various tissues, and plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF concentrations. There were no significant differences in body weights and daily intake between both groups. Compared with the CNL group, TB mice have decreases in plasma Se concentrations and GPx activities, as well as higher plasma VEGF and MDA concentrations. Plasma Se concentrations were also negatively correlated with plasma MDA and VEGF concentrations. Furthermore, tissue Se concentrations and GPx activities in TB animals were lower; whereas the MDA concentrations higher in various tissues including liver, kidney, brain, lung, spleen, and thymic tissues. In conclusion, disruption of Se homeostasis critically reflects oxidative stress in target tissues, thus may increase the risk for progression of breast cancer and metastasis.

  1. Lung injury induced by Bisphenol A: A food contaminant, is ameliorated by selenium supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedelhaffez, Azza S; El-Aziz, Ebtihal A Abd; Aziz, Mohamed A Abdel; Ahmed, Asmaa M

    2017-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a widely used industrial chemical, is known to disrupt endocrine function. This study aimed to investigate the impact of chronic exposure to BPA on the lung tissue of adult male rats as well as any possible alleviating effects resulting from selenium (Se) treatment. Chronic exposure to BPA resulted in prominent inflammation and oxidative stress responses as evidenced by an increase in levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced concentrations of superoxide dismutase (SOD), and upregulation of Interleukin-18 (IL-18) expression in lung tissue. In addition, chronic exposure led to modulation of the fibrosis-related gene expression, as we observed augmented follistatin-like1 (FSTL1) expression and diminished a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motif 5 (ADAMTS5) expression. Se treatment remarkably mitigated changes in the expression of these dysregulated markers of lung injury. The biochemical changes were consistent with the histopathological findings, where cellular infiltration and inflammatory fibrotic changes were observed following BPA administration and a lessening of these effects with concomitant Se treatment. Taken together, the results from the study reveal that chronic exposure to BPA may promote the development of pulmonary inflammatory diseases with possible induction of lung fibrosis. Se treatment effectively suppressed oxidative stress, inflammation, and fibrosis, suggesting that Se has the potential to be used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of pulmonary inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Bioavailability of selenium from fish, yeast and selenate: a comparative study in humans using stable isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, T E; Van den Heuvel, E G H M; Atherton, C A; Dainty, J R; Lewis, D J; Langford, N J; Crews, H M; Luten, J B; Lorentzen, M; Sieling, F W; van Aken-Schneyder, P; Hoek, M; Kotterman, M J J; van Dael, P; Fairweather-Tait, S J

    2004-02-01

    To measure the bioavailability of selenium from cooked and raw fish in humans by estimating and comparing apparent absorption and retention of selenium in biosynthetically labelled fish with labelled selenate and biosynthetically labelled selenium in brewers yeast. The intervention study was a parallel, randomised, reference substance controlled design carried out at two different centres in Europe. The human study was carried out at the Institute of Food Research, Norwich, UK and at TNO Nutrition and Food Research, Zeist, The Netherlands. In all, 35 male volunteers aged 18-50 y were recruited; 17 subjects were studied in Norwich (UK) and 18 in Zeist (Netherlands). All of the recruited subjects completed the study. Biosynthetically labelled trout fish (processed by two different methods), biosynthetically labelled brewers yeast and isotopically labelled selenate were used to estimate selenium apparent absorption and retention by quantitative analysis of stable isotope labels recovered in faeces and urine. Subjects consumed the labelled foods in four meals over two consecutive days and absorption was measured by the luminal disappearance method over 10 days. Urinary clearance of isotopic labels was measured over 7 days to enable retention to be calculated. Apparent absorption of selenium from fish was similar to selenate and there was no difference between the two processing methods used. However, retention of fish selenium was significantly higher than selenate (P<0.001). Apparent absorption and retention of yeast selenium was significantly different (P<0.001) from both fish selenium and selenate. Fish selenium is a highly bioavailable source of dietary selenium. Cooking did not affect selenium apparent absorption or retention from fish. Selenium from yeast is less bioavailable.

  3. Effect of dietary selenium and omega-3 fatty acids on muscle composition and quality in broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetland Harald

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human health may be improved if dietary intakes of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids are increased. Consumption of broiler meat is increasing, and the meat content of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids are affected by the composition of broiler feed. A two-way analyses of variance was used to study the effect of feed containing omega-3 rich plant oils and selenium enriched yeast on broiler meat composition, antioxidation- and sensory parameters. Four different wheat-based dietary treatments supplemented with 5% rapeseed oil or 4% rapeseed oil plus 1% linseed oil, and either 0.50 mg selenium or 0.84 mg selenium (organic form per kg diet was fed to newly hatched broilers for 22 days. Results The different dietary treatments gave distinct different concentrations of selenium and fatty acids in thigh muscle; one percent linseed oil in the diet increased the concentration of the omega-3 fatty acids 18:3, 20:5 and 22:5, and 0.84 mg selenium per kg diet gave muscle selenium concentration at the same level as is in fish muscle (0.39 mg/kg muscle. The high selenium intake also resulted in increased concentration of the long-chain omega-3 fatty acids EPA (20:5, DPA (22:5 and DHA (22:6, thus it may be speculated if high dietary selenium might have a role in increasing the concentration of EPA, DPA and DHA in tissues after intake of plant oils contning omega-3 fatty acids. Conclusion Moderate modifications of broiler feed may give a healthier broiler meat, having increased content of selenium and omega-3 fatty acids. High intakes of selenium (organic form may increase the concentration of very long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in muscle.

  4. Concentration of selenium in plasma and erythrocytes during total parenteral nutrition in Crohn's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobson, S; Plantin, L O

    1985-01-01

    Plasma- and erythrocyte-selenium concentrations were determined in five consecutive patients with Crohn's disease given preoperative total parenteral nutrition - nil per os - for a mean period of 34 days per patient. No blood components were administered during the total parenteral nutrition. Before the total parenteral nutrition the plasma-selenium level and, to a less extent, the erythrocyte-selenium levels were below the reference values. After three weeks of total parenteral nutrition bot...

  5. Effects of selenium and reduced glutathione on the proliferation and apoptosis of XWLC-05 cell

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    Lan ZHOU

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Selenium is an essential micronutrient for mammals but toxic in large amounts. Most studies indicate that selenium has inhibitory effect on cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of selenium and reduced glutathione (GSH combined application on the proliferation and apoptosis of human lung adenocarcinoma cell line XWLC-05. Methods XWLC-05 cells were respectively treated in vitro by four factors (sodium selenite, GSH, sodium selenite+GSH and blank control (RMPI-1640 +10% calf serum in different concentrations for 24 h. Cell growth inhibition rates were determined by MTT assay, cytomorphology was observed under inverted phase contrast microscope and changes of cell cycle were detected by Flow Cytometry (FCM. Results Both selenium and GSH individual on the XWLC-05 cells were found to possess obvious growth inhibition effect on the XWLC-05 cells. Selenium and GSH combined application on the XWLC-05 cells had cooperative inhibition effect (P<0.01. The inhibition rate was increased in a dose-dependent relationship as selenium with concentrations between (0.5-4.0 μg/mL (P<0.01 whether it was selenium single factors or selenium and GSH combined effect. FCM results showed that some XWLC-05 cells were induced apoptosis and G1 phase cells were markedly increased and S, G2/M phase cells decreased in both selenium individual groups and selenium and GSH combined groups. Conclusion Selenium and GSH combined application on XWLC-05 cells can enhance directly the cell growth inhibitory effect compared with selenium and GSH individual. The mechanism seems to inhibit the synthesis of RNA and protein and prevent cells from entering S phase.

  6. Lithium as a prooxidant? A possible protective role of selenium – in vitro study

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    Irena Musik

    2017-09-01

    In Vero cells lithium decreased all studied parameters, particularly GPx. Selenium co-treatment showed a distinct protective effect. In FaDu cells the similar effect was observed only in case of GSH. The results point to differences in action of lithium and selenium in physiological and pathological state. As long-term lithium therapy is applied in psychiatric patients the results regarding Vero line let suggest that selenium might be considered as an adjuvant alleviating side effects of Li-treatment.

  7. Beneficial Effects of Selenium on Some Morphological and Physiological Trait of Hot Pepper (Capsicum anuum)

    OpenAIRE

    Shekari, L.; m.m Kamelmanesh; M. Mozafarian; F Sadeghi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Aluminum (Al), cobalt (Co), sodium (Na), selenium (Se), and silicon (Si) are considered as beneficial elements for plants. They are not required for all plants but they can improve the growth and development of some plant species. Selenium is an essential element for human with antioxidant and antivirus functions but is not considered essential for higher plants. Selenium is reported to be protective against cancer and more than 40 types of diseases are associated with Se defici...

  8. Effect of selenium on cadmium-induced oxidative stress and esterase activity in rat organs

    OpenAIRE

    Kevin Dzobo; Yogeshkumar S. Naik

    2013-01-01

    Metal toxicity is a threat mainly in the industrialised world where industry discharges many toxic metals into the environment. We investigated the effects of two metals cadmium and selenium on the cytosolic antioxidant enzymes and esterases in the liver, kidneys and testes of rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=28) were divided equally into four groups: control, cadmium, selenium and cadmium/selenium. Salts of the metals were administered intraperitoneally for 15 days. In the liver, cadmium tr...

  9. Comparative effect of organic and inorganic selenium supplementation on selenium status in camel

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    B. Faye

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Selenium deficiency is widely described in livestock from the Arabian Peninsula, notably in the camel, and selenium supplementation is based on cattle or horse requirements, usually with sodium selenite product. In order to test the effect of organic Se supplementation vs inorganic Se, 24 pregnant camels were subjected to 3 treatment groups starting one month before delivery (control without Se, non-organic bolus, organic Se. Blood, milk and feces samples were collected from one month before delivery to 3 months of lactation. At delivery, the organic group had a significant higher Se concentration (P < 0.01 in serum (8.21 ± 1.38 μg/100 mL and in colostrum (7.27 ± 2.89 μg/100 mL than in inorganic group (3.90 ± 0.68 and 3.72 ± 0.71, respectively and than in control group (5.45 ± 2.38 and 2.70 ± 0.66, respectively. In calf serum, the Se concentration was significantly higher (P < 0.001 in the two supplemented groups (6.32 ± 2.81 and 5.99 ± 3.31 μg/100 mL in organic and inorganic groups, respectively than in control (3.42 ± 1.41 μg/100 mL. The Se in mother serum decreased after parturition but was highly correlated to Se serum in calf and to Se fecal excretion. Se in milk was lower than in colostrum in all groups (P < 0.01. Treatments had no significant effect on somatic cell count. This study revealed that organic supplementation in camel appeared more efficient.

  10. Examination of the selenium content of wheat grasses produced in different soil types in Csik Basin

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    Tamás M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the course of the research, we determined selenium and dry matter content of 35 wheat grass and 35 wheat seed samples. The selenium content of the preparation plant probes was measured by spectrofluorimetric determination (λexcitation = 380 nm, λemission = 519 nm of the resulted piazselenol complex. It was established that between the selenium content of the wheat grass and wheat seed the correlation coefficient was 0.36 at p = 0.05 level, which indicates a medium-close correlation. Similarly, there was a medium-close correlation between the selenium content of the wheat grass calculated on dry-matter basis and total selenium content of the wheat, with a correlation coefficient of 0.40 at p = 0.02 level. Afterwards, beside the selenium content, we measured the selenomethionine content by ion-exchange chromatography and highperformance liquid chromatography, and the organic selenium content was calculated. A very close correlation was established between the total selenium, selenomethionine and calculated organic selenium content of wheat (the correlation coefficients were between 0.92 and 0.99 at p = 0.01 level. The correlation between the selenomethionine content of wheat grass and wheat seed was very weak (r = 0.23.

  11. Loss of selenium in drying and storage of agronomic plant species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1970-01-01

    In two experiments with Se75, loss of selenium from agricultural species was noted during both drying and storage. The loss of selenium during drying was to some extent overshadowed by the influence of self-absorption caused by the water in the fresh material. The results showed that even plant...... material of non-indicator plantslose volatile selenium at drying temperatures of 60°C or higher, and in some cases even at temperatures below 60°C. The results also showed that storage as briquettes gives the lowest storage loss of selenium....

  12. Antioxidant effect of curcumin in selenium induced cataract of Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmaja, S; Raju, T N

    2004-06-01

    Wistar rat pups treated with curcumin, a natural constituent of Curcuma longa before being administered with selenium showed no opacities in the lens. The lipid peroxidation, xanthine oxidase enzyme levels in the lenses of curcumin and selenium co-treated animals were significantly less when compared to selenium treated animals. The superoxidase dismutase and catalase enzyme activities of curcumin and selenium co-treated animal lenses showed an enhancement. Curcumin co-treatment seems to prevent oxidative damage and found to delay the development of cataract.

  13. Genotoxicity studies on Sel-Plex, a standardized, registered high-selenium yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, James C; Matulka, Ray A; Power, Ronan

    2006-01-01

    Selenium, recognized as an essential nutrient for human health, is a component of proteins and enzymes required for various biological functions and is currently being used as a feed supplement for livestock in geographical areas that are naturally low in selenium. Selenium is structurally similar to sulfur, replacing the sulfur atom in stoichiometric amounts and thus functions through an association with proteins, termed selenoproteins. In geographic areas low in selenium, there is the potential for animals (including humans) to become selenium deficient and this potential deficiency can be remedied by consumption of exogenous selenium, including selenium-enriched yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) that contains high levels of organic selenium (e.g., selenized yeast). A unique, standardized, registered high selenium food-grade baker's yeast (S. cerevisiae; Sel-Plex), was tested in the following battery of Genotoxicity assays; (1) a bacterial reverse mutation test (Ames test); (2) an in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test; and (3) a mouse micronucleus test. Under the conditions of this assay, Sel-Plex showed no evidence of mutagenic activity in Salmonella typhimurium, in the bacterial reverse mutation test. Sel-Plex did not induce significant chromosomal aberrations in cultured human lymphocytes in the in vitro mammalian chromosome aberration test. Sel-Plex did not statistically increase the frequency or proportion of micronucleated immature erythrocytes in the mouse micronucleus test. Thus, from the studies presented here, the authors conclude that Sel-Plex is nongenotoxic.

  14. Effects of dietary selenium on mood in healthy men living in a metabolic research unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, W C; Hornbostel, L

    1996-01-15

    Eleven healthy men were confined in a metabolic research unit for 120 days in a double-blind study of the effects of dietary selenium on mood as assessed by the Profile of Mood States-Bipolar Form. At an intake of 2800 kcal/day, the diet of conventional foods provided 80 micrograms/day of selenium for the first 21 days, then either 13 or 356 micrograms/day for the remaining 99 days. There were no significant changes in any of the mood scales due to dietary selenium. However, in the low-selenium group, the changes in the agreeable-hostile and the elated-depressed subscales were correlated with initial erythrocyte selenium concentration; that is, the lower the initial selenium status, the more the mood scores decreased. These results suggest that persons with low selenium status might experience relatively depressed moods and support the idea that selenium plays a special role in the brain. However, these studies do not support the notion that selenium supplementation could promote improvements in mood in persons eating a typical U.S. diet.

  15. Serum selenium concentration is associated with metabolic factors in the elderly: a cross-sectional study

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    Huang Hui-Ying

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selenium is an essential micronutrient known for its antioxidant function. However, the association of serum selenium with lipid profiles and fasting glucose are inconsistent in populations with average intake of selenium. Furthermore, there were few studies conducted specifically for the elderly. This study examined the relationship of serum selenium concentration with serum lipids and fasting glucose in the Taiwanese elderly population. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of 200 males and females aged 65-85 years (mean 71.5 ± 4.6 years from Taipei, Taiwan. Serum selenium was measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer. The association between serum selenium and metabolic factors was examined using a multivariate linear regression analysis after controlling several confounders. Results The mean serum selenium concentration was 1.14 μmol/L, without significant difference between sexes. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL cholesterol increased significantly with serum selenium concentration (P P P P Conclusions Total cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL cholesterol, and fasting serum glucose concentrations increased significantly with serum selenium concentration in the Taiwanese elderly. The underlying mechanism warrants further research.

  16. Dietary Selenium in Adjuvant Therapy of Viral and Bacterial Infections12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrenner, Holger; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Dkhil, Mohamed A; Wunderlich, Frank; Sies, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Viral and bacterial infections are often associated with deficiencies in macronutrients and micronutrients, including the essential trace element selenium. In selenium deficiency, benign strains of Coxsackie and influenza viruses can mutate to highly pathogenic strains. Dietary supplementation to provide adequate or supranutritional selenium supply has been proposed to confer health benefits for patients suffering from some viral diseases, most notably with respect to HIV and influenza A virus (IAV) infections. In addition, selenium-containing multimicronutrient supplements improved several clinical and lifestyle variables in patients coinfected with HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Selenium status may affect the function of cells of both adaptive and innate immunity. Supranutritional selenium promotes proliferation and favors differentiation of naive CD4-positive T lymphocytes toward T helper 1 cells, thus supporting the acute cellular immune response, whereas excessive activation of the immune system and ensuing host tissue damage are counteracted through directing macrophages toward the M2 phenotype. This review provides an up-to-date overview on selenium in infectious diseases caused by viruses (e.g., HIV, IAV, hepatitis C virus, poliovirus, West Nile virus) and bacteria (e.g., M. tuberculosis, Helicobacter pylori). Data from epidemiologic studies and intervention trials, with selenium alone or in combination with other micronutrients, and animal experiments are discussed against the background of dietary selenium requirements to alter immune functions. PMID:25593145

  17. EFFECT OF SELENIUM SUPPLEMENTATION ON PIG PRODUCTION PROPERTIES, ANTIOXIDANT STATUS AND MEAT QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Šperanda

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Food containing functional ingredients to achieve a positive effect on health and reducing the risk of infection is increasing production. It is also very important to improve the quality of pork with respect to change the genetic makeup of pigs that raised leanness, being inversely correlated with the quality of meat. This study monitored the effectiveness of addition of higher doses of organic selenium in the diet of fattening pigs in relation to their growth, immunity, antioxidant power, the quality of meat and possibility of meat enriching with selenium. The experiment was carried out on 100 pigs (crossbred WJxSLxP of both sexes, from 28 kg to 98 kg body weight during a period of 98 days. Piglets fed the finished feed mixture for fattening up to 60 kg (ST-1 and a mixture for fattening up to 100 kg (DM-2 in addition, by the groups as follows: K-0. 3 mg/kg organic selenium, P1-0.5 mg/kg inorganic selenium, P2-0.5 mg/kg organic selenium, P3-0.5 mg/ kg organic selenium +0.2% zeolite clinoptilolite treated vibrotehnology and P4-gradual increase in selenium so that the concentration of the last month was 0.7 mg/ kg diet of organic selenium. All groups of pigs fed high concentration of organic selenium had a higher proportion of lymphocytes, especially CD4 T lymphocytes. Glutathione peroxidase activity was higher in all groups fed elevated selenium levels and significantly higher in the P3 and P4 groups 71st and 98th days of the trials. Glutathione reductase was significantly higher in the P3 and P4 group 98th days compared to the control. Antioxidant indicators suggested increased antioxidant protection in groups supplemented with 0.5 ppm organic selenium and selenium formulations of the same with the addition of zeolite under stress intensive pig production. No differences were found in the products of lipid peroxidation (TBARS in raw meat or in meat after a week in refrigerator storage. By histological examination statistically higher level of

  18. Selenium dynamics in boreal streams: the role of wetlands and changing groundwater tables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidman, Fredrik; Mörth, Carl-Magnus; Björkvald, Louise; Laudon, Hjalmar

    2011-04-01

    The concentrations of selenium in 10 catchments of a stream network in northern Sweden were monitored over two years, yielding almost 350 observations of selenium concentrations in streamwater. The export of selenium was found to be systematically greater from forests than from mires. Accounting for atmospheric deposition, which was monitored over four years, there was a net accumulation of selenium in mires, while the export from forest soils was approximately equal to the atmospheric deposition. In forest dominated catchments the concentrations of selenium oscillated rapidly back and forth from high to low levels during spring floods. High selenium concentrations coincided with rising groundwater tables in the riparian forest soils, while low selenium concentrations were associated with receding groundwater. Thermodynamic modeling indicated that precipitation of elemental selenium would occur under reducing conditions in the riparian soils. Since changes in the redox conditions are likely to occur near the transition from the unsaturated to the saturated zone, it is hypothesized that the transport of selenium from forest soils to streams is controlled by redox reactions in riparian soils.

  19. Serum selenium and selenoprotein P status in adult Danes-8-year followup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lone Banke; Hollenbach, B.; Laurberg, P.

    2009-01-01

    Selenium is an essential micronutrient important to human health. The main objective of this study is to describe serum selenium and selenoprotein P status in two samples of the Danish population. In addition, the influence of various factors potentially associated with selenium status was invest......Selenium is an essential micronutrient important to human health. The main objective of this study is to describe serum selenium and selenoprotein P status in two samples of the Danish population. In addition, the influence of various factors potentially associated with selenium status...... subjects had filled in a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and a questionnaire with information about smoking habits, alcohol consumption and exercise habits. Mean serum selenium level was 98.7+/-19.8microg/L and median selenoprotein P level was 2.72 (2.18-3.49)mg/L. Serum selenium and selenoprotein P...... increased with age, and selenoprotein P was higher in men than in women. Serum selenium levels decreased by 5% on average from 1997-98 to 2004-05 (Pselenoprotein P level increased (P

  20. Optimised selenium enrichment of Artemia sp. feed to improve red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) larvae rearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, Péter; Lengyel, Szvetlana; Udvari, Zsolt; Sándor, Alex Nagy; Stündl, László

    2017-09-01

    Selenium is an essential microelement for the normal functioning of life processes. Moreover, it is a component of enzymes with antioxidant effects. However, it has the smallest window of any micronutrient between requirement and toxicity. Selenium is a regularly used element in fish feeds; moreover, enriching zooplankton with selenium to rear larvae is also a well-known technology. It is accepted that the most common starter foods of fish larvae, natural rotifers contain the smallest dosage of selenium, but providing selenium enriched Artemia sp. instead could increase survival and growth rate of fish. However, no such references are available for the red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) larvae. Therefore, in this study, Artemia sp. was enriched with nano-selenium of verified low toxicity and easy availability in 5 treatments (1, 5, 10, 50, 100 mg/l Se), and then, fish larvae were fed with four of these enriched Artemia stocks (1, 5, 10, 50 mg/l Se) and a control group. At the end of the 9-day-long experiment, survival rate (S) and growth parameters (SL, W, K-factor, SGR) of fish larvae were calculated as well as their selenium retention and glutathione peroxidase enzyme activity were analysed. It was revealed that a moderate level of selenium enrichment (~4 mg/kg dry matter) of Artemia sp. positively influences the rearing efficiency (i.e. survival and growth) of fish larvae, but higher dosages of selenium could cause adverse effects.