WorldWideScience

Sample records for augmented virtual experiences

  1. How to design compelling Virtual Reality or Augmented Reality experience?

    OpenAIRE

    Richir , Simon; Fuchs , Philippe; Lourdeaux , Domitile; Millet , Dominique; BUCHE , Cédric; Querrec , Ronan

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The convergence of technologies currently observed in the field of Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, robotics and consumer electronic reinforces the trend of new applications appearing every day. But when transferring knowledge acquired from research to businesses, research laboratories are often at a loss because of a lack of knowledge of the design and integration processes in creating an industrial scale product. In fact, the innovation approaches that take a good...

  2. ARLearn: augmented reality meets augmented virtuality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Klemke, Roland; Kalz, Marco; Van Ulzen, Patricia; Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Ternier, S., Klemke, R., Kalz, M., Van Ulzen, P., & Specht, M. (2012). ARLearn: augmented reality meets augmented virtuality [Special issue]. Journal of Universal Computer Science - Technology for learning across physical and virtual spaces, 18(15), 2143-2164.

  3. Transforming Experience: The Potential of Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality for Enhancing Personal and Clinical Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Giuseppe; Baños, Rosa M; Botella, Cristina; Mantovani, Fabrizia; Gaggioli, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    During life, many personal changes occur. These include changing house, school, work, and even friends and partners. However, the daily experience shows clearly that, in some situations, subjects are unable to change even if they want to. The recent advances in psychology and neuroscience are now providing a better view of personal change, the change affecting our assumptive world: (a) the focus of personal change is reducing the distance between self and reality (conflict); (b) this reduction is achieved through (1) an intense focus on the particular experience creating the conflict or (2) an internal or external reorganization of this experience; (c) personal change requires a progression through a series of different stages that however happen in discontinuous and non-linear ways; and (d) clinical psychology is often used to facilitate personal change when subjects are unable to move forward. Starting from these premises, the aim of this paper is to review the potential of virtuality for enhancing the processes of personal and clinical change. First, the paper focuses on the two leading virtual technologies - augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) - exploring their current uses in behavioral health and the outcomes of the 28 available systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Then the paper discusses the added value provided by VR and AR in transforming our external experience by focusing on the high level of personal efficacy and self-reflectiveness generated by their sense of presence and emotional engagement. Finally, it outlines the potential future use of virtuality for transforming our inner experience by structuring, altering, and/or replacing our bodily self-consciousness. The final outcome may be a new generation of transformative experiences that provide knowledge that is epistemically inaccessible to the individual until he or she has that experience, while at the same time transforming the individual's worldview.

  4. Transforming Experience: The Potential of Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality for Enhancing Personal and Clinical Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Riva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During our life we undergo many personal changes: we change our house, our school, our work and even our friends and partners. However, our daily experience shows clearly that in some situations subjects are unable to change even if they want to. The recent advances in psychology and neuroscience are now providing a better view of personal change, the change affecting our assumptive world: a the focus of personal change is reducing the distance between self and reality (conflict; b this reduction is achieved through (1 an intense focus on the particular experience creating the conflict or (2 an internal or external reorganization of this experience; c personal change requires a progression through a series of different stages; d clinical psychology is often used to facilitate personal change when subjects are unable to move forward. Starting from these premises, the aim of this paper is to review the potential of virtuality for enhancing the processes of personal and clinical change. First, the paper will focus on the two leading virtual technologies – Augmented Reality (AR and Virtual Reality (VR – exploring their current uses in behavioral health and the outcomes of the 28 available systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Then the paper discusses the added value provided by VR and AR in transforming our external experience, by focusing on the high level of self-reflectiveness and personal efficacy induced by their emotional engagement and sense of presence. Finally, it outlines the potential future use of virtuality for transforming our inner experience by structuring, altering and/or replacing our bodily self-consciousness. The final outcome may be a new generation of transformative experiences that provide knowledge that is epistemically inaccessible to the individual until he or she has that experience, while at the same time transforming the individual’s worldview.

  5. Designing Recreational Virtual Environments for Older Adult Nursing Home Residents - How Nature And Content Matter For Improving Augmented Exercise Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Pedersen, Jon Ram; Serafin, Stefania; Maculewicz, Justyna

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the design for restorative virtual environments (RVEs), specifically developed to augment rehabilitation exercise for older adult users living at nursing homes, in order to increase exercise motivation. User evaluations on these RVE designs suggest that the soundscapes did...... not have a noticeable role for user experience. Moreover, soundscapes might simply be perceived congruent with the visuals, and thus seamlessly accepted by users as an inherent part of the augmented exercise experience....

  6. Augmented Virtual Reality Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully-Hanson, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Real time motion tracking hardware has for the most part been cost prohibitive for research to regularly take place until recently. With the release of the Microsoft Kinect in November 2010, researchers now have access to a device that for a few hundred dollars is capable of providing redgreenblue (RGB), depth, and skeleton data. It is also capable of tracking multiple people in real time. For its original intended purposes, i.e. gaming, being used with the Xbox 360 and eventually Xbox One, it performs quite well. However, researchers soon found that although the sensor is versatile, it has limitations in real world applications. I was brought aboard this summer by William Little in the Augmented Virtual Reality (AVR) Lab at Kennedy Space Center to find solutions to these limitations.

  7. Possible applications of the LEAP motion controller for more interactive simulated experiments in augmented or virtual reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Peter; Vauderwange, Oliver; Mandal, Avikarsha; Javahiraly, Nicolas; Curticapean, Dan

    2016-09-01

    Practical exercises are a crucial part of many curricula. Even simple exercises can improve the understanding of the underlying subject. Most experimental setups require special hardware. To carry out e. g. a lens experiments the students need access to an optical bench, various lenses, light sources, apertures and a screen. In our previous publication we demonstrated the use of augmented reality visualization techniques in order to let the students prepare with a simulated experimental setup. Within the context of our intended blended learning concept we want to utilize augmented or virtual reality techniques for stationary laboratory exercises. Unlike applications running on mobile devices, stationary setups can be extended more easily with additional interfaces and thus allow for more complex interactions and simulations in virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). The most significant difference is the possibility to allow interactions beyond touching a screen. The LEAP Motion controller is a small inexpensive device that allows for the tracking of the user's hands and fingers in three dimensions. It is conceivable to allow the user to interact with the simulation's virtual elements by the user's very hand position, movement and gesture. In this paper we evaluate possible applications of the LEAP Motion controller for simulated experiments in augmented and virtual reality. We pay particular attention to the devices strengths and weaknesses and want to point out useful and less useful application scenarios.

  8. Enhancing tourism with augmented and virtual reality

    OpenAIRE

    Jenny, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Augmented and virtual reality are on the advance. In the last twelve months, several interesting devices have entered the market. Since tourism is one of the fastest growing economic sectors in the world and has become one of the major players in international commerce, the aim of this thesis was to examine how tourism could be enhanced with augmented and virtual reality. The differences and functional principles of augmented and virtual reality were investigated, general uses were described ...

  9. Transforming Experience: The Potential of Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality for Enhancing Personal and Clinical Change

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Riva; Giuseppe Riva; ROSA M. BAÑOS; ROSA M. BAÑOS; ROSA M. BAÑOS; Cristina Botella; Cristina Botella; Cristina Botella; Fabrizia Mantovani; Andrea Gaggioli; Andrea Gaggioli

    2016-01-01

    During our life we undergo many personal changes: we change our house, our school, our work and even our friends and partners. However, our daily experience shows clearly that in some situations subjects are unable to change even if they want to. The recent advances in psychology and neuroscience are now providing a better view of personal change, the change affecting our assumptive world: a) the focus of personal change is reducing the distance between self and reality (conflict); b) this re...

  10. Augmented-Virtual Reality: How to improve education systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Fernandez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay presents and discusses the developing role of virtual and augmented reality technologies in education. Addressing the challenges in adapting such technologies to focus on improving students’ learning outcomes, the author discusses the inclusion of experiential modes as a vehicle for improving students’ knowledge acquisition. Stakeholders in the educational role of technology include students, faculty members, institutions, and manufacturers. While the benefits of such technologies are still under investigation, the technology landscape offers opportunities to enhance face-to-face and online teaching, including contributions in the understanding of abstract concepts and training in real environments and situations. Barriers to technology use involve limited adoption of augmented and virtual reality technologies, and, more directly, necessary training of teachers in using such technologies within meaningful educational contexts. The author proposes a six-step methodology to aid adoption of these technologies as basic elements within the regular education: training teachers; developing conceptual prototypes; teamwork involving the teacher, a technical programmer, and an educational architect; and producing the experience, which then provides results in the subsequent two phases wherein teachers are trained to apply augmented- and virtual-reality solutions within their teaching methodology using an available subject-specific experience and then finally implementing the use of the experience in a regular subject with students. The essay concludes with discussion of the business opportunities facing virtual reality in face-to-face education as well as augmented and virtual reality in online education.

  11. Reality Check: Basics of Augmented, Virtual, and Mixed Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, Tara J

    2017-01-01

    Augmented, virtual, and mixed reality applications all aim to enhance a user's current experience or reality. While variations of this technology are not new, within the last few years there has been a significant increase in the number of artificial reality devices or applications available to the general public. This column will explain the difference between augmented, virtual, and mixed reality and how each application might be useful in libraries. It will also provide an overview of the concerns surrounding these different reality applications and describe how and where they are currently being used.

  12. Interactive Anatomy-Augmented Virtual Simulation Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aebersold, Michelle; Voepel-Lewis, Terri; Cherara, Leila; Weber, Monica; Khouri, Christina; Levine, Robert; Tait, Alan R

    2018-02-01

    Traditionally, clinical psychomotor skills are taught through videos and demonstration by faculty which does not allow for the visualization of internal structures and anatomical landmarks that would enhance the learner skill performance. Sophomore and junior nursing students attending a large Midwestern Institution (N=69) participated in this mixed methods study. Students demonstrated their ability to place a nasogastric tube (NGT) after being randomly assigned to usual training (Control group) or an iPad anatomy-augmented virtual simulation training module (AR group). The ability of the participants to demonstrate competence in placing the NGT was assessed using a 17-item competency checklist. After the demonstration, students completed a survey to elicit information about students' level of training, prior experience with NGT placement, satisfaction with the AR technology, and perceptions of AR as a potential teaching tool for clinical skills training. The ability to correctly place the NGT through all the checklist items was statistically significant in the AR group compared with the control group (P = 0.011). Eighty-six percent of participants in the AR group rated AR as superior/far superior to other procedural training programs to which they had been exposed, whereas, only 5.9% of participants in the control group rated the control program as superior/far superior (P < 0.001). Overall the AR module was better received compared with the control group with regards to realism, identifying landmarks, visualization of internal organs, ease of use, usefulness, and promoting learning and understanding.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Cole, John; Lineberry, John; Chapman, Jim; Schmidt, Harold; Cook, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental obstacle to routine space access is the specific energy limitations associated with chemical fuels. In the case of vertical take-off, the high thrust needed for vertical liftoff and acceleration to orbit translates into power levels in the 10 GW range. Furthermore, useful payload mass fractions are possible only if the exhaust particle energy (i.e., exhaust velocity) is much greater than that available with traditional chemical propulsion. The electronic binding energy released by the best chemical reactions (e.g., LOX/LH2 for example, is less than 2 eV per product molecule (approx. 1.8 eV per H2O molecule), which translates into particle velocities less than 5 km/s. Useful payload fractions, however, will require exhaust velocities exceeding 15 km/s (i.e., particle energies greater than 20 eV). As an added challenge, the envisioned hypothetical RLV (reusable launch vehicle) should accomplish these amazing performance feats while providing relatively low acceleration levels to orbit (2-3g maximum). From such fundamental considerations, it is painfully obvious that planned and current RLV solutions based on chemical fuels alone represent only a temporary solution and can only result in minor gains, at best. What is truly needed is a revolutionary approach that will dramatically reduce the amount of fuel and size of the launch vehicle. This implies the need for new compact high-power energy sources as well as advanced accelerator technologies for increasing engine exhaust velocity. Electromagnetic acceleration techniques are of immense interest since they can be used to circumvent the thermal limits associated with conventional propulsion systems. This paper describes the Magnetohydrodynamic Augmented Propulsion Experiment (MAPX) being undertaken at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). In this experiment, a 1-MW arc heater is being used as a feeder for a 1-MW magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accelerator. The purpose of the experiment is to demonstrate

  14. Mobile devices, Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, and Digital Geoscience Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, H.; De Paor, D. G.; Whitmeyer, S. J.; Bentley, C.

    2016-12-01

    Mobile devices are playing an increasing role in geoscience education. Affordances include instructor-student communication and class management in large classrooms, virtual and augmented reality applications, digital mapping, and crowd-sourcing. Mobile technologies have spawned the sub field of mobile learning or m-learning, which is defined as learning across multiple contexts, through social and content interactions. Geoscientists have traditionally engaged in non-digital mobile learning via fieldwork, but digital devices are greatly extending the possibilities, especially for non-traditional students. Smartphones and tablets are the most common devices but smart glasses such as Pivothead enable live streaming of a first-person view (see for example, https://youtu.be/gWrDaYP5w58). Virtual reality headsets such as Google Cardboard create an immersive virtual field experience and digital imagery such as GigaPan and Structure from Motion enables instructors and/or students to create virtual specimens and outcrops that are sharable across the globe. Whereas virtual reality (VR) replaces the real world with a virtual representation, augmented reality (AR) overlays digital data on the live scene visible to the user in real time. We have previously reported on our use of the AR application called FreshAiR for geoscientific "egg hunts." The popularity of Pokémon Go demonstrates the potential of AR for mobile learning in the geosciences.

  15. International workshop on multimodal virtual and augmented reality (workshop summary)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hürst, W.O.; Iwai, Daisuke; Balakrishnan, Prabhakaran

    2016-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) are expected by many to become the next wave of computing with significant impacts on our daily lives. Motivated by this, we organized a workshop on “Multimodal Virtual and Augmented Reality (MVAR)” at the 18th ACM International Conference on

  16. Virtual and Augmented Reality on the 5G Highway

    OpenAIRE

    Orlosky, Jason; Kiyokawa, Kiyoshi; Takemura, Haruo

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, virtual and augmented reality have begun to take advantage of the high speed capabilities of data streaming technologies and wireless networks. However, limitations like bandwidth and latency still prevent us from achieving high fidelity telepresence and collaborative virtual and augmented reality applications. Fortunately, both researchers and engineers are aware of these problems and have set out to design 5G networks to help us to move to the next generation of virtual int...

  17. Augmented Reality Platforms for Virtual Fitting Rooms

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannis Pachoulakis; Kostas Kapetanakis

    2012-01-01

    Multi-sensor body scanners combined with new algorithms and social media technologies have started a revolutionary shift away from the classic desktop paradigm and into the direction of intuitive, “natural interaction” where people interface with the technological world through hand gestures, speech and body language. This article reviews recent examples of Virtual Fitting Rooms (VFRs) and supporting technologies which facilitate the shopping experience by letting customers to try...

  18. Towards augmented reality: The dialectics of physical and virtual space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guga Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spaces generated by new media technologies, no matter how abstract they may be, represent a qualitatively new form of the media environment. Moreover, they are integrated into everyday life in a way that they have become the constituents of social reality. Based on dualistic Cartesian understanding of real and virtual space, virtuality still carries a connotation of 'other' world, which is ontologically and phenomenologically different from 'reality'. However, virtuality as a characteristic of new media technologies should neither be equated with illusion, deception or fiction nor set in opposition to reality, given that it embodies real interactions. Instead, we could say that there are different types or levels of reality and that the virtual exists as reality qualitatively different from that of physical reality. Today, when every place on the planet, as well as social, political, and cultural activities, have their digital manifestations, can we still talk about virtual space as an isolated phenomenon? The ubiquitous use of new media technologies such as smartphones or wearables has profoundly transformed the experience of modern man. It is more and more determined by technologically mediated reality, i.e. augmented reality. In this regard, the key issues that will be addressed in this article are the ways technologically mediated spaces redefine not only the social relationships, but also the notions of identity, embodiment, and the self.

  19. Virtual, augmented reality and serious games for healthcare

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Lakhmi; Anderson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    There is a tremendous interest among researchers for the development of virtual, augmented reality and games technologies due to their widespread applications in medicine and healthcare. To date the major applications of these technologies include medical simulation, telemedicine, medical and healthcare training, pain control, visualisation aid for surgery, rehabilitation in cases such as stroke, phobia, and trauma therapies. Many recent studies have identified the benefits of using Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, or serious games in a variety of medical applications.   This research volume on Virtual, Augmented Reality and Serious Games for Healthcare 1 offers an insightful introduction to the theories, development and applications of virtual, augmented reality and digital games technologies in medical and clinical settings and healthcare in general. It is divided into six sections: section one presents a selection of applications in medical education and healthcare management; Section two relates to th...

  20. Virtual and augmented reality for training on maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents two projects focused to support training on maintenance using new technologies. Both projects aims at specifying. designing, developing, and demonstrating prototypes allowing computer guided maintenance of complex mechanical elements using Virtual Reality (VIRMAN) and Augmented Reality (STARMATE) techniques. VIRMAN project is dedicated to training course development on maintenance using Virtual Reality. It based in the animation of three dimension images for component assembly/de-assembly or equipment movements. STARMATE will rely on Augmented Reality techniques which is a growing area in virtual Reality research. The idea of Augmented Reality is to combine a real scene, viewed by the user, with a virtual scene generated by a computer augmenting the reality with additional information. (Author)

  1. Instrument Motion Metrics for Laparoscopic Skills Assessment in Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Boel A; Chen, Chi-Ya; Noyes, Julie A; Ragle, Claude A

    2016-11-01

    To determine the construct and concurrent validity of instrument motion metrics for laparoscopic skills assessment in virtual reality and augmented reality simulators. Evaluation study. Veterinarian students (novice, n = 14) and veterinarians (experienced, n = 11) with no or variable laparoscopic experience. Participants' minimally invasive surgery (MIS) experience was determined by hospital records of MIS procedures performed in the Teaching Hospital. Basic laparoscopic skills were assessed by 5 tasks using a physical box trainer. Each participant completed 2 tasks for assessments in each type of simulator (virtual reality: bowel handling and cutting; augmented reality: object positioning and a pericardial window model). Motion metrics such as instrument path length, angle or drift, and economy of motion of each simulator were recorded. None of the motion metrics in a virtual reality simulator showed correlation with experience, or to the basic laparoscopic skills score. All metrics in augmented reality were significantly correlated with experience (time, instrument path, and economy of movement), except for the hand dominance metric. The basic laparoscopic skills score was correlated to all performance metrics in augmented reality. The augmented reality motion metrics differed between American College of Veterinary Surgeons diplomates and residents, whereas basic laparoscopic skills score and virtual reality metrics did not. Our results provide construct validity and concurrent validity for motion analysis metrics for an augmented reality system, whereas a virtual reality system was validated only for the time score. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  2. Virtual neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Julie Hougaard; Bruun, Jesper; May, Michael

    2017-01-01

    . In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus......We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering...

  3. Virtual neutron scattering experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Julie Hougaard; Bruun, Jesper; May, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering....... In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus...... on physics and data rather than the overwhelming instrumentation. We argue that this is because they can transfer their virtual experimental experience to the real-life situation. However, we also find that learning is still situated in the sense that only knowledge of particular experiments is transferred...

  4. Applying virtual and augmented reality in cultural computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartneck, C.; Hu, J.; Salem, B.I.; Cristescu, R.; Rauterberg, G.W.M.

    2008-01-01

    We are exploring a new application of virtual and augmented reality for a novel direction in human-computer inteaction named 'cultural computing', which aims to provide a new medium for cultural translation and unconscious metamorphosis. In this application both virtual and robotic agents are

  5. Nested immersion: Describing and classifying augmented virtual reality

    OpenAIRE

    MARSH, William Eric; MERIENNE, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    We present a system, intended for automotive design review use cases, that incorporates a tracked tablet in a CAVE, where both the tablet and the CAVE provide different views and interaction possibilities within the same virtual scene. At its core, this idea is not novel. However, the literature reveals few examples of this paradigm in which virtual information is presented on a second physical device to augment an immersive virtual environment. Similarly, it is unclear where the system shoul...

  6. Restorative Virtual Environment Design for Augmenting Nursing Home Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Pedersen, Jon Ram; Serafin, Stefania; Kofoed, Lise

    2016-01-01

    do, but more studies on content and design of proper custom designs for RVEs is necessary. This paper reviews the background for RVE design, describes four custom RVE designs for recreational VE exploration and presents user preferences among nursing home users concerning content and other pivotal......With increasing age, muscle strength decreases excessively rapidly if physical activity is not maintained. However, physical activity is increasingly difficult with age, due to balance, strength or coordination difficulties, arthritis, etc. Moreover, many nursing home residents become unable...... to experience natural surroundings. Augmenting a conventional biking exercise with a recreational virtual environment (RVE) has shown to serve as an intrinsic motivation contributor to exercise for nursing home residents. RVEs might be able to provide some of the health benefits that regular nature experiences...

  7. Methods and systems relating to an augmented virtuality environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Curtis W; Anderson, Matthew O; McKay, Mark D; Wadsworth, Derek C; Boyce, Jodie R; Hruska, Ryan C; Koudelka, John A; Whetten, Jonathan; Bruemmer, David J

    2014-05-20

    Systems and methods relating to an augmented virtuality system are disclosed. A method of operating an augmented virtuality system may comprise displaying imagery of a real-world environment in an operating picture. The method may further include displaying a plurality of virtual icons in the operating picture representing at least some assets of a plurality of assets positioned in the real-world environment. Additionally, the method may include displaying at least one virtual item in the operating picture representing data sensed by one or more of the assets of the plurality of assets and remotely controlling at least one asset of the plurality of assets by interacting with a virtual icon associated with the at least one asset.

  8. CONTROLLING VIRTUAL CLOUDS AND MAKING IT RAIN PARTICLE SYSTEMS IN REAL SPACES USING SITUATED AUGMENTED SIMULATION AND PORTABLE VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hedley

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The research described in this paper reports on the design, rationale, development and implementation of a set of new geospatial interfaces that combine multi-touch interaction, portable virtual environments, 'geosimulation gaming', and mobile augmented reality. The result is a set of new ways for us to combine the capabilities of geospatial virtual environments, augmented realitiy and geosimulation. These new hybrid interfaces deliver new geospatial information experiences – new ways of connecting spatial data, simulations, and abstract concepts to real spaces. Their potential to enhance environmental perception and learning must be explored.

  9. AR Feels "Softer" than VR: Haptic Perception of Stiffness in Augmented versus Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffary, Yoren; Le Gouis, Benoit; Marchal, Maud; Argelaguet, Ferran; Arnaldi, Bruno; Lecuyer, Anatole

    2017-11-01

    Does it feel the same when you touch an object in Augmented Reality (AR) or in Virtual Reality (VR)? In this paper we study and compare the haptic perception of stiffness of a virtual object in two situations: (1) a purely virtual environment versus (2) a real and augmented environment. We have designed an experimental setup based on a Microsoft HoloLens and a haptic force-feedback device, enabling to press a virtual piston, and compare its stiffness successively in either Augmented Reality (the virtual piston is surrounded by several real objects all located inside a cardboard box) or in Virtual Reality (the same virtual piston is displayed in a fully virtual scene composed of the same other objects). We have conducted a psychophysical experiment with 12 participants. Our results show a surprising bias in perception between the two conditions. The virtual piston is on average perceived stiffer in the VR condition compared to the AR condition. For instance, when the piston had the same stiffness in AR and VR, participants would select the VR piston as the stiffer one in 60% of cases. This suggests a psychological effect as if objects in AR would feel "softer" than in pure VR. Taken together, our results open new perspectives on perception in AR versus VR, and pave the way to future studies aiming at characterizing potential perceptual biases.

  10. Intuitive Robot Tasks with Augmented Reality and Virtual Obstacles

    OpenAIRE

    Gaschler, Andre;Springer, Maximilian;Rickert, Markus;Knoll, Alois

    2017-01-01

    Today's industrial robots require expert knowledge and are not profitable for small and medium sized enterprises with their small lot sizes. It is our strong belief that more intuitive robot programming in an augmented reality robot work cell can dramatically simplify re-programming and leverage robotics technology in short production cycles. In this paper, we present a novel augmented reality system for defining virtual obstacles, specifying tool positions, and specifying robot tasks. We eva...

  11. Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) applied in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Ta-Ko Huang; Chi-Hsun Yang; Yu-Hsin Hsieh; Jen-Chyan Wang; Chun-Cheng Hung

    2018-01-01

    The OSCE is a reliable evaluation method to estimate the preclinical examination of dental students. The most ideal assessment for OSCE is used the augmented reality simulator to evaluate. This literature review investigated a recently developed in virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) starting of the dental history to the progress of the dental skill. As result of the lacking of technology, it needs to depend on other device increasing the success rate and decreasing the risk of th...

  12. Spatial augmented reality merging real and virtual worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Bimber, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    Like virtual reality, augmented reality is becoming an emerging platform in new application areas for museums, edutainment, home entertainment, research, industry, and the art communities using novel approaches which have taken augmented reality beyond traditional eye-worn or hand-held displays. In this book, the authors discuss spatial augmented reality approaches that exploit optical elements, video projectors, holograms, radio frequency tags, and tracking technology, as well as interactive rendering algorithms and calibration techniques in order to embed synthetic supplements into the real

  13. Exploring Urban Environments Using Virtual and Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Stelios Papakonstantinou; Vesna Brujic-Okretic; Fotis Liarokapis

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose the use of specific system architecture, based on mobile device, for navigation in urban environments. The aim of this work is to assess how virtual and augmented reality interface paradigms can provide enhanced location based services using real-time techniques in the context of these two different technologies. The virtual reality interface is based on faithful graphical representation of the localities of interest, coupled with sensory information on the location ...

  14. Engembangan Virtual Class Untuk Pembelajaran Augmented Reality Berbasis Android

    OpenAIRE

    Arief, Rifiana; Umniati, Naeli

    2012-01-01

    Augmanted Reality for android handphone has been a trend among collage students of computer department who join New Media course. To develop this application, the knowladge about visual presentation theory and case study of Augmanted Reality on android phoneneed to be conducted. Learning media through virtual class can facilitate the students' needs in learning and developing Augmanted Reality. The method of this study in developing virtual class for Augmented Reality learning were: a) having...

  15. ENGEMBANGAN VIRTUAL CLASS UNTUK PEMBELAJARAN AUGMENTED REALITY BERBASIS ANDROID

    OpenAIRE

    Rifiana Arief; Naeli Umniati

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Augmanted Reality for android handphone has been a trend among collage students of computer department who join New Media course. To develop this application, the knowladge about visual presentation theory and case study of Augmanted Reality on android phoneneed to be conducted. Learning media through virtual class can facilitate the students’ needs in learning and developing Augmanted Reality. The method of this study in developing virtual class for Augmented Reality learning we...

  16. Application of Virtual, Augmented, and Mixed Reality to Urology

    OpenAIRE

    Hamacher, Alaric; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Sung Tae; Pardeshi, Sunil; Lee, Seung Hyun; Eun, Sung-Jong; Whangbo, Taeg Keun

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in virtual, augmented, and mixed reality have introduced a considerable number of new devices into the consumer market. This momentum is also affecting the medical and health care sector. Although many of the theoretical and practical foundations of virtual reality (VR) were already researched and experienced in the 1980s, the vastly improved features of displays, sensors, interactivity, and computing power currently available in devices offer a new field of applications t...

  17. Augmented Virtual Reality: How to Improve Education Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    This essay presents and discusses the developing role of virtual and augmented reality technologies in education. Addressing the challenges in adapting such technologies to focus on improving students' learning outcomes, the author discusses the inclusion of experiential modes as a vehicle for improving students' knowledge acquisition.…

  18. Experiencing 3D interactions in virtual reality and augmented reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, J.B.; Qi, W.; Aliakseyeu, D.; Kok, A.J.F.; Liere, van R.; Hoven, van den E.; Ijsselsteijn, W.; Kortuem, G.; Laerhoven, van K.; McClelland, I.; Perik, E.; Romero, N.; Ruyter, de B.

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate basic 2D and 3D interactions in both a Virtual Reality (VR) system, called the Personal Space Station, and an Augmented Reality (AR) system, called the Visual Interaction Platform. Since both platforms use identical (optical) tracking hardware and software, and can run identical

  19. Augmented exercise biking with virtual environments for elderly users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Pedersem, Jon Ram; Serafin, Stefania; Kofoed, Lise Busk

    2014-01-01

    residents used an audio-visual virtual environment (VE) augmentation for an exercise bike. Besides a visual display, a soundscape was played to the subjects using headphones. The soundscape was not no- ticed wand the headphones were found to be obtrusive. In this paper, we consider and discuss possible...

  20. Augmenting a Virtual World Game in a Physical Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offermans, S.A.M.; Hu, J.

    2013-01-01

    Computer games and virtual worlds offer unique possibilities for learning and personal development. Physical world play on the other hand offers its own unique opportunities. To combine these opportunities, we have developed the Augmented Home, a game which combines the qualities of both worlds and

  1. VirtualTable: a projection augmented reality game

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dal Corso, Alessandro; Olsen, Mikkel Damgaard; Steenstrup, Kasper Hornbak

    2015-01-01

    VirtualTable is a projection augmented reality installation where users are engaged in an interactive tower defense game. The installation runs continuously and is designed to attract people to a table, which the game is projected onto. Any number of players can join the game for an optional period...

  2. Augmented reality (AR and virtual reality (VR applied in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ta-Ko Huang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The OSCE is a reliable evaluation method to estimate the preclinical examination of dental students. The most ideal assessment for OSCE is used the augmented reality simulator to evaluate. This literature review investigated a recently developed in virtual reality (VR and augmented reality (AR starting of the dental history to the progress of the dental skill. As result of the lacking of technology, it needs to depend on other device increasing the success rate and decreasing the risk of the surgery. The development of tracking unit changed the surgical and educational way. Clinical surgery is based on mature education. VR and AR simultaneously affected the skill of the training lesson and navigation system. Widely, the VR and AR not only applied in the dental training lesson and surgery, but also improved all field in our life. Keywords: OSCE, Dental simulator, Augmented reality, Virtual reality, Dentistry

  3. ENGEMBANGAN VIRTUAL CLASS UNTUK PEMBELAJARAN AUGMENTED REALITY BERBASIS ANDROID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifiana Arief

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Augmanted Reality for android handphone has been a trend among collage students of computer department who join New Media course. To develop this application, the knowladge about visual presentation theory and case study of Augmanted Reality on android phoneneed to be conducted. Learning media through virtual class can facilitate the students’ needs in learning and developing Augmanted Reality. The method of this study in developing virtual class for Augmented Reality learning were: a having preparation to arrange learning unit, b analyzing and developing the content of learning materials, c designing storyboard or scenario of the virtual class, d making website of virtual class, e implementing the website as facility of online learning for Augmanted Reality. The available facilities in virtual class were to check learning units, to choose and download the material in the forms of e-book and presentation slides, to open the relevant website link for material enrichment as well as students’ practice with pre-test and post-test for measuring students’ understanding. By implementing virtual class for Augmanted Reality learning based Android, it is expected to provide alternative learning strategies for students that are interesting and easy to understand. The students are expected to be able to utilize this facility optimally in order to achieve the purposes of learning process and graduates’ competence. Keywords: VirtualClass, Augmented Reality (AR

  4. Usability in virtual and augmented environments : A qualitative and quantitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dias, P.; Pimentel, A.; Ferreira, C.; Van Huussen, F.; Baggerman, J.W.; Van der Horst, P.; Madeira, J.; Bidarra, R.; Sousa Santos, B.

    2007-01-01

    Virtual and Augmented Reality are developing rapidly: there is a multitude of environments and experiments in several laboratories using from simple HMD (Head-Mounted Display) visualization to more complex and expensive 6-wall projection CAVEs, and other systems. Still, there is not yet a clear

  5. Factory Virtual Environment Development for Augmented and Virtual Reality

    OpenAIRE

    M. Gregor; J. Polcar; P. Horejsi; M. Simon

    2015-01-01

    Machine visualization is an area of interest with fast and progressive development. We present a method of machine visualization which will be applicable in real industrial conditions according to current needs and demands. Real factory data were obtained in a newly built research plant. Methods described in this paper were validated on a case study. Input data were processed and the virtual environment was created. The environment contains information about dimensions, s...

  6. Augmented Virtual Reality: How to Improve Education Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández-Utrilla Miguel, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    This essay presents and discusses the developing role of virtual and augmented reality technologies in education. Addressing the challenges in adapting such technologies to focus on improving students’ learning outcomes, the author discusses the inclusion of experiential modes as a vehicle for improving students’ knowledge acquisition. Stakeholders in the educational role of technology include students, faculty members, institutions, and manufacturers. While the benefits of suc...

  7. Future Trends of Virtual, Augmented Reality, and Games for Health

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Minhua; Jain, Lakhmi C; Anderson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Serious game is now a multi-billion dollar industry and is still growing steadily in many sectors. As a major subset of serious games, designing and developing Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR), and serious games or adopting off-the-shelf games to support medical education, rehabilitation, or promote health has become a promising frontier in the healthcare sector since 2004, because games technology is inexpensive, widely available, fun and entertaining for people of all ages, with...

  8. (Is?) Virtual Opponent of Tourism Sector: Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Özgüneş, Reşad Emre; Bozok, Düriye

    2018-01-01

    It is seen that brands arebuilding their marketing strategies on technological innovations with the aimof standing out, coming to the leading position in the sector, increase theirprofitability. One of these methods experienced in the virtual world and usedby major brands such as Marshall, L'Oreal Paris, Ray-Ban, Adidas, BMW, Ford,Volkswagen, IKEA as a marketing instrument by being followed closely is AR(Augmented Reality) technology. In essence, it is anticipated that AR will beused ext...

  9. Augmenting the thermal flux experiment: a mixed reality approach with the HoloLens

    OpenAIRE

    Strzys, M. P.; Kapp, S.; Thees, M.; Lukowicz, P.; Knierim, P.; Schmidt, A.; Kuhn, J.

    2017-01-01

    In the field of Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) technologies have made huge progress during the last years and also reached the field of education. The virtuality continuum, ranging from pure virtuality on one side to the real world on the other has been successfully covered by the use of immersive technologies like head-mounted displays, which allow to embed virtual objects into the real surroundings, leading to a Mixed Reality (MR) experience. In such an environment digital ...

  10. Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) applied in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ta-Ko; Yang, Chi-Hsun; Hsieh, Yu-Hsin; Wang, Jen-Chyan; Hung, Chun-Cheng

    2018-04-01

    The OSCE is a reliable evaluation method to estimate the preclinical examination of dental students. The most ideal assessment for OSCE is used the augmented reality simulator to evaluate. This literature review investigated a recently developed in virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) starting of the dental history to the progress of the dental skill. As result of the lacking of technology, it needs to depend on other device increasing the success rate and decreasing the risk of the surgery. The development of tracking unit changed the surgical and educational way. Clinical surgery is based on mature education. VR and AR simultaneously affected the skill of the training lesson and navigation system. Widely, the VR and AR not only applied in the dental training lesson and surgery, but also improved all field in our life. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  11. Perform light and optic experiments in Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Peter; Vauderwange, Oliver; Curticapean, Dan; Javahiraly, Nicolas; Israel, Kai

    2015-10-01

    In many scientific studies lens experiments are part of the curriculum. The conducted experiments are meant to give the students a basic understanding for the laws of optics and its applications. Most of the experiments need special hardware like e.g. an optical bench, light sources, apertures and different lens types. Therefore it is not possible for the students to conduct any of the experiments outside of the university's laboratory. Simple optical software simulators enabling the students to virtually perform lens experiments already exist, but are mostly desktop or web browser based. Augmented Reality (AR) is a special case of mediated and mixed reality concepts, where computers are used to add, subtract or modify one's perception of reality. As a result of the success and widespread availability of handheld mobile devices, like e.g. tablet computers and smartphones, mobile augmented reality applications are easy to use. Augmented reality can be easily used to visualize a simulated optical bench. The students can interactively modify properties like e.g. lens type, lens curvature, lens diameter, lens refractive index and the positions of the instruments in space. Light rays can be visualized and promote an additional understanding of the laws of optics. An AR application like this is ideally suited to prepare the actual laboratory sessions and/or recap the teaching content. The authors will present their experience with handheld augmented reality applications and their possibilities for light and optic experiments without the needs for specialized optical hardware.

  12. Augmented versus Virtual Reality Laparoscopic Simulation: What Is the Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botden, Sanne M.B.I.; Buzink, Sonja N.; Schijven, Marlies P.

    2007-01-01

    Background Virtual reality (VR) is an emerging new modality for laparoscopic skills training; however, most simulators lack realistic haptic feedback. Augmented reality (AR) is a new laparoscopic simulation system offering a combination of physical objects and VR simulation. Laparoscopic instruments are used within an hybrid mannequin on tissue or objects while using video tracking. This study was designed to assess the difference in realism, haptic feedback, and didactic value between AR and VR laparoscopic simulation. Methods The ProMIS AR and LapSim VR simulators were used in this study. The participants performed a basic skills task and a suturing task on both simulators, after which they filled out a questionnaire about their demographics and their opinion of both simulators scored on a 5-point Likert scale. The participants were allotted to 3 groups depending on their experience: experts, intermediates and novices. Significant differences were calculated with the paired t-test. Results There was general consensus in all groups that the ProMIS AR laparoscopic simulator is more realistic than the LapSim VR laparoscopic simulator in both the basic skills task (mean 4.22 resp. 2.18, P < 0.000) as well as the suturing task (mean 4.15 resp. 1.85, P < 0.000). The ProMIS is regarded as having better haptic feedback (mean 3.92 resp. 1.92, P < 0.000) and as being more useful for training surgical residents (mean 4.51 resp. 2.94, P < 0.000). Conclusions In comparison with the VR simulator, the AR laparoscopic simulator was regarded by all participants as a better simulator for laparoscopic skills training on all tested features. PMID:17361356

  13. Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality in Plastic Surgery: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngjun; Kim, Hannah; Kim, Yong Oock

    2017-05-01

    Recently, virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) have received increasing attention, with the development of VR/AR devices such as head-mounted displays, haptic devices, and AR glasses. Medicine is considered to be one of the most effective applications of VR/AR. In this article, we describe a systematic literature review conducted to investigate the state-of-the-art VR/AR technology relevant to plastic surgery. The 35 studies that were ultimately selected were categorized into 3 representative topics: VR/AR-based preoperative planning, navigation, and training. In addition, future trends of VR/AR technology associated with plastic surgery and related fields are discussed.

  14. Application of Virtual, Augmented, and Mixed Reality to Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Alaric; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Sung Tae; Pardeshi, Sunil; Lee, Seung Hyun; Eun, Sung-Jong; Whangbo, Taeg Keun

    2016-09-01

    Recent developments in virtual, augmented, and mixed reality have introduced a considerable number of new devices into the consumer market. This momentum is also affecting the medical and health care sector. Although many of the theoretical and practical foundations of virtual reality (VR) were already researched and experienced in the 1980s, the vastly improved features of displays, sensors, interactivity, and computing power currently available in devices offer a new field of applications to the medical sector and also to urology in particular. The purpose of this review article is to review the extent to which VR technology has already influenced certain aspects of medicine, the applications that are currently in use in urology, and the future development trends that could be expected.

  15. Application of Virtual, Augmented, and Mixed Reality to Urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaric Hamacher

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in virtual, augmented, and mixed reality have introduced a considerable number of new devices into the consumer market. This momentum is also affecting the medical and health care sector. Although many of the theoretical and practical foundations of virtual reality (VR were already researched and experienced in the 1980s, the vastly improved features of displays, sensors, interactivity, and computing power currently available in devices offer a new field of applications to the medical sector and also to urology in particular. The purpose of this review article is to review the extent to which VR technology has already influenced certain aspects of medicine, the applications that are currently in use in urology, and the future development trends that could be expected.

  16. Virtual environment to evaluate multimodal feedback strategies for augmented navigation of the visually impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Masayuki; Shokur, Solaiman; Yamamoto, Akio; Higuchi, Toshiro; Gassert, Roger; Bleuler, Hannes

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel experimental environment to evaluate multimodal feedback strategies for augmented navigation of the visually impaired. The environment consists of virtual obstacles and walls, an optical tracking system and a simple device with audio and vibrotactile feedback that interacts with the virtual environment, and presents many advantages in terms of safety, flexibility, control over experimental parameters and cost. The subject can freely move in an empty room, while the position of head and arm are tracked in real time. A virtual environment (walls, obstacles) is randomly generated, and audio and vibrotactile feedback are given according to the distance from the subjects arm to the virtual walls/objects. We investigate the applicability of our environment using a simple, commercially available feedback device. Experiments with unimpaired subjects show that it is possible to use the setup to "blindly" navigate in an unpredictable virtual environment. This validates the environment as a test platform to investigate navigation and exploration strategies of the visually impaired, and to evaluate novel technologies for augmented navigation.

  17. Virtual and augmented reality technologies in Human Performance: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Brusque Crocetta

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction : Today's society is influenced by Information and Communication Technologies. Toys that were once built by hand have been reinterpreted and have become highly commercialized products. In this context, games using Augmented Reality (AR and Virtual Reality (VR technologies are present in the everyday lives of children, youth and adults. Objective : To investigate how Physical Education professionals in Brazil have been making use of AR and VR games to benefit their work. Materials and methods : We only included studies that addressed exercise or physical activity using AR or VR games. We searched the databases of Virtual Health Library (VHL and Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO, using the words augmented reality, virtual reality, exergames, Wii and serious games. Results : Nineteen articles were included in the systematic review. The most frequently used device was the Nintendo(r Wii, with over 25 different kinds of games. With regard to the subjects of the studies, four studies were conducted with healthy individuals (mean = 65.7, three with patients with Parkinson's disease (mean = 18.0, three with elderly women (mean = 7.7 and two with patients with stroke injury (mean = 6.0. Conclusion : Many physical therapists and occupational therapists use serious games with AR or VR technologies as another work tool, especially for rehabilitation practices. The fact that these technologies are also used in Physical Education classes in Brazil indicates that electronic games are available and can be a tool that can contribute to the widespread adoption of exercise as an enjoyable form of recreation.

  18. The Perceptions of CEIT Postgraduate Students Regarding Reality Concepts: Augmented, Virtual, Mixed and Mirror Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taçgin, Zeynep; Arslan, Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine perception of postgraduate Computer Education and Instructional Technologies (CEIT) students regarding the concepts of Augmented Reality (AR), Virtual Reality (VR), Mixed Reality (MR), Augmented Virtuality (AV) and Mirror Reality; and to offer a table that includes differences and similarities between…

  19. Learning Experience with Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Virtual worlds create a new opportunity to enrich the educational experience through media-rich immersive learning. Virtual worlds have gained notoriety in games such as World of Warcraft (WoW), which has become the most successful online game ever, and in "general purpose" worlds, such as Second Life (SL), whose participation levels (more than 10…

  20. Using Augmented Reality to Plan Virtual Construction Worksite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu Wang

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Current construction worksite layout planning heavily relies on 2D paper media where the worksite planners sketch the future layout adjacent to their real environment. This traditional approach turns out to be ineffective and prone to error because only experienced and well-trained planners are able to generate the effective layout design with paper sketch. Augmented Reality (AR, as a new user interface technology, introduces a completely new perspective for construction worksite planning. This paper disucsses the related AR work and issues in construction and describes the concept and prototype of an AR-based construction planning tool, AR Planner with virtual elements sets and tangible interface. The focus of the paper is to identify and integrate worksite planning rules into the AR planner with the purpose of intelligently preventing potential planning errors and process inefficiency, thus maximizing the overall productivity. Future work includes refining and verifying AR Planner in realistic projects.

  1. Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality in Plastic Surgery: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjun Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently, virtual reality (VR and augmented reality (AR have received increasing attention, with the development of VR/AR devices such as head-mounted displays, haptic devices, and AR glasses. Medicine is considered to be one of the most effective applications of VR/AR. In this article, we describe a systematic literature review conducted to investigate the state-of-the-art VR/AR technology relevant to plastic surgery. The 35 studies that were ultimately selected were categorized into 3 representative topics: VR/AR-based preoperative planning, navigation, and training. In addition, future trends of VR/AR technology associated with plastic surgery and related fields are discussed.

  2. Using Augmented Reality to Plan Virtual Construction Worksite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu Wang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Current construction worksite layout planning heavily relies on 2D paper media where the worksite planners sketch the future layout adjacent to their real environment. This traditional approach turns out to be ineffective and prone to error because only experienced and well-trained planners are able to generate the effective layout design with paper sketch. Augmented Reality (AR, as a new user interface technology, introduces a completely new perspective for construction worksite planning. This paper disucsses the related AR work and issues in construction and describes the concept and prototype of an AR-based construction planning tool, AR Planner with virtual elements sets and tangible interface. The focus of the paper is to identify and integrate worksite planning rules into the AR planner with the purpose of intelligently preventing potential planning errors and process inefficiency, thus maximizing the overall productivity. Future work includes refining and verifying AR Planner in realistic projects.

  3. The Architectonic Experience of Body and Space in Augmented Interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Isabella; Blefari, Maria Laura; Tadi, Tej; Serino, Andrea; Blanke, Olaf

    2018-01-01

    The environment shapes our experience of space in constant interaction with the body. Architectonic interiors amplify the perception of space through the bodily senses; an effect also known as embodiment. The interaction of the bodily senses with the space surrounding the body can be tested experimentally through the manipulation of multisensory stimulation and measured via a range of behaviors related to bodily self-consciousness. Many studies have used Virtual Reality to show that visuotactile conflicts mediated via a virtual body or avatar can disrupt the unified subjective experience of the body and self. In the full-body illusion paradigm, participants feel as if the avatar was their body (ownership, self-identification) and they shift their center of awareness toward the position of the avatar (self-location). However, the influence of non-bodily spatial cues around the body on embodiment remains unclear, and data about the impact of architectonic space on human perception and self-conscious states are sparse. We placed participants into a Virtual Reality arena, where large and narrow virtual interiors were displayed with and without an avatar. We then applied synchronous or asynchronous visuotactile strokes to the back of the participants and avatar, or, to the front wall of the void interiors. During conditions of illusory self-identification with the avatar, participants reported sensations of containment, drift, and touch with the architectonic environment. The absence of the avatar suppressed such feelings, yet, in the large space, we found an effect of continuity between the physical and the virtual interior depending on the full-body illusion. We discuss subjective feelings evoked by architecture and compare the full-body illusion in augmented interiors to architectonic embodiment. A relevant outcome of this study is the potential to dissociate the egocentric, first-person view from the physical point of view through augmented architectonic space. PMID

  4. The Architectonic Experience of Body and Space in Augmented Interiors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Isabella; Blefari, Maria Laura; Tadi, Tej; Serino, Andrea; Blanke, Olaf

    2018-01-01

    The environment shapes our experience of space in constant interaction with the body. Architectonic interiors amplify the perception of space through the bodily senses; an effect also known as embodiment. The interaction of the bodily senses with the space surrounding the body can be tested experimentally through the manipulation of multisensory stimulation and measured via a range of behaviors related to bodily self-consciousness. Many studies have used Virtual Reality to show that visuotactile conflicts mediated via a virtual body or avatar can disrupt the unified subjective experience of the body and self. In the full-body illusion paradigm, participants feel as if the avatar was their body (ownership, self-identification) and they shift their center of awareness toward the position of the avatar (self-location). However, the influence of non-bodily spatial cues around the body on embodiment remains unclear, and data about the impact of architectonic space on human perception and self-conscious states are sparse. We placed participants into a Virtual Reality arena, where large and narrow virtual interiors were displayed with and without an avatar. We then applied synchronous or asynchronous visuotactile strokes to the back of the participants and avatar, or, to the front wall of the void interiors. During conditions of illusory self-identification with the avatar, participants reported sensations of containment, drift, and touch with the architectonic environment. The absence of the avatar suppressed such feelings, yet, in the large space, we found an effect of continuity between the physical and the virtual interior depending on the full-body illusion. We discuss subjective feelings evoked by architecture and compare the full-body illusion in augmented interiors to architectonic embodiment. A relevant outcome of this study is the potential to dissociate the egocentric, first-person view from the physical point of view through augmented architectonic space.

  5. The Architectonic Experience of Body and Space in Augmented Interiors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Pasqualini

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The environment shapes our experience of space in constant interaction with the body. Architectonic interiors amplify the perception of space through the bodily senses; an effect also known as embodiment. The interaction of the bodily senses with the space surrounding the body can be tested experimentally through the manipulation of multisensory stimulation and measured via a range of behaviors related to bodily self-consciousness. Many studies have used Virtual Reality to show that visuotactile conflicts mediated via a virtual body or avatar can disrupt the unified subjective experience of the body and self. In the full-body illusion paradigm, participants feel as if the avatar was their body (ownership, self-identification and they shift their center of awareness toward the position of the avatar (self-location. However, the influence of non-bodily spatial cues around the body on embodiment remains unclear, and data about the impact of architectonic space on human perception and self-conscious states are sparse. We placed participants into a Virtual Reality arena, where large and narrow virtual interiors were displayed with and without an avatar. We then applied synchronous or asynchronous visuotactile strokes to the back of the participants and avatar, or, to the front wall of the void interiors. During conditions of illusory self-identification with the avatar, participants reported sensations of containment, drift, and touch with the architectonic environment. The absence of the avatar suppressed such feelings, yet, in the large space, we found an effect of continuity between the physical and the virtual interior depending on the full-body illusion. We discuss subjective feelings evoked by architecture and compare the full-body illusion in augmented interiors to architectonic embodiment. A relevant outcome of this study is the potential to dissociate the egocentric, first-person view from the physical point of view through augmented

  6. The NASA Augmented/Virtual Reality Lab: The State of the Art at KSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, William

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Augmented Virtual Reality (AVR) Lab at Kennedy Space Center is dedicated to the investigation of Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) technologies, with the goal of determining potential uses of these technologies as human-computer interaction (HCI) devices in an aerospace engineering context. Begun in 2012, the AVR Lab has concentrated on commercially available AR and VR devices that are gaining in popularity and use in a number of fields such as gaming, training, and telepresence. We are working with such devices as the Microsoft Kinect, the Oculus Rift, the Leap Motion, the HTC Vive, motion capture systems, and the Microsoft Hololens. The focus of our work has been on human interaction with the virtual environment, which in turn acts as a communications bridge to remote physical devices and environments which the operator cannot or should not control or experience directly. Particularly in reference to dealing with spacecraft and the oftentimes hazardous environments they inhabit, it is our hope that AR and VR technologies can be utilized to increase human safety and mission success by physically removing humans from those hazardous environments while virtually putting them right in the middle of those environments.

  7. Virtual and augmented reality in the nuclear plant lifecycle perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsen, Terje; Mark, Niels-Kristian

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents a subset of the research and development performed over the last decade by the OECD Halden Reactor Project (HRP) using virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) in design, operation, maintenance and decommissioning to solve real world problems in the nuclear plant lifecycle. The use of VR in training at Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (LNPP) in Russia started in 1999 with the introduction of VR technology developed by Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) for the training and presentation of procedures related to safe operation and maintenance of the refuelling machine. At Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) in Ukraine, the establishment of the Chernobyl Decommissioning Visualisation Centre (CDVC) was started in 2007. The CDVC will be used for planning, training and presentation of dismantling procedures. In the future, the CDVC will also offer calculation of the occupational dose. VR has proven to be an effective technology for better communicating the layout of project proposals in design of control rooms. AR can be used to supplement reality by blending the physical and the virtual in the actual physical environment. IFE has developed a practical solution for using the AR technology. The paper also discusses how and for what areas the VR and AR applications can contribute to the nuclear safety for symbiosis and sustainability. Finally, IFE's plans for future use of VR and AR technologies in a nuclear plant lifecycle perspective are discussed. (author)

  8. Augmented Reality versus Virtual Reality for 3D Object Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krichenbauer, Max; Yamamoto, Goshiro; Taketom, Takafumi; Sandor, Christian; Kato, Hirokazu

    2018-02-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) Head-Mounted Displays (HMDs) are on the verge of becoming commodity hardware available to the average user and feasible to use as a tool for 3D work. Some HMDs include front-facing cameras, enabling Augmented Reality (AR) functionality. Apart from avoiding collisions with the environment, interaction with virtual objects may also be affected by seeing the real environment. However, whether these effects are positive or negative has not yet been studied extensively. For most tasks it is unknown whether AR has any advantage over VR. In this work we present the results of a user study in which we compared user performance measured in task completion time on a 9 degrees of freedom object selection and transformation task performed either in AR or VR, both with a 3D input device and a mouse. Our results show faster task completion time in AR over VR. When using a 3D input device, a purely VR environment increased task completion time by 22.5 percent on average compared to AR ( ). Surprisingly, a similar effect occurred when using a mouse: users were about 17.3 percent slower in VR than in AR ( ). Mouse and 3D input device produced similar task completion times in each condition (AR or VR) respectively. We further found no differences in reported comfort.

  9. The Influences of the 2D Image-Based Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality on Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Hsin-Hun; Yang, Stephen J. H.; Chen, Sherry Y.; Tarng, Wernhuar

    2017-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) learning environments can provide students with concepts of the simulated phenomena, but users are not allowed to interact with real elements. Conversely, augmented reality (AR) learning environments blend real-world environments so AR could enhance the effects of computer simulation and promote students' realistic experience.…

  10. Towards Robot teaching based on Virtual and Augmented Reality Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennakr, Said; Domingues, Christophe; Benchikh, Laredj; Otmane, Samir; Mallem, Malik

    2009-03-01

    A complex system is a system made up of a great number of entities in local and simultaneous interaction. Its design requires the collaboration of engineers of various complementary specialties, so that it is necessary to invent new design methods. Indeed, currently the industry loses much time between the moment when the product model is designed and when the latter is serially produced on the lines of factories. This production is generally ensured by automated and more often robotized means. A deadline is thus necessary for the development of the automatisms and the robots work on a new product model. In this context we launched a study based on the principle of the mechatronics design in Augmented Reality-Virtual Reality. This new approach will bring solutions to problems encountered in many application scopes, but also to problems involved in the distance which separates the offices from design of vehicles and their production sites. This new approach will minimize the differences of errors between the design model and real prototype.

  11. ARLearn and StreetLearn software for virtual reality and augmented reality multi user learning games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Klemke, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Ternier, S., & Klemke, R. (2011). ARLearn and StreetLearn software for virtual reality and augmented reality multi user learning games (Version 1.0) [Software Documentation]. Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open Universiteit in the Netherlands.

  12. ARLearn and StreetLearn software for virtual reality and augmented reality multi user learning games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ternier, Stefaan; Klemke, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Ternier, S., & Klemke, R. (2011). ARLearn and StreetLearn software for virtual reality and augmented reality multi user learning games (Version 1.0) [Computer software]. Heerlen, The Netherlands: Open Universiteit in the Netherlands.

  13. Latency and User Performance in Virtual Environments and Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    System rendering latency has been recognized by senior researchers, such as Professor Fredrick Brooks of UNC (Turing Award 1999), as a major factor limiting the realism and utility of head-referenced displays systems. Latency has been shown to reduce the user's sense of immersion within a virtual environment, disturb user interaction with virtual objects, and to contribute to motion sickness during some simulation tasks. Latency, however, is not just an issue for external display systems since finite nerve conduction rates and variation in transduction times in the human body's sensors also pose problems for latency management within the nervous system. Some of the phenomena arising from the brain's handling of sensory asynchrony due to latency will be discussed as a prelude to consideration of the effects of latency in interactive displays. The causes and consequences of the erroneous movement that appears in displays due to latency will be illustrated with examples of the user performance impact provided by several experiments. These experiments will review the generality of user sensitivity to latency when users judge either object or environment stability. Hardware and signal processing countermeasures will also be discussed. In particular the tuning of a simple extrapolative predictive filter not using a dynamic movement model will be presented. Results show that it is possible to adjust this filter so that the appearance of some latencies may be hidden without the introduction of perceptual artifacts such as overshoot. Several examples of the effects of user performance will be illustrated by three-dimensional tracking and tracing tasks executed in virtual environments. These experiments demonstrate classic phenomena known from work on manual control and show the need for very responsive systems if they are indented to support precise manipulation. The practical benefits of removing interfering latencies from interactive systems will be emphasized with some

  14. Virtualization for the LHCb experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonaccorsi, E.; Brarda, L.; Chebbi, M.; Neufeld, N.; Sborzacci, F.

    2012-01-01

    The LHCb experiment, one of the 4 large particle detector at CERN, counts in its Online System more than 2000 servers and embedded systems. As a result of ever-increasing CPU performance in modern servers, many of the applications in the controls system are excellent candidates for virtualization technologies. We see virtualization as an approach to cut down cost, optimize resource usage and manage the complexity of the IT infrastructure of LHCb. Recently we have added a Kernel Virtual Machine (KVM) cluster based on Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization for Servers (RHEV) complementary to the existing Hyper-V cluster devoted only to the virtualization of the windows guests. This paper describes the architecture of our solution based on KVM and RHEV as along with its integration with the existing Hyper-V infrastructure and the Quattor cluster management tools and in particular how we use to run controls applications on a virtualized infrastructure. We present performance results of both the KVM and Hyper-V solutions, problems encountered and a description of the management tools developed for the integration with the Online cluster and LHCb SCADA control system based on PVSS. (authors)

  15. Going Outside While Staying Inside - Exercise Motivation with Immersive vs. Non–Immersive Recreational Virtual Environment Augmentation for Older Adult Nursing Home Residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Pedersen, Jon Ram; Serafin, Stefania; Kofoed, Lise

    2016-01-01

    Virtual technology and immersive experiences are not very often associated with older adults. Recent studies suggest that exercise augmentation using flat screen-based virtual environments, which allow nursing home residents to experience virtual places different from the nursing home, can increase...... the intrinsic motivation of nursing home residents. In this paper, we increase the immersive properties of such augmentation through an Oculus Rift Head Mounted Display, to evaluate the effect on the older adults’ sense of presence, if it has any relation to the level of intrinsic motivation to exercise...

  16. The Virtual Arizona Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, M. L.; Davis, R.; Conway, F. M.; Bellasai, R.

    2012-12-01

    To commemorate the once-in-a-lifetime event of Arizona's hundredth birthday, the Centennial Commission and the Governor of Arizona envisioned a museum and companion website that would capture the state's history, celebrate its people, and embrace its future. Working with world-renowned museum designers, the state began to seek ideas from across Arizona to create plans for a journey of discovery through science and the humanities. The museum would introduce visitors to some of the people who nurtured the state through its early years and others who are innovating its tomorrows. Showcases would include the resources and experiences that shaped the state's history and are transforming its present day, highlighting the ingenuity that tamed the wild frontier and is envisioning Arizona's next frontiers through science and technology. The Arizona Experience (www.arizonaexperience.org) was initially intended to serve as the web presence for the physical museum, but as delays occurred with the physical museum, the site has quickly developed an identify of its own as an interactive, multimedia experience, reaching a wider audience with functions that would be difficult or expensive to produce in a museum. As leaders in scientific and technological innovation in the state, the Arizona Geological Survey was tasked with designing and creating the Arizona Experience site. The general themes remain the same; however, the site has added content and applications that are better suited to the online environment in order to create a rich, dynamic supplement to a physical museum experience. The website offers the features and displays of the future museum with the interactive nature and learning environment of the web. This provides an encyclopedic overview of the State of Arizona by subject matter experts in a manner that is free and open to the public and erases socio-economic, political, and physical boundaries. Over the Centennial Year of 2012 the site will release a new theme and

  17. The effectiveness of virtual and augmented reality in health sciences and medical anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Christian; Štromberga, Zane; Raikos, Athanasios; Stirling, Allan

    2017-11-01

    Although cadavers constitute the gold standard for teaching anatomy to medical and health science students, there are substantial financial, ethical, and supervisory constraints on their use. In addition, although anatomy remains one of the fundamental areas of medical education, universities have decreased the hours allocated to teaching gross anatomy in favor of applied clinical work. The release of virtual (VR) and augmented reality (AR) devices allows learning to occur through hands-on immersive experiences. The aim of this research was to assess whether learning structural anatomy utilizing VR or AR is as effective as tablet-based (TB) applications, and whether these modes allowed enhanced student learning, engagement and performance. Participants (n = 59) were randomly allocated to one of the three learning modes: VR, AR, or TB and completed a lesson on skull anatomy, after which they completed an anatomical knowledge assessment. Student perceptions of each learning mode and any adverse effects experienced were recorded. No significant differences were found between mean assessment scores in VR, AR, or TB. During the lessons however, VR participants were more likely to exhibit adverse effects such as headaches (25% in VR P virtual and augmented reality as means to supplement lesson content in anatomical education. Anat Sci Educ 10: 549-559. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  18. Considerations on the use of Virtual and Augmented Reality Technologies in Music Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafin, Stefania; Adjorlu, Ali; Nilsson, Niels Chr.

    2017-01-01

    Learning to play an instrument is challenging for both children and adults. Adding to this music education in K-12 oftentimes is subject to budget cuts. In this paper, we propose that virtual reality may offer children with an alternative approach to acquiring musical skills. Initially we present...... an overview of the state of the art software and technology for virtual and augmented reality in music, and then we outline a series of considerations on how virtual and augmented reality can help music education....

  19. Virtual laboratory for radiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiftikci, A.; Kocar, C.; Tombakoglu, M.

    2009-01-01

    Simulation of alpha, beta and gamma radiation detection and measurement experiments which are part of real nuclear physics laboratory courses was realized with Monte Carlo method and JAVA Programming Language. As being known, establishing this type of laboratories are very expensive. At the same time, highly radioactive sources used in some experiments carries risk for students and also for experimentalists. By taking into consideration of those problems, the aim of this study is to setup a virtual radiation laboratory with minimum cost and to speed up the training of radiation physics for students with no radiation risk. Software coded possesses the nature of radiation and radiation transport with the help of Monte Carlo method. In this software, experimental parameters can be changed manually by the user and experimental results can be followed synchronous in an MCA (Multi Channel Analyzer) or an SCA (Single Channel Analyzer). Results obtained in experiments can be analyzed by these MCA or SCA panels. Virtual radiation laboratory which is developed in this study with reliable results and unlimited experimentation capability seems as an useful educational material. Moreover, new type of experiments can be integrated to this software easily and as a result, virtual laboratory can be extended.

  20. Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality in Physical and Online Retailing:A Review, Synthesis and Research Agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Bonetti, Francesca; Wamaby, Gary; Quinn, Lee

    2017-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) have emerged as rapidly developing technologies used in both physical and online retailing to enhance the selling environment and shopping experience. However, academic research on, and practical applications of, AR and VR in retail are still fragmented, and this state of affairs is arguably attributable to the interdisciplinary origins of the topic. Undertaking a comparative chronological analysis of AR and VR research and applications in a ret...

  1. Implementing augmented reality for visualisation of virtual buildings using Android

    OpenAIRE

    Dąbrowski, Piotr Władysław

    2011-01-01

    The mobile phone devices are still developing and they are gaining more functionality and are able to deal with more advanced tasks. One of the technologies timidly trying to approach the mobile phone market is the augmented reality, which does no longer require external equipment to be formed in a programming application. There is a limited number of sources trying to describe the accuracy of augmented reality applications implemented on mobile devices. Within this study an application of au...

  2. archAR: an archaeological augmented reality experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Bridgette; Schulze, Jürgen P.

    2015-03-01

    We present an application for Android phones or tablets called "archAR" that uses augmented reality as an alternative, portable way of viewing archaeological information from UCSD's Levantine Archaeology Laboratory. archAR provides a unique experience of flying through an archaeological dig site in the Levantine area and exploring the artifacts uncovered there. Using a Google Nexus tablet and Qualcomm's Vuforia API, we use an image target as a map and overlay a three-dimensional model of the dig site onto it, augmenting reality such that we are able to interact with the plotted artifacts. The user can physically move the Android device around the image target and see the dig site model from any perspective. The user can also move the device closer to the model in order to "zoom" into the view of a particular section of the model and its associated artifacts. This is especially useful, as the dig site model and the collection of artifacts are very detailed. The artifacts are plotted as points, colored by type. The user can touch the virtual points to trigger a popup information window that contains details of the artifact, such as photographs, material descriptions, and more.

  3. Medieval Victoria-Gasteiz Interaction between virtual and augmented reality in the 16th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainhoa Pérez-Valle

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Medieval Vitoria-Gasteiz’s game provides information about the history and lifestyle of this town in the 16th century, which has been rebuilt through procedural software. This interactive application allows you to enjoy an experience that merges the virtual party with an ‘in situ’ visit to the city’s streets nowadays, enabling travel through time. The game becomes a competition in which users have to overcome challenges and could enjoy Augmented Reality’s benefits. The main goal of the project is the cultural heritage transmission. And this is done through one of the best ways to do this, in a funny way. Learn “playing”. Being education and tourism the main application fields.

  4. Augmented and virtual reality in the media: Questioning the concept of 'immersive' journalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić Aleksandra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article questions and analyzes the concept of 'immersive' journalism, which has emerged from advanced technologies of augmented and virtual reality and which has already been changing the role of the media, journalism and audiences' experiences. Developed and applied in media and tech companies in the Western countries, this form of journalism represents one of the growing business models used by companies oriented towards improving and developing social networks, mobile platforms and multimedia online portals. Immersion of the audience into journalistic stories, which are upgraded by AR and VR technologies, represents the key change of our understanding, analyzing and representing the reality, and at the same time brings into question ethical and professional journalistic standards. Built on the growing body of academic scholarship and contemporary research in the field, this article critically examines the concept 'immersive' journalism and looks into relevant aspects of its theoretical foundations and practical implementation in the media industry and the university education of journalists.

  5. Moving from Virtual Reality Exposure-Based Therapy to Augmented Reality Exposure-Based Therapy: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Baus, Oliver; Bouchard, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the move from virtual reality exposure-based therapy to augmented reality exposure-based therapy (ARET). Unlike virtual reality (VR), which entails a complete virtual environment (VE), augmented reality (AR) limits itself to producing certain virtual elements to then merge them into the view of the physical world. Although, the general public may only have become aware of AR in the last few years, AR type applications have been around since beginning of the twentieth centur...

  6. Mixed Reality with HoloLens: Where Virtual Reality Meets Augmented Reality in the Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Oren M; Rudy, Hayeem L; Lefkowitz, Aaron; Weimer, Katie A; Marks, Shelby M; Stern, Carrie S; Garfein, Evan S

    2017-11-01

    Virtual reality and augmented reality devices have recently been described in the surgical literature. The authors have previously explored various iterations of these devices, and although they show promise, it has become clear that virtual reality and/or augmented reality devices alone do not adequately meet the demands of surgeons. The solution may lie in a hybrid technology known as mixed reality, which merges many virtual reality and augmented realty features. Microsoft's HoloLens, the first commercially available mixed reality device, provides surgeons intraoperative hands-free access to complex data, the real environment, and bidirectional communication. This report describes the use of HoloLens in the operating room to improve decision-making and surgical workflow. The pace of mixed reality-related technological development will undoubtedly be rapid in the coming years, and plastic surgeons are ideally suited to both lead and benefit from this advance.

  7. Aspects of User Experience in Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Boesen

    in human factors related to Augmented Reality. This is investigated partly as how Augmented Reality applications are used in unsupervised settings, and partly in specific evaluations related to user performance in supervised settings. The thesis starts by introducing Augmented Reality to the reader......, followed by a presentation of the technical areas related to the field, and different human factor areas. As a contribution to the research area, this thesis presents five separate, but sequential, papers within the area of Augmented Reality.......In Augmented Reality applications, the real environment is annotated or enhanced with computer-generated graphics. This is a topic that has been researched in the recent decades, but for many people this is a brand new and never heard of topic. The main focus of this thesis is investigations...

  8. Virtual interactive presence and augmented reality (VIPAR) for remote surgical assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenai, Mahesh B; Dillavou, Marcus; Shum, Corey; Ross, Douglas; Tubbs, Richard S; Shih, Alan; Guthrie, Barton L

    2011-03-01

    Surgery is a highly technical field that combines continuous decision-making with the coordination of spatiovisual tasks. We designed a virtual interactive presence and augmented reality (VIPAR) platform that allows a remote surgeon to deliver real-time virtual assistance to a local surgeon, over a standard Internet connection. The VIPAR system consisted of a "local" and a "remote" station, each situated over a surgical field and a blue screen, respectively. Each station was equipped with a digital viewpiece, composed of 2 cameras for stereoscopic capture, and a high-definition viewer displaying a virtual field. The virtual field was created by digitally compositing selected elements within the remote field into the local field. The viewpieces were controlled by workstations mutually connected by the Internet, allowing virtual remote interaction in real time. Digital renderings derived from volumetric MRI were added to the virtual field to augment the surgeon's reality. For demonstration, a fixed-formalin cadaver head and neck were obtained, and a carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and pterional craniotomy were performed under the VIPAR system. The VIPAR system allowed for real-time, virtual interaction between a local (resident) and remote (attending) surgeon. In both carotid and pterional dissections, major anatomic structures were visualized and identified. Virtual interaction permitted remote instruction for the local surgeon, and MRI augmentation provided spatial guidance to both surgeons. Camera resolution, color contrast, time lag, and depth perception were identified as technical issues requiring further optimization. Virtual interactive presence and augmented reality provide a novel platform for remote surgical assistance, with multiple applications in surgical training and remote expert assistance.

  9. Moving from Virtual Reality Exposure-Based Therapy (VRET to Augmented Reality Exposure-Based Therapy (ARET: A review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver eBaus

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the move from virtual reality exposure-based therapy (VRET to augmented reality exposure-based therapy (ARET. Unlike virtual reality (VR, which entails a complete virtual environment (VE, augmented reality (AR limits itself to producing certain virtual elements to then merge them into the view of the physical world. Although the general public may only have become aware of AR in the last few years, AR type applications have been around since beginning of the 20th century. Since, then, technological developments have enabled an ever increasing level of seamless integration of virtual and physical elements into one view. Like VR, AR allows the exposure to stimuli which, due to various reasons, may not be suitable for real-life scenarios. As such, AR has proven itself to be a medium through which individuals suffering from specific phobia can be exposed safely to the object(s of their fear, without the costs associated with programming complete virtual environments. Thus, ARET can offer an efficacious alternative to some less advantageous exposure-based therapies. Above and beyond presenting what has been accomplished in ARET, this paper also raises some ARET related issues, and proposes potential avenues to be followed. These include the definition of an AR related term, the type of measures to be used to qualify the user’s experience in an augmented reality environment (ARE, the development of alternative geospatial referencing systems, as well as the potential use of ARET to treat social phobia. Overall, it may be said that the use of ARET, although promising, is still in its infancy but that, given a continued cooperation between clinical and technical teams, ARET has the potential of going well beyond the treatment of small animal phobia.

  10. Framework for Virtual Cognitive Experiment in Virtual Geographic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtual Geographic Environment Cognition is the attempt to understand the human cognition of surface features, geographic processes, and human behaviour, as well as their relationships in the real world. From the perspective of human cognition behaviour analysis and simulation, previous work in Virtual Geographic Environments (VGEs has focused mostly on representing and simulating the real world to create an ‘interpretive’ virtual world and improve an individual’s active cognition. In terms of reactive cognition, building a user ‘evaluative’ environment in a complex virtual experiment is a necessary yet challenging task. This paper discusses the outlook of VGEs and proposes a framework for virtual cognitive experiments. The framework not only employs immersive virtual environment technology to create a realistic virtual world but also involves a responsive mechanism to record the user’s cognitive activities during the experiment. Based on the framework, this paper presents two potential implementation methods: first, training a deep learning model with several hundred thousand street view images scored by online volunteers, with further analysis of which visual factors produce a sense of safety for the individual, and second, creating an immersive virtual environment and Electroencephalogram (EEG-based experimental paradigm to both record and analyse the brain activity of a user and explore what type of virtual environment is more suitable and comfortable. Finally, we present some preliminary findings based on the first method.

  11. Augmented Reality Learning Experiences: Survey of Prototype Design and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Marc Ericson C.; Chen, Angie; Taketomi, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Goshiro; Miyazaki, Jun; Kato, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) technology is mature for creating learning experiences for K-12 (pre-school, grade school, and high school) educational settings. We reviewed the applications intended to complement traditional curriculum materials for K-12. We found 87 research articles on augmented reality learning experiences (ARLEs) in the IEEE Xplore…

  12. Augmented Visual Experience of Simulated Solar Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, A. O., IV; Berardino, R. A.; Hahne, D.; Schreurs, B.; Fox, N. J.; Raouafi, N.

    2017-12-01

    The Parker Solar Probe (PSP) mission will explore the Sun's corona, studying solar wind, flares and coronal mass ejections. The effects of these phenomena can impact the technology that we use in ways that are not readily apparent, including affecting satellite communications and power grids. Determining the structure and dynamics of corona magnetic fields, tracing the flow of energy that heats the corona, and exploring dusty plasma near the Sun to understand its influence on solar wind and energetic particle formation requires a suite of sensors on board the PSP spacecraft that are engineered to observe specific phenomena. Using models of these sensors and simulated observational data, we can visualize what the PSP spacecraft will "see" during its multiple passes around the Sun. Augmented reality (AR) technologies enable convenient user access to massive data sets. We are developing an application that allows users to experience environmental data from the point of view of the PSP spacecraft in AR using the Microsoft HoloLens. Observational data, including imagery, magnetism, temperature, and density are visualized in 4D within the user's immediate environment. Our application provides an educational tool for comprehending the complex relationships of observational data, which aids in our understanding of the Sun.

  13. Augmenting the Sound Experience at Music Festivals using Mobile Phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Larsen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we describe experiments carried out at the Nibe music festival in Denmark involving the use of mobile phones to augment the participants' sound experience at the concerts. The experiments involved N=19 test participants that used a mobile phone with a headset playing back sound...... “in-the-wild” experiments augmenting the sound experience at two concerts at this music festival....

  14. Katalog Penjualan Rumah Berbasis Android Menggunakan Teknologi Augmented Reality dan Virtual Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alders Paliling

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Penerapan teknologi augmented reality kian diminati oleh pihak produsen untuk memasarkan produk  yang dihasilkan. Teknologi augmented reality mampu meproyeksikan objek dua dimensi ataupun tiga dimensi kedalam lingkungan nyata. Teknologi virtual reality mampu membawa pengguna masuk kedalam lingkungan virtual sehingga pengguna merasa berada dalam lingkungan virtual. Penelitian ini menggunakan teknologi augmented reality yang mampu memproyeksikan objek tiga dimensi rumah sehingga katalog menjadi lebih nyata,  dan teknologi virtual reality yang membuat pengguna berinteraksi langsung dengan objek tiga dimensi rumah dan merasa berada di dalam rumah. Aplikasi yang dibangun memanfaatkan sensor accelerometer yang tertanam dalam perangkat mobile android yang memungkinkan pengguna melihat seisi ruangan dengan memiringkan perangkat mobile android kekiri dan kekanan. Jumlah kamera virtual yang digunakan berjumlah lima yang diletakkan di ruang tamu, ruang keluarga, ruang kamar utama, ruang kamar anak, dan ruang dapur. Aplikasi ini berjalan pada platform android dan menggunakan personal komputer sebagai server yang menyimpan data informasi rumah. Dengan adanya aplikasi ini pengguna dapat merasakan suasana berbeda dalam melihat sebuah katalog. . Kata kunci—Augmentd Reality, Virtual Reality, Katalog, Android

  15. Focus, locus, and sensus: the three dimensions of virtual experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterworth, E L; Waterworth, J A

    2001-04-01

    A model of virtual/physical experience is presented, which provides a three dimensional conceptual space for virtual and augmented reality (VR and AR) comprising the dimensions of focus, locus, and sensus. Focus is most closely related to what is generally termed presence in the VR literature. When in a virtual environment, presence is typically shared between the VR and the physical world. "Breaks in presence" are actually shifts of presence away from the VR and toward the external environment. But we can also have "breaks in presence" when attention moves toward absence--when an observer is not attending to stimuli present in the virtual environment, nor to stimuli present in the surrounding physical environment--when the observer is present in neither the virtual nor the physical world. We thus have two dimensions of presence: focus of attention (between presence and absence) and the locus of attention (the virtual vs. the physical world). A third dimension is the sensus of attention--the level of arousal determining whether the observer is highly conscious or relatively unconscious while interacting with the environment. After expanding on each of these three dimensions of experience in relation to VR, we present a couple of educational examples as illustrations, and also relate our model to a suggested spectrum of evaluation methods for virtual environments.

  16. DJINNI: A Novel Technology Supported Exposure Therapy Paradigm for SAD Combining Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Moussa, Maher; Rubo, Marius; Debracque, Coralie; Lange, Wolf-Gero

    2017-01-01

    The present paper explores the benefits and the capabilities of various emerging state-of-the-art interactive 3D and Internet of Things technologies and investigates how these technologies can be exploited to develop a more effective technology supported exposure therapy solution for social anxiety disorder. “DJINNI” is a conceptual design of an in vivo augmented reality (AR) exposure therapy mobile support system that exploits several capturing technologies and integrates the patient’s state and situation by vision-based, audio-based, and physiology-based analysis as well as by indoor/outdoor localization techniques. DJINNI also comprises an innovative virtual reality exposure therapy system that is adaptive and customizable to the demands of the in vivo experience and therapeutic progress. DJINNI follows a gamification approach where rewards and achievements are utilized to motivate the patient to progress in her/his treatment. The current paper reviews the state of the art of technologies needed for such a solution and recommends how these technologies could be integrated in the development of an individually tailored and yet feasible and effective AR/virtual reality-based exposure therapy. Finally, the paper outlines how DJINNI could be part of classical cognitive behavioral treatment and how to validate such a setup. PMID:28503155

  17. DJINNI: A Novel Technology Supported Exposure Therapy Paradigm for SAD Combining Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Moussa, Maher; Rubo, Marius; Debracque, Coralie; Lange, Wolf-Gero

    2017-01-01

    The present paper explores the benefits and the capabilities of various emerging state-of-the-art interactive 3D and Internet of Things technologies and investigates how these technologies can be exploited to develop a more effective technology supported exposure therapy solution for social anxiety disorder. "DJINNI" is a conceptual design of an in vivo augmented reality (AR) exposure therapy mobile support system that exploits several capturing technologies and integrates the patient's state and situation by vision-based, audio-based, and physiology-based analysis as well as by indoor/outdoor localization techniques. DJINNI also comprises an innovative virtual reality exposure therapy system that is adaptive and customizable to the demands of the in vivo experience and therapeutic progress. DJINNI follows a gamification approach where rewards and achievements are utilized to motivate the patient to progress in her/his treatment. The current paper reviews the state of the art of technologies needed for such a solution and recommends how these technologies could be integrated in the development of an individually tailored and yet feasible and effective AR/virtual reality-based exposure therapy. Finally, the paper outlines how DJINNI could be part of classical cognitive behavioral treatment and how to validate such a setup.

  18. DJINNI: A Novel Technology Supported Exposure Therapy Paradigm for SAD Combining Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Ben-Moussa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The present paper explores the benefits and the capabilities of various emerging state-of-the-art interactive 3D and Internet of Things technologies and investigates how these technologies can be exploited to develop a more effective technology supported exposure therapy solution for social anxiety disorder. “DJINNI” is a conceptual design of an in vivo augmented reality (AR exposure therapy mobile support system that exploits several capturing technologies and integrates the patient’s state and situation by vision-based, audio-based, and physiology-based analysis as well as by indoor/outdoor localization techniques. DJINNI also comprises an innovative virtual reality exposure therapy system that is adaptive and customizable to the demands of the in vivo experience and therapeutic progress. DJINNI follows a gamification approach where rewards and achievements are utilized to motivate the patient to progress in her/his treatment. The current paper reviews the state of the art of technologies needed for such a solution and recommends how these technologies could be integrated in the development of an individually tailored and yet feasible and effective AR/virtual reality-based exposure therapy. Finally, the paper outlines how DJINNI could be part of classical cognitive behavioral treatment and how to validate such a setup.

  19. Moving from virtual reality exposure-based therapy to augmented reality exposure-based therapy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baus, Oliver; Bouchard, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the move from virtual reality exposure-based therapy to augmented reality exposure-based therapy (ARET). Unlike virtual reality (VR), which entails a complete virtual environment (VE), augmented reality (AR) limits itself to producing certain virtual elements to then merge them into the view of the physical world. Although, the general public may only have become aware of AR in the last few years, AR type applications have been around since beginning of the twentieth century. Since, then, technological developments have enabled an ever increasing level of seamless integration of virtual and physical elements into one view. Like VR, AR allows the exposure to stimuli which, due to various reasons, may not be suitable for real-life scenarios. As such, AR has proven itself to be a medium through which individuals suffering from specific phobia can be exposed "safely" to the object(s) of their fear, without the costs associated with programing complete VEs. Thus, ARET can offer an efficacious alternative to some less advantageous exposure-based therapies. Above and beyond presenting what has been accomplished in ARET, this paper covers some less well-known aspects of the history of AR, raises some ARET related issues, and proposes potential avenues to be followed. These include the type of measures to be used to qualify the user's experience in an augmented reality environment, the exclusion of certain AR-type functionalities from the definition of AR, as well as the potential use of ARET to treat non-small animal phobias, such as social phobia.

  20. Moving from Virtual Reality Exposure-Based Therapy to Augmented Reality Exposure-Based Therapy: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baus, Oliver; Bouchard, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the move from virtual reality exposure-based therapy to augmented reality exposure-based therapy (ARET). Unlike virtual reality (VR), which entails a complete virtual environment (VE), augmented reality (AR) limits itself to producing certain virtual elements to then merge them into the view of the physical world. Although, the general public may only have become aware of AR in the last few years, AR type applications have been around since beginning of the twentieth century. Since, then, technological developments have enabled an ever increasing level of seamless integration of virtual and physical elements into one view. Like VR, AR allows the exposure to stimuli which, due to various reasons, may not be suitable for real-life scenarios. As such, AR has proven itself to be a medium through which individuals suffering from specific phobia can be exposed “safely” to the object(s) of their fear, without the costs associated with programing complete VEs. Thus, ARET can offer an efficacious alternative to some less advantageous exposure-based therapies. Above and beyond presenting what has been accomplished in ARET, this paper covers some less well-known aspects of the history of AR, raises some ARET related issues, and proposes potential avenues to be followed. These include the type of measures to be used to qualify the user’s experience in an augmented reality environment, the exclusion of certain AR-type functionalities from the definition of AR, as well as the potential use of ARET to treat non-small animal phobias, such as social phobia. PMID:24624073

  1. Virtual and Augmented Reality Systems for Renal Interventions: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detmer, Felicitas J; Hettig, Julian; Schindele, Daniel; Schostak, Martin; Hansen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Many virtual and augmented reality systems have been proposed to support renal interventions. This paper reviews such systems employed in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma and renal stones. A systematic literature search was performed. Inclusion criteria were virtual and augmented reality systems for radical or partial nephrectomy and renal stone treatment, excluding systems solely developed or evaluated for training purposes. In total, 52 research papers were identified and analyzed. Most of the identified literature (87%) deals with systems for renal cell carcinoma treatment. About 44% of the systems have already been employed in clinical practice, but only 20% in studies with ten or more patients. Main challenges remaining for future research include the consideration of organ movement and deformation, human factor issues, and the conduction of large clinical studies. Augmented and virtual reality systems have the potential to improve safety and outcomes of renal interventions. In the last ten years, many technical advances have led to more sophisticated systems, which are already applied in clinical practice. Further research is required to cope with current limitations of virtual and augmented reality assistance in clinical environments.

  2. Evaluating Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality Training for Industrial Maintenance and Assembly Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavish, Nirit; Gutiérrez, Teresa; Webel, Sabine; Rodríguez, Jorge; Peveri, Matteo; Bockholt, Uli; Tecchia, Franco

    2015-01-01

    The current study evaluated the use of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) platforms, developed within the scope of the SKILLS Integrated Project, for industrial maintenance and assembly (IMA) tasks training. VR and AR systems are now widely regarded as promising training platforms for complex and highly demanding IMA tasks. However,…

  3. Feasibility of Using an Augmented Immersive Virtual Reality Learning Environment to Enhance Music Conducting Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orman, Evelyn K.; Price, Harry E.; Russell, Christine R.

    2017-01-01

    Acquiring nonverbal skills necessary to appropriately communicate and educate members of performing ensembles is essential for wind band conductors. Virtual reality learning environments (VRLEs) provide a unique setting for developing these proficiencies. For this feasibility study, we used an augmented immersive VRLE to enhance eye contact, torso…

  4. Towards Determination of Visual Requirements for Augmented Reality Displays and Virtual Environments for the Airport Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    The visual requirements for augmented reality or virtual environments displays that might be used in real or virtual towers are reviewed with respect to similar displays already used in aircraft. As an example of the type of human performance studies needed to determine the useful specifications of augmented reality displays, an optical see-through display was used in an ATC Tower simulation. Three different binocular fields of view (14deg, 28deg, and 47deg) were examined to determine their effect on subjects ability to detect aircraft maneuvering and landing. The results suggest that binocular fields of view much greater than 47deg are unlikely to dramatically improve search performance and that partial binocular overlap is a feasible display technique for augmented reality Tower applications.

  5. Twitter-Augmented Journal Club: Educational Engagement and Experience So Far.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udani, Ankeet D; Moyse, Daniel; Peery, Charles Andrew; Taekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-04-15

    Social media is a nascent medical educational technology. The benefits of Twitter include (1) easy adoption; (2) access to experts, peers, and patients across the globe; (3) 24/7 connectivity; (4) creation of virtual, education-based communities using hashtags; and (5) crowdsourcing information using retweets. We report on a novel Twitter-augmented journal club for anesthesia residents: its design, implementation, and impact. Our inaugural anesthesia Twitter-augmented journal club succeeded in engaging the anesthesia community and increasing residents' professional use of Twitter. Notably, our experience suggests that anesthesia residents are willing to use social media for their education.

  6. Virtual patients in a real clinical context using augmented reality: impact on antibiotics prescription behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nifakos, Sokratis; Zary, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    The research community has called for the development of effective educational interventions for addressing prescription behaviour since antimicrobial resistance remains a global health issue. Examining the potential to displace the educational process from Personal Computers to Mobile devices, in this paper we investigated a new method of integration of Virtual Patients into Mobile devices with augmented reality technology, enriching the practitioner's education in prescription behavior. Moreover, we also explored which information are critical during the prescription behavior education and we visualized these information on real context with augmented reality technology, simultaneously with a running Virtual Patient's scenario. Following this process, we set the educational frame of experiential knowledge to a mixed (virtual and real) environment.

  7. Information literacy experiencies inside virtual learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Hernández Salazar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Suggest the use of virtual learning environments as an Information Literacy (IL alternative. Method. Analysis of the main elements of web sites. To achieve this purpose the article includes the relationship between IL and the learning virtual environment (by defining both phrases; phases to create virtual IL programs; processes to elaborate didactic media; the applications that may support this plan; and the description of eleven examples of learning virtual environments IL experiences from four countries (Mexico, United States of America, Spain and United Kingdom these examples fulfill the conditions expressed. Results. We obtained four comparative tables examining five elements of each experience: objectives; target community; institution; country; and platform used. Conclusions. Any IL proposal should have a clear definition; IL experiences have to follow a didactic systematic process; described experiences are based on IL definition; the experiences analyzed are similar; virtual learning environments can be used as alternatives of IL.

  8. Augmented kinematic feedback from haptic virtual reality for dental skill acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suebnukarn, Siriwan; Haddawy, Peter; Rhienmora, Phattanapon; Jittimanee, Pannapa; Viratket, Piyanuch

    2010-12-01

    We have developed a haptic virtual reality system for dental skill training. In this study we examined several kinds of kinematic information about the movement provided by the system supplement knowledge of results (KR) in dental skill acquisition. The kinematic variables examined involved force utilization (F) and mirror view (M). This created three experimental conditions that received augmented kinematic feedback (F, M, FM) and one control condition that did not (KR-only). Thirty-two dental students were randomly assigned to four groups. Their task was to perform access opening on the upper first molar with the haptic virtual reality system. An acquisition session consisted of two days of ten trials of practice in which augmented kinematic feedback was provided for the appropriate experimental conditions after each trial. One week after, a retention test consisting of two trials without augmented feedback was completed. The results showed that the augmented kinematic feedback groups had larger mean performance scores than the KR-only group in Day 1 of the acquisition and retention sessions (ANOVA, p0.05). The trends in acquisition and retention sessions suggest that the augmented kinematic feedback can enhance the performance earlier in the skill acquisition and retention sessions.

  9. Augmented versus virtual reality laparoscopic simulation: what is the difference? A comparison of the ProMIS augmented reality laparoscopic simulator versus LapSim virtual reality laparoscopic simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botden, Sanne M. B. I.; Buzink, Sonja N.; Schijven, Marlies P.; Jakimowicz, Jack J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Virtual reality (VR) is an emerging new modality for laparoscopic skills training; however, most simulators lack realistic haptic feedback. Augmented reality (AR) is a new laparoscopic simulation system offering a combination of physical objects and VR simulation. Laparoscopic

  10. “Reality is in the air”: concept of perceived augmentation and exploration of its impact on consumer experience

    OpenAIRE

    Javornik, Ana; Mandelli, Andreina; Snehota, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) technology is becoming increasingly used in marketing as a tool for enhancing consumer experience. Developed and defined in the fields of computer science and human-computer interaction, AR technology simulates an overlay of virtual annotations in the physical environment and interacts with it in real- time (Azuma et al., 2001). Some popular examples of AR include virtual mirrors (Ray Ban, ModiFace) and smartphone applications that simulate products such as furnitur...

  11. Virtual reality, augmented reality…I call it i-Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Rafael J

    2015-01-01

    The new term improved reality (i-Reality) is suggested to include virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). It refers to a real world that includes improved, enhanced and digitally created features that would offer an advantage on a particular occasion (i.e., a medical act). I-Reality may help us bridge the gap between the high demand for medical providers and the low supply of them by improving the interaction between providers and patients.

  12. Utilizing virtual and augmented reality for educational and clinical enhancements in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelargos, Panayiotis E; Nagasawa, Daniel T; Lagman, Carlito; Tenn, Stephen; Demos, Joanna V; Lee, Seung J; Bui, Timothy T; Barnette, Natalie E; Bhatt, Nikhilesh S; Ung, Nolan; Bari, Ausaf; Martin, Neil A; Yang, Isaac

    2017-01-01

    Neurosurgery has undergone a technological revolution over the past several decades, from trephination to image-guided navigation. Advancements in virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) represent some of the newest modalities being integrated into neurosurgical practice and resident education. In this review, we present a historical perspective of the development of VR and AR technologies, analyze its current uses, and discuss its emerging applications in the field of neurosurgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Virtual and augmented reality in finance: State visibility of events and risk

    OpenAIRE

    Soha Maad; Samir Garbaya; James B. Mccarthy; Meurig Beynon; Saida Bouakaz; Rajagopal Nagarajan

    2010-01-01

    This chapter reflected on the potential of Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality (VR / AR) technologies in supporting the dynamics of global financial systems and in addressing the grand challenges posed by unexpected events and crisis. The chapter briefly overviewed traditional VR/AR uses and described three early attempts to use 3D/ VR / AR technologies in Finance. In light of the recent financial crisis, there is a potential added valued in harnessing the use of VR/AR technologies to conve...

  14. Analysis of Mental Workload in Online Shopping: Are Augmented and Virtual Reality Consistent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaojun; Shi, Changxiu; You, Xuqun; Zong, Chenming

    2017-01-01

    A market research company (Nielsen) reported that consumers in the Asia-Pacific region have become the most active group in online shopping. Focusing on augmented reality (AR), which is one of three major techniques used to change the method of shopping in the future, this study used a mixed design to discuss the influences of the method of online shopping, user gender, cognitive style, product value, and sensory channel on mental workload in virtual reality (VR) and AR situations. The results showed that males' mental workloads were significantly higher than females'. For males, high-value products' mental workload was significantly higher than that of low-value products. In the VR situation, the visual mental workload of field-independent and field-dependent consumers showed a significant difference, but the difference was reduced under audio-visual conditions. In the AR situation, the visual mental workload of field-independent and field-dependent consumers showed a significant difference, but the difference increased under audio-visual conditions. This study provided a psychological study of online shopping with AR and VR technology with applications in the future. Based on the perspective of embodied cognition, AR online shopping may be potential focus of research and market application. For the future design of online shopping platforms and the updating of user experience, this study provides a reference.

  15. A Proposal for Stress Management Using Serious Games Associated to Virtual and Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato de Aquino Lopes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Occupational stress is a serious problem that affects a large number of workers. Regardless financial or social status, age and profession, a person exposed to stress may develop health problems that can interfere with work and his quality of life. Thus, due to absenteeism and reduced productivity, companies lose money when its employees are stressed. In this scenario, it is important that employees use strategies to deal with such drawback. Coping with occupational stress can be basically achieved, in two ways: problem-focused or emotion-focused. Literature shows that strategies which take the needs of individual workers into account have a greater chance of success. On the other hand, computer games, mainly those based upon Virtual and Augmented Reality (VR/AR techniques, offer players some experiences like: relaxation, sense of control, challenges, learning opportunities and immersion. These characteristics can contribute to the control process of occupational stress. The objective of this paper is to propose a new methodology for occupational stress, focused on emotion. In so doing, we use Serious Games and VR/AR techniques, considering particular needs of the employee.

  16. Analysis of Mental Workload in Online Shopping: Are Augmented and Virtual Reality Consistent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaojun; Shi, Changxiu; You, Xuqun; Zong, Chenming

    2017-01-01

    A market research company (Nielsen) reported that consumers in the Asia-Pacific region have become the most active group in online shopping. Focusing on augmented reality (AR), which is one of three major techniques used to change the method of shopping in the future, this study used a mixed design to discuss the influences of the method of online shopping, user gender, cognitive style, product value, and sensory channel on mental workload in virtual reality (VR) and AR situations. The results showed that males’ mental workloads were significantly higher than females’. For males, high-value products’ mental workload was significantly higher than that of low-value products. In the VR situation, the visual mental workload of field-independent and field-dependent consumers showed a significant difference, but the difference was reduced under audio–visual conditions. In the AR situation, the visual mental workload of field-independent and field-dependent consumers showed a significant difference, but the difference increased under audio–visual conditions. This study provided a psychological study of online shopping with AR and VR technology with applications in the future. Based on the perspective of embodied cognition, AR online shopping may be potential focus of research and market application. For the future design of online shopping platforms and the updating of user experience, this study provides a reference. PMID:28184207

  17. Virtual and augmented reality for training on maintenance; Realidad virutal y aumentada para la formacion en mantenimiento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, F.

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents two projects focused to support training on maintenance using new technologies. Both projects aims at specifying. designing, developing, and demonstrating prototypes allowing computer guided maintenance of complex mechanical elements using Virtual Reality (VIRMAN) and Augmented Reality (STARMATE) techniques. VIRMAN project is dedicated to training course development on maintenance using Virtual Reality. It based in the animation of three dimension images for component assembly/de-assembly or equipment movements. STARMATE will rely on Augmented Reality techniques which is a growing area in virtual Reality research. The idea of Augmented Reality is to combine a real scene, viewed by the user, with a virtual scene generated by a computer augmenting the reality with additional information. (Author)

  18. Virtual laryngoscopy-preliminary experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, A.T. [Departments of Radiology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Dublin 24 (Ireland); Walshe, P. [Departments of Otolaryngology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Dublin 24 (Ireland); McShane, D. [Departments of Otolaryngology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Dublin 24 (Ireland); Hamilton, S. [Departments of Radiology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Dublin 24 (Ireland)]. E-mail: samuel.hamilton@amnch.ie

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: Computed tomographic virtual laryngoscopy is a non-invasive radiological technique that allows visualisation of intra-luminal surfaces by three-dimensional reconstruction of air/soft tissue interfaces. It is particularly useful when the patient cannot tolerate clinical examination, when infection, neoplasm or congenital defects compromise the lumen and for assessment of the sub-glottic region. We have performed virtual laryngoscopy on patients referred because of upper airway symptoms, and compared the findings with those at conventional laryngoscopy. Materials and methods: Axial scans were obtained using a Toshiba Xpress helical scanner. Virtual laryngoscopy was then performed on a workstation using Toshiba 'Fly-thru' software and was completed within 5 min. Results: Pathology included vocal cord nodules, laryngeal cysts, Reinke's oedema, laryngeal neoplasms and leukoplakia. Conclusions: Virtual laryngoscopy displays anatomical detail comparable to conventional endoscopy. Impassable obstructions are no hindrance and all viewing directions are possible. It is especially useful for providing views of the larynx from below.

  19. Augmented reality and photogrammetry: A synergy to visualize physical and virtual city environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portalés, Cristina; Lerma, José Luis; Navarro, Santiago

    2010-01-01

    Close-range photogrammetry is based on the acquisition of imagery to make accurate measurements and, eventually, three-dimensional (3D) photo-realistic models. These models are a photogrammetric product per se. They are usually integrated into virtual reality scenarios where additional data such as sound, text or video can be introduced, leading to multimedia virtual environments. These environments allow users both to navigate and interact on different platforms such as desktop PCs, laptops and small hand-held devices (mobile phones or PDAs). In very recent years, a new technology derived from virtual reality has emerged: Augmented Reality (AR), which is based on mixing real and virtual environments to boost human interactions and real-life navigations. The synergy of AR and photogrammetry opens up new possibilities in the field of 3D data visualization, navigation and interaction far beyond the traditional static navigation and interaction in front of a computer screen. In this paper we introduce a low-cost outdoor mobile AR application to integrate buildings of different urban spaces. High-accuracy 3D photo-models derived from close-range photogrammetry are integrated in real (physical) urban worlds. The augmented environment that is presented herein requires for visualization a see-through video head mounted display (HMD), whereas user's movement navigation is achieved in the real world with the help of an inertial navigation sensor. After introducing the basics of AR technology, the paper will deal with real-time orientation and tracking in combined physical and virtual city environments, merging close-range photogrammetry and AR. There are, however, some software and complex issues, which are discussed in the paper.

  20. The virtual mirror: a new interaction paradigm for augmented reality environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichlmeier, Christoph; Heining, Sandro Michael; Feuerstein, Marco; Navab, Nassir

    2009-09-01

    Medical augmented reality (AR) has been widely discussed within the medical imaging as well as computer aided surgery communities. Different systems for exemplary medical applications have been proposed. Some of them produced promising results. One major issue still hindering AR technology to be regularly used in medical applications is the interaction between physician and the superimposed 3-D virtual data. Classical interaction paradigms, for instance with keyboard and mouse, to interact with visualized medical 3-D imaging data are not adequate for an AR environment. This paper introduces the concept of a tangible/controllable Virtual Mirror for medical AR applications. This concept intuitively augments the direct view of the surgeon with all desired views on volumetric medical imaging data registered with the operation site without moving around the operating table or displacing the patient. We selected two medical procedures to demonstrate and evaluate the potentials of the Virtual Mirror for the surgical workflow. Results confirm the intuitiveness of this new paradigm and its perceptive advantages for AR-based computer aided interventions.

  1. Using virtual ridge augmentation and 3D printing to fabricate a titanium mesh positioning device: A novel technique letter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ardah, Aladdin; Alqahtani, Nasser; AlHelal, Abdulaziz; Goodacre, Brian; Swamidass, Rajesh; Garbacea, Antoanela; Lozada, Jaime

    2018-05-02

    This technique describes a novel approach for planning and augmenting a large bony defect using a titanium mesh (TiMe). A 3-dimensional (3D) surgical model was virtually created from a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and wax-pattern of the final prosthetic outcome. The required bone volume (horizontally and vertically) was digitally augmented and then 3D printed to create a bone model. The 3D model was then used to contour the TiMe in accordance with the digital augmentation. With the contoured / preformed TiMe on the 3D printed model a positioning jig was made to aid the placement of the TiMe as planned during surgery. Although this technique does not impact the final outcome of the augmentation procedure, it allows the clinician to virtually design the augmentation, preform and contour the TiMe, and create a positioning jig reducing surgical time and error.

  2. Augmenting the Thermal Flux Experiment: A Mixed Reality Approach with the HoloLens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzys, M. P.; Kapp, S.; Thees, M.; Kuhn, J.; Lukowicz, P.; Knierim, P.; Schmidt, A.

    2017-01-01

    In the field of Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR), technologies have made huge progress during the last years and also reached the field of education. The virtuality continuum, ranging from pure virtuality on one side to the real world on the other, has been successfully covered by the use of immersive technologies like head-mounted…

  3. Application of Virtual and Augmented reality to geoscientific teaching and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgetts, David

    2017-04-01

    The geological sciences are the ideal candidate for the application of Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR). Digital data collection techniques such as laser scanning, digital photogrammetry and the increasing use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) or Small Unmanned Aircraft (SUA) technology allow us to collect large datasets efficiently and evermore affordably. This linked with the recent resurgence in VR and AR technologies make these 3D digital datasets even more valuable. These advances in VR and AR have been further supported by rapid improvements in graphics card technologies, and by development of high performance software applications to support them. Visualising data in VR is more complex than normal 3D rendering, consideration needs to be given to latency, frame-rate and the comfort of the viewer to enable reasonably long immersion time. Each frame has to be rendered from 2 viewpoints (one for each eye) requiring twice the rendering than for normal monoscopic views. Any unnatural effects (e.g. incorrect lighting) can lead to an uncomfortable VR experience so these have to be minimised. With large digital outcrop datasets comprising 10's-100's of millions of triangles this is challenging but achievable. Apart from the obvious "wow factor" of VR there are some serious applications. It is often the case that users of digital outcrop data do not appreciate the size of features they are dealing with. This is not the case when using correctly scaled VR, and a true sense of scale can be achieved. In addition VR provides an excellent way of performing quality control on 3D models and interpretations and errors are much more easily visible. VR models can then be used to create content that can then be used in AR applications closing the loop and taking interpretations back into the field.

  4. Nonsurgical Medical Penile Girth Augmentation: Experience-Based Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Jayson; Sharp, Gemma

    2017-10-01

    Penile augmentation is increasingly sought by men who are dissatisfied with the size and/or appearance of their penis. However, augmentation procedures are still considered to be highly controversial with no standardized recommendations reported in the medical literature and limited outcome data. Nevertheless, these procedures continue to be performed in increasing numbers in private settings. Therefore, there is a need for safe, effective, and minimally invasive procedures to be developed, evaluated, and reported in the research literature. In this article, we focus particularly on girth enhancement procedures rather than lengthening procedures as penile girth appears to be particularly important for sexual satisfaction. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the common techniques to date, with a focus on the minimally invasive injectable girth augmentation techniques. Based on considerable operative experience, we offer our own suggestions for patient screening, technique selection, and perioperative care. © 2017 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Composite augmentation phalloplasty: personal experience after 275 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Monreal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To report the author's experience in augmentation phalloplasty by studying a retrospective series of patients who underwent fat grafting for girth enhancement or a composite technique based on suspensory ligament release plus fat grafting performed simultaneously. Methods: The author analyzed retrospectively the outcomes of 275 augmentation phalloplasty procedures performed in 259 patients until November 2013. Of these, 127 correspond to girth augmentation with fat grafting and 148 to composite augmentation phalloplasty (girth augmentation with fat grafting and length improvement by suspensory ligament release. In 16 patients girth and length enhancement were performed in two separate procedures. Results: Of this 259 patients, 87 underwent postoperative follow-up for at least 12 months and 160 patients underwent follow-up for at least 6 months. The average increase in circumference at 6 months was 1.7 cm (1.57 cm at 12 months and the average increase in length of 3.2 cm (3.1 cm at 12 months. Twenty-two patients showed minor complications that were treated without sequelae and without influencing the final result. Conclusion: By judicious use of currently available techniques, it is possible to achieve stable increases in penis size. The use of composite techniques provides better final results than the use of individual techniques performed alone due to the increase of the actual volume of the penis. An adequate informed consent is essential in all patients due to the unrealistic expectations expressed by the majority of them.

  6. Recent advances in head-mounted light field displays for virtual and augmented reality (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Hong

    2017-02-01

    Head-mounted light field displays render a true 3D scene by sampling either the projections of the 3D scene at different depths or the directions of the light rays apparently emitted by the 3D scene and viewed from different eye positions. They are capable of rendering correct or nearly correct focus cues and addressing the very well-known vergence-accommodation mismatch problem in conventional virtual and augmented reality displays. In this talk, I will focus on reviewing recent advancements of head-mounted light field displays for VR and AR applications. I will demonstrate examples of HMD systems developed in my group.

  7. Augmented and virtual reality in surgery—the digital surgical environment: applications, limitations and legal pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Benjamin; Amin, Kavit; Chan, Adrian; Patel, Ketan; Wong, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The continuing enhancement of the surgical environment in the digital age has led to a number of innovations being highlighted as potential disruptive technologies in the surgical workplace. Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) are rapidly becoming increasingly available, accessible and importantly affordable, hence their application into healthcare to enhance the medical use of data is certain. Whether it relates to anatomy, intraoperative surgery, or post-operative rehabilitation, applications are already being investigated for their role in the surgeons armamentarium. Here we provide an introduction to the technology and the potential areas of development in the surgical arena. PMID:28090510

  8. Augmented and virtual reality in surgery-the digital surgical environment: applications, limitations and legal pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Wee Sim; Baker, Benjamin; Amin, Kavit; Chan, Adrian; Patel, Ketan; Wong, Jason

    2016-12-01

    The continuing enhancement of the surgical environment in the digital age has led to a number of innovations being highlighted as potential disruptive technologies in the surgical workplace. Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) are rapidly becoming increasingly available, accessible and importantly affordable, hence their application into healthcare to enhance the medical use of data is certain. Whether it relates to anatomy, intraoperative surgery, or post-operative rehabilitation, applications are already being investigated for their role in the surgeons armamentarium. Here we provide an introduction to the technology and the potential areas of development in the surgical arena.

  9. Social Gaming and Learning Applications: A Driving Force for the Future of Virtual and Augmented Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörner, Ralf; Lok, Benjamin; Broll, Wolfgang

    Backed by a large consumer market, entertainment and education applications have spurred developments in the fields of real-time rendering and interactive computer graphics. Relying on Computer Graphics methodologies, Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality benefited indirectly from this; however, there is no large scale demand for VR and AR in gaming and learning. What are the shortcomings of current VR/AR technology that prevent a widespread use in these application areas? What advances in VR/AR will be necessary? And what might future “VR-enhanced” gaming and learning look like? Which role can and will Virtual Humans play? Concerning these questions, this article analyzes the current situation and provides an outlook on future developments. The focus is on social gaming and learning.

  10. Digital heritage gamification: An augmented-virtual walkthrough to learn and explore historical places

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kian Lam; Lim, Chen Kim

    2017-10-01

    In the last decade, cultural heritage including historical sites are reconstructed into digital heritage. Based on UNESCO, digital heritage defines as "cultural, educational, scientific and administrative resources, as well as technical, legal, medical and other kinds of information created digitally, or converted into digital form from existing analogue resources". In addition, the digital heritage is doubling in size every two years and expected will grow tenfold between 2013 and 2020. In order to attract and stir the interest of younger generations about digital heritage, gamification has been widely promoted. In this research, a virtual walkthrough combine with gamifications are proposed for learning and exploring historical places in Malaysia by using mobile device. In conjunction with Visit Perak 2017 Campaign, this virtual walkthrough is proposed for Kellie's Castle at Perak. The objectives of this research is two folds 1) modelling and design of innovative mobile game for virtual walkthrough application, and 2) to attract tourist to explore and learn historical places by using sophisticated graphics from Augmented Reality. The efficiency and effectiveness of the mobile virtual walkthrough will be accessed by the International and local tourists. In conclusion, this research is speculated to be pervasively improve the cultural and historical knowledge of the learners.

  11. Implementation and Analysis of the Chromakey Augmented Virtual Environment (ChrAVE) Version 3.0 and Virtual Environment Helicopter (VEHELO) Version 2.0 in Simulated Helicopter Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hahn, M. E

    2005-01-01

    The Chromakey Augmented Virtual Environment (ChrAVE) 3.0 System is a training system created to augment initial, refresher, and proficiency training in helicopter aviation using accurate simulation...

  12. Real-time markerless tracking for augmented reality: the virtual visual servoing framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comport, Andrew I; Marchand, Eric; Pressigout, Muriel; Chaumette, François

    2006-01-01

    Tracking is a very important research subject in a real-time augmented reality context. The main requirements for trackers are high accuracy and little latency at a reasonable cost. In order to address these issues, a real-time, robust, and efficient 3D model-based tracking algorithm is proposed for a "video see through" monocular vision system. The tracking of objects in the scene amounts to calculating the pose between the camera and the objects. Virtual objects can then be projected into the scene using the pose. Here, nonlinear pose estimation is formulated by means of a virtual visual servoing approach. In this context, the derivation of point-to-curves interaction matrices are given for different 3D geometrical primitives including straight lines, circles, cylinders, and spheres. A local moving edges tracker is used in order to provide real-time tracking of points normal to the object contours. Robustness is obtained by integrating an M-estimator into the visual control law via an iteratively reweighted least squares implementation. This approach is then extended to address the 3D model-free augmented reality problem. The method presented in this paper has been validated on several complex image sequences including outdoor environments. Results show the method to be robust to occlusion, changes in illumination, and mistracking.

  13. Initial virtual flight test for a dynamically similar aircraft model with control augmentation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linliang Guo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To satisfy the validation requirements of flight control law for advanced aircraft, a wind tunnel based virtual flight testing has been implemented in a low speed wind tunnel. A 3-degree-of-freedom gimbal, ventrally installed in the model, was used in conjunction with an actively controlled dynamically similar model of aircraft, which was equipped with the inertial measurement unit, attitude and heading reference system, embedded computer and servo-actuators. The model, which could be rotated around its center of gravity freely by the aerodynamic moments, together with the flow field, operator and real time control system made up the closed-loop testing circuit. The model is statically unstable in longitudinal direction, and it can fly stably in wind tunnel with the function of control augmentation of the flight control laws. The experimental results indicate that the model responds well to the operator’s instructions. The response of the model in the tests shows reasonable agreement with the simulation results. The difference of response of angle of attack is less than 0.5°. The effect of stability augmentation and attitude control law was validated in the test, meanwhile the feasibility of virtual flight test technique treated as preliminary evaluation tool for advanced flight vehicle configuration research was also verified.

  14. Augmenting the thermal flux experiment: A mixed reality approach with the HoloLens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzys, M. P.; Kapp, S.; Thees, M.; Kuhn, J.; Lukowicz, P.; Knierim, P.; Schmidt, A.

    2017-09-01

    In the field of Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR), technologies have made huge progress during the last years and also reached the field of education. The virtuality continuum, ranging from pure virtuality on one side to the real world on the other, has been successfully covered by the use of immersive technologies like head-mounted displays, which allow one to embed virtual objects into the real surroundings, leading to a Mixed Reality (MR) experience. In such an environment, digital and real objects do not only coexist, but moreover are also able to interact with each other in real time. These concepts can be used to merge human perception of reality with digitally visualized sensor data, thereby making the invisible visible. As a first example, in this paper we introduce alongside the basic idea of this column an MR experiment in thermodynamics for a laboratory course for freshman students in physics or other science and engineering subjects that uses physical data from mobile devices for analyzing and displaying physical phenomena to students.

  15. Collaboration in Augmented Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukosch, S.; Billinghurst, M.; Alem, L.; Kiyokawa, K.

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a technology that allows users to view and interact in real time with virtual images seamlessly superimposed over the real world. AR systems can be used to create unique collaborative experiences. For example, co-located users can see shared 3D virtual objects that they

  16. Feasibility of virtual reality augmented cycling for health promotion of people poststroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Judith E; Myslinski, Mary Jane; Kafri, Michal; Ranky, Richard; Sivak, Mark; Mavroidis, Constantinos; Lewis, Jeffrey A

    2013-09-01

    A virtual reality (VR) augmented cycling kit (VRACK) was developed to address motor control and fitness deficits of individuals with chronic stroke. In this article, we report on the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of using the VR augmented cycling kit to improve cardiorespiratory (CR) fitness of individuals in the chronic phase poststroke. Four individuals with chronic stroke (47-65 years old and ≥3 years poststroke), with residual lower extremity impairments (Fugl-Meyer 24-26/34), who were limited community ambulators (gait speed range 0.56-1.1 m/s) participated in this study. Safety was defined as the absence of adverse events. Feasibility was measured using attendance, total exercise time, and "involvement" measured with the presence questionnaire (PQ). Efficacy of CR fitness was evaluated using a submaximal bicycle ergometer test before and after an 8-week training program. The intervention was safe and feasible with participants having 1 adverse event, 100% adherence, achieving between 90 and 125 minutes of cycling each week, and a mean PQ score of 39 (SD 3.3). There was a statistically significant (13%; P = 0.035) improvement in peak VO(2), with a range of 6% to 24.5%. For these individuals, poststroke, VR augmented cycling, using their heart rate to set their avatar's speed, fostered training of sufficient duration and intensity to promote CR fitness. In addition, there was a transfer of training from the bicycle to walking endurance. VR augmented cycling may be an addition to the therapist's tools for concurrent training of mobility and health promotion of individuals poststroke.

  17. Real-Time Motion Tracking for Mobile Augmented/Virtual Reality Using Adaptive Visual-Inertial Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wei; Zheng, Lianyu; Deng, Huanjun; Zhang, Hongbo

    2017-05-05

    In mobile augmented/virtual reality (AR/VR), real-time 6-Degree of Freedom (DoF) motion tracking is essential for the registration between virtual scenes and the real world. However, due to the limited computational capacity of mobile terminals today, the latency between consecutive arriving poses would damage the user experience in mobile AR/VR. Thus, a visual-inertial based real-time motion tracking for mobile AR/VR is proposed in this paper. By means of high frequency and passive outputs from the inertial sensor, the real-time performance of arriving poses for mobile AR/VR is achieved. In addition, to alleviate the jitter phenomenon during the visual-inertial fusion, an adaptive filter framework is established to cope with different motion situations automatically, enabling the real-time 6-DoF motion tracking by balancing the jitter and latency. Besides, the robustness of the traditional visual-only based motion tracking is enhanced, giving rise to a better mobile AR/VR performance when motion blur is encountered. Finally, experiments are carried out to demonstrate the proposed method, and the results show that this work is capable of providing a smooth and robust 6-DoF motion tracking for mobile AR/VR in real-time.

  18. Explore and experience: mobile augmented reality for medical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Urs-Vito; Noll, Christoph; von Jan, Ute

    2013-01-01

    In medicine, especially in basic education, it may sometimes be inappropriate to integrate real patients into classes due to ethical issues that must be avoided. Nevertheless, the quality of medical education may suffer without the use of real cases. This is especially true of medical specialties such as legal medicine: survivors of a crime are already subjected to procedures that constitute a severe emotional burden and may cause additional distress even without the added presence of students. Using augmented reality based applications may alleviate this ethical dilemma by giving students the possibility to practice the necessary skills based on virtual but nevertheless almost realistic cases. The app "mARble®" that is presented in this paper follows this approach. The currently available learning module for legal medicine gives users an opportunity to learn about various wound patterns by virtually overlaying them on their own skin and is applicable in different learning settings. Preliminary evaluation results covering learning efficiency and emotional components of the learning process are promising. Content modules for other medical specialtiesare currently under construction.

  19. Virtual and augmented reality in the treatment of phantom limb pain: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Justin; Yeo, Elizabeth; Moghaddampour, Parisah; Chau, Brian; Humbert, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Phantom limb pain (PLP), the perception of discomfort in a limb no longer present, commonly occurs following amputation. A variety of interventions have been employed for PLP, including mirror therapy. Virtual Reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) mirror therapy treatments have also been utilized and have the potential to provide an even greater immersive experience for the amputee. However, there is not currently a consensus on the efficacy of VR and AR therapy. The aim of this review is to evaluate and summarize the current research on the effect of immersive VR and AR in the treatment of PLP. A comprehensive literature search was conducted utilizing PubMed and Google Scholar in order to collect all available studies concerning the use of VR and/or AR in the treatment of PLP using the search terms "virtual reality," "augmented reality," and "phantom limb pain." Eight studies in total were evaluated, with six of those reporting quantitative data and the other two reporting qualitative findings. All studies located were of low-level evidence. Each noted improved pain with VR and AR treatment for phantom limb pain, through quantitative or qualitative reporting. Additionally, adverse effects were limited only to simulator sickness occurring in one trial for one patient. Despite the positive findings, all of the studies were confined purely to case studies and case report series. No studies of higher evidence have been conducted, thus considerably limiting the strength of the findings. As such, the current use of VR and AR for PLP management, while attractive due to the increasing levels of immersion, customizable environments, and decreasing cost, is yet to be fully proven and continues to need further research with higher quality studies to fully explore its benefits.

  20. Virtual and augmented medical imaging environments: enabling technology for minimally invasive cardiac interventional guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linte, Cristian A; White, James; Eagleson, Roy; Guiraudon, Gérard M; Peters, Terry M

    2010-01-01

    Virtual and augmented reality environments have been adopted in medicine as a means to enhance the clinician's view of the anatomy and facilitate the performance of minimally invasive procedures. Their value is truly appreciated during interventions where the surgeon cannot directly visualize the targets to be treated, such as during cardiac procedures performed on the beating heart. These environments must accurately represent the real surgical field and require seamless integration of pre- and intra-operative imaging, surgical tracking, and visualization technology in a common framework centered around the patient. This review begins with an overview of minimally invasive cardiac interventions, describes the architecture of a typical surgical guidance platform including imaging, tracking, registration and visualization, highlights both clinical and engineering accuracy limitations in cardiac image guidance, and discusses the translation of the work from the laboratory into the operating room together with typically encountered challenges.

  1. Optical methods for enabling focus cues in head-mounted displays for virtual and augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Hong

    2017-05-01

    Developing head-mounted displays (HMD) that offer uncompromised optical pathways to both digital and physical worlds without encumbrance and discomfort confronts many grand challenges, both from technological perspectives and human factors. Among the many challenges, minimizing visual discomfort is one of the key obstacles. One of the key contributing factors to visual discomfort is the lack of the ability to render proper focus cues in HMDs to stimulate natural eye accommodation responses, which leads to the well-known accommodation-convergence cue discrepancy problem. In this paper, I will provide a summary on the various optical methods approaches toward enabling focus cues in HMDs for both virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR).

  2. Object and Facial Recognition in Augmented and Virtual Reality: Investigation into Software, Hardware and Potential Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Erin

    2017-01-01

    As augmented and virtual reality grows in popularity, and more researchers focus on its development, other fields of technology have grown in the hopes of integrating with the up-and-coming hardware currently on the market. Namely, there has been a focus on how to make an intuitive, hands-free human-computer interaction (HCI) utilizing AR and VR that allows users to control their technology with little to no physical interaction with hardware. Computer vision, which is utilized in devices such as the Microsoft Kinect, webcams and other similar hardware has shown potential in assisting with the development of a HCI system that requires next to no human interaction with computing hardware and software. Object and facial recognition are two subsets of computer vision, both of which can be applied to HCI systems in the fields of medicine, security, industrial development and other similar areas.

  3. Mass production of holographic transparent components for augmented and virtual reality applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Juan Manuel; Dimov, Fedor; Padiyar, Joy; Coe-Sullivan, Seth

    2017-06-01

    Diffractive optics such as holographic optical elements (HOEs) can provide transparent and narrow band components with arbitrary incident and diffracted angles for near-to-eye commercial electronic products for augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR), and smart glass applications. In this paper, we will summarize the operational parameters and general optical geometries relevant for near-to-eye displays, the holographic substrates available for these applications, and their performance characteristics and ease of manufacture. We will compare the holographic substrates available in terms of fabrication, manufacturability, and end-user performance characteristics. Luminit is currently emplacing the manufacturing capacity to serve this market, and this paper will discuss the capabilities and limitations of this unique facility.

  4. APPLICATION OF AUGMENTED AND VIRTUAL REALITY IN RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX PRESENTATION, CASE STUDY: ENERGOPROJEKT SUNNYVILLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PEJIC Petar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The traditional method of residential complex project presentations involves the use of a printed poster or elaborate on which the building is presented by using of two-dimensional drawings and images. The main traditional approach problem is the presentation of three-dimensional space on two-dimensional paper. The main focus of this paper is the development of contemporary, mobile systems for residential complex presentations which will be presented on a case study of “Energoprojekt Sunnyville” using a method of virtual and augmented reality. This approach enables easier and better understanding of all types of architectural objects and urban complex, allowing the user intuitive spatial overview of architectural work.

  5. Beam steering for virtual/augmented reality displays with a cycloidal diffractive waveplate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiwei; Weng, Yishi; Xu, Daming; Tabiryan, Nelson V; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2016-04-04

    We proposed a switchable beam steering device with cycloidal diffractive waveplate (CDW) for eye tracking in a virtual reality (VR) or augmented reality (AR) display system. Such a CDW diffracts the incident circularly polarized light to the first order with over 95% efficiency. To convert the input linearly polarized light to right-handed or left-handed circular polarization, we developed a broadband polarization switch consisting of a twisted nematic liquid crystal cell and an achromatic quarter-wave retardation film. By cascading 2-3 CDWs together, multiple diffraction angles can be achieved. To suppress the color dispersion, we proposed two approaches to obtain the same diffraction angle for red, green, and blue LEDs-based full color displays. Our device exhibits several advantages, such as high diffraction efficiency, fast response time, low power consumption, and low cost. It holds promise for the emerging VR/AR displays.

  6. Using virtual reality to augment perception, enhance sensorimotor adaptation, and change our minds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, W Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances that involve human sensorimotor processes can have both intended and unintended effects on the central nervous system (CNS). This mini review focuses on the use of virtual environments (VE) to augment brain functions by enhancing perception, eliciting automatic motor behavior, and inducing sensorimotor adaptation. VE technology is becoming increasingly prevalent in medical rehabilitation, training simulators, gaming, and entertainment. Although these VE applications have often been shown to optimize outcomes, whether it be to speed recovery, reduce training time, or enhance immersion and enjoyment, there are inherent drawbacks to environments that can potentially change sensorimotor calibration. Across numerous VE studies over the years, we have investigated the effects of combining visual and physical motion on perception, motor control, and adaptation. Recent results from our research involving exposure to dynamic passive motion within a visually-depicted VE reveal that short-term exposure to augmented sensorimotor discordance can result in systematic aftereffects that last beyond the exposure period. Whether these adaptations are advantageous or not, remains to be seen. Benefits as well as risks of using VE-driven sensorimotor stimulation to enhance brain processes will be discussed.

  7. Using virtual reality to augment perception, enhance sensorimotor adaptation, and change our minds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Geoffrey Wright

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances that involve human sensorimotor processes can have both intended and unintended effects on the central nervous system (CNS. This mini-review focuses on the use of virtual environments (VE to augment brain functions by enhancing perception, eliciting automatic motor behavior, and inducing sensorimotor adaptation. VE technology is becoming increasingly prevalent in medical rehabilitation, training simulators, gaming, and entertainment. Although these VE applications have often been shown to optimize outcomes, whether it be to speed recovery, reduce training time, or enhance immersion and enjoyment, there are inherent drawbacks to environments that can potentially change sensorimotor calibration. Across numerous VE studies over the years, we have investigated the effects of combining visual and physical motion on perception, motor control, and adaptation. Recent results from our research involving exposure to dynamic passive motion within a visually-depicted VE reveal that short-term exposure to augmented sensorimotor discordance can result in systematic aftereffects that last beyond the exposure period. Whether these adaptations are advantageous or not, remains to be seen. Benefits as well as risks of using VE-driven sensorimotor stimulation to enhance brain processes will be discussed.

  8. Presenting the invisible and unfathomable: Virtual museum and augmented reality of the Neolithic site in Bylany, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Květina, Petr; Unger, Jiří; Vavrečka, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 1 (2015), s. 3-22 ISSN 0323-1267 R&D Projects: GA MK(CZ) DF12P01OVV032 Keywords : digital heritage management * virtual museum * augmented reality * Neolithic * community engagement Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  9. Virtual geotechnical laboratory experiments using a simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penumadu, Dayakar; Zhao, Rongda; Frost, David

    2000-04-01

    The details of a test simulator that provides a realistic environment for performing virtual laboratory experimentals in soil mechanics is presented. A computer program Geo-Sim that can be used to perform virtual experiments, and allow for real-time observations of material response is presented. The results of experiments, for a given set of input parameters, are obtained with the test simulator using well-trained artificial neural-network-based soil models for different soil types and stress paths. Multimedia capabilities are integrated in Geo-Sim, using software that links and controls a laser disc player with a real-time parallel processing ability. During the simulation of a virtual experiment, relevant portions of the video image of a previously recorded test on an actual soil specimen are dispalyed along with the graphical presentation of response from the feedforward ANN model predictions. The pilot simulator developed to date includes all aspects related to performing a triaxial test on cohesionless soil under undrained and drained conditions. The benefits of the test simulator are also presented.

  10. A virtual reality endoscopic simulator augments general surgery resident cancer education as measured by performance improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ian; Buchberg, Brian; Tsikitis, V Liana; Herzig, Daniel O; Vetto, John T; Lu, Kim C

    2014-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of death in the USA. The need for screening colonoscopies, and thus adequately trained endoscopists, particularly in rural areas, is on the rise. Recent increases in required endoscopic cases for surgical resident graduation by the Surgery Residency Review Committee (RRC) further emphasize the need for more effective endoscopic training during residency to determine if a virtual reality colonoscopy simulator enhances surgical resident endoscopic education by detecting improvement in colonoscopy skills before and after 6 weeks of formal clinical endoscopic training. We conducted a retrospective review of prospectively collected surgery resident data on an endoscopy simulator. Residents performed four different clinical scenarios on the endoscopic simulator before and after a 6-week endoscopic training course. Data were collected over a 5-year period from 94 different residents performing a total of 795 colonoscopic simulation scenarios. Main outcome measures included time to cecal intubation, "red out" time, and severity of simulated patient discomfort (mild, moderate, severe, extreme) during colonoscopy scenarios. Average time to intubation of the cecum was 6.8 min for those residents who had not undergone endoscopic training versus 4.4 min for those who had undergone endoscopic training (p Virtual reality endoscopic simulation is an effective tool for both augmenting surgical resident endoscopy cancer education and measuring improvement in resident performance after formal clinical endoscopic training.

  11. Augmented Reality Experience: From High-Resolution Acquisition to Real Time Augmented Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Clini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of a research project “dUcale” that experiments ICT solutions for the museum of Palazzo Ducale (Urbino. In this project, the famed painting the “Città Ideale” becomes a case to exemplify a specific approach to the digital mediation of cultural heritage. An augmented reality (AR mobile application, able to enhance the museum visit experience, is presented. The computing technologies involved in the project (websites, desktop and social applications, mobile software, and AR constitute a persuasive environment for the artwork knowledge. The overall goal of our research is to provide to cultural institutions best practices efficiently on low budgets. Therefore, we present a low cost method for high-resolution acquisition of paintings; the image is used as a base in AR approach. The proposed methodology consists of an improved SIFT extractor for real time image. The other novelty of this work is the multipoint probabilistic layer. Experimental results demonstrated the robustness of the proposed approach with extensive use of the AR application in front of the “Città Ideale” painting. To prove the usability of the application and to ensure a good user experience, we also carried out several users tests in the real scenario.

  12. Analysing neutron scattering data using McStas virtual experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udby, L.; Willendrup, Peter Kjær; Bergbäck Knudsen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    With the intention of developing a new data analysis method using virtual experiments we have built a detailed virtual model of the cold triple-axis spectrometer RITA-II at PSI, Switzerland, using the McStas neutron ray-tracing package. The parameters characterising the virtual instrument were...... carefully tuned against real experiments. In the present paper we show that virtual experiments reproduce experimentally observed linewidths within 1–3% for a variety of samples. Furthermore we show that the detailed knowledge of the instrumental resolution found from virtual experiments, including sample...

  13. Technological mediations in the city: from a notion of augmented urban space to the construction of a sense of connectedness by the collective experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta M. de V. LEITE

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a contribution to the research on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT for the construction and share of urban experience. We illustrate our considerations with examples that combine dynamics of urban and virtual spaces according to a notion of augmented urban space. In this dynamics ICT function as mediators of the perception of space and social relations.

  14. Virtual experiences in business administration learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Alves Amâncio

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In Business Administration, the question about contents’ specialization has arisen, which would difficult the construction of student’s global view and promote detachment between those contents and their application, compromising his professional performance. Considering Theory of Experiential Learning KOLB, 1984 which relates concrete experience and abstract conceptualization, the overcoming of those problems is searched by using a free simulation software that provides a virtual environment for those experiences – in this case, for business plan formulation including all organizational aspects. This paper reports one of those experiences and highlights as important innovations: the appreciation of contents’ integration; the student’s active and critical participation; and the teacher’s essential role as a facilitator of all the process. The incorporation of a new didactical/technological resource to enhance Business Administration Teaching and Learning Process stands out as a contribution of this work.

  15. Virtual Interactive Presence in Global Surgical Education: International Collaboration Through Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew Christopher; Can, Dang D; Pindrik, Jonathan; Rocque, Brandon G; Johnston, James M

    2016-02-01

    Technology allowing a remote, experienced surgeon to provide real-time guidance to local surgeons has great potential for training and capacity building in medical centers worldwide. Virtual interactive presence and augmented reality (VIPAR), an iPad-based tool, allows surgeons to provide long-distance, virtual assistance wherever a wireless internet connection is available. Local and remote surgeons view a composite image of video feeds at each station, allowing for intraoperative telecollaboration in real time. Local and remote stations were established in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and Birmingham, Alabama, as part of ongoing neurosurgical collaboration. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy with choroid plexus coagulation with VIPAR was used for subjective and objective evaluation of system performance. VIPAR allowed both surgeons to engage in complex visual and verbal communication during the procedure. Analysis of 5 video clips revealed video delay of 237 milliseconds (range, 93-391 milliseconds) relative to the audio signal. Excellent image resolution allowed the remote neurosurgeon to visualize all critical anatomy. The remote neurosurgeon could gesture to structures with no detectable difference in accuracy between stations, allowing for submillimeter precision. Fifteen endoscopic third ventriculostomy with choroid plexus coagulation procedures have been performed with the use of VIPAR between Vietnam and the United States, with no significant complications. 80% of these patients remain shunt-free. Evolving technologies that allow long-distance, intraoperative guidance, and knowledge transfer hold great potential for highly efficient international neurosurgical education. VIPAR is one example of an inexpensive, scalable platform for increasing global neurosurgical capacity. Efforts to create a network of Vietnamese neurosurgeons who use VIPAR for collaboration are underway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Worldwide Experience with Erosion of the Magnetic Sphincter Augmentation Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicuben, Evan T; Bell, Reginald C W; Jobe, Blair A; Buckley, F P; Daniel Smith, C; Graybeal, Casey J; Lipham, John C

    2018-04-17

    The magnetic sphincter augmentation device continues to become a more common antireflux surgical option with low complication rates. Erosion into the esophagus is an important complication to recognize and is reported to occur at very low incidences (0.1-0.15%). Characterization of this complication remains limited. We aim to describe the worldwide experience with erosion of the magnetic sphincter augmentation device including presentation, techniques for removal, and possible risk factors. We reviewed data obtained from the device manufacturer Torax Medical, Inc., as well as the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database. The study period was from February 2007 through July 2017 and included all devices placed worldwide. In total, 9453 devices were placed and there were 29 reported cases of erosions. The median time to presentation of an erosion was 26 months with most occurring between 1 and 4 years after placement. The risk of erosion was 0.3% at 4 years after device implantation. Most patients experienced new-onset dysphagia prompting evaluation. Devices were successfully removed in all patients most commonly via an endoscopic removal of the eroded portion followed by a delayed laparoscopic removal of the remaining beads. At a median follow-up of 58 days post-removal, there were no complications and 24 patients have returned to baseline. Four patients reported ongoing mild dysphagia. Erosion of the LINX device is an important but rare complication to recognize that has been safely managed via minimally invasive approaches without long-term consequences.

  17. Virtual synchrotron experiments for deep Earth studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, J. M.; Alp, E. E.; Zhao, J.; Alatas, A.; Sturhahn, W.

    2011-12-01

    National facilities offer one-of-a-kind opportunities to apply state-of-the-art experimental techniques to the pressing scientific problems of today. Yet, few students are able to experience research projects at national facilities due to limited accessibility caused in part by limited involvement in the local academic institution, constrained working areas at the experimental stations, and/or travel costs. We present a virtual and remote beam-line for deep Earth mineral physics studies using nuclear resonant and inelastic x-ray scattering methods at Sector 3 of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. Off-site students have the capability of controlling their measurements via secure internet connections and webcams. Students can access a 'view only mode' for ease of interaction and safety-control. More experienced users have exclusive control of the experiment and can remotely change variables within the experimental setup.

  18. Virtual reality, immersion, and the unforgettable experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morie, Jacquelyn F.

    2006-02-01

    Virtual reality has been in the public eye for nearly forty years. Its early promise was vast: worlds we could visit and live in, if we could bend the technology to our desires. Progress was made, but along the way the original directions and challenges of fully immersive VR took a back seat to more ubiquitous technology such as games that provided many of the same functions. What was lost in this transition was the potential for VR to become a stage for encounters that are meaningful, those experiences that tap into what it means to be human. This paper describes examples of such experiences using VR technology and puts forward several avenues of thought concerning how we might reinvigorate these types of VR explorations.

  19. On the use of virtual and augmented reality for upper limb prostheses training and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamounier, Edgard; Lopes, Kenedy; Cardoso, Alexandre; Andrade, Adriano; Soares, Alcimar

    2010-01-01

    Accidents happen and unfortunately people may loose part of their body members. Studies have shown that in this case, most individuals suffer physically and psychologically. For this reason, actions to restore the patient's freedom and mobility are imperative. Traditional solutions require ways to adapt the individual to prosthetic devices. This idea is also applied to patients who have congenital limitations. However, one of the major difficulties faced by those who are fitted with these devices is the great mental effort needed during first stages of training. As a result, a meaningful number of patients give up the use of theses devices very soon. Thus, this article reports on a solution designed by the authors to help patients during the learning phases, without actually having to wear the prosthesis. This solution considers Virtual (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) techniques to mimic the prosthesis natural counterparts. Thus, it is expected that problems such as weight, heat and pain should not contribute to an already hard task.

  20. Interactive Learning Environment: Web-based Virtual Hydrological Simulation System using Augmented and Immersive Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, I.

    2014-12-01

    Recent developments in internet technologies make it possible to manage and visualize large data on the web. Novel visualization techniques and interactive user interfaces allow users to create realistic environments, and interact with data to gain insight from simulations and environmental observations. The hydrological simulation system is a web-based 3D interactive learning environment for teaching hydrological processes and concepts. The simulation systems provides a visually striking platform with realistic terrain information, and water simulation. Students can create or load predefined scenarios, control environmental parameters, and evaluate environmental mitigation alternatives. The web-based simulation system provides an environment for students to learn about the hydrological processes (e.g. flooding and flood damage), and effects of development and human activity in the floodplain. The system utilizes latest web technologies and graphics processing unit (GPU) for water simulation and object collisions on the terrain. Users can access the system in three visualization modes including virtual reality, augmented reality, and immersive reality using heads-up display. The system provides various scenarios customized to fit the age and education level of various users. This presentation provides an overview of the web-based flood simulation system, and demonstrates the capabilities of the system for various visualization and interaction modes.

  1. Computer-assisted surgery: virtual- and augmented-reality displays for navigation during urological interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oosterom, Matthias N; van der Poel, Henk G; Navab, Nassir; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2018-03-01

    To provide an overview of the developments made for virtual- and augmented-reality navigation procedures in urological interventions/surgery. Navigation efforts have demonstrated potential in the field of urology by supporting guidance for various disorders. The navigation approaches differ between the individual indications, but seem interchangeable to a certain extent. An increasing number of pre- and intra-operative imaging modalities has been used to create detailed surgical roadmaps, namely: (cone-beam) computed tomography, MRI, ultrasound, and single-photon emission computed tomography. Registration of these surgical roadmaps with the real-life surgical view has occurred in different forms (e.g. electromagnetic, mechanical, vision, or near-infrared optical-based), whereby the combination of approaches was suggested to provide superior outcome. Soft-tissue deformations demand the use of confirmatory interventional (imaging) modalities. This has resulted in the introduction of new intraoperative modalities such as drop-in US, transurethral US, (drop-in) gamma probes and fluorescence cameras. These noninvasive modalities provide an alternative to invasive technologies that expose the patients to X-ray doses. Whereas some reports have indicated navigation setups provide equal or better results than conventional approaches, most trials have been performed in relatively small patient groups and clear follow-up data are missing. The reported computer-assisted surgery research concepts provide a glimpse in to the future application of navigation technologies in the field of urology.

  2. Working alliance inventory applied to virtual and augmented reality (WAI-VAR): psychometrics and therapeutic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miragall, Marta; Baños, Rosa M; Cebolla, Ausiàs; Botella, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the psychometric properties of the Working Alliance Inventory-Short (WAI-S) adaptation to Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) therapies (WAI-VAR). The relationship between the therapeutic alliance (TA) with VR and AR and clinically significant change (CSC) is also explored. Seventy-five patients took part in this study (74.7% women, M age = 34.41). Fear of flying and adjustment disorder patients received VR therapy, and cockroach phobia patients received AR therapy. Psychometric properties, CSC, one-way ANOVA, Spearman's Correlations and Multiple Regression were calculated. The WAI-VAR showed a unidimensional structure, high internal consistency and adequate convergent validity. "Not changed" patients scored lower on the WAI-VAR than "improved" and "recovered" patients. Correlation between the WAI-VAR and CSC was moderate. The best fitting model for predicting CSC was a linear combination of the TA with therapist (WAI-S) and the TA with VR and AR (WAI-VAR), due to the latter variable slightly increased the percentage of variability accounted for in CSC. The WAI-VAR is the first validated instrument to measure the TA with VR and AR in research and clinical practice. This study reveals the importance of the quality of the TA with technologies in achieving positive outcomes in the therapy.

  3. User Experience in Mobile Augmented Reality: Emotions, Challenges, Opportunities and Best Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Dirin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Mobile Augmented Reality (MAR is gaining a strong momentum to become a major interactive technology that can be applied across domains and purposes. The rapid proliferation of MAR applications in global mobile application markets has been fueled by a range of freely-available MAR software development kits and content development tools, some of which enable the creation of MAR applications even without programming skills. Despite the recent advances of MAR technology and tools, there are still many challenges associated with MAR from the User Experience (UX design perspective. In this study, we first define UX as the emotions that the user encounters while using a service, a product or an application and then explore the recent research on the topic. We present two case studies, a commercial MAR experience and our own Virtual Campus Tour MAR application, and evaluate them from the UX perspective, with a focus on emotions. Next, we synthesize the findings from previous research and the results of the case study evaluations to form sets of challenges, opportunities and best practices related to UX design of MAR applications. Based on the identified best practices, we finally present an updated version of the Virtual Campus Tour. The results can be used for improving UX design of future MAR applications, thus making them emotionally engaging.

  4. Augmented Reality Guidance for the Resection of Missing Colorectal Liver Metastases: An Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntourakis, Dimitrios; Memeo, Ricardo; Soler, Luc; Marescaux, Jacques; Mutter, Didier; Pessaux, Patrick

    2016-02-01

    Modern chemotherapy achieves the shrinking of colorectal cancer liver metastases (CRLM) to such extent that they may disappear from radiological imaging. Disappearing CRLM rarely represents a complete pathological remission and have an important risk of recurrence. Augmented reality (AR) consists in the fusion of real-time patient images with a computer-generated 3D virtual patient model created from pre-operative medical imaging. The aim of this prospective pilot study is to investigate the potential of AR navigation as a tool to help locate and surgically resect missing CRLM. A 3D virtual anatomical model was created from thoracoabdominal CT-scans using customary software (VR RENDER(®), IRCAD). The virtual model was superimposed to the operative field using an Exoscope (VITOM(®), Karl Storz, Tüttlingen, Germany). Virtual and real images were manually registered in real-time using a video mixer, based on external anatomical landmarks with an estimated accuracy of 5 mm. This modality was tested in three patients, with four missing CRLM that had sizes from 12 to 24 mm, undergoing laparotomy after receiving pre-operative oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy. AR display and fine registration was performed within 6 min. AR helped detect all four missing CRLM, and guided their resection. In all cases the planned security margin of 1 cm was clear and resections were confirmed to be R0 by pathology. There was no postoperative major morbidity or mortality. No local recurrence occurred in the follow-up period of 6-22 months. This initial experience suggests that AR may be a helpful navigation tool for the resection of missing CRLM.

  5. Virtual Planning, Control, and Machining for a Modular-Based Automated Factory Operation in an Augmented Reality Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Yun Suen; Yap, Hwa Jen; Md Dawal, Siti Zawiah; Ramesh, S.; Phoon, Sin Ye

    2016-06-01

    This study presents a modular-based implementation of augmented reality to provide an immersive experience in learning or teaching the planning phase, control system, and machining parameters of a fully automated work cell. The architecture of the system consists of three code modules that can operate independently or combined to create a complete system that is able to guide engineers from the layout planning phase to the prototyping of the final product. The layout planning module determines the best possible arrangement in a layout for the placement of various machines, in this case a conveyor belt for transportation, a robot arm for pick-and-place operations, and a computer numerical control milling machine to generate the final prototype. The robotic arm module simulates the pick-and-place operation offline from the conveyor belt to a computer numerical control (CNC) machine utilising collision detection and inverse kinematics. Finally, the CNC module performs virtual machining based on the Uniform Space Decomposition method and axis aligned bounding box collision detection. The conducted case study revealed that given the situation, a semi-circle shaped arrangement is desirable, whereas the pick-and-place system and the final generated G-code produced the highest deviation of 3.83 mm and 5.8 mm respectively.

  6. Virtual Planning, Control, and Machining for a Modular-Based Automated Factory Operation in an Augmented Reality Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Yun Suen; Yap, Hwa Jen; Md Dawal, Siti Zawiah; Ramesh, S.; Phoon, Sin Ye

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a modular-based implementation of augmented reality to provide an immersive experience in learning or teaching the planning phase, control system, and machining parameters of a fully automated work cell. The architecture of the system consists of three code modules that can operate independently or combined to create a complete system that is able to guide engineers from the layout planning phase to the prototyping of the final product. The layout planning module determines the best possible arrangement in a layout for the placement of various machines, in this case a conveyor belt for transportation, a robot arm for pick-and-place operations, and a computer numerical control milling machine to generate the final prototype. The robotic arm module simulates the pick-and-place operation offline from the conveyor belt to a computer numerical control (CNC) machine utilising collision detection and inverse kinematics. Finally, the CNC module performs virtual machining based on the Uniform Space Decomposition method and axis aligned bounding box collision detection. The conducted case study revealed that given the situation, a semi-circle shaped arrangement is desirable, whereas the pick-and-place system and the final generated G-code produced the highest deviation of 3.83 mm and 5.8 mm respectively. PMID:27271840

  7. Virtual Planning, Control, and Machining for a Modular-Based Automated Factory Operation in an Augmented Reality Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Yun Suen; Yap, Hwa Jen; Md Dawal, Siti Zawiah; Ramesh, S; Phoon, Sin Ye

    2016-06-07

    This study presents a modular-based implementation of augmented reality to provide an immersive experience in learning or teaching the planning phase, control system, and machining parameters of a fully automated work cell. The architecture of the system consists of three code modules that can operate independently or combined to create a complete system that is able to guide engineers from the layout planning phase to the prototyping of the final product. The layout planning module determines the best possible arrangement in a layout for the placement of various machines, in this case a conveyor belt for transportation, a robot arm for pick-and-place operations, and a computer numerical control milling machine to generate the final prototype. The robotic arm module simulates the pick-and-place operation offline from the conveyor belt to a computer numerical control (CNC) machine utilising collision detection and inverse kinematics. Finally, the CNC module performs virtual machining based on the Uniform Space Decomposition method and axis aligned bounding box collision detection. The conducted case study revealed that given the situation, a semi-circle shaped arrangement is desirable, whereas the pick-and-place system and the final generated G-code produced the highest deviation of 3.83 mm and 5.8 mm respectively.

  8. RealityConvert: a tool for preparing 3D models of biochemical structures for augmented and virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrel, Alexandre; Fourches, Denis

    2017-12-01

    There is a growing interest for the broad use of Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) in the fields of bioinformatics and cheminformatics to visualize complex biological and chemical structures. AR and VR technologies allow for stunning and immersive experiences, offering untapped opportunities for both research and education purposes. However, preparing 3D models ready to use for AR and VR is time-consuming and requires a technical expertise that severely limits the development of new contents of potential interest for structural biologists, medicinal chemists, molecular modellers and teachers. Herein we present the RealityConvert software tool and associated website, which allow users to easily convert molecular objects to high quality 3D models directly compatible for AR and VR applications. For chemical structures, in addition to the 3D model generation, RealityConvert also generates image trackers, useful to universally call and anchor that particular 3D model when used in AR applications. The ultimate goal of RealityConvert is to facilitate and boost the development and accessibility of AR and VR contents for bioinformatics and cheminformatics applications. http://www.realityconvert.com. dfourch@ncsu.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  9. Mobile Augmented Reality: A Tool for Effective Tourism Interpretation in Enhancing Tourist Experience at Urban Tourism Destination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Shuhadah Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The formation of tourism experience frequently subjected to complexity of individual tourist psycho-graphical factor, which leads to vast difference in the end experience formed among the respective tourist. However, the fact that travelling is highly subjected to environmental fuzziness and the issue of geographical consciousness may interfere the emotion of tourist and influence the formation of this experience. The evolution and advancement of mobile technologies had been optimized in improving the way human interact with the surrounding environment. Within this context, mobile augmented reality (AR technology is perceived as capable in narrowing the gap between the formation of pleasant experience and the issue of geographical consciousness, thus transform the way tourist interact with the destination. Pertaining to this situation, this conceptual paper is attempted to understand the effectiveness of mobile augmented reality in enhancing tourist travel experience on the tourism destination. In relation to this aim, this study is directed to clarify the mechanism and usability of mobile augmented reality in relation to its capability in improving tourism interpretation and to discover the influence of utilization of this technology towards tourism experience. Critical review of existing literature that relevant to the research area was done in understanding on the extensiveness of impact of mobile AR on tourist and experience formation. Findings revealed the capability of AR in merging virtual information with the real world environment through the platform of mobile device able to create a more dynamic interaction between tourist and surrounding environment.

  10. Experiments in augmented teleoperation for mobile robots: I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witus, Gary; Hunt, Shawn; Ellis, R. Darrin

    2007-04-01

    Teleoperated mobile robots are beginning to be used for a variety of tasks that require movement in close quarters in the vicinity of moving and parked vehicles, buildings and other man-made structures, and the target object for inspection or manipulation. The robots must be close enough to deploy short-range sensors and manipulators, and must be able to maneuver without potentially damaging collisions. Teleoperation is fatiguing and stressful even without the requirement for close positioning. In cooperation with the TARDEC Robotic Mobility Laboratory (TRML), we are investigating approaches to reduce workload and improve performance through augmented teleoperation. Human-robot interfaces for teleoperation commonly provide two degrees-of-freedom (DoF) motion control with visual feedback from an on-board egocentric camera and no supplemental distance or orientation cueing. This paper reports on the results of preliminary experiments to assess the effects on man-machine task performance of several options for augmented teleoperation: (a) 3 DoF motion control (rotation and omni-directional translation) versus 2 DoF control (rotation and forward/reverse motion), (b) on-board egocentric camera versus fixed-position overwatch camera versus dual egocentric-and-overwatch cameras, and (c) presence or absence of distance and orientation visual cueing. We examined three dimensions of performance: completion time, spatial accuracy, and workspace area. We investigated effects on the expected completion time and on the variance in completion time. Spatial accuracy had three components: orientation, aimpoint, and distance. We collected performance under different task conditions: (a) three position-and-orientation tolerance or accuracy objectives, and (b) four travel distances between successive inspection points. We collected data from three subjects. We analyzed the main effects and conditional interaction effects among the teleoperation options and task conditions. We were

  11. Laparoscopic skill improvement after virtual reality simulator training in medical students as assessed by augmented reality simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Tsutomu; Mamada, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Matsutani, Takeshi; Hagiwara, Nobutoshi; Fujita, Isturo; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Fujikura, Terumichi; Miyashita, Masao; Uchida, Eiji

    2015-11-01

    Definitive assessment of laparoscopic skill improvement after virtual reality simulator training is best obtained during an actual operation. However, this is impossible in medical students. Therefore, we developed an alternative assessment technique using an augmented reality simulator. Nineteen medical students completed a 6-week training program using a virtual reality simulator (LapSim). The pretest and post-test were performed using an object-positioning module and cholecystectomy on an augmented reality simulator(ProMIS). The mean performance measures between pre- and post-training on the LapSim were compared with a paired t-test. In the object-positioning module, the execution time of the task (P virtual reality simulator improved the operative skills of medical students as objectively evaluated by assessment using an augmented reality simulator instead of an actual operation. We hope that these findings help to establish an effective training program for medical students. © 2015 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Virtual experiment instrument of nuclear pulse measuring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan Jian; Zhao Xiuliang; Yu Hong; Zhang Meiqin

    2009-01-01

    Study on the scheme of application of virtual instrument(VI) technique in measuring of nuclear pulse. The system of Counter based on technology of LabVIEW and NI company's products USB-6009-DAQ is developed. Virtual nuclear instrument-Virtual Counter is realized. This system extends the application of technology of virtual instrument. The experimental results indicate that the system of Counter had the good counting measuring function of Nuclear Pulse. (authors)

  13. Valorisation of Cultural Heritage Through Virtual Visit and Augmented Reality: the Case of the Abbey of Epau (france)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetto, E.; Froment, C.; Labergerie, E.; Ferré, G.; Séchet, B.; Chédorge, H.; Cali, J.; Polidori, L.

    2013-07-01

    Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), 3-D modeling and its Web visualization are the three key steps needed to perform storage and grant-free and wide access to cultural heritage, as highlighted in many recent examples. The goal of this study is to set up 3-D Web resources for "virtually" visiting the exterior of the Abbaye de l'Epau, an old French abbey which has both a rich history and delicate architecture. The virtuality is considered in two ways: the flowing navigation in a virtual reality environment around the abbey and a game activity using augmented reality. First of all, the data acquisition consists in GPS and tacheometry survey, terrestrial laser scanning and photography acquisition. After data pre-processing, the meshed and textured 3-D model is generated using 3-D Reshaper commercial software. The virtual reality visit and augmented reality animation are then created using Unity software. This work shows the interest of such tools in bringing out the regional cultural heritage and making it attractive to the public.

  14. Modeling and computational simulation and the potential of virtual and augmented reality associated to the teaching of nanoscience and nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Allan; Santos, Helen

    With the advent of new information and communication technologies (ICTs), the communicative interaction changes the way of being and acting of people, at the same time that changes the way of work activities related to education. In this range of possibilities provided by the advancement of computational resources include virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR), are highlighted as new forms of information visualization in computer applications. While the RV allows user interaction with a virtual environment totally computer generated; in RA the virtual images are inserted in real environment, but both create new opportunities to support teaching and learning in formal and informal contexts. Such technologies are able to express representations of reality or of the imagination, as systems in nanoscale and low dimensionality, being imperative to explore, in the most diverse areas of knowledge, the potential offered by ICT and emerging technologies. In this sense, this work presents computer applications of virtual and augmented reality developed with the use of modeling and simulation in computational approaches to topics related to nanoscience and nanotechnology, and articulated with innovative pedagogical practices.

  15. Augmented postcard

    OpenAIRE

    Bernik , Aleš

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is the examination of augmented reality technology, which allows us mixing real and virtual elements. Augmented reality is a relatively new technology which is becoming more widespread, thanks to a fairly reasonable price of smart phones. Here we presents the types of augmented reality, the necessary technology and their advantages and disadvantages, its current use in applications, and software for building augmented reality applications. The thesis is mainly focuse...

  16. Evaluating Experiences in Different Virtual Reality Setups

    OpenAIRE

    Settgast , Volker; Pirker , Johanna; Lontschar , Stefan; Maggale , Stefan; Gütl , Christian

    2016-01-01

    Part 2: Use and Evaluation of Digital Entertainment; International audience; This paper describes the evaluation of three different scenarios in the fully immersive room-based virtual environment DAVE (Definitely Affordable Virtual Environment) and a head-mounted display, the Oculus Rift. The evaluation focuses on comparing the two immersive environments and three different scenarios (observation, emotion in a roller coaster, and interaction) in regards to typical virtual-reality characterist...

  17. Augmented reality: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Donna R

    2012-01-01

    Augmented reality is a technology that overlays digital information on objects or places in the real world for the purpose of enhancing the user experience. It is not virtual reality, that is, the technology that creates a totally digital or computer created environment. Augmented reality, with its ability to combine reality and digital information, is being studied and implemented in medicine, marketing, museums, fashion, and numerous other areas. This article presents an overview of augmented reality, discussing what it is, how it works, its current implementations, and its potential impact on libraries.

  18. Adaptive Augmenting Control and Launch Vehicle Adaptive Control Flight Experiments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Researchers at NASA Armstrong are working to further the development of an adaptive augmenting control algorithm (AAC). The AAC was developed to improve the...

  19. A conceptualisation of the relationship between virtual experience and cybernauts' satisfaction with virtual communities

    OpenAIRE

    Bouattour , Dorra; Debos , Franck; Abdellatif , Tarek

    2015-01-01

    International audience; In this research, we developed and tested an integrated model relating individuals' satisfaction with their experiential values in virtual communities. Using a realised factorial analysis and regression, we identified the factors that influence member satisfaction in virtual communities. Adopting Mathwick et al.'s (2001) concept of experiential value, we proposed a conceptualisation of a virtual experience that fits closely with the original nomological framework advoc...

  20. Learning Ethics through Virtual Fieldtrips: Teaching Ethical Theories through Virtual Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Rick; Thoma, Steve; Coppock, Amanda; Mazer, Matthew; Midkiff, Lewis; Younanian, Marisa; Young, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Teaching ethical reasoning is considered an important component of the undergraduate learning experience. A recent approach to teaching using experiential learning is through virtual worlds such as Second Life. We discuss how ethics may be taught using experiential learning in the virtual world of Second Life. Participants in the class in this…

  1. Augmented Virtuality: A Real-time Process for Presenting Real-world Visual Sensory Information in an Immersive Virtual Environment for Planetary Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, D.; Tavakkoli, A.; Regenbrecht, J.; Wilson, B.

    2017-12-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) applications have recently seen an impressive growth, thanks to the advent of commercial Head Mounted Displays (HMDs). This new visualization era has opened the possibility of presenting researchers from multiple disciplines with data visualization techniques not possible via traditional 2D screens. In a purely VR environment researchers are presented with the visual data in a virtual environment, whereas in a purely AR application, a piece of virtual object is projected into the real world with which researchers could interact. There are several limitations to the purely VR or AR application when taken within the context of remote planetary exploration. For example, in a purely VR environment, contents of the planet surface (e.g. rocks, terrain, or other features) should be created off-line from a multitude of images using image processing techniques to generate 3D mesh data that will populate the virtual surface of the planet. This process usually takes a tremendous amount of computational resources and cannot be delivered in real-time. As an alternative, video frames may be superimposed on the virtual environment to save processing time. However, such rendered video frames will lack 3D visual information -i.e. depth information. In this paper, we present a technique to utilize a remotely situated robot's stereoscopic cameras to provide a live visual feed from the real world into the virtual environment in which planetary scientists are immersed. Moreover, the proposed technique will blend the virtual environment with the real world in such a way as to preserve both the depth and visual information from the real world while allowing for the sensation of immersion when the entire sequence is viewed via an HMD such as Oculus Rift. The figure shows the virtual environment with an overlay of the real-world stereoscopic video being presented in real-time into the virtual environment. Notice the preservation of the object

  2. Experiences with a synchronous virtual classroom in distance education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, Hermannus; Vranken, H.

    2008-01-01

    Modern technology offers the tools for having synchronous virtual classes. This paper reports about experiences of such a class in the context of distance education. The paper focuses on the tool as well as on the pedagogy. It outlines the pedagogical approach of the virtual class, which is an

  3. Virtual reality, augmented reality, and robotics applied to digestive operative procedures: from in vivo animal preclinical studies to clinical use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Luc; Marescaux, Jacques

    2006-04-01

    Technological innovations of the 20 th century provided medicine and surgery with new tools, among which virtual reality and robotics belong to the most revolutionary ones. Our work aims at setting up new techniques for detection, 3D delineation and 4D time follow-up of small abdominal lesions from standard mecial images (CT scsan, MRI). It also aims at developing innovative systems making tumor resection or treatment easier with the use of augmented reality and robotized systems, increasing gesture precision. It also permits a realtime great distance connection between practitioners so they can share a same 3D reconstructed patient and interact on a same patient, virtually before the intervention and for real during the surgical procedure thanks to a telesurgical robot. In preclinical studies, our first results obtained from a micro-CT scanner show that these technologies provide an efficient and precise 3D modeling of anatomical and pathological structures of rats and mice. In clinical studies, our first results show the possibility to improve the therapeutic choice thanks to a better detection and and representation of the patient before performing the surgical gesture. They also show the efficiency of augmented reality that provides virtual transparency of the patient in real time during the operative procedure. In the near future, through the exploitation of these systems, surgeons will program and check on the virtual patient clone an optimal procedure without errors, which will be replayed on the real patient by the robot under surgeon control. This medical dream is today about to become reality.

  4. Wayfinding and Glaucoma: A Virtual Reality Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daga, Fábio B; Macagno, Eduardo; Stevenson, Cory; Elhosseiny, Ahmed; Diniz-Filho, Alberto; Boer, Erwin R; Schulze, Jürgen; Medeiros, Felipe A

    2017-07-01

    Wayfinding, the process of determining and following a route between an origin and a destination, is an integral part of everyday tasks. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of glaucomatous visual field loss on wayfinding behavior using an immersive virtual reality (VR) environment. This cross-sectional study included 31 glaucomatous patients and 20 healthy subjects without evidence of overall cognitive impairment. Wayfinding experiments were modeled after the Morris water maze navigation task and conducted in an immersive VR environment. Two rooms were built varying only in the complexity of the visual scene in order to promote allocentric-based (room A, with multiple visual cues) versus egocentric-based (room B, with single visual cue) spatial representations of the environment. Wayfinding tasks in each room consisted of revisiting previously visible targets that subsequently became invisible. For room A, glaucoma patients spent on average 35.0 seconds to perform the wayfinding task, whereas healthy subjects spent an average of 24.4 seconds (P = 0.001). For room B, no statistically significant difference was seen on average time to complete the task (26.2 seconds versus 23.4 seconds, respectively; P = 0.514). For room A, each 1-dB worse binocular mean sensitivity was associated with 3.4% (P = 0.001) increase in time to complete the task. Glaucoma patients performed significantly worse on allocentric-based wayfinding tasks conducted in a VR environment, suggesting visual field loss may affect the construction of spatial cognitive maps relevant to successful wayfinding. VR environments may represent a useful approach for assessing functional vision endpoints for clinical trials of emerging therapies in ophthalmology.

  5. Human Factors Issues in the Use of Virtual and Augmented Reality for Military Purposes - USA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2005-01-01

    .... military virtual reality research facilites. The articles lists key research personnel, current research projects, a selection of literature by affiliated researchers, and laboratory facilities available...

  6. Augmenting breath regulation using a mobile driven virtual reality therapy framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abushakra, Ahmad; Faezipour, Miad

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a conceptual framework of a virtual reality therapy to assist individuals, especially lung cancer patients or those with breathing disorders to regulate their breath through real-time analysis of respiration movements using a smartphone. Virtual reality technology is an attractive means for medical simulations and treatment, particularly for patients with cancer. The theories, methodologies and approaches, and real-world dynamic contents for all the components of this virtual reality therapy (VRT) via a conceptual framework using the smartphone will be discussed. The architecture and technical aspects of the offshore platform of the virtual environment will also be presented.

  7. Towards Determination of Visual Requirements for Augmented Reality Displays and Virtual Environments for the Airport Tower

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    .... As an example of the type of human performance studies needed to determine the useful specifications of augmented reality displays, an optical see-through display was used in an ATC Tower simulation...

  8. Practice on an augmented reality/haptic simulator and library of virtual brains improves residents' ability to perform a ventriculostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudkowsky, Rachel; Luciano, Cristian; Banerjee, Pat; Schwartz, Alan; Alaraj, Ali; Lemole, G Michael; Charbel, Fady; Smith, Kelly; Rizzi, Silvio; Byrne, Richard; Bendok, Bernard; Frim, David

    2013-02-01

    Ventriculostomy is a neurosurgical procedure for providing therapeutic cerebrospinal fluid drainage. Complications may arise during repeated attempts at placing the catheter in the ventricle. We studied the impact of simulation-based practice with a library of virtual brains on neurosurgery residents' performance in simulated and live surgical ventriculostomies. Using computed tomographic scans of actual patients, we developed a library of 15 virtual brains for the ImmersiveTouch system, a head- and hand-tracked augmented reality and haptic simulator. The virtual brains represent a range of anatomies including normal, shifted, and compressed ventricles. Neurosurgery residents participated in individual simulator practice on the library of brains including visualizing the 3-dimensional location of the catheter within the brain immediately after each insertion. Performance of participants on novel brains in the simulator and during actual surgery before and after intervention was analyzed using generalized linear mixed models. Simulator cannulation success rates increased after intervention, and live procedure outcomes showed improvement in the rate of successful cannulation on the first pass. However, the incidence of deeper, contralateral (simulator) and third-ventricle (live) placements increased after intervention. Residents reported that simulations were realistic and helpful in improving procedural skills such as aiming the probe, sensing the pressure change when entering the ventricle, and estimating how far the catheter should be advanced within the ventricle. Simulator practice with a library of virtual brains representing a range of anatomies and difficulty levels may improve performance, potentially decreasing complications due to inexpert technique.

  9. The final TimeWarp: using form and content to support player experience and presence when designing location-aware mobile augmented reality games

    OpenAIRE

    Blum, Lisa; Wetzel, Richard; McCall, Roderick; Oppermann, Leif; Broll, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Designing Augmented Reality location aware games requires an understanding of how form and content issues impact on presence. A study of 60 players was conducted using questionnaires, video analysis and interviews. The results indicate that content including: moral dilemmas, strong narratives, using real locations effectively and applying simple physical behavior within virtual characters to improve embodiment have a positive impact on player experience. The results are presented in ...

  10. Inquiry style interactive virtual experiments: a case on circular motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Shaona; Wang Xiaojun; Xiao Hua; Han Jing; Pelz, Nathaniel; Peng Liangyu; Bao Lei

    2011-01-01

    Interest in computer-based learning, especially in the use of virtual reality simulations is increasing rapidly. While there are good reasons to believe that technologies have the potential to improve teaching and learning, how to utilize the technology effectively in teaching specific content difficulties is challenging. To help students develop robust understandings of correct physics concepts, we have developed interactive virtual experiment simulations that have the unique feature of enabling students to experience force and motion via an analogue joystick, allowing them to feel the applied force and simultaneously see its effects. The simulations provide students learning experiences that integrate both scientific representations and low-level sensory cues such as haptic cues under a single setting. In this paper, we introduce a virtual experiment module on circular motion. A controlled study has been conducted to evaluate the impact of using this virtual experiment on students' learning of force and motion in the context of circular motion. The results show that the interactive virtual experiment method is preferred by students and is more effective in helping students grasp the physics concepts than the traditional education method such as problem-solving practices. Our research suggests that well-developed interactive virtual experiments can be useful tools in teaching difficult concepts in science.

  11. Inquiry style interactive virtual experiments: a case on circular motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Shaona; Wang Xiaojun; Xiao Hua [School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Han Jing; Pelz, Nathaniel; Peng Liangyu; Bao Lei, E-mail: xiaoh@scnu.edu.cn, E-mail: lbao@mps.ohio-state.edu [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Interest in computer-based learning, especially in the use of virtual reality simulations is increasing rapidly. While there are good reasons to believe that technologies have the potential to improve teaching and learning, how to utilize the technology effectively in teaching specific content difficulties is challenging. To help students develop robust understandings of correct physics concepts, we have developed interactive virtual experiment simulations that have the unique feature of enabling students to experience force and motion via an analogue joystick, allowing them to feel the applied force and simultaneously see its effects. The simulations provide students learning experiences that integrate both scientific representations and low-level sensory cues such as haptic cues under a single setting. In this paper, we introduce a virtual experiment module on circular motion. A controlled study has been conducted to evaluate the impact of using this virtual experiment on students' learning of force and motion in the context of circular motion. The results show that the interactive virtual experiment method is preferred by students and is more effective in helping students grasp the physics concepts than the traditional education method such as problem-solving practices. Our research suggests that well-developed interactive virtual experiments can be useful tools in teaching difficult concepts in science.

  12. Virtual parameter-estimation experiments in Bioprocess-Engineering education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sessink, O.D.T.; Beeftink, H.H.; Hartog, R.J.M.; Tramper, J.

    2006-01-01

    Cell growth kinetics and reactor concepts constitute essential knowledge for Bioprocess-Engineering students. Traditional learning of these concepts is supported by lectures, tutorials, and practicals: ICT offers opportunities for improvement. A virtual-experiment environment was developed that

  13. Augmenting real-time video with virtual models for enhanced visualization for simulation, teaching, training and guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Michael; Bensch, Alexander; Dawson-Elli, Alexander; Linte, Cristian A.

    2015-03-01

    In minimally invasive surgical interventions direct visualization of the target area is often not available. Instead, clinicians rely on images from various sources, along with surgical navigation systems for guidance. These spatial localization and tracking systems function much like the Global Positioning Systems (GPS) that we are all well familiar with. In this work we demonstrate how the video feed from a typical camera, which could mimic a laparoscopic or endoscopic camera used during an interventional procedure, can be used to identify the pose of the camera with respect to the viewed scene and augment the video feed with computer-generated information, such as rendering of internal anatomy not visible beyond the imaged surface, resulting in a simple augmented reality environment. This paper describes the software and hardware environment and methodology for augmenting the real world with virtual models extracted from medical images to provide enhanced visualization beyond the surface view achieved using traditional imaging. Following intrinsic and extrinsic camera calibration, the technique was implemented and demonstrated using a LEGO structure phantom, as well as a 3D-printed patient-specific left atrial phantom. We assessed the quality of the overlay according to fiducial localization, fiducial registration, and target registration errors, as well as the overlay offset error. Using the software extensions we developed in conjunction with common webcams it is possible to achieve tracking accuracy comparable to that seen with significantly more expensive hardware, leading to target registration errors on the order of 2 mm.

  14. Augmented reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrik Pucer

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Today we can obtain in a simple and rapid way most of the information that we need. Devices, such as personal computers and mobile phones, enable access to information in different formats (written, pictorial, audio or video whenever and wherever. Daily we use and encounter information that can be seen as virtual objects or objects that are part of the virtual world of computers. Everyone, at least once, wanted to bring these virtual objects from the virtual world of computers into real environments and thus mix virtual and real worlds. In such a mixed reality, real and virtual objects coexist in the same environment. The reality, where users watch and use the real environment upgraded with virtual objects is called augmented reality. In this article we describe the main properties of augmented reality. In addition to the basic properties that define a reality as augmented reality, we present the various building elements (possible hardware and software that provide an insight into such a reality and practical applications of augmented reality. The applications are divided into three groups depending on the information and functions that augmented reality offers, such as help, guide and simulator.

  15. Augmentation of Virtual Space Physics Observatory Services to Expand Data Access Capabilities, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aquilent, Inc. proposes to support the effort of Virtual Space Physics Observatory (VSPO) by developing services to expand the VSPO search capabilities, developing...

  16. Rapid prototyping, astronaut training, and experiment control and supervision: distributed virtual worlds for COLUMBUS, the European Space Laboratory module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Eckhard; Rossmann, Juergen

    2002-02-01

    In 2004, the European COLUMBUS Module is to be attached to the International Space Station. On the way to the successful planning, deployment and operation of the module, computer generated and animated models are being used to optimize performance. Under contract of the German Space Agency DLR, it has become IRF's task to provide a Projective Virtual Reality System to provide a virtual world built after the planned layout of the COLUMBUS module let astronauts and experimentators practice operational procedures and the handling of experiments. The key features of the system currently being realized comprise the possibility for distributed multi-user access to the virtual lab and the visualization of real-world experiment data. Through the capabilities to share the virtual world, cooperative operations can be practiced easily, but also trainers and trainees can work together more effectively sharing the virtual environment. The capability to visualize real-world data will be used to introduce measured data of experiments into the virtual world online in order to realistically interact with the science-reference model hardware: The user's actions in the virtual world are translated into corresponding changes of the inputs of the science reference model hardware; the measured data is than in turn fed back into the virtual world. During the operation of COLUMBUS, the capabilities for distributed access and the capabilities to visualize measured data through the use of metaphors and augmentations of the virtual world may be used to provide virtual access to the COLUMBUS module, e.g. via Internet. Currently, finishing touches are being put to the system. In November 2001 the virtual world shall be operational, so that besides the design and the key ideas, first experimental results can be presented.

  17. Comparing Virtual and Location-Based Augmented Reality Mobile Learning: Emotions and Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Jason M.; Poitras, Eric G.; Jarrell, Amanda; Duffy, Melissa C.; Lajoie, Susanne P.

    2016-01-01

    Research on the effectiveness of augmented reality (AR) on learning exists, but there is a paucity of empirical work that explores the role that positive emotions play in supporting learning in such settings. To address this gap, this study compared undergraduate students' emotions and learning outcomes during a guided historical tour using mobile…

  18. Physics holo.lab learning experience: using smartglasses for augmented reality labwork to foster the concepts of heat conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzys, M. P.; Kapp, S.; Thees, M.; Klein, P.; Lukowicz, P.; Knierim, P.; Schmidt, A.; Kuhn, J.

    2018-05-01

    Fundamental concepts of thermodynamics rely on abstract physical quantities such as energy, heat and entropy, which play an important role in the process of interpreting thermal phenomena and statistical mechanics. However, these quantities are not covered by human visual perception, and since heat sensation is purely qualitative and easy to deceive, an intuitive understanding often is lacking. Today immersive technologies like head-mounted displays of the newest generation, especially HoloLens, allow for high-quality augmented reality learning experiences, which can overcome this gap in human perception by presenting different representations of otherwise invisible quantities directly in the field of view of the user on the experimental apparatus, which simultaneously avoids a split-attention effect. In a mixed reality (MR) scenario as presented in this paper—which we call a holo.lab—human perception can be extended to the thermal regime by presenting false-color representations of the temperature of objects as a virtual augmentation directly on the real object itself in real-time. Direct feedback to experimental actions of the users in the form of different representations allows for immediate comparison to theoretical principles and predictions and therefore is supposed to intensify the theory–experiment interactions and to increase students’ conceptual understanding. We tested this technology for an experiment on thermal conduction of metals in the framework of undergraduate laboratories. A pilot study with treatment and control groups (N = 59) showed a small positive effect of MR on students’ performance measured with a standardized concept test for thermodynamics, pointing to an improvement of the understanding of the underlying physical concepts. These findings indicate that complex experiments could benefit even more from augmentation. This motivates us to enrich further experiments with MR.

  19. Transumbilical breast augmentation (TUBA): patient selection, technique, and clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, E C; Pound, E C

    2001-07-01

    The TUBA procedure offers another approach to placing inflatable breast implants in the subglandular or submuscular position. It is an easy procedure to learn and to perform, using only a few relatively inexpensive specialized instruments. It also can be modified to use preexisting scars on the abdomen as the access point. The authors believe that complications seem to occur less with TUBA patients than with patients having breast augmentation by other approaches, an observation shared by other plastic surgeons offering the TUBA procedure. Limitations include the fact that only inflatable implants can be used. Also, with increasing distance from the breast, there is less control over manipulation of the pocket. Fortunately, the authors have not found this to be a problem in achieving symmetry. Furthermore, bleeding tends to be minimal with this approach. Nevertheless, should technical difficulties arise, conversion to a standard breast incision is an easy back-up option and should be discussed with the patient before surgery. Interest in the TUBA approach to breast augmentation continues to grow. Patients appreciate the lack of scarring on the breast and the short recovery that allows them to resume their normal lifestyle quickly. The authors' caseload has increased considerably over the past 8 years through word-of-mouth advertising from satisfied patients. Other plastic surgeons who offer this approach agree that patient demand for this operation continues to grow dramatically in their practices.

  20. Designing Interactive Storytelling: A Virtual Environment for Personal Experience Narratives

    OpenAIRE

    Ladeira , Ilda; Marsden , Gary; Green , Lesley

    2011-01-01

    Part 1: Long and Short Papers; International audience; We describe an ongoing collaboration with the District Six Museum, in Cape Town, aimed at designing a storytelling prototype for preserving personal experience narratives. We detail the design of an interactive virtual environment (VE) which was inspired by a three month ethnography of real-life oral storytelling. The VE places the user as an audience member in a virtual group listening to two storytelling agents capable of two forms of i...

  1. Real-time virtual EAST physical experiment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dan, E-mail: lidan@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); Xiao, B.J., E-mail: bjxiao@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); Xia, J.Y., E-mail: jyxia@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); Yang, Fei, E-mail: fyang@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); Department of Computer Science, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2014-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • 3D model of experimental advanced superconducting tokamak is established. • Interaction behavior is created that the users can get information from database. • The system integrates data acquisition, plasma shape visualization and simulation. • Browser-oriented system is web-based and more interactive, immersive and convenient. • The system provides the framework for virtual physical experimental environment. - Abstract: As a large fusion reaction device, experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST)’s internal structure is complicated and not easily accessible. Moreover, various diagnostic systems and complicated configuration bring about the inconveniency to the scientists who are unfamiliar with the system but interested in the data. We propose a virtual system to display the 3D model of EAST facility and enable people to view its inner structure and get access to the information of its components in various view sights. We would also provide most of the diagnostic configuration details together with their signal names and physical properties. Compared to the previous ways of viewing information by reference to collected drawings and videos, virtual EAST system is more interactive and immersive. We constructed the browser-oriented virtual EAST physical experiment system, integrated real-time experiment data acquisition, plasma shape visualization and experiment result simulation in order to reproduce physical experiments in a web browser. This system used B/S (Browser/Server) structure in combination with the technology of virtual reality – VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) and Java 3D. In order to avoid the bandwidth limit across internet, we balanced the rendering speed and the precision of the virtual model components. Any registered user can view the experimental information visually and efficiently by logining the system through a web browser. The establishment of the system provides the

  2. Real-time virtual EAST physical experiment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dan; Xiao, B.J.; Xia, J.Y.; Yang, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • 3D model of experimental advanced superconducting tokamak is established. • Interaction behavior is created that the users can get information from database. • The system integrates data acquisition, plasma shape visualization and simulation. • Browser-oriented system is web-based and more interactive, immersive and convenient. • The system provides the framework for virtual physical experimental environment. - Abstract: As a large fusion reaction device, experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST)’s internal structure is complicated and not easily accessible. Moreover, various diagnostic systems and complicated configuration bring about the inconveniency to the scientists who are unfamiliar with the system but interested in the data. We propose a virtual system to display the 3D model of EAST facility and enable people to view its inner structure and get access to the information of its components in various view sights. We would also provide most of the diagnostic configuration details together with their signal names and physical properties. Compared to the previous ways of viewing information by reference to collected drawings and videos, virtual EAST system is more interactive and immersive. We constructed the browser-oriented virtual EAST physical experiment system, integrated real-time experiment data acquisition, plasma shape visualization and experiment result simulation in order to reproduce physical experiments in a web browser. This system used B/S (Browser/Server) structure in combination with the technology of virtual reality – VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) and Java 3D. In order to avoid the bandwidth limit across internet, we balanced the rendering speed and the precision of the virtual model components. Any registered user can view the experimental information visually and efficiently by logining the system through a web browser. The establishment of the system provides the

  3. Virtual Experience: The Impact of Mediated Communication in a Democratic Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, James D.; Hatcher, Tim

    1996-01-01

    Defines virtual experience as machine-based experience, of which virtual reality is a subconcept. Topics include a history of virtual experience; criticism of the influence of machine-mediated experiences such as computer games; virtual reality environments; and Heidegger's views on technology. (LRW)

  4. Tecnatom virtual reality experience in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeza, Guillermo; Cabrera, Esteban; Salve, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    TECNATOM is a Spanish company focused in providing support to the energy sector. Training, operation engineering and inspection services in nuclear environments are the main business of the company. Emerging applications based on Virtual Reality (VR) are being demanded by the market as a response to the current cost reduction trend and to the new challenges arising in decommissioning of NPP's, human factors analysis and training of personnel in high risk tasks. On this respect, Tecnatom has launched several initiatives to consolidate its internal capabilities in VR and to acquire consulting skills for the Tecnatom market. The results of theses actions will be shown in this paper. (Author)

  5. Generic precise augmented reality guiding system and its calibration method based on 3D virtual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Miao; Yang, Shourui; Wang, Zhangying; Huang, Shujun; Liu, Yue; Niu, Zhenqi; Zhang, Xiaoxuan; Zhu, Jigui; Zhang, Zonghua

    2016-05-30

    Augmented reality system can be applied to provide precise guidance for various kinds of manual works. The adaptability and guiding accuracy of such systems are decided by the computational model and the corresponding calibration method. In this paper, a novel type of augmented reality guiding system and the corresponding designing scheme are proposed. Guided by external positioning equipment, the proposed system can achieve high relative indication accuracy in a large working space. Meanwhile, the proposed system is realized with a digital projector and the general back projection model is derived with geometry relationship between digitized 3D model and the projector in free space. The corresponding calibration method is also designed for the proposed system to obtain the parameters of projector. To validate the proposed back projection model, the coordinate data collected by a 3D positioning equipment is used to calculate and optimize the extrinsic parameters. The final projecting indication accuracy of the system is verified with subpixel pattern projecting technique.

  6. Comparing "pick and place" task in spatial Augmented Reality versus non-immersive Virtual Reality for rehabilitation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Maryam; Hondori, Hossein Mousavi; Dodakian, Lucy; Cramer, Steve; Lopes, Cristina V

    2013-01-01

    Introducing computer games to the rehabilitation market led to development of numerous Virtual Reality (VR) training applications. Although VR has provided tremendous benefit to the patients and caregivers, it has inherent limitations, some of which might be solved by replacing it with Augmented Reality (AR). The task of pick-and-place, which is part of many activities of daily living (ADL's), is one of the major affected functions stroke patients mainly expect to recover. We developed an exercise consisting of moving an object between various points, following a flash light that indicates the next target. The results show superior performance of subjects in spatial AR versus non-immersive VR setting. This could be due to the extraneous hand-eye coordination which exists in VR whereas it is eliminated in spatial AR.

  7. Design Guidelines for the Development of Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality Training Systems for Maintenance and Assembly Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tecchia Franco

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The current work describes design guidelines for the development of Virtual Reality (VR and Augmented Reality (AR platforms to train technicians on maintenance and assembly tasks of industrial machineries. The main skill involved in this kind of tasks is the procedural skill. Based on past literature and studies conducted within the SKILLS project, several main design guidelines were formulated. First, observational learning integrated properly within the training protocol increases training efficiency. Second, training protocols combining physical and cognitive fidelity enhances procedural skills acquisition. Third, guidance aids should be provided in a proper and controlled way. And last, enriched information about the task helps trainees to develop a useful mental model of the task. These recommendations were implemented in both VR and AR training platforms.

  8. Virtual reality-augmented neurorehabilitation improves motor function and reduces neuropathic pain in patients with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villiger, Michael; Bohli, Dominik; Kiper, Daniel; Pyk, Pawel; Spillmann, Jeremy; Meilick, Bruno; Curt, Armin; Hepp-Reymond, Marie-Claude; Hotz-Boendermaker, Sabina; Eng, Kynan

    2013-10-01

    Neurorehabilitation interventions to improve lower limb function and neuropathic pain have had limited success in people with chronic, incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). We hypothesized that intense virtual reality (VR)-augmented training of observed and executed leg movements would improve limb function and neuropathic pain. Patients used a VR system with a first-person view of virtual lower limbs, controlled via movement sensors fitted to the patient's own shoes. Four tasks were used to deliver intensive training of individual muscles (tibialis anterior, quadriceps, leg ad-/abductors). The tasks engaged motivation through feedback of task success. Fourteen chronic iSCI patients were treated over 4 weeks in 16 to 20 sessions of 45 minutes. Outcome measures were 10 Meter Walking Test, Berg Balance Scale, Lower Extremity Motor Score, Spinal Cord Independence Measure, Locomotion and Neuropathic Pain Scale (NPS), obtained at the start and at 4 to 6 weeks before intervention. In addition to positive changes reported by the patients (Patients' Global Impression of Change), measures of walking capacity, balance, and strength revealed improvements in lower limb function. Intensity and unpleasantness of neuropathic pain in half of the affected participants were reduced on the NPS test. Overall findings remained stable 12 to 16 weeks after termination of the training. In a pretest/posttest, uncontrolled design, VR-augmented training was associated with improvements in motor function and neuropathic pain in persons with chronic iSCI, several of which reached the level of a minimal clinically important change. A controlled trial is needed to compare this intervention to active training alone or in combination.

  9. Using Augmented Reality and Virtual Environments in Historic Places to Scaffold Historical Empathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Sara K.; Newbill, Phyllis; Ogle, Todd; Terry, Krista

    2018-01-01

    The authors explore how 3D visualizations of historical sites can be used as pedagogical tools to support historical empathy. They provide three visualizations created by a team at Virginia Tech as examples. They discuss virtual environments and how the digital restoration process is applied. They also define historical empathy, explain why it is…

  10. European pharmacy students' experience with virtual patient technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaco, Afonso Miguel; Madeira, Filipe

    2012-08-10

    To describe how virtual patients are being used to simulate real-life clinical scenarios in undergraduate pharmacy education in Europe. One hundred ninety-four participants at the 2011 Congress of the European Pharmaceutical Students Association (EPSA) completed an exploratory cross-sectional survey instrument. Of the 46 universities and 23 countries represented at the EPSA Congress, only 12 students from 6 universities in 6 different countries reported having experience with virtual patient technology. The students were satisfied with the virtual patient technology and considered it more useful as a teaching and learning tool than an assessment tool. Respondents who had not used virtual patient technology expressed support regarding its potential benefits in pharmacy education. French and Dutch students were significantly less interested in virtual patient technology than were their counterparts from other European countries. The limited use of virtual patients in pharmacy education in Europe suggests the need for initiatives to increase the use of virtual patient technology and the benefits of computer-assisted learning in pharmacy education.

  11. The Virtual Shopping Experience: using virtual presence to motivate online shopping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Chin

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Online shopping has thus far tended to be a niche business – highly successful in selling digital products such as shares, software and, increasingly, music and films, it has been less successful in persuading the purchasers of ‘traditional’ goods such as cars, clothes, toiletries, or household appliances to forsake their physical retailers and move into cyberspace. In this wide-ranging review paper we investigate the issue of the virtual experience – endeavouring to understand what is needed for a successful ‘shopping experience’ online and what the possible obstacles or pitfalls along the way might be. We initially introduce the concepts of virtual presence (the sense of ‘being there’ and virtual reality, discussing the possible roles both can play in providing a solution to the problem of effective online shopping. We then consider the Experience Economy, a concept which encapsulates many of the issues related to the problem of online shopping and which suggests ways in which online retailers can enhance the effectiveness of their sites by means of a virtual ‘experience’. Having set the scene for online shopping, we discuss eTailing today in terms of direct product experience and the opportunities which cyber-shopping offers to replicate this process. Finally, we identify some of the possibilities and problems of online shopping today, illustrating the current status of virtual presence in retailing with two micro-cases of success and failure.

  12. LHCb experience with running jobs in virtual machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, A.; Stagni, F.; Luzzi, C.

    2015-12-01

    The LHCb experiment has been running production jobs in virtual machines since 2013 as part of its DIRAC-based infrastructure. We describe the architecture of these virtual machines and the steps taken to replicate the WLCG worker node environment expected by user and production jobs. This relies on the uCernVM system for providing root images for virtual machines. We use the CernVM-FS distributed filesystem to supply the root partition files, the LHCb software stack, and the bootstrapping scripts necessary to configure the virtual machines for us. Using this approach, we have been able to minimise the amount of contextualisation which must be provided by the virtual machine managers. We explain the process by which the virtual machine is able to receive payload jobs submitted to DIRAC by users and production managers, and how this differs from payloads executed within conventional DIRAC pilot jobs on batch queue based sites. We describe our operational experiences in running production on VM based sites managed using Vcycle/OpenStack, Vac, and HTCondor Vacuum. Finally we show how our use of these resources is monitored using Ganglia and DIRAC.

  13. LHCb experience with running jobs in virtual machines

    CERN Document Server

    McNab, A; Luzzi, C

    2015-01-01

    The LHCb experiment has been running production jobs in virtual machines since 2013 as part of its DIRAC-based infrastructure. We describe the architecture of these virtual machines and the steps taken to replicate the WLCG worker node environment expected by user and production jobs. This relies on the uCernVM system for providing root images for virtual machines. We use the CernVM-FS distributed filesystem to supply the root partition files, the LHCb software stack, and the bootstrapping scripts necessary to configure the virtual machines for us. Using this approach, we have been able to minimise the amount of contextualisation which must be provided by the virtual machine managers. We explain the process by which the virtual machine is able to receive payload jobs submitted to DIRAC by users and production managers, and how this differs from payloads executed within conventional DIRAC pilot jobs on batch queue based sites. We describe our operational experiences in running production on VM based sites mana...

  14. Augmentative and alternative communication in adolescents with severe intellectual disability: a clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uliano, D; Falciglia, G; Del Viscio, C; Picelli, A; Gandolfi, M; Passarella, A

    2010-06-01

    Augmentative and alternative communication devices proved to be effective in patients with severe intellectual disability to overcome their communication impairments. In order to give a contribution for design of augmentative and alternative communication systems that better meet the needs of beginning communicators we decided to report our clinical experience about using augmentative and alternative communication in adolescents with severe intellectual disability. Five patients who underwent a long time traditional speech rehabilitation program (at least 5 years) with scant improvements in linguistic function were recruited and evaluated by means of the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scale before and after a three years augmentative and alternative communication intervention carried out by a multidisciplinary team. After the rehabilitative intervention patients showed an improvement in communication, daily living skills and socialization as measured by the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scale. Augmentative and alternative communication is an effective rehabilitation approach to people with severe intellectual disability and impairments in linguistic expression. Moreover augmentative and alternative communication is a useful tool allowing these patients to increase their social participation also enhancing their self-esteem. Our clinical experience confirmed these topics also in adolescents who underwent a long time traditional speech rehabilitation program with scant improvements, providing practical information to clinicians.

  15. An Analysis of Engagement in a Combination Indoor/Outdoor Augmented Reality Educational Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkestad, James; O'Shea, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a qualitative analysis of video captured during a dual indoor/outdoor Augmented Reality experience. Augmented Reality is the layering of virtual information on top of the physical world. This Augmented Reality experience asked students to interact with the San Diego Museum of Art and the Botanical Gardens in San…

  16. Medical student evaluation using virtual pathology echocardiography (VPE) for augmented standardized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; McKenzie, Frederic D

    2008-01-01

    With the increasing role played by ultrasound in clinical diagnostics, ultrasound training in medical education is becoming more important. We have developed a real-time ultrasound simulator to augment standardized patients (SPs) with a simulated echocardiogram. It enables changes in the standard of ultrasound training where the clinical routine is practiced on real patients, which limits monitored and guided examinations for medical students due to time constraints and availability of patients. This paper describes our preliminary system of a tracker-based echocardiogram simulator, the latest evaluation results, and future work.

  17. Virtual experiments: the ultimate aim of neutron ray-tracing simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefmann, Kim; Willendrup, Peter Kjær; Udby, Linda

    2008-01-01

    We define a virtual neutron experiment as a complete simulation of an experiment, from source over sample to detector. The virtual experiment (VE) will ideally interface with the instrument control software for the input and with standard data analysis packages for the virtual data output. Virtual...

  18. Internet virtual studio: low-cost augmented reality system for WebTV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnik, Robert; Pasko, Slawomir; Karaszewski, Maciej; Witkowski, Marcin

    2008-02-01

    In this paper a concept of a Internet Virtual Studio as a modern system for production of news, entertainment, educational and training material is proposed. This system is based on virtual studio technology and integrated with multimedia data base. Its was developed for web television content production. In successive subentries the general system architecture, as well as the architecture of modules one by one is discussed. The authors describe each module by presentation of a brief information about work principles and technical limitations. The presentation of modules is strictly connected with a presentation of their capabilities. Results produced by each of them are shown in the form of exemplary images. Finally, exemplary short production is presented and discussed.

  19. A journey of restoring self-confidence: the life experiences of women recipients of augmentation mammaplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wan-Ru; Chung, Ue-Lin; Chang, Sophia C N

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research study was to explore the preoperative through postoperative phase experience of women who had undergone augmentation mammaplasty. Nine women undergoing augmentation mammaplasty were selected by purposive sampling and interviewed using semi- structured, open-ended interview guidelines. Researchers used Symbolic interactionism to frame their overall perspective and analyzed data with the content analysis method. Rigors of data analysis were adopted credibility, transferability, dependability and confirmability proposed by Guba and Lincoln. The main theme of living experience of women who received augmentation mammaplasty could be summarized as "a journey to restore self-confidence". The categories identified within this journey included: (1) the invisible standards of breast beauty; (2) Taking courageous action to make changes; (3) conflicts between the natural and artificial. The above findings provided initial qualitative data from Taiwanese women's perspective. By better understanding their experience, nurses can become increasingly sensitive to patients' psychosocial adjustment and provide prudential nursing care.

  20. Robust augmented reality registration method for localization of solid organs' tumors using CT-derived virtual biomechanical model and fluorescent fiducials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Seong-Ho; Haouchine, Nazim; Soares, Renato; Klymchenko, Andrey; Andreiuk, Bohdan; Marques, Bruno; Shabat, Galyna; Piechaud, Thierry; Diana, Michele; Cotin, Stéphane; Marescaux, Jacques

    2017-07-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is the fusion of computer-generated and real-time images. AR can be used in surgery as a navigation tool, by creating a patient-specific virtual model through 3D software manipulation of DICOM imaging (e.g., CT scan). The virtual model can be superimposed to real-time images enabling transparency visualization of internal anatomy and accurate localization of tumors. However, the 3D model is rigid and does not take into account inner structures' deformations. We present a concept of automated AR registration, while the organs undergo deformation during surgical manipulation, based on finite element modeling (FEM) coupled with optical imaging of fluorescent surface fiducials. Two 10 × 1 mm wires (pseudo-tumors) and six 10 × 0.9 mm fluorescent fiducials were placed in ex vivo porcine kidneys (n = 10). Biomechanical FEM-based models were generated from CT scan. Kidneys were deformed and the shape changes were identified by tracking the fiducials, using a near-infrared optical system. The changes were registered automatically with the virtual model, which was deformed accordingly. Accuracy of prediction of pseudo-tumors' location was evaluated with a CT scan in the deformed status (ground truth). In vivo: fluorescent fiducials were inserted under ultrasound guidance in the kidney of one pig, followed by a CT scan. The FEM-based virtual model was superimposed on laparoscopic images by automatic registration of the fiducials. Biomechanical models were successfully generated and accurately superimposed on optical images. The mean measured distance between the estimated tumor by biomechanical propagation and the scanned tumor (ground truth) was 0.84 ± 0.42 mm. All fiducials were successfully placed in in vivo kidney and well visualized in near-infrared mode enabling accurate automatic registration of the virtual model on the laparoscopic images. Our preliminary experiments showed the potential of a biomechanical model with fluorescent

  1. Perception of Affordances and Experience of Presence in Virtual Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Grabarczyk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in virtual reality technology raise a question about the experience of presence and immersion in virtual environments. What is immersion and what are the conditions for inducing the experience of virtual presence? In this paper, we argue that crucial determinants of presence are perception of affordances and sense of embodiment. In the first section of this paper, we define key concepts and introduce important distinctions such as immersion and presence. In the second and third sections, we respectively discuss presence, immersion and their determinants in detail. In the fourth and fifth sections, we argue for the importance of perception of affordances and sense of embodiment in increasing the degree of presence. Finally, we show the consequences of our view and discuss possible future implications.

  2. The Benefits of Third-Person Perspective in Virtual and Augmented Reality?

    OpenAIRE

    Salamin, P.; Vexo, F.; Thalmann, D.

    2006-01-01

    Instead of the reality in which you can see your own limbs, in virtual reality simulations it is sometimes disturbing not to be able to see your own body. It seems to create an issue in the proprioperception of the user who does not completely feel integrated in the environment. This perspective should be beneficial for the users. We propose to give the possibility to the people to use the first and the third-person perspective like in video games (e.g. GTA). As the gamers prefer to use the t...

  3. Virtual 3D bladder reconstruction for augmented medical records from white light cystoscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Kristen L.; Zlatev, Dimitar V.; Angst, Roland; Liao, Joseph C.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2016-02-01

    Bladder cancer has a high recurrence rate that necessitates lifelong surveillance to detect mucosal lesions. Examination with white light cystoscopy (WLC), the standard of care, is inherently subjective and data storage limited to clinical notes, diagrams, and still images. A visual history of the bladder wall can enhance clinical and surgical management. To address this clinical need, we developed a tool to transform in vivo WLC videos into virtual 3-dimensional (3D) bladder models using advanced computer vision techniques. WLC videos from rigid cystoscopies (1280 x 720 pixels) were recorded at 30 Hz followed by immediate camera calibration to control for image distortions. Video data were fed into an automated structure-from-motion algorithm that generated a 3D point cloud followed by a 3D mesh to approximate the bladder surface. The highest quality cystoscopic images were projected onto the approximated bladder surface to generate a virtual 3D bladder reconstruction. In intraoperative WLC videos from 36 patients undergoing transurethral resection of suspected bladder tumors, optimal reconstruction was achieved from frames depicting well-focused vasculature, when the bladder was maintained at constant volume with minimal debris, and when regions of the bladder wall were imaged multiple times. A significant innovation of this work is the ability to perform the reconstruction using video from a clinical procedure collected with standard equipment, thereby facilitating rapid clinical translation, application to other forms of endoscopy and new opportunities for longitudinal studies of cancer recurrence.

  4. Can hazard risk be communicated through a virtual experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J T

    1997-09-01

    Cyberspace, defined by William Gibson as a consensual hallucination, now refers to all computer-generated interactive environments. Virtual reality, one of a class of interactive cyberspaces, allows us to create and interact directly with objects not available in the everyday world. Despite successes in the entertainment and aviation industries, this technology has been called a 'solution in search of a problem'. The purpose of this commentary is to suggest such a problem: the inability to acquire experience with a hazard to motivate mitigation. Direct experience with a hazard has been demonstrated as a powerful incentive to adopt mitigation measures. While we lack the ability to summon hazard events at will in order to gain access to that experience, a virtual environment can provide an arena where potential victims are exposed to a hazard's effects. Immersion as an active participant within the hazard event through virtual reality may stimulate users to undertake mitigation steps that might otherwise remain undone. This paper details the possible direction in which virtual reality may be applied to hazards mitigation through a discussion of the technology, the role of hazard experience, the creation of a hazard stimulation and the issues constraining implementation.

  5. Effects of Web Experience factors on virtual retail purchase preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorenzo, Carlota; Constantinides, Efthymios; Gomez-Borja, Miguel Angel

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the effects of different elements of the Web Experience (WE) on the buying behaviour of virtual consumers, specifically on the choice of the online retail vendor. The purpose of the study is to empirically test the theoretical findings as to the main parameters of the online

  6. Agreed Discoveries: Students' Negotiations in a Virtual Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Goran; Ivarsson, Jonas; Lindstrom, Berner

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the scientific reasoning of a dyad of secondary school students about the phenomenon of dissolution of gases in water as they work on this in a simulated laboratory experiment. A web-based virtual laboratory was developed to provide learners with the opportunity to examine the influence of physical factors on gas…

  7. Virtual Reality Simulation of the International Space Welding Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a set of breakthrough technologies that allow a human being to enter and fully experience a 3-dimensional, computer simulated environment. A true virtual reality experience meets three criteria: (1) It involves 3-dimensional computer graphics; (2) It includes real-time feedback and response to user actions; and (3) It must provide a sense of immersion. Good examples of a virtual reality simulator are the flight simulators used by all branches of the military to train pilots for combat in high performance jet fighters. The fidelity of such simulators is extremely high -- but so is the price tag, typically millions of dollars. Virtual reality teaching and training methods are manifestly effective, and we have therefore implemented a VR trainer for the International Space Welding Experiment. My role in the development of the ISWE trainer consisted of the following: (1) created texture-mapped models of the ISWE's rotating sample drum, technology block, tool stowage assembly, sliding foot restraint, and control panel; (2) developed C code for control panel button selection and rotation of the sample drum; (3) In collaboration with Tim Clark (Antares Virtual Reality Systems), developed a serial interface box for the PC and the SGI Indigo so that external control devices, similar to ones actually used on the ISWE, could be used to control virtual objects in the ISWE simulation; (4) In collaboration with Peter Wang (SFFP) and Mark Blasingame (Boeing), established the interference characteristics of the VIM 1000 head-mounted-display and tested software filters to correct the problem; (5) In collaboration with Peter Wang and Mark Blasingame, established software and procedures for interfacing the VPL DataGlove and the Polhemus 6DOF position sensors to the SGI Indigo serial ports. The majority of the ISWE modeling effort was conducted on a PC-based VR Workstation, described below.

  8. On-line interactive virtual experiments on nanoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadar, Manuella; Ileana, Ioan; Hutanu, Constantin

    2009-01-01

    This paper is an overview on the next generation web which allows students to experience virtual experiments on nano science, physics devices, processes and processing equipment. Virtual reality is used to support a real university lab in which a student can experiment real lab sessions. The web material is presented in an intuitive and highly visual 3D form that is accessible to a diverse group of students. Such type of laboratory provides opportunities for professional and practical education for a wide range of users. The expensive equipment and apparatuses that build the experimental stage in a particular standard laboratory is used to create virtual educational research laboratories. Students learn how to prepare the apparatuses and facilities for the experiment. The online experiments metadata schema is the format for describing online experiments, much like the schema behind a library catalogue used to describe the books in a library. As an online experiment is a special kind of learning object, one specifies its schema as an extension to an established metadata schema for learning objects. The content of the courses, metainformation as well as readings and user data are saved on the server in a database as XML objects.

  9. ASSESSING THE USER EXPERIENCE WHEN USING MOBILE AUGMENTED REALITY IN ADVERTISING

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shanshan

    2014-01-01

    Facing huge profits brought by applying augmented reality (AR) to advertising on mobile devices, this study investigated the user experience from four dimensions as emotional, instrumental, motivational and social experience when using AR as an advertising tool. It aims to help designers understand that how the user experience emerges during the use of AR advertising tool. In addition, providing some design suggestions to AR designer. Eighteen participants were recruited and the data were col...

  10. Two Innovative Steps for Training on Maintenance: 'VIRMAN' Spanish Project based on Virtual Reality 'STARMATE' European Project based on Augmented Reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Anez, Francisco

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents two development projects (STARMATE and VIRMAN) focused on supporting training on maintenance. Both projects aim at specifying, designing, developing, and demonstrating prototypes allowing computer guided maintenance of complex mechanical elements using Augmented and Virtual Reality techniques. VIRMAN is a Spanish development project. The objective is to create a computer tool for maintenance training course elaborations and training delivery based on 3D virtual reality models of complex components. The training delivery includes 3D record displays on maintenance procedures with all complementary information for intervention understanding. Users are requested to perform the maintenance intervention trying to follow up the procedure. Users can be evaluated about the level of knowledge achieved. Instructors can check the evaluation records left during the training sessions. VIRMAN is simple software supported by a regular computer and can be used in an Internet framework. STARMATE is a forward step in the area of virtual reality. STARMATE is a European Commission project in the frame of 'Information Societies Technologies'. A consortium of five companies and one research institute shares their expertise in this new technology. STARMATE provides two main functionalities (1) user assistance for achieving assembly/de-assembly and following maintenance procedures, and (2) workforce training. The project relies on Augmented Reality techniques, which is a growing area in Virtual Reality research. The idea of Augmented Reality is to combine a real scene, viewed by the user, with a virtual scene, generated by a computer, augmenting the reality with additional information. The user interface is see-through goggles, headphones, microphone and an optical tracking system. All these devices are integrated in a helmet connected with two regular computers. The user has his hands free for performing the maintenance intervention and he can navigate in the virtual

  11. Rehabilitation after Stroke using Immersive User Interfaces in 3D Virtual and Augmented Gaming Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vogiatzaki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of most common diseases of our modern societies with high socio-economic impact. Hence, rehabilitation approach involving patients in their rehabilitation process while lowering costly involvement of specialised human personnel is needed. This article describes a novel approach, offering an integrated rehabilitation training for stroke patients using a serious gaming approach based on a Unity3D virtual reality engine combined with a range of advanced technologies and immersive user interfaces. It puts patients and caretakers in control of the rehabilitation protocols, while leading physicians are enabled to supervise the progress of the rehabilitation via Personal Health Record. Possibility to perform training in a familiar home environment directly improves the effectiveness of the rehabilitation. The work presented herein has been conducted within the "StrokeBack" project co-funded by the European Commission under the Framework 7 Program in the ICT domain.

  12. The use of virtual reality-based therapy to augment poststroke upper limb recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Geoffrey S; Choo, Min; Chan, Wai Yin; Kok, Stanley; Ng, Yee Sien

    2015-01-01

    Stroke remains one of the major causes of disability worldwide. This case report illustrates the complementary use of biomechanical and kinematic in-game markers, in addition to standard clinical outcomes, to comprehensively assess and track a patient’s disabilities. A 65-year-old patient was admitted for right-sided weakness and clinically diagnosed with acute ischaemic stroke. She participated in a short trial of standard stroke occupational therapy and physiotherapy with additional daily virtual reality (VR)-based therapy. Outcomes were tracked using kinematic data and conventional clinical assessments. Her Functional Independence Measure score improved from 87 to 113 and Fugl-Meyer motor score improved from 56 to 62, denoting clinically significant improvement. Corresponding kinematic analysis revealed improved hand path ratios and a decrease in velocity peaks. Further research is being undertaken to elucidate the optimal type, timing, setting and duration of VR-based therapy, as well as the use of neuropharmacological adjuncts. PMID:26243983

  13. Augmented video viewing: transforming video consumption into an active experience

    OpenAIRE

    WIJNANTS, Maarten; Leën, Jeroen; QUAX, Peter; LAMOTTE, Wim

    2014-01-01

    Traditional video productions fail to cater to the interactivity standards that the current generation of digitally native customers have become accustomed to. This paper therefore advertises the \\activation" of the video consumption process. In particular, it proposes to enhance HTML5 video playback with interactive features in order to transform video viewing into a dynamic pastime. The objective is to enable the authoring of more captivating and rewarding video experiences for end-users. T...

  14. From Motion to Photons in 80 Microseconds: Towards Minimal Latency for Virtual and Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Peter; Blate, Alex; Singh, Montek; Whitted, Turner; State, Andrei; Lastra, Anselmo; Fuchs, Henry

    2016-04-01

    We describe an augmented reality, optical see-through display based on a DMD chip with an extremely fast (16 kHz) binary update rate. We combine the techniques of post-rendering 2-D offsets and just-in-time tracking updates with a novel modulation technique for turning binary pixels into perceived gray scale. These processing elements, implemented in an FPGA, are physically mounted along with the optical display elements in a head tracked rig through which users view synthetic imagery superimposed on their real environment. The combination of mechanical tracking at near-zero latency with reconfigurable display processing has given us a measured average of 80 µs of end-to-end latency (from head motion to change in photons from the display) and also a versatile test platform for extremely-low-latency display systems. We have used it to examine the trade-offs between image quality and cost (i.e. power and logical complexity) and have found that quality can be maintained with a fairly simple display modulation scheme.

  15. Virtual Stream Stage Sensor Using Projected Geometry and Augmented Reality for Crowdsourcing Citizen Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, I.; Villanueva, P.; Sermet, M. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Accurately measuring the surface level of a river is a vital component of environmental monitoring and modeling efforts. Reliable data points are required for calibrating the statistical models that are used for, among other things, flood prediction and model validation. While current embedded monitoring systems provide accurate measurements, the cost to replicate this current system on a large scale is prohibitively expensive, limiting the quantity of data available. In this project, we describe a new method to accurately measure river levels using smartphone sensors. We take three pictures of the same point on the river's surface and perform calculations based on the GPS location and spatial orientation of the smartphone for each picture using projected geometry. Augmented reality is used to improve the accuracy of smartphone sensor readings. This proposed implementation is significantly cheaper than existing water measuring systems while offering similar accuracy. Additionally, since the measurements are taken by sensors that are commonly found in smartphones, crowdsourcing the collection of river measurements to citizen-scientists is possible. Thus, our proposed method leads to a much higher quantity of reliable data points than currently possible at a fraction of the cost. Sample runs and an analysis of the results are included. The presentation concludes with a discussion of future work, including applications to other fields and plans to implement a fully automated system using this method in tandem with image recognition and machine learning.

  16. Designing an Augmented Reality Board Games with children: The BattleBoard 3D experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Kaj; Kristensen, Sune; Andersen, Troels L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the design of Battleboard 3D (BB3D) which is an ARToolkit based game prototype, featuring the use of LEGO bricks for the physical and digital pieces. BB3D is a novel type of an AR game augmenting traditional board games with features from computer games. The initial experiments...

  17. A strategic map for high-impact virtual experience design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faste, Haakon; Bergamasco, Massimo

    2009-02-01

    We have employed methodologies of human centered design to inspire and guide the engineering of a definitive low-cost aesthetic multimodal experience intended to stimulate cultural growth. Using a combination of design research, trend analysis and the programming of immersive virtual 3D worlds, over 250 innovative concepts have been brainstormed, prototyped, evaluated and refined. These concepts have been used to create a strategic map for the development of highimpact virtual art experiences, the most promising of which have been incorporated into a multimodal environment programmed in the online interactive 3D platform XVR. A group of test users have evaluated the experience as it has evolved, using a multimodal interface with stereo vision, 3D audio and haptic feedback. This paper discusses the process, content, results, and impact on our engineering laboratory that this research has produced.

  18. Torrenting values, feelings, and thoughts—Cyber nursing and virtual self-care in a breast augmentation forum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Salzmann-Erikson

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Earlier research shows that breast augmentation is positively correlated with positive psychological states. The aim of this study was to explore the shared values, feelings, and thoughts within the culture of breast enlargement among women visiting Internet-based forums when considering and/or undergoing esthetic plastic surgery. The study used a netnographic method for gathering and analyzing data. The findings show that the women used the Internet forum to provide emotional support to other women. Through electronic postings, they cared for and nursed each others’ anxiety and feelings throughout the whole process. Apart from the process, another central issue was that the women's relationships were frequently discussed; specifically their relationship to themselves, their environment, and with the surgeons. The findings suggest that Internet forums represent a channel through which posters can share values, feelings, and thoughts from the position of an agent of action as well as from a position as the object of action. These dual positions and the medium endow the women with a virtual nursing competence that would otherwise be unavailable. By introducing the concept of torrenting as a means of sharing important self-care information, the authors provide a concept that can be further explored in relation to post modern self-care strategies within contemporary nursing theories and practice.

  19. The Virtual Shopping Experience: using virtual presence to motivate online shopping

    OpenAIRE

    Carolyn Chin; Paula Swatman; Paula Swatman

    2005-01-01

    Online shopping has thus far tended to be a niche business – highly successful in selling digital products such as shares, software and, increasingly, music and films, it has been less successful in persuading the purchasers of ‘traditional’ goods such as cars, clothes, toiletries, or household appliances to forsake their physical retailers and move into cyberspace. In this wide-ranging review paper we investigate the issue of the virtual experience – endeavouring to understand what is nee...

  20. Impact of Virtual and Augmented Reality Based on Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Functional Neuronavigation in Glioma Surgery Involving Eloquent Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guo-Chen; Wang, Fei; Chen, Xiao-Lei; Yu, Xin-Guang; Ma, Xiao-Dong; Zhou, Ding-Biao; Zhu, Ru-Yuan; Xu, Bai-Nan

    2016-12-01

    The utility of virtual and augmented reality based on functional neuronavigation and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for glioma surgery has not been previously investigated. The study population consisted of 79 glioma patients and 55 control subjects. Preoperatively, the lesion and related eloquent structures were visualized by diffusion tensor tractography and blood oxygen level-dependent functional MRI. Intraoperatively, microscope-based functional neuronavigation was used to integrate the reconstructed eloquent structure and the real head and brain, which enabled safe resection of the lesion. Intraoperative MRI was used to verify brain shift during the surgical process and provided quality control during surgery. The control group underwent surgery guided by anatomic neuronavigation. Virtual and augmented reality protocols based on functional neuronavigation and intraoperative MRI provided useful information for performing tailored and optimized surgery. Complete resection was achieved in 55 of 79 (69.6%) glioma patients and 20 of 55 (36.4%) control subjects, with average resection rates of 95.2% ± 8.5% and 84.9% ± 15.7%, respectively. Both the complete resection rate and average extent of resection differed significantly between the 2 groups (P virtual and augmented reality based on functional neuronavigation and intraoperative MRI can facilitate resection of gliomas involving eloquent areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The GOSTT concept and hybrid mixed/virtual/augmented reality environment radioguided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdés Olmos, R. A.; Van Leeuwen, F. W. B.; Vidal-Sicart, S.; Giammarile, F.; Zaknun, J. J.; Mariani, G.

    2014-01-01

    these protocols the generated virtual SPECT/CT elements are visually superimposed in the body of the patient in the operating room to directly facilitate, by means of visualization on screen or using head-mounted devices, the localization of radioactive and/or fluorescent targets by minimal invasive approaches in areas of complex anatomy. All these technological advances will play an increasing role in the future extension and the clinical impact of the GOSTT concept

  2. The GOSTT concept and hybrid mixed/virtual/augmented reality environment radioguided surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés Olmos, R A; Vidal-Sicart, S; Giammarile, F; Zaknun, J J; Van Leeuwen, F W; Mariani, G

    2014-06-01

    these protocols the generated virtual SPECT/CT elements are visually superimposed in the body of the patient in the operating room to directly facilitate, by means of visualization on screen or using head-mounted devices, the localization of radioactive and/or fluorescent targets by minimal invasive approaches in areas of complex anatomy. All these technological advances will play an increasing role in the future extension and the clinical impact of the GOSTT concept.

  3. Virtual Experiments on the Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, Vickie E; Cobb, John W; Farhi, Emmanuel N; Miller, Stephen D; Taylor, M

    2008-01-01

    The TeraGrid's outreach effort to the neutron science community is creating an environment that is encouraging the exploration of advanced cyberinfrastructure being incorporated into facility operations in a way that leverages facility operations to multiply the scientific output of its users, including many NSF supported scientists in many disciplines. The Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway serves as an exploratory incubator for several TeraGrid projects. Virtual neutron scattering experiments from one exploratory project will be highlighted

  4. PENERAPAN VIRTUAL EXPERIMENT BERBASIS INKUIRI UNTUK MENGEMBANGKAN KEMANDIRIAN MAHASISWA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yulianti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mahasiswa sebagai calon guru fisika bertugas sebagi pilar bagi perkembangan fisika di masyarakat, oleh karena itu dituntut menguasai fisika dan kemandirian di dalam mempelajari fisika. Kemandirian mahasiswa yang rendah perlu dilatih melalui penelitian tindakan kelas yang bersiklus. Penelitian Tindakan Kelas ini bertujuan mengembangkan kemandirian mahasiswa prodi Pendidikan Fisika melalui penerapan virtual experiment berbasis inkuiri pada pembelajaran Mekanika I Tujuan yang lain meningkatkan hasil belajar melalui pembelajaran inkuiri menggunakan virtual experiment  Penelitian  berlangsung tiga siklus, tiga pertemuan pada bahasan gerak parabola. Setiap siklus terdiri dari perencanaan, pelaksanaan, pengamatan dan refleksi. Data hasil belajar kognitif   diperoleh melalui, tes dan lembar pengamatan untuk mengukur hasil belajar afektif dan psikomotorik. Hasil yang diperoleh kemandirian mahasiswa dapat berkembang dan terjadi pe-ningkatan hasil belajar kognitif, afektif, dan psikomotorik mahasiswa prodi Pendidikan Fisika FMIPA Unnes semester III tahun 2011/2012This three-cycle classroom action research was aimed to develop physics education student autonomy and to increase students’ cognitive, afective and psychomotoric achievements by applying inquiry virtual experiment on Mechanics I lecture. Each cycle consists of planning, action, observing and reflection activity. The cognitive data was collected by using test, while the affective and psychomotoric ones were collected by using observation sheet. The result showed an increase of student autonomy and students’ cognitive, affective and psycomotoric achievements of third semester students of physics education of FMIPA Unnes year 2011/2012.

  5. Role of cranial and spinal virtual and augmented reality simulation using immersive touch modules in neurosurgical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaraj, Ali; Charbel, Fady T; Birk, Daniel; Tobin, Matthew; Tobin, Mathew; Luciano, Cristian; Banerjee, Pat P; Rizzi, Silvio; Sorenson, Jeff; Foley, Kevin; Slavin, Konstantin; Roitberg, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that mental script-based rehearsal and simulation-based training improve the transfer of surgical skills in various medical disciplines. Despite significant advances in technology and intraoperative techniques over the last several decades, surgical skills training on neurosurgical operations still carries significant risk of serious morbidity or mortality. Potentially avoidable technical errors are well recognized as contributing to poor surgical outcome. Surgical education is undergoing overwhelming change, as a result of the reduction of work hours and current trends focusing on patient safety and linking reimbursement with clinical outcomes. Thus, there is a need for adjunctive means for neurosurgical training, which is a recent advancement in simulation technology. ImmersiveTouch is an augmented reality system that integrates a haptic device and a high-resolution stereoscopic display. This simulation platform uses multiple sensory modalities, re-creating many of the environmental cues experienced during an actual procedure. Modules available include ventriculostomy, bone drilling, percutaneous trigeminal rhizotomy, and simulated spinal modules such as pedicle screw placement, vertebroplasty, and lumbar puncture. We present our experience with the development of such augmented reality neurosurgical modules and the feedback from neurosurgical residents.

  6. NASA Virtual Glovebox: An Immersive Virtual Desktop Environment for Training Astronauts in Life Science Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twombly, I. Alexander; Smith, Jeffrey; Bruyns, Cynthia; Montgomery, Kevin; Boyle, Richard

    2003-01-01

    The International Space Station will soon provide an unparalleled research facility for studying the near- and longer-term effects of microgravity on living systems. Using the Space Station Glovebox Facility - a compact, fully contained reach-in environment - astronauts will conduct technically challenging life sciences experiments. Virtual environment technologies are being developed at NASA Ames Research Center to help realize the scientific potential of this unique resource by facilitating the experimental hardware and protocol designs and by assisting the astronauts in training. The Virtual GloveboX (VGX) integrates high-fidelity graphics, force-feedback devices and real- time computer simulation engines to achieve an immersive training environment. Here, we describe the prototype VGX system, the distributed processing architecture used in the simulation environment, and modifications to the visualization pipeline required to accommodate the display configuration.

  7. Combining physical and virtual contexts through augmented reality: design and evaluation of a prototype using a drug box as a marker for antibiotic training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomson, Tanja; Zary, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Antimicrobial resistance is a global health issue. Studies have shown that improved antibiotic prescription education among healthcare professionals reduces mistakes during the antibiotic prescription process. The aim of this study was to investigate novel educational approaches that through the use of Augmented Reality technology could make use of the real physical context and thereby enrich the educational process of antibiotics prescription. The objective is to investigate which type of information related to antibiotics could be used in an augmented reality application for antibiotics education. Methods. This study followed the Design-Based Research Methodology composed of the following main steps: problem analysis, investigation of information that should be visualized for the training session, and finally the involvement of the end users the development and evaluation processes of the prototype. Results. Two of the most important aspects in the antibiotic prescription process, to represent in an augmented reality application, are the antibiotic guidelines and the side effects. Moreover, this study showed how this information could be visualized from a mobile device using an Augmented Reality scanner and antibiotic drug boxes as markers. Discussion. In this study we investigated the usage of objects from a real physical context such as drug boxes and how they could be used as educational resources. The logical next steps are to examine how this approach of combining physical and virtual contexts through Augmented Reality applications could contribute to the improvement of competencies among healthcare professionals and its impact on the decrease of antibiotics resistance. PMID:25548733

  8. Combining physical and virtual contexts through augmented reality: design and evaluation of a prototype using a drug box as a marker for antibiotic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokratis Nifakos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Antimicrobial resistance is a global health issue. Studies have shown that improved antibiotic prescription education among healthcare professionals reduces mistakes during the antibiotic prescription process. The aim of this study was to investigate novel educational approaches that through the use of Augmented Reality technology could make use of the real physical context and thereby enrich the educational process of antibiotics prescription. The objective is to investigate which type of information related to antibiotics could be used in an augmented reality application for antibiotics education.Methods. This study followed the Design-Based Research Methodology composed of the following main steps: problem analysis, investigation of information that should be visualized for the training session, and finally the involvement of the end users the development and evaluation processes of the prototype.Results. Two of the most important aspects in the antibiotic prescription process, to represent in an augmented reality application, are the antibiotic guidelines and the side effects. Moreover, this study showed how this information could be visualized from a mobile device using an Augmented Reality scanner and antibiotic drug boxes as markers.Discussion. In this study we investigated the usage of objects from a real physical context such as drug boxes and how they could be used as educational resources. The logical next steps are to examine how this approach of combining physical and virtual contexts through Augmented Reality applications could contribute to the improvement of competencies among healthcare professionals and its impact on the decrease of antibiotics resistance.

  9. Combining physical and virtual contexts through augmented reality: design and evaluation of a prototype using a drug box as a marker for antibiotic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nifakos, Sokratis; Tomson, Tanja; Zary, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Antimicrobial resistance is a global health issue. Studies have shown that improved antibiotic prescription education among healthcare professionals reduces mistakes during the antibiotic prescription process. The aim of this study was to investigate novel educational approaches that through the use of Augmented Reality technology could make use of the real physical context and thereby enrich the educational process of antibiotics prescription. The objective is to investigate which type of information related to antibiotics could be used in an augmented reality application for antibiotics education. Methods. This study followed the Design-Based Research Methodology composed of the following main steps: problem analysis, investigation of information that should be visualized for the training session, and finally the involvement of the end users the development and evaluation processes of the prototype. Results. Two of the most important aspects in the antibiotic prescription process, to represent in an augmented reality application, are the antibiotic guidelines and the side effects. Moreover, this study showed how this information could be visualized from a mobile device using an Augmented Reality scanner and antibiotic drug boxes as markers. Discussion. In this study we investigated the usage of objects from a real physical context such as drug boxes and how they could be used as educational resources. The logical next steps are to examine how this approach of combining physical and virtual contexts through Augmented Reality applications could contribute to the improvement of competencies among healthcare professionals and its impact on the decrease of antibiotics resistance.

  10. Interactive screen experiments-innovative virtual laboratories for distance learners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatherly, P A; Jordan, S E; Cayless, A

    2009-01-01

    The desirability and value of laboratory work for physics students is a well-established principle and issues arise where students are inherently remote from their host institution, as is the case for the UK's Open University. In this paper, we present developments from the Physics Innovations Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (piCETL) in the production and technology of the virtual laboratory resources, interactive screen experiments, and the benefits and drawbacks of such resources. We also explore the motivations behind current implementation of interactive screen experiments and examine evaluation strategies and outcomes through a series of case studies

  11. Risks and opportunities of virtual learning: the experience of UOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Ros Híjar

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I have tried to give answers to the question of what the risks and opportunities of virtual learning are. In this sense, the UOC's experience has been of great value to analyse several key issues such as the new ways of accessing quality education, the new ways of participation, the new values of educational processes as well as some of the structural factors on which e-learning is based, but which place its very model in jeopardy. Direct observation of some key processes as well as contact with the main actors (e.g. students, teachers and technicians have provided valuable information about some factors to consider when analysing the social implications of virtual learning.

  12. Augmented effects of EMG biofeedback interfaced with virtual reality on neuromuscular control and movement coordination during reaching in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ji Won; Lee, Dong Ryul; Cha, Young Joo; You, Sung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare therapeutic effects of an electromyography (EMG) biofeedback augmented by virtual reality (VR) and EMG biofeedback alone on the triceps and biceps (T:B) muscle activity imbalance and elbow joint movement coordination during a reaching motor taskOBJECTIVE: To compare therapeutic effects of an electromyography (EMG) biofeedback augmented by virtual reality (VR) and EMG biofeedback alone on the triceps and biceps muscle activity imbalance and elbow joint movement coordination during a reaching motor task in normal children and children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). 18 children with spastic CP (2 females; mean±standard deviation = 9.5 ± 1.96 years) and 8 normal children (3 females; mean ± standard deviation = 9.75 ± 2.55 years) were recruited from a local community center. All children with CP first underwent one intensive session of EMG feedback (30 minutes), followed by one session of the EMG-VR feedback (30 minutes) after a 1-week washout period. Clinical tests included elbow extension range of motion (ROM), biceps muscle strength, and box and block test. EMG triceps and biceps (T:B) muscle activity imbalance and reaching movement acceleration coordination were concurrently determined by EMG and 3-axis accelerometer measurements respectively. Independent t-test and one-way repeated analysis of variance (ANOVA) were performed at p augmented by virtual reality exercise games in children with spastic CP. The augmented EMG and VR feedback produced better neuromuscular balance control in the elbow joint than the EMG biofeedback alone.

  13. Viscosity Measurement: A Virtual Experiment - Abstract of Issues 9907W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, N.; Pitta, A. T.; Markopoulos, N.; Limniou, M.; Lemos, M. A. N. D. A.; Lemos, F.; Freire, F. G.

    1999-11-01

    Viscosity Measurement: A Virtual Experiment simulates a series of viscosity experiments. Viscosity is an important subject in chemistry and chemical engineering. It is important when dealing with intermolecular forces in liquids and gases and it has enormous relevance in all technological aspects of equipment dealing with liquids or gases. Most university-level chemistry courses include viscosity to some extent. Viscosity Measurement includes three virtual experiments: an Ostwald viscometer simulator, a falling-ball viscometer simulator, and a balance simulator for a simple determination of the density of a liquid. The Ostwald viscometer simulator and the balance simulator allow the student to find out how composition and temperature influence the density and viscosity of an ethanol-water mixture. The falling-ball viscometer simulator allows the student to determine experimentally the size and density of the ball required to measure viscosity of various liquids. Each virtual experiment includes a corresponding theoretical section. Support from the program is sufficient to enable the students to carry out a virtual experiment sensibly and on their own. Preparation is not essential. Students can use the program unsupervised, thus saving staff time and allowing flexibility in students' time. The design of the program interface plays a key role in the success of a simulated experiment. Direct manipulation has greater intuitive appeal than alternative interface forms such as menus and has been observed to provide performance and learning advantages (1). We tried to design an interface that is visually attractive, is user friendly with simple and intuitive navigation, and provides appropriate schematic animations to clarify the principles of the laboratory procedures. The opening screen presents the virtual experiments that can be selected. Clicking an icon takes the student to the appropriate section. Viscosity Measurement allows the student to concentrate on the

  14. A virtual reality catchment for data assimilation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalge, Bernd; Rihani, Jehan; Haese, Barbara; Baroni, Gabriele; Erdal, Daniel; Neuweiler, Insa; Hendricks-Franssen, Harrie-Jan; Geppert, Gernot; Ament, Felix; Kollet, Stefan; Cirpka, Olaf; Saavedra, Pablo; Han, Xujun; Attinger, Sabine; Kunstmann, Harald; Vereecken, Harry; Simmer, Clemens

    2016-04-01

    Current data assimilation (DA) systems often lack the possibility to assimilate measurements across compartments to accurately estimate states and fluxes in subsurface-land surface-atmosphere systems (SLAS). In order to develop a new DA framework that is able to realize this cross-compartmental assimilation a comprehensive testing environment is needed. Therefore a virtual reality (VR) catchment is constructed with the Terrestrial System Modeling Platform (TerrSysMP). This catchment mimics the Neckar catchment in Germany. TerrSysMP employs the atmospheric model COSMO, the land surface model CLM and the hydrological model ParFlow coupled with the external coupler OASIS. We will show statistical tests to prove the plausibility of the VR. The VR is running in a fully-coupled mode (subsurface - land surface - atmosphere) which includes the interactions of subsurface dynamics with the atmosphere, such as the effects of soil moisture, which can influence near-surface temperatures, convection patterns or the surface heat fluxes. A reference high resolution run serves as the "truth" from which virtual observations are extracted with observation operators like virtual rain gauges, synoptic stations and satellite observations (amongst others). This effectively solves the otherwise often encountered data scarcity issues with respect to DA. Furthermore an ensemble of model runs at a reduced resolution is performed. This ensemble serves also for open loop runs to be compared with data assimilation experiments. The model runs with this ensemble served to identify sets of parameters that are especially sensitive to changes and have the largest impact on the system. These parameters were the focus of subsequent ensemble simulations and DA experiments. We will show to what extend the VR states can be re-constructed using data assimilation methods with only a limited number of virtual observations available.

  15. Google Cardboard Dates Augmented Reality : Issues, Challenges and Future Opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Perla, Ramakrishna; Hebbalaguppe, Ramya

    2017-01-01

    The Google's frugal Cardboard solution for immersive Virtual Reality experiences has come a long way in the VR market. The Google Cardboard VR applications will support us in the fields such as education, virtual tourism, entertainment, gaming, design etc. Recently, Qualcomm's Vuforia SDK has introduced support for developing mixed reality applications for Google Cardboard which can combine Virtual and Augmented Reality to develop exciting and immersive experiences. In this work, we present a...

  16. Construction of Virtual-Experiment Systems for Information Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Jin-Hua; Amano, Naoki

    Practice is very important in education because it not only can stimulate the motivation of learning, but also can deepen the understanding of theory. However, due to the limitations on the time and experiment resources, experiments cannot be simply introduced in every lesson. To make the best use of multimedia technology, this paper designs five virtual experiment systems, which are based on the knowledge of physics at the high-school lever, to improve the effectiveness of teaching data processing. The systems are designed by employing the cognitive theory of multimedia learning and the inner game principle to ensure the easy use and to reduce the cognitive load. The learning process is divided into two stages: the first stage teaches the basic concepts of data processing; and the second stage practices the techniques taught in the first stage and uses them to build a linear model and to carry out estimation. The virtual experiment systems have been tested in an university's data processing course, and have demonstrated their validity.

  17. Augmented Reality Cubes for Cognitive Gaming: Preliminary Usability and Game Experience Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas Boletsis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Early detection is important in dementia care; however, cognitive impairment is still under-recognised and under-diagnosed. Cognitive screening and training are two important preventative treatments, which can lead to early detection of cognitive decline. In this work, the “Cognitive Augmented Reality Cubes” (CogARC system is presented, i.e. a serious game for cognitive training and screening, utilising an interaction technique based on Augmented Reality and the manipulation of tangible, physical objects (cubes. The game is a collection of cognitive mini-games of preventative nature and is, primarily, targeting elderly players (≥60 years old. A preliminary testing was conducted focusing on the game experience that CogARC offers (utilising the In-Game Experience Questionnaire, the usability of the system (using the System Usability Scale, and the specific user observations and remarks, as documented by open, semi-structured interviews.  Overall, CogARC demonstrated satisfying positive responses, however, the negative reactions indicated that there are specific problems with aspects of the interaction technique and a number of mini-games. The open interview shed more light on the specific issues of each mini-game and further interpretation of user interactions. The current study managed to provide interesting insights into the game design elements, integration of Augmented Reality, tangible interaction of the system, and on how elderly players perceive and use those interaction components. 

  18. How incorporation of scents could enhance immersive virtual experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Jeremiah Ischer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Under normal everyday conditions, senses all work together to create experiences that fill a typical person´s life. Unfortunately for behavioral and cognitive researchers who investigate such experiences, standard laboratory tests are usually conducted in a nondescript room in front of a computer screen. They are very far from replicating the complexity of real world experiences. Recently, immersive virtual reality (IVR environments became promising methods to immerse people into an almost real environment that involves more senses. IVR environments provide many similarities to the complexity of the real world and at the same time allow experimenters to constrain experimental parameters to obtain empirical data. This can eventually lead to better treatment options and/or new mechanistic hypotheses. The idea that increasing sensory modalities improve the realism of immersive virtual reality environments has been empirically supported, but the senses used did not usually include olfaction. In this technology report, we will present an odor delivery system applied to a state-of-the-art IVR technology. The platform provides a three-dimensional, immersive, and fully interactive visualization environment called Brain and Behavioral Laboratory - Immersive System (BBL-IS. The solution we propose can reliably deliver various complex scents during different virtual scenarios, at a precise time and space and without contamination of the environment. The main features of this platform are: i the limited cross-contamination between odorant streams with a fast odor delivery (< 500 ms, ii the ease of use and control, and iii the possibility to synchronize the delivery of the odorant with pictures, videos or sounds. How this unique technology could be used to investigate typical research questions in olfaction (e.g., emotional elicitation, memory encoding or attentional capture by scents will also be addressed.

  19. Virtually numbed: immersive video gaming alters real-life experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weger, Ulrich W; Loughnan, Stephen

    2014-04-01

    As actors in a highly mechanized environment, we are citizens of a world populated not only by fellow humans, but also by virtual characters (avatars). Does immersive video gaming, during which the player takes on the mantle of an avatar, prompt people to adopt the coldness and rigidity associated with robotic behavior and desensitize them to real-life experience? In one study, we correlated participants' reported video-gaming behavior with their emotional rigidity (as indicated by the number of paperclips that they removed from ice-cold water). In a second experiment, we manipulated immersive and nonimmersive gaming behavior and then likewise measured the extent of the participants' emotional rigidity. Both studies yielded reliable impacts, and thus suggest that immersion into a robotic viewpoint desensitizes people to real-life experiences in oneself and others.

  20. Evaluating virtual STEM mentoring programs: The SAGANet.org experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, S. M.; Walker, S. I.; Miller, E.; Anbar, M.; Kacar, B.; Forrester, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Many school districts within the United States continue to seek new ways of engaging students within Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. SAGANet.org, a web-based 501c3 Astrobiology outreach initiative, works with a number of schools, partnering K-12 students and their families with professional scientist mentors from around the world to teach and inspire students using virtual technology platforms. Current programs include two mentoring partnerships: pairing scientist-mentors with at-risk youth at the Pittsburg Community School in Pittsburg CA, and pairing scientist-mentors with families from the Kyrene del Cielo Elementary School in Chandler AZ. These programs represent two very different models for utilizing the virtual media platform provided by SAGANet.org to engage K-12 students and their families in STEM. For the former, scientists mentor the students of the Pittsburg School as part of the formal in-class curriculum. For the latter, scientists work with K-5 students and their families through Cielo's Science & Engineering Discovery Room to develop a science project as part of an informal learning experience that is independent of the formal curriculum. In this presentation, we (1) discuss the challenges and successes of engaging these two distinct audiences through virtual media, (2) present the results of how these two very-different mentoring partnership impact K-12 students science self-efficacy, interest in science, and STEM career awareness, and (3) share the impact of the mentoring experience on the mentor's confidence and self-efficacy with communicating science to the public.

  1. Virtual neutron scattering experiments - Training and preparing students for large-scale facility experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Hougaard Overgaard

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dansk Vi beskriver, hvordan virtuelle eksperimenter kan udnyttes i et læringsdesign ved at forberede de studerende til hands-on-eksperimenter ved storskalafaciliteter. Vi illustrerer designet ved at vise, hvordan virtuelle eksperimenter bruges på Niels Bohr Institutets kandidatkursus om neutronspredning. I den sidste uge af kurset, rejser studerende til et storskala neutronspredningsfacilitet for at udføre neutronspredningseksperimenter. Vi bruger studerendes udsagn om deres oplevelser til at argumentere for, at arbejdet med virtuelle experimenter forbereder de studerende til at engagere sig mere frugtbart med eksperimenter ved at lade dem fokusere på fysikken og relevante data i stedet for instrumenternes funktion. Vi hævder, at det er, fordi de kan overføre deres erfaringer med virtuelle eksperimenter til rigtige eksperimenter. Vi finder dog, at læring stadig er situeret i den forstand, at kun kendskab til bestemte eksperimenter overføres. Vi afslutter med at diskutere de muligheder, som virtuelle eksperimenter giver. English We describe how virtual experiments can be utilized in a learning design that prepares students for hands-on experiments at large-scale facilities. We illustrate the design by showing how virtual experiments are used at the Niels Bohr Institute in a master level course on neutron scattering. In the last week of the course, students travel to a large-scale neutron scattering facility to perform real neutron scattering experiments. Through student interviews and survey answers, we argue, that the virtual training prepares the students to engage more fruitfully with experiments by letting them focus on physics and data rather than the overwhelming instrumentation. We argue that this is because they can transfer their virtual experimental experience to the real-life situation. However, we also find that learning is still situated in the sense that only knowledge of particular experiments is transferred. We proceed to

  2. Using voice input and audio feedback to enhance the reality of a virtual experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miner, N.E.

    1994-04-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a rapidly emerging technology which allows participants to experience a virtual environment through stimulation of the participant`s senses. Intuitive and natural interactions with the virtual world help to create a realistic experience. Typically, a participant is immersed in a virtual environment through the use of a 3-D viewer. Realistic, computer-generated environment models and accurate tracking of a participant`s view are important factors for adding realism to a virtual experience. Stimulating a participant`s sense of sound and providing a natural form of communication for interacting with the virtual world are equally important. This paper discusses the advantages and importance of incorporating voice recognition and audio feedback capabilities into a virtual world experience. Various approaches and levels of complexity are discussed. Examples of the use of voice and sound are presented through the description of a research application developed in the VR laboratory at Sandia National Laboratories.

  3. Talking with a Virtual Human : Controlling the Human Experience and Behavior in a Virtual Conversation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qu, C.

    2014-01-01

    Virtual humans are often designed to replace real humans in virtual reality applications for e.g., psychotherapy, education and entertainment. In general, applications with virtual humans are created for modifying a person's knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, emotions or behaviors. Reaching these

  4. Role of Cranial and Spinal Virtual and Augmented Reality Simulation Using Immersive Touch Modules in Neurosurgical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaraj, Ali; Charbel, Fady T.; Birk, Daniel; Tobin, Mathew; Luciano, Cristian; Banerjee, Pat P.; Rizzi, Silvio; Sorenson, Jeff; Foley, Kevin; Slavin, Konstantin; Roitberg, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that mental script-based rehearsal and simulation-based training improves the transfer of surgical skills in various medical disciplines. Despite significant advances in technology and intraoperative techniques over the last several decades, surgical skills training on neurosurgical operations still carries significant risk of serious morbidity or mortality. Potentially avoidable technical errors are well recognized as contributing to poor surgical outcome. Surgical education is undergoing overwhelming change, with reduction of working hours and current trends to focus on patient’s safety and linking reimbursement with clinical outcomes, and there is a need for adjunctive means for neurosurgical training;this has been recent advancement in simulation technology. ImmersiveTouch (IT) is an augmented reality (AR) system that integrates a haptic device and a high-resolution stereoscopic display. This simulation platform utilizes multiple sensory modalities, recreating many of the environmental cues experienced during an actual procedure. Modules available include ventriculostomy, bone drilling, percutaneous trigeminal rhizotomy, in addition to simulated spinal modules such as pedicle screw placement, vertebroplasty, and lumbar puncture. We present our experience with development of such AR neurosurgical modules and the feedback from neurosurgical residents. PMID:23254799

  5. A Virtual Rock Physics Laboratory Through Visualized and Interactive Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanorio, T.; Di Bonito, C.; Clark, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    As new scientific challenges demand more comprehensive and multidisciplinary investigations, laboratory experiments are not expected to become simpler and/or faster. Experimental investigation is an indispensable element of scientific inquiry and must play a central role in the way current and future generations of scientist make decisions. To turn the complexity of laboratory work (and that of rocks!) into dexterity, engagement, and expanded learning opportunities, we are building an interactive, virtual laboratory reproducing in form and function the Stanford Rock Physics Laboratory, at Stanford University. The objective is to combine lectures on laboratory techniques and an online repository of visualized experiments consisting of interactive, 3-D renderings of equipment used to measure properties central to the study of rock physics (e.g., how to saturate rocks, how to measure porosity, permeability, and elastic wave velocity). We use a game creation system together with 3-D computer graphics, and a narrative voice to guide the user through the different phases of the experimental protocol. The main advantage gained in employing computer graphics over video footage is that students can virtually open the instrument, single out its components, and assemble it. Most importantly, it helps describe the processes occurring within the rock. These latter cannot be tracked while simply recording the physical experiment, but computer animation can efficiently illustrate what happens inside rock samples (e.g., describing acoustic waves, and/or fluid flow through a porous rock under pressure within an opaque core-holder - Figure 1). The repository of visualized experiments will complement lectures on laboratory techniques and constitute an on-line course offered through the EdX platform at Stanford. This will provide a virtual laboratory for anyone, anywhere to facilitate teaching/learning of introductory laboratory classes in Geophysics and expand the number of courses

  6. Deployed Virtual Consulting: The Fusion of Wearable Computing, Collaborative Technology, Augmented Reality and Intelligent Agents to Support Fleet Aviation Maintenance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nasman, James

    2004-01-01

    .... By implementing wireless technology in combination with advanced software allowing the virtual collaboration of parties widely separated by geographical distance the Navy can establish a "virUal...

  7. Experiments at The Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, P.A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Celata, C.M.; Faltens, A.; Kwan, J.W.; MacLaren, S.A.; Ponce, D.; Shuman, D.; Yu, S.; Ahle, L.; Lund, S.; Molvik, A.; Sangster, T.C.

    2000-01-01

    An overview of experiments is presented, in which the physical dimensions, emittance and perveance are scaled to explore driver-relevant beam dynamics. Among these are beam merging, focusing to a small spot, and bending and recirculating beams. The Virtual National Laboratory for Heavy Ion Fusion (VNL) is also developing two driver-scale beam experiments involving heavy-ion beams with I(sub beam) about 1 Ampere to provide guidance for the design of an Integrated Research Experiment (IRE) for driver system studies within the next 5 years. Multiple-beam sources and injectors are being designed and a one-beam module will be built and tested. Another experimental effort will be the transport of such a beam through about 100 magnetic quadrupoles. The experiment will determine transport limits at high aperture fill factors, beam halo formation, and the influence on beam properties of secondary electron Research into driver technology will be briefly presented, including the development of ferromagnetic core materials, induction core pulsers, multiple-beam quadrupole arrays and plasma channel formation experiments for pinched transport in reactor chambers

  8. Innovative application of virtual display technique in virtual museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiankang

    2017-09-01

    Virtual museum refers to display and simulate the functions of real museum on the Internet in the form of 3 Dimensions virtual reality by applying interactive programs. Based on Virtual Reality Modeling Language, virtual museum building and its effective interaction with the offline museum lie in making full use of 3 Dimensions panorama technique, virtual reality technique and augmented reality technique, and innovatively taking advantages of dynamic environment modeling technique, real-time 3 Dimensions graphics generating technique, system integration technique and other key virtual reality techniques to make sure the overall design of virtual museum.3 Dimensions panorama technique, also known as panoramic photography or virtual reality, is a technique based on static images of the reality. Virtual reality technique is a kind of computer simulation system which can create and experience the interactive 3 Dimensions dynamic visual world. Augmented reality, also known as mixed reality, is a technique which simulates and mixes the information (visual, sound, taste, touch, etc.) that is difficult for human to experience in reality. These technologies make virtual museum come true. It will not only bring better experience and convenience to the public, but also be conducive to improve the influence and cultural functions of the real museum.

  9. V-TIME: a treadmill training program augmented by virtual reality to decrease fall risk in older adults: study design of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirelman, Anat; Rochester, Lynn; Reelick, Miriam; Nieuwhof, Freek; Pelosin, Elisa; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Dockx, Kim; Nieuwboer, Alice; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2013-02-06

    Recent work has demonstrated that fall risk can be attributed to cognitive as well as motor deficits. Indeed, everyday walking in complex environments utilizes executive function, dual tasking, planning and scanning, all while walking forward. Pilot studies suggest that a multi-modal intervention that combines treadmill training to target motor function and a virtual reality obstacle course to address the cognitive components of fall risk may be used to successfully address the motor-cognitive interactions that are fundamental for fall risk reduction. The proposed randomized controlled trial will evaluate the effects of treadmill training augmented with virtual reality on fall risk. Three hundred older adults with a history of falls will be recruited to participate in this study. This will include older adults (n=100), patients with mild cognitive impairment (n=100), and patients with Parkinson's disease (n=100). These three sub-groups will be recruited in order to evaluate the effects of the intervention in people with a range of motor and cognitive deficits. Subjects will be randomly assigned to the intervention group (treadmill training with virtual reality) or to the active-control group (treadmill training without virtual reality). Each person will participate in a training program set in an outpatient setting 3 times per week for 6 weeks. Assessments will take place before, after, and 1 month and 6 months after the completion of the training. A falls calendar will be kept by each participant for 6 months after completing the training to assess fall incidence (i.e., the number of falls, multiple falls and falls rate). In addition, we will measure gait under usual and dual task conditions, balance, community mobility, health related quality of life, user satisfaction and cognitive function. This randomized controlled trial will demonstrate the extent to which an intervention that combines treadmill training augmented by virtual reality reduces fall risk

  10. Augmented Virtuality for Coastal Management: A Holistic Use of In Situ and Remote Sensing for Large Scale Definition of Coastal Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Bartolini

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors describe the architecture of a multidisciplinary data acquisition and visualization platform devoted to the management of coastal environments. The platform integrates heterogeneous data acquisition sub-systems that can be roughly divided into two main categories: remote sensing systems and in situ sensing systems. Remote sensing solutions that are going to be implemented include aerial and underwater data acquisition while in situ sensing solutions include the use of Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID tracers, Wireless Sensor Networks and imaging techniques. All the data collected by these subsystems are stored, integrated and fused on a single platform that is also in charge of data visualization and analysis. This last task is carried out according to the paradigm of Augmented Virtuality that foresees the augmentation of a virtually reconstructed environment with data collected in the real world. The described solution proposes a novel holistic approach where different disciplines concur, with different data acquisition techniques, to a large scale definition of coastal dynamics, in order to better describe and face the coastal erosion phenomenon. The overall framework has been conceived by the so-called Team COSTE, a joint research team between the Universities of Pisa, Siena and Florence.

  11. Art in virtual reality 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ben

    2010-01-01

    For decades, virtual reality artwork has existed in a small but highly influential niche in the world of electronic and new media art. Since the early 1990's, virtual reality installations have come to define an extreme boundary point of both aesthetic experience and technological sophistication. Classic virtual reality artworks have an almost mythological stature - powerful, exotic, and often rarely exhibited. Today, art in virtual environments continues to evolve and mature, encompassing everything from fully immersive CAVE experiences to performance art in Second Life to the use of augmented and mixed reality in public space. Art in Virtual Reality 2010 is a public exhibition of new artwork that showcases the diverse ways that contemporary artists use virtual environments to explore new aesthetic ground and investigate the continually evolving relationship between our selves and our virtual worlds.

  12. The Augmented REality Sandtable (ARES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Introduction The US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) Human Sciences Campaign calls out the topic of Virtual /Mixed and Augmented Reality as one of the...type of virtual environment. In virtual reality (VR), the totality of the environment is computer generated. In AR, the real world is augmented by...tangible user interfaces; and the effectiveness of virtual sand tables and similar systems. A market survey was also done to discover the state of

  13. Learning design thinking online : studying students' learning experience in shared virtual reality

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Kung Wong

    2010-01-01

    Learning Design Thinking Online: Studying Students' Learning Experience in Shared Virtual Reality My study attempts to deepen understanding about the learning experiences of design students in undertaking design-thinking exercises in a shared virtual reality. This study has identified the areas of an appropriate pedagogy for E-Learning and the use of a shared virtual environment for students in tertiary design education. Specific questions arising ji"Om this research are: (1...

  14. Thematic web portals for different user profiles in a virtual health science library: Bibliosalut's experience

    OpenAIRE

    Páez, Virgili; Font, Mònica; Pastor-Ramon, Elena; Sastre-Suárez, Sílvia; Costa-Marin, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Normally users of a virtual health library have different professional profiles (physicians, nurses, pharmacists...) and/or they are from different specialties (Primary Health Care, Internal Medicine, Oncology...). This poster shows the experience of the Virtual Health Sciences Library of the Balearic Islands (Bibliosalut) of creating thematic web portals, which aims is to improve the experience of our users to browse and query to information resources and services of the virtual library and ...

  15. The Virtual Point 1 event display for the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittelmann, Thomas; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Boudreau, Joseph; Moyse, Edward

    2010-01-01

    We present an event display for the ATLAS Experiment, called Virtual Point 1 (VP1), designed initially for deployment at point 1 of the LHC, the location of the ATLAS detector. The Qt/OpenGL based application provides truthful and interactive 3D representations of both event and non-event data, and now serves a general-purpose role within the experiment. Thus, VP1 is used both online (in the control room itself or remotely via a special 'live' mode) and offline environments to provide fast debugging and understanding of events, detector status and software. In addition to a flexible plugin infrastructure and a high level of configurability, this multi-purpose role is mainly facilitated by embedding the application directly into the ATLAS offline software framework, enabling it to use the native Event Data Model directly, and thus run on any source of ATLAS data, or even directly from within processes such as reconstruction jobs. Finally, VP1 provides high-quality pictures and movies, useful for outreach purposes.

  16. Results of a massive experiment on virtual currency endowments and money demand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Živić

    Full Text Available We use a 575,000-subject, 28-day experiment to investigate monetary policy in a virtual setting. The experiment tests the effect of virtual currency endowments on player retention and virtual currency demand. An increase in endowments of a virtual currency should lower the demand for the currency in the short run. However, in the long run, we would expect money demand to rise in response to inflation in the virtual world. We test for this behavior in a virtual field experiment in the football management game Top11. 575,000 players were selected at random and allocated to different "shards" or versions of the world. The shards differed only in terms of the initial money endowment offered to new players. Money demand was observed for 28 days as players used real money to purchase additional virtual currency. The results indicate that player money purchases were significantly higher in the shards where higher endowments were given. This suggests that a positive change in the money supply in a virtual context leads to inflation and increased money demand, and does so much more quickly than in real-world economies. Differences between virtual and real currency behavior will become more interesting as virtual currency becomes a bigger part of the real economy.

  17. Results of a massive experiment on virtual currency endowments and money demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Živić, Nenad; Andjelković, Igor; Özden, Tolga; Dekić, Milovan; Castronova, Edward

    2017-01-01

    We use a 575,000-subject, 28-day experiment to investigate monetary policy in a virtual setting. The experiment tests the effect of virtual currency endowments on player retention and virtual currency demand. An increase in endowments of a virtual currency should lower the demand for the currency in the short run. However, in the long run, we would expect money demand to rise in response to inflation in the virtual world. We test for this behavior in a virtual field experiment in the football management game Top11. 575,000 players were selected at random and allocated to different "shards" or versions of the world. The shards differed only in terms of the initial money endowment offered to new players. Money demand was observed for 28 days as players used real money to purchase additional virtual currency. The results indicate that player money purchases were significantly higher in the shards where higher endowments were given. This suggests that a positive change in the money supply in a virtual context leads to inflation and increased money demand, and does so much more quickly than in real-world economies. Differences between virtual and real currency behavior will become more interesting as virtual currency becomes a bigger part of the real economy.

  18. Virtual Teams and Synchronous Presentations: An Online Class Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Joni K.

    2013-01-01

    Global expansion, cost containment, and technology advances have all played a role in the increase of virtual teams in today's workplace. Virtual teams in an online graduate information technology management class prepared and presented synchronous presentations over a business or non-profit sector case. This paper includes a brief literature…

  19. Real behavior in virtual environments: psychology experiments in a simple virtual-reality paradigm using video games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Michail D; Johansen, Mark K

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to illustrate the broad usefulness of simple video-game-based virtual environments (VEs) for psychological research on real-world behavior. To this end, this research explored several high-level social phenomena in a simple, inexpensive computer-game environment: the reduced likelihood of helping under time pressure and the bystander effect, which is reduced helping in the presence of bystanders. In the first experiment, participants had to find the exit in a virtual labyrinth under either high or low time pressure. They encountered rooms with and without virtual bystanders, and in each room, a virtual person requested assistance. Participants helped significantly less frequently under time pressure but the presence/absence of a small number of bystanders did not significantly moderate helping. The second experiment increased the number of virtual bystanders, and participants were instructed to imagine that these were real people. Participants helped significantly less in rooms with large numbers of bystanders compared to rooms with no bystanders, thus demonstrating a bystander effect. These results indicate that even sophisticated high-level social behaviors can be observed and experimentally manipulated in simple VEs, thus implying the broad usefulness of this paradigm in psychological research as a good compromise between experimental control and ecological validity.

  20. AUGMENTED REALITY AS AN EXCITING ONLINE EXPERIENCE: IS IT REALLY BENEFICIAL FOR BRANDS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezgi Eyüboğlu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research aims to look at the ways in wh ich Augmented Reality beneficial for brands to create positive brand perc eption, intention of purchase and positive word of mouth. Based on the aims of this r esearch paper and the study of Bluearca and Tamarjan (2010, five measures of perc eived value have been chosen- enhancing convenience, influencing enjoymen t, relevancy of idea, ease of interaction and WOM. Focus group is the method for this study because Augmented Reality application is a very new applica tion in Turkey so there is little prior knowledge and the range of responses l ikely to emerge. Focus groups have the ability to provide us with data not obtain able through paper and pencil self-report measures or observational measures. In areas of study in which little is known, focus groups may be an appropriate place to begin (Byers and Wilcox, 1991: 65. This paper explores the ways how can brands use AR application for their own beneficence. First time exposing this kind of inter active application, consumers’ first impressions, feelings and experiences will be valuable for Turkish brands which might prefer to engage their customers more c losely in future. Banana Flame is the brand chosen for this study because th ere is no Turkish brand using this application properly. Through this study, peop le’s understanding about AR technologies will be able to revealed and those inf ormation will lead Turkish brands developing experiential value and positive a ttitude in minds of their customers. The lack of Turkish brands using this application p roperly caused to choose a foreign brand (Banana Flame which is an Online Fas hion Boutique and first online retailer to integrate Augmented Reality thro ughout entire site in U.S.A. For this reason, it was assumed that Banana Flame has n o brand awareness between young Turkish consumers. Owing to the fact that Ban ana Flame is a women’s fashion brand, focus group included 18-30 years of

  1. Exploring key determinants of virtual worlds business success based on users' experience and perception

    OpenAIRE

    Xu , Xiaobo (Bob)

    2010-01-01

    Given the growth and popularity of virtual worlds, companies have a strong interest in presenting themselves successfully in virtual worlds. We designed an experimental study to identify the key determinants of virtual worlds business success based on users’ experience and perception. The preliminary results indicate that Starbucks, McDonalds, and Paris are the 3 most favorite sites. Furthermore, 5 key determinants (entertainment, functionality, interactivity, reality, and s...

  2. Designing Shared Virtual Reality Gaming Experiences in Local Multi-platform Games

    OpenAIRE

    Liszio , Stefan; Masuch , Maic

    2016-01-01

    Part 4: Short Papers; International audience; Designing multiplayer virtual reality games is a challenging task since immersion is easily destroyed by real world influences. However, providing fun and social virtual reality experiences is inevitable for establishing virtual reality gaming as a convincing new medium. We propose a design approach to integrate social interactions into the game design while retaining immersion, and present design methods to implement this approach. Furthermore, w...

  3. AMI: Augmented Michelson Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furió, David; Hachet, Martin; Guillet, Jean-Paul; Bousquet, Bruno; Fleck, Stéphanie; Reuter, Patrick; Canioni, Lionel

    2015-10-01

    Experiments in optics are essential for learning and understanding physical phenomena. The problem with these experiments is that they are generally time consuming for both their construction and their maintenance, potentially dangerous through the use of laser sources, and often expensive due to high technology optical components. We propose to simulate such experiments by way of hybrid systems that exploit both spatial augmented reality and tangible interaction. In particular, we focus on one of the most popular optical experiments: the Michelson interferometer. In our approach, we target a highly interactive system where students are able to interact in real time with the Augmented Michelson Interferometer (AMI) to observe, test hypotheses and then to enhance their comprehension. Compared to a fully digital simulation, we are investigating an approach that benefits from both physical and virtual elements, and where the students experiment by manipulating 3D-printed physical replicas of optical components (e.g. lenses and mirrors). Our objective is twofold. First, we want to ensure that the students will learn with our simulator the same concepts and skills that they learn with traditional methods. Second, we hypothesis that such a system opens new opportunities to teach optics in a way that was not possible before, by manipulating concepts beyond the limits of observable physical phenomena. To reach this goal, we have built a complementary team composed of experts in the field of optics, human-computer interaction, computer graphics, sensors and actuators, and education science.

  4. DARPA Improving Warfighter Information Intake Under Stress -- Augmented Cognition. Volume 1. Phase 2: Concept Validation Experiment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morrison, J. G; Kobus, D. A; Brown, C. M

    2006-01-01

    ...) systems that demonstrate how the limitations of human cognition can be addressed by augmenting cognition with advanced cognitive state sensors that provide input to complex computational systems...

  5. A cone-beam CT based technique to augment the 3D virtual skull model with a detailed dental surface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swennen, G.R.J.; Mommaerts, M.Y.; Abeloos, J.V.S.; Clercq, C. De; Lamoral, P.; Neyt, N.; Casselman, J.W.; Schutyser, F.A.C.

    2009-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is used for maxillofacial imaging. 3D virtual planning of orthognathic and facial orthomorphic surgery requires detailed visualisation of the interocclusal relationship. This study aimed to introduce and evaluate the use of a double CBCT scan procedure with a

  6. Frames of Reference in Mobile Augmented Reality Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Weimin; Biocca, Frank; Owen, Charles B.; Tang, Arthur; Xiao, Fan; Lim, Lynette

    2004-01-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors investigated spatial updating in augmented reality environments. Participants learned locations of virtual objects on the physical floor. They were turned to appropriate facing directions while blindfolded before making pointing judgments (e.g., "Imagine you are facing X. Point to Y"). Experiments manipulated the…

  7. Communication in virtual teams : ten years of experience in education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutkowski, A.F.; Vogel, D.R.; Genuchten, van M.J.I.M.; Saunders, C.

    2008-01-01

    Engineering teams are often globally distributed and comprise participants from multiple disciplines and cultures who rely on professional communication support. Companies, organizations, and institutions increasingly embrace these virtual teams and use a variety of information and communication

  8. Musical journey: a virtual world gamification experience for music learning

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, José; Figueiredo, Mauro; Amante, Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    Games are an integral part of the learning process of humans, in particular for children, who exploit the imagery as an intrinsic part of their lives. Features from games have been successfully implemented as a means to captivate and motivate students to perform learning at various levels of education in traditional schools. This paper presents a virtual world – Musical Journey – representing the Aesthetic Periods of Music History. This virtual environment allows students to freely explore an...

  9. An experiment on fear of public speaking in virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertaub, D P; Slater, M; Barker, C

    2001-01-01

    Can virtual reality exposure therapy be used to treat people with social phobia? To answer this question it is vital to known if people will respond to virtual humans (avatars) in a virtual social setting in the same way they would to real humans. If someone is extremely anxious with real people, will they also be anxious when faced with simulated people, despite knowing that the avatars are computer generated? In [17] we described a small pilot study that placed 10 people before a virtual audience. The purpose was to assess the extent to which social anxiety, specifically fear of public speaking, was induced by the virtual audience and the extent of influence of degree of immersion (head mounted display or desktop monitor. The current paper describes a follow up study conducted with 40 subjects and the results clearly show that not only is social anxiety induced by the audience, but the degree of anxiety experienced is directly related to the type of virtual audience feedback the speaker receives. In particular, a hostile negative audience scenario was found to generate strong affect in speakers, regardless of whether or not they normally suffered from fear of public speaking.

  10. Virtual experiments: a new approach for improving process conceptualization in hillslope hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Markus; McDonnell, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    We present an approach for process conceptualization in hillslope hydrology. We develop and implement a series of virtual experiments, whereby the interaction between water flow pathways, source and mixing at the hillslope scale is examined within a virtual experiment framework. We define these virtual experiments as 'numerical experiments with a model driven by collective field intelligence'. The virtual experiments explore the first-order controls in hillslope hydrology, where the experimentalist and modeler work together to cooperatively develop and analyze the results. Our hillslope model for the virtual experiments (HillVi) in this paper is based on conceptualizing the water balance within the saturated and unsaturated zone in relation to soil physical properties in a spatially explicit manner at the hillslope scale. We argue that a virtual experiment model needs to be able to capture all major controls on subsurface flow processes that the experimentalist might deem important, while at the same time being simple with few 'tunable parameters'. This combination makes the approach, and the dialog between experimentalist and modeler, a useful hypothesis testing tool. HillVi simulates mass flux for different initial conditions under the same flow conditions. We analyze our results in terms of an artificial line source and isotopic hydrograph separation of water and subsurface flow. Our results for this first set of virtual experiments showed how drainable porosity and soil depth variability exert a first order control on flow and transport at the hillslope scale. We found that high drainable porosity soils resulted in a restricted water table rise, resulting in more pronounced channeling of lateral subsurface flow along the soil-bedrock interface. This in turn resulted in a more anastomosing network of tracer movement across the slope. The virtual isotope hydrograph separation showed higher proportions of event water with increasing drainable porosity. When

  11. Uniqueness of Experience and Virtual Playworlds: Playing Is Not Just for Fun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamo, Alessandra; Pozzi, Simone; Mellini, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Social interactions within virtual communities are often described solely as being online experiences. Such descriptions are limited, for they fail to reference life external to the screen. The terms "virtual" and "real" have a negative connotation for many people and can even be interpreted to mean that something is "false" or "inauthentic."…

  12. Virtual Teams and International Business Teaching and Learning: The Case of the Global Enterprise Experience (GEE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Maria Alejandra; Velez-Calle, Andres; Cathro, Virginia; Caprar, Dan V.; Taras, Vasyl

    2014-01-01

    The increasing importance of global virtual teams in business is reflected in the classroom by the increased adoption of activities that facilitate real-time cross-cultural interaction. This article documents the experience of students from two Colombian universities who participated in a collaborative international project using virtual teams as…

  13. A Mixed Methods Assessment of Students' Flow Experiences during a Mobile Augmented Reality Science Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressler, D. M.; Bodzin, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Current studies have reported that secondary students are highly engaged while playing mobile augmented reality (AR) learning games. Some researchers have posited that players' engagement may indicate a flow experience, but no research results have confirmed this hypothesis with vision-based AR learning games. This study investigated factors…

  14. Where Does My Augmented Reality Learning Experience (ARLE) Belong? A Student and Teacher Perspective to Positioning ARLEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drljevic, Neven; Wong, Lung Hsiang; Boticki, Ivica

    2017-01-01

    The paper provides a high-level review of the current state of techno-pedagogical design in Augmented Reality Learning Experiences (ARLEs). The review is based on a rubric constructed from the Meaningful Learning with ICT framework and the Orchestration Load reduction framework, providing, respectively, a view of primarily student- and primarily…

  15. A Mobile Service Oriented Multiple Object Tracking Augmented Reality Architecture for Education and Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanarungrot, Sasithorn; White, Martin; Newbury, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design of our service-oriented architecture to support mobile multiple object tracking augmented reality applications applied to education and learning scenarios. The architecture is composed of a mobile multiple object tracking augmented reality client, a web service framework, and dynamic content providers. Tracking of…

  16. Enhancing User Experiences of Mobile-Based Augmented Reality via Spatial Augmented Reality: Designs and Architectures of Projector-Camera Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thitirat Siriborvornratanakul

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available As smartphones, tablet computers, and other mobile devices have continued to dominate our digital world ecosystem, there are many industries using mobile or wearable devices to perform Augmented Reality (AR functions in their workplaces in order to increase productivity and decrease unnecessary workloads. Mobile-based AR can basically be divided into three main types: phone-based AR, wearable AR, and projector-based AR. Among these, projector-based AR or Spatial Augmented Reality (SAR is the most immature and least recognized type of AR for end users. This is because there are a small number of commercial products providing projector-based AR functionalities in a mobile manner. Also, prices of mobile projectors are still relatively high. Moreover, there are still many technical problems regarding projector-based AR that have been left unsolved. Nevertheless, it is projector-based AR that has potential to solve a fundamental problem shared by most mobile-based AR systems. Also the always-visible nature of projector-based AR is one good answer for solving current user experience issues of phone-based AR and wearable AR systems. Hence, in this paper, we analyze what are the user experience issues and technical issues regarding common mobile-based AR systems, recently widespread phone-based AR systems, and rising wearable AR systems. Then for each issue, we propose and explain a new solution of how using projector-based AR can solve the problems and/or help enhance its user experiences. Our proposed framework includes hardware designs and architectures as well as a software computing paradigm towards mobile projector-based AR systems. The proposed design is evaluated by three experts using qualitative and semiquantitative research approaches.

  17. AUGMENTED REALITY - STATE OF KNOWLEDGE, USE AND EXPERIMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Filofteia TUTUNEA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Technologies for augmenting reality have been consolidated during the last decades, extending their applicability to more and more socio-economic areas. The rapid evolution of mobile technologies and virtualization of the digital environment have created auspicious conditions for massive extension and implementation of solutions for augmenting reality at global level. Experience has already shown that augmented reality, alongside virtual reality can offer very important support solutions in modeling the real world with the aim of extending the human capabilities of perception, allowing the opening of a new phase in the world’s socio-economic development. Starting from the evident tendencies that have manifested at global level in the development and implementation of augmented reality technologies, the paper begins with the presentation of the most important aspects related to augmented reality technologies, highlighting their main areas of application, and presents the study realized for identifying the level of knowledge, use and effective experimentation of augmented reality applications by mobile device users. The results of this study could be very useful to the socio-economic environment, starting with the field of research, continuing with developers and providers of augmented reality solutions, manufacturers and providers of hardware infrastructure support for augmented reality solutions and systems, final users of these solutions, both individuals and businesses, and experimenting digital communities.

  18. [Virtual CT-pneumocystoscopy: indications, advantages and limitations. Our experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regine, Giovanni; Atzori, Maurizio; Buffa, Vitaliano; Miele, Vittorio; Ialongo, Pasquale; Adami, Loredana

    2003-09-01

    The use of CT volume-rendering techniques allows the evaluation of visceral organs without the need for endoscopy. Conventional endoscopic evaluation of the bladder is limited by the invasiveness of the technique and the difficulty exploring the entire bladder. Virtual evaluation of the bladder by three-dimensional CT reconstruction offers potential advantages and can be used in place of endoscopy. This study investigates the sensitivity of virtual CT in assessing lesion of the bladder wall to compare it with that of conventional endoscopy, and outlines the indications, advantages and disadvantages of virtual CT-pneumocystography. Between September 2001 and May 2002, 21 patients with haematuria and positive cystoscopic findings were studied. After an initial assessment by ultrasound, the patients underwent pelvic CT as a single volumetric scan after preliminary air distension of the bladder by means of 12 F Foley catheter. The images were processed on an independent workstation (Advantage 3.0 GE) running dedicated software for endoluminal navigation. The lesions detected by endoscopy were classified as sessile or pedunculated, and according to size (more or less than 5 mm). Finally, the results obtained at virtual cystoscopy were evaluated by two radiologists blinded to the conventional cystoscopy results. Thirty lesions (24 pedunculated, 6 sessile) were detected at conventional cystoscopy in 16 patients (multiple polyposis in 3 cases). Virtual cystoscopy identified 23 lesions (19 pedunculated and 4 sessile). The undetected lesions were pedunculated <5 mm (5 cases) and sessile (2 cases). One correctly identified pedunculated lesion was associated with a bladder stone. Good quality virtual images were obtained in all of the patients. In only one patient with multiple polyposis the quality of the virtual endoscopic evaluation was limited by the patient's intolerance to bladder distension, although identification of the lesions was not compromised. The overall

  19. Facilitating efficient augmentation of transmission networks to connect renewable energy generation: the Australian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Glen

    2012-01-01

    Australia is heavily dependent on coal for electricity generation. The Renewable Energy Target has spurred growth in the utilization of renewable energy sources, with further growth expected into the future. Australia's strongest renewable energy sources are generally distant from the transmission network in resource ‘basins’. Investment is needed to augment the transmission network to enable delivery of electricity from these sources to consumers. Considerable economies of scale flow from anticipating the connection of numerous generators in an area over time and sizing augmentations accordingly. Following a lengthy rulemaking process, the National Electricity Rules were recently amended by a new rule, designed to facilitate the construction of such efficiently sized augmentations. However, the new rule is more conservative than initially envisaged, making little substantive change to the current frameworks for augmentation and connection. This paper outlines these frameworks and the rulemaking process and identifies the key debates surrounding the rule change are identified. This paper then provides a detailed analysis of the new rule, concluding that it is defective in a number of respects and is unlikely to result in the efficient and timely augmentation of the network needed to unlock the potential of Australia's strongest renewable energy resources. - Highlights: ► Remoteness of renewable energy sources is a barrier to greater renewable energy utilization. ► Significant economies of scale flow from efficiently-sized transmission network augmentation. ► Current frameworks in Australia do not incentivise efficiently-sized network augmentations. ► The lack of property rights in an augmentation is particularly problematic. ► The new Scale Efficient Network Extensions rule is not apt to facilitate efficiently-sized network augmentations.

  20. Capillary Refill using Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Clausen, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    Master's thesis in Computer science The opportunities within augmented reality is growing. Augmented reality is a combination of the real and the virtual world in real time, and large companies like Microsoft and Google is now investing heavily in the technology. This thesis presents a solution for simulating a medical test called capillary refill, by using augmented reality. The simulation is performed with an augmented reality headset called HoloLens. The HoloLens will recognise a mark...

  1. Adaptive Augmenting Control Flight Characterization Experiment on an F/A-18

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Gilligan, Eric T.; Wall, John H.; Orr, Jeb S.; Miller, Christopher J.; Hanson, Curtis E.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Flight Mechanics and Analysis Division developed an Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) algorithm for launch vehicles that improves robustness and performance by adapting an otherwise welltuned classical control algorithm to unexpected environments or variations in vehicle dynamics. This AAC algorithm is currently part of the baseline design for the SLS Flight Control System (FCS), but prior to this series of research flights it was the only component of the autopilot design that had not been flight tested. The Space Launch System (SLS) flight software prototype, including the adaptive component, was recently tested on a piloted aircraft at Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) which has the capability to achieve a high level of dynamic similarity to a launch vehicle. Scenarios for the flight test campaign were designed specifically to evaluate the AAC algorithm to ensure that it is able to achieve the expected performance improvements with no adverse impacts in nominal or nearnominal scenarios. Having completed the recent series of flight characterization experiments on DFRC's F/A-18, the AAC algorithm's capability, robustness, and reproducibility, have been successfully demonstrated. Thus, the entire SLS control architecture has been successfully flight tested in a relevant environment. This has increased NASA's confidence that the autopilot design is ready to fly on the SLS Block I vehicle and will exceed the performance of previous architectures.

  2. ''Augmented reality'' in conventional simulation by projection of 3-D structures into 2-D images. A comparison with virtual methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutschmann, H.; Nairz, O.; Zehentmayr, F.; Fastner, G.; Sedlmayer, F.; Steininger, P.; Kopp, P.; Merz, F.; Wurstbauer, K.; Kranzinger, M.; Kametriser, G.; Kopp, M.

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: in this study, a new method is introduced, which allows the overlay of three-dimensional structures, that have been delineated on transverse slices, onto the fluoroscopy from conventional simulators in real time. Patients and methods: setup deviations between volumetric imaging and simulation were visualized, measured and corrected for 701 patient isocenters. Results: comparing the accuracy to mere virtual simulation lacking additional X-ray imaging, a clear benefit of the new method could be shown. On average, virtual prostate simulations had to be corrected by 0.48 cm (standard deviation [SD] 0.38), and those of the breast by 0.67 cm (SD 0.66). Conclusion: the presented method provides an easy way to determine entity-specific safety margins related to patient setup errors upon registration of bony anatomy (prostate 0.9 cm for 90% of cases, breast 1.3 cm). The important role of planar X-ray imaging was clearly demonstrated. The innovation can also be applied to adaptive image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) protocols. (orig.)

  3. Zero time tunneling: macroscopic experiments with virtual particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimtz Günter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Feynman introduced virtual particles in his diagrams as intermediate states of an interaction process. They represent necessary intermediate states between observable real states. Such virtual particles were introduced to describe the interaction process between an electron and a positron and for much more complicated interaction processes. Other candidates for virtual particles are evanescent modes in optics and in elastic fields. Evanescent modes have a purely imaginary wave number, they represent the mathematical analogy of the tunneling solutions of the Schrödinger equation. Evanescent modes exist in the forbidden frequency bands of a photonic lattice and in undersized wave guides, for instance. The most prominent example for the occurrence of evanescent modes is the frustrated total internal reflection (FTIR at double prisms. Evanescent modes and tunneling lie outside the bounds of the special theory of relativity. They can cause faster than light (FTL signal velocities. We present examples of the quantum mechanical behavior of evanescent photons and phonons at a macroscopic scale. The evanescent modes of photons are described by virtual particles as predicted by former QED calculations.

  4. Inquiry Style Interactive Virtual Experiments: A Case on Circular Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shaona; Han, Jing; Pelz, Nathaniel; Wang, Xiaojun; Peng, Liangyu; Xiao, Hua; Bao, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Interest in computer-based learning, especially in the use of virtual reality simulations is increasing rapidly. While there are good reasons to believe that technologies have the potential to improve teaching and learning, how to utilize the technology effectively in teaching specific content difficulties is challenging. To help students develop…

  5. Rotational Augmentation Disparities in the MEXICO and UAE Phase VI Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreck, S.; Sant, T.; Micallef, D.

    2010-01-01

    Wind turbine structures and components suffer excessive loads and premature failures when key aerodynamic phenomena are not well characterized, fail to be understood, or are inaccurately predicted. Turbine blade rotational augmentation remains incompletely characterized and understood, thus limiting

  6. Dissociation of past and present experience in problem solving using a virtual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturz, Bradley R; Bodily, Kent D; Katz, Jeffrey S

    2009-02-01

    An interactive 3D desktop virtual environment task was created to investigate learning mechanisms in human problem solving. Participants were assessed for previous video game experience, divided into two groups (Training and Control), and matched for gender and experience. The Training group learned specific skills within the virtual environment before being presented a problem. The Control group was presented the problem only. Completion time was faster for the Training group and was affected by level of previous video game experience. Results indicated problem solving was a function of specific and general experience and demonstrated a method for dissociating these two facets of experience.

  7. Virtual community centre for power wheelchair training: Experience of children and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkia, Caryne; Ryan, Stephen E; Reid, Denise; Boissy, Patrick; Lemay, Martin; Routhier, François; Contardo, Resi; Woodhouse, Janet; Archambault, Phillipe S

    2017-11-02

    To: 1) characterize the overall experience in using the McGill immersive wheelchair - community centre (miWe-CC) simulator; and 2) investigate the experience of presence (i.e., sense of being in the virtual rather than in the real, physical environment) while driving a PW in the miWe-CC. A qualitative research design with structured interviews was used. Fifteen clinicians and 11 children were interviewed after driving a power wheelchair (PW) in the miWe-CC simulator. Data were analyzed using the conventional and directed content analysis approaches. Overall, participants enjoyed using the simulator and experienced a sense of presence in the virtual space. They felt a sense of being in the virtual environment, involved and focused on driving the virtual PW rather than on the surroundings of the actual room where they were. Participants reported several similarities between the virtual community centre layout and activities of the miWe-CC and the day-to-day reality of paediatric PW users. The simulator replicated participants' expectations of real-life PW use and promises to have an effect on improving the driving skills of new PW users. Implications for rehabilitation Among young users, the McGill immersive wheelchair (miWe) simulator provides an experience of presence within the virtual environment. This experience of presence is generated by a sense of being in the virtual scene, a sense of being involved, engaged, and focused on interacting within the virtual environment, and by the perception that the virtual environment is consistent with the real world. The miWe is a relevant and accessible approach, complementary to real world power wheelchair training for young users.

  8. Using virtual Lustre clients on the WAN for analysis of data from high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourilkov, D; Avery, P; Cheng, M; Fu, Y; Kim, B; Palencia, J; Budden, R; Benninger, K; Shrum, D; Wilgenbusch, J

    2012-01-01

    We describe the work on creating system images of Lustre virtual clients in the ExTENCI project (Extending Science Through Enhanced National Cyberlnfrastructure), using several virtual technologies (Xen, VMware, VirtualBox, KVM). These virtual machines can be built at several levels, from a basic Linux installation (we use Scientific Linux 5 as an example), adding a Lustre client with Kerberos authentication, and up to complete clients including local or distributed (based on CernVM-FS) installations of the full CERN and project specific software stack for typical LHC experiments. The level, and size, of the images are determined by the users on demand. Various sites and individual users can just download and use them out of the box on Linux/UNIX, Windows and Mac OS X based hosts. We compare the performance of virtual clients with that of real physical systems for typical high energy physics applications like Monte Carlo simulations or analysis of data stored in ROOT trees.

  9. EXPERIENCE OF THE ORGANIZATION OF VIRTUAL LABORATORIES ON THE BASIS OF TECHNOLOGIES OF CLOUD COMPUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Oleksyuk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article investigated the concept of «virtual laboratory». This paper describes models of deploying of cloud technologies in IT infrastructure. The hybrid model is most recent for higher educational institution. The author suggests private cloud platforms to deploying the virtual laboratory. This paper describes the experience of the deployment enterprise cloud in IT infrastructure of Department of Physics and Mathematics of Ternopil V. Hnatyuk National Pedagogical University. The object of the research are virtual laboratories as components of IT infrastructure of higher education. The subject of the research are clouds as base of deployment of the virtual laboratories. Conclusions. The use of cloud technologies in the development virtual laboratories of the is an actual and need of the development. The hybrid model is the most appropriate in the deployment of cloud infrastructure of higher educational institution. It is reasonable to use the private (Cloudstack, Eucalyptus, OpenStack cloud platform in the universities.

  10. Virtual Nursing Intervention Adjunctive to Conventional Care: The Experience of Persons Living With HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, José; Rouleau, Geneviève; Ramirez-Garcia, Pilar; Bourbonnais, Anne

    2015-10-20

    Persons living with HIV (PLHIV) must adhere optimally to antiretroviral therapy (ART) on a daily basis and for their lifetime to maintain an undetectable viral load, allowing them to preserve their health. Taking advantage of the opportunity that information and communication technologies provide to broaden intervention modalities and intensify clinical follow-up, a virtual nursing intervention consisting of four interactive computer sessions was developed to empower PLHIV to manage their ART and symptoms optimally. Compared with other types of information and communication technologies-assisted interventions such as text messages, HIV Treatment, Virtual Nursing Assistance and Education (VIH-TAVIE) requires a certain degree of active engagement on the part of the user to develop and strengthen the self-management skills to optimize adherence. After the intervention's impact on ART adherence was measured quantitatively, a qualitative study was undertaken to describe how users experience the intervention. Understanding how PLHIV perceive being assisted asynchronously by a virtual nurse was of particular interest. The objective of the study was to explore and describe how PLHIV experience VIH-TAVIE, that is, receiving customized asynchronous accompaniment via a virtual nurse. A qualitative study was conducted with 26 PLHIV (20 men, 6 women) who received all four VIH-TAVIE sessions. Participants had been diagnosed with HIV 14 years earlier on average and had been on ART for a mean period of 10 years. The sessions lasted 20-30 minutes each and were received two weeks apart. They are hosted by a virtual nurse who engages the user in a self-management skills-learning process for the purpose of treatment adherence. Semistructured interviews were conducted lasting 30-40 minutes to get participants to share their experience of the intervention through personal stories and what they thought and felt during their participation. Data were analyzed using Miles and Huberman

  11. Communication, Community, and Disconnection: Pre-Service Teachers in Virtual School Field Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, Christian; Eckdahl, Kelli; Morone, Mike; Cook, Vicki; Giblin, Thomas; Coon, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the experiences of 11 graduate-level pre-service teachers completing Virtual School Field Experiences (VSFEs) with cooperating teachers in fully online, asynchronous high school courses in New York State. The VSFEs included a 7-week online teacher training course, and a 7-week online field experience. Pre-service teachers…

  12. Experimenting with the virtual environment Moodle in Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Maria Ines; Dickman, Adriana

    2008-03-01

    The master's program in Physics Education of the Catholic University in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, includes the discipline ``Digital technologies in Physics education.'' The main goal of this discipline is to discuss the role of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in the process of learning-teaching science. We introduce our students to several virtual platforms, both free and commercial, discussing their functionality and features. We encourage our students to get in touch with computer tools and resources by planning their own computer based course using the Moodle platform. We discuss different patterns of virtual environment courses, whose proposals are centered mainly in the students, or teacher-centered or even system-centered. The student is free to choose between only one topic and a year course to work with, since their interests vary from learning something more about a specific subject to a complete e-learning course covering the entire school year. (The courses are available online in the address sitesinf01.pucmg.br/moodle. Participation only requires filling out an application form.) After three editions of this discipline, we have several courses available. We realize that students tend to focus on traditional methods, always preserving their role as knowledge-givers. In conclusion, we can say that, in spite of exhaustive discussion about autonomy involved with ICTs abilities, most of the students used the new virtual medium to organize traditional teacher-centered courses.

  13. Evaluating the Effect on User Perception and Performance of Static and Dynamic Contents Deployed in Augmented Reality Based Learning Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Mauricio Hincapié; Díaz, Christian Andrés; Moreno, Gustavo Adolfo

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, the use of technology to improve teaching and learning experiences in the classroom has been promoted. One of these technologies is augmented reality, which allows overlaying layers of virtual information on real scene with the aim of increasing the perception that user has of reality. Augmented reality has proved to offer several…

  14. The Virtual GloveboX (VGX: a Semi-immersive Virtual Environment for Training Astronauts in Life Sciences Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Alexander Twombly

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The International Space Station will soon provide an unparalleled research facility for studying the near- and longer-term effects of microgravity on living systems. Using the Space Station Glovebox Facility - a compact, fully contained reach-in environment - astronauts will conduct technically challenging life sciences experiments. Virtual environment technologies are being developed at NASA Ames Research Center to help realize the scientific potential of this unique resource by facilitating the experimental hardware and protocol designs and by assisting the astronauts in training. The "Virtual GloveboX" (VGX integrates high-fidelity graphics, force-feedback devices and real-time computer simulation engines to achieve an immersive training environment. Here, we describe the prototype VGX system, the distributed processing architecture used in the simulation environment, and modifications to the visualization pipeline required to accommodate the display configuration.

  15. Virtual Reality Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs basic and applied research in interactive 3D computer graphics, including visual analytics, virtual environments, and augmented reality (AR). The...

  16. Experiencing Soil Science from your office through virtual experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beato, M. Carmen; González-Merino, Ramón; Campillo, M. Carmen; Fernández-Ahumada, Elvira; Ortiz, Leovigilda; Taguas, Encarnación V.; Guerrero, José Emilio

    2017-04-01

    Currently, numerous tools based on the new information and communication technologies offer a wide range of possibilities for the implementation of interactive methodologies in Education and Science. In particular, virtual reality and immersive worlds - artificially generated computer environments where users interact through a figurative individual that represents them in that environment (their "avatar") - have been identified as the technology that will change the way we live, particularly in educational terms, product development and entertainment areas (Schmorrow, 2009). Gisbert-Cervera et al. (2011) consider that the 3D worlds in education, among others, provide a unique training and exchange of knowledge environment which allows a goal reflection to support activities and achieve learning outcomes. In Soil Sciences, the experimental component is essential to acquire the necessary knowledge to understand the biogeochemical processes taking place and their interactions with time, climate, topography and living organisms present. In this work, an immersive virtual environment which reproduces a series of pits have been developed to evaluate and differentiate soil characteristics such as texture, structure, consistency, color and other physical-chemical and biological properties for educational purposes. Bibliographical material such as pictures, books, papers and were collected in order to classify the information needed and to build the soil profiles into the virtual environment. The programming language for the virtual recreation was Unreal Engine4 (UE4; https://www.unrealengine.com/unreal-engine-4). This program was chosen because it provides two toolsets for programmers and it can also be used in tandem to accelerate development workflows. In addition, Unreal Engine4 technology powers hundreds of games as well as real-time 3D films, training simulations, visualizations and it creates very realistic graphics. For the evaluation of its impact and its

  17. Multimodal augmented reality : the norm rather than the exception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schraffenberger, Hanna; van der Heide, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is commonly seen as a technology that overlays virtual imagery onto a participant's view of the world. In line with this, most AR research is focused on what we see. In this paper, we challenge this focus on vision and make a case for an experience-focused and

  18. From urban planning and emergency training to Pokémon Go: applications of virtual reality GIS (VRGIS) and augmented reality GIS (ARGIS) in personal, public and environmental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel Boulos, Maged N; Lu, Zhihan; Guerrero, Paul; Jennett, Charlene; Steed, Anthony

    2017-02-20

    The latest generation of virtual and mixed reality hardware has rekindled interest in virtual reality GIS (VRGIS) and augmented reality GIS (ARGIS) applications in health, and opened up new and exciting opportunities and possibilities for using these technologies in the personal and public health arenas. From smart urban planning and emergency training to Pokémon Go, this article offers a snapshot of some of the most remarkable VRGIS and ARGIS solutions for tackling public and environmental health problems, and bringing about safer and healthier living options to individuals and communities. The article also covers the main technical foundations and issues underpinning these solutions.

  19. From urban planning and emergency training to Pokémon Go: applications of virtual reality GIS (VRGIS and augmented reality GIS (ARGIS in personal, public and environmental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maged N. Kamel Boulos

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The latest generation of virtual and mixed reality hardware has rekindled interest in virtual reality GIS (VRGIS and augmented reality GIS (ARGIS applications in health, and opened up new and exciting opportunities and possibilities for using these technologies in the personal and public health arenas. From smart urban planning and emergency training to Pokémon Go, this article offers a snapshot of some of the most remarkable VRGIS and ARGIS solutions for tackling public and environmental health problems, and bringing about safer and healthier living options to individuals and communities. The article also covers the main technical foundations and issues underpinning these solutions.

  20. Trauma management therapy with virtual-reality augmented exposure therapy for combat-related PTSD: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidel, Deborah C; Frueh, B Christopher; Neer, Sandra M; Bowers, Clint A; Trachik, Benjamin; Uhde, Thomas W; Grubaugh, Anouk

    2017-08-23

    Virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) realistically incorporates traumatic cues into exposure therapy and holds promise in the treatment of combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In a randomized controlled trial of 92 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans and active duty military personnel with combat-related PTSD, we compared the efficacy of Trauma Management Therapy (TMT; VRET plus a group treatment for anger, depression, and social isolation) to VRET plus a psychoeducation control condition. Efficacy was evaluated at mid- and post-treatment, and at 3- and 6-month follow-up. Consistent with our hypothesis, VRET resulted in significant decreases on the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale and the PTSD Checklist-Military version for both groups. Also consistent with our hypothesis, significant decreases in social isolation occurred only for those participants who received the TMT group component. There were significant decreases for depression and anger for both groups, although these occurred after VRET and before group treatment. All treatment gains were maintained six-months later. Although not part of the original hypotheses, sleep was not improved by either intervention and remained problematic. The results support the use of VRET as an efficacious treatment for combat-related PTSD, but suggest that VRET alone does not result in optimal treatment outcomes across domains associated with PTSD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Collaborative Virtual 3D Environment for Internet-Accessible Physics Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Scheucher

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract—Immersive 3D worlds have increasingly raised the interest of researchers and practitioners for various learning and training settings over the last decade. These virtual worlds can provide multiple communication channels between users and improve presence and awareness in the learning process. Consequently virtual 3D environments facilitate collaborative learning and training scenarios. In this paper we focus on the integration of internet-accessible physics experiments (iLabs combined with the TEALsim 3D simulation toolkit in Project Wonderland, Sun's toolkit for creating collaborative 3D virtual worlds. Within such a collaborative environment these tools provide the opportunity for teachers and students to work together as avatars as they control actual equipment, visualize physical phenomenon generated by the experiment, and discuss the results. In particular we will outline the steps of integration, future goals, as well as the value of a collaboration space in Wonderland's virtual world.

  2. Human-Avatar Symbiosis for the Treatment of Auditory Verbal Hallucinations in Schizophrenia through Virtual/Augmented Reality and Brain-Computer Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Caballero, Antonio; Navarro, Elena; Fernández-Sotos, Patricia; González, Pascual; Ricarte, Jorge J; Latorre, José M; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    This perspective paper faces the future of alternative treatments that take advantage of a social and cognitive approach with regards to pharmacological therapy of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) in patients with schizophrenia. AVH are the perception of voices in the absence of auditory stimulation and represents a severe mental health symptom. Virtual/augmented reality (VR/AR) and brain computer interfaces (BCI) are technologies that are growing more and more in different medical and psychological applications. Our position is that their combined use in computer-based therapies offers still unforeseen possibilities for the treatment of physical and mental disabilities. This is why, the paper expects that researchers and clinicians undergo a pathway toward human-avatar symbiosis for AVH by taking full advantage of new technologies. This outlook supposes to address challenging issues in the understanding of non-pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia-related disorders and the exploitation of VR/AR and BCI to achieve a real human-avatar symbiosis.

  3. Reform and practice for photoelectric specialty experimental teaching based on virtual simulation experiment platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yan; Lv, Qingsong; Wu, Maocheng; Xu, Yishen; Gu, Jihua

    2017-08-01

    In view of some problems about the traditional photoelectric specialty experimental teaching process, such as separation of theoretical teaching and practical teaching, immobilization of experimental teaching contents, low quality of experiments and no obvious effect, we explored and practiced a new experimental teaching model of "theoretical teaching, virtual simulation and physical experiment", which combined the characteristics of photoelectric information science and engineering major and the essential requirements of engineering innovation talents cultivation. The virtual simulation experiment platform has many advantages, such as high performance-to-price ratio, easy operation and open experimental process, which makes virtual simulation combine physical experiment, complete each other with virtual for practical. After the users log into the virtual simulation experimental platform, they will first study the contents of the experiment, clarify the purpose and requirements of the experiment, master the method of using the instrument and the relevant notes, and then use the experimental instruments provided by the platform to build the corresponding experimental system. Once the experimenter's optical path is set incorrectly or the instrument parameters are set incorrectly, the error or warning message will be automatically triggered, and the reference information will be given instructing the student to complete the correct experimental operation. The results of our practice in recent years show that the teaching reform of the photoelectric specialty experiments has not only brought great convenience to the experimental teaching management, broadened the students' thinking and vision, enhanced the students' experimental skills and comprehensive qualities, but also made the students participate in the experiment with their enthusiasm. During the construction of experiment programs, the students' engineering practical ability and independent innovation awareness

  4. Virtual reality visualization algorithms for the ALICE high energy physics experiment on the LHC at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrcha, Julian; Trzciński, Tomasz; Rokita, Przemysław

    2017-08-01

    Analyzing massive amounts of data gathered during many high energy physics experiments, including but not limited to the LHC ALICE detector experiment, requires efficient and intuitive methods of visualisation. One of the possible approaches to that problem is stereoscopic 3D data visualisation. In this paper, we propose several methods that provide high quality data visualisation and we explain how those methods can be applied in virtual reality headsets. The outcome of this work is easily applicable to many real-life applications needed in high energy physics and can be seen as a first step towards using fully immersive virtual reality technologies within the frames of the ALICE experiment.

  5. Remote Laboratory Experiments in a Virtual Immersive Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Berruti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Virtual Immersive Learning (VIL test bench implements a virtual collaborative immersive environment, capable of integrating natural contexts and typical gestures, which may occur during traditional lectures, enhanced with advanced experimental sessions. The system architecture is described, along with the motivations, and the most significant choices, both hardware and software, adopted for its implementation. The novelty of the approach essentially relies on its capability of embedding functionalities that stem from various research results (mainly carried out within the VICOM national project, and “putting the pieces together” in a well-integrated framework. These features, along with its high portability, good flexibility, and, above all, low cost, make this approach appropriate for educational and training purposes, mainly concerning measurements on telecommunication systems, at universities and research centers, as well as enterprises. Moreover, the methodology can be employed for remote access to and sharing of costly measurement equipment in many different activities. The immersive characteristics of the framework are illustrated, along with performance measurements related to a specific application.

  6. Web Services as Product Experience Augmenters and the Implications for Requirements Engineering: A Position Paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, Pascal; Nijholt, Antinus; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    There is currently little insight into what requirement engineering for web services is and in which context it will be carried out. In this position paper, we investigate requirements engineering for a special kind of web services, namely web services that are used to augment the perceived value of

  7. Taking Science Online: Evaluating Presence and Immersion through a Laboratory Experience in a Virtual Learning Environment for Entomology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annetta, Leonard; Klesath, Marta; Meyer, John

    2009-01-01

    A 3-D virtual field trip was integrated into an online college entomology course and developed as a trial for the possible incorporation of future virtual environments to supplement online higher education laboratories. This article provides an explanation of the rationale behind creating the virtual experience, the Bug Farm; the method and…

  8. MODELING STRATEGIES FOR THE ANALYSIS OF EXPERIMENTS IN AUGMENTED BLOCK DESIGN IN CLONAL TESTS OF Eucalyptus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Eduardo Rodrigues Prado

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5902/1980509810546The objective of this work was to compare analyses of experiment strategies when there is a large number of clones and a reduced number of seedlings to be evaluated. Data from girth at breast height of two seasons of evaluation, 30 and 90 months, from a clonal test of Eucalyptus were analyzed in three locations. The experiments were carried out in the augmented block design with 400 regular clones distributed in 20 blocks and with four common clones (controls.  Each plot consisted of five plants spaced 3 x 3 meters. The individual statistic analyses were carried out by season and local, a combined one by local at each season and a combined one involving the three locals and the two seasons. Each analysis was carried out according to two models: augmented design (AD and one way classification (OWC. The variance components, the heritability, the Speaman’s rank correlation and the coincidence indexes in the clone selection at the two models were estimated. It was found that the augmented block design and the one way classification provide similar results in Eucalyptus clone evaluation. The coincidence indexes between the two models in the clone selection, in general, were high, showing values of 100% in the local combined analyses at 90 months. The Spearman’s rank

  9. Undergraduate Student Self-Efficacy and Perceptions of Virtual World Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Lorraine May

    2017-01-01

    Virtual worlds are innovative teaching and learning methods that can provide immersive and engaging learning experiences (Lu, 2010). Though they have potential benefits, students sometimes experience a steep learning curve and discomfort with the technology (Warburton, 2009). This study explored how students in two American Studies classes using…

  10. Sound Design in Virtual Reality Concert Experiences using a Wave Field Synthesis Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Rasmus Bloustrød; Milesen, Victor; Smed, Dina Madsen

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we propose an experiment that evaluates the influence of audience noise on the feeling of presence and the perceived quality in a virtual reality concert experience delivered using Wave Field Synthesis. A 360 degree video of a live rock concert from a local band was recorded. Single...

  11. Enhancing Experiment Central Service Reliability: from delivery to security and virtualization

    CERN Document Server

    Donno, Flavia; Buzykaev, Alexey; Saiz Santos, Maria Dolores

    2011-01-01

    The four LHC experiments rely on experiment specific services running on machines mainly located at CERN. Some of these services have been rated by the experiments as very critical: any loss or degradation of performance has a major impact on the experiment's production and analysis activities. It is therefore important to provide a reliable and robust operational environment. In this work we describe the strategy based on service deployment, security and virtualization adopted to enhance the reliability of ATLAS and CMS central services.

  12. Augmented Mirror: Interactive Augmented Reality System Based on Kinect

    OpenAIRE

    Vera , Lucía; Gimeno , Jesús; Coma , Inmaculada; Fernández , Marcos

    2011-01-01

    Part 1: Long and Short Papers; International audience; In this paper we present a virtual character controlled by an actor in real time, who talks with an audience through an augmented mirror. The application, which integrates video images, the avatar and other virtual objects within an Augmented Reality system, has been implemented using a mixture of technologies: two kinect systems for motion capture, depth map and real images, a gyroscope to detect head movements, and control algorithms to...

  13. A Regional Integrated Virtual Learning Environment: The AOU's Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said Hammad

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose to construct a Regional Integrated Virtual Learning Environment (RIVLE for the Arab Open University (AOU. AOU is a new nonprofit learning institution with branches in six Arab countries and more branches scheduled to open in the near future. The university adopts an open learning methodology. We describe the major elements of the RIVLE and their interaction. We present a generic interface between the RIVLE and the Student Information System (SIS. We focus on the characteristics of the pedagogical model in the Arab Open University context and explain why RIVLE would be a perfect fit for this model. We argue that the potential benefits of a RIVLE are realized in such a setting. We also study the possibility of extending the RIVLE to existing learning institutions in the region.

  14. [Virtual surgical education: experience with medicine and surgery students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavina, Luigi; Mozzi, Enrico; Peracchia, Alberto

    2003-01-01

    The use of virtual reality simulation is currently being proposed within programs of postgraduate surgical education. The simple tasks that make up an operative procedure can be repeatedly performed until satisfactory execution is achieved, and the errors can be corrected by means of objective assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the applicability and the results of structured practice with the LapSim laparoscopic simulator used by undergraduate medical students. A significant reduction in operative time and errors was noted in several tasks (navigation, clipping, etc.). Although the transfer of technical skills to the operating room environment remains to be demonstrated, our research shows that this type of teaching is applicable to undergraduate medical students and in future may become a useful tool for selecting individuals for surgical residency programs.

  15. Media-Augmented Exercise Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, T.

    2002-01-01

    Cardio-vascular exercise has been used to mitigate the muscle and cardiac atrophy associated with adaptation to micro-gravity environments. Several hours per day may be required. In confined spaces and long duration missions this kind of exercise is inevitably repetitive and rapidly becomes uninteresting. At the same time, there are pressures to accomplish as much as possible given the cost- per-hour for humans occupying orbiting or interplanetary. Media augmentation provides a the means to overlap activities in time by supplementing the exercise with social, recreational, training or collaborative activities and thereby reducing time pressures. In addition, the machine functions as an interface to a wide range of digital environments allowing for spatial variety in an otherwise confined environment. We hypothesize that the adoption of media augmented exercise machines will have a positive effect on psycho-social well-being on long duration missions. By organizing and supplementing exercise machines, data acquisition hardware, computers and displays into an interacting system this proposal increases functionality with limited additional mass. This paper reviews preliminary work on a project to augment exercise equipment in a manner that addresses these issues and at the same time opens possibilities for additional benefits. A testbed augmented exercise machine uses a specialty built cycle trainer as both input to a virtual environment and as an output device from it using spatialized sound, and visual displays, vibration transducers and variable resistance. The resulting interactivity increases a sense of engagement in the exercise, provides a rich experience of the digital environments. Activities in the virtual environment and accompanying physiological and psychological indicators may be correlated to track and evaluate the health of the crew.

  16. Enhancing the Tourism Experience through Mobile Augmented Reality: Challenges and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris D. Kounavis

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the use of Augmented Reality (AR applications for the needs of tourism. It describes the technology’s evolution from pilot applications into commercial mobile applications. We address the technical aspects of mobile AR application development, emphasizing the technologies that render the delivery of augmented reality content possible and experientially superior. We examine the state of the art, providing an analysis concerning the development and the objectives of each application. Acknowledging the various technological limitations hindering AR’s substantial end‐ user adoption, the paper proposes a model for developing AR mobile applications for the field of tourism, aiming to release AR’s full potential within the field.

  17. Extending Science lessons with Virtual Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Minocha, Shailey; Tudor, Ana-Despina; Tilling, Steve; Needham, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The Open University, Field Studies Council and Association for Science Education are conducting research into the use of Google Expeditions and other virtual reality tools to a) augment and extend field work experiences; and b) as an additional tool in the classrooms along with resources such as videos, photographs. \\ud \\ud The following aspects were discussed in this workshop:\\ud \\ud Does the virtual reality technology improve student engagement, and what are the implications for teachers?\\u...

  18. Hyaluron Filler Containing Lidocaine on a CPM Basis for Lip Augmentation: Reports from Practical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tanja C; Sattler, Gerhard; Gauglitz, Gerd G

    2016-06-01

    Lip augmentation with hyaluronic acid fillers is established. As monophasic polydensified hyaluronic acid products with variable density, CPM-HAL1 (Belotero Balance Lidocaine, Merz Aesthetics, Raleigh, NC) and CPM-HAL2 (Belotero Intense Lidocaine, Merz Aesthetics, Raleigh, NC) are qualified for beautification and particularly natural-looking rejuvenation, respectively. The aim of this article was to assess the handling and outcome of lip augmentation using the lidocaine-containing hyaluronic acid fillers, CPM-HAL1 and CPM-HAL2. Data were documented from patients who received lip augmentation by means of beautification and/or rejuvenation using CPM-HAL1 and/or CPM-HAL2. Observation period was 4 months, with assessment of natural outcome, evenness, distribution, fluidity, handling, malleability, tolerability, as well as patient satisfaction and pain. A total of 146 patients from 21 German centers participated. Physicians rated natural outcome and evenness as good or very good for more than 95% of patients. Distribution, fluidity, handling, and malleability were assessed for both fillers as good or very good in more than 91% of patients. At every evaluation point, more than 93% of patients were very or very much satisfied with the product. A total of 125 patients (85.6%) experienced transient injection-related side effects. Pain intensity during the procedure was mild (2.72 ± 1.72 on the 0-10 pain assessment scale) and abated markedly within 30 minutes (0.42 ± 0.57). Lip augmentation with hyaluronic acid fillers produced a long-term cosmetic result. Due to the lidocaine content, procedural pain was low and transient. Accordingly, a high degree of patient satisfaction was achieved that was maintained throughout the observation period. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Home-Based Virtual Reality-Augmented Training Improves Lower Limb Muscle Strength, Balance, and Functional Mobility following Chronic Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villiger, Michael; Liviero, Jasmin; Awai, Lea; Stoop, Rahel; Pyk, Pawel; Clijsen, Ron; Curt, Armin; Eng, Kynan; Bolliger, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Key factors positively influencing rehabilitation and functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) include training variety, intensive movement repetition, and motivating training tasks. Systems supporting these aspects may provide profound gains in rehabilitation, independent of the subject's treatment location. In the present study, we test the hypotheses that virtual reality (VR)-augmented training at home (i.e., unsupervised) is feasible with subjects with an incomplete SCI (iSCI) and that it improves motor functions such as lower limb muscle strength, balance, and functional mobility. In the study, 12 chronic iSCI subjects used a home-based, mobile version of a lower limb VR training system. The system included motivating training scenarios and combined action observation and execution. Virtual representations of the legs and feet were controlled via movement sensors. The subjects performed home-based training over 4 weeks, with 16-20 sessions of 30-45 min each. The outcome measures assessed were the Lower Extremity Motor Score (LEMS), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go (TUG), Spinal Cord Independence Measure mobility, Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury II, and 10 m and 6 min walking tests. Two pre-treatment assessment time points were chosen for outcome stability: 4 weeks before treatment and immediately before treatment. At post-assessment (i.e., immediately after treatment), high motivation and positive changes were reported by the subjects (adapted Patients' Global Impression of Change). Significant improvements were shown in lower limb muscle strength (LEMS, P  = 0.008), balance (BBS, P  = 0.008), and functional mobility (TUG, P  = 0.007). At follow-up assessment (i.e., 2-3 months after treatment), functional mobility (TUG) remained significantly improved ( P  = 0.005) in contrast to the other outcome measures. In summary, unsupervised exercises at home with the VR training system led to beneficial functional

  20. Home-Based Virtual Reality-Augmented Training Improves Lower Limb Muscle Strength, Balance, and Functional Mobility following Chronic Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Villiger

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Key factors positively influencing rehabilitation and functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI include training variety, intensive movement repetition, and motivating training tasks. Systems supporting these aspects may provide profound gains in rehabilitation, independent of the subject’s treatment location. In the present study, we test the hypotheses that virtual reality (VR-augmented training at home (i.e., unsupervised is feasible with subjects with an incomplete SCI (iSCI and that it improves motor functions such as lower limb muscle strength, balance, and functional mobility. In the study, 12 chronic iSCI subjects used a home-based, mobile version of a lower limb VR training system. The system included motivating training scenarios and combined action observation and execution. Virtual representations of the legs and feet were controlled via movement sensors. The subjects performed home-based training over 4 weeks, with 16–20 sessions of 30–45 min each. The outcome measures assessed were the Lower Extremity Motor Score (LEMS, Berg Balance Scale (BBS, Timed Up and Go (TUG, Spinal Cord Independence Measure mobility, Walking Index for Spinal Cord Injury II, and 10 m and 6 min walking tests. Two pre-treatment assessment time points were chosen for outcome stability: 4 weeks before treatment and immediately before treatment. At post-assessment (i.e., immediately after treatment, high motivation and positive changes were reported by the subjects (adapted Patients’ Global Impression of Change. Significant improvements were shown in lower limb muscle strength (LEMS, P = 0.008, balance (BBS, P = 0.008, and functional mobility (TUG, P = 0.007. At follow-up assessment (i.e., 2–3 months after treatment, functional mobility (TUG remained significantly improved (P = 0.005 in contrast to the other outcome measures. In summary, unsupervised exercises at home with the VR training system led to beneficial

  1. New weather depiction technology for night vision goggle (NVG) training: 3D virtual/augmented reality scene-weather-atmosphere-target simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folaron, Michelle; Deacutis, Martin; Hegarty, Jennifer; Vollmerhausen, Richard; Schroeder, John; Colby, Frank P.

    2007-04-01

    US Navy and Marine Corps pilots receive Night Vision Goggle (NVG) training as part of their overall training to maintain the superiority of our forces. This training must incorporate realistic targets; backgrounds; and representative atmospheric and weather effects they may encounter under operational conditions. An approach for pilot NVG training is to use the Night Imaging and Threat Evaluation Laboratory (NITE Lab) concept. The NITE Labs utilize a 10' by 10' static terrain model equipped with both natural and cultural lighting that are used to demonstrate various illumination conditions, and visual phenomena which might be experienced when utilizing night vision goggles. With this technology, the military can safely, systematically, and reliably expose pilots to the large number of potentially dangerous environmental conditions that will be experienced in their NVG training flights. A previous SPIE presentation described our work for NAVAIR to add realistic atmospheric and weather effects to the NVG NITE Lab training facility using the NVG - WDT(Weather Depiction Technology) system (Colby, et al.). NVG -WDT consist of a high end multiprocessor server with weather simulation software, and several fixed and goggle mounted Heads Up Displays (HUDs). Atmospheric and weather effects are simulated using state-of-the-art computer codes such as the WRF (Weather Research μ Forecasting) model; and the US Air Force Research Laboratory MODTRAN radiative transport model. Imagery for a variety of natural and man-made obscurations (e.g. rain, clouds, snow, dust, smoke, chemical releases) are being calculated and injected into the scene observed through the NVG via the fixed and goggle mounted HUDs. This paper expands on the work described in the previous presentation and will describe the 3D Virtual/Augmented Reality Scene - Weather - Atmosphere - Target Simulation part of the NVG - WDT. The 3D virtual reality software is a complete simulation system to generate realistic

  2. [Intraoperative augmented reality visualization. Current state of development and initial experiences with the CamC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidert, S; Wang, L; von der Heide, A; Navab, N; Euler, E

    2012-03-01

    The intraoperative application of augmented reality (AR) has so far mainly taken place in the field of endoscopy. Here, the camera image of the endoscope was augmented by computer graphics derived mostly from preoperative imaging. Due to the complex setup and operation of the devices, they have not yet become part of routine clinical practice. The Camera Augmented Mobile C-arm (CamC) that extends a classic C-arm by a video camera and mirror construction is characterized by its uncomplicated handling. It combines its video live stream geometrically correct with the acquired X-ray. The clinical application of the device in 43 cases showed the strengths of the device in positioning for X-ray acquisition, incision placement, K-wire placement, and instrument guidance. With its new function and the easy integration into the OR workflow of any procedure that requires X-ray imaging, the CamC has the potential to become the first widely used AR technology for orthopedic and trauma surgery.

  3. Virtually teaching virtual leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Thomas Duus; Nielsen, Rikke Kristine; Børgesen, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    This paper seeks to investigate the challenges to virtual collaboration and leadership on basis of findings from a virtual course on collaboration and leadership. The course used for this experiment was designed as a practical approach, which allowed participants to experience curriculum phenomena....... This experimental course provided insights into the challenges involved in virtual processes, and those experiences where used for addressing the challenges that virtual leadership is confronted with. Emphasis was placed on the reduction of undesired virtual distance and its consequences through affinity building....... We found that student scepticism appeared when a breakdown resulted in increasing virtual distance, and raises questions on how leaders might translate or upgrade their understandings of leadership to handling such increased distance through affinity building....

  4. Integrating virtual reality video games into practice: clinicians' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levac, Danielle E; Miller, Patricia A

    2013-10-01

    The Nintendo Wii is a popular virtual reality (VR) video gaming system in rehabilitation practice and research. As evidence emerges related to its effectiveness as a physical therapy training method, clinicians require information about the pragmatics of its use in practice. The purpose of this descriptive qualitative study is to explore observations and insights from a sample of physical therapists (PTs) working with children with acquired brain injury regarding practical implications of using the Wii as a physical therapy intervention. Six PTs employed at a children's rehabilitation center participated in semi-structured interviews, which were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Two themes summarize the practical implications of Wii use: 1) technology meets clinical practice; and 2) onus is on the therapist. Therapists described both beneficial and challenging implications arising from the intersection of technology and practice, and reported the personal commitment required to orient oneself to the gaming system and capably implement this intervention. Findings include issues that may be relevant to professional development in a broader rehabilitation context, including suggestions for the content of educational initiatives and the need for institutional support from managers in the form of physical resources for VR implementation.

  5. Adaptive Augmenting Control Flight Characterization Experiment on an F/A-18

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZwieten, Tannen S.; Orr, Jeb S.; Wall, John H.; Gilligan, Eric T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarizes the Adaptive Augmenting Control (AAC) flight characterization experiments performed using an F/A-18 (TN 853). AAC was designed and developed specifically for launch vehicles, and is currently part of the baseline autopilot design for NASA's Space Launch System (SLS). The scope covered here includes a brief overview of the algorithm (covered in more detail elsewhere), motivation and benefits of flight testing, top-level SLS flight test objectives, applicability of the F/A-18 as a platform for testing a launch vehicle control design, test cases designed to fully vet the AAC algorithm, flight test results, and conclusions regarding the functionality of AAC. The AAC algorithm developed at Marshall Space Flight Center is a forward loop gain multiplicative adaptive algorithm that modifies the total attitude control system gain in response to sensed model errors or undesirable parasitic mode resonances. The AAC algorithm provides the capability to improve or decrease performance by balancing attitude tracking with the mitigation of parasitic dynamics, such as control-structure interaction or servo-actuator limit cycles. In the case of the latter, if unmodeled or mismodeled parasitic dynamics are present that would otherwise result in a closed-loop instability or near instability, the adaptive controller decreases the total loop gain to reduce the interaction between these dynamics and the controller. This is in contrast to traditional adaptive control logic, which focuses on improving performance by increasing gain. The computationally simple AAC attitude control algorithm has stability properties that are reconcilable in the context of classical frequency-domain criteria (i.e., gain and phase margin). The algorithm assumes that the baseline attitude control design is well-tuned for a nominal trajectory and is designed to adapt only when necessary. Furthermore, the adaptation is attracted to the nominal design and adapts only on an as-needed basis

  6. Web experience effects in a virtual shopping interaction environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorenzo-Romero, C.; Constantinides, Efthymios; Gomez-Borja, M.A.; Lin, A.; Foster, J.; Scifleet, P.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this chapter is to contextualize the concepts of web atmospherics and web experience in the particular case of a shopping situation in the Internet environment. Based on a broader concept of user experience, the chapter identifies the main influencers of consumer behaviour in the

  7. Crossing the Atlantic: Integrating Cross-Cultural Experiences into Undergraduate Business Courses Using Virtual Communities Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luethge, Denise J.; Raska, David; Greer, Bertie M.; O'Connor, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Today's business school academics are tasked with pedagogy that offers students an understanding of the globalization of markets and the cross-cultural communication skills needed in today's business environment. The authors describe how a virtual cross-cultural experience was integrated into an undergraduate business course and used as an…

  8. Exploring Adult Learners Usage of Information Communication Technology during a Virtual Peer Coaching Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladyshewsky, Richard; Pettapiece, Ronald G.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how post-graduate students in a fully online business course used information communication technology during a virtual peer coaching experience. In this exploration of technology use it was found students required additional guidance in the use of technologies such as email, telephone calling, and more…

  9. Virtual Reality Conferencing: Multi-user immersive VR experiences on the web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunkel, S.N.B.; Stokking, H.M.; Prins, M.J.; Stap, N. van der; Haar, F.B. ter; Niamut, O.A.

    2018-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) and 360-degree video are set to become part of the future social environment, enriching and enhancing the way we share experiences and collaborate remotely. While Social VR applications are getting more momentum, most services regarding Social VR focus on animated avatars. In

  10. Providing guidance in virtual lab experimentation : the case of an experiment design tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efstathiou, Charalampos; Hovardas, Tasos; Xenofontos, Nikoletta A.; Zacharia, Zacharias C.; de Jong, Ton A.J.M.; Anjewierden, Anjo; van Riesen, Siswa A.N.

    2018-01-01

    The present study employed a quasi-experimental design to assess a computer-based tool, which was intended to scaffold the task of designing experiments when using a virtual lab for the process of experimentation. In particular, we assessed the impact of this tool on primary school students’

  11. Nursing Faculty Experiences of Virtual Learning Environments for Teaching Clinical Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharzuk-Marciano, Tara

    2017-01-01

    Nurses need sharp, clinical reasoning skills to respond to critical situations and to be successful at work in a complex and challenging healthcare system. While past research has focused on using virtual learning environments to teach clinical reasoning, there has been limited research on the experiences of nursing faculty and there is a need for…

  12. Middle school students' learning of mechanics concepts through engagement in different sequences of physical and virtual experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sarah; Gnesdilow, Dana; Puntambekar, Sadhana; Kim, Jee-Seon

    2017-08-01

    Physical and virtual experimentation are thought to have different affordances for supporting students' learning. Research investigating the use of physical and virtual experiments to support students' learning has identified a variety of, sometimes conflicting, outcomes. Unanswered questions remain about how physical and virtual experiments may impact students' learning and for which contexts and content areas they may be most effective. Using a quasi-experimental design, we examined eighth grade students' (N = 100) learning of physics concepts related to pulleys depending on the sequence of physical and virtual labs they engaged in. Five classes of students were assigned to either the: physical first condition (PF) (n = 55), where students performed a physical pulley experiment and then performed the same experiment virtually, or virtual first condition (VF) (n = 45), with the opposite sequence. Repeated measures ANOVA's were conducted to examine how physical and virtual labs impacted students' learning of specific physics concepts. While we did not find clear-cut support that one sequence was better, we did find evidence that participating in virtual experiments may be more beneficial for learning certain physics concepts, such as work and mechanical advantage. Our findings support the idea that if time or physical materials are limited, using virtual experiments may help students understand work and mechanical advantage.

  13. Virtual Nursing Intervention Adjunctive to Conventional Care: The Experience of Persons Living With HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Geneviève; Ramirez-Garcia, Pilar; Bourbonnais, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background Persons living with HIV (PLHIV) must adhere optimally to antiretroviral therapy (ART) on a daily basis and for their lifetime to maintain an undetectable viral load, allowing them to preserve their health. Taking advantage of the opportunity that information and communication technologies provide to broaden intervention modalities and intensify clinical follow-up, a virtual nursing intervention consisting of four interactive computer sessions was developed to empower PLHIV to manage their ART and symptoms optimally. Compared with other types of information and communication technologies-assisted interventions such as text messages, HIV Treatment, Virtual Nursing Assistance and Education (VIH-TAVIE) requires a certain degree of active engagement on the part of the user to develop and strengthen the self-management skills to optimize adherence. After the intervention’s impact on ART adherence was measured quantitatively, a qualitative study was undertaken to describe how users experience the intervention. Understanding how PLHIV perceive being assisted asynchronously by a virtual nurse was of particular interest. Objective The objective of the study was to explore and describe how PLHIV experience VIH-TAVIE, that is, receiving customized asynchronous accompaniment via a virtual nurse. Methods A qualitative study was conducted with 26 PLHIV (20 men, 6 women) who received all four VIH-TAVIE sessions. Participants had been diagnosed with HIV 14 years earlier on average and had been on ART for a mean period of 10 years. The sessions lasted 20-30 minutes each and were received two weeks apart. They are hosted by a virtual nurse who engages the user in a self-management skills-learning process for the purpose of treatment adherence. Semistructured interviews were conducted lasting 30-40 minutes to get participants to share their experience of the intervention through personal stories and what they thought and felt during their participation. Data were analyzed

  14. A home-based intervention using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) techniques in rural Kenya: what are the caregivers' experiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gona, J K; Newton, C R; Hartley, S; Bunning, K

    2014-01-01

    Caring for a child with complex communication needs associated with a developmental condition frequently adds stress to the caregiver. Furthermore, professional assistance is scarce in low-income rural settings. For such children speech is frequently unachievable. Augmentative and alternative communication provides options for supplementing or replacing speech with other techniques. The current study aimed to examine the experiences of caregivers in Kenya before and after a home-based intervention using augmentative and alternative communication techniques with children with complex communication needs. Caregivers were interviewed pre- and post-intervention. The interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and translated into English. Content analysis was applied through the stages of text familiarization and topic organization. Emergent themes and their sub-themes were identified and labelled. Connections between themes were established and interpretations made. The procedure was completed by a second researcher independently. Conflicting ideas were jointly discussed until consensus was achieved. Four themes emerged from the data: communication process; struggle; normality; and supernatural power. Before intervention, the caregivers acknowledged their expertise in communications with the child, while also revealing their sense of isolation, burden and pain. Normality was present as a source of comparison and also an aspirational goal. Post-intervention more positive language was used to describe the child. There was an 'opening up' of communication that recognized the child's strengths and some social support systems were re-established. The power of the supernatural was recognized before and after intervention. Caring of a child with complex communication needs presents many challenges. A home-based intervention using augmentative and alternative communication techniques appears to have been a catalyst for some positive transformations in the caregivers

  15. Development, Implementation, and Assessment of General Chemistry Lab Experiments Performed in the Virtual World of Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Kurt; Keeney-Kennicutt, Wendy; Fowler, Debra; Macik, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Virtual worlds are a potential medium for teaching college-level chemistry laboratory courses. To determine the feasibility of conducting chemistry experiments in such an environment, undergraduate students performed two experiments in the immersive virtual world of Second Life (SL) as part of their regular General Chemistry 2 laboratory course.…

  16. Virtual experiment of optical spatial filtering in Matlab environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yunjing; Wang, Chunyong; Song, Yang; Lai, Jiancheng; Wang, Qinghua; Qi, Jing; Shen, Zhonghua

    2017-08-01

    The principle of spatial filtering experiment has been introduced, and the computer simulation platform with graphical user interface (GUI) has been made out in Matlab environment. Using it various filtering processes for different input image or different filtering purpose will be completed accurately, and filtering effect can be observed clearly with adjusting experimental parameters. The physical nature of the optical spatial filtering can be showed vividly, and so experimental teaching effect will be promoted.

  17. The experiment editor: supporting inquiry-based learning with virtual labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan, D.; Heradio, R.; de la Torre, L.; Dormido, S.; Esquembre, F.

    2017-05-01

    Inquiry-based learning is a pedagogical approach where students are motivated to pose their own questions when facing problems or scenarios. In physics learning, students are turned into scientists who carry out experiments, collect and analyze data, formulate and evaluate hypotheses, and so on. Lab experimentation is essential for inquiry-based learning, yet there is a drawback with traditional hands-on labs in the high costs associated with equipment, space, and maintenance staff. Virtual laboratories are helpful to reduce these costs. This paper enriches the virtual lab ecosystem by providing an integrated environment to automate experimentation tasks. In particular, our environment supports: (i) scripting and running experiments on virtual labs, and (ii) collecting and analyzing data from the experiments. The current implementation of our environment supports virtual labs created with the authoring tool Easy Java/Javascript Simulations. Since there are public repositories with hundreds of freely available labs created with this tool, the potential applicability to our environment is considerable.

  18. Virtual and remote experiments for radiometric and photometric measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoms, L-J; Girwidz, R

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of spectra is fundamental to our modern understanding of wave optics and colour perception. Since spectrometers are expensive, and accurate calibration is necessary to achieve high quality spectra, we developed a remote lab on optical spectrometry. With this tool, students can carry out real experiments over the Internet. In this article the pros and cons of remote labs, the physical background of optical spectrometry, and the development and use of a radiometric remote lab for higher education are discussed. The remote lab is freely accessible to everyone at http://virtualremotelab.net. (paper)

  19. Virtual and remote experiments for radiometric and photometric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, L.-J.; Girwidz, R.

    2017-09-01

    The analysis of spectra is fundamental to our modern understanding of wave optics and colour perception. Since spectrometers are expensive, and accurate calibration is necessary to achieve high quality spectra, we developed a remote lab on optical spectrometry. With this tool, students can carry out real experiments over the Internet. In this article the pros and cons of remote labs, the physical background of optical spectrometry, and the development and use of a radiometric remote lab for higher education are discussed. The remote lab is freely accessible to everyone at http://virtualremotelab.net.

  20. An independent shopping experience for wheelchair users through augmented reality and RFID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Zulqarnain; Pous, Rafael; Norrie, Christopher S

    2017-06-23

    People with physical and mobility impairments continue to struggle to attain independence in the performance of routine activities and tasks. For example, browsing in a store and interacting with products located beyond an arm's length may be impossible without the enabling intervention of a human assistant. This research article describes a study undertaken to design, develop, and evaluate potential interaction methods for motor-impaired individuals, specifically those who use wheelchairs. Our study includes a user-centered approach, and a categorization of wheelchair users based upon the severity of their disability and their individual needs. We designed and developed access solutions that utilize radio frequency identification (RFID), augmented reality (AR), and touchscreen technologies in order to help people who use wheelchairs to carry out certain tasks autonomously. In this way, they have been empowered to go shopping independently, free from reliance upon the assistance of others. A total of 18 wheelchair users participated in the completed study.

  1. Tracking for Outdoor Mobile Augmented Reality: Further development of the Zion Augmented Reality Application

    OpenAIRE

    Strand, Tor Egil Riegels

    2008-01-01

    This report deals with providing tracking to an outdoor mobile augmented reality system and the Zion Augmented Reality Application. ZionARA is meant to display a virtual recreation of a 13th century castle on the site it once stood through an augmented reality Head Mounted Display. Mobile outdoor augmented/mixed reality puts special demands on what kind of equipment is practical. After briefly evaluating the different existing tracking methods, a solution based on GPS and an augmented inertia...

  2. Transcanalicular Laser-Assisted Dacryocystorhinostomy With Endonasal Augmentation in Primary Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction: Our Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Ruchi; Nagpal, Smriti; Kumar, Sushil; Meher, Ravi; Kamal, Saurabh; Garg, Sonam

    To evaluate and compare the success rate of transcanalicular laser-assisted dacryocystorhinostomy with endonasal augmentation, with and without intubation, in patients suffering from primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction, at 1 year of follow up. A prospective, randomized interventional pilot study was conducted at a tertiary care center, in accordance with the guidelines of Declaration of Helsinki. Sixty eyes of 60 adult patients with primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction were included. The participants were divided randomly into 2 equal groups (A and B-without and with bicanalicular intubation, respectively). An osteotomy was first created using 980 nm diode laser (set at 8W continuous mode) transcanalicularly and then enlarged intranasally using Blakesley's nasal forceps, followed by bicanalicular silicon intubation in group B patients. The tubes were removed at the end of 8 weeks. The ostium size was assessed endoscopically at 8 weeks and again at the end of follow up, at 1 year. A successful outcome was defined in terms of ostium patency at the end of 1 year. The results were analyzed at the end of a follow up of 1 year, using various statistical tests (p < 0.05). The mean age of the patients was 35.3 ± 15.89 years, with 23 male and 37 female patients, the 2 groups having a similar male:female ratio. An overall success rate of 90% was achieved at the end of 1 year with no statistically significant difference between the groups. Postoperative complications like tube displacement and punctal, canalicular injury were more in the intubated group. The average osteotomy size was 8.06 ± 5.4 mm at the end of 1 year. Transcanalicular laser-assisted dacryocysto rhinostomy, with endonasal augmentation, is a scarless, effective, daycare procedure, for treatment of primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction with no additional advantage offered by silicone intubation.

  3. Virtual Reality As A Spatial Experience For Architecture Design: A Study of Effectiveness for Architecture Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapto Pamungkas Luhur

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Studios. This ability gained through visual design thinking. The spatial experience honed by three dimensional thinking from the medium diversity. The spatial experience learned through a room layout, proportion, and composition. This research used an experimental method and the primary data obtained by a “Likert” scale questionnaire. The Respondents are 50 students of the Architectural Design Studio. Moreover, the analysis focuses on the VR for spatial experience. The result was a descriptive explanation of the effectiveness of Virtual Reality for a spatial experience of architecture students at Technology University of Yogyakarta.

  4. Crime Scenes as Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil

    2010-01-01

    Using the concept of augmented reality, this article will investigate how places in various ways have become augmented by means of different mediatization strategies. Augmentation of reality implies an enhancement of the places' emotional character: a certain mood, atmosphere or narrative surplus......, physical damage: they are all readable and interpretable signs. As augmented reality the crime scene carries a narrative which at first is hidden and must be revealed. Due to the process of investigation and the detective's ability to reason and deduce, the crime scene as place is reconstructed as virtual...

  5. Virtual machines & volunteer computing: Experience from LHC@Home: Test4Theory project

    CERN Document Server

    Lombraña González, Daniel; Blomer, Jakob; Buncic, Predrag; Harutyunyan, Artem; Marquina, Miguel; Segal, Ben; Skands, Peter; Karneyeu, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Volunteer desktop grids are nowadays becoming more and more powerful thanks to improved high end components: multi-core CPUs, larger RAM memories and hard disks, better network connectivity and bandwidth, etc. As a result, desktop grid systems can run more complex experiments or simulations, but some problems remain: the heterogeneity of hardware architectures and software (library dependencies, code length, big repositories, etc.) make it very difficult for researchers and developers to deploy and maintain a software stack for all the available platforms. In this paper, the employment of virtualization is shown to be the key to solve these problems. It provides a homogeneous layer allowing researchers to focus their efforts on running their experiments. Inside virtual custom execution environments, researchers can control and deploy very complex experiments or simulations running on heterogeneous grids of high-end computers. The following work presents the latest results from CERN’s LHC@home Test4Theory p...

  6. THE VIRTUAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS IN VOCATIONAL EDUCATION: A REPORT OF BLENDED LEARNING EXPERIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Prado Constantino

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experiment in uses of virtual learning environments (VLE in the vocational education, evaluated by the Educational Supervision of Vocational and Secondary Schools of Paula Souza Center. The experience occurred in Etec "Jacinto Ferreira de Sá", São Paulo, Brazil, between 2009 and 2011, where the reported activities were organized and developed in the degree of Music, with students of different ages. Using specifics instruments to qualitative research for data collection were selected class record books, the reports to the virtual environment, the records of the participants' personal reflections, interviews and examination of the minutes of class councils involved. The experience has served as a basis for replication in other contexts and vocational courses presented by the institution.

  7. Virtual worlds. Meta-analysis of educational experiences from its beginnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Manuel DÍAZ FERNÁNDEZ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Over a decade has passed since the specialized scientific literature presented in 2004 the first educational experience with virtual worlds. An evolutionary period that requires analysis to determine the adequacy of the developed experiences so far, enabling the formulation of guidelines and / or aspects to consider in future experiences to achieve better adjustment and adaptation to the specific framework.The investigation lies within the meta-analytic paradigm, with a quantitative and systematic review of the results of the 36 experiences that have been accessed, projecting an analysis and review of the same by using a form of observation, new and validated, in which a number of desirable compliance parameters are set, based on the current framework established by different experts.The results show a high degree of adaptation in didactic and pedagogical aspects, as well as communication and interaction, being lower in technical and support aspects, which can influence the work in virtual worlds. On the other hand, errors not meet the characteristics of the participants are detected. Failure to take into account their degree of socialization, their digital knowledge or communication skills in these environments, determines the validity of the designs and implementations, being important to consider in future experiences with virtual worlds.

  8. Towards Pervasive Augmented Reality: Context-Awareness in Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubert, Jens; Langlotz, Tobias; Zollmann, Stefanie; Regenbrecht, Holger

    2017-06-01

    Augmented Reality is a technique that enables users to interact with their physical environment through the overlay of digital information. While being researched for decades, more recently, Augmented Reality moved out of the research labs and into the field. While most of the applications are used sporadically and for one particular task only, current and future scenarios will provide a continuous and multi-purpose user experience. Therefore, in this paper, we present the concept of Pervasive Augmented Reality, aiming to provide such an experience by sensing the user's current context and adapting the AR system based on the changing requirements and constraints. We present a taxonomy for Pervasive Augmented Reality and context-aware Augmented Reality, which classifies context sources and context targets relevant for implementing such a context-aware, continuous Augmented Reality experience. We further summarize existing approaches that contribute towards Pervasive Augmented Reality. Based our taxonomy and survey, we identify challenges for future research directions in Pervasive Augmented Reality.

  9. Motor priming in virtual reality can augment motor-imagery training efficacy in restorative brain-computer interaction: a within-subject analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourvopoulos, Athanasios; Bermúdez I Badia, Sergi

    2016-08-09

    The use of Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) technology in neurorehabilitation provides new strategies to overcome stroke-related motor limitations. Recent studies demonstrated the brain's capacity for functional and structural plasticity through BCI. However, it is not fully clear how we can take full advantage of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying recovery and how to maximize restoration through BCI. In this study we investigate the role of multimodal virtual reality (VR) simulations and motor priming (MP) in an upper limb motor-imagery BCI task in order to maximize the engagement of sensory-motor networks in a broad range of patients who can benefit from virtual rehabilitation training. In order to investigate how different BCI paradigms impact brain activation, we designed 3 experimental conditions in a within-subject design, including an immersive Multimodal Virtual Reality with Motor Priming (VRMP) condition where users had to perform motor-execution before BCI training, an immersive Multimodal VR condition, and a control condition with standard 2D feedback. Further, these were also compared to overt motor-execution. Finally, a set of questionnaires were used to gather subjective data on Workload, Kinesthetic Imagery and Presence. Our findings show increased capacity to modulate and enhance brain activity patterns in all extracted EEG rhythms matching more closely those present during motor-execution and also a strong relationship between electrophysiological data and subjective experience. Our data suggest that both VR and particularly MP can enhance the activation of brain patterns present during overt motor-execution. Further, we show changes in the interhemispheric EEG balance, which might play an important role in the promotion of neural activation and neuroplastic changes in stroke patients in a motor-imagery neurofeedback paradigm. In addition, electrophysiological correlates of psychophysiological responses provide us with valuable information

  10. Evaluation for the design of experience in virtual environments: modeling breakdown of interaction and illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, T; Wright, P; Smith, S

    2001-04-01

    New and emerging media technologies have the potential to induce a variety of experiences in users. In this paper, it is argued that the inducement of experience presupposes that users are absorbed in the illusion created by these media. Looking to another successful visual medium, film, this paper borrows from the techniques used in "shaping experience" to hold spectators' attention in the illusion of film, and identifies what breaks the illusion/experience for spectators. This paper focuses on one medium, virtual reality (VR), and advocates a transparent or "invisible style" of interaction. We argue that transparency keeps users in the "flow" of their activities and consequently enhances experience in users. Breakdown in activities breaks the experience and subsequently provides opportunities to identify and analyze potential causes of usability problems. Adopting activity theory, we devise a model of interaction with VR--through consciousness and activity--and introduce the concept of breakdown in illusion. From this, a model of effective interaction with VR is devised and the occurrence of breakdown in interaction and illusion is identified along a continuum of engagement. Evaluation guidelines for the design of experience are proposed and applied to usability problems detected in an empirical study of a head-mounted display (HMD) VR system. This study shows that the guidelines are effective in the evaluation of VR. Finally, we look at the potential experiences that may be induced in users and propose a way to evaluate user experience in virtual environments (VEs) and other new and emerging media.

  11. The Selimiye Mosque of Edirne, Turkey - AN Immersive and Interactive Virtual Reality Experience Using Htc Vive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, T. P.; Büyüksalih, G.; Tschirschwitz, F.; Kan, T.; Deggim, S.; Kaya, Y.; Baskaraca, A. P.

    2017-05-01

    Recent advances in contemporary Virtual Reality (VR) technologies are going to have a significant impact on veryday life. Through VR it is possible to virtually explore a computer-generated environment as a different reality, and to immerse oneself into the past or in a virtual museum without leaving the current real-life situation. For such the ultimate VR experience, the user should only see the virtual world. Currently, the user must wear a VR headset which fits around the head and over the eyes to visually separate themselves from the physical world. Via the headset images are fed to the eyes through two small lenses. Cultural heritage monuments are ideally suited both for thorough multi-dimensional geometric documentation and for realistic interactive visualisation in immersive VR applications. Additionally, the game industry offers tools for interactive visualisation of objects to motivate users to virtually visit objects and places. In this paper the generation of a virtual 3D model of the Selimiye mosque in the city of Edirne, Turkey and its processing for data integration into the game engine Unity is presented. The project has been carried out as a co-operation between BİMTAŞ, a company of the Greater Municipality of Istanbul, Turkey and the Photogrammetry & Laser Scanning Lab of the HafenCity University Hamburg, Germany to demonstrate an immersive and interactive visualisation using the new VR system HTC Vive. The workflow from data acquisition to VR visualisation, including the necessary programming for navigation, is described. Furthermore, the possible use (including simultaneous multiple users environments) of such a VR visualisation for a CH monument is discussed in this contribution.

  12. The Virtuality Continuum Revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Traum, D.; Zhai, Sh.; Kellogg, W.

    2005-01-01

    We survey the themes and the aims of a workshop devoted to the state-of-the-art virtuality continuum. In this continuum, ranging from fully virtual to real physical environments, allowing for mixed, augmented and desktop virtual reality, several perspectives can be taken. Originally, the emphasis

  13. Virtual Learning Environments and Learning Forms -experiments in ICT-based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Jan; Knudsen, Morten

    2004-01-01

    This paper report the main results of a three year experiment in ICT-based distance learning. The results are based on a full scale experiment in the education, Master of Industrial Information Technology (MII) and is one of many projects deeply rooted in the project Virtual Learning Environments...... didactic model has until now been a positive experience........ The main problem is that we do not find the same self regulatoring learning effect in the group work among the off-campus students as is the case for on-campus students. Based on feedback from evaluation questionnaires and discussions with the students didactic adjustments have been made. The revised...

  14. The Herbert Virtual Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Petridis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, virtual reality and augmented reality have emerged as areas of extreme interest as unique methods for visualising and interacting with digital museum artefacts in a different context, for example, as a virtual museum or exhibition, particularly over the Internet. Modern cultural heritage exhibitions have evolved from static to dynamic exhibitions and challenging explorations. This paper presents two different applications developed for the Herbert Museum and Art Gallery that make the user’s experience more immersive, engaging, and interactive. The first application utilizes mobile phone devices in order to enrich the visitors experience in the museum, and the second application is a serious game for cultural heritage and in particular for museum environments focusing on the younger visitors.

  15. A Remote and Virtual Lab with Experiments for Secondary Education, Engineering and Lifelong Learning Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Cardoso

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Information and Communication Technology tools are nowadays invaluable to support e-learning and b-learning programs. The Remote and Virtual Laboratory in development at the Department of Informatics Engineering of the University of Coimbra (Portugal, RVL@DEI-UC, is a web-based platform that allows users to perform a large set of experiments in different areas and contexts, such as in education or training. This paper aims to describe the inherent potential of this platform in secondary education, engineering and lifelong learning courses. The conceptualization, architecture and implementation of the web platform for real and virtual experiments, which is remotely accessed using the Internet, are presented and the relevance of the lab’s integration in an intelligent tutoring system is also highlighted, mainly in what regards the requirements of adaptation and customization to different users’ profile in different learning contexts.

  16. VIRTUAL MODELING OF PHYSICAL EXPERIMENT FOR DISTANCE LEARNING SYSTEMS IN THE SECONDARY AND HIGHER PEDAGOGICAL SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola V. Holovko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the state of the educational computer simulation and its modern features. It deals with psychological and didactic approaches to modeling in physics education and school physical experiment. It was considered the possible classification of computer models for distance learning system, as well as proposed the ways of implementing virtual experiment in distance education in physics. The main types of virtual modeling, the most widely used computer systems support in teaching physics, their possible application in teaching secondary school students were characterized. The peculiarities of distance education of future physics teachers by means of electronic teaching methods as a combination of integrated electronic educational resources and services were highlighted.

  17. Doing Textiles Experiments in Game-Based Virtual Reality: A Design of the Stereoscopic Chemical Laboratory (SCL) for Textiles Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kung Wong; Kan, Chi Wai; Lee, Pui Yuen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the use of stereoscopic virtual technology in textile and fashion studies in particular to the area of chemical experiment. The development of a designed virtual platform, called Stereoscopic Chemical Laboratory (SCL), is introduced. Design/methodology/approach: To implement the suggested…

  18. Immersive journalism: immersive virtual reality for the first-person experience of news

    OpenAIRE

    Peña, Nonny de la; Weil, Peggy; Llobera, Joan; Giannopoulos, Elias; Pomés Freixa, Ausiàs; Spanlang, Bernhard; Friedman, Doron; Sánchez-Vives, María Victoria; Slater, Mel

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces the concept, and discusses the implications of Immersive Journalism, that is the production of news in a form in which people can gain first- 2 person experiences of the events or situation described in news stories. The fundamental idea of Immersive Journalism is to allow the participant, typically represented as a digital avatar, to actually enter a virtually recreated scenario representing the news story. The sense of presence obtained through an immersive system (whe...

  19. Vertebral Augmentation with Nitinol Endoprosthesis: Clinical Experience in 40 Patients with 1-Year Follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo, E-mail: gc.anselmetti@fastwebnet.it [Villa Maria Hospital, Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Manca, Antonio, E-mail: anto.manca@gmail.com [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Marcia, Stefano, E-mail: stemarcia@gmail.com [Institute of Radiology, University of Cagliari (Italy); Chiara, Gabriele, E-mail: gabriele.chiara@ircc.it [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Marini, Stefano, E-mail: stemarini@gmail.com [Institute of Radiology, University of Cagliari (Italy); Baroud, Gamal, E-mail: gamalbaroud@gmail.com [University of Sherbrooke, Departement de Genie Mecanique (Canada); Regge, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.regge@ircc.it [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Radiology Unit (Italy); Montemurro, Filippo, E-mail: filippo.montemurro@ircc.it [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment (IRCC), Internal Medicine Unit (Italy)

    2013-05-08

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess the clinical outcomes of patients treated by vertebral augmentation with nitinol endoprosthesis (VNE) to treat painful vertebral compression fractures.MethodsForty patients with one or more painful osteoporotic VCF, confirmed by MRI and accompanied by back-pain unresponsive to a minimum 2 months of conservative medical treatment, underwent VNE at 42 levels. Preoperative and postoperative pain measured with Visual Analog Scale (VAS), disability measured by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and vertebral height restoration (measured with 2-dimensional reconstruction CT) were compared at last follow-up (average follow-up 15 months). Cement extravasation, subsequent fractures, and implant migration were recorded.ResultsLong-term follow-up was obtained in 38 of 40 patients. Both VAS and ODI significantly improved from a median of 8.0 (range 5–10) and 66 % (range 44–88 %) to 0.5 (range 0–8) and 6 % (range 6–66 %), respectively, at 1 year (p < 0.0001). Vertebral height measurements comparing time points increased in a statistically significant manner (ANOVA, p < 0.001). Overall cement extravasation rate was 9.5 %. Discal and venous leakage rates were 7.1 and 0 % respectively. No symptomatic extravasations occurred. Five of 38 (13.1 %) patients experienced new spontaneous, osteoporotic fractures. No device change or migration was observed.ConclusionsVNE is a safe and effective procedure that is able to provide long-lasting pain relief and durable vertebral height gain with a low rate of new fractures and cement leakages.

  20. Vertebral Augmentation with Nitinol Endoprosthesis: Clinical Experience in 40 Patients with 1-Year Follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo; Manca, Antonio; Marcia, Stefano; Chiara, Gabriele; Marini, Stefano; Baroud, Gamal; Regge, Daniele; Montemurro, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess the clinical outcomes of patients treated by vertebral augmentation with nitinol endoprosthesis (VNE) to treat painful vertebral compression fractures.MethodsForty patients with one or more painful osteoporotic VCF, confirmed by MRI and accompanied by back-pain unresponsive to a minimum 2 months of conservative medical treatment, underwent VNE at 42 levels. Preoperative and postoperative pain measured with Visual Analog Scale (VAS), disability measured by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and vertebral height restoration (measured with 2-dimensional reconstruction CT) were compared at last follow-up (average follow-up 15 months). Cement extravasation, subsequent fractures, and implant migration were recorded.ResultsLong-term follow-up was obtained in 38 of 40 patients. Both VAS and ODI significantly improved from a median of 8.0 (range 5–10) and 66 % (range 44–88 %) to 0.5 (range 0–8) and 6 % (range 6–66 %), respectively, at 1 year (p < 0.0001). Vertebral height measurements comparing time points increased in a statistically significant manner (ANOVA, p < 0.001). Overall cement extravasation rate was 9.5 %. Discal and venous leakage rates were 7.1 and 0 % respectively. No symptomatic extravasations occurred. Five of 38 (13.1 %) patients experienced new spontaneous, osteoporotic fractures. No device change or migration was observed.ConclusionsVNE is a safe and effective procedure that is able to provide long-lasting pain relief and durable vertebral height gain with a low rate of new fractures and cement leakages

  1. Game controller modification for fMRI hyperscanning experiments in a cooperative virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trees, Jason; Snider, Joseph; Falahpour, Maryam; Guo, Nick; Lu, Kun; Johnson, Douglas C; Poizner, Howard; Liu, Thomas T

    2014-01-01

    Hyperscanning, an emerging technique in which data from multiple interacting subjects' brains are simultaneously recorded, has become an increasingly popular way to address complex topics, such as "theory of mind." However, most previous fMRI hyperscanning experiments have been limited to abstract social interactions (e.g. phone conversations). Our new method utilizes a virtual reality (VR) environment used for military training, Virtual Battlespace 2 (VBS2), to create realistic avatar-avatar interactions and cooperative tasks. To control the virtual avatar, subjects use a MRI compatible Playstation 3 game controller, modified by removing all extraneous metal components and replacing any necessary ones with 3D printed plastic models. Control of both scanners' operation is initiated by a VBS2 plugin to sync scanner time to the known time within the VR environment. Our modifications include:•Modification of game controller to be MRI compatible.•Design of VBS2 virtual environment for cooperative interactions.•Syncing two MRI machines for simultaneous recording.

  2. Crimes Scenes as Augmented Reality, off-screen, online and offline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Waade, Anne-Marit

    Our field of investigation is site specific realism in crime fiction and spatial production as media specific features. We analyze the (re)production of crime scenes in respectively crime series, computer games and tourist practice, and relate this to the ideas of augmented reality. Using...... a distinction between places as locations situated in the physical world and spaces as imagined or virtual locations as our point of departure, this paper investigates how places in various ways have become augmented by means of mediatization. Augmented reality represents processes of mediatization that broaden...... and enhance spatial experiences. These processes are characterized by the activation of users and the creation of artificial operational environments embedded in various physical or virtual locations. The idea of augmented spatial practice is related to the ideas of site specific aesthetic...

  3. Crimes Scenes as Augmented Reality, off-screen, online and offline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Waade, Anne Marit

    2008-01-01

    Our field of investigation is site specific realism in crime fiction and spatial production as media specific features. We analyze the (re)production of crime scenes in respectively crime series, computer games and tourist practice, and relate this to the ideas of augmented reality. Using...... a distinction between places as locations situated in the physical world and spaces as imagined or virtual locations as our point of departure, this paper investigates how places in various ways have become augmented by means of mediatization. Augmented reality represents processes of mediatization that broaden...... and enhance spatial experiences. These processes are characterized by the activation of users and the creation of artificial operational environments embedded in various physical or virtual locations. The idea of augmented spatial practice is related to the ideas of site specific aesthetic...

  4. Understanding augmented reality concepts and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Alan B

    2013-01-01

    Augmented reality is not a technology. Augmented reality is a medium. Likewise, a book on augmented reality that only addresses the technology that is required to support the medium of augmented reality falls far short of providing the background that is needed to produce, or critically consume augmented reality applications. One reads a book. One watches a movie. One experiences augmented reality. Understanding Augmented Reality addresses the elements that are required to create compelling augmented reality experiences. The technology that supports

  5. NEDE: an open-source scripting suite for developing experiments in 3D virtual environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangraw, David C; Johri, Ansh; Gribetz, Meron; Sajda, Paul

    2014-09-30

    As neuroscientists endeavor to understand the brain's response to ecologically valid scenarios, many are leaving behind hyper-controlled paradigms in favor of more realistic ones. This movement has made the use of 3D rendering software an increasingly compelling option. However, mastering such software and scripting rigorous experiments requires a daunting amount of time and effort. To reduce these startup costs and make virtual environment studies more accessible to researchers, we demonstrate a naturalistic experimental design environment (NEDE) that allows experimenters to present realistic virtual stimuli while still providing tight control over the subject's experience. NEDE is a suite of open-source scripts built on the widely used Unity3D game development software, giving experimenters access to powerful rendering tools while interfacing with eye tracking and EEG, randomizing stimuli, and providing custom task prompts. Researchers using NEDE can present a dynamic 3D virtual environment in which randomized stimulus objects can be placed, allowing subjects to explore in search of these objects. NEDE interfaces with a research-grade eye tracker in real-time to maintain precise timing records and sync with EEG or other recording modalities. Python offers an alternative for experienced programmers who feel comfortable mastering and integrating the various toolboxes available. NEDE combines many of these capabilities with an easy-to-use interface and, through Unity's extensive user base, a much more substantial body of assets and tutorials. Our flexible, open-source experimental design system lowers the barrier to entry for neuroscientists interested in developing experiments in realistic virtual environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Immersive Virtual Reality Experience: A Typology of Users Revealed Through Multiple Correspondence Analysis Combined with Cluster Analysis Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Pedro J; Morais, Diogo; Gamito, Pedro; Oliveira, Jorge; Saraiva, Tomaz

    2016-03-01

    Immersive virtual reality is thought to be advantageous by leading to higher levels of presence. However, and despite users getting actively involved in immersive three-dimensional virtual environments that incorporate sound and motion, there are individual factors, such as age, video game knowledge, and the predisposition to immersion, that may be associated with the quality of virtual reality experience. Moreover, one particular concern for users engaged in immersive virtual reality environments (VREs) is the possibility of side effects, such as cybersickness. The literature suggests that at least 60% of virtual reality users report having felt symptoms of cybersickness, which reduces the quality of the virtual reality experience. The aim of this study was thus to profile the right user to be involved in a VRE through head-mounted display. To examine which user characteristics are associated with the most effective virtual reality experience (lower cybersickness), a multiple correspondence analysis combined with cluster analysis technique was performed. Results revealed three distinct profiles, showing that the PC gamer profile is more associated with higher levels of virtual reality effectiveness, that is, higher predisposition to be immersed and reduced cybersickness symptoms in the VRE than console gamer and nongamer. These findings can be a useful orientation in clinical practice and future research as they help identify which users are more predisposed to benefit from immersive VREs.

  7. Virtual navigation performance: the relationship to field of view and prior video gaming experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Anthony E; Collaer, Marcia L

    2011-04-01

    Two experiments examined whether learning a virtual environment was influenced by field of view and how it related to prior video gaming experience. In the first experiment, participants (42 men, 39 women; M age = 19.5 yr., SD = 1.8) performed worse on a spatial orientation task displayed with a narrow field of view in comparison to medium and wide field-of-view displays. Counter to initial hypotheses, wide field-of-view displays did not improve performance over medium displays, and this was replicated in a second experiment (30 men, 30 women; M age = 20.4 yr., SD = 1.9) presenting a more complex learning environment. Self-reported video gaming experience correlated with several spatial tasks: virtual environment pointing and tests of Judgment of Line Angle and Position, mental rotation, and Useful Field of View (with correlations between .31 and .45). When prior video gaming experience was included as a covariate, sex differences in spatial tasks disappeared.

  8. ARZombie: A Mobile Augmented Reality Game with Multimodal Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Cordeiro

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Augmented reality games have the power to extend virtual gaming into real world scenarios with real people, while enhancing the senses of the user. This paper describes the AR- Zombie game developed with the aim of studying and developing mobile augmented reality applications, specifically for tablets, using face recognition interaction techniques. The goal of the ARZombie player is to kill zombies that are detected through the display of the device. Instead of using markers as a mean of tracking the zombies, this game incorporates a facial recognition system, which will enhance the user experience by improving the interaction of players with the real world. As the player moves around the environment, the game will display virtual zombies on the screen if the detected faces are recognized as belonging to the class of the zombies. ARZombie was tested with users to evaluate the interaction proposals and its components were evaluated regarding the performance in order to ensure a better gaming experience.

  9. Enabling Field Experiences in Introductory Geoscience Classes through the Use of Immersive Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysey, S. M.; Smith, E.; Sellers, V.; Wyant, P.; Boyer, D. M.; Mobley, C.; Brame, S.

    2015-12-01

    Although field experiences are an important aspect of geoscience education, the opportunity to provide physical world experiences to large groups of introductory students is often limited by access, logistical, and financial constraints. Our project (NSF IUSE 1504619) is investigating the use of immersive virtual reality (VR) technologies as a surrogate for real field experiences in introductory geosciences classes. We are developing a toolbox that leverages innovations in the field of VR, including the Oculus Rift and Google Cardboard, to enable every student in an introductory geology classroom the opportunity to have a first-person virtual field experience in the Grand Canyon. We have opted to structure our VR experience as an interactive game where students must explore the Canyon to accomplish a series of tasks designed to emphasize key aspects of geoscience learning. So far we have produced two demo products for the virtual field trip. The first is a standalone "Rock Box" app developed for the iPhone, which allows students to select different rock samples, examine them in 3D, and obtain basic information about the properties of each sample. The app can act as a supplement to the traditional rock box used in physical geology labs. The second product is a fully functioning VR environment for the Grand Canyon developed using satellite-based topographic and imagery data to retain real geologic features within the experience. Players can freely navigate to explore anywhere they desire within the Canyon, but are guided to points of interest where they are able to complete exercises that will be aligned with specific learning goals. To this point we have integrated elements of the "Rock Box" app within the VR environment, allowing players to examine 3D details of rock samples they encounter within the Grand Canyon. We plan to provide demos of both products and obtain user feedback during our presentation.

  10. The Effects of In-Nature and Virtual-Nature Field Trip Experiences On Proenvironmental Attitudes and Behaviors, And Environmental Knowledge Of Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferderbar, Catherine A.

    To develop sustainable solutions to remediate the complex ecological problems of earth's soil, water, and air degradation requires the talents and skills of knowledgeable, motivated people (UNESCO, 1977; UNESCO, 2010). Researchers historically emphasized that time spent in outdoor, nature activities (Wells & Lekies, 2006), particularly with an adult mentor (Chawla & Cushing, 2007), promotes environmental knowledge and nature-relatedness, precursors to environmental literacy. Research has also demonstrated that technology is integral to the lives of youth, who spend 7:38 hours daily (Rideout, et al., 2010), engaged in electronics. Educators would benefit from knowing if in-nature and virtual-nature field trip experiences provide comparable levels of knowledge and connectedness, to nurture student proenvironmentalism. To investigate field trip phenomena, the researcher studied the impact of virtual-nature and in-nature experiences during which students analyzed water quality along Midwestern rivers. The quasi-experimental, mixed method convergent parallel design with a purposeful sample (n=131) of middle school students from two Midwestern K-8 schools, utilized scientist participant observer field records and narrative response, written assessment aligned to field trip content to evaluate knowledge acquisition. To gain insight into student environmental dispositions, participant observers recorded student comments and behaviors throughout field trips. A survey, administered Pre-Treatment, Post-Treatment 1 and Post-Treatment 2, focused on family water-related behaviors and student perceptions of the need for local government water protection. The findings demonstrated both field trips increased content knowledge significantly, with large effect size. Content knowledge gain from one experience transferred to and was augmented by the second experience. Skill gain (technical and observational) varied by type of field trip and did not transfer. Technical skill was often

  11. LEARNING ANATOMY WITH AUGMENTED REALITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Cita; Dyhrberg O'Neill, Lotte; Nielsen, Kurt Gammelgaard

    An Augmented Reality (AR) app for Hololens glasses was developed to help students learn the anatomy of the human body mediastinum. In this research project, we wanted to evaluate whether AR: strengthened the students’ self-efficacy and motivation, helped students to improve learning, and provided...... a questionnaire regarding their self-efficacy and motivation, presence in the virtual room, experiences with Hololens teaching, and how they used the quizzes. In addition, students answered a test with the same 20 questions used in the app and three additional transfer questions new to students. Finally, students......’ scores on the mediastinum questions in the exam 2 month later were collected to examine the long-term memory of content. Internal consistency was estimated for all measures. Correlations between measures were examined with a correlation matrix, and group differences were examined with one-way analysis...

  12. An 'In the Wild' Experiment on Presence and Embodiment using Consumer Virtual Reality Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steed, Anthony; Frlston, Sebastian; López, María Murcia; Drummond, Jason; Pan, Ye; Swapp, David

    2016-04-01

    Consumer virtual reality systems are now becoming widely available. We report on a study on presence and embodiment within virtual reality that was conducted 'in the wild', in that data was collected from devices owned by consumers in uncontrolled settings, not in a traditional laboratory setting. Users of Samsung Gear VR and Google Cardboard devices were invited by web pages and email invitation to download and run an app that presented a scenario where the participant would sit in a bar watching a singer. Each participant saw one of eight variations of the scenario: with or without a self-avatar; singer inviting the participant to tap along or not; singer looking at the participant or not. Despite the uncontrolled situation of the experiment, results from an in-app questionnaire showed tentative evidence that a self-avatar had a positive effect on self-report of presence and embodiment, and that the singer inviting the participant to tap along had a negative effect on self-report of embodiment. We discuss the limitations of the study and the platforms, and the potential for future open virtual reality experiments.

  13. Experiência subjetiva de idosas durante exercício em ambiente virtual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Mayara do Nascimento

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos desse estudo quali-quantitativo foram verificar as experiências subjetivas relacionadas ao exercício em idosas antes e depois da realização de atividade física em ambientes real e virtual, bem como a preferência pelo ambiente. A amostra foi composta por 20 idosas (71,1±6,5 anos que executaram sessões de dança nos dois ambientes e responderam ao instrumento Subjective Exercise Experiences Scale (SEES antes e depois da prática. Na situação virtual foi utilizado o jogo Just Dance I do console Wii® da Nintendo. Na situação real, cada participante reproduziu os mesmos movimentos demonstrados pela pesquisadora. Para a análise dos dados da SEES foram utilizados os testes Wilcoxon e Mann-Whitney (p<0,05. Houve redução significativa na pontuação da subescala distress psicológico da SEES após ambas as situações experimentais e aumento no bem-estar positivo apenas em ambiente virtual. A maioria das idosas escolheu o ambiente real como o preferido.

  14. SEMINAR ABOUT SERIOUS GAMES AND VIRTUAL WORLDS: An Experience of International Collaboration And Reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram LAASER

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The educational possibilities of ICT, dizzying and exponentially growing every day, offer multiple alternatives of mediation for teaching, learning and communication.Thus, the inclusion of video games and virtual worlds into educational context represents a qualitative leap that claims to significantly boost ways of communication and knowledge representation of the scenarios involved. Aware of this reality, in the framework of the Master of Technology Enhanced Learning at the National University of Cordoba, Argentina, a virtual seminar was offered to students to address the issue on the basis of invited lectures of worldwide recognized experts. The format chosen for the seminar allowed the treatment of subjects not only through reading assignments and web quests to be discussed collaboratively but also included the state of the art experience of developers working in the field. The paper describes didactic design and technical solutions of the seminar format.

  15. Embodied social interaction constitutes social cognition in pairs of humans: a minimalist virtual reality experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froese, Tom; Iizuka, Hiroyuki; Ikegami, Takashi

    2014-01-14

    Scientists have traditionally limited the mechanisms of social cognition to one brain, but recent approaches claim that interaction also realizes cognitive work. Experiments under constrained virtual settings revealed that interaction dynamics implicitly guide social cognition. Here we show that embodied social interaction can be constitutive of agency detection and of experiencing another's presence. Pairs of participants moved their "avatars" along an invisible virtual line and could make haptic contact with three identical objects, two of which embodied the other's motions, but only one, the other's avatar, also embodied the other's contact sensor and thereby enabled responsive interaction. Co-regulated interactions were significantly correlated with identifications of the other's avatar and reports of the clearest awareness of the other's presence. These results challenge folk psychological notions about the boundaries of mind, but make sense from evolutionary and developmental perspectives: an extendible mind can offload cognitive work into its environment.

  16. Gaming with augmented reality interface and quantum dot technology

    OpenAIRE

    SAYANTAN GUPTA

    2017-01-01

    In Augmented Reality (AR), interfaces consist of a blend of both real and virtual content. In this paper we examine existing gaming styles played in the real world or on computers. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of these mediums within an informal model of gaming experience split into four aspects; physical, mental, social and emotional. We find that their strengths are mostly complementary, and argue that games built in AR can blend them to enhance existing game styles a...

  17. Presence and User Experience in a Virtual Environment under the Influence of Ethanol: An Explorative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Mario; Brade, Jennifer; Diamond, Lisa; Sjölie, Daniel; Busch, Marc; Tscheligi, Manfred; Klimant, Philipp; Heyde, Christoph-E; Hammer, Niels

    2018-04-23

    Virtual Reality (VR) is used for a variety of applications ranging from entertainment to psychological medicine. VR has been demonstrated to influence higher order cognitive functions and cortical plasticity, with implications on phobia and stroke treatment. An integral part for successful VR is a high sense of presence - a feeling of 'being there' in the virtual scenario. The underlying cognitive and perceptive functions causing presence in VR scenarios are however not completely known. It is evident that the brain function is influenced by drugs, such as ethanol, potentially confounding cortical plasticity, also in VR. As ethanol is ubiquitous and forms part of daily life, understanding the effects of ethanol on presence and user experience, the attitudes and emotions about using VR applications, is important. This exploratory study aims at contributing towards an understanding of how low-dose ethanol intake influences presence, user experience and their relationship in a validated VR context. It was found that low-level ethanol consumption did influence presence and user experience, but on a minimal level. In contrast, correlations between presence and user experience were strongly influenced by low-dose ethanol. Ethanol consumption may consequently alter cognitive and perceptive functions related to the connections between presence and user experience.

  18. Effects of a Haptic Augmented Simulation on K-12 Students' Achievement and Their Attitudes Towards Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civelek, Turhan; Ucar, Erdem; Ustunel, Hakan; Aydin, Mehmet Kemal

    2014-01-01

    The current research aims to explore the effects of a haptic augmented simulation on students' achievement and their attitudes towards Physics in an immersive virtual reality environment (VRE). A quasi-experimental post-test design was employed utilizing experiment and control groups. The participants were 215 students from a K-12 school in…

  19. Interactive learning environments in augmented reality technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Wojciechowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of creation of learning environments based on augmented reality (AR is considered. The concept of AR is presented as a tool for safe and cheap experimental learning. In AR learning environments students may acquire knowledge by personally carrying out experiments on virtual objects by manipulating real objects located in real environments. In the paper, a new approach to creation of interactive educational scenarios, called Augmented Reality Interactive Scenario Modeling (ARISM, is mentioned. In this approach, the process of building learning environments is divided into three stages, each of them performed by users with different technical and domain knowledge. The ARISM approach enables teachers who are not computer science experts to create AR learning environments adapted to the needs of their students.

  20. Augmenting playspaces to enhance the game experience: A tag game case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno Celleri, Alejandro Manuel; van Delden, Robertus Wilhelmus; Poppe, Ronald Walter; Reidsma, Dennis; Heylen, Dirk K.J.

    Introducing technology into games can improve players’ game experience. However, it can also reduce the amount of physical activity and social interaction. In this article, we discuss how we enhance the game of tag with technology such that physical and social characteristics of the game are

  1. Augmenting short cheap talk scripts with a repeated opt-out reminder in choice experiment surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    2014-01-01

    find the OOR to significantly reduce total WTP and to some extent also marginal WTP beyond the capability of the CT applied without the OOR. This suggests that the CT practice should be adapted to fit the potentially different decision processes and repeated choices structure of the Choice Experiment...

  2. Augmenting short cheap talk scripts with a repeated opt-out reminder in choice experiment surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    to choose the opt-out alternative if they find the experimentally designed alternatives too expensive. In an empirical Choice Experiment survey we find the Opt-Out Reminder to significantly reduce total WTP and to some extent also marginal WTP beyond the capability of the Cheap Talk applied without the Opt...

  3. Augmented Reality Game-Based Learning: Enriching Students' Experience during Reading Comprehension Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobar-Muñoz, Hendrys; Baldiris, Silvia; Fabregat, Ramon

    2017-01-01

    Program for International Student Assessment results indicate that while reading comprehension needs to be promoted, teachers are struggling to find ways to motivate students to do reading comprehension activities and although technology-enhanced learning approaches are entering the classroom, researchers are still experimenting with them to…

  4. The photoelectric effect and study of the diffraction of light: Two new experiments in UNILabs virtual and remote laboratories network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez, Juan Pedro; Carreras, Carmen; Yuste, Manuel; Dormido, Sebastián; Sáenz, Jacobo; De la Torre, Luis; Rubén, Heradio

    2015-01-01

    This work describes two experiments: 'study of the diffraction of light: Fraunhofer approximation' and 'the photoelectric effect'. Both of them count with a virtual, simulated, version of the experiment as well as with a real one which can be operated remotely. The two previous virtual and remote labs (built using Easy Java(script) Simulations) are integrated in UNILabs, a network of online interactive laboratories based on the free Learning Management System Moodle. In this web environment, students can find not only the virtual and remote labs but also manuals with related theory, the user interface description for each application, and so on.

  5. Social media experiences of adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy who use augmentative and alternative communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Jessica Gosnell; Light, Janice

    2017-02-01

    This pilot study aimed to expand the current understanding of how adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy (CP) and complex communication needs use social media. An online focus group was used to investigate the social media experiences of seven individuals with CP who used Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC). Questions posed to the group related to social media: (a) advantages; (b) disadvantages; (c) barriers; (d) supports; and (e) recommendations. Adolescents with CP who use AAC used a range of communication media to participate in daily interactions, including social media. An analysis of the focus group interaction revealed that the participants used social media to: bypass the constraints of face-to-face interactions; communicate for a number of reasons (e.g. maintain relationships, share experiences); and support independent leisure (e.g. playing games, looking at pictures/videos). Despite the advantages, the participants discussed barriers including limitations related to AAC technologies, social media sites and literacy skills. The results suggest that service providers should implement interventions to support social media use, including enhancement of linguistic, operational and strategic competence. Technology manufacturers should focus on improving the designs of AAC apps and social media sites to facilitate access by individuals who require AAC.

  6. Differentiating levels of surgical experience on a virtual reality temporal bone simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi C; Kennedy, Gregor; Hall, Richard; O'Leary, Stephen

    2010-11-01

    Virtual reality simulation is increasingly being incorporated into surgical training and may have a role in temporal bone surgical education. Here we test whether metrics generated by a virtual reality surgical simulation can differentiate between three levels of experience, namely novices, otolaryngology residents, and experienced qualified surgeons. Cohort study. Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital. Twenty-seven participants were recruited. There were 12 experts, six residents, and nine novices. After orientation, participants were asked to perform a modified radical mastoidectomy on the simulator. Comparisons of time taken, injury to structures, and forces exerted were made between the groups to determine which specific metrics would discriminate experience levels. Experts completed the simulated task in significantly shorter time than the other two groups (experts 22 minutes, residents 36 minutes, and novices 46 minutes; P = 0.001). Novices exerted significantly higher average forces when dissecting close to vital structures compared with experts (0.24 Newton [N] vs 0.13 N, P = 0.002). Novices were also more likely to injure structures such as dura compared to experts (23 injuries vs 3 injuries, P = 0.001). Compared with residents, the experts modulated their force between initial cortex dissection and dissection close to vital structures. Using the combination of these metrics, we were able to correctly classify the participants' level of experience 90 percent of the time. This preliminary study shows that measurements of performance obtained from within a virtual reality simulator can differentiate between levels of users' experience. These results suggest that simulator training may have a role in temporal bone training beyond foundational training. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Design of a Flexible Hardware Interface for Multiple Remote Electronic practical Experiments of Virtual Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Said

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to present a new design of a Flexible Hardware Interface (FHI based on PID control techniques to use in a virtual laboratory. This flexible hardware interface allows the easy implementation of different and multiple remote electronic practical experiments for undergraduate engineering classes. This interface can be viewed as opened hardware architecture to easily develop simple or complex remote experiments in the electronic domain. The philosophy of the use of this interface can also be expanded to many other domains as optic experiments for instance. It is also demonstrated that software can be developed to enable remote measurements of electronic circuits or systems using only Web site Interface. Using standard browsers (such as Internet explorer, Firefox, Chrome or Safari, different students can have a remote access to different practical experiments at a time.

  8. Virtual Learning Environments and Learning Forms -experiments in ICT-based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Jan; Knudsen, Morten

    2004-01-01

    This paper report the main results of a three year experiment in ICT-based distance learning. The results are based on a full scale experiment in the education, Master of Industrial Information Technology (MII) and is one of many projects deeply rooted in the project Virtual Learning Environments...... and Learning forms (ViLL). The experiment was to transfer a well functioning on-campus engineering program based on project organized collaborative learning to a technology supported distance education program. After three years the experiments indicate that adjustments are required in this transformation....... The main problem is that we do not find the same self regulatoring learning effect in the group work among the off-campus students as is the case for on-campus students. Based on feedback from evaluation questionnaires and discussions with the students didactic adjustments have been made. The revised...

  9. Formative experience mediated by virtual learning environment: science and mathematics teachers’ education in the amazon region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    France Fraiha Martins

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This article reports results of a qualitative research, in the narrative modality. We investigated the formative experiences of teachers of Mathematics and Science through distance learning in the Amazon region, experienced in a course through the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE. We investigated under what conditions this education experience was a catalyst for teachers’ reflections on the Amazonian context of teaching science and mathematics. By using Discursive Textual Analysis some categories e merged: graduating in the Amazon region: obstacles and confrontations; AVA and Technologies: meaning (s of the education experience and the impact of the experience in the perceptions of teachers’ practices and training. The analysis of the results reveals the obstacles to the training in this context. The dynamics experienced by the use of VLE technologies and of the teachers reverberated methodological insights regarding the use of technology in teaching practices, indicating also the VLE as an alternative of (self education on the Amazon reality

  10. An integrated pipeline to create and experience compelling scenarios in virtual reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Jan P.; Neumann, Carsten; Reiners, Dirk; Cruz-Neira, Carolina

    2011-03-01

    One of the main barriers to create and use compelling scenarios in virtual reality is the complexity and time-consuming efforts for modeling, element integration, and the software development to properly display and interact with the content in the available systems. Still today, most virtual reality applications are tedious to create and they are hard-wired to the specific display and interaction system available to the developers when creating the application. Furthermore, it is not possible to alter the content or the dynamics of the content once the application has been created. We present our research on designing a software pipeline that enables the creation of compelling scenarios with a fair degree of visual and interaction complexity in a semi-automated way. Specifically, we are targeting drivable urban scenarios, ranging from large cities to sparsely populated rural areas that incorporate both static components (e. g., houses, trees) and dynamic components (e. g., people, vehicles) as well as events, such as explosions or ambient noise. Our pipeline has four basic components. First, an environment designer, where users sketch the overall layout of the scenario, and an automated method constructs the 3D environment from the information in the sketch. Second, a scenario editor used for authoring the complete scenario, incorporate the dynamic elements and events, fine tune the automatically generated environment, define the execution conditions of the scenario, and set up any data gathering that may be necessary during the execution of the scenario. Third, a run-time environment for different virtual-reality systems provides users with the interactive experience as designed with the designer and the editor. And fourth, a bi-directional monitoring system that allows for capturing and modification of information from the virtual environment. One of the interesting capabilities of our pipeline is that scenarios can be built and modified on-the-fly as they are

  11. Augmented reality in the surgery of cerebral arteriovenous malformations: technique assessment and considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrilo, Ivan; Bijlenga, Philippe; Schaller, Karl

    2014-09-01

    Augmented reality technology has been used for intraoperative image guidance through the overlay of virtual images, from preoperative imaging studies, onto the real-world surgical field. Although setups based on augmented reality have been used for various neurosurgical pathologies, very few cases have been reported for the surgery of arteriovenous malformations (AVM). We present our experience with AVM surgery using a system designed for image injection of virtual images into the operating microscope's eyepiece, and discuss why augmented reality may be less appealing in this form of surgery. N = 5 patients underwent AVM resection assisted by augmented reality. Virtual three-dimensional models of patients' heads, skulls, AVM nidi, and feeder and drainage vessels were selectively segmented and injected into the microscope's eyepiece for intraoperative image guidance, and their usefulness was assessed in each case. Although the setup helped in performing tailored craniotomies, in guiding dissection and in localizing drainage veins, it did not provide the surgeon with useful information concerning feeder arteries, due to the complexity of AVM angioarchitecture. The difficulty in intraoperatively conveying useful information on feeder vessels may make augmented reality a less engaging tool in this form of surgery, and might explain its underrepresentation in the literature. Integrating an AVM's hemodynamic characteristics into the augmented rendering could make it more suited to AVM surgery.

  12. Virtual planning of dental implant placement using CT double scan-technique - own experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojciechowski, W.; Urbanik, A.; Kownacki, P.; Kownacki, S.

    2007-01-01

    The correctness of CT performed with the use of a double-scan technique is the basis for achieving proper quality of 3D reconstructions of the maxilla or mandible and subsequent virtual planning of dental implant placement. The aim of this study was the presentation of the methodology of computed tomography scanning and own experience with the use of the double-scan technique. The study group included 26 individuals who underwent MDCT with a double-scan technique using a MDCT scanner SOMATOM Sensation (Siemens, Germany). The parameters of the examination: slice-collimation 10 x 0.75 mm, slice-thickness 0.75 mm. The first CT scan in the procedure was the scan of the patient wearing a radiological prosthesis and occlusal index, which was followed by a separate scan of the radiological prosthesis. These two CT scans were copied and transferred to PC with Procera Software program (Nobel Biocare, Sweden) where dental implant placement was virtually planned. In all 26 patients, precise three-dimensional reconstructions of the anatomical structure were obtained. In 11 patients, on the basis of the virtual planning, the implant placement was performed, 5 patients were referred to preparatory procedures, that is, restoration of the alveolar process, otolaryngological treatment of the maxillary sinuses. The remaining 10 patients did not qualify to the procedure because of unfavorable anatomical ideation's. Correct computed tomography with double-scan technique enables virtual planning of dental implant placement, on the basis of which the real procedure of implantation can be performed. (author)

  13. Experiences of using mobile technologies and virtual field tours in Physical Geography: implications for hydrology education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Kingston

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Education in hydrology is changing rapidly due to diversification of students, emergent major scientific and practical challenges that our discipline must engage with, shifting pedagogic ideas and higher education environments, the need for students to develop new discipline specific and transferrable skills, and the advent of innovative technologies for learning and teaching. This paper focuses on new technologies in the context of learning and teaching in Physical Geography and reflects on the implications of our experiences for education in hydrology. We evaluate the experience of designing and trialling novel mobile technology-based field exercises and a virtual field tour for a Year 1 undergraduate Physical Geography module at a UK university. The new exercises are based on using and obtaining spatial data, operation of meteorological equipment (explained using an interactive DVD, and include introductions to global positioning systems (GPS and geographical information systems (GIS. The technology and exercises were well received in a pilot study and subsequent rolling-out to the full student cohort (∼150 students. A statistically significant improvement in marks was observed following the redesign. Although the students enjoyed using mobile technology, the increased interactivity and opportunity for peer learning were considered to be the primary benefits by students. This is reinforced further by student preference for the new interactive virtual field tour over the previous "show-and-tell" field exercise. Despite the new exercises having many advantages, exercise development was not trivial due to the high start-up costs, the need for provision of sufficient technical support and the relative difficulty of making year-to-year changes (to the virtual field tour in particular. Our experiences are highly relevant to the implementation of novel learning and teaching technologies in hydrology education.

  14. Experiences of using mobile technologies and virtual field tours in Physical Geography: implications for hydrology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, D. G.; Eastwood, W. J.; Jones, P. I.; Johnson, R.; Marshall, S.; Hannah, D. M.

    2012-05-01

    Education in hydrology is changing rapidly due to diversification of students, emergent major scientific and practical challenges that our discipline must engage with, shifting pedagogic ideas and higher education environments, the need for students to develop new discipline specific and transferrable skills, and the advent of innovative technologies for learning and teaching. This paper focuses on new technologies in the context of learning and teaching in Physical Geography and reflects on the implications of our experiences for education in hydrology. We evaluate the experience of designing and trialling novel mobile technology-based field exercises and a virtual field tour for a Year 1 undergraduate Physical Geography module at a UK university. The new exercises are based on using and obtaining spatial data, operation of meteorological equipment (explained using an interactive DVD), and include introductions to global positioning systems (GPS) and geographical information systems (GIS). The technology and exercises were well received in a pilot study and subsequent rolling-out to the full student cohort (∼150 students). A statistically significant improvement in marks was observed following the redesign. Although the students enjoyed using mobile technology, the increased interactivity and opportunity for peer learning were considered to be the primary benefits by students. This is reinforced further by student preference for the new interactive virtual field tour over the previous "show-and-tell" field exercise. Despite the new exercises having many advantages, exercise development was not trivial due to the high start-up costs, the need for provision of sufficient technical support and the relative difficulty of making year-to-year changes (to the virtual field tour in particular). Our experiences are highly relevant to the implementation of novel learning and teaching technologies in hydrology education.

  15. Experiences of using mobile technologies and virtual fieldtrips in Physical Geography: implications for hydrology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, D. G.; Eastwood, W. J.; Jones, P. I.; Johnson, R.; Marshall, S.; Hannah, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Education in hydrology is changing rapidly due to diversification of students, emergent major scientific and practical challenges that our discipline must engage with, shifting pedagogic ideas and higher education environments, the need for students to develop new discipline specific and transferrable skills, and the advent of innovative technologies for learning and teaching. This paper focuses on new technologies in the context of learning and teaching in Physical Geography and reflects on the implications of our experiences for education in hydrology. We evaluate the experience of designing and trialling novel mobile technology-based field exercises and a virtual field trip for a Year 1 undergraduate Physical Geography module at a UK university. The new exercises are based on using and obtaining spatial data, operation of meteorological equipment (explained using an interactive DVD), and include introductions to global positioning systems (GPS) and geographical information systems (GIS). The technology and exercises were well received in a pilot study and subsequent rolling-out to the full student cohort (∼150 students). A statistically significant improvement in marks was observed following the redesign. Although the students enjoyed using mobile technology, the increased interactivity and opportunity for peer learning were considered to be the primary benefits by students. This is reinforced further by student preference for the new interactive virtual field trip over the previous "show-and-tell" field exercise. Despite the new exercises having many advantages, exercise development was not trivial due to the high start-up costs, the need for provision of sufficient technical support and the relative difficulty of making year-to-year changes (to the virtual field trip in particular). We believe our experiences are directly relevant to the implementation of such novel learning and teaching technologies in hydrology education.

  16. AUGMENTED REALITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Kirsten; Bahn, Anne Louise

    2017-01-01

    Projektets grundlæggende idé er udvikling af visuel, æstetisk læring med Augmented Reality, hvor intentionen er at bidrage med konkrete undersøgelser og udforskning af begrebet Augmented Reality – herunder koblingen mellem det analoge og digitale i forhold til læring, multimodalitet og it...

  17. Simulating Nature for Elderly Users - A Design Approach for Recreational Virtual Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Pedersen, Jon Ram; Serafin, Stefania; Kofoed, Lise

    2015-01-01

    Recreational nature experiences are rehabilitative for humans. Nature-oriented virtual environments (VEs) might be able to provide similar experiences. A pilot study have shown to increase the enjoyment of an exercise experience for retirement home residents, by augmenting their everyday bike...

  18. Enhancing the Student Experiment Experience: Visible Scientific Inquiry Through a Virtual Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Dermot; O'Reilly, John; McGarr, Oliver

    2013-08-01

    Practical work is often noted as a core reason many students take on science in secondary schools (high schools). However, there are inherent difficulties associated with classroom practical work that militate against scientific inquiry, an approach espoused by many science educators. The use of interactive simulations to facilitate student inquiry has emerged as a complement to practical work. This study presents case studies of four science teachers using a virtual chemistry laboratory (VCL) with their students in an explicitly guided inquiry manner. Research tools included the use of the Inquiry Science Implementation Scale in a `talk-aloud' manner, Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol for video observations, and teacher interviews. The findings suggest key aspects of practical work that hinder teachers in adequately supporting inquiry and highlight where a VCL can overcome many of these difficulties. The findings also indicate considerations in using the VCL in its own right.

  19. Fusion virtual laboratory: The experiments' collaboration platform in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, H., E-mail: nakanisi@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kojima, M.; Takahashi, C.; Ohsuna, M.; Imazu, S.; Nonomura, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Hasegawa, M. [RIAM, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8560 (Japan); Yoshikawa, M. [PRC, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    'Fusion virtual laboratory (FVL)' is the experiments' collaboration platform covering multiple fusion projects in Japan. Major Japanese fusion laboratories and universities are mutually connected through the dedicated virtual private network, named SNET, on SINET4. It has 3 different categories; (i) LHD remote participation, (ii) bilateral experiments' collaboration, and (iii) remote use of supercomputer. By extending the LABCOM data system developed at LHD, FVL supports (i) and (ii) so that it can deal with not only LHD data but also the data of two remote experiments: QUEST at Kyushu University and GAMMA10 at University of Tsukuba. FVL has applied the latest 'cloud' technology for both data acquisition and storage architecture. It can provide us high availability and performance scalability of the whole system. With a well optimized TCP data transferring method, the unified data access platform for both experimental data and numerical computation results could become realistic on FVL. The FVL project will continue demonstrating the ITER-era international collaboration schemes and the necessary technology.

  20. Older Adults' Experiences with Audiovisual Virtual Reality: Perceived Usefulness and Other Factors Influencing Technology Acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Amy Restorick; Schutter, Bob De; Franks, Kelley; Radina, M Elise

    2018-02-21

    This study explores how older adults respond to audiovisual virtual reality (VR) and perceive its usefulness to their lives. Focus groups were conducted with residents of a retirement community after they viewed two audiovisual VR simulations (n = 41). Thematic analysis was used to identify patterns in responses. Older adults described positive and negative emotional reactions to aspects of the VR experience, articulated content preferences, shared ideas to improve the usability of the equipment, and identified facilitators and barriers that influenced perceived usefulness. Recommendations for improving this technology include maximizing the positive aspects of VR through increasing interactivity, facilitating socializing with friends or family, and enhancing older adults' ease of use. Desired content of simulations involved travel, continuing education, reminiscence, and self-care/therapy. Virtual reality was reviewed positively, yet modifications are necessary to facilitate optimal user experience and potential benefit for this population. As older adults are interested in using VR, especially if poor health prevents the continuation of desirable activities or new experiences, it is important to respond to older adults' preferences and remove barriers that limit use and enjoyment.

  1. PIRE Experience Reaches out to the Russian Far East and Augments Graduate Education Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almberg, L. D.; Eichelberger, J. C.; Izbekov, P.; Ushakov, S.; Vesna, E.

    2006-12-01

    NSF's Partners in International Research and Education (PIRE) program seeks to introduce American students to collaborative international science early in their graduate careers. The intent is that the next generation of American scientists will be better prepared to work at the international level. The emphases on partnership and learning about the culture of the host country is a welcome and productive change from the `grab and dash' approach that can characterize `Winter national' projects. Our PIRE project, US-Russia-Japan Partnership in Volcanological Research and Education, is an interdisciplinary investigation of the magma systems at Bezymianny and Shiveluch Volcanoes in Kamchatka, Russia and Mount St Helens in Washington, USA. We wish to understand how massive edifice collapse at all three volcanoes perturbed the magma systems and influenced subsequent and continuing eruptive behavior. Seven American graduate students from the universities of Alaska, Hawaii, Washington, Oregon, and Stanford embarked on a personal and professional development adventure in July and August, 2006. Their experience began in Fairbanks, AK with preparations for remote foreign field work and research planning with mentor scientists. The adventure continued in Petropavlosk-Kamchatsky, Kamchatka, which required circumnavigation of the world as no airlines fly between Anchorage and Petropavlovsk. Faculty at Kamchatka State University provided intensive short courses for two weeks, introducing students to Russian language, culture, geography and history while they adjusted to the new environment and met Russian counterparts at the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology. Afternoon discussions with Russian experts in volcanology, seismology, tectonics and tephrachronology were enlightening and influenced the research plans. Russian graduate and advanced undergraduate students joined the group at the helicopter accessed camp on Bezymianny volcano. Two young Russian scientists headed the

  2. Fathers' experience of childbirth when non-progressive labour occurs and augmentation is established. A qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasman, Kirsten; Kjaergaard, Hanne; Esbensen, Bente Appel

    2014-01-01

    as uncontrollable processes and (3) Relief about the decision of augmentation. The fathers had a rational approach and felt powerless when the process of labour was uncontrollable. They felt they were not able to help their partners in pain when non-progressive labour occurred. They experienced relief when......OBJECTIVE: Augmentation with oxytocin during labour has increased in Western obstetrics over the last few decades. The aim of this study was to describe how fathers experienced childbirth when non-progressive labour occurred and augmentation was established. METHOD: A qualitative descriptive design...... after experiencing the non-progressive labour, need directions from the midwives to carry out appropriate and usefull tasks....

  3. Virtual study groups and online Observed Structured Clinical Examinations practices - enabling trainees to enable themselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Dennisa; Evans, Lois

    2018-03-01

    To explore online study groups as augmentation tools in preparing for the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists Observed Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) for fellowship. An online survey of New Zealand trainees was carried out to assess exam preparedness and openness to virtual study groups and results analysed. Relevant material around virtual study groups for fellowship examinations was reviewed and used to inform a pilot virtual study group. Four New Zealand trainees took part in the pilot project, looking at using a virtual platform to augment OSCE preparation. Of the 50 respondents 36% felt adequately prepared for the OSCE. Sixty-four per cent were interested in using a virtual platform to augment their study. Virtual study groups were noted to be especially important for rural trainees, none of whom felt able to form study groups for themselves. The pilot virtual study group was trialled successfully. All four trainees reported the experience as subjectively beneficial to their examination preparation. Virtual platforms hold promise as an augmentation strategy for exam preparation, especially for rural trainees who are more geographically isolated and less likely to have peers preparing for the same examinations.

  4. Experience of the posterior lip augmentation device in a regional hip arthroplasty unit as a treatment for recurrent dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggett, L; Cross, C; Helm, T

    2017-12-01

    Dislocation after total hip arthroplasty (THA) remains a significant complication of the procedure and is the third leading cause for revision THA. One technique for treatment of this complication is the use of the posterior lip augmentation device (PLAD). We describe our experience using the PLAD including complication rates. A retrospective review of 55 PLADs (54 patients) was carried out following identification from electronic theatre records. Basic patient demographics, operative records and radiographs were collected and reviewed and data was analysed using Microsoft Excel. Failure of the PLAD was defined as further operative intervention after PLAD insertion and included: dislocation, implant breakage, infection and revision of the THA for loosening of either component. 55 PLADs were implanted in 54 patients with an average age of 77 years. There was a significant preponderance of females and a variety of surgical approaches had been used for the original hip replacement, including trochanteric osteotomy, posterior and antero-lateral. 9 (16%) patients had recurrent dislocations,1 (2%) failed secondary to screw breakage, 3 (5%) had and infection requiring intervention and 2 (4%) underwent further revision for aseptic loosening of the femoral component. The overall failure rate was 25% with 14 patients requiring intervention post PLAD. Our results are inferior to other published results and indicate that the PLAD should be used with caution for recurrent dislocations of the Charnley hip replacement.

  5. Transduction between worlds: using virtual and mixed reality for earth and planetary science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedley, N.; Lochhead, I.; Aagesen, S.; Lonergan, C. D.; Benoy, N.

    2017-12-01

    Virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) have the potential to transform the way we visualize multidimensional geospatial datasets in support of geoscience research, exploration and analysis. The beauty of virtual environments is that they can be built at any scale, users can view them at many levels of abstraction, move through them in unconventional ways, and experience spatial phenomena as if they had superpowers. Similarly, augmented reality allows you to bring the power of virtual 3D data visualizations into everyday spaces. Spliced together, these interface technologies hold incredible potential to support 21st-century geoscience. In my ongoing research, my team and I have made significant advances to connect data and virtual simulations with real geographic spaces, using virtual environments, geospatial augmented reality and mixed reality. These research efforts have yielded new capabilities to connect users with spatial data and phenomena. These innovations include: geospatial x-ray vision; flexible mixed reality; augmented 3D GIS; situated augmented reality 3D simulations of tsunamis and other phenomena interacting with real geomorphology; augmented visual analytics; and immersive GIS. These new modalities redefine the ways in which we can connect digital spaces of spatial analysis, simulation and geovisualization, with geographic spaces of data collection, fieldwork, interpretation and communication. In a way, we are talking about transduction between real and virtual worlds. Taking a mixed reality approach to this, we can link real and virtual worlds. This paper presents a selection of our 3D geovisual interface projects in terrestrial, coastal, underwater and other environments. Using rigorous applied geoscience data, analyses and simulations, our research aims to transform the novelty of virtual and augmented reality interface technologies into game-changing mixed reality geoscience.

  6. A Heterogeneous Distributed Virtual Geographic Environment—Potential Application in Spatiotemporal Behavior Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Shen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to their strong immersion and real-time interactivity, helmet-mounted virtual reality (VR devices are becoming increasingly popular. Based on these devices, an immersive virtual geographic environment (VGE provides a promising method for research into crowd behavior in an emergency. However, the current cheaper helmet-mounted VR devices are not popular enough, and will continue to coexist with personal computer (PC-based systems for a long time. Therefore, a heterogeneous distributed virtual geographic environment (HDVGE could be a feasible solution to the heterogeneous problems caused by various types of clients, and support the implementation of spatiotemporal crowd behavior experiments with large numbers of concurrent participants. In this study, we developed an HDVGE framework, and put forward a set of design principles to define the similarities between the real world and the VGE. We discussed the HDVGE architecture, and proposed an abstract interaction layer, a protocol-based interaction algorithm, and an adjusted dead reckoning algorithm to solve the heterogeneous distributed problems. We then implemented an HDVGE prototype system focusing on subway fire evacuation experiments. Two types of clients are considered in the system: PC, and all-in-one VR. Finally, we evaluated the performances of the prototype system and the key algorithms. The results showed that in a low-latency local area network (LAN environment, the prototype system can smoothly support 90 concurrent users consisting of PC and all-in-one VR clients. HDVGE provides a feasible solution for studying not only spatiotemporal crowd behaviors in normal conditions, but also evacuation behaviors in emergency conditions such as fires and earthquakes. HDVGE could also serve as a new means of obtaining observational data about individual and group behavior in support of human geography research.

  7. Ambiente virtual de aprendizagem no ensino de Enfermagem: relato de experiência Ambiente virtual de aprendizaje en la educación de Enfermería: relato de experiencia Virtual learning environment in nursing education: an experience report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Prado

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Novas Tecnologias da Informação/Comunicação oferecem a opção do uso do ambiente virtual de aprendizagem (AVA, o qual possibilita maior interatividade no cotidiano do ensino de enfermagem instigando os educadores a repensarem suas práticas pedagógicas. O objetivo deste estudo foi relatar a experiência do emprego do ambiente virtual no ensino de enfermagem na perspectiva dos estudantes. A disciplina "Educação em Enfermagem: Tendências e Desafios" foi ministrada a 78 estudantes do 4º semestre do Curso de Graduação em Enfermagem, dos quais 48 responderam um questionário com questões fechadas e, dentre estes, 33 responderam uma questão aberta sobre o uso do AVA. Os alunos consideraram o AVA uma ferramenta facilitadora da aprendizagem, do processo de construção do conhecimento e interação entre alunos, professores e tutores enriquecendo, assim, o compartilhamento de idéias e permitindo uma aprendizagem significativa e colaborativa. O estudo revelou a necessidade de potencialização do uso de AVA no ensino de graduação em enfermagem.Nuevas Tecnologías de la Información / Comunicación ofrecen la opción de usar un entorno de aprendizaje virtual (VLE, lo que permite una mayor interactividad en la educación de enfermería diario instando a los educadores a modificar sus sistemas de enseñanza. El objetivo de este trabajo es presentar la experiencia en el uso de entornos virtuales en la educación de enfermería desde la perspectiva de los estudiantes. La disciplina "Educación de Enfermería: Tendencias y Desafíos" fue ofrecida a 78 alumnos del 4º semestre de pregrado en enfermería, de los cuales 48 respondieron un cuestionario con preguntas cerradas y, entre ellos, 33 respondieron una pregunta abierta sobre el uso de AVA. Los estudiantes consideran el AVA una herramienta facilitadora del aprendizaje, el proceso de construcción del conocimiento y la interacción entre los estudiantes, los profesores y tutores

  8. A cone-beam computed tomography triple scan procedure to obtain a three-dimensional augmented virtual skull model appropriate for orthognathic surgery planning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swennen, G.R.J.; Mollemans, W.; Clercq, C. De; Abeloos, J.V.S.; Lamoral, P.; Lippens, F.R.C.; Neyt, N.; Casselman, J.W.; Schutyser, F.A.C.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a new approach to acquire a three-dimensional virtual skull model appropriate for orthognathic surgery planning without the use of plaster dental models and without deformation of the facial soft-tissue mask. A "triple" cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan

  9. The use of a wax bite wafer and a double computed tomography scan procedure to obtain a three-dimensional augmented virtual skull model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swennen, G.R.J.; Mommaerts, M.Y.; Abeloos, J.V.S.; Clercq, C. De; Lamoral, P.; Neyt, N.; Casselman, J.W.; Schutyser, F.A.C.

    2007-01-01

    A detailed visualization of the interocclusal relationship is essential in a three-dimensional virtual planning setup for orthognathic and facial orthomorphic surgery. The purpose of this study was to introduce and evaluate the use of a wax bite wafer in combination with a double computed tomography

  10. On the potential for using immersive virtual environments to support laboratory experiment contextualisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machet, Tania; Lowe, David; Gütl, Christian

    2012-12-01

    This paper explores the hypothesis that embedding a laboratory activity into a virtual environment can provide a richer experimental context and hence improve the understanding of the relationship between a theoretical model and the real world, particularly in terms of the model's strengths and weaknesses. While an identified learning objective of laboratories is to support the understanding of the relationship between models and reality, the paper illustrates that this understanding is hindered by inherently limited experiments and that there is scope for improvement. Despite the contextualisation of learning activities having been shown to support learning objectives in many fields, there is traditionally little contextual information presented during laboratory experimentation. The paper argues that the enhancing laboratory activity with contextual information affords an opportunity to improve students' understanding of the relationship between the theoretical model and the experiment (which is effectively a proxy for the complex real world), thereby improving their understanding of the relationship between the model and reality. The authors propose that these improvements can be achieved by setting remote laboratories within context-rich virtual worlds.

  11. Virtuality and efficiency - overcoming past antinomy in the remote collaboration experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Joao; Bjorkli, Knut; Clavo, David Martin; Baron, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Several recent initiatives have been put in place by the CERN IT Department to improve the user experience in remote dispersed meetings and remote collaboration at large in the LHC communities worldwide. We will present an analysis of the factors which were historically limiting the efficiency of remote dispersed meetings and describe the consequent actions which were undertaken at CERN to overcome these limitations. After giving a status update of the different equipment available at CERN to enable the virtual sessions and the various collaborative tools which are currently proposed to users, we will focus on the evolution of this market: how can the new technological trends (among others, HD videoconferencing, Telepresence, Unified Communications, etc.) impact positively the user experience and how to attain the best usage of them. Finally, by projecting ourselves in the future, we will give some hints as to how to answer the difficult question of selecting the next generation of collaborative tools: which set of tools among the various offers (systems like Vidyo H264 SVC, next generation EVO, Groupware offers, standard H323 systems, etc.) is best suited for our environment and how to unify this set for the common user. This will finally allow us to definitively overcome the past antinomy between virtuality and efficiency.

  12. Using a Virtual Environment to Deliver Evidence-Based Interventions: The Facilitator's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarruel, Antonia; Tschannen, Dana; Valladares, Angel; Yaksich, Joseph; Yeagley, Emily; Hawes, Armani

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence-based interventions (EBIs) have the potential to maximize positive impact on communities. However, despite the quantity and quality of EBIs for prevention, the need for formalized training and associated training-related expenses, such as travel costs, program materials, and input of personnel hours, pose implementation challenges for many community-based organizations. In this study, the community of inquiry (CoI) framework was used to develop the virtual learning environment to support the adaptation of the ¡Cuídate! (Take Care of Yourself!) Training of Facilitators curriculum (an EBI) to train facilitators from community-based organizations. Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of adapting a traditional face-to-face facilitator training program for ¡Cuídate!, a sexual risk reduction EBI for Latino youth, for use in a multi-user virtual environment (MUVE). Additionally, two aims of the study were explored: the acceptability of the facilitator training and the level of the facilitators’ knowledge and self-efficacy to implement the training. Methods A total of 35 facilitators were trained in the virtual environment. We evaluated the facilitators' experience in the virtual training environment and determined if the learning environment was acceptable and supported the acquisition of learning outcomes. To this end, the facilitators were surveyed using a modified community of inquiry survey, with questions specific to the Second Life environment and an open-ended questionnaire. In addition, a comparison to face-to-face training was conducted using survey methods. Results Results of the community of inquiry survey demonstrated a subscale mean of 23.11 (SD 4.12) out of a possible 30 on social presence, a subscale mean of 8.74 (SD 1.01) out of a possible 10 on teaching presence, and a subscale mean of 16.69 (SD 1.97) out of a possible 20 on cognitive presence. The comparison to face-to-face training showed no

  13. A fast and flexible panoramic virtual reality system for behavioural and electrophysiological experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takalo, Jouni; Piironen, Arto; Honkanen, Anna; Lempeä, Mikko; Aikio, Mika; Tuukkanen, Tuomas; Vähäsöyrinki, Mikko

    2012-01-01

    Ideally, neuronal functions would be studied by performing experiments with unconstrained animals whilst they behave in their natural environment. Although this is not feasible currently for most animal models, one can mimic the natural environment in the laboratory by using a virtual reality (VR) environment. Here we present a novel VR system based upon a spherical projection of computer generated images using a modified commercial data projector with an add-on fish-eye lens. This system provides equidistant visual stimulation with extensive coverage of the visual field, high spatio-temporal resolution and flexible stimulus generation using a standard computer. It also includes a track-ball system for closed-loop behavioural experiments with walking animals. We present a detailed description of the system and characterize it thoroughly. Finally, we demonstrate the VR system's performance whilst operating in closed-loop conditions by showing the movement trajectories of the cockroaches during exploratory behaviour in a VR forest.

  14. The Army rolls through Indianapolis: Fieldwork at the Virtual Army Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Allen

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay takes an ethnographic look at the individuals and institutions associated with the development, production, and implementation of the Virtual Army Experience (VAE, a mobile mission simulator that travels across the United States to venues such as state fairs and air shows. As an explicit aid to Army recruitment and interaction with the public, the VAE is an interesting nexus point that often channels public anxieties surrounding the medium of the video game and its role in the militarization of society. Here, I present my own experience of doing ethnography at this site, describing how it is received by visitors and interpreted by its employees. By means of the example of the VAE, I argue that polarizing media reports and academic criticisms that pit the processes of militarization against critical reflection of those processes are counterproductive and result in silencing more nuanced and thoughtful critical reflection that is already present at sites such as the VAE.

  15. Augmented reality for breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancati, Alberto; Angrigiani, Claudio; Nava, Maurizio B; Catanuto, Giuseppe; Rocco, Nicola; Ventrice, Fernando; Dorr, Julio

    2018-02-21

    Augmented reality (AR) enables the superimposition of virtual reality reconstructions onto clinical images of a real patient, in real time. This allows visualization of internal structures through overlying tissues, thereby providing a virtual transparency vision of surgical anatomy. AR has been applied to neurosurgery, which utilizes a relatively fixed space, frames, and bony references; the application of AR facilitates the relationship between virtual and real data. Augmented Breast imaging (ABI) is described. Breast MRI studies for breast implant patients with seroma were performed using a Siemens 3T system with a body coil and a four-channel bilateral phased-array breast coil as the transmitter and receiver, respectively. The contrast agent used was (CA) gadolinium (Gd) injection (0.1 mmol/kg at 2 ml/s) by a programmable power injector. Dicom formated images data from 10 MRI cases of breast implant seroma and 10 MRI cases with T1-2 N0 M0 breast cancer, were imported and transformed into Augmented reality images. Augmented breast imaging (ABI) demonstrated stereoscopic depth perception, focal point convergence, 3D cursor use, and joystick fly-through. Augmented breast imaging (ABI) to the breast can improve clinical outcomes, giving an enhanced view of the structures to work on. It should be further studied to determine its utility in clinical practice.

  16. Breast Augmentation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-04-13

    Apr 13, 1974 ... Complications encountered after breast augmentation are dealt with in .... in Phisohex or other suitable preparation for a few days before surgery ... In all cases, the prosthesis causes a fibrous tissue capsule to form around it.

  17. Chin augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or bigger compared to the nose. The best candidates for chin augmentation are people with weak or ... www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. ...

  18. A hierarchical model of virtual experience and its influences on the perceived value and loyalty of customers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piyathasanan, B; Mathies, C; Wetzels, M.G.M.; Patterson, P.; de Ruyter, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Many businesses use virtual experience (VE) to enhance the overall customer experience, though extant research offers little guidance for how to improve consumers' VE. This study, anchored in activity theory, examines key drivers of VE and its influences on value perceptions and customer loyalty. A

  19. Emulation-Based Virtual Laboratories: A Low-Cost Alternative to Physical Experiments in Control Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, G. C.; Medioli, A. M.; Sher, W.; Vlacic, L. B.; Welsh, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper argues the case for emulation-based virtual laboratories in control engineering education. It demonstrates that such emulation experiments can give students an industrially relevant educational experience at relatively low cost. The paper also describes a particular emulation-based system that has been developed with the aim of giving…

  20. Segeberg 1600 - Reconstructing a Historic Town for Virtual Reality Visualisation as AN Immersive Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deggim, S.; Kersten, T. P.; Tschirschwitz, F.; Hinrichsen, N.

    2017-11-01

    The 3D reconstruction of historic buildings and cities offers an opportunity to experience the history of relevant objects and their development over the centuries. Digital visualisations of such historic objects allow for a more natural view of history as well as showing information that is not possible in a real world setting. New presentation forms, such as the virtual reality (VR) system HTC Vive, can be used to disseminate information in another dimension and simplify the access by changing the user's viewpoint from a listener and viewer into being an integrated part of an interactive situation. In general, this approach is a combination of education and entertainment, also known as "edutainment" or "gamification", a term used in the education sector as describing where motivation to learn is encouraged through adding a competitive element. It is thus a step away from simple consumption of information towards experiencing information and a more literal interpretation of "living history". In this contribution, we present the development of a 3D reconstruction of the two towns Segeberg and Gieschenhagen (today: Bad Segeberg) in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany in the Early Modern Age around 1600. The historic landscape and its conversion from a reconstructed virtual town model into an interactive VR application is also described. The reconstruction is based on a recent digital terrain model as well as survey data of surviving buildings, historic visual information based on historic drawings and written accounts from that era. All datasets are combined to a single walkable virtual world that spans approximately 3 km2.

  1. SEGEBERG 1600 – RECONSTRUCTING A HISTORIC TOWN FOR VIRTUAL REALITY VISUALISATION AS AN IMMERSIVE EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Deggim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The 3D reconstruction of historic buildings and cities offers an opportunity to experience the history of relevant objects and their development over the centuries. Digital visualisations of such historic objects allow for a more natural view of history as well as showing information that is not possible in a real world setting. New presentation forms, such as the virtual reality (VR system HTC Vive, can be used to disseminate information in another dimension and simplify the access by changing the user’s viewpoint from a listener and viewer into being an integrated part of an interactive situation. In general, this approach is a combination of education and entertainment, also known as “edutainment” or “gamification”, a term used in the education sector as describing where motivation to learn is encouraged through adding a competitive element. It is thus a step away from simple consumption of information towards experiencing information and a more literal interpretation of “living history”. In this contribution, we present the development of a 3D reconstruction of the two towns Segeberg and Gieschenhagen (today: Bad Segeberg in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany in the Early Modern Age around 1600. The historic landscape and its conversion from a reconstructed virtual town model into an interactive VR application is also described. The reconstruction is based on a recent digital terrain model as well as survey data of surviving buildings, historic visual information based on historic drawings and written accounts from that era. All datasets are combined to a single walkable virtual world that spans approximately 3 km².

  2. The Impact of BIM-based virtual and augmented reality interfaces on health and safety in construction projects: protocol for a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Alfredo Soeiro; Adeeb Sidani; João Santos Baptista; João Pedro Poças Martins; Fabio Dinis; J. Duarte

    2018-01-01

    The construction sector is notable for its interdisciplinary knowledge and complex interactions between different parties and the sector has been gradually adopting new methodologies to improve work and collaboration practices, such as the case of Building Information Modeling (BIM). A protocol for a systematic review is proposed to evaluate the effectiveness of virtual reality techniques in the Architectural, Engineering, Construction and Operations sector. The search will be carried out in ...

  3. Metronome LKM: An open source virtual keyboard driver to measure experiment software latencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaizar, Pablo; Vadillo, Miguel A

    2017-10-01

    Experiment software is often used to measure reaction times gathered with keyboards or other input devices. In previous studies, the accuracy and precision of time stamps has been assessed through several means: (a) generating accurate square wave signals from an external device connected to the parallel port of the computer running the experiment software, (b) triggering the typematic repeat feature of some keyboards to get an evenly separated series of keypress events, or (c) using a solenoid handled by a microcontroller to press the input device (keyboard, mouse button, touch screen) that will be used in the experimental setup. Despite the advantages of these approaches in some contexts, none of them can isolate the measurement error caused by the experiment software itself. Metronome LKM provides a virtual keyboard to assess an experiment's software. Using this open source driver, researchers can generate keypress events using high-resolution timers and compare the time stamps collected by the experiment software with those gathered by Metronome LKM (with nanosecond resolution). Our software is highly configurable (in terms of keys pressed, intervals, SysRq activation) and runs on 2.6-4.8 Linux kernels.

  4. Promoting the Learning Mobility of Future Workers: Experiments with Virtual Placements in University-Business Arrangements.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dorp, C.A.; Herrero de Egaña y Espinosa de los Monteros, A.; Lansu, A.; Kocsis Baán, M.; Virkus, S.

    2011-01-01

    Virtual placements are learning arrangements, which generate new possibilities for accumulating professional (work-based) knowledge. Virtual placements are beneficial in many ways; they merit increased training opportunities, exposure to not/never-thought-of occupations, integration of disadvantaged

  5. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off a deuterium target at the HERMES experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movsisyan, Aram

    2011-05-01

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering is studied in this report, using all data collected at the HERMES experiment from 1996 to 2005. Azimuthal asymmetries with respect to beam-helicity, beam-charge and target polarization alone and also to their different combinations for hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons in deep-inelastic scattering from a both unpolarized and longitudinally polarized deuterium targets are measured. The asymmetries are attributed to the interference between the deeply virtual Compton scattering and Bethe-Heitler processes. The asymmetries are observed in the exclusive region -(1.5) 2 GeV 2 2 X 2 GeV 2 of the squared missing mass. The dependences of these asymmetries on -t, x N , or Q 2 are investigated. The results include the coherent process ed→edγ and the incoherent process ed→epnγ where in addition a nucleon may be excited to a resonance. For an unpolarized deuterium target, the leading Fourier amplitude of the beam-helicity asymmetry that is sensitive to the interference term is found to be substantial, but no significant t dependence is observed. The leading amplitude of the beam-charge asymmetry is substantial at large -t, but becomes small at small values of -t. The amplitudes of the beam-helicity asymmetry that are sensitive to the squared DVCS term are found to be consistent with zero. The deuteron Compton form factor H 1 appears to have a similar behavior as H of the proton. (orig.)

  6. Ambiente virtual de aprendizagem no ensino de Enfermagem: relato de experiência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Prado

    Full Text Available Novas Tecnologias da Informação/Comunicação oferecem a opção do uso do ambiente virtual de aprendizagem (AVA, o qual possibilita maior interatividade no cotidiano do ensino de enfermagem instigando os educadores a repensarem suas práticas pedagógicas. O objetivo deste estudo foi relatar a experiência do emprego do ambiente virtual no ensino de enfermagem na perspectiva dos estudantes. A disciplina "Educação em Enfermagem: Tendências e Desafios" foi ministrada a 78 estudantes do 4º semestre do Curso de Graduação em Enfermagem, dos quais 48 responderam um questionário com questões fechadas e, dentre estes, 33 responderam uma questão aberta sobre o uso do AVA. Os alunos consideraram o AVA uma ferramenta facilitadora da aprendizagem, do processo de construção do conhecimento e interação entre alunos, professores e tutores enriquecendo, assim, o compartilhamento de idéias e permitindo uma aprendizagem significativa e colaborativa. O estudo revelou a necessidade de potencialização do uso de AVA no ensino de graduação em enfermagem.

  7. Ambiente virtual de aprendizagem no ensino de Enfermagem: relato de experiência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Prado

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Novas Tecnologias da Informação/Comunicação oferecem a opção do uso do ambiente virtual de aprendizagem (AVA, o qual possibilita maior interatividade no cotidiano do ensino de enfermagem instigando os educadores a repensarem suas práticas pedagógicas. O objetivo deste estudo foi relatar a experiência do emprego do ambiente virtual no ensino de enfermagem na perspectiva dos estudantes. A disciplina "Educação em Enfermagem: Tendências e Desafios" foi ministrada a 78 estudantes do 4º semestre do Curso de Graduação em Enfermagem, dos quais 48 responderam um questionário com questões fechadas e, dentre estes, 33 responderam uma questão aberta sobre o uso do AVA. Os alunos consideraram o AVA uma ferramenta facilitadora da aprendizagem, do processo de construção do conhecimento e interação entre alunos, professores e tutores enriquecendo, assim, o compartilhamento de idéias e permitindo uma aprendizagem significativa e colaborativa. O estudo revelou a necessidade de potencialização do uso de AVA no ensino de graduação em enfermagem.

  8. Docencia universitaria semipresencial: Experiencia en el uso de la plataforma virtual SWAD Semi-presential university teaching: An experience in the use of SWAD virtual platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel López-Morales

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La innovación en la metodología docente universitaria es una exigencia del nuevo Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior. La utilización de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación es una realidad de la sociedad actual, y especialmente del alumnado universitario. Materiales y métodos: Este artículo muestra la experiencia en el uso de la plataforma virtual de apoyo a la docencia, en la asignatura de Salud y Medio Ambiente en la Universidad de Granada. Resultados y conclusiones: La opinión de los alumnos es muy favorable hacia su uso. Su nivel de satisfacción es muy alto, aunque les supone una dedicación y esfuerzo mayores a los esperados. La plataforma virtual ofrece unas posibilidades académicas que permiten el acercamiento y adaptación a los nuevos perfiles de alumnado. Para el profesorado supone un cambio en sus principales actividades: la preparación y diseño de contenidos, las tutorías virtuales y la gestión de foros.Introduction: The new European Space of higher education demands innovation in the university teaching methodology. The use of the new information and communication technologies is a reality in our current society, especially among university students. The use of virtual platforms for teaching is more developed in post graduate lifelong learning than in university education. Materials and methods: This articles narrates an experience in the use of SWAD virtual platform, teaching aid, in the subject course Health and Environment, in the University of Granada. Results and conclusions: The students have a positive opinion about the use of this platform. Their satisfaction level is very high, although it means more dedication and effort than expected. This virtual platform offers academic possibilities that allows us to get close and adapt to the new student profiles. To professors, it means a change in their main activities: preparing and designing contents, virtual tutorials, and forums

  9. Simulated and Virtual Science Laboratory Experiments: Improving Critical Thinking and Higher-Order Learning Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Nicole A.

    Virtual laboratory experiments using interactive computer simulations are not being employed as viable alternatives to laboratory science curriculum at extensive enough rates within higher education. Rote traditional lab experiments are currently the norm and are not addressing inquiry, Critical Thinking, and cognition throughout the laboratory experience, linking with educational technologies (Pyatt & Sims, 2007; 2011; Trundle & Bell, 2010). A causal-comparative quantitative study was conducted with 150 learners enrolled at a two-year community college, to determine the effects of simulation laboratory experiments on Higher-Order Learning, Critical Thinking Skills, and Cognitive Load. The treatment population used simulated experiments, while the non-treatment sections performed traditional expository experiments. A comparison was made using the Revised Two-Factor Study Process survey, Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire, and the Scientific Attitude Inventory survey, using a Repeated Measures ANOVA test for treatment or non-treatment. A main effect of simulated laboratory experiments was found for both Higher-Order Learning, [F (1, 148) = 30.32,p = 0.00, eta2 = 0.12] and Critical Thinking Skills, [F (1, 148) = 14.64,p = 0.00, eta 2 = 0.17] such that simulations showed greater increases than traditional experiments. Post-lab treatment group self-reports indicated increased marginal means (+4.86) in Higher-Order Learning and Critical Thinking Skills, compared to the non-treatment group (+4.71). Simulations also improved the scientific skills and mastery of basic scientific subject matter. It is recommended that additional research recognize that learners' Critical Thinking Skills change due to different instructional methodologies that occur throughout a semester.

  10. Improving dental experiences by using virtual reality distraction: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanja-Dijkstra, Karin; Pahl, Sabine; White, Mathew P; Andrade, Jackie; Qian, Cheng; Bruce, Malcolm; May, Jon; Moles, David R

    2014-01-01

    Dental anxiety creates significant problems for both patients and the dental profession. Some distraction interventions are already used by healthcare professionals to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. The present study is novel because it a) builds on evidence that natural scenery is beneficial for patients, and b) uses a Virtual Reality (VR) representation of nature to distract participants. Extending previous work that has investigated pain and anxiety during treatment, c) we also consider the longer term effects in terms of more positive memories of the treatment, building on a cognitive theory of memory (Elaborated Intrusions). Participants (n = 69) took part in a simulated dental experience and were randomly assigned to one of three VR conditions (active vs. passive vs. control). In addition, participants were distinguished into high and low dentally anxious according to a median split resulting in a 3×2 between-subjects design. VR distraction in a simulated dental context affected memories a week later. The VR distraction had effects not only on concurrent experiences, such as perceived control, but longitudinally upon the vividness of memories after the dental experience had ended. Participants with higher dental anxiety (for whom the dental procedures were presumably more aversive) showed a greater reduction in memory vividness than lower dental-anxiety participants. This study thus suggests that VR distractions can be considered as a relevant intervention for cycles of care in which people's previous experiences affect their behaviour for future events.

  11. Improving dental experiences by using virtual reality distraction: a simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Tanja-Dijkstra

    Full Text Available Dental anxiety creates significant problems for both patients and the dental profession. Some distraction interventions are already used by healthcare professionals to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. The present study is novel because it a builds on evidence that natural scenery is beneficial for patients, and b uses a Virtual Reality (VR representation of nature to distract participants. Extending previous work that has investigated pain and anxiety during treatment, c we also consider the longer term effects in terms of more positive memories of the treatment, building on a cognitive theory of memory (Elaborated Intrusions. Participants (n = 69 took part in a simulated dental experience and were randomly assigned to one of three VR conditions (active vs. passive vs. control. In addition, participants were distinguished into high and low dentally anxious according to a median split resulting in a 3×2 between-subjects design. VR distraction in a simulated dental context affected memories a week later. The VR distraction had effects not only on concurrent experiences, such as perceived control, but longitudinally upon the vividness of memories after the dental experience had ended. Participants with higher dental anxiety (for whom the dental procedures were presumably more aversive showed a greater reduction in memory vividness than lower dental-anxiety participants. This study thus suggests that VR distractions can be considered as a relevant intervention for cycles of care in which people's previous experiences affect their behaviour for future events.

  12. Improving Dental Experiences by Using Virtual Reality Distraction: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanja-Dijkstra, Karin; Pahl, Sabine; P. White, Mathew; Andrade, Jackie; Qian, Cheng; Bruce, Malcolm; May, Jon; Moles, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Dental anxiety creates significant problems for both patients and the dental profession. Some distraction interventions are already used by healthcare professionals to help patients cope with unpleasant procedures. The present study is novel because it a) builds on evidence that natural scenery is beneficial for patients, and b) uses a Virtual Reality (VR) representation of nature to distract participants. Extending previous work that has investigated pain and anxiety during treatment, c) we also consider the longer term effects in terms of more positive memories of the treatment, building on a cognitive theory of memory (Elaborated Intrusions). Participants (n = 69) took part in a simulated dental experience and were randomly assigned to one of three VR conditions (active vs. passive vs. control). In addition, participants were distinguished into high and low dentally anxious according to a median split resulting in a 3×2 between-subjects design. VR distraction in a simulated dental context affected memories a week later. The VR distraction had effects not only on concurrent experiences, such as perceived control, but longitudinally upon the vividness of memories after the dental experience had ended. Participants with higher dental anxiety (for whom the dental procedures were presumably more aversive) showed a greater reduction in memory vividness than lower dental-anxiety participants. This study thus suggests that VR distractions can be considered as a relevant intervention for cycles of care in which people’s previous experiences affect their behaviour for future events. PMID:24621518

  13. Training presence: the importance of virtual reality experience on the "sense of being there".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamito, Pedro; Oliveira, Jorge; Morais, Diogo; Baptista, André; Santos, Nuno; Soares, Fábio; Saraiva, Tomaz; Rosa, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Nature and origin of presence are still unclear. Although it can be characterized, under a neurophysiological perspective, as a process resulting from a synchrony between cognitive and perceptive systems, the multitude of associated processes reduces the chances of brain mapping presence. In this way, our study was designed in order to understand the possible role of VR experience on presence in a virtual environment. For our study, 16 participants (M=28.39 years; SD=13.44) of both genders without computer experience were selected. The study design consisted of two assessments (initial and final), where the participants were evaluated with BFI, PQ, ITQ, QC, MCSDS-SF, STAI, visual attention and behavioral measures after playing an first person shooter (FPS) game. In order to manipulate the level of VR experience the participants were trained on, a different FPS was used during the 12 weekly sessions of 30 minutes. Results revealed significant differences between the first and final assessment for presence (F(1,15)=11.583; MSE=775.538; p<01) and immersion scores (F(1,15)=6.234; MSE=204.962; p<05), indicating higher levels of presence and immersion in the final assessment. No statistical significant results were obtained for cybersickness or the behavioral measures. In summary, our results showed that training and the subsequent higher computer experience levels can increase immersion and presence.

  14. First Determination of Generalized Polarizabilities of the Proton by a Virtual Compton Scattering Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, J. [CEA Saclay, DSM/DAPNIA/SPhN, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, (France); Friedrich, J. M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Mainz, 55099 Mainz, (Germany); Lhuillier, D. [CEA Saclay, DSM/DAPNIA/SPhN, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, (France); Bartsch, P. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Mainz, 55099 Mainz, (Germany); Baumann, D. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Mainz, 55099 Mainz, (Germany); Berthot, J. [LPC de Clermont-Fd, IN2P3-CNRS, Universite Blaise Pascal, 63177 Aubiere Cedex, (France); Bertin, P. Y. [LPC de Clermont-Fd, IN2P3-CNRS, Universite Blaise Pascal, 63177 Aubiere Cedex, (France); Breton, V. [LPC de Clermont-Fd, IN2P3-CNRS, Universite Blaise Pascal, 63177 Aubiere Cedex, (France); Boeglin, W. U. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Mainz, 55099 Mainz, (Germany); Boehm, R. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Mainz, 55099 Mainz, (Germany)] (and others)

    2000-07-24

    Absolute differential cross sections for the reaction ep{yields}ep{gamma} have been measured at a four-momentum transfer with virtuality Q{sup 2}=0.33 GeV{sup 2} and polarization {epsilon}=0.62 in the range 33.6 to 111.5 MeV/c for the momentum of the outgoing photon in the photon-proton center of mass frame. The experiment has been performed with the high-resolution spectrometers at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. From the photon angular distributions, two structure functions which are a linear combination of the generalized polarizabilities have been determined for the first time. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  15. Patients’ and Health Professionals’ Experiences of Using Virtual Reality Technology for Upper Limb Training after Stroke:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Hanne; Andersen, Mette Brændstrup; Hansen, Gunhild Mo

    2018-01-01

    Background. In recent years, virtual reality (VR) therapy systems for upper limb training after stroke have been increasingly used in clinical practice.Therapy systems employing VR technology can enhance the intensity of training and can also boost patients’ motivation by adding a playful element...... to therapy. However, reports on user experiences are still scarce. Methods. A qualitative investigation of patients’ and therapists’ perspectives on VR upper limb training. Semistructured face-to-face interviews were conducted with six patients in the final week of the VR intervention.Therapists participated......) engagement, (iii) perceived improvements, (iv) individualization, and (v) device malfunction. The health professionals described the same themes as the patients but less positively, emphasizing negative technical challenges. Conclusion. Patients and therapists mainly valued the intensive and motivational...

  16. Augmented reality system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Liang; Su, Yu-Zheng; Hung, Min-Wei; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, Augmented Reality (AR)[1][2][3] is very popular in universities and research organizations. The AR technology has been widely used in Virtual Reality (VR) fields, such as sophisticated weapons, flight vehicle development, data model visualization, virtual training, entertainment and arts. AR has characteristics to enhance the display output as a real environment with specific user interactive functions or specific object recognitions. It can be use in medical treatment, anatomy training, precision instrument casting, warplane guidance, engineering and distance robot control. AR has a lot of vantages than VR. This system developed combines sensors, software and imaging algorithms to make users feel real, actual and existing. Imaging algorithms include gray level method, image binarization method, and white balance method in order to make accurate image recognition and overcome the effects of light.

  17. Augmenting effectiveness of control loops of a PMSG (permanent magnet synchronous generator) based wind energy conversion system by a virtually adaptive PI (proportional integral) controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, Mojtaba; Kojori, Shokrollah Shokri

    2015-01-01

    Offering substantial features, PMSG (permanent magnet synchronous generator) based WECS (wind energy conversion system) is definitely one of the most reliable and efficient ways of extracting electrical power from the wind. Like other WECSs, PMSG-based WECS (PMSG WECS) encompasses two main control loops, each equipped with PI (proportional integral) controller, to control speed and currents of the system. This work develops a virtually adaptive PI controller to enhance the performance of both main control loops of a PMSG WECS. A WNN (wavelet neural network) is proposed to be added to each closed control loop in series with PI controller. Due to having a cascade connection, the transfer function of the WNN, which is a pure gain in each time step, is multiplied by PI gains. Therefore, the value of transfer function of the WNN, and consequently, both parameters of PI controller can be changed in each time step by online training of the WNN, resulting in a virtually adaptive PI controller. The performance of the proposed controller in improving efficacy of both current and speed control loops is evaluated by simulation studies and is also compared to that of PI controller, WNNC (wavelet neural network controller), and QNNC (quantum neural network controller). - Highlights: • To propose a virtually adaptive PI controller to be used in a PMSG WECS. • Both parameters of PI controller can be changed in each time step. • The proposed controller can be used as both current or speed controller. • The plant data is not required for offline training of proposed current controller.

  18. Using a Virtual Experiment to Analyze Infiltration Process from Point to Grid-cell Size Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    The hydrological science requires the emergence of a consistent theoretical corpus driving the relationships between dominant physical processes at different spatial and temporal scales. However, the strong spatial heterogeneities and non-linearities of these processes make difficult the development of multiscale conceptualizations. Therefore, scaling understanding is a key issue to advance this science. This work is focused on the use of virtual experiments to address the scaling of vertical infiltration from a physically based model at point scale to a simplified physically meaningful modeling approach at grid-cell scale. Numerical simulations have the advantage of deal with a wide range of boundary and initial conditions against field experimentation. The aim of the work was to show the utility of numerical simulations to discover relationships between the hydrological parameters at both scales, and to use this synthetic experience as a media to teach the complex nature of this hydrological process. The Green-Ampt model was used to represent vertical infiltration at point scale; and a conceptual storage model was employed to simulate the infiltration process at the grid-cell scale. Lognormal and beta probability distribution functions were assumed to represent the heterogeneity of soil hydraulic parameters at point scale. The linkages between point scale parameters and the grid-cell scale parameters were established by inverse simulations based on the mass balance equation and the averaging of the flow at the point scale. Results have shown numerical stability issues for particular conditions and have revealed the complex nature of the non-linear relationships between models' parameters at both scales and indicate that the parameterization of point scale processes at the coarser scale is governed by the amplification of non-linear effects. The findings of these simulations have been used by the students to identify potential research questions on scale issues

  19. Developing Preceptors through Virtual Communities and Networks: Experiences from a Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackman, Margaret L; Romanick, Marcel

    2011-11-01

    Supporting preceptors is critical to the expansion of experiential learning opportunities for the pharmacy profession. Informal learning opportunities within communities of practitioners are important for hospital preceptors. However, such communities may be limited by geographic separation of preceptors from peers, faculty members, and supports within the pharmacy services department. To use computer-mediated conferencing to create a sense of community among preceptors, specifically by using this medium to provide initial development of and continuing support for preceptors, and to examine preceptors' satisfaction with this approach. Thirty-nine preceptors who had completed a day-long face-to-face preceptor development workshop and who were supervising students in 1 of 2 specific rotation blocks were invited to participate in the study. The pharmacists used computer-mediated conferencing to meet for virtual networking about specific topics. They met once before the student rotation to receive instructions about the technology and to discuss student orientation and scheduling, and 3 times during the student rotation for open discussion of specific topics. Evaluation and feedback were solicited by means of an electronic survey and virtual (i.e., computer-based) feedback sessions with an independent facilitator. The response rate was 66% (26/39) for the electronic survey, but only 15% (6/39) for the virtual feedback sessions. All of the respondents were experienced preceptors, but for 92% (22/24), this was their first experience with computer-mediated conferencing. Overall, the sessions had a positive reception, and participants found it useful to share information and experiences with other preceptors. The main challenges were related to the technology, perceived lack of support for their participation in the sessions, and inconvenience related to the timing of sessions. Computer-mediated conferencing allowed preceptors to learn from and to support each other

  20. Applying the HVRC VRdose Planner in the design of a Pneumatic Transfer System. Virtual, immersive and augmented reality - Feasibility study on the applications of the HVRC VRdose Planner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapasi, Q.; Rhodes, C.

    2017-01-01

    The UK National Nuclear Laboratory (NNL) has developed simulations using the HVRC VRdose Planner, to assist in the design of a Pneumatic Transfer System (PTS) within an active facility. The PTS is at the concept stage, and rationale behind the installation is to facilitate the transfer of small radioactive packages more quickly and safely than is possible using current methods, which require significant input from operators and/or large and heavy equipment. VRdose Planner simulations have been used to determine the optimum pipe material and thickness in order to simulate the radiological effects of mal-operation. Simulations were undertaken to represent 3 point sources with a Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) inventory moving through the PTS from one end of the plant to another. Dose graphs have been used to understand the radiological implications of the sources and results found the risk to operators to be minimal. The visual animation of the simulation has provided the NNL with a quick and effective way of describing the scenario and identifying areas of risk which would otherwise have been time consuming. Applications: Design - The programme enables assessors from any discipline or background to interface with the virtual design, undertake operations and fully understand the environment proposed. Furthermore, where layouts are found wanting, they can be rectified in real time and fed back into the official design drawings and requirements. Safety Case - The development of a safety case are undertaken against a suite of 2D technical drawings which can be hard to follow, particularly for disciplines that do not have regular interface with design. Supplementing the safety case with the availability of advanced simulation and walk-through could prove a step change in efficiency and speed up understanding in this process. Decommissioning - The ability to map out radiation and simulate dose uptake is particularly beneficial during the decommissioning of existing facilities

  1. Initial Model of Social Acceptability for Human Augmentation Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eghtebas, Chloe; Pay, Yun Suen; Väänänen, Kaisa; Pfeiffer, Ties; Meyer, Joachim; Lukosch, S.G.

    2017-01-01

    Academia and industry engage in major efforts to develop technologies for augmenting human senses and activities. Many of these technologies, such as augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) head mounted displays (HMD), haptic augmentation systems, and exoskeletons can be applied in numerous

  2. Effect of an Immersive Preoperative Virtual Reality Experience on Patient Reported Outcomes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekelis, Kimon; Calnan, Daniel; Simmons, Nathan; MacKenzie, Todd A; Kakoulides, George

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effect of exposure to a virtual reality (VR) environment preoperatively on patient-reported outcomes for surgical operations. There is a scarcity of well-developed quality improvement initiatives targeting patient satisfaction. We performed a randomized controlled trial of patients undergoing cranial and spinal operations in a tertiary referral center. Patients underwent a 1:1 randomization to an immersive preoperative VR experience or standard preoperative experience stratified on type of operation. The primary outcome measures were the Evaluation du Vecu de l'Anesthesie Generale (EVAN-G) score and the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information (APAIS) score, as markers of the patient's experience during the surgical encounter. During the study period, a total of 127 patients (mean age 55.3 years, 41.9% females) underwent randomization. The average EVAN-G score was 84.3 (standard deviation, SD, 6.4) after VR, and 64.3 (SD, 11.7) after standard preoperative experience (difference, 20.0; 95% confidence interval, CI, 16.6-23.3). Exposure to an immersive VR experience also led to higher APAIS score (difference, 29.9; 95% CI, 24.5-35.2). In addition, VR led to lower preoperative VAS stress score (difference, -41.7; 95% CI, -33.1 to -50.2), and higher preoperative VAS preparedness (difference, 32.4; 95% CI, 24.9-39.8), and VAS satisfaction (difference, 33.2; 95% CI, 25.4-41.0) scores. No association was identified with VAS stress score (difference, -1.6; 95% CI, -13.4 to 10.2). In a randomized controlled trial, we demonstrated that patients exposed to preoperative VR had increased satisfaction during the surgical encounter. Harnessing the power of this technology, hospitals can create an immersive environment that minimizes stress, and enhances the perioperative experience.

  3. Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher; Kjeldsen, Lars Peter Bech; Rahn, Annette

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of iPad-facilitated application of augmented reality in the teaching of highly complex anatomical and physiological subjects in the training of nurses at undergraduate level. The general aim of the project is to investigate the potentials of this application in terms...... of making the complex content and context of these subjects more approachable to the students through the visualization made possible through the use of this technology. A case study is described in this chapter. Issues and factors required for the sustainable use of the mobile-facilitated application...... of augmented reality are discussed....

  4. 'Augmented reality' in conventional simulation by projection of 3-D structures into 2-D images. A comparison with virtual methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutschmann, H.; Nairz, O.; Zehentmayr, F.; Fastner, G.; Sedlmayer, F. [Univ. Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); radART - Inst. for research and development on Advanced Radiation Technologies at the Paracelsus Medical Univ., Salzburg (Austria); Steininger, P. [radART - Inst. for research and development on Advanced Radiation Technologies at the Paracelsus Medical Univ., Salzburg (Austria); Dept. of Medical Computer Science and Technology, Univ. for Health Sciences, Hall i. T. (Austria); Kopp, P.; Merz, F.; Wurstbauer, K.; Kranzinger, M.; Kametriser, G.; Kopp, M. [Univ. Clinic for Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg (Austria)

    2008-02-15

    Background and purpose: in this study, a new method is introduced, which allows the overlay of three-dimensional structures, that have been delineated on transverse slices, onto the fluoroscopy from conventional simulators in real time. Patients and methods: setup deviations between volumetric imaging and simulation were visualized, measured and corrected for 701 patient isocenters. Results: comparing the accuracy to mere virtual simulation lacking additional X-ray imaging, a clear benefit of the new method could be shown. On average, virtual prostate simulations had to be corrected by 0.48 cm (standard deviation [SD] 0.38), and those of the breast by 0.67 cm (SD 0.66). Conclusion: the presented method provides an easy way to determine entity-specific safety margins related to patient setup errors upon registration of bony anatomy (prostate 0.9 cm for 90% of cases, breast 1.3 cm). The important role of planar X-ray imaging was clearly demonstrated. The innovation can also be applied to adaptive image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) protocols. (orig.)

  5. The Effect of Focal Distance, Age, and Brightness on Near-Field Augmented Reality Depth Matching

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Gujot; Ellis, Stephen R.; Swan II, J. Edward

    2017-01-01

    Many augmented reality (AR) applications operate within near-field reaching distances, and require matching the depth of a virtual object with a real object. The accuracy of this matching was measured in three experiments, which examined the effect of focal distance, age, and brightness, within distances of 33.3 to 50 cm, using a custom-built AR haploscope. Experiment I examined the effect of focal demand, at the levels of collimated (infinite focal distance), consistent with other depth cues...

  6. Virtual Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Lillian; Bygholm, Ann

    In relation to the Tutor course in the Mediterranean Virtual University (MVU) project, a virtual workshop “Getting experiences with different synchronous communication media, collaboration, and group work” was held with all partner institutions in January 2006. More than 25 key-tutors within MVU...

  7. Droni e turismo virtuale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Minucciani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Virtual tourism has been through at least three generations. The first is a special form of e-commerce, and no doubt it has much changed the way you plan your travel. Second generation of virtual tourism has exploited georeference: the user can know the services offered nearby and, with appropriate apps and augmented reality, receive information about places. An important contribution has been made in this field by social media (see Flickr, as well as Tripadvisor. The third generation of virtual tourism even replaces the travel experience: first proposing visits in virtual worlds, then in the real world. That allows tourism to social classes that are excluded. The goal is to send in the real place an "avatar", that can perform what tourist wants. Some experiments have been recently performed with robots, here a visit by drones is proposed. In particular, indoor visits are difficult because it is necessary to re-create a microgeodetic reference system in a closed and confined environment, to allow remote control and to ensure the protection of the cultural property. It has also to be considered the issue of the size of the drone, its autonomy and shooting video (which must be 360 degrees and high definition. The real experience is irreplaceable, but this form of tourism can find many interesting applications and strengthen real tourism. In conclusion, we believe that not only this performances are now within the reach of our technical capabilities, but  they also represent an effective response to certain social and cultural issues.

  8. Droni e turismo virtuale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Minucciani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Virtual tourism has been through at least three generations.The first is a special form of e-commerce, and no doubt it has much changed the way you plan your travel. Second generation of virtual tourism has exploited georeference: the user can know the services offered nearby and, with appropriate apps and augmented reality, receive information about places.An important contribution has been made in this field by social media (see Flickr, as well as Tripadvisor. The third generation of virtual tourism even replaces the travel experience: first proposing visits in virtual worlds, then in the real world. That allows tourism to social classes that are excluded.The goal is to send in the real place an "avatar", that can perform what tourist wants. Some experiments have been recently performed with robots, here a visit by drones is proposed. In particular, indoor visits are difficult because it is necessary to re-create a microgeodetic reference system in a closed and confined environment, to allow remote control and to ensure the protection of the cultural property. It has also to be considered the issue of the size of the drone, its autonomy and shooting video (which must be 360 degrees and high definition.The real experience is irreplaceable, but this form of tourism can find many interesting applications and strengthen real tourism.In conclusion, we believe that not only this performances are now within the reach of our technical capabilities, but  they also represent an effective response to certain social and cultural issues. 

  9. Augmented reality in dentistry: a current perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ho-Beom; Park, Young-Seok; Han, Jung-Suk

    2018-02-21

    Augmentation reality technology offers virtual information in addition to that of the real environment and thus opens new possibilities in various fields. The medical applications of augmentation reality are generally concentrated on surgery types, including neurosurgery, laparoscopic surgery and plastic surgery. Augmentation reality technology is also widely used in medical education and training. In dentistry, oral and maxillofacial surgery is the primary area of use, where dental implant placement and orthognathic surgery are the most frequent applications. Recent technological advancements are enabling new applications of restorative dentistry, orthodontics and endodontics. This review briefly summarizes the history, definitions, features, and components of augmented reality technology and discusses its applications and future perspectives in dentistry.

  10. A Virtual Object-Location Task for Children: Gender and Videogame Experience Influence Navigation; Age Impacts Memory and Completion Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Andres, David; Mendez-Lopez, Magdalena; Juan, M-Carmen; Perez-Hernandez, Elena

    2018-01-01

    The use of virtual reality-based tasks for studying memory has increased considerably. Most of the studies that have looked at child population factors that influence performance on such tasks have been focused on cognitive variables. However, little attention has been paid to the impact of non-cognitive skills. In the present paper, we tested 52 typically-developing children aged 5-12 years in a virtual object-location task. The task assessed their spatial short-term memory for the location of three objects in a virtual city. The virtual task environment was presented using a 3D application consisting of a 120″ stereoscopic screen and a gamepad interface. Measures of learning and displacement indicators in the virtual environment, 3D perception, satisfaction, and usability were obtained. We assessed the children's videogame experience, their visuospatial span, their ability to build blocks, and emotional and behavioral outcomes. The results indicate that learning improved with age. Significant effects on the speed of navigation were found favoring boys and those more experienced with videogames. Visuospatial skills correlated mainly with ability to recall object positions, but the correlation was weak. Longer paths were related with higher scores of withdrawal behavior, attention problems, and a lower visuospatial span. Aggressiveness and experience with the device used for interaction were related with faster navigation. However, the correlations indicated only weak associations among these variables.

  11. A Virtual Object-Location Task for Children: Gender and Videogame Experience Influence Navigation; Age Impacts Memory and Completion Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Andres, David; Mendez-Lopez, Magdalena; Juan, M.-Carmen; Perez-Hernandez, Elena

    2018-01-01

    The use of virtual reality-based tasks for studying memory has increased considerably. Most of the studies that have looked at child population factors that influence performance on such tasks have been focused on cognitive variables. However, little attention has been paid to the impact of non-cognitive skills. In the present paper, we tested 52 typically-developing children aged 5–12 years in a virtual object-location task. The task assessed their spatial short-term memory for the location of three objects in a virtual city. The virtual task environment was presented using a 3D application consisting of a 120″ stereoscopic screen and a gamepad interface. Measures of learning and displacement indicators in the virtual environment, 3D perception, satisfaction, and usability were obtained. We assessed the children’s videogame experience, their visuospatial span, their ability to build blocks, and emotional and behavioral outcomes. The results indicate that learning improved with age. Significant effects on the speed of navigation were found favoring boys and those more experienced with videogames. Visuospatial skills correlated mainly with ability to recall object positions, but the correlation was weak. Longer paths were related with higher scores of withdrawal behavior, attention problems, and a lower visuospatial span. Aggressiveness and experience with the device used for interaction were related with faster navigation. However, the correlations indicated only weak associations among these variables. PMID:29674988

  12. A Virtual Object-Location Task for Children: Gender and Videogame Experience Influence Navigation; Age Impacts Memory and Completion Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rodriguez-Andres

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of virtual reality-based tasks for studying memory has increased considerably. Most of the studies that have looked at child population factors that influence performance on such tasks have been focused on cognitive variables. However, little attention has been paid to the impact of non-cognitive skills. In the present paper, we tested 52 typically-developing children aged 5–12 years in a virtual object-location task. The task assessed their spatial short-term memory for the location of three objects in a virtual city. The virtual task environment was presented using a 3D application consisting of a 120″ stereoscopic screen and a gamepad interface. Measures of learning and displacement indicators in the virtual environment, 3D perception, satisfaction, and usability were obtained. We assessed the children’s videogame experience, their visuospatial span, their ability to build blocks, and emotional and behavioral outcomes. The results indicate that learning improved with age. Significant effects on the speed of navigation were found favoring boys and those more experienced with videogames. Visuospatial skills correlated mainly with ability to recall object positions, but the correlation was weak. Longer paths were related with higher scores of withdrawal behavior, attention problems, and a lower visuospatial span. Aggressiveness and experience with the device used for interaction were related with faster navigation. However, the correlations indicated only weak associations among these variables.

  13. 'Silk Road', the virtual drug marketplace: a single case study of user experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hout, Marie Claire; Bingham, Tim

    2013-09-01

    The online promotion of 'drug shopping' and user information networks is of increasing public health and law enforcement concern. An online drug marketplace called 'Silk Road' has been operating on the 'Deep Web' since February 2011 and was designed to revolutionise contemporary drug consumerism. A single case study approach explored a 'Silk Road' user's motives for online drug purchasing, experiences of accessing and using the website, drug information sourcing, decision making and purchasing, outcomes and settings for use, and perspectives around security. The participant was recruited following a lengthy relationship building phase on the 'Silk Road' chat forum. The male participant described his motives, experiences of purchasing processes and drugs used from 'Silk Road'. Consumer experiences on 'Silk Road' were described as 'euphoric' due to the wide choice of drugs available, relatively easy once navigating the Tor Browser (encryption software) and using 'Bitcoins' for transactions, and perceived as safer than negotiating illicit drug markets. Online researching of drug outcomes, particularly for new psychoactive substances was reported. Relationships between vendors and consumers were described as based on cyber levels of trust and professionalism, and supported by 'stealth modes', user feedback and resolution modes. The reality of his drug use was described as covert and solitary with psychonautic characteristics, which contrasted with his membership, participation and feelings of safety within the 'Silk Road' community. 'Silk Road' as online drug marketplace presents an interesting displacement away from 'traditional' online and street sources of drug supply. Member support and harm reduction ethos within this virtual community maximises consumer decision-making and positive drug experiences, and minimises potential harms and consumer perceived risks. Future research is necessary to explore experiences and backgrounds of other users. Copyright © 2013

  14. Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund; Brandt, Harald; Radmer, Ole

    2017-01-01

    Artiklen præsenterer resultater fra pilotafprøvning i 7.-klasses fysik/kemi og biologi af to Augmented Reality (AR)-apps til naturfagsundervisning. Muligheder og udfordringer ved lærerens stilladsering af elevernes undersøgende samtale og modelleringskompetence er undersøgt med interview...

  15. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off a deuterium target at the HERMES experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Movsisyan, Aram

    2011-05-15

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering is studied in this report, using all data collected at the HERMES experiment from 1996 to 2005. Azimuthal asymmetries with respect to beam-helicity, beam-charge and target polarization alone and also to their different combinations for hard exclusive electroproduction of real photons in deep-inelastic scattering from a both unpolarized and longitudinally polarized deuterium targets are measured. The asymmetries are attributed to the interference between the deeply virtual Compton scattering and Bethe-Heitler processes. The asymmetries are observed in the exclusive region -(1.5){sup 2} GeV{sup 2}

  16. Experience of Adult Facilitators in a Virtual-Reality-Based Social Interaction Program for Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Fengfeng; Im, Tami; Xue, Xinrong; Xu, Xinhao; Kim, Namju; Lee, Sungwoong

    2015-01-01

    This phenomenological study explored and described the experiences and perceptions of adult facilitators who facilitated virtual-reality-based social interaction for children with autism. Extensive data were collected from iterative, in-depth interviews; online activities observation; and video analysis. Four salient themes emerged through the…

  17. Augmented Reality: A Brand New Challenge for the Assessment and Treatment of Psychological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicchi Giglioli, Irene Alice; Pallavicini, Federica; Pedroli, Elisa; Serino, Silvia; Riva, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality is a new technological system that allows introducing virtual contents in the real world in order to run in the same representation and, in real time, enhancing the user's sensory perception of reality. From another point of view, Augmented Reality can be defined as a set of techniques and tools that add information to the physical reality. To date, Augmented Reality has been used in many fields, such as medicine, entertainment, maintenance, architecture, education, and cognitive and motor rehabilitation but very few studies and applications of AR exist in clinical psychology. In the treatment of psychological disorders, Augmented Reality has given preliminary evidence to be a useful tool due to its adaptability to the patient needs and therapeutic purposes and interactivity. Another relevant factor is the quality of the user's experience in the Augmented Reality system determined from emotional engagement and sense of presence. This experience could increase the AR ecological validity in the treatment of psychological disorders. This paper reviews the recent studies on the use of Augmented Reality in the evaluation and treatment of psychological disorders, focusing on current uses of this technology and on the specific features that delineate Augmented Reality a new technique useful for psychology.

  18. Augmented Reality: A Brand New Challenge for the Assessment and Treatment of Psychological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicchi Giglioli, Irene Alice; Pedroli, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality is a new technological system that allows introducing virtual contents in the real world in order to run in the same representation and, in real time, enhancing the user's sensory perception of reality. From another point of view, Augmented Reality can be defined as a set of techniques and tools that add information to the physical reality. To date, Augmented Reality has been used in many fields, such as medicine, entertainment, maintenance, architecture, education, and cognitive and motor rehabilitation but very few studies and applications of AR exist in clinical psychology. In the treatment of psychological disorders, Augmented Reality has given preliminary evidence to be a useful tool due to its adaptability to the patient needs and therapeutic purposes and interactivity. Another relevant factor is the quality of the user's experience in the Augmented Reality system determined from emotional engagement and sense of presence. This experience could increase the AR ecological validity in the treatment of psychological disorders. This paper reviews the recent studies on the use of Augmented Reality in the evaluation and treatment of psychological disorders, focusing on current uses of this technology and on the specific features that delineate Augmented Reality a new technique useful for psychology. PMID:26339283

  19. Augmented Reality: A Brand New Challenge for the Assessment and Treatment of Psychological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Alice Chicchi Giglioli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Augmented Reality is a new technological system that allows introducing virtual contents in the real world in order to run in the same representation and, in real time, enhancing the user’s sensory perception of reality. From another point of view, Augmented Reality can be defined as a set of techniques and tools that add information to the physical reality. To date, Augmented Reality has been used in many fields, such as medicine, entertainment, maintenance, architecture, education, and cognitive and motor rehabilitation but very few studies and applications of AR exist in clinical psychology. In the treatment of psychological disorders, Augmented Reality has given preliminary evidence to be a useful tool due to its adaptability to the patient needs and therapeutic purposes and interactivity. Another relevant factor is the quality of the user’s experience in the Augmented Reality system determined from emotional engagement and sense of presence. This experience could increase the AR ecological validity in the treatment of psychological disorders. This paper reviews the recent studies on the use of Augmented Reality in the evaluation and treatment of psychological disorders, focusing on current uses of this technology and on the specific features that delineate Augmented Reality a new technique useful for psychology.

  20. ARSC: Augmented Reality Student Card--An Augmented Reality Solution for the Education Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Neven A. M.; Zayed, Hala H.; Sharawy, Mohamed I.

    2011-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is the technology of adding virtual objects to real scenes through enabling the addition of missing information in real life. As the lack of resources is a problem that can be solved through AR, this paper presents and explains the usage of AR technology we introduce Augmented Reality Student Card (ARSC) as an application of…

  1. Advanced Intellect-Augmentation Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbart, D. C.

    This progress report covers a two-year project which is part of a program that is exploring the value of computer aids in augmenting human intellectual capability. The background and nature of the program, its resources, and the activities it has undertaken are outlined. User experience in applying augmentation tools and techniques to various…

  2. Augmented Reality Comes to Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesing, Mark; Cook, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is a technology used on computing devices where processor-generated graphics are rendered over real objects to enhance the sensory experience in real time. In other words, what you are really seeing is augmented by the computer. Many AR games already exist for systems such as Kinect and Nintendo 3DS and mobile apps, such as…

  3. Virtual Workshop Experiences for Faculty: Lessons Learned from On the Cutting Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaris, J. R.; Kirk, K. B.; Mogk, D. W.; Bruckner, M. Z.

    2010-12-01

    The On the Cutting Edge professional development program for geoscience faculty has begun offering online workshops as a supplement to its face-to-face workshop series. Following a few initial forays since 2005, Cutting Edge launched a suite of four virtual workshops in 2010: Teaching Geoscience with Service Learning, Understanding the Deep Earth, Designing Effective and Innovative Courses in the Geosciences, and Teaching Geoscience Online. Each workshop was presented over 1-2 weeks and included pre-workshop web postings, synchronous whole-group presentations, live small-group discussions, asynchronous input via threaded discussions or editable web pages, and personal time for reflection and writing. Synchronous sessions were facilitated through the Elluminate software platform which includes tools for viewing presentations, screen sharing, real-time participant response, and an ongoing chat-room discussion. Audio was provided through a separate telephone conference service. In addition, many asynchronous conversations on workshop topics were held via a threaded discussion board on the Cutting Edge website and in Wiki-like, editable web pages designed to support collaborative work. A number of challenges to running online workshops exist, primarily involving participants’ time management. It is difficult for participants to set aside enough time to complete workshop activities when they are still enmeshed in their everyday lives. It also requires new skills for speakers, participants and support staff to prepare web-based materials and navigate the technology required for the online presentations. But there are also a number of opportunities presented by these experiences. With no travel needed, an online workshop is less expensive for participants, which allows Cutting Edge to extend its commitment to providing workshop materials to a wider audience of interested faculty. Also, synchronous sessions can be recorded and posted on the website for broader community

  4. When STAR meets the Clouds-Virtualization and Cloud Computing Experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauret, J; Hajdu, L; Walker, M; Balewski, J; Goasguen, S; Stout, L; Fenn, M; Keahey, K

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, Cloud computing has become a very attractive paradigm and popular model for accessing distributed resources. The Cloud has emerged as the next big trend. The burst of platform and projects providing Cloud resources and interfaces at the very same time that Grid projects are entering a production phase in their life cycle has however raised the question of the best approach to handling distributed resources. Especially, are Cloud resources scaling at the levels shown by Grids? Are they performing at the same level? What is their overhead on the IT teams and infrastructure? Rather than seeing the two as orthogonal, the STAR experiment has viewed them as complimentary and has studied merging the best of the two worlds with Grid middleware providing the aggregation of both Cloud and traditional resources. Since its first use of Cloud resources on Amazon EC2 in 2008/2009 using a Nimbus/EC2 interface, the STAR software team has tested and experimented with many novel approaches: from a traditional, native EC2 approach to the Virtual Organization Cluster (VOC) at Clemson University and Condor/VM on the GLOW resources at the University of Wisconsin. The STAR team is also planning to run as part of the DOE/Magellan project. In this paper, we will present an overview of our findings from using truly opportunistic resources and scaling-out two orders of magnitude in both tests and practical usage.

  5. Behavioral Responses to Epidemics in an Online Experiment: Using Virtual Diseases to Study Human Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Frederick; Griffith, Amanda; Cottrell, Allin; Wong, Yue-Ling

    2013-01-01

    We report the results of a study we conducted using a simple multiplayer online game that simulates the spread of an infectious disease through a population composed of the players. We use our virtual epidemics game to examine how people respond to epidemics. The analysis shows that people's behavior is responsive to the cost of self-protection, the reported prevalence of disease, and their experiences earlier in the epidemic. Specifically, decreasing the cost of self-protection increases the rate of safe behavior. Higher reported prevalence also raises the likelihood that individuals would engage in self-protection, where the magnitude of this effect depends on how much time has elapsed in the epidemic. Individuals' experiences in terms of how often an infection was acquired when they did not engage in self-protection are another factor that determines whether they will invest in preventive measures later on. All else being equal, individuals who were infected at a higher rate are more likely to engage in self-protective behavior compared to those with a lower rate of infection. Lastly, fixing everything else, people's willingness to engage in safe behavior waxes or wanes over time, depending on the severity of an epidemic: when prevalence is high, people are more likely to adopt self-protective measures as time goes by; when prevalence is low, a ‘self-protection fatigue’ effect sets in whereby individuals are less willing to engage in safe behavior over time. PMID:23326360

  6. Display technologies for augmented reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoungho; Lee, Seungjae; Jang, Changwon; Hong, Jong-Young; Li, Gang

    2018-02-01

    With the virtue of rapid progress in optics, sensors, and computer science, we are witnessing that commercial products or prototypes for augmented reality (AR) are penetrating into the consumer markets. AR is spotlighted as expected to provide much more immersive and realistic experience than ordinary displays. However, there are several barriers to be overcome for successful commercialization of AR. Here, we explore challenging and important topics for AR such as image combiners, enhancement of display performance, and focus cue reproduction. Image combiners are essential to integrate virtual images with real-world. Display performance (e.g. field of view and resolution) is important for more immersive experience and focus cue reproduction may mitigate visual fatigue caused by vergence-accommodation conflict. We also demonstrate emerging technologies to overcome these issues: index-matched anisotropic crystal lens (IMACL), retinal projection displays, and 3D display with focus cues. For image combiners, a novel optical element called IMACL provides relatively wide field of view. Retinal projection displays may enhance field of view and resolution of AR displays. Focus cues could be reconstructed via multi-layer displays and holographic displays. Experimental results of our prototypes are explained.

  7. [Lidocaine-containing hyaluronic acid filler on a CPM® basis for lip augmentation : Experience from clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, T; Sattler, G; Gauglitz, G

    2016-06-01

    Lip augmentation with hyaluronic acid fillers is an established procedure. As monophasic polydensified hyaluronic acid products with variable density CPM-HAL1 (Belotero® Balance Lidocaine) and CPM-HAL2 (Belotero® Intense Lidocaine) are qualified for beautification and particularly natural-looking rejuvenation, respectively. Assessment of handling and outcome of lip augmentation using the lidocaine-containing hyaluronic acid fillers CPM-HAL1 and CPM-HAL2. Data from patients who received lip augmentation by means of bautification and/or rejuvenation using CPM-HAL1 and/or CPM-HAL2 were documented. Observation period was 4 months, with assessment of natural outcome, evenness, handling, fluidity, distribution, malleability, tolerability, as well as patient satisfaction and pain. In total, 146 patients from 21 German centres participated. Physicians rated natural outcome and evenness as good or very good for > 95 % of patients. Handling, fluidity, distribution and malleability were assessed for both fillers as good or very good in > 91 % of patients. At every evaluation point, more than 93 % of patients were very or very much satisfied with the product. A total of 125 patients (85.6 %) experienced transient injection-related side effects. Pain intensity during the procedure was mild (2.72 ± 1.72 on the 0-10 pain assessment scale) and abated markedly within 30 min (0.42 ± 0.57). Lip augmentation with hyaluronic acid fillers produced a long-term cosmetic result. Due to the lidocaine content, procedural pain was low and transient. Accordingly, a high degree of patient satisfaction was achieved that was maintained throughout the observation period.

  8. Experience in Education Environment Virtualization within the Automated Information System "Platonus" (Kazakhstan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeldina, Zhaidary; Moldumarova, Zhibek; Abeldina, Rauza; Makysh, Gulmira; Moldumarova, Zhuldyz Ilibaevna

    2016-01-01

    This work reports on the use of virtual tools as means of learning process activation. A good result can be achieved by combining the classical learning with modern computer technology. By creating a virtual learning environment and using multimedia learning tools one can obtain a significant result while facilitating the development of students'…

  9. Virtual Laboratories in Science Education: Students' Motivation and Experiences in Two Tertiary Biology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrberg, Nadia Rahbek; Treusch, Alexander H.; Wiegand, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Potential benefits of simulations and virtual laboratory exercises in natural sciences have been both theorised and studied recently. This study reports findings from a pilot study on student attitude, motivation and self-efficacy when using the virtual laboratory programme Labster. The programme allows interactive learning about the workflows and…

  10. Special Experiences for Exceptional Students: Integrating Virtual Reality into Special Education Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Erez Cedric

    This paper discusses some of the potential benefits and hazards that virtual reality holds for exceptional children in the special education system. Topics addressed include (1) applications of virtual reality, including developing academic skills via cyberspace, vocational training, and social learning in cyberspace; (2) telepresence and distance…

  11. Augmented reality

    OpenAIRE

    Jecha, Jakub

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is focused on a technology called Augmented reality, especially on its use in marketing. The main objective of the thesis is to define why this technology is a suitable tool for marketing and to assess its use in real conditions. This is achieved by defining specific devices and use cases of this technology in practice, whereas evaluation of its use in real enviroment is based on statistics. The contribution of the thesis is objective evaluation of this technology and provision of...

  12. The UFRJ-UERJ group: interdisciplinary virtual reality experiments in neuropsychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rosa Maria E M; de Carvalho, Luis Alfredo V; Drummond, Ricardo; Wauke, Ana Paula T; de Sá Guimarães, Marcele

    2002-10-01

    This paper describes the research lines of an interdisciplinary group composed by two government universities in Rio de Janeiro. The first research line, a Virtual Environment for testing the acceptance of Virtual Reality equipment by schizophrenia patients, has stimulated a growing interest in this area in the country and abroad. The second research line, in progress now, develops a virtual environment to improve the learning abilities of children with Attention-Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Another study is related to the use of Virtual Reality in the cognitive treatment of common city phobias, beginning with the reproduction of some tunnels of our city to treatment of claustrophobic patients. The last of the research lines in progress in this group develops a virtual square for stimulating autistic patients.

  13. KioskAR: An Augmented Reality Game as a New Business Model to Present Artworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoones A. Sekhavat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the architecture of KioskAR, which is a pervasive game implemented using augmented reality (AR. This game introduces a new business model that makes it possible for players to present their artworks in virtual kiosks using augmented reality, while they are having fun playing the game. In addition to competition between the players in the game, this game requires social interaction between players to earn more points. A user study is conducted to evaluate the sense of presence and the usability of the application. The results of experiments show that KioskAR can achieve a high level of usability as well as sense of presence.

  14. The Application of Augmented Reality Technology in Food Professional Education

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Shan

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the application of augmented reality technology in food professional education, combining with the current situation of applying virtual reality education, analyzes the problems existing in the virtual reality application in food professional education, puts forward some suggestions and finally prospects the developing trend of the technology of virtual reality now.

  15. New Augmented Reality Taxonomy: Technologies and Features of Augmented Environment.

    OpenAIRE

    Hugues , Olivier; Fuchs , Philippe; Nannipieri , Olivier

    2011-01-01

    978-1-4614-0063-9; This article has a dual aim: firstly to define augmented reality (AR) en- vironments and secondly, based on our definition, a new taxonomy enabling these environments to be classified. After briefly reviewing existing classifica- tions, we define AR by its purpose, ie. to enable someone to create sensory- motor and cognitive activities in a new space combining the real environment and a virtual environment. Below we present our functional taxonomy of AR environments. We div...

  16. Virtual reality in decommissioning projects: experiences, lessons learned and future plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rindahl, G.; Mark, N.K.F.; Meyer, G.

    2006-01-01

    The work on Virtual Reality (VR) tools for decommissioning planning, dose estimation and work management started at the Norwegian Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) in 1999 in the VR dose project with Japan Nuclear Cycle development institute (JNC), now JAEA. The main aim of this effort has been to help minimize workers' radiation exposure, as well as help to achieve more efficient use of human resources. VR dose is now used in the decommissioning of one of JNC's reactors, the Fugen Nuclear Power Station. This VR decommissioning project has later resulted in a series of projects and applications. In addition to decommissioning, IFE also put great focus on two other branches of VR tools, namely tools for knowledge management, training and education in operating facilities and tools for control room design. During the last years, this work, beginning at different ends, has been converging more and more towards VR technology for use through out the life cycle of a facility. A VR training simulator for a refuelling machine of the Leningrad NPP (LNPP) developed in cooperation with the Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (RRC KI) is now planned to be used in connection with the decommissioning of the three intact reactors at Chernobyl in Ukraine. In this paper we describe experiences from use of VR in decommissioning processes, as well as results from bringing the VR technology initially developed for planned or productive facilities into the decommissioning toolbox. (author)

  17. Earth Experiments in a Virtual World: Introducing Climate & Coding to High School Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H. A.; Twedt, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    In our increasingly technologically-driven and information-saturated world, literacy in STEM fields can be crucial for career advancement. Nevertheless, both systemic and interpersonal barriers can prevent individuals, particularly members of under-represented groups, from engaging in these fields. Here, we present a high school-level workshop developed to foster basic understanding of climate science while exposing students to the Python programming language. For the past four years, the workshop has been a part of the annual Expanding Your Horizons conference for high school girls, whose mission is to spark interest in STEM fields. Moving through current events in the realm of global climate policy, the fundamentals of climate, and the mathematical representation of planetary energy balance, the workshop culminates in an under-the-hood exploration of a basic climate model coded in the Python programming language. Students interact directly with the underlying code to run `virtual world' experiments that explore the impact of solar insolation, planetary albedo, the greenhouse effect, and meridional energy transport on global temperatures. Engagement with Python is through the Jupyter Notebook interface, which permits direct interaction with the code but is more user-friendly for beginners than a command-line approach. We conclude with further ideas for providing online access to workshop materials for educators, and additional venues for presenting such workshops to under-represented groups in STEM.

  18. Experimental setup for deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) experiment in hall A at Jefferson Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camsonne, A.

    2005-11-01

    The Hall A Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) experiment used the 5.757 GeV polarized electron beam available at Jefferson Laboratory and ran from september until december 2004. Using the standard Hall A left high resolution spectrometer three kinematical points were taken at a fixed x b (jorken) = 0.32 value for three Q 2 values: 1.5 GeV 2 , 1.91 GeV 2 , 2.32 GeV 2 . An electromagnetic Lead Fluoride calorimeter and a proton detector scintillator array designed to work at a luminosity of 10 37 cm -2 s -1 were added to ensure the exclusivity of the DVCS reaction. In addition to the new detectors new custom electronics was used: a calorimeter trigger module which determines if an electron photon coincidence has occurred and a sampling system allowing to deal with pile-up events during the offline analysis. Finally the data from the kinematic at Q 2 = 2.32 GeV 2 and s = 5.6 GeV 2 allowed to get a preliminary result for the exclusive π 0 electroproduction on the proton. (author)

  19. Traditional microscopy instruction versus process-oriented virtual microscopy instruction: a naturalistic experiment with control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle, Laura; Nivala, Markus; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Gegenfurtner, Andreas; Björk, Pasi; Säljö, Roger

    2011-03-30

    Virtual microscopy is being introduced in medical education as an approach for learning how to interpret information in microscopic specimens. It is, however, far from evident how to incorporate its use into existing teaching practice. The aim of the study was to explore the consequences of introducing virtual microscopy tasks into an undergraduate pathology course in an attempt to render the instruction more process-oriented. The research questions were: 1) How is virtual microscopy perceived by students? 2) Does work on virtual microscopy tasks contribute to improvement in performance in microscopic pathology in comparison with attending assistant-led demonstrations only? During a one-week period, an experimental group completed three sets of virtual microscopy homework assignments in addition to attending demonstrations. A control group attended the demonstrations only. Performance in microscopic pathology was measured by a pre-test and a post-test. Student perceptions of regular instruction and virtual microscopy were collected one month later by administering the Inventory of Intrinsic Motivation and open-ended questions. The students voiced an appreciation for virtual microscopy for the purposes of the course and for self-study. As for learning gains, the results indicated that learning was speeded up in a subgroup of students consisting of conscientious high achievers. The enriched instruction model may be suited as such for elective courses following the basic course. However, the instructional model needs further development to be suited for basic courses.

  20. A virtual outpatient department provides a satisfactory patient experience following endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Elizabeth M; Rogers, Ailín C; Hanly, Ann M; McCawley, Niamh; Deasy, Joseph; McNamara, Deborah A

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate telephone follow-up of post-endoscopy patients as an alternative to attendance at the outpatient department. Access to outpatient appointments is often a target for improvement in healthcare systems. Increased outpatient clinic capacity is not feasible without investment and extra manpower in an already constrained service. Outpatient attendance was audited at a busy colorectal surgical service. A subset of patients appropriate for follow-up in a "virtual outpatient department" (VOPD) were identified. A pilot study was designed and involved telephone follow-up of low-risk endoscopic procedures. Patient satisfaction was assessed using the Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale (MISS), which is a standardised survey of patient satisfaction with healthcare experiences. This was conducted via anonymous questionnaire at the end of the study. Of a total of 166 patients undergoing endoscopy in the time period, 79 were prospectively recruited to VOPD follow-up based on eligibility criteria. Overall, 67 (84.8 %) were successfully followed up by telephone consultation; nine patients (11.4 %) were contacted by mail. The remaining three patients (3.8 %) were brought back to the OPD. Patients recruited were more likely to be younger (55.82 ± 14.96 versus 60.78 ± 13.97 years, P = 0.029) and to have had normal examinations (49.4 versus 31.0 %, χ (2) = 5.070, P = 0.025). Nearly three quarters of patients responded to the questionnaire. The mean scores for all four aspects of the MISS were satisfactory, and overall patients were satisfied with the VOPD experience. VOPD is a target for improved healthcare provision, with improved efficiency and a high patient satisfaction rate.